WorldWideScience

Sample records for biological network structure

  1. Communication on the structure of biological networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Deyasi Krishanu; Upadhyay Shashankaditya; Banerjee Anirban

    2016-03-01

    Networks are widely used to represent interaction pattern among the components in complex systems. Structures of real networks from different domains may vary quite significantly. As there is an interplay between network architecture and dynamics, structure plays an important role in communication and spreading of information in a network. Here we investigate the underlying undirected topology of different biological networks which support faster spreading of information and are better in communication. We analyse the good expansion property by using the spectral gap and communicability between nodes. Different epidemic models are also used to study the transmission of information in terms of spreading of disease through individuals (nodes)in those networks. Moreover, we explore the structural conformation and properties which may be responsible for better communication. Among all biological networks studied here, the undirected structure of neuronal networks not only possesses the small-world property but the same is also expressed remarkably to a higher degree compared to any randomly generated network which possesses the same degree sequence. A relatively high percentage of nodes, in neuronal networks, form a higher core in their structure. Our study shows that the underlying undirected topology in neuronal networks, in a significant way, is qualitatively different from the same in other biologicalnetworks and that they may have evolved in such a way that they inherit a (undirected) structure which is excellent and robust in communication.

  2. Exploring biological network structure with clustered random networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bansal Shweta

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complex biological systems are often modeled as networks of interacting units. Networks of biochemical interactions among proteins, epidemiological contacts among hosts, and trophic interactions in ecosystems, to name a few, have provided useful insights into the dynamical processes that shape and traverse these systems. The degrees of nodes (numbers of interactions and the extent of clustering (the tendency for a set of three nodes to be interconnected are two of many well-studied network properties that can fundamentally shape a system. Disentangling the interdependent effects of the various network properties, however, can be difficult. Simple network models can help us quantify the structure of empirical networked systems and understand the impact of various topological properties on dynamics. Results Here we develop and implement a new Markov chain simulation algorithm to generate simple, connected random graphs that have a specified degree sequence and level of clustering, but are random in all other respects. The implementation of the algorithm (ClustRNet: Clustered Random Networks provides the generation of random graphs optimized according to a local or global, and relative or absolute measure of clustering. We compare our algorithm to other similar methods and show that ours more successfully produces desired network characteristics. Finding appropriate null models is crucial in bioinformatics research, and is often difficult, particularly for biological networks. As we demonstrate, the networks generated by ClustRNet can serve as random controls when investigating the impacts of complex network features beyond the byproduct of degree and clustering in empirical networks. Conclusion ClustRNet generates ensembles of graphs of specified edge structure and clustering. These graphs allow for systematic study of the impacts of connectivity and redundancies on network function and dynamics. This process is a key step in

  3. Integrated analysis of multiple data sources reveals modular structure of biological networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been a challenging task to integrate high-throughput data into investigations of the systematic and dynamic organization of biological networks. Here, we presented a simple hierarchical clustering algorithm that goes a long way to achieve this aim. Our method effectively reveals the modular structure of the yeast protein-protein interaction network and distinguishes protein complexes from functional modules by integrating high-throughput protein-protein interaction data with the added subcellular localization and expression profile data. Furthermore, we take advantage of the detected modules to provide a reliably functional context for the uncharacterized components within modules. On the other hand, the integration of various protein-protein association information makes our method robust to false-positives, especially for derived protein complexes. More importantly, this simple method can be extended naturally to other types of data fusion and provides a framework for the study of more comprehensive properties of the biological network and other forms of complex networks

  4. Maria Goeppert-Mayer Award Talk: Probing the structure and dynamics of biological networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Reka

    2011-03-01

    The relationship between the structure and dynamics of networks is one of the central topics in network science. In the context of biological regulatory networks at the molecular to cellular level, the dynamics in question is often thought of as information propagation through the network. Quantitative dynamic models help to achieve an understanding of this process, but are difficult to construct and validate because of the scarcity of known mechanistic details and kinetic parameters. Structural and qualitative analysis is emerging as a feasible and useful alternative for interpreting biological signal transduction, and at the same time probing the structure-function relation of these networks. This analysis, however, necessitates the extension of current graph theoretical frameworks to incorporate features such as the positive or negative nature of interactions and synergistic behaviors among multiple components. This talk will present a method for structural analysis in an augmented graph framework that can probe the dynamics of information transfer. The first step is to expand the network to a richer representation that incorporates negative and synergistic regulation by the addition of pseudo-nodes and new edges. Our method simulates both knockout and constitutive activation of components as node disruptions, and takes into account the possible cascading effects of a node's disruption. We introduce the concept of elementary signaling mode (ESM), as the minimal set of nodes that can perform signal transduction independently. As a first application of this method we ranked the importance of signaling components by the effects of their perturbation on the ESMs of the network. Validation on various regulatory networks shows that this method can effectively uncover the essentiality of components mediating a signal transduction process and agrees with dynamic simulation results and experimental observations. Future applications include determining the ESMs that (do

  5. The Structure of a Gene Co-Expression Network Reveals Biological Functions Underlying eQTLs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa-Vialaneix, Nathalie; Liaubet, Laurence; Laurent, Thibault; Cherel, Pierre; Gamot, Adrien; SanCristobal, Magali

    2013-01-01

    What are the commonalities between genes, whose expression level is partially controlled by eQTL, especially with regard to biological functions? Moreover, how are these genes related to a phenotype of interest? These issues are particularly difficult to address when the genome annotation is incomplete, as is the case for mammalian species. Moreover, the direct link between gene expression and a phenotype of interest may be weak, and thus difficult to handle. In this framework, the use of a co-expression network has proven useful: it is a robust approach for modeling a complex system of genetic regulations, and to infer knowledge for yet unknown genes. In this article, a case study was conducted with a mammalian species. It showed that the use of a co-expression network based on partial correlation, combined with a relevant clustering of nodes, leads to an enrichment of biological functions of around 83%. Moreover, the use of a spatial statistics approach allowed us to superimpose additional information related to a phenotype; this lead to highlighting specific genes or gene clusters that are related to the network structure and the phenotype. Three main results are worth noting: first, key genes were highlighted as a potential focus for forthcoming biological experiments; second, a set of biological functions, which support a list of genes under partial eQTL control, was set up by an overview of the global structure of the gene expression network; third, pH was found correlated with gene clusters, and then with related biological functions, as a result of a spatial analysis of the network topology. PMID:23577081

  6. Insights into biological information processing: structural and dynamical analysis of a human protein signalling network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an investigation on the structural and dynamical properties of a 'human protein signalling network' (HPSN). This biological network is composed of nodes that correspond to proteins and directed edges that represent signal flows. In order to gain insight into the organization of cell information processing this network is analysed taking into account explicitly the edge directions. We explore the topological properties of the HPSN at the global and the local scale, further applying the generating function formalism to provide a suitable comparative model. The relationship between the node degrees and the distribution of signals through the network is characterized using degree correlation profiles. Finally, we analyse the dynamical properties of small sub-graphs showing high correlation between their occurrence and dynamic stability

  7. A Structure of Biological System and Functionality using Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Mohammed Beer Gamal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Artificial neural networks have, as initial motivation, the structure of biological systems, and constitute an alternative computability paradigm. For that reason we will review some aspects of the way in which biological systems perform information processing. The fascination which still pervades this research field has much to do with the points of contact with the surprisingly elegant methods used by neurons in order to process information at the cellular level. Several million years of evolution have led to very sophisticated solutions to the problem of dealing with an uncertain environment. In this chapter we will discuss some elements of these strategies in order to determine what features we want to adopt in our abstract models of neural networks.

  8. Synthetic biological networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite their obvious relationship and overlap, the field of physics is blessed with many insightful laws, while such laws are sadly absent in biology. Here we aim to discuss how the rise of a more recent field known as synthetic biology may allow us to more directly test hypotheses regarding the possible design principles of natural biological networks and systems. In particular, this review focuses on synthetic gene regulatory networks engineered to perform specific functions or exhibit particular dynamic behaviors. Advances in synthetic biology may set the stage to uncover the relationship of potential biological principles to those developed in physics. (review article)

  9. Dominating biological networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tijana Milenković

    Full Text Available Proteins are essential macromolecules of life that carry out most cellular processes. Since proteins aggregate to perform function, and since protein-protein interaction (PPI networks model these aggregations, one would expect to uncover new biology from PPI network topology. Hence, using PPI networks to predict protein function and role of protein pathways in disease has received attention. A debate remains open about whether network properties of "biologically central (BC" genes (i.e., their protein products, such as those involved in aging, cancer, infectious diseases, or signaling and drug-targeted pathways, exhibit some topological centrality compared to the rest of the proteins in the human PPI network.To help resolve this debate, we design new network-based approaches and apply them to get new insight into biological function and disease. We hypothesize that BC genes have a topologically central (TC role in the human PPI network. We propose two different concepts of topological centrality. We design a new centrality measure to capture complex wirings of proteins in the network that identifies as TC those proteins that reside in dense extended network neighborhoods. Also, we use the notion of domination and find dominating sets (DSs in the PPI network, i.e., sets of proteins such that every protein is either in the DS or is a neighbor of the DS. Clearly, a DS has a TC role, as it enables efficient communication between different network parts. We find statistically significant enrichment in BC genes of TC nodes and outperform the existing methods indicating that genes involved in key biological processes occupy topologically complex and dense regions of the network and correspond to its "spine" that connects all other network parts and can thus pass cellular signals efficiently throughout the network. To our knowledge, this is the first study that explores domination in the context of PPI networks.

  10. Revisiting the variation of clustering coefficient of biological networks suggests new modular structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Dapeng

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A central idea in biology is the hierarchical organization of cellular processes. A commonly used method to identify the hierarchical modular organization of network relies on detecting a global signature known as variation of clustering coefficient (so-called modularity scaling. Although several studies have suggested other possible origins of this signature, it is still widely used nowadays to identify hierarchical modularity, especially in the analysis of biological networks. Therefore, a further and systematical investigation of this signature for different types of biological networks is necessary. Results We analyzed a variety of biological networks and found that the commonly used signature of hierarchical modularity is actually the reflection of spoke-like topology, suggesting a different view of network architecture. We proved that the existence of super-hubs is the origin that the clustering coefficient of a node follows a particular scaling law with degree k in metabolic networks. To study the modularity of biological networks, we systematically investigated the relationship between repulsion of hubs and variation of clustering coefficient. We provided direct evidences for repulsion between hubs being the underlying origin of the variation of clustering coefficient, and found that for biological networks having no anti-correlation between hubs, such as gene co-expression network, the clustering coefficient doesn’t show dependence of degree. Conclusions Here we have shown that the variation of clustering coefficient is neither sufficient nor exclusive for a network to be hierarchical. Our results suggest the existence of spoke-like modules as opposed to “deterministic model” of hierarchical modularity, and suggest the need to reconsider the organizational principle of biological hierarchy.

  11. Structural Biology Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Science Education > Structural Biology Fact Sheet Structural Biology Fact Sheet Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area What is structural biology? Structural biology is a field of science focused ...

  12. Networks in Cell Biology = Modelling cell biology with networks

    OpenAIRE

    Buchanan, Mark; Caldarelli, Guido; De Los Rios, Paolo; Rao, Francesco; Vendruscolo, M.

    2010-01-01

    The science of complex biological networks is transforming research in areas ranging from evolutionary biology to medicine. This is the first book on the subject, providing a comprehensive introduction to complex network science and its biological applications. With contributions from key leaders in both network theory and modern cell biology, this book discusses the network science that is increasingly foundational for systems biology and the quantitative understanding of living systems. It ...

  13. Drivers of structural features in gene regulatory networks: From biophysical constraints to biological function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, O. C.; Krzywicki, A.; Zagorski, M.

    2016-07-01

    Living cells can maintain their internal states, react to changing environments, grow, differentiate, divide, etc. All these processes are tightly controlled by what can be called a regulatory program. The logic of the underlying control can sometimes be guessed at by examining the network of influences amongst genetic components. Some associated gene regulatory networks have been studied in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, unveiling various structural features ranging from broad distributions of out-degrees to recurrent "motifs", that is small subgraphs having a specific pattern of interactions. To understand what factors may be driving such structuring, a number of groups have introduced frameworks to model the dynamics of gene regulatory networks. In that context, we review here such in silico approaches and show how selection for phenotypes, i.e., network function, can shape network structure.

  14. Network systems biology for targeted cancer therapies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting-Ting Zhou

    2012-01-01

    The era of targeted cancer therapies has arrived.However,due to the complexity of biological systems,the current progress is far from enough.From biological network modeling to structural/dynamic network analysis,network systems biology provides unique insight into the potential mechanisms underlying the growth and progression of cancer cells.It has also introduced great changes into the research paradigm of cancer-associated drug discovery and drug resistance.

  15. Visual Analysis of Transcriptome Data in the Context of Anatomical Structures and Biological Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Junker, Astrid; Rohn, Hendrik; Schreiber, Falk

    2012-01-01

    The complexity and temporal as well as spatial resolution of transcriptome datasets is constantly increasing due to extensive technological developments. Here we present methods for advanced visualization and intuitive exploration of transcriptomics data as necessary prerequisites in order to facilitate the gain of biological knowledge. Color-coding of structural images based on the expression level enables a fast visual data analysis in the background of the examined biological system. The n...

  16. Species interactions–area relationships: biological invasions and network structure in relation to island area

    OpenAIRE

    Sugiura, Shinji

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between species number and island area is a fundamental rule in ecology. However, the extent to which interactions with exotic species and how the structure of species interactions is related to island area remain unexplored. Here, I document the relationship between island area and (i) interactions with exotic species and (ii) network structure of species interactions in the context of mutualistic interactions between ants and extrafloral nectary-bearing plants on the oceani...

  17. Evolution, Interactions, and Biological Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Weitz, Joshua S.; Benfey, Philip N.; Wingreen, Ned S.

    2007-01-01

    Shifting the perspective of the questions we ask will ensure that network theory continues to excite the network theorists, but more importantly, that it remains vital to progress in biological research.

  18. Logical impossibilities in biological networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monendra Grover

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Biological networks are complex and involve several kinds of molecules. For proper biological function it is important for these biomolecules to act at an individual level and act at the level of interaction of these molecules. In this paper some of the logical impossibilities that may arise in the biological networks and their possible solutions are discussed. It may be important to understand these paradoxes and their possible solutions in order to develop a holistic view of biological function.

  19. On Crowd-verification of Biological Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Sam; Binder, Jean; Boue, Stephanie; Di Fabio, Anselmo; Hayes, William; Hoeng, Julia; Iskandar, Anita; Kleiman, Robin; Norel, Raquel; O'Neel, Bruce; Peitsch, Manuel C; Poussin, Carine; Pratt, Dexter; Rhrissorrakrai, Kahn; Schlage, Walter K; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Talikka, Marja

    2013-01-01

    Biological networks with a structured syntax are a powerful way of representing biological information generated from high density data; however, they can become unwieldy to manage as their size and complexity increase. This article presents a crowd-verification approach for the visualization and expansion of biological networks. Web-based graphical interfaces allow visualization of causal and correlative biological relationships represented using Biological Expression Language (BEL). Crowdsourcing principles enable participants to communally annotate these relationships based on literature evidences. Gamification principles are incorporated to further engage domain experts throughout biology to gather robust peer-reviewed information from which relationships can be identified and verified. The resulting network models will represent the current status of biological knowledge within the defined boundaries, here processes related to human lung disease. These models are amenable to computational analysis. For some period following conclusion of the challenge, the published models will remain available for continuous use and expansion by the scientific community. PMID:24151423

  20. Querying Large Biological Network Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulsoy, Gunhan

    2013-01-01

    New experimental methods has resulted in increasing amount of genetic interaction data to be generated every day. Biological networks are used to store genetic interaction data gathered. Increasing amount of data available requires fast large scale analysis methods. Therefore, we address the problem of querying large biological network datasets.…

  1. Discovering large network motifs from a complex biological network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graph structures representing relationships between entries have been studied in statistical analysis, and the results of these studies have been applied to biological networks, whose nodes and edges represent proteins and the relationships between them, respectively. Most of the studies have focused on only graph structures such as scale-free properties and cliques, but the relationships between nodes are also important features since most of the proteins perform their functions by connecting to other proteins. In order to determine such relationships, the problem of network motif discovery has been addressed; network motifs are frequently appearing graph structures in a given graph. However, the methods for network motif discovery are highly restrictive for the application to biological network because they can only be used to find small network motifs or they do not consider noise and uncertainty in observations. In this study, we introduce a new index to measure network motifs called AR index and develop a novel algorithm called ARIANA for finding large motifs even when the network has noise. Experiments using a synthetic network verify that our method can find better network motifs than an existing algorithm. By applying ARIANA to a real complex biological network, we find network motifs associated with regulations of start time of cell functions and generation of cell energies and discover that the cell cycle proteins can be categorized into two different groups.

  2. PANET: a GPU-based tool for fast parallel analysis of robustness dynamics and feed-forward/feedback loop structures in large-scale biological networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Cuong Trinh

    Full Text Available It has been a challenge in systems biology to unravel relationships between structural properties and dynamic behaviors of biological networks. A Cytoscape plugin named NetDS was recently proposed to analyze the robustness-related dynamics and feed-forward/feedback loop structures of biological networks. Despite such a useful function, limitations on the network size that can be analyzed exist due to high computational costs. In addition, the plugin cannot verify an intrinsic property which can be induced by an observed result because it has no function to simulate the observation on a large number of random networks. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a novel software tool, PANET. First, the time-consuming parts of NetDS were redesigned to be processed in parallel using the OpenCL library. This approach utilizes the full computing power of multi-core central processing units and graphics processing units. Eventually, this made it possible to investigate a large-scale network such as a human signaling network with 1,609 nodes and 5,063 links. We also developed a new function to perform a batch-mode simulation where it generates a lot of random networks and conducts robustness calculations and feed-forward/feedback loop examinations of them. This helps us to determine if the findings in real biological networks are valid in arbitrary random networks or not. We tested our plugin in two case studies based on two large-scale signaling networks and found interesting results regarding relationships between coherently coupled feed-forward/feedback loops and robustness. In addition, we verified whether or not those findings are consistently conserved in random networks through batch-mode simulations. Taken together, our plugin is expected to effectively investigate various relationships between dynamics and structural properties in large-scale networks. Our software tool, user manual and example datasets are freely available at http://panet-csc.sourceforge.net/.

  3. Reconstructing Causal Biological Networks through Active Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyunghoon; Berger, Bonnie; Peng, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Reverse-engineering of biological networks is a central problem in systems biology. The use of intervention data, such as gene knockouts or knockdowns, is typically used for teasing apart causal relationships among genes. Under time or resource constraints, one needs to carefully choose which intervention experiments to carry out. Previous approaches for selecting most informative interventions have largely been focused on discrete Bayesian networks. However, continuous Bayesian networks are of great practical interest, especially in the study of complex biological systems and their quantitative properties. In this work, we present an efficient, information-theoretic active learning algorithm for Gaussian Bayesian networks (GBNs), which serve as important models for gene regulatory networks. In addition to providing linear-algebraic insights unique to GBNs, leading to significant runtime improvements, we demonstrate the effectiveness of our method on data simulated with GBNs and the DREAM4 network inference challenge data sets. Our method generally leads to faster recovery of underlying network structure and faster convergence to final distribution of confidence scores over candidate graph structures using the full data, in comparison to random selection of intervention experiments. PMID:26930205

  4. Reconstructing Causal Biological Networks through Active Learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunghoon Cho

    Full Text Available Reverse-engineering of biological networks is a central problem in systems biology. The use of intervention data, such as gene knockouts or knockdowns, is typically used for teasing apart causal relationships among genes. Under time or resource constraints, one needs to carefully choose which intervention experiments to carry out. Previous approaches for selecting most informative interventions have largely been focused on discrete Bayesian networks. However, continuous Bayesian networks are of great practical interest, especially in the study of complex biological systems and their quantitative properties. In this work, we present an efficient, information-theoretic active learning algorithm for Gaussian Bayesian networks (GBNs, which serve as important models for gene regulatory networks. In addition to providing linear-algebraic insights unique to GBNs, leading to significant runtime improvements, we demonstrate the effectiveness of our method on data simulated with GBNs and the DREAM4 network inference challenge data sets. Our method generally leads to faster recovery of underlying network structure and faster convergence to final distribution of confidence scores over candidate graph structures using the full data, in comparison to random selection of intervention experiments.

  5. Functional Aspects of Biological Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneppen, Kim

    2007-03-01

    We discuss biological networks with respect to 1) relative positioning and importance of high degree nodes, 2) function and signaling, 3) logic and dynamics of regulation. Visually the soft modularity of many real world networks can be characterized in terms of number of high and low degrees nodes positioned relative to each other in a landscape analogue with mountains (high-degree nodes) and valleys (low-degree nodes). In these terms biological networks looks like rugged landscapes with separated peaks, hub proteins, which each are roughly as essential as any of the individual proteins on the periphery of the hub. Within each sup-domain of a molecular network one can often identify dynamical feedback mechanisms that falls into combinations of positive and negative feedback circuits. We will illustrate this with examples taken from phage regulation and bacterial uptake and regulation of small molecules. In particular we find that a double negative regulation often are replaced by a single positive link in unrelated organisms with same functional requirements. Overall we argue that network topology primarily reflects functional constraints. References: S. Maslov and K. Sneppen. ``Computational architecture of the yeast regulatory network." Phys. Biol. 2:94 (2005) A. Trusina et al. ``Functional alignment of regulatory networks: A study of temerate phages". Plos Computational Biology 1:7 (2005). J.B. Axelsen et al. ``Degree Landscapes in Scale-Free Networks" physics/0512075 (2005). A. Trusina et al. ``Hierarchy and Anti-Hierarchy in Real and Scale Free networks." PRL 92:178702 (2004) S. Semsey et al. ``Genetic Regulation of Fluxes: Iron Homeostasis of Escherichia coli". (2006) q-bio.MN/0609042

  6. Network model with structured nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisco, Pierluigi

    2011-08-01

    We present a network model in which words over a specific alphabet, called structures, are associated to each node and undirected edges are added depending on some distance measure between different structures. This model shifts the underlying principle of network generation from a purely mathematical one to an information-based one. It is shown how this model differs from the Barábasi-Albert and duplication models and how it can generate networks with topological features similar to biological networks: power law degree distribution, low average path length, clustering coefficient independent from the network size, etc. Two biological networks: S. cerevisiae gene network and E. coli protein-protein interaction network, are replicated using this model.

  7. Design principles in biological networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Sidhartha

    Much of biology emerges from networks of interactions. Even in a single bacterium such as Escherichia coli, there are hundreds of coexisting gene and protein networks. Although biological networks are the outcome of evolution, various physical and biological constraints limit their functional capacity. The focus of this thesis is to understand how functional constraints such as optimal growth in mircoorganisms and information flow in signaling pathways shape the metabolic network of bacterium E. coli and the quorum sensing network of marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi, respectively. Metabolic networks convert basic elemental sources into complex building-blocks eventually leading to cell's growth. Therefore, typically, metabolic pathways are often coupled both by the use of a common substrate and by stoichiometric utilization of their products for cell growth. We showed that such a coupled network with product-feedback inhibition may exhibit limit-cycle oscillations which arise via a Hopf bifurcation. Furthermore, we analyzed several representative metabolic modules and find that, in all cases, simple product-feedback inhibition allows nearly optimal growth, in agreement with the predicted growth-rate by the flux-balance analysis (FBA). Bacteria have fascinating and diverse social lives. They display coordinated group behaviors regulated by quorum sensing (QS) systems. The QS circuit of V. harveyi integrates and funnels different ecological information through a common phosphorelay cascade to a set of small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) that enables collective behavior. We analyzed the signaling properties and information flow in the QS circuit, which provides a model for information flow in signaling networks more generally. A comparative study of post-transcriptional and conventional transcriptional regulation suggest a niche for sRNAs in allowing cells to transition quickly yet reliably between distinct states. Furthermore, we develop a new framework for analyzing signal

  8. Simplified models of biological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneppen, Kim; Krishna, Sandeep; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2010-01-01

    The function of living cells is controlled by complex regulatory networks that are built of a wide diversity of interacting molecular components. The sheer size and intricacy of molecular networks of even the simplest organisms are obstacles toward understanding network functionality. This review discusses the achievements and promise of a bottom-up approach that uses well-characterized subnetworks as model systems for understanding larger networks. It highlights the interplay between the structure, logic, and function of various types of small regulatory circuits. The bottom-up approach advocates understanding regulatory networks as a collection of entangled motifs. We therefore emphasize the potential of negative and positive feedback, as well as their combinations, to generate robust homeostasis, epigenetics, and oscillations. PMID:20192769

  9. New scaling relation for information transfer in biological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunju; Davies, Paul; Walker, Sara Imari

    2015-12-01

    We quantify characteristics of the informational architecture of two representative biological networks: the Boolean network model for the cell-cycle regulatory network of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe (Davidich et al. 2008 PLoS ONE 3, e1672 (doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0001672)) and that of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Li et al. 2004 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 101, 4781-4786 (doi:10.1073/pnas.0305937101)). We compare our results for these biological networks with the same analysis performed on ensembles of two different types of random networks: Erdös-Rényi and scale-free. We show that both biological networks share features in common that are not shared by either random network ensemble. In particular, the biological networks in our study process more information than the random networks on average. Both biological networks also exhibit a scaling relation in information transferred between nodes that distinguishes them from random, where the biological networks stand out as distinct even when compared with random networks that share important topological properties, such as degree distribution, with the biological network. We show that the most biologically distinct regime of this scaling relation is associated with a subset of control nodes that regulate the dynamics and function of each respective biological network. Information processing in biological networks is therefore interpreted as an emergent property of topology (causal structure) and dynamics (function). Our results demonstrate quantitatively how the informational architecture of biologically evolved networks can distinguish them from other classes of network architecture that do not share the same informational properties. PMID:26701883

  10. Neutron structural biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron structural biology will be one of the most important fields in the life sciences which will interest human beings in the 21st century because neutrons can provide not only the position of hydrogen atoms in biological macromolecules but also the dynamic molecular motion of hydrogen atoms and water molecules. However, there are only a few examples experimentally determined at present because of the lack of neutron source intensity. Next generation neutron source scheduled in JAERI (Performance of which is 100 times better than that of JRR-3M) opens the life science of the 21st century. (author)

  11. Novel topological descriptors for analyzing biological networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varmuza Kurt K

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Topological descriptors, other graph measures, and in a broader sense, graph-theoretical methods, have been proven as powerful tools to perform biological network analysis. However, the majority of the developed descriptors and graph-theoretical methods does not have the ability to take vertex- and edge-labels into account, e.g., atom- and bond-types when considering molecular graphs. Indeed, this feature is important to characterize biological networks more meaningfully instead of only considering pure topological information. Results In this paper, we put the emphasis on analyzing a special type of biological networks, namely bio-chemical structures. First, we derive entropic measures to calculate the information content of vertex- and edge-labeled graphs and investigate some useful properties thereof. Second, we apply the mentioned measures combined with other well-known descriptors to supervised machine learning methods for predicting Ames mutagenicity. Moreover, we investigate the influence of our topological descriptors - measures for only unlabeled vs. measures for labeled graphs - on the prediction performance of the underlying graph classification problem. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that the application of entropic measures to molecules representing graphs is useful to characterize such structures meaningfully. For instance, we have found that if one extends the measures for determining the structural information content of unlabeled graphs to labeled graphs, the uniqueness of the resulting indices is higher. Because measures to structurally characterize labeled graphs are clearly underrepresented so far, the further development of such methods might be valuable and fruitful for solving problems within biological network analysis.

  12. Structural inference for uncertain networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Travis; Ball, Brian; Newman, M. E. J.

    2016-01-01

    In the study of networked systems such as biological, technological, and social networks the available data are often uncertain. Rather than knowing the structure of a network exactly, we know the connections between nodes only with a certain probability. In this paper we develop methods for the analysis of such uncertain data, focusing particularly on the problem of community detection. We give a principled maximum-likelihood method for inferring community structure and demonstrate how the results can be used to make improved estimates of the true structure of the network. Using computer-generated benchmark networks we demonstrate that our methods are able to reconstruct known communities more accurately than previous approaches based on data thresholding. We also give an example application to the detection of communities in a protein-protein interaction network.

  13. Mapping biological systems to network systems

    CERN Document Server

    Rathore, Heena

    2016-01-01

    The book presents the challenges inherent in the paradigm shift of network systems from static to highly dynamic distributed systems – it proposes solutions that the symbiotic nature of biological systems can provide into altering networking systems to adapt to these changes. The author discuss how biological systems – which have the inherent capabilities of evolving, self-organizing, self-repairing and flourishing with time – are inspiring researchers to take opportunities from the biology domain and map them with the problems faced in network domain. The book revolves around the central idea of bio-inspired systems -- it begins by exploring why biology and computer network research are such a natural match. This is followed by presenting a broad overview of biologically inspired research in network systems -- it is classified by the biological field that inspired each topic and by the area of networking in which that topic lies. Each case elucidates how biological concepts have been most successfully ...

  14. Networks and Industry Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, F P

    1995-01-01

    This paper explores how the network approach to marketing might be informed by concepts drawn from traditional industry structure analysis. It argues that industry structures defined by small numbers of participants such as oligopolies are more likely to lead to network effects while industry structures that approach perfect competition are unlikely to involve network formation.

  15. Measuring the evolutionary rewiring of biological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shou, Chong; Bhardwaj, Nitin; Lam, Hugo Y K; Yan, Koon-Kiu; Kim, Philip M; Snyder, Michael; Gerstein, Mark B

    2011-01-01

    We have accumulated a large amount of biological network data and expect even more to come. Soon, we anticipate being able to compare many different biological networks as we commonly do for molecular sequences. It has long been believed that many of these networks change, or "rewire", at different rates. It is therefore important to develop a framework to quantify the differences between networks in a unified fashion. We developed such a formalism based on analogy to simple models of sequence evolution, and used it to conduct a systematic study of network rewiring on all the currently available biological networks. We found that, similar to sequences, biological networks show a decreased rate of change at large time divergences, because of saturation in potential substitutions. However, different types of biological networks consistently rewire at different rates. Using comparative genomics and proteomics data, we found a consistent ordering of the rewiring rates: transcription regulatory, phosphorylation regulatory, genetic interaction, miRNA regulatory, protein interaction, and metabolic pathway network, from fast to slow. This ordering was found in all comparisons we did of matched networks between organisms. To gain further intuition on network rewiring, we compared our observed rewirings with those obtained from simulation. We also investigated how readily our formalism could be mapped to other network contexts; in particular, we showed how it could be applied to analyze changes in a range of "commonplace" networks such as family trees, co-authorships and linux-kernel function dependencies. PMID:21253555

  16. Measuring the evolutionary rewiring of biological networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Shou

    Full Text Available We have accumulated a large amount of biological network data and expect even more to come. Soon, we anticipate being able to compare many different biological networks as we commonly do for molecular sequences. It has long been believed that many of these networks change, or "rewire", at different rates. It is therefore important to develop a framework to quantify the differences between networks in a unified fashion. We developed such a formalism based on analogy to simple models of sequence evolution, and used it to conduct a systematic study of network rewiring on all the currently available biological networks. We found that, similar to sequences, biological networks show a decreased rate of change at large time divergences, because of saturation in potential substitutions. However, different types of biological networks consistently rewire at different rates. Using comparative genomics and proteomics data, we found a consistent ordering of the rewiring rates: transcription regulatory, phosphorylation regulatory, genetic interaction, miRNA regulatory, protein interaction, and metabolic pathway network, from fast to slow. This ordering was found in all comparisons we did of matched networks between organisms. To gain further intuition on network rewiring, we compared our observed rewirings with those obtained from simulation. We also investigated how readily our formalism could be mapped to other network contexts; in particular, we showed how it could be applied to analyze changes in a range of "commonplace" networks such as family trees, co-authorships and linux-kernel function dependencies.

  17. Optimizing Nutrient Uptake in Biological Transport Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronellenfitsch, Henrik; Katifori, Eleni

    2013-03-01

    Many biological systems employ complex networks of vascular tubes to facilitate transport of solute nutrients, examples include the vascular system of plants (phloem), some fungi, and the slime-mold Physarum. It is believed that such networks are optimized through evolution for carrying out their designated task. We propose a set of hydrodynamic governing equations for solute transport in a complex network, and obtain the optimal network architecture for various classes of optimizing functionals. We finally discuss the topological properties and statistical mechanics of the resulting complex networks, and examine correspondence of the obtained networks to those found in actual biological systems.

  18. Biologically inspired self-organizing networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naoki WAKAMIYA; Kenji LEIBNITZ; Masayuki MURATA

    2009-01-01

    Information networks are becoming more and more complex to accommodate a continuously increasing amount of traffic and networked devices, as well as having to cope with a growing diversity of operating environments and applications. Therefore, it is foreseeable that future information networks will frequently face unexpected problems, some of which could lead to the complete collapse of a network. To tackle this problem, recent attempts have been made to design novel network architectures which achieve a high level of scalability, adaptability, and robustness by taking inspiration from self-organizing biological systems. The objective of this paper is to discuss biologically inspired networking technologies.

  19. Statistical properties and robustness of biological controller-target networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob D Feala

    Full Text Available Cells are regulated by networks of controllers having many targets, and targets affected by many controllers, in a "many-to-many" control structure. Here we study several of these bipartite (two-layer networks. We analyze both naturally occurring biological networks (composed of transcription factors controlling genes, microRNAs controlling mRNA transcripts, and protein kinases controlling protein substrates and a drug-target network composed of kinase inhibitors and of their kinase targets. Certain statistical properties of these biological bipartite structures seem universal across systems and species, suggesting the existence of common control strategies in biology. The number of controllers is ∼8% of targets and the density of links is 2.5%±1.2%. Links per node are predominantly exponentially distributed. We explain the conservation of the mean number of incoming links per target using a mathematical model of control networks, which also indicates that the "many-to-many" structure of biological control has properties of efficient robustness. The drug-target network has many statistical properties similar to the biological networks and we show that drug-target networks with biomimetic features can be obtained. These findings suggest a completely new approach to pharmacological control of biological systems. Molecular tools, such as kinase inhibitors, are now available to test if therapeutic combinations may benefit from being designed with biomimetic properties, such as "many-to-many" targeting, very wide coverage of the target set, and redundancy of incoming links per target.

  20. Reconstructing Causal Biological Networks through Active Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Hyunghoon; Berger, Bonnie; Peng, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Reverse-engineering of biological networks is a central problem in systems biology. The use of intervention data, such as gene knockouts or knockdowns, is typically used for teasing apart causal relationships among genes. Under time or resource constraints, one needs to carefully choose which intervention experiments to carry out. Previous approaches for selecting most informative interventions have largely been focused on discrete Bayesian networks. However, continuous Bayesian networks are ...

  1. Organization principles of biological networks: An explorative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohestani, Havva; Giuliani, Alessandro

    2016-03-01

    The definition of general topological principles allowing for graph characterization is an important pre-requisite for investigating structure-function relationships in biological networks. Here we approached the problem by means of an explorative, data-driven strategy, building upon a size-balanced data set made of around 200 distinct biological networks from seven functional classes and simulated networks coming from three mathematical graph models. A clear link between topological structure and biological function did emerge in terms of class membership prediction (average 67% of correct predictions, p<0.0001) with a varying degree of 'peculiarity' across classes going from a very low (25%) recognition efficiency for neural and brain networks to the extremely high (80%) peculiarity of amino acid-amino acid interaction (AAI) networks. We recognized four main dimensions (principal components) as main organization principles of biological networks. These components allowed for an efficient description of network architectures and for the identification of 'not-physiological' (in this case cancer metabolic networks acting as test set) wiring patterns. We highlighted as well the need of developing new theoretical generative models for biological networks overcoming the limitations of present mathematical graph idealizations. PMID:26845173

  2. An evolving network model with community structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many social and biological networks consist of communities-groups of nodes within which connections are dense, but between which connections are sparser. Recently, there has been considerable interest in designing algorithms for detecting community structures in real-world complex networks. In this paper, we propose an evolving network model which exhibits community structure. The network model is based on the inner-community preferential attachment and inter-community preferential attachment mechanisms. The degree distributions of this network model are analysed based on a mean-field method. Theoretical results and numerical simulations indicate that this network model has community structure and scale-free properties

  3. Folksodriven Structure Network

    CERN Document Server

    Mas, Massimiliano Dal

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays folksonomy is used as a system derived from user-generated electronic tags or keywords that annotate and describe online content. But it is not a classification system as an ontology. To consider it as a classification system it would be necessary to share a representation of contexts by all the users. This paper is proposing the use of folksonomies and network theory to devise a new concept: a "Folksodriven Structure Network" to represent folksonomies. This paper proposed and analyzed the network structure of Folksodriven tags thought as folsksonomy tags suggestions for the user on a dataset built on chosen websites. It is observed that the Folksodriven Network has relative low path lengths checking it with classic networking measures (clustering coefficient). Experiment result shows it can facilitate serendipitous discovery of content among users. Neat examples and clear formulas can show how a "Folksodriven Structure Network" can be used to tackle ontology mapping challenges.

  4. Multicore-periphery structure in networks

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Bowen

    2016-01-01

    Many real-world networked systems exhibit a multicore-periphery structure, i.e., multiple cores, each of which contains densely connected elements, surrounded by sparsely connected elements that define the periphery. Identification of the multiple-periphery structure can provide a new handle on structures and functions of various complex networks, such as cognitive and biological networks, food webs, social networks, and communication and transportation networks. However, still no quantitative method exists to identify the multicore-periphery structure embedded in networks. Prior studies on core-periphery structure focused on either dichotomous or continuous division of a network into a single core and a periphery, whereas community detection algorithms did not discern the periphery from dense cohesive communities. Herein, we introduce a method to identify the optimal partition of a network into multiple dense cores and a loosely-connected periphery, and test the method on a well-known social network and the ...

  5. Understanding regulatory networks requires more than computing a multitude of graph statistics. Comment on "Drivers of structural features in gene regulatory networks: From biophysical constraints to biological function" by O.C. Martin et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkačik, Gašper

    2016-07-01

    The article by O. Martin and colleagues provides a much needed systematic review of a body of work that relates the topological structure of genetic regulatory networks to evolutionary selection for function. This connection is very important. Using the current wealth of genomic data, statistical features of regulatory networks (e.g., degree distributions, motif composition, etc.) can be quantified rather easily; it is, however, often unclear how to interpret the results. On a graph theoretic level the statistical significance of the results can be evaluated by comparing observed graphs to "randomized" ones (bravely ignoring the issue of how precisely to randomize!) and comparing the frequency of appearance of a particular network structure relative to a randomized null expectation. While this is a convenient operational test for statistical significance, its biological meaning is questionable. In contrast, an in-silico genotype-to-phenotype model makes explicit the assumptions about the network function, and thus clearly defines the expected network structures that can be compared to the case of no selection for function and, ultimately, to data.

  6. Biological Networks for Cancer Candidate Biomarkers Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wenying; Xue, Wenjin; Chen, Jiajia; Hu, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Due to its extraordinary heterogeneity and complexity, cancer is often proposed as a model case of a systems biology disease or network disease. There is a critical need of effective biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and/or outcome prediction from system level analyses. Methods based on integrating omics data into networks have the potential to revolutionize the identification of cancer biomarkers. Deciphering the biological networks underlying cancer is undoubtedly important for understanding the molecular mechanisms of the disease and identifying effective biomarkers. In this review, the networks constructed for cancer biomarker discovery based on different omics level data are described and illustrated from recent advances in the field.

  7. Biological Networks for Cancer Candidate Biomarkers Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wenying; Xue, Wenjin; Chen, Jiajia; Hu, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Due to its extraordinary heterogeneity and complexity, cancer is often proposed as a model case of a systems biology disease or network disease. There is a critical need of effective biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and/or outcome prediction from system level analyses. Methods based on integrating omics data into networks have the potential to revolutionize the identification of cancer biomarkers. Deciphering the biological networks underlying cancer is undoubtedly important for understanding the molecular mechanisms of the disease and identifying effective biomarkers. In this review, the networks constructed for cancer biomarker discovery based on different omics level data are described and illustrated from recent advances in the field. PMID:27625573

  8. Reduction of dynamical biochemical reactions networks in computational biology

    OpenAIRE

    Radulescu, O.; Gorban, A.N.; Zinovyev, A.; Noel, V.

    2012-01-01

    Biochemical networks are used in computational biology, to model mechanistic details of systems involved in cell signaling, metabolism, and regulation of gene expression. Parametric and structural uncertainty, as well as combinatorial explosion are strong obstacles against analyzing the dynamics of large models of this type. Multiscaleness, an important property of these networks, can be used to get past some of these obstacles. Networks with many well separated time scales, can be reduced to...

  9. Inferring biological networks by sparse identification of nonlinear dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Mangan, Niall M.; Brunton, Steven L.; Proctor, Joshua L.; Kutz, J Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Inferring the structure and dynamics of network models is critical to understanding the functionality and control of complex systems, such as metabolic and regulatory biological networks. The increasing quality and quantity of experimental data enable statistical approaches based on information theory for model selection and goodness-of-fit metrics. We propose an alternative method to infer networked nonlinear dynamical systems by using sparsity-promoting $\\ell_1$ optimization to select a sub...

  10. NETWORKING ENTERPRISE MANAGEMENT STRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Podderеgina

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents new basic criteria and recommendations on formation of networking enterprise management structure at national enterprises that make it possible to improve economic efficiency of their intra-industrial relations.

  11. Network-Based Models in Molecular Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Andreas

    Biological systems are characterized by a large number of diverse interactions. Interaction maps have been used to abstract those interactions at all biological scales ranging from food webs at the ecosystem level down to protein interaction networks at the molecular scale.

  12. Predicting biological networks from genomic data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrington, Eoghan D; Jensen, Lars J; Bork, Peer

    2008-01-01

    Continuing improvements in DNA sequencing technologies are providing us with vast amounts of genomic data from an ever-widening range of organisms. The resulting challenge for bioinformatics is to interpret this deluge of data and place it back into its biological context. Biological networks...... provide a conceptual framework with which we can describe part of this context, namely the different interactions that occur between the molecular components of a cell. Here, we review the computational methods available to predict biological networks from genomic sequence data and discuss how they relate...

  13. BiologicalNetworks: visualization and analysis tool for systems biology

    OpenAIRE

    Baitaluk, Michael; Sedova, Mayya; Ray, Animesh; Gupta, Amarnath

    2006-01-01

    Systems level investigation of genomic scale information requires the development of truly integrated databases dealing with heterogeneous data, which can be queried for simple properties of genes or other database objects as well as for complex network level properties, for the analysis and modelling of complex biological processes. Towards that goal, we recently constructed PathSys, a data integration platform for systems biology, which provides dynamic integration over a diverse set of dat...

  14. Quantifying evolvability in small biological networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemenman, Ilya [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mugler, Andrew [COLUMBIA UNIV; Ziv, Etay [COLUMBIA UNIV; Wiggins, Chris H [COLUMBIA UNIV

    2008-01-01

    The authors introduce a quantitative measure of the capacity of a small biological network to evolve. The measure is applied to a stochastic description of the experimental setup of Guet et al. (Science 2002, 296, pp. 1466), treating chemical inducers as functional inputs to biochemical networks and the expression of a reporter gene as the functional output. The authors take an information-theoretic approach, allowing the system to set parameters that optimise signal processing ability, thus enumerating each network's highest-fidelity functions. All networks studied are highly evolvable by the measure, meaning that change in function has little dependence on change in parameters. Moreover, each network's functions are connected by paths in the parameter space along which information is not significantly lowered, meaning a network may continuously change its functionality without completely losing it along the way. This property further underscores the evolvability of the networks.

  15. Structural Biology Guides Antibiotic Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyak, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Modern drug discovery programs require the contribution of researchers in a number of specialist areas. One of these areas is structural biology. Using X-ray crystallography, the molecular basis of how a drug binds to its biological target and exerts its mode of action can be defined. For example, a drug that binds into the active site of an…

  16. Structural Analysis of Complex Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Dehmer, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Filling a gap in literature, this self-contained book presents theoretical and application-oriented results that allow for a structural exploration of complex networks. The work focuses not only on classical graph-theoretic methods, but also demonstrates the usefulness of structural graph theory as a tool for solving interdisciplinary problems. Applications to biology, chemistry, linguistics, and data analysis are emphasized. The book is suitable for a broad, interdisciplinary readership of researchers, practitioners, and graduate students in discrete mathematics, statistics, computer science,

  17. Inference problems in structural biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, Simon

    The structure and dynamics of biological molecules are essential for their function. Consequently, a wealth of experimental techniques have been developed to study these features. However, while experiments yield detailed information about geometrical features of molecules, this information is of...

  18. Structure and inference in annotated networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, M. E. J.; Clauset, Aaron

    2016-06-01

    For many networks of scientific interest we know both the connections of the network and information about the network nodes, such as the age or gender of individuals in a social network. Here we demonstrate how this `metadata' can be used to improve our understanding of network structure. We focus in particular on the problem of community detection in networks and develop a mathematically principled approach that combines a network and its metadata to detect communities more accurately than can be done with either alone. Crucially, the method does not assume that the metadata are correlated with the communities we are trying to find. Instead, the method learns whether a correlation exists and correctly uses or ignores the metadata depending on whether they contain useful information. We demonstrate our method on synthetic networks with known structure and on real-world networks, large and small, drawn from social, biological and technological domains.

  19. Discriminative topological features reveal biological network mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levovitz Chaya

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent genomic and bioinformatic advances have motivated the development of numerous network models intending to describe graphs of biological, technological, and sociological origin. In most cases the success of a model has been evaluated by how well it reproduces a few key features of the real-world data, such as degree distributions, mean geodesic lengths, and clustering coefficients. Often pairs of models can reproduce these features with indistinguishable fidelity despite being generated by vastly different mechanisms. In such cases, these few target features are insufficient to distinguish which of the different models best describes real world networks of interest; moreover, it is not clear a priori that any of the presently-existing algorithms for network generation offers a predictive description of the networks inspiring them. Results We present a method to assess systematically which of a set of proposed network generation algorithms gives the most accurate description of a given biological network. To derive discriminative classifiers, we construct a mapping from the set of all graphs to a high-dimensional (in principle infinite-dimensional "word space". This map defines an input space for classification schemes which allow us to state unambiguously which models are most descriptive of a given network of interest. Our training sets include networks generated from 17 models either drawn from the literature or introduced in this work. We show that different duplication-mutation schemes best describe the E. coli genetic network, the S. cerevisiae protein interaction network, and the C. elegans neuronal network, out of a set of network models including a linear preferential attachment model and a small-world model. Conclusions Our method is a first step towards systematizing network models and assessing their predictability, and we anticipate its usefulness for a number of communities.

  20. Attentional Networks and Biological Motion

    OpenAIRE

    Chandramouli Chandrasekaran; Lucy Turner; Heinrich H Bülthoff; Thornton, Ian M.

    2010-01-01

    Our ability to see meaningful actions when presented with pointlight traces of human movement is commonly referred to as the perception of biological motion. While traditionalexplanations have emphasized the spontaneous and automatic nature of this ability, morerecent findings suggest that attention may play a larger role than is typically assumed. Intwo studies we show that the speed and accuracy of responding to point-light stimuli is highly correlated with the ability to control selective ...

  1. Neutron structural biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niimura, Nobuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    Neutron diffraction provides an experimental method of directly locating hydrogen atoms in protein which play important roles in physiological functions. However, there are relatively few examples of neutron crystallography in biology since it takes a lot of time to collect a sufficient number of Bragg reflections due to the low flux of neutrons illuminating the sample. In order to overcome the flux problem, we have successfully developed the neutron IP, where the neutron converter, {sup 6}Li or Gd, was mixed with a photostimulated luminescence material on flexible plastic support. Neutron Laue diffraction 2A data from tetragonal lysozyme were collected for 10 days with neutron imaging plates, and 960 hydrogen atoms in the molecule and 157 bound water molecules were identified. These results explain the proposed hydrolysis mechanism of the sugar by the lysozyme molecule and that lysozyme is less active at pH7.0. (author)

  2. Patchworking Network Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norus, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    groups has been treated as a contingent factor.However, little attention has been given to the managerial efforts that entrepreneurshave make to establish the fit between small firms, university research, and publicpolicies such as regulatory policies and R&D policies through network-type structures...... analyzes fourdifferent managerial strategies of how to create network structures to deal with theinterfaces between industry, university and public institutions. The research-orientedstrategy, the incubator strategy, the industrial-partnering strategy, and the policyorientedstrategy. The research......-oriented strategyfocuses on the problem of having products approved by the public authorities. The aimof the article is to demonstrate how SBFs over time develop network structures throughpatchwork-like activities, ongoing and overlapping activities, that serve as a blueprintfor the management...

  3. Application of Graph Coloring to Biological Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Khor, Susan

    2009-01-01

    We explore the application of graph coloring to biological networks, specifically protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. First, we find that given similar conditions (i.e. number of nodes, number of links, degree distribution and clustering), fewer colors are needed to color disassortative (high degree nodes tend to connect to low degree nodes and vice versa) than assortative networks. Fewer colors create fewer independent sets which in turn imply higher concurrency potential for a network. Since PPI networks tend to be disassortative, we suggest that in addition to functional specificity and stability proposed previously by Maslov and Sneppen (Science 296, 2002), the disassortative nature of PPI networks may promote the ability of cells to perform multiple, crucial and functionally diverse tasks concurrently. Second, since graph coloring is closely related to the presence of cliques in a graph, the significance of node coloring information to the problem of identifying protein complexes, i.e. dense subg...

  4. Biological and Environmental Research Network Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balaji, V. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Earth Science Grid Federation (ESGF); Boden, Tom [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cowley, Dave [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dart, Eli [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Dattoria, Vince [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Desai, Narayan [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Egan, Rob [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Foster, Ian [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Goldstone, Robin [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gregurick, Susan [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Biological Systems Science Division; Houghton, John [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Program; Izaurralde, Cesar [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Johnston, Bill [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Joseph, Renu [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Climate and Environmental Sciences Division; Kleese-van Dam, Kerstin [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lipton, Mary [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Monga, Inder [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Pritchard, Matt [British Atmospheric Data Centre (BADC), Oxon (United Kingdom); Rotman, Lauren [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Strand, Gary [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Stuart, Cory [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Tatusova, Tatiana [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States); Tierney, Brian [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Thomas, Brian [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zurawski, Jason [Internet2, Washington, DC (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of SC programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 25 years. In November 2012, ESnet and the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) of the DOE SC organized a review to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by the BER program office. Several key findings resulted from the review. Among them: 1) The scale of data sets available to science collaborations continues to increase exponentially. This has broad impact, both on the network and on the computational and storage systems connected to the network. 2) Many science collaborations require assistance to cope with the systems and network engineering challenges inherent in managing the rapid growth in data scale. 3) Several science domains operate distributed facilities that rely on high-performance networking for success. Key examples illustrated in this report include the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) and the Systems Biology Knowledgebase (KBase). This report expands on these points, and addresses others as well. The report contains a findings section as well as the text of the case studies discussed at the review.

  5. Classification of Approaches and Challenges of Frequent Subgraphs Mining in Biological Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Keyvanpour, Mohammadreza; Azizani, Fereshteh

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the structure and dynamics of biological networks is one of the important challenges in system biology. In addition, increasing amount of experimental data in biological networks necessitate the use of efficient methods to analyze these huge amounts of data. Such methods require to recognize common patterns to analyze data. As biological networks can be modeled by graphs, the problem of common patterns recognition is equivalent with frequent sub graph mining in a set of graphs. ...

  6. Rigidity and flexibility of biological networks

    CERN Document Server

    Gaspar, Merse E

    2012-01-01

    The network approach became a widely used tool to understand the behaviour of complex systems in the last decade. We start from a short description of structural rigidity theory. A detailed account on the combinatorial rigidity analysis of protein structures, as well as local flexibility measures of proteins and their applications in explaining allostery and thermostability is given. We also briefly discuss the network aspects of cytoskeletal tensegrity. Finally, we show the importance of the balance between functional flexibility and rigidity in protein-protein interaction, metabolic, gene regulatory and neuronal networks. Our summary raises the possibility that the concepts of flexibility and rigidity can be generalized to all networks.

  7. Rigidity and flexibility of biological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gáspár, Merse E; Csermely, Peter

    2012-11-01

    The network approach became a widely used tool to understand the behaviour of complex systems in the last decade. We start from a short description of structural rigidity theory. A detailed account on the combinatorial rigidity analysis of protein structures, as well as local flexibility measures of proteins and their applications in explaining allostery and thermostability is given. We also briefly discuss the network aspects of cytoskeletal tensegrity. Finally, we show the importance of the balance between functional flexibility and rigidity in protein-protein interaction, metabolic, gene regulatory and neuronal networks. Our summary raises the possibility that the concepts of flexibility and rigidity can be generalized to all networks. PMID:23165349

  8. Evolving production network structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunow, Martin; Gunther, H.O.; Burdenik, H.; Alting, Leo

    2007-01-01

    When deciding about future production network configurations, the current structures have to be taken into account. Further, core issues such as the maturity of the products and the capacity requirements for test runs and ramp-ups must be incorporated. Our approach is based on optimization...

  9. Dense module enumeration in biological networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of large networks is a central topic in various research fields including biology, sociology, and web mining. Detection of dense modules (a.k.a. clusters) is an important step to analyze the networks. Though numerous methods have been proposed to this aim, they often lack mathematical rigorousness. Namely, there is no guarantee that all dense modules are detected. Here, we present a novel reverse-search-based method for enumerating all dense modules. Furthermore, constraints from additional data sources such as gene expression profiles or customer profiles can be integrated, so that we can systematically detect dense modules with interesting profiles. We report successful applications in human protein interaction network analyses.

  10. Network biology methods integrating biological data for translational science

    OpenAIRE

    Bebek, Gurkan; Koyutürk, Mehmet; Nathan D Price; Mark R Chance

    2012-01-01

    The explosion of biomedical data, both on the genomic and proteomic side as well as clinical data, will require complex integration and analysis to provide new molecular variables to better understand the molecular basis of phenotype. Currently, much data exist in silos and is not analyzed in frameworks where all data are brought to bear in the development of biomarkers and novel functional targets. This is beginning to change. Network biology approaches, which emphasize the interactions betw...

  11. Making the right connections: biological networks in the light of evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Knight, Christopher G.; Pinney, John W

    2009-01-01

    Our understanding of how evolution acts on biological networks remains patchy, as is our knowledge of how that action is best identified, modelled and understood. Starting with network structure and the evolution of protein–protein interaction networks, we briefly survey the ways in which network evolution is being addressed in the fields of systems biology, development and ecology. The approaches highlighted demonstrate a movement away from a focus on network topology towards a more integrat...

  12. Detecting modules in biological networks by edge weight clustering and entropy significance

    OpenAIRE

    Lecca, Paola; Re, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Detection of the modular structure of biological networks is of interest to researchers adopting a systems perspective for the analysis of omics data. Computational systems biology has provided a rich array of methods for network clustering. To date, the majority of approaches address this task through a network node classification based on topological or external quantifiable properties of network nodes. Conversely, numerical properties of network edges are underused, even though the informa...

  13. Abrupt structural transitions involving functionally optimal networks

    CERN Document Server

    Jarrett, T C; Fricker, M; Johnson, N F; Jarrett, Timothy C.; Ashton, Douglas J.; Fricker, Mark; Johnson, Neil F.

    2005-01-01

    We show analytically that abrupt structural transitions can arise in functionally optimal networks, driven by small changes in the level of transport congestion. Our findings are based on an exactly solvable model system which mimics a variety of biological and social networks. Our results offer an explanation as to why such diverse sets of network structures arise in Nature (e.g. fungi) under essentially the same environmental conditions. As a by-product of this work, we introduce a novel renormalization scheme involving `cost motifs' which describes analytically the average shortest path across multiple-ring-and-hub networks.

  14. Complex network perspective on structure and function of Staphylococcus aureus metabolic network

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L Ying; D W Ding

    2013-02-01

    With remarkable advances in reconstruction of genome-scale metabolic networks, uncovering complex network structure and function from these networks is becoming one of the most important topics in system biology. This work aims at studying the structure and function of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) metabolic network by complex network methods. We first generated a metabolite graph from the recently reconstructed high-quality S. aureus metabolic network model. Then, based on `bow tie' structure character, we explain and discuss the global structure of S. aureus metabolic network. The functional significance, global structural properties, modularity and centrality analysis of giant strong component in S. aureus metabolic networks are studied.

  15. Discovery of Chemical Toxicity via Biological Networks and Systems Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, Edward; Habib, Tanwir; Guan, Xin; Escalon, Barbara; Falciani, Francesco; Chipman, J.K.; Antczak, Philipp; Edwards, Stephen; Taylor, Ronald C.; Vulpe, Chris; Loguinov, Alexandre; Van Aggelen, Graham; Villeneuve, Daniel L.; Garcia-Reyero, Natalia

    2010-09-30

    Both soldiers and animals are exposed to many chemicals as the result of military activities. Tools are needed to understand the hazards and risks that chemicals and new materials pose to soldiers and the environment. We have investigated the potential of global gene regulatory networks in understanding the impact of chemicals on reproduction. We characterized effects of chemicals on ovaries of the model animal system, the Fathead minnow (Pimopheles promelas) connecting chemical impacts on gene expression to circulating blood levels of the hormones testosterone and estradiol in addition to the egg yolk protein vitellogenin. We describe the application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional gene expression data to characterize chemicals that disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis that governs reproduction in fathead minnows. The construction of global gene regulatory networks provides deep insights into how drugs and chemicals effect key organs and biological pathways.

  16. Linking network topology to function. Comment on "Drivers of structural features in gene regulatory networks: From biophysical constraints to biological function" by O.C. Martin, A. Krzywicki and M. Zagorski

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Bernardo, Diego

    2016-07-01

    The review by Martin et al. deals with a long standing problem at the interface of complex systems and molecular biology, that is the relationship between the topology of a complex network and its function. In biological terms the problem translates to relating the topology of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) to specific cellular functions. GRNs control the spatial and temporal activity of the genes encoded in the cell's genome by means of specialised proteins called Transcription Factors (TFs). A TF is able to recognise and bind specifically to a sequence (TF biding site) of variable length (order of magnitude of 10) found upstream of the sequence encoding one or more genes (at least in prokaryotes) and thus activating or repressing their transcription. TFs can thus be distinguished in activator and repressor. The picture can become more complex since some classes of TFs can form hetero-dimers consisting of a protein complex whose subunits are the individual TFs. Heterodimers can have completely different binding sites and activity compared to their individual parts. In this review the authors limit their attention to prokaryotes where the complexity of GRNs is somewhat reduced. Moreover they exploit a unique feature of living systems, i.e. evolution, to understand whether function can shape network topology. Indeed, prokaryotes such as bacteria are among the oldest living systems that have become perfectly adapted to their environment over geological scales and thus have reached an evolutionary steady-state where the fitness of the population has reached a plateau. By integrating in silico analysis and comparative evolution, the authors show that indeed function does tend to shape the structure of a GRN, however this trend is not always present and depends on the properties of the network being examined. Interestingly, the trend is more apparent for sparse networks, i.e. where the density of edges is very low. Sparsity is indeed one of the most prominent features

  17. Qualitative networks: a symbolic approach to analyze biological signaling networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henzinger Thomas A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A central goal of Systems Biology is to model and analyze biological signaling pathways that interact with one another to form complex networks. Here we introduce Qualitative networks, an extension of Boolean networks. With this framework, we use formal verification methods to check whether a model is consistent with the laboratory experimental observations on which it is based. If the model does not conform to the data, we suggest a revised model and the new hypotheses are tested in-silico. Results We consider networks in which elements range over a small finite domain allowing more flexibility than Boolean values, and add target functions that allow to model a rich set of behaviors. We propose a symbolic algorithm for analyzing the steady state of these networks, allowing us to scale up to a system consisting of 144 elements and state spaces of approximately 1086 states. We illustrate the usefulness of this approach through a model of the interaction between the Notch and the Wnt signaling pathways in mammalian skin, and its extensive analysis. Conclusion We introduce an approach for constructing computational models of biological systems that extends the framework of Boolean networks and uses formal verification methods for the analysis of the model. This approach can scale to multicellular models of complex pathways, and is therefore a useful tool for the analysis of complex biological systems. The hypotheses formulated during in-silico testing suggest new avenues to explore experimentally. Hence, this approach has the potential to efficiently complement experimental studies in biology.

  18. Analyzing large biological datasets with association networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpinets, Tatiana V [ORNL; Park, Byung H [ORNL; Uberbacher, Edward C [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Due to advances in high throughput biotechnologies biological information is being collected in databases at an amazing rate, requiring novel computational approaches for timely processing of the collected data into new knowledge. In this study we address this problem by developing a new approach for discovering modular structure, relationships and regularities in complex data. These goals are achieved by converting records of biological annotations of an object, like organism, gene, chemical, sequence, into networks (Anets) and rules (Arules) of the associated annotations. Anets are based on similarity of annotation profiles of objects and can be further analyzed and visualized providing a compact birds-eye view of most significant relationships in the collected data and a way of their clustering and classification. Arules are generated by Apriori considering each record of annotations as a transaction and augmenting each annotation item by its type. Arules provide a way to validate relationships discovered by Anets producing comprehensive statistics on frequently associated annotations and specific confident relationships among them. A combination of Anets and Arules represents condensed information on associations among the collected data, helping to discover new knowledge and generate hypothesis. As an example we have applied the approach to analyze bacterial metadata from the Genomes OnLine Database. The analysis allowed us to produce a map of sequenced bacterial and archaeal organisms based on their genomic, metabolic and physiological characteristics with three major clusters of metadata representing bacterial pathogens, environmental isolates, and plant symbionts. A signature profile of clustered annotations of environmental bacteria if compared with pathogens linked the aerobic respiration, the high GC content and the large genome size to diversity of metabolic activities and physiological features of the organisms.

  19. Application of graph colouring to biological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khor, S

    2010-05-01

    The author explores the application of graph colouring to biological networks, specifically protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. First, the author finds that given similar conditions (i.e. graph size, degree distribution and clustering), fewer colours are needed to colour disassortative than assortative networks. Fewer colours create fewer independent sets which in turn imply higher concurrency potential for a network. Since PPI networks tend to be disassortative, the author suggests that in addition to functional specificity and stability proposed previously by Maslov and Sneppen (Science, 296, 2002), the disassortative nature of PPI networks may promote the ability of cells to perform multiple, crucial and functionally diverse tasks concurrently. Second, because graph colouring is closely related to the presence of cliques in a graph, the significance of node colouring information to the problem of identifying protein complexes (dense subgraphs in PPI networks), is investigated. The author finds that for PPI networks where 1-11% of nodes participate in at least one identified protein complex, such as H. sapien, DSATUR (a well-known complete graph colouring algorithm) node colouring information can improve the quality (homogeneity and separation) of initial candidate complexes. This finding may help improve existing protein complex detection methods, and/or suggest new methods. [Includes supplementary material]. PMID:20499999

  20. Uncovering Biological Network Function via Graphlet Degree Signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Pržulj

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Motivation: Proteins are essential macromolecules of life and thus understanding their function is of great importance. The number of functionally unclassified proteins is large even for simple and well studied organisms such as baker’s yeast. Methods for determining protein function have shifted their focus from targeting specific proteins based solely on sequence homology to analyses of the entire proteome based on protein-protein interaction (PPI networks. Since proteins interact to perform a certain function, analyzing structural properties of PPI networks may provide useful clues about the biological function of individual proteins, protein complexes they participate in, and even larger subcellular machines.Results: We design a sensitive graph theoretic method for comparing local structures of node neighborhoods that demonstrates that in PPI networks, biological function of a node and its local network structure are closely related. The method summarizes a protein’s local topology in a PPI network into the vector of graphlet degrees called the signature of the protein and computes the signature similarities between all protein pairs. We group topologically similar proteins under this measure in a PPI network and show that these protein groups belong to the same protein complexes, perform the same biological functions, are localized in the same subcellular compartments, and have the same tissue expressions. Moreover, we apply our technique on a proteome-scale network data and infer biological function of yet unclassified proteins demonstrating that our method can provide valuable guidelines for future experimental research such as disease protein prediction.Availability: Data is available upon request.

  1. Robustness and structure of complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Shuai

    This dissertation covers the two major parts of my PhD research on statistical physics and complex networks: i) modeling a new type of attack -- localized attack, and investigating robustness of complex networks under this type of attack; ii) discovering the clustering structure in complex networks and its influence on the robustness of coupled networks. Complex networks appear in every aspect of our daily life and are widely studied in Physics, Mathematics, Biology, and Computer Science. One important property of complex networks is their robustness under attacks, which depends crucially on the nature of attacks and the structure of the networks themselves. Previous studies have focused on two types of attack: random attack and targeted attack, which, however, are insufficient to describe many real-world damages. Here we propose a new type of attack -- localized attack, and study the robustness of complex networks under this type of attack, both analytically and via simulation. On the other hand, we also study the clustering structure in the network, and its influence on the robustness of a complex network system. In the first part, we propose a theoretical framework to study the robustness of complex networks under localized attack based on percolation theory and generating function method. We investigate the percolation properties, including the critical threshold of the phase transition pc and the size of the giant component Pinfinity. We compare localized attack with random attack and find that while random regular (RR) networks are more robust against localized attack, Erdoḧs-Renyi (ER) networks are equally robust under both types of attacks. As for scale-free (SF) networks, their robustness depends crucially on the degree exponent lambda. The simulation results show perfect agreement with theoretical predictions. We also test our model on two real-world networks: a peer-to-peer computer network and an airline network, and find that the real-world networks

  2. Linking network topology to function. Comment on "Drivers of structural features in gene regulatory networks: From biophysical constraints to biological function" by O.C. Martin, A. Krzywicki and M. Zagorski

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Bernardo, Diego

    2016-07-01

    The review by Martin et al. deals with a long standing problem at the interface of complex systems and molecular biology, that is the relationship between the topology of a complex network and its function. In biological terms the problem translates to relating the topology of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) to specific cellular functions. GRNs control the spatial and temporal activity of the genes encoded in the cell's genome by means of specialised proteins called Transcription Factors (TFs). A TF is able to recognise and bind specifically to a sequence (TF biding site) of variable length (order of magnitude of 10) found upstream of the sequence encoding one or more genes (at least in prokaryotes) and thus activating or repressing their transcription. TFs can thus be distinguished in activator and repressor. The picture can become more complex since some classes of TFs can form hetero-dimers consisting of a protein complex whose subunits are the individual TFs. Heterodimers can have completely different binding sites and activity compared to their individual parts. In this review the authors limit their attention to prokaryotes where the complexity of GRNs is somewhat reduced. Moreover they exploit a unique feature of living systems, i.e. evolution, to understand whether function can shape network topology. Indeed, prokaryotes such as bacteria are among the oldest living systems that have become perfectly adapted to their environment over geological scales and thus have reached an evolutionary steady-state where the fitness of the population has reached a plateau. By integrating in silico analysis and comparative evolution, the authors show that indeed function does tend to shape the structure of a GRN, however this trend is not always present and depends on the properties of the network being examined. Interestingly, the trend is more apparent for sparse networks, i.e. where the density of edges is very low. Sparsity is indeed one of the most prominent features

  3. Using biological networks to integrate, visualize and analyze genomics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charitou, Theodosia; Bryan, Kenneth; Lynn, David J

    2016-01-01

    Network biology is a rapidly developing area of biomedical research and reflects the current view that complex phenotypes, such as disease susceptibility, are not the result of single gene mutations that act in isolation but are rather due to the perturbation of a gene's network context. Understanding the topology of these molecular interaction networks and identifying the molecules that play central roles in their structure and regulation is a key to understanding complex systems. The falling cost of next-generation sequencing is now enabling researchers to routinely catalogue the molecular components of these networks at a genome-wide scale and over a large number of different conditions. In this review, we describe how to use publicly available bioinformatics tools to integrate genome-wide 'omics' data into a network of experimentally-supported molecular interactions. In addition, we describe how to visualize and analyze these networks to identify topological features of likely functional relevance, including network hubs, bottlenecks and modules. We show that network biology provides a powerful conceptual approach to integrate and find patterns in genome-wide genomic data but we also discuss the limitations and caveats of these methods, of which researchers adopting these methods must remain aware. PMID:27036106

  4. A Newtonian framework for community detection in undirected biological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Tejaswini; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2014-02-01

    Community detection is a key problem of interest in network analysis, with applications in a variety of domains such as biological networks, social network modeling, and communication pattern analysis. In this paper, we present a novel framework for community detection that is motivated by a physical system analogy. We model a network as a system of point masses, and drive the process of community detection, by leveraging the Newtonian interactions between the point masses. Our framework is designed to be generic and extensible relative to the model parameters that are most suited for the problem domain. We illustrate the applicability of our approach by applying the Newtonian Community Detection algorithm on protein-protein interaction networks of E. coli , C. elegans, and S. cerevisiae. We obtain results that are comparable in quality to those obtained from the Newman-Girvan algorithm, a widely employed divisive algorithm for community detection. We also present a detailed analysis of the structural properties of the communities produced by our proposed algorithm, together with a biological interpretation using E. coli protein network as a case study. A functional enrichment heat map is constructed with the Gene Ontology functional mapping, in addition to a pathway analysis for each community. The analysis illustrates that the proposed algorithm elicits communities that are not only meaningful from a topological standpoint, but also possess biological relevance. We believe that our algorithm has the potential to serve as a key computational tool for driving therapeutic applications involving targeted drug development for personalized care delivery. PMID:24681920

  5. Spatiotemporal network motif reveals the biological traits of developmental gene regulatory networks in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Man-Sun

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Network motifs provided a “conceptual tool” for understanding the functional principles of biological networks, but such motifs have primarily been used to consider static network structures. Static networks, however, cannot be used to reveal time- and region-specific traits of biological systems. To overcome this limitation, we proposed the concept of a “spatiotemporal network motif,” a spatiotemporal sequence of network motifs of sub-networks which are active only at specific time points and body parts. Results On the basis of this concept, we analyzed the developmental gene regulatory network of the Drosophila melanogaster embryo. We identified spatiotemporal network motifs and investigated their distribution pattern in time and space. As a result, we found how key developmental processes are temporally and spatially regulated by the gene network. In particular, we found that nested feedback loops appeared frequently throughout the entire developmental process. From mathematical simulations, we found that mutual inhibition in the nested feedback loops contributes to the formation of spatial expression patterns. Conclusions Taken together, the proposed concept and the simulations can be used to unravel the design principle of developmental gene regulatory networks.

  6. Modelling the structure of complex networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlau, Tue

    A complex network is a systems in which a discrete set of units interact in a quantifiable manner. Representing systems as complex networks have become increasingly popular in a variety of scientific fields including biology, social sciences and economics. Parallel to this development complex...... next chapters will treat some of the various symmetries, representer theorems and probabilistic structures often deployed in the modelling complex networks, the construction of sampling methods and various network models. The introductory chapters will serve to provide context for the included written...

  7. An Improved Method for Completely Uncertain Biological Network Alignment

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    With the continuous development of biological experiment technology, more and more data related to uncertain biological networks needs to be analyzed. However, most of current alignment methods are designed for the deterministic biological network. Only a few can solve the probabilistic network alignment problem. However, these approaches only use the part of probabilistic data in the original networks allowing only one of the two networks to be probabilistic. To overcome the weakness of curr...

  8. Structure and function in biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary is given of the history of the developments of structural chemistry in biology beginning with the work of the bacteriologist Ehrlich leading to a comprehensive examination of the influence of size and configuration on the interaction between specific antibodies and side-chain determinants. Recent developments include the recognition of a higher order of specificity in the interaction of proteins with one another

  9. Onion structure and network robustness

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Zhi-Xi; 10.1103/PhysRevE.84.026106

    2011-01-01

    In a recent work [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 108, 3838 (2011)], Schneider et al. proposed a new measure for network robustness and investigated optimal networks with respect to this quantity. For networks with a power-law degree distribution, the optimized networks have an onion structure-high-degree vertices forming a core with radially decreasing degrees and an over-representation of edges within the same radial layer. In this paper we relate the onion structure to graphs with good expander properties (another characterization of robust network) and argue that networks of skewed degree distributions with large spectral gaps (and thus good expander properties) are typically onion structured. Furthermore, we propose a generative algorithm producing synthetic scale-free networks with onion structure, circumventing the optimization procedure of Schneider et al. We validate the robustness of our generated networks against malicious attacks and random removals.

  10. Comparing artificial and biological dynamical neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAulay, Alastair D.

    2006-05-01

    Modern computers can be made more friendly and otherwise improved by making them behave more like humans. Perhaps we can learn how to do this from biology in which human brains evolved over a long period of time. Therefore, we first explain a commonly used biological neural network (BNN) model, the Wilson-Cowan neural oscillator, that has cross-coupled excitatory (positive) and inhibitory (negative) neurons. The two types of neurons are used for frequency modulation communication between neurons which provides immunity to electromagnetic interference. We then evolve, for the first time, an artificial neural network (ANN) to perform the same task. Two dynamical feed-forward artificial neural networks use cross-coupling feedback (like that in a flip-flop) to form an ANN nonlinear dynamic neural oscillator with the same equations as the Wilson-Cowan neural oscillator. Finally we show, through simulation, that the equations perform the basic neural threshold function, switching between stable zero output and a stable oscillation, that is a stable limit cycle. Optical implementation with an injected laser diode and future research are discussed.

  11. Structural Biology: Practical NMR Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Teng, Quincy

    2005-01-01

    This textbook begins with an overview of NMR development and applications in biological systems. It describes recent developments in instrument hardware and methodology. Chapters highlight the scope and limitation of NMR methods. While detailed math and quantum mechanics dealing with NMR theory have been addressed in several well-known NMR volumes, chapter two of this volume illustrates the fundamental principles and concepts of NMR spectroscopy in a more descriptive manner. Topics such as instrument setup, data acquisition, and data processing using a variety of offline software are discussed. Chapters further discuss several routine stategies for preparing samples, especially for macromolecules and complexes. The target market for such a volume includes researchers in the field of biochemistry, chemistry, structural biology and biophysics.

  12. Distance, dissimilarity index, and network community structure

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, H

    2003-01-01

    We address the question of finding the community structure of a complex network. In an earlier effort [H. Zhou, {\\em Phys. Rev. E} (2003)], the concept of network random walking is introduced and a distance measure defined. Here we calculate, based on this distance measure, the dissimilarity index between nearest-neighboring vertices of a network and design an algorithm to partition these vertices into communities that are hierarchically organized. Each community is characterized by an upper and a lower dissimilarity threshold. The algorithm is applied to several artificial and real-world networks, and excellent results are obtained. In the case of artificially generated random modular networks, this method outperforms the algorithm based on the concept of edge betweenness centrality. For yeast's protein-protein interaction network, we are able to identify many clusters that have well defined biological functions.

  13. Impact of environmental inputs on reverse-engineering approach to network structures

    OpenAIRE

    Buchanan-Wollaston Vicky; Sinfield James L; Wu Jianhua; Feng Jianfeng

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Uncovering complex network structures from a biological system is one of the main topic in system biology. The network structures can be inferred by the dynamical Bayesian network or Granger causality, but neither techniques have seriously taken into account the impact of environmental inputs. Results With considerations of natural rhythmic dynamics of biological data, we propose a system biology approach to reveal the impact of environmental inputs on network structures. ...

  14. Noncommutative Biology: Sequential Regulation of Complex Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letsou, William; Cai, Long

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell variability in gene expression is important for generating distinct cell types, but it is unclear how cells use the same set of regulatory molecules to specifically control similarly regulated genes. While combinatorial binding of transcription factors at promoters has been proposed as a solution for cell-type specific gene expression, we found that such models resulted in substantial information bottlenecks. We sought to understand the consequences of adopting sequential logic wherein the time-ordering of factors informs the final outcome. We showed that with noncommutative control, it is possible to independently control targets that would otherwise be activated simultaneously using combinatorial logic. Consequently, sequential logic overcomes the information bottleneck inherent in complex networks. We derived scaling laws for two noncommutative models of regulation, motivated by phosphorylation/neural networks and chromosome folding, respectively, and showed that they scale super-exponentially in the number of regulators. We also showed that specificity in control is robust to the loss of a regulator. Lastly, we connected these theoretical results to real biological networks that demonstrate specificity in the context of promiscuity. These results show that achieving a desired outcome often necessitates roundabout steps. PMID:27560383

  15. Relevance of Dynamic Clustering to Biological Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Kaneko, K

    1993-01-01

    Abstract Network of nonlinear dynamical elements often show clustering of synchronization by chaotic instability. Relevance of the clustering to ecological, immune, neural, and cellular networks is discussed, with the emphasis of partially ordered states with chaotic itinerancy. First, clustering with bit structures in a hypercubic lattice is studied. Spontaneous formation and destruction of relevant bits are found, which give self-organizing, and chaotic genetic algorithms. When spontaneous changes of effective couplings are introduced, chaotic itinerancy of clusterings is widely seen through a feedback mechanism, which supports dynamic stability allowing for complexity and diversity, known as homeochaos. Second, synaptic dynamics of couplings is studied in relation with neural dynamics. The clustering structure is formed with a balance between external inputs and internal dynamics. Last, an extension allowing for the growth of the number of elements is given, in connection with cell differentiation. Effecti...

  16. Detecting Hierarchical Structure in Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlau, Tue; Mørup, Morten; Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard;

    2012-01-01

    Many real-world networks exhibit hierarchical organization. Previous models of hierarchies within relational data has focused on binary trees; however, for many networks it is unknown whether there is hierarchical structure, and if there is, a binary tree might not account well for it. We propose....... On synthetic and real data we demonstrate that our model can detect hierarchical structure leading to better link-prediction than competing models. Our model can be used to detect if a network exhibits hierarchical structure, thereby leading to a better comprehension and statistical account the network....

  17. Identifying community structure in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Chenxi; Duan, Yubing

    2015-07-01

    A wide variety of applications could be formulated to resolve the problem of finding all communities from a given network, ranging from social and biological network analysis to web mining and searching. In this study, we propose the concept of virtual attractive strength between each pair of node in networks, and then give the definition of community structure based on the proposed attractive strength. Furthermore, we present a community detection method by moving vertices to the clusters that produce the largest attractive strengths to them until the division of network reaches unchanged. Experimental results on synthetic and real networks indicate that the proposed approach has favorite effectiveness and fast convergence speed, which provides an efficient method for exploring and analyzing complex systems.

  18. Track structure in biological models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, S B

    1986-01-01

    High-energy heavy ions in the galactic cosmic radiation (HZE particles) may pose a special risk during long term manned space flights outside the sheltering confines of the earth's geomagnetic field. These particles are highly ionizing, and they and their nuclear secondaries can penetrate many centimeters of body tissue. The three dimensional patterns of ionizations they create as they lose energy are referred to as their track structure. Several models of biological action on mammalian cells attempt to treat track structure or related quantities in their formulation. The methods by which they do this are reviewed. The proximity function is introduced in connection with the theory of Dual Radiation Action (DRA). The ion-gamma kill (IGK) model introduces the radial energy-density distribution, which is a smooth function characterizing both the magnitude and extension of a charged particle track. The lethal, potentially lethal (LPL) model introduces lambda, the mean distance between relevant ion clusters or biochemical species along the track. Since very localized energy depositions (within approximately 10 nm) are emphasized, the proximity function as defined in the DRA model is not of utility in characterizing track structure in the LPL formulation. PMID:11537218

  19. Life, career, and structural biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a Chinese born and raised in central China, I came to the United States for graduate education in 1990. Eighteen years later, I resigned my tenured faculty position at Princeton University and returned to my alma mater Tsinghua University. In this review, I share my experiences and reflections as a graduate student, a postdoctoral fellow, and an independent scientist in both Princeton and Beijing. Much focus is given to my research effort in the field of programmed cell death (also known as apoptosis). Systematic structural biology, which combines x-ray crystallography with other biochemical and biophysical methods, has led to comprehensive understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms that govern the initiation, execution, and regulation of apoptosis. (invited comment)

  20. Hierarchical community structure in complex (social) networks

    CERN Document Server

    Massaro, Emanuele

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of community structure in networks is a task of great importance in many disciplines, namely physics, sociology, biology and computer science where systems are often represented as graphs. One of the challenges is to find local communities from a local viewpoint in a graph without global information in order to reproduce the subjective hierarchical vision for each vertex. In this paper we present the improvement of an information dynamics algorithm in which the label propagation of nodes is based on the Markovian flow of information in the network under cognitive-inspired constraints \\cite{Massaro2012}. In this framework we have introduced two more complex heuristics that allow the algorithm to detect the multi-resolution hierarchical community structure of networks from a source vertex or communities adopting fixed values of model's parameters. Experimental results show that the proposed methods are efficient and well-behaved in both real-world and synthetic networks.

  1. Metagovernance, network structure, and legitimacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugbjerg, Carsten; Fawcett, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This article develops a heuristic for comparative governance analysis. The heuristic depicts four network types by combining network structure with the state’s capacity to metagovern. It suggests that each network type produces a particular combination of input and output legitimacy. We illustrate...... the heuristic and its utility using a comparative study of agri-food networks (organic farming and land use) in four countries, which each exhibit different combinations of input and output legitimacy respectively. The article concludes by using a fifth case study to illustrate what a network type...

  2. PREFACE: Complex Networks: from Biology to Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrat, A.; Boccaletti, S.; Caldarelli, G.; Chessa, A.; Latora, V.; Motter, A. E.

    2008-06-01

    The field of complex networks is one of the most active areas in contemporary statistical physics. Ten years after seminal work initiated the modern study of networks, interest in the field is in fact still growing, as indicated by the ever increasing number of publications in network science. The reason for such a resounding success is most likely the simplicity and broad significance of the approach that, through graph theory, allows researchers to address a variety of different complex systems within a common framework. This special issue comprises a selection of contributions presented at the workshop 'Complex Networks: from Biology to Information Technology' held in July 2007 in Pula (Cagliari), Italy as a satellite of the general conference STATPHYS23. The contributions cover a wide range of problems that are currently among the most important questions in the area of complex networks and that are likely to stimulate future research. The issue is organised into four sections. The first two sections describe 'methods' to study the structure and the dynamics of complex networks, respectively. After this methodological part, the issue proceeds with a section on applications to biological systems. The issue closes with a section concentrating on applications to the study of social and technological networks. The first section, entitled Methods: The Structure, consists of six contributions focused on the characterisation and analysis of structural properties of complex networks: The paper Motif-based communities in complex networks by Arenas et al is a study of the occurrence of characteristic small subgraphs in complex networks. These subgraphs, known as motifs, are used to define general classes of nodes and their communities by extending the mathematical expression of the Newman-Girvan modularity. The same line of research, aimed at characterising network structure through the analysis of particular subgraphs, is explored by Bianconi and Gulbahce in Algorithm

  3. Assessment of network perturbation amplitudes by applying high-throughput data to causal biological networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Florian

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput measurement technologies produce data sets that have the potential to elucidate the biological impact of disease, drug treatment, and environmental agents on humans. The scientific community faces an ongoing challenge in the analysis of these rich data sources to more accurately characterize biological processes that have been perturbed at the mechanistic level. Here, a new approach is built on previous methodologies in which high-throughput data was interpreted using prior biological knowledge of cause and effect relationships. These relationships are structured into network models that describe specific biological processes, such as inflammatory signaling or cell cycle progression. This enables quantitative assessment of network perturbation in response to a given stimulus. Results Four complementary methods were devised to quantify treatment-induced activity changes in processes described by network models. In addition, companion statistics were developed to qualify significance and specificity of the results. This approach is called Network Perturbation Amplitude (NPA scoring because the amplitudes of treatment-induced perturbations are computed for biological network models. The NPA methods were tested on two transcriptomic data sets: normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE cells treated with the pro-inflammatory signaling mediator TNFα, and HCT116 colon cancer cells treated with the CDK cell cycle inhibitor R547. Each data set was scored against network models representing different aspects of inflammatory signaling and cell cycle progression, and these scores were compared with independent measures of pathway activity in NHBE cells to verify the approach. The NPA scoring method successfully quantified the amplitude of TNFα-induced perturbation for each network model when compared against NF-κB nuclear localization and cell number. In addition, the degree and specificity to which CDK

  4. Collective network for computer structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumrich, Matthias A.; Coteus, Paul W.; Chen, Dong; Gara, Alan; Giampapa, Mark E.; Heidelberger, Philip; Hoenicke, Dirk; Takken, Todd E.; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D.; Vranas, Pavlos M.

    2011-08-16

    A system and method for enabling high-speed, low-latency global collective communications among interconnected processing nodes. The global collective network optimally enables collective reduction operations to be performed during parallel algorithm operations executing in a computer structure having a plurality of the interconnected processing nodes. Router devices ate included that interconnect the nodes of the network via links to facilitate performance of low-latency global processing operations at nodes of the virtual network and class structures. The global collective network may be configured to provide global barrier and interrupt functionality in asynchronous or synchronized manner. When implemented in a massively-parallel supercomputing structure, the global collective network is physically and logically partitionable according to needs of a processing algorithm.

  5. How structure determines correlations in neuronal networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Pernice

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Networks are becoming a ubiquitous metaphor for the understanding of complex biological systems, spanning the range between molecular signalling pathways, neural networks in the brain, and interacting species in a food web. In many models, we face an intricate interplay between the topology of the network and the dynamics of the system, which is generally very hard to disentangle. A dynamical feature that has been subject of intense research in various fields are correlations between the noisy activity of nodes in a network. We consider a class of systems, where discrete signals are sent along the links of the network. Such systems are of particular relevance in neuroscience, because they provide models for networks of neurons that use action potentials for communication. We study correlations in dynamic networks with arbitrary topology, assuming linear pulse coupling. With our novel approach, we are able to understand in detail how specific structural motifs affect pairwise correlations. Based on a power series decomposition of the covariance matrix, we describe the conditions under which very indirect interactions will have a pronounced effect on correlations and population dynamics. In random networks, we find that indirect interactions may lead to a broad distribution of activation levels with low average but highly variable correlations. This phenomenon is even more pronounced in networks with distance dependent connectivity. In contrast, networks with highly connected hubs or patchy connections often exhibit strong average correlations. Our results are particularly relevant in view of new experimental techniques that enable the parallel recording of spiking activity from a large number of neurons, an appropriate interpretation of which is hampered by the currently limited understanding of structure-dynamics relations in complex networks.

  6. Biology Question Generation from a Semantic Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lishan

    Science instructors need questions for use in exams, homework assignments, class discussions, reviews, and other instructional activities. Textbooks never have enough questions, so instructors must find them from other sources or generate their own questions. In order to supply instructors with biology questions, a semantic network approach was developed for generating open response biology questions. The generated questions were compared to professional authorized questions. To boost students' learning experience, adaptive selection was built on the generated questions. Bayesian Knowledge Tracing was used as embedded assessment of the student's current competence so that a suitable question could be selected based on the student's previous performance. A between-subjects experiment with 42 participants was performed, where half of the participants studied with adaptive selected questions and the rest studied with mal-adaptive order of questions. Both groups significantly improved their test scores, and the participants in adaptive group registered larger learning gains than participants in the control group. To explore the possibility of generating rich instructional feedback for machine-generated questions, a question-paragraph mapping task was identified. Given a set of questions and a list of paragraphs for a textbook, the goal of the task was to map the related paragraphs to each question. An algorithm was developed whose performance was comparable to human annotators. A multiple-choice question with high quality distractors (incorrect answers) can be pedagogically valuable as well as being much easier to grade than open-response questions. Thus, an algorithm was developed to generate good distractors for multiple-choice questions. The machine-generated multiple-choice questions were compared to human-generated questions in terms of three measures: question difficulty, question discrimination and distractor usefulness. By recruiting 200 participants from

  7. Onion structure and network robustness

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Zhi-Xi; Holme, Petter

    2011-01-01

    In a recent work [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 108, 3838 (2011)], Schneider et al. proposed a new measure for network robustness and investigated optimal networks with respect to this quantity. For networks with a power-law degree distribution, the optimized networks have an onion structure—high-degree vertices forming a core with radially decreasing degrees and an over-representation of edges within the same radial layer. In this paper we relate the onion structure to graphs with good expander...

  8. BioNSi: A Discrete Biological Network Simulator Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Amir; Bracha, Noga; Rudner, Liat; Zucker, Noga; Sloin, Hadas E; Chor, Benny

    2016-08-01

    Modeling and simulation of biological networks is an effective and widely used research methodology. The Biological Network Simulator (BioNSi) is a tool for modeling biological networks and simulating their discrete-time dynamics, implemented as a Cytoscape App. BioNSi includes a visual representation of the network that enables researchers to construct, set the parameters, and observe network behavior under various conditions. To construct a network instance in BioNSi, only partial, qualitative biological data suffices. The tool is aimed for use by experimental biologists and requires no prior computational or mathematical expertise. BioNSi is freely available at http://bionsi.wix.com/bionsi , where a complete user guide and a step-by-step manual can also be found. PMID:27354160

  9. Power Laws, Scale-Free Networks and Genome Biology

    CERN Document Server

    Koonin, Eugene V; Karev, Georgy P

    2006-01-01

    Power Laws, Scale-free Networks and Genome Biology deals with crucial aspects of the theoretical foundations of systems biology, namely power law distributions and scale-free networks which have emerged as the hallmarks of biological organization in the post-genomic era. The chapters in the book not only describe the interesting mathematical properties of biological networks but moves beyond phenomenology, toward models of evolution capable of explaining the emergence of these features. The collection of chapters, contributed by both physicists and biologists, strives to address the problems in this field in a rigorous but not excessively mathematical manner and to represent different viewpoints, which is crucial in this emerging discipline. Each chapter includes, in addition to technical descriptions of properties of biological networks and evolutionary models, a more general and accessible introduction to the respective problems. Most chapters emphasize the potential of theoretical systems biology for disco...

  10. Activating and inhibiting connections in biological network dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knight Rob

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many studies of biochemical networks have analyzed network topology. Such work has suggested that specific types of network wiring may increase network robustness and therefore confer a selective advantage. However, knowledge of network topology does not allow one to predict network dynamical behavior – for example, whether deleting a protein from a signaling network would maintain the network's dynamical behavior, or induce oscillations or chaos. Results Here we report that the balance between activating and inhibiting connections is important in determining whether network dynamics reach steady state or oscillate. We use a simple dynamical model of a network of interacting genes or proteins. Using the model, we study random networks, networks selected for robust dynamics, and examples of biological network topologies. The fraction of activating connections influences whether the network dynamics reach steady state or oscillate. Conclusion The activating fraction may predispose a network to oscillate or reach steady state, and neutral evolution or selection of this parameter may affect the behavior of biological networks. This principle may unify the dynamics of a wide range of cellular networks. Reviewers Reviewed by Sergei Maslov, Eugene Koonin, and Yu (Brandon Xia (nominated by Mark Gerstein. For the full reviews, please go to the Reviewers' comments section.

  11. Characterization of Adaptation by Morphology in a Planar Biological Network of Plasmodial Slime Mold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Masateru; Okamoto, Riki; Takamatsu, Atsuko

    2011-07-01

    Growth processes of a planar biological network of plasmodium of a true slime mold, Physarum polycephalum, were analyzed quantitatively. The plasmodium forms a transportation network through which protoplasm conveys nutrients, oxygen, and cellular organelles similarly to blood in a mammalian vascular network. To analyze the network structure, vertices were defined at tube bifurcation points. Then edges were defined for the tubes connecting both end vertices. Morphological analysis was attempted along with conventional topological analysis, revealing that the growth process of the plasmodial network structure depends on environmental conditions. In an attractive condition, the network is a polygonal lattice with more than six edges per vertex at the early stage and the hexagonal lattice at a later stage. Through all growing stages, the tube structure was not highly developed but an unstructured protoplasmic thin sheet was dominantly formed. The network size is small. In contrast, in the repulsive condition, the network is a mixture of polygonal lattice and tree-graph. More specifically, the polygonal lattice has more than six edges per vertex in the early stage, then a tree-graph structure is added to the lattice network at a later stage. The thick tube structure was highly developed. The network size, in the meaning of Euclidean distance but not topological one, grows considerably. Finally, the biological meaning of the environment-dependent network structure in the plasmodium is discussed.

  12. Spatial network structure and amphibian persistence in stochastic environments

    OpenAIRE

    Fortuna, Miguel A.; Gómez-Rodríguez, Carola; Bascompte, Jordi

    2006-01-01

    In the past few years, the framework of complex networks has provided new insight into the organization and function of biological systems. However, in spite of its potential, spatial ecology has not yet fully incorporated tools and concepts from network theory. In the present study, we identify a large spatial network of temporary ponds, which are used as breeding sites by several amphibian species. We investigate how the structural properties of the spatial network...

  13. Collective network for computer structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumrich, Matthias A; Coteus, Paul W; Chen, Dong; Gara, Alan; Giampapa, Mark E; Heidelberger, Philip; Hoenicke, Dirk; Takken, Todd E; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D; Vranas, Pavlos M

    2014-01-07

    A system and method for enabling high-speed, low-latency global collective communications among interconnected processing nodes. The global collective network optimally enables collective reduction operations to be performed during parallel algorithm operations executing in a computer structure having a plurality of the interconnected processing nodes. Router devices are included that interconnect the nodes of the network via links to facilitate performance of low-latency global processing operations at nodes of the virtual network. The global collective network may be configured to provide global barrier and interrupt functionality in asynchronous or synchronized manner. When implemented in a massively-parallel supercomputing structure, the global collective network is physically and logically partitionable according to the needs of a processing algorithm.

  14. Confidence sets for network structure

    CERN Document Server

    Airoldi, Edoardo M; Wolfe, Patrick J

    2011-01-01

    Latent variable models are frequently used to identify structure in dichotomous network data, in part because they give rise to a Bernoulli product likelihood that is both well understood and consistent with the notion of exchangeable random graphs. In this article we propose conservative confidence sets that hold with respect to these underlying Bernoulli parameters as a function of any given partition of network nodes, enabling us to assess estimates of 'residual' network structure, that is, structure that cannot be explained by known covariates and thus cannot be easily verified by manual inspection. We demonstrate the proposed methodology by analyzing student friendship networks from the National Longitudinal Survey of Adolescent Health that include race, gender, and school year as covariates. We employ a stochastic expectation-maximization algorithm to fit a logistic regression model that includes these explanatory variables as well as a latent stochastic blockmodel component and additional node-specific...

  15. Duplication: a Mechanism Producing Disassortative Mixing Networks in Biology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Dan; LIU Zeng-Rong; WANG Jia-Zeng

    2007-01-01

    Assortative/disassortative mixing is an important topological property of a network. A network is called assortative mixing if the nodes in the network tend to connect to their connectivity peers, or disassortative mixing if nodes with low degrees are more likely to connect with high-degree nodes. We have known that biological networks such as protein-protein interaction networks (PPI), gene regulatory networks, and metabolic networks tend to be disassortative. On the other hand, in biological evolution, duplication and divergence are two fundamental processes. In order to make the relationship between the property of disassortative mixing and the two basic biological principles clear and to study the cause of the disassortative mixing property in biological networks, we present a random duplication model and an anti-preference duplication model. Our results show that disassortative mixing networks can be obtained by both kinds of models from uncorrelated initial networks.Moreover, with the growth of the network size, the disassortative mixing property becomes more obvious.

  16. Structural biology at York Structural Biology Laboratory; laboratory information management systems for structural genomics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dohnálek, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2005), s. 3. ISSN 1211-5894. [Meeting of Structural Biologists /4./. 10.03.2005-12.03.2005, Nové Hrady] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1K05008 Keywords : structural biology * LIMS * structural genomics Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  17. A unified biological modeling and simulation system for analyzing biological reaction networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Seok Jong; Tung, Thai Quang; Park, Junho; Lim, Jongtae; Yoo, Jaesoo

    2013-12-01

    In order to understand the biological response in a cell, a researcher has to create a biological network and design an experiment to prove it. Although biological knowledge has been accumulated, we still don't have enough biological models to explain complex biological phenomena. If a new biological network is to be created, integrated modeling software supporting various biological models is required. In this research, we design and implement a unified biological modeling and simulation system, called ezBioNet, for analyzing biological reaction networks. ezBioNet designs kinetic and Boolean network models and simulates the biological networks using a server-side simulation system with Object Oriented Parallel Accelerator Library framework. The main advantage of ezBioNet is that a user can create a biological network by using unified modeling canvas of kinetic and Boolean models and perform massive simulations, including Ordinary Differential Equation analyses, sensitivity analyses, parameter estimates and Boolean network analysis. ezBioNet integrates useful biological databases, including the BioModels database, by connecting European Bioinformatics Institute servers through Web services Application Programming Interfaces. In addition, we employ Eclipse Rich Client Platform, which is a powerful modularity framework to allow various functional expansions. ezBioNet is intended to be an easy-to-use modeling tool and a simulation system for understanding the control mechanism by monitoring the change of each component in a biological network. The simulation result can be managed and visualized on ezBioNet, which is available free of charge at http://ezbionet.sourceforge.net or http://ezbionet.cbnu.ac.kr.

  18. Notes on a PDE system for biological network formation

    KAUST Repository

    Haskovec, Jan

    2016-01-22

    We present new analytical and numerical results for the elliptic–parabolic system of partial differential equations proposed by Hu and Cai, which models the formation of biological transport networks. The model describes the pressure field using a Darcy’s type equation and the dynamics of the conductance network under pressure force effects. Randomness in the material structure is represented by a linear diffusion term and conductance relaxation by an algebraic decay term. The analytical part extends the results of Haskovec et al. (2015) regarding the existence of weak and mild solutions to the whole range of meaningful relaxation exponents. Moreover, we prove finite time extinction or break-down of solutions in the spatially one-dimensional setting for certain ranges of the relaxation exponent. We also construct stationary solutions for the case of vanishing diffusion and critical value of the relaxation exponent, using a variational formulation and a penalty method. The analytical part is complemented by extensive numerical simulations. We propose a discretization based on mixed finite elements and study the qualitative properties of network structures for various parameter values. Furthermore, we indicate numerically that some analytical results proved for the spatially one-dimensional setting are likely to be valid also in several space dimensions.

  19. Low-rank network decomposition reveals structural characteristics of small-world networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barranca, Victor J.; Zhou, Douglas; Cai, David

    2015-12-01

    Small-world networks occur naturally throughout biological, technological, and social systems. With their prevalence, it is particularly important to prudently identify small-world networks and further characterize their unique connection structure with respect to network function. In this work we develop a formalism for classifying networks and identifying small-world structure using a decomposition of network connectivity matrices into low-rank and sparse components, corresponding to connections within clusters of highly connected nodes and sparse interconnections between clusters, respectively. We show that the network decomposition is independent of node indexing and define associated bounded measures of connectivity structure, which provide insight into the clustering and regularity of network connections. While many existing network characterizations rely on constructing benchmark networks for comparison or fail to describe the structural properties of relatively densely connected networks, our classification relies only on the intrinsic network structure and is quite robust with respect to changes in connection density, producing stable results across network realizations. Using this framework, we analyze several real-world networks and reveal new structural properties, which are often indiscernible by previously established characterizations of network connectivity.

  20. [Classification of organisms and structuralism in biology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'eva, L I

    2001-01-01

    Structuralism in biology is the oldest trend oriented to the search for natural "laws of forms" comparable with laws of growth of crystal, was revived at the end of 20th century on the basis of structuralist thought in socio-humanitarian sciences. The development of principal ideas of the linguistic structuralism in some aspects is similar to that of biological systematics, especially concerning the relationships between "system" and "evolution". However, apart from this general similarity, biological structuralism is strongly focused on familiar problems of the origin of diversity in nature. In their striving for the renovation of existing views, biological structuralists oppose the neo-darwinism emphasizing the existence of "law of forms", that are independent on heredity and genetic "determinism". The trend to develop so-called "rational taxonomy" is also characteristic of biological structuralism but this attempt failed being connected neither with Darwin's historicism nor with Plato's typology. PMID:11605547

  1. Comparing the biological coherence of network clusters identified by different detection algorithms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Protein-protein interaction networks serve to carry out basic molecular activity in the cell. Detecting the modular structures from the protein-protein interaction network is important for understanding the organization, function and dynamics of a biological system. In order to identify functional neighborhoods based on network topology, many network cluster identification algorithms have been developed. However, each algorithm might dissect a network from a different aspect and may provide different insight on the network partition. In order to objectively evaluate the performance of four commonly used cluster detection algorithms: molecular complex detection (MCODE), NetworkBlast, shortest-distance clustering (SDC) and Girvan-Newman (G-N) algorithm, we compared the biological coherence of the network clusters found by these algorithms through a uniform evaluation framework. Each algorithm was utilized to find network clusters in two different protein-protein interaction networks with various parameters. Comparison of the resulting network clusters indicates that clusters found by MCODE and SDC are of higher biological coherence than those by NetworkBlast and G-N algorithm.

  2. Modeling information flow in biological networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large-scale molecular interaction networks are being increasingly used to provide a system level view of cellular processes. Modeling communications between nodes in such huge networks as information flows is useful for dissecting dynamical dependences between individual network components. In the information flow model, individual nodes are assumed to communicate with each other by propagating the signals through intermediate nodes in the network. In this paper, we first provide an overview of the state of the art of research in the network analysis based on information flow models. In the second part, we describe our computational method underlying our recent work on discovering dysregulated pathways in glioma. Motivated by applications to inferring information flow from genotype to phenotype in a very large human interaction network, we generalized previous approaches to compute information flows for a large number of instances and also provided a formal proof for the method

  3. Structure and formation of ant transportation networks

    OpenAIRE

    Latty, Tanya; Ramsch, Kai; Ito, Kentaro; Nakagaki, Toshiyuki; Sumpter, David J. T.; Middendorf, Martin; Beekman, Madeleine

    2011-01-01

    Many biological systems use extensive networks for the transport of resources and information. Ants are no exception. How do biological systems achieve efficient transportation networks in the absence of centralized control and without global knowledge of the environment? Here, we address this question by studying the formation and properties of inter-nest transportation networks in the Argentine ant (Linepithema humile). We find that the formation of inter-nest networks depends on the number...

  4. Evolution of biological interaction networks: from models to real data

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Mark GF; Kim, Philip M.

    2011-01-01

    We are beginning to uncover common mechanisms leading to the evolution of biological networks. The driving force behind these advances is the increasing availability of comparative data in several species.

  5. Structural reducibility of multilayer networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Domenico, Manlio; Nicosia, Vincenzo; Arenas, Alexandre; Latora, Vito

    2015-04-01

    Many complex systems can be represented as networks consisting of distinct types of interactions, which can be categorized as links belonging to different layers. For example, a good description of the full protein-protein interactome requires, for some organisms, up to seven distinct network layers, accounting for different genetic and physical interactions, each containing thousands of protein-protein relationships. A fundamental open question is then how many layers are indeed necessary to accurately represent the structure of a multilayered complex system. Here we introduce a method based on quantum theory to reduce the number of layers to a minimum while maximizing the distinguishability between the multilayer network and the corresponding aggregated graph. We validate our approach on synthetic benchmarks and we show that the number of informative layers in some real multilayer networks of protein-genetic interactions, social, economical and transportation systems can be reduced by up to 75%.

  6. Bayesian variable selection and data integration for biological regulatory networks

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Shane T; Chen, Guang; Stoeckert, Jr, Christian J.

    2007-01-01

    A substantial focus of research in molecular biology are gene regulatory networks: the set of transcription factors and target genes which control the involvement of different biological processes in living cells. Previous statistical approaches for identifying gene regulatory networks have used gene expression data, ChIP binding data or promoter sequence data, but each of these resources provides only partial information. We present a Bayesian hierarchical model that integrates all three dat...

  7. Summarizing cellular responses as biological process networks

    OpenAIRE

    Lasher, Christopher D; Rajagopalan, Padmavathy; Murali, T.M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Microarray experiments can simultaneously identify thousands of genes that show significant perturbation in expression between two experimental conditions. Response networks, computed through the integration of gene interaction networks with expression perturbation data, may themselves contain tens of thousands of interactions. Gene set enrichment has become standard for summarizing the results of these analyses in te...

  8. Network structure of multivariate time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacasa, Lucas; Nicosia, Vincenzo; Latora, Vito

    2015-10-01

    Our understanding of a variety of phenomena in physics, biology and economics crucially depends on the analysis of multivariate time series. While a wide range tools and techniques for time series analysis already exist, the increasing availability of massive data structures calls for new approaches for multidimensional signal processing. We present here a non-parametric method to analyse multivariate time series, based on the mapping of a multidimensional time series into a multilayer network, which allows to extract information on a high dimensional dynamical system through the analysis of the structure of the associated multiplex network. The method is simple to implement, general, scalable, does not require ad hoc phase space partitioning, and is thus suitable for the analysis of large, heterogeneous and non-stationary time series. We show that simple structural descriptors of the associated multiplex networks allow to extract and quantify nontrivial properties of coupled chaotic maps, including the transition between different dynamical phases and the onset of various types of synchronization. As a concrete example we then study financial time series, showing that a multiplex network analysis can efficiently discriminate crises from periods of financial stability, where standard methods based on time-series symbolization often fail.

  9. Epigenetics and Why Biological Networks are More Controllable than Expected

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motter, Adilson

    2013-03-01

    A fundamental property of networks is that perturbations to one node can affect other nodes, potentially causing the entire system to change behavior or fail. In this talk, I will show that it is possible to exploit this same principle to control network behavior. This approach takes advantage of the nonlinear dynamics inherent to real networks, and allows bringing the system to a desired target state even when this state is not directly accessible or the linear counterpart is not controllable. Applications show that this framework permits both reprogramming a network to a desired task as well as rescuing networks from the brink of failure, which I will illustrate through various biological problems. I will also briefly review the progress our group has made over the past 5 years on related control of complex networks in non-biological domains.

  10. Systematic Functional Annotation and Visualization of Biological Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baryshnikova, Anastasia

    2016-06-22

    Large-scale biological networks represent relationships between genes, but our understanding of how networks are functionally organized is limited. Here, I describe spatial analysis of functional enrichment (SAFE), a systematic method for annotating biological networks and examining their functional organization. SAFE visualizes the network in 2D space and measures the continuous distribution of functional enrichment across local neighborhoods, producing a list of the associated functions and a map of their relative positioning. I applied SAFE to annotate the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genetic interaction similarity network and protein-protein interaction network with gene ontology terms. SAFE annotations of the genetic network matched manually derived annotations, while taking less than 1% of the time, and proved robust to noise and sensitive to biological signal. Integration of genetic interaction and chemical genomics data using SAFE revealed a link between vesicle-mediate transport and resistance to the anti-cancer drug bortezomib. These results demonstrate the utility of SAFE for examining biological networks and understanding their functional organization. PMID:27237738

  11. Small-scale universality and large-scale diversity. Comment on "Drivers of structural features in gene regulatory networks: From biophysical constraints to biological function" by O.C. Martin, A. Krzywicki, and M. Zagorski

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ispolatov, Yaroslav

    2016-07-01

    Martin et al. undertook an arduous task of reviewing vast literature on evolution and functionality of directed biological networks and gene networks in particular. The literature is assessed addressing a question of whether a set of features particular for gene networks is repeatedly recreated among unrelated species driven by selection pressure or has evolved once and is being inherited. To argue for the former mechanism, Martin and colleagues explore the following examples: Scale-free out-degree distribution.

  12. Watershed hydrology, network allometry and ecosystem structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldo, A.

    2003-04-01

    The lecture covers recent advances relevant to watershed hydrology, in particular derived from the realm of data now available, covering a wide range of scales and objectively collected and analyzed. It is intended to summarize results that are, in the lecturer's opinion, crucial to our current understanding of a variety of issues. Key among them, landscape evolution models, models of the hydrologic response and, indeed a scientific challenge, ecosystem structure. In particular, a new allometric scaling law for loopless networks, confirmed through studies on rivers, exact network results and computer simulations, offers unique insight on a variety of phenomena, ranging from the ubiquity of the 'quarter-power' law in biology to the origin of scaling size spectra in marine microbial ecosystems, to the proper geomorphological description of a river basin and its hydrological implications. In a sense, networks are a byproduct of the hydrologic dynamics, and indeed can be shown to be related to ecosystem structure. Si parva licet, I will provide evidence suggesting that ensemble averaging of the allometric property (where individual realizations are different networks) leads to results in excellent accord with the known limit scaling of efficient and compact networks with remarkably little scatter with implications of somewhat general character. Such results complement recent work suggesting that scaling features are quite robust to geometrical fluctuations of network properties. Finally, I shall gather from the morphological analysis on river networks the potential for predicting the main characters of the hydrologic response in ungauged basins - a task of practical nature with many social implications, possibly relevant to the Session's aims.

  13. Biologically Inspired Optimization of Building District Heating Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Leiming Shang; Xiaomin Zhao

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we show that a biologically inspired model can be successfully applied to problems of building optimal district heating network. The model is based on physiological observations of the true slime mold Physarumpolycephalum, but can also be used for path-finding in the complicated networks of mazes and road maps. A strategy of optimally building heating distribution network was guided by the model and a well-tuned ant colony algorithm and genetic algorithm. The results indicate th...

  14. From network structure to network reorganization: implications for adult neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider-Mizell, Casey M.; Parent, Jack M.; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Zochowski, Michal R.; Sander, Leonard M.

    2010-12-01

    Networks can be dynamical systems that undergo functional and structural reorganization. One example of such a process is adult hippocampal neurogenesis, in which new cells are continuously born and incorporate into the existing network of the dentate gyrus region of the hippocampus. Many of these introduced cells mature and become indistinguishable from established neurons, joining the existing network. Activity in the network environment is known to promote birth, survival and incorporation of new cells. However, after epileptogenic injury, changes to the connectivity structure around the neurogenic niche are known to correlate with aberrant neurogenesis. The possible role of network-level changes in the development of epilepsy is not well understood. In this paper, we use a computational model to investigate how the structural and functional outcomes of network reorganization, driven by addition of new cells during neurogenesis, depend on the original network structure. We find that there is a stable network topology that allows the network to incorporate new neurons in a manner that enhances activity of the persistently active region, but maintains global network properties. In networks having other connectivity structures, new cells can greatly alter the distribution of firing activity and destroy the initial activity patterns. We thus find that new cells are able to provide focused enhancement of network only for small-world networks with sufficient inhibition. Network-level deviations from this topology, such as those caused by epileptogenic injury, can set the network down a path that develops toward pathological dynamics and aberrant structural integration of new cells.

  15. From network structure to network reorganization: implications for adult neurogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Networks can be dynamical systems that undergo functional and structural reorganization. One example of such a process is adult hippocampal neurogenesis, in which new cells are continuously born and incorporate into the existing network of the dentate gyrus region of the hippocampus. Many of these introduced cells mature and become indistinguishable from established neurons, joining the existing network. Activity in the network environment is known to promote birth, survival and incorporation of new cells. However, after epileptogenic injury, changes to the connectivity structure around the neurogenic niche are known to correlate with aberrant neurogenesis. The possible role of network-level changes in the development of epilepsy is not well understood. In this paper, we use a computational model to investigate how the structural and functional outcomes of network reorganization, driven by addition of new cells during neurogenesis, depend on the original network structure. We find that there is a stable network topology that allows the network to incorporate new neurons in a manner that enhances activity of the persistently active region, but maintains global network properties. In networks having other connectivity structures, new cells can greatly alter the distribution of firing activity and destroy the initial activity patterns. We thus find that new cells are able to provide focused enhancement of network only for small-world networks with sufficient inhibition. Network-level deviations from this topology, such as those caused by epileptogenic injury, can set the network down a path that develops toward pathological dynamics and aberrant structural integration of new cells

  16. The effect of network biology on drug toxicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gautier, Laurent; Taboureau, Olivier; Audouze, Karine Marie Laure

    2013-01-01

    biology has the opportunity to contribute to a better understanding of a drug's safety profile. The authors believe that considering a drug action and protein's function in a global physiological environment may benefit our understanding of the impact some chemicals have on human health and toxicity. The...... network biology. The authors specifically assess this approach across different biological scales when it is applied to toxicity. Expert opinion: There has been much progress made with the amount of data that is generated by various omics technologies. With this large amount of useful data, network...

  17. Generalized Double Ring Network Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Myrup; Patel, A.; Knudsen, Thomas Phillip; Madsen, Ole Brun

    This paper describes and studies generalizations of the well-known double ring network structures. Two classes of structures are studied, the N2R(p; q) and N2R(p; q; r) structures, of which the former is a special case of the well known Generalized Petersen Graphs. Basic properties of these...... distances and diameters is evaluated and compared to the performance of double rings. This comparison shows that the N2R(p; q) structures are superior to the double rings with regard to distances. For example, a N2R(p; q) structure with 1000 nodes has average distance 12 and diameter 18, while a similar...... structures are shown, indicating that they forma suitable base for future access network infrastructures. The first result is that every N2R(p; q; r) structure is isomorphic to a N2R(p; q) structure N2R(p; q'), and it is shown how q' is determined. Consequently, the rest of the paper focuses on the N2R(p; q...

  18. CytoGEDEVO - Global alignment of biological networks with Cytoscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malek, Maximilian; Ibragimov, Rashid; Albrecht, Mario;

    2016-01-01

    MOTIVATION: In the systems biology era, high-throughput omics technologies have enabled the unraveling of the interplay of some biological entities on a large scale (e.g. genes, proteins, metabolites or RNAs). Huge biological networks have emerged, where nodes correspond to these entities and edges...... between them model their relations. Protein-protein-interaction (PPI) networks, for instance, show the physical interactions of proteins in an organism. The comparison of such networks promises additional insights into protein and cell function as well as knowledge-transfer across species. Several...... computational approaches have been developed previously to solve the network alignment problem, but only a few concentrate on the usability of the implemented tools for the evaluation of protein-protein interactions by the end-users (biologists and medical researchers). RESULTS: We have created CytoGEDEVO, a...

  19. Structural Transitions in Dense Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Lambiotte, R; Bhat, U; Redner, S

    2016-01-01

    We introduce an evolving network model in which a new node attaches to a randomly selected target node and also to each of its neighbors with probability $p$. The resulting network is sparse for $p<\\frac{1}{2}$ and dense (average degree increasing with number of nodes $N$) for $p\\geq \\frac{1}{2}$. In the dense regime, individual networks realizations built by this copying mechanism are disparate and not self-averaging. Further, there is an infinite sequence of structural anomalies at $p=\\frac{2}{3}$, $\\frac{3}{4}$, $\\frac{4}{5}$, etc., where the dependences on $N$ of the number of triangles (3-cliques), 4-cliques, undergo phase transitions. When linking to second neighbors of the target can occur, the probability that the resulting graph is complete---where all nodes are connected---is non-zero as $N\\to\\infty$.

  20. Networks in biological systems: An investigation of the Gene Ontology as an evolving network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many biological systems can be described as networks where different elements interact, in order to perform biological processes. We introduce a network associated with the Gene Ontology. Specifically, we construct a correlation-based network where the vertices are the terms of the Gene Ontology and the link between each two terms is weighted on the basis of the number of genes that they have in common. We analyze a filtered network obtained from the correlation-based network and we characterize its evolution over different releases of the Gene Ontology.

  1. Walk modularity and community structure in networks

    CERN Document Server

    Mehrle, David; Harkin, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Modularity maximization has been one of the most widely used approaches in the last decade for discovering community structure in networks of practical interest in biology, computing, social science, statistical mechanics, and more. Modularity is a quality function that measures the difference between the number of edges found within clusters minus the number of edges one would statistically expect to find based on random chance. We present a natural generalization of modularity based on the difference between the actual and expected number of walks within clusters, which we call walk-modularity. Walk-modularity can be expressed in matrix form, and community detection can be performed by finding leading eigenvectors of the walk-modularity matrix. We demonstrate community detection on both synthetic and real-world networks and find that walk-modularity maximization returns significantly improved results compared to traditional modularity maximization.

  2. The complex channel networks of bone structure

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Luciano da Fontoura; Beletti, Marcelo E

    2006-01-01

    Bone structure in mammals involves a complex network of channels (Havers and Volkmann channels) required to nourish the bone marrow cells. This work describes how three-dimensional reconstructions of such systems can be obtained and represented in terms of complex networks. Three important findings are reported: (i) the fact that the channel branching density resembles a power law implies the existence of distribution hubs; (ii) the conditional node degree density indicates a clear tendency of connection between nodes with degrees 2 and 4; and (iii) the application of the recently introduced concept of hierarchical clustering coefficient allows the identification of typical scales of channel redistribution. A series of important biological insights is drawn and discussed

  3. Structural Biology for A-Level Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Judith

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between the structure and function of proteins is an important area in biochemistry. Pupils studying A-level Biology are introduced to the four levels of protein structure (primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary) and how these can be used to describe the progressive folding of a chain of amino acid residues to a final,…

  4. Visualizing ensembles in structural biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin, Ryan L; Salsbury, Freddie R

    2016-06-01

    Displaying a single representative conformation of a biopolymer rather than an ensemble of states mistakenly conveys a static nature rather than the actual dynamic personality of biopolymers. However, there are few apparent options due to the fixed nature of print media. Here we suggest a standardized methodology for visually indicating the distribution width, standard deviation and uncertainty of ensembles of states with little loss of the visual simplicity of displaying a single representative conformation. Of particular note is that the visualization method employed clearly distinguishes between isotropic and anisotropic motion of polymer subunits. We also apply this method to ligand binding, suggesting a way to indicate the expected error in many high throughput docking programs when visualizing the structural spread of the output. We provide several examples in the context of nucleic acids and proteins with particular insights gained via this method. Such examples include investigating a therapeutic polymer of FdUMP (5-fluoro-2-deoxyuridine-5-O-monophosphate) - a topoisomerase-1 (Top1), apoptosis-inducing poison - and nucleotide-binding proteins responsible for ATP hydrolysis from Bacillus subtilis. We also discuss how these methods can be extended to any macromolecular data set with an underlying distribution, including experimental data such as NMR structures. PMID:27179343

  5. Structural permeability of complex networks to control signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Iudice, Francesco; Garofalo, Franco; Sorrentino, Francesco

    2015-09-01

    Many biological, social and technological systems can be described as complex networks. The goal of affecting their behaviour has motivated recent work focusing on the relationship between the network structure and its propensity to be controlled. While this work has provided insight into several relevant problems, a comprehensive approach to address partial and complete controllability of networks is still lacking. Here, we bridge this gap by developing a framework to maximize the diffusion of the control signals through a network, while taking into account physical and economic constraints that inevitably arise in applications. This approach allows us to introduce the network permeability, a unified metric of the propensity of a network to be controllable. The analysis of the permeability of several synthetic and real networks enables us to extract some structural features that deepen our quantitative understanding of the ease with which specific controllability requirements can be met.

  6. Structural Connectivity Networks of Transgender People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Andreas; Kranz, Georg S; Küblböck, Martin; Kaufmann, Ulrike; Ganger, Sebastian; Hummer, Allan; Seiger, Rene; Spies, Marie; Winkler, Dietmar; Kasper, Siegfried; Windischberger, Christian; Swaab, Dick F; Lanzenberger, Rupert

    2015-10-01

    Although previous investigations of transsexual people have focused on regional brain alterations, evaluations on a network level, especially those structural in nature, are largely missing. Therefore, we investigated the structural connectome of 23 female-to-male (FtM) and 21 male-to-female (MtF) transgender patients before hormone therapy as compared with 25 female and 25 male healthy controls. Graph theoretical analysis of whole-brain probabilistic tractography networks (adjusted for differences in intracranial volume) showed decreased hemispheric connectivity ratios of subcortical/limbic areas for both transgender groups. Subsequent analysis revealed that this finding was driven by increased interhemispheric lobar connectivity weights (LCWs) in MtF transsexuals and decreased intrahemispheric LCWs in FtM patients. This was further reflected on a regional level, where the MtF group showed mostly increased local efficiencies and FtM patients decreased values. Importantly, these parameters separated each patient group from the remaining subjects for the majority of significant findings. This work complements previously established regional alterations with important findings of structural connectivity. Specifically, our data suggest that network parameters may reflect unique characteristics of transgender patients, whereas local physiological aspects have been shown to represent the transition from the biological sex to the actual gender identity. PMID:25217469

  7. Structural Connectivity Networks of Transgender People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Andreas; Kranz, Georg S.; Küblböck, Martin; Kaufmann, Ulrike; Ganger, Sebastian; Hummer, Allan; Seiger, Rene; Spies, Marie; Winkler, Dietmar; Kasper, Siegfried; Windischberger, Christian; Swaab, Dick F.; Lanzenberger, Rupert

    2015-01-01

    Although previous investigations of transsexual people have focused on regional brain alterations, evaluations on a network level, especially those structural in nature, are largely missing. Therefore, we investigated the structural connectome of 23 female-to-male (FtM) and 21 male-to-female (MtF) transgender patients before hormone therapy as compared with 25 female and 25 male healthy controls. Graph theoretical analysis of whole-brain probabilistic tractography networks (adjusted for differences in intracranial volume) showed decreased hemispheric connectivity ratios of subcortical/limbic areas for both transgender groups. Subsequent analysis revealed that this finding was driven by increased interhemispheric lobar connectivity weights (LCWs) in MtF transsexuals and decreased intrahemispheric LCWs in FtM patients. This was further reflected on a regional level, where the MtF group showed mostly increased local efficiencies and FtM patients decreased values. Importantly, these parameters separated each patient group from the remaining subjects for the majority of significant findings. This work complements previously established regional alterations with important findings of structural connectivity. Specifically, our data suggest that network parameters may reflect unique characteristics of transgender patients, whereas local physiological aspects have been shown to represent the transition from the biological sex to the actual gender identity. PMID:25217469

  8. Social Structure of Facebook Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Traud, Amanda L.; Mucha, Peter J.; Mason A. Porter

    2011-01-01

    We study the social structure of Facebook "friendship" networks at one hundred American colleges and universities at a single point in time, and we examine the roles of user attributes - gender, class year, major, high school, and residence - at these institutions. We investigate the influence of common attributes at the dyad level in terms of assortativity coefficients and regression models. We then examine larger-scale groupings by detecting communities algorithmically and comparing them to...

  9. Computing the structural influence matrix for biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Giulia; Cuba Samaniego, Christian; Franco, Elisa; Blanchini, Franco

    2016-06-01

    We consider the problem of identifying structural influences of external inputs on steady-state outputs in a biological network model. We speak of a structural influence if, upon a perturbation due to a constant input, the ensuing variation of the steady-state output value has the same sign as the input (positive influence), the opposite sign (negative influence), or is zero (perfect adaptation), for any feasible choice of the model parameters. All these signs and zeros can constitute a structural influence matrix, whose (i, j) entry indicates the sign of steady-state influence of the jth system variable on the ith variable (the output caused by an external persistent input applied to the jth variable). Each entry is structurally determinate if the sign does not depend on the choice of the parameters, but is indeterminate otherwise. In principle, determining the influence matrix requires exhaustive testing of the system steady-state behaviour in the widest range of parameter values. Here we show that, in a broad class of biological networks, the influence matrix can be evaluated with an algorithm that tests the system steady-state behaviour only at a finite number of points. This algorithm also allows us to assess the structural effect of any perturbation, such as variations of relevant parameters. Our method is applied to nontrivial models of biochemical reaction networks and population dynamics drawn from the literature, providing a parameter-free insight into the system dynamics. PMID:26395779

  10. Using biological networks to improve our understanding of infectious diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola J. Mulder

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Infectious diseases are the leading cause of death, particularly in developing countries. Although many drugs are available for treating the most common infectious diseases, in many cases the mechanism of action of these drugs or even their targets in the pathogen remain unknown. In addition, the key factors or processes in pathogens that facilitate infection and disease progression are often not well understood. Since proteins do not work in isolation, understanding biological systems requires a better understanding of the interconnectivity between proteins in different pathways and processes, which includes both physical and other functional interactions. Such biological networks can be generated within organisms or between organisms sharing a common environment using experimental data and computational predictions. Though different data sources provide different levels of accuracy, confidence in interactions can be measured using interaction scores. Connections between interacting proteins in biological networks can be represented as graphs and edges, and thus studied using existing algorithms and tools from graph theory. There are many different applications of biological networks, and here we discuss three such applications, specifically applied to the infectious disease tuberculosis, with its causative agent Mycobacterium tuberculosis and host, Homo sapiens. The applications include the use of the networks for function prediction, comparison of networks for evolutionary studies, and the generation and use of host–pathogen interaction networks.

  11. Potential Networks, Contagious Communities, and Understanding Social Network Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Schoenebeck, Grant

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we study how the network of agents adopting a particular technology relates to the structure of the underlying network over which the technology adoption spreads. We develop a model and show that the network of agents adopting a particular technology may have characteristics that differ significantly from the social network of agents over which the technology spreads. For example, the network induced by a cascade may have a heavy-tailed degree distribution even if the original n...

  12. Biological impacts and context of network theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almaas, E

    2007-01-05

    Many complex systems can be represented and analyzed as networks, and examples that have benefited from this approach span the natural sciences. For instance, we now know that systems as disparate as the World-Wide Web, the Internet, scientific collaborations, food webs, protein interactions and metabolism all have common features in their organization, the most salient of which are their scale-free connectivity distributions and their small-world behavior. The recent availability of large scale datasets that span the proteome or metabolome of an organism have made it possible to elucidate some of the organizational principles and rules that govern their function, robustness and evolution. We expect that combining the currently separate layers of information from gene regulatory-, signal transduction-, protein interaction- and metabolic networks will dramatically enhance our understanding of cellular function and dynamics.

  13. Course 10: Three Lectures on Biological Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnasco, M. O.

    1 Enzymatic networks. Proofreading knots: How DNA topoisomerases disentangle DNA 1.1 Length scales and energy scales 1.2 DNA topology 1.3 Topoisomerases 1.4 Knots and supercoils 1.5 Topological equilibrium 1.6 Can topoisomerases recognize topology? 1.7 Proposal: Kinetic proofreading 1.8 How to do it twice 1.9 The care and proofreading of knots 1.10 Suppression of supercoils 1.11 Problems and outlook 1.12 Disquisition 2 Gene expression networks. Methods for analysis of DNA chip experiments 2.1 The regulation of gene expression 2.2 Gene expression arrays 2.3 Analysis of array data 2.4 Some simplifying assumptions 2.5 Probeset analysis 2.6 Discussion 3 Neural and gene expression networks: Song-induced gene expression in the canary brain 3.1 The study of songbirds 3.2 Canary song 3.3 ZENK 3.4 The blush 3.5 Histological analysis 3.6 Natural vs. artificial 3.7 The Blush II: gAP 3.8 Meditation

  14. Structured population models in biology and epidemiology

    CERN Document Server

    Ruan, Shigui

    2008-01-01

    This book consists of six chapters written by leading researchers in mathematical biology. These chapters present recent and important developments in the study of structured population models in biology and epidemiology. Topics include population models structured by age, size, and spatial position; size-structured models for metapopulations, macroparasitc diseases, and prion proliferation; models for transmission of microparasites between host populations living on non-coincident spatial domains; spatiotemporal patterns of disease spread; method of aggregation of variables in population dynamics; and biofilm models. It is suitable as a textbook for a mathematical biology course or a summer school at the advanced undergraduate and graduate level. It can also serve as a reference book for researchers looking for either interesting and specific problems to work on or useful techniques and discussions of some particular problems.

  15. Optimizing Dynamical Network Structure for Pinning Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orouskhani, Yasin; Jalili, Mahdi; Yu, Xinghuo

    2016-04-01

    Controlling dynamics of a network from any initial state to a final desired state has many applications in different disciplines from engineering to biology and social sciences. In this work, we optimize the network structure for pinning control. The problem is formulated as four optimization tasks: i) optimizing the locations of driver nodes, ii) optimizing the feedback gains, iii) optimizing simultaneously the locations of driver nodes and feedback gains, and iv) optimizing the connection weights. A newly developed population-based optimization technique (cat swarm optimization) is used as the optimization method. In order to verify the methods, we use both real-world networks, and model scale-free and small-world networks. Extensive simulation results show that the optimal placement of driver nodes significantly outperforms heuristic methods including placing drivers based on various centrality measures (degree, betweenness, closeness and clustering coefficient). The pinning controllability is further improved by optimizing the feedback gains. We also show that one can significantly improve the controllability by optimizing the connection weights.

  16. Structure and Associated Biological Functions of Viroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steger, Gerhard; Perreault, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Mature viroids consist of a noncoding, covalently closed circular RNA that is able to autonomously infect respective host plants. Thus, they must utilize proteins of the host for most biological functions such as replication, processing, transport, and pathogenesis. Therefore, viroids can be regarded as minimal parasites of the host machinery. They have to present to the host machinery the appropriate signals based on either their sequence or their structure. Here, we summarize such sequence and structural features critical for the biological functions of viroids. PMID:26997592

  17. Distributed Structure-Searchable Toxicity Database Network

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Distributed Structure-Searchable Toxicity (DSSTox) Database Network provides a public forum for search and publishing downloadable, structure-searchable,...

  18. Non-Hermitian localization in biological networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Ariel; Hatano, Naomichi; Nelson, David R.

    2016-04-01

    We explore the spectra and localization properties of the N -site banded one-dimensional non-Hermitian random matrices that arise naturally in sparse neural networks. Approximately equal numbers of random excitatory and inhibitory connections lead to spatially localized eigenfunctions and an intricate eigenvalue spectrum in the complex plane that controls the spontaneous activity and induced response. A finite fraction of the eigenvalues condense onto the real or imaginary axes. For large N , the spectrum has remarkable symmetries not only with respect to reflections across the real and imaginary axes but also with respect to 90∘ rotations, with an unusual anisotropic divergence in the localization length near the origin. When chains with periodic boundary conditions become directed, with a systematic directional bias superimposed on the randomness, a hole centered on the origin opens up in the density-of-states in the complex plane. All states are extended on the rim of this hole, while the localized eigenvalues outside the hole are unchanged. The bias-dependent shape of this hole tracks the bias-independent contours of constant localization length. We treat the large-N limit by a combination of direct numerical diagonalization and using transfer matrices, an approach that allows us to exploit an electrostatic analogy connecting the "charges" embodied in the eigenvalue distribution with the contours of constant localization length. We show that similar results are obtained for more realistic neural networks that obey "Dale's law" (each site is purely excitatory or inhibitory) and conclude with perturbation theory results that describe the limit of large directional bias, when all states are extended. Related problems arise in random ecological networks and in chains of artificial cells with randomly coupled gene expression patterns.

  19. Tensegrity I. Cell structure and hierarchical systems biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, Donald E.

    2003-01-01

    In 1993, a Commentary in this journal described how a simple mechanical model of cell structure based on tensegrity architecture can help to explain how cell shape, movement and cytoskeletal mechanics are controlled, as well as how cells sense and respond to mechanical forces (J. Cell Sci. 104, 613-627). The cellular tensegrity model can now be revisited and placed in context of new advances in our understanding of cell structure, biological networks and mechanoregulation that have been made over the past decade. Recent work provides strong evidence to support the use of tensegrity by cells, and mathematical formulations of the model predict many aspects of cell behavior. In addition, development of the tensegrity theory and its translation into mathematical terms are beginning to allow us to define the relationship between mechanics and biochemistry at the molecular level and to attack the larger problem of biological complexity. Part I of this two-part article covers the evidence for cellular tensegrity at the molecular level and describes how this building system may provide a structural basis for the hierarchical organization of living systems--from molecule to organism. Part II, which focuses on how these structural networks influence information processing networks, appears in the next issue.

  20. A swarm intelligence framework for reconstructing gene networks: searching for biologically plausible architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentzoglanakis, Kyriakos; Poole, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the problem of reverse engineering the topology of gene regulatory networks from temporal gene expression data. We adopt a computational intelligence approach comprising swarm intelligence techniques, namely particle swarm optimization (PSO) and ant colony optimization (ACO). In addition, the recurrent neural network (RNN) formalism is employed for modeling the dynamical behavior of gene regulatory systems. More specifically, ACO is used for searching the discrete space of network architectures and PSO for searching the corresponding continuous space of RNN model parameters. We propose a novel solution construction process in the context of ACO for generating biologically plausible candidate architectures. The objective is to concentrate the search effort into areas of the structure space that contain architectures which are feasible in terms of their topological resemblance to real-world networks. The proposed framework is initially applied to the reconstruction of a small artificial network that has previously been studied in the context of gene network reverse engineering. Subsequently, we consider an artificial data set with added noise for reconstructing a subnetwork of the genetic interaction network of S. cerevisiae (yeast). Finally, the framework is applied to a real-world data set for reverse engineering the SOS response system of the bacterium Escherichia coli. Results demonstrate the relative advantage of utilizing problem-specific knowledge regarding biologically plausible structural properties of gene networks over conducting a problem-agnostic search in the vast space of network architectures. PMID:21576756

  1. An open system network for the biological sciences.

    OpenAIRE

    Springer, G K; Loch, J. L.; Patrick, T. B.

    1991-01-01

    A description of an open system, distributed computing environment for the Biological Sciences is presented. This system utilizes a transparent interface in a computer network using NCS to implement an application system for molecular biologists to perform various processing activities from their local workstation. This system accepts requests for the services of a remote database server, located across the network, to perform all of the database searches needed to support the activities of t...

  2. Social structure of Facebook networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traud, Amanda L.; Mucha, Peter J.; Porter, Mason A.

    2012-08-01

    We study the social structure of Facebook “friendship” networks at one hundred American colleges and universities at a single point in time, and we examine the roles of user attributes-gender, class year, major, high school, and residence-at these institutions. We investigate the influence of common attributes at the dyad level in terms of assortativity coefficients and regression models. We then examine larger-scale groupings by detecting communities algorithmically and comparing them to network partitions based on user characteristics. We thereby examine the relative importance of different characteristics at different institutions, finding for example that common high school is more important to the social organization of large institutions and that the importance of common major varies significantly between institutions. Our calculations illustrate how microscopic and macroscopic perspectives give complementary insights on the social organization at universities and suggest future studies to investigate such phenomena further.

  3. Quantitative Structure Pharmacokinetic Relationship Using Artificial Neural Network: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Singh

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR has become a tool for designing in various areas like drugs, food additive, Pesticides, biochemical reactant, environmental pollutant and toxic products. In QSAR biological activity can be related with physicochemical properties and in QSPkR (Quantitative Structure Pharmacokinetic Relationship, pharmacokinetic properties can be related with physicochemical properties, relation found in terms of quantity. A number of literature and review article have been published on Quantitative structure pharmacokinetic relationship. But prediction of human pharmacokinetic properties of known and unknown is much difficult job in pharmaceutical industry. Pharmacokinetic data of animal cannot be put straightforward. Artificial neural network (ANN is used to predict the pharmacokinetic properties. Artificial neural network has basic structure like biological brain and compose of neurons which are interconnected to each other. The present review not only compiles the literature of QSPkR using ANN, but gives detail about the physicochemical properties and artificial neural network.

  4. Social network structures and bank runs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shouwei; Li, Jiaheng

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigates the impact of social network structures of depositors on bank runs. The analyzed network structures include random networks, small-world networks and scale-free networks. Simulation results show that the probability of bank run occurrence in random networks is larger than that in small-world networks, but the probability of bank run occurrence in scale-free networks drops from the highest to the lowest among the three types of network structures with the increase of the proportion of impatient depositors. The average degree of depositor networks has a significant impact on bank runs, but this impact is related to the proportion of impatient depositors and the confidence levels of depositors in banks.

  5. Novel amphiphilic networks for biological use

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Toman, Luděk; Janata, Miroslav; Spěváček, Jiří; Sikora, Antonín; Pleštil, Josef; Michálek, Jiří; Dvořánková, B.; Vlček, Petr; Látalová, Petra; Masař, Bohumil

    Prague: Czech Society for New Materials and Technologies, 2005. Poster Session II. [European Congress on Advanced Materials and Processes. 5.9.2005-8.9.2005, Prague] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/04/1050 Keywords : polyisobutylene * poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) * amphiphilic networks Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry http://webdb.dgm.de/dgm_lit/prg/FMPro?-db=w%5fprogram&- format =prog%5fpaper%5fresults.htm&-lay=standard&TB=%3d%3d688&tgb%5fsymposium%5fund%5fnr=B14%20Engineering%20and%20Design%20of%20Biomedical%20Materials&-max=20&-skip=20&-token.0=688&-token.1=B14%20Engineering%20and%20Design%20of%20Biomedical%20Materials&-find=

  6. From biological and social network metaphors to coupled bio-social wireless networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Christopher L; Channakeshava, Karthik; Eubank, Stephen; Anil Kumar, V S; Marathe, Madhav V

    2011-01-01

    Biological and social analogies have been long applied to complex systems. Inspiration has been drawn from biological solutions to solve problems in engineering products and systems, ranging from Velcro to camouflage to robotics to adaptive and learning computing methods. In this paper, we present an overview of recent advances in understanding biological systems as networks and use this understanding to design and analyse wireless communication networks. We expand on two applications, namely cognitive sensing and control and wireless epidemiology. We discuss how our work in these two applications is motivated by biological metaphors. We believe that recent advances in computing and communications coupled with advances in health and social sciences raise the possibility of studying coupled bio-social communication networks. We argue that we can better utilise the advances in our understanding of one class of networks to better our understanding of the other. PMID:21643462

  7. Eddy Current Probe for Biological Structures Identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new eddy current probe for conductivity measurement of biological structures was presented. The probe operation principle is based on the differential pick-up. After theoretical analysis results of experiments have been presented. For experiments fruits and meat, have been used. (author)

  8. Xanthane sesquiterpenoids: structure, synthesis and biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasas, Andrea; Hohmann, Judit

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this review is to survey the naturally occurring xanthanes and xanthanolides, their structures, biological activities, structure–activity relationships and synthesis. There has been no comprehensive review of this topic previously. On the basis of 126 references, 112 compounds are summarized. PMID:21321751

  9. Structural Equivalence in a Journal Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doreian, Patrick; Fararo, Thomas J.

    1985-01-01

    Techniques used in contemporary social network analysis are applied to citation data for a network of journals from three time periods--1970/71, 1975/76, 1980/81. Blocks or positions in journal network based on structural equivalence correspond closely to categorization by aims and objectives. Hypotheses concerning journal networks are advanced.…

  10. Towards the understanding of network information processing in biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vijay

    Living organisms perform incredibly well in detecting a signal present in the environment. This information processing is achieved near optimally and quite reliably, even though the sources of signals are highly variable and complex. The work in the last few decades has given us a fair understanding of how individual signal processing units like neurons and cell receptors process signals, but the principles of collective information processing on biological networks are far from clear. Information processing in biological networks, like the brain, metabolic circuits, cellular-signaling circuits, etc., involves complex interactions among a large number of units (neurons, receptors). The combinatorially large number of states such a system can exist in makes it impossible to study these systems from the first principles, starting from the interactions between the basic units. The principles of collective information processing on such complex networks can be identified using coarse graining approaches. This could provide insights into the organization and function of complex biological networks. Here I study models of biological networks using continuum dynamics, renormalization, maximum likelihood estimation and information theory. Such coarse graining approaches identify features that are essential for certain processes performed by underlying biological networks. We find that long-range connections in the brain allow for global scale feature detection in a signal. These also suppress the noise and remove any gaps present in the signal. Hierarchical organization with long-range connections leads to large-scale connectivity at low synapse numbers. Time delays can be utilized to separate a mixture of signals with temporal scales. Our observations indicate that the rules in multivariate signal processing are quite different from traditional single unit signal processing.

  11. Spatial network structure and amphibian persistence in stochastic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuna, Miguel A; Gómez-Rodríguez, Carola; Bascompte, Jordi

    2006-01-01

    In the past few years, the framework of complex networks has provided new insight into the organization and function of biological systems. However, in spite of its potential, spatial ecology has not yet fully incorporated tools and concepts from network theory. In the present study, we identify a large spatial network of temporary ponds, which are used as breeding sites by several amphibian species. We investigate how the structural properties of the spatial network change as a function of the amphibian dispersal distance and the hydric conditions. Our measures of network topology suggest that the observed spatial structure of ponds is robust to drought (compared with similar random structures), allowing the movement of amphibians to and between flooded ponds, and hence, increasing the probability of reproduction even in dry seasons. PMID:16777733

  12. Network structure exploration in networks with node attributes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi; Wang, Xiaolong; Bu, Junzhao; Tang, Buzhou; Xiang, Xin

    2016-05-01

    Complex networks provide a powerful way to represent complex systems and have been widely studied during the past several years. One of the most important tasks of network analysis is to detect structures (also called structural regularities) embedded in networks by determining group number and group partition. Most of network structure exploration models only consider network links. However, in real world networks, nodes may have attributes that are useful for network structure exploration. In this paper, we propose a novel Bayesian nonparametric (BNP) model to explore structural regularities in networks with node attributes, called Bayesian nonparametric attribute (BNPA) model. This model does not only take full advantage of both links between nodes and node attributes for group partition via shared hidden variables, but also determine group number automatically via the Bayesian nonparametric theory. Experiments conducted on a number of real and synthetic networks show that our BNPA model is able to automatically explore structural regularities in networks with node attributes and is competitive with other state-of-the-art models.

  13. Biologically plausible multi-dimensional reinforcement learning in neural networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rombouts, J.O.; Ooyen, A. van; Roelfsema, P.R.; Bohte, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    How does the brain learn to map multi-dimensional sensory inputs to multi-dimensional motor outputs when it can only observe single rewards for the coordinated outputs of the whole network of neurons that make up the brain? We introduce Multi-AGREL, a novel, biologically plausible multi-layer neural

  14. Discovering Networks of Perturbed Biological Processes in Hepatocyte Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasher, Christopher D.; Rajagopalan, Padmavathy; Murali, T. M.

    2011-01-01

    The liver plays a vital role in glucose homeostasis, the synthesis of bile acids and the detoxification of foreign substances. Liver culture systems are widely used to test adverse effects of drugs and environmental toxicants. The two most prevalent liver culture systems are hepatocyte monolayers (HMs) and collagen sandwiches (CS). Despite their wide use, comprehensive transcriptional programs and interaction networks in these culture systems have not been systematically investigated. We integrated an existing temporal transcriptional dataset for HM and CS cultures of rat hepatocytes with a functional interaction network of rat genes. We aimed to exploit the functional interactions to identify statistically significant linkages between perturbed biological processes. To this end, we developed a novel approach to compute Contextual Biological Process Linkage Networks (CBPLNs). CBPLNs revealed numerous meaningful connections between different biological processes and gene sets, which we were successful in interpreting within the context of liver metabolism. Multiple phenomena captured by CBPLNs at the process level such as regulation, downstream effects, and feedback loops have well described counterparts at the gene and protein level. CBPLNs reveal high-level linkages between pathways and processes, making the identification of important biological trends more tractable than through interactions between individual genes and molecules alone. Our approach may provide a new route to explore, analyze, and understand cellular responses to internal and external cues within the context of the intricate networks of molecular interactions that control cellular behavior. PMID:21245926

  15. Biologically-inspired Learning in Pulsed Neural Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehmann, Torsten; Woodburn, Robin

    1999-01-01

    Self-learning chips to implement many popular ANN (artificial neural network) algorithms are very difficult to design. We explain why this is so and say what lessons previous work teaches us in the design of self-learning systems. We offer a contribution to the `biologically-inspired' approach...

  16. Biologically-inspired Learning in Pulsed Neural Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehmann, Torsten; Woodburn, Robin

    Self-learning chips to implement many popular ANN (artificial neural network) algorithms are very difficult to design. We explain why this is so and say what lessons previous work teaches us in the design of self-learning systems. We offer a contribution to the `biologically-inspired' approach...

  17. Exploitation of complex network topology for link prediction in biological interactomes

    KAUST Repository

    Alanis Lobato, Gregorio

    2014-06-01

    The network representation of the interactions between proteins and genes allows for a holistic perspective of the complex machinery underlying the living cell. However, the large number of interacting entities within the cell makes network construction a daunting and arduous task, prone to errors and missing information. Fortunately, the structure of biological networks is not different from that of other complex systems, such as social networks, the world-wide web or power grids, for which growth models have been proposed to better understand their structure and function. This means that we can design tools based on these models in order to exploit the topology of biological interactomes with the aim to construct more complete and reliable maps of the cell. In this work, we propose three novel and powerful approaches for the prediction of interactions in biological networks and conclude that it is possible to mine the topology of these complex system representations and produce reliable and biologically meaningful information that enriches the datasets to which we have access today.

  18. Discriminating different classes of biological networks by analyzing the graphs spectra distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, Daniel Yasumasa; Ferreira, Carlos Eduardo; Fujita, André

    2012-01-01

    The brain's structural and functional systems, protein-protein interaction, and gene networks are examples of biological systems that share some features of complex networks, such as highly connected nodes, modularity, and small-world topology. Recent studies indicate that some pathologies present topological network alterations relative to norms seen in the general population. Therefore, methods to discriminate the processes that generate the different classes of networks (e.g., normal and disease) might be crucial for the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of the disease. It is known that several topological properties of a network (graph) can be described by the distribution of the spectrum of its adjacency matrix. Moreover, large networks generated by the same random process have the same spectrum distribution, allowing us to use it as a "fingerprint". Based on this relationship, we introduce and propose the entropy of a graph spectrum to measure the "uncertainty" of a random graph and the Kullback-Leibl...

  19. Global Electricity Trade Network: Structures and Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Ling; Jia, Xiaoping; Chiu, Anthony S F; Xu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Nations increasingly trade electricity, and understanding the structure of the global power grid can help identify nations that are critical for its reliability. This study examines the global grid as a network with nations as nodes and international electricity trade as links. We analyze the structure of the global electricity trade network and find that the network consists of four sub-networks, and provide a detailed analysis of the largest network, Eurasia. Russia, China, Ukraine, and Azerbaijan have high betweenness measures in the Eurasian sub-network, indicating the degrees of centrality of the positions they hold. The analysis reveals that the Eurasian sub-network consists of seven communities based on the network structure. We find that the communities do not fully align with geographical proximity, and that the present international electricity trade in the Eurasian sub-network causes an approximately 11 million additional tons of CO2 emissions. PMID:27504825

  20. Global Electricity Trade Network: Structures and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Ling; Jia, Xiaoping; Chiu, Anthony S. F.; Xu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Nations increasingly trade electricity, and understanding the structure of the global power grid can help identify nations that are critical for its reliability. This study examines the global grid as a network with nations as nodes and international electricity trade as links. We analyze the structure of the global electricity trade network and find that the network consists of four sub-networks, and provide a detailed analysis of the largest network, Eurasia. Russia, China, Ukraine, and Azerbaijan have high betweenness measures in the Eurasian sub-network, indicating the degrees of centrality of the positions they hold. The analysis reveals that the Eurasian sub-network consists of seven communities based on the network structure. We find that the communities do not fully align with geographical proximity, and that the present international electricity trade in the Eurasian sub-network causes an approximately 11 million additional tons of CO2 emissions. PMID:27504825

  1. Biologically Inspired Optimization of Building District Heating Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leiming Shang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we show that a biologically inspired model can be successfully applied to problems of building optimal district heating network. The model is based on physiological observations of the true slime mold Physarumpolycephalum, but can also be used for path-finding in the complicated networks of mazes and road maps. A strategy of optimally building heating distribution network was guided by the model and a well-tuned ant colony algorithm and genetic algorithm. The results indicate that although there are not large-scale efficiency savings to be made, the biologically inspired amoeboid movement model is capable of finding results of equal or better optimality than a comparable ant colony algorithm and genetic algorithm.

  2. A Reconfigurable and Biologically Inspired Paradigm for Computation Using Network-On-Chip and Spiking Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Harkin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available FPGA devices have emerged as a popular platform for the rapid prototyping of biological Spiking Neural Networks (SNNs applications, offering the key requirement of reconfigurability. However, FPGAs do not efficiently realise the biologically plausible neuron and synaptic models of SNNs, and current FPGA routing structures cannot accommodate the high levels of interneuron connectivity inherent in complex SNNs. This paper highlights and discusses the current challenges of implementing scalable SNNs on reconfigurable FPGAs. The paper proposes a novel field programmable neural network architecture (EMBRACE, incorporating low-power analogue spiking neurons, interconnected using a Network-on-Chip architecture. Results on the evaluation of the EMBRACE architecture using the XOR benchmark problem are presented, and the performance of the architecture is discussed. The paper also discusses the adaptability of the EMBRACE architecture in supporting fault tolerant computing.

  3. Centrality measures for networks with community structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Naveen; Singh, Anurag; Cherifi, Hocine

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the network structure, and finding out the influential nodes is a challenging issue in large networks. Identifying the most influential nodes in a network can be useful in many applications like immunization of nodes in case of epidemic spreading, during intentional attacks on complex networks. A lot of research is being done to devise centrality measures which could efficiently identify the most influential nodes in a network. There are two major approaches to this problem: On one hand, deterministic strategies that exploit knowledge about the overall network topology, while on the other end, random strategies are completely agnostic about the network structure. Centrality measures that can deal with a limited knowledge of the network structure are of prime importance. Indeed, in practice, information about the global structure of the overall network is rarely available or hard to acquire. Even if available, the structure of the network might be too large that it is too much computationally expensive to calculate global centrality measures. To that end, a centrality measure is proposed here that requires information only at the community level. Indeed, most of the real-world networks exhibit a community structure that can be exploited efficiently to discover the influential nodes. We performed a comparative evaluation of prominent global deterministic strategies together with stochastic strategies, an available and the proposed deterministic community-based strategy. Effectiveness of the proposed method is evaluated by performing experiments on synthetic and real-world networks with community structure in the case of immunization of nodes for epidemic control.

  4. Mesoscopic Structures Reveal the Network Between the Layers of Multiplex Datasets

    CERN Document Server

    Iacovacci, Jacopo; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2015-01-01

    Multiplex networks describe a large variety of complex systems, whose elements (nodes) can be connected by different types of interactions forming different layers (networks) of the multiplex. Multiplex networks include social networks, transportation networks or biological networks in the cell or in the brain. Extracting relevant information from these networks is of crucial importance for solving challenging inference problems and for characterizing the multiplex networks microscopic and mesoscopic structure. Here we propose an information theory method to extract the network between the layers of multiplex datasets, forming a "network of networks". We build an indicator function, based on the entropy of network ensembles, to characterize the mesoscopic similarities between the layers of a multiplex network and we use clustering techniques to characterize the communities present in this network of networks. We apply the proposed method to study the Multiplex Collaboration Network formed by scientists collab...

  5. The Structure and Dynamics of Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Newman, Mark; Watts, Duncan J

    2011-01-01

    From the Internet to networks of friendship, disease transmission, and even terrorism, the concept--and the reality--of networks has come to pervade modern society. But what exactly is a network? What different types of networks are there? Why are they interesting, and what can they tell us? In recent years, scientists from a range of fields--including mathematics, physics, computer science, sociology, and biology--have been pursuing these questions and building a new "science of networks." This book brings together for the first time a set of seminal articles representing research from across

  6. Structural Approaches to Sequence Evolution Molecules, Networks, Populations

    CERN Document Server

    Bastolla, Ugo; Roman, H. Eduardo; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2007-01-01

    Structural requirements constrain the evolution of biological entities at all levels, from macromolecules to their networks, right up to populations of biological organisms. Classical models of molecular evolution, however, are focused at the level of the symbols - the biological sequence - rather than that of their resulting structure. Now recent advances in understanding the thermodynamics of macromolecules, the topological properties of gene networks, the organization and mutation capabilities of genomes, and the structure of populations make it possible to incorporate these key elements into a broader and deeply interdisciplinary view of molecular evolution. This book gives an account of such a new approach, through clear tutorial contributions by leading scientists specializing in the different fields involved.

  7. Glycosides from Marine Sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae: Structures, Taxonomical Distribution, Biological Activities and Biological Roles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin A. Stonik

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Literature data about glycosides from sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae are reviewed. Structural diversity, biological activities, taxonomic distribution and biological functions of these natural products are discussed.

  8. Glycosides from Marine Sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae): Structures, Taxonomical Distribution, Biological Activities and Biological Roles

    OpenAIRE

    Valentin A. Stonik; Makarieva, Tatyana N.; Vladimir I. Kalinin; Krasokhin, Vladimir B.; Ivanchina, Natalia V.

    2012-01-01

    Literature data about glycosides from sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae) are reviewed. Structural diversity, biological activities, taxonomic distribution and biological functions of these natural products are discussed.

  9. Glycosides from marine sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae): structures, taxonomical distribution, biological activities and biological roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinin, Vladimir I; Ivanchina, Natalia V; Krasokhin, Vladimir B; Makarieva, Tatyana N; Stonik, Valentin A

    2012-08-01

    Literature data about glycosides from sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae) are reviewed. Structural diversity, biological activities, taxonomic distribution and biological functions of these natural products are discussed. PMID:23015769

  10. An new representation for interconnection network structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丽华; 陈建二; 陈松乔; 贾维嘉

    2002-01-01

    An important theoretic interest is to study the relations between different interconnection networks, and to compare the capability and performance of the network structures. The most popular way to do the investigation is network emulation. Based on the classical voltage graph theory, the authors develop a new representation scheme for interconnection network structures. The new approach is a combination of algebraic methods and combinatorial methods. The results demonstrate that the voltage graph theory is a powerful tool for representing well-known interconnection networks and in implementing optimal network emulation algorithms, and in particular, show that all popular interconnection networks have very simple and intuitive representations under the new scheme. The new representation scheme also offers powerful tools for the study of network routings and emulations. For example, we present very simple constructions for optimal network emulations from the cube-connected cycles networks to the butterfly networks, and from the butterfly networks to the hypercube networks. Compared with the most popular way of network emulation, this new scheme is intuitive and easy to realize, and easy to apply to other network structures.

  11. Taxonomies of networks from community structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onnela, Jukka-Pekka; Fenn, Daniel J.; Reid, Stephen; Porter, Mason A.; Mucha, Peter J.; Fricker, Mark D.; Jones, Nick S.

    2012-09-01

    The study of networks has become a substantial interdisciplinary endeavor that encompasses myriad disciplines in the natural, social, and information sciences. Here we introduce a framework for constructing taxonomies of networks based on their structural similarities. These networks can arise from any of numerous sources: They can be empirical or synthetic, they can arise from multiple realizations of a single process (either empirical or synthetic), they can represent entirely different systems in different disciplines, etc. Because mesoscopic properties of networks are hypothesized to be important for network function, we base our comparisons on summaries of network community structures. Although we use a specific method for uncovering network communities, much of the introduced framework is independent of that choice. After introducing the framework, we apply it to construct a taxonomy for 746 networks and demonstrate that our approach usefully identifies similar networks. We also construct taxonomies within individual categories of networks, and we thereby expose nontrivial structure. For example, we create taxonomies for similarity networks constructed from both political voting data and financial data. We also construct network taxonomies to compare the social structures of 100 Facebook networks and the growth structures produced by different types of fungi.

  12. Impact of environmental inputs on reverse-engineering approach to network structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buchanan-Wollaston Vicky

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uncovering complex network structures from a biological system is one of the main topic in system biology. The network structures can be inferred by the dynamical Bayesian network or Granger causality, but neither techniques have seriously taken into account the impact of environmental inputs. Results With considerations of natural rhythmic dynamics of biological data, we propose a system biology approach to reveal the impact of environmental inputs on network structures. We first represent the environmental inputs by a harmonic oscillator and combine them with Granger causality to identify environmental inputs and then uncover the causal network structures. We also generalize it to multiple harmonic oscillators to represent various exogenous influences. This system approach is extensively tested with toy models and successfully applied to a real biological network of microarray data of the flowering genes of the model plant Arabidopsis Thaliana. The aim is to identify those genes that are directly affected by the presence of the sunlight and uncover the interactive network structures associating with flowering metabolism. Conclusion We demonstrate that environmental inputs are crucial for correctly inferring network structures. Harmonic causal method is proved to be a powerful technique to detect environment inputs and uncover network structures, especially when the biological data exhibit periodic oscillations.

  13. Immunization of networks with community structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, an efficient method to immunize modular networks (i.e. networks with community structure) is proposed. The immunization of networks aims at fragmenting networks into small parts with a small number of removed nodes. Its applications include prevention of epidemic spreading, protection against intentional attacks on networks, and conservation of ecosystems. Although preferential immunization of hubs is efficient, good immunization strategies for modular networks have not been established. On the basis of an immunization strategy based on eigenvector centrality, we develop an analytical framework for immunizing modular networks. To this end, we quantify the contribution of each node to the connectivity in a coarse-grained network among modules. We verify the effectiveness of the proposed method by applying it to model and real networks with modular structure.

  14. Landscape Structure and Biological Control in Agroecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Thies, Carsten; Tscharntke, Teja

    1999-01-01

    Biological pest control has primarily relied on local improvements in populations of natural enemies, but landscape structure may also be important. This is shown here with experiments at different spatial scales using the rape pollen beetle (Meligethes aeneus), an important pest on oilseed rape (Brassica napus). The presence of old field margin strips along rape fields was associated with increased mortality of pollen beetles resulting from parasitism and adjacent, large, old fallow habit...

  15. 2004 Reversible Associations in Structure & Molecular Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward Eisenstein Nancy Ryan Gray

    2005-03-23

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on 2004 Gordon Research Conference on Reversible Associations in Structure & Molecular Biology was held at Four Points Sheraton, CA, 1/25-30/2004. The Conference was well attended with 82 participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students.

  16. Pattern recognition and classification of images of biological macromolecules using artificial neural networks

    OpenAIRE

    Marabini, Roberto; Carazo García, José María

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this work was to analyze an image data set and to detect the structural variability within this set. Two algorithms for pattern recognition based on neural networks are presented, one that performs an unsupervised classification (the self-organizing map) and the other a supervised classification (the learning vector quantization). The approach has a direct impact in current strategies for structural determination from electron microscopic images of biological macromolecules. In th...

  17. Imposing early stability to ecological and biological networks through Evolutionary Network Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Ferrarini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The stability analysis of the dynamical networks is a well-studied topic, both in ecology and in biology. In this work, I adopt a different perspective: instead of analysing the stability of an arbitrary ecological network, I seek here to impose such stability as soon as possible (or, contrariwise, as late as possible during network dynamics. Evolutionary Network Control (ENC is a theoretical and methodological framework aimed to the control of ecological and biological networks by coupling network dynamics and evolutionary modelling. ENC covers several topics of network control, for instance a the global control from inside and b from outside, c the local (step-by-step control, and the computation of: d control success, e feasibility, and f degree of uncertainty. In this work, I demonstrate that ENC can also be employed to impose early (but, also, late stability to arbitrary ecological and biological networks, and provide an applicative example based on the nonlinear, widely-used, Lotka-Volterra model.

  18. Landscape structure and biological control in agroecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thies; Tscharntke

    1999-08-01

    Biological pest control has primarily relied on local improvements in populations of natural enemies, but landscape structure may also be important. This is shown here with experiments at different spatial scales using the rape pollen beetle (Meligethes aeneus), an important pest on oilseed rape (Brassica napus). The presence of old field margin strips along rape fields was associated with increased mortality of pollen beetles resulting from parasitism and adjacent, large, old fallow habitats had an even greater effect. In structurally complex landscapes, parasitism was higher and crop damage was lower than in simple landscapes with a high percentage of agricultural use. PMID:10436158

  19. Detecting modules in biological networks by edge weight clustering and entropy significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecca, Paola; Re, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Detection of the modular structure of biological networks is of interest to researchers adopting a systems perspective for the analysis of omics data. Computational systems biology has provided a rich array of methods for network clustering. To date, the majority of approaches address this task through a network node classification based on topological or external quantifiable properties of network nodes. Conversely, numerical properties of network edges are underused, even though the information content which can be associated with network edges has augmented due to steady advances in molecular biology technology over the last decade. Properly accounting for network edges in the development of clustering approaches can become crucial to improve quantitative interpretation of omics data, finally resulting in more biologically plausible models. In this study, we present a novel technique for network module detection, named WG-Cluster (Weighted Graph CLUSTERing). WG-Cluster's notable features, compared to current approaches, lie in: (1) the simultaneous exploitation of network node and edge weights to improve the biological interpretability of the connected components detected, (2) the assessment of their statistical significance, and (3) the identification of emerging topological properties in the detected connected components. WG-Cluster utilizes three major steps: (i) an unsupervised version of k-means edge-based algorithm detects sub-graphs with similar edge weights, (ii) a fast-greedy algorithm detects connected components which are then scored and selected according to the statistical significance of their scores, and (iii) an analysis of the convolution between sub-graph mean edge weight and connected component score provides a summarizing view of the connected components. WG-Cluster can be applied to directed and undirected networks of different types of interacting entities and scales up to large omics data sets. Here, we show that WG-Cluster can be

  20. The impact of network biology in pharmacology and toxicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagiotou, Gianni; Taboureau, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    With the need to investigate alternative approaches and emerging technologies in order to increase drug efficacy and reduce adverse drug effects, network biology offers a novel way of approaching drug discovery by considering the effect of a molecule and protein's function in a global physiological...... environment. By studying drug action across multiple scales of complexity, from molecular to cellular and tissue level, network-based computational methods have the potential to improve our understanding of the impact of chemicals in human health. In this review we present the available large-scale databases...

  1. A comparative analysis on computational methods for fitting an ERGM to biological network data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudipta Saha

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Exponential random graph models (ERGM based on graph theory are useful in studying global biological network structure using its local properties. However, computational methods for fitting such models are sensitive to the type, structure and the number of the local features of a network under study. In this paper, we compared computational methods for fitting an ERGM with local features of different types and structures. Two commonly used methods, such as the Markov Chain Monte Carlo Maximum Likelihood Estimation and the Maximum Pseudo Likelihood Estimation are considered for estimating the coefficients of network attributes. We compared the estimates of observed network to our random simulated network using both methods under ERGM. The motivation was to ascertain the extent to which an observed network would deviate from a randomly simulated network if the physical numbers of attributes were approximately same. Cut-off points of some common attributes of interest for different order of nodes were determined through simulations. We implemented our method to a known regulatory network database of Escherichia coli (E. coli.

  2. FastGGM: An Efficient Algorithm for the Inference of Gaussian Graphical Model in Biological Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Ren, Zhao; Ding, Ying; Fang, Zhou; Sun, Zhe; MacDonald, Matthew L; Sweet, Robert A; Wang, Jieru; Chen, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Biological networks provide additional information for the analysis of human diseases, beyond the traditional analysis that focuses on single variables. Gaussian graphical model (GGM), a probability model that characterizes the conditional dependence structure of a set of random variables by a graph, has wide applications in the analysis of biological networks, such as inferring interaction or comparing differential networks. However, existing approaches are either not statistically rigorous or are inefficient for high-dimensional data that include tens of thousands of variables for making inference. In this study, we propose an efficient algorithm to implement the estimation of GGM and obtain p-value and confidence interval for each edge in the graph, based on a recent proposal by Ren et al., 2015. Through simulation studies, we demonstrate that the algorithm is faster by several orders of magnitude than the current implemented algorithm for Ren et al. without losing any accuracy. Then, we apply our algorithm to two real data sets: transcriptomic data from a study of childhood asthma and proteomic data from a study of Alzheimer's disease. We estimate the global gene or protein interaction networks for the disease and healthy samples. The resulting networks reveal interesting interactions and the differential networks between cases and controls show functional relevance to the diseases. In conclusion, we provide a computationally fast algorithm to implement a statistically sound procedure for constructing Gaussian graphical model and making inference with high-dimensional biological data. The algorithm has been implemented in an R package named "FastGGM". PMID:26872036

  3. Modeling Cancer Metastasis using Global, Quantitative and Integrative Network Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoof, Erwin; Erler, Janine

    understanding of molecular processes which are fundamental to tumorigenesis. In Article 1, we propose a novel framework for how cancer mutations can be studied by taking into account their effect at the protein network level. In Article 2, we demonstrate how global, quantitative data on phosphorylation dynamics...... can be generated using MS, and how this can be modeled using a computational framework for deciphering kinase-substrate dynamics. This framework is described in depth in Article 3, and covers the design of KinomeXplorer, which allows the prediction of kinases responsible for modulating observed...... phosphorylation dynamics in a given biological sample. In Chapter III, we move into Integrative Network Biology, where, by combining two fundamental technologies (MS & NGS), we can obtain more in-depth insights into the links between cellular phenotype and genotype. Article 4 describes the proof...

  4. Capacitive Structures for Gas and Biological Sensing

    KAUST Repository

    Sapsanis, Christos

    2015-04-01

    The semiconductor industry was benefited by the advances in technology in the last decades. This fact has an impact on the sensors field, where the simple transducer was evolved into smart miniaturized multi-functional microsystems. However, commercially available gas and biological sensors are mostly bulky, expensive, and power-hungry, which act as obstacles to mass use. The aim of this work is gas and biological sensing using capacitive structures. Capacitive sensors were selected due to its design simplicity, low fabrication cost, and no DC power consumption. In the first part, the dominant structure among interdigitated electrodes (IDEs), fractal curves (Peano and Hilbert) and Archimedean spiral was investigated from capacitance density perspective. The investigation consists of geometrical formula calculations, COMSOL Multiphysics simulations and cleanroom fabrication of the capacitors on a silicon substrate. Moreover, low-cost fabrication on flexible plastic PET substrate was conducted outside cleanroom with rapid prototyping using a maskless laser etching. The second part contains the humidity, Volatile Organic compounds (VOCs) and Ammonia sensing of polymers, Polyimide and Nafion, and metal-organic framework (MOF), Cu(bdc)2.xH2O using IDEs and tested in an automated gas setup for experiment control and data extraction. The last part includes the biological sensing of C - reactive protein (CRP) quantification, which is considered as a biomarker of being prone to cardiac diseases and Bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein quantification, which is used as a reference for quantifying unknown proteins.

  5. Analysis of complex networks from biology to linguistics

    CERN Document Server

    Dehmer, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Mathematical problems such as graph theory problems are of increasing importance for the analysis of modelling data in biomedical research such as in systems biology, neuronal network modelling etc. This book follows a new approach of including graph theory from a mathematical perspective with specific applications of graph theory in biomedical and computational sciences. The book is written by renowned experts in the field and offers valuable background information for a wide audience.

  6. Facile: a command-line network compiler for systems biology

    OpenAIRE

    Ollivier Julien F; Siso-Nadal Fernando; Swain Peter S

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background A goal of systems biology is the quantitative modelling of biochemical networks. Yet for many biochemical systems, parameter values and even the existence of interactions between some chemical species are unknown. It is therefore important to be able to easily investigate the effects of adding or removing reactions and to easily perform a bifurcation analysis, which shows the qualitative dynamics of a model for a range of parameter values. Results We present Facile, a Perl...

  7. Matching Community Structure Across Online Social Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of community structure in networks is a problem of considerable interest in recent years. In online social networks, often times, users are simultaneously involved in multiple social media sites, some of which share common social relationships. It is of great interest to uncover a shared community structure across these networks. However, in reality, users typically identify themselves with different usernames across social media sites. This creates a great difficulty in detecting the community structure. In this paper, we explore several approaches for community detection across online social networks with limited knowledge of username alignment across the networks. We refer to the known alignment of usernames as seeds. We investigate strategies for seed selection and its impact on networks with a different fraction of overlapping vertices. The goal is to study the interplay between network topologies and seed selection strategies, and to understand how it affects the detected community structu...

  8. Structural Dissection for Controlling Complex Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Wen-Xu; Zhao, Chen; Liu, Yang-Yu; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Controlling complex networked systems has been a central goal in different fields and understanding controllability of complex networks has been at the forefront of contemporary science. Despite the recent progress in the development of controllability theories for complex networks, we continue to lack efficient tools to fully understand the effect of network topology and interaction strengths among nodes on controllability. Here we establish a framework to discern the significance of links and nodes for controlling general complex networks in a simple way based on local information. A dissection process is offered by the framework to probe and classify nodes and links completely, giving rise to a criterion for strong structural controllability. Analytical results indicate phase transitions associated with link and node categories, and strong structural controllability. Applying the tools to real networks demonstrate that real technological networks are strong structurally controllable, whereas most of real s...

  9. Structural Interfaces and Attachments in Biology

    CERN Document Server

    Birman, Victor; Genin, Guy

    2013-01-01

    Attachment of dissimilar materials in engineering and surgical practice is a perennial challenge. Bimaterial attachment sites are common locations for injury, repeated injury, and mechanical failure. Nature presents several highly effective solutions to the challenge of bimaterial attachment that differ from those found in engineering practice. Structural Interfaces and Attachments in Biology describes the attachment of dissimilar materials from multiple perspectives. The text will simultaneously elucidate natural bimaterial attachments and outline engineering principles underlying successful attachments to the communities of tissue engineers and surgeons. Included an in-depth analysis of the biology of attachments in the body and mechanisms by which robust attachments are formed, a review of current concepts of attaching dissimilar materials in surgical practice and a discussion of bioengineering approaches that are currently being developed. This book also: Provides the first comprehensive treatment of phys...

  10. NetDecoder: a network biology platform that decodes context-specific biological networks and gene activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha, Edroaldo Lummertz; Ung, Choong Yong; McGehee, Cordelia D.; Correia, Cristina; Li, Hu

    2016-01-01

    The sequential chain of interactions altering the binary state of a biomolecule represents the ‘information flow’ within a cellular network that determines phenotypic properties. Given the lack of computational tools to dissect context-dependent networks and gene activities, we developed NetDecoder, a network biology platform that models context-dependent information flows using pairwise phenotypic comparative analyses of protein–protein interactions. Using breast cancer, dyslipidemia and Alzheimer's disease as case studies, we demonstrate NetDecoder dissects subnetworks to identify key players significantly impacting cell behaviour specific to a given disease context. We further show genes residing in disease-specific subnetworks are enriched in disease-related signalling pathways and information flow profiles, which drive the resulting disease phenotypes. We also devise a novel scoring scheme to quantify key genes—network routers, which influence many genes, key targets, which are influenced by many genes, and high impact genes, which experience a significant change in regulation. We show the robustness of our results against parameter changes. Our network biology platform includes freely available source code (http://www.NetDecoder.org) for researchers to explore genome-wide context-dependent information flow profiles and key genes, given a set of genes of particular interest and transcriptome data. More importantly, NetDecoder will enable researchers to uncover context-dependent drug targets. PMID:26975659

  11. NetDecoder: a network biology platform that decodes context-specific biological networks and gene activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha, Edroaldo Lummertz; Ung, Choong Yong; McGehee, Cordelia D; Correia, Cristina; Li, Hu

    2016-06-01

    The sequential chain of interactions altering the binary state of a biomolecule represents the 'information flow' within a cellular network that determines phenotypic properties. Given the lack of computational tools to dissect context-dependent networks and gene activities, we developed NetDecoder, a network biology platform that models context-dependent information flows using pairwise phenotypic comparative analyses of protein-protein interactions. Using breast cancer, dyslipidemia and Alzheimer's disease as case studies, we demonstrate NetDecoder dissects subnetworks to identify key players significantly impacting cell behaviour specific to a given disease context. We further show genes residing in disease-specific subnetworks are enriched in disease-related signalling pathways and information flow profiles, which drive the resulting disease phenotypes. We also devise a novel scoring scheme to quantify key genes-network routers, which influence many genes, key targets, which are influenced by many genes, and high impact genes, which experience a significant change in regulation. We show the robustness of our results against parameter changes. Our network biology platform includes freely available source code (http://www.NetDecoder.org) for researchers to explore genome-wide context-dependent information flow profiles and key genes, given a set of genes of particular interest and transcriptome data. More importantly, NetDecoder will enable researchers to uncover context-dependent drug targets. PMID:26975659

  12. Ice breaking in GPCR structural biology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang ZHAO; Bei-li WU

    2012-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are one of the most challenging targets in structural biology.To successfully solve a high-resolution GPCR structure,several experimental obstacles must be overcome,including expression,extraction,purification,and crystallization.As a result,there are only a handful of unique structures reported from this protein superfamily,which consists of over 800 members.In the past few years,however,there has been an increase in the amount of solved GPCR structures,and a few high-impact structures have been determined:the peptide receptor CXCR4,the agonist bound receptors,and the GPCR-G protein complex.The dramatic progress in GPCR structural studies is not due to the development of any single technique,buta combination of new techniques,new tools and new concepts.Here,we summarize the progress made for GPCR expression,purification,and crystalliza-tion,and we highlight the technical advances that will facilitate the future determination of GPCR structures.

  13. Importance of randomness in biological networks: A random matrix analysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sarika Jalan

    2015-02-01

    Random matrix theory, initially proposed to understand the complex interactions in nuclear spectra, has demonstrated its success in diverse domains of science ranging from quantum chaos to galaxies. We demonstrate the applicability of random matrix theory for networks by providing a new dimension to complex systems research. We show that in spite of huge differences these interaction networks, representing real-world systems, posses from random matrix models, the spectral properties of the underlying matrices of these networks follow random matrix theory bringing them into the same universality class. We further demonstrate the importance of randomness in interactions for deducing crucial properties of the underlying system. This paper provides an overview of the importance of random matrix framework in complex systems research with biological systems as examples.

  14. Systems analysis of biological networks in skeletal muscle function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lucas R; Meyer, Gretchen; Lieber, Richard L

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle function depends on the efficient coordination among subcellular systems. These systems are composed of proteins encoded by a subset of genes, all of which are tightly regulated. In the cases where regulation is altered because of disease or injury, dysfunction occurs. To enable objective analysis of muscle gene expression profiles, we have defined nine biological networks whose coordination is critical to muscle function. We begin by describing the expression of proteins necessary for optimal neuromuscular junction function that results in the muscle cell action potential. That action potential is transmitted to proteins involved in excitation-contraction coupling enabling Ca(2+) release. Ca(2+) then activates contractile proteins supporting actin and myosin cross-bridge cycling. Force generated by cross-bridges is transmitted via cytoskeletal proteins through the sarcolemma and out to critical proteins that support the muscle extracellular matrix. Muscle contraction is fueled through many proteins that regulate energy metabolism. Inflammation is a common response to injury that can result in alteration of many pathways within muscle. Muscle also has multiple pathways that regulate size through atrophy or hypertrophy. Finally, the isoforms associated with fast muscle fibers and their corresponding isoforms in slow muscle fibers are delineated. These nine networks represent important biological systems that affect skeletal muscle function. Combining high-throughput systems analysis with advanced networking software will allow researchers to use these networks to objectively study skeletal muscle systems. PMID:23188744

  15. Edge direction and the structure of networks

    OpenAIRE

    Foster, Jacob G.; Foster, David V.; Grassberger, Peter; Paczuski, Maya

    2009-01-01

    Directed networks are ubiquitous and are necessary to represent complex systems with asymmetric interactions---from food webs to the World Wide Web. Despite the importance of edge direction for detecting local and community structure, it has been disregarded in studying a basic type of global diversity in networks: the tendency of nodes with similar numbers of edges to connect. This tendency, called assortativity, affects crucial structural and dynamic properties of real-world networks, such ...

  16. Structurally Robust Control of Complex Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Nacher, Jose C; Akutsu, Tatsuya

    2014-01-01

    Robust control theory has been successfully applied to numerous real-world problems using a small set of devices called {\\it controllers}. However, the real systems represented by networks contain unreliable components and modern robust control engineering has not addressed the problem of structural changes on a large network. Here, we introduce the concept of structurally robust control of complex networks and provide a concrete example using an algorithmic framework that is widely applied i...

  17. The fundamental structures of dynamic social networks

    OpenAIRE

    Sekara, Vedran; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Lehmann, Sune

    2015-01-01

    Networks provide a powerful mathematical framework for analyzing the structure and dynamics of complex systems (1-3). The study of group behavior has deep roots in the social science literature (4,5) and community detection is a central part of modern network science. Network communities have been found to be highly overlapping and organized in a hierarchical structure (6-9). Recent technological advances have provided a toolset for measuring the detailed social dynamics at scale (10,11). In ...

  18. Network structure of inter-industry flows

    OpenAIRE

    McNerney, J.; B. D. Fath; Silverberg, G

    2012-01-01

    We study the structure of inter-industry relationships using networks of money flows between industries in 20 national economies. We find these networks vary around a typical structure characterized by a Weibull link weight distribution, exponential industry size distribution, and a common community structure. The community structure is hierarchical, with the top level of the hierarchy comprising five industry communities: food industries, chemical industries, manufacturing industries, servic...

  19. Network structure of inter-industry flows

    CERN Document Server

    McNerney, James; Silverberg, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    We study the structure of inter-industry relationships using networks of money flows between industries in 20 national economies. We find these networks vary around a typical structure characterized by a Weibull link weight distribution, exponential industry size distribution, and a common community structure. The community structure is hierarchical, with the top level of the hierarchy comprising five industry communities: food industries, chemical industries, manufacturing industries, service industries, and extraction industries.

  20. The structural biology of phenazine biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenfeldt, Wulf; Parsons, James F

    2014-12-01

    The phenazines are a class of over 150 nitrogen-containing aromatic compounds of bacterial and archeal origin. Their redox properties not only explain their activity as broad-specificity antibiotics and virulence factors but also enable them to function as respiratory pigments, thus extending their importance to the primary metabolism of phenazine-producing species. Despite their discovery in the mid-19th century, the molecular mechanisms behind their biosynthesis have only been unraveled in the last decade. Here, we review the contribution of structural biology that has led to our current understanding of phenazine biosynthesis. PMID:25215885

  1. From biological neural networks to thinking machines: Transitioning biological organizational principles to computer technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Muriel D.

    1991-01-01

    The three-dimensional organization of the vestibular macula is under study by computer assisted reconstruction and simulation methods as a model for more complex neural systems. One goal of this research is to transition knowledge of biological neural network architecture and functioning to computer technology, to contribute to the development of thinking computers. Maculas are organized as weighted neural networks for parallel distributed processing of information. The network is characterized by non-linearity of its terminal/receptive fields. Wiring appears to develop through constrained randomness. A further property is the presence of two main circuits, highly channeled and distributed modifying, that are connected through feedforward-feedback collaterals and biasing subcircuit. Computer simulations demonstrate that differences in geometry of the feedback (afferent) collaterals affects the timing and the magnitude of voltage changes delivered to the spike initiation zone. Feedforward (efferent) collaterals act as voltage followers and likely inhibit neurons of the distributed modifying circuit. These results illustrate the importance of feedforward-feedback loops, of timing, and of inhibition in refining neural network output. They also suggest that it is the distributed modifying network that is most involved in adaptation, memory, and learning. Tests of macular adaptation, through hyper- and microgravitational studies, support this hypothesis since synapses in the distributed modifying circuit, but not the channeled circuit, are altered. Transitioning knowledge of biological systems to computer technology, however, remains problematical.

  2. Origin and Structure of Dynamic Cooperative Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardil, Lucas; Hauert, Christoph

    2014-07-01

    Societies are built on social interactions among individuals. Cooperation represents the simplest form of a social interaction: one individual provides a benefit to another one at a cost to itself. Social networks represent a dynamical abstraction of social interactions in a society. The behaviour of an individual towards others and of others towards the individual shape the individual's neighbourhood and hence the local structure of the social network. Here we propose a simple theoretical framework to model dynamic social networks by focussing on each individual's actions instead of interactions between individuals. This eliminates the traditional dichotomy between the strategy of individuals and the structure of the population and easily complements empirical studies. As a consequence, altruists, egoists and fair types are naturally determined by the local social structures, while globally egalitarian networks or stratified structures arise. Cooperative interactions drive the emergence and shape the structure of social networks.

  3. Bit by bit control of nonlinear ecological and biological networks using Evolutionary Network Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Ferrarini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary Network Control (ENC has been first introduced in 2013 to effectively subdue network-like systems. ENC opposes the idea, very common in the scientific literature, that controllability of networks should be based on the identification of the set of driver nodes that can guide the system's dynamics, in other words on the choice of a subset of nodes that should be selected to be permanently controlled. ENC has proven to be effective in the global control (i.e. the focus is on mastery of the final state of network dynamics of linear and nonlinear networks, and in the local (i.e. the focus is on the step-by-step ascendancy of network dynamics control of linear networks. In this work, ENC is applied to the local control of nonlinear networks. Using the Lotka-Volterra model as a case study, I show here that ENC is capable of locally driving nonlinear networks as well, so that also intermediate steps (not only the final state are under our strict control. ENC can be readily applied to any kind of ecological, biological, economic and network-like system.

  4. Cross-linked structure of network evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassett, Danielle S., E-mail: dsb@seas.upenn.edu [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Sage Center for the Study of the Mind, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Wymbs, Nicholas F.; Grafton, Scott T. [Department of Psychology and UCSB Brain Imaging Center, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Porter, Mason A. [Oxford Centre for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford OX2 6GG (United Kingdom); CABDyN Complexity Centre, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX1 1HP (United Kingdom); Mucha, Peter J. [Carolina Center for Interdisciplinary Applied Mathematics, Department of Mathematics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Applied Physical Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    We study the temporal co-variation of network co-evolution via the cross-link structure of networks, for which we take advantage of the formalism of hypergraphs to map cross-link structures back to network nodes. We investigate two sets of temporal network data in detail. In a network of coupled nonlinear oscillators, hyperedges that consist of network edges with temporally co-varying weights uncover the driving co-evolution patterns of edge weight dynamics both within and between oscillator communities. In the human brain, networks that represent temporal changes in brain activity during learning exhibit early co-evolution that then settles down with practice. Subsequent decreases in hyperedge size are consistent with emergence of an autonomous subgraph whose dynamics no longer depends on other parts of the network. Our results on real and synthetic networks give a poignant demonstration of the ability of cross-link structure to uncover unexpected co-evolution attributes in both real and synthetic dynamical systems. This, in turn, illustrates the utility of analyzing cross-links for investigating the structure of temporal networks.

  5. Cross-linked structure of network evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the temporal co-variation of network co-evolution via the cross-link structure of networks, for which we take advantage of the formalism of hypergraphs to map cross-link structures back to network nodes. We investigate two sets of temporal network data in detail. In a network of coupled nonlinear oscillators, hyperedges that consist of network edges with temporally co-varying weights uncover the driving co-evolution patterns of edge weight dynamics both within and between oscillator communities. In the human brain, networks that represent temporal changes in brain activity during learning exhibit early co-evolution that then settles down with practice. Subsequent decreases in hyperedge size are consistent with emergence of an autonomous subgraph whose dynamics no longer depends on other parts of the network. Our results on real and synthetic networks give a poignant demonstration of the ability of cross-link structure to uncover unexpected co-evolution attributes in both real and synthetic dynamical systems. This, in turn, illustrates the utility of analyzing cross-links for investigating the structure of temporal networks

  6. Temporal network structures controlling disease spreading

    CERN Document Server

    Holme, Petter

    2016-01-01

    We investigate disease spreading on eight empirical data sets of human contacts (mostly proximity networks recording who is close to whom, at what time). We compare three levels of representations of these data sets: temporal networks, static networks and a fully connected topology. We notice that the difference between the static and fully-connected networks -- with respect to time to extinction and average outbreak size -- is smaller than between the temporal and static topologies. This suggests that, for these data sets, temporal structures influence disease spreading more than static network structures. To explain the details in the differences between the representations, we use 32 network measures. This study concur that long-time temporal structures, like the turnover of nodes and links, are the most important for the spreading dynamics.

  7. Interplay between evolutionary game and network structure

    CERN Document Server

    Ren, J; Wang, W X; Chen, G; Wang, B H; Ren, Jie; Wu, Xiang; Wang, Wen-Xu; Chen, Guanrong; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2006-01-01

    We study the interplay between evolutionary game and network structure and show how the dynamics of the game affect the growth pattern of the network and how the evolution of the network influence the cooperative behavior in the game. Simulation results show that the payoff preferential attachment mechanism leads to the emergence of a scale-free structural property, $P(k)\\sim k^{-\\gamma}$, with the power-law exponent $\\gamma$ controlled by a model parameter. Moreover, we investigate the average path length and the assortative mixing features. The obtained results indicate that the network has small-world and positive assortative behaviors, which are consistent with the observations of some real social networks. In parallel, we found that the evolution of the underlying network structure remarkably promotes the cooperation level of the game. Furthermore, we provide detrended fluctuation analysis for the time series of cooperator density. Interestingly, we found $1/f$ scaling behavior, which suggests that a lon...

  8. Dynamic Analysis of Structures Using Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ahmadi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, neural networks are considered as the best candidate for fast approximation with arbitrary accuracy in the time consuming problems. Dynamic analysis of structures against earthquake has the time consuming process. We employed two kinds of neural networks: Generalized Regression neural network (GR and Back-Propagation Wavenet neural network (BPW, for approximating of dynamic time history response of frame structures. GR is a traditional radial basis function neural network while BPW categorized as a wavelet neural network. In BPW, sigmoid activation functions of hidden layer neurons are substituted with wavelets and weights training are achieved using Scaled Conjugate Gradient (SCG algorithm. Comparison the results of BPW with those of GR in the dynamic analysis of eight story steel frame indicates that accuracy of the properly trained BPW was better than that of GR and therefore, BPW can be efficiently used for approximate dynamic analysis of structures.

  9. Learning and structure of neuronal networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kiran M Kolwankar; Quansheng Ren; Areejit Samal; Jürgen Jost

    2011-11-01

    We study the effect of learning dynamics on network topology. Firstly, a network of discrete dynamical systems is considered for this purpose and the coupling strengths are made to evolve according to a temporal learning rule that is based on the paradigm of spike-time-dependent plasticity (STDP). This incorporates necessary competition between different edges. The final network we obtain is robust and has a broad degree distribution. Then we study the dynamics of the structure of a formal neural network. For properly chosen input signals, there exists a steady state with a residual network. We compare the motif profile of such a network with that of the real neural network of . elegans and identify robust qualitative similarities. In particular, our extensive numerical simulations show that this STDP-driven resulting network is robust under variations of model parameters.

  10. 2010 Diffraction Methods in Structural Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Ana Gonzalez

    2011-03-10

    Advances in basic methodologies have played a major role in the dramatic progress in macromolecular crystallography over the past decade, both in terms of overall productivity and in the increasing complexity of the systems being successfully tackled. The 2010 Gordon Research Conference on Diffraction Methods in Structural Biology will, as in the past, focus on the most recent developments in methodology, covering all aspects of the process from crystallization to model building and refinement, complemented by examples of structural highlights and complementary methods. Extensive discussion will be encouraged and it is hoped that all attendees will participate by giving oral or poster presentations, the latter using the excellent poster display area available at Bates College. The relatively small size and informal atmosphere of the meeting provides an excellent opportunity for all participants, especially younger scientists, to meet and exchange ideas with leading methods developers.

  11. Mathematical Analysis of a PDE System for Biological Network Formation

    KAUST Repository

    Haskovec, Jan

    2015-02-04

    Motivated by recent physics papers describing rules for natural network formation, we study an elliptic-parabolic system of partial differential equations proposed by Hu and Cai [13, 15]. The model describes the pressure field thanks to Darcy\\'s type equation and the dynamics of the conductance network under pressure force effects with a diffusion rate D >= 0 representing randomness in the material structure. We prove the existence of global weak solutions and of local mild solutions and study their long term behavior. It turns out that, by energy dissipation, steady states play a central role to understand the network formation capacity of the system. We show that for a large diffusion coefficient D, the zero steady state is stable, while network formation occurs for small values of D due to the instability of the zero steady state, and the borderline case D = 0 exhibits a large class of dynamically stable (in the linearized sense) steady states.

  12. Neural Networks for protein Structure Prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik

    1998-01-01

    This is a review about neural network applications in bioinformatics. Especially the applications to protein structure prediction, e.g. prediction of secondary structures, prediction of surface structure, fold class recognition and prediction of the 3-dimensional structure of protein backbones, is...

  13. Information transfer in community structured multiplex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé Ribalta, Albert; Granell, Clara; Gómez, Sergio; Arenas, Alex

    2015-08-01

    The study of complex networks that account for different types of interactions has become a subject of interest in the last few years, specially because its representational power in the description of users interactions in diverse online social platforms (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc.). The mathematical description of these interacting networks has been coined under the name of multilayer networks, where each layer accounts for a type of interaction. It has been shown that diffusive processes on top of these networks present a phenomenology that cannot be explained by the naive superposition of single layer diffusive phenomena but require the whole structure of interconnected layers. Nevertheless, the description of diffusive phenomena on multilayer networks has obviated the fact that social networks have strong mesoscopic structure represented by different communities of individuals driven by common interests, or any other social aspect. In this work, we study the transfer of information in multilayer networks with community structure. The final goal is to understand and quantify, if the existence of well-defined community structure at the level of individual layers, together with the multilayer structure of the whole network, enhances or deteriorates the diffusion of packets of information.

  14. Information transfer in community structured multiplex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Solé-Ribalta, Albert; Gómez, Sergio; Arenas, Alex

    2015-01-01

    The study of complex networks that account for different types of interactions has become a subject of interest in the last few years, specially because its representational power in the description of users interactions in diverse online social platforms (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc.). The mathematical description of these interacting networks has been coined under the name of multilayer networks, where each layer accounts for a type of interaction. It has been shown that diffusive processes on top of these networks present a phenomenology that cannot be explained by the naive superposition of single layer diffusive phenomena but require the whole structure of interconnected layers. Nevertheless, the description of diffusive phenomena on multilayer networks has obviated the fact that social networks have strong mesoscopic structure represented by different communities of individuals driven by common interests, or any other social aspect. In this work, we study the transfer of information in multilayer ...

  15. Evaluation of gene association methods for coexpression network construction and biological knowledge discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapna Kumari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Constructing coexpression networks and performing network analysis using large-scale gene expression data sets is an effective way to uncover new biological knowledge; however, the methods used for gene association in constructing these coexpression networks have not been thoroughly evaluated. Since different methods lead to structurally different coexpression networks and provide different information, selecting the optimal gene association method is critical. METHODS AND RESULTS: In this study, we compared eight gene association methods - Spearman rank correlation, Weighted Rank Correlation, Kendall, Hoeffding's D measure, Theil-Sen, Rank Theil-Sen, Distance Covariance, and Pearson - and focused on their true knowledge discovery rates in associating pathway genes and construction coordination networks of regulatory genes. We also examined the behaviors of different methods to microarray data with different properties, and whether the biological processes affect the efficiency of different methods. CONCLUSIONS: We found that the Spearman, Hoeffding and Kendall methods are effective in identifying coexpressed pathway genes, whereas the Theil-sen, Rank Theil-Sen, Spearman, and Weighted Rank methods perform well in identifying coordinated transcription factors that control the same biological processes and traits. Surprisingly, the widely used Pearson method is generally less efficient, and so is the Distance Covariance method that can find gene pairs of multiple relationships. Some analyses we did clearly show Pearson and Distance Covariance methods have distinct behaviors as compared to all other six methods. The efficiencies of different methods vary with the data properties to some degree and are largely contingent upon the biological processes, which necessitates the pre-analysis to identify the best performing method for gene association and coexpression network construction.

  16. Network structure of subway passenger flows

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Qi; Bai, Yun

    2016-01-01

    The results of transportation infrastructure network analyses have been used to analyze complex networks in a topological context. However, most modeling approaches, including those based on complex network theory, do not fully account for real-life traffic patterns and may provide an incomplete view of network functions. This study utilizes trip data obtained from the Beijing Subway System to characterize individual passenger movement patterns. A directed weighted passenger flow network was constructed from the subway infrastructure network topology by incorporating trip data. The passenger flow networks exhibit several properties that can be characterized by power-law distributions based on flow size, and log-logistic distributions based on the fraction of boarding and departing passengers. The study also characterizes the temporal patterns of in-transit and waiting passengers and provides a hierarchical clustering structure for passenger flows. This hierarchical flow organization varies in the spatial doma...

  17. Molecular codes in biological and chemical reaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Görlich

    Full Text Available Shannon's theory of communication has been very successfully applied for the analysis of biological information. However, the theory neglects semantic and pragmatic aspects and thus cannot directly be applied to distinguish between (bio- chemical systems able to process "meaningful" information from those that do not. Here, we present a formal method to assess a system's semantic capacity by analyzing a reaction network's capability to implement molecular codes. We analyzed models of chemical systems (martian atmosphere chemistry and various combustion chemistries, biochemical systems (gene expression, gene translation, and phosphorylation signaling cascades, an artificial chemistry, and random reaction networks. Our study suggests that different chemical systems possess different semantic capacities. No semantic capacity was found in the model of the martian atmosphere chemistry, the studied combustion chemistries, and highly connected random networks, i.e. with these chemistries molecular codes cannot be implemented. High semantic capacity was found in the studied biochemical systems and in random reaction networks where the number of second order reactions is twice the number of species. We conclude that our approach can be applied to evaluate the information processing capabilities of a chemical system and may thus be a useful tool to understand the origin and evolution of meaningful information, e.g. in the context of the origin of life.

  18. The Economic Consequences of Social Network Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Matthew O.; Rogers, Brian; Zenou, Yves

    2015-01-01

    We survey the literatures on the economic consequences of the structure of social networks. We develop a taxonomy of 'macro' and 'micro' characteristics of social inter-action networks and discuss both the theoretical and empirical findings concerning the role of those characteristics in determining learning, diffusion, decisions, and resulting behaviors. We also discuss the challenges of accounting for the endogeneity of networks in assessing the relationship between the patterns of interact...

  19. Centralized and decentralized network control structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hock, G.; Motl, G.

    1983-03-01

    Network control systems are aids for network operation resulting from take-over, transport and distribution of the electric power generated in power plants. In order to achieve this, the energy used by the consumers must be generated and supplied at the very moment of demand. From this objective the network structure in the Federal Republic of Germany, which in principle is also valid for other contries comparable in infrastructure, has developed.

  20. The structure of scientific collaboration networks

    OpenAIRE

    Newman, M. E. J.

    2000-01-01

    The structure of scientific collaboration networks is investigated. Two scientists are considered connected if they have authored a paper together and explicit networks of such connections are constructed by using data drawn from a number of databases, including MEDLINE (biomedical research), the Los Alamos e-Print Archive (physics), and NCSTRL (computer science). I show that these collaboration networks form “small worlds,” in which randomly chosen pairs of scientists...

  1. Combination of Neuro-Fuzzy Network Models with Biological Knowledge for Reconstructing Gene Regulatory Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guixia Liu; Lei Liu; Chunyu Liu; Ming Zheng; Lanying Su; Chunguang Zhou

    2011-01-01

    Inferring gene regulatory networks from large-scale expression data is an important topic in both cellular systems and computational biology. The inference of regulators might be the core factor for understanding actual regulatory conditions in gene regulatory networks, especially when strong regulators do work significantly, in this paper, we propose a novel approach based on combining neuro-fuzzy network models with biological knowledge to infer strong regulators and interrelated fuzzy rules. The hybrid neuro-fuzzy architecture can not only infer the fuzzy rules, which are suitable for describing the regulatory conditions in regulatory networks, but also explain the meaning of nodes and weight value in the neural network. It can get useful rules automatically without factitious judgments. At the same time, it does not add recursive layers to the model, and the model can also strengthen the relationships among genes and reduce calculation. We use the proposed approach to reconstruct a partial gene regulatory network of yeast. The results show that this approach can work effectively.

  2. Temporal network structures controlling disease spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, Petter

    2016-08-01

    We investigate disease spreading on eight empirical data sets of human contacts (mostly proximity networks recording who is close to whom, at what time). We compare three levels of representations of these data sets: temporal networks, static networks, and a fully connected topology. We notice that the difference between the static and fully connected networks—with respect to time to extinction and average outbreak size—is smaller than between the temporal and static topologies. This suggests that, for these data sets, temporal structures influence disease spreading more than static-network structures. To explain the details in the differences between the representations, we use 32 network measures. This study concurs that long-time temporal structures, like the turnover of nodes and links, are the most important for the spreading dynamics.

  3. The Structure of Online Consumer Communication Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.G.C. Dellaert (Benedict); M.J.W. Harmsen-van Hout (Marjolein); P.J.J. Herings (Jean-Jacques)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we study the structure of the bilateral communication links within Online Consumer Communication Networks (OCCNs), such as virtual communities. Compared to the offline world, consumers in online networks are highly flexible to choose their communication partners and little

  4. A Systems’ Biology Approach to Study MicroRNA-Mediated Gene Regulatory Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Lai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are potent effectors in gene regulatory networks where aberrant miRNA expression can contribute to human diseases such as cancer. For a better understanding of the regulatory role of miRNAs in coordinating gene expression, we here present a systems biology approach combining data-driven modeling and model-driven experiments. Such an approach is characterized by an iterative process, including biological data acquisition and integration, network construction, mathematical modeling and experimental validation. To demonstrate the application of this approach, we adopt it to investigate mechanisms of collective repression on p21 by multiple miRNAs. We first construct a p21 regulatory network based on data from the literature and further expand it using algorithms that predict molecular interactions. Based on the network structure, a detailed mechanistic model is established and its parameter values are determined using data. Finally, the calibrated model is used to study the effect of different miRNA expression profiles and cooperative target regulation on p21 expression levels in different biological contexts.

  5. Structurally dynamic spin market networks

    CERN Document Server

    Horváth, D

    2007-01-01

    The agent-based model of price dynamics on a directed evolving complex network is suggested and studied by direct simulation. The resulting stationary regime is maintained as a result of the balance between the extremal dynamics, adaptivity of strategic variables and reconnection rules. For some properly selected parametric combination the network displays small-world phenomenon with high mean clustering coefficient and power-law node degree distribution. The mechanism of repeated random walk through network combined with a fitness recognition is proposed and tested to generate modular multi-leader market. The simulations suggest that dynamics of fitness is the slowest process that manifests itself in the volatility clustering of the log-price returns.

  6. Revealing biological information using data structuring and automated learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohorianu, Irina; Moulton, Vincent

    2010-11-01

    The intermediary steps between a biological hypothesis, concretized in the input data, and meaningful results, validated using biological experiments, commonly employ bioinformatics tools. Starting with storage of the data and ending with a statistical analysis of the significance of the results, every step in a bioinformatics analysis has been intensively studied and the resulting methods and models patented. This review summarizes the bioinformatics patents that have been developed mainly for the study of genes, and points out the universal applicability of bioinformatics methods to other related studies such as RNA interference. More specifically, we overview the steps undertaken in the majority of bioinformatics analyses, highlighting, for each, various approaches that have been developed to reveal details from different perspectives. First we consider data warehousing, the first task that has to be performed efficiently, optimizing the structure of the database, in order to facilitate both the subsequent steps and the retrieval of information. Next, we review data mining, which occupies the central part of most bioinformatics analyses, presenting patents concerning differential expression, unsupervised and supervised learning. Last, we discuss how networks of interactions of genes or other players in the cell may be created, which help draw biological conclusions and have been described in several patents. PMID:21288193

  7. Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides a brief description of the Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) Network in response to a request from the Advisory Group Meeting on ''Co-ordination of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators'' (IAEA, Vienna, 14-17 December 1998, report IAEA(NDS)-399 (1999)). This report supersedes the special issue of the Nuclear Data Newsletter No. 20 published in November 1994. (author)

  8. Structural Connectivity Networks of Transgender People

    OpenAIRE

    Hahn, Andreas; Kranz, Georg S.; Küblböck, Martin; Kaufmann, Ulrike; Ganger, Sebastian; Hummer, Allan; Seiger, Rene; Spies, Marie; Winkler, Dietmar; Kasper, Siegfried; Windischberger, Christian; Swaab, Dick F.; Lanzenberger, Rupert

    2015-01-01

    Although previous investigations of transsexual people have focused on regional brain alterations, evaluations on a network level, especially those structural in nature, are largely missing. Therefore, we investigated the structural connectome of 23 female-to-male (FtM) and 21 male-to-female (MtF) transgender patients before hormone therapy as compared with 25 female and 25 male healthy controls. Graph theoretical analysis of whole-brain probabilistic tractography networks (adjusted for diffe...

  9. Network Structure and Travel Time Perception

    OpenAIRE

    Pavithra Parthasarathi; David Levinson; Hartwig Hochmair

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to test the systematic variation in the perception of travel time among travelers and relate the variation to the underlying street network structure. Travel survey data from the Twin Cities metropolitan area (which includes the cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul) is used for the analysis. Travelers are classified into two groups based on the ratio of perceived and estimated commute travel time. The measures of network structure are estimated using the street n...

  10. Benchmarking dynamic Bayesian network structure learning algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Trabelsi, Ghada; Leray, Philippe; Ben Ayed, Mounir; Alimi, Adel

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic Bayesian Networks (DBNs) are probabilistic graphical models dedicated to modeling multivariate time series. Two-time slice BNs (2-TBNs) are the most current type of these models. Static BN structure learning is a well-studied domain. Many approaches have been proposed and the quality of these algorithms has been studied over a range of di erent standard networks and methods of evaluation. To the best of our knowledge, all studies about DBN structure learning use their own benchmarks a...

  11. Structure and biological functions of fungal cerebrosides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barreto-Bergter Eliana

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Ceramide monohexosides (CMHs, cerebrosides are glycosphingolipids composed of a hydrophobic ceramide linked to one sugar unit. In fungal cells, CMHs are very conserved molecules consisting of a ceramide moiety containing 9-methyl-4,8-sphingadienine in amidic linkage to 2-hydroxyoctadecanoic or 2-hydroxyhexadecanoic acids, and a carbohydrate portion consisting of one residue of glucose or galactose. 9-Methyl 4,8-sphingadienine-containing ceramides are usually glycosylated to form fungal cerebrosides, but the recent description of a ceramide dihexoside (CDH presenting phytosphingosine in Magnaporthe grisea suggests the existence of alternative pathways of ceramide glycosylation in fungal cells. Along with their unique structural characteristics, fungal CMHs have a peculiar subcellular distribution and striking biological properties. In Pseudallescheria boydii, Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus nidulans, A. fumigatus, and Schizophyllum commune, CMHs are apparently involved in morphological transitions and fungal growth. The elucidation of structural and functional aspects of fungal cerebrosides may therefore contribute to the design of new antifungal agents inhibiting growth and differentiation of pathogenic species.

  12. Structure-based control of complex networks with nonlinear dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Zañudo, Jorge G T; Albert, Réka

    2016-01-01

    Given the network of interactions underlying a complex system, what can we learn about controlling such a system solely from its structure? Over a century of research in control theory has given us tools to answer this question, which were widely applied in science and engineering. Yet the current tools do not always consider the inherently nonlinear dynamics of real systems and the naturally occurring system states in their definition of "control", a term whose interpretation varies across disciplines. Here we use a new mathematical framework for structure-based control of networks governed by a broad class of nonlinear dynamics that includes the major dynamic models of biological, technological, and social processes. This framework provides realizable node overrides that steer a system towards any of its natural long term dynamic behaviors and which are guaranteed to be effective regardless of the dynamic details and parameters of the underlying system. We use this framework on several real networks, compar...

  13. The Deep Structure of Organizational Online Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Matthias; Richter, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    While research on organizational online networking recently increased significantly, most studies adopt quantitative research designs with a focus on the consequences of social network configurations. Very limited attention is paid to comprehensive theoretical conceptions of the complex phenomenon......-scale implementation of a corporate social network site (SNS) in a global organization. We reveal organizational online networking as a multi-dimensional phenomenon with multiplex relationships that are unbalanced, primarily consist of weak ties and are subject to temporal change. Further, we identify discourse...... of organizational online networking. We address this gap by adopting a theoretical framework of the deep structure of organizational online networking with a focus on their emerging meaning for the employees. We apply and assess the framework in a qualitative case study of a large...

  14. Dynamics of overlapping structures in modular networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almendral, J A; Leyva, I; Li, D; Sendiña-Nadal, I; Havlin, S; Boccaletti, S

    2010-07-01

    Modularity is a fundamental feature of real networks, being intimately bounded to their functionality, i.e., to their capability of performing parallel tasks in a coordinated way. Although the modular structure of real graphs has been intensively studied, very little is known on the interactions between functional modules of a graph. Here, we present a general method based on synchronization of networking oscillators, that is able to detect overlapping structures in multimodular environments. We furthermore report the full analytical and theoretical description on the relationship between the overlapping dynamics and the underlying network topology. The method is illustrated by means of a series of applications. PMID:20866697

  15. Community-Reviewed Biological Network Models for Toxicology and Drug Discovery Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namasivayam, Aishwarya Alex; Morales, Alejandro Ferreiro; Lacave, Ángela María Fajardo; Tallam, Aravind; Simovic, Borislav; Alfaro, David Garrido; Bobbili, Dheeraj Reddy; Martin, Florian; Androsova, Ganna; Shvydchenko, Irina; Park, Jennifer; Calvo, Jorge Val; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C.; Racero, Manuel González Vélez; Biryukov, Maria; Talikka, Marja; Pérez, Modesto Berraquero; Rohatgi, Neha; Díaz-Díaz, Noberto; Mandarapu, Rajesh; Ruiz, Rubén Amián; Davidyan, Sergey; Narayanasamy, Shaman; Boué, Stéphanie; Guryanova, Svetlana; Arbas, Susana Martínez; Menon, Swapna; Xiang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Biological network models offer a framework for understanding disease by describing the relationships between the mechanisms involved in the regulation of biological processes. Crowdsourcing can efficiently gather feedback from a wide audience with varying expertise. In the Network Verification Challenge, scientists verified and enhanced a set of 46 biological networks relevant to lung and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The networks were built using Biological Expression Language and contain detailed information for each node and edge, including supporting evidence from the literature. Network scoring of public transcriptomics data inferred perturbation of a subset of mechanisms and networks that matched the measured outcomes. These results, based on a computable network approach, can be used to identify novel mechanisms activated in disease, quantitatively compare different treatments and time points, and allow for assessment of data with low signal. These networks are periodically verified by the crowd to maintain an up-to-date suite of networks for toxicology and drug discovery applications.

  16. Structural measures for multiplex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battiston, Federico; Nicosia, Vincenzo; Latora, Vito

    2014-03-01

    Many real-world complex systems consist of a set of elementary units connected by relationships of different kinds. All such systems are better described in terms of multiplex networks, where the links at each layer represent a different type of interaction between the same set of nodes rather than in terms of (single-layer) networks. In this paper we present a general framework to describe and study multiplex networks, whose links are either unweighted or weighted. In particular, we propose a series of measures to characterize the multiplexicity of the systems in terms of (i) basic node and link properties such as the node degree, and the edge overlap and reinforcement, (ii) local properties such as the clustering coefficient and the transitivity, and (iii) global properties related to the navigability of the multiplex across the different layers. The measures we introduce are validated on a genuinely multiplex data set of Indonesian terrorists, where information among 78 individuals are recorded with respect to mutual trust, common operations, exchanged communications, and business relationships.

  17. A New Computationally Efficient Measure of Topological Redundancy of Biological and Social Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Albert, Reka; Gitter, Anthony; Gursoy, Gamze; Hegde, Rashmi; Paul, Pradyut; Sivanathan, Gowri Sangeetha; Sontag, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    It is well-known that biological and social interaction networks have a varying degree of redundancy, though a consensus of the precise cause of this is so far lacking. In this paper, we introduce a topological redundancy measure for labeled directed networks that is formal, computationally efficient and applicable to a variety of directed networks such as cellular signaling, metabolic and social interaction networks. We demonstrate the computational efficiency of our measure by computing its value and statistical significance on a number of biological and social networks with up to several thousands of nodes and edges. Our results suggest a number of interesting observations: (1) social networks are more redundant that their biological counterparts, (2) transcriptional networks are less redundant than signaling networks, (3) the topological redundancy of the C. elegans metabolic network is largely due to its inclusion of currency metabolites, and (4) the redundancy of signaling networks is highly (negatively...

  18. Mining Functional Modules in Heterogeneous Biological Networks Using Multiplex PageRank Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Zhao, Patrick X

    2016-01-01

    Identification of functional modules/sub-networks in large-scale biological networks is one of the important research challenges in current bioinformatics and systems biology. Approaches have been developed to identify functional modules in single-class biological networks; however, methods for systematically and interactively mining multiple classes of heterogeneous biological networks are lacking. In this paper, we present a novel algorithm (called mPageRank) that utilizes the Multiplex PageRank approach to mine functional modules from two classes of biological networks. We demonstrate the capabilities of our approach by successfully mining functional biological modules through integrating expression-based gene-gene association networks and protein-protein interaction networks. We first compared the performance of our method with that of other methods using simulated data. We then applied our method to identify the cell division cycle related functional module and plant signaling defense-related functional module in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results demonstrated that the mPageRank method is effective for mining sub-networks in both expression-based gene-gene association networks and protein-protein interaction networks, and has the potential to be adapted for the discovery of functional modules/sub-networks in other heterogeneous biological networks. The mPageRank executable program, source code, the datasets and results of the presented two case studies are publicly and freely available at http://plantgrn.noble.org/MPageRank/. PMID:27446133

  19. Structural Biology in the context of EGEE

    CERN Document Server

    García, D; Carazo, J M; Valverde, J R; Moscicki, J; Muraru, A

    2007-01-01

    Electron microscopy (EM) is a crucial technique, which allows Structural Biology researchers to characterize macromolecular assemblies in distinct functional states. Image processing in three dimensional EM (3D-EM) is used by a flourishing community (exemplarized by the EU funded 3D-EM NoE) and is characterized by voluminous data and large computing requirements, making this a problem well suited for Grid computing and the EGEE infrastructure. There are various steps in the 3D-EM refinement process that may benefit from Grid computing. To start with, large numbers of experimental images need to be averaged. Nowadays, typically tens of thousands of images are used, while future studies may routinely employ millions of images. Our group has been developing Xmipp, a package for single-particle 3D-EM image processing. Using Xmipp, the classification of 91,000 ribosome projections into 4 classes took more than 2500 CPU hours using the resources of the MareNostrum supercomputer at the Barcelona Supercomputing Centr...

  20. Networks: structure and action : steering in and steering by policy networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dassen, Adrie

    2010-01-01

    This thesis explores the opportunities to build a structural policy network model that is rooted in social network theories. By making a distinction between a process of steering in networks, and a process of steering by networks, it addresses the effects of network structures on network dynamics as

  1. Studying the structure of complex networks by the transition to acyclic networks

    CERN Document Server

    Shevchuk, R

    2010-01-01

    The directed acyclic networks is the fundamental class of networks which include network citation, food chains, family trees and other networks with similar structure. In this paper we present an algorithm for transforming an ordinary undirected complex network into acyclic one and further analysis of the structure of a complex network.

  2. The Scientific Network of Surfactants: Structural Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Bailón-Moreno, Rafael; Jurado-Alameda, Encarnación; Ruiz-Baños, Rosario

    2006-01-01

    The scientific network of the surfactants and related subjects has been analyzed with the CoPalRed© knowledge system. The actors studied have been countries, research centers and laboratories, researchers, and journals. The thematic map of the major research areas has been established. Most of the research areas, and those that have the greatest representation in terms of number of documents, are related to physics and chemistry. However, biochemistry and cell biology,...

  3. What does biologically meaningful mean? A perspective on gene regulatory network validation

    OpenAIRE

    Walhout, Albertha JM

    2011-01-01

    Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) are rapidly being delineated, but their quality and biological meaning are often questioned. Here, I argue that biological meaning is challenging to define and discuss reasons why GRN validation should be interpreted cautiously.

  4. Structural properties of spatially embedded networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmidis, K.; Havlin, S.; Bunde, A.

    2008-05-01

    We study the effects of spatial constraints on the structural properties of networks embedded in one- or two-dimensional space. When nodes are embedded in space, they have a well-defined Euclidean distance r between any pair. We assume that nodes at distance r have a link with probability p(r)~r-δ. We study the mean topological distance l and the clustering coefficient C of these networks and find that they both exhibit phase transitions for some critical value of the control parameter δ depending on the dimensionality d of the embedding space. We have identified three regimes. When δ2d the networks are "large" worlds l~N1/d with high clustering. Our results indicate that spatial constrains have a significant impact on the network properties, a fact that should be taken into account when modeling complex networks.

  5. ClusterViz: A Cytoscape APP for Cluster Analysis of Biological Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianxin; Zhong, Jiancheng; Chen, Gang; Li, Min; Wu, Fang-xiang; Pan, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Cluster analysis of biological networks is one of the most important approaches for identifying functional modules and predicting protein functions. Furthermore, visualization of clustering results is crucial to uncover the structure of biological networks. In this paper, ClusterViz, an APP of Cytoscape 3 for cluster analysis and visualization, has been developed. In order to reduce complexity and enable extendibility for ClusterViz, we designed the architecture of ClusterViz based on the framework of Open Services Gateway Initiative. According to the architecture, the implementation of ClusterViz is partitioned into three modules including interface of ClusterViz, clustering algorithms and visualization and export. ClusterViz fascinates the comparison of the results of different algorithms to do further related analysis. Three commonly used clustering algorithms, FAG-EC, EAGLE and MCODE, are included in the current version. Due to adopting the abstract interface of algorithms in module of the clustering algorithms, more clustering algorithms can be included for the future use. To illustrate usability of ClusterViz, we provided three examples with detailed steps from the important scientific articles, which show that our tool has helped several research teams do their research work on the mechanism of the biological networks. PMID:26357321

  6. Computational Structural Biology of Macromolecular Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia Lopes Maia Rodrigues, J.

    2014-01-01

    The living cell is a formidable entity kept intact and functioning by a network of interactions carried out by protein molecules. As such, understanding this network, the interactome, is key to understand the cell itself. To dissect the fundamental properties of protein interactions, researchers use

  7. Cognitive network structure: an experimental study

    CERN Document Server

    Guazzini, Andrea; Bagnoli, Franco; Carletti, Timoteo; Grotto, Rosapia Lauro

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present first experimental results about a small group of people exchanging private and public messages in a virtual community. Our goal is the study of the cognitive network that emerges during a chat seance. We used the Derrida coefficient and the triangle structure under the working assumption that moods and perceived mutual affinity can produce results complementary to a full semantic analysis. The most outstanding outcome is the difference between the network obtained considering publicly exchanged messages and the one considering only privately exchanged messages: in the former case, the network is very homogeneous, in the sense that each individual interacts in the same way with all the participants, whilst in the latter the interactions among different agents are very heterogeneous, and are based on "the enemy of my enemy is my friend" strategy. Finally a recent characterization of the triangular cliques has been considered in order to describe the intimate structure of the network. E...

  8. Network Structure and Resilience of Mafia Syndicates

    OpenAIRE

    Agreste, Santa; Catanese, Salvatore; De Meo, Pasquale; Ferrara, Emilio; Fiumara, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of the study of Sicilian Mafia organization by using Social Network Analysis. The study investigates the network structure of a Mafia organization, describing its evolution and highlighting its plasticity to interventions targeting membership and its resilience to disruption caused by police operations. We analyze two different datasets about Mafia gangs built by examining different digital trails and judicial documents spanning a period of ten years: the ...

  9. NAPS: Network Analysis of Protein Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, Broto; Parekh, Nita

    2016-07-01

    Traditionally, protein structures have been analysed by the secondary structure architecture and fold arrangement. An alternative approach that has shown promise is modelling proteins as a network of non-covalent interactions between amino acid residues. The network representation of proteins provide a systems approach to topological analysis of complex three-dimensional structures irrespective of secondary structure and fold type and provide insights into structure-function relationship. We have developed a web server for network based analysis of protein structures, NAPS, that facilitates quantitative and qualitative (visual) analysis of residue-residue interactions in: single chains, protein complex, modelled protein structures and trajectories (e.g. from molecular dynamics simulations). The user can specify atom type for network construction, distance range (in Å) and minimal amino acid separation along the sequence. NAPS provides users selection of node(s) and its neighbourhood based on centrality measures, physicochemical properties of amino acids or cluster of well-connected residues (k-cliques) for further analysis. Visual analysis of interacting domains and protein chains, and shortest path lengths between pair of residues are additional features that aid in functional analysis. NAPS support various analyses and visualization views for identifying functional residues, provide insight into mechanisms of protein folding, domain-domain and protein-protein interactions for understanding communication within and between proteins. URL:http://bioinf.iiit.ac.in/NAPS/. PMID:27151201

  10. The structure and evolution of story networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsdorp, Folgert; van den Bosch, Antal

    2016-06-01

    With this study, we advance the understanding about the processes through which stories are retold. A collection of story retellings can be considered as a network of stories, in which links between stories represent pre-textual (or ancestral) relationships. This study provides a mechanistic understanding of the structure and evolution of such story networks: we construct a story network for a large diachronic collection of Dutch literary retellings of Red Riding Hood, and compare this network to one derived from a corpus of paper chain letters. In the analysis, we first provide empirical evidence that the formation of these story networks is subject to age-dependent selection processes with a strong lopsidedness towards shorter time-spans between stories and their pre-texts (i.e. 'young' story versions are preferred in producing new versions). Subsequently, we systematically compare these findings with and among predictions of various formal models of network growth to determine more precisely which kinds of attractiveness are also at play or might even be preferred as explicatory models. By carefully studying the structure and evolution of the two story networks, then, we show that existing stories are differentially preferred to function as a new version's pre-text given three types of attractiveness: (i) frequency-based and (ii) model-based attractiveness which (iii) decays in time. PMID:27429767

  11. Genetic and logic networks with the signal-inhibitor-activator structure are dynamically robust

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fangting; TAN Ning

    2006-01-01

    The proteins, DNA and RNA interaction networks govern various biological functions in living cells, these networks should be dynamically robust in the intracellular and environmental fluctuations. Here, we use Boolean network to study the robust structure of both genetic and logic networks. First, SOS network in bacteria E. coli, which regulates cell survival and repair after DNA damage, is shown to be dynamically robust. Comparing with cell cycle network in budding yeast and flagella network in E. coli, we find the signal-inhibitor-activator (SIA) structure in transcription regulatory networks. Second, under the dynamical rule that inhibition is much stronger than activation, we have searched 3-node non-self-loop logical networks that are dynamically robust, and that if the attractive basin of a final attractor is as large as seven, and the final attractor has only one active node, then the active node acts as inhibitor, and the SIA and signal-inhibitor (SI) structures are fundamental architectures of robust networks. SIA and SI networks with dynamic robustness against environment uncertainties may be selected and maintained over the course of evolution, rather than blind trial-error testing and be ing an accidental consequence of particular evolutionary history. SIA network can perform a more complex process than SI network, andSIA might be used to design robust artificial genetic network. Our results provide dynamical support for why the inhibitors and SIA/SI structures are frequently employed in cellular regulatory networks.

  12. Alzheimer disease: modeling an Aβ-centered biological network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campion, D; Pottier, C; Nicolas, G; Le Guennec, K; Rovelet-Lecrux, A

    2016-07-01

    In genetically complex diseases, the search for missing heritability is focusing on rare variants with large effect. Thanks to next generation sequencing technologies, genome-wide characterization of these variants is now feasible in every individual. However, a lesson from current studies is that collapsing rare variants at the gene level is often insufficient to obtain a statistically significant signal in case-control studies, and that network-based analyses are an attractive complement to classical approaches. In Alzheimer disease (AD), according to the prevalent amyloid cascade hypothesis, the pathology is driven by the amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide. In past years, based on experimental studies, several hundreds of proteins have been shown to interfere with Aβ production, clearance, aggregation or toxicity. Thanks to a manual curation of the literature, we identified 335 genes/proteins involved in this biological network and classified them according to their cellular function. The complete list of genes, or its subcomponents, will be of interest in ongoing AD genetic studies. PMID:27021818

  13. Double network bacterial cellulose hydrogel to build a biology-device interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhijun; Li, Ying; Chen, Xiuli; Han, Hongwei; Yang, Guang

    2013-12-01

    Establishing a biology-device interface might enable the interaction between microelectronics and biotechnology. In this study, electroactive hydrogels have been produced using bacterial cellulose (BC) and conducting polymer (CP) deposited on the BC hydrogel surface to cover the BC fibers. The structures of these composites thus have double networks, one of which is a layer of electroactive hydrogels combined with BC and CP. The electroconductivity provides the composites with capabilities for voltage and current response, and the BC hydrogel layer provides good biocompatibility, biodegradability, bioadhesion and mass transport properties. Such a system might allow selective biological functions such as molecular recognition and specific catalysis and also for probing the detailed genetic and molecular mechanisms of life. A BC-CP composite hydrogel could then lead to a biology-device interface. Cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) are used here to study the composite hydrogels' electroactive property. BC-PAni and BC-PPy respond to voltage changes. This provides a mechanism to amplify electrochemical signals for analysis or detection. BC hydrogels were found to be able to support the growth, spreading and migration of human normal skin fibroblasts without causing any cytotoxic effect on the cells in the cell culture. These double network BC-CP hydrogels are biphasic Janus hydrogels which integrate electroactivity with biocompatibility, and might provide a biology-device interface to produce implantable devices for personalized and regenerative medicine.

  14. Community Structure in Online Collegiate Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traud, Amanda; Kelsic, Eric; Mucha, Peter; Porter, Mason

    2009-03-01

    Online social networking sites have become increasingly popular with college students. The networks we studied are defined through ``friendships'' indicated by Facebook users from UNC, Oklahoma, Caltech, Georgetown, and Princeton. We apply the tools of network science to study the Facebook networks from these five different universities at a single point in time. We investigate each single-institution network's community structure, which we obtain through partitioning the graph using an eigenvector method. We use both graphical and quantitative tools, including pair-counting methods, which we interpret through statistical analysis and permutation tests to measure the correlations between the network communities and a set of characteristics given by each user (residence, class year, major, and high school). We also analyze the single gender subsets of these networks, and the impact of missing demographical data. Our study allows us to compare the online social networks for the five schools as well as infer differences in offline social interactions. At the schools studied, we were able to define which characteristics of the Facebook users correlate best with friendships.

  15. Polarized DIS Structure Functions from Neural Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a parametrization of polarized Deep-Inelastic-Scattering (DIS) structure functions based on Neural Networks. The parametrization provides a bias-free determination of the probability measure in the space of structure functions, which retains information on experimental errors and correlations. As an example we discuss the application of this method to the study of the structure function g1p(x,Q2)

  16. Network Biology (http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/nb/online-version.asp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    networkbiology@iaees.org

    Full Text Available Network Biology ISSN 2220-8879 URL: http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/nb/online-version.asp RSS: http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/nb/rss.xml E-mail: networkbiology@iaees.org Editor-in-Chief: WenJun Zhang Aims and Scope NETWORK BIOLOGY (ISSN 2220-8879; CODEN NBEICS is an open access, peer-reviewed international journal that considers scientific articles in all different areas of network biology. It is the transactions of the International Society of Network Biology. It dedicates to the latest advances in network biology. The goal of this journal is to keep a record of the state-of-the-art research and promote the research work in these fast moving areas. The topics to be covered by Network Biology include, but are not limited to: •Theories, algorithms and programs of network analysis •Innovations and applications of biological networks •Ecological networks, food webs and natural equilibrium •Co-evolution, co-extinction, biodiversity conservation •Metabolic networks, protein-protein interaction networks, biochemical reaction networks, gene networks, transcriptional regulatory networks, cell cycle networks, phylogenetic networks, network motifs •Physiological networksNetwork regulation of metabolic processes, human diseases and ecological systems •Social networks, epidemiological networks •System complexity, self-organized systems, emergence of biological systems, agent-based modeling, individual-based modeling, neural network modeling, and other network-based modeling, etc. We are also interested in short communications that clearly address a specific issue or completely present a new ecological network, food web, or metabolic or gene network, etc. Authors can submit their works to the email box of this journal, networkbiology@iaees.org. All manuscripts submitted to this journal must be previously unpublished and may not be considered for publication elsewhere at any time during review period of this journal

  17. Data acquisition and analysis at the Structural Biology Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Structural Biology Center (SBC), a national user facility for macromolecular crystallography located at Argonne National Laboratory's Advanced Photon Source, is currently being built and commissioned. SBC facilities include a bending-magnet beamline, an insertion-device beamline, laboratory and office space adjacent to the beamlines, and associated instrumentation, experimental apparatus, and facilities. SBC technical facilities will support anomalous dispersion phasing experiments, data collection from microcrystals, data collection from crystals with large molecular structures and rapid data collection from multiple related crystal structures for protein engineering and drug design. The SBC Computing Systems and Software Engineering Group is tasked with developing the SBC Control System, which includes computing systems, network, and software. The emphasis of SBC Control System development has been to provide efficient and convenient beamline control, data acquisition, and data analysis for maximal facility and experimenter productivity. This paper describes the SBC Control System development, specifically data acquisition and analysis at the SBC, and the development methods used to meet this goal

  18. Hydrological structure and biological productivity of the tropical Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Muraleedharan, U.D.; Muraleedharan, P.M.

    Hydrological structure analyses of regions in the tropical Atlantic Ocean have consistently revealed the existence of a typical tropical structure characterized by a nitrate-depleted mixed layer above the thermocline. The important biological...

  19. Structural systems biology evaluation of metabolic thermotolerance in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Roger L.; Andrews, Kathleen; Kim, Donghyuk; Li, Zhanwen; Godzik, Adam; Palsson, Bernhard Ø.

    2013-01-01

    Genome scale network reconstruction has enabled predictive modeling of metabolism for many systems. Traditionally, protein structural information has not been represented in such reconstructions. Expanding a genome-scale model of Escherichia coli metabolism by including experimental and predicted protein structures enabled the analysis of protein thermostability in a network context, allowing prediction of protein activities that limit network function at super-optimal temperature and mechani...

  20. Structural Biology and Molecular Applications Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Part of NCI's Division of Cancer Biology's research portfolio, research and development in this area focuses on enabling technologies, models, and methodologies to support basic and applied cancer research.

  1. Managing biological networks by using text mining and computer-aided curation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Seok Jong; Cho, Yongseong; Lee, Min-Ho; Lim, Jongtae; Yoo, Jaesoo

    2015-11-01

    In order to understand a biological mechanism in a cell, a researcher should collect a huge number of protein interactions with experimental data from experiments and the literature. Text mining systems that extract biological interactions from papers have been used to construct biological networks for a few decades. Even though the text mining of literature is necessary to construct a biological network, few systems with a text mining tool are available for biologists who want to construct their own biological networks. We have developed a biological network construction system called BioKnowledge Viewer that can generate a biological interaction network by using a text mining tool and biological taggers. It also Boolean simulation software to provide a biological modeling system to simulate the model that is made with the text mining tool. A user can download PubMed articles and construct a biological network by using the Multi-level Knowledge Emergence Model (KMEM), MetaMap, and A Biomedical Named Entity Recognizer (ABNER) as a text mining tool. To evaluate the system, we constructed an aging-related biological network that consist 9,415 nodes (genes) by using manual curation. With network analysis, we found that several genes, including JNK, AP-1, and BCL-2, were highly related in aging biological network. We provide a semi-automatic curation environment so that users can obtain a graph database for managing text mining results that are generated in the server system and can navigate the network with BioKnowledge Viewer, which is freely available at http://bioknowledgeviewer.kisti.re.kr.

  2. Spatial-Frequency Azimuthally Stable Cartography of Biological Polycrystalline Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Ushenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A new azimuthally stable polarimetric technique processing microscopic images of optically anisotropic structures of biological tissues histological sections is proposed. It has been used as a generalized model of phase anisotropy definition of biological tissues by using superposition of Mueller matrices of linear birefringence and optical activity. The matrix element M44 has been chosen as the main information parameter, whose value is independent of the rotation angle of both sample and probing beam polarization plane. For the first time, the technique of concerted spatial-frequency filtration has been used in order to separate the manifestation of linear birefringence and optical activity. Thereupon, the method of azimuthally stable spatial-frequency cartography of biological tissues histological sections has been elaborated. As the analyzing tool, complex statistic, correlation, and fractal analysis of coordinate distributions of M44 element has been performed. The possibility of using the biopsy of the uterine wall tissue in order to differentiate benign (fibromyoma and malignant (adenocarcinoma conditions has been estimated.

  3. Architecture and biological applications of artificial neural networks: a tuberculosis perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darsey, Jerry A; Griffin, William O; Joginipelli, Sravanthi; Melapu, Venkata Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Advancement of science and technology has prompted researchers to develop new intelligent systems that can solve a variety of problems such as pattern recognition, prediction, and optimization. The ability of the human brain to learn in a fashion that tolerates noise and error has attracted many researchers and provided the starting point for the development of artificial neural networks: the intelligent systems. Intelligent systems can acclimatize to the environment or data and can maximize the chances of success or improve the efficiency of a search. Due to massive parallelism with large numbers of interconnected processers and their ability to learn from the data, neural networks can solve a variety of challenging computational problems. Neural networks have the ability to derive meaning from complicated and imprecise data; they are used in detecting patterns, and trends that are too complex for humans, or other computer systems. Solutions to the toughest problems will not be found through one narrow specialization; therefore we need to combine interdisciplinary approaches to discover the solutions to a variety of problems. Many researchers in different disciplines such as medicine, bioinformatics, molecular biology, and pharmacology have successfully applied artificial neural networks. This chapter helps the reader in understanding the basics of artificial neural networks, their applications, and methodology; it also outlines the network learning process and architecture. We present a brief outline of the application of neural networks to medical diagnosis, drug discovery, gene identification, and protein structure prediction. We conclude with a summary of the results from our study on tuberculosis data using neural networks, in diagnosing active tuberculosis, and predicting chronic vs. infiltrative forms of tuberculosis. PMID:25502388

  4. The structure of scientific collaboration networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, M. E. J.

    2001-01-01

    The structure of scientific collaboration networks is investigated. Two scientists are considered connected if they have authored a paper together and explicit networks of such connections are constructed by using data drawn from a number of databases, including MEDLINE (biomedical research), the Los Alamos e-Print Archive (physics), and NCSTRL (computer science). I show that these collaboration networks form “small worlds,” in which randomly chosen pairs of scientists are typically separated by only a short path of intermediate acquaintances. I further give results for mean and distribution of numbers of collaborators of authors, demonstrate the presence of clustering in the networks, and highlight a number of apparent differences in the patterns of collaboration between the fields studied. PMID:11149952

  5. Identifying Community Structures in Dynamic Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Alvari, Hamidreza; Sukthankar, Gita; Lakkaraju, Kiran

    2016-01-01

    Most real-world social networks are inherently dynamic, composed of communities that are constantly changing in membership. To track these evolving communities, we need dynamic community detection techniques. This article evaluates the performance of a set of game theoretic approaches for identifying communities in dynamic networks. Our method, D-GT (Dynamic Game Theoretic community detection), models each network node as a rational agent who periodically plays a community membership game with its neighbors. During game play, nodes seek to maximize their local utility by joining or leaving the communities of network neighbors. The community structure emerges after the game reaches a Nash equilibrium. Compared to the benchmark community detection methods, D-GT more accurately predicts the number of communities and finds community assignments with a higher normalized mutual information, while retaining a good modularity.

  6. Self-healing networks: redundancy and structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Quattrociocchi

    Full Text Available We introduce the concept of self-healing in the field of complex networks modelling; in particular, self-healing capabilities are implemented through distributed communication protocols that exploit redundant links to recover the connectivity of the system. We then analyze the effect of the level of redundancy on the resilience to multiple failures; in particular, we measure the fraction of nodes still served for increasing levels of network damages. Finally, we study the effects of redundancy under different connectivity patterns-from planar grids, to small-world, up to scale-free networks-on healing performances. Small-world topologies show that introducing some long-range connections in planar grids greatly enhances the resilience to multiple failures with performances comparable to the case of the most resilient (and least realistic scale-free structures. Obvious applications of self-healing are in the important field of infrastructural networks like gas, power, water, oil distribution systems.

  7. CSMB | Center For Structural Molecular Biology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Structural Molecular Biologyat ORNL is dedicated to developing instrumentation and methods for determining the 3-dimensional structures of proteins,...

  8. Complex network problems in physics, computer science and biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojocaru, Radu Ionut

    There is a close relation between physics and mathematics and the exchange of ideas between these two sciences are well established. However until few years ago there was no such a close relation between physics and computer science. Even more, only recently biologists started to use methods and tools from statistical physics in order to study the behavior of complex system. In this thesis we concentrate on applying and analyzing several methods borrowed from computer science to biology and also we use methods from statistical physics in solving hard problems from computer science. In recent years physicists have been interested in studying the behavior of complex networks. Physics is an experimental science in which theoretical predictions are compared to experiments. In this definition, the term prediction plays a very important role: although the system is complex, it is still possible to get predictions for its behavior, but these predictions are of a probabilistic nature. Spin glasses, lattice gases or the Potts model are a few examples of complex systems in physics. Spin glasses and many frustrated antiferromagnets map exactly to computer science problems in the NP-hard class defined in Chapter 1. In Chapter 1 we discuss a common result from artificial intelligence (AI) which shows that there are some problems which are NP-complete, with the implication that these problems are difficult to solve. We introduce a few well known hard problems from computer science (Satisfiability, Coloring, Vertex Cover together with Maximum Independent Set and Number Partitioning) and then discuss their mapping to problems from physics. In Chapter 2 we provide a short review of combinatorial optimization algorithms and their applications to ground state problems in disordered systems. We discuss the cavity method initially developed for studying the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model of spin glasses. We extend this model to the study of a specific case of spin glass on the Bethe

  9. An examination of a reciprocal relationship between network governance and network structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergenholtz, Carsten; Goduscheit, René Chester

    2011-01-01

    In the present article, we examine the network structure and governance of inter-organisational innovation networks over time. Network governance refers to the issue of how to manage and coordinate the relational activities and processes in the network while research on network structure deals wi...

  10. Structure, reactivity, and biological properties of hidantoines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydantoin (imidazolidine-2,4-dione) is a 2,4-diketotetrahydroimidazole discovered by Baeyer in 1861. Thiohydantoins and derivatives were prepared, having chemical properties similar to the corresponding carbonyl compounds. Some biological activities (antimicrobial, anticonvulsant, schistosomicidal) are attributed to the chemical reactivity and consequent affinity of hydantoinic rings towards biomacromolecules. Therefore, knowledge about the chemistry of hydantoins has increased enormously. In this review, we present important aspects such as reactivity of hydantoins, acidity of hydantoins, spectroscopy and crystallographic properties, and biological activities of hydantoin and its derivatives. (author)

  11. The redox biology network in cancer pathophysiology and therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Manda

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The review pinpoints operational concepts related to the redox biology network applied to the pathophysiology and therapeutics of solid tumors. A sophisticated network of intrinsic and extrinsic cues, integrated in the tumor niche, drives tumorigenesis and tumor progression. Critical mutations and distorted redox signaling pathways orchestrate pathologic events inside cancer cells, resulting in resistance to stress and death signals, aberrant proliferation and efficient repair mechanisms. Additionally, the complex inter-cellular crosstalk within the tumor niche, mediated by cytokines, redox-sensitive danger signals (HMGB1 and exosomes, under the pressure of multiple stresses (oxidative, inflammatory, metabolic, greatly contributes to the malignant phenotype. The tumor-associated inflammatory stress and its suppressive action on the anti-tumor immune response are highlighted. We further emphasize that ROS may act either as supporter or enemy of cancer cells, depending on the context. Oxidative stress-based therapies, such as radiotherapy and photodynamic therapy, take advantage of the cytotoxic face of ROS for killing tumor cells by a non-physiologically sudden, localized and intense oxidative burst. The type of tumor cell death elicited by these therapies is discussed. Therapy outcome depends on the differential sensitivity to oxidative stress of particular tumor cells, such as cancer stem cells, and therefore co-therapies that transiently down-regulate their intrinsic antioxidant system hold great promise. We draw attention on the consequences of the damage signals delivered by oxidative stress-injured cells to neighboring and distant cells, and emphasize the benefits of therapeutically triggered immunologic cell death in metastatic cancer. An integrative approach should be applied when designing therapeutic strategies in cancer, taking into consideration the mutational, metabolic, inflammatory and oxidative status of tumor cells, cellular

  12. Social Network Structures among Groundnut Farmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuo, Mary; Bell, Alexandra A.; Bravo-Ureta, Boris E.; Okello, David K.; Okoko, Evelyn Nasambu; Kidula, Nelson L.; Deom, C. Michael; Puppala, Naveen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Groundnut farmers in East Africa have experienced declines in production despite research and extension efforts to increase productivity. This study examined how social network structures related to acquisition of information about new seed varieties and productivity among groundnut farmers in Uganda and Kenya.…

  13. Networks: structure and action : steering in and steering by policy networks

    OpenAIRE

    Dassen, Adrie

    2010-01-01

    This thesis explores the opportunities to build a structural policy network model that is rooted in social network theories. By making a distinction between a process of steering in networks, and a process of steering by networks, it addresses the effects of network structures on network dynamics as well as on the production of policy outputs. Steering in policy networks refers to the process of horizontal bargaining over policy positions in which resources are exchanged between individual ne...

  14. Visualising Knowledge Structures in Biology: Discipline, Curriculum and Student Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinchin, Ian M.

    2011-01-01

    Concept mapping is discussed as a tool for the visualisation of knowledge structures that can be exploited within biological education. Application of this tool makes it possible to relate the structure of the curriculum to the structure of the discipline, in order to support the development of robust student knowledge structures in ways that…

  15. Information diffusion in structured online social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pei; Zhang, Yini; Qiao, Fengcai; Wang, Hui

    2015-05-01

    Nowadays, due to the word-of-mouth effect, online social networks have been considered to be efficient approaches to conduct viral marketing, which makes it of great importance to understand the diffusion dynamics in online social networks. However, most research on diffusion dynamics in epidemiology and existing social networks cannot be applied directly to characterize online social networks. In this paper, we propose models to characterize the information diffusion in structured online social networks with push-based forwarding mechanism. We introduce the term user influence to characterize the average number of times that messages are browsed which is incurred by a given type user generating a message, and study the diffusion threshold, above which the user influence of generating a message will approach infinity. We conduct simulations and provide the simulation results, which are consistent with the theoretical analysis results perfectly. These results are of use in understanding the diffusion dynamics in online social networks and also critical for advertisers in viral marketing who want to estimate the user influence before posting an advertisement.

  16. Collaboration Networks in the Brazilian Scientific Output in Evolutionary Biology: 2000-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santin, Dirce M; Vanz, Samile A S; Stumpf, Ida R C

    2016-03-01

    This article analyzes the existing collaboration networks in the Brazilian scientific output in Evolutionary Biology, considering articles published during the period from 2000 to 2012 in journals indexed by Web of Science. The methodology integrates bibliometric techniques and Social Network Analysis resources to describe the growth of Brazilian scientific output and understand the levels, dynamics and structure of collaboration between authors, institutions and countries. The results unveil an enhancement and consolidation of collaborative relationships over time and suggest the existence of key institutions and authors, whose influence on research is expressed by the variety and intensity of the relationships established in the co-authorship of articles. International collaboration, present in more than half of the publications, is highly significant and unusual in Brazilian science. The situation indicates the internationalization of scientific output and the ability of the field to take part in the science produced by the international scientific community. PMID:26871500

  17. Fundamental structures of dynamic social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekara, Vedran; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Lehmann, Sune

    2016-09-01

    Social systems are in a constant state of flux, with dynamics spanning from minute-by-minute changes to patterns present on the timescale of years. Accurate models of social dynamics are important for understanding the spreading of influence or diseases, formation of friendships, and the productivity of teams. Although there has been much progress on understanding complex networks over the past decade, little is known about the regularities governing the microdynamics of social networks. Here, we explore the dynamic social network of a densely-connected population of ∼1,000 individuals and their interactions in the network of real-world person-to-person proximity measured via Bluetooth, as well as their telecommunication networks, online social media contacts, geolocation, and demographic data. These high-resolution data allow us to observe social groups directly, rendering community detection unnecessary. Starting from 5-min time slices, we uncover dynamic social structures expressed on multiple timescales. On the hourly timescale, we find that gatherings are fluid, with members coming and going, but organized via a stable core of individuals. Each core represents a social context. Cores exhibit a pattern of recurring meetings across weeks and months, each with varying degrees of regularity. Taken together, these findings provide a powerful simplification of the social network, where cores represent fundamental structures expressed with strong temporal and spatial regularity. Using this framework, we explore the complex interplay between social and geospatial behavior, documenting how the formation of cores is preceded by coordination behavior in the communication networks and demonstrating that social behavior can be predicted with high precision. PMID:27555584

  18. Mesoscopic structures reveal the network between the layers of multiplex data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacovacci, Jacopo; Wu, Zhihao; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2015-10-01

    Multiplex networks describe a large variety of complex systems, whose elements (nodes) can be connected by different types of interactions forming different layers (networks) of the multiplex. Multiplex networks include social networks, transportation networks, or biological networks in the cell or in the brain. Extracting relevant information from these networks is of crucial importance for solving challenging inference problems and for characterizing the multiplex networks microscopic and mesoscopic structure. Here we propose an information theory method to extract the network between the layers of multiplex data sets, forming a "network of networks." We build an indicator function, based on the entropy of network ensembles, to characterize the mesoscopic similarities between the layers of a multiplex network, and we use clustering techniques to characterize the communities present in this network of networks. We apply the proposed method to study the Multiplex Collaboration Network formed by scientists collaborating on different subjects and publishing in the American Physical Society journals. The analysis of this data set reveals the interplay between the collaboration networks and the organization of knowledge in physics.

  19. Exploring hierarchical and overlapping modular structure in the yeast protein interaction network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Yi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Developing effective strategies to reveal modular structures in protein interaction networks is crucial for better understanding of molecular mechanisms of underlying biological processes. In this paper, we propose a new density-based algorithm (ADHOC for clustering vertices of a protein interaction network using a novel subgraph density measurement. Results By statistically evaluating several independent criteria, we found that ADHOC could significantly improve the outcome as compared with five previously reported density-dependent methods. We further applied ADHOC to investigate the hierarchical and overlapping modular structure in the yeast PPI network. Our method could effectively detect both protein modules and the overlaps between them, and thus greatly promote the precise prediction of protein functions. Moreover, by further assaying the intermodule layer of the yeast PPI network, we classified hubs into two types, module hubs and inter-module hubs. Each type presents distinct characteristics both in network topology and biological functions, which could conduce to the better understanding of relationship between network architecture and biological implications. Conclusions Our proposed algorithm based on the novel subgraph density measurement makes it possible to more precisely detect hierarchical and overlapping modular structures in protein interaction networks. In addition, our method also shows a strong robustness against the noise in network, which is quite critical for analyzing such a high noise network.

  20. An examination of a reciprocal relationship between network governance and network structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergenholtz, Carsten; Goduscheit, René Chester

    2011-01-01

    the overall structural relations between the actors in the network. These streams of research do contain references to each other but they mainly rely on a static conception of the relationship between network structure and the applied network governance. Based on a case study of a loosely coupled......In the present article, we examine the network structure and governance of inter-organisational innovation networks over time. Network governance refers to the issue of how to manage and coordinate the relational activities and processes in the network while research on network structure deals with...... Danish inter-organisational innovation network, the proposition is that a reciprocal relationship between network governance and network structure can be identified. Such a reciprocal relationship involves theoretical and practical implications for how to govern an inter-organisational network....

  1. The fundamental structures of dynamic social networks

    CERN Document Server

    Sekara, Vedran; Lehmann, Sune

    2015-01-01

    Networks provide a powerful mathematical framework for analyzing the structure and dynamics of complex systems (1-3). The study of group behavior has deep roots in the social science literature (4,5) and community detection is a central part of modern network science. Network communities have been found to be highly overlapping and organized in a hierarchical structure (6-9). Recent technological advances have provided a toolset for measuring the detailed social dynamics at scale (10,11). In spite of great progress, a quantitative description of the complex temporal behavior of social groups-with dynamics spanning from minute-by-minute changes to patterns expressed on the timescale of years-is still absent. Here we uncover a class of fundamental structures embedded within highly dynamic social networks. On the shortest time-scale, we find that social gatherings are fluid, with members coming and going, but organized via a stable core of individuals. We show that cores represent social contexts (9), with recur...

  2. Structural properties of spatially embedded networks

    OpenAIRE

    Kosmidis, Kosmas; Havlin, Shlomo; Bunde, Armin

    2008-01-01

    We study the effects of spatial constraints on the structural properties of networks embedded in one or two dimensional space. When nodes are embedded in space, they have a well defined Euclidean distance $r$ between any pair. We assume that nodes at distance $r$ have a link with probability $p(r) \\sim r^{- \\delta}$. We study the mean topological distance $l$ and the clustering coefficient $C$ of these networks and find that they both exhibit phase transitions for some critical value of the c...

  3. Finding local community structure in networks

    CERN Document Server

    Clauset, A

    2005-01-01

    Although the inference of global community structure in networks has recently become a topic of great interest in the physics community, all such algorithms require that the graph be completely known. Here, we define both a measure of local community structure and an algorithm that infers the hierarchy of communities that enclose a given vertex by exploring the graph one vertex at a time. This algorithm runs in time O(d*k^2) for general graphs when $d$ is the mean degree and k is the number of vertices to be explored. For graphs where exploring a new vertex is time-consuming, the running time is linear, O(k). We show that on computer-generated graphs this technique compares favorably to algorithms that require global knowledge. We also use this algorithm to extract meaningful local clustering information in the large recommender network of an online retailer and show the existence of mesoscopic structure.

  4. Fundamentals of complex networks models, structures and dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Guanrong; Li, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Complex networks such as the Internet, WWW, transportationnetworks, power grids, biological neural networks, and scientificcooperation networks of all kinds provide challenges for futuretechnological development. In particular, advanced societies havebecome dependent on large infrastructural networks to an extentbeyond our capability to plan (modeling) and to operate (control).The recent spate of collapses in power grids and ongoing virusattacks on the Internet illustrate the need for knowledge aboutmodeling, analysis of behaviors, optimized planning and performancecontrol in such networks. F

  5. Reconstruct the Hierarchical Structure in a Complex Network

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, H; Zhou, T; Ang, B; Zhao, F; Yang, Huijie; Wang, Wenxu; Zhou, Tao; ang, Binghong; Zhao, Fangcui

    2005-01-01

    A number of recent works have concentrated on a few statistical properties of complex networks, such as the clustering, the right-skewed degree distribution and the community, which are common to many real world networks. In this paper, we address the hierarchy property sharing among a large amount of networks. Based upon the eigenvector centrality (EC) measure, a method is proposed to reconstruct the hierarchical structure of a complex network. It is tested on the Santa Fe Institute collaboration network, whose structure is well known. We also apply it to a Mathematicians' collaboration network and the protein interaction network of Yeast. The method can detect significantly hierarchical structures in these networks.

  6. Combining neural networks for protein secondary structure prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Søren Kamaric

    1995-01-01

    In this paper structured neural networks are applied to the problem of predicting the secondary structure of proteins. A hierarchical approach is used where specialized neural networks are designed for each structural class and then combined using another neural network. The submodels are designe...... is better than most secondary structure prediction methods based on single sequences even though this model contains much fewer parameters...

  7. Neutron scattering for the analysis of biological structures. Brookhaven symposia in biology. Number 27

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenborn, B P [ed.

    1976-01-01

    Sessions were included on neutron scattering and biological structure analysis, protein crystallography, neutron scattering from oriented systems, solution scattering, preparation of deuterated specimens, inelastic scattering, data analysis, experimental techniques, and instrumentation. Separate entries were made for the individual papers.

  8. Parameterized Complexity Results for Exact Bayesian Network Structure Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastian Ordyniak; Stefan Szeider

    2014-01-01

    Bayesian network structure learning is the notoriously difficult problem of discovering a Bayesian network that optimally represents a given set of training data. In this paper we study the computational worst-case complexity of exact Bayesian network structure learning under graph theoretic restrictions on the (directed) super-structure. The super-structure is an undirected graph that contains as subgraphs the skeletons of solution networks. We introduce the directed super-structure as a nat...

  9. Exploratory Analysis of Biological Networks through Visualization, Clustering, and Functional Annotation in Cytoscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baryshnikova, Anastasia

    2016-01-01

    Biological networks define how genes, proteins, and other cellular components interact with one another to carry out specific functions, providing a scaffold for understanding cellular organization. Although in-depth network analysis requires advanced mathematical and computational knowledge, a preliminary visual exploration of biological networks is accessible to anyone with basic computer skills. Visualization of biological networks is used primarily to examine network topology, identify functional modules, and predict gene functions based on gene connectivity within the network. Networks are excellent at providing a bird's-eye view of data sets and have the power of illustrating complex ideas in simple and intuitive terms. In addition, they enable exploratory analysis and generation of new hypotheses, which can then be tested using rigorous statistical and experimental tools. This protocol describes a simple procedure for visualizing a biological network using the genetic interaction similarity network for Saccharomyces cerevisiae as an example. The visualization procedure described here relies on the open-source network visualization software Cytoscape and includes detailed instructions on formatting and loading the data, clustering networks, and overlaying functional annotations. PMID:26988373

  10. Community structure in the phonological network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia S. Q. Siew

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Community structure, which refers to the presence of densely connected groups within a larger network, is a common feature of several real-world networks from a variety of domains such as the human brain, social networks of hunter-gatherers and business organizations, and the World Wide Web (Porter et al., 2009. Using a community detection technique known as the Louvain optimization method, 17 communities were extracted from the giant component of the phonological network described in Vitevitch (2008. Additional analyses comparing the lexical and phonological characteristics of words in these communities against words in randomly generated communities revealed several novel discoveries. Larger communities tend to consist of short, frequent words of high degree and low age of acquisition ratings, and smaller communities tend to consist of longer, less frequent words of low degree and high age of acquisition ratings. Real communities also contained fewer different phonological segments compared to random communities, although the number of occurrences of phonological segments found in real communities was much higher than that of the same phonological segments in random communities. Interestingly, the observation that relatively few biphones occur very frequently and a large number of biphones occur rarely within communities mirrors the pattern of the overall frequency of words in a language (Zipf, 1935. The present findings have important implications for understanding the dynamics of activation spread among words in the phonological network that are relevant to lexical processing, as well as understanding the mechanisms that underlie language acquisition and the evolution of language.

  11. Targeting the Human Cancer Pathway Protein Interaction Network by Structural Genomics*

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Yuanpeng Janet; Hang, Dehua; Lu, Long Jason; Tong, Liang; Gerstein, Mark B; Montelione, Gaetano T.

    2008-01-01

    Structural genomics provides an important approach for characterizing and understanding systems biology. As a step toward better integrating protein three-dimensional (3D) structural information in cancer systems biology, we have constructed a Human Cancer Pathway Protein Interaction Network (HCPIN) by analysis of several classical cancer-associated signaling pathways and their physical protein-protein interactions. Many well known cancer-associated proteins play central roles as “hubs” or “b...

  12. Inner structure of capital control networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battiston, Stefano

    2004-07-01

    We study the topological structure of the network of shareholding relationships in the Italian stock market (MIB) and in two US stock markets (NYSE and NASDAQ). The portfolio diversification and the wealth invested on the market by economical agents have been shown in our previous work to have all a power law behavior. However, a further investigation shows that the inner structure of the capital control network are not at all the same across markets. The shareholding network is a weighted graph, therefore we introduce two quantities analogous to in-degree and out-degree for weighted graphs which measure, respectively: the number of effective shareholders of a stock and the number of companies effectively controlled by a single holder. Combining the information carried by the distributions of these two quantities we are able to extract the backbone of each market and we find that while the MIB splits into several separated groups of interest, the US markets is characterized by very large holders sharing control on overlapping subsets of stocks. This method seems promising for the analysis of the topology of capital control networks in general and not only in the stock market.

  13. The defining features of the modern entrepreneurship network structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.V. Kochubey

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the article the various forms of network enterprises are analyzed, the key characteristics of network structures are identified. The relationship between network types and forms of business organization is shown. The studies of different types of network structures are systematized.

  14. An examination of a reciprocal relationship between network governance and network structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergenholtz, Carsten; Goduscheit, René Chester

    structural relations between the actors in the network. These streams of research do contain references to each other but mostly rely on a static conception of the relationship between network structure and the applied network governance. The paper is based on a primarily qualitative case study of a loosely......The present article examines the network structure and governance of inter-organisational innovation networks. Network governance refers to the issue of how to manage and coordinate the relational activities and processes in the network while research on network structure deals with the overall...... coupled Danish inter-organisational innovation network. The proposition is that a reciprocal relation between network governance and network structure can be identified....

  15. Probabilistic modeling and machine learning in structural and systems biology

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    This supplement contains extended versions of a selected subset of papers presented at the workshop PMSB 2007, Probabilistic Modeling and Machine Learning in Structural and Systems Biology, Tuusula, Finland, from June 17 to 18, 2006.

  16. Biology content cognitive structure: From science student to science teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauslein, Patricia L.; Good, Ronald G.; Cummins, Catherine L.

    The F-Sort of Biology Concepts was used to assess understanding of the relationships among 37 biology concepts by five groups: Preservice secondary science teachers, in-service biology teachers with 1-3 years of teaching experience, in-service biology teachers with 5 or more years of experience, scientists in any biological science field, and college seniors majoring in biology. Data collected from the F-sort were analyzed using latent partition analysis and alpha factor analysis with additional interpretation from multidimensional scaling. The subjects were asked to think aloud as they performed the F-sort and each session was audiotaped for later analysis. These analyses indicated that the biology major and experienced secondary science teachers were separated from the scientists by a dimension based on a deep-versus-surface structure understanding of the concepts. A second axis shows that scientists are separated from other groups by a fluid-versus-fixed cognitive structure dimension. That is, both experienced teachers and scientists were found to have well-constructed and ordered cognitive structures, but scientists were much more likely to see an item having a place in two or more categories, whereas experienced teachers tended to focus on only one aspect of an item, and therefore understanding that it rightfully belonged in only one category. It appears that teachers restructure their science knowledge as they become more experienced. There is an apparent transition from poorly organized to highly organized cognitive structures for biology concepts when comparing preservice, novice, and experienced teachers, respectively. The transition does not seem to be one achieving a deeper understanding of the biology concepts or to a greater degree of integration of the concepts, but rather a transition from a fairly large, loosely organized pool of biology concepts to one which is highly structured but limited to the expectations of the established curriculum. The

  17. Integration of biological networks and gene expression data using Cytoscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cline, M.S.; Smoot, M.; Cerami, E.;

    2007-01-01

    interaction network obtained for genes of interest. Five major steps are described: (i) obtaining a gene or protein network, (ii) displaying the network using layout algorithms, (iii) integrating with gene expression and other functional attributes, (iv) identifying putative complexes and functional modules...

  18. Structuring heterogeneous biological information using fuzzy clustering of k-partite graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theis Fabian J

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extensive and automated data integration in bioinformatics facilitates the construction of large, complex biological networks. However, the challenge lies in the interpretation of these networks. While most research focuses on the unipartite or bipartite case, we address the more general but common situation of k-partite graphs. These graphs contain k different node types and links are only allowed between nodes of different types. In order to reveal their structural organization and describe the contained information in a more coarse-grained fashion, we ask how to detect clusters within each node type. Results Since entities in biological networks regularly have more than one function and hence participate in more than one cluster, we developed a k-partite graph partitioning algorithm that allows for overlapping (fuzzy clusters. It determines for each node a degree of membership to each cluster. Moreover, the algorithm estimates a weighted k-partite graph that connects the extracted clusters. Our method is fast and efficient, mimicking the multiplicative update rules commonly employed in algorithms for non-negative matrix factorization. It facilitates the decomposition of networks on a chosen scale and therefore allows for analysis and interpretation of structures on various resolution levels. Applying our algorithm to a tripartite disease-gene-protein complex network, we were able to structure this graph on a large scale into clusters that are functionally correlated and biologically meaningful. Locally, smaller clusters enabled reclassification or annotation of the clusters' elements. We exemplified this for the transcription factor MECP2. Conclusions In order to cope with the overwhelming amount of information available from biomedical literature, we need to tackle the challenge of finding structures in large networks with nodes of multiple types. To this end, we presented a novel fuzzy k-partite graph partitioning

  19. Hierarchical Neural Network Structures for Phoneme Recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Vasquez, Daniel; Minker, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    In this book, hierarchical structures based on neural networks are investigated for automatic speech recognition. These structures are evaluated on the phoneme recognition task where a  Hybrid Hidden Markov Model/Artificial Neural Network paradigm is used. The baseline hierarchical scheme consists of two levels each which is based on a Multilayered Perceptron. Additionally, the output of the first level serves as a second level input. The computational speed of the phoneme recognizer can be substantially increased by removing redundant information still contained at the first level output. Several techniques based on temporal and phonetic criteria have been investigated to remove this redundant information. The computational time could be reduced by 57% whilst keeping the system accuracy comparable to the baseline hierarchical approach.

  20. Community structure in introductory physics course networks

    CERN Document Server

    Traxler, Adrienne L

    2015-01-01

    Student-to-student interactions are foundational to many active learning environments, but are most often studied using qualitative methods. Network analysis tools provide a quantitative complement to this picture, allowing researchers to describe the social interactions of whole classrooms as systems. Past results from introductory physics courses have suggested a sharp division in the formation of social structure between large lecture sections and small studio classroom environments. Extending those results, this study focuses on calculus-based introductory physics courses at a large public university with a heavily commuter and nontraditional student population. Community detection network methods are used to characterize pre- and post-course collaborative structure in several sections, and differences are considered between small and large classes. These results are compared with expectations from earlier findings, and comment on implications for instruction and further study.

  1. Hysteresis-driven structure formation in biochemical networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein

    1998-09-21

    A mechanism of structure formation, based on hysteresis behaviour is presented. A bisubstrate kinetic system with substrate inhibition, discussed previously in the context of Turing structure formation, may show hysteresis behaviour, when embedded in a metabolic network: the system may possess multiple steady states and may be switched from one stable fixpoint to the other. When cells containing this type of system are diffusively coupled, under certain conditions patterns result, which, as is demonstrated, are not of the Turing type. The main difference to diffusion-driven (Turing) structures is the fact that the hysteresis-driven patterns emerge under diffusive conditions, under which both the homogeneous and the asymmetrical steady state is stable. The resulting special properties and biological implications are discussed.Copyright 1998 Academic Press Limited PMID:9778438

  2. Biological Sequence Mining Using Plausible Neural Network and its Application to Exon/intron Boundaries Prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Kuochen; Chang, Dar-jen; Rouchka, Eric; Chen, Yuan Yan

    2007-01-01

    Biological sequence usually contains yet to find knowledge, and mining biological sequences usually involves a huge dataset and long computation time. Common tasks for biological sequence mining are pattern discovery, classification and clustering. The newly developed model, Plausible Neural Network (PNN), provides an intuitive and unified architecture for such a large dataset analysis. This paper introduces the basic concepts of the PNN, and explains how it is applied to biological sequence ...

  3. STRUCTURAL BIOLOGY: A moving story of receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, Thue W; Hubbell, Wayne L.

    2008-01-01

    Animals sense light and chemical signals through proteins called G-protein-coupled receptors. The crystal structure of one such receptor in complex with a G-protein fragment shows how these receptors are activated.

  4. Structure and dynamics of core-periphery networks

    CERN Document Server

    Csermely, Peter; Wu, Ling-Yun; Uzzi, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies uncovered important core/periphery network structures characterizing complex sets of cooperative and competitive interactions between network nodes, be they proteins, cells, species or humans. Better characterization of the structure, dynamics and function of core/periphery networks is a key step of our understanding cellular functions, species adaptation, social and market changes. Here we summarize the current knowledge of the structure and dynamics of "traditional" core/periphery networks, rich-clubs, nested, bow-tie and onion networks. Comparing core/periphery structures with network modules, we discriminate between global and local cores. The core/periphery network organization lies in the middle of several extreme properties, such as random/condensed structures, clique/star configurations, network symmetry/asymmetry, network assortativity/disassortativity, as well as network hierarchy/anti-hierarchy. These properties of high complexity together with the large degeneracy of core pathways e...

  5. Characteristic imsets for learning Bayesian network structure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hemmecke, R.; Lindner, S.; Studený, Milan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 9 (2012), s. 1336-1349. ISSN 0888-613X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0572; GA ČR GA201/08/0539 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : learning Bayesian network structure * essential graph * standard imset * characteristic imset * LP relaxation of a polytope Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.729, year: 2012 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2012/MTR/studeny-0382596.pdf

  6. Spatial Structures and Regulation in Biological Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yde, Pernille

    other is the spatial regulation of biological systems, here related to different aspects of the inflammatory response. All systems are studied using computational modelling and mathematical analysis. The first part of the thesis explores different protein aggregation scenarios. In Chapter 1, we consider...... environmental conditions are different pH and calcium concentrations. We construct a mathematical model for the aggregation process, and fit the model to an array of experimental data. The model reproduces the dynamics of the aggregation process and predicts final size distributions of the aggregates, which...... conditions of the cell. We then construct a multicellular model of the tissue and show how coupled cells are able to function as an excitable medium and propagate waves of high cytokine concentration through the tissue. If the internal regulation in the cells is over-productive, the model predicts a...

  7. Structural biology applications of solid state MAS DNP NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbey, Ümit; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has long been an aim for increasing sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, delivering spectra in shorter experiment times or of smaller sample amounts. In recent years, it has been applied in magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR to a large range of samples, including biological macromolecules and functional materials. New research directions in structural biology can be envisaged by DNP, facilitating investigations on very large complexes or very heterogeneous samples. Here we present a summary of state of the art DNP MAS NMR spectroscopy and its applications to structural biology, discussing the technical challenges and factors affecting DNP performance.

  8. Research on Multi-Layer Distributed HF Radio Network Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Dai; Chun-Jiang Wang; Quan Yu

    2008-01-01

    High frequency (HF) transmission is an important communication techniques. However, conventional point-to-point transmission can be easily destroyed, which limits its utilization in practice. HF networking communication has the capability against demolishment. The network structure is one of the key factors for HF networking communication. In this paper, a novel analysis method of the network connectedness based on the eigenvalue is derived, and a multi-layer distributed HF radio network structure is proposed. Both the theore tical analysis and the computer simulation results verify that the application of the proposed network structure in the HF radio communication can improve the anti demolishment ability of the HF network efficiently.

  9. Effect of edge pruning on structural controllability and observability of complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengiste, Simachew Abebe; Aertsen, Ad; Kumar, Arvind

    2015-12-01

    Controllability and observability of complex systems are vital concepts in many fields of science. The network structure of the system plays a crucial role in determining its controllability and observability. Because most naturally occurring complex systems show dynamic changes in their network connectivity, it is important to understand how perturbations in the connectivity affect the controllability of the system. To this end, we studied the control structure of different types of artificial, social and biological neuronal networks (BNN) as their connections were progressively pruned using four different pruning strategies. We show that the BNNs are more similar to scale-free networks than to small-world networks, when comparing the robustness of their control structure to structural perturbations. We introduce a new graph descriptor, ‘the cardinality curve’, to quantify the robustness of the control structure of a network to progressive edge pruning. Knowing the susceptibility of control structures to different pruning methods could help design strategies to destroy the control structures of dangerous networks such as epidemic networks. On the other hand, it could help make useful networks more resistant to edge attacks.

  10. Learning Bayesian network structure with immune algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiqiang Cai; Shubin Si; Shudong Sun; Hongyan Dui

    2015-01-01

    Finding out reasonable structures from bulky data is one of the difficulties in modeling of Bayesian network (BN), which is also necessary in promoting the application of BN. This pa-per proposes an immune algorithm based method (BN-IA) for the learning of the BN structure with the idea of vaccination. Further-more, the methods on how to extract the effective vaccines from local optimal structure and root nodes are also described in details. Final y, the simulation studies are implemented with the helicopter convertor BN model and the car start BN model. The comparison results show that the proposed vaccines and the BN-IA can learn the BN structure effectively and efficiently.

  11. On the Calculation of System Entropy in Nonlinear Stochastic Biological Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bor-Sen Chen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Biological networks are open systems that can utilize nutrients and energy from their environment for use in their metabolic processes, and produce metabolic products. System entropy is defined as the difference between input and output signal entropy, i.e., the net signal entropy of the biological system. System entropy is an important indicator for living or non-living biological systems, as biological systems can maintain or decrease their system entropy. In this study, system entropy is determined for the first time for stochastic biological networks, and a computation method is proposed to measure the system entropy of nonlinear stochastic biological networks that are subject to intrinsic random fluctuations and environmental disturbances. We find that intrinsic random fluctuations could increase the system entropy, and that the system entropy is inversely proportional to the robustness and stability of the biological networks. It is also determined that adding feedback loops to shift all eigenvalues to the farther left-hand plane of the complex s-domain could decrease the system entropy of a biological network.

  12. Dynamic neuronal ensembles: Issues in representing structure change in object-oriented, biologically-based brain models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahie, S.; Zeigler, B.P.; Cho, H. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the structure of dynamic neuronal ensembles (DNEs). DNEs represent a new paradigm for learning, based on biological neural networks that use variable structures. We present a computational neural element that demonstrates biological neuron functionality such as neurotransmitter feedback absolute refractory period and multiple output potentials. More specifically, we will develop a network of neural elements that have the ability to dynamically strengthen, weaken, add and remove interconnections. We demonstrate that the DNE is capable of performing dynamic modifications to neuron connections and exhibiting biological neuron functionality. In addition to its applications for learning, DNEs provide an excellent environment for testing and analysis of biological neural systems. An example of habituation and hyper-sensitization in biological systems, using a neural circuit from a snail is presented and discussed. This paper provides an insight into the DNE paradigm using models developed and simulated in DEVS.

  13. Structure biology of selective autophagy receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byeong-Won; Kwon, Do Hoon; Song, Hyun Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a process tightly regulated by various autophagy-related proteins. It is generally classified into non-selective and selective autophagy. Whereas non-selective autophagy is triggered when the cell is under starvation, selective autophagy is involved in eliminating dysfunctional organelles, misfolded and/or ubiquitylated proteins, and intracellular pathogens. These components are recognized by autophagy receptors and delivered to phagophores. Several selective autophagy receptors have been identified and characterized. They usually have some common domains, such as motif, a specific cargo interacting (ubiquitin-dependent or ubiquitin-independent) domain. Recently, structural data of these autophagy receptors has been described, which provides an insight of their function in the selective autophagic process. In this review, we summarize the most up-to-date findings about the structure-function of autophagy receptors that regulates selective autophagy. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(2): 73-80] PMID:26698872

  14. Wham: Identifying Structural Variants of Biological Consequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zev N Kronenberg

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Existing methods for identifying structural variants (SVs from short read datasets are inaccurate. This complicates disease-gene identification and efforts to understand the consequences of genetic variation. In response, we have created Wham (Whole-genome Alignment Metrics to provide a single, integrated framework for both structural variant calling and association testing, thereby bypassing many of the difficulties that currently frustrate attempts to employ SVs in association testing. Here we describe Wham, benchmark it against three other widely used SV identification tools-Lumpy, Delly and SoftSearch-and demonstrate Wham's ability to identify and associate SVs with phenotypes using data from humans, domestic pigeons, and vaccinia virus. Wham and all associated software are covered under the MIT License and can be freely downloaded from github (https://github.com/zeeev/wham, with documentation on a wiki (http://zeeev.github.io/wham/. For community support please post questions to https://www.biostars.org/.

  15. Structural Biology of Bacterial RNA Polymerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiko S. Murakami

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Since its discovery and characterization in the early 1960s (Hurwitz, J. The discovery of RNA polymerase. J. Biol. Chem. 2005, 280, 42477–42485, an enormous amount of biochemical, biophysical and genetic data has been collected on bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP. In the late 1990s, structural information pertaining to bacterial RNAP has emerged that provided unprecedented insights into the function and mechanism of RNA transcription. In this review, I list all structures related to bacterial RNAP (as determined by X-ray crystallography and NMR methods available from the Protein Data Bank, describe their contributions to bacterial transcription research and discuss the role that small molecules play in inhibiting bacterial RNA transcription.

  16. Predicting metabolic pathways from metabolic networks with limited biological knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Leung, HCM; Yiu, SM; Chin, FYL; Leung, SY; Xiang, CL

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the metabolism of new species (e.g. endophytic fungi that produce fuel) have tremendous impact on human lives. Based on predicted proteins and existing reaction databases, one can construct the metabolic network for the species. Next is to identify critical metabolic pathways from the network. Existing computational techniques identify conserved pathways based on multiple networks of related species, but have the following drawbacks. Some do not rely on additional information, s...

  17. Structural Biology of Pectin Degradation by Enterobacteriaceae

    OpenAIRE

    Abbott, D. Wade; Boraston, Alisdair B.

    2008-01-01

    Pectin is a structural polysaccharide that is integral for the stability of plant cell walls. During soft rot infection, secreted virulence factors from pectinolytic bacteria such as Erwinia spp. degrade pectin, resulting in characteristic plant cell necrosis and tissue maceration. Catabolism of pectin and its breakdown products by pectinolytic bacteria occurs within distinct cellular environments. This process initiates outside the cell, continues within the periplasmic space, and culminates...

  18. Measuring structural similarity in large online networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yongren; Macy, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Structural similarity based on bipartite graphs can be used to detect meaningful communities, but the networks have been tiny compared to massive online networks. Scalability is important in applications involving tens of millions of individuals with highly skewed degree distributions. Simulation analysis holding underlying similarity constant shows that two widely used measures - Jaccard index and cosine similarity - are biased by the distribution of out-degree in web-scale networks. However, an alternative measure, the Standardized Co-incident Ratio (SCR), is unbiased. We apply SCR to members of Congress, musical artists, and professional sports teams to show how massive co-following on Twitter can be used to map meaningful affiliations among cultural entities, even in the absence of direct connections to one another. Our results show how structural similarity can be used to map cultural alignments and demonstrate the potential usefulness of social media data in the study of culture, politics, and organizations across the social and behavioral sciences. PMID:27480374

  19. Systems Biology in the Context of Big Data and Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Md. Altaf-Ul-Amin; Farit Mochamad Afendi; Samuel Kuria Kiboi; Shigehiko Kanaya

    2014-01-01

    Science is going through two rapidly changing phenomena: one is the increasing capabilities of the computers and software tools from terabytes to petabytes and beyond, and the other is the advancement in high-throughput molecular biology producing piles of data related to genomes, transcriptomes, proteomes, metabolomes, interactomes, and so on. Biology has become a data intensive science and as a consequence biology and computer science have become complementary to each other bridged by other...

  20. The fractal octahedron network of the large scale structure

    OpenAIRE

    Battaner, E

    1998-01-01

    In a previous article, we have proposed that the large scale structure network generated by large scale magnetic fields could consist of a network of octahedra only contacting at their vertexes. Assuming such a network could arise at different scales producing a fractal geometry, we study here its properties, and in particular how a sub-octahedron network can be inserted within an octahedron of the large network. We deduce that the scale of the fractal structure would range from $\\approx$100 ...

  1. Exact Coupling Threshold for Structural Transition in Interconnected Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Sahneh, Faryad Darabi; Scoglio, Caterina; Van Mieghem, Piet

    2014-01-01

    Interconnected networks are mathematical representation of systems where two or more simple networks are coupled to each other. Depending on the coupling weight between the two components, the interconnected network can function in two regimes: one where the two networks are structurally distinguishable, and one where they are not. The coupling threshold--denoting this structural transition--is one of the most crucial concepts in interconnected networks. Yet, current information about the cou...

  2. Measuring the robustness of network community structure using assortativity

    OpenAIRE

    Shizuka, Daizaburo; Farine, Damien R.

    2016-01-01

    The existence of discrete social clusters, or ‘communities’, is a common feature of social networks in human and nonhuman animals. The level of such community structure in networks is typically measured using an index of modularity, Q. While modularity quantifies the degree to which individuals associate within versus between social communities and provides a useful measure of structure in the social network, it assumes that the network has been well sampled. However, animal social network da...

  3. Modeling Reactivity to Biological Macromolecules with a Deep Multitask Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Tyler B; Dang, Na Le; Miller, Grover P; Swamidass, S Joshua

    2016-08-24

    Most small-molecule drug candidates fail before entering the market, frequently because of unexpected toxicity. Often, toxicity is detected only late in drug development, because many types of toxicities, especially idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions (IADRs), are particularly hard to predict and detect. Moreover, drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is the most frequent reason drugs are withdrawn from the market and causes 50% of acute liver failure cases in the United States. A common mechanism often underlies many types of drug toxicities, including both DILI and IADRs. Drugs are bioactivated by drug-metabolizing enzymes into reactive metabolites, which then conjugate to sites in proteins or DNA to form adducts. DNA adducts are often mutagenic and may alter the reading and copying of genes and their regulatory elements, causing gene dysregulation and even triggering cancer. Similarly, protein adducts can disrupt their normal biological functions and induce harmful immune responses. Unfortunately, reactive metabolites are not reliably detected by experiments, and it is also expensive to test drug candidates for potential to form DNA or protein adducts during the early stages of drug development. In contrast, computational methods have the potential to quickly screen for covalent binding potential, thereby flagging problematic molecules and reducing the total number of necessary experiments. Here, we train a deep convolution neural network-the XenoSite reactivity model-using literature data to accurately predict both sites and probability of reactivity for molecules with glutathione, cyanide, protein, and DNA. On the site level, cross-validated predictions had area under the curve (AUC) performances of 89.8% for DNA and 94.4% for protein. Furthermore, the model separated molecules electrophilically reactive with DNA and protein from nonreactive molecules with cross-validated AUC performances of 78.7% and 79.8%, respectively. On both the site- and molecule-level, the

  4. The Structural Characteristics of Tourism Economic Network in Xinjiang Province

    OpenAIRE

    Qian Cao; Xiaoxia Tian

    2014-01-01

    The database of tourism economic network in the fifteen regions of Xinjiang is constructed based on the gravity model. By using social network analysis methods to analyze the Xinjiang tourism economy network centricity nodes, network density and core-edge structure, and study its effect. The results show that economic network of tourism in Xinjiang is becoming complicated and unbalanced. Finally, the factors affecting the regional discrepancy of the network are discussed, which is mainly rela...

  5. The prescribed output pattern regulates the modular structure of flow networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel Beber, Moritz; Armbruster, Dieter; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2013-11-01

    Modules are common functional and structural properties of many social, technical and biological networks. Especially for biological systems it is important to understand how modularity is related to function and how modularity evolves. It is known that time-varying or spatially organized goals can lead to modularity in a simulated evolution of signaling networks. Here, we study a minimal model of material flow in networks. We discuss the relation between the shared use of nodes, i.e., the cooperativity of modules, and the orthogonality of a prescribed output pattern. We study the persistence of cooperativity through an evolution of robustness against local damages. We expect the results to be valid for a large class of flow-based biological and technical networks. Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjb/e2013-40672-3

  6. Structural Systems Biology Evaluation of Metabolic Thermotolerance in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Roger L.; Andrews, Kathleen; Kim, Donghyuk;

    2013-01-01

    Improve the System A "systems biology" approach may clarify, for example, how particular proteins determine sensitivity of bacteria to extremes of temperature. Chang et al. (p. 1220) integrated information on protein structure with a model of metabolism, thus associating the protein structure of ...

  7. Gene Network Biological Validity Based on Gene-Gene Interaction Relevance

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco Gómez-Vela; Norberto Díaz-Díaz

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, gene networks have become one of the most useful tools for modeling biological processes. Many inference gene network algorithms have been developed as techniques for extracting knowledge from gene expression data. Ensuring the reliability of the inferred gene relationships is a crucial task in any study in order to prove that the algorithms used are precise. Usually, this validation process can be carried out using prior biological knowledge. The metabolic pathways stored in...

  8. Optical manipulation of microparticles and biological structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahagan, Kevin Thomas

    1998-06-01

    We report experimental and theoretical investigations of the trapping of microparticles and biological objects using radiation pressure. Part I of this thesis presents a technique for trapping both low and high index microparticles using a single, stationary focused laser beam containing an optical vortex. Advantages of this vortex trap include the ease of implementation, a lower exposure level for high-index particles compared to a standard Gaussian beam trap, and the ability to isolate individual low-index particles in concentrated dispersions. The vortex trap is modeled using ray-tracing methods and a more precise electromagnetic model, which is accurate for particles less than 10 μm in diameter. We have measured the stable equilibrium position for two low-index particle systems (e.g., hollow glass spheres (HGS) in water, and water droplets in acetophenone (W/A)). The strength of the trap was measured for the HGS system along the longitudinal and transverse directions. We also demonstrate simultaneous trapping of a low and high index particle with a vortex beam. The stability of this dual-particle trap is found to depend on the relative particle size, the divergence angle of the beam, and the depth of the particles within the trapping chamber. Part II presents results from an interdisciplinary and collaborative investigation of an all-optical genetic engineering technique whereby Agrobacterium rhizogenes were inserted through a laser-ablated hole in the cell wall of the plant, Gingko biloba. We describe a protocol which includes the control of osmotic conditions, culturing procedures, viability assays and laser microsurgery. We succeeded in placing up to twelve viable bacteria into a single plant cell using this technique. The bacteria are believed to be slightly heated by the Gaussian beam trap. A numerical model is presented predicting a temperature rise of just a few degrees. Whereas G. biloba and A. rhitogenes were chosen for this study because of Ginkgo

  9. Network Flow Algorithms for Structured Sparsity

    CERN Document Server

    Mairal, Julien; Obozinski, Guillaume; Bach, Francis

    2010-01-01

    We consider a class of learning problems that involve a structured sparsity-inducing norm defined as the sum of $\\ell_\\infty$-norms over groups of variables. Whereas a lot of effort has been put in developing fast optimization methods when the groups are disjoint or embedded in a specific hierarchical structure, we address here the case of general overlapping groups. To this end, we show that the corresponding optimization problem is related to network flow optimization. More precisely, the proximal problem associated with the norm we consider is dual to a quadratic min-cost flow problem. We propose an efficient procedure which computes its solution exactly in polynomial time. Our algorithm scales up to millions of variables, and opens up a whole new range of applications for structured sparse models. We present several experiments on image and video data, demonstrating the applicability and scalability of our approach for various problems.

  10. Commentary: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Educators Launch National Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Cheryl; Bell, Ellis; Johnson, Margaret; Mattos, Carla; Sears, Duane; White, Harold B.

    2010-01-01

    The American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB) has launched an National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded 5 year project to support biochemistry and molecular biology educators learning what and how students learn. As a part of this initiative, hundreds of life scientists will plan and develop a rich central resource for…

  11. Information Diversity in Structure and Dynamics of Simulated Neuronal Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuomo eMäki-Marttunen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal networks exhibit a wide diversity of structures, which contributes to the diversity of the dynamics therein. The presented work applies an information theoretic framework to simultaneously analyze structure and dynamics in neuronal networks. Information diversity within the structure and dynamics of a neuronal network is studied using the normalized compression distance (NCD. To describe the structure, a scheme for generating distance-dependent networks with identical in-degree distribution but variable strength of dependence on distance is presented. The resulting network structure classes possess differing path length and clustering coefficient distributions. In parallel, comparable realistic neuronal networks are generated with NETMORPH simulator and similar analysis is done on them. To describe the dynamics, network spike trains are simulated using different network structures and their bursting behaviours are analyzed. For the simulation of the network activity the Izhikevich model of spiking neurons is used together with the Tsodyks model of dynamical synapses.We show that the structure of the simulated neuronal networks affects the spontaneous bursting activity when measured with bursting frequency and a set of intraburst measures: the more locally connected networks produce more and longer bursts than the more random networks. The information diversity of the structure of a network is greatest in the most locally connected networks, smallest in random networks, and somewhere in between in the networks between order and disorder. As for the dynamics, the most locally connected networks and some of the in-between networks produce the most complex intraburst spike trains. The same result also holds for sparser of the two considered network densities in the case of full spike trains.

  12. The network structure of human personality according to the NEO-PI-R: matching network community structure to factor structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutger Goekoop

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Human personality is described preferentially in terms of factors (dimensions found using factor analysis. An alternative and highly related method is network analysis, which may have several advantages over factor analytic methods. AIM: To directly compare the ability of network community detection (NCD and principal component factor analysis (PCA to examine modularity in multidimensional datasets such as the neuroticism-extraversion-openness personality inventory revised (NEO-PI-R. METHODS: 434 healthy subjects were tested on the NEO-PI-R. PCA was performed to extract factor structures (FS of the current dataset using both item scores and facet scores. Correlational network graphs were constructed from univariate correlation matrices of interactions between both items and facets. These networks were pruned in a link-by-link fashion while calculating the network community structure (NCS of each resulting network using the Wakita Tsurumi clustering algorithm. NCSs were matched against FS and networks of best matches were kept for further analysis. RESULTS: At facet level, NCS showed a best match (96.2% with a 'confirmatory' 5-FS. At item level, NCS showed a best match (80% with the standard 5-FS and involved a total of 6 network clusters. Lesser matches were found with 'confirmatory' 5-FS and 'exploratory' 6-FS of the current dataset. Network analysis did not identify facets as a separate level of organization in between items and clusters. A small-world network structure was found in both item- and facet level networks. CONCLUSION: We present the first optimized network graph of personality traits according to the NEO-PI-R: a 'Personality Web'. Such a web may represent the possible routes that subjects can take during personality development. NCD outperforms PCA by producing plausible modularity at item level in non-standard datasets, and can identify the key roles of individual items and clusters in the network.

  13. Structural biology of cytoplasmic and axonemal dyneins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Takashi

    2012-08-01

    Dyneins are microtubule-based, ATP-driven motor proteins with six tandemly linked AAA+ domains, a long N-terminal tail and a coiled-coil stalk. Cytoplasmic dyneins function as individual homodimers and are responsible for minus-end-oriented transport along microtubules. Axonemal dyneins of flagella/cilia are anchored in arrays to peripheral microtubule doublets by their N-terminal tails, and generate sliding motions of adjacent microtubule doublets toward the plus end. The coiled-coil stalk is responsible for communication between the AAA+ domains and the microtubule binding domain. A number of isoforms of axonemal dyneins are integrated to generate bending motion. In this article I will review recent structural studies and address the question as to how dyneins generate force and cause bending in flagella/cilia. PMID:22664481

  14. Effective identification of conserved pathways in biological networks using hidden Markov models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoning Qian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The advent of various high-throughput experimental techniques for measuring molecular interactions has enabled the systematic study of biological interactions on a global scale. Since biological processes are carried out by elaborate collaborations of numerous molecules that give rise to a complex network of molecular interactions, comparative analysis of these biological networks can bring important insights into the functional organization and regulatory mechanisms of biological systems. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this paper, we present an effective framework for identifying common interaction patterns in the biological networks of different organisms based on hidden Markov models (HMMs. Given two or more networks, our method efficiently finds the top matching paths in the respective networks, where the matching paths may contain a flexible number of consecutive insertions and deletions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on several protein-protein interaction (PPI networks obtained from the Database of Interacting Proteins (DIP and other public databases, we demonstrate that our method is able to detect biologically significant pathways that are conserved across different organisms. Our algorithm has a polynomial complexity that grows linearly with the size of the aligned paths. This enables the search for very long paths with more than 10 nodes within a few minutes on a desktop computer. The software program that implements this algorithm is available upon request from the authors.

  15. Applying Intelligent Computing Techniques to Modeling Biological Networks from Expression Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Po Lee; Kung-Cheng Yang

    2008-01-01

    Constructing biological networks is one of the most important issues in system sbiology. However, constructing a network from data manually takes a considerable large amount of time, therefore an automated procedure is advocated. To automate the procedure of network construction, in this work we use two intelligent computing techniques, genetic programming and neural computation, to infer two kinds of network models that use continuous variables. To verify the presented approaches, experiments have been conducted and the preliminary results show that both approaches can be used to infer networks successfully.

  16. Terpenoid Plant Metabolites - Structural Characterization and Biological Importance

    OpenAIRE

    Maldonado, Eliana

    2014-01-01

    In response to the challenges of their local environments, organisms produce of a large number of chemical diverse compounds with complex stereochemistry and reactive functional groups. These characteristics enable them to interact and bind specifically to biological target molecules and exert various biological activities, and have assured that Natural products continues to be an important source of bioactive compounds, which, for example, facilitate the search for new lead structures that c...

  17. Structuring networks for maximum performance under managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, T R

    1996-12-01

    Healthcare providers interested in forming delivery networks to secure managed care contracts must decide how to structure their networks. Two basic structural models are available: the noncorporate model and the corporate model. The noncorporate model delivery network typically has a single governing body and management infrastructure to oversee only managed care contracting and related business. The corporate model delivery system has a unified governance management infrastructure that handles all of the network's business. While either structure can work, corporate model networks usually are better able to enforce provider behavior that is in the best interest of a network as a whole. PMID:10163003

  18. Polynomial-Time Algorithm for Controllability Test of a Class of Boolean Biological Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Kobayashi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, Boolean-network-model-based approaches to dynamical analysis of complex biological networks such as gene regulatory networks have been extensively studied. One of the fundamental problems in control theory of such networks is the problem of determining whether a given substance quantity can be arbitrarily controlled by operating the other substance quantities, which we call the controllability problem. This paper proposes a polynomial-time algorithm for solving this problem. Although the algorithm is based on a sufficient condition for controllability, it is easily computable for a wider class of large-scale biological networks compared with the existing approaches. A key to this success in our approach is to give up computing Boolean operations in a rigorous way and to exploit an adjacency matrix of a directed graph induced by a Boolean network. By applying the proposed approach to a neurotransmitter signaling pathway, it is shown that it is effective.

  19. Electronic structure and biological activity: Barbiturates vs. thiobarbiturates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Igor; Kovač, Branka

    2010-06-01

    The electronic structure of the derivatives of thiobarbituric acid: 1,3-diethyl-2-thiobarbituric acid ( I) and 1,3-dibutyl-2-thiobarbituric acid ( II) has been investigated by HeI and HeII UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) and quantum chemical calculations. We discuss their electronic structures and compare them with barbituric acid. We also relate the difference in electronic structure between barbituric and thiobarbituric acids to difference in biological activity of their derivatives.

  20. Uncovering disease mechanisms through network biology in the era of next generation sequencing.

    OpenAIRE

    Janet Piñero; Ariel Berenstein; Abel Gonzalez-Perez; Ariel Chernomoretz; Furlong, Laura I.

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing the behavior of disease genes in the context of biological networks has the potential to shed light on disease mechanisms, and to reveal both new candidate disease genes and therapeutic targets. Previous studies addressing the network properties of disease genes have produced contradictory results. Here we have explored the causes of these discrepancies and assessed the relationship between the network roles of disease genes and their tolerance to deleterious germline variants ...

  1. Neural network models: from biology to many - body phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current surge of research on practical side of neural networks and their utility in memory storage/recall, pattern recognition and classification is given in this article. The initial attraction of neural networks as dynamical and statistical system has been investigated. From the view of many-body theorist, the neurons may be thought of as particles, and the weighted connection between the units, as the interaction between these particles. Finally, the author has seen the impressive capabilities of artificial neural networks in pattern recognition and classification may be exploited to solve data management problems in experimental physics and the discovery of radically new theoretically description of physical problems and neural networks can be used in physics. (A.B.)

  2. Yeast systems biology to unravel the network of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mustacchi, Roberta; Hohmann, S; Nielsen, Jens

    2006-01-01

    Systems biology focuses on obtaining a quantitative description of complete biological systems, even complete cellular function. In this way, it will be possible to perform computer-guided design of novel drugs, advanced therapies for treatment of complex diseases, and to perform in silico design...... of advanced cell factories for production of fuels, chemicals, food ingredients and pharmaceuticals. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae represents an excellent model system; the density of biological information available on this organism allows it to serve as a eukaryotic model for studying human...... diseases. Furthermore, it serves as an industrial workhorse for production of a wide range of chemicals and pharmaceuticals. Systems biology involves the combination of novel experimental techniques from different disciplines as well as functional genomics, bioinformatics and mathematical modelling, and...

  3. GraphAlignment: Bayesian pairwise alignment of biological networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolář Michal

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With increased experimental availability and accuracy of bio-molecular networks, tools for their comparative and evolutionary analysis are needed. A key component for such studies is the alignment of networks. Results We introduce the Bioconductor package GraphAlignment for pairwise alignment of bio-molecular networks. The alignment incorporates information both from network vertices and network edges and is based on an explicit evolutionary model, allowing inference of all scoring parameters directly from empirical data. We compare the performance of our algorithm to an alternative algorithm, Græmlin 2.0. On simulated data, GraphAlignment outperforms Græmlin 2.0 in several benchmarks except for computational complexity. When there is little or no noise in the data, GraphAlignment is slower than Græmlin 2.0. It is faster than Græmlin 2.0 when processing noisy data containing spurious vertex associations. Its typical case complexity grows approximately as O(N2.6. On empirical bacterial protein-protein interaction networks (PIN and gene co-expression networks, GraphAlignment outperforms Græmlin 2.0 with respect to coverage and specificity, albeit by a small margin. On large eukaryotic PIN, Græmlin 2.0 outperforms GraphAlignment. Conclusions The GraphAlignment algorithm is robust to spurious vertex associations, correctly resolves paralogs, and shows very good performance in identification of homologous vertices defined by high vertex and/or interaction similarity. The simplicity and generality of GraphAlignment edge scoring makes the algorithm an appropriate choice for global alignment of networks.

  4. Modeling Small Oscillating Biological Networks in Analog VLSI

    OpenAIRE

    Ryckebusch, Sylvie; Bower, James M.; Mead, Carver

    1989-01-01

    We have used analog VLSI technology to model a class of small oscillating biological neural circuits known as central pattern generators (CPG). These circuits generate rhythmic patterns of activity which drive locomotor behaviour in the animal. We have designed, fabricated, and tested a model neuron circuit which relies on many of the same mechanisms as a biological central pattern generator neuron, such as delays and internal feedback. We show that this neuron can be use...

  5. Pattern Learning, Damage and Repair within Biological Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Theodore; Fitzgerald O'Neill, Kate; Shinbrot, Troy

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes damage to neural networks, potentially leading to disability or even death. Nearly one in ten of these patients die, and most of the remainder suffer from symptoms ranging from headaches and nausea to convulsions and paralysis. In vitro studies to develop treatments for TBI have limited in vivo applicability, and in vitro therapies have even proven to worsen the outcome of TBI patients. We propose that this disconnect between in vitro and in vivo outcomes may be associated with the fact that in vitro tests assess indirect measures of neuronal health, but do not investigate the actual function of neuronal networks. Therefore in this talk, we examine both in vitro and in silico neuronal networks that actually perform a function: pattern identification. We allow the networks to execute genetic, Hebbian, learning, and additionally, we examine the effects of damage and subsequent repair within our networks. We show that the length of repaired connections affects the overall pattern learning performance of the network and we propose therapies that may improve function following TBI in clinical settings.

  6. System Review about Function Role of ESCC Driver Gene KDM6A by Network Biology Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Jihua; Li, Hui; Li, Huiwu

    2016-01-01

    Background. KDM6A (Lysine (K)-Specific Demethylase 6A) is the driver gene related to esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). In order to provide more biological insights into KDM6A, in this paper, we treat PPI (protein-protein interaction) network derived from KDM6A as a conceptual framework and follow it to review its biological function. Method. We constructed a PPI network with Cytoscape software and performed clustering of network with Clust&See. Then, we evaluate the pathways, which are statistically involved in the network derived from KDM6A. Lastly, gene ontology analysis of clusters of genes in the network was conducted. Result. The network includes three clusters that consist of 74 nodes connected via 453 edges. Fifty-five pathways are statistically involved in the network and most of them are functionally related to the processes of cell cycle, gene expression, and carcinogenesis. The biology themes of clusters 1, 2, and 3 are chromatin modification, regulation of gene expression by transcription factor complex, and control of cell cycle, respectively. Conclusion. The PPI network presents a panoramic view which can facilitate for us to understand the function role of KDM6A. It is a helpful way by network approach to perform system review on a certain gene. PMID:27294188

  7. Identification of Non-Linear Structures using Recurrent Neural Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Nielsen, Søren R. K.; Hansen, H. I.

    Two different partially recurrent neural networks structured as Multi Layer Perceptrons (MLP) are investigated for time domain identification of a non-linear structure.......Two different partially recurrent neural networks structured as Multi Layer Perceptrons (MLP) are investigated for time domain identification of a non-linear structure....

  8. Identification of Non-Linear Structures using Recurrent Neural Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Nielsen, Søren R. K.; Hansen, H. I.

    1995-01-01

    Two different partially recurrent neural networks structured as Multi Layer Perceptrons (MLP) are investigated for time domain identification of a non-linear structure.......Two different partially recurrent neural networks structured as Multi Layer Perceptrons (MLP) are investigated for time domain identification of a non-linear structure....

  9. Complex quantum networks as structured environments: engineering and probing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokkala, Johannes; Galve, Fernando; Zambrini, Roberta; Maniscalco, Sabrina; Piilo, Jyrki

    2016-05-01

    We consider structured environments modeled by bosonic quantum networks and investigate the probing of their spectral density, structure, and topology. We demonstrate how to engineer a desired spectral density by changing the network structure. Our results show that the spectral density can be very accurately detected via a locally immersed quantum probe for virtually any network configuration. Moreover, we show how the entire network structure can be reconstructed by using a single quantum probe. We illustrate our findings presenting examples of spectral densities and topology probing for networks of genuine complexity.

  10. Information theory in systems biology. Part I: Gene regulatory and metabolic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavian, Zaynab; Kavousi, Kaveh; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2016-03-01

    "A Mathematical Theory of Communication", was published in 1948 by Claude Shannon to establish a framework that is now known as information theory. In recent decades, information theory has gained much attention in the area of systems biology. The aim of this paper is to provide a systematic review of those contributions that have applied information theory in inferring or understanding of biological systems. Based on the type of system components and the interactions between them, we classify the biological systems into 4 main classes: gene regulatory, metabolic, protein-protein interaction and signaling networks. In the first part of this review, we attempt to introduce most of the existing studies on two types of biological networks, including gene regulatory and metabolic networks, which are founded on the concepts of information theory. PMID:26701126

  11. Phase synchronization on small-world networks with community structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we propose a simple model that can generate small-world network with community structure. The network is introduced as a tunable community organization with parameter r, which is directly measured by the ratio of inter- to intra-community connectivity, and a smaller r corresponds to a stronger community structure. The structure properties, including the degree distribution, clustering, the communication efficiency and modularity are also analysed for the network. In addition, by using the Kuramoto model, we investigated the phase synchronization on this network, and found that increasing the fuzziness of community structure will markedly enhance the network synchronizability; however, in an abnormal region (r ≤ 0.001), the network has even worse synchronizability than the case of isolated communities (r = 0). Furthermore, this network exhibits a remarkable synchronization behaviour in topological scales: the oscillators of high densely interconnected communities synchronize more easily, and more rapidly than the whole network. (general)

  12. Social inheritance can explain the structure of animal social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilany, Amiyaal; Akçay, Erol

    2016-01-01

    The social network structure of animal populations has major implications for survival, reproductive success, sexual selection and pathogen transmission of individuals. But as of yet, no general theory of social network structure exists that can explain the diversity of social networks observed in nature, and serve as a null model for detecting species and population-specific factors. Here we propose a simple and generally applicable model of social network structure. We consider the emergence of network structure as a result of social inheritance, in which newborns are likely to bond with maternal contacts, and via forming bonds randomly. We compare model output with data from several species, showing that it can generate networks with properties such as those observed in real social systems. Our model demonstrates that important observed properties of social networks, including heritability of network position or assortative associations, can be understood as consequences of social inheritance. PMID:27352101

  13. Logical Reduction of Biological Networks to Their Most Determinative Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matache, Mihaela T; Matache, Valentin

    2016-07-01

    Boolean networks have been widely used as models for gene regulatory networks, signal transduction networks, or neural networks, among many others. One of the main difficulties in analyzing the dynamics of a Boolean network and its sensitivity to perturbations or mutations is the fact that it grows exponentially with the number of nodes. Therefore, various approaches for simplifying the computations and reducing the network to a subset of relevant nodes have been proposed in the past few years. We consider a recently introduced method for reducing a Boolean network to its most determinative nodes that yield the highest information gain. The determinative power of a node is obtained by a summation of all mutual information quantities over all nodes having the chosen node as a common input, thus representing a measure of information gain obtained by the knowledge of the node under consideration. The determinative power of nodes has been considered in the literature under the assumption that the inputs are independent in which case one can use the Bahadur orthonormal basis. In this article, we relax that assumption and use a standard orthonormal basis instead. We use techniques of Hilbert space operators and harmonic analysis to generate formulas for the sensitivity to perturbations of nodes, quantified by the notions of influence, average sensitivity, and strength. Since we work on finite-dimensional spaces, our formulas and estimates can be and are formulated in plain matrix algebra terminology. We analyze the determinative power of nodes for a Boolean model of a signal transduction network of a generic fibroblast cell. We also show the similarities and differences induced by the alternative complete orthonormal basis used. Among the similarities, we mention the fact that the knowledge of the states of the most determinative nodes reduces the entropy or uncertainty of the overall network significantly. In a special case, we obtain a stronger result than in previous

  14. Usefulness and limitations of dK random graph models to predict interactions and functional homogeneity in biological networks under a pseudo-likelihood parameter estimation approach

    OpenAIRE

    Luan Yihui; Nunez-Iglesias Juan; Wang Wenhui; Sun Fengzhu

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Many aspects of biological functions can be modeled by biological networks, such as protein interaction networks, metabolic networks, and gene coexpression networks. Studying the statistical properties of these networks in turn allows us to infer biological function. Complex statistical network models can potentially more accurately describe the networks, but it is not clear whether such complex models are better suited to find biologically meaningful subnetworks. Results ...

  15. A Decomposition Algorithm for Learning Bayesian Network Structures from Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Yifeng; Cordero Hernandez, Jorge

    2008-01-01

    the complete network. The new learning algorithm firstly finds local components from the data, and then recover the complete network by joining the learned components. We show the empirical performance of the decomposition algorithm in several benchmark networks.......It is a challenging task of learning a large Bayesian network from a small data set. Most conventional structural learning approaches run into the computational as well as the statistical problems. We propose a decomposition algorithm for the structure construction without having to learn...

  16. Improving the structure MCMC sampler for Bayesian networks by introducing a new edge reversal move

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grzegorczyk, Marco; Husmeier, Dirk

    2008-01-01

    Applications of Bayesian networks in systems biology are computationally demanding due to the large number of model parameters. Conventional MCMC schemes based on proposal moves in structure space tend to be too slow in mixing and convergence, and have recently been superseded by proposal moves in t

  17. From crystallography to structural biology, a century of discoveries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montoya, Guillermo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available From crystallography, the technique mostly used to study the structure of matter, the field mutated into structural biology, has mutated in life sciences into structural biology, which has been developed as an essential and rather successful area of research to fully understand the workings of cellular pathways. The application of physical approaches to biological systems has been crucial to comprehend the structure and function of the biological components of living organisms. In this assay the author walks the reader through the last century, which has witnessed how this life sciences research area was born and moved towards larger assemblies in the core of crucial biological problems. The influence of research in physics, biochemistry and molecular biology has been key in the successes and large body of seminal results obtained by structural biologists. The author proposes that the future of this area implies the integration of its results at the cellular level apart of using more quantitative approaches to describe biological processes.La cristalografía, la técnica más ampliamente usada para estudiar la estructura de la materia, ha evolucionado en las ciencias de la vida hacia la biología estructural, una exitosa área de investigación encaminada a comprender el funcionamiento de los procesos celulares. La aplicación de aproximaciones físicas a sistemas biológicos es clave para entender la estructura y funcionamiento de los componentes de los organismos. En este artículo el autor ofrece al lector un paseo por la evolución de esta área de conocimiento durante el siglo XX, desde su nacimiento hasta el análisis de grandes complejos macromoleculares, protagonistas importantes en diversos procesos biológicos. La influencia de investigaciones en física, bioquímica y biología molecular ha sido clave para los numerosos éxitos alcanzados por biólogos estructurales. El autor sostiene que el futuro de esta disciplina pasa por la

  18. Building gene co-expression networks using transcriptomics data for systems biology investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kadarmideen, Haja; Watson-Haigh, Nathan S.

    2012-01-01

    connected within a network. The two GCN construction methods used were, Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis (WGCNA) and Partial Correlation and Information Theory (PCIT) methods. Nodes were ranked based on their connectivity measures in each of the four different networks created by WGCNA and PCIT......Gene co-expression networks (GCN), built using high-throughput gene expression data are fundamental aspects of systems biology. The main aims of this study were to compare two popular approaches to building and analysing GCN. We use real ovine microarray transcriptomics datasets representing four...... and node ranks in two methods were compared to identify those nodes which are highly differentially ranked (HDR). A total of 1,017 HDR nodes were identified across one or more of four networks. We investigated HDR nodes by gene enrichment analyses in relation to their biological relevance to...

  19. Study of nanoscale structural biology using advanced particle beam microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boseman, Adam J.

    This work investigates developmental and structural biology at the nanoscale using current advancements in particle beam microscopy. Typically the examination of micro- and nanoscale features is performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), but in order to decrease surface charging, and increase resolution, an obscuring conductive layer is applied to the sample surface. As magnification increases, this layer begins to limit the ability to identify nanoscale surface structures. A new technology, Helium Ion Microscopy (HIM), is used to examine uncoated surface structures on the cuticle of wild type and mutant fruit flies. Corneal nanostructures observed with HIM are further investigated by FIB/SEM to provide detailed three dimensional information about internal events occurring during early structural development. These techniques are also used to reconstruct a mosquito germarium in order to characterize unknown events in early oogenesis. Findings from these studies, and many more like them, will soon unravel many of the mysteries surrounding the world of developmental biology.

  20. Analysis and Design of Biological Materials and Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Öchsner, Andreas; Altenbach, Holm

    2012-01-01

    This collection provides researchers and scientists with advanced analyses and materials design techniques in Biomaterials and presents mechanical studies of biological structures. In 16 contributions well known experts present their research on Stress and Strain Analysis, Material Properties, Fluid and Gas mechanics and they show related problems.

  1. Biologically Inspired Target Recognition in Radar Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Qilian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the great mysteries of the brain is cognitive control. How can the interactions between millions of neurons result in behavior that is coordinated and appears willful and voluntary? There is consensus that it depends on the prefrontal cortex (PFC. Many PFC areas receive converging inputs from at least two sensory modalities. Inspired by human's innate ability to process and integrate information from disparate, network-based sources, we apply human-inspired information integration mechanisms to target detection in cognitive radar sensor network. Humans' information integration mechanisms have been modelled using maximum-likelihood estimation (MLE or soft-max approaches. In this paper, we apply these two algorithms to cognitive radar sensor networks target detection. Discrete-cosine-transform (DCT is used to process the integrated data from MLE or soft-max. We apply fuzzy logic system (FLS to automatic target detection based on the AC power values from DCT. Simulation results show that our MLE-DCT-FLS and soft-max-DCT-FLS approaches perform very well in the radar sensor network target detection, whereas the existing 2D construction algorithm does not work in this study.

  2. Revealing gene regulation and association through biological networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    This review had first summarized traditional methods used by plant breeders for genetic improvement, such as QTL analysis and transcriptomic analysis. With accumulating data, we can draw a network that comprises all possible links between members of a community, including protein–protein interaction...

  3. The effect of nano scale inhomogeneity and silicate network connectivity on the activity of glasses with biological applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations of six soda-lime phospho silicate glasses are analyzed to identify correlations between specific structural features of the glasses and their biological activity, namely the dissolution in physiological fluids and the rate of deposition of a bone-like apatite film on their surface. Structural markers of the bioactivity can be identified in the silicate connectivity and the formation of nanometer-size calcium clusters separated from the silicate network, with the latter associated with less bioactive or bio-inactive compositions. The simulations show how these key structural features are affected by the glass composition, and suggest that different strategies (i.e. compositional ranges)can be employed to modify them in a rational and systematic way, in order to steer the biological activity of the glass towards the level required by different biomedical applications.

  4. The Evolving Contribution of Mass Spectrometry to Integrative Structural Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faini, Marco; Stengel, Florian; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2016-04-01

    Protein complexes are key catalysts and regulators for the majority of cellular processes. Unveiling their assembly and structure is essential to understanding their function and mechanism of action. Although conventional structural techniques such as X-ray crystallography and NMR have solved the structure of important protein complexes, they cannot consistently deal with dynamic and heterogeneous assemblies, limiting their applications to small scale experiments. A novel methodological paradigm, integrative structural biology, aims at overcoming such limitations by combining complementary data sources into a comprehensive structural model. Recent applications have shown that a range of mass spectrometry (MS) techniques are able to generate interaction and spatial restraints (cross-linking MS) information on native complexes or to study the stoichiometry and connectivity of entire assemblies (native MS) rapidly, reliably, and from small amounts of substrate. Although these techniques by themselves do not solve structures, they do provide invaluable structural information and are thus ideally suited to contribute to integrative modeling efforts. The group of Brian Chait has made seminal contributions in the use of mass spectrometric techniques to study protein complexes. In this perspective, we honor the contributions of the Chait group and discuss concepts and milestones of integrative structural biology. We also review recent examples of integration of structural MS techniques with an emphasis on cross-linking MS. We then speculate on future MS applications that would unravel the dynamic nature of protein complexes upon diverse cellular states.

  5. The Evolving Contribution of Mass Spectrometry to Integrative Structural Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faini, Marco; Stengel, Florian; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2016-06-01

    Protein complexes are key catalysts and regulators for the majority of cellular processes. Unveiling their assembly and structure is essential to understanding their function and mechanism of action. Although conventional structural techniques such as X-ray crystallography and NMR have solved the structure of important protein complexes, they cannot consistently deal with dynamic and heterogeneous assemblies, limiting their applications to small scale experiments. A novel methodological paradigm, integrative structural biology, aims at overcoming such limitations by combining complementary data sources into a comprehensive structural model. Recent applications have shown that a range of mass spectrometry (MS) techniques are able to generate interaction and spatial restraints (cross-linking MS) information on native complexes or to study the stoichiometry and connectivity of entire assemblies (native MS) rapidly, reliably, and from small amounts of substrate. Although these techniques by themselves do not solve structures, they do provide invaluable structural information and are thus ideally suited to contribute to integrative modeling efforts. The group of Brian Chait has made seminal contributions in the use of mass spectrometric techniques to study protein complexes. In this perspective, we honor the contributions of the Chait group and discuss concepts and milestones of integrative structural biology. We also review recent examples of integration of structural MS techniques with an emphasis on cross-linking MS. We then speculate on future MS applications that would unravel the dynamic nature of protein complexes upon diverse cellular states.

  6. Structural equation models from paths to networks

    CERN Document Server

    Westland, J Christopher

    2015-01-01

    This compact reference surveys the full range of available structural equation modeling (SEM) methodologies.  It reviews applications in a broad range of disciplines, particularly in the social sciences where many key concepts are not directly observable.  This is the first book to present SEM’s development in its proper historical context–essential to understanding the application, strengths and weaknesses of each particular method.  This book also surveys the emerging path and network approaches that complement and enhance SEM, and that will grow in importance in the near future.  SEM’s ability to accommodate unobservable theory constructs through latent variables is of significant importance to social scientists.  Latent variable theory and application are comprehensively explained, and methods are presented for extending their power, including guidelines for data preparation, sample size calculation, and the special treatment of Likert scale data.  Tables of software, methodologies and fit st...

  7. Evolving networks-Using past structure to predict the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Ke-ke; Yan, Wei-sheng; Small, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Many previous studies on link prediction have focused on using common neighbors to predict the existence of links between pairs of nodes. More broadly, research into the structural properties of evolving temporal networks and temporal link prediction methods have recently attracted increasing attention. In this study, for the first time, we examine the use of links between a pair of nodes to predict their common neighbors and analyze the relationship between the weight and the structure in static networks, evolving networks, and in the corresponding randomized networks. We propose both new unweighted and weighted prediction methods and use six kinds of real networks to test our algorithms. In unweighted networks, we find that if a pair of nodes connect to each other in the current network, they will have a higher probability to connect common nodes both in the current and the future networks-and the probability will decrease with the increase of the number of neighbors. Furthermore, we find that the original networks have their particular structure and statistical characteristics which benefit link prediction. In weighted networks, the prediction algorithm performance of networks which are dominated by human factors decrease with the decrease of weight and are in general better in static networks. Furthermore, we find that geographical position and link weight both have significant influence on the transport network. Moreover, the evolving financial network has the lowest predictability. In addition, we find that the structure of non-social networks has more robustness than social networks. The structure of engineering networks has both best predictability and also robustness.

  8. Application of neural networks to health monitoring of bridge structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Chin-Hsiung; Yeh, ShyChing

    2000-06-01

    A procedure based on the use of artificial neural networks for the identification of dynamic system is developed and applied to the bridge structure under earthquake excitation. This neural network-based approach is also applied for the detection of changes in the characteristics of structure- unknown system. Based on the vibration measurement from a linear/healthy system to train the neural network for identification purposes, then the trained network is fed comparable vibration measurements from the same structure under different episodes of response in order to monitor the nonlinearity of the system. The learning ability of the network is examined for the use of multiple inputs. The effects of the network parameters on learning and accuracy of predictions are discussed. Based on this study it is found that the configuration of neural network model is the same as NARMA model and has the potential for structural damage detection.

  9. Network nestedness as generalized core-periphery structures

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Sang Hoon

    2016-01-01

    The concept of nestedness, in particular for ecological and economical networks, has been introduced as a structural characteristic of real interacting systems. We suggest that the nestedness is in fact another way to express a mesoscale network property called the core-periphery structure. With real ecological mutualistic networks and synthetic model networks, we reveal the strong correlation between the nestedness and core-peripheriness, by defining the network-level measures for nestedness and core-peripheriness in case of weighted and bipartite networks. However, at the same time, via more sophisticated null-model analysis, we also discover that the degree (the number of connected neighbors of a node) distribution poses quite severe restrictions on the possible nestedness and core-peripheriness parameter space. Therefore, there must exist structurally interwoven properties in more fundamental levels of network formation, behind this seemingly obvious relation between nestedness and core-periphery structur...

  10. Networks as a Privileged Way to Develop Mesoscopic Level Approaches in Systems Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandro Giuliani

    2014-01-01

    The methodologies advocated in computational biology are in many cases proper system-level approaches. These methodologies are variously connected to the notion of “mesosystem” and thus on the focus on relational structures that are at the basis of biological regulation. Here, I describe how the formalization of biological systems by means of graph theory constitutes an extremely fruitful approach to biology. I suggest the epistemological relevance of the notion of graph resides in its multil...

  11. Discovering Networks of Perturbed Biological Processes in Hepatocyte Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Lasher, Christopher D; Rajagopalan, Padmavathy; Murali, T.M.

    2011-01-01

    The liver plays a vital role in glucose homeostasis, the synthesis of bile acids and the detoxification of foreign substances. Liver culture systems are widely used to test adverse effects of drugs and environmental toxicants. The two most prevalent liver culture systems are hepatocyte monolayers (HMs) and collagen sandwiches (CS). Despite their wide use, comprehensive transcriptional programs and interaction networks in these culture systems have not been systematically investigated. We inte...

  12. A biologically inspired neural network controller for ballistic arm movements

    OpenAIRE

    Schmid Maurizio; Accornero Neri; Capozza Marco; Conforto Silvia; Bernabucci Ivan; D'Alessio Tommaso

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background In humans, the implementation of multijoint tasks of the arm implies a highly complex integration of sensory information, sensorimotor transformations and motor planning. Computational models can be profitably used to better understand the mechanisms sub-serving motor control, thus providing useful perspectives and investigating different control hypotheses. To this purpose, the use of Artificial Neural Networks has been proposed to represent and interpret the movement of ...

  13. Perturbation Biology: inferring signaling networks in cellular systems

    OpenAIRE

    Molinelli, Evan J.; Korkut, Anil; Wang, Weiqing; Miller, Martin L; Gauthier, Nicholas P.; Jing, Xiaohong; Kaushik, Poorvi; He, Qin; Mills, Gordon; Solit, David B.; Pratilas, Christine A.; Weigt, Martin; Braunstein, Alfredo; Pagnani, Andrea; Zecchina, Riccardo

    2013-01-01

    Author Summary Drugs that target specific effects of signaling proteins are promising agents for treating cancer. One of the many obstacles facing optimal drug design is inadequate quantitative understanding of the coordinated interactions between signaling proteins. De novo model inference of network or pathway models refers to the algorithmic construction of mathematical predictive models from experimental data without dependence on prior knowledge. De novo inference is difficult because of...

  14. Neutron scattering applications in structural biology: now and the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trewhella, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Neutrons have an important role to play in structural biology. Neutron crystallography, small-angle neutron scattering and inelastic neutron scattering techniques all contribute unique information on biomolecular structures. In particular, solution scattering techniques give critical information on the conformations and dispositions of the components of complex assemblies under a wide variety of relevant conditions. The power of these methods is demonstrated here by studies of protein/DNA complexes, and Ca{sup 2+}-binding proteins complexed with their regulatory targets. In addition, we demonstrate the utility of a new structural approach using neutron resonance scattering. The impact of biological neutron scattering to date has been constrained principally by the available fluxes at neutron sources and the true potential of these approaches will only be realized with the development of new more powerful neutron sources. (author)

  15. Quantitative assessment of biological impact using transcriptomic data and mechanistic network models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to biologically active substances such as therapeutic drugs or environmental toxicants can impact biological systems at various levels, affecting individual molecules, signaling pathways, and overall cellular processes. The ability to derive mechanistic insights from the resulting system responses requires the integration of experimental measures with a priori knowledge about the system and the interacting molecules therein. We developed a novel systems biology-based methodology that leverages mechanistic network models and transcriptomic data to quantitatively assess the biological impact of exposures to active substances. Hierarchically organized network models were first constructed to provide a coherent framework for investigating the impact of exposures at the molecular, pathway and process levels. We then validated our methodology using novel and previously published experiments. For both in vitro systems with simple exposure and in vivo systems with complex exposures, our methodology was able to recapitulate known biological responses matching expected or measured phenotypes. In addition, the quantitative results were in agreement with experimental endpoint data for many of the mechanistic effects that were assessed, providing further objective confirmation of the approach. We conclude that our methodology evaluates the biological impact of exposures in an objective, systematic, and quantifiable manner, enabling the computation of a systems-wide and pan-mechanistic biological impact measure for a given active substance or mixture. Our results suggest that various fields of human disease research, from drug development to consumer product testing and environmental impact analysis, could benefit from using this methodology. - Highlights: • The impact of biologically active substances is quantified at multiple levels. • The systems-level impact integrates the perturbations of individual networks. • The networks capture the relationships between

  16. Quantitative assessment of biological impact using transcriptomic data and mechanistic network models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, Ty M. [Selventa, One Alewife Center, Cambridge, MA 02140 (United States); Sewer, Alain, E-mail: Alain.Sewer@pmi.com [Philip Morris International R and D, Philip Morris Products S.A., Quai Jeanrenaud 5, 2000 Neuchâtel (Switzerland); Martin, Florian; Belcastro, Vincenzo [Philip Morris International R and D, Philip Morris Products S.A., Quai Jeanrenaud 5, 2000 Neuchâtel (Switzerland); Frushour, Brian P. [Selventa, One Alewife Center, Cambridge, MA 02140 (United States); Gebel, Stephan [Philip Morris International R and D, Philip Morris Research Laboratories GmbH, Edmund-Rumpler-Strasse 5, 51149 Koeln (Germany); Park, Jennifer [Selventa, One Alewife Center, Cambridge, MA 02140 (United States); Schlage, Walter K. [Philip Morris International R and D, Philip Morris Research Laboratories GmbH, Edmund-Rumpler-Strasse 5, 51149 Koeln (Germany); Talikka, Marja [Philip Morris International R and D, Philip Morris Products S.A., Quai Jeanrenaud 5, 2000 Neuchâtel (Switzerland); Vasilyev, Dmitry M.; Westra, Jurjen W. [Selventa, One Alewife Center, Cambridge, MA 02140 (United States); Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C. [Philip Morris International R and D, Philip Morris Products S.A., Quai Jeanrenaud 5, 2000 Neuchâtel (Switzerland)

    2013-11-01

    Exposure to biologically active substances such as therapeutic drugs or environmental toxicants can impact biological systems at various levels, affecting individual molecules, signaling pathways, and overall cellular processes. The ability to derive mechanistic insights from the resulting system responses requires the integration of experimental measures with a priori knowledge about the system and the interacting molecules therein. We developed a novel systems biology-based methodology that leverages mechanistic network models and transcriptomic data to quantitatively assess the biological impact of exposures to active substances. Hierarchically organized network models were first constructed to provide a coherent framework for investigating the impact of exposures at the molecular, pathway and process levels. We then validated our methodology using novel and previously published experiments. For both in vitro systems with simple exposure and in vivo systems with complex exposures, our methodology was able to recapitulate known biological responses matching expected or measured phenotypes. In addition, the quantitative results were in agreement with experimental endpoint data for many of the mechanistic effects that were assessed, providing further objective confirmation of the approach. We conclude that our methodology evaluates the biological impact of exposures in an objective, systematic, and quantifiable manner, enabling the computation of a systems-wide and pan-mechanistic biological impact measure for a given active substance or mixture. Our results suggest that various fields of human disease research, from drug development to consumer product testing and environmental impact analysis, could benefit from using this methodology. - Highlights: • The impact of biologically active substances is quantified at multiple levels. • The systems-level impact integrates the perturbations of individual networks. • The networks capture the relationships between

  17. 3DProIN: Protein-Protein Interaction Networks and Structure Visualization

    OpenAIRE

    Hui LI; Liu, Chunmei

    2014-01-01

    3DProIN is a computational tool to visualize protein–protein interaction networks in both two dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D) view. It models protein-protein interactions in a graph and explores the biologically relevant features of the tertiary structures of each protein in the network. Properties such as color, shape and name of each node (protein) of the network can be edited in either 2D or 3D views. 3DProIN is implemented using 3D Java and C programming languages. The interne...

  18. Information theory in systems biology. Part II: protein-protein interaction and signaling networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavian, Zaynab; Díaz, José; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2016-03-01

    By the development of information theory in 1948 by Claude Shannon to address the problems in the field of data storage and data communication over (noisy) communication channel, it has been successfully applied in many other research areas such as bioinformatics and systems biology. In this manuscript, we attempt to review some of the existing literatures in systems biology, which are using the information theory measures in their calculations. As we have reviewed most of the existing information-theoretic methods in gene regulatory and metabolic networks in the first part of the review, so in the second part of our study, the application of information theory in other types of biological networks including protein-protein interaction and signaling networks will be surveyed. PMID:26691180

  19. Reverse engineering biological networks :applications in immune responses to bio-toxins.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martino, Anthony A.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Davidson, George S.; Haaland, David Michael; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Thomas, Edward Victor; Slepoy, Alexander; Zhang, Zhaoduo; May, Elebeoba Eni; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel

    2005-12-01

    Our aim is to determine the network of events, or the regulatory network, that defines an immune response to a bio-toxin. As a model system, we are studying T cell regulatory network triggered through tyrosine kinase receptor activation using a combination of pathway stimulation and time-series microarray experiments. Our approach is composed of five steps (1) microarray experiments and data error analysis, (2) data clustering, (3) data smoothing and discretization, (4) network reverse engineering, and (5) network dynamics analysis and fingerprint identification. The technological outcome of this study is a suite of experimental protocols and computational tools that reverse engineer regulatory networks provided gene expression data. The practical biological outcome of this work is an immune response fingerprint in terms of gene expression levels. Inferring regulatory networks from microarray data is a new field of investigation that is no more than five years old. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first attempt that integrates experiments, error analyses, data clustering, inference, and network analysis to solve a practical problem. Our systematic approach of counting, enumeration, and sampling networks matching experimental data is new to the field of network reverse engineering. The resulting mathematical analyses and computational tools lead to new results on their own and should be useful to others who analyze and infer networks.

  20. Health and the Structure of Adolescent Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Steven A.; Schaefer, David R.; Kornienko, Olga

    2010-01-01

    Much research has explored the role of social networks in promoting health through the provision of social support. However, little work has examined how social networks themselves may be structured by health. This article investigates the link between individuals' health and the characteristics of their social network positions.We first develop…

  1. 3-D components of a biological neural network visualized in computer generated imagery. II - Macular neural network organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Muriel D.; Meyer, Glenn; Lam, Tony; Cutler, Lynn; Vaziri, Parshaw

    1990-01-01

    Computer-assisted reconstructions of small parts of the macular neural network show how the nerve terminals and receptive fields are organized in 3-dimensional space. This biological neural network is anatomically organized for parallel distributed processing of information. Processing appears to be more complex than in computer-based neural network, because spatiotemporal factors figure into synaptic weighting. Serial reconstruction data show anatomical arrangements which suggest that (1) assemblies of cells analyze and distribute information with inbuilt redundancy, to improve reliability; (2) feedforward/feedback loops provide the capacity for presynaptic modulation of output during processing; (3) constrained randomness in connectivities contributes to adaptability; and (4) local variations in network complexity permit differing analyses of incoming signals to take place simultaneously. The last inference suggests that there may be segregation of information flow to central stations subserving particular functions.

  2. Hierarchical Models for Independence Structures of Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Sadeghi, Kayvan; Rinaldo, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a new family of network models, called hierarchical network models, that allow to represent in an explicit manner the stochastic dependence among the edges. In particular, each member of this family can be associated with a graphical model defining conditional independence clauses among the edges of the network, called the dependency graph. Every network model of dyadic independence assumption can be generalized to construct members of this new family. Using this new framework, w...

  3. The BIOSCI electronic newsgroup network for the biological sciences. Final report, October 1, 1992--June 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristofferson, D.; Mack, D.

    1996-10-01

    This is the final report for a DOE funded project on BIOSCI Electronic Newsgroup Network for the biological sciences. A usable network for scientific discussion, major announcements, problem solving, etc. has been created.

  4. Networking Biology: The Origins of Sequence-Sharing Practices in Genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Hallam

    2015-10-01

    The wide sharing of biological data, especially nucleotide sequences, is now considered to be a key feature of genomics. Historians and sociologists have attempted to account for the rise of this sharing by pointing to precedents in model organism communities and in natural history. This article supplements these approaches by examining the role that electronic networking technologies played in generating the specific forms of sharing that emerged in genomics. The links between early computer users at the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory in the 1960s, biologists using local computer networks in the 1970s, and GenBank in the 1980s, show how networking technologies carried particular practices of communication, circulation, and data distribution from computing into biology. In particular, networking practices helped to transform sequences themselves into objects that had value as a community resource. PMID:26593711

  5. The fractal octahedron network of the large scale structure

    CERN Document Server

    Battaner, E

    1998-01-01

    In a previous article, we have proposed that the large scale structure network generated by large scale magnetic fields could consist of a network of octahedra only contacting at their vertexes. Assuming such a network could arise at different scales producing a fractal geometry, we study here its properties, and in particular how a sub-octahedron network can be inserted within an octahedron of the large network. We deduce that the scale of the fractal structure would range from $\\approx$100 Mpc, i.e. the scale of the deepest surveys, down to about 10 Mpc, as other smaller scale magnetic fields were probably destroyed in the radiation dominated Universe.

  6. Structure and Response in the World Trade Network

    OpenAIRE

    Jiankui He; Deem, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    We examine how the structure of the world trade network has been shaped by globalization and recessions over the last 40 years. We show that by treating the world trade network as an evolving system, theory predicts the trade network is more sensitive to evolutionary shocks and recovers more slowly from them now than it did 40 years ago, due to structural changes in the world trade network induced by globalization. We also show that recession-induced change to the world trade network leads to...

  7. Modeling Wireless Sensor Networks for Monitoring in Biological Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nadimi, Esmaeil

    signal strength). Fusing the two measured behavioral data resulted in an improvement of the classification results regarding the animal behavior mode (activity/inactivity), compared to the results achieved by only monitoring one of the behavioral parameters. Applying a multiple-model adaptive estimation...... (MMAE) approach to the data resulted in the highest classification success rate, due to the use of precise forth-order mathematical models which relate the feed offer to the pitch angle of the neck. This thesis shows that wireless sensor networks can be successfully employed to monitor the behavior...

  8. Biologic

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffman, L H

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we explore the boundary between biology and the study of formal systems (logic). In the end, we arrive at a summary formalism, a chapter in "boundary mathematics" where there are not only containers but also extainers ><, entities open to interaction and distinguishing the space that they are not. The boundary algebra of containers and extainers is to biologic what boolean algebra is to classical logic. We show how this formalism encompasses significant parts of the logic of DNA replication, the Dirac formalism for quantum mechanics, formalisms for protein folding and the basic structure of the Temperley Lieb algebra at the foundations of topological invariants of knots and links.

  9. Structural analysis of behavioral networks from the Internet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In spite of the Internet's phenomenal growth and social impact, many aspects of the collective communication behavior of its users are largely unknown. Understanding the structure and dynamics of the behavioral networks that connect users with each other and with services across the Internet is key to modeling the network and designing future applications. We present a characterization of the properties of the behavioral networks generated by several million users of the Abilene (Internet2) network. Structural features of these networks offer new insights into scaling properties of network activity and ways of distinguishing particular patterns of traffic. For example, we find that the structure of the behavioral network associated with Web activity is characterized by such extreme heterogeneity as to challenge any simple attempt to model Web server traffic

  10. Deciphering Diseases and Biological Targets for Environmental Chemicals using Toxicogenomics Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Audouze, Karine Marie Laure; Juncker, Agnieszka; Roque, Francisco José Sousa Simões Almeida;

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to environmental chemicals and drugs may have a negative effect on human health. A better understanding of the molecular mechanism of such compounds is needed to determine the risk. We present a high confidence human protein-protein association network built upon the integration of...... chemical toxicology and systems biology. This computational systems chemical biology model reveals uncharacterized connections between compounds and diseases, thus predicting which compounds may be risk factors for human health. Additionally, the network can be used to identify unexpected potential...

  11. Efficient reconstruction of biological networks via transitive reduction on general purpose graphics processors

    OpenAIRE

    Bošnački Dragan; Odenbrett Maximilian R; Wijs Anton; Ligtenberg Willem; Hilbers Peter

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Techniques for reconstruction of biological networks which are based on perturbation experiments often predict direct interactions between nodes that do not exist. Transitive reduction removes such relations if they can be explained by an indirect path of influences. The existing algorithms for transitive reduction are sequential and might suffer from too long run times for large networks. They also exhibit the anomaly that some existing direct interactions are also remove...

  12. Cryo-focused-ion-beam applications in structural biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigort, Alexander; Plitzko, Jürgen M

    2015-09-01

    The ability to precisely control the preparation of biological samples for investigations by electron cryo-microscopy is becoming increasingly important for ultrastructural imaging in biology. Precision machining instruments such as the focused ion beam microscope (FIB) were originally developed for applications in materials science. However, today we witness a growing use of these tools in the life sciences mainly due to their versatility, since they can be used both as manipulation and as imaging devices, when complemented with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The advent of cryo-preparation equipment and accessories made it possible to pursue work on frozen-hydrated biological specimens with these two beam (FIB/SEM) instruments. In structural biology, the cryo-FIB can be used to site-specifically thin vitrified specimens for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and tomography. Having control over the specimen thickness is a decisive factor for TEM imaging, as the thickness of the object under scrutiny determines the attainable resolution. Besides its use for TEM preparation, the FIB/SEM microscope can be additionally used to obtain three-dimensional volumetric data from biological specimens. The unique combination of an imaging and precision manipulation tool allows sequentially removing material with the ion beam and imaging the milled block faces by scanning with the electron beam, an approach known as FIB/SEM tomography. This review covers both fields of cryo-FIB applications: specimen preparation for TEM cryo-tomography and volume imaging by cryo-FIB/SEM tomography. PMID:25703192

  13. On The Measurement Of The Structure Of Global Market Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Holland, C P

    1994-01-01

    Hie research problem considered is the measurement of global market networks. Market networks are defined as separate organisations connected by business relationships. With the widespread implementation of Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) and latterly more complex Inter-Organisational Systems (lOSs) market networks are evolving in an electronic trading environment. The structure of such networks has been considered from a variety of different theoretical perspectives including transaction c...

  14. A Hierarchical Dispatch Structure for Distribution Network Pricing

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Zhao; Hesamzadeh, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a hierarchical dispatch structure for efficient distribution network pricing. The dispatch coordination problem in the context of hierarchical network operators are addressed. We formulate decentralized generation dispatch into a bilevel optimization problem in which main network operator and the connected distribution network operator optimize their costs in two levels. By using Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions and Fortuny-Amat McCarl linearization, the bilevel optimization ...

  15. Multiple regimes of robust patterns between network structure and biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jover, Luis F.; Flores, Cesar O.; Cortez, Michael H.; Weitz, Joshua S.

    2015-12-01

    Ecological networks such as plant-pollinator and host-parasite networks have structured interactions that define who interacts with whom. The structure of interactions also shapes ecological and evolutionary dynamics. Yet, there is significant ongoing debate as to whether certain structures, e.g., nestedness, contribute positively, negatively or not at all to biodiversity. We contend that examining variation in life history traits is key to disentangling the potential relationship between network structure and biodiversity. Here, we do so by analyzing a dynamic model of virus-bacteria interactions across a spectrum of network structures. Consistent with prior studies, we find plausible parameter domains exhibiting strong, positive relationships between nestedness and biodiversity. Yet, the same model can exhibit negative relationships between nestedness and biodiversity when examined in a distinct, plausible region of parameter space. We discuss steps towards identifying when network structure could, on its own, drive the resilience, sustainability, and even conservation of ecological communities.

  16. A Network Biology Approach Identifies Molecular Cross-Talk between Normal Prostate Epithelial and Prostate Carcinoma Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Trevino

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The advent of functional genomics has enabled the genome-wide characterization of the molecular state of cells and tissues, virtually at every level of biological organization. The difficulty in organizing and mining this unprecedented amount of information has stimulated the development of computational methods designed to infer the underlying structure of regulatory networks from observational data. These important developments had a profound impact in biological sciences since they triggered the development of a novel data-driven investigative approach. In cancer research, this strategy has been particularly successful. It has contributed to the identification of novel biomarkers, to a better characterization of disease heterogeneity and to a more in depth understanding of cancer pathophysiology. However, so far these approaches have not explicitly addressed the challenge of identifying networks representing the interaction of different cell types in a complex tissue. Since these interactions represent an essential part of the biology of both diseased and healthy tissues, it is of paramount importance that this challenge is addressed. Here we report the definition of a network reverse engineering strategy designed to infer directional signals linking adjacent cell types within a complex tissue. The application of this inference strategy to prostate cancer genome-wide expression profiling data validated the approach and revealed that normal epithelial cells exert an anti-tumour activity on prostate carcinoma cells. Moreover, by using a Bayesian hierarchical model integrating genetics and gene expression data and combining this with survival analysis, we show that the expression of putative cell communication genes related to focal adhesion and secretion is affected by epistatic gene copy number variation and it is predictive of patient survival. Ultimately, this study represents a generalizable approach to the challenge of deciphering cell

  17. A Network Biology Approach Identifies Molecular Cross-Talk between Normal Prostate Epithelial and Prostate Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino, Victor; Cassese, Alberto; Nagy, Zsuzsanna; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Herbert, John; Antzack, Philipp; Clarke, Kim; Davies, Nicholas; Rahman, Ayesha; Campbell, Moray J; Guindani, Michele; Bicknell, Roy; Vannucci, Marina; Falciani, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    The advent of functional genomics has enabled the genome-wide characterization of the molecular state of cells and tissues, virtually at every level of biological organization. The difficulty in organizing and mining this unprecedented amount of information has stimulated the development of computational methods designed to infer the underlying structure of regulatory networks from observational data. These important developments had a profound impact in biological sciences since they triggered the development of a novel data-driven investigative approach. In cancer research, this strategy has been particularly successful. It has contributed to the identification of novel biomarkers, to a better characterization of disease heterogeneity and to a more in depth understanding of cancer pathophysiology. However, so far these approaches have not explicitly addressed the challenge of identifying networks representing the interaction of different cell types in a complex tissue. Since these interactions represent an essential part of the biology of both diseased and healthy tissues, it is of paramount importance that this challenge is addressed. Here we report the definition of a network reverse engineering strategy designed to infer directional signals linking adjacent cell types within a complex tissue. The application of this inference strategy to prostate cancer genome-wide expression profiling data validated the approach and revealed that normal epithelial cells exert an anti-tumour activity on prostate carcinoma cells. Moreover, by using a Bayesian hierarchical model integrating genetics and gene expression data and combining this with survival analysis, we show that the expression of putative cell communication genes related to focal adhesion and secretion is affected by epistatic gene copy number variation and it is predictive of patient survival. Ultimately, this study represents a generalizable approach to the challenge of deciphering cell communication networks

  18. ezBioNet: A modeling and simulation system for analyzing biological reaction networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Seok Jong; Tung, Thai Quang; Park, Junho; Lim, Jongtae; Yoo, Jaesoo

    2012-10-01

    To achieve robustness against living environments, a living organism is composed of complicated regulatory mechanisms ranging from gene regulations to signal transduction. If such life phenomena are to be understand, an integrated analysis tool that should have modeling and simulation functions for biological reactions, as well as new experimental methods for measuring biological phenomena, is fundamentally required. We have designed and implemented modeling and simulation software (ezBioNet) for analyzing biological reaction networks. The software can simultaneously perform an integrated modeling of various responses occurring in cells, ranging from gene expressions to signaling processes. To support massive analysis of biological networks, we have constructed a server-side simulation system (VCellSim) that can perform ordinary differential equations (ODE) analysis, sensitivity analysis, and parameter estimates. ezBioNet integrates the BioModel database by connecting the european bioinformatics institute (EBI) servers through Web services APIs and supports the handling of systems biology markup language (SBML) files. In addition, we employed eclipse RCP (rich client platform) which is a powerful modularity framework allowing various functional expansions. ezBioNet is intended to be an easy-to-use modeling tool, as well as a simulation system, to understand the control mechanism by monitoring the change of each component in a biological network. A researcher may perform the kinetic modeling and execute the simulation. The simulation result can be managed and visualized on ezBioNet, which is freely available at http://ezbionet.cbnu.ac.kr.

  19. Exploring network structure, dynamics, and function using networkx

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagberg, Aric [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swart, Pieter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; S Chult, Daniel [COLGATE UNIV

    2008-01-01

    NetworkX is a Python language package for exploration and analysis of networks and network algorithms. The core package provides data structures for representing many types of networks, or graphs, including simple graphs, directed graphs, and graphs with parallel edges and self loops. The nodes in NetworkX graphs can be any (hashable) Python object and edges can contain arbitrary data; this flexibility mades NetworkX ideal for representing networks found in many different scientific fields. In addition to the basic data structures many graph algorithms are implemented for calculating network properties and structure measures: shortest paths, betweenness centrality, clustering, and degree distribution and many more. NetworkX can read and write various graph formats for eash exchange with existing data, and provides generators for many classic graphs and popular graph models, such as the Erdoes-Renyi, Small World, and Barabasi-Albert models, are included. The ease-of-use and flexibility of the Python programming language together with connection to the SciPy tools make NetworkX a powerful tool for scientific computations. We discuss some of our recent work studying synchronization of coupled oscillators to demonstrate how NetworkX enables research in the field of computational networks.

  20. KeyPathwayMiner - De-novo network enrichment by combining multiple OMICS data and biological networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumbach, Jan; Alcaraz, Nicolas; Pauling, Josch K.;

    We tackle the problem of de-novo pathway extraction. Given a biological network and a set of case-control studies, KeyPathwayMiner efficiently extracts and visualizes all maximal connected sub-networks that contain mainly genes that are dysregulated, e.g., differentially expressed, in most cases...... problems and designed a set of algorithms to tackle the combinatorial explosion of the search space. During the presentation we will demonstrate how to: Import and process the data, set the parameters for the two models, compute and visualize the key pathways, judge and statistically evaluate the results...

  1. Image-Based Structural Modeling of the Cardiac Purkinje Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin R. Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Purkinje network is a specialized conduction system within the heart that ensures the proper activation of the ventricles to produce effective contraction. Its role during ventricular arrhythmias is less clear, but some experimental studies have suggested that the Purkinje network may significantly affect the genesis and maintenance of ventricular arrhythmias. Despite its importance, few structural models of the Purkinje network have been developed, primarily because current physical limitations prevent examination of the intact Purkinje network. In previous modeling efforts Purkinje-like structures have been developed through either automated or hand-drawn procedures, but these networks have been created according to general principles rather than based on real networks. To allow for greater realism in Purkinje structural models, we present a method for creating three-dimensional Purkinje networks based directly on imaging data. Our approach uses Purkinje network structures extracted from photographs of dissected ventricles and projects these flat networks onto realistic endocardial surfaces. Using this method, we create models for the combined ventricle-Purkinje system that can fully activate the ventricles through a stimulus delivered to the Purkinje network and can produce simulated activation sequences that match experimental observations. The combined models have the potential to help elucidate Purkinje network contributions during ventricular arrhythmias.

  2. Measuring the robustness of network community structure using assortativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shizuka, Daizaburo; Farine, Damien R.

    2016-01-01

    The existence of discrete social clusters, or ‘communities’, is a common feature of social networks in human and nonhuman animals. The level of such community structure in networks is typically measured using an index of modularity, Q. While modularity quantifies the degree to which individuals associate within versus between social communities and provides a useful measure of structure in the social network, it assumes that the network has been well sampled. However, animal social network data is typically subject to sampling errors. In particular, the associations among individuals are often not sampled equally, and animal social network studies are often based on a relatively small set of observations. Here, we extend an existing framework for bootstrapping network metrics to provide a method for assessing the robustness of community assignment in social networks using a metric we call community assortativity (rcom). We use simulations to demonstrate that modularity can reliably detect the transition from random to structured associations in networks that differ in size and number of communities, while community assortativity accurately measures the level of confidence based on the detectability of associations. We then demonstrate the use of these metrics using three publicly available data sets of avian social networks. We suggest that by explicitly addressing the known limitations in sampling animal social network, this approach will facilitate more rigorous analyses of population-level structural patterns across social systems. PMID:26949266

  3. Aromatic rings in chemical and biological recognition: energetics and structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salonen, Laura M; Ellermann, Manuel; Diederich, François

    2011-05-16

    This review describes a multidimensional treatment of molecular recognition phenomena involving aromatic rings in chemical and biological systems. It summarizes new results reported since the appearance of an earlier review in 2003 in host-guest chemistry, biological affinity assays and biostructural analysis, data base mining in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) and the Protein Data Bank (PDB), and advanced computational studies. Topics addressed are arene-arene, perfluoroarene-arene, S⋅⋅⋅aromatic, cation-π, and anion-π interactions, as well as hydrogen bonding to π systems. The generated knowledge benefits, in particular, structure-based hit-to-lead development and lead optimization both in the pharmaceutical and in the crop protection industry. It equally facilitates the development of new advanced materials and supramolecular systems, and should inspire further utilization of interactions with aromatic rings to control the stereochemical outcome of synthetic transformations. PMID:21538733

  4. Structure and mechanics of interfaces in biological materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthelat, Francois; Yin, Zhen; Buehler, Markus J.

    2016-04-01

    Hard biological materials — for example, seashells, bone or wood — fulfil critical structural functions and display unique and attractive combinations of stiffness, strength and toughness, owing to their intricate architectures, which are organized over several length scales. The size, shape and arrangement of the ‘building blocks’ of which these materials are made are essential for defining their properties and their exceptional performance, but there is growing evidence that their deformation and toughness are also largely governed by the interfaces that join these building blocks. These interfaces channel nonlinear deformations and deflect cracks into configurations in which propagation is more difficult. In this Review, we discuss comparatively the composition, structure and mechanics of a set of representative biological interfaces in nacre, bone and wood, and show that these interfaces possess unusual mechanical characteristics, which can encourage the development of advanced bioinspired composites. Finally, we highlight recent examples of synthetic materials inspired from the mechanics and architecture of natural interfaces.

  5. Polysaccharides of higher fungi: Biological role, structure, and antioxidative activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozarski Maja S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal polysaccharides attract a lot of attention due to their multiple challenging biological properties, such as: anti-tumor, anti-viral, anticomplementary, anticoagulant, hypolipidemic and immunomodulatory and immune-stimulatory activities, which all together make them suitable for application in many quite distinctive areas, such as food industry, biomedicine, cosmetology, agriculture, environmental protection and waste water management. This article presents results with respect to biological properties, structure and procedures related to the isolation and activation of polysaccharides of higher fungi. It is considered and presented along with a review of the critical antioxidative activity and possible influence of the structural composition of polysaccharide extracts (isolated from these higher fungi upon their antioxidative properties.

  6. Adapting Bayes Network Structures to Non-stationary Domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Holbech; Nielsen, Thomas Dyhre

    2008-01-01

    When an incremental structural learning method gradually modifies a Bayesian network (BN) structure to fit a sequential stream of observations, we call the process structural adaptation. Structural adaptation is useful when the learner is set to work in an unknown environment, where a BN is gradu......When an incremental structural learning method gradually modifies a Bayesian network (BN) structure to fit a sequential stream of observations, we call the process structural adaptation. Structural adaptation is useful when the learner is set to work in an unknown environment, where a BN...

  7. Network Analysis of Cosmic Structures : Network Centrality and Topological Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Sungryong

    2015-01-01

    We apply simple analyses techniques developed for the study of complex networks to the study of the cosmic web, the large scale galaxy distribution. In this paper, we measure three network centralities (ranks of topological importance), Degree Centrality (DC), Closeness Centrality (CL), and Betweenness Centrality (BC) from a network built from the Cosmological Evolution Survey (COSMOS) catalog. We define 8 galaxy populations according to the centrality measures; Void, Wall, and Cluster by DC, Main Branch and Dangling Leaf by BC, and Kernel, Backbone, and Fracture by CL. We also define three populations by voronoi tessellation density to compare these with the DC selection. We apply the topological selections to galaxies in the (photometric) redshift range $0.91

  8. The potential for biological structure determination with pulsed neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential of pulsed neutron diffraction in structural determination of biological materials is discussed. The problems and potential solutions in this area are outlined, with reference to both current and future sources and instrumentation. The importance of developing instrumentation on pulsed sources in emphasized, with reference to the likelihood of future expansion in this area. The possibilities and limitations of single crystal, fiber and powder diffraction in this area are assessed

  9. The potential for biological structure determination with pulsed neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, C.C. [CLRC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton Didcot Oxon (United Kingdom)

    1994-12-31

    The potential of pulsed neutron diffraction in structural determination of biological materials is discussed. The problems and potential solutions in this area are outlined, with reference to both current and future sources and instrumentation. The importance of developing instrumentation on pulsed sources in emphasized, with reference to the likelihood of future expansion in this area. The possibilities and limitations of single crystal, fiber and powder diffraction in this area are assessed.

  10. The Structural Biology of CRISPR-Cas Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Fuguo; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Prokaryotic CRISPR-Cas genomic loci encode RNA-mediated adaptive immune systems that bear some functional similarities with eukaryotic RNA interference. Acquired and heritable immunity against bacteriophage and plasmids begins with integration of ~30 base pair foreign DNA sequences into the host genome. CRISPR-derived transcripts assemble with CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins to target complementary nucleic acids for degradation. Here we review recent advances in the structural biology of the...

  11. Chemical and structural features influencing the biological activity of curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyadarsini, K Indira

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin, a polyphenolic natural product, exhibits therapeutic activity against a number of diseases, attributed mainly to its chemical structure and unique physical, chemical, and biological properties. It is a diferuloyl methane molecule [1,7-bis (4-hydroxy-3- methoxyphenyl)-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione)] containing two ferulic acid residues joined by a methylene bridge. It has three important functionalities: an aromatic o-methoxy phenolic group, α, β-unsaturated β-diketo moiety and a seven carbon linker. Extensive research in the last two decades has provided evidence for the role of these different functional groups in its crucial biological activities. A few highlights of chemical structural features associated with the biological activity of curcumin are: The o-methoxyphenol group and methylenic hydrogen are responsible for the antioxidant activity of curcumin, and curcumin donates an electron/ hydrogen atom to reactive oxygen species. Curcumin interacts with a number of biomolecules through non-covalent and covalent binding. The hydrogen bonding and hydrophobicity of curcumin, arising from the aromatic and tautomeric structures along with the flexibility of the linker group are responsible for the non-covalent interactions. The α, β-unsaturated β-diketone moiety covalently interacts with protein thiols, through Michael reaction. The β-diketo group forms chelates with transition metals, there by reducing the metal induced toxicity and some of the metal complexes exhibit improved antioxidant activity as enzyme mimics. New analogues with improved activity are being developed with modifications on specific functional groups of curcumin. The physico-chemical and structural features associated with some of the biological activities of curcumin and important analogues are summarized in this article. PMID:23116315

  12. Structural and Computational Studies of Small Organic and Biological Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Lozano-Casal, Patricia

    2006-01-01

    Over the last three decades high-pressure X-ray diffraction techniques have been widely utilised to perform structural studies in many areas of research. For example, physicists make use of these experimental techniques to investigate metals, conductor and semi-conductor compounds among others, whereas geochemists apply them to study the conditions deep within the Earth’s interior. Furthermore, pressure studies have reached an important status in chemistry, biology and planetary science, and ...

  13. Slow poisoning and destruction of networks: edge proximity and its implications for biological and infrastructure networks

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Soumya Jyoti; Roy, Soumen

    2014-01-01

    There have been many studies on malicious targeting of network nodes using degree, betweenness etc. We propose a new network metric, edge proximity, ${\\cal P}_e$, which demonstrates the importance of specific edges in a network, hitherto not captured by existing network metrics. Effects of removing edges with high ${\\cal P}_e$ might initially seem inconspicuous but is eventually shown to be very harmful for the network. When compared to existing strategies, removal of edges by ${\\cal P}_e$, leads to remarkable increase of diameter and average path length in real and random networks till the first disconnection and beyond. ${\\cal P}_e$ can be consistently used to rupture the network into two nearly equal parts, thus presenting a very potent strategy to greatly harm a network. Targeting by ${\\cal P}_e$ causes notable efficiency loss in US and European power grid. ${\\cal P}_e$ identifies proteins with essential cellular functions in protein-protein interaction networks. It pinpoints regulatory neural connections...

  14. Theoretical Neuroanatomy:Analyzing the Structure, Dynamics,and Function of Neuronal Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Anil K.; Edelman, Gerald M.

    The mammalian brain is an extraordinary object: its networks give rise to our conscious experiences as well as to the generation of adaptive behavior for the organism within its environment. Progress in understanding the structure, dynamics and function of the brain faces many challenges. Biological neural networks change over time, their detailed structure is difficult to elucidate, and they are highly heterogeneous both in their neuronal units and synaptic connections. In facing these challenges, graph-theoretic and information-theoretic approaches have yielded a number of useful insights and promise many more.

  15. Mass Media Influence Spreading in Social Networks with Community Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Candia, Julián; Mazzitello, Karina I.

    2008-01-01

    We study an extension of Axelrod's model for social influence, in which cultural drift is represented as random perturbations, while mass media are introduced by means of an external field. In this scenario, we investigate how the modular structure of social networks affects the propagation of mass media messages across the society. The community structure of social networks is represented by coupled random networks, in which two random graphs are connected by intercommunity links. Considerin...

  16. Inference, simulation, modeling, and analysis of complex networks, with special emphasis on complex networks in systems biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Claire Petra

    Across diverse fields ranging from physics to biology, sociology, and economics, the technological advances of the past decade have engendered an unprecedented explosion of data on highly complex systems with thousands, if not millions of interacting components. These systems exist at many scales of size and complexity, and it is becoming ever-more apparent that they are, in fact, universal, arising in every field of study. Moreover, they share fundamental properties---chief among these, that the individual interactions of their constituent parts may be well-understood, but the characteristic behaviour produced by the confluence of these interactions---by these complex networks---is unpredictable; in a nutshell, the whole is more than the sum of its parts. There is, perhaps, no better illustration of this concept than the discoveries being made regarding complex networks in the biological sciences. In particular, though the sequencing of the human genome in 2003 was a remarkable feat, scientists understand that the "cellular-level blueprints" for the human being are cellular-level parts lists, but they say nothing (explicitly) about cellular-level processes. The challenge of modern molecular biology is to understand these processes in terms of the networks of parts---in terms of the interactions among proteins, enzymes, genes, and metabolites---as it is these processes that ultimately differentiate animate from inanimate, giving rise to life! It is the goal of systems biology---an umbrella field encapsulating everything from molecular biology to epidemiology in social systems---to understand processes in terms of fundamental networks of core biological parts, be they proteins or people. By virtue of the fact that there are literally countless complex systems, not to mention tools and techniques used to infer, simulate, analyze, and model these systems, it is impossible to give a truly comprehensive account of the history and study of complex systems. The author

  17. Quantification of the impact of PSI:Biology according to the annotations of the determined structures

    OpenAIRE

    DePietro, Paul J; Julfayev, Elchin S.; McLaughlin, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Protein Structure Initiative:Biology (PSI:Biology) is the third phase of PSI where protein structures are determined in high-throughput to characterize their biological functions. The transition to the third phase entailed the formation of PSI:Biology Partnerships which are composed of structural genomics centers and biomedical science laboratories. We present a method to examine the impact of protein structures determined under the auspices of PSI:Biology by measuring their rates ...

  18. Influence of a network structure on the network effect in the communication service market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Makoto; Shirayama, Susumu

    2008-09-01

    In this study, we analyze the network effect in a model of a personal communication market, by using a multi-agent based simulation approach. We introduce into the simulation model complex network structures as the interaction patterns of agents. With complex network models, we investigate the dynamics of a market in which two providers are competing. We also examine the structure of networks that affect the complex behavior of the market. By a series of simulations, we show that the structural properties of complex networks, such as the clustering coefficient and degree correlation, have a major influence on the dynamics of the market. We find that the network effect is increased if the interaction pattern of agents is characterized by a high clustering coefficient, or a positive degree correlation. We also discuss a suitable model of the interaction pattern for reproducing market dynamics in the real world, by performing simulations using real data of a social network.

  19. Packing regularities in biological structures relate to their dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernigan, Robert L; Kloczkowski, Andrzej

    2007-01-01

    The high packing density inside proteins leads to certain geometric regularities and also is one of the most important contributors to the high extent of cooperativity manifested by proteins in their cohesive domain motions. The orientations between neighboring nonbonded residues in proteins substantially follow the similar geometric regularities, regardless of whether the residues are on the surface or buried, a direct result of hydrophobicity forces. These orientations are relatively fixed and correspond closely to small deformations from those of the face-centered cubic lattice, which is the way in which identical spheres pack at the highest density. Packing density also is related to the extent of conservation of residues, and we show this relationship for residue packing densities by averaging over a large sample or residue packings. There are three regimes: (1) over a broad range of packing densities the relationship between sequence entropy and inverse packing density is nearly linear, (2) over a limited range of low packing densities the sequence entropy is nearly constant, and (3) at extremely low packing densities the sequence entropy is highly variable. These packing results provide important justification for the simple elastic network models that have been shown for a large number of proteins to represent protein dynamics so successfully, even when the models are extremely coarse grained. Elastic network models for polymeric chains are simple and could be combined with these protein elastic networks to represent partially denatured parts of proteins. Finally, we show results of applications of the elastic network model to study the functional motions of the ribosome, based on its known structure. These results indicate expected correlations among its components for the step-wise processing steps in protein synthesis, and suggest ways to use these elastic network models to develop more detailed mechanisms, an important possibility because most

  20. Functional clustering in hippocampal cultures: relating network structure and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we investigate the relationship between gross anatomic structural network properties, neuronal dynamics and the resultant functional structure in dissociated rat hippocampal cultures. Specifically, we studied cultures as they developed under two conditions: the first supporting glial cell growth (high glial group), and the second one inhibiting it (low glial group). We then compared structural network properties and the spatio-temporal activity patterns of the neurons. Differences in dynamics between the two groups could be linked to the impact of the glial network on the neuronal network as the cultures developed. We also implemented a recently developed algorithm called the functional clustering algorithm (FCA) to obtain the resulting functional network structure. We show that this new algorithm is useful for capturing changes in functional network structure as the networks evolve over time. The FCA detects changes in functional structure that are consistent with expected dynamical differences due to the impact of the glial network. Cultures in the high glial group show an increase in global synchronization as the cultures age, while those in the low glial group remain locally synchronized. We additionally use the FCA to quantify the amount of synchronization present in the cultures and show that the total level of synchronization in the high glial group is stronger than in the low glial group. These results indicate an interdependence between the glial and neuronal networks present in dissociated cultures

  1. Synthesis, crystal structure and biological activity of novel diester cyclophanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Yang, Bingqin; Fang, Xianwen; Cheng, Zhao; Yang, Meipan, E-mail: yangbq@nwu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Natural Functional Molecule Chemistry, Northwest University, Shaanxi (China)

    2012-10-15

    A series of novel diester cyclophanes was synthesized by esterification of 1,2-benzenedicarbonyl chloride with eight different diols under high dilution conditions. The structures of the compounds were verified by elemental analysis, {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), IR spectroscopy and high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). The crystal structures of two compounds were characterized by single crystal X-ray diffractometry (XRD). All the new cyclophanes were evaluated for biological activities and the results showed that some of these compounds have low antibacterial or antifungal activities (author)

  2. Magnetic Micro/Nano Structures for Biological Manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chen-Yu; Hsieh, Teng-Fu; Chang, Wei-Chieh; Yeh, Kun-Chieh; Hsu, Ming-Shinn; Chang, Ching-Ray; Chen, Jiann-Yeu; Wei, Zung-Hang

    2016-05-01

    Biomanipulation based on micro/nano structures is an attractive approach for biotechnology. To manipulate biological systems by magnetic forces, the magnetic labeling technology utilized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as a common rule. Ferrofluid, well-dispersed MNPs, can be used for magnetic modification of the surface or as molds to form organized microstructures. For magnetic-based micro/nano structures, different methods to modulate magnetic field at the microscale have been developed. Specifically, this review focused on a new strategy which uses the concept of micromagnetism of patterned magnetic thin film with specific domain walls configurations to generate stable magnetic poles for cell patterning.

  3. Network effects, network structure and consumer interaction in mobile telecommunications in Europe and Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Birke, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    This paper estimates the importance of (tariff-mediated) network effects and the impact of a consumer's social network on her choice of mobile phone provider. The study uses network data obtained from surveys of students in several European and Asian countries. We use the Quadratic Assignment Procedure, a non-parametric permutation test, to adjust for the particular error structure of network data. We find that respondents strongly coordinate their choice of mobile phone providers, but only i...

  4. Network versus portfolio structure in financial systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Teruyoshi

    2013-10-01

    The question of how to stabilize financial systems has attracted considerable attention since the global financial crisis of 2007-2009. Recently, Beale et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 108, 12647 (2011)] demonstrated that higher portfolio diversity among banks would reduce systemic risk by decreasing the risk of simultaneous defaults at the expense of a higher likelihood of individual defaults. In practice, however, a bank default has an externality in that it undermines other banks’ balance sheets. This paper explores how each of these different sources of risk, simultaneity risk and externality, contributes to systemic risk. The results show that the allocation of external assets that minimizes systemic risk varies with the topology of the financial network as long as asset returns have negative correlations. In the model, a well-known centrality measure, PageRank, reflects an appropriately defined “infectiveness” of a bank. An important result is that the most infective bank needs not always to be the safest bank. Under certain circumstances, the most infective node should act as a firewall to prevent large-scale collective defaults. The introduction of a counteractive portfolio structure will significantly reduce systemic risk.

  5. Wireless sensor networks for structural health monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Jiannong

    2016-01-01

    This brief covers the emerging area of wireless sensor network (WSN)-based structural health monitoring (SHM) systems, and introduces the authors’ WSN-based platform called SenetSHM. It helps the reader differentiate specific requirements of SHM applications from other traditional WSN applications, and demonstrates how these requirements are addressed by using a series of systematic approaches. The brief serves as a practical guide, explaining both the state-of-the-art technologies in domain-specific applications of WSNs, as well as the methodologies used to address the specific requirements for a WSN application. In particular, the brief offers instruction for problem formulation and problem solving based on the authors’ own experiences implementing SenetSHM. Seven concise chapters cover the development of hardware and software design of SenetSHM, as well as in-field experiments conducted while testing the platform. The brief’s exploration of the SenetSHM platform is a valuable feature for civil engine...

  6. Synthetic biology and regulatory networks: where metabolic systems biology meets control engineering

    OpenAIRE

    He, Fei; Murabito, Ettore; Westerhoff, Hans V

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic pathways can be engineered to maximize the synthesis of various products of interest. With the advent of computational systems biology, this endeavour is usually carried out through in silico theoretical studies with the aim to guide and complement further in vitro and in vivo experimental efforts. Clearly, what counts is the result in vivo, not only in terms of maximal productivity but also robustness against environmental perturbations. Engineering an organism towards an increased...

  7. Spatial Structure and Scaling of Agricultural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa, Daniel; Small, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Considering agricultural landscapes as networks can provide information about spatial connectivity relevant for a wide range of applications including pollination, pest management, and ecology. Global agricultural networks are well-described by power law rank-size distributions. However, regional analyses capture only a subset of the total global network. Most analyses are regional. In this paper, we seek to address the following questions: Does the globally observed scale-free property of ag...

  8. Introduction to Focus Issue: Complex Dynamics in Networks, Multilayered Structures and Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccaletti, Stefano; Criado, Regino; Romance, Miguel; Torres, Joaquín J.

    2016-06-01

    In the last years, network scientists have directed their interest to the multi-layer character of real-world systems, and explicitly considered the structural and dynamical organization of graphs made of diverse layers between its constituents. Most complex systems include multiple subsystems and layers of connectivity and, in many cases, the interdependent components of systems interact through many different channels. Such a new perspective is indeed found to be the adequate representation for a wealth of features exhibited by networked systems in the real world. The contributions presented in this Focus Issue cover, from different points of view, the many achievements and still open questions in the field of multi-layer networks, such as: new frameworks and structures to represent and analyze heterogeneous complex systems, different aspects related to synchronization and centrality of complex networks, interplay between layers, and applications to logistic, biological, social, and technological fields.

  9. A biologically inspired neural network controller for ballistic arm movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmid Maurizio

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In humans, the implementation of multijoint tasks of the arm implies a highly complex integration of sensory information, sensorimotor transformations and motor planning. Computational models can be profitably used to better understand the mechanisms sub-serving motor control, thus providing useful perspectives and investigating different control hypotheses. To this purpose, the use of Artificial Neural Networks has been proposed to represent and interpret the movement of upper limb. In this paper, a neural network approach to the modelling of the motor control of a human arm during planar ballistic movements is presented. Methods The developed system is composed of three main computational blocks: 1 a parallel distributed learning scheme that aims at simulating the internal inverse model in the trajectory formation process; 2 a pulse generator, which is responsible for the creation of muscular synergies; and 3 a limb model based on two joints (two degrees of freedom and six muscle-like actuators, that can accommodate for the biomechanical parameters of the arm. The learning paradigm of the neural controller is based on a pure exploration of the working space with no feedback signal. Kinematics provided by the system have been compared with those obtained in literature from experimental data of humans. Results The model reproduces kinematics of arm movements, with bell-shaped wrist velocity profiles and approximately straight trajectories, and gives rise to the generation of synergies for the execution of movements. The model allows achieving amplitude and direction errors of respectively 0.52 cm and 0.2 radians. Curvature values are similar to those encountered in experimental measures with humans. The neural controller also manages environmental modifications such as the insertion of different force fields acting on the end-effector. Conclusion The proposed system has been shown to properly simulate the development of

  10. J D Bernal and the genesis of structural biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, Martin

    2007-02-01

    I was invited to participate in this Symposium a month or so before the event. At that time however, I knew little about J D Bernal. I vaguely remembered a brief conversation on the topic over a decade ago with Professor Vittorio Luzzati as we ambled around the gardens at the Palace of Varsailles. Vittorio likely knew Bernal through his friend Rosalind Franklin who worked with Bernal at Birbeck College. But beyond that I knew nothing about the man or his science. And so it was most fortunate that Andrew Brown's book J D Bernal: The Sage of Science appeared in 2005 and I was able to call on it. Indeed, much of the material included in this chapter is based on that source and on Dorothy Hodgkin's biographic memoir of J D Bernal, her postgraduate supervisor. Given that this chapter is to be published in a Physics journal I thought it appropriate to provide some background to the theme of my presentation, structural biology. Accordingly, I will begin with an introduction to proteins, one of structural biology's central characters, and to which Bernal devoted much energy and attention. How the molecular structure of a protein determines its activity and function will then be described. Bernal's major contribution in this area was to X-ray crystallography, the primary method by which a protein's structure is determined. The method, and aspects of its development, will be described. I will also make reference to some of Bernal's additional contributions in related fields. Finally, Vincent Casey, the symposium organizer, asked that I comment on how structural biology might impact on society. I will attempt to address that at the close of my presentation.

  11. Dynamic structure evolution of time-dependent network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Beibei; Zhou, Yadong; Xu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Dai; Guan, Xiaohong

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we research the long-voided problem of formulating the time-dependent network structure evolution scheme, it focus not only on finding new emerging vertices in evolving communities and new emerging communities over the specified time range but also formulating the complex network structure evolution schematic. Previous approaches basically applied to community detection on time static networks and thus failed to consider the potentially crucial and useful information latently embedded in the dynamic structure evolution process of time-dependent network. To address these problems and to tackle the network non-scalability dilemma, we propose the dynamic hierarchical method for detecting and revealing structure evolution schematic of the time-dependent network. In practice and specificity, we propose an explicit hierarchical network evolution uncovering algorithm framework originated from and widely expanded from time-dependent and dynamic spectral optimization theory. Our method yields preferable results compared with previous approaches on a vast variety of test network data, including both real on-line networks and computer generated complex networks.

  12. Simulating the Influence of Collaborative Networks on the Structure of Networks of Organizations, Employment Structure, and Organization Value

    OpenAIRE

    Picard, Willy

    2013-01-01

    From the perspective of reindustrialization, it is important to understand the evolution of the structure of the network of organizations employment structure, and organization value. Understanding the potential influence of collaborative networks (CNs) on these aspects may lead to the development of appropriate economic policies. In this paper, we propose a theoretical approach to analysis this potential influence, based on a model of dynamic networked ecosystem of organizations encompassing...

  13. Structural and robustness properties of smart-city transportation networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen-Gang; Ding, Zhuo; Fan, Jing-Fang; Meng, Jun; Ding, Yi-Min; Ye, Fang-Fu; Chen, Xiao-Song

    2015-09-01

    The concept of smart city gives an excellent resolution to construct and develop modern cities, and also demands infrastructure construction. How to build a safe, stable, and highly efficient public transportation system becomes an important topic in the process of city construction. In this work, we study the structural and robustness properties of transportation networks and their sub-networks. We introduce a complementary network model to study the relevance and complementarity between bus network and subway network. Our numerical results show that the mutual supplement of networks can improve the network robustness. This conclusion provides a theoretical basis for the construction of public traffic networks, and it also supports reasonable operation of managing smart cities. Project supported by the Major Projects of the China National Social Science Fund (Grant No. 11 & ZD154).

  14. Resolving structural variability in network models and the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Klimm

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale white matter pathways crisscrossing the cortex create a complex pattern of connectivity that underlies human cognitive function. Generative mechanisms for this architecture have been difficult to identify in part because little is known in general about mechanistic drivers of structured networks. Here we contrast network properties derived from diffusion spectrum imaging data of the human brain with 13 synthetic network models chosen to probe the roles of physical network embedding and temporal network growth. We characterize both the empirical and synthetic networks using familiar graph metrics, but presented here in a more complete statistical form, as scatter plots and distributions, to reveal the full range of variability of each measure across scales in the network. We focus specifically on the degree distribution, degree assortativity, hierarchy, topological Rentian scaling, and topological fractal scaling--in addition to several summary statistics, including the mean clustering coefficient, the shortest path-length, and the network diameter. The models are investigated in a progressive, branching sequence, aimed at capturing different elements thought to be important in the brain, and range from simple random and regular networks, to models that incorporate specific growth rules and constraints. We find that synthetic models that constrain the network nodes to be physically embedded in anatomical brain regions tend to produce distributions that are most similar to the corresponding measurements for the brain. We also find that network models hardcoded to display one network property (e.g., assortativity do not in general simultaneously display a second (e.g., hierarchy. This relative independence of network properties suggests that multiple neurobiological mechanisms might be at play in the development of human brain network architecture. Together, the network models that we develop and employ provide a potentially useful

  15. Synthesis, structure and biological properties of active spirohydantoin derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazić Anita M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spirohidantoins represent an pharmacologically important class of heterocycles since many derivatives have been recognized that display interesting activities against a wide range of biological targets. First synthesis of cycloalkanespiro-5-hydantoins was performed by Bucherer and Lieb 1934 by the reaction of cycloalkanone, potassium cyanide and ammonium-carbonate at reflux in a mixture of ethanol and water. QSAR (Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship studies showed that a wide range of biological activities of spirohydantoin derivatives strongly depend upon their structure. This paper describes different methods of synthesis of spirohydantoin derivatives, their physico-chemical properties and biological activity. It emphasizes the importance of cycloalkanespiro-5-hydantoins with anticonvulsant, antiproliferative, antipsychotic, antimicrobial and antiinflammatory properties as well as their importance in the treatment of diabetes. Numerous spirohydantoin compounds exhibit physiological activity such as serotonin and fibrinogen antagonist, inhibitors of the glycine binding site of the NMDA receptor also, antagonist of leukocyte cell adhesion, acting as allosteric inhibitors of the protein-protein interactions. Some spirohydantoin derivatives have been identified as antitumor agents. Their activity depends on the substituent presented at position N-3 of the hydantoin ring and increases in order alkene > ester > ether. Besides that, compounds that contain two electron withdrawing groups (e.g. fluorine or chlorine on the third and fourth position of the phenyl ring are better antitumor agents than compounds with a single electron withdrawing group. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172013

  16. Spatial Structure and Scaling of Agricultural Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Sousa, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Considering agricultural landscapes as networks can provide information about spatial connectivity relevant for a wide range of applications including pollination, pest management, and ecology. Global agricultural networks are well-described by power law rank-size distributions. However, regional analyses capture only a subset of the total global network. Most analyses are regional. In this paper, we seek to address the following questions: Does the globally observed scale-free property of agricultural networks hold over smaller spatial domains? Can similar properties be observed at kilometer to meter scales? We analyze 9 intensively cultivated Landsat scenes on 5 continents with a wide range of vegetation distributions. We find that networks of vegetation fraction within the domain of each of these Landsat scenes exhibit substantial variability - but still possess similar scaling properties to the global distribution of agriculture. We also find similar results using a 39 km2 IKONOS image. To illustrate an a...

  17. Self-healing networks: redundancy and structure

    CERN Document Server

    Quattrociocchi, Walter; Scala, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the concept of self-healing in the field of complex networks. Obvious applications range from infrastructural to technological networks. By exploiting the presence of redundant links in recovering the connectivity of the system, we introduce self-healing capabilities through the application of distributed communication protocols granting the "smartness" of the system. We analyze the interplay between redundancies and smart reconfiguration protocols in improving the resilience of networked infrastructures to multiple failures; in particular, we measure the fraction of nodes still served for increasing levels of network damages. We study the effects of different connectivity patterns (planar square-grids, small-world, scale-free networks) on the healing performances. The study of small-world topologies shows us that the introduction of some long-range connections in the planar grids greatly enhances the resilience to multiple failures giving results comparable to the most resilient (but less realis...

  18. Compressed Sensing Electron Tomography for Determining Biological Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guay, Matthew D; Czaja, Wojciech; Aronova, Maria A; Leapman, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    There has been growing interest in applying compressed sensing (CS) theory and practice to reconstruct 3D volumes at the nanoscale from electron tomography datasets of inorganic materials, based on known sparsity in the structure of interest. Here we explore the application of CS for visualizing the 3D structure of biological specimens from tomographic tilt series acquired in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). CS-ET reconstructions match or outperform commonly used alternative methods in full and undersampled tomogram recovery, but with less significant performance gains than observed for the imaging of inorganic materials. We propose that this disparity stems from the increased structural complexity of biological systems, as supported by theoretical CS sampling considerations and numerical results in simulated phantom datasets. A detailed analysis of the efficacy of CS-ET for undersampled recovery is therefore complicated by the structure of the object being imaged. The numerical nonlinear decoding process of CS shares strong connections with popular regularized least-squares methods, and the use of such numerical recovery techniques for mitigating artifacts and denoising in reconstructions of fully sampled datasets remains advantageous. This article provides a link to the software that has been developed for CS-ET reconstruction of electron tomographic data sets. PMID:27291259

  19. Compressed Sensing Electron Tomography for Determining Biological Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guay, Matthew D.; Czaja, Wojciech; Aronova, Maria A.; Leapman, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    There has been growing interest in applying compressed sensing (CS) theory and practice to reconstruct 3D volumes at the nanoscale from electron tomography datasets of inorganic materials, based on known sparsity in the structure of interest. Here we explore the application of CS for visualizing the 3D structure of biological specimens from tomographic tilt series acquired in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). CS-ET reconstructions match or outperform commonly used alternative methods in full and undersampled tomogram recovery, but with less significant performance gains than observed for the imaging of inorganic materials. We propose that this disparity stems from the increased structural complexity of biological systems, as supported by theoretical CS sampling considerations and numerical results in simulated phantom datasets. A detailed analysis of the efficacy of CS-ET for undersampled recovery is therefore complicated by the structure of the object being imaged. The numerical nonlinear decoding process of CS shares strong connections with popular regularized least-squares methods, and the use of such numerical recovery techniques for mitigating artifacts and denoising in reconstructions of fully sampled datasets remains advantageous. This article provides a link to the software that has been developed for CS-ET reconstruction of electron tomographic data sets.

  20. Compressed Sensing Electron Tomography for Determining Biological Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guay, Matthew D.; Czaja, Wojciech; Aronova, Maria A.; Leapman, Richard D.

    2016-06-01

    There has been growing interest in applying compressed sensing (CS) theory and practice to reconstruct 3D volumes at the nanoscale from electron tomography datasets of inorganic materials, based on known sparsity in the structure of interest. Here we explore the application of CS for visualizing the 3D structure of biological specimens from tomographic tilt series acquired in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). CS-ET reconstructions match or outperform commonly used alternative methods in full and undersampled tomogram recovery, but with less significant performance gains than observed for the imaging of inorganic materials. We propose that this disparity stems from the increased structural complexity of biological systems, as supported by theoretical CS sampling considerations and numerical results in simulated phantom datasets. A detailed analysis of the efficacy of CS-ET for undersampled recovery is therefore complicated by the structure of the object being imaged. The numerical nonlinear decoding process of CS shares strong connections with popular regularized least-squares methods, and the use of such numerical recovery techniques for mitigating artifacts and denoising in reconstructions of fully sampled datasets remains advantageous. This article provides a link to the software that has been developed for CS-ET reconstruction of electron tomographic data sets.

  1. RNA triplexes: from structural principles to biological and biotech applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Gitali; Zhou, Yuan; Zhong, Zhensheng; Toh, Desiree-Faye Kaixin; Chen, Gang

    2015-01-01

    The diverse biological functions of RNA are determined by the complex structures of RNA stabilized by both secondary and tertiary interactions. An RNA triplex is an important tertiary structure motif that is found in many pseudoknots and other structured RNAs. A triplex structure usually forms through tertiary interactions in the major or minor groove of a Watson-Crick base-paired stem. A major-groove RNA triplex structure is stable in isolation by forming consecutive major-groove base triples such as U·A-U and C(+) ·G-C. Minor-groove RNA triplexes, e.g., A-minor motif triplexes, are found in almost all large structured RNAs. As double-stranded RNA stem regions are often involved in biologically important tertiary triplex structure formation and protein binding, the ability to sequence specifically target any desired RNA duplexes by triplex formation would have great potential for biomedical applications. Programmable chemically modified triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) and triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have been developed to form TFO·RNA2 and PNA·RNA2 triplexes, respectively, with enhanced binding affinity and sequence specificity at physiological conditions. Here, we (1) provide an overview of naturally occurring RNA triplexes, (2) summarize the experimental methods for studying triplexes, and (3) review the development of TFOs and triplex-forming PNAs for targeting an HIV-1 ribosomal frameshift-inducing RNA, a bacterial ribosomal A-site RNA, and a human microRNA hairpin precursor, and for inhibiting the RNA-protein interactions involving human RNA-dependent protein kinase and HIV-1 viral protein Rev. PMID:25146348

  2. Structural and Infrastructural Underpinnings of International R&D Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niang, Mohamed; Sørensen, Brian Vejrum

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the process of globally distributing R&D activities with an emphasis on the effects of network maturity. It discusses emerging configurations by asking how the structure and infrastructure of international R&D networks evolve along with the move from a strong R&D center to...... dispersed development. Drawing from case studies of two international R&D networks, it presents a capability maturity model and argues that understanding the interaction between new structures and infrastructures of the dispersed networks has become a key requirement for developing organizational...

  3. Synthetic biology and regulatory networks: where metabolic systems biology meets control engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fei; Murabito, Ettore; Westerhoff, Hans V

    2016-04-01

    Metabolic pathways can be engineered to maximize the synthesis of various products of interest. With the advent of computational systems biology, this endeavour is usually carried out throughin silicotheoretical studies with the aim to guide and complement furtherin vitroandin vivoexperimental efforts. Clearly, what counts is the resultin vivo, not only in terms of maximal productivity but also robustness against environmental perturbations. Engineering an organism towards an increased production flux, however, often compromises that robustness. In this contribution, we review and investigate how various analytical approaches used in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology are related to concepts developed by systems and control engineering. While trade-offs between production optimality and cellular robustness have already been studied diagnostically and statically, the dynamics also matter. Integration of the dynamic design aspects of control engineering with the more diagnostic aspects of metabolic, hierarchical control and regulation analysis is leading to the new, conceptual and operational framework required for the design of robust and productive dynamic pathways. PMID:27075000

  4. Lipids in the structure and functions of biological membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsov V.I.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Lipids are one of the main components of cellular membranes. Lipids make up 30-55% of the cell content depending on the types of cells. Phospholipids, sphingomyelins, cholesterol, etc. are characteristic to cellular membranes. The composition of lipids of the both sides of the membranes differs. This fact determines asymmetry of the structure of bili-pid layer. The reason for many pathologies is the changes in the properties of cellular membranes with the modification of their components. The study of structure and functioning of cellular biomembranes is essential for many researchers. The condition of membranes, their quality, their quantitative composition and modification under the influence of different factors as well as their interaction with carbohydrate and protein component are of great importance for the functioning of both membranes, cells and the body in general. Analysis and structuring of lipids and their functions in biological membranes are studied.

  5. Social networks: modeling structure and dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Toivonen, Riitta

    2009-01-01

    The study of networks of social interaction can be seen to originate from the work of Jacob Moreno in the 1920's. At the turn of the millennium new actors entered the field, researchers with a background in physics and computer science, who brought with them a new set of tools that could be used to collect and analyse large sets of data. Analysis of large scale social network data from various sources has increased our knowledge of the common features of various social networks, observed in n...

  6. Large-scale photonic neural networks with biology-like processing elements: the role of electron-trapping materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Nabil H.; Wen, Zhimin

    1995-08-01

    Neural networks employing pulsating biology-oriented integrate-and-fire (IF) model neurons, that can exhibit synchronicity (phase-locking), bifurcation, and chaos, have features that make them potentially useful for learning and recognition of spatio-temporal patterns, generation of complex motor control, emulating higher-level cortical functions like feature binding, separation of object from background, cognition and other higher-level functions; all of which are beyond the ready reach of nonpulsating sigmoidal neuron networks. The spiking nature of biology-oriented neural networks makes their study in digital hardware impractical. Prange and Klar convincingly argued that the best way of realizing such networks is through analog CMOS technology rather than digital hardware. They showed, however, that the number of neurons one can accommodate on a VLSI chip limited to a hundred or so, even when submicron CMOS technology is used, because of the relatively large size of the neuron/dendrite cell. One way of reducing the size of neuron/dendrite cell is to reduce the structural complexity of the cell by realizing some of the processes needed in the cell's operation externally to the chip and by coupling these processes to the cell optically. Two such processes are the relaxation mechanism of the IF neuron and dendritic-tree processing. We have shown, by examining the blue light impulse response of electron trapping materials (ETMs) used under simultaneous infrared and blue light bias, that these materials offer features that can be used in realizing both the optical relaxation and synapto-dendritic response mechanisms. Experimental results demonstrating the potential of this approach in realizing dense arrays of biology-oriented neuron/dendrite cells will be presented, focusing on the concept and design of ETM-based image intensifier as new enabling technology.

  7. Use of reverse micelles in membrane protein structural biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Membrane protein structural biology is a rapidly developing field with fundamental importance for elucidating key biological and biophysical processes including signal transduction, intercellular communication, and cellular transport. In addition to the intrinsic interest in this area of research, structural studies of membrane proteins have direct significance on the development of therapeutics that impact human health in diverse and important ways. In this article we demonstrate the potential of investigating the structure of membrane proteins using the reverse micelle forming surfactant dioctyl sulfosuccinate (AOT) in application to the prototypical model ion channel gramicidin A. Reverse micelles are surfactant based nanoparticles which have been employed to investigate fundamental physical properties of biomolecules. The results of this solution NMR based study indicate that the AOT reverse micelle system is capable of refolding and stabilizing relatively high concentrations of the native conformation of gramicidin A. Importantly, pulsed-field-gradient NMR diffusion and NOESY experiments reveal stable gramicidin A homodimer interactions that bridge reverse micelle particles. The spectroscopic benefit of reverse micelle-membrane protein solubilization is also explored, and significant enhancement over commonly used micelle based mimetic systems is demonstrated. These results establish the effectiveness of reverse micelle based studies of membrane proteins, and illustrate that membrane proteins solubilized by reverse micelles are compatible with high resolution solution NMR techniques

  8. Image-based surface matching algorithm oriented to structural biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merelli, Ivan; Cozzi, Paolo; D'Agostino, Daniele; Clematis, Andrea; Milanesi, Luciano

    2011-01-01

    Emerging technologies for structure matching based on surface descriptions have demonstrated their effectiveness in many research fields. In particular, they can be successfully applied to in silico studies of structural biology. Protein activities, in fact, are related to the external characteristics of these macromolecules and the ability to match surfaces can be important to infer information about their possible functions and interactions. In this work, we present a surface-matching algorithm, based on encoding the outer morphology of proteins in images of local description, which allows us to establish point-to-point correlations among macromolecular surfaces using image-processing functions. Discarding methods relying on biological analysis of atomic structures and expensive computational approaches based on energetic studies, this algorithm can successfully be used for macromolecular recognition by employing local surface features. Results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can be employed both to identify surface similarities in context of macromolecular functional analysis and to screen possible protein interactions to predict pairing capability. PMID:21566253

  9. Use of reverse micelles in membrane protein structural biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Horn, Wade D. [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Department of Biochemistry and Center for Structural Biology (United States); Ogilvie, Mark E.; Flynn, Peter F. [University of Utah, Department of Chemistry (United States)], E-mail: peter.flynn@utah.edu

    2008-03-15

    Membrane protein structural biology is a rapidly developing field with fundamental importance for elucidating key biological and biophysical processes including signal transduction, intercellular communication, and cellular transport. In addition to the intrinsic interest in this area of research, structural studies of membrane proteins have direct significance on the development of therapeutics that impact human health in diverse and important ways. In this article we demonstrate the potential of investigating the structure of membrane proteins using the reverse micelle forming surfactant dioctyl sulfosuccinate (AOT) in application to the prototypical model ion channel gramicidin A. Reverse micelles are surfactant based nanoparticles which have been employed to investigate fundamental physical properties of biomolecules. The results of this solution NMR based study indicate that the AOT reverse micelle system is capable of refolding and stabilizing relatively high concentrations of the native conformation of gramicidin A. Importantly, pulsed-field-gradient NMR diffusion and NOESY experiments reveal stable gramicidin A homodimer interactions that bridge reverse micelle particles. The spectroscopic benefit of reverse micelle-membrane protein solubilization is also explored, and significant enhancement over commonly used micelle based mimetic systems is demonstrated. These results establish the effectiveness of reverse micelle based studies of membrane proteins, and illustrate that membrane proteins solubilized by reverse micelles are compatible with high resolution solution NMR techniques.

  10. Congestion induced by the structure of multiplex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Solé-Ribalta, Albert; Arenas, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Multiplex networks are representations of multilayer interconnected complex networks where the nodes are the same at every layer. They turn out to be good abstractions of the intricate connectivity of multimodal transportation networks, among other types of complex systems. One of the most important critical phenomena arising in such networks is the emergence of congestion in transportation flows. Here we prove analytically that the structure of multiplex networks can induce congestion for flows that otherwise will be decongested if the individual layers were not interconnected. We provide explicit equations for the onset of congestion and approximations that allow to compute this onset from individual descriptors of the individual layers. The observed cooperative phenomenon reminds the Braess' paradox in which adding extra capacity to a network when the moving entities selfishly choose their route can in some cases reduce overall performance. Similarly, in the multiplex structure, the efficiency in transport...

  11. Generalized method for finding community structures in networks

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Chang

    2013-01-01

    To date, most algorithms aiming to find community structures in networks mainly focus on unipartite or bipartite networks. However, to our knowledge, there is no algorithm specifically designed for the mixture network, a third type defined in our paper that represents a wide range of real-world networks. Interestingly, unipartite and bipartite networks can be viewed as limiting cases of a mixture network, suggesting that the mixture network can be considered as a general condition. Based on this observation, we propose a probabilistic model based on the link community model for a unipartite, undirected network [B. Ball, B. Karrer, and M. E. Newman, Phys. Rev. E 84, 036103 (2011)] by redefining this model in the context of a bipartite network and generalizing the bipartite network version model to a mixture network, the general condition, which can be used to find modules in unipartite, bipartite, and mixture networks in a unified framework. We show that both the model of Ball et al. (unipartite, undirected ne...

  12. Reverse Logistics Network Structures and Design

    OpenAIRE

    Fleischmann, Moritz

    2001-01-01

    textabstractLogistics network design is commonly recognized as a strategic supply chain issue of prime importance. The location of production facilities, storage concepts, and transportation strategies are major determinants of supply chain performance. This chapter considers logistics network design for the particular case of closed-loop supply chains. We highlight key issues that companies are facing when deciding upon the logistics implementation of a product recovery initiative. In partic...

  13. Structural correlations in bacterial metabolic networks

    OpenAIRE

    Lizana Ludvig; Gerlee Philip; Bernhardsson Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Evolution of metabolism occurs through the acquisition and loss of genes whose products acts as enzymes in metabolic reactions, and from a presumably simple primordial metabolism the organisms living today have evolved complex and highly variable metabolisms. We have studied this phenomenon by comparing the metabolic networks of 134 bacterial species with known phylogenetic relationships, and by studying a neutral model of metabolic network evolution. Results We consider t...

  14. Reverse Logistics Network Structures and Design

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    Logistics network design is commonly recognized as a strategic supply chain issue of prime importance. The location of production facilities, storage concepts, and transportation strategies are major determinants of supply chain performance. This chapter considers logistics network design for the particular case of closed-loop supply chains. We highlight key issues that companies are facing when deciding upon the logistics implementation of a product recovery initiative. In particular, we poi...

  15. Computer structures perspective on switching dynamics of simple biological systems

    OpenAIRE

    Moškon, Miha

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic biology is a rapidly evolving discipline that copes with the modifications of existent and with the construction of new biological systems with novel functionalities. Its interdisciplinarity arises from combining of engineering and biological sciences. Biological computing is a relatively new research field that is analyzing the possibilities of constructing a biological computer. Synthetic biology approaches can also be used in order to build biological computer. Certain levels of ...

  16. Learning modular structures from network data and node variables

    CERN Document Server

    Azizi, Elham; Airoldi, Edoardo M

    2014-01-01

    A standard technique for understanding underlying dependency structures among a set of variables posits a shared conditional probability distribution for the variables measured on individuals within a group. This approach is often referred to as module networks, where individuals are represented by nodes in a network, groups are termed modules, and the focus is on estimating the network structure among modules. However, estimation solely from node-specific variables can lead to spurious dependencies, and unverifiable structural assumptions are often used for regularization. Here, we propose an extended model that leverages direct observations about the network in addition to node-specific variables. By integrating complementary data types, we avoid the need for structural assumptions. We illustrate theoretical and practical significance of the model and develop a reversible-jump MCMC learning procedure for learning modules and model parameters. We demonstrate the method accuracy in predicting modular structur...

  17. Serial femtosecond crystallography: A revolution in structural biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Garcia, Jose M; Conrad, Chelsie E; Coe, Jesse; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Fromme, Petra

    2016-07-15

    Macromolecular crystallography at synchrotron sources has proven to be the most influential method within structural biology, producing thousands of structures since its inception. While its utility has been instrumental in progressing our knowledge of structures of molecules, it suffers from limitations such as the need for large, well-diffracting crystals, and radiation damage that can hamper native structural determination. The recent advent of X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) and their implementation in the emerging field of serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) has given rise to a remarkable expansion upon existing crystallographic constraints, allowing structural biologists access to previously restricted scientific territory. SFX relies on exceptionally brilliant, micro-focused X-ray pulses, which are femtoseconds in duration, to probe nano/micrometer sized crystals in a serial fashion. This results in data sets comprised of individual snapshots, each capturing Bragg diffraction of single crystals in random orientations prior to their subsequent destruction. Thus structural elucidation while avoiding radiation damage, even at room temperature, can now be achieved. This emerging field has cultivated new methods for nanocrystallogenesis, sample delivery, and data processing. Opportunities and challenges within SFX are reviewed herein. PMID:27143509

  18. Joint Modelling of Structural and Functional Brain Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kasper Winther; Herlau, Tue; Mørup, Morten;

    -parametric Bayesian network model which allows for joint modelling and integration of multiple networks. We demonstrate the model’s ability to detect vertices that share structure across networks jointly in functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion MRI (dMRI) data. Using two fMRI and dMRI scans per subject, we establish...... significant structures that are consistently shared across subjects and data splits. This provides an unsupervised approach for modeling of structure-function relations in the brain and provides a general framework for multimodal integration....

  19. Recovery Management in All Optical Networks Using Biologically-Inspired Complex Adaptive System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inadyuti Dutt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available All-Optical Networks have the ability to display varied advantages like performance efficiency, throughput etc but their efficiency depends on their survivability as they are attack prone. These attacks can be categorised as active or passive because they try to access information within the network or alter the information in the network. The attack once detected has to be recovered by formulating back-up or alternative paths. The proposed heuristic uses biologically inspired Complex Adaptive System, inspired by Natural Immune System. The study shows that natural immune system exhibit unique behaviour of detecting foreign bodies in our body and removing them on their first occurrences. This phenomenon is being utilised in the proposed heuristic for recovery management in All-optical Network

  20. MODA: an efficient algorithm for network motif discovery in biological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidi, Saeed; Schreiber, Falk; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2009-10-01

    In recent years, interest has been growing in the study of complex networks. Since Erdös and Rényi (1960) proposed their random graph model about 50 years ago, many researchers have investigated and shaped this field. Many indicators have been proposed to assess the global features of networks. Recently, an active research area has developed in studying local features named motifs as the building blocks of networks. Unfortunately, network motif discovery is a computationally hard problem and finding rather large motifs (larger than 8 nodes) by means of current algorithms is impractical as it demands too much computational effort. In this paper, we present a new algorithm (MODA) that incorporates techniques such as a pattern growth approach for extracting larger motifs efficiently. We have tested our algorithm and found it able to identify larger motifs with more than 8 nodes more efficiently than most of the current state-of-the-art motif discovery algorithms. While most of the algorithms rely on induced subgraphs as motifs of the networks, MODA is able to extract both induced and non-induced subgraphs simultaneously. The MODA source code is freely available at: http://LBB.ut.ac.ir/Download/LBBsoft/MODA/ PMID:20154426

  1. The Geography, Structure and Evolution of Infrastructure Networks in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Vinciguerra, S.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, network science has entered in virtually every scientific discipline. Some even speak of the “new science of networks” causing a scientific revolution across all disciplines. Also in Geography and Urban Studies, interest in network analysis has increased. This interest is understandable since most networks have a geographical structure, with nodes being located in space and links providing connections across space. This study positions itself at the interface of Social Networ...

  2. Temporal and structural heterogeneities emerging in adaptive temporal networks

    CERN Document Server

    Aoki, Takaaki; Gross, Thilo

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a model of adaptive temporal networks whose evolution is regulated by an interplay between node activity and dynamic exchange of information through links. We study the model by using a master equation approach. Starting from a homogeneous initial configuration, we show that temporal and structural heterogeneities, characteristic of real-world networks, spontaneously emerge. This theoretically tractable model thus contributes to the understanding of the dynamics of human activity and interaction networks.

  3. Sensors Grouping Hierarchy Structure for Wireless Sensor Network

    OpenAIRE

    Ammar Hawbani; Xingfu Wang; Saleem Karmoshi; Lin Wang; Naji Husaini

    2015-01-01

    There are many challenges in implementation of wireless sensor network systems: clustering and grouping are two of them. The grouping of sensors is computational process intended to partition the sensors of network into groups. Each group contains a number of sensors and a sensor can be an element of multiple groups. In this paper, we provided a Sensors Grouping Hierarchy Structure (GHS) to split the nodes in wireless sensor network into groups to assist the collaborative, dynamic, distribute...

  4. Detecting the overlapping and hierarchical community structure of complex networks

    OpenAIRE

    Lancichinetti, Andrea; Fortunato, Santo; Kertesz, Janos

    2008-01-01

    Many networks in nature, society and technology are characterized by a mesoscopic level of organization, with groups of nodes forming tightly connected units, called communities or modules, that are only weakly linked to each other. Uncovering this community structure is one of the most important problems in the field of complex networks. Networks often show a hierarchical organization, with communities embedded within other communities; moreover, nodes can be shared between different communi...

  5. Temporal and structural heterogeneities emerging in adaptive temporal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Takaaki; Rocha, Luis E. C.; Gross, Thilo

    2016-04-01

    We introduce a model of adaptive temporal networks whose evolution is regulated by an interplay between node activity and dynamic exchange of information through links. We study the model by using a master equation approach. Starting from a homogeneous initial configuration, we show that temporal and structural heterogeneities, characteristic of real-world networks, spontaneously emerge. This theoretically tractable model thus contributes to the understanding of the dynamics of human activity and interaction networks.

  6. Application of Kohonen Neural Networks in classification of biologically active compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirew, D B; Chretien, J R; Bernard, P; Ros, F

    1998-01-01

    Automated data classification is an indispensable tool in Drug Design. It allows to select homogeneous training sets or to distinguish compounds with required biological properties. The Kohonen Neural Networks (KNN) suggest new means for classification of biologically interesting compounds. In this paper, first, capabilities of KNN in data dimensionality reduction are presented as compared with the capabilities of Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (HCA). The advantages of KNN become evident with increasing data dimensionality and size of the training set. Then, new methods are suggested to evaluate the quality of KNN models. Finally, a case study on chemical and biological data is presented. The database studied includes more than 2000 organophosphorous potent pesticides. The Kohonen maps were obtained which allow to distinguish compounds with different biological behavior. PMID:9517011

  7. Correlation in mobile call networks from structure perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin WU; Deyong HU; Qi YE; Bai WANG

    2009-01-01

    Researchers have done considerable work on the structure of social network recently, but mostly neglected the correlation between two connected nodes. In this pa-per, our primary goal is to acquire users' structural proper-ties in mobile call networks. We take a novel perspective-structure correlation between two connected users perspec-tive to study the structural properties. To investigate the structural properties in static and dynamic mobile call net-works, we define some metrics which are based on the clique size vectors of mobile call users. By exploring several real-world mobile call networks, which contain hundreds of thou-sands of mobile call users respectively, we find that people tend to communicate with the one who has a similar struc-ture in static mobile call networks. Moreover, It is found that the connected people have similar structural changes on the whole in dynamic mobile call networks, and the structures of some two connected persons both have growing or shrinking trends. We use a visualization toolkit to give a view of the growing or shrinking scenarios temporally.

  8. Community structure and multi-modal oscillations in complex networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Dorrian

    Full Text Available In many types of network, the relationship between structure and function is of great significance. We are particularly interested in community structures, which arise in a wide variety of domains. We apply a simple oscillator model to networks with community structures and show that waves of regular oscillation are caused by synchronised clusters of nodes. Moreover, we show that such global oscillations may arise as a direct result of network topology. We also observe that additional modes of oscillation (as detected through frequency analysis occur in networks with additional levels of topological hierarchy and that such modes may be directly related to network structure. We apply the method in two specific domains (metabolic networks and metropolitan transport demonstrating the robustness of our results when applied to real world systems. We conclude that (where the distribution of oscillator frequencies and the interactions between them are known to be unimodal our observations may be applicable to the detection of underlying community structure in networks, shedding further light on the general relationship between structure and function in complex systems.

  9. Network-Level Structure-Function Relationships in Human Neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mišić, Bratislav; Betzel, Richard F; de Reus, Marcel A; van den Heuvel, Martijn P; Berman, Marc G; McIntosh, Anthony R; Sporns, Olaf

    2016-07-01

    The dynamics of spontaneous fluctuations in neural activity are shaped by underlying patterns of anatomical connectivity. While numerous studies have demonstrated edge-wise correspondence between structural and functional connections, much less is known about how large-scale coherent functional network patterns emerge from the topology of structural networks. In the present study, we deploy a multivariate statistical technique, partial least squares, to investigate the association between spatially extended structural networks and functional networks. We find multiple statistically robust patterns, reflecting reliable combinations of structural and functional subnetworks that are optimally associated with one another. Importantly, these patterns generally do not show a one-to-one correspondence between structural and functional edges, but are instead distributed and heterogeneous, with many functional relationships arising from nonoverlapping sets of anatomical connections. We also find that structural connections between high-degree hubs are disproportionately represented, suggesting that these connections are particularly important in establishing coherent functional networks. Altogether, these results demonstrate that the network organization of the cerebral cortex supports the emergence of diverse functional network configurations that often diverge from the underlying anatomical substrate. PMID:27102654

  10. Mesoscopic structure conditions the emergence of cooperation on social networks

    CERN Document Server

    Lozano, S; Sánchez, A; Lozano, Sergi; Arenas, Alex; Sanchez, Angel

    2006-01-01

    We study the evolutionary Prisoner's Dilemma on two social networks obtained from actual relational data. We find very different cooperation levels on each of them that can not be easily understood in terms of global statistical properties of both networks. We propose to look instead at the mesoscopic scale, specifically to the community structure of the networks, and show that the reason for this different cooperation behavior can be traced back to their intermediate-scale features. We explain the dependence of the cooperation level on the temptation parameter in terms of the internal structure of the communities and their interconnections. Our results support the conclusion that studies of games on model networks and their interpretation in terms of global properties may not be sufficient to study specific, real social systems. In addition, the community perspective may be helpful to interpret the origin and behavior of existing networks as well as to design structures that show resilient cooperative behavi...

  11. Structural Damage Detection Using Randomized Trained Neural Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Haryanto, Ismoyo; Budiyono, Agus

    2008-01-01

    A computationally method on damage detection problems in structures was conducted using neural networks. The problem that is considered in this works consists of estimating the existence, location and extent of stiffness reduction in structure which is indicated by the changes of the structural static parameters such as deflection and strain. The neural network was trained to recognize the behaviour of static parameter of the undamaged structure as well as of the structure with various possible damage extent and location which were modelled as random states. The proposed techniques were applied to detect damage in a simply supported beam. The structure was analyzed using finite-element-method (FEM) and the damage identification was conducted by a back-propagation neural network using the change of the structural strain and displacement. The results showed that using proposed method the strain is more efficient for identification of damage than the displacement.

  12. Chinese lexical networks: The structure, function and formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianyu; Zhou, Jie; Luo, Xiaoyue; Yang, Zhanxin

    2012-11-01

    In this paper Chinese phrases are modeled using complex networks theory. We analyze statistical properties of the networks and find that phrase networks display some important features: not only small world and the power-law distribution, but also hierarchical structure and disassortative mixing. These statistical traits display the global organization of Chinese phrases. The origin and formation of such traits are analyzed from a macroscopic Chinese culture and philosophy perspective. It is interesting to find that Chinese culture and philosophy may shape the formation and structure of Chinese phrases. To uncover the structural design principles of networks, network motif patterns are studied. It is shown that they serve as basic building blocks to form the whole phrase networks, especially triad 38 (feed forward loop) plays a more important role in forming most of the phrases and other motifs. The distinct structure may not only keep the networks stable and robust, but also be helpful for information processing. The results of the paper can give some insight into Chinese language learning and language acquisition. It strengthens the idea that learning the phrases helps to understand Chinese culture. On the other side, understanding Chinese culture and philosophy does help to learn Chinese phrases. The hub nodes in the networks show the close relationship with Chinese culture and philosophy. Learning or teaching the hub characters, hub-linking phrases and phrases which are meaning related based on motif feature should be very useful and important for Chinese learning and acquisition.

  13. The structure of decision support systems administrator next information network

    OpenAIRE

    І.Ю. Субач; П.В. Хусаінов; Міщенко, В.О.; Д.Е. Прусов

    2009-01-01

     Tasks of execute orderly administrator of special purpose information network are analyzed, and the structure and functions of the system are proved that support taking decisions in real time. Key words: information networks, information services, methods of increasing the efficiency, information evaluation, intellectual data analysis.

  14. Biologically-inspired On-chip Learning in Pulsed Neural Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehmann, Torsten; Woodburn, Robin

    1999-01-01

    Self-learning chips to implement many popular ANN (artificial neural network) algorithms are very difficult to design. We explain why this is so and say what lessons previous work teaches us in the design of self-learning systems. We offer a contribution to the "biologically-inspired" approach......, explaining what we mean by this term and providing an example of a robust, self-learning design that can solve simple classical-conditioning tasks, We give details of the design of individual circuits to perform component functions, which can then be combined into a network to solve the task. We argue that...

  15. Higher-Order Aggregate Networks in the Analysis of Temporal Networks: Path structures and centralities

    CERN Document Server

    Scholtes, Ingo; Garas, Antonios

    2015-01-01

    Recent research on temporal networks has highlighted the limitations of a static network perspective for our understanding of complex systems with dynamic topologies. In particular, recent works have shown that i) the specific order in which links occur in real-world temporal networks affects causality structures and thus the evolution of dynamical processes, and ii) higher-order aggregate representations of temporal networks can be used to analytically study the effect of these order correlations on dynamical processes. In this article we analyze the effect of order correlations on path-based centrality measures in real-world temporal networks. Analyzing temporal equivalents of betweenness, closeness and reach centrality in six empirical temporal networks, we first show that an analysis of the commonly used static, time-aggregated representation can give misleading results about the actual importance of nodes. We further study higher-order time-aggregated networks, a recently proposed generalization of the c...

  16. Mesoscopic structure conditions the emergence of cooperation on social networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozano, S.; Arenas, A.; Sanchez, A.

    2008-12-01

    We study the evolutionary Prisoner's Dilemma on two social networks substrates obtained from actual relational data. We find very different cooperation levels on each of them that cannot be easily understood in terms of global statistical properties of both networks. We claim that the result can be understood at the mesoscopic scale, by studying the community structure of the networks. We explain the dependence of the cooperation level on the temptation parameter in terms of the internal structure of the communities and their interconnections. We then test our results on community-structured, specifically designed artificial networks, finding a good agreement with the observations in both real substrates. Our results support the conclusion that studies of evolutionary games on model networks and their interpretation in terms of global properties may not be sufficient to study specific, real social systems. Further, the study allows us to define new quantitative parameters that summarize the mesoscopic structure of any network. In addition, the community perspective may be helpful to interpret the origin and behavior of existing networks as well as to design structures that show resilient cooperative behavior.

  17. Depicting network structures from variable data produced by unknown colored-noise driven dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Wang, Shihong; Zheng, Zhigang; Zhang, Zhaoyang; Hu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades, the topic of depicting network structures from output variable data, i.e., the inverse problem, turns to be a key issue in wide interdisciplinary areas, in particular, in biological and social fields. Noise inevitably exists in practical dynamic networks, and the output data are often generated via interplay between noise and network structures. The essential difficulty to solve the inverse problem is how to extract information of node links in networks under unknown and possibly strong noise. In this paper, based on the idea that the output variable data contain information not only for network topology but also for noise, we propose a method to deal with this problem, incorporating three crucial ingredients: Computing multiple matrices to extract as much as possible information on network topology and noise statistics; making a systematical matrix algebraic computation to obtain equations closed for network inference; using an effective iteration algorithm to solve the resulting nonlinear matrix equations. The above theory is established in an accurate and closed form, numerical computations convincingly verify the validity of theoretical analysis, and the possible applications in practical inverse problems are emphasized.

  18. Visualizing and Clustering Protein Similarity Networks: Sequences, Structures, and Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Te-Lun; Hu, Geng-Ming; Chen, Chi-Ming

    2016-07-01

    Research in the recent decade has demonstrated the usefulness of protein network knowledge in furthering the study of molecular evolution of proteins, understanding the robustness of cells to perturbation, and annotating new protein functions. In this study, we aimed to provide a general clustering approach to visualize the sequence-structure-function relationship of protein networks, and investigate possible causes for inconsistency in the protein classifications based on sequences, structures, and functions. Such visualization of protein networks could facilitate our understanding of the overall relationship among proteins and help researchers comprehend various protein databases. As a demonstration, we clustered 1437 enzymes by their sequences and structures using the minimum span clustering (MSC) method. The general structure of this protein network was delineated at two clustering resolutions, and the second level MSC clustering was found to be highly similar to existing enzyme classifications. The clustering of these enzymes based on sequence, structure, and function information is consistent with each other. For proteases, the Jaccard's similarity coefficient is 0.86 between sequence and function classifications, 0.82 between sequence and structure classifications, and 0.78 between structure and function classifications. From our clustering results, we discussed possible examples of divergent evolution and convergent evolution of enzymes. Our clustering approach provides a panoramic view of the sequence-structure-function network of proteins, helps visualize the relation between related proteins intuitively, and is useful in predicting the structure and function of newly determined protein sequences. PMID:27267620

  19. Analysis of community structure in networks of correlated data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, S.; Jensen, P.; Arenas, A.

    2008-12-25

    We present a reformulation of modularity that allows the analysis of the community structure in networks of correlated data. The new modularity preserves the probabilistic semantics of the original definition even when the network is directed, weighted, signed, and has self-loops. This is the most general condition one can find in the study of any network, in particular those defined from correlated data. We apply our results to a real network of correlated data between stores in the city of Lyon (France).

  20. The effects of traffic structure on application and network performance

    CERN Document Server

    Aikat, Jay; Smith, F Donelson

    2012-01-01

    Over the past three decades, the Internet's rapid growth has spurred the development of new applications in mobile computing, digital music, online video, gaming and social networks. These applications rely heavily upon various underlying network protocols and mechanisms to enable, maintain and enhance their Internet functionalityThe Effects of Traffic Structure on Application and Network Performance provides the necessary tools for maximizing the network efficiency of any Internet application, and presents ground-breaking research that will influence how these applications are built in the fu