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Sample records for biological motion perception

  1. Perception of biological motion in visual agnosia

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    Elisabeth Huberle

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the past twenty-five years, visual processing has been discussed in the context of the dual stream hypothesis consisting of a ventral (‘what' and a dorsal ('where' visual information processing pathway. Patients with brain damage of the ventral pathway typically present with signs of visual agnosia, the inability to identify and discriminate objects by visual exploration, but show normal perception of motion perception. A dissociation between the perception of biological motion and non-biological motion has been suggested: Perception of biological motion might be impaired when 'non-biological' motion perception is intact and vice versa. The impact of object recognition on the perception of biological motion remains unclear. We thus investigated this question in a patient with severe visual agnosia, who showed normal perception of non-biological motion. The data suggested that the patient's perception of biological motion remained largely intact. However, when tested with objects constructed of coherently moving dots (‘Shape-from-Motion’, recognition was severely impaired. The results are discussed in the context of possible mechanisms of biological motion perception.

  2. Perception of biological motion in visual agnosia

    OpenAIRE

    Elisabeth Huberle; Paul Rupek; Markus Lappe

    2012-01-01

    Over the past twenty-five years, visual processing has been discussed in the context of the dual stream hypothesis consisting of a ventral (‘what') and a dorsal ('where') visual information processing pathway. Patients with brain damage of the ventral pathway typically present with signs of visual agnosia, the inability to identify and discriminate objects by visual exploration, but show normal perception of motion perception. A dissociation between the perception of biological motion and non...

  3. Deficient Biological Motion Perception in Schizophrenia: Results from a Motion Noise Paradigm

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    Jejoong eKim

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Schizophrenia patients exhibit deficient processing of perceptual and cognitive information. However, it is not well understood how basic perceptual deficits contribute to higher level cognitive problems in this mental disorder. Perception of biological motion, a motion-based cognitive recognition task, relies on both basic visual motion processing and social cognitive processing, thus providing a useful paradigm to evaluate the potentially hierarchical relationship between these two levels of information processing. Methods: In this study, we designed a biological motion paradigm in which basic visual motion signals were manipulated systematically by incorporating different levels of motion noise. We measured the performances of schizophrenia patients (n=21 and healthy controls (n=22 in this biological motion perception task, as well as in coherent motion detection, theory of mind, and a widely used biological motion recognition task. Results: Schizophrenia patients performed the biological motion perception task with significantly lower accuracy than healthy controls when perceptual signals were moderately degraded by noise. A more substantial degradation of perceptual signals, through using additional noise, impaired biological motion perception in both groups. Performance levels on biological motion recognition, coherent motion detection and theory of mind tasks were also reduced in patients. Conclusion: The results from the motion-noise biological motion paradigm indicate that in the presence of visual motion noise, the processing of biological motion information in schizophrenia is deficient. Combined with the results of poor basic visual motion perception (coherent motion task and biological motion recognition, the association between basic motion signals and biological motion perception suggests a need to incorporate the improvement of visual motion perception in social cognitive remediation.

  4. Local form interference in biological motion perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr-Gaffney, Jess E; Hunt, Amelia R; Pilz, Karin S

    2016-07-01

    Replacing the local dots of point-light walkers with complex images leads to significant detriments to performance in biological motion detection and discrimination tasks. This detriment has previously been shown to be larger when the local elements match the global shape in object category and facing direction. In contrast, studies using Navon stimuli have demonstrated that local interference on global processing primarily occurs when local elements are dissimilar to the global form. In 3 experiments, we investigated this contradiction by replacing the local dots of a point-light walker with human images or stick figures. Participants were significantly faster and more accurate at discriminating the facing and walking direction of a walker when the local images were facing in the same direction as the global walker than when they were facing in the opposite direction. These results provide support for the idea that organization of biological motion depends on allocation of limited processing resources to the global motion information when the local elements are complex. However, there is more disruption to global form processing when the local elements and global form conflict in task-related properties. PMID:27016343

  5. Deficient biological motion perception in schizophrenia: results from a motion noise paradigm

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jejoong; Norton, Daniel; McBain, Ryan; Ongur, Dost; Chen, Yue

    2013-01-01

    Background: Schizophrenia patients exhibit deficient processing of perceptual and cognitive information. However, it is not well-understood how basic perceptual deficits contribute to higher level cognitive problems in this mental disorder. Perception of biological motion, a motion-based cognitive recognition task, relies on both basic visual motion processing and social cognitive processing, thus providing a useful paradigm to evaluate the potentially hierarchical relationship between these ...

  6. Perception of biological motion from limited-lifetime stimuli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beintema, J.A.; Georg, K.; Lappe, M.

    2006-01-01

    The visual perception of human movement from sparse point-light walkers is often believed to rely on local motion analysis. We investigated the role of local motion in the perception of human walking, viewed from the side, in different tasks. The motion signal was manipulated by varying point lifeti

  7. Perception of biological motion from size-invariant body representations

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    Markus eLappe

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The visual recognition of action is one of the socially most important and computationally demanding capacities of the human visual system. It combines visual shape recognition with complex non-rigid motion perception. Action presented as a point-light animation is a striking visual experience for anyone who sees it for the first time. Information about the shape and posture of the human body is sparse in point-light animations, but it is essential for action recognition. In the posturo-temporal filter model of biological motion perception posture information is picked up by visual neurons tuned to the form of the human body before body motion is calculated. We tested whether point-light stimuli are processed through posture recognition of the human body form by using a typical feature of form recognition, namely size invariance. We constructed a point-light stimulus that can only be perceived through a size-invariant mechanism. This stimulus changes rapidly in size from one image to the next. It thus disrupts continuity of early visuo-spatial properties but maintains continuity of the body posture representation. Despite this massive manipulation at the visuo-spatial level, size-changing point-light figures are spontaneously recognized by naive observers, and support discrimination of human body motion.

  8. Embodied Learning of a Generative Neural Model for Biological Motion Perception and Inference

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    Fabian eSchrodt

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Although an action observation network and mirror neurons for understanding the actions and intentions of others have been under deep, interdisciplinary consideration over recent years, it remains largely unknown how the brain manages to map visually perceived biological motion of others onto its own motor system. This paper shows how such a mapping may be established, even if the biologically motion is visually perceived from a new vantage point. We introduce a learning artificial neural network model and evaluate it on full body motion tracking recordings. The model implements an embodied, predictive inference approach. It first learns to correlate and segment multimodal sensory streams of own bodily motion. In doing so, it becomes able to anticipate motion progression, to complete missing modal information, and to self-generate learned motion sequences. When biological motion of another person is observed, this self-knowledge is utilized to recognize similar motion patterns and predict their progress. Due to the relative encodings, the model shows strong robustness in recognition despite observing rather large varieties of body morphology and posture dynamics. By additionally equipping the model with the capability to rotate its visual frame of reference, it is able to deduce the visual perspective onto the observed person, establishing full consistency to the embodied self-motion encodings by means of active inference. In further support of its neuro-cognitive plausibility, we also model typical bistable perceptions when crucial depth information is missing. In sum, the introduced neural model proposes a solution to the problem of how the human brain may establish correspondence between observed bodily motion and its own motor system, thus offering a mechanism that supports the development of mirror neurons.

  9. Perception of biological motion and emotion in mild cognitive impairment and dementia.

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    Henry, Julie D; Thompson, Claire; Rendell, Peter G; Phillips, Louise H; Carbert, Jessica; Sachdev, Perminder; Brodaty, Henry

    2012-09-01

    Participants diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), dementia and controls completed measures that required decoding emotions from point-light displays of bodily motion, and static images of facial affect. Both of these measures tap social cognitive processes that are considered critical for social competency. Consistent with prior literature, both clinical groups were impaired on the static measure of facial affect recognition. The dementia (but not the MCI) group additionally showed difficulties interpreting biological motion cues. However, this did not reflect a specific deficit in decoding emotions, but instead a more generalized difficulty in processing visual motion (both to action and to emotion). These results align with earlier studies showing that visual motion processing is disrupted in dementia, but additionally show for the first time that this extends to the recognition of socially relevant biological motion. The absence of any MCI related impairment on the point-light biological emotion measure (coupled with deficits on the measure of facial affect recognition) also point to a potential disconnect between the processes implicated in the perception of emotion cues from static versus dynamic stimuli. For clinical (but not control) participants, performance on all recognition measures was inversely correlated with level of semantic memory impairment. (JINS, 2012, 18, 1-8). PMID:22687579

  10. Biological motion perception links diverse facets of theory of mind during middle childhood.

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    Rice, Katherine; Anderson, Laura C; Velnoskey, Kayla; Thompson, James C; Redcay, Elizabeth

    2016-06-01

    Two cornerstones of social development-social perception and theory of mind-undergo brain and behavioral changes during middle childhood, but the link between these developing domains is unclear. One theoretical perspective argues that these skills represent domain-specific areas of social development, whereas other perspectives suggest that both skills may reflect a more integrated social system. Given recent evidence from adults that these superficially different domains may be related, the current study examined the developmental relation between these social processes in 52 children aged 7 to 12years. Controlling for age and IQ, social perception (perception of biological motion in noise) was significantly correlated with two measures of theory of mind: one in which children made mental state inferences based on photographs of the eye region of the face and another in which children made mental state inferences based on stories. Social perception, however, was not correlated with children's ability to make physical inferences from stories about people. Furthermore, the mental state inference tasks were not correlated with each other, suggesting a role for social perception in linking various facets of theory of mind. PMID:26542938

  11. Reprint of "Biological motion perception links diverse facets of theory of mind during middle childhood".

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    Rice, Katherine; Anderson, Laura C; Velnoskey, Kayla; Thompson, James C; Redcay, Elizabeth

    2016-09-01

    Two cornerstones of social development-social perception and theory of mind-undergo brain and behavioral changes during middle childhood, but the link between these developing domains is unclear. One theoretical perspective argues that these skills represent domain-specific areas of social development, whereas other perspectives suggest that both skills may reflect a more integrated social system. Given recent evidence from adults that these superficially different domains may be related, the current study examined the developmental relation between these social processes in 52 children aged 7 to 12years. Controlling for age and IQ, social perception (perception of biological motion in noise) was significantly correlated with two measures of theory of mind: one in which children made mental state inferences based on photographs of the eye region of the face and another in which children made mental state inferences based on stories. Social perception, however, was not correlated with children's ability to make physical inferences from stories about people. Furthermore, the mental state inference tasks were not correlated with each other, suggesting a role for social perception in linking various facets of theory of mind. PMID:27286919

  12. The effect of oxytocin on biological motion perception in dogs (Canis familiaris).

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    Kovács, Krisztina; Kis, Anna; Kanizsár, Orsolya; Hernádi, Anna; Gácsi, Márta; Topál, József

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that the neuropeptide oxytocin is involved in the regulation of several complex human social behaviours. There is, however, little research on the effect of oxytocin on basic mechanisms underlying human sociality, such as the perception of biological motion. In the present study, we investigated the effect of oxytocin on biological motion perception in dogs (Canis familiaris), a species adapted to the human social environment and thus widely used to model many aspects of human social behaviour. In a within-subjects design, dogs (N = 39), after having received either oxytocin or placebo treatment, were presented with 2D projection of a moving point-light human figure and the inverted and scrambled version of the same movie. Heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) were measured as physiological responses, and behavioural response was evaluated by observing dogs' looking time. Subjects were also rated on the personality traits of Neuroticism and Agreeableness by their owners. As expected, placebo-pretreated (control) dogs showed a spontaneous preference for the biological motion pattern; however, there was no such preference after oxytocin pretreatment. Furthermore, following the oxytocin pretreatment female subjects looked more at the moving point-light figure than males. The individual variations along the dimensions of Agreeableness and Neuroticism also modulated dogs' behaviour. Furthermore, HR and HRV measures were affected by oxytocin treatment and in turn played a role in subjects' looking behaviour. We discuss how these findings contribute to our understanding of the neurohormonal regulatory mechanisms of human (and non-human) social skills. PMID:26742930

  13. Brain asymmetry modulates perception of biological motion in newborn chicks (Gallus gallus).

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    Rugani, Rosa; Rosa Salva, Orsola; Regolin, Lucia; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2015-09-01

    Few light-points on the joints of a moving animal give the impression of biological motion (BM). Day-old chicks prefer BM to non-BM, suggesting a conserved predisposition to attend to moving animals. In humans and other mammals a network of regions, primarily in the right hemisphere, provides the neural substrate for BM perception. However, this has not been investigated in avians. In birds the information from each eye is mainly feeding to the contralateral hemisphere. To study brain asymmetry, we recorded the eye spontaneously used by chicks to inspect a BM stimulus. We also investigated the effect of lateralization following light exposure of the embryos. In Experiment 1, highly lateralized chicks aligned with the apparent direction of motion only when they were exposed to a BM-stimulus moving rightward first, monitoring it with the left-eye-system. In Experiment 2 weakly lateralized chicks did not show any behavioral asymmetry. Moreover, they counter aligned with the apparent direction of motion. Brain lateralization affects chicks behavior while processing and approaching a BM stimulus. Highly lateralized chicks aligned their body with the apparent direction of the BM, a behavior akin to a following response, monitoring the stimulus preferentially with their left eye. This suggests a right hemisphere dominance in BM processing. Weakly lateralized chicks counter-aligned with the apparent direction of the BM, facing it during interaction, and monitored it equally with both eyes. Environmental factors (light stimulation) seem to affect the development of lateralization, and consequently social behavior. PMID:25930217

  14. The Models of Biological Motion Perception%生物运动信息加工模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈婷婷; 丁锦红; 蒋长妤

    2012-01-01

    人类可以从生物体的各种运动行为中获得丰富的社会信息,以满足社会交往的需求。视觉系统对生物运动信息的加工是一个复杂的过程,不同于对其他普通客体的加工能力。研究者们采用不同的方法,分别从各自的角度来研究这一过程,同时也建立了一系列模型。其中早期模型关注视觉系统加工生物运动信息的过程和方法;近期模型则采用脑成像手段构建生物运动信息加工的神经网络。这些模型包含了很多有价值的研究成果,但是也存在需要进一步完善的地方。%The perception of biological motion is crucial to the survival of human beings. Examining the models of biological motion perception is helpful to understanding the complex process. Previous models emphasize how the visual system encodes biological motion. The kinetic-geometric model for visual vector analysis that originally developed in the study of perception of motion combinations of the mechanical type was applied to these biological motion patterns. For the " planarity assumption" in the interpretation of biological motion, the specific problem addressed is how the three-dimensional structure and motions of animal limbs may be computed from the twodimensional motions of their projected images. Most recent studies take into account the neural mechanism of biological motion perception. The hierarchical neural model by Giese and Poggio uses a neurophysiologically plausible and quantitative model as a tool for organizing and making sense of the experimental data, despite their growing size and complexity. The template-matching model from configural form cues is addressed by Lange and Lappe. They presented a computational model based on neurally plausible assumptions to elucidate the contributions of motion and form signals to biological motion perception and the computations in the underlying brain network. The model simulates receptive fields for images of

  15. Both physical exercise and progressive muscle relaxation reduce the facing-the-viewer bias in biological motion perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Heenan

    Full Text Available Biological motion stimuli, such as orthographically projected stick figure walkers, are ambiguous about their orientation in depth. The projection of a stick figure walker oriented towards the viewer, therefore, is the same as its projection when oriented away. Even though such figures are depth-ambiguous, however, observers tend to interpret them as facing towards them more often than facing away. Some have speculated that this facing-the-viewer bias may exist for sociobiological reasons: Mistaking another human as retreating when they are actually approaching could have more severe consequences than the opposite error. Implied in this hypothesis is that the facing-towards percept of biological motion stimuli is potentially more threatening. Measures of anxiety and the facing-the-viewer bias should therefore be related, as researchers have consistently found that anxious individuals display an attentional bias towards more threatening stimuli. The goal of this study was to assess whether physical exercise (Experiment 1 or an anxiety induction/reduction task (Experiment 2 would significantly affect facing-the-viewer biases. We hypothesized that both physical exercise and progressive muscle relaxation would decrease facing-the-viewer biases for full stick figure walkers, but not for bottom- or top-half-only human stimuli, as these carry less sociobiological relevance. On the other hand, we expected that the anxiety induction task (Experiment 2 would increase facing-the-viewer biases for full stick figure walkers only. In both experiments, participants completed anxiety questionnaires, exercised on a treadmill (Experiment 1 or performed an anxiety induction/reduction task (Experiment 2, and then immediately completed a perceptual task that allowed us to assess their facing-the-viewer bias. As hypothesized, we found that physical exercise and progressive muscle relaxation reduced facing-the-viewer biases for full stick figure walkers only. Our

  16. Attentional Networks and Biological Motion

    OpenAIRE

    Chandramouli Chandrasekaran; Lucy Turner; Heinrich H Bülthoff; Thornton, Ian M.

    2010-01-01

    Our ability to see meaningful actions when presented with pointlight traces of human movement is commonly referred to as the perception of biological motion. While traditionalexplanations have emphasized the spontaneous and automatic nature of this ability, morerecent findings suggest that attention may play a larger role than is typically assumed. Intwo studies we show that the speed and accuracy of responding to point-light stimuli is highly correlated with the ability to control selective ...

  17. The Perception of Auditory Motion.

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    Carlile, Simon; Leung, Johahn

    2016-01-01

    The growing availability of efficient and relatively inexpensive virtual auditory display technology has provided new research platforms to explore the perception of auditory motion. At the same time, deployment of these technologies in command and control as well as in entertainment roles is generating an increasing need to better understand the complex processes underlying auditory motion perception. This is a particularly challenging processing feat because it involves the rapid deconvolution of the relative change in the locations of sound sources produced by rotational and translations of the head in space (self-motion) to enable the perception of actual source motion. The fact that we perceive our auditory world to be stable despite almost continual movement of the head demonstrates the efficiency and effectiveness of this process. This review examines the acoustical basis of auditory motion perception and a wide range of psychophysical, electrophysiological, and cortical imaging studies that have probed the limits and possible mechanisms underlying this perception. PMID:27094029

  18. Dynamical evolution of motion perception.

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    Kanai, Ryota; Sheth, Bhavin R; Shimojo, Shinsuke

    2007-03-01

    Motion is defined as a sequence of positional changes over time. However, in perception, spatial position and motion dynamically interact with each other. This reciprocal interaction suggests that the perception of a moving object itself may dynamically evolve following the onset of motion. Here, we show evidence that the percept of a moving object systematically changes over time. In experiments, we introduced a transient gap in the motion sequence or a brief change in some feature (e.g., color or shape) of an otherwise smoothly moving target stimulus. Observers were highly sensitive to the gap or transient change if it occurred soon after motion onset ( or = 300 ms). Our findings suggest that the moving stimulus is initially perceived as a time series of discrete potentially isolatable frames; later failures to perceive change suggests that over time, the stimulus begins to be perceived as a single, indivisible gestalt integrated over space as well as time, which could well be the signature of an emergent stable motion percept. PMID:17316736

  19. Simulating Biological and Non-Biological Motion

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    Bruzzo, Angela; Gesierich, Benno; Wohlschlager, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the brain processes biological and non-biological movements in distinct neural circuits. Biological motion, in contrast to non-biological motion, refers to active movements of living beings. Aim of our experiment was to investigate the mechanisms underlying mental simulation of these two movement types. Subjects had to…

  20. The neural basis of tactile motion perception

    OpenAIRE

    Pei, Yu-Cheng; Sliman J Bensmaia

    2014-01-01

    The manipulation of objects commonly involves motion between object and skin. In this review, we discuss the neural basis of tactile motion perception and its similarities with its visual counterpart. First, much like in vision, the perception of tactile motion relies on the processing of spatiotemporal patterns of activation across populations of sensory receptors. Second, many neurons in primary somatosensory cortex are highly sensitive to motion direction, and the response properties of th...

  1. Normal form from biological motion despite impaired ventral stream function

    OpenAIRE

    Gilaie-Dotan, S.; Bentin, S.; Harel, M; Rees, G.; Saygin, A.P.

    2011-01-01

    We explored the extent to which biological motion perception depends on ventral stream integration by studying LG, an unusual case of developmental visual agnosia. LG has significant ventral stream processing deficits but no discernable structural cortical abnormality. LG's intermediate visual areas and object-sensitive regions exhibit abnormal activation during visual object perception, in contrast to area V5/MT+ which responds normally to visual motion (Gilaie-Dotan, Perry, Bonneh, Malach, ...

  2. Perceived causality influences brain activity evoked by biological motion.

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    Morris, James P; Pelphrey, Kevin A; McCarthy, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we investigated brain activity in an observer who watched the hand and arm motions of an individual when that individual was, or was not, the cause of the motion. Subjects viewed a realistic animated 3D character who sat at a table containing four pistons. On Intended Motion trials, the character raised his hand and arm upwards. On Unintended Motion trials, the piston under one of the character's hands pushed the hand and arm upward with the same motion. Finally, during Non-Biological Motion control trials, a piston pushed a coffee mug upward in the same smooth motion. Hand and arm motions, regardless of intention, evoked significantly more activity than control trials in a bilateral region that extended ventrally from the posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) region and which was more spatially extensive in the right hemisphere. The left pSTS near the temporal-parietal junction, robustly differentiated between the Intended Motion and Unintended Motion conditions. Here, strong activity was observed for Intended Motion trials, while Unintended Motion trials evoked similar activity as the coffee mug trials. Our results demonstrate a strong hemispheric bias in the role of the pSTS in the perception of causality of biological motion. PMID:18633843

  3. Self-Motion Perception in the Elderly

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    Matthias Lich

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Self-motion through space generates a visual pattern called optic flow. It can be used to determine one’s direction of self-motion (heading. Previous studies have already shown thatthis perceptual ability, which is of critical importance during everyday life, changes with age. In most of these studies subjects were asked to judge whether they appeared to be heading to the left or right of a target. Thresholds were found to increase continuously with age. In our current study, we were interested in absolute rather than relative heading judgements and in the question about a potential neural correlate of an age-related deterioration of heading perception. Two groups, older test subjects and younger controls, were shown optic flow stimuli in a virtual-reality setup. Visual stimuli simulated self-motion through a 3-D cloud of dots and subjects had to indicate their perceived heading direction after each trial. In different subsets of experiments we varied individuallyrelevant stimulus parameters: presentation time, number of dots in the display, stereoscopic vs. non-stereoscopic stimulation, and motion coherence. We found decrements in heading performance with agefor each stimulus parameter. In a final step we aimed to determine a putative neural basis of this behavioural decline. To this end we modified a neural network model which previously has proven to be capable of reproduce and predict certain aspects of heading perception. We show that the observed data can be modeled by implementing an age related neuronal cell loss in this neural network. We conclude that a continuous decline of certain aspects of motion perception, among them heading, might directly be based on anage-related progressive loss of groups of neurons being activated by visual motion.

  4. Neural correlates of facial motion perception.

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    Girges, Christine; O'Brien, Justin; Spencer, Janine

    2016-06-01

    Several neuroimaging studies have revealed that the superior temporal sulcus (STS) is highly implicated in the processing of facial motion. A limitation of these investigations, however, is that many of them utilize unnatural stimuli (e.g., morphed videos) or those which contain many confounding spatial cues. As a result, the underlying mechanisms may not be fully engaged during such perception. The aim of the current study was to build upon the existing literature by implementing highly detailed and accurate models of facial movement. Accordingly, neurologically healthy participants viewed simultaneous sequences of rigid and nonrigid motion that was retargeted onto a standard computer generated imagery face model. Their task was to discriminate between different facial motion videos in a two-alternative forced choice paradigm. Presentations varied between upright and inverted orientations. In corroboration with previous data, the perception of natural facial motion strongly activated a portion of the posterior STS. The analysis also revealed engagement of the lingual gyrus, fusiform gyrus, precentral gyrus, and cerebellum. These findings therefore suggest that the processing of dynamic facial information is supported by a network of visuomotor substrates. PMID:26077725

  5. Human Perception of Ambiguous Inertial Motion Cues

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    Zhang, Guan-Lu

    2010-01-01

    Human daily activities on Earth involve motions that elicit both tilt and translation components of the head (i.e. gazing and locomotion). With otolith cues alone, tilt and translation can be ambiguous since both motions can potentially displace the otolithic membrane by the same magnitude and direction. Transitions between gravity environments (i.e. Earth, microgravity and lunar) have demonstrated to alter the functions of the vestibular system and exacerbate the ambiguity between tilt and translational motion cues. Symptoms of motion sickness and spatial disorientation can impair human performances during critical mission phases. Specifically, Space Shuttle landing records show that particular cases of tilt-translation illusions have impaired the performance of seasoned commanders. This sensorimotor condition is one of many operational risks that may have dire implications on future human space exploration missions. The neural strategy with which the human central nervous system distinguishes ambiguous inertial motion cues remains the subject of intense research. A prevailing theory in the neuroscience field proposes that the human brain is able to formulate a neural internal model of ambiguous motion cues such that tilt and translation components can be perceptually decomposed in order to elicit the appropriate bodily response. The present work uses this theory, known as the GIF resolution hypothesis, as the framework for experimental hypothesis. Specifically, two novel motion paradigms are employed to validate the neural capacity of ambiguous inertial motion decomposition in ground-based human subjects. The experimental setup involves the Tilt-Translation Sled at Neuroscience Laboratory of NASA JSC. This two degree-of-freedom motion system is able to tilt subjects in the pitch plane and translate the subject along the fore-aft axis. Perception data will be gathered through subject verbal reports. Preliminary analysis of perceptual data does not indicate that

  6. Action induction by visual perception of rotational motion.

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    Classen, Claudia; Kibele, Armin

    2016-09-01

    A basic process in the planning of everyday actions involves the integration of visually perceived movement characteristics. Such processes of information integration often occur automatically. The aim of the present study was to examine whether the visual perception of spatial characteristics of a rotational motion (rotation direction) can induce a spatially compatible action. Four reaction time experiments were conducted to analyze the effect of perceiving task irrelevant rotational motions of simple geometric figures as well as of gymnasts on a horizontal bar while responding to color changes in these objects. The results show that the participants react faster when the directional information of a rotational motion is compatible with the spatial characteristics of an intended action. The degree of complexity of the perceived event does not play a role in this effect. The spatial features of the used biological motion were salient enough to elicit a motion based Simon effect. However, in the cognitive processing of the visual stimulus, the critical criterion is not the direction of rotation, but rather the relative direction of motion (direction of motion above or below the center of rotation). Nevertheless, this conclusion is tainted with reservations since it is only fully supported by the response behavior of female participants. PMID:26259847

  7. Biological Motion Cues Trigger Reflexive Attentional Orienting

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    Shi, Jinfu; Weng, Xuchu; He, Sheng; Jiang, Yi

    2010-01-01

    The human visual system is extremely sensitive to biological signals around us. In the current study, we demonstrate that biological motion walking direction can induce robust reflexive attentional orienting. Following a brief presentation of a central point-light walker walking towards either the left or right direction, observers' performance…

  8. Illusionary self-motion perception in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Yu Huang

    Full Text Available Zebrafish mutant belladonna (bel carries a mutation in the lhx2 gene (encoding a Lim domain homeobox transcription factor that results in a defect in retinotectal axon pathfinding, which can lead to uncrossed optic nerves failing to form an optic chiasm. Here, we report on a novel swimming behavior of the bel mutants, best described as looping. Together with two previously reported oculomotor instabilities that have been related to achiasmatic bel mutants, reversed optokinetic response (OKR and congenital nystagmus (CN, involuntary conjugate oscillations of both eyes, looping opens a door to study the influence of visual input and eye movements on postural balance. Our result shows that looping correlates perfectly with reversed OKR and CN and is vision-dependent and contrast sensitive. CN precedes looping and the direction of the CN slow phase is predictive of the looping direction, but is absent during looping. Therefore, looping may be triggered by CN in bel. Moreover, looping in wild-type fish can also be evoked by whole-field motion, suggesting that looping in a bel mutant larvae is a result of self-motion perception. In contrary to previous hypotheses, our findings indicate that postural control in vertebrates relies on both direct visual input (afference signal and eye-movement-related signals (efference copy or reafference signal.

  9. Temporal characteristics of neuronal sources for implied motion perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorteije, J.A.M.; Kenemans, J.L.; Jellema, T.; Lubbe, R.H.J. van der; Heer, F. de; Wezel, R.J.A. van

    2004-01-01

    Viewing photographs of objects in motion evokes higher fMRI activation in human MT+ than similar photographs without this implied motion. MT+ is traditionally considered to be involved in motion perception. Therefore, this finding suggests feedback from object-recognition areas to MT+. To investigat

  10. Individualistic weight perception from motion on a slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zintus-art, K.; Shin, D.; Kambara, H.; Yoshimura, N.; Koike, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Perception of an object’s weight is linked to its form and motion. Studies have shown the relationship between weight perception and motion in horizontal and vertical environments to be universally identical across subjects during passive observation. Here we show a contradicting finding in that not all humans share the same motion-weight pairing. A virtual environment where participants control the steepness of a slope was used to investigate the relationship between sliding motion and weight perception. Our findings showed that distinct, albeit subjective, motion-weight relationships in perception could be identified for slope environments. These individualistic perceptions were found when changes in environmental parameters governing motion were introduced, specifically inclination and surface texture. Differences in environmental parameters, combined with individual factors such as experience, affected participants’ weight perception. This phenomenon may offer evidence of the central nervous system’s ability to choose and combine internal models based on information from the sensory system. The results also point toward the possibility of controlling human perception by presenting strong sensory cues to manipulate the mechanisms managing internal models. PMID:27174036

  11. Word selection affects perceptions of synthetic biology

    OpenAIRE

    Tonidandel Scott; Bye-Nagel Kyri; Snell Sam; Pearson Brianna; Heyer Laurie J; Campbell A Malcolm

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Members of the synthetic biology community have discussed the significance of word selection when describing synthetic biology to the general public. In particular, many leaders proposed the word "create" was laden with negative connotations. We found that word choice and framing does affect public perception of synthetic biology. In a controlled experiment, participants perceived synthetic biology more negatively when "create" was used to describe the field compared to "construct" (...

  12. Motion perception modelling in flight simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, E.L.; Hosman, R.J.A.W.; Bos, J.E.; Dominicus, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    Motion cueing algorithms are indispensable to transform aircraft motions into simulator motions. Usually, such algorithms apply to the whole flight envelope. Since a motion base should stay within its six degrees of freedom workspace, the parameter settings necessarily involve concessions, which may

  13. Neck Proprioception Shapes Body Orientation and Perception of Motion

    OpenAIRE

    Vito Enrico Pettorossi; Marco Schieppati

    2014-01-01

    This review article deals with some effects of neck muscle proprioception on human balance, gait trajectory, subjective straight-ahead, and self-motion perception. These effects are easily observed during neck muscle vibration, a strong stimulus for the spindle primary afferent fibers. We first remind the early findings on human balance, gait trajectory, subjective straight-ahead, induced by limb and neck muscle vibration. Then, more recent findings on self-motion perception of vestibular...

  14. Gravity matters: Motion perceptions modified by direction and body position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claassen, Jens; Bardins, Stanislavs; Spiegel, Rainer; Strupp, Michael; Kalla, Roger

    2016-07-01

    Motion coherence thresholds are consistently higher at lower velocities. In this study we analysed the influence of the position and direction of moving objects on their perception and thereby the influence of gravity. This paradigm allows a differentiation to be made between coherent and randomly moving objects in an upright and a reclining position with a horizontal or vertical axis of motion. 18 young healthy participants were examined in this coherent threshold paradigm. Motion coherence thresholds were significantly lower when position and motion were congruent with gravity independent of motion velocity (p=0.024). In the other conditions higher motion coherence thresholds (MCT) were found at lower velocities and vice versa (p<0.001). This result confirms previous studies with higher MCT at lower velocity but is in contrast to studies concerning perception of virtual turns and optokinetic nystagmus, in which differences of perception were due to different directions irrespective of body position, i.e. perception took place in an egocentric reference frame. Since the observed differences occurred in an upright position only, perception of coherent motion in this study is defined by an earth-centered reference frame rather than by an ego-centric frame. PMID:27258411

  15. Perceptual Training Strongly Improves Visual Motion Perception in Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Daniel J.; McBain, Ryan K.; Ongur, Dost; Chen, Yue

    2011-01-01

    Schizophrenia patients exhibit perceptual and cognitive deficits, including in visual motion processing. Given that cognitive systems depend upon perceptual inputs, improving patients' perceptual abilities may be an effective means of cognitive intervention. In healthy people, motion perception can be enhanced through perceptual learning, but it…

  16. The motion/pursuit law for visual depth perception from motion parallax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrot, Mark; Stroyan, Keith

    2009-07-01

    One of vision's most important functions is specification of the layout of objects in the 3D world. While the static optical geometry of retinal disparity explains the perception of depth from binocular stereopsis, we propose a new formula to link the pertinent dynamic geometry to the computation of depth from motion parallax. Mathematically, the ratio of retinal image motion (motion) and smooth pursuit of the eye (pursuit) provides the necessary information for the computation of relative depth from motion parallax. We show that this could have been obtained with the approaches of Nakayama and Loomis [Nakayama, K., & Loomis, J. M. (1974). Optical velocity patterns, velocity-sensitive neurons, and space perception: A hypothesis. Perception, 3, 63-80] or Longuet-Higgens and Prazdny [Longuet-Higgens, H. C., & Prazdny, K. (1980). The interpretation of a moving retinal image. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B, 208, 385-397] by adding pursuit to their treatments. Results of a psychophysical experiment show that changes in the motion/pursuit ratio have a much better relationship to changes in the perception of depth from motion parallax than do changes in motion or pursuit alone. The theoretical framework provided by the motion/pursuit law provides the quantitative foundation necessary to study this fundamental visual depth perception ability. PMID:19463848

  17. Can molecular cell biology explain chromosome motions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagliardi L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitotic chromosome motions have recently been correlated with electrostatic forces, but a lingering "molecular cell biology" paradigm persists, proposing binding and release proteins or molecular geometries for force generation. Results Pole-facing kinetochore plates manifest positive charges and interact with negatively charged microtubule ends providing the motive force for poleward chromosome motions by classical electrostatics. This conceptual scheme explains dynamic tracking/coupling of kinetochores to microtubules and the simultaneous depolymerization of kinetochore microtubules as poleward force is generated. Conclusion We question here why cells would prefer complex molecular mechanisms to move chromosomes when direct electrostatic interactions between known bound charge distributions can accomplish the same task much more simply.

  18. Influence of Visual Motion, Suggestion, and Illusory Motion on Self-Motion Perception in the Horizontal Plane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven David Rosenblatt

    Full Text Available A moving visual field can induce the feeling of self-motion or vection. Illusory motion from static repeated asymmetric patterns creates a compelling visual motion stimulus, but it is unclear if such illusory motion can induce a feeling of self-motion or alter self-motion perception. In these experiments, human subjects reported the perceived direction of self-motion for sway translation and yaw rotation at the end of a period of viewing set visual stimuli coordinated with varying inertial stimuli. This tested the hypothesis that illusory visual motion would influence self-motion perception in the horizontal plane. Trials were arranged into 5 blocks based on stimulus type: moving star field with yaw rotation, moving star field with sway translation, illusory motion with yaw, illusory motion with sway, and static arrows with sway. Static arrows were used to evaluate the effect of cognitive suggestion on self-motion perception. Each trial had a control condition; the illusory motion controls were altered versions of the experimental image, which removed the illusory motion effect. For the moving visual stimulus, controls were carried out in a dark room. With the arrow visual stimulus, controls were a gray screen. In blocks containing a visual stimulus there was an 8s viewing interval with the inertial stimulus occurring over the final 1s. This allowed measurement of the visual illusion perception using objective methods. When no visual stimulus was present, only the 1s motion stimulus was presented. Eight women and five men (mean age 37 participated. To assess for a shift in self-motion perception, the effect of each visual stimulus on the self-motion stimulus (cm/s at which subjects were equally likely to report motion in either direction was measured. Significant effects were seen for moving star fields for both translation (p = 0.001 and rotation (p0.1 for both. Thus, although a true moving visual field can induce self-motion, results of this

  19. Word selection affects perceptions of synthetic biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonidandel Scott

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Members of the synthetic biology community have discussed the significance of word selection when describing synthetic biology to the general public. In particular, many leaders proposed the word "create" was laden with negative connotations. We found that word choice and framing does affect public perception of synthetic biology. In a controlled experiment, participants perceived synthetic biology more negatively when "create" was used to describe the field compared to "construct" (p = 0.008. Contrary to popular opinion among synthetic biologists, however, low religiosity individuals were more influenced negatively by the framing manipulation than high religiosity people. Our results suggest that synthetic biologists directly influence public perception of their field through avoidance of the word "create".

  20. The Interplay between Perception of Language and Perception of Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poizner, Howard; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Investigates the psychological representation of visual-gestural languages from a cross-linguistic perspective. The perception of signers of American and Chinese Sign Languages is analyzed. (27 references) (Author/VWL)

  1. Motion and color analysis for animat perception

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabie, T.F.; Terzopoulos, D. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    We propose novel gaze control algorithms for active perception in mobile autonomous agents with directable, foveated vision sensors. Our agents are realistic artificial animals, or animals, situated in physics-based virtual worlds. Their active perception systems continuously analyze photorealistic retinal image streams to glean information useful for controlling the animal`s eyes and body. The vision system computes optical flow and segments moving targets in the low-resolution visual periphery. It then matches segmented targets against mental models of colored objects of interest. The eyes saccade to increase acuity by foveating objects, The resulting sensorimotor control loop supports complex behaviors, such as predation.

  2. Self-Motion Perception in the Elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Matthias Lich

    2014-01-01

    Self-motion through space generates a visual pattern called optic flow. It can be used to determine one’s direction of self-motion (heading). Previous studies have already shown thatthis perceptual ability, which is of critical importance during everyday life, changes with age. In most of these studies subjects were asked to judge whether they appeared to be heading to the left or right of a target. Thresholds were found to increase continuously with age. In our current study, we were interes...

  3. Self-motion perception in the elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Lich, Matthias; Bremmer, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Self-motion through space generates a visual pattern called optic flow. It can be used to determine one's direction of self-motion (heading). Previous studies have already shown that this perceptual ability, which is of critical importance during everyday life, changes with age. In most of these studies subjects were asked to judge whether they appeared to be heading to the left or right of a target. Thresholds were found to increase continuously with age. In our current study, we were intere...

  4. Biological Motion Displays Elicit Social Behavior in 12-Month-Olds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jennifer M. D.; Johnson, Susan C.

    2009-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that biological motion perception is developmentally integrated with important social cognitive abilities, 12-month-olds (N = 36) were shown a display of a human point-light figure turning to observe a target. Infants spontaneously and reliably followed the figure's "gaze" despite the absence of familiar and socially…

  5. Neurophysiological and Behavioural Correlates of Coherent Motion Perception in Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taroyan, Naira A.; Nicolson, Roderick I.; Buckley, David

    2011-01-01

    Coherent motion perception was tested in nine adolescents with dyslexia and 10 control participants matched for age and IQ using low contrast stimuli with three levels of coherence (10%, 25% and 40%). Event-related potentials (ERPs) and behavioural performance data were obtained. No significant between-group differences were found in performance…

  6. He Throws like a Girl (but Only when He's Sad): Emotion Affects Sex-Decoding of Biological Motion Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kerri L.; McKay, Lawrie S.; Pollick, Frank E.

    2011-01-01

    Gender stereotypes have been implicated in sex-typed perceptions of facial emotion. Such interpretations were recently called into question because facial cues of emotion are confounded with sexually dimorphic facial cues. Here we examine the role of visual cues and gender stereotypes in perceptions of biological motion displays, thus overcoming…

  7. Decision-level adaptation in motion perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, George; Sharman, Rebecca J

    2015-12-01

    Prolonged exposure to visual stimuli causes a bias in observers' responses to subsequent stimuli. Such adaptation-induced biases are usually explained in terms of changes in the relative activity of sensory neurons in the visual system which respond selectively to the properties of visual stimuli. However, the bias could also be due to a shift in the observer's criterion for selecting one response rather than the alternative; adaptation at the decision level of processing rather than the sensory level. We investigated whether adaptation to implied motion is best attributed to sensory-level or decision-level bias. Three experiments sought to isolate decision factors by changing the nature of the participants' task while keeping the sensory stimulus unchanged. Results showed that adaptation-induced bias in reported stimulus direction only occurred when the participants' task involved a directional judgement, and disappeared when adaptation was measured using a non-directional task (reporting where motion was present in the display, regardless of its direction). We conclude that adaptation to implied motion is due to decision-level bias, and that a propensity towards such biases may be widespread in sensory decision-making. PMID:27019726

  8. The First Time Ever I Saw Your Feet: Inversion Effect in Newborns' Sensitivity to Biological Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardi, Lara; Regolin, Lucia; Simion, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Inversion effect in biological motion perception has been recently attributed to an innate sensitivity of the visual system to the gravity-dependent dynamic of the motion. However, the specific cues that determine the inversion effect in naïve subjects were never investigated. In the present study, we have assessed the contribution of the local…

  9. Differential brain activity states during the perception and nonperception of illusory motion as revealed by magnetoencephalography

    OpenAIRE

    Crowe, David A.; Leuthold, Arthur C.; Georgopoulos, Apostolos P.

    2010-01-01

    We studied visual perception using an annular random-dot motion stimulus called the racetrack. We recorded neural activity using magnetoencephalography while subjects viewed variants of this stimulus that contained no inherent motion or various degrees of embedded motion. Subjects reported seeing rotary motion during viewing of all stimuli. We found that, in the absence of any motion signals, patterns of brain activity differed between states of motion perception and nonperception. Furthermor...

  10. Infants' perception of subjective contours from apparent motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Masami K; Kanazawa, So; Okamura, Hiromi

    2008-01-01

    We examined infants' perception of subjective contours in Subjective-Contour-from-Apparent-Motion (SCAM) stimuli [e.g., Cicerone, C. M., Hoffman, D. D., Gowdy, P. D., & Kim, J. S. (1995). The perception of color from motion. Perception & Psychophysics, 57, 761-777] using the preferential looking technique. The SCAM stimulus is composed of random dots which are assigned two different colors. Circular region assigned one color moved apparently, keeping all dots' location unchanged. In the SCAM stimulus, adults can perceive subjective color spreading and subjective contours in apparent motion (http://c-faculty.chuo-u.ac.jp/ approximately ymasa/okamura/ibd_demo.html). In the present study, we conducted two experiments by using this type of SCAM stimulus. A total of thirty-six 3-8-month-olds participated. In experiment 1, we presented two stimuli to the infants side by side: a SCAM stimulus consisting of different luminance, and a non-SCAM stimulus consisting of isoluminance dots. The results indicated that the 5-8-month-olds showed preference for the SCAM stimuli. In experiments 2 and 3, we confirmed that the infants' preference for the SCAM stimulus was not generated by the local difference and local change made by luminance of dots but by the subjective contours. These results suggest that 5-8-month-olds were able to perceive subjective contours in the SCAM stimuli. PMID:17727955

  11. Self-motion perception: assessment by computer-generated animations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, D E; Harm, D L; Sandoz, G R; Skinner, N C

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this research is more precise description of adaptation to sensory rearrangements, including microgravity, by development of improved procedures for assessing spatial orientation perception. Thirty-six subjects reported perceived self-motion following exposure to complex inertial-visual motion. Twelve subjects were assigned to each of 3 perceptual reporting procedures: (a) animation movie selection, (b) written report selection and (c) verbal report generation. The question addressed was: do reports produced by these procedures differ with respect to complexity and reliability? Following repeated (within-day and across-day) exposures to 4 different "motion profiles," subjects either (a) selected movies presented on a laptop computer, or (b) selected written descriptions from a booklet, or (c) generated self-motion verbal descriptions that corresponded most closely with their motion experience. One "complexity" and 2 reliability "scores" were calculated. Contrary to expectations, reliability and complexity scores were essentially equivalent for the animation movie selection and written report selection procedures. Verbal report generation subjects exhibited less complexity than did subjects in the other conditions and their reports were often ambiguous. The results suggest that, when selecting from carefully written descriptions and following appropriate training, people may be better able to describe their self-motion experience with words than is usually believed. PMID:11541611

  12. Sex Differences in the Development of Brain Mechanisms for Processing Biological Motion

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, L.C.; Bolling, D. Z.; Schelinski, S.; Coffman, M.C.; Pelphrey, K.A.; Kaiser, M.D.

    2013-01-01

    Disorders related to social functioning including autism and schizophrenia differ drastically in incidence and severity between males and females. Little is known about the neural systems underlying these sex-linked differences in risk and resiliency. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging and a task involving the visual perception of point-light displays of coherent and scrambled biological motion, we discovered sex differences in the development of neural systems for basic social perce...

  13. Motion Perception of Short-Wavelength Sensitive Cones in Glaucoma Using Random Dots Moving

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baowen Gu; De-Zheng Wu; Jongji Liang; Minzhong Yu

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether motion perception of short-wavelength sensitive(SWS)cones is capable of predicting primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) optic neuropathy.Methods: Motion perceptions of SWS cones were isolated by Blue random dot stimulusdisplayed on the Yellow background, then the detecting displacement threshold of motionperception from SWS cone in POAG was measured, and compared with the age-matchednormal group.Results: The detecting displacement thresholds of motion perception from SWS cones in8 sites of 15 degrees were all elevated in POAG compared with the normal group.Conclusion: These findings suggest that motion perception of SWS cones may revealpreclinical visual nerve damage in early POAG.

  14. Secondary School Biology Teachers' Perceptions of Scientific Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndeke, Grace C. W.; Okere, Mark I. O.; Keraro, Fred N.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate secondary school biology teachers' perceptions of scientific creativity. Cross-sectional survey research design was employed. The population of the study comprised all biology teachers in public secondary schools in Kericho and Kajiado counties in Kenya. A sample of 205 biology teachers' was selected…

  15. Translational Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex and Motion Perception During Interaural Linear Acceleration: Comparison of Different Motion Paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaton, K. H.; Holly, J. E.; Clement, G. R.; Wood, S. J.

    2011-01-01

    The neural mechanisms to resolve ambiguous tilt-translation motion have been hypothesized to be different for motion perception and eye movements. Previous studies have demonstrated differences in ocular and perceptual responses using a variety of motion paradigms, including Off-Vertical Axis Rotation (OVAR), Variable Radius Centrifugation (VRC), translation along a linear track, and tilt about an Earth-horizontal axis. While the linear acceleration across these motion paradigms is presumably equivalent, there are important differences in semicircular canal cues. The purpose of this study was to compare translation motion perception and horizontal slow phase velocity to quantify consistencies, or lack thereof, across four different motion paradigms. Twelve healthy subjects were exposed to sinusoidal interaural linear acceleration between 0.01 and 0.6 Hz at 1.7 m/s/s (equivalent to 10 tilt) using OVAR, VRC, roll tilt, and lateral translation. During each trial, subjects verbally reported the amount of perceived peak-to-peak lateral translation and indicated the direction of motion with a joystick. Binocular eye movements were recorded using video-oculography. In general, the gain of translation perception (ratio of reported linear displacement to equivalent linear stimulus displacement) increased with stimulus frequency, while the phase did not significantly vary. However, translation perception was more pronounced during both VRC and lateral translation involving actual translation, whereas perceptions were less consistent and more variable during OVAR and roll tilt which did not involve actual translation. For each motion paradigm, horizontal eye movements were negligible at low frequencies and showed phase lead relative to the linear stimulus. At higher frequencies, the gain of the eye movements increased and became more inphase with the acceleration stimulus. While these results are consistent with the hypothesis that the neural computational strategies for

  16. Computational model for perception of objects and motions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Perception of objects and motions in the visual scene is one of the basic problems in the visual system. There exist ’What’ and ’Where’ pathways in the superior visual cortex, starting from the simple cells in the primary visual cortex. The former is able to perceive objects such as forms, color, and texture, and the latter perceives ’where’, for example, velocity and direction of spatial movement of objects. This paper explores brain-like computational architectures of visual information processing. We propose a visual perceptual model and computational mechanism for training the perceptual model. The compu- tational model is a three-layer network. The first layer is the input layer which is used to receive the stimuli from natural environments. The second layer is designed for representing the internal neural information. The connections between the first layer and the second layer, called the receptive fields of neurons, are self-adaptively learned based on principle of sparse neural representation. To this end, we introduce Kullback-Leibler divergence as the measure of independence between neural responses and derive the learning algorithm based on minimizing the cost function. The proposed algorithm is applied to train the basis functions, namely receptive fields, which are localized, oriented, and bandpassed. The resultant receptive fields of neurons in the second layer have the characteristics resembling that of simple cells in the primary visual cortex. Based on these basis functions, we further construct the third layer for perception of what and where in the superior visual cortex. The proposed model is able to perceive objects and their motions with a high accuracy and strong robustness against additive noise. Computer simulation results in the final section show the feasibility of the proposed perceptual model and high efficiency of the learning algorithm.

  17. Computational model for perception of objects and motions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG WenLu; ZHANG LiQing; MA LiBo

    2008-01-01

    Perception of objects and motions inthe visual scene is one of the basic problems in the visual system. There exist 'What' and 'Where' pathways in the superior visual cortex, starting from the simple cells in the primary visual cortex. The former is able to perceive objects such as forms, color, and texture, and the latter perceives 'where', for example, velocity and direction of spatial movement of objects. This paper explores brain-like computational architectures of visual information processing. We propose a visual perceptual model and computational mechanism for training the perceptual model. The compu-tational model is a three-layer network. The first layer is the input layer which is used to receive the stimuli from natural environments. The second layer is designed for representing the internal neural information. The connections between the first layer and the second layer, called the receptive fields of neurons, are self-adaptively learned based on principle of sparse neural representation, To this end, we introduce Kullback-Leibler divergence as the measure of independence between neural responses and derive the learning algorithm based on minimizing the cost function. The proposed algorithm is applied to train the basis functions, namely receptive fields, which are localized, oriented, and bandpassed. The resultant receptive fields of neurons in the second layer have the characteristics resembling that of simple cells in the primary visual cortex. Based on these basis functions, we further construct the third layer for perception of what and where in the superior visual cortex. The proposed model is able to perceive objects and their motions with a high accuracy and strong robustness against additive noise. Computer simulation results in the final section show the feasibility of the proposed perceptual model and high efficiency of the learning algorithm.

  18. A Computational Model of Extrastriate Visual Area MT on Motion Perception

    OpenAIRE

    Jiawei Xu; Shigang Yue

    2013-01-01

    Human vision system are sensitive to motion perception under complex scenes. Building motion attention models similar to human visual attention system should be very beneficial to computer vision and machine intelligence; meanwhile, it has been a challenging task due to the complexity of human brain and limited understanding of the mechanisms underlying the human vision system. This paper models the motion perception mechanisms in human extrastriate visual middle temporal area (MT) computatio...

  19. Distinct mechanisms of form-from-motion perception in human extrastriate cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Blanke, O; Brooks, A.; Mercier, M.; Spinelli, L.; Adriani, M.; Lavanchy, L.; Safran, A B; Landis, T

    2007-01-01

    The exquisite sensitivity of the human visual system to form-from-motion (FfM) cues is well documented. However, identifying the neural correlates of this sensitivity has proven difficult, particularly determining the respective contributions of different motion areas in extrastriate visual cortex. Here we measured visual FfM perception and more elementary visual motion (VM) perception in a group of 32 patients suffering from acute posterior brain damage, and performed MRI-based lesion analys...

  20. Being moved by the self and others: influence of empathy on self-motion perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Lopez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The observation of conspecifics influences our bodily perceptions and actions: Contagious yawning, contagious itching, or empathy for pain, are all examples of mechanisms based on resonance between our own body and others. While there is evidence for the involvement of the mirror neuron system in the processing of motor, auditory and tactile information, it has not yet been associated with the perception of self-motion. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated whether viewing our own body, the body of another, and an object in motion influences self-motion perception. We found a visual-vestibular congruency effect for self-motion perception when observing self and object motion, and a reduction in this effect when observing someone else's body motion. The congruency effect was correlated with empathy scores, revealing the importance of empathy in mirroring mechanisms. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The data show that vestibular perception is modulated by agent-specific mirroring mechanisms. The observation of conspecifics in motion is an essential component of social life, and self-motion perception is crucial for the distinction between the self and the other. Finally, our results hint at the presence of a "vestibular mirror neuron system".

  1. Hysteresis in the perception of motion direction as evidence for neural cooperativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D; Phillips, G; Sekuler, R

    When elements of a parallel network, such as the human brain, are extensively interconnected, the network can exhibit 'cooperative behaviour'. Such behaviour, which is characterized by order-disorder transitions, multi-stable states, and a form of memory called 'hysteresis', has been observed in human stereopsis and has motivated models of stereopsis that incorporate cooperative networks. More recently, cooperative phenomena have also been observed in human visual motion perception. This report strongly supports a cooperative interpretation of motion perception by demonstrating hysteresis in the perception of motion direction. The results agree quantitatively with a mathematical model incorporating nonlinear excitatory and inhibitory interactions among direction-selective elements. PMID:3785395

  2. Image statistics and the perception of apparent motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilden, D L; Bertenthal, B I; Othman, S

    1990-11-01

    The short- and long-range apparent motion processes are discussed in terms of the statistical properties of images. It is argued that the short-range process, exemplified by the random-dot kinematogram, is primarily sensitive to the dipole statistics, whereas the long-range process, exemplified by illusory occlusion, is treated by the visual system primarily in terms of the tripole and higher statistical correlation functions. The studies incorporate the balanced dot, which is a unique stimulus element that permits high pass filtering while preserving detailed positional information. Low spatial frequencies are shown to be critical for texture segregation in random-dot kinematograms, independent of the grain size or number density of texture elements. Illusory path perception in the long-range process is shown not to require low spatial frequencies, but is sensitive rather to global temporal phase coherency. These results are interpreted in terms of the respective roles of the power and phase spectra in perceptual organization. The construction of balanced dots is discussed in detail. PMID:2148586

  3. A binocular rivalry study of motion perception in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutoussis, K; Keliris, G; Kourtzi, Z; Logothetis, N

    2005-08-01

    The relationship between brain activity and conscious visual experience is central to our understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying perception. Binocular rivalry, where monocular stimuli compete for perceptual dominance, has been previously used to dissociate the constant stimulus from the varying percept. We report here fMRI results from humans experiencing binocular rivalry under a dichoptic stimulation paradigm that consisted of two drifting random dot patterns with different motion coherence. Each pattern had also a different color, which both enhanced rivalry and was used for reporting which of the two patterns was visible at each time. As the perception of the subjects alternated between coherent motion and motion noise, we examined the effect that these alternations had on the strength of the MR signal throughout the brain. Our results demonstrate that motion perception is able to modulate the activity of several of the visual areas which are known to be involved in motion processing. More specifically, in addition to area V5 which showed the strongest modulation, a higher activity during the perception of motion than during the perception of noise was also clearly observed in areas V3A and LOC, and less so in area V3. In previous studies, these areas had been selectively activated by motion stimuli but whether their activity reflects motion perception or not remained unclear; here we show that they are involved in motion perception as well. The present findings therefore suggest a lack of a clear distinction between 'processing' versus 'perceptual' areas in the brain, but rather that the areas involved in the processing of a specific visual attribute are also part of the neuronal network that is collectively responsible for its perceptual representation. PMID:15924938

  4. What is infidelity? Perceptions based on biological sex and personality

    OpenAIRE

    Thornton V; Nagurney AJ

    2011-01-01

    Victoria Thornton, Alexander NagurneyTexas State University – San Marcos, San Marcos, Texas, USAAbstract: The study examines perceptions of infidelity, paying particular attention to how these perceptions differ based on biological sex and personality traits, specifically agency and communion and their unmitigated counterparts. The study utilizes a sample of 125 male and 233 female college students. In addition to the personality measures, participants completed a 19-item checklist ...

  5. Effects of proposed preflight adaptation training on eye movements, self-motion perception, and motion sickness - A progress report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, D. E.; Reschke, M. F.; Von Gierke, H. E.; Lessard, C. S.

    1987-01-01

    The preflight adaptation trainer (PAT) was designed to produce rearranged relationships between visual and otolith signals analogous to those experienced in space. Investigations have been undertaken with three prototype trainers. The results indicated that exposure to the PAT sensory rearrangement altered self-motion perception, induced motion sickness, and changed the amplitude and phase of the horizontal eye movements evoked by roll stimulation. However, the changes were inconsistent.

  6. Self-motion perception: assessment by real-time computer-generated animations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, D. E.; Phillips, J. O.

    2001-01-01

    We report a new procedure for assessing complex self-motion perception. In three experiments, subjects manipulated a 6 degree-of-freedom magnetic-field tracker which controlled the motion of a virtual avatar so that its motion corresponded to the subjects' perceived self-motion. The real-time animation created by this procedure was stored using a virtual video recorder for subsequent analysis. Combined real and illusory self-motion and vestibulo-ocular reflex eye movements were evoked by cross-coupled angular accelerations produced by roll and pitch head movements during passive yaw rotation in a chair. Contrary to previous reports, illusory self-motion did not correspond to expectations based on semicircular canal stimulation. Illusory pitch head-motion directions were as predicted for only 37% of trials; whereas, slow-phase eye movements were in the predicted direction for 98% of the trials. The real-time computer-generated animations procedure permits use of naive, untrained subjects who lack a vocabulary for reporting motion perception and is applicable to basic self-motion perception studies, evaluation of motion simulators, assessment of balance disorders and so on.

  7. Audiovisual associations alter the perception of low-level visual motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hulusi Kafaligonul

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Motion perception is a pervasive nature of vision and is affected by both immediate pattern of sensory inputs and prior experiences acquired through associations. Recently, several studies reported that an association can be established quickly between directions of visual motion and static sounds of distinct frequencies. After the association is formed, sounds are able to change the perceived direction of visual motion. To determine whether such rapidly acquired audiovisual associations and their subsequent influences on visual motion perception are dependent on the involvement of higher-order attentive tracking mechanisms, we designed psychophysical experiments using regular and reverse-phi random dot motions isolating low-level pre-attentive motion processing. Our results show that an association between the directions of low-level visual motion and static sounds can be formed and this audiovisual association alters the subsequent perception of low-level visual motion. These findings support the view that audiovisual associations are not restricted to high-level attention based motion system and early-level visual motion processing has some potential role.

  8. Development of global motion perception requires early postnatal exposure to patterned light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Donald E; Kennie, Jan; Kung, Diane

    2009-04-28

    The accurate representation of the motion of external objects is one of the more important tasks of the visual areas of the brain because motion by itself can provide sufficient information for discriminating visual forms and hence breaking camouflage. Whereas the analysis of the motion of single small elements can occur in primary visual cortex (V1), the perception of a common direction of global motion of some visual elements among many is supported by extrastriate cortical areas [1, 2]. Humans treated for binocular congenital cataracts afterward exhibit extreme deficits of global motion, but after monocular cataracts, the deficits are minimal [3]. These observations suggest a need for normal early patterned visual experience through at least one eye for global motion perception to develop in a typical fashion. We investigated this role for early experience and its timing on kittens that were deprived of light or patterned light at different ages. Such deprivation in the first 6 weeks resulted in long-lasting (>2 yr) profound deficits of perception of global motion but no apparent effects on the perception of simple unidirectional motion. Contrary to current opinion, sensitive periods to visual deprivation in primary and extrastriate cortex may be of similar duration. PMID:19285405

  9. Evaluation Of Webquest In Biology:Teachers’ Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamisah OSMAN

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Teaching and learning based on web or web-based learning is a concept which integrates information and technology in education. Teachers and instructors have to assist their learners to learn to function in this information environment. However, teacher trainers and instructors have limited experience in the integration of ICT by using web in their teaching, mainly for Biology subject. The Indonesian Ministry of Education has started to implement ICT in the process of learning and teaching. Hence, it geared our attention to evaluate the suitability of WebQuest to be used in teacher training among Biology teachers in central Kalimantan. Results showed those teachers’ perceptions towards WebQuest on technical, content, as well as teaching and learning structure were on the high level. However, there was no significant difference on teachers’ perception towards WebQuest based on their experience. Further evaluation study should be done on students to gauge their perception towards the WebQuest.

  10. Audiovisual associations alter the perception of low-level visual motion

    OpenAIRE

    Hulusi Kafaligonul; Can Oluk

    2015-01-01

    Motion perception is a pervasive nature of vision and is affected by both immediate pattern of sensory inputs and prior experiences acquired through associations. Recently, several studies reported that an association can be established quickly between directions of visual motion and static sounds of distinct frequencies. After the association is formed, sounds are able to change the perceived direction of visual motion. To determine whether such rapidly acquired audiovisual associations and ...

  11. Neural representations of kinematic laws of motion: Evidence for action-perception coupling

    OpenAIRE

    Dayan, Eran; Casile, Antonino; Levit-Binnun, Nava; Giese, Martin A; Hendler, Talma; Flash, Tamar

    2007-01-01

    Behavioral and modeling studies have established that curved and drawing human hand movements obey the 2/3 power law, which dictates a strong coupling between movement curvature and velocity. Human motion perception seems to reflect this constraint. The functional MRI study reported here demonstrates that the brain's response to this law of motion is much stronger and more widespread than to other types of motion. Compliance with this law is reflected in the activation of a large network of b...

  12. Human motion perception and smooth eye movements show similar directional biases for elongated apertures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutter, B. R.; Stone, L. S.

    1998-01-01

    Although numerous studies have examined the relationship between smooth-pursuit eye movements and motion perception, it remains unresolved whether a common motion-processing system subserves both perception and pursuit. To address this question, we simultaneously recorded perceptual direction judgments and the concomitant smooth eye-movement response to a plaid stimulus that we have previously shown generates systematic perceptual errors. We measured the perceptual direction biases psychophysically and the smooth eye-movement direction biases using two methods (standard averaging and oculometric analysis). We found that the perceptual and oculomotor biases were nearly identical, suggesting that pursuit and perception share a critical motion processing stage, perhaps in area MT or MST of extrastriate visual cortex.

  13. The Relationship between Grade 11 Palestinian Attitudes toward Biology and Their Perceptions of the Biology Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidan, Afif

    2010-01-01

    The aims of the study were to investigate (a) the relationship between the attitudes toward biology and perceptions of the biology learning environment among grade 11 students in Tulkarm District, Palestine and (b) the effect of gender and residence of these students on their attitudes toward biology and on their perceptions of the biology…

  14. Being Moved by the Self and Others: Influence of Empathy on Self-Motion Perception

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez, Christophe; Falconer, Caroline J.; Mast, Fred W.; Avenanti, Alessio

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The observation of conspecifics influences our bodily perceptions and actions: Contagious yawning, contagious itching, or empathy for pain, are all examples of mechanisms based on resonance between our own body and others. While there is evidence for the involvement of the mirror neuron system in the processing of motor, auditory and tactile information, it has not yet been associated with the perception of self-motion. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated wh...

  15. Bayesian Models for Multimodal Perception of 3D Structure and Motion

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, J.F.; Bessière, Pierre; Mekhnacha, Kamel; Lobo, J.; J. Dias; Laugier, Christian

    2008-01-01

    In this text we will formalise a novel solution, the Bayesian Volumetric Map (BVM), as a framework for a metric, short-term, egocentric spatial memory for multimodal perception of 3D structure and motion. This solution will enable the implementation of top-down mechanisms of attention guidance of perception towards areas of high entropy/uncertainty, so as to promote active exploration of the environment by the robotic perceptual system. In the process, we will to try address the inherent chal...

  16. Effects of Frequency and Motion Paradigm on Perception of Tilt and Translation During Periodic Linear Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaton, K. H.; Holly, J. E.; Clement, G. R.; Wood, Scott J.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated an effect of frequency on the gain of tilt and translation perception. Results from different motion paradigms are often combined to extend the stimulus frequency range. For example, Off-Vertical Axis Rotation (OVAR) and Variable Radius Centrifugation (VRC) are useful to test low frequencies of linear acceleration at amplitudes that would require impractical sled lengths. The purpose of this study was to compare roll-tilt and lateral translation motion perception in 12 healthy subjects across four paradigms: OVAR, VRC, sled translation and rotation about an earth-horizontal axis. Subjects were oscillated in darkness at six frequencies from 0.01875 to 0.6 Hz (peak acceleration equivalent to 10 deg, less for sled motion below 0.15 Hz). Subjects verbally described the amplitude of perceived tilt and translation, and used a joystick to indicate the direction of motion. Consistent with previous reports, tilt perception gain decreased as a function of stimulus frequency in the motion paradigms without concordant canal tilt cues (OVAR, VRC and Sled). Translation perception gain was negligible at low stimulus frequencies and increased at higher frequencies. There were no significant differences between the phase of tilt and translation, nor did the phase significantly vary across stimulus frequency. There were differences in perception gain across the different paradigms. Paradigms that included actual tilt stimuli had the larger tilt gains, and paradigms that included actual translation stimuli had larger translation gains. In addition, the frequency at which there was a crossover of tilt and translation gains appeared to vary across motion paradigm between 0.15 and 0.3 Hz. Since the linear acceleration in the head lateral plane was equivalent across paradigms, differences in gain may be attributable to the presence of linear accelerations in orthogonal directions and/or cognitive aspects based on the expected motion paths.

  17. Binding biological motion and visual features in working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiaowei; Zhao, Yangfan; Wu, Fan; Lu, Xiqian; Gao, Zaifeng; Shen, Mowei

    2015-06-01

    Working memory mechanisms for binding have been examined extensively in the last decade, yet few studies have explored bindings relating to human biological motion (BM). Human BM is the most salient and biologically significant kinetic information encountered in everyday life and is stored independently from other visual features (e.g., colors). The current study explored 3 critical issues of BM-related binding in working memory: (a) how many BM binding units can be retained in working memory, (b) whether involuntarily object-based binding occurs during BM binding, and (c) whether the maintenance of BM bindings in working memory requires attention above and beyond that needed to maintain the constituent dimensions. We isolated motion signals of human BM from non-BM sources by using point-light displays as to-be-memorized BM and presented the participants colored BM in a change detection task. We found that working memory capacity for BM-color bindings is rather low; only 1 or 2 BM-color bindings could be retained in working memory regardless of the presentation manners (Experiments 1-3). Furthermore, no object-based encoding took place for colored BM stimuli regardless of the processed dimensions (Experiments 4 and 5). Central executive attention contributes to the maintenance of BM-color bindings, yet maintaining BM bindings in working memory did not require more central attention than did maintaining the constituent dimensions in working memory (Experiment 6). Overall, these results suggest that keeping BM bindings in working memory is a fairly resource-demanding process, yet central executive attention does not play a special role in this cross-module binding. PMID:25893683

  18. Rocking or Rolling – Perception of Ambiguous Motion after Returning from Space

    OpenAIRE

    Clément, Gilles; Wood, Scott J.

    2014-01-01

    The central nervous system must resolve the ambiguity of inertial motion sensory cues in order to derive an accurate representation of spatial orientation. Adaptive changes during spaceflight in how the brain integrates vestibular cues with other sensory information can lead to impaired movement coordination, vertigo, spatial disorientation, and perceptual illusions after return to Earth. The purpose of this study was to compare tilt and translation motion perception in astronauts before and ...

  19. Development of visual motion perception for prospective control: Brain and behavioural studies in infants

    OpenAIRE

    Seth B. Agyei; Ruud eVan der Weel; van der Meer, Audrey L. H.

    2016-01-01

    During infancy, smart perceptual mechanisms develop allowing infants to judge time-space motion dynamics more efficiently with age and locomotor experience. This emerging capacity may be vital to enable preparedness for upcoming events and to be able to navigate in a changing environment. Little is known about brain changes that support the development of prospective control and about processes, such as preterm birth, that may compromise it. As a function of perception of visual motion, this ...

  20. Comparison of Flight Simulators Based on Human Motion Perception Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente Pais, Ana R.; Correia Gracio, Bruno J.; Kelly, Lon C.; Houck, Jacob A.

    2015-01-01

    In flight simulation, motion filters are used to transform aircraft motion into simulator motion. When looking for the best match between visual and inertial amplitude in a simulator, researchers have found that there is a range of inertial amplitudes, rather than a single inertial value, that is perceived by subjects as optimal. This zone, hereafter referred to as the optimal zone, seems to correlate to the perceptual coherence zones measured in flight simulators. However, no studies were found in which these two zones were compared. This study investigates the relation between the optimal and the coherence zone measurements within and between different simulators. Results show that for the sway axis, the optimal zone lies within the lower part of the coherence zone. In addition, it was found that, whereas the width of the coherence zone depends on the visual amplitude and frequency, the width of the optimal zone remains constant.

  1. Construction and evaluation of an integrated dynamical model of visual motion perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlapale, Émilien; Dosher, Barbara Anne; Lu, Zhong-Lin

    2015-07-01

    Although numerous models describe the individual neural mechanisms that may be involved in the perception of visual motion, few of them have been constructed to take arbitrary stimuli and map them to a motion percept. Here, we propose an integrated dynamical motion model (IDM), which is sufficiently general to handle diverse moving stimuli, yet sufficiently precise to account for a wide-ranging set of empirical observations made on a family of random dot kinematograms. In particular, we constructed models of the cortical areas involved in motion detection, motion integration and perceptual decision. We analyzed their parameters through dynamical simulations and numerical continuation to constrain their proper ranges. Then, empirical data from a family of random dot kinematograms experiments with systematically varying direction distribution, presentation duration and stimulus size, were used to evaluate our model and estimate corresponding model parameters. The resulting model provides an excellent account of a demanding set of parametrically varied behavioral effects on motion perception, providing both quantitative and qualitative elements of evaluation. PMID:25897511

  2. Two independent mechanisms for motion-in-depth perception: evidence from individual differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold T Nefs

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Our forward-facing eyes allow us the advantage of binocular visual information: using the tiny differences between right and left eye views to learn about depth and location in three dimensions. Our visual systems also contain specialized mechanisms to detect motion-in-depth from binocular vision, but the nature of these mechanisms remains controversial. Binocular motion-in-depth perception could theoretically be based on first detecting binocular disparity and then monitoring how it changes over time. The alternative is to monitor the motion in the right and left eye separately and then compare these motion signals. Here we used an individual differences approach to test whether the two sources of information are processed via dissociated mechanisms, and to measure the relative importance of those mechanisms. Our results suggest the existence of two distinct mechanisms, each contributing to the perception of motion in depth in most observers. Additionally, for the first time, we demonstrate the relative prevalence of the two mechanisms within a normal population. In general, visual systems appear to rely mostly on the mechanism sensitive to changing binocular disparity, but perception of motion in depth is augmented by the presence of a less sensitive mechanism that uses interocular velocity differences. Occasionally, we find observers with the opposite pattern of sensitivity. More generally this work showcases the power of the individual differences approach in studying the functional organisation of cognitive systems.

  3. Modification of Motion Perception and Manual Control Following Short-Durations Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, S. J.; Vanya, R. D.; Esteves, J. T.; Rupert, A. H.; Clement, G.

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive changes during space flight in how the brain integrates vestibular cues with other sensory information can lead to impaired movement coordination and spatial disorientation following G-transitions. This ESA-NASA study was designed to examine both the physiological basis and operational implications for disorientation and tilt-translation disturbances following short-duration spaceflights. The goals of this study were to (1) examine the effects of stimulus frequency on adaptive changes in motion perception during passive tilt and translation motion, (2) quantify decrements in manual control of tilt motion, and (3) evaluate vibrotactile feedback as a sensorimotor countermeasure.

  4. Cerebellar contributions to self-motion perception: evidence from patients with congenital cerebellar agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlem, Kilian; Valko, Yulia; Schmahmann, Jeremy D; Lewis, Richard F

    2016-05-01

    The cerebellum was historically considered a brain region dedicated to motor control, but it has become clear that it also contributes to sensory processing, particularly when sensory discrimination is required. Prior work, for example, has demonstrated a cerebellar contribution to sensory discrimination in the visual and auditory systems. The cerebellum also receives extensive inputs from the motion and gravity sensors in the vestibular labyrinth, but its role in the perception of head motion and orientation has received little attention. Drawing on the lesion-deficit approach to understanding brain function, we evaluated the contributions of the cerebellum to head motion perception by measuring perceptual thresholds in two subjects with congenital agenesis of the cerebellum. We used a set of passive motion paradigms that activated the semicircular canals or otolith organs in isolation or combination, and compared results of the agenesis patients with healthy control subjects. Perceptual thresholds for head motion were elevated in the agenesis subjects for all motion protocols, most prominently for paradigms that only activated otolith inputs. These results demonstrate that the cerebellum increases the sensitivity of the brain to the motion and orientation signals provided by the labyrinth during passive head movements. PMID:26888100

  5. 76 FR 16612 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Perceptions About the Biological and Socio...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    ...; Perceptions About the Biological and Socio-Economic Performance of Marine Regulations in the U.S. Caribbean... Puerto Rico. The data gathered will be used to: (1) Describe the fishermen's perceptions about...

  6. “What women like”: influence of motion and form on esthetic body perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ValentinaCazzato

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have shown the distinct contribution of motion and form to the esthetic evaluation of female bodies. Here, we investigated how variations of implied motion and body size interact in the esthetic evaluation of female and male bodies in a sample of young healthy women. Participants provided attractiveness, beauty, and liking ratings for the shape and posture of virtual renderings of human bodies with variable body size and implied motion. The esthetic judgments for both shape and posture of human models were influenced by body size and implied motion, with a preference for thinner and more dynamic stimuli. Implied motion, however, attenuated the impact of extreme body size on the esthetic evaluation of body postures, and body size variations did not affect the preference for more dynamic stimuli. Results show that body form and action cues interact in esthetic perception, but the final esthetic appreciation of human bodies is predicted by a mixture of perceptual and affective evaluative components.

  7. Motion Perception and Manual Control Performance During Passive Tilt and Translation Following Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Gilles; Wood, Scott J.

    2010-01-01

    This joint ESA-NASA study is examining changes in motion perception following Space Shuttle flights and the operational implications of post-flight tilt-translation ambiguity for manual control performance. Vibrotactile feedback of tilt orientation is also being evaluated as a countermeasure to improve performance during a closed-loop nulling task. METHODS. Data has been collected on 5 astronaut subjects during 3 preflight sessions and during the first 8 days after Shuttle landings. Variable radius centrifugation (216 deg/s) combined with body translation (12-22 cm, peak-to-peak) is utilized to elicit roll-tilt perception (equivalent to 20 deg, peak-to-peak). A forward-backward moving sled (24-390 cm, peak-to-peak) with or without chair tilting in pitch is utilized to elicit pitch tilt perception (equivalent to 20 deg, peak-to-peak). These combinations are elicited at 0.15, 0.3, and 0.6 Hz for evaluating the effect of motion frequency on tilt-translation ambiguity. In both devices, a closed-loop nulling task is also performed during pseudorandom motion with and without vibrotactile feedback of tilt. All tests are performed in complete darkness. PRELIMINARY RESULTS. Data collection is currently ongoing. Results to date suggest there is a trend for translation motion perception to be increased at the low and medium frequencies on landing day compared to pre-flight. Manual control performance is improved with vibrotactile feedback. DISCUSSION. The results of this study indicate that post-flight recovery of motion perception and manual control performance is complete within 8 days following short-duration space missions. Vibrotactile feedback of tilt improves manual control performance both before and after flight.

  8. Neural adaptation in pSTS correlates with perceptual aftereffects to biological motion and with autistic traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, Steven M; van Boxtel, Jeroen J A; Monti, Martin M; Chiang, Jeffrey N; Lu, Hongjing

    2016-08-01

    The adaptive nature of biological motion perception has been documented in behavioral studies, with research showing that prolonged viewing of an action can bias judgments of subsequent actions towards the opposite of its attributes. However, the neural mechanisms underlying action adaptation aftereffects remain unknown. We examined adaptation-induced changes in brain responses to an ambiguous action after adapting to walking or running actions within two bilateral regions of interest: 1) human middle temporal area (hMT+), a lower-level motion-sensitive region of cortex, and 2) posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS), a higher-level action-selective area. We found a significant correlation between neural adaptation strength in right pSTS and perceptual aftereffects to biological motion measured behaviorally, but not in hMT+. The magnitude of neural adaptation in right pSTS was also strongly correlated with individual differences in the degree of autistic traits. Participants with more autistic traits exhibited less adaptation-induced modulations of brain responses in right pSTS and correspondingly weaker perceptual aftereffects. These results suggest a direct link between perceptual aftereffects and adaptation of neural populations in right pSTS after prolonged viewing of a biological motion stimulus, and highlight the potential importance of this brain region for understanding differences in social-cognitive processing along the autistic spectrum. PMID:27164327

  9. Motion planning and perception : integration on humanoid robots

    OpenAIRE

    Nakhaei, Alireza

    2009-01-01

    Le chapitre 1 est pour l'essentiel une brève introduction générale qui donne le contexte générale de la planification et présente l'organisation du document dans son ensemble et quelques uns des points clés retenus : robot humanoïde, environnement non statique, perception par vision artificielle, et représentation de cet environnement par grilles d'occupation. Dans le chapitre 2, après une revue de littérature bien menée, l'auteur propose de considérer les points de repère de l'environnement ...

  10. Tessellated structure from motion for midrange perception and tactical planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Minbo; Yilma, Samson

    2009-05-01

    A typical structure from motion (SFM) technique is to construct 3-D structures from the observation of the motions of salient features tracked over time. Although the sparse feature-based SFM provides additional solutions to robotic platforms as a tool to augment navigation performance, the technique often fails to produce dense 3-D structures due to the sparseness that is introduced during the feature selection and matching processes. For midrange sensing and tactical planning, it is important to have a dense map that is able to provide not only 3-D coordinates of features, but also clustered terrain information around the features for better thematic representation of the scene. In order to overcome the shortfalls embedded in the sparse feature-based SFM, we propose an approach that uses Voronoi decomposition with an equidistance-based triangulation that is applied to each of segmented and classified regions. The set of the circumcenters of the circum-hyperspheres used in the triangulation is formed with the feature points extracted from the SFM processing. We also apply flat surface detection to find traversable surface for a robotic vehicle to be able to maneuver safely on.

  11. Global Motion Perception in 2-Year-Old Children: A Method for Psychophysical Assessment and Relationships With Clinical Measures of Visual Function

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Tzu-Ying; Jacobs, Robert J; Anstice, Nicola S.; Paudel, Nabin; Harding, Jane E; Thompson, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Global motion perception is susceptible to abnormal development and may provide a sensitive measure of visual cortex function. We describe and validate a technique for measuring global motion perception in 2-year-old children, and relate global motion perception to acuity and stereopsis.

  12. Biological Motion Preference in Humans at Birth: Role of Dynamic and Configural Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardi, Lara; Regolin, Lucia; Simion, Francesca

    2011-01-01

    The present study addresses the hypothesis that detection of biological motion is an intrinsic capacity of the visual system guided by a non-species-specific predisposition for the pattern of vertebrate movement and investigates the role of global vs. local information in biological motion detection. Two-day-old babies exposed to a biological…

  13. Perception of motion and position relative to the earth. An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedry, F E

    1992-05-22

    visual information will change the dynamics of spatial orientation perception. My discussion has been limited to consideration of the vestibular system, as though the canal and otolith systems completely controlled the dynamics of spatial orientation perceptions. Obviously other partners in the dynamics of postural control, including vision, proprioception, and expectation, must be included in this challenging field of research. Dedication to stereotyped ideas about objectivity in the 20th century has hindered advancement of knowledge on the dynamics of spatial orientation perception relative to rate of progress achieved by several scientists of the 18th and 19th centuries, who provided word pictures of perceived motions and tilts along with descriptions of the motions that engendered the pictures.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:1599152

  14. Biological Nanomotors with a Revolution, Linear, or Rotation Motion Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Peixuan; Noji, Hiroyuki; Yengo, Christopher M; Zhao, Zhengyi; Grainge, Ian

    2016-03-01

    The ubiquitous biological nanomotors were classified into two categories in the past: linear and rotation motors. In 2013, a third type of biomotor, revolution without rotation (http://rnanano.osu.edu/movie.html), was discovered and found to be widespread among bacteria, eukaryotic viruses, and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) bacteriophages. This review focuses on recent findings about various aspects of motors, including chirality, stoichiometry, channel size, entropy, conformational change, and energy usage rate, in a variety of well-studied motors, including FoF1 ATPase, helicases, viral dsDNA-packaging motors, bacterial chromosome translocases, myosin, kinesin, and dynein. In particular, dsDNA translocases are used to illustrate how these features relate to the motion mechanism and how nature elegantly evolved a revolution mechanism to avoid coiling and tangling during lengthy dsDNA genome transportation in cell division. Motor chirality and channel size are two factors that distinguish rotation motors from revolution motors. Rotation motors use right-handed channels to drive the right-handed dsDNA, similar to the way a nut drives the bolt with threads in same orientation; revolution motors use left-handed motor channels to revolve the right-handed dsDNA. Rotation motors use small channels (3 nm) with room for the bolt to revolve. Binding and hydrolysis of ATP are linked to different conformational entropy changes in the motor that lead to altered affinity for the substrate and allow work to be done, for example, helicase unwinding of DNA or translocase directional movement of DNA. PMID:26819321

  15. Self-Motion Perception: Assessment by Real-Time Computer Generated Animations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Donald E.

    1999-01-01

    Our overall goal is to develop materials and procedures for assessing vestibular contributions to spatial cognition. The specific objective of the research described in this paper is to evaluate computer-generated animations as potential tools for studying self-orientation and self-motion perception. Specific questions addressed in this study included the following. First, does a non- verbal perceptual reporting procedure using real-time animations improve assessment of spatial orientation? Are reports reliable? Second, do reports confirm expectations based on stimuli to vestibular apparatus? Third, can reliable reports be obtained when self-motion description vocabulary training is omitted?

  16. Perceptions of the Learning Environment and Associations with Cognitive Achievement among Gifted Biology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rita, Ronald D.; Martin-Dunlop, Catherine S.

    2011-01-01

    This study assessed the perceptions of 146 gifted and 115 non-gifted high school biology students and investigated associations between student perceptions and cognitive achievement. The What Is Happening In this Class? (WIHIC) was used to assess perceptions of actual and preferred learning environments. Data indicated that all students preferred…

  17. Motion Perception: A review of developmental changes and the role of early visual experience

    OpenAIRE

    Bat-Sheva eHadad; Sivan eSchwartz; Daphne eMaurer; Lewis, Terri L.

    2015-01-01

    Significant controversies have arisen over the developmental trajectory for the perception of global motion. Studies diverge on the age at which it becomes adult-like, with estimates ranging from as young as 3 years to as old as 16. In this article, we review these apparently conflicting results and suggest a potentially unifying hypothesis that may also account for the contradictory literature in neurodevelopmental disorders, such as Autism Spectrum Disorder. We also discuss the extent to wh...

  18. Rocking or rolling--perception of ambiguous motion after returning from space.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Clément

    Full Text Available The central nervous system must resolve the ambiguity of inertial motion sensory cues in order to derive an accurate representation of spatial orientation. Adaptive changes during spaceflight in how the brain integrates vestibular cues with other sensory information can lead to impaired movement coordination, vertigo, spatial disorientation, and perceptual illusions after return to Earth. The purpose of this study was to compare tilt and translation motion perception in astronauts before and after returning from spaceflight. We hypothesized that these stimuli would be the most ambiguous in the low-frequency range (i.e., at about 0.3 Hz where the linear acceleration can be interpreted either as a translation or as a tilt relative to gravity. Verbal reports were obtained in eleven astronauts tested using a motion-based tilt-translation device and a variable radius centrifuge before and after flying for two weeks on board the Space Shuttle. Consistent with previous studies, roll tilt perception was overestimated shortly after spaceflight and then recovered with 1-2 days. During dynamic linear acceleration (0.15-0.6 Hz, ±1.7 m/s2 perception of translation was also overestimated immediately after flight. Recovery to baseline was observed after 2 days for lateral translation and 8 days for fore-aft translation. These results suggest that there was a shift in the frequency dynamic of tilt-translation motion perception after adaptation to weightlessness. These results have implications for manual control during landing of a space vehicle after exposure to microgravity, as it will be the case for human asteroid and Mars missions.

  19. Motion planning in unstructured road for intelligent vehicle with long-range perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chaoxia; Wang, Yanqing; Yang, Jingyu; Liu, Hanxiang

    2011-10-01

    We present a novel motion planning method for intelligent vehicle with long-range perception under the uncertain constraints of unstructured road boundary on the basis of obstacle roadside fusion strategy and beam curvature method . Not only does this method inherit the advantages of reliability, smoothness and speediness from LCM, but also it can produce more reasonable path than traditional LCM does by virtue of the global information acquired by long-range sensors.

  20. Rocking or rolling--perception of ambiguous motion after returning from space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, Gilles; Wood, Scott J

    2014-01-01

    The central nervous system must resolve the ambiguity of inertial motion sensory cues in order to derive an accurate representation of spatial orientation. Adaptive changes during spaceflight in how the brain integrates vestibular cues with other sensory information can lead to impaired movement coordination, vertigo, spatial disorientation, and perceptual illusions after return to Earth. The purpose of this study was to compare tilt and translation motion perception in astronauts before and after returning from spaceflight. We hypothesized that these stimuli would be the most ambiguous in the low-frequency range (i.e., at about 0.3 Hz) where the linear acceleration can be interpreted either as a translation or as a tilt relative to gravity. Verbal reports were obtained in eleven astronauts tested using a motion-based tilt-translation device and a variable radius centrifuge before and after flying for two weeks on board the Space Shuttle. Consistent with previous studies, roll tilt perception was overestimated shortly after spaceflight and then recovered with 1-2 days. During dynamic linear acceleration (0.15-0.6 Hz, ±1.7 m/s2) perception of translation was also overestimated immediately after flight. Recovery to baseline was observed after 2 days for lateral translation and 8 days for fore-aft translation. These results suggest that there was a shift in the frequency dynamic of tilt-translation motion perception after adaptation to weightlessness. These results have implications for manual control during landing of a space vehicle after exposure to microgravity, as it will be the case for human asteroid and Mars missions. PMID:25354042

  1. Rocking or Rolling – Perception of Ambiguous Motion after Returning from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, Gilles; Wood, Scott J.

    2014-01-01

    The central nervous system must resolve the ambiguity of inertial motion sensory cues in order to derive an accurate representation of spatial orientation. Adaptive changes during spaceflight in how the brain integrates vestibular cues with other sensory information can lead to impaired movement coordination, vertigo, spatial disorientation, and perceptual illusions after return to Earth. The purpose of this study was to compare tilt and translation motion perception in astronauts before and after returning from spaceflight. We hypothesized that these stimuli would be the most ambiguous in the low-frequency range (i.e., at about 0.3 Hz) where the linear acceleration can be interpreted either as a translation or as a tilt relative to gravity. Verbal reports were obtained in eleven astronauts tested using a motion-based tilt-translation device and a variable radius centrifuge before and after flying for two weeks on board the Space Shuttle. Consistent with previous studies, roll tilt perception was overestimated shortly after spaceflight and then recovered with 1–2 days. During dynamic linear acceleration (0.15–0.6 Hz, ±1.7 m/s2) perception of translation was also overestimated immediately after flight. Recovery to baseline was observed after 2 days for lateral translation and 8 days for fore–aft translation. These results suggest that there was a shift in the frequency dynamic of tilt-translation motion perception after adaptation to weightlessness. These results have implications for manual control during landing of a space vehicle after exposure to microgravity, as it will be the case for human asteroid and Mars missions. PMID:25354042

  2. Suppression and Reversal of Motion Perception around the Time of the Saccade

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    Matthias Niemeier

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We make fast, “saccadic” eye movements to capture finely resolved foveal snapshots of the world but these saccades cause motion artefacts. The artefacts go unnoticed, perhaps because the brain suppresses them through subcortical oculomotor signals feeding back into visual cortex. Opposing views, however, claim that passive mechanisms suffice: saccadic shearing forces might render the retina insensitive to the artefacts or post-saccadic snapshots might mask them before they enter consciousness. Crucially, only active suppression could explain perceptual changes that precede saccades but existing evidence for presaccadic misperception are ill-suited for addressing this issue: Previous studies have found misperceptions of space for objects briefly flashed before saccades, but perhaps only because observers confused the timing of flashes and saccades before they could be tested (‘postdiction’, and presaccadic motion perception might have appeared to decline because motion stimuli persisted past eye movement onset. Here we addressed these concerns using briefly flashed two-frame animations (50 ms to probe people’s motion sensitivity during and around saccades. We found that sensitivity declined before saccade onset, even when the probe appeared entirely outside the saccade, and this sensitivity decline was present for motion in every direction relative to saccade, ruling out problems with postdiction. Intriguingly, brief periods during the saccade produced negative sensitivity as if motion was reversed, arguably due to postsaccadic enhancement. These data suggest that motion perception is minimized during saccades through active suppression, complementing neurophysiological findings of colliculo-pulvinar projections that suppress the cortical middle temporal area around the time of the saccade.

  3. In-Service Teachers Perception about Their Competencies in Delivery of Biology Lessons

    OpenAIRE

    Ms. Zakia Khatoon Ph.D Scholar; Dr. Muhammad Tayyab Alam; Dr. Maqsud Alam Bukhari; Muhammad Mushtaq

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores in-service teacher perception of their competencies in delivery of biology lessons at secondary level.The objectives of the study were to examine the perception of biology teachers about their competencies in lesson delivery, to make analysis of their competencies at four formal steps as mentioned by Herbart (1776-1841), and to suggest remedial steps for improvement of present teaching competencies of biology teachers. The study is significant for biology teachers, curricu...

  4. Cross-modal distortion of time perception: demerging the effects of observed and performed motion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Hass

    Full Text Available Temporal information is often contained in multi-sensory stimuli, but it is currently unknown how the brain combines e.g. visual and auditory cues into a coherent percept of time. The existing studies of cross-modal time perception mainly support the "modality appropriateness hypothesis", i.e. the domination of auditory temporal cues over visual ones because of the higher precision of audition for time perception. However, these studies suffer from methodical problems and conflicting results. We introduce a novel experimental paradigm to examine cross-modal time perception by combining an auditory time perception task with a visually guided motor task, requiring participants to follow an elliptic movement on a screen with a robotic manipulandum. We find that subjective duration is distorted according to the speed of visually observed movement: The faster the visual motion, the longer the perceived duration. In contrast, the actual execution of the arm movement does not contribute to this effect, but impairs discrimination performance by dual-task interference. We also show that additional training of the motor task attenuates the interference, but does not affect the distortion of subjective duration. The study demonstrates direct influence of visual motion on auditory temporal representations, which is independent of attentional modulation. At the same time, it provides causal support for the notion that time perception and continuous motor timing rely on separate mechanisms, a proposal that was formerly supported by correlational evidence only. The results constitute a counterexample to the modality appropriateness hypothesis and are best explained by Bayesian integration of modality-specific temporal information into a centralized "temporal hub".

  5. Synesthesia for Color Is Linked to Improved Color Perception but Reduced Motion Perception

    OpenAIRE

    Banissy, M. J.; Tester, V.; Muggleton, N. G.; Janik, A. B.; Davenport, A.; Franklin, A.; Walsh, V; Ward, J.

    2013-01-01

    Synesthesia is a rare condition in which one property of a stimulus (e.g., shape) triggers a secondary percept (e.g., color) not typically associated with the first. Work on synesthesia has predominantly focused on confirming the authenticity of synesthetic experience, but much less research has been conducted to examine the extent to which synesthesia is linked to broader perceptual differences. In the research reported here, we examined whether synesthesia is associated with differences in ...

  6. Tilt and Translation Motion Perception during Pitch Tilt with Visual Surround Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Brita M.; Harm, Deborah L.; Reschke, Millard F.; Wood, Scott J.

    2006-01-01

    The central nervous system must resolve the ambiguity of inertial motion sensory cues in order to derive an accurate representation of spatial orientation. Previous studies suggest that multisensory integration is critical for discriminating linear accelerations arising from tilt and translation head motion. Visual input is especially important at low frequencies where canal input is declining. The NASA Tilt Translation Device (TTD) was designed to recreate postflight orientation disturbances by exposing subjects to matching tilt self motion with conflicting visual surround translation. Previous studies have demonstrated that brief exposures to pitch tilt with foreaft visual surround translation produced changes in compensatory vertical eye movement responses, postural equilibrium, and motion sickness symptoms. Adaptation appeared greatest with visual scene motion leading (versus lagging) the tilt motion, and the adaptation time constant appeared to be approximately 30 min. The purpose of this study was to compare motion perception when the visual surround translation was inphase versus outofphase with pitch tilt. The inphase stimulus presented visual surround motion one would experience if the linear acceleration was due to foreaft self translation within a stationary surround, while the outofphase stimulus had the visual scene motion leading the tilt by 90 deg as previously used. The tilt stimuli in these conditions were asymmetrical, ranging from an upright orientation to 10 deg pitch back. Another objective of the study was to compare motion perception with the inphase stimulus when the tilts were asymmetrical relative to upright (0 to 10 deg back) versus symmetrical (10 deg forward to 10 deg back). Twelve subjects (6M, 6F, 22-55 yrs) were tested during 3 sessions separated by at least one week. During each of the three sessions (out-of-phase asymmetrical, in-phase asymmetrical, inphase symmetrical), subjects were exposed to visual surround translation

  7. Social inclusion enhances biological motion processing: A functional near-infrared spectroscopy study

    OpenAIRE

    Bolling, Danielle Z.; Pelphrey, Kevin A.; Kaiser, Martha D.

    2012-01-01

    Humans are especially tuned to the movements of other people. Neural correlates of this social attunement have been proposed to lie in and around the right posterior superior temporal sulcus (STS) region, which robustly responds to biological motion in contrast to a variety of non-biological motions. This response persists even when no form information is provided, as in point-light displays (PLDs). The aim of the current study was to assess the ability of functional near-infrared spectroscop...

  8. The Perception of Prototypical Motion: Synchronization Is Enhanced with Quantitatively Morphed Gestures of Musical Conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollner, Clemens; Deconinck, Frederik J. A.; Parkinson, Jim; Hove, Michael J.; Keller, Peter E.

    2012-01-01

    Aesthetic theories have long suggested perceptual advantages for prototypical exemplars of a given class of objects or events. Empirical evidence confirmed that morphed (quantitatively averaged) human faces, musical interpretations, and human voices are preferred over most individual ones. In this study, biological human motion was morphed and…

  9. Perception of linear horizontal self-motion induced by peripheral vision /linearvection/ - Basic characteristics and visual-vestibular interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthoz, A.; Pavard, B.; Young, L. R.

    1975-01-01

    The basic characteristics of the sensation of linear horizontal motion have been studied. Objective linear motion was induced by means of a moving cart. Visually induced linear motion perception (linearvection) was obtained by projection of moving images at the periphery of the visual field. Image velocity and luminance thresholds for the appearance of linearvection have been measured and are in the range of those for image motion detection (without sensation of self motion) by the visual system. Latencies of onset are around 1 sec and short term adaptation has been shown. The dynamic range of the visual analyzer as judged by frequency analysis is lower than the vestibular analyzer. Conflicting situations in which visual cues contradict vestibular and other proprioceptive cues show, in the case of linearvection a dominance of vision which supports the idea of an essential although not independent role of vision in self motion perception.

  10. Physical and biological dosimetry for risk perception in radioprotection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ademir Amaral

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The increase in ionizing radiation (IR applications, especially nuclear, has been followed by the growth of public concern for the potential associated risks. The public’s perception of such risks is often based on the philosophy that IR is harmful at any exposure level. On the other hand, although radiation workers have knowledge about the nature of IR and its potential health effects, the relationship between absorbed dose and risk is not well understood, principally for low doses. This report presents an overview of physical and biological dosimetry as complementary methodologies, as well as their possible contribution for improving risk perception in radioprotection.O crescente aumento das aplicações das radiações ionizantes, em particular as radiações de origem nuclear, tem sido acompanhado pelo aumento do interesse público em relação aos riscos associados a essas aplicações. A percepção de tais riscos por parte da população é freqüentemente baseada na filosofia que a radiação ionizante é perigosa independentemente dos níveis de exposição. Por outro lado, apesar dos trabalhadores ocupacionalmente expostos terem conhecimento da natureza da IR e seus possíveis efeitos á saúde, a relação entre dose absorvida e risco não é bem entendida por estes, em particular para baixos valores de dose. Este artigo resume aspectos da dosimetria física e biológica como metodologias complementares na melhoria da percepção dos riscos em radioproteção.

  11. Do perceptual biases emerge early or late in visual processing? Decision-biases in motion perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboni, Elisa; Ledgeway, Timothy; McGraw, Paul V; Schluppeck, Denis

    2016-06-29

    Visual perception is strongly influenced by contextual information. A good example is reference repulsion, where subjective reports about the direction of motion of a stimulus are significantly biased by the presence of an explicit reference. These perceptual biases could arise early, during sensory encoding, or alternatively, they may reflect decision-related processes occurring relatively late in the task sequence. To separate these two competing possibilities, we asked (human) subjects to perform a fine motion-discrimination task and then estimate the direction of motion in the presence or absence of an oriented reference line. When subjects performed the discrimination task with the reference, but subsequently estimated motion direction in its absence, direction estimates were unbiased. However, when subjects viewed the same stimuli but performed the estimation task only, with the orientation of the reference line jittered on every trial, the directions estimated by subjects were biased and yoked to the orientation of the shifted reference line. These results show that judgements made relative to a reference are subject to late, decision-related biases A model in which information about motion is integrated with that of an explicit reference cue, resulting in a late, decision-related re-weighting of the sensory representation, can account for these results. PMID:27335413

  12. Color improves speed of processing but not perception in a motion illusion

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    Carolyn J Perry

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available When two superimposed surfaces of dots move in different directions, the perceived directions are shifted away from each other. This perceptual illusion has been termed direction repulsion and is thought to be due to mutual inhibition between the representations of the two directions. It has further been shown that a speed difference between the two surfaces attenuates direction repulsion. As speed and direction are both necessary components of representing motion, the reduction in direction repulsion can be attributed to the additional motion information strengthening the representations of the two directions and thus reducing the mutual inhibition. We tested whether bottom-up attention and top-down task demands, in the form of color differences between the two surfaces, would also enhance motion processing, reducing direction repulsion. We found that the addition of color differences did not improve direction discrimination and reduce direction repulsion. However, we did find that adding a color difference improved performance on the task. We hypothesized that the performance differences were due to the limited presentation time of the stimuli. We tested this in a follow-up experiment where we varied the time of presentation to determine the duration needed to successfully perform the task with and without the color difference. As we expected, the addition of color reduced the amount of time needed to process and encode both directions of motion. Thus we find a dissociation between the effects of attention on the speed of processing and conscious perception. We propose 4 potential mechanisms wherein color speeds figure-ground segmentation of an object, attentional switching between objects, direction discrimination and/or the accumulation of motion information for decision-making, without affecting conscious perception. Potential neural bases are also explored.

  13. Motion as a source of environmental information: A fresh view on biological motion computation by tiny brains

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    Martin Egelhaaf

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite their miniature brains insects, such as flies, bees and wasps, are able to navigate by highly aerobatic flight maneuvers in cluttered environments. They rely on spatial information that is contained in the retinal motion patterns induced on the eyes while moving around (‘optic flow’ to accomplish their extraordinary performance. Thereby, they employ an active flight and gaze strategy that separates rapid saccade-like turns from translatory flight phases where the gaze direction is kept largely constant. This behavioral strategy facilitates the processing of environmental information, because information about the distance of the animal to objects in the environment is only contained in the optic flow generated by translatory motion. However, motion detectors as are widespread in biological systems do not represent veridically the velocity of the optic flow vectors, but also reflect textural information about the environment. This characteristic has often been regarded as a deficiency of a biological motion detection mechanism. In contrast, we conclude from analyses challenging insect movement detectors with image flow as generated during translatory locomotion through cluttered natural environments that this mechanism represents the contours of nearby objects. Contrast borders are a main carrier of functionally relevant object information in artificial and natural sceneries. The motion detection system thus segregates in a computationally parsimonious way the environment into behaviorally relevant nearby objects and – in many behavioral contexts – less relevant distant structures. Hence, by making use of an active flight and gaze strategy, insects are capable of performing extraordinarily well even with a computationally simple motion detection mechanism.

  14. Student Perception of Relevance of Biology Content to Everyday Life: A Study in Higher Education Biology Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himschoot, Agnes Rose

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed method case study was to examine the effects of methods of instruction on students' perception of relevance in higher education non-biology majors' courses. Nearly ninety percent of all students in a liberal arts college are required to take a general biology course. It is proposed that for many of those students, this is…

  15. Violating instructed human agency: An fMRI study on ocular tracking of biological and nonbiological motion stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gertz, Hanna; Hilger, Maximilian; Hegele, Mathias; Fiehler, Katja

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that beliefs about the human origin of a stimulus are capable of modulating the coupling of perception and action. Such beliefs can be based on top-down recognition of the identity of an actor or bottom-up observation of the behavior of the stimulus. Instructed human agency has been shown to lead to superior tracking performance of a moving dot as compared to instructed computer agency, especially when the dot followed a biological velocity profile and thus matched the predicted movement, whereas a violation of instructed human agency by a nonbiological dot motion impaired oculomotor tracking (Zwickel et al., 2012). This suggests that the instructed agency biases the selection of predictive models on the movement trajectory of the dot motion. The aim of the present fMRI study was to examine the neural correlates of top-down and bottom-up modulations of perception-action couplings by manipulating the instructed agency (human action vs. computer-generated action) and the observable behavior of the stimulus (biological vs. nonbiological velocity profile). To this end, participants performed an oculomotor tracking task in an MRI environment. Oculomotor tracking activated areas of the eye movement network. A right-hemisphere occipito-temporal cluster comprising the motion-sensitive area V5 showed a preference for the biological as compared to the nonbiological velocity profile. Importantly, a mismatch between instructed human agency and a nonbiological velocity profile primarily activated medial-frontal areas comprising the frontal pole, the paracingulate gyrus, and the anterior cingulate gyrus, as well as the cerebellum and the supplementary eye field as part of the eye movement network. This mismatch effect was specific to the instructed human agency and did not occur in conditions with a mismatch between instructed computer agency and a biological velocity profile. Our results support the hypothesis that humans activate a specific

  16. Age differences in visual-auditory self-motion perception during a simulated driving task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eRamkhalawansingh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests that visual-auditory cue integration may change as a function of age such that integration is heightened among older adults. Our goal was to determine whether these changes in multisensory integration are also observed in the context of self-motion perception under realistic task constraints. Thus, we developed a simulated driving paradigm in which we provided older and younger adults with visual motion cues (i.e. optic flow and systematically manipulated the presence or absence of congruent auditory cues to self-motion (i.e. engine, tire, and wind sounds. Results demonstrated that the presence or absence of congruent auditory input had different effects on older and younger adults. Both age groups demonstrated a reduction in speed variability when auditory cues were present compared to when they were absent, but older adults demonstrated a proportionally greater reduction in speed variability under combined sensory conditions. These results are consistent with evidence indicating that multisensory integration is heightened in older adults. Importantly, this study is the first to provide evidence to suggest that age differences in multisensory integration may generalize from simple stimulus detection tasks to the integration of the more complex and dynamic visual and auditory cues that are experienced during self-motion.

  17. Sensory versus motor loci for integration of multiple motion signals in smooth pursuit eye movements and human motion perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yu-Qiong; Lisberger, Stephen G

    2011-08-01

    We have investigated how visual motion signals are integrated for smooth pursuit eye movements by measuring the initiation of pursuit in monkeys for pairs of moving stimuli of the same or differing luminance. The initiation of pursuit for pairs of stimuli of the same luminance could be accounted for as a vector average of the responses to the two stimuli singly. When stimuli comprised two superimposed patches of moving dot textures, the brighter stimulus suppressed the inputs from the dimmer stimulus, so that the initiation of pursuit became winner-take-all when the luminance ratio of the two stimuli was 8 or greater. The dominance of the brighter stimulus could be not attributed to either the latency difference or the ratio of the eye accelerations for the bright and dim stimuli presented singly. When stimuli comprised either spot targets or two patches of dots moving across separate locations in the visual field, the brighter stimulus had a much weaker suppressive influence; the initiation of pursuit could be accounted for by nearly equal vector averaging of the responses to the two stimuli singly. The suppressive effects of the brighter stimulus also appeared in human perceptual judgments, but again only for superimposed stimuli. We conclude that one locus of the interaction of two moving visual stimuli is shared by perception and action and resides in local inhibitory connections in the visual cortex. A second locus resides deeper in sensory-motor processing and may be more closely related to action selection than to stimulus selection. PMID:21593392

  18. Turkish secondary education students' perceptions of their classroom learning environment and their attitude towards Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Telli, S.; Cakiroglu, J.; den Brok, P.

    2006-01-01

    The domain of learning environments research has produced many promising findings, leading to an enhancement of the teaching and learning process in many countries. However, there have been a limited number of studies in this field in Turkey. For that reason, the purpose of the present study was to examine Turkish high school students’ perceptions of their classroom environment in biology and to investigate relationships between these perceptions and students’ attitudes toward biology. Second...

  19. Lesions to right posterior parietal cortex impair visual depth perception from disparity but not motion cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, David A.; Humphreys, Glyn W.; Welchman, Andrew E.

    2016-01-01

    The posterior parietal cortex (PPC) is understood to be active when observers perceive three-dimensional (3D) structure. However, it is not clear how central this activity is in the construction of 3D spatial representations. Here, we examine whether PPC is essential for two aspects of visual depth perception by testing patients with lesions affecting this region. First, we measured subjects' ability to discriminate depth structure in various 3D surfaces and objects using binocular disparity. Patients with lesions to right PPC (N = 3) exhibited marked perceptual deficits on these tasks, whereas those with left hemisphere lesions (N = 2) were able to reliably discriminate depth as accurately as control subjects. Second, we presented an ambiguous 3D stimulus defined by structure from motion to determine whether PPC lesions influence the rate of bistable perceptual alternations. Patients' percept durations for the 3D stimulus were generally within a normal range, although the two patients with bilateral PPC lesions showed the fastest perceptual alternation rates in our sample. Intermittent stimulus presentation reduced the reversal rate similarly across subjects. Together, the results suggest that PPC plays a causal role in both inferring and maintaining the perception of 3D structure with stereopsis supported primarily by the right hemisphere, but do not lend support to the view that PPC is a critical contributor to bistable perceptual alternations. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Vision in our three-dimensional world’. PMID:27269606

  20. What is the perception of biological risk by undergraduate nursing students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Arroyo, Mª Carmen; Puig-Llobet, Montserrat; Falco-Pegueroles, Anna; Lluch-Canut, Maria Teresa; García, Irma Casas; Roldán-Merino, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to analyze undergraduate nursing students' perception of biological risk and its relationship with their prior practical training. Method: a descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted among undergraduate nursing students enrolled in clinical practice courses in the academic year 2013-2014 at the School of Nursing at the University of Barcelona. Variables: sociodemographic variables, employment, training, clinical experience and other variables related to the assessment of perceived biological risk were collected. Both a newly developed tool and the Dimensional Assessment of Risk Perception at the worker level scale (Escala de Evaluación Dimensional del Riesgo Percibido por el Trabajador, EDRP-T) were used. Statistical analysis: descriptive and univariate analysis were used to identify differences between the perception of biological risk of the EDRP-T scale items and sociodemographic variables. Results: students without prior practical training had weaker perceptions of biological risk compared to students with prior practical training (p=0.05 and p=0.04, respectively). Weaker perceptions of biological risk were found among students with prior work experience. Conclusion: practical training and work experience influence the perception of biological risk among nursing students. PMID:27384468

  1. What is the perception of biological risk by undergraduate nursing students?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Carmen Moreno-Arroyo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: to analyze undergraduate nursing students' perception of biological risk and its relationship with their prior practical training. Method: a descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted among undergraduate nursing students enrolled in clinical practice courses in the academic year 2013-2014 at the School of Nursing at the University of Barcelona. Variables: sociodemographic variables, employment, training, clinical experience and other variables related to the assessment of perceived biological risk were collected. Both a newly developed tool and the Dimensional Assessment of Risk Perception at the worker level scale (Escala de Evaluación Dimensional del Riesgo Percibido por el Trabajador, EDRP-T were used. Statistical analysis: descriptive and univariate analysis were used to identify differences between the perception of biological risk of the EDRP-T scale items and sociodemographic variables. Results: students without prior practical training had weaker perceptions of biological risk compared to students with prior practical training (p=0.05 and p=0.04, respectively. Weaker perceptions of biological risk were found among students with prior work experience. Conclusion: practical training and work experience influence the perception of biological risk among nursing students.

  2. Similar effects of feature-based attention on motion perception and pursuit eye movements at different levels of awareness

    OpenAIRE

    Spering, Miriam; Carrasco, Marisa

    2012-01-01

    Feature-based attention enhances visual processing and improves perception, even for visual features that we are not aware of. Does feature-based attention also modulate motor behavior in response to visual information that does or does not reach awareness? Here we compare the effect of feature-based attention on motion perception and smooth pursuit eye movements in response to moving dichoptic plaids–stimuli composed of two orthogonally-drifting gratings, presented separately to each eye–in ...

  3. Torsional eye movements are facilitated during perception of self-motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thilo, K V; Probst, T; Bronstein, A M; Ito, Y; Gresty, M A

    1999-06-01

    Visual motion in the roll plane elicits torsional optokinetic nystagmus (tOKN) with intermittent periods of illusory, contradirectional self-motion (circularvection, CV). The CV may also have a component of whole-body tilt if the axis of stimulus rotation is not aligned with the direction of gravity. We report how the characteristics of tOKN are affected by the presence of CV. Subjects had their eye movements recorded by VOG whilst viewing a full-field stimulus rotating at 30-60 degrees/s about their naso-occipital axis. They were tested in upright and supine posture and signalled the presence-absence of CV with a pushbutton. In both postures, during CV, tOKN slow-phase gain was found to be enhanced and average torsional eye position shifted in the direction opposite to stimulus rotation. When supine, slow-phase gain was greater than when upright both during the perception of object-motion and during CV. The effects may be explained in terms of a relegation of restraining vestibular input to the torsional oculomotor system during CV and illusory tilt. PMID:10422712

  4. Recognizing biological motion and emotions from point-light displays in autism spectrum disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelien Nackaerts

    Full Text Available One of the main characteristics of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD are problems with social interaction and communication. Here, we explored ASD-related alterations in 'reading' body language of other humans. Accuracy and reaction times were assessed from two observational tasks involving the recognition of 'biological motion' and 'emotions' from point-light displays (PLDs. Eye movements were recorded during the completion of the tests. Results indicated that typically developed-participants were more accurate than ASD-subjects in recognizing biological motion or emotions from PLDs. No accuracy differences were revealed on two control-tasks (involving the indication of color-changes in the moving point-lights. Group differences in reaction times existed on all tasks, but effect sizes were higher for the biological and emotion recognition tasks. Biological motion recognition abilities were related to a person's ability to recognize emotions from PLDs. However, ASD-related atypicalities in emotion recognition could not entirely be attributed to more basic deficits in biological motion recognition, suggesting an additional ASD-specific deficit in recognizing the emotional dimension of the point light displays. Eye movements were assessed during the completion of tasks and results indicated that ASD-participants generally produced more saccades and shorter fixation-durations compared to the control-group. However, especially for emotion recognition, these altered eye movements were associated with reductions in task-performance.

  5. Directional asymmetries and age effects in human self-motion perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roditi, Rachel E; Crane, Benjamin T

    2012-06-01

    Directional asymmetries in vestibular reflexes have aided the diagnosis of vestibular lesions; however, potential asymmetries in vestibular perception have not been well defined. This investigation sought to measure potential asymmetries in human vestibular perception. Vestibular perception thresholds were measured in 24 healthy human subjects between the ages of 21 and 68 years. Stimuli consisted of a single cycle of sinusoidal acceleration in a single direction lasting 1 or 2 s (1 or 0.5 Hz), delivered in sway (left-right), surge (forward-backward), heave (up-down), or yaw rotation. Subject identified self-motion directions were analyzed using a forced choice technique, which permitted thresholds to be independently determined for each direction. Non-motion stimuli were presented to measure possible response bias. A significant directional asymmetry in the dynamic response occurred in 27% of conditions tested within subjects, and in at least one type of motion in 92% of subjects. Directional asymmetries were usually consistent when retested in the same subject but did not occur consistently in one direction across the population with the exception of heave at 0.5 Hz. Responses during null stimuli presentation suggested that asymmetries were not due to biased guessing. Multiple models were applied and compared to determine if sensitivities were direction specific. Using Akaike information criterion, it was found that the model with direction specific sensitivities better described the data in 86% of runs when compared with a model that used the same sensitivity for both directions. Mean thresholds for yaw were 1.3±0.9°/s at 0.5 Hz and 0.9±0.7°/s at 1 Hz and were independent of age. Thresholds for surge and sway were 1.7±0.8 cm/s at 0.5 Hz and 0.7±0.3 cm/s at 1.0 Hz for subjects 50 years old. Heave thresholds were higher and were independent of age. PMID:22402987

  6. Study of the perception of visual motion in amblyopia using functional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To research the pathophysiological mechanism of anisometropic and strabismic amblyopia through observation of the cortex activation under the stimulus of visual motion using functional MRI (fMRI). Methods: Seven patients with anisometropic amblyopia and 10 patients with strabismic amblyopia were examined under the stimulus with the paradigm that task and control states were rotating and stationary grating with 1.5 T MR scanners. The data were processed using software of SPM offline, and the result was analyzed with single subject. An index of interocular difference of activation (IDA) was set for Mann-Whitney rank sum test to denote the extension of difference between activation of each eye. Results: There appeared activation on bilaterally occipital lobe in both group of amblyopia patients. There was mild activation on frontal lobe when amblyopic eyes were stimulated, but no activation when sound eyes. The MT area was regarded as region of interesting when analyzed, the activation of all sound eyes was stronger than amblyopic eyes in 7 anisometropic amblyopia patients. There were 5 patients whose level of activation of amblyopic eye's were lower than sound eye, and four were higher than sound eye, among the strabismic amblyopia patients except one patient's activation was none. There was statistical difference between IDA value of two groups (Z=2.382, P=0.017). Conclusion: There are more cortex areas activated of amblyopic eye than sound eye when single eye is stimulated. The function of visual motion maybe has been affected in anisometropic amblyopia. In strabismic amblyopia, the function of visual motion may relate to the underlying mechanism of strabismic, which suggests, as for the impairment of perception of visual motion, there is difference between two types of amblyopia. (authors)

  7. Student perception of relevance of biology content to everyday life: A study in higher education biology courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himschoot, Agnes Rose

    The purpose of this mixed method case study was to examine the effects of methods of instruction on students' perception of relevance in higher education non-biology majors' courses. Nearly ninety percent of all students in a liberal arts college are required to take a general biology course. It is proposed that for many of those students, this is the last science course they will take for life. General biology courses are suspected of discouraging student interest in biology with large enrollment, didactic instruction, covering a huge amount of content in one semester, and are charged with promoting student disengagement with biology by the end of the course. Previous research has been aimed at increasing student motivation and interest in biology as measured by surveys and test results. Various methods of instruction have been tested and show evidence of improved learning gains. This study focused on students' perception of relevance of biology content to everyday life and the methods of instruction that increase it. A quantitative survey was administered to assess perception of relevance pre and post instruction over three topics typically taught in a general biology course. A second quantitative survey of student experiences during instruction was administered to identify methods of instruction used in the course lecture and lab. While perception of relevance dropped in the study, qualitative focus groups provided insight into the surprising results by identifying topics that are more relevant than the ones chosen for the study, conveying the affects of the instructor's personal and instructional skills on student engagement, explanation of how active engagement during instruction promotes understanding of relevance, the roll of laboratory in promoting students' understanding of relevance as well as identifying external factors that affect student engagement. The study also investigated the extent to which gender affected changes in students' perception of

  8. NATO Symposium entitled "Symposium on the Study of Motion Perception : Recent Developments and Applications"

    CERN Document Server

    Wagenaar, Willem; Leibowitz, Herschel

    1982-01-01

    From August 24-29, 1980 the international "Symposium on the Study of Motion Perception; Recent Developments and Applications", sponsored by NATO and organized by the editors of this book, was held in Veldhoven, the Netherlands. The meeting was attended by about eighty scholars, including psychologists, neurologists, physicists and other scientists, from fourteen different countries. During the symposium some fifty research papers were presented and a series of tutorial review papers were read and discussed. The research presentations have been published in a special issue of the international journal of psychonomics "Acta Psychologica" (Vol. 48, 1981). The present book is a compilation of the tutorial papers. The tutorials were arranged around early versions of the chapters now appearing in this book. The long discussions at the Veldhoven tutorial sessions resulted in extensive revisions of the texts prior to this publication. Unfortunately this led to a delay in publication, but we feel that this was justifi...

  9. Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Do Not Preferentially Attend to Biological Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annaz, Dagmara; Campbell, Ruth; Coleman, Mike; Milne, Elizabeth; Swettenham, John

    2012-01-01

    Preferential attention to biological motion can be seen in typically developing infants in the first few days of life and is thought to be an important precursor in the development of social communication. We examined whether children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) aged 3-7 years preferentially attend to point-light displays depicting…

  10. Preference for Point-Light Human Biological Motion in Newborns: Contribution of Translational Displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidet-Ildei, Christel; Kitromilides, Elenitsa; Orliaguet, Jean-Pierre; Pavlova, Marina; Gentaz, Edouard

    2014-01-01

    In human newborns, spontaneous visual preference for biological motion is reported to occur at birth, but the factors underpinning this preference are still in debate. Using a standard visual preferential looking paradigm, 4 experiments were carried out in 3-day-old human newborns to assess the influence of translational displacement on perception…

  11. Dopamine Activation Preserves Visual Motion Perception Despite Noise Interference of Human V5/MT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, Nada; Fu, Richard Z.; Abou-El-Ela Bourquin, Bilal; Bhrugubanda, Vamsee; Schultz, Simon R.

    2016-01-01

    When processing sensory signals, the brain must account for noise, both noise in the stimulus and that arising from within its own neuronal circuitry. Dopamine receptor activation is known to enhance both visual cortical signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) and visual perceptual performance; however, it is unknown whether these two dopamine-mediated phenomena are linked. To assess this, we used single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) applied to visual cortical area V5/MT to reduce the SNR focally and thus disrupt visual motion discrimination performance to visual targets located in the same retinotopic space. The hypothesis that dopamine receptor activation enhances perceptual performance by improving cortical SNR predicts that dopamine activation should antagonize TMS disruption of visual perception. We assessed this hypothesis via a double-blinded, placebo-controlled study with the dopamine receptor agonists cabergoline (a D2 agonist) and pergolide (a D1/D2 agonist) administered in separate sessions (separated by 2 weeks) in 12 healthy volunteers in a William's balance-order design. TMS degraded visual motion perception when the evoked phosphene and the visual stimulus overlapped in time and space in the placebo and cabergoline conditions, but not in the pergolide condition. This suggests that dopamine D1 or combined D1 and D2 receptor activation enhances cortical SNR to boost perceptual performance. That local visual cortical excitability was unchanged across drug conditions suggests the involvement of long-range intracortical interactions in this D1 effect. Because increased internal noise (and thus lower SNR) can impair visual perceptual learning, improving visual cortical SNR via D1/D2 agonist therapy may be useful in boosting rehabilitation programs involving visual perceptual training. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In this study, we address the issue of whether dopamine activation improves visual perception despite increasing sensory noise in the visual cortex

  12. Variables Predicting Prospective Biology Teachers' Acceptance Perceptions Regarding Gene Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Mirac; Demirhan, Haydar

    2014-01-01

    The different opinions on products and applications of gene technology (GT) draw attention to the training and education activities related to GT. The purpose of this study is to review some variables predicting the acceptance perception regarding GT, and to investigate their changes at levels. The prospective teachers' subjective knowledge and…

  13. Fixable or Fate? Perceptions of the Biology of Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebowitz, Matthew S.; Ahn, Woo-Kyoung; Nolen-Hoeksema, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Previous research has shown that biological (e.g., genetic, biochemical) accounts of depression--currently in ascendancy--are linked to the general public's pessimism about the syndrome's prognosis. This research examined for the first time whether people with depressive symptoms would associate biological accounts of depression with…

  14. Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Take the mystery out of motion. Our resource gives you everything you need to teach young scientists about motion. Students will learn about linear, accelerating, rotating and oscillating motion, and how these relate to everyday life - and even the solar system. Measuring and graphing motion is easy, and the concepts of speed, velocity and acceleration are clearly explained. Reading passages, comprehension questions, color mini posters and lots of hands-on activities all help teach and reinforce key concepts. Vocabulary and language are simplified in our resource to make them accessible to str

  15. The neurophysiology of human biological motion processing: a high-density electrical mapping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakowski, Aaron I; Ross, Lars A; Snyder, Adam C; Sehatpour, Pejman; Kelly, Simon P; Foxe, John J

    2011-05-01

    The neural processing of biological motion (BM) is of profound experimental interest since it is often through the movement of another that we interpret their immediate intentions. Neuroimaging points to a specialized cortical network for processing biological motion. Here, high-density electrical mapping and source-analysis techniques were employed to interrogate the timing of information processing across this network. Participants viewed point-light-displays depicting standard body movements (e.g. jumping), while event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded and compared to ERPs to scrambled motion control stimuli. In a pair of experiments, three major phases of BM-specific processing were identified: 1) The earliest phase of BM-sensitive modulation was characterized by a positive shift of the ERP between 100 and 200 ms after stimulus onset. This modulation was observed exclusively over the right hemisphere and source-analysis suggested a likely generator in close proximity to regions associated with general motion processing (KO/hMT). 2) The second phase of BM-sensitivity occurred from 200 to 350 ms, characterized by a robust negative-going ERP modulation over posterior middle temporal regions bilaterally. Source-analysis pointed to bilateral generators at or near the posterior superior temporal sulcus (STS). 3) A third phase of processing was evident only in our second experiment, where participants actively attended the BM aspect of the stimuli, and was manifest as a centro-parietal positive ERP deflection, likely related to later cognitive processes. These results point to very early sensory registration of biological motion, and highlight the interactive role of the posterior STS in analyzing the movements of other living organisms. PMID:21276862

  16. Comparative Study on Interaction of Form and Motion Processing Streams by Applying Two Different Classifiers in Mechanism for Recognition of Biological Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bardia Yousefi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on psychophysics, neurophysiology, and functional imaging shows particular representation of biological movements which contains two pathways. The visual perception of biological movements formed through the visual system called dorsal and ventral processing streams. Ventral processing stream is associated with the form information extraction; on the other hand, dorsal processing stream provides motion information. Active basic model (ABM as hierarchical representation of the human object had revealed novelty in form pathway due to applying Gabor based supervised object recognition method. It creates more biological plausibility along with similarity with original model. Fuzzy inference system is used for motion pattern information in motion pathway creating more robustness in recognition process. Besides, interaction of these paths is intriguing and many studies in various fields considered it. Here, the interaction of the pathways to get more appropriated results has been investigated. Extreme learning machine (ELM has been implied for classification unit of this model, due to having the main properties of artificial neural networks, but crosses from the difficulty of training time substantially diminished in it. Here, there will be a comparison between two different configurations, interactions using synergetic neural network and ELM, in terms of accuracy and compatibility.

  17. Real-time tracking using stereo and motion: Visual perception for space robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishihara, H. Keith; Thomas, Hans; Huber, Eric; Reid, C. Ann

    1994-01-01

    The state-of-the-art in computing technology is rapidly attaining the performance necessary to implement many early vision algorithms at real-time rates. This new capability is helping to accelerate progress in vision research by improving our ability to evaluate the performance of algorithms in dynamic environments. In particular, we are becoming much more aware of the relative stability of various visual measurements in the presence of camera motion and system noise. This new processing speed is also allowing us to raise our sights toward accomplishing much higher-level processing tasks, such as figure-ground separation and active object tracking, in real-time. This paper describes a methodology for using early visual measurements to accomplish higher-level tasks; it then presents an overview of the high-speed accelerators developed at Teleos to support early visual measurements. The final section describes the successful deployment of a real-time vision system to provide visual perception for the Extravehicular Activity Helper/Retriever robotic system in tests aboard NASA's KC135 reduced gravity aircraft.

  18. Habituation of self-motion perception following unidirectional angular velocity steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, Gilles; Terlevic, Robert

    2016-09-01

    We investigated whether the perceived angular velocity following velocity steps of 80°/s in the dark decreased with the repetition of the stimulation in the same direction. The perceptual response to velocity steps in the opposite direction was also compared before and after this unidirectional habituation training. Participants indicated their perceived angular velocity by clicking on a wireless mouse every time they felt that they had rotated by 90°. The prehabituation perceptual response decayed exponentially with a time constant of 23.9 s. After 100 velocity steps in the same direction, this time constant was 12.9 s. The time constant after velocity steps in the opposite direction was 13.4 s, indicating that the habituation of the sensation of rotation is not direction specific. The peak velocity of the perceptual response was not affected by the habituation training. The differences between the habituation characteristics of self-motion perception and eye movements confirm that different velocity storage mechanisms mediate ocular and perceptual responses. PMID:27391426

  19. Procedural Audio in Computer Games Using Motion Controllers: An Evaluation on the Effect and Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Böttcher

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A study has been conducted into whether the use of procedural audio affects players in computer games using motion controllers. It was investigated whether or not (1 players perceive a difference between detailed and interactive procedural audio and prerecorded audio, (2 the use of procedural audio affects their motor-behavior, and (3 procedural audio affects their perception of control. Three experimental surveys were devised, two consisting of game sessions and the third consisting of watching videos of gameplay. A skiing game controlled by a Nintendo Wii balance board and a sword-fighting game controlled by a Wii remote were implemented with two versions of sound, one sample based and the other procedural based. The procedural models were designed using a perceptual approach and by alternative combinations of well-known synthesis techniques. The experimental results showed that, when being actively involved in playing or purely observing a video recording of a game, the majority of participants did not notice any difference in sound. Additionally, it was not possible to show that the use of procedural audio caused any consistent change in the motor behavior. In the skiing experiment, a portion of players perceived the control of the procedural version as being more sensitive.

  20. Soccer athletes are superior to non-athletes at perceiving soccer-specific and non-sport specific human biological motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eRomeas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that athletes’ domain specific perceptual-cognitive expertise can transfer to everyday tasks. Here we assessed the perceptual-cognitive expertise of athletes and non-athletes using sport specific and non-sport specific biological motion perception tasks. Using a virtual environment, university-level soccer players and university students’ non-athletes were asked to perceive the direction of a point-light walker and to predict the trajectory of a masked-ball during a point-light soccer kick. Angles of presentation were varied for orientation (upright, inverted and distance (2m, 4m, 16m. Accuracy and reaction time were measured to assess observers’ performance. The results highlighted athletes’ superior ability compared to non-athletes to accurately predict the trajectory of a masked soccer ball presented at 2m (reaction time, 4m (accuracy and reaction time and 16m (accuracy of distance. More interestingly, experts also displayed greater performance compared to non-athletes throughout the more fundamental and general point-light walker direction task presented at 2m (reaction time, 4m (accuracy and reaction time and 16m (reaction time of distance. In addition, athletes showed a better performance throughout inverted conditions in the walker (reaction time and soccer kick (accuracy and reaction time tasks. This implies that during human biological motion perception, athletes demonstrate an advantage for recognizing body kinematics that goes beyond sport specific actions.

  1. Perception of optic flow and random visual motion in preterm and full-term infants: A longitudinal EEG study

    OpenAIRE

    Straume, Liv Ragnhild

    2015-01-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) was used in preterm and full-term infants at 5 and 12 months of age to longitudinally study brain electrical activity as a function of perception of structured forward optic flow, structured reversed optic flow, and non-structured random visual motion. This study aimed to investigate how developments in neuronal maturation and locomotion are related to changes in brain activity. Analyses of visual evoked potentials (VEPs) and temporal spectral evolution (TSE, time-d...

  2. Modification of Otolith-Ocular Reflexes, Motion Perception and Manual Control During Variable Radius Centrifugation Following Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Scott J.; Clarke, A. H.; Rupert, A. H.; Harm, D. L.; Clement, G. R.

    2009-01-01

    Two joint ESA-NASA studies are examining changes in otolith-ocular reflexes and motion perception following short duration space flights, and the operational implications of post-flight tilt-translation ambiguity for manual control performance. Vibrotactile feedback of tilt orientation is also being evaluated as a countermeasure to improve performance during a closed-loop nulling task. Data is currently being collected on astronaut subjects during 3 preflight sessions and during the first 8 days after Shuttle landings. Variable radius centrifugation is utilized to elicit otolith reflexes in the lateral plane without concordant roll canal cues. Unilateral centrifugation (400 deg/s, 3.5 cm radius) stimulates one otolith positioned off-axis while the opposite side is centered over the axis of rotation. During this paradigm, roll-tilt perception is measured using a subjective visual vertical task and ocular counter-rolling is obtained using binocular video-oculography. During a second paradigm (216 deg/s, less than 20 cm radius), the effects of stimulus frequency (0.15 - 0.6 Hz) are examined on eye movements and motion perception. A closed-loop nulling task is also performed with and without vibrotactile display feedback of chair radial position. Data collection is currently ongoing. Results to date suggest there is a trend for perceived tilt and translation amplitudes to be increased at the low and medium frequencies on landing day compared to pre-flight. Manual control performance is improved with vibrotactile feedback. One result of this study will be to characterize the variability (gain, asymmetry) in both otolith-ocular responses and motion perception during variable radius centrifugation, and measure the time course of post-flight recovery. This study will also address how adaptive changes in otolith-mediated reflexes correspond to one's ability to perform closed-loop nulling tasks following G-transitions, and whether manual control performance can be improved

  3. Sensory versus motor loci for integration of multiple motion signals in smooth pursuit eye movements and human motion perception

    OpenAIRE

    Niu, Yu-Qiong; Lisberger, Stephen G.

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated how visual motion signals are integrated for smooth pursuit eye movements by measuring the initiation of pursuit in monkeys for pairs of moving stimuli of the same or differing luminance. The initiation of pursuit for pairs of stimuli of the same luminance could be accounted for as a vector average of the responses to the two stimuli singly. When stimuli comprised two superimposed patches of moving dot textures, the brighter stimulus suppressed the inputs from the dimmer ...

  4. Combination of image expansion and known size explains time-to-passage of biological motion

    OpenAIRE

    Mouta, Sandra; Santos, Jorge A.; López-Moliner, Joan

    2010-01-01

    It is important in everyday tasks to estimate the time it takes an object to reach an observer, time-to-contact (TTC), or when it will pass us, time-to-passage (TTP). However, we do not solely interact with inanimate objects but also with people. It is known that the visual system does not integrate biological motion (BM) linearly over space and time with constant efficiency (Neri Morrone and Burr, 1998 Nature 395 894-896), but little is known about judging TTC/TTP of BM. In a TTP task we pre...

  5. Directional Asymmetries and Age Effects in Human Self-Motion Perception

    OpenAIRE

    Roditi, Rachel E.; Crane, Benjamin T.

    2012-01-01

    Directional asymmetries in vestibular reflexes have aided the diagnosis of vestibular lesions; however, potential asymmetries in vestibular perception have not been well defined. This investigation sought to measure potential asymmetries in human vestibular perception. Vestibular perception thresholds were measured in 24 healthy human subjects between the ages of 21 and 68 years. Stimuli consisted of a single cycle of sinusoidal acceleration in a single direction lasting 1 or 2 s (1 or 0.5 Hz...

  6. Occupational biological risk knowledge and perception: results from a large survey in Rome, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria De Giusti

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A cross-sectional survey on knowledge and perception of occupational biological risk among workers in several occupations was carried out in the industrial area of Rome. METHODS: The study was carried out in the period of March-April 2010 using a questionnaire with 33 items on the following areas: a socio-demographic data; b perception of the biological risks in ordinary occupational activity; c knowledge about biological risks; d biological risks in the working environment. The questionnaire was submitted to a convenience sample of workers of an industrial area in Southern Rome. RESULTS: 729 participants entered the study from the following work activities: food, catering, service, farming and breeding, healthcare, school and research (males 57.2%; mean age 37.4 years, SD = 10.9. Significant associations were found between different activity areas with respect to the relevance of the biological risk (p = 0.044 and the perception of the biological risk (p < 0.001. With respect to vehicles of infectious agents, the highest percentages of the most common biological risk exposures were: air and physical contact for the catering and food group, 66.7% and 61.90% respectively; air and blood for the health and research group, with 73.50% and 57.00% respectively; and physical contact and blood for the service group, 63.10 % and 48.30%. Significant difference of proportions were found about the prevalent effect caused by the biological agents was the occurrence of infectious diseases (59.90% food group, 91.60% health and research and 79.30% service group (p < 0.001. The perception of knowledge resulted in a good rank (sufficient, many or complete in the food and catering group, 78.3% with significant difference compared to other professions (p < 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: All participants show good knowledge the effects induced by biological agents and it is significant that almost half of the respondents are aware of the risks concerning allergies

  7. Time-Perception Network and Default Mode Network Are Associated with Temporal Prediction in a Periodic Motion Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Fabiana M.; Chaim, Khallil T.; Sanchez, Tiago A.; de Araujo, Draulio B.

    2016-01-01

    The updating of prospective internal models is necessary to accurately predict future observations. Uncertainty-driven internal model updating has been studied using a variety of perceptual paradigms, and have revealed engagement of frontal and parietal areas. In a distinct literature, studies on temporal expectations have also characterized a time-perception network, which relies on temporal orienting of attention. However, the updating of prospective internal models is highly dependent on temporal attention, since temporal attention must be reoriented according to the current environmental demands. In this study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to evaluate to what extend the continuous manipulation of temporal prediction would recruit update-related areas and the time-perception network areas. We developed an exogenous temporal task that combines rhythm cueing and time-to-contact principles to generate implicit temporal expectation. Two patterns of motion were created: periodic (simple harmonic oscillation) and non-periodic (harmonic oscillation with variable acceleration). We found that non-periodic motion engaged the exogenous temporal orienting network, which includes the ventral premotor and inferior parietal cortices, and the cerebellum, as well as the presupplementary motor area, which has previously been implicated in internal model updating, and the motion-sensitive area MT+. Interestingly, we found a right-hemisphere preponderance suggesting the engagement of explicit timing mechanisms. We also show that the periodic motion condition, when compared to the non-periodic motion, activated a particular subset of the default-mode network (DMN) midline areas, including the left dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), and bilateral posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus (PCC/PC). It suggests that the DMN plays a role in processing contextually expected information and supports recent evidence that the DMN may

  8. Time-perception network and default mode network are associated with temporal prediction in a periodic motion task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Mesquita Carvalho

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The updating of prospective internal models is necessary to accurately predict future observations. Uncertainty-driven internal model updating has been studied using a variety of perceptual paradigms, and have revealed engagement of frontal and parietal areas. In a distinct literature, studies on temporal expectations have also characterized a time-perception network, which relies on temporal orienting of attention. However, the updating of prospective internal models is highly dependent on temporal attention, since temporal attention must be reoriented according to the current environmental demands. In this study we used fMRI to evaluate to what extend the continuous manipulation of temporal prediction would recruit update-related areas and the time-perception network areas. We developed an exogenous temporal task that combines rhythm cueing and time-to-contact principles to generate implicit temporal expectation. Two patterns of motion were created: periodic (simple harmonic oscillation and non-periodic (harmonic oscillation with variable acceleration. We found that non-periodic motion engaged the exogenous temporal orienting network, which includes the ventral premotor and inferior parietal cortices, and the cerebellum, as well as the presupplementary motor area, which has previously been implicated in internal model updating, and the motion-sensitive area MT+. Interestingly, we found a right-hemisphere preponderance suggesting the engagement of explicit timing mechanisms. We also show that the periodic motion condition, when compared to the non-periodic motion, activated a particular subset of the default-mode network (DMN midline areas, including the left dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and bilateral posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus. It suggests that the DMN plays a role in processing contextually expected information and supports recent evidence that the DMN may reflect the validation of prospective internal

  9. Time-Perception Network and Default Mode Network Are Associated with Temporal Prediction in a Periodic Motion Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Fabiana M; Chaim, Khallil T; Sanchez, Tiago A; de Araujo, Draulio B

    2016-01-01

    The updating of prospective internal models is necessary to accurately predict future observations. Uncertainty-driven internal model updating has been studied using a variety of perceptual paradigms, and have revealed engagement of frontal and parietal areas. In a distinct literature, studies on temporal expectations have also characterized a time-perception network, which relies on temporal orienting of attention. However, the updating of prospective internal models is highly dependent on temporal attention, since temporal attention must be reoriented according to the current environmental demands. In this study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to evaluate to what extend the continuous manipulation of temporal prediction would recruit update-related areas and the time-perception network areas. We developed an exogenous temporal task that combines rhythm cueing and time-to-contact principles to generate implicit temporal expectation. Two patterns of motion were created: periodic (simple harmonic oscillation) and non-periodic (harmonic oscillation with variable acceleration). We found that non-periodic motion engaged the exogenous temporal orienting network, which includes the ventral premotor and inferior parietal cortices, and the cerebellum, as well as the presupplementary motor area, which has previously been implicated in internal model updating, and the motion-sensitive area MT+. Interestingly, we found a right-hemisphere preponderance suggesting the engagement of explicit timing mechanisms. We also show that the periodic motion condition, when compared to the non-periodic motion, activated a particular subset of the default-mode network (DMN) midline areas, including the left dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), and bilateral posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus (PCC/PC). It suggests that the DMN plays a role in processing contextually expected information and supports recent evidence that the DMN may

  10. Teachers' perceptions of the effects of a scientific literary course on subsequent learning in biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Dale R.; Piburn, Michael D.; Piburn, Michael D.

    Five teachers were interviewed as to their perceptions of the effect of an intervention to teach scientific literacy on learning in subsequent biology courses. The sample consisted of 450 students who had a literacy course in ninth grade and had completed tenth-grade biology. At the end of the academic year the biology teachers were interviewed and asked to compare the biology students who had the literacy course to students they had taught in earlier years. The biology teachers concluded that the literacy course did have an effect on students' subsequent ability to learn biology. The strength of the effect varied according to level of biology. Students had a better understanding of the nature of science and better laboratory and process skills. They were also better at analyzing data. The advanced and intermediate biology students were more creative, more likely to take risks, and engage in hypothetical thinking than other groups of students that the teachers had taught. Although the purpose of the literacy course was to teach literacy skills the advanced students retained a substantial amount of content material that was applicable to biology.

  11. Adaptation of sensor morphology: an integrative view of perception from biologically inspired robotics perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Fumiya; Nurzaman, Surya G

    2016-08-01

    Sensor morphology, the morphology of a sensing mechanism which plays a role of shaping the desired response from physical stimuli from surroundings to generate signals usable as sensory information, is one of the key common aspects of sensing processes. This paper presents a structured review of researches on bioinspired sensor morphology implemented in robotic systems, and discusses the fundamental design principles. Based on literature review, we propose two key arguments: first, owing to its synthetic nature, biologically inspired robotics approach is a unique and powerful methodology to understand the role of sensor morphology and how it can evolve and adapt to its task and environment. Second, a consideration of an integrative view of perception by looking into multidisciplinary and overarching mechanisms of sensor morphology adaptation across biology and engineering enables us to extract relevant design principles that are important to extend our understanding of the unfinished concepts in sensing and perception. PMID:27499843

  12. Time-to-passage estimation on periphery : better for biological motion?

    OpenAIRE

    Mouta, Sandra; Fontes, Liliana; Santos, Jorge A.; López-Moliner, Joan

    2013-01-01

    In  previous  studies,  complex  motion  stimuli  were  judged  as  passing  sooner  than  rigid stimuli  but  reflected  more  uncertainty  in  the  judgments  as  revealed  by  precision  loss  and  longer reaction  times.  It  is  known  that  biological  motion  can  be  perceived  in  the  periphery .  In  the everyday  life  people  are  required  to  interact  with  or  to  estimate  motion  variables  of  other  agents located  on  the  periphery ,  at  different  locations  of  the  ...

  13. What is the perception of biological risk by undergraduate nursing students?

    OpenAIRE

    Mª Carmen Moreno-Arroyo; Montserrat Puig-Llobet; Anna Falco-Pegueroles; Maria Teresa Lluch-Canut; Irma Casas García; Juan Roldán-Merino

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to analyze undergraduate nursing students' perception of biological risk and its relationship with their prior practical training. Method: a descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted among undergraduate nursing students enrolled in clinical practice courses in the academic year 2013-2014 at the School of Nursing at the University of Barcelona. Variables: sociodemographic variables, employment, training, clinical experience and other variables related to the assess...

  14. Quantitative assessment of image motion blur in diffraction images of moving biological cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, He; Jin, Changrong; Feng, Yuanming; Qi, Dandan; Sa, Yu; Hu, Xin-Hua

    2016-02-01

    Motion blur (MB) presents a significant challenge for obtaining high-contrast image data from biological cells with a polarization diffraction imaging flow cytometry (p-DIFC) method. A new p-DIFC experimental system has been developed to evaluate the MB and its effect on image analysis using a time-delay-integration (TDI) CCD camera. Diffraction images of MCF-7 and K562 cells have been acquired with different speed-mismatch ratios and compared to characterize MB quantitatively. Frequency analysis of the diffraction images shows that the degree of MB can be quantified by bandwidth variations of the diffraction images along the motion direction. The analytical results were confirmed by the p-DIFC image data acquired at different speed-mismatch ratios and used to validate a method of numerical simulation of MB on blur-free diffraction images, which provides a useful tool to examine the blurring effect on diffraction images acquired from the same cell. These results provide insights on the dependence of diffraction image on MB and allow significant improvement on rapid biological cell assay with the p-DIFC method.

  15. STUDENTS’ PERCEPTION AND PERCEIVED EFFECTIVENESS TOWARD e-AV BIOLOGY COURSEWARE FOR LEARNING ABOUT RENEWABLE ENERGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Hadiati Nugraini*

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The teaching media namely e-AV Biology, was developed with the main features of video lessons in supporting the students’ learning process. Some video lessons describe the production process of Bio-fuel or Renewable Energy on the field of Biotechnology Industrial, which is one of the subjects that students and teachers find it difficult to learn and explain. The design and development of a Courseware for Biology in senior high schools in Indonesia is described in this paper. The context of Biology education in Indonesia shows that the students’ motivation in learning this subject is considered low. Moreover, students have difficulties in learning Biology and have no interest in the lesson due to the subject irrelevant with the daily experiences, and Biology teachers in Indonesia were still using the monotonous teaching method, teachers are the focal point of learning in the classroom. The methodology used in this study was quasi experimental research. There were two groups involved in this experiment, namely: T0 and T1. The first group (T0 was assigned as the control group and the second group (T1 was assigned to the experiment group. Two objectives were identified, firstly to design and develop the e-AV Biology Courseware that can be used as a teaching medium. Secondly, it examined the impact on students’ perception and perceived effectiveness of high and low academic achievement when the e-AV Biology Courseware is used. The findings of study indicated that the eAV Biology Courseware was able to help students to understand more about the Biology subject compared to the conventional ways of teaching. The students who learn Biology using the e-AV Biology Courseware have more interest, better perception and perceived effectiveness toward the subject. Most of the students who participated in this experiment responded positively and suggested that the video lesson should be added to their Biology subject in their schools. The study suggested

  16. Dorsal stream vulnerability in preterm infants – A longitudinal EEG study of visual motion perception

    OpenAIRE

    Zotcheva, Ekaterina

    2015-01-01

    High-density electroencephalogram (EEG) was used to longitudinally investigate evoked and induced brain electrical activity as a function of visual motion in full-term and preterm infants at 4-5 and 12 months of age. The infants were presented with two visual motion paradigms, optic flow and looming. The optic flow experiment simulated structured forwards and reversed optic flow and random visual motion, while the looming experiment simulated a looming object approaching on a direct collision...

  17. A comparison of teacher and principal perception of an outstanding biology teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searles, William E.; Ng, Raymond W. M.

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the level of agreement or disagreement between principals and teachers when using established criteria to measure the effectiveness of a biology teacher. To obtain information regarding their perceptions of an outstanding biology teacher, twenty-two principals and forty-one biology teachers were chosen randomly from English-speaking high schools within a 50 km radius of metropolitan Montreal, Quebec, Canada. The measuring instrument was a modified version of Dieter's questionnaire that evolved from his doctoral study of the National Association of Biology Teachers-Outstanding Biology Teacher Award Program. The data collected from the two populations were tested using one-way ANOVA (analysis of variance) or by applying normal approximation. Results indicated that both the principals and teachers agree on the relative importance of most criteria, particularly those related to the teacher's classroom behavior and academic background in biology. From such results, it was possible to construct one stereotype of the outstanding biology teacher. A number of recommendations were made from the results of the study, which were directed to the (a) teachers and their professional organization, (b) principals and the school boards, (c) teacher training institutions, and (d) researchers in teacher evaluation.

  18. Students' perceptions of motivation in high school biology class: Informing current theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManic, Janet A.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate students' perceptions of motivation to achieve while participating in general level high school biology classes. In a national poll of teacher's attitudes, student's motivation was a top concern of teachers (Elam, 1989). The student's perceptions of motivation are important to understand if improvements and advancements in motivation are to be implemented in the science classroom. This qualitative study was conducted in an urban high school that is located in a major metropolitan area in the southeast of the United States. The student body of 1100 is composed of Caucasian, African-American, Hispanic, and Asian students. The focus question of the study was: What are students' perceptions of their motivation in biology class? From general level biology classes, purposeful sampling narrowed the participants to fifteen students. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with the participants having varying measurements of motivation on the Scale of Intrinsic versus Extrinsic Orientation in the Classroom (Harter, 1980). The interviews were recorded and transcribed. After transcription, the interviews were coded by the constant comparative method (Glaser & Strauss, 1967). The coded data of students' responses were analyzed and compared to current theories of motivation. The current theories are the social-cognitive model (Bandura, 1977), attribution theory (Weiner, 1979), basic needs theory (Maslow, 1954) and choice theory (Glasser, 1986). The results of this study support the social cognitive model of motivation (Bandura, 1977) through the description of family structure and its relationship to motivation (Gonzalez, 2002). The study upheld previous research in that extrinsic orientation was shown to be prevalent in older students (Harter, 1981; Anderman & Maehr, 1994). In addition, the students' responses disclosed the difficulties encountered in studying biology. Students expressed the opinion that biology terms are

  19. On the visual system's architecture underlying binocular rivalry and motion perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boxtel, J.J.A. van

    2008-01-01

    Our everyday visual perception is supported by a complicated set of interactions between different brain areas. These areas often have a specific function. A lot of communication takes place between, and also within, these areas. The total set of interactions between and within the different brain a

  20. Student and instructor perceptions of the use of inquiry practices in a Biology Survey Laboratory course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayer, Lisbeth Ann

    The level of inquiry in science education has been the subject of a great deal of research by organizations such as The National Resource Council, The National Science Teachers Association, and The National Science Resources Center. Although inquiry has been promulgated as best practice, most colleges have not included inquiry science instruction in their coursework. The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptions of the level of inquiry, which students and instructors in a Biology Survey Laboratory I course consider the most supportive of student learning at a small, rural, Midwestern university. A survey instrument developed using the Inquiry Level Rubric designed by Buck et al., (2008) and the Likert Scale (1932) was used to collect data from 192 Biology Survey Laboratory I course students and their two instructors. The instrument consisted of 36 five-point Likert scale items followed by four demographic questions. A total of 190 (99.0%) students' surveys contained usable information for statistical analyses. Semi-structured instructor interviews were completed after the survey. Descriptive statistics including means and standard deviations were analyzed to determine the perceptions of students and their instructors regarding the best level of inquiry to learn biology. Inferential statistical analysis with independent t tests were utilized to determine if there were statistically significant differences between education majors and non-education majors, underrepresented groups and students typically represented in the science fields, and students with high versus low inquiry experience K--12. Qualitative phenomenological data were collected and analyzed from instructor interviews. Descriptive analyses revealed that students perceived that they would learn best with Open or Authentic inquiry levels, while instructors' perceptions leaned towards Open or Guided inquiry levels in the Biology Survey Laboratory I course (Buck et al., 2008). Inferential data

  1. Higher education biology faculty at urban institutions: Perceptions of how they learn to teach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusch, Jennifer D.

    Instructor education has gained considerable attention over the years, as it has become apparent that it plays a vital role in learners' achievement and participation in higher education programs---especially for minority learners, and could hold one of the keys to enhancing the global economy (Sundberg, 1991; Brianard, 2007; O'Connel, 2007). However, despite the efforts of researchers and funded efforts by the National Science Foundation, higher education biology instruction continues to remain lacking, causing biology programs to struggle to recruit and maintain learners (Smyth & McArdle, 2004; Hamilton, 2004; Seymour & Hewitt, 1997). This study incorporated interpretive qualitative research through use of one-on-one, semi-structured interviews with a sample of twelve biology faculty from higher education urban institutions to explore their perceptions about how they learn to teach. Qualitative coding was used to analyze study findings, which led to the formulation of the Biology Faculty Learning to Teach Framework. This framework explicates the relationship of the various, perceived, ways faculty learn to teach, and the subsequent instructional strategies they use. The major theme, or means by which faculty have learned to teach, was determined to be informal learning experiences, including trial and error learning, learners' feedback, previous instructors, teaching assistant opportunities, temporary instructional assignments in graduate school, and instructional experiences as faculty members. It is hoped that the results of this study will offer insight into ways that undergraduate and graduate programs which prepare biology faculty might be enhanced. More effective faculty preparation would facilitate the attainment of more appropriate knowledge and skill sets by undergraduate biology instructors, enabling them to deliver more effective instruction, and subsequently better prepare biology learners.

  2. Alaska Native people's perceptions, understandings, and expectations for research involving biological specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Y. Hiratsuka

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Members of racially and ethnically diverse groups have been persistently underrepresented in biomedical research in general, possibly due to mistrust with the medical and research community. This article describes the perceptions, understandings, and expectations of Alaska Native people about research involving the collection and storage of biological specimens. Study design. Stratified focus groups. Methods. Twenty-nine focus groups with Alaska Native people (n = 178 were held in 14 locations using a semi-structured moderator guide. ATLAS.ti was used for thematic analysis through iterative readings and coding. Alaska Native peoples’ perceptions, understandings, and expectations of researcher beneficence, informed consent processes, and provision of research findings were elicited. Results and conclusions. Alaska Native people desired extensive disclosure of information beyond that typically provided in consent and results dissemination processes. Information germane to the motivation and intent of researchers and specifics of specimen storage and destruction were specifically requested. A clear and extensive process of informed consent and continued improvements in sharing results may enhance the transparency of research intent, conduct, and use of obtained results among Alaska Native people. Meeting expectations may improve relationships between researchers and the Alaska Native population which could result in increased research participation. Our findings offer a guide for researchers and communities when planning and implementing research with biological specimens.

  3. Cathodal HD-tDCS on the right V5 improves motion perception in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Angelo Zito

    2015-09-01

    The specific effect of influencing performance of visual tasks by modulating the excitability of the neurons in the visual cortex might be explained by the complexity of perceptual information needed for the tasks. This provokes a “noisy” activation state of the encoding neuronal patterns. We speculate that in this case cathodal HD-tDCS may focus the correct perception by decreasing global excitation and thus diminishing the “noise” below threshold.

  4. Role of cerebellum in motion perception and vestibulo-ocular reflex-similarities and disparities

    OpenAIRE

    Shaikh, A G; Palla, A; Marti, S.; Olasagasti, I.; Optican, L.M.; Zee, D S; Straumann, D.

    2013-01-01

    Vestibular velocity storage enhances the efficacy of the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) during relatively low-frequency head rotations. This function is modulated by GABA-mediated inhibitory cerebellar projections. Velocity storage also exists in perceptual pathway and has similar functional principles as VOR. However, it is not known whether the neural substrate for perception and VOR overlap. We propose two possibilities. First, there is the same velocity storage for both VOR and per...

  5. Perception of animacy from the motion of a single sound object

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Høll; Vuust, Peter; Wallentin, Mikkel

    2015-01-01

    generated “mosquito” sounds moving along trajectories in space, and asked to rate how certain they were that each sound emitting entity was alive. At a random point on a linear motion trajectory, the sound source would deviate from its initial path and speed. Results confirm findings from the visual domain...

  6. The contribution of otoliths and semicircular canals to the perception of two-dimensional passive whole-body motion in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanenko, Y P; Grasso, R; Israël, I; Berthoz, A

    1997-07-01

    1. Perception of two-dimensional (2-D) whole-body passive motion in the horizontal plane was studied in twelve blindfolded healthy volunteers: pure rotation in place (180 deg), linear motion (4.5 m) and a semicircular trajectory (radius, 1.5 m; angular acceleration, 0.2 rad s-2) were applied in random sequence by means of a remote-controlled robot equipped with a racing-car seat. The seat orientation in the horizontal plane was controlled by the experimenter, independent of the robot trajectory. Thus different degrees of otolith-canal interaction were obtained. The maximal linear acceleration during the semicircular trajectory was 0.1 g; however, the linear acceleration vector was complex as it rotated relative to the subject's head. 2. In the first of two sessions, subjects were instructed to maintain an angular pointer oriented towards a remote (15 m) previously seen target during the passive movements. In the second session they had to make a drawing of the path of the perceived trajectory, after the movement was finished. 3. The results showed that, on average, the movement of the pointer matched the dynamics of the rotatory component of the 2-D motion well. This suggests that, in the range of linear accelerations used in this study, no appreciable influence of otolith input on canal-mediated perception of angular motion occurred. 4. The curvature of the drawn paths was mostly explained by the input to the semicircular canals. Subjects' reconstruction of motion did not account for the directional dynamics of the input to the otoliths occurring during passive motion. 5. This finding proves that reconstructing trajectory in space does not imply a mathematically perfect transformation of the linear and angular motion-related inputs into a Cartesian or polar 2-D representation. Physiological constraints on the interaction between motion direction and change of heading play an important role in motion perception. PMID:9234209

  7. Evidence for multiple extra-striate mechanisms behind perception of visual motion gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meso, Andrew Isaac; Hess, Robert F

    2012-07-01

    Perceiving motion patterns in visual scenes in which speed or motion direction varies over space while average luminance remains constant presents a processing task that requires at least two separate stages of neural spatio-temporal filtering. We have previously probed the transfer of information between these stages of filtering identifying a largely scale invariant process in which narrowband initial motion sensitive filters are coupled with a broad range of spatial frequencies of secondary filters, with an optimal coupling - in terms of optimal observer visual sensitivity - at a frequency ratio of around twelve. In the current work, we used the same stimulus to investigate the possible presence of multiple secondary filtering mechanisms and their associated bandwidths. Using a forced choice psychophysical task with both a detection and an identification component, we presented experimental blocks containing stimuli with one of two different modulator frequencies in each trial to measure the frequency difference at which the detection performance matched the identification of the frequency. We found that at a frequency differences of about 2.2 octaves, performance of both tasks was similar, and the processing could therefore be inferred to occur in independent frequency channels. The same observation was confirmed for stimuli presented at a longer viewing distance. We conclude that for the motion gradient stimuli, there are secondary filtering mechanisms with a moderately broad bandwidth of over 2 octaves that underlie our sensitivity for detecting motion gradients of different modulation frequency. These are likely to be implemented at least in part within the dorsal stream of extra-striate cortex. PMID:22659589

  8. Determining the point of subjective ambiguity of ambiguous biological-motion figures with perspective cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouten, Ben; Verfaillie, Karl

    2010-02-01

    Orthographic frontal/back projections of biological-motion figures are bistable: The point-light figure in principle can be perceived either as facing toward the viewer or as facing away from the viewer. Some point-light actions--for example, walking--elicit a strong "facing bias": Despite the absence of objective cues to depth, observers tend to interpret the figure as facing toward the viewer in most of the cases. In this article, we present and experimentally validate a technique that affords full experimental control of the perceived in-depth orientation of point-light figures. We demonstrate that by parametrically manipulating the amount of perspective information in the stimulus, it is possible to obtain any desired level of subjective ambiguity. Directions for future research, in which this technique can be fruitfully implemented, are suggested. Program code of a demo is provided that can be modified easily for program code of new experiments. The demo and QuickTime movie files illustrating our perspective manipulation technique may be downloaded from http://brm.psychonomic-journals.org/content/supplemental. PMID:20160296

  9. The perception of ego-motion change in environments with varying depth: Interaction of stereo and optic flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Florian; Pohl, Ladina; Halfmann, Marc; Hardiess, Gregor; Mallot, Hanspeter A

    2016-07-01

    When estimating ego-motion in environments (e.g., tunnels, streets) with varying depth, human subjects confuse ego-acceleration with environment narrowing and ego-deceleration with environment widening. Festl, Recktenwald, Yuan, and Mallot (2012) demonstrated that in nonstereoscopic viewing conditions, this happens despite the fact that retinal measurements of acceleration rate-a variable related to tau-dot-should allow veridical perception. Here we address the question of whether additional depth cues (specifically binocular stereo, object occlusion, or constant average object size) help break the confusion between narrowing and acceleration. Using a forced-choice paradigm, the confusion is shown to persist even if unambiguous stereo information is provided. The confusion can also be demonstrated in an adjustment task in which subjects were asked to keep a constant speed in a tunnel with varying diameter: Subjects increased speed in widening sections and decreased speed in narrowing sections even though stereoscopic depth information was provided. If object-based depth information (stereo, occlusion, constant average object size) is added, the confusion between narrowing and acceleration still remains but may be slightly reduced. All experiments are consistent with a simple matched filter algorithm for ego-motion detection, neglecting both parallactic and stereoscopic depth information, but leave open the possibility of cue combination at a later stage. PMID:27442810

  10. The integration of disparity, shading and motion parallax cues for depth perception in humans and monkeys

    OpenAIRE

    Schiller, Peter H.; Slocum, Warren M.; Jao, Brian; Weiner, Veronica S.

    2011-01-01

    A visual stimulus display was created that enabled us to examine how effectively the three depth cues of disparity, motion parallax and shading can be integrated in humans and monkeys. The display was designed to allow us to present these three depth cues separately and in various combinations. Depth was processed most effectively and most rapidly when all three cues were presented together indicating that these separate cues are integrated at yet unknown sites in the brain. Testing in humans...

  11. Building Subjective Spatial Perception Based on Sensor Space Integration for Motion Generation

    OpenAIRE

    Yuichi Kobayashi; Manabu Gouko

    2011-01-01

    For the development of flexible intelligence of robots, it is important to build a subjective spatial representation in a bottom-up way. Humanoid robots as well as humans have multi-modal sensors that cover wide range but not necessarily overlap with each other. This paper presents a motion generation method for robot with multiple sensors with limited sensing ranges. The proposed method introduce extension of the action-observation mapping to outside of the sensing range of a sensor, based o...

  12. Development of Motion Processing in Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annaz, Dagmara; Remington, Anna; Milne, Elizabeth; Coleman, Mike; Campbell, Ruth; Thomas, Michael S. C.; Swettenham, John

    2010-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that children with autism may be impaired in the perception of biological motion from moving point-light displays. Some children with autism also have abnormally high motion coherence thresholds. In the current study we tested a group of children with autism and a group of typically developing children aged 5 to 12 years of…

  13. Interpersonal amplification of risk? Citizen discussions and their impact on perceptions of risks and benefits of a biological research facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Andrew R; Scheufele, Dietram A; Brossard, Dominique; Gunther, Albert C

    2011-02-01

    Much risk communication research has demonstrated how mass media can influence individual risk perceptions, but lacks a comprehensive conceptual understanding of another key channel of communication: interpersonal discussion. Using the social amplification of risk as a theoretical framework, we consider the potential for discussions to function as amplification stations. We explore this possibility using data from a public opinion survey of residents living in potential locations for a new biological research facility in the United States. Controlling for a variety of key information variables, our results show that two dimensions of discussion-frequency and valence-have impacts on residents' perceptions of the facility's benefits and its risks. We also explore the possibility that an individual's overall attitude moderates the effect of discussion on their perceptions of risks and benefits. Our results demonstrate the potential for discussions to operate as amplifiers or attenuators of perceptions of both risks and benefits. PMID:21039705

  14. Semantic Models of Sentences with Verbs of Motion in Standard Language and in Scientific Language Used in Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vita Banionytė

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The semantic models of sentences with verbs of motion in German standard language and in scientific language used in biology are analyzed in the article. In its theoretic part it is affirmed that the article is based on the semantic theory of the sentence. This theory, in its turn, is grounded on the correlation of semantic predicative classes and semantic roles. The combination of semantic predicative classes and semantic roles is expressed by the main semantic formula – proposition. In its practical part the differences between the semantic models of standard and scientific language used in biology are explained. While modelling sentences with verbs of motion, two groups of semantic models of sentences are singled out: that of action (Handlung and process (Vorgang. The analysis shows that the semantic models of sentences with semantic action predicatives dominate in the text of standard language while the semantic models of sentences with semantic process predicatives dominate in the texts of scientific language used in biology. The differences how the doer and direction are expressed in standard and in scientific language are clearly seen and the semantic cases (Agens, Patiens, Direktiv1 help to determine that. It is observed that in scientific texts of high level of specialization (biology science in contrast to popular scientific literature models of sentences with moving verbs are usually seldom found. They are substituted by denominative constructions. In conclusions it is shown that this analysis can be important in methodics, especially planning material for teaching professional-scientific language.

  15. Soccer athletes are superior to non-athletes at perceiving soccer-specific and non-sport specific human biological motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeas, Thomas; Faubert, Jocelyn

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that athletes' domain specific perceptual-cognitive expertise can transfer to everyday tasks. Here we assessed the perceptual-cognitive expertise of athletes and non-athletes using sport specific and non-sport specific biological motion perception (BMP) tasks. Using a virtual environment, university-level soccer players and university students' non-athletes were asked to perceive the direction of a point-light walker and to predict the trajectory of a masked-ball during a point-light soccer kick. Angles of presentation were varied for orientation (upright, inverted) and distance (2 m, 4 m, 16 m). Accuracy and reaction time were measured to assess observers' performance. The results highlighted athletes' superior ability compared to non-athletes to accurately predict the trajectory of a masked soccer ball presented at 2 m (reaction time), 4 m (accuracy and reaction time), and 16 m (accuracy) of distance. More interestingly, experts also displayed greater performance compared to non-athletes throughout the more fundamental and general point-light walker direction task presented at 2 m (reaction time), 4 m (accuracy and reaction time), and 16 m (reaction time) of distance. In addition, athletes showed a better performance throughout inverted conditions in the walker (reaction time) and soccer kick (accuracy and reaction time) tasks. This implies that during human BMP, athletes demonstrate an advantage for recognizing body kinematics that goes beyond sport specific actions. PMID:26388828

  16. Cosmetics as a Feature of the Extended Human Phenotype: Modulation of the Perception of Biologically Important Facial Signals

    OpenAIRE

    Nancy L Etcoff; Shannon Stock; Haley, Lauren E.; Vickery, Sarah A.; House, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Research on the perception of faces has focused on the size, shape, and configuration of inherited features or the biological phenotype, and largely ignored the effects of adornment, or the extended phenotype. Research on the evolution of signaling has shown that animals frequently alter visual features, including color cues, to attract, intimidate or protect themselves from conspecifics. Humans engage in conscious manipulation of visual signals using cultural tools in real time rather than g...

  17. ZAG-Otolith: Modification of Otolith-Ocular Reflexes, Motion Perception and Manual Control during Variable Radius Centrifugation Following Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, S. J.; Clarke, A. H.; Rupert, A. H.; Harm, D. L.; Clement, G. R.

    2009-01-01

    Two joint ESA-NASA studies are examining changes in otolith-ocular reflexes and motion perception following short duration space flights, and the operational implications of post-flight tilt-translation ambiguity for manual control performance. Vibrotactile feedback of tilt orientation is also being evaluated as a countermeasure to improve performance during a closed-loop nulling task. METHODS. Data is currently being collected on astronaut subjects during 3 preflight sessions and during the first 8 days after Shuttle landings. Variable radius centrifugation is utilized to elicit otolith reflexes in the lateral plane without concordant roll canal cues. Unilateral centrifugation (400 deg/s, 3.5 cm radius) stimulates one otolith positioned off-axis while the opposite side is centered over the axis of rotation. During this paradigm, roll-tilt perception is measured using a subjective visual vertical task and ocular counter-rolling is obtained using binocular video-oculography. During a second paradigm (216 deg/s, <20 cm radius), the effects of stimulus frequency (0.15 - 0.6 Hz) are examined on eye movements and motion perception. A closed-loop nulling task is also performed with and without vibrotactile display feedback of chair radial position. PRELIMINARY RESULTS. Data collection is currently ongoing. Results to date suggest there is a trend for perceived tilt and translation amplitudes to be increased at the low and medium frequencies on landing day compared to pre-flight. Manual control performance is improved with vibrotactile feedback. DISCUSSION. One result of this study will be to characterize the variability (gain, asymmetry) in both otolithocular responses and motion perception during variable radius centrifugation, and measure the time course of postflight recovery. This study will also address how adaptive changes in otolith-mediated reflexes correspond to one's ability to perform closed-loop nulling tasks following G-transitions, and whether manual

  18. The psychophysics of visual motion and global form processing in autism

    OpenAIRE

    Koldewyn, Kami; Whitney, David; Rivera, Susan M.

    2009-01-01

    Several groups have recently reported that people with autism may suffer from a deficit in visual motion processing and proposed that these deficits may be related to a general dorsal stream dysfunction. In order to test the dorsal stream deficit hypothesis, we investigated coherent and biological motion perception as well as coherent form perception in a group of adolescents with autism and a group of age-matched typically developing controls. If the dorsal stream hypothesis were true, we wo...

  19. The psychophysics of Visual Motion and Global form Processing in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koldewyn, Kami; Whitney, David; Rivera, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    Several groups have recently reported that people with autism may suffer from a deficit in visual motion processing and proposed that these deficits may be related to a general dorsal stream dysfunction. In order to test the dorsal stream deficit hypothesis, we investigated coherent and biological motion perception as well as coherent form…

  20. Long-term effects of serial anodal tDCS on motion perception in subjects with occipital stroke measured in the unaffected visual hemifield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel C Olma

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is a novel neuromodulatory tool that has seen early transition to clinical trials, although the high variability of these findings necessitates further studies in clincally-relevant populations. The majority of evidence into effects of repeated tDCS is based on research in the human motor system, but it is unclear whether the long-term effects of serial tDCS are motor-specific or transferable to other brain areas. This study aimed to examine whether serial anodal tDCS over the visual cortex can exogenously induce long-term neuroplastic changes in the visual cortex. However, when the visual cortex is affected by a cortical lesion, up-regulated endogenous neuroplastic adaptation processes may alter the susceptibility to tDCS. To this end, motion perception was investigated in the unaffected hemifield of subjects with unilateral visual cortex lesions. Twelve subjects with occipital ischaemic lesions participated in a within-subject, sham-controlled, double-blind study. MRI-registered sham or anodal tDCS (1.5 mA, 20 minutes was applied on five consecutive days over the visual cortex. Motion perception was tested before and after stimulation sessions and at 14- and 28-day follow-up. After a 16-day interval an identical study block with the other stimulation condition (anodal or sham tDCS followed. Serial anodal tDCS over the visual cortex resulted in an improvement in motion perception, a function attributed to MT/V5. This effect was still measurable at 14- and 28-day follow-up measurements. Thus, this may represent evidence for long-term tDCS-induced plasticity and has implications for the design of studies examining the time course of tDCS effects in both the visual and motor systems.

  1. ZAG-Otolith: Modification of Otolith-Ocular Reflexes, Motion Perception and Manual Control during Variable Radius Centrifugation Following Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, S. J.; Clarke, A. H.; Rupert, A. H.; Harm, D. L.; Clement, G. R.

    2009-01-01

    Two joint ESA-NASA studies are examining changes in otolith-ocular reflexes and motion perception following short duration space flights, and the operational implications of post-flight tilt-translation ambiguity for manual control performance. Vibrotactile feedback of tilt orientation is also being evaluated as a countermeasure to improve performance during a closed-loop nulling task. METHODS. Data is currently being collected on astronaut subjects during 3 preflight sessions and during the first 8 days after Shuttle landings. Variable radius centrifugation is utilized to elicit otolith reflexes in the lateral plane without concordant roll canal cues. Unilateral centrifugation (400 deg/s, 3.5 cm radius) stimulates one otolith positioned off-axis while the opposite side is centered over the axis of rotation. During this paradigm, roll-tilt perception is measured using a subjective visual vertical task and ocular counter-rolling is obtained using binocular video-oculography. During a second paradigm (216 deg/s, perception. A closed-loop nulling task is also performed with and without vibrotactile display feedback of chair radial position. PRELIMINARY RESULTS. Data collection is currently ongoing. Results to date suggest there is a trend for perceived tilt and translation amplitudes to be increased at the low and medium frequencies on landing day compared to pre-flight. Manual control performance is improved with vibrotactile feedback. DISCUSSION. One result of this study will be to characterize the variability (gain, asymmetry) in both otolithocular responses and motion perception during variable radius centrifugation, and measure the time course of postflight recovery. This study will also address how adaptive changes in otolith-mediated reflexes correspond to one's ability to perform closed-loop nulling tasks following G-transitions, and whether manual control performance can be improved with vibrotactile feedback of orientation.

  2. Distinct Regions of Right Temporal Cortex Are Associated with Biological and Human-Agent Motion: Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Neuropsychological Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Zaizhu; Bi, Yanchao; Chen, Jing; Chen, Quanjing; He, Yong; Caramazza, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    In human lateral temporal cortex, some regions show specific sensitivity to human motion. Here we examine whether such effects reflect a general biological-nonbiological organizational principle or a process specific to human-agent processing by comparing processing of human, animal, and tool motion in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment with healthy participants and a voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM) study of patients with brain damage (77 stroke patients). The...

  3. Do student perceptions of teaching predict the development of representational competence and biological knowledge?

    OpenAIRE

    Nitz, Sandra; Ainsworth, Shaaron E; Nerdel, Claudia; Prechtl, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Dealing with representations is a crucial skill for students and such representational competence is essential for learning science. This study analysed the relationship between representational competence and content knowledge, student perceptions of teaching practices concerning the use of different representations, and their impact on students’ outcome over a teaching unit. Participants were 931 students in 51 secondary school classes. Representational competence and content knowledge ...

  4. Motivational Goal Orientation, Perceptions of Biology and Physics Classroom Learning Environments, and Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koul, Ravinder; Roy, Laura; Lerdpornkulrat, Thanita

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have reported persuasive evidence that students' perceptions of their classroom learning environment account for significant variance in cognitive and affective outcomes (e.g. intrinsic motivation, self-concept, liking for particular subjects and students' intention to drop out). The study reported in this paper investigated the…

  5. Student Perceptions of the Cell Biology Laboratory Learning Environment in Four Undergraduate Science Courses in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Juan, Joaquin; Pérez-Cañaveras, Rosa M.; Segovia, Yolanda; Girela, Jose Luis; Martínez-Ruiz, Noemi; Romero-Rameta, Alejandro; Gómez-Torres, Maria José; Vizcaya-Moreno, M. Flores

    2016-01-01

    Cell biology is an academic discipline that organises and coordinates the learning of the structure, function and molecular composition of cells in some undergraduate biomedical programs. Besides course content and teaching methodologies, the laboratory environment is considered a key element in the teaching of and learning of cell biology. The…

  6. Non-contact, ultrasound-based indentation method for measuring elastic properties of biological tissues using harmonic motion imaging (HMI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vappou, Jonathan; Hou, Gary Y; Marquet, Fabrice; Shahmirzadi, Danial; Grondin, Julien; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-04-01

    Noninvasive measurement of mechanical properties of biological tissues in vivo could play a significant role in improving the current understanding of tissue biomechanics. In this study, we propose a method for measuring elastic properties non-invasively by using internal indentation as generated by harmonic motion imaging (HMI). In HMI, an oscillating acoustic radiation force is produced by a focused ultrasound transducer at the focal region, and the resulting displacements are estimated by tracking radiofrequency signals acquired by an imaging transducer. In this study, the focal spot region was modeled as a rigid cylindrical piston that exerts an oscillatory, uniform internal force to the underlying tissue. The HMI elastic modulus EHMI was defined as the ratio of the applied force to the axial strain measured by 1D ultrasound imaging. The accuracy and the precision of the EHMI estimate were assessed both numerically and experimentally in polyacrylamide tissue-mimicking phantoms. Initial feasibility of this method in soft tissues was also shown in canine liver specimens in vitro. Very good correlation and agreement was found between the measured Young's modulus and the HMI modulus in the numerical study (r(2) > 0.99, relative error <10%) and on polyacrylamide gels (r(2) = 0.95, relative error <24%). The average HMI modulus on five liver samples was found to EHMI = 2.62  ±  0.41 kPa, compared to EMechTesting = 4.2  ±  2.58 kPa measured by rheometry. This study has demonstrated for the first time the initial feasibility of a non-invasive, model-independent method to estimate local elastic properties of biological tissues at a submillimeter scale using an internal indentation-like approach. Ongoing studies include in vitro experiments in a larger number of samples and feasibility testing in in vivo models as well as pathological human specimens. PMID:25776065

  7. Student and Teacher Perceptions of a Mobile-Based Biology Vocabulary Study Tool for English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Maria B.

    English language learners studying biology face a dual challenge of mastering both content and language. Teaching ELLs how to engage in scientific discourse using appropriate language to ask, answer, explain, and make predictions about science requires a foundational knowledge of content-specific vocabulary. This study used qualitative interviews with intermediate-level ELLs at an American high school to learn how a supplemental iPod-based vocabulary review tool influenced their perceptions of learning biology vocabulary outside of classroom hours. Interviews with their biology teacher were also used to complement student testimony from the point of view of an educational professional with ELL teaching experience. Past studies in the area of mobile learning have primarily employed questionnaires to gather feedback from participants. This research study adds greater participant voice to the body of literature that encompasses mobile language learning, second language acquisition, and science education by presenting nuanced opinions from both students and teachers. This dissertation concludes with a discussion on the influence that this study could have on further research in the fields of mobile learning, academic vocabulary, and student learning behaviors.

  8. Auditory motion capturing ambiguous visual motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ArjenAlink

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, it is demonstrated that moving sounds have an effect on the direction in which one sees visual stimuli move. During the main experiment sounds were presented consecutively at four speaker locations inducing left- or rightwards auditory apparent motion. On the path of auditory apparent motion, visual apparent motion stimuli were presented with a high degree of directional ambiguity. The main outcome of this experiment is that our participants perceived visual apparent motion stimuli that were ambiguous (equally likely to be perceived as moving left- or rightwards more often as moving in the same direction than in the opposite direction of auditory apparent motion. During the control experiment we replicated this finding and found no effect of sound motion direction on eye movements. This indicates that auditory motion can capture our visual motion percept when visual motion direction is insufficiently determinate without affecting eye movements.

  9. ZAG-Otolith: Modification of Otolith-Ocular Reflexes, Motion Perception and Manual Control during Variable Radius Centrifugation Following Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, S. J.; Clarke, A. H.; Rupert, A. H.; Harm, D. L.; Clement, G. R.

    2009-01-01

    Two joint ESA-NASA studies are examining changes in otolith-ocular reflexes and motion perception following short duration space flights, and the operational implications of post-flight tilt-translation ambiguity for manual control performance. Vibrotactile feedback of tilt orientation is also being evaluated as a countermeasure to improve performance during a closed-loop nulling task. METHODS. Data is currently being collected on astronaut subjects during 3 preflight sessions and during the first 8 days after Shuttle landings. Variable radius centrifugation is utilized to elicit otolith reflexes in the lateral plane without concordant roll canal cues. Unilateral centrifugation (400 deg/s, 3.5 cm radius) stimulates one otolith positioned off-axis while the opposite side is centered over the axis of rotation. During this paradigm, roll-tilt perception is measured using a subjective visual vertical task and ocular counter-rolling is obtained using binocular video-oculography. During a second paradigm (216 deg/s, centrifugation, and measure the time course of postflight recovery. This study will also address how adaptive changes in otolith-mediated reflexes correspond to one's ability to perform closed-loop nulling tasks following G-transitions, and whether manual control performance can be improved with vibrotactile feedback of orientation.

  10. Cosmetics as a feature of the extended human phenotype: modulation of the perception of biologically important facial signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy L Etcoff

    Full Text Available Research on the perception of faces has focused on the size, shape, and configuration of inherited features or the biological phenotype, and largely ignored the effects of adornment, or the extended phenotype. Research on the evolution of signaling has shown that animals frequently alter visual features, including color cues, to attract, intimidate or protect themselves from conspecifics. Humans engage in conscious manipulation of visual signals using cultural tools in real time rather than genetic changes over evolutionary time. Here, we investigate one tool, the use of color cosmetics. In two studies, we asked viewers to rate the same female faces with or without color cosmetics, and we varied the style of makeup from minimal (natural, to moderate (professional, to dramatic (glamorous. Each look provided increasing luminance contrast between the facial features and surrounding skin. Faces were shown for 250 ms or for unlimited inspection time, and subjects rated them for attractiveness, competence, likeability and trustworthiness. At 250 ms, cosmetics had significant positive effects on all outcomes. Length of inspection time did not change the effect for competence or attractiveness. However, with longer inspection time, the effect of cosmetics on likability and trust varied by specific makeup looks, indicating that cosmetics could impact automatic and deliberative judgments differently. The results suggest that cosmetics can create supernormal facial stimuli, and that one way they may do so is by exaggerating cues to sexual dimorphism. Our results provide evidence that judgments of facial trustworthiness and attractiveness are at least partially separable, that beauty has a significant positive effect on judgment of competence, a universal dimension of social cognition, but has a more nuanced effect on the other universal dimension of social warmth, and that the extended phenotype significantly influences perception of biologically important

  11. Cosmetics as a feature of the extended human phenotype: modulation of the perception of biologically important facial signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etcoff, Nancy L; Stock, Shannon; Haley, Lauren E; Vickery, Sarah A; House, David M

    2011-01-01

    Research on the perception of faces has focused on the size, shape, and configuration of inherited features or the biological phenotype, and largely ignored the effects of adornment, or the extended phenotype. Research on the evolution of signaling has shown that animals frequently alter visual features, including color cues, to attract, intimidate or protect themselves from conspecifics. Humans engage in conscious manipulation of visual signals using cultural tools in real time rather than genetic changes over evolutionary time. Here, we investigate one tool, the use of color cosmetics. In two studies, we asked viewers to rate the same female faces with or without color cosmetics, and we varied the style of makeup from minimal (natural), to moderate (professional), to dramatic (glamorous). Each look provided increasing luminance contrast between the facial features and surrounding skin. Faces were shown for 250 ms or for unlimited inspection time, and subjects rated them for attractiveness, competence, likeability and trustworthiness. At 250 ms, cosmetics had significant positive effects on all outcomes. Length of inspection time did not change the effect for competence or attractiveness. However, with longer inspection time, the effect of cosmetics on likability and trust varied by specific makeup looks, indicating that cosmetics could impact automatic and deliberative judgments differently. The results suggest that cosmetics can create supernormal facial stimuli, and that one way they may do so is by exaggerating cues to sexual dimorphism. Our results provide evidence that judgments of facial trustworthiness and attractiveness are at least partially separable, that beauty has a significant positive effect on judgment of competence, a universal dimension of social cognition, but has a more nuanced effect on the other universal dimension of social warmth, and that the extended phenotype significantly influences perception of biologically important signals at first

  12. Cosmetics as a Feature of the Extended Human Phenotype: Modulation of the Perception of Biologically Important Facial Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etcoff, Nancy L.; Stock, Shannon; Haley, Lauren E.; Vickery, Sarah A.; House, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Research on the perception of faces has focused on the size, shape, and configuration of inherited features or the biological phenotype, and largely ignored the effects of adornment, or the extended phenotype. Research on the evolution of signaling has shown that animals frequently alter visual features, including color cues, to attract, intimidate or protect themselves from conspecifics. Humans engage in conscious manipulation of visual signals using cultural tools in real time rather than genetic changes over evolutionary time. Here, we investigate one tool, the use of color cosmetics. In two studies, we asked viewers to rate the same female faces with or without color cosmetics, and we varied the style of makeup from minimal (natural), to moderate (professional), to dramatic (glamorous). Each look provided increasing luminance contrast between the facial features and surrounding skin. Faces were shown for 250 ms or for unlimited inspection time, and subjects rated them for attractiveness, competence, likeability and trustworthiness. At 250 ms, cosmetics had significant positive effects on all outcomes. Length of inspection time did not change the effect for competence or attractiveness. However, with longer inspection time, the effect of cosmetics on likability and trust varied by specific makeup looks, indicating that cosmetics could impact automatic and deliberative judgments differently. The results suggest that cosmetics can create supernormal facial stimuli, and that one way they may do so is by exaggerating cues to sexual dimorphism. Our results provide evidence that judgments of facial trustworthiness and attractiveness are at least partially separable, that beauty has a significant positive effect on judgment of competence, a universal dimension of social cognition, but has a more nuanced effect on the other universal dimension of social warmth, and that the extended phenotype significantly influences perception of biologically important signals at first

  13. Factors influencing elective science students’ perception of their Biology classroom environment in low and high academic achieving schools in the Central Region of Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    Otami, Deodat Charles; Ampiah, Joseph Ghartey; Anthony-Krueger, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The study investigated factors influencing elective science students’ perception of their Biology classroom environment in low and high academic achieving senior secondary schools in the Central Region of Ghana. The cross-sectional survey research design was adopted. Participants were 356 third-year elective science students, selection through a multi-stage sampling technique. Data were obtained using the Biology Classroom Environment Questionnaire (BCEQ). This was after the senior secondary ...

  14. Phase-Based Binocular Perception of Motion in Depth: Cortical-Like Operators and Analog VLSI Architectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio P. Sabatini

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a cortical-like strategy to obtain reliable estimates of the motions of objects in a scene toward/away from the observer (motion in depth, from local measurements of binocular parameters derived from direct comparison of the results of monocular spatiotemporal filtering operations performed on stereo image pairs. This approach is suitable for a hardware implementation, in which such parameters can be gained via a feedforward computation (i.e., collection, comparison, and punctual operations on the outputs of the nodes of recurrent VLSI lattice networks, performing local computations. These networks act as efficient computational structures for embedded analog filtering operations in smart vision sensors. Extensive simulations on both synthetic and real-world image sequences prove the validity of the approach that allows to gain high-level information about the 3D structure of the scene, directly from sensorial data, without resorting to explicit scene reconstruction.

  15. Risk assessment and stakeholder perceptions in novel biological control agent release: YST as a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objectives of risk assessment are to learn about whether a candidate agent would be safe to use in the environment where release is planned, and to present such information in a clear, understandable format to regulators, stakeholders, and the public. Plant pathogens evaluated for biological co...

  16. Anthropomorphism influences perception of computer-animated characters’ actions

    OpenAIRE

    Chaminade, Thierry; Hodgins, Jessica; Kawato, Mitsuo

    2007-01-01

    Computer-animated characters are common in popular culture and have begun to be used as experimental tools in social cognitive neurosciences. Here we investigated how appearance of these characters’ influences perception of their actions. Subjects were presented with different characters animated either with motion data captured from human actors or by interpolating between poses (keyframes) designed by an animator, and were asked to categorize the motion as biological or artificial. The resp...

  17. Klein bottle logophysics: a unified principle for non-linear systems, cosmology, geophysics, biology, biomechanics and perception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a unified principle for science that surmounts dualism, in terms of torsion fields and the non-orientable surfaces, notably the Klein Bottle and its logic, the Möbius strip and the projective plane. We apply it to the complex numbers and cosmology, to non-linear systems integrating the issue of hyperbolic divergences with the change of orientability, to the biomechanics of vision and the mammal heart, to the morphogenesis of crustal shapes on Earth in connection to the wavefronts of gravitation, elasticity and electromagnetism, to pattern recognition of artificial images and visual recognition, to neurology and the topographic maps of the sensorium, to perception, in particular of music. We develop it in terms of the fundamental 2:1 resonance inherent to the Möbius strip and the Klein Bottle, the minimal surfaces representation of the wavefronts, and the non-dual Klein Bottle logic inherent to pattern recognition, to the harmonic functions and vector fields that lay at the basis of geophysics and physics at large. We discuss the relation between the topographic maps of the sensorium, and the issue of turning inside-out of the visual world as a general principle for cognition, topological chemistry, cell biology and biological morphogenesis in particular in embryology

  18. Klein bottle logophysics: a unified principle for non-linear systems, cosmology, geophysics, biology, biomechanics and perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucio Rapoport, Diego

    2013-04-01

    We present a unified principle for science that surmounts dualism, in terms of torsion fields and the non-orientable surfaces, notably the Klein Bottle and its logic, the Möbius strip and the projective plane. We apply it to the complex numbers and cosmology, to non-linear systems integrating the issue of hyperbolic divergences with the change of orientability, to the biomechanics of vision and the mammal heart, to the morphogenesis of crustal shapes on Earth in connection to the wavefronts of gravitation, elasticity and electromagnetism, to pattern recognition of artificial images and visual recognition, to neurology and the topographic maps of the sensorium, to perception, in particular of music. We develop it in terms of the fundamental 2:1 resonance inherent to the Möbius strip and the Klein Bottle, the minimal surfaces representation of the wavefronts, and the non-dual Klein Bottle logic inherent to pattern recognition, to the harmonic functions and vector fields that lay at the basis of geophysics and physics at large. We discuss the relation between the topographic maps of the sensorium, and the issue of turning inside-out of the visual world as a general principle for cognition, topological chemistry, cell biology and biological morphogenesis in particular in embryology

  19. Machine perception and intelligent control architecture for multirobot coordination based on biological principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomopoulos, Stelios C.; Braught, Grant

    1996-10-01

    Intelligent control, inspired by biological and AI (artificial intelligence) principles, has increased the understanding of controlling complex processes without precise mathematical model of the controlled process. Through customized applications, intelligent control has demonstrated that it is a step in the right direction. However, intelligent control has yet to provide a complete solution to the problem of integrated manufacturing systems via intelligent reconfiguration of the robotics systems. The aim of this paper is to present an intelligent control architecture and design methodology based on biological principles that govern self-organization of autonomous agents. Two key structural elements of the proposed control architecture have been tested individually on key pilot applications and shown promising results. The proposed intelligent control design is inspired by observed individual and collective biological behavior in colonies of living organisms that are capable of self-organization into groups of specialized individuals capable of collectively achieving a set of prescribed or emerging objectives. The nervous and brain system in the proposed control architecture is based on reinforcement learning principles and conditioning and modeled using adaptive neurocontrollers. Mathematical control theory (e.g. optimal control, adaptive control, and neurocontrol) is used to coordinate the interactions of multiple robotics agents.

  20. Factors influencing elective science students’ perception of their Biology classroom environment in low and high academic achieving schools in the Central Region of Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otami, Deodat Charles

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated factors influencing elective science students’ perception of their Biology classroom environment in low and high academic achieving senior secondary schools in the Central Region of Ghana. The cross-sectional survey research design was adopted. Participants were 356 third-year elective science students, selection through a multi-stage sampling technique. Data were obtained using the Biology Classroom Environment Questionnaire (BCEQ. This was after the senior secondary schools that offer elective science program had been categorized into low and high academic achieving schools based on their performance in Senior Secondary School Certificate Examination/West Africa Senior Secondary School Examinations for five years. Two third-year intact classes were randomly selected from four schools under each category. Data analysis includes Factor and Item Analyses, and Multivariate Analysis of Variance. The findings revealed that four factors influence elective science students’ perception of their Biology classroom environment. The findings further suggested that elective science students in both school categories had a low perception of their Biology classroom environment but significantly different in favor of the elective science students in low academic achieving schools in teacher support, cooperation, and equity. Implications of the study are discussed and recommendations given.

  1. Interpersonal interaction recognition of biological motion%生物运动的人际交互辨识研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    边红艳; 刘霞; 韩继明; 郭淑芳; 史娟; 张永莉

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the interpersonal interaction recognition characteristics of biological motion. Methods We played 19 interpersonal interaction stimulations and 8 non-communication stimulations to the partici-pants, who were asked to answer to the stimulations. Then the results were assessed by the judges. Results (1) As for communication behaviors, point source video test showed that significant difference existed in the recognition rate of“the near point"between females and males (χ2=21.52, P=0.001). (2) As for the social motivation, there were signifi-cant differences in the recognition rate of“don't”(χ2=8.66, P=0.003) and“which one”(χ2=8.37, P=0.004) between fe-males and males. (3) As for specific gestures, there were significant differences in the identification rates of“I am very angry”(χ2=5.44, P=0.020),“don't”(χ2=8.27, P=0.004) and“pick up”(χ2=5.70, P=0.017). Conclusion Chinese col-lege students have high sensitivity in the interactive recognition. In the recognition rates of social motivation and ges-tures, some actions are consistent with foreign studies, and some are not.%目的:研究人际交互的辨识特征。方法向参与者播放19项人际互动刺激和8项非交流性对照刺激,要求参与者作答,再由评判员进行判断。结果(1)对交流行为识别率方面女性和男性点光源视频识别率做对比后发现“靠近点”这一动作识别率差异有统计学意义(χ2=21.52,P=0.001);(2)对社会动机识别率方面女性和男性点光源视频识别率做对比后发现,“不要”这一动作识别率存在显著性差异(χ2=8.66,P=0.003)。“哪一个?”这一动作存在显著性差异(χ2=8.37,P=0.004);(3)对具体姿势的识别率差异有统计学意义的是:“我很生气”(χ2=5.44, P=0.020)、“不要”(χ2=8.27,P=0.004)和“捡起来”(χ2=5.70,P=0.017)。结论我国大学生在互动交流识别方面的敏感性较高;在社会动机

  2. Rapid Perceptual Switching of a Reversible Biological Figure

    OpenAIRE

    Stuart Jackson; Fred Cummins; Nuala Brady

    2008-01-01

    Certain visual stimuli can give rise to contradictory perceptions. In this paper we examine the temporal dynamics of perceptual reversals experienced with biological motion, comparing these dynamics to those observed with other ambiguous structure from motion (SFM) stimuli. In our first experiment, naïve observers monitored perceptual alternations with an ambiguous rotating walker, a figure that randomly alternates between walking in clockwise (CW) and counter-clockwise (CCW) directions. Whil...

  3. Attending to Motion: an object-based approach

    OpenAIRE

    Belardinelli, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Visual attention is the biological mechanism allowing to turn mere sensing into conscious perception. In this process, object-based modulation of attention provides a further layer between low-level space/feature-based region selection and full object recognition. In this context, motion is a very powerful feature, naturally attracting our gaze and yielding rapid and effective shape distinction. Moving from a pixel-based account of attention to the definition of proto-objects as perc...

  4. Biologic

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffman, L H

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we explore the boundary between biology and the study of formal systems (logic). In the end, we arrive at a summary formalism, a chapter in "boundary mathematics" where there are not only containers but also extainers ><, entities open to interaction and distinguishing the space that they are not. The boundary algebra of containers and extainers is to biologic what boolean algebra is to classical logic. We show how this formalism encompasses significant parts of the logic of DNA replication, the Dirac formalism for quantum mechanics, formalisms for protein folding and the basic structure of the Temperley Lieb algebra at the foundations of topological invariants of knots and links.

  5. A writing-intensive course improves biology undergraduates' perception and confidence of their abilities to read scientific literature and communicate science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownell, Sara E; Price, Jordan V; Steinman, Lawrence

    2013-03-01

    Most scientists agree that comprehension of primary scientific papers and communication of scientific concepts are two of the most important skills that we can teach, but few undergraduate biology courses make these explicit course goals. We designed an undergraduate neuroimmunology course that uses a writing-intensive format. Using a mixture of primary literature, writing assignments directed toward a layperson and scientist audience, and in-class discussions, we aimed to improve the ability of students to 1) comprehend primary scientific papers, 2) communicate science to a scientific audience, and 3) communicate science to a layperson audience. We offered the course for three consecutive years and evaluated its impact on student perception and confidence using a combination of pre- and postcourse survey questions and coded open-ended responses. Students showed gains in both the perception of their understanding of primary scientific papers and of their abilities to communicate science to scientific and layperson audiences. These results indicate that this unique format can teach both communication skills and basic science to undergraduate biology students. We urge others to adopt a similar format for undergraduate biology courses to teach process skills in addition to content, thus broadening and strengthening the impact of undergraduate courses. PMID:23471252

  6. Delayed Response to Animate Implied Motion in Human Motion Processing Areas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorteije, Jeannette A.M.; Kenemans, J. Leon; Jellema, Tjeerd; Lubbe, van der Rob H.J.; Heer, de Frederiek; Wezel, van Richard J.A.

    2006-01-01

    Viewing static photographs of objects in motion evokes higher fMRI activation in the human medial temporal complex (MT+) than looking at similar photographs without this implied motion. As MT+ is traditionally thought to be involved in motion perception (and not in form perception), this finding sug

  7. Delayed response to animate implied motion in human motion processing areas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorteije, J.A.M.; Kenemans, J.L.; Jellema, T.; Lubbe, R.H.J. van der; Heer, F. de; Wezel, R.J.A. van

    2006-01-01

    Viewing static photographs of objects in motion evokes higher fMRI activation in the human medial temporal complex (MT+) than looking at similar photographs without this implied motion. As MT+ is traditionally thought to be involved in motion perception (and not in form perception), this finding sug

  8. Grundskoleelevers uppfattningar om begreppet art relaterade till formuleringar i läroböcker i biologi12 to 15 year old pupils' perceptions of the concept species related to formulations in textbooks in Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ferlin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false SV X-NONE X-NONE This study contributes to knowledge about pupils’ conceptions of species. There is no unique and unequivocal definition of the species concept and this is a matter of discussion among biology researchers. This complexity is not communicated when the species concept is presented in Swedish Biology textbooks used in grades 6/7–9. Diverse conceptualizations of science concepts among pupils have, however, been analyzed in previous educational studies. This study analyses pupils’ expressions concerning species and the species concept and how these correspond to the presentations of them in Biology textbooks. The findings are based on results from content analyses of seven textbooks as well as a questionnaire answered by 12–15-year-old pupils. The results demonstrate that pupils essentially base their perception of the species concept on morphological similarities; hence the pupils’ perceptions deviate from textbook presentations. This is an issue which teachers, textbook authors and producers of other teaching materials should be aware of.

  9. Biological Motion induced mu suppression is reduced in Early Psychosis (EP) patients with active negative symptoms and Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minichino, Amedeo; Singh, Fiza; Pineda, Jaime; Friederich, Elisabeth; Cadenhead, Kristin S

    2016-04-30

    There is evidence of genetic and neural system overlap in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and Early Psychosis (EP). Five datasets were pooled to compare mu suppression index (MSI), a proxy of mirror neuron activity, in EP, high functioning ASD, and healthy subjects (HS). ASDs and EPs with "active" negative symptoms showed significant differences in mu suppression, in response to Biological Motion/point-light display animation, compared to HS. Preliminary findings suggest that similar neural network deficits in ASD and EP could be driven by the expression of negative symptoms in the latter group of patients. These findings may aid future studies on EP and ASD and facilitate the formulation of new hypotheses regarding their pathophysiology. PMID:26970656

  10. Collective Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Czirok, A

    1999-01-01

    With the aim of understanding the emergence of collective motion from local interactions of organisms in a "noisy" environment, we study biologically inspired, inherently non-equilibrium models consisting of self-propelled particles. In these models particles interact with their neighbors by turning towards the local average direction of motion. In the limit of vanishing velocities this behavior results in a dynamics analogous to some Monte Carlo realization of equilibrium ferromagnets. However, numerical simulations indicate the existence of new types of phase transitions which are not present in the corresponding ferromagnets. In particular, here we demonstrate both numerically and analytically that even in certain one dimensional self-propelled particle systems an ordered phase exists for finite noise levels.

  11. Extending human perception of electromagnetic radiation to the UV region through biologically inspired photochromic fuzzy logic (BIPFUL) systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentili, Pier Luigi; Rightler, Amanda L; Heron, B Mark; Gabbutt, Christopher D

    2016-01-25

    Photochromic fuzzy logic systems have been designed that extend human visual perception into the UV region. The systems are founded on a detailed knowledge of the activation wavelengths and quantum yields of a series of thermally reversible photochromic compounds. By appropriate matching of the photochromic behaviour unique colour signatures are generated in response differing UV activation frequencies. PMID:26658700

  12. Neuromorphic Configurable Architecture for Robust Motion Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Botella

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The robustness of the human visual system recovering motion estimation in almost any visual situation is enviable, performing enormous calculation tasks continuously, robustly, efficiently, and effortlessly. There is obviously a great deal we can learn from our own visual system. Currently, there are several optical flow algorithms, although none of them deals efficiently with noise, illumination changes, second-order motion, occlusions, and so on. The main contribution of this work is the efficient implementation of a biologically inspired motion algorithm that borrows nature templates as inspiration in the design of architectures and makes use of a specific model of human visual motion perception: Multichannel Gradient Model (McGM. This novel customizable architecture of a neuromorphic robust optical flow can be constructed with FPGA or ASIC device using properties of the cortical motion pathway, constituting a useful framework for building future complex bioinspired systems running in real time with high computational complexity. This work includes the resource usage and performance data, and the comparison with actual systems. This hardware has many application fields like object recognition, navigation, or tracking in difficult environments due to its bioinspired and robustness properties.

  13. Using student motivation to design groups in a non-majors biology course for team-based collaborative learning: Impacts on knowledge, views, attitudes, and perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Kristi L.

    The importance of student motivation and its connection to other learning variables (i.e., attitudes, knowledge, persistence, attendance) is well established. Collaborative work at the undergraduate level has been recognized as a valuable tool in large courses. However, motivation and collaborative group work have rarely been combined. This project utilized student motivation to learn biology to place non-major biology undergraduates in collaborative learning groups at East Carolina University, a mid-sized southeastern American university, to determine the effects of this construct on student learning. A pre-test measuring motivation to learn biology, attitudes toward biology, perceptions of biology and biologists, views of science, and content knowledge was administered. A similar post-test followed as part of the final exam. Two sections of the same introductory biology course (n = 312) were used and students were divided into homogeneous and heterogeneous groups (based on their motivation score). The heterogeneous groups (n = 32) consisted of a mixture of different motivation levels, while the homogeneous groups (n = 32) were organized into teams with similar motivation scores using tiers of high-, middle-, and low-level participants. Data analysis determined mixed perceptions of biology and biologists. These include the perceptions biology was less intriguing, less relevant, less practical, less ethical, and less understandable. Biologists were perceived as being neat and slightly intelligent, but not very altruistic, humane, ethical, logical, honest, or moral. Content knowledge scores more than doubled from pre- to post-test. Half of the items measuring views of science were not statistically significantly different from pre- to post-test. Many of the factors for attitudes toward biology became more agreeable from pre- to post-test. Correlations between motivation scores, participation levels, attendance rates, and final course grades were examined at both the

  14. Constructing Visual Perception of Body Movement with the Motor Cortex.

    OpenAIRE

    Orgs, Guido; Dovern, Anna; Hagura, Nobuhiro; Haggard, Patrick; Fink, Gereon R.; Weiss, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    The human brain readily perceives fluent movement from static input. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated brain mechanisms that mediate fluent apparent biological motion (ABM) perception from sequences of body postures. We presented body and nonbody stimuli varying in objective sequence duration and fluency of apparent movement. Three body postures were ordered to produce a fluent (ABC) or a nonfluent (ACB) apparent movement. This enabled us to identify brain areas inv...

  15. Constructing Visual Perception of Body Movement with the Motor Cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Orgs, Guido; Dovern, Anna; Hagura, Nobuhiro; Haggard, Patrick; Fink, Gereon R.; Weiss, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    The human brain readily perceives fluent movement from static input. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated brain mechanisms that mediate fluent apparent biological motion (ABM) perception from sequences of body postures. We presented body and nonbody stimuli varying in objective sequence duration and fluency of apparent movement. Three body postures were ordered to produce a fluent (ABC) or a nonfluent (ACB) apparent movement. This enabled us to identify brain areas inv...

  16. Perception coherence zones in flight simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valente Pais, A.R.; Paassen, M.M. van; Mulder, M.; Wentink, M.

    2009-01-01

    The importance of motion perception knowledge for flight simulation is widely recognized. The development and tuning of motion filters relies on understanding the human motion perception mechanisms and its limitations. Particularly interesting for flight simulation is the study of visual-vestibular

  17. Perception and environmental education about mangrove ecosystem improving sciences and biology subjects in public school at Recife, PE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauro Lopes Rodrigues

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This work was developed with the aim to identify the perceptions of the students from a school about the mangrove ecosystem, using didactic and natural elements available to do an environmental education action. The previous perception of the students on the ecosystem was evaluated by means of a questionnaire, followed of a theoretical exposition, complemented with a visit to a conserved mangrove (Paripe River, Itamaracá and another impacted (Jiquiá River, Recife, near to the school, being applied new questionnaires to evaluate their conceptions and the academic strategies. The students demonstrated a relative previous knowledge on the mangrove and the educative action showed effectiveness in the transference of the ecological concepts about the ecosystem, using the method of incorporate their daily knowledge to stimulate them to know the scientific side of the subject, ending with the development of ecologic conscience.

  18. Using a Professional Development Program for Enhancing Chilean Biology Teachers' Understanding of Nature of Science (NOS) and Their Perceptions About Using History of Science to Teach NOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavez, José M.; Vergara, Claudia A.; Santibañez, David; Cofré, Hernán

    2016-05-01

    A number of authors have recognized the importance of understanding the nature of science (NOS) for scientific literacy. Different instructional strategies such as decontextualized, hands-on inquiry, and history of science (HOS) activities have been proposed for teaching NOS. This article seeks to understand the contribution of HOS in enhancing biology teachers' understanding of NOS, and their perceptions about using HOS to teach NOS. These teachers ( N = 8), enrolled in a professional development program in Chile are, according to the national curriculum, expected to teach NOS, but have no specific NOS and HOS training. Teachers' views of NOS were assessed using the VNOS-D+ questionnaire at the beginning and at the end of two modules about science instruction and NOS. Both the pre- and the post-test were accompanied by interviews, and in the second session we collected information about teachers' perceptions of which interventions had been more significant in changing their views on NOS. Finally, the teachers also had to prepare a lesson plan for teaching NOS that included HOS. Some of the most important study results were: significant improvements were observed in teachers' understanding of NOS, although they assigned different levels of importance to HOS in these improvements; and although the teachers improved their understanding of NOS, most had difficulties in planning lessons about NOS and articulating historical episodes that incorporated NOS. The relationship between teachers' improved understanding of NOS and their instructional NOS skills is also discussed.

  19. Event-related alpha suppression in response to facial motion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Girges

    Full Text Available While biological motion refers to both face and body movements, little is known about the visual perception of facial motion. We therefore examined alpha wave suppression as a reduction in power is thought to reflect visual activity, in addition to attentional reorienting and memory processes. Nineteen neurologically healthy adults were tested on their ability to discriminate between successive facial motion captures. These animations exhibited both rigid and non-rigid facial motion, as well as speech expressions. The structural and surface appearance of these facial animations did not differ, thus participants decisions were based solely on differences in facial movements. Upright, orientation-inverted and luminance-inverted facial stimuli were compared. At occipital and parieto-occipital regions, upright facial motion evoked a transient increase in alpha which was then followed by a significant reduction. This finding is discussed in terms of neural efficiency, gating mechanisms and neural synchronization. Moreover, there was no difference in the amount of alpha suppression evoked by each facial stimulus at occipital regions, suggesting early visual processing remains unaffected by manipulation paradigms. However, upright facial motion evoked greater suppression at parieto-occipital sites, and did so in the shortest latency. Increased activity within this region may reflect higher attentional reorienting to natural facial motion but also involvement of areas associated with the visual control of body effectors.

  20. Prenatal exposure to a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB congener influences fixation duration on biological motion at 4-months-old: a preliminary study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Doi

    Full Text Available Adverse effects of prenatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB congeners on postnatal brain development have been reported in a number of previous studies. However, few studies have examined the effects of prenatal PCB exposure on early social development. The present study sought to increase understanding of the neurotoxicity of PCBs by examining the relationship between PCB congener concentrations in umbilical cord blood and fixation patterns when observing upright and inverted biological motion (BM at four-months after birth. The development of the ability to recognize BM stimuli is considered a hallmark of socio-cognitive development. The results revealed a link between dioxin-like PCB #118 concentration and fixation pattern. Specifically, four-month-olds with a low-level of prenatal exposure to PCB #118 exhibited a preference for the upright BM over inverted BM, whereas those with a relatively high-level of exposure did not. This finding supports the proposal that prenatal PCB exposure impairs the development of social functioning, and indicates the importance of congener-specific analysis in the risk analysis of the adverse effects of PCB exposure on the brain development.

  1. Ways of incorporating photographic images in learning and assessing high school biology: A study of visual perception and visual cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Brenda Chaumont

    This study evaluated the cognitive benefits and costs of incorporating biology-textbook and student-generated photographic images into the learning and assessment processes within a 10th grade biology classroom. The study implemented Wandersee's (2000) 20-Q Model of Image-Based Biology Test-Item Design (20-Q Model) to explore the use of photographic images to assess students' understanding of complex biological processes. A thorough review of the students' textbook using ScaleMaster R with PC Interface was also conducted. The photographs, diagrams, and other representations found in the textbook were measured to determine the percentage of each graphic depicted in the book and comparisons were made to the text. The theoretical framework that guided the research included Human Constructivist tenets espoused by Mintzes, Wandersee and Novak (2000). Physiological and cognitive factors of images and image-based learning as described by Robin (1992), Solso (1997) and Wandersee (2000) were examined. Qualitative case study design presented by Yin (1994), Denzin and Lincoln (1994) was applied and data were collected through interviews, observations, student activities, student and school artifacts and Scale Master IIRTM measurements. The results of the study indicate that although 24% of the high school biology textbook is devoted to photographic images which contribute significantly to textbook cost, the teacher and students paid little attention to photographic images other than as aesthetic elements for creating biological ambiance, wasting valuable opportunities for learning. The analysis of the photographs corroborated findings published by the Association American Association for the Advancement of Science that indicated "While most of the books are lavishly illustrated, these representations are rarely helpful, because they are too abstract, needlessly complicated, or inadequately explained" (Roseman, 2000, p. 2). The findings also indicate that applying the 20-Q

  2. Labs not in a lab: A case study of instructor and student perceptions of an online biology lab class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiron, Jessica Boyce

    Distance learning is not a new phenomenon but with the advancement in technology, the different ways of delivering an education have increased. Today, many universities and colleges offer their students the option of taking courses online instead of sitting in a classroom on campus. In general students like online classes because they allow for flexibility, the comfort of sitting at home, and the potential to save money. Even though there are advantages to taking online classes, many students and instructors still debate the effectiveness and quality of education in a distant learning environment. Many universities and colleges are receiving pressure from students to offer more and more classes online. Research argues for both the advantages and disadvantages of online classes and stresses the importance of colleges and universities weighing both sides before deciding to adopt an online class. Certain classes may not be suitable for online instruction and not all instructors are suitable to teach online classes. The literature also reveals that there is a need for more research on online biology lab classes. With the lack of information on online biology labs needed by science educators who face the increasing demand for online biology labs, this case study hopes to provide insight into the use of online biology lab classes and the how students and an instructor at a community college in Virginia perceive their online biology lab experience as well as the effectiveness of the online labs.

  3. Children's Perception of Motion in Unidirectional, Two- and Three-Pitch Melodic Patterns and the Related Effects of Change in Timbre, Loudness, and Duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David Brian

    Three experiments examined the effects of selected factors of interval size, timbre, loudness, and length of the melodic pattern on children's ability to perceive, the motion of 2- and 3-pitch melodic patterns. Subjects for all experiments were 32 second- and 32 fifth-grade children. The task for each experiment consisted of identifying the motion…

  4. Teacher and Student Perceptions of the Development of Learner Autonomy; A Case Study in the Biological Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, G. W.; Furnell, J.; Murphy, C. M.; Goulder, R.

    2015-01-01

    Biology teachers in a UK university expressed a majority view that student learning autonomy increases with progression through university. A minority suggested that pre-existing diversity in learning autonomy was more important and that individuals not cohorts differ in their learning autonomy. They suggested that personal experience prior to…

  5. Psychobiology and Food Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson, A.

    1985-01-01

    Psychobiology is a scientific discipline which encompasses the phenomena known to be important as regards nutrition and food consumption in space. Specifically, it includes those areas of biology which are clearly related to behavior, human subjective experience and problems of coping and adapting to stress. Taste and odor perception; perception (knowledge gaps); perception (needs); food preference and menu selection; and choosing of acceptable diets are discussed.

  6. Response Priming with More or Less Biological Movements as Primes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, David; Bermeitinger, Christina

    2016-07-01

    Response priming in general is a suitable tool in cognitive psychology to investigate motor preactivations. Typically, compatibility effects reflect faster reactions in cases in which prime and target suggest the same response (i.e., compatible trials) compared with cases in which prime and target suggest opposite responses (i.e., incompatible trials). With moving dots that were horizontally aligned, Bermeitinger (2013) found a stable pattern of results: with short SOAs, faster responses in compatible trials were found; with longer SOAs up to 250 ms, faster responses in incompatible trials were found. It is unclear whether these results are specific to the special motion used therein or whether it generalizes to other motions. We therefore used other motions realized by arrangements of dots. In four experiments, we tested point-light displays (biological coherent walkers vs. less biological scrambled/split displays) as primes. In two experiments, eye gaze motions realized by moving dots representing irises and pupils (i.e., biological) versus the same motion either without surrounding face information or integrated in an abstract line drawing (i.e., less biological) were used. We found overall large positive compatibility effects with biological motion primes and also positive-but smaller-compatibility effects with less biological motion primes. Most important, also with very long SOAs (up to 1320 ms), we did not find evidence for negative compatibility effects. Thus, the pattern of positive-followed-by-negative-compatibility effects found in Bermeitinger (2013) seems to be specific to the materials used therein, whereas response priming in general seems an applicable tool to study motion perception. PMID:27150613

  7. Seeing Circles and Drawing Ellipses: When Sound Biases Reproduction of Visual Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoret, Etienne; Aramaki, Mitsuko; Bringoux, Lionel; Ystad, Sølvi; Kronland-Martinet, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The perception and production of biological movements is characterized by the 1/3 power law, a relation linking the curvature and the velocity of an intended action. In particular, motions are perceived and reproduced distorted when their kinematics deviate from this biological law. Whereas most studies dealing with this perceptual-motor relation focused on visual or kinaesthetic modalities in a unimodal context, in this paper we show that auditory dynamics strikingly biases visuomotor processes. Biologically consistent or inconsistent circular visual motions were used in combination with circular or elliptical auditory motions. Auditory motions were synthesized friction sounds mimicking those produced by the friction of the pen on a paper when someone is drawing. Sounds were presented diotically and the auditory motion velocity was evoked through the friction sound timbre variations without any spatial cues. Remarkably, when subjects were asked to reproduce circular visual motion while listening to sounds that evoked elliptical kinematics without seeing their hand, they drew elliptical shapes. Moreover, distortion induced by inconsistent elliptical kinematics in both visual and auditory modalities added up linearly. These results bring to light the substantial role of auditory dynamics in the visuo-motor coupling in a multisensory context. PMID:27119411

  8. Perception of the upright and susceptibility to motion sickness as functions of angle of tilt and angular velocity in off-vertical rotation. [human tolerance to angular accelerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, E. F., II; Graybiel, A.

    1973-01-01

    Motion sickness susceptibility of four normal subjects was measured in terms of duration of exposure necessary to evoke moderate malaise (MIIA) as a function of velocity in a chair rotated about a central axis tilted 10 deg with respect to gravitational upright. The subjects had little or no susceptibility to this type of rotation at 2.5 and 5.0 rpm, but with further increases in rate, the MIIA endpoint was always reached and with ever shorter test durations. Minimal provocative periods for all subjects were found at 15 or 20 rpm. Higher rotational rates dramatically reversed the vestibular stressor effect, and the subjects as a group tended to reach a plateau of relatively low susceptibility at 40 and 45 rpm. At these higher velocities, furthermore, the subjects essentially lost their sensation of being tilted off vertical. In the second half of the study, the effect of tilt angle was varied while the rotation rate was maintained at a constant 17.5 rpm. Two subjects were completely resistant to symptoms of motion sickness when rotated at 2.5 deg off vertical; with greater off-vertical angles, the susceptibility of all subjects increased sharply at first, then tapered off in a manner reflecting a Fechnerian function.

  9. Research on the Application of Motion Perception in Caricature and Animation Creation%论运动知觉在动漫创作中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庄唯

    2012-01-01

    在动漫创作中,创作者如果忽视对“运动知觉”的一些基本原理的应用,必然会影响动画片制作的效率和质量。文章结合电影心理学的相关理论,通过实例比较和分析,探讨“运动知觉”这一原理在漫画、二维动画片及三维动画片创作中的应用及其意义。%The neglect of some basic principles of "motion perception" will influence the efficiency and quality of the creators" caricature and animation creation. Based on the related theories of film psychol- ogy, and by means of case comparison and analysis, this paper discusses the application of the "motion perception" in the creation of caricature, two-dimensional and three-dimensional animations and its significance.

  10. Aprendizagem motora baseada em demonstrações de movimento biológico Motor learning based on biological motion demonstrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Tosi Rodrigues

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar o processo de aprendizagem motora de uma habilidade complexa da Ginástica Artística a partir da observação de demonstrações de modelos de pontos de luz e vídeo. Dezesseis participantes divididas em grupos dos respectivos modelos executaram um pré-teste, seguido de 100 tentativas de uma parada de mãos, igualmente distribuídas em blocos de 10 tentativas em dois dias, alternando períodos de demonstração e prática, com um teste de retenção após um dia. Cinemática de braço, tronco e perna das participantes possibilitaram análise da semelhança entre a coordenação de cada participante e do modelo e do tempo de movimento; a performance das participantes também foi avaliada por duas especialistas em Ginástica Artística. Ambas as análises indicaram que os grupos não diferiram. Os resultados são discutidos em termos da hipótese de suficiência de informação nos modelos de movimento biológico particularmente aplicada ao processo de aprendizagem de habilidades motoras complexas.The aim of this study was to evaluate the motor learning process of a complex Artistic Gymnastics skill following demonstrations of point-light and video models. Sixteen participants divided into the respective model groups performed a pre-test and 100 trials of a handstand, equally distributed in blocks of 10 trials in two days, alternating periods of demonstration and practice, with retention test a day later. Participants' kinematics of arm, trunk, and leg was used to analyze the coordination similarities between each participant and the model and movement time; participants' performance was also evaluated by two Artistic Gymnastics experts. Both analyses revealed that the groups did not differ. Results are discussed in terms of the hypothesis of information sufficiency in biological motion models particularly applied to the learning process of complex motor skills.

  11. Central Inhibition Ability Modulates Attention-Induced Motion Blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milders, Maarten; Hay, Julia; Sahraie, Arash; Niedeggen, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Impaired motion perception can be induced in normal observers in a rapid serial visual presentation task. Essential for this effect is the presence of motion distractors prior to the motion target, and we proposed that this attention-induced motion blindness results from high-level inhibition produced by the distractors. To investigate this, we…

  12. Motion scaling for high-performance driving simulators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berthoz, A.; Bles, W.; Bülthoff, H.H.; Correia Grácio, B.J.; Feenstra, P.; Filliard, N.; Hühne, R.; Kemeny, A.; Mayrhofer, M.; Mulder, M.; Nusseck, H.G.; Pretto, P.; Reymond, G.; Schlüsselberger, R.; Schwandtner, J.; Teufel, H.; Vailleau, B.; Paassen, M.M.R. van; Vidal, M.; Wentink, M.

    2013-01-01

    Advanced driving simulators aim at rendering the motion of a vehicle with maximum fidelity, which requires increased mechanical travel, size, and cost of the system. Motion cueing algorithms reduce the motion envelope by taking advantage of limitations in human motion perception, and the most common

  13. Unconscious local motion alters global image speed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sieu K Khuu

    Full Text Available Accurate motion perception of self and object speed is crucial for successful interaction in the world. The context in which we make such speed judgments has a profound effect on their accuracy. Misperceptions of motion speed caused by the context can have drastic consequences in real world situations, but they also reveal much about the underlying mechanisms of motion perception. Here we show that motion signals suppressed from awareness can warp simultaneous conscious speed perception. In Experiment 1, we measured global speed discrimination thresholds using an annulus of 8 local Gabor elements. We show that physically removing local elements from the array attenuated global speed discrimination. However, removing awareness of the local elements only had a small effect on speed discrimination. That is, unconscious local motion elements contributed to global conscious speed perception. In Experiment 2 we measured the global speed of the moving Gabor patterns, when half the elements moved at different speeds. We show that global speed averaging occurred regardless of whether local elements were removed from awareness, such that the speed of invisible elements continued to be averaged together with the visible elements to determine the global speed. These data suggest that contextual motion signals outside of awareness can both boost and affect our experience of motion speed, and suggest that such pooling of motion signals occurs before the conscious extraction of the surround motion speed.

  14. The effect of motion acceleration on displacement of continuous and staircase motion in the frontoparallel plane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Poljanšek

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available If a moving target suddenly disappears, memory for the final location of the target is displaced forward in the direction of motion. This displacement depends on higher order motion regularities (e.g., velocity, acceleration, and so a consideration of displacement might reveal which other motion regularities observers are sensitive to. Perceptually continuous or staircase motions exhibiting either negative, zero, or positive acceleration were presented. Displacement magnitude was smallest for negative acceleration and largest for positive acceleration, and these differences were stronger with continuous motion than with staircase motion. The effect of acceleration is consistent with effects of velocity and an incorporation of effects of momentum into the representation. The weaker effect of acceleration condition with staircase motion is consistent with previous findings that motion signals are more impoverished with staircase motion than with continuous motion. Implications for theories of representational momentum and for perception of motion are considered.

  15. Motion Aftereffects Transfer between Touch and Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konkle, Talia; Wang, Qi; Hayward, Vincent; Moore, Christopher I.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Current views on multisensory motion integration assume separate substrates where visual motion perceptually dominates tactile motion [1, 2]. However, recent neuroimaging findings demonstrate strong activation of visual motion processing areas by tactile stimuli [3–6], implying a potentially bidirectional relationship. To test the relationship between visual and tactile motion processing, we examined the transfer of motion aftereffects. In the well-known visual motion aftereffect, adapting to visual motion in one direction causes a subsequently presented stationary stimulus to be perceived as moving in the opposite direction [7, 8]. The existence of motion aftereffects in the tactile domain was debated [9–11], though robust tactile motion aftereffects have recently been demonstrated [12, 13]. By using a motion adaptation paradigm, we found that repeated exposure to visual motion in a given direction produced a tactile motion aftereffect, the illusion of motion in the opponent direction across the finger pad. We also observed that repeated exposure to tactile motion induces a visual motion aftereffect, biasing the perceived direction of counterphase gratings. These crossmodal aftereffects, operating both from vision to touch and from touch to vision, present strong behavioral evidence that the processing of visual and tactile motion rely on shared representations that dynamically impact modality-specific perception. PMID:19361996

  16. Priming with real motion biases visual cortical response to bistable apparent motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing-fang; Wen, Yunqing; Zhang, Deng; She, Liang; Wu, Jian-young; Dan, Yang; Poo, Mu-ming

    2012-12-11

    Apparent motion quartet is an ambiguous stimulus that elicits bistable perception, with the perceived motion alternating between two orthogonal paths. In human psychophysical experiments, the probability of perceiving motion in each path is greatly enhanced by a brief exposure to real motion along that path. To examine the neural mechanism underlying this priming effect, we used voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) imaging to measure the spatiotemporal activity in the primary visual cortex (V1) of awake mice. We found that a brief real motion stimulus transiently biased the cortical response to subsequent apparent motion toward the spatiotemporal pattern representing the real motion. Furthermore, intracellular recording from V1 neurons in anesthetized mice showed a similar increase in subthreshold depolarization in the neurons representing the path of real motion. Such short-term plasticity in early visual circuits may contribute to the priming effect in bistable visual perception. PMID:23188797

  17. Cross-category adaptation: objects produce gender adaptation in the perception of faces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Homayoun Javadi

    Full Text Available Adaptation aftereffects have been found for low-level visual features such as colour, motion and shape perception, as well as higher-level features such as gender, race and identity in domains such as faces and biological motion. It is not yet clear if adaptation effects in humans extend beyond this set of higher order features. The aim of this study was to investigate whether objects highly associated with one gender, e.g. high heels for females or electric shavers for males can modulate gender perception of a face. In two separate experiments, we adapted subjects to a series of objects highly associated with one gender and subsequently asked participants to judge the gender of an ambiguous face. Results showed that participants are more likely to perceive an ambiguous face as male after being exposed to objects highly associated to females and vice versa. A gender adaptation aftereffect was obtained despite the adaptor and test stimuli being from different global categories (objects and faces respectively. These findings show that our perception of gender from faces is highly affected by our environment and recent experience. This suggests two possible mechanisms: (a that perception of the gender associated with an object shares at least some brain areas with those responsible for gender perception of faces and (b adaptation to gender, which is a high-level concept, can modulate brain areas that are involved in facial gender perception through top-down processes.

  18. Dazzle camouflage affects speed perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas E Scott-Samuel

    Full Text Available Movement is the enemy of camouflage: most attempts at concealment are disrupted by motion of the target. Faced with this problem, navies in both World Wars in the twentieth century painted their warships with high contrast geometric patterns: so-called "dazzle camouflage". Rather than attempting to hide individual units, it was claimed that this patterning would disrupt the perception of their range, heading, size, shape and speed, and hence reduce losses from, in particular, torpedo attacks by submarines. Similar arguments had been advanced earlier for biological camouflage. Whilst there are good reasons to believe that most of these perceptual distortions may have occurred, there is no evidence for the last claim: changing perceived speed. Here we show that dazzle patterns can distort speed perception, and that this effect is greatest at high speeds. The effect should obtain in predators launching ballistic attacks against rapidly moving prey, or modern, low-tech battlefields where handheld weapons are fired from short ranges against moving vehicles. In the latter case, we demonstrate that in a typical situation involving an RPG7 attack on a Land Rover the reduction in perceived speed is sufficient to make the grenade miss where it was aimed by about a metre, which could be the difference between survival or not for the occupants of the vehicle.

  19. Cross-Category Adaptation: Objects Produce Gender Adaptation in the Perception of Faces

    OpenAIRE

    Javadi, A. H.; Wee, N.

    2012-01-01

    Adaptation aftereffects have been found for low-level visual features such as colour, motion and shape perception, as well as higher-level features such as gender, race and identity in domains such as faces and biological motion. It is not yet clear if adaptation effects in humans extend beyond this set of higher order features. The aim of this study was to investigate whether objects highly associated with one gender, e.g. high heels for females or electric shavers for males can modulate gen...

  20. Motion camouflage in three dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, P.V.; Justh, E. W.; Krishnaprasad, P. S.

    2006-01-01

    We formulate and analyze a three-dimensional model of motion camouflage, a stealth strategy observed in nature. A high-gain feedback law for motion camouflage is formulated in which the pursuer and evader trajectories are described using natural Frenet frames (or relatively parallel adapted frames), and the corresponding natural curvatures serve as controls. The biological plausibility of the feedback law is discussed, as is its connection to missile guidance. Simulations illustrating motion ...

  1. Atypical integration of motion signals in Autism Spectrum Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline E Robertson

    Full Text Available Vision in Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC is characterized by enhanced perception of local elements, but impaired perception of global percepts. Deficits in coherent motion perception seem to support this characterization, but the roots and robustness of such deficits remain unclear. We aimed to investigate the dynamics of the perceptual decision-making network known to support coherent motion perception. In a series of forced-choice coherent motion perception tests, we parametrically varied a single stimulus dimension, viewing duration, to test whether the rate at which evidence is accumulated towards a global decision is atypical in ASC. 40 adult participants (20 ASC performed a classic motion discrimination task, manually indicating the global direction of motion in a random-dot kinematogram across a range of coherence levels (2-75% and stimulus-viewing durations (200-1500 ms. We report a deficit in global motion perception at short viewing durations in ASC. Critically, however, we found that increasing the amount of time over which motion signals could be integrated reduced the magnitude of the deficit, such that at the longest duration there was no difference between the ASC and control groups. Further, the deficit in motion integration at the shortest duration was significantly associated with the severity of autistic symptoms in our clinical population, and was independent from measures of intelligence. These results point to atypical integration of motion signals during the construction of a global percept in ASC. Based on the neural correlates of decision-making in global motion perception our findings suggest the global motion deficit observed in ASC could reflect a slower or more variable response from the primary motion area of the brain or longer accumulation of evidence towards a decision-bound in parietal areas.

  2. Steering laws for motion camouflage

    OpenAIRE

    Justh, E. W.; Krishnaprasad, P. S.

    2005-01-01

    Motion camouflage is a stealth strategy observed in nature. We formulate the problem as a feedback system for particles moving at constant speed, and define what it means for the system to be in a state of motion camouflage. (Here we focus on the planar setting, although the results can be generalized to three-dimensional motion.) We propose a biologically plausible feedback law, and use a high-gain limit to prove accessibility of a motion camouflage state in finite time. We discuss connectio...

  3. BOLD Response Selective to Flow-Motion in Very Young Infants

    OpenAIRE

    Biagi, Laura; Crespi, Sofia Allegra; Tosetti, Michela; Morrone, Maria Concetta

    2015-01-01

    In adults, motion perception is mediated by an extensive network of occipital, parietal, temporal, and insular cortical areas. Little is known about the neural substrate of visual motion in infants, although behavioural studies suggest that motion perception is rudimentary at birth and matures steadily over the first few years. Here, by measuring Blood Oxygenated Level Dependent (BOLD) responses to flow versus random-motion stimuli, we demonstrate that the major cortical areas serving motion ...

  4. Dynamics and cortical distribution of neural responses to 2D and 3D motion in human

    OpenAIRE

    Cottereau, Benoit R.; McKee, Suzanne P.; Norcia, Anthony M.

    2013-01-01

    The perception of motion-in-depth is important for avoiding collisions and for the control of vergence eye-movements and other motor actions. Previous psychophysical studies have suggested that sensitivity to motion-in-depth has a lower temporal processing limit than the perception of lateral motion. The present study used functional MRI-informed EEG source-imaging to study the spatiotemporal properties of the responses to lateral motion and motion-in-depth in human visual cortex. Lateral mot...

  5. Motion constraint

    OpenAIRE

    Raunhardt, Daniel; Boulic, Ronan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a hybrid postural control approach taking advantage of data-driven and goal-oriented methods while overcoming their limitations. In particular, we take advantage of the latent space characterizing a given motion database. We introduce a motion constraint operating in the latent space to benefit from its much smaller dimension compared to the joint space. This allows its transparent integration into a Prioritized Inverse Kinematics framework. If its priority is high t...

  6. Biophysics of food perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbidge, Adam S.; Le Révérend, Benjamin J. D.

    2016-03-01

    In this article, we present food perception across a range of time and length scales as well as across the disciplines of physics, chemistry and biology. We achieve the objective of the article by presenting food from a material science angle as well as presenting the physiology of food perception that enables humans to probe materials in terms of aroma, taste and texture. We highlight that by using simple physical concepts, one can also decipher the mechanisms of transport that link food structure with perception physiology and define the regime in which physiology operates. Most importantly, we emphasise the notion that food/consumer interaction operates across the biological fluid interface grouped under the terminology of mucus, acting as a transfer fluid for taste, aroma and pressure between food and dedicated receptors.

  7. The Impact of Inquiry Based Instruction on Science Process Skills and Self-Efficacy Perceptions of Pre-Service Science Teachers at a University Level Biology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Ceylan; Sezen Vekli, Gülsah

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the influence of inquiry-based teaching approach on pre-service science teachers' laboratory self-efficacy perceptions and scientific process skills. The quasi experimental model with pre-test-post-test control group design was used as an experimental design in this research. The sample of this study included…

  8. Cross-Modal Sensory Integration of Visual-Tactile Motion Information: Instrument Design and Human Psychophysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice M. K. Wong

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Information obtained from multiple sensory modalities, such as vision and touch, is integrated to yield a holistic percept. As a haptic approach usually involves cross-modal sensory experiences, it is necessary to develop an apparatus that can characterize how a biological system integrates visual-tactile sensory information as well as how a robotic device infers object information emanating from both vision and touch. In the present study, we develop a novel visual-tactile cross-modal integration stimulator that consists of an LED panel to present visual stimuli and a tactile stimulator with three degrees of freedom that can present tactile motion stimuli with arbitrary motion direction, speed, and indentation depth in the skin. The apparatus can present cross-modal stimuli in which the spatial locations of visual and tactile stimulations are perfectly aligned. We presented visual-tactile stimuli in which the visual and tactile directions were either congruent or incongruent, and human observers reported the perceived visual direction of motion. Results showed that perceived direction of visual motion can be biased by the direction of tactile motion when visual signals are weakened. The results also showed that the visual-tactile motion integration follows the rule of temporal congruency of multi-modal inputs, a fundamental property known for cross-modal integration.

  9. Hierarchical Motion Control for a Team of Humanoid Soccer Robots

    OpenAIRE

    Seung-Joon Yi; Stephen McGill; Dennis Hong; Daniel Lee

    2016-01-01

    Robot soccer has become an effective benchmarking problem for robotics research as it requires many aspects of robotics including perception, self localization, motion planning and distributed coordination to work in uncertain and adversarial environments. Especially with humanoid robots that lack inherent stability, a capable and robust motion controller is crucial for generating walking and kicking motions without losing balance. In this paper, we describe the details of a motion controller...

  10. Computational validation of the motor contribution to speech perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badino, Leonardo; D'Ausilio, Alessandro; Fadiga, Luciano; Metta, Giorgio

    2014-07-01

    Action perception and recognition are core abilities fundamental for human social interaction. A parieto-frontal network (the mirror neuron system) matches visually presented biological motion information onto observers' motor representations. This process of matching the actions of others onto our own sensorimotor repertoire is thought to be important for action recognition, providing a non-mediated "motor perception" based on a bidirectional flow of information along the mirror parieto-frontal circuits. State-of-the-art machine learning strategies for hand action identification have shown better performances when sensorimotor data, as opposed to visual information only, are available during learning. As speech is a particular type of action (with acoustic targets), it is expected to activate a mirror neuron mechanism. Indeed, in speech perception, motor centers have been shown to be causally involved in the discrimination of speech sounds. In this paper, we review recent neurophysiological and machine learning-based studies showing (a) the specific contribution of the motor system to speech perception and (b) that automatic phone recognition is significantly improved when motor data are used during training of classifiers (as opposed to learning from purely auditory data). PMID:24935820

  11. Categorical Perception

    OpenAIRE

    Harnad, Stevan

    2003-01-01

    Differences can be perceived as gradual and quantitative, as with different shades of gray, or they can be perceived as more abrupt and qualitative, as with different colors. The first is called continuous perception and the second categorical perception. Categorical perception (CP) can be inborn or can be induced by learning. Formerly thought to be peculiar to speech and color perception, CP turns out to be far more general, and may be related to how the neural networks in our brains detect ...

  12. Biological effects of gamma radiation on stored product insects. 4 - radiation effects on sex pheromone production and perception by the rust-red flour beetle. Tribolium castaneum (herbst)

    OpenAIRE

    Abdu, R. M.; Abdel-Kader, Maissa M.; M. A. Hussein; Abdel-Rahman, H. A.

    1985-01-01

    Irradiation of the rust-red flour beetle, T. castaneum at different doses of gamma radiation considerably affected sex pheromone production by females and perception by males. The production of sex pheromone by virgin females decreased with the increase of radiation doses from 4 to 10 krad., and a dose of 12 krad could almost inhibit pheromone production. Males were more radiosensitive in their response to sex pheromone; and a radiation dose of 8 krad could brought inhibition of male respo...

  13. Perception coherence zones in flight simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valente Pais, A.R.; Paassen, M.M. van; Mulder, M.; Wentink, M.

    2010-01-01

    The development and tuning of flight simulator motion filters relies on understanding human motion perception and its limitations. Of particular interest to flight simulation is the study of visual-inertial coherence zones. Coherence zones refer to combinations of visual and inertial cues that, alth

  14. Slow motion increases perceived intent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Eugene M; Burns, Zachary C; Converse, Benjamin A

    2016-08-16

    To determine the appropriate punishment for a harmful action, people must often make inferences about the transgressor's intent. In courtrooms and popular media, such inferences increasingly rely on video evidence, which is often played in "slow motion." Four experiments (n = 1,610) involving real surveillance footage from a murder or broadcast replays of violent contact in professional football demonstrate that viewing an action in slow motion, compared with regular speed, can cause viewers to perceive an action as more intentional. This slow motion intentionality bias occurred, in part, because slow motion video caused participants to feel like the actor had more time to act, even when they knew how much clock time had actually elapsed. Four additional experiments (n = 2,737) reveal that allowing viewers to see both regular speed and slow motion replay mitigates the bias, but does not eliminate it. We conclude that an empirical understanding of the effect of slow motion on mental state attribution should inform the life-or-death decisions that are currently based on tacit assumptions about the objectivity of human perception. PMID:27482091

  15. Perception of rotation, path, and heading in circular trajectories

    OpenAIRE

    Nooij, Suzanne A. E.; Nesti, Alessandro; Heinrich H Bülthoff; Pretto, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    When in darkness, humans can perceive the direction and magnitude of rotations and of linear translations in the horizontal plane. The current paper addresses the integrated perception of combined translational and rotational motion, as it occurs when moving along a curved trajectory. We questioned whether the perceived motion through the environment follows the predictions of a self-motion perception model (e.g., Merfeld et al. in J Vestib Res 3:141–161, 1993; Newman in A multisensory observ...

  16. Yaw Motion Cues in Helicopter Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Jeffrey A.; Johnson, Walter W.

    1996-01-01

    A piloted simulation that examined the effects of yaw motion cues on pilot-vehicle performance, pilot workload, and pilot motion perception was conducted on the NASA Ames Vertical Motion Simulator. The vehicle model that was used represented an AH-64 helicopter. Three tasks were performed in which only combinations of vehicle yaw and vertical displacement were allowed. The commands issued to the motion platform were modified to present the following four motion configurations for a pilot located forward of the center of rotation: (1) only the linear translations, (2) only the angular rotation, (3) both the linear translations and the angular rotation, and (4) no motion. The objective data indicated that pilot-vehicle performance was reduced and the necessary control activity increased when linear motion was removed; however, the lack of angular rotation did not result in a measured degradation for almost all cases. Also, pilots provided subjective assessments of their compensation required, the motion fidelity, and their judgment of whether or not linear or rotational cockpit motion was present. Ratings of compensation and fidelity were affected only by linear acceleration, and the rotational motion had no significant impact. Also, when only linear motion was present, pilots typically reported the presence of rotation. Thus, linear acceleration cues, not yaw rotational cues, appear necessary to simulate hovering flight.

  17. Sound-contingent visual motion aftereffect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi Maori

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After a prolonged exposure to a paired presentation of different types of signals (e.g., color and motion, one of the signals (color becomes a driver for the other signal (motion. This phenomenon, which is known as contingent motion aftereffect, indicates that the brain can establish new neural representations even in the adult's brain. However, contingent motion aftereffect has been reported only in visual or auditory domain. Here, we demonstrate that a visual motion aftereffect can be contingent on a specific sound. Results Dynamic random dots moving in an alternating right or left direction were presented to the participants. Each direction of motion was accompanied by an auditory tone of a unique and specific frequency. After a 3-minutes exposure, the tones began to exert marked influence on the visual motion perception, and the percentage of dots required to trigger motion perception systematically changed depending on the tones. Furthermore, this effect lasted for at least 2 days. Conclusions These results indicate that a new neural representation can be rapidly established between auditory and visual modalities.

  18. Virtual, on-line, frog dissection vs. conventional laboratory dissection: A comparison of student achievement and teacher perceptions among honors, general ability, and foundations-level high school biology classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopec, Ronald H.

    2002-09-01

    Dissecting animal specimens has long been a tradition in biology classes. Objections by students, based on religious or ethical grounds, have been raised regarding the dissections of animals in classroom laboratories. A number of states now have legal proceedings or statewide policies requiring that alternatives to the actual dissection of laboratory animal specimens be permitted in their school districts. Alternatives to actual dissections have been developed in recent years. For a variety of reasons, performing an actual or conventional animal dissection may not be a desirable option. The purpose of this study was to investigate how a virtual On-line frog dissection compares with an actual laboratory dissection. What were the perceptions of the teacher's using it? How does student achievement compare among three the different ability levels on a pre and posttest regarding basic frog anatomy? Is a virtual On-line dissection a suitable alternative for students who, for whatever reason, do not participate in the actual laboratory experience? The subjects consisted of 218 biology students among three different ability levels, in a Northeastern suburban high school. Approximately half of the student groups participated in a virtual On-line dissection, the other half in an actual laboratory dissection. A pretest of basic frog anatomy was administered to the students two days before and the posttest one day after their dissection experience. Data were analyzed using matched pairs t-Tests, Analysis of Variance, Tukey HSD, and Squared Curvilinear Coefficients. Survey questionnaires were administered to the teachers after the dissection experiences were completed. There were no significant differences found in achievement between the virtual and conventional dissection groups. There were significant differences found in achievement score means among the three ability levels. There was no significant interaction between gender and achievement. Perceptions of the teacher

  19. Biyoloyi Öğretmenlerinin Öğrenci Başarısından Sorumluluk Algılarının Sınıf Yönetimi Profillerine Göre Analizi
    The Analyse Of Biology Teachers’ Responsility Perception For Student Achievement In Terms Of Classroom Management Profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Kurt, Hakan

    2013-01-01

    This study was carried out to analyses biology teachers’ responsibility perception for student achievement in terms of classroom management profiles. The screening model was used in the study. The study group was comprised of 117 biology teachers. The data were collected with teachers’ responsibility for student achievement and classroom management profile scales. The Cronbach Alpha reliability coefficient was .846 for teachers’ responsibility for student achievement and .870 for classroom ma...

  20. The Impact of Aging and Alzheimer's Disease on Decoding Emotion Cues from Bodily Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline M. Insch

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Both healthy aging and dementia cause problems with emotion perception, and the impairment is generally greater for specific emotions (anger, sadness and fear. Most studies to date have focused on static facial photographs of emotions. The current study investigated the effects of healthy aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD on the ability to decode emotions from bodily motion displayed by point light stimuli. Response biases were controlled to investigate whether these influenced the specificity of impairment in perceiving individual emotions. Study 1 compared healthy young and older adults, and Study 2 people with AD and age-matched controls, on an emotion perception task using point light stimuli. Accuracy and the pattern of errors were investigated. Specific age-related impairments were found in labeling sadness, anger and fear from point light displays. Response biases were also found, and controlling for these biases indicated that older adults were worse at labeling all emotions. People with AD were less accurate than healthy older controls at labeling fear, anger and sadness. After controlling for response biases, AD caused impairment in perceiving all emotions. These results indicate a general age-related impairment in decoding emotions from bodily motion, and a further impairment in this skill in AD. Apparent specificity of deficits in emotion labeling tasks needs to be interpreted cautiously, and correction for response bias should be considered. Problems perceiving emotion cues from biological motion might impair social interaction in older adults, particularly those with dementia.

  1. Visually guided control of self motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettinger, Lawrence J.; Andersen, G. John; Flach, John M.; Riccio, Gary E.; Bennett, C. Thomas; Johnson, Walter W.

    1989-01-01

    A workshop entitled 'Visually Guided Control of Movement' was held at NASA Ames Research Center on June 26 - July 14, 1989. The workshop brought together individuals with diverse backgrounds related to the areas of the visual perception and control of motion. During the workshop, participants designed and conducted experiments using NASA Ames flight simulation research facilities. These studies contrasted participants' alternative theoretical approaches to the visual control of self motion. Panel members, drawn from the workshop's participants, will discuss their approaches to the study of the control of self motion and will present interpretations of the outcomes of the workshop.

  2. Remapping motion across modalities: tactile rotations influence visual motion judgments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butz, Martin V; Thomaschke, Roland; Linhardt, Matthias J; Herbort, Oliver

    2010-11-01

    Multisensory interactions between haptics and vision remain poorly understood. Previous studies have shown that shapes, such as letters of the alphabet, when drawn on the skin, are differently perceived dependent upon which body part is stimulated and on how the stimulated body part, such as the hand, is positioned. Another line of research within this area has investigated multisensory interactions. Tactile perceptions, for example, have the potential to disambiguate visually perceived information. While the former studies focused on explicit reports about tactile perception, the latter studies relied on fully aligned multisensory stimulus dimensions. In this study, we investigated to what extent rotating tactile stimulations on the hand affect directional visual motion judgments implicitly and without any spatial stimulus alignment. We show that directional tactile cues and ambiguous visual motion cues are integrated, thus biasing the judgment of visually perceived motion. We further show that the direction of the tactile influence depends on the position and orientation of the stimulated part of the hand relative to a head-centered frame of reference. Finally, we also show that the time course of the cue integration is very versatile. Overall, the results imply immediate directional cue integration within a head-centered frame of reference. PMID:20878396

  3. A Writing-Intensive Course Improves Biology Undergraduates' Perception and Confidence of Their Abilities to Read Scientific Literature and Communicate Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownell, Sara E.; Price, Jordan V.; Steinman, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Most scientists agree that comprehension of primary scientific papers and communication of scientific concepts are two of the most important skills that we can teach, but few undergraduate biology courses make these explicit course goals. We designed an undergraduate neuroimmunology course that uses a writing-intensive format. Using a mixture of…

  4. MODELING OF VEHICULAR STEERING EFFICIENCY IN TRAFFIC DIRECTION MOTION CHANNEL

    OpenAIRE

    V. A. Ganai; S. A. O. Diab Abdullah

    2011-01-01

    The paper formulates and solves an actual problem pertaining to vehicular steering efficiency in traffic direction motion channel. Models of operator-drivers with low, medium and high rates in motivational perception of road conditions and also a model for controlling a traffic direction motion have been taken into ccount in the paper.  Modeling has been done by using MATLAB.

  5. Visual-Motion Cueing in Altitude and Yaw Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Walter W.; Schroeder, Jeffery; Statler, Irving C. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Research conducted using the Vertical Motion Simulator at the NASA Ames Research Center examined the contributions of platform motion and visual level-of-detail (LOD) cueing to tasks that required altitude and/or yaw control in a simulated AH-64 Apache helicopter. Within the altitude control tasks the LOD manipulation caused optical density to change across altitudes by a small, moderate, or large amount; while platform motion was either present or absent. The results from these tasks showed that both constant optical density and platform motion improved altitude awareness in an altitude repositioning task, while the presence of platform motion also led to improved performance in a vertical rate control task. The yaw control tasks had pilots'sit 4.5 ft in front of the center of rotation, thus subjecting them to both rotational and lateral motions during a yaw. The pilots were required to regulate their yaw, while the platform motion was manipulated in order to present all combinations of the resulting rotational and lateral motion components. Ratings of simulation fidelity and sensed platform motion showed that the pilots were relatively insensitive to the rotational component, but highly aware of the lateral component. Together these findings show that: 1) platform motion cues are important when speed regulation is required during altitude change; 2) platform motion contributes to the perception of movement amplitude; 3) lateral, but not rotational, motion cues are essential to the perception of vehicle yaw; and 4) LOD management yielding constant optical density across altitudes improves altitude awareness.

  6. Changing Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallett, Susanne; Wren, Steve; Dawes, Mark; Blinco, Amy; Haines, Brett; Everton, Jenny; Morgan, Ellen; Barton, Craig; Breen, Debbie; Ellison, Geraldine; Burgess, Danny; Stavrou, Jim; Carre, Catherine; Watson, Fran; Cherry, David; Hawkins, Chris; Stapenhill-Hunt, Maria; Gilderdale, Charlie; Kiddle, Alison; Piggott, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    A group of teachers involved in embedding NRICH tasks (http://nrich.maths.org) into their everyday practice were keen to challenge common perceptions of mathematics, and of the teaching and learning of mathematics. In this article, the teachers share what they are doing to change these perceptions in their schools.

  7. People can understand descriptions of motion without activating visual motion brain regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SwethasriDravida

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available What is the relationship between our perceptual and linguistic representations of the same event? We approached this question by asking to whether visual perception of motion and understanding linguistic depictions of motion rely on the same neural architecture. The same group of participants took part in two language tasks and one visual task. In task 1, participants made semantic similarity judgments with high (e.g. “to bounce” and low motion (e.g. “to look” words. In task 2, participants made plausibility judgments for passages describing movement (“A centaur hurled a spear…” or cognitive events (“A gentleman loved cheese…”. Task 3 was a visual motion localizer in which participants viewed animations of point-light walkers, randomly moving dots, and stationary dots changing in luminance. Based on the visual motion localizer we identified classic visual motion areas of the temporal (MT/MST and STS and parietal cortex (inferior and superior parietal lobules. We find that linguistic depictions of motion and seeing motion activate largely distinct cortical areas. Motion words did not activate any part of the visual motion system. Motion passages produced a small response in the right superior parietal lobule, but none of the temporal motion regions. These results suggest 1 as compared to words, rich language stimuli such as passages are more likely to evoke mental imagery and more likely to affect perceptual circuits and 2 effects of language on the visual system are more likely in secondary perceptual areas as compared to early sensory areas. We conclude that language and visual perception constitute distinct but interacting systems.

  8. Evaluation of motion tracking by cell survival measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At GSI patients with stationary tumors are treated with a rasterscanned carbon ion beam. For moving targets interplay possibly deteriorates the dose distribution because target motion and scanner motion interfere. Several motion mitigation techniques are proposed to solve this problem. We use a fully integrated 3D online motion compensation system to track target motion of phantoms which includes adaptation of the Bragg peak position. To validate motion tracking with biological systems we conducted a series of repetitive experiments with hamster cells grown in wellplates. The wellplates were placed on a sliding table to induce lateral as well as longitudinal motion. Irradiations were performed with stationary wellplates and by tracking moving wellplates. Multiple samples were irradiated to gain statistics. As a result, we observed no significant difference in cell survival between the motion compensated measurements in comparison to a stationary reference irradiation. We conclude that our motion compensation system allows correct delivery of the biologically effective dose to moving phantoms

  9. Does language guide event perception? Evidence from eye movements

    OpenAIRE

    Papafragou, Anna; Hulbert, Justin; Trueswell, John

    2008-01-01

    Languages differ in how they encode motion. When describing bounded motion, English speakers typically use verbs that convey information about manner (e.g., slide, skip, walk) rather than path (e.g., approach, ascend), whereas Greek speakers do the opposite. We investigated whether this strong cross-language difference influences how people allocate attention during motion perception. We compared eye movements from Greek and English speakers as they viewed motion events while (a) preparing ve...

  10. Motion vision for mobile robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrb, Matthieu

    The problem of using computer vision in mobile robots is dealt with. The datacube specialized cards and a parallel machine using a transputer network are studied. The tracking and localization of a three dimensional object in a sequence of images is examined, using first order prediction of the motion in the image plane and verification by a maximal clique search in the graph of mutually compatible matchings. A dynamic environment modeling module, using numerical fusion between trinocular stereovision and tracking of stereo matched primitives is presented. The integration of this perception system in the control architecture of a mobile robot is examined to achieve various functions, such as vision servo motion and environment modeling. The functional units implementing vision tasks and the data exchanged with other units are outlined. Experiments realized with the mobile robot Hilare 1.5 allowed the proposed algorithms and concepts to be validated.

  11. Biomechanical metrics of aesthetic perception in dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronner, Shaw; Shippen, James

    2015-12-01

    The brain may be tuned to evaluate aesthetic perception through perceptual chunking when we observe the grace of the dancer. We modelled biomechanical metrics to explain biological determinants of aesthetic perception in dance. Eighteen expert (EXP) and intermediate (INT) dancers performed développé arabesque in three conditions: (1) slow tempo, (2) slow tempo with relevé, and (3) fast tempo. To compare biomechanical metrics of kinematic data, we calculated intra-excursion variability, principal component analysis (PCA), and dimensionless jerk for the gesture limb. Observers, all trained dancers, viewed motion capture stick figures of the trials and ranked each for aesthetic (1) proficiency and (2) movement smoothness. Statistical analyses included group by condition repeated-measures ANOVA for metric data; Mann-Whitney U rank and Friedman's rank tests for nonparametric rank data; Spearman's rho correlations to compare aesthetic rankings and metrics; and linear regression to examine which metric best quantified observers' aesthetic rankings, p < 0.05. The goodness of fit of the proposed models was determined using Akaike information criteria. Aesthetic proficiency and smoothness rankings of the dance movements revealed differences between groups and condition, p < 0.0001. EXP dancers were rated more aesthetically proficient than INT dancers. The slow and fast conditions were judged more aesthetically proficient than slow with relevé (p < 0.0001). Of the metrics, PCA best captured the differences due to group and condition. PCA also provided the most parsimonious model to explain aesthetic proficiency and smoothness rankings. By permitting organization of large data sets into simpler groupings, PCA may mirror the phenomenon of chunking in which the brain combines sensory motor elements into integrated units of behaviour. In this representation, the chunk of information which is remembered, and to which the observer reacts, is the elemental mode shape of

  12. Motion control report

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Please note this is a short discount publication. In today's manufacturing environment, Motion Control plays a major role in virtually every project.The Motion Control Report provides a comprehensive overview of the technology of Motion Control:* Design Considerations* Technologies* Methods to Control Motion* Examples of Motion Control in Systems* A Detailed Vendors List

  13. Detection of periodic motion trajectories: Effects of frequency and radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Frances; Haque, Yousra; Or, Charles C-F; Gottlieb, Audrey S; Wilson, Hugh R

    2016-05-01

    Periodic trajectories are an important component of biological motion. Or, Thabet, Wilkinson, and Wilson (2011) studied radial frequency (RF) motion trajectory detection and concluded that, for RF2-5 trajectories, the threshold function paralleled that of static RF patterns. We have extended Or et al.'s (2011) findings to a broader range of RFs (three to 24 cycles) and across a 4-fold range of radii (1°-4°). We report that (a) thresholds for RF trajectories decrease as a power function of RF for low RF trajectories (three to six cycles) before approaching an asymptote at high RFs (12-24 cycles); (b) detection thresholds for RF trajectories scale proportionally with radius; and (c) there is no lower versus upper field advantage in the parafoveal field for stimuli displaced from fixation on the vertical midline. The results are compared to earlier findings for static RF thresholds, and we argue that our findings support the existence of parallel spatial and temporal processing channels that may contribute to both action perception and production. PMID:27183192

  14. Tactile Perception - Role of Physical Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Skedung, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to interconnect human tactile perception with various physical properties of materials. Tactile perception necessitates contact and relative motion between the skin and the surfaces of interest. This implies that properties such as friction and surface roughness ought to be important physical properties for tactile sensing. In this work, a method to measure friction between human fingers and surfaces is presented. This method is believed to best represent friction in...

  15. Brand perception

    OpenAIRE

    NOSKOVÁ, Simona

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this bachelor work was to analyze the perception of selected brands from the customer's perspective and from the perspective of brand founder called Regional Agrarian Chamber of the South Bohemian Region. To determine the attitudes of opinion on brand perception by the customer, I developed a questionnaire survey using semantic differential. First hypothesis, which argues that the selection of food plays an important role in regional mark at least half of the respondents, was refut...

  16. Dazzle camouflage affects speed perception

    OpenAIRE

    Scott-Samuel, Nicholas E.; Roland Baddeley; Palmer, Chloe E.; Cuthill, Innes C.

    2011-01-01

    Movement is the enemy of camouflage: most attempts at concealment are disrupted by motion of the target. Faced with this problem, navies in both World Wars in the twentieth century painted their warships with high contrast geometric patterns: so-called “dazzle camouflage”. Rather than attempting to hide individual units, it was claimed that this patterning would disrupt the perception of their range, heading, size, shape and speed, and hence reduce losses from, in particular, torpedo attacks ...

  17. Perception des émotions non verbales dans la musique, les voix et les visages chez les adultes implantés cochléaires présentant une surdité évolutive

    OpenAIRE

    Ambert-Dahan, Emmanuèle

    2014-01-01

    Le bénéfice de l’implant cochléaire pour la compréhension de la parole en milieu calme, et même dans certains cas pour des situations auditives complexes telles que les environnements bruyants ou l’écoute de la musique est aujourd’hui connu. Si la compréhension de la parole est nécessaire à la communication, la perception des informations non verbales transmises par la voix de même que des expressions faciales est fondamentale pour interpréter le message d’un interlocuteur. Les capacités de p...

  18. Self-organizing neural integration of pose-motion features for human action recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, German I; Weber, Cornelius; Wermter, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The visual recognition of complex, articulated human movements is fundamental for a wide range of artificial systems oriented toward human-robot communication, action classification, and action-driven perception. These challenging tasks may generally involve the processing of a huge amount of visual information and learning-based mechanisms for generalizing a set of training actions and classifying new samples. To operate in natural environments, a crucial property is the efficient and robust recognition of actions, also under noisy conditions caused by, for instance, systematic sensor errors and temporarily occluded persons. Studies of the mammalian visual system and its outperforming ability to process biological motion information suggest separate neural pathways for the distinct processing of pose and motion features at multiple levels and the subsequent integration of these visual cues for action perception. We present a neurobiologically-motivated approach to achieve noise-tolerant action recognition in real time. Our model consists of self-organizing Growing When Required (GWR) networks that obtain progressively generalized representations of sensory inputs and learn inherent spatio-temporal dependencies. During the training, the GWR networks dynamically change their topological structure to better match the input space. We first extract pose and motion features from video sequences and then cluster actions in terms of prototypical pose-motion trajectories. Multi-cue trajectories from matching action frames are subsequently combined to provide action dynamics in the joint feature space. Reported experiments show that our approach outperforms previous results on a dataset of full-body actions captured with a depth sensor, and ranks among the best results for a public benchmark of domestic daily actions. PMID:26106323

  19. Self-Organizing Neural Integration of Pose-Motion Features for Human Action Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    German Ignacio Parisi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The visual recognition of complex, articulated human movements is fundamental for a wide range of artificial systems oriented towards human-robot communication, action classification, and action-driven perception. These challenging tasks may generally involve the processing of a huge amount of visual information and learning-based mechanisms for generalizing a set of training actions and classifying new samples. To operate in natural environments, a crucial property is the efficient and robust recognition of actions, also under noisy conditions caused by, for instance, systematic sensor errors and temporarily occluded persons. Studies of the mammalian visual system and its outperforming ability to process biological motion information suggest separate neural pathways for the distinct processing of pose and motion features at multiple levels and the subsequent integration of these visual cues for action perception. We present a neurobiologically-motivated approach to achieve noise-tolerant action recognition in real time. Our model consists of self-organizing Growing When Required (GWR networks that obtain progressively generalized representations of sensory inputs and learn inherent spatiotemporal dependencies. During the training, the GWR networks dynamically change their topological structure to better match the input space. We first extract pose and motion features from video sequences and then cluster actions in terms of prototypical pose-motion trajectories. Multi-cue trajectories from matching action frames are subsequently combined to provide action dynamics in the joint feature space. Reported experiments show that our approach outperforms previous results on a dataset of full-body actions captured with a depth sensor, and ranks among the best 21 results for a public benchmark of domestic daily actions.

  20. Perception du mouvement propre : contributions des différentes modalités sensorielles et applications en ergonomie cognitive

    OpenAIRE

    Priot, Anne-Emmanuelle

    2005-01-01

    Self-motion perception involves various sensory systems (primarily visual, vestibular and somatosensory). Sensory information is processed by the central nervous system to acquire a representation of the three-dimensional movements of the head and body in space, allowing spatial orientation, travelled distance perception, control of balance and posture. Perception at the sensory receptor reflects only very rarely conscious sensation of movement. The study of motion perception has to deal the ...

  1. A Motion Detection Algorithm Using Local Phase Information

    OpenAIRE

    Lazar, Aurel A; Ukani, Nikul H.; Yiyin Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Previous research demonstrated that global phase alone can be used to faithfully represent visual scenes. Here we provide a reconstruction algorithm by using only local phase information. We also demonstrate that local phase alone can be effectively used to detect local motion. The local phase-based motion detector is akin to models employed to detect motion in biological vision, for example, the Reichardt detector. The local phase-based motion detection algorithm introduced here consists of ...

  2. Transition from secondary to degree level studies. How do School of Biology students perceive and cope with the changes in assessment practices from secondary level education to degree level education? What role does assessment play in student perceptions of their first semester at University?

    OpenAIRE

    Walters, Chris

    2010-01-01

    In late August 2009, prior to their enrollment, first year students in the School of Biology were surveyed for their opinions on their perceptions of aspects of university life. The survey centered around preparedness, motivation and expectations. The results were then compared and contrasted with a follow up questionnaire, which was distributed to the same group of students via their tutors in February 2010 to coincide with the release of first semester exam results. The second questionna...

  3. Marine biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book discusses both taxonomic and ecological topics on marine biology. Full coverage of marine organisms of all five kingdoms is provided, along with interesting and thorough discussion of all major marine habitats. Organization into six major parts allows flexibility. It also provides insight into important topics such as disposal of nuclear waste at sea, the idea that life began on the ocean floor, and how whales, krill, and people interact. A full-color photo chapter reviews questions, and exercises. The contents are: an overview marine biology: fundamental concepts/investigating life in the ocean; the physical ocean, the ocean floor, the nature of water, the nature and motion of ocean water; general ecology, conditions for life in the sea, biological productivity and energy transfer; marine organisms; monera, protista, mycota and metaphyta; the smaller marine animals, the large animals marine habitats, the intertidal zone/benthos of the continental shelf, the photic zone, the deep ocean, the ocean under stress, marine pollution, appendix a: the metric system and conversion factors/ appendix b: prefixes and suffixes/ appendix c: taxonomic classification of common marine organisms, and glossary, and index

  4. Marine biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurman, H.V.; Webber, H.H.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses both taxonomic and ecological topics on marine biology. Full coverage of marine organisms of all five kingdoms is provided, along with interesting and thorough discussion of all major marine habitats. Organization into six major parts allows flexibility. It also provides insight into important topics such as disposal of nuclear waste at sea, the idea that life began on the ocean floor, and how whales, krill, and people interact. A full-color photo chapter reviews questions, and exercises. The contents are: an overview marine biology: fundamental concepts/investigating life in the ocean; the physical ocean, the ocean floor, the nature of water, the nature and motion of ocean water; general ecology, conditions for life in the sea, biological productivity and energy transfer; marine organisms; monera, protista, mycota and metaphyta; the smaller marine animals, the large animals marine habitats, the intertidal zone/benthos of the continental shelf, the photic zone, the deep ocean, the ocean under stress, marine pollution, appendix a: the metric system and conversion factors/ appendix b: prefixes and suffixes/ appendix c: taxonomic classification of common marine organisms, and glossary, and index.

  5. Risk perception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper outlines perceptions of radiation risks within a general framework of risk perception research. The authors comment on the importance and the implications related to the choice of terminology, including the multiple definitions of ''risk'', for risk perception and risk communication. They describe the main factors influencing subjective risk assessments found in the literature, and illustrate how these factors guide the different reactions to indoor radon and radioactive fall-out due to nuclear accidents. They also exemplify the differences between risk assessments by experts and the public, present some successful models of perceived risk and risk acceptance, and draw some general conclusions from the research field. (author). 96 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  6. Gender differences in crowd perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yang; Leib, Allison Y; Puri, Amrita M; Whitney, David; Peng, Kaiping

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated whether the first impression of a crowd of faces-crowd perception-is influenced by social background and cognitive processing. Specifically, we explored whether males and females, two groups that are distinct biologically and socially, differ in their ability to extract ensemble characteristics from crowds of faces that were comprised of different identities. Participants were presented with crowds of similar faces and were instructed to scroll through a morphed continuum of faces until they found a face that was representative of the average identity of each crowd. Consistent with previous research, females were more precise in single face perception. Furthermore, the results showed that females were generally more accurate in estimating the average identity of a crowd. However, the correlation between single face discrimination and crowd averaging differed between males and females. Specifically, male subjects' ensemble integration slightly compensated for their poor single face perception; their performance on the crowd perception task was not as poor as would be expected from their single face discrimination ability. Overall, the results suggest that group perception is not an isolated or uniform cognitive mechanism, but rather one that interacts with biological and social processes. PMID:26388805

  7. Canonical active Brownian motion

    OpenAIRE

    Gluck, Alexander; Huffel, Helmuth; Ilijic, Sasa

    2008-01-01

    Active Brownian motion is the complex motion of active Brownian particles. They are active in the sense that they can transform their internal energy into energy of motion and thus create complex motion patterns. Theories of active Brownian motion so far imposed couplings between the internal energy and the kinetic energy of the system. We investigate how this idea can be naturally taken further to include also couplings to the potential energy, which finally leads to a general theory of cano...

  8. Neural mechanisms of uncon-scious visual motion priming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The neural correlates of the motion priming were examined in normal young subjects using event-related brain potentials (ERPs) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Visual motion perception can be uncon-sciously biased in favor of a particular direction by a pre-ceding motion in that direction. Motion priming first in-volved an enhancement of ERP amplitude about 100 ms fol-lowing the onset of motion. The amplitudes of ERP compo-nents after 350 ms were also increased. The fMRI results suggest that the early-latency effect reflects modulation of neural responses in extrastriate cortex. Higher-level visual processing areas, including cortical regions MT/MST and the intraparietal cortices were also activated. The findings provide direct evidence that unconscious priming of motion perception is the result of interaction of direction-selective neural responses to motion stimuli. The results cannot be accounted for by refractoriness of neural responses, but in-stead support a theory of motion priming based on motion opponency, as proposed in computational models.

  9. Dissociation of neuronal and psychophysical responses to local and global motion

    OpenAIRE

    Hedges, James H.; Gartshteyn, Yevgeniya; Kohn, Adam; Rust, Nicole C.; Shadlen, Michael N.; Newsome, William T; Movshon, J. Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Most neurons in area MT (V5) are strongly direction selective [1–4], and their activity is closely associated with the perception of visual motion [reviewed in 5]. These neurons have large receptive fields, built by combining inputs with smaller receptive fields that respond to local motion [6]. Humans integrate motion over large areas and can perceive what has been referred to as global motion. The large size and direction selectivity of MT receptive fields suggests that MT neurons may repre...

  10. Consumer perceptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngapo, T. M.; Dransfield, E.; Martin, J. F.;

    2004-01-01

    Consumer focus groups in France, England, Sweden and Denmark were used to obtain insights into the decision-making involved in the choice of fresh pork and attitudes towards today's pig production systems. Many positive perceptions of pork meat were evoked. Negative images of the production systems...

  11. [Time perceptions and representations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tordjman, S

    2015-09-01

    Representations of time and time measurements depend on subjective constructs that vary according to changes in our concepts, beliefs, societal needs and technical advances. Similarly, the past, the future and the present are subjective representations that depend on each individual's psychic time and biological time. Therefore, there is no single, one-size-fits-all time for everyone, but rather a different, subjective time for each individual. We need to acknowledge the existence of different inter-individual times but also intra-individual times, to which different functions and different rhythms are attached, depending on the system of reference. However, the construction of these time perceptions and representations is influenced by objective factors (physiological, physical and cognitive) related to neuroscience which will be presented and discussed in this article. Thus, studying representation and perception of time lies at the crossroads between neuroscience, human sciences and philosophy. Furthermore, it is possible to identify several constants among the many and various representations of time and their corresponding measures, regardless of the system of time reference. These include the notion of movements repeated in a stable rhythmic pattern involving the recurrence of the same interval of time, which enables us to define units of time of equal and invariable duration. This rhythmicity is also found at a physiological level and contributes through circadian rhythms, in particular the melatonin rhythm, to the existence of a biological time. Alterations of temporality in mental disorders will be also discussed in this article illustrated by certain developmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorders. In particular, the hypothesis will be developed that children with autism would need to create discontinuity out of continuity through stereotyped behaviors and/or interests. This discontinuity repeated at regular intervals could have been

  12. Capturing Motion and Depth Before Cinematography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Nicholas J

    2016-01-01

    Visual representations of biological states have traditionally faced two problems: they lacked motion and depth. Attempts were made to supply these wants over many centuries, but the major advances were made in the early-nineteenth century. Motion was synthesized by sequences of slightly different images presented in rapid succession and depth was added by presenting slightly different images to each eye. Apparent motion and depth were combined some years later, but they tended to be applied separately. The major figures in this early period were Wheatstone, Plateau, Horner, Duboscq, Claudet, and Purkinje. Others later in the century, like Marey and Muybridge, were stimulated to extend the uses to which apparent motion and photography could be applied to examining body movements. These developments occurred before the birth of cinematography, and significant insights were derived from attempts to combine motion and depth. PMID:26684420

  13. 3D motion analysis via energy minimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedel, Andreas

    2009-10-16

    This work deals with 3D motion analysis from stereo image sequences for driver assistance systems. It consists of two parts: the estimation of motion from the image data and the segmentation of moving objects in the input images. The content can be summarized with the technical term machine visual kinesthesia, the sensation or perception and cognition of motion. In the first three chapters, the importance of motion information is discussed for driver assistance systems, for machine vision in general, and for the estimation of ego motion. The next two chapters delineate on motion perception, analyzing the apparent movement of pixels in image sequences for both a monocular and binocular camera setup. Then, the obtained motion information is used to segment moving objects in the input video. Thus, one can clearly identify the thread from analyzing the input images to describing the input images by means of stationary and moving objects. Finally, I present possibilities for future applications based on the contents of this thesis. Previous work in each case is presented in the respective chapters. Although the overarching issue of motion estimation from image sequences is related to practice, there is nothing as practical as a good theory (Kurt Lewin). Several problems in computer vision are formulated as intricate energy minimization problems. In this thesis, motion analysis in image sequences is thoroughly investigated, showing that splitting an original complex problem into simplified sub-problems yields improved accuracy, increased robustness, and a clear and accessible approach to state-of-the-art motion estimation techniques. In Chapter 4, optical flow is considered. Optical flow is commonly estimated by minimizing the combined energy, consisting of a data term and a smoothness term. These two parts are decoupled, yielding a novel and iterative approach to optical flow. The derived Refinement Optical Flow framework is a clear and straight-forward approach to

  14. Effect of heading perception on microsaccade dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piras, Alessandro; Raffi, Milena; Persiani, Michela; Perazzolo, Monica; Squatrito, Salvatore

    2016-10-01

    The present study shows the relationship between microsaccades and heading perception. Recent research demonstrates that microsaccades during fixation are necessary to overcome loss of vision due to continuous stimulation of the retinal receptors, even at the potential cost of a decrease in visual acuity. The goal of oculomotor fixational mechanisms might be not retinal stabilization, but controlled image motion adjusted to be optimal for visual processing. Thus, patterns of microsaccades may be exploited to help to understand the oculomotor system, aspects of visual perception, and the dynamics of visual attention. We presented an expansion optic flow in which the dot speed simulated a heading directed to the left or to the right of the subject, who had to signal the perceived heading by making a saccade toward the perceived direction. We recorded microsaccades during the optic flow stimulation to investigate their characteristics before and after the response. The time spent on heading perception was similar between right and left direction, and response latency was shorter during correct than incorrect responses. Furthermore, we observed that correct heading perception is associated with longer, larger and faster microsaccade characteristics. The time-course of microsaccade rate shows a modulation across the perception process similar to that seen for other local perception tasks, while the main direction is oriented toward the opposite side with respect to the perceived heading. Microsaccades enhance visual perception and, therefore, represent a fundamental motor process, with a specific effect for the build-up of global visual perception of space. PMID:27327105

  15. Microsaccades drive illusory motion in the Enigma illusion

    OpenAIRE

    Troncoso, Xoana G.; Macknik, Stephen L.; Otero-Millan, Jorge; Martinez-Conde, Susana

    2008-01-01

    Visual images consisting of repetitive patterns can elicit striking illusory motion percepts. For almost 200 years, artists, psychologists, and neuroscientists have debated whether this type of illusion originates in the eye or in the brain. For more than a decade, the controversy has centered on the powerful illusory motion perceived in the painting Enigma, created by op-artist Isia Leviant. However, no previous study has directly correlated the Enigma illusion to any specific physiological ...

  16. MODELING OF VEHICULAR STEERING EFFICIENCY IN TRAFFIC DIRECTION MOTION CHANNEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Ganai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper formulates and solves an actual problem pertaining to vehicular steering efficiency in traffic direction motion channel. Models of operator-drivers with low, medium and high rates in motivational perception of road conditions and also a model for controlling a traffic direction motion have been taken into ccount in the paper.  Modeling has been done by using MATLAB.

  17. The Dynamic Ebbinghaus: motion dynamics greatly enhance the classic contextual size illusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan E.B. Mruczek

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The Ebbinghaus illusion is a classic example of the influence of a contextual surround on the perceived size of an object. Here, we introduce a novel variant of this illusion called the Dynamic Ebbinghaus illusion in which the size and eccentricity of the surrounding inducers modulates dynamically over time. Under these conditions, the size of the central circle is perceived to change in opposition with the size of the inducers. Interestingly, this illusory effect is relatively weak when participants are fixating a stationary central target, less than half the magnitude of the classic static illusion. However, when the entire stimulus translates in space requiring a smooth pursuit eye movement to track the target, the illusory effect is greatly enhanced, almost twice the magnitude of the classic static illusion. A variety of manipulations including target motion, peripheral viewing, and smooth pursuit eye movements all lead to dramatic illusory effects, with the largest effect nearly four times the strength of the classic static illusion. We interpret these results in light of the fact that motion-related manipulations lead to uncertainty in the image size representation of the target, specifically due to added noise at the level of the retinal input. We propose that the neural circuits integrating visual cues for size perception, such as retinal image size, perceived distance, and various contextual factors, weight each cue according to the level of noise or uncertainty in their neural representation. Thus, more weight is given to the influence of contextual information in deriving perceived size in the presence of stimulus and eye motion. Biologically plausible models of size perception should be able to account for the reweighting of different visual cues under varying levels of certainty.

  18. Gender differences in the perception of crowd perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang eBai

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated whether the first impression of a crowd of faces—crowd perception—is influenced by social background and cognitive processing. Specifically, we explored whether males and females, two groups that are distinct biologically and socially, differ in their ability to extract ensemble characteristics from crowds of faces that were comprised of different identities. Participants were presented with crowds of similar faces and were instructed to scroll through a morphed continuum of faces until they found a face that was representative of the average identity of each crowd. Consistent with previous research, females were more precise in single face perception. Furthermore, the results showed that females were generally more accurate in estimating the average identity of a crowd. However, the correlation between single face discrimination and crowd averaging differed between males and females. Specifically, male subjects’ ensemble integration superiority slightly compensated for their poor single face perception; their performance on the crowd perception task was not as poor as would be expected from their single face discrimination ability. Overall, the results suggest that group perception is not an isolated or uniform cognitive mechanism, but rather one that interacts with biological and social processes.

  19. Compressible motion fields

    OpenAIRE

    Ottaviano, Giuseppe; Kohli, Pushmeet

    2013-01-01

    Traditional video compression methods obtain a compact representation for image frames by computing coarse motion fields defined on patches of pixels called blocks, in order to compensate for the motion in the scene across frames. This piecewise constant approximation makes the motion field efficiently encodable, but it introduces block artifacts in the warped image frame. In this paper, we address the problem of estimating dense motion fields that, while accurately predicting one frame from ...

  20. Computer vision methods for robot tasks: Motion detection, depth estimation and tracking

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Martín, Ester

    2012-01-01

    On the way to autonomous robots, perception is a key point. Among all the perception senses, vision is undoubtedly the most important for the information it can provide. However, it is not easy to identify what is seen from the provided visual input. On this regard, inspired by humans, we have studied motion as a primary cue. Particularly, we present a computational solution for motion detection, object location and tracking from images captured by perspective and fisheye cameras. Th...

  1. Naturalistic fMRI mapping reveals superior temporal sulcus as the hub for the distributed brain network for social perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juha Marko Lahnakoski

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite the abundant data on brain networks processing static social signals, such as pictures of faces, the neural systems supporting social perception in naturalistic conditions are still poorly understood. Here we delineated brain networks subserving social perception under naturalistic conditions in 19 healthy humans who watched, during 3-tesla functional magnetic imaging (fMRI, a set of 137 short (~16 s each, total 27 min audiovisual movie clips depicting pre-selected social signals. Two independent raters estimated how well each clip represented eight social features (faces, human bodies, biological motion, goal-oriented actions, emotion, social interaction, pain, and speech and six filler features (places, objects, rigid motion, people not in social interaction, non-goal-oriented action and non-human sounds lacking social content. These ratings were used as predictors in the fMRI analysis. The posterior superior temporal sulcus (STS responded to all social features but not to any non-social features, and the anterior STS responded to all social features except bodies and biological motion. We also found four partially segregated, extended networks for processing of specific social signals: 1 a fronto-temporal network responding to multiple social categories, 2 a fronto-parietal network preferentially activated to bodies, motion and pain, 3 a temporo-amygdalar network responding to faces, social interaction and speech, and 4 a fronto-insular network responding to pain, emotions, social interactions, and speech. Our results highlight the role of the posterior STS in processing multiple aspects of social information, as well as the feasibility and efficiency of fMRI mapping under conditions that resemble the complexity of real life.

  2. Sensory uncertainty leads to systematic misperception of the direction of motion in depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulvio, Jacqueline M; Rosen, Monica L; Rokers, Bas

    2015-07-01

    Although we have made major advances in understanding motion perception based on the processing of lateral (2D) motion signals on computer displays, the majority of motion in the real (3D) world occurs outside of the plane of fixation, and motion directly toward or away from observers has particular behavioral relevance. Previous work has reported a systematic lateral bias in the perception of 3D motion, such that an object on a collision course with an observer's head is frequently judged to miss it, with obvious negative consequences. To better understand this bias, we systematically investigated the accuracy of 3D motion perception while manipulating sensory noise by varying the contrast of a moving target and its position in depth relative to fixation. Inconsistent with previous work, we found little bias under low sensory noise conditions. With increased sensory noise, however, we revealed a novel perceptual phenomenon: observers demonstrated a surprising tendency to confuse the direction of motion-in-depth, such that approaching objects were reported to be receding and vice versa. Subsequent analysis revealed that the lateral and motion-in-depth components of observers' reports are similarly affected, but that the effects on the motion-in-depth component (i.e., the motion-in-depth confusions) are much more apparent than those on the lateral component. In addition to revealing this novel visual phenomenon, these results shed new light on errors that can occur in motion perception and provide a basis for continued development of motion perception models. Finally, our findings suggest methods to evaluate the effectiveness of 3D visualization environments, such as 3D movies and virtual reality devices. PMID:25828462

  3. Perception of rotation, path, and heading in circular trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nooij, Suzanne A E; Nesti, Alessandro; Bülthoff, Heinrich H; Pretto, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    When in darkness, humans can perceive the direction and magnitude of rotations and of linear translations in the horizontal plane. The current paper addresses the integrated perception of combined translational and rotational motion, as it occurs when moving along a curved trajectory. We questioned whether the perceived motion through the environment follows the predictions of a self-motion perception model (e.g., Merfeld et al. in J Vestib Res 3:141-161, 1993; Newman in A multisensory observer model for human spatial orientation perception, 2009), which assume linear addition of rotational and translational components. For curved motion in darkness, such models predict a non-veridical motion percept, consisting of an underestimation of the perceived rotation, a distortion of the perceived travelled path, and a bias in the perceived heading (i.e., the perceived instantaneous direction of motion with respect to the body). These model predictions were evaluated in two experiments. In Experiment 1, seven participants were moved along a circular trajectory in darkness while facing the motion direction. They indicated perceived yaw rotation using an online tracking task, and perceived travelled path by drawings. In Experiment 2, the heading was systematically varied, and six participants indicated, in a 2-alternative forced-choice task, whether they perceived facing inward or outward of the circular path. Overall, we found no evidence for the heading bias predicted by the model. This suggests that the sum of the perceived rotational and translational components alone cannot adequately explain the overall perceived motion through the environment. Possibly, knowledge about motion dynamics and familiar stimuli combinations may play an important additional role in shaping the percept. PMID:27056085

  4. Rolling Shutter Motion Deblurring

    KAUST Repository

    Su, Shuochen

    2015-06-07

    Although motion blur and rolling shutter deformations are closely coupled artifacts in images taken with CMOS image sensors, the two phenomena have so far mostly been treated separately, with deblurring algorithms being unable to handle rolling shutter wobble, and rolling shutter algo- rithms being incapable of dealing with motion blur. We propose an approach that delivers sharp and undis torted output given a single rolling shutter motion blurred image. The key to achieving this is a global modeling of the camera motion trajectory, which enables each scanline of the image to be deblurred with the corresponding motion segment. We show the results of the proposed framework through experiments on synthetic and real data.

  5. The importance of stimulus noise analysis for self-motion studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Nesti

    Full Text Available Motion simulators are widely employed in basic and applied research to study the neural mechanisms of perception and action during inertial stimulation. In these studies, uncontrolled simulator-introduced noise inevitably leads to a disparity between the reproduced motion and the trajectories meticulously designed by the experimenter, possibly resulting in undesired motion cues to the investigated system. Understanding actual simulator responses to different motion commands is therefore a crucial yet often underestimated step towards the interpretation of experimental results. In this work, we developed analysis methods based on signal processing techniques to quantify the noise in the actual motion, and its deterministic and stochastic components. Our methods allow comparisons between commanded and actual motion as well as between different actual motion profiles. A specific practical example from one of our studies is used to illustrate the methodologies and their relevance, but this does not detract from its general applicability. Analyses of the simulator's inertial recordings show direction-dependent noise and nonlinearity related to the command amplitude. The Signal-to-Noise Ratio is one order of magnitude higher for the larger motion amplitudes we tested, compared to the smaller motion amplitudes. Simulator-introduced noise is found to be primarily of deterministic nature, particularly for the stronger motion intensities. The effect of simulator noise on quantification of animal/human motion sensitivity is discussed. We conclude that accurate recording and characterization of executed simulator motion are a crucial prerequisite for the investigation of uncertainty in self-motion perception.

  6. Structural motion engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Connor, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    This innovative volume provides a systematic treatment of the basic concepts and computational procedures for structural motion design and engineering for civil installations. The authors illustrate the application of motion control to a wide spectrum of buildings through many examples. Topics covered include optimal stiffness distributions for building-type structures, the role of damping in controlling motion, tuned mass dampers, base isolation systems, linear control, and nonlinear control. The book's primary objective is the satisfaction of motion-related design requirements, such as restrictions on displacement and acceleration. The book is ideal for practicing engineers and graduate students. This book also: ·         Broadens practitioners' understanding of structural motion control, the enabling technology for motion-based design ·         Provides readers the tools to satisfy requirements of modern, ultra-high strength materials that lack corresponding stiffness, where the motion re...

  7. Bounded Active Perception

    OpenAIRE

    KETENCI, Uktu Gorkem; Bremond, Roland; Auberlet, Jean Michel; GRISLIN, Emmanuelle

    2010-01-01

    There are two kinds of perception : active and passive. This paper is an attempt to take advantage of active perception to improve the agent's perception of relevant information. Through the data filtering capacity, active perception is a useful tool for modeling human-like bounded perception. Using such filters, either the agent or the environment take an active role. We determine several unsolved issues in active perception and do several proposals to implement our concept on the active per...

  8. The Biological Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Steven J.

    2000-03-01

    Introduction; 1. From the physical world to the biological universe: Democritus to Lowell; 2. Plurality of worlds and the decline of anthropocentrism; 3. The solar system: the limits of observation; 4. Solar systems beyond: the limits of theory; 5. Extraterrestrials in literature and the arts: the role of imagination; 6. The UFO controversy: on perception and deception; 7. The origin and evolution of life in the extraterrestrial context; 8. SETI: the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence; 9. The convergence of disciplines: birth of a new science; 10. The meaning of life; Summary and conclusion: the biological universe and the limits of science.

  9. A Motion Planning Approach to Studying Molecular Motions

    KAUST Repository

    Amato, Nancy M.

    2010-01-01

    While structurally very different, protein and RNA molecules share an important attribute. The motions they undergo are strongly related to the function they perform. For example, many diseases such as Mad Cow disease or Alzheimer\\'s disease are associated with protein misfolding and aggregation. Similarly, RNA folding velocity may regulate the plasmid copy number, and RNA folding kinetics can regulate gene expression at the translational level. Knowledge of the stability, folding, kinetics and detailed mechanics of the folding process may help provide insight into how proteins and RNAs fold. In this paper, we present an overview of our work with a computational method we have adapted from robotic motion planning to study molecular motions. We have validated against experimental data and have demonstrated that our method can capture biological results such as stochastic folding pathways, population kinetics of various conformations, and relative folding rates. Thus, our method provides both a detailed view (e.g., individual pathways) and a global view (e.g., population kinetics, relative folding rates, and reaction coordinates) of energy landscapes of both proteins and RNAs. We have validated these techniques by showing that we observe the same relative folding rates as shown in experiments for structurally similar protein molecules that exhibit different folding behaviors. Our analysis has also been able to predict the same relative gene expression rate for wild-type MS2 phage RNA and three of its mutants.

  10. On the Motion of Falling Leaves

    CERN Document Server

    Razavi, Pedram

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the motion of falling leaves through modeling using papers and the corresponding data collected from more than four thousands experiments. Two series of experiments were designed in order to study the relationship between different parameters which can affect different paths of motion in leaves. In the first series of experiments, the shapes of the potential paths that falling papers can take were investigated as a whole. A new classification scheme was derived from these experiments, categorizing the motion of falling sheets of paper based on the deviation from the original point of release and the shape of the path they take on their descending journey. We believe this new classification scheme can be very useful with potential applications in various fields such as biology, meteorology, etc.; it can also build a foundation for further experiments. The second set of experiments was focused on the dynamics and shape of the motion of the falling paper itself. It was observed from these...

  11. moco: Fast Motion Correction for Calcium Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubbs, Alexander; Guevara, James; Yuste, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Motion correction is the first step in a pipeline of algorithms to analyze calcium imaging videos and extract biologically relevant information, for example the network structure of the neurons therein. Fast motion correction is especially critical for closed-loop activity triggered stimulation experiments, where accurate detection and targeting of specific cells in necessary. We introduce a novel motion-correction algorithm which uses a Fourier-transform approach, and a combination of judicious downsampling and the accelerated computation of many L 2 norms using dynamic programming and two-dimensional, fft-accelerated convolutions, to enhance its efficiency. Its accuracy is comparable to that of established community-used algorithms, and it is more stable to large translational motions. It is programmed in Java and is compatible with ImageJ. PMID:26909035

  12. 3D Image Sensor based on Parallax Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barna Reskó

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available For humans and visual animals vision it is the primary and the most sophisticatedperceptual modality to get information about the surrounding world. Depth perception is apart of vision allowing to accurately determine the distance to an object which makes it animportant visual task. Humans have two eyes with overlapping visual fields that enablestereo vision and thus space perception. Some birds however do not have overlappingvisual fields, and compensate this lask by moving their heads, which in turn makes spaceperception possible using the motion parallax as a visual cue. This paper presents asolution using an opto-mechanical filter that was inspired by the way birds observe theirenvironment. The filtering is done using two different approaches:using motion blur duringmotion parallax, and using the optical flow algorithm. The two methods have differentadvantages and drawbacks, which will be discussed in the paper. The proposed system canbe used in robotics for 3D space perception.

  13. Biological Threats

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Workplace Plans School Emergency Plans Main Content Biological Threats Biological agents are organisms or toxins that can ... for Disease Control and Prevention . Before a Biological Threat Unlike an explosion, a biological attack may or ...

  14. Passive motion reduces vestibular balance and perceptual responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Richard C; Watson, Shaun R D

    2015-05-15

    With the hypothesis that vestibular sensitivity is regulated to deal with a range of environmental motion conditions, we explored the effects of passive whole-body motion on vestibular perceptual and balance responses. In 10 subjects, vestibular responses were measured before and after a period of imposed passive motion. Vestibulospinal balance reflexes during standing evoked by galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) were measured as shear reaction forces. Perceptual tests measured thresholds for detecting angular motion, perceptions of suprathreshold rotation and perceptions of GVS-evoked illusory rotation. The imposed conditioning motion was 10 min of stochastic yaw rotation (0.5-2.5 Hz ≤ 300 deg s(-2) ) with subjects seated. This conditioning markedly reduced reflexive and perceptual responses. The medium latency galvanic reflex (300-350 ms) was halved in amplitude (48%; P = 0.011) but the short latency response was unaffected. Thresholds for detecting imposed rotation more than doubled (248%; P vestibular sensations of rotation evoked by GVS (mean 113 deg for 10 s at 1 mA) by 44% (P vestibular sensory autoregulation exists and that this probably involves central and peripheral mechanisms, possibly through vestibular efferent regulation. We propose that failure of these regulatory mechanisms at different levels could lead to disorders of movement perception and balance control during standing. PMID:25809702

  15. Performance characterization of Watson Ahumada motion detector using random dot rotary motion stimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth Jain

    Full Text Available The performance of Watson & Ahumada's model of human visual motion sensing is compared against human psychophysical performance. The stimulus consists of random dots undergoing rotary motion, displayed in a circular annulus. The model matches psychophysical observer performance with respect to most parameters. It is able to replicate some key psychophysical findings such as invariance of observer performance to dot density in the display, and decrease of observer performance with frame duration of the display.Associated with the concept of rotary motion is the notion of a center about which rotation occurs. One might think that for accurate estimation of rotary motion in the display, this center must be accurately known. A simple vector analysis reveals that this need not be the case. Numerical simulations confirm this result, and may explain the position invariance of MST(d cells. Position invariance is the experimental finding that rotary motion sensitive cells are insensitive to where in their receptive field rotation occurs.When all the dots in the display are randomly drawn from a uniform distribution, illusory rotary motion is perceived. This case was investigated by Rose & Blake previously, who termed the illusory rotary motion the omega effect. Two important experimental findings are reported concerning this effect. First, although the display of random dots evokes perception of rotary motion, the direction of motion perceived does not depend on what dot pattern is shown. Second, the time interval between spontaneous flips in perceived direction is lognormally distributed (mode approximately 2 s. These findings suggest the omega effect fits in the category of a typical bistable illusion, and therefore the processes that give rise to this illusion may be the same processes that underlie much of other bistable phenomenon.

  16. Brain Image Motion Correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Ramsbøl; Benjaminsen, Claus; Larsen, Rasmus;

    2015-01-01

    The application of motion tracking is wide, including: industrial production lines, motion interaction in gaming, computer-aided surgery and motion correction in medical brain imaging. Several devices for motion tracking exist using a variety of different methodologies. In order to use such devices...... offset and tracking noise in medical brain imaging. The data are generated from a phantom mounted on a rotary stage and have been collected using a Siemens High Resolution Research Tomograph for positron emission tomography. During acquisition the phantom was tracked with our latest tracking prototype...

  17. EDITORIAL: Nanotechnology in motion Nanotechnology in motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna

    2012-02-01

    , Toshio Ando from the University of Kanazawa provides an overview of developments that have allowed atomic force microscopy to move from rates of the order of one frame a minute to over a thousand frames per second in constant height mode, as reported by Mervyn Miles and colleagues at Bristol University and University College London [8]. Among the pioneers in the field, Ando's group demonstrated the ability to record the Brownian motion of myosin V molecules on mica with image capture rates of 100 x 100 pixels in 80 ms over a decade ago [9]. The developments unleash the potential of atomic force microscopy to observe the dynamics of biological and materials systems. If seeing is believing, the ability to present real motion pictures of the nanoworld cannot fail to capture the public imagination and stimulate burgeoning new avenues of scientific endeavour. Nearly 350 years on from the publication Micrographia, images in microscopy have moved from the page to the movies. References [1] Binnig G, Quate C F, and Gerber Ch 1986 Phys. Rev. Lett. 56 930-3 [2] Ando T 2012 Nanotechnology 23 062001 [3] J G 1934 Nature 134 635-6 [4] Bharadwaj P, Anger P and Novotny L 2007 Nanotechnology 18 044017 [5] The Nobel Prize in Physics 1986 Nobelprize.org [6] Kim K K, Reina A, Shi Y, Park H, Li L-J, Lee Y H and Kong J 2010 Nanotechnology 21 285205 [7] Phillips D B, Grieve J A, Olof S N, Kocher S J, Bowman R, Padgett M J, Miles M J and Carberry D M 2011 Nanotechnology 22 285503 [8] Picco L M, Bozec L, Ulcinas A, Engledew D J, Antognozzi M, Horton M A and Miles M J 2007 Nanotechnology 18 044030 [9] Ando T, Kodera N, Takai E, Maruyama D, Saito K and Toda A 2001 Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 98 12468

  18. Perceptual Learning of Motion Direction Discrimination with Suppressed and Unsuppressed MT in Humans: An fMRI Study

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Benjamin; Tjan, Bosco S.; Liu, Zili

    2013-01-01

    The middle temporal area of the extrastriate visual cortex (area MT) is integral to motion perception and is thought to play a key role in the perceptual learning of motion tasks. We have previously found, however, that perceptual learning of a motion discrimination task is possible even when the training stimulus contains locally balanced, motion opponent signals that putatively suppress the response of MT. Assuming at least partial suppression of MT, possible explanations for this learning ...

  19. Perception without awareness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bánréti-Fuchs, K.M.

    1967-01-01

    Two experiments were carried out in order to re-examine the phenomenon of subliminal perception, c.q. perception without awareness. Subliminal perception, c.q. perception without awareness, was defined in terms of the subjects' ability to respond differentially to the content of stimuli like words o

  20. Self-recognition of avatar motion: how do I know it's me?

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, Richard; Johnston, Alan; Heyes, Cecilia

    2011-01-01

    When motion is isolated from form cues and viewed from third-person perspectives, individuals are able to recognize their own whole body movements better than those of friends. Because we rarely see our own bodies in motion from third-person viewpoints, this self-recognition advantage may indicate a contribution to perception from the motor system. Our first experiment provides evidence that recognition of self-produced and friends' motion dissociate, with only the latter showing sensitivity ...

  1. Locust Collective Motion and Its Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariel, Gil; Ayali, Amir

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade, technological advances in experimental and animal tracking techniques have motivated a renewed theoretical interest in animal collective motion and, in particular, locust swarming. This review offers a comprehensive biological background followed by comparative analysis of recent models of locust collective motion, in particular locust marching, their settings, and underlying assumptions. We describe a wide range of recent modeling and simulation approaches, from discrete agent-based models of self-propelled particles to continuous models of integro-differential equations, aimed at describing and analyzing the fascinating phenomenon of locust collective motion. These modeling efforts have a dual role: The first views locusts as a quintessential example of animal collective motion. As such, they aim at abstraction and coarse-graining, often utilizing the tools of statistical physics. The second, which originates from a more biological perspective, views locust swarming as a scientific problem of its own exceptional merit. The main goal should, thus, be the analysis and prediction of natural swarm dynamics. We discuss the properties of swarm dynamics using the tools of statistical physics, as well as the implications for laboratory experiments and natural swarms. Finally, we stress the importance of a combined-interdisciplinary, biological-theoretical effort in successfully confronting the challenges that locusts pose at both the theoretical and practical levels. PMID:26656851

  2. Motion compensator for holographic motion picture camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    When reference beam strikes target it undergoes Doppler shift dependent upon target velocity. To compensate, object beam is first reflected from rotating cylinder that revolves in direction opposite to target but at same speed. When beam strikes target it is returned to original frequency and is in phase with reference beam. Alternatively this motion compensator may act on reference beam.

  3. Perception of radiation risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perception of risks by people depends on many factors, either characterizing the individuals, or specific to the risk sources. The risk concept, which confuses the issue, is precised first. Second, the perception phenomenon is presented as an interactive process involving the individual, the hazard, and the social context. Third, dimensions of perception are listed and used to describe the perception of radiation risks. Finally, the relation between perception and attitude is clarified. (author) 50 refs

  4. Fundamental dimensions of musical perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilgün Sazak

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, definition of perception concept has been emphasized.Musical perception concept occurred as a result of relationship between perception and music has been examined.Musical perception process has been developed by utilizing general perception processes.Scientific studies made on musical perception process and types of musical perception have been exhibited.

  5. Fundamental dimensions of musical perception

    OpenAIRE

    Nilgün Sazak

    2008-01-01

    In this study, definition of perception concept has been emphasized.Musical perception concept occurred as a result of relationship between perception and music has been examined.Musical perception process has been developed by utilizing general perception processes.Scientific studies made on musical perception process and types of musical perception have been exhibited.

  6. The 'atom-splitting' moment of synthetic biology: Nuclear physics and synthetic biology share common features

    OpenAIRE

    Valentine, Alex J; Kleinert, Aleysia; Verdier, Jerome

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic biology and nuclear physics share many commonalities in terms of public perception and funding. Synthetic biologists could learn valuable lessons from the history of the atomic bomb and nuclear power.

  7. Cyclotron motion in graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Schliemann, John

    2008-01-01

    We investigate cyclotron motion in graphene monolayers considering both the full quantum dynamics and its semiclassical limit reached at high carrier energies. Effects of zitterbewegung due to the two dispersion branches of the spectrum dominate the irregular quantum motion at low energies and are obtained as a systematic correction to the semiclassical case. Recent experiments are shown to operate in the semiclassical regime.

  8. Neutron structural biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron structural biology will be one of the most important fields in the life sciences which will interest human beings in the 21st century because neutrons can provide not only the position of hydrogen atoms in biological macromolecules but also the dynamic molecular motion of hydrogen atoms and water molecules. However, there are only a few examples experimentally determined at present because of the lack of neutron source intensity. Next generation neutron source scheduled in JAERI (Performance of which is 100 times better than that of JRR-3M) opens the life science of the 21st century. (author)

  9. Stochastic ground motion simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaeian, Sanaz; Xiaodan, Sun

    2014-01-01

    Strong earthquake ground motion records are fundamental in engineering applications. Ground motion time series are used in response-history dynamic analysis of structural or geotechnical systems. In such analysis, the validity of predicted responses depends on the validity of the input excitations. Ground motion records are also used to develop ground motion prediction equations(GMPEs) for intensity measures such as spectral accelerations that are used in response-spectrum dynamic analysis. Despite the thousands of available strong ground motion records, there remains a shortage of records for large-magnitude earthquakes at short distances or in specific regions, as well as records that sample specific combinations of source, path, and site characteristics.

  10. Motion control systems

    CERN Document Server

    Sabanovic, Asif

    2011-01-01

    "Presents a unified approach to the fundamental issues in motion control, starting from the basics and moving through single degree of freedom and multi-degree of freedom systems In Motion Control Systems, Šabanovic and Ohnishi present a unified approach to very diverse issues covered in motion control systems, offering know-how accumulated through work on very diverse problems into a comprehensive, integrated approach suitable for application in high demanding high-tech products. It covers material from single degree of freedom systems to complex multi-body non-redundant and redundant systems. The discussion of the main subject is based on original research results and will give treatment of the issues in motion control in the framework of the acceleration control method with disturbance rejection technique. This allows consistent unification of different issues in motion control ranging from simple trajectory tracking to topics related to haptics and bilateral control without and with delay in the measure...

  11. A Bayesian Framework for Active Artificial Perception

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Joao; Lobo, Jorge; Bessiere, Pierre; Castelo-Branco, M; Dias, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    In this text, we present a Bayesian framework for active multimodal perception of 3D structure and motion. The design of this framework finds its inspiration in the role of the dorsal perceptual pathway of the human brain. Its composing models build upon a common egocentric spatial configuration that is naturally fitting for the integration of readings from multiple sensors using a Bayesian approach. In the process, we will contribute with efficient and robust probabilistic solutions for cycl...

  12. The impact of the perception of rhythmic music on self-paced oscillatory movements

    OpenAIRE

    Peckel, Mathieu; Pozzo, Thierry; Bigand, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by theories of perception-action coupling and embodied music cognition, we investigated how rhythmic music perception impacts self-paced oscillatory movements. In a pilot study, we examined the kinematic parameters of self-paced oscillatory movements, walking and finger tapping using optical motion capture. In accordance with biomechanical constraints accounts of motion, we found that movements followed a hierarchical organization depending on the proximal/distal characteristic of th...

  13. The impact of the perception of rhythmic music on oscillatory self-paced movements

    OpenAIRE

    Mathieu ePeckel; Thierry ePozzo; Emmanuel eBigand

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by theories of perception-action coupling and embodied music cognition, we investigated how rhythmic music perception impacts self-paced oscillatory movements. In a pilot study, we examined the kinematic parameters of self-paced oscillatory movements, walking and finger tapping using optical motion capture. In accordance with biomechanical constraints accounts of motion, we found that movements followed a hierarchical organization depending on the proximal/distal characteristic of th...

  14. OCT Motion Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Martin F.; Hornegger, Joachim

    From the introduction of time domain OCT [1] up to recent swept source systems, motion continues to be an issue in OCT imaging. In contrast to normal photography, an OCT image does not represent a single point in time. Instead, conventional OCT devices sequentially acquire one-dimensional data over a period of several seconds, capturing one beam of light at a time and recording both the intensity and delay of reflections along its path through an object. In combination with unavoidable object motion which occurs in many imaging contexts, the problem of motion artifacts lies in the very nature of OCT imaging. Motion artifacts degrade image quality and make quantitative measurements less reliable. Therefore, it is desirable to come up with techniques to measure and/or correct object motion during OCT acquisition. In this chapter, we describe the effect of motion on OCT data sets and give an overview on the state of the art in the field of retinal OCT motion correction.

  15. Inflation and Cyclotron Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Greensite, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    We consider, in the context of a braneworld cosmology, the motion of the universe coupled to a four-form gauge field, with constant field strength, defined in higher dimensions. It is found, under rather general initial conditions, that in this situation there is a period of exponential inflation combined with cyclotron motion in the inflaton field space. The main effect of the cyclotron motion is that conditions on the flatness of the inflaton potential, which are typically necessary for exponential inflation, can be evaded. There are Landau levels associated with the four-form gauge field, and these correspond to quantum excitations of the inflaton field.

  16. Generalized compliant motion primitive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backes, Paul G.

    1994-08-01

    This invention relates to a general primitive for controlling a telerobot with a set of input parameters. The primitive includes a trajectory generator; a teleoperation sensor; a joint limit generator; a force setpoint generator; a dither function generator, which produces telerobot motion inputs in a common coordinate frame for simultaneous combination in sensor summers. Virtual return spring motion input is provided by a restoration spring subsystem. The novel features of this invention include use of a single general motion primitive at a remote site to permit the shared and supervisory control of the robot manipulator to perform tasks via a remotely transferred input parameter set.

  17. ROV Motion Control Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Dukan, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is about automatic motion control systems for remotely operated vehicles (ROV). The work has focused on topics within guidance and navigation. In addition, a motion control system has been developed, implemented, tested and used on two ROVs in sea trials.The main motivation for the work has been the need to automate ROV tasks in order to make the ROV a more efficient tool for exploring the ocean space. Many parts of a motion control system for a ROV is similar to that of surface v...

  18. Self-motion Perception from Optic Flow and Rotation Signals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Beintema (Jaap)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe value of optic flow for retrieving movement direction was recognised already two centuries ago by astronomers, searching the sky for meteorite showers. The point from which the shower appeared to emanate they termed the radiant, knowing it indicated the direction along which the mete

  19. Collective motion in populations of colloidal robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolo, Denis; Bricard, Antoine; Caussin, Jean-Baptiste; Dauchot, Olivier; Desreumaux, Nicolas

    2014-03-01

    Could the behavior of bacteria swarms, fish schools, and bird flocks be understood within a unified framework? Can one ignore the very details of the interaction mechanisms at the individual level to elucidate how strikingly similar collective motion emerges at the group level in this broad range of motile systems? These seemingly provocative questions have triggered significant advance in the physics and the biology, communities over the last decade. In the physics language these systems, made of motile individuals, can all be though as different realizations of ``active matter.'' In this talk, I will show how to gain more insight into this vivid field using self-propelled colloids as a proxy for motile organism. I will show how to motorize colloidal particles capable of sensing the orientation of their neighbors. Then, I will demonstrate that these archetypal populations display spontaneous transitions to swarming motion, and to global directed motion with very few density and orientation fluctuations.

  20. Gestalt perception is associated with reduced parietal beta oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaretskaya, Natalia; Bartels, Andreas

    2015-05-15

    The ability to perceive composite objects as a whole is fundamental for visual perception in a complex and cluttered natural environment. This ability may be mediated by increased communication between neural representations of distinct object elements, and has been linked to increased synchronization of oscillatory brain activity in the gamma band. Previous studies of perceptual grouping either guided attention between local and global aspects of a given stimulus or manipulated its physical properties to achieve grouped and ungrouped perceptual conditions. In contrast to those studies, we fully matched the physical properties underlying global and local percepts using a bistable stimulus that causes the viewer to perceive either local motion of multiple elements or global motion of two illusory shapes without any external change. To test the synchronization hypothesis we recorded brain activity with EEG, while human participants viewed the stimulus and reported changes in their perception. In contrast to previous findings we show that power of the beta-band was lower during perception of global Gestalt than during that of local elements. Source localization places these differences in the posterior parietal cortex, overlapping with a site previously associated with both attention and Gestalt perception. These findings reveal a role of parietal beta-band activity in internally, rather than externally or attention-driven processes of Gestalt perception. They also add to the growing evidence for shared neural substrates of attention and Gestalt perception, both being linked to parietal cortex. PMID:25731988

  1. Vision and Motion Pictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grambo, Gregory

    1998-01-01

    Presents activities on persistence of vision that involve students in a hands-on approach to the study of early methods of creating motion pictures. Students construct flip books, a Zoetrope, and an early movie machine. (DDR)

  2. Travelers' Health: Motion Sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Visiting Friends and Family in Areas with Chikungunya, Dengue, or Zika Travel to the Olympics Infographic: Olympic ... ibandronate sodium, risedronate sodium TREATMENT Nonpharmacologic treatments for preventing and treating motion sickness can be effective with ...

  3. Ballistic motion planning

    OpenAIRE

    Campana, Mylène; Laumond, Jean-Paul

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the motion planning problem for a jumping point-robot. Each jump consists in a ballistic motion linking two positions in contact with obstacle surfaces. A solution path is thus a sequence of parabola arcs. The originality of the approach is to consider non-sliding constraints at contact points: slipping avoidance is handled by constraining takeoff and landing velocity vectors to belong to 3D friction cones. Furthermore the magnitude of these velocities is bounded. A balli...

  4. Humanoid Motion Description Language

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Ben; Chen, Yanbing

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we propose a description language for specifying motions for humanoid robots and for allowing humanoid robots to acquire motor skills. Locomotion greatly increases our ability to interact with our environments, which in turn increases our mental abilities. This principle also applies to humanoid robots. However, there are great difficulties to specify humanoid motions and to represent motor skills, which in most cases require four-dimensional space representations. We propose a ...

  5. Motion of a Pendulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared Wynn

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this project is to derive and solve the equation of motion for a pendulum swinging at small angles in one dimension. The pendulum may be either a simple pendulum like a ball hanging from a string or a physical pendulum like a pendulum on a clock. For simplicity, we only considered small rotational angles so that the equation of motion becomes a harmonic oscillator.

  6. Cell motility as random motion: A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmeczi, Dávid; Li, Liwen; Pedersen, Leif;

    2008-01-01

    The historical co-evolution of biological motility models with models of Brownian motion is outlined. Recent results for how to derive cell-type-specific motility models from experimental cell trajectories are reviewed. Experimental work in progress, which tests the generality of this...... phenomenological model building is reported. So is theoretical work in progress, which explains the characteristic time scales and correlations of phenomenological models in terms of the dynamics of cytoskeleton, lamellipodia, and pseudopodia....

  7. How bodies and voices interact in early emotion perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Jessen

    Full Text Available Successful social communication draws strongly on the correct interpretation of others' body and vocal expressions. Both can provide emotional information and often occur simultaneously. Yet their interplay has hardly been studied. Using electroencephalography, we investigated the temporal development underlying their neural interaction in auditory and visual perception. In particular, we tested whether this interaction qualifies as true integration following multisensory integration principles such as inverse effectiveness. Emotional vocalizations were embedded in either low or high levels of noise and presented with or without video clips of matching emotional body expressions. In both, high and low noise conditions, a reduction in auditory N100 amplitude was observed for audiovisual stimuli. However, only under high noise, the N100 peaked earlier in the audiovisual than the auditory condition, suggesting facilitatory effects as predicted by the inverse effectiveness principle. Similarly, we observed earlier N100 peaks in response to emotional compared to neutral audiovisual stimuli. This was not the case in the unimodal auditory condition. Furthermore, suppression of beta-band oscillations (15-25 Hz primarily reflecting biological motion perception was modulated 200-400 ms after the vocalization. While larger differences in suppression between audiovisual and audio stimuli in high compared to low noise levels were found for emotional stimuli, no such difference was observed for neutral stimuli. This observation is in accordance with the inverse effectiveness principle and suggests a modulation of integration by emotional content. Overall, results show that ecologically valid, complex stimuli such as joined body and vocal expressions are effectively integrated very early in processing.

  8. Importance of public perception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Public opinion', 'public expectation' and 'public perception' are three phrases used in representing views of the public. As an example of the impact and hence importance of public perception, recall that Sweden is terminating its nuclear power programme. Being a democracy, it will, in the end, do what the majority of its citizens believe should be done. Such beliefs are influenced by public perception

  9. Consumer perception of risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholderer, Joachim

    2001-01-01

    ' in risk perception research covering structure, process, and the social dynamics of risk debates. After that I will present results from a recently completed research project. In this project, we specifically looked into consumers' perceptions of gene technology applied to brewing, and how...... these perceptions related to consumers' attitudes and choice behavior....

  10. Rubber hand illusion affects joint angle perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin V Butz

    Full Text Available The Rubber Hand Illusion (RHI is a well-established experimental paradigm. It has been shown that the RHI can affect hand location estimates, arm and hand motion towards goals, the subjective visual appearance of the own hand, and the feeling of body ownership. Several studies also indicate that the peri-hand space is partially remapped around the rubber hand. Nonetheless, the question remains if and to what extent the RHI can affect the perception of other body parts. In this study we ask if the RHI can alter the perception of the elbow joint. Participants had to adjust an angular representation on a screen according to their proprioceptive perception of their own elbow joint angle. The results show that the RHI does indeed alter the elbow joint estimation, increasing the agreement with the position and orientation of the artificial hand. Thus, the results show that the brain does not only adjust the perception of the hand in body-relative space, but it also modifies the perception of other body parts. In conclusion, we propose that the brain continuously strives to maintain a consistent internal body image and that this image can be influenced by the available sensory information sources, which are mediated and mapped onto each other by means of a postural, kinematic body model.

  11. Stronger misdirection in curved than in straight motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge eOtero-Millan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Illusions developed by magicians are a rich and largely untapped source of insight into perception and cognition. Here we show that curved motion, as employed by the magician in a classic sleight of hand trick, generates stronger misdirection than rectilinear motion, and that this difference can be explained by the differential engagement of the smooth pursuit and the saccadic oculomotor systems. This research moreover exemplifies how the magician’s intuitive understanding of the spectator’s mindset can surpass that of the cognitive scientist in specific instances, and that observation-based behavioral insights developed by magicians are worthy of quantitative investigation in the neuroscience laboratory.

  12. The primary signal in the biological perception of temperature: Pd-catalyzed hydrogenation of membrane lipids stimulated the expression of the desA gene in Synechocystis PCC6803.

    OpenAIRE

    Vigh, L; Los, D A; Horváth, I.; Murata, N

    1993-01-01

    One of the well-characterized phenomena associated with the acclimation of organisms to changes in ambient temperature is the regulation of the molecular motion or "fluidity" of membrane lipids via changes in the extent of unsaturation of the fatty acids of membrane lipids. The enzymes responsible for this process when the temperature is decreased are the desaturases, the activities of which are enhanced at low temperature. To examine whether the change in the fluidity of membrane lipids is t...

  13. Strong motion deficits in dyslexia associated with DCDC2 gene alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchini, Guido Marco; Marino, Cecilia; Mascheretti, Sara; Perani, Daniela; Morrone, Maria Concetta

    2015-05-27

    Dyslexia is a specific impairment in reading that affects 1 in 10 people. Previous studies have failed to isolate a single cause of the disorder, but several candidate genes have been reported. We measured motion perception in two groups of dyslexics, with and without a deletion within the DCDC2 gene, a risk gene for dyslexia. We found impairment for motion particularly strong at high spatial frequencies in the population carrying the deletion. The data suggest that deficits in motion processing occur in a specific genotype, rather than the entire dyslexia population, contributing to the large variability in impairment of motion thresholds in dyslexia reported in the literature. PMID:26019324

  14. The Physics of Marine Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Kathleen

    1992-01-01

    Discusses ways in which marine biology can be integrated into the physics classroom. Topics suggested for incorporation include the harmonic motion of ocean waves, ocean currents, the interaction of visible light with ocean water, pressure, light absorption, and sound transfer in water. (MDH)

  15. A physical basis for sensory perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norwich, Kenneth H.

    2014-11-01

    It is argued that the process of perception takes origin within physics itself. A simple, physical model of a biological sensory receptor unit, a unit which mediates perception at its most elemental level, is developed. This model will be not just a detector of sensory signals (like a light meter or sound level meter), but will transduce these signals to the level of consciousness. The properties of this physical model of the sensory receptor unit are drawn from classical physics. Because of its simplicity, the receptor model allows for perception of only discrete quantities of incident signal energy. My primary goal in presenting this reduced model of perception is to teach concepts without the need for detailed anatomy or physiology. Using the simple mathematical properties of the receptor model, we are able to derive a number of the empirical equations of sensory science. Since the idea has been advanced that the process of perception, at a fundamental level, belongs to physics whose validity is universal, it is suggested that the “laws” of perception of the world manifested by organisms anywhere within the universe will be similar to the laws we observe here on earth.

  16. Experimental Harmonic Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searle, G. F. C.

    2014-05-01

    1. Elementary theory of harmonic motion; 2. Experimental work in harmonic motion; Experiment 1. Determination of g by a simple pendulum; Experiment 2. Harmonic motion of a body suspended by a spring; Experiment 3. Harmonic motion of a rigid body suspended by a torsion wire; Experiment 4. Study of a system with variable moment of inertia; Experiment 5. Dynamical determination of ratio of couple to twist for a torsion wire; Experiment 6. Comparison of the moments of inertia of two bodies; Experiment 7. Experiment with a pair of inertia bars; Experiment 8. Determination of the moment of inertia of a rigid pendulum; Experiment 9. Experiment on a pendulum with variable moment of inertia; Experiment 10. Determination of g by a rigid pendulum; Experiment 11. Pendulum on a yielding support; Experiment 12. Determination of the radius of curvature of a concave mirror by the oscillations of a sphere rolling in it; Experiment 13. Determination of g by the oscillations of a rod rolling on a cylinder; Experiment 14. Study of a vibrating system with two degrees of freedom; Note 1. On the vibration of a body suspended from a light spring; Note 2. Periodic time of a pendulum vibrating through a finite arc; Note 3. Periodic time for finite motion; Note 4. Periodic times of a pendulum with two degrees of freedom.

  17. The Particle--Motion Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demana, Franklin; Waits, Bert K.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses solutions to real-world linear particle-motion problems using graphing calculators to simulate the motion and traditional analytic methods of calculus. Applications include (1) changing circular or curvilinear motion into linear motion and (2) linear particle accelerators in physics. (MDH)

  18. Relationships of a Circular Singer Arm Gesture to Acoustical and Perceptual Measures of Singing: A Motion Capture Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunkan, Melissa C.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate previous research that suggests using movement in conjunction with singing tasks can affect intonation and perception of the task. Singers (N = 49) were video and audio recorded, using a motion capture system, while singing a phrase from a familiar song, first with no motion, and then while doing a low,…

  19. Model of human visual-motion sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, A. B.; Ahumada, A. J., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A model of how humans sense the velocity of moving images is proposed. The model exploits constraints provided by human psychophysics, notably that motion-sensing elements appear tuned for two-dimensional spatial frequency, and by the frequency spectrum of a moving image, namely, that its support lies in the plane in which the temporal frequency equals the dot product of the spatial frequency and the image velocity. The first stage of the model is a set of spatial-frequency-tuned, direction-selective linear sensors. The temporal frequency of the response of each sensor is shown to encode the component of the image velocity in the sensor direction. At the second stage, these components are resolved in order to measure the velocity of image motion at each of a number of spatial locations and spatial frequencies. The model has been applied to several illustrative examples, including apparent motion, coherent gratings, and natural image sequences. The model agrees qualitatively with human perception.

  20. Method through motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steijn, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    context, I have been conducting a practice-led research project. Central to the project is construction of a design model describing sets of procedures, concepts and terminology relevant for design and studies of motion graphics in spatial contexts. The focus of this paper is the role of model......Contemporary scenography often consists of video-projected motion graphics. The field is lacking in academic methods and rigour: descriptions and models relevant for the creation as well as in the analysis of existing works. In order to understand the phenomenon of motion graphics in a scenographic...... construction as a support to working systematically practice-led research project. The design model is being developed through design laboratories and workshops with students and professionals who provide feedback that lead to incremental improvements. Working with this model construction-as-method reveals...

  1. Muscle Motion Solenoid Actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obata, Shuji

    It is one of our dreams to mechanically recover the lost body for damaged humans. Realistic humanoid robots composed of such machines require muscle motion actuators controlled by all pulling actions. Particularly, antagonistic pairs of bi-articular muscles are very important in animal's motions. A system of actuators is proposed using the electromagnetic force of the solenoids with the abilities of the stroke length over 10 cm and the strength about 20 N, which are needed to move the real human arm. The devised actuators are based on developments of recent modern electro-magnetic materials, where old time materials can not give such possibility. Composite actuators are controlled by a high ability computer and software making genuine motions.

  2. Ground motion predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear generated ground motion is defined and then related to the physical parameters that cause it. Techniques employed for prediction of ground motion peak amplitude, frequency spectra and response spectra are explored, with initial emphasis on the analysis of data collected at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). NTS postshot measurements are compared with pre-shot predictions. Applicability of these techniques to new areas, for example, Plowshare sites, must be questioned. Fortunately, the Atomic Energy Commission is sponsoring complementary studies to improve prediction capabilities primarily in new locations outside the NTS region. Some of these are discussed in the light of anomalous seismic behavior, and comparisons are given showing theoretical versus experimental results. In conclusion, current ground motion prediction techniques are applied to events off the NTS. Predictions are compared with measurements for the event Faultless and for the Plowshare events, Gasbuggy, Cabriolet, and Buggy I. (author)

  3. Attentional influences on the dynamics of motion-induced blindness

    OpenAIRE

    Scholvinck, M. L.; Rees, G.

    2009-01-01

    Motion-induced blindness (MIB) is a visual phenomenon in which a highly salient, peripheral, visual target spontaneously disappears from visual awareness (and subsequently reappears) when superimposed on a globally moving background of distracters. Here, we investigated the influence of attention on these fluctuations in perception in two experiments. In the first experiment, directing spatial attention to the MIB target (and thus away from the distracters) led to an increased probability of ...

  4. Visual Hierarchy and Mind Motion in Advertising Design

    OpenAIRE

    Doaa Farouk Badawy Eldesouky

    2013-01-01

    Visual hierarchy is a significant concept in the field of advertising, a field that is dominated by effective communication, visual recognition and motion. Designers of advertisements have always been trying to organize the visual hierarchy throughout their advertising designs to aid the eye to recognize information in the desired order, to achieve the ultimate goals of clear perception and effectively delivering the advertising messages. However many assumptions and questions usually rise on...

  5. Unimpaired Perception of Social and Physical Causality, but Impaired Perception of Animacy in High Functioning Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congiu, Sara; Schlottmann, Anne; Ray, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    We investigated perception of social and physical causality and animacy in simple motion events, for high-functioning children with autism (CA = 13, VMA = 9.6). Children matched 14 different animations to pictures showing physical, social or non-causality. In contrast to previous work, children with autism performed at a high level similar to…

  6. BOLD Response Selective to Flow-Motion in Very Young Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosetti, Michela; Morrone, Maria Concetta

    2015-01-01

    In adults, motion perception is mediated by an extensive network of occipital, parietal, temporal, and insular cortical areas. Little is known about the neural substrate of visual motion in infants, although behavioural studies suggest that motion perception is rudimentary at birth and matures steadily over the first few years. Here, by measuring Blood Oxygenated Level Dependent (BOLD) responses to flow versus random-motion stimuli, we demonstrate that the major cortical areas serving motion processing in adults are operative by 7 wk of age. Resting-state correlations demonstrate adult-like functional connectivity between the motion-selective associative areas, but not between primary cortex and temporo-occipital and posterior-insular cortices. Taken together, the results suggest that the development of motion perception may be limited by slow maturation of the subcortical input and of the cortico-cortical connections. In addition they support the existence of independent input to primary (V1) and temporo-occipital (V5/MT+) cortices very early in life. PMID:26418729

  7. Leap Motion development essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Spiegelmock, Mischa

    2013-01-01

    This book is a fast-paced guide with practical examples that aims to help you understand and master the Leap Motion SDK.This book is for developers who are either involved in game development or who are looking to utilize Leap Motion technology in order to create brand new user interaction experiences to distinguish their products from the mass market. You should be comfortable with high-level languages and object-oriented development concepts in order to get the most out of this book.

  8. Hand in motion reveals mind in motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JonathanFreeman

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, researchers have measured hand movements en route to choices on a screen to understand the dynamics of a broad range of psychological processes. We review this growing body of research and explain how manual action exposes the real-time unfolding of underlying cognitive processing. We describe how simple hand motions may be used to continuously index participants’ tentative commitments to different choice alternatives during the evolution of a behavioral response. As such, hand-tracking can provide unusually high-fidelity, real-time motor traces of the mind. These motor traces cast novel theoretical and empirical light onto a wide range of phenomena and serve as a potential bridge between far-reaching areas of psychological science—from language, to high-level cognition and learning, to social cognitive processes.

  9. Challenges to normal neural functioning provide insights into separability of motion processing mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billino, Jutta; Braun, Doris I; Bremmer, Frank; Gegenfurtner, Karl R

    2011-10-01

    There is a long history of attempts to disentangle different visual processing mechanisms for physically different motion cues. However, underlying neural correlates and separability of networks are still under debate. We aimed to refine the current understanding by studying differential vulnerabilities when normal neural functioning is challenged. We investigated effects of ageing and extrastriate brain lesions on detection thresholds for motion defined by either luminance- or contrast modulations, known as first- and second-order motion. Both approaches focus on extrastriate processing changes and combine distributed as well as more focal constraints. Our ageing sample comprised 102 subjects covering an age range from 20 to 82 years. Threshold signal-to-noise ratios for detection approximately doubled across the age range for both motion types. Results suggest that ageing affects perception of both motion types to an equivalent degree and thus support overlapping processing resources. Underlying neural substrates were further qualified by testing perceptual performance of 18 patients with focal cortical brain lesions. We determined selective first-order motion deficits in three patients, selective second-order motion deficits in only one patient, and deficits for both motion types in three patients. Lesion analysis yielded support for common functional substrates in higher cortical regions. Functionally specific substrates remained ambiguous, but tended to cover earlier visual areas. We conclude that observed vulnerabilities of first- and second-order motion perception provide limited evidence for functional specialization at early extrastriate stages, but emphasize shared processing pathways at higher cortical levels. PMID:21807009

  10. Circular Motion of Asymmetric Self-Propelling Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kümmel, Felix; ten Hagen, Borge; Wittkowski, Raphael; Buttinoni, Ivo; Eichhorn, Ralf; Volpe, Giovanni; Löwen, Hartmut; Bechinger, Clemens

    2013-05-01

    Micron-sized self-propelled (active) particles can be considered as model systems for characterizing more complex biological organisms like swimming bacteria or motile cells. We produce asymmetric microswimmers by soft lithography and study their circular motion on a substrate and near channel boundaries. Our experimental observations are in full agreement with a theory of Brownian dynamics for asymmetric self-propelled particles, which couples their translational and orientational motion.

  11. Modeling direction discrimination thresholds for yaw rotations around an earth-vertical axis for arbitrary motion profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Soyka, Florian; Giordano, Paolo Robuffo; Barnett-Cowan, Michael; Heinrich H Bülthoff

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of vestibular perception is important, for example, for improving the realism of motion simulation and virtual reality environments or for diagnosing patients suffering from vestibular problems. Previous research has found a dependence of direction discrimination thresholds for rotational motions on the period length (inverse frequency) of a transient (single cycle) sinusoidal acceleration stimulus. However, self-motion is seldom purely sinusoidal, and up to now, no...

  12. Research on integration of visual and motion cues for flight simulation and ride quality investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, L. R.; Oman, C. M.; Curry, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    Vestibular perception and integration of several sensory inputs in simulation were studied. The relationship between tilt sensation induced by moving fields and those produced by actual body tilt is discussed. Linearvection studies were included and the application of the vestibular model for perception of orientation based on motion cues is presented. Other areas of examination includes visual cues in approach to landing, and a comparison of linear and nonlinear wash out filters using a model of the human vestibular system is given.

  13. Mental rotation meets the motion aftereffect: the role of hV5/MT+ in visual mental imagery

    OpenAIRE

    Seurinck, Ruth; de Lange, Floris P.; Achten, Eric; Vingerhoets, Guy

    2011-01-01

    A growing number of studies show that visual mental imagery recruits the same brain areas as visual perception. Although the necessity of hV5/MT+ for motion perception has been revealed by means of TMS, its relevance for motion imagery remains unclear. We induced a direction-selective adaptation in hV5/MT+ by means of an MAE while subjects performed a mental rotation task that elicits imagined motion. We concurrently measured behavioral performance and neural activity with fMRI, enabling us t...

  14. Visual perception of spatial subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Principally, any imaging technology consists of two consecutive, though strictly separated processes: data acquisition and subsequent processing to generate an image that can be looked at, either on a monitor screen or printed on paper. Likewise, the physiological process of viewing can be separated into vision and perception, though these processes are much more overlapping. Understanding the appearance of a subject requires the entire sequence from receiving the information carried e.g. by photons up to an appropriate processing leading to the perception of the subject shown. As a consequence, the imagination of a subject is a result of both, technological and physiological processes. Whenever an evaluation of an image is critical, also the physiological part of the processing should be considered. However, an image has two dimensions in the first place and reality is spatial, it has three dimensions. This problem has been tackled on a philosophical level at least since Platon's famous discussion on the shadow image in a dark cave. The mere practical point is which structural details can be perceived and what may remain undetected depending on the mode of presentation. This problem cannot be resolved without considering each single step of visual perception. Physiologically, there are three 'tools' available to understanding the spatial structure of a subject: binocular viewing, following the course of perspective projection and motion to collect multiple aspects. Artificially, an object may be cut in various ways to display the interior or covering parts could be made transparent within a model. Samples will be shown how certain details of a subject can be emphasised or hidden depending on the way of presentation. It needs to be discussed what might help to perceive the true spatial structure of a subject with all relevant details and what could be misleading. (authors)

  15. Nuclear motion is classical

    CERN Document Server

    Frank, Irmgard

    2016-01-01

    The notion from ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations that nuclear motion is best described by classical Newton dynamics instead of the time-dependent Schr{\\"o}dinger equation is substantiated. In principle a single experiment should bring clarity. Caution is however necessary, as temperature dependent effects must be eliminated when trying to determine the existence of a zero-point energy.

  16. Noncommutative Brownian motion

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, Willien O; Souza, Andre M C

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the Brownian motion of a particle in a two-dimensional noncommutative (NC) space. Using the standard NC algebra embodied by the sympletic Weyl-Moyal formalism we find that noncommutativity induces a non-vanishing correlation between both coordinates at different times. The effect itself stands as a signature of spatial noncommutativity and offers further alternatives to experimentally detect the phenomena.

  17. Motion of magnetotactic microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic moments for different magnetotactic microorganisms are obtained by electron microscopy analyses and studies of motion by optical microscopy. The results are analysed in terms of a model due to C.Bean. The considerations presented suggest that magnetotaxy is an efficient mechanism for orientation only if the time for reorientation is smaller than the cycles of environmental perturbations. (Author)

  18. Ship Roll Motion Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez, Tristan; Blanke, Mogens

    2010-01-01

    . This tutorial paper presents an account of the development of various ship roll motion control systems and the challenges associated with their design. The paper discusses how to assess performance, the applicability of dierent models, and control methods that have been applied in the past....

  19. Markerless Motion Tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Anthony Lewis; Czarowicz, Alex

    2012-01-01

    This contribution focuses on the Associated Technologies aspect of the ICDVRAT event. Two industry leading markerless motion capture systems are examined that offer advancement in the field of rehabilitation. Residing at each end of the cost continuum, technical differences such as 3D versus 360...

  20. Planets in Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddle, Bob

    2005-01-01

    All the planets in the solar system revolve around the Sun in the same direction, clockwise when viewed from above the North Pole. This is referred to as direct motion. From the perspective on the Earth's surface, the planets travel east across the sky in relation to the background of stars. The Sun also moves eastward daily, but this is an…

  1. Wiimote Experiments: Circular Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouh, Minjoon; Holz, Danielle; Kawam, Alae; Lamont, Mary

    2013-01-01

    The advent of new sensor technologies can provide new ways of exploring fundamental physics. In this paper, we show how a Wiimote, which is a handheld remote controller for the Nintendo Wii video game system with an accelerometer, can be used to study the dynamics of circular motion with a very simple setup such as an old record player or a…

  2. A world in motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boynton, J.A. [SAE, Warrendale, PA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    A World in Motion is a physical science curriculum supplement for grades four, five, and six which responds to the need to promote and teach sound science and mathematics concepts. Using the A World in Motion kits, teachers work in partnership with practicing engineer or scientists volunteers to provide students with fun, exciting, and relevant hands-on science and math experiences. During the A World in Motion experience, students work together in {open_quotes}Engineering Design Teams{close_quotes} exploring physics concepts through a series of activities. Each student is assigned a role as either a facilities engineer, development engineer, test engineer, or project engineer and is given responsibilities paralleling those of engineers in industry. The program culminates in a {open_quotes}Design Review{close_quotes} where students can communicate their results, demonstrate their designs, and receive recognition for their efforts. They are given a chance to take on responsibility and build self-esteem. Since January 1991, over 12,000 volunteers engineers have been involved with the program, with a distribution of 20,000 A World in Motion kit throughout the U.S. and Canada.

  3. Introducing Simple Harmonic Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, John

    2002-01-01

    Explains the origin and significance of harmonic motion which is an important topic that has wide application in the world. Describes the phenomenon by using an auxiliary circle to help illustrate the key relationships between acceleration, displacement, time, velocity, and phase. (Contains 16 references.) (Author/YDS)

  4. A Harmonic Motion Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluck, P.; Krakower, Zeev

    2010-01-01

    We present a unit comprising theory, simulation and experiment for a body oscillating on a vertical spring, in which the simultaneous use of a force probe and an ultrasonic range finder enables one to explore quantitatively and understand many aspects of simple and damped harmonic motions. (Contains 14 figures.)

  5. Motion dominance in binocular rivalry depends on extraretinal motions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Ryohei; Motoyoshi, Isamu; Sato, Takao

    2016-01-01

    In binocular rivalry, moving stimulus is dominant over stationary stimulus. This is called motion dominance. The motion here is usually a motion defined on the retina (retinal motion). However, motion can be defined in several different coordinates. It can be defined with respect to objects in the background (object-based motion) or to observers' head or body (spatiotopic motion), as well as to the retinal coordinate. In this study, we examined the role of motions defined by these three coordinates. A dichoptic pair of gratings was presented to create a binocular rivalry, one of which was moving and the other stationary. A fixation point and a reference background were either moving with the grating or stationary, depending on the condition. Different combinations of the three types of motions were created by having the observer track the fixation point or the background when they are moving. It was found that the retinal motion does not necessarily yield motion dominance, and that the motion dominance is determined by the combination of motions defined by different coordinate systems. PMID:26943347

  6. Biology of Nanobots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Wentao; Pavlick, Ryan; Sen, Ayusman

    2013-12-01

    One of the more interesting recent discoveries has been the ability to design nano/microbots which catalytically harness the chemical energy in their environment to move autonomously. Their potential applications include delivery of materials, self-assembly of superstructures, and roving sensors. One emergent area of research is the study of their collective behavior and how they emulate living systems. The aim of this chapter is to describe the "biology" of nanobots, summarizing the fundamentals physics behind their motion and how the bots interact with each other to initiate complex emergent behavior.

  7. Perception of the Body in Space: Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Laurence R.

    1991-01-01

    The principal topic is the perception of body orientation and motion in space and the extent to which these perceptual abstraction can be related directly to the knowledge of sensory mechanisms, particularly for the vestibular apparatus. Spatial orientation is firmly based on the underlying sensory mechanisms and their central integration. For some of the simplest situations, like rotation about a vertical axis in darkness, the dynamic response of the semicircular canals furnishes almost enough information to explain the sensations of turning and stopping. For more complex conditions involving multiple sensory systems and possible conflicts among their messages, a mechanistic response requires significant speculative assumptions. The models that exist for multisensory spatial orientation are still largely of the non-rational parameter variety. They are capable of predicting relationships among input motions and output perceptions of motion, but they involve computational functions that do not now and perhaps never will have their counterpart in central nervous system machinery. The challenge continues to be in the iterative process of testing models by experiment, correcting them where necessary, and testing them again.

  8. Perception, Action, and Consciousness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    What is the relationship between perception and action, between an organism and its environment, in explaining consciousness? These are issues at the heart of philosophy of mind and the cognitive sciences. This book explores the relationship between perception and action from a variety of...... the view that perception is an achievement by an agent acting in a complex environment in which sensorimotor dynamics constitute an essential ingredient to perceptual experience. A key focus of the book is on the debate about action-oriented theories of visual perception versus the dual-visual systems...... hypothesis The former champions the role of sensorimotor dynamics in perceptual awareness while the latter favours a functional dichotomy between perception and action. At least on the surface, these two approaches are in conflict. Where one emphasizes the interdependence of action and perception, the other...

  9. Public perception of chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Stražar, Alenka

    2015-01-01

    The thesis deals with the perception of chemistry among the public, which reflects the stereotypes that people have about chemistry. It presents the existing classification of stereotypes about chemistry and their upgrade. An analysis of movies that reflect the existing perception of chemistry in the public is written. Literature on selected aspects of the application of chemistry in movies is collected and analyzed. A qualification of perception of chemistry in the movies is presented based ...

  10. Searle on Perception

    OpenAIRE

    García-Carpintero, Manuel

    1999-01-01

    In the course of his discussion of perception, Searle criticizes representative theories in general. In this paper I will argue that, even though his criticisms may be adequate regarding a certain form of these theories, perhaps the most frequently defended by philosophers of perception, a version I will outline here escapes to them. A second issue I raise concerns Searle's claim that his theory of perception is a form of direct realism. I will raise difficulties for Searle's attempt to maint...

  11. The Competitive Perception

    OpenAIRE

    Lima, João Tiago

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to define what competitive perception is. Using Dufrenne’s phenomenological analysis of the art spectator’s experience, namely the concept of aesthetic perception, I will claim that it is useful to apply this phenomenological approach to the experience of watching sport events. I will argue that the concepts of uncertainty and auto teleology, being two main features in sport competition, are helpful to define competitive perception.

  12. Discrete Visual Perception

    OpenAIRE

    Paragios, Nikos; Komodakis, Nikos

    2014-01-01

    Computational vision and biomedical image have made tremendous progress of the past decade. This is mostly due the development of efficient learning and inference algorithms which allow better, faster and richer modeling of visual perception tasks. Graph-based representations are among the most prominent tools to address such perception through the casting of perception as a graph optimization problem. In this paper, we briefly introduce the interest of such representations, discuss their stre...

  13. An Orientation Map for Motion Boundaries in Macaque V2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Li, Peichao; Zhu, Shude; Han, Chao; Xu, Haoran; Fang, Yang; Hu, Jiaming; Roe, Anna W; Lu, Haidong D

    2016-01-01

    The ability to extract the shape of moving objects is fundamental to visual perception. However, where such computations are processed in the visual system is unknown. To address this question, we used intrinsic signal optical imaging in awake monkeys to examine cortical response to perceptual contours defined by motion contrast (motion boundaries, MBs). We found that MB stimuli elicit a robust orientation response in area V2. Orientation maps derived from subtraction of orthogonal MB stimuli aligned well with the orientation maps obtained with luminance gratings (LGs). In contrast, area V1 responded well to LGs, but exhibited a much weaker orientation response to MBs. We further show that V2 direction domains respond to motion contrast, which is required in the detection of MB in V2. These results suggest that V2 represents MB information, an important prerequisite for shape recognition and figure-ground segregation. PMID:25260703

  14. Perception Lie Paradox: Mathematically Proved Uncertainty about Humans Perception Similarity

    OpenAIRE

    Mahran, Ahmed M.

    2012-01-01

    Agents' judgment depends on perception and previous knowledge. Assuming that previous knowledge depends on perception, we can say that judgment depends on perception. So, if judgment depends on perception, can agents judge that they have the same perception? In few words, this is the addressed paradox through this document. While illustrating on the paradox, it's found that to reach agreement in communication, it's not necessary for parties to have the same perception however the necessity is...

  15. Emotional Perception of Music in Children with Unilateral Cochlear Implants

    OpenAIRE

    Sareh Shirvani; Zahra Jafari; Abdolreza Sheibanizadeh; Masoud Motasaddi Zarandy; Shohre Jalaie

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Cochlear implantation (CI) improves language skills among children with hearing loss. However, children with CIs still fall short of fulfilling some other needs, including musical perception. This is often attributed to the biological, technological, and acoustic limitations of CIs. Emotions play a key role in the understanding and enjoyment of music. The present study aimed to investigate the emotional perception of music in children with bilaterally severe-to-profound hearing ...

  16. Time perception: paradigms, methods, target duration and individual differences

    OpenAIRE

    McFarlane, Henriett A

    2008-01-01

    The present study assessed the role of the time judgement paradigms of prospective and retrospective durations, the length of durations and the effects of the states of mood and arousal in time perception. The role of the biological variable of circadian types was also assessed. Long target durations were judged as shorter than whereas short target durations were judged as longer. Duration judgement paradigms did not affect perception of time and neither did mood and circa...

  17. Sexualité et émotions

    OpenAIRE

    Girard, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Amour, réprobation, désir, dégoût, plaisir, honte, culpabilité… Au premier abord, la sexualité, qu’elle recouvre des expériences, des représentations ou des catégories de perception, apparaît comme le domaine par excellence des émotions les plus diverses. Et pourtant, elles ne constituent qu’un angle d’analyse fort peu exploré par les sciences humaines et sociales. Faut-il y voir un paradoxe ? Un regard historique sur les analyses de la sexualité conduit plutôt à envisager ce silence relatif ...

  18. Rate-distortion theory and human perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Chris R

    2016-07-01

    The fundamental goal of perception is to aid in the achievement of behavioral objectives. This requires extracting and communicating useful information from noisy and uncertain sensory signals. At the same time, given the complexity of sensory information and the limitations of biological information processing, it is necessary that some information must be lost or discarded in the act of perception. Under these circumstances, what constitutes an 'optimal' perceptual system? This paper describes the mathematical framework of rate-distortion theory as the optimal solution to the problem of minimizing the costs of perceptual error subject to strong constraints on the ability to communicate or transmit information. Rate-distortion theory offers a general and principled theoretical framework for developing computational-level models of human perception (Marr, 1982). Models developed in this framework are capable of producing quantitatively precise explanations for human perceptual performance, while yielding new insights regarding the nature and goals of perception. This paper demonstrates the application of rate-distortion theory to two benchmark domains where capacity limits are especially salient in human perception: discrete categorization of stimuli (also known as absolute identification) and visual working memory. A software package written for the R statistical programming language is described that aids in the development of models based on rate-distortion theory. PMID:27107330

  19. Optimisation of nonlinear motion cueing algorithm based on genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, Houshyar; Mohamed, Shady; Rahim Zadeh, Delpak; Nahavandi, Saeid

    2015-04-01

    Motion cueing algorithms (MCAs) are playing a significant role in driving simulators, aiming to deliver the most accurate human sensation to the simulator drivers compared with a real vehicle driver, without exceeding the physical limitations of the simulator. This paper provides the optimisation design of an MCA for a vehicle simulator, in order to find the most suitable washout algorithm parameters, while respecting all motion platform physical limitations, and minimising human perception error between real and simulator driver. One of the main limitations of the classical washout filters is that it is attuned by the worst-case scenario tuning method. This is based on trial and error, and is effected by driving and programmers experience, making this the most significant obstacle to full motion platform utilisation. This leads to inflexibility of the structure, production of false cues and makes the resulting simulator fail to suit all circumstances. In addition, the classical method does not take minimisation of human perception error and physical constraints into account. Production of motion cues and the impact of different parameters of classical washout filters on motion cues remain inaccessible for designers for this reason. The aim of this paper is to provide an optimisation method for tuning the MCA parameters, based on nonlinear filtering and genetic algorithms. This is done by taking vestibular sensation error into account between real and simulated cases, as well as main dynamic limitations, tilt coordination and correlation coefficient. Three additional compensatory linear blocks are integrated into the MCA, to be tuned in order to modify the performance of the filters successfully. The proposed optimised MCA is implemented in MATLAB/Simulink software packages. The results generated using the proposed method show increased performance in terms of human sensation, reference shape tracking and exploiting the platform more efficiently without reaching

  20. Ground motion effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ground motion caused by natural earthquakes or by nuclear explosion causes buildings and other structures to respond in such manner as possibly to have high unit stresses and to be subject to damage or-in some cases-collapse. Even minor damage may constitute a hazard to persons within or adjacent to buildings. The risk of damage may well be the governing restraint on the uses of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes. Theory is advanced regarding structural-dynamic response but real buildings and structures are complex, highly variable, and often difficult to model realistically. This paper discusses the state of knowledge, the art of damage prediction and safety precautions, and shows ground motion effects from explosions of underground nuclear devices in the continental United States including events Salmon, Gasbuggy, Boxcar, Faultless and Benham. (author)

  1. Theory of coorbital motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopliv, Alexander Stephen

    The gravitational interaction of two small coorbital satellites in nearly identical orbits about a large central mass is investigated. This involves the study of the general three-body problem as well as the restricted three-body problem. Since the eccentricity is small, dynamical models are developed by expanding the equations of motion in rotating polar coordinates about a circular orbit. For numerical investigation, a combination of Hill's variables and equinoctial variables is used to find series solutions expanded in time. From these series solutions, highly accurate averaged equations are determined. To study the stability of the motion, periodic orbits are generated and the linearized stability is found from the eigenvalues of the state transition matrix.

  2. Scents and sensibility: how biology perceives chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Firestein

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The olfactory system plays a leading role in the perception of flavors, even though we experience this perception in our oral cavity as "taste". Without a sense of smell, food loses all but its most elementary flavor qualities. Smell begins in the periphery with the olfactory epithelium, a thin tissue lining the bones of the upper nasal cavity (1. Residing in this tissue are upwards of several million bipolar shaped cells which are the primary olfactory sensory neurons. At one end of these neurons there are hair-like projections called cilia. Residing within the membranes of these cilia are the proteins that make up the molecular machinery for detecting odor molecules that are breathed into the nasal cavity and become adsorbed to the mucus (2. These include, first and foremost, the receptor protein or “odor receptor”. This protein, made up of just over 300 amino acids strung together like pearls on a string, has a unique shape, including a pocket that allows for the entry and binding of specific odor molecules, much the way a lock permits certain shaped keys to be inserted. Again in analogy with a lock and key, where the right shaped key can open the lock, when a molecule fits into the binding pocket it is able to activate the receptor. This sets in motion a series of events through "second messenger" proteins which very rapidly cause an electrical change in the state of the sensory neuron. It is this electrical change, encoded in trains of changing voltage impulses, that signals to the brain the presence of a particular odor molecule. There are nearly 400 different odor receptors expressed by the various neurons of the epithelium in humans (3. However even this large number of receptors is insufficient to explain our ability to detect and identify many thousands of diverse chemicals as odorants (one recent report claims we have the potential to discriminate trillions!. It is hypothesized that there is a combinatorial code in which any given

  3. Generalized squirming motion of a sphere

    CERN Document Server

    Pak, On Shun

    2014-01-01

    A number of swimming microorganisms such as ciliates ($\\textit{Opalina}$) and multicellular colonies of flagellates ($\\textit{Volvox}$) are approximately spherical in shape and swim using beating arrays of cilia or short flagella covering their surfaces. Their physical actuation on the fluid may be mathematically modeled as the generation of surface velocities on a continuous spherical surface -- a model known in the literature as squirming, which has been used to address various aspects of the biological physics of locomotion. Previous analyses of squirming assumed axisymmetric fluid motion and hence restricted all swimming kinematics to take place along a line. In this paper we generalize squirming to three spatial dimensions. We derive analytically the flow field surrounding a spherical squirmer with arbitrary surface motion, and use it to derive its three-dimensional translational and rotational swimming kinematics. We then use our results to physically interpret the flow field induced by the swimmer in t...

  4. MOTION IN PAINTING

    OpenAIRE

    AKÇAOĞLU, ZELİHA

    2010-01-01

    Starting from primitive society until nowadays, the paint art, which shows the life with thoughts and fantasies, has awakened interest of people. Those, who were interested in it (paint art) were tryin to catch this elusive moment which is exposed in picture or paint. This short period of time called "moment"' is really important in paint art. Painter, who transfers the moment into a picture, at the same time tryin to transfer the motion. So far, all the light and regular mo...

  5. Motional Casimir force

    OpenAIRE

    Jaekel, Marc-Thierry; Reynaud, Serge

    2001-01-01

    We study the situation where two point like mirrors are placed in the vacuum state of a scalar field in a two-dimensional spacetime. Describing the scattering upon the mirrors by transmittivity and reflectivity functions obeying unitarity, causality and high frequency transparency conditions, we compute the fluctuations of the Casimir forces exerted upon the two motionless mirrors. We use the linear response theory to derive the motional forces exerted upon one mirror when it moves or when th...

  6. Motion of Confined Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, David E

    2016-01-01

    We carry out numerical evaluations of the motion of classical particles in Minkowski Space $\\mathbb{M}^{4}$ which are confined to the inside of a bag. In particular, we analyze the structure of the paths evolving from the breaking of the dilatation symmetry, the conformal symmetry and the combination of both together. The confining forces arise directly from the corresponding nonconserved currents. We demonstrate in our evaluations that these particles under certain initial conditions move toward the interior of the bag.

  7. Force and motion

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2002-01-01

    Intimidated by inertia? Frightened by forces? Mystified by Newton s law of motion? You re not alone and help is at hand. The stop Faking It! Series is perfect for science teachers, home-schoolers, parents wanting to help with homework all of you who need a jargon-free way to learn the background for teaching middle school physical science with confidence. With Bill Roberton as your friendly, able but somewhat irreverent guide, you will discover you CAN come to grips with the basics of force and motion. Combining easy-to-understand explanations with activities using commonly found equipment, this book will lead you through Newton s laws to the physics of space travel. The book is as entertaining as it is informative. Best of all, the author understands the needs of adults who want concrete examples, hands-on activities, clear language, diagrams and yes, a certain amount of empathy. Ideas For Use Newton's laws, and all of the other motion principles presented in this book, do a good job of helping us to underst...

  8. Navigation, perception et apprentissage pour la robotique

    OpenAIRE

    Filliat, David

    2011-01-01

    We conducted research mainly in the areas of navigation, perception and learning for mobile robots. These studies, oriented toward a cognitive approach to robotics have the overall goal of allowing robots to adapt to their environment, providing ba- sic primitives such as open space, position, or the presence of objects necessary to choose actions. A large part of this work is inspired by capabilities found in nature, but without trying to reproduce exactly the biological systems inner functi...

  9. A Common Framework for the Analysis of Complex Motion? Standstill and Capture Illusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Reinhard Dürsteler

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A series of illusions was created by presenting stimuli, which consisted of two overlapping surfaces each defined by textures of independent visual features (i.e. modulation of luminance, color, depth, etc.. When presented concurrently with a stationary 2-D luminance texture, observers often fail to perceive the motion of an overlapping stereoscopically defined depth-texture. This illusory motion standstill arises due to a failure to represent two independent surfaces (one for luminance and one for depth textures and motion transparency (the ability to perceive motion of both surfaces simultaneously. Instead the stimulus is represented as a single non-transparent surface taking on the stationary nature of the luminance-defined texture. By contrast, if it is the 2D-luminance defined texture that is in motion, observers often perceive the stationary depth texture as also moving. In this latter case, the failure to represent the motion transparency of the two textures gives rise to illusionary motion capture. Our past work demonstrated that the illusions of motion standstill and motion capture can occur for depth-textures that are rotating, or expanding / contracting, or else spiraling. Here I extend these findings to include stereo-shearing. More importantly, it is the motion (or lack thereof of the luminance texture that determines how the motion of the depth will be perceived. This observation is strongly in favor of a single pathway for complex motion that operates on luminance-defines texture motion signals only. In addition, these complex motion illusions arise with chromatically-defined textures with smooth, transitions between their colors. This suggests that in respect to color motion perception the complex motions’ pathway is only able to accurately process signals from isoluminant colored textures with sharp transitions between colors, and/or moving at high speeds, which is conceivable if it relies on inputs from a hypothetical dual

  10. Perceptions about the biology of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus among milk producers in Divinópolis, Minas Gerais Percepção dos produtores de leite de Divinópolis, Minas Gerais, sobre a biologia do Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Maria Barcellos Magalhães da Rocha

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available One hundred semi-systematized interviews were applied with the aim of surveying the perceptions of milk producers in the municipality of Divinópolis, Minas Gerais regarding the biology of the tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus. Content analysis was conducted on each of the variables surveyed and their descriptions, highlighting the higher frequencies in order to construct profiles of perceptions about each of the matters surveyed. In addition, each of the producers was categorized regarding their readiness to proceed with efficient control, from the assessment of their responses. Among the variables surveyed were the tick lifespan, duration of parasitic life, time of greatest incidence, survival in pastures and egg-laying volume. These questions are considered important for defining the knowledge needed for rational combat. It was concluded that the information needed for adopting effective practices to combat ticks was insufficient among the milk farm properties in Divinópolis. Moreover, the producers interviewed had a good perception of what they observed in their daily routine, but did not have complementary information about the tick life cycle.Foram aplicadas 100 entrevistas semissistematizadas com o objetivo de levantar a percepção dos produtores de leite do município de Divinópolis, Minas Gerais, sobre a biologia do carrapato Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus. Foi feita "análise de conteúdo" de cada uma das variáveis levantadas e sua descrição com destaque das maiores frequências para a construção de perfis de percepção sobre cada um dos aspectos levantados. Além disso, cada um dos produtores foram categorizados quanto a estar ou não apto a proceder um controle eficiente pela avaliação de suas respostas. Algumas das variáveis levantadas foram tempo de vida do carrapato, tempo de vida parasitária, época de maior incidência, sobrevivência nas pastagens e volume de postura, questões consideradas importantes

  11. Haptic perception of wetness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Kosters, N.D.; Daanen, H.A.M.; Kappers, A.M.L.

    2011-01-01

    The sensation of wetness is well-known but barely investigated. There are no specific wetness receptors in the skin, but the sensation is mediated by temperature and pressure perception. In our study, we have measured discrimination thresholds for the haptic perception of wetness of three di erent t

  12. Perceptions of pork quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredahl, Lone; Grunert, Klaus G.

    1997-01-01

    This paper deals with consumer perceptions of food quality before and after consuming the product, and with the relationship between quality perception and the actural physiological characteristics of the product. The paper is work in progress and with an investigation of how German consumers...

  13. Language, Perception, Culture & Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Man-li

    2015-01-01

    The paper explores the prospect of introducing language, perception, culture and communication. Starting with some definitions of language, perception, culture and communication, the paper argues for the internal connection among them. It pro⁃vides better understanding of these factors in foreign language learning and encourages learners to achieve the better learning re⁃sult to communicate effectively through language, culture etc.

  14. Changes in Perception

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ Though not the sole element to determine foreign policies, perception is of vital importance in defining an environment, understanding international relations and analyzing potential policy choices. India's "Look East" policy after the Cold War originates from its perception changes toward ASEAN.

  15. Perception of linear acceleration in weightlessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrott, Anthony P.; Young, Laurence R.; Merfeld, Daniel M.

    1991-01-01

    Tests of the perception and use of linear acceleration sensory information were performed on the science crews of the Spacelab 1 (SL-1) and D-1 missions using linear 'sleds' in-flight (D-1) and pre-post flight. The time delay between the acceleration step stimulus and the subjective response was consistently reduced during weightlessness, but was neither statistically significant nor of functional importance. Increased variability of responses when going from one environment to the other was apparent from measurements on the first day of the mission and in the first days post-flight. Subjective reports of perceived motion during sinusoidal oscillation in weightlessness were qualitatively similar to reports on earth. In a closed-loop motion nulling task, enhanced performance was observed post-flight in all crewmembers tested in the Y or Z axes.

  16. Consumers' quality perception

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Anne C.; Grunert, Klaus G.; Bredahl, Lone;

    2001-01-01

    is rapidly becoming a reality. On the other hand, still many consumers are in favour of local production, resulting in fierce competition between the multinational suppliers and the local producers of food. Under these market conditions, the importance of skills relating to hoe to study consumers' perception...... of quality and the ability of producers to react to changes in consumers' perception of quality may form the basis of market success or failure, independent of whether you are a local or multinational producer. This chapter deals with the analysis of consumers' quality perception. We will introduce a general...... framework, the Total Food Quality Model, which we believe is useful in understanding consumers perception of food quality. We will then illustrate applications of the model using two recent examples of the quality perception of meat and fish....

  17. Biology Notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents procedures, exercises, demonstrations, and information on a variety of biology topics including labeling systems, biological indicators of stream pollution, growth of lichens, reproductive capacity of bulbous buttercups, a straw balance to measure transpiration, interaction of fungi, osmosis, and nitrogen fixation and crop production. (DC)

  18. Metal ion coupled protein folding and allosteric motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei

    2014-03-01

    Many proteins need the help of cofactors for their successful folding and functioning. Metal ions, i.e., Zn2+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ etc., are typical biological cofactors. Binding of metal ions can reshape the energy landscapes of proteins, thereby modifying the folding and allosteric motions. For example, such binding may make the intrinsically disordered proteins have funneled energy landscapes, consequently, ensures their spontaneous folding. In addition, the binding may activate certain biological processes by inducing related conformational changes of regulation proteins. However, how the local interactions involving the metal ion binding can induce the global conformational motions of proteins remains elusive. Investigating such question requires multiple models with different details, including quantum mechanics, atomistic models, and coarse grained models. In our recent work, we have been developing such multiscale methods which can reasonably model the metal ion binding induced charge transfer, protonation/deprotonation, and large conformational motions of proteins. With such multiscale model, we elucidated the zinc-binding induced folding mechanism of classical zinc finger and the calcium-binding induced dynamic symmetry breaking in the allosteric motions of calmodulin. In addition, we studied the coupling of folding, calcium binding and allosteric motions of calmodulin domains. In this talk, I will introduce the above progresses on the metal ion coupled protein folding and allosteric motions. We thank the finacial support from NSFC and the 973 project.

  19. Ecology and Evolutionary Biology of Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Pigliucci, Massimo

    2002-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is now widely used as a model system in molecular and developmental biology, as well as in physiology and cell biology. However, ecologists and evolutionary biologists have turned their attention to the mouse ear cress only much more recently and almost reluctantly. The reason for this is the perception that A. thaliana is not particularly interesting ecologically and that it represents an oddity from an evolutionary standpoint. While there is some truth in both these att...

  20. Communicative interactions improve visual detection of biological motion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Manera

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the context of interacting activities requiring close-body contact such as fighting or dancing, the actions of one agent can be used to predict the actions of the second agent. In the present study, we investigated whether interpersonal predictive coding extends to interactive activities--such as communicative interactions--in which no physical contingency is implied between the movements of the interacting individuals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Participants observed point-light displays of two agents (A and B performing separate actions. In the communicative condition, the action performed by agent B responded to a communicative gesture performed by agent A. In the individual condition, agent A's communicative action was substituted with a non-communicative action. Using a simultaneous masking detection task, we demonstrate that observing the communicative gesture performed by agent A enhanced visual discrimination of agent B. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our finding complements and extends previous evidence for interpersonal predictive coding, suggesting that the communicative gestures of one agent can serve as a predictor for the expected actions of the respondent, even if no physical contact between agents is implied.

  1. Evaluating High School Students' Anxiety and Self-Efficacy towards Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çimen, Osman; Yilmaz, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety and self-efficacy are among the factors that impact students' performance in biology. The current study aims to investigate high school students' perception of biology anxiety and self-efficacy, in relation to gender, grade level, interest in biology, negative experience associated with biology classes, and teachers' approaches in the…

  2. Higher Education Students’ Perceptions of Environmental Issues and Media Coverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keinonen Tuula

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to find higher education students’ perceptions about environmental issues and how the perceptions are related to perceptions of media coverage. This study investigates higher education students’ perceptions of the seriousness of environmental issues and their relation to perceptions of media coverage. Higher education students perceived a global problem, lack of clean water, as most serious environmental problem. Media has had an effect on students’ perceptions on environmental issues: when students perceived the problem as serious they also perceived the information in media concerning it appropriate. Students perceived that the media underestimate and obscure some environmental problems such as biological diversity and global warming. It was concluded that higher education educators need more knowledge of students’, future decision makers’ concerns and perceptions about environmental issues to develop more effective teaching practices in higher education. Through education environmental issues literacy, which is a precursor for engaged protection of the environment, can be fostered. This study offers some insights into higher education students’ perceptions of the media’s role in environmental issues.

  3. WORKSHOP: Stable particle motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Particle beam stability is crucial to any accelerator or collider, particularly big ones, such as Brookhaven's RHIC heavy ion collider and the larger SSC and LHC proton collider schemes. A workshop on the Stability of Particle Motion in Storage Rings held at Brookhaven in October dealt with the important issue of determining the short- and long-term stability of single particle motion in hadron storage rings and colliders, and explored new methods for ensuring it. In the quest for realistic environments, the imperfections of superconducting magnets and the effects of field modulation and noise were taken into account. The workshop was divided into three study groups: Short-Term Stability in storage rings, including chromatic and geometric effects and correction strategies; Long-Term Stability, including modulation and random noise effects and slow varying effects; and Methods for determining the stability of particle motion. The first two were run in parallel, but the third was attended by everyone. Each group considered analytical, computational and experimental methods, reviewing work done so far, comparing results and approaches and underlining outstanding issues. By resolving conflicts, it was possible to identify problems of common interest. The workshop reaffirmed the validity of methods proposed several years ago. Major breakthroughs have been in the rapid improvement of computer capacity and speed, in the development of more sophisticated mathematical packages, and in the introduction of more powerful analytic approaches. In a typical storage ring, a particle may be required to circulate for about a billion revolutions. While ten years ago it was only possible to predict accurately stability over about a thousand revolutions, it is now possible to predict over as many as one million turns. If this trend continues, in ten years it could become feasible to predict particle stability over the entire storage period. About ninety participants

  4. Interactions between motion and form processing in the human visual system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Mather

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The predominant view of motion and form processing in the human visual system assumes that these two attributes are handled by separate and independent modules. Motion processing involves filtering by direction-selective sensors, followed by integration to solve the aperture problem. Form processing involves filtering by orientation-selective and size-selective receptive fields, followed by integration to encode object shape. It has long been known that motion signals can influence form processing in the well-known Gestalt principle of common fate; texture elements which share a common motion property are grouped into a single contour or texture region. However recent research in psychophysics and neuroscience indicates that the influence of form signals on motion processing is more extensive than previously thought. First, the salience and apparent direction of moving lines depends on how the local orientation and direction of motion combine to match the receptive field properties of motion-selective neurons. Second, orientation signals generated by ‘motion-streaks’ influence motion processing; motion sensitivity, apparent direction and adaptation are affected by simultaneously present orientation signals. Third, form signals generated by human body shape influence biological motion processing, as revealed by studies using point-light motion stimuli. Thus form-motion integration seems to occur at several different levels of cortical processing, from V1 to STS.

  5. Functional correlates of optic flow motion processing in Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti Putcha

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The visual input created by the relative motion between an individual and the environment, also called optic flow, influences the sense of self-motion, postural orientation, veering of gait, and visuospatial cognition. An optic flow network comprising visual motion areas V6, V3A, and MT+, as well as visuo-vestibular areas including posterior insula vestibular cortex (PIVC and cingulate sulcus visual area (CSv, has been described as uniquely selective for parsing egomotion depth cues in humans. Individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD have known behavioral deficits in optic flow perception and visuospatial cognition compared to age- and education-matched control adults (MC. The present study used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate neural correlates related to impaired optic flow perception in PD. We conducted fMRI on 40 non-demented participants (23 PD and 17 MC during passive viewing of simulated optic flow motion and random motion. We hypothesized that compared to the MC group, PD participants would show abnormal neural activity in regions comprising this optic flow network. MC participants showed robust activation across all regions in the optic flow network, consistent with studies in young adults, suggesting intact optic flow perception at the neural level in healthy aging. PD participants showed diminished activity compared to MC particularly within visual motion area MT+ and the visuo-vestibular region CSv. Further, activation in visuo-vestibular region CSv was associated with disease severity. These findings suggest that behavioral reports of impaired optic flow perception and visuospatial performance may be a result of impaired neural processing within visual motion and visuo-vestibular regions in PD.

  6. Electromechanical motion devices

    CERN Document Server

    Krause, Paul C; Pekarek, Steven D

    2012-01-01

    This text provides a basic treatment of modern electric machine analysis that gives readers the necessary background for comprehending the traditional applications and operating characteristics of electric machines-as well as their emerging applications in modern power systems and electric drives, such as those used in hybrid and electric vehicles. Through the appropriate use of reference frame theory, Electromagnetic Motion Devices, Second Edition introduces readers to field-oriented control of induction machines, constant-torque, and constant-power control of dc, permanent-magnet ac

  7. Rotational motion in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear structure theories are reviewed concerned with nuclei rotational motion. The development of the deformed nucleus model facilitated a discovery of rotational spectra of nuclei. Comprehensive verification of the rotational scheme and a successful classification of corresponding spectra stimulated investigations of the rotational movement dynamics. Values of nuclear moments of inertia proved to fall between two marginal values corresponding to rotation of a solid and hydrodynamic pattern of an unrotating flow, respectively. The discovery of governing role of the deformation and a degree of a symmetry violence for determining rotational degrees of freedon is pointed out to pave the way for generalization of the rotational spectra

  8. Brownian Brownian Motion-1

    OpenAIRE

    Chernov, N.; Dolgopyat, D.

    2008-01-01

    A classical model of Brownian motion consists of a heavy molecule submerged into a gas of light atoms in a closed container. In this work we study a 2D version of this model, where the molecule is a heavy disk of mass M and the gas is represented by just one point particle of mass m = 1, which interacts with the disk and the walls of the container via elastic collisions. Chaotic behavior of the particles is ensured by convex (scattering) walls of the container. We prove that the position and ...

  9. Neural networks for perception human and machine perception

    CERN Document Server

    Wechsler, Harry

    1991-01-01

    Neural Networks for Perception, Volume 1: Human and Machine Perception focuses on models for understanding human perception in terms of distributed computation and examples of PDP models for machine perception. This book addresses both theoretical and practical issues related to the feasibility of both explaining human perception and implementing machine perception in terms of neural network models. The book is organized into two parts. The first part focuses on human perception. Topics on network model ofobject recognition in human vision, the self-organization of functional architecture in t

  10. Quantum Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Sergi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A critical assessment of the recent developmentsof molecular biology is presented.The thesis that they do not lead to a conceptualunderstanding of life and biological systems is defended.Maturana and Varela's concept of autopoiesis is briefly sketchedand its logical circularity avoided by postulatingthe existence of underlying living processes,entailing amplification from the microscopic to the macroscopic scale,with increasing complexity in the passage from one scale to the other.Following such a line of thought, the currently accepted model of condensed matter, which is based on electrostatics and short-ranged forces,is criticized. It is suggested that the correct interpretationof quantum dispersion forces (van der Waals, hydrogen bonding, and so onas quantum coherence effects hints at the necessity of includinglong-ranged forces (or mechanisms for them incondensed matter theories of biological processes.Some quantum effects in biology are reviewedand quantum mechanics is acknowledged as conceptually important to biology since withoutit most (if not all of the biological structuresand signalling processes would not even exist. Moreover, it is suggested that long-rangequantum coherent dynamics, including electron polarization,may be invoked to explain signal amplificationprocess in biological systems in general.

  11. The Hierarchy of Fast Motions in Protein Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Mazur, A K

    1998-01-01

    For many biological applications of molecular dynamics (MD) the importance of good sampling in conformational space makes it necessary to eliminate the fastest motions from the system in order to increase the time step. An accurate knowledge of these motions is a necessary prerequisite for such efforts. It is known that harmonic vibrations of bond lengths and bond angles produce the highest frequencies in proteins. There are also fast anharmonic motions, such as inter-atomic collisions, which are probably most important when bond lengths and bond angles are fixed. However, the specific time scales corresponding to all these limitations are not known precisely. In order to clarify the above issue this paper analyses time step limiting factors in a series of numerical tests by using an internal coordinate molecular dynamics approach, which allows chosen internal coordinates to be frozen. It is found that, in proteins, there is a rather complicated hierarchy of fast motions, with both harmonic and anharmonic eff...

  12. Stochastic Blind Motion Deblurring

    KAUST Repository

    Xiao, Lei

    2015-05-13

    Blind motion deblurring from a single image is a highly under-constrained problem with many degenerate solutions. A good approximation of the intrinsic image can therefore only be obtained with the help of prior information in the form of (often non-convex) regularization terms for both the intrinsic image and the kernel. While the best choice of image priors is still a topic of ongoing investigation, this research is made more complicated by the fact that historically each new prior requires the development of a custom optimization method. In this paper, we develop a stochastic optimization method for blind deconvolution. Since this stochastic solver does not require the explicit computation of the gradient of the objective function and uses only efficient local evaluation of the objective, new priors can be implemented and tested very quickly. We demonstrate that this framework, in combination with different image priors produces results with PSNR values that match or exceed the results obtained by much more complex state-of-the-art blind motion deblurring algorithms.

  13. Motion Cueing Algorithm Development: Human-Centered Linear and Nonlinear Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houck, Jacob A. (Technical Monitor); Telban, Robert J.; Cardullo, Frank M.

    2005-01-01

    While the performance of flight simulator motion system hardware has advanced substantially, the development of the motion cueing algorithm, the software that transforms simulated aircraft dynamics into realizable motion commands, has not kept pace. Prior research identified viable features from two algorithms: the nonlinear "adaptive algorithm", and the "optimal algorithm" that incorporates human vestibular models. A novel approach to motion cueing, the "nonlinear algorithm" is introduced that combines features from both approaches. This algorithm is formulated by optimal control, and incorporates a new integrated perception model that includes both visual and vestibular sensation and the interaction between the stimuli. Using a time-varying control law, the matrix Riccati equation is updated in real time by a neurocomputing approach. Preliminary pilot testing resulted in the optimal algorithm incorporating a new otolith model, producing improved motion cues. The nonlinear algorithm vertical mode produced a motion cue with a time-varying washout, sustaining small cues for longer durations and washing out large cues more quickly compared to the optimal algorithm. The inclusion of the integrated perception model improved the responses to longitudinal and lateral cues. False cues observed with the NASA adaptive algorithm were absent. The neurocomputing approach was crucial in that the number of presentations of an input vector could be reduced to meet the real time requirement without degrading the quality of the motion cues.

  14. Distributed Representation of Curvilinear Self-Motion in the Macaque Parietal Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixian Cheng

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Information about translations and rotations of the body is critical for complex self-motion perception during spatial navigation. However, little is known about the nature and function of their convergence in the cortex. We measured neural activity in multiple areas in the macaque parietal cortex in response to three different types of body motion applied through a motion platform: translation, rotation, and combined stimuli, i.e., curvilinear motion. We found a continuous representation of motion types in each area. In contrast to single-modality cells preferring either translation-only or rotation-only stimuli, convergent cells tend to be optimally tuned to curvilinear motion. A weighted summation model captured the data well, suggesting that translation and rotation signals are integrated subadditively in the cortex. Interestingly, variation in the activity of convergent cells parallels behavioral outputs reported in human psychophysical experiments. We conclude that representation of curvilinear self-motion perception is widely distributed in the primate sensory cortex.

  15. Quantum Biology

    CERN Document Server

    Sergi, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    A critical assessment of the recent developments of molecular biology is presented. The thesis that they do not lead to a conceptual understanding of life and biological systems is defended. Maturana and Varela's concept of autopoiesis is briefly sketched and its logical circularity avoided by postulating the existence of underlying {\\it living processes}, entailing amplification from the microscopic to the macroscopic scale, with increasing complexity in the passage from one scale to the other. Following such a line of thought, the currently accepted model of condensed matter, which is based on electrostatics and short-ranged forces, is criticized. It is suggested that the correct interpretation of quantum dispersion forces (van der Waals, hydrogen bonding, and so on) as quantum coherence effects hints at the necessity of including long-ranged forces (or mechanisms for them) in condensed matter theories of biological processes. Some quantum effects in biology are reviewed and quantum mechanics is acknowledge...

  16. Perceptions and attitudes among milk producers in Minas Gerais regarding cattle tick biology and control Percepções e atitudes entre produtores de leite em Minas Gerais relacionado a biologia e controle de carrapatos em bovinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alice Zacarias do Amaral

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates milk producers' knowledge regarding cattle ticks and practices for controlling them. Ninety-three dairymen in Minas Gerais were interviewed. These producers had no information regarding acaricide efficiency tests. To analyze the information, open responses were categorized through "content analysis", and descriptive analysis consisting of extracting the profile highlighted by the highest frequencies. The association between schooling level and knowledge was tested by means of chi-square trend tests. It was observed that 92.3% had no knowledge of the non-parasitic period. For 96.4%, what determined the time to apply treatment was the degree of tick infestation; 93.3% used spray guns to apply the acaricide. In seeking to cross-correlate the biological and control variables with education, cooperative action, length of experience and herd size, it was found that there was a linear association between schooling level and implementation of acaricide solution preparation. The other factors didn't show any significant association. These data demonstrated the need to instruct the producers in relation to the biology and control of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus. It was concluded that the majority of milk producers were unaware of cattle tick biology and the factors that influence choosing an acaricide, which makes it difficult to implement strategic control.Este estudo teve como objetivo avaliar o conhecimento dos produtores de leite sobre o carrapato dos bovinos e seu controle. Foram entrevistados 93 produtores de leite de Minas Gerais. Estes produtores não tinham informação sobre testes de eficiência de carrapaticidas e controle de carrapatos. Foi testada associação entre a escolaridade e as práticas e conhecimento sobre os carrapatos e constatou-se que 92,3% dos produtores nada sabiam sobre o período não-parasitário. Para 96,4%, o que determinava o momento do tratamento era o grau de infestação de carrapatos; e 93

  17. Deterministic Brownian Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trefan, Gyorgy

    1993-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is to contribute to the ambitious program of the foundation of developing statistical physics using chaos. We build a deterministic model of Brownian motion and provide a microscopic derivation of the Fokker-Planck equation. Since the Brownian motion of a particle is the result of the competing processes of diffusion and dissipation, we create a model where both diffusion and dissipation originate from the same deterministic mechanism--the deterministic interaction of that particle with its environment. We show that standard diffusion which is the basis of the Fokker-Planck equation rests on the Central Limit Theorem, and, consequently, on the possibility of deriving it from a deterministic process with a quickly decaying correlation function. The sensitive dependence on initial conditions, one of the defining properties of chaos insures this rapid decay. We carefully address the problem of deriving dissipation from the interaction of a particle with a fully deterministic nonlinear bath, that we term the booster. We show that the solution of this problem essentially rests on the linear response of a booster to an external perturbation. This raises a long-standing problem concerned with Kubo's Linear Response Theory and the strong criticism against it by van Kampen. Kubo's theory is based on a perturbation treatment of the Liouville equation, which, in turn, is expected to be totally equivalent to a first-order perturbation treatment of single trajectories. Since the boosters are chaotic, and chaos is essential to generate diffusion, the single trajectories are highly unstable and do not respond linearly to weak external perturbation. We adopt chaotic maps as boosters of a Brownian particle, and therefore address the problem of the response of a chaotic booster to an external perturbation. We notice that a fully chaotic map is characterized by an invariant measure which is a continuous function of the control parameters of the map

  18. Confining collective motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolo, Denis; Bricard, Antoine; Caussin, Jean-Baptiste; Savoie, Charles; Das, Debasish; Chepizhko, Oleskar; Peruani, Fernando; Saintillan, David

    2014-11-01

    It is well established that geometrical confinement have a significant impact on the structure and the flow properties of complex fluids. Prominent examples include the formation of topological defects in liquid crystals, and the flow instabilities of viscoelastic fluids in curved geometries. In striking contrast very little is known about the macroscopic behavior of confined active fluids. In this talk we show how to motorize plastic colloidal beads and turn them into self-propelled particles. Using microfluidic geometries we demonstrate how confinement impacts their collective motion. Combining quantitative experiments, analytical theory and numerical simulations we show how a population of motile bodies interacting via alignement and repulsive interactions self-organizes into a single heterogeneous macroscopic vortex that lives on the verge of a phase separation.

  19. Bayesian estimation of turbulent motion

    OpenAIRE

    Héas, P.; Herzet, C.; Mémin, E.; Heitz, D.; P. D. Mininni

    2013-01-01

    International audience Based on physical laws describing the multi-scale structure of turbulent flows, this article proposes a regularizer for fluid motion estimation from an image sequence. Regularization is achieved by imposing some scale invariance property between histograms of motion increments computed at different scales. By reformulating this problem from a Bayesian perspective, an algorithm is proposed to jointly estimate motion, regularization hyper-parameters, and to select the ...

  20. Longitudinal motion in circular accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general description is given of the longitudinal motion of an idealized synchronous particle, exactly in step with the radiofrequency field of a circular accelerator, and a domain in phase and energy, called a bucket, around this particle within which particles are focused around the synchronous particle. This general picture is then made more precise and quantitative. The equations of longitudinal motion and their solutions and the resulting motion are discussed, followed by applications and amplication of the theory. 7 refs., 8 figs

  1. Perception and information processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholderer, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Consumer researchers are interested in the responses of people to commercial stimuli. Usually, these stimuli are products and services, including all attributes, issues, persons, communications, situations, and behaviours related to them. Perception is the first bottleneck in this process...... information and to characterise the operations they perform. To avoid confusion, it should be stressed that the term "perception" is often used in a colloquial sense in consumer research. In concepts like perceived quality, perceived value, or perceived risk, the modifier "perceived" simply highlights...... the subjective nature of these phenomena. However, many of these phenomena are the result of rather complex evaluative judgments and should therefore be regarded as attitudes, not as perceptions in a narrow sense. In this chapter, the term perception will be used in its narrow sense, referring to the selection...

  2. Multivariate respiratory motion prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In extracranial robotic radiotherapy, tumour motion is compensated by tracking external and internal surrogates. To compensate system specific time delays, time series prediction of the external optical surrogates is used. We investigate whether the prediction accuracy can be increased by expanding the current clinical setup by an accelerometer, a strain belt and a flow sensor. Four previously published prediction algorithms are adapted to multivariate inputs—normalized least mean squares (nLMS), wavelet-based least mean squares (wLMS), support vector regression (SVR) and relevance vector machines (RVM)—and evaluated for three different prediction horizons. The measurement involves 18 subjects and consists of two phases, focusing on long term trends (M1) and breathing artefacts (M2). To select the most relevant and least redundant sensors, a sequential forward selection (SFS) method is proposed. Using a multivariate setting, the results show that the clinically used nLMS algorithm is susceptible to large outliers. In the case of irregular breathing (M2), the mean root mean square error (RMSE) of a univariate nLMS algorithm is 0.66 mm and can be decreased to 0.46 mm by a multivariate RVM model (best algorithm on average). To investigate the full potential of this approach, the optimal sensor combination was also estimated on the complete test set. The results indicate that a further decrease in RMSE is possible for RVM (to 0.42 mm). This motivates further research about sensor selection methods. Besides the optical surrogates, the sensors most frequently selected by the algorithms are the accelerometer and the strain belt. These sensors could be easily integrated in the current clinical setup and would allow a more precise motion compensation. (paper)

  3. Multivariate respiratory motion prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürichen, R.; Wissel, T.; Ernst, F.; Schlaefer, A.; Schweikard, A.

    2014-10-01

    In extracranial robotic radiotherapy, tumour motion is compensated by tracking external and internal surrogates. To compensate system specific time delays, time series prediction of the external optical surrogates is used. We investigate whether the prediction accuracy can be increased by expanding the current clinical setup by an accelerometer, a strain belt and a flow sensor. Four previously published prediction algorithms are adapted to multivariate inputs—normalized least mean squares (nLMS), wavelet-based least mean squares (wLMS), support vector regression (SVR) and relevance vector machines (RVM)—and evaluated for three different prediction horizons. The measurement involves 18 subjects and consists of two phases, focusing on long term trends (M1) and breathing artefacts (M2). To select the most relevant and least redundant sensors, a sequential forward selection (SFS) method is proposed. Using a multivariate setting, the results show that the clinically used nLMS algorithm is susceptible to large outliers. In the case of irregular breathing (M2), the mean root mean square error (RMSE) of a univariate nLMS algorithm is 0.66 mm and can be decreased to 0.46 mm by a multivariate RVM model (best algorithm on average). To investigate the full potential of this approach, the optimal sensor combination was also estimated on the complete test set. The results indicate that a further decrease in RMSE is possible for RVM (to 0.42 mm). This motivates further research about sensor selection methods. Besides the optical surrogates, the sensors most frequently selected by the algorithms are the accelerometer and the strain belt. These sensors could be easily integrated in the current clinical setup and would allow a more precise motion compensation.

  4. An Expert Map of Gambling Risk Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurrier, Michael; Blaszczynski, Alexander; Rhodes, Paul

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate the moderating or mediating role played by risk perception in decision-making, gambling behaviour, and disordered gambling aetiology. Eleven gambling expert clinicians and researchers completed a semi-structured interview derived from mental models and grounded theory methodologies. Expert interview data was used to construct a comprehensive expert mental model 'map' detailing risk-perception related factors contributing to harmful or safe gambling. Systematic overlapping processes of data gathering and analysis were used to iteratively extend, saturate, test for exception, and verify concepts and emergent themes. Findings indicated that experts considered idiosyncratic beliefs among gamblers result in overall underestimates of risk and loss, insufficient prioritization of needs, and planning and implementation of risk management strategies. Additional contextual factors influencing use of risk information (reinforcement and learning; mental states, environmental cues, ambivalence; and socio-cultural and biological variables) acted to shape risk perceptions and increase vulnerabilities to harm or disordered gambling. It was concluded that understanding the nature, extent and processes by which risk perception predisposes an individual to maintain gambling despite adverse consequences can guide the content of preventative educational responsible gambling campaigns. PMID:25060132

  5. Implied dynamics biases the visual perception of velocity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara La Scaleia

    Full Text Available We expand the anecdotic report by Johansson that back-and-forth linear harmonic motions appear uniform. Six experiments explore the role of shape and spatial orientation of the trajectory of a point-light target in the perceptual judgment of uniform motion. In Experiment 1, the target oscillated back-and-forth along a circular arc around an invisible pivot. The imaginary segment from the pivot to the midpoint of the trajectory could be oriented vertically downward (consistent with an upright pendulum, horizontally leftward, or vertically upward (upside-down. In Experiments 2 to 5, the target moved uni-directionally. The effect of suppressing the alternation of movement directions was tested with curvilinear (Experiment 2 and 3 or rectilinear (Experiment 4 and 5 paths. Experiment 6 replicated the upright condition of Experiment 1, but participants were asked to hold the gaze on a fixation point. When some features of the trajectory evoked the motion of either a simple pendulum or a mass-spring system, observers identified as uniform the kinematic profiles close to harmonic motion. The bias towards harmonic motion was most consistent in the upright orientation of Experiment 1 and 6. The bias disappeared when the stimuli were incompatible with both pendulum and mass-spring models (Experiments 3 to 5. The results are compatible with the hypothesis that the perception of dynamic stimuli is biased by the laws of motion obeyed by natural events, so that only natural motions appear uniform.

  6. Linguistic insecurity perception questionnaire

    OpenAIRE

    Baldaquí Escandell, Josep Maria

    2011-01-01

    This document is annexed to the article: BALDAQUÍ, J. M. "Relations between formal linguistic insecurity and the perception of linguistic insecurity. A quantitative study on linguistic insecurity in an educational environment at the Valencian Community (Spain)", Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, 32:4, 325-342 / Aquest document és un anex de l'article: BALDAQUÍ, J. M. "Relations between formal linguistic insecurity and the perception of linguistic insecurity. A quantitativ...

  7. GABA Predicts Time Perception

    OpenAIRE

    Terhune, D.B.; S. Russo(Lugano); Near, J; Stagg, C.J.; Cohen Kadosh, R.

    2014-01-01

    Our perception of time constrains our experience of the world and exerts a pivotal influence over a myriad array of cognitive and motor functions. There is emerging evidence that the perceived duration of subsecond intervals is driven by sensory-specific neural activity in human and nonhuman animals, but the mechanisms underlying individual differences in time perception remain elusive. We tested the hypothesis that elevated visual cortex GABA impairs the coding of particular visual stimuli, ...

  8. Canine Sensory Perception

    OpenAIRE

    Homolková, Eliška

    2014-01-01

    Senses are physiological capacities of an individual that provide the individual with data for perception of the outside world. Perception is a subjective reflection of an objective reality in our brain through our sensory receptors. The way we perceive the actual stimulus depends in some way on our experiences and on the way the stimulus is interpreted by our memory. This thesis describes the mechanisms of transport of the stimuli about the outside world to the central nervous system and the...

  9. Music alters visual perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Jolij

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Visual perception is not a passive process: in order to efficiently process visual input, the brain actively uses previous knowledge (e.g., memory and expectations about what the world should look like. However, perception is not only influenced by previous knowledge. Especially the perception of emotional stimuli is influenced by the emotional state of the observer. In other words, how we perceive the world does not only depend on what we know of the world, but also by how we feel. In this study, we further investigated the relation between mood and perception. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We let observers do a difficult stimulus detection task, in which they had to detect schematic happy and sad faces embedded in noise. Mood was manipulated by means of music. We found that observers were more accurate in detecting faces congruent with their mood, corroborating earlier research. However, in trials in which no actual face was presented, observers made a significant number of false alarms. The content of these false alarms, or illusory percepts, was strongly influenced by the observers' mood. CONCLUSIONS: As illusory percepts are believed to reflect the content of internal representations that are employed by the brain during top-down processing of visual input, we conclude that top-down modulation of visual processing is not purely predictive in nature: mood, in this case manipulated by music, may also directly alter the way we perceive the world.

  10. A Bayesian framework for active artificial perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, João Filipe; Lobo, Jorge; Bessière, Pierre; Castelo-Branco, Miguel; Dias, Jorge

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we present a Bayesian framework for the active multimodal perception of 3-D structure and motion. The design of this framework finds its inspiration in the role of the dorsal perceptual pathway of the human brain. Its composing models build upon a common egocentric spatial configuration that is naturally fitting for the integration of readings from multiple sensors using a Bayesian approach. In the process, we will contribute with efficient and robust probabilistic solutions for cyclopean geometry-based stereovision and auditory perception based only on binaural cues, modeled using a consistent formalization that allows their hierarchical use as building blocks for the multimodal sensor fusion framework. We will explicitly or implicitly address the most important challenges of sensor fusion using this framework, for vision, audition, and vestibular sensing. Moreover, interaction and navigation require maximal awareness of spatial surroundings, which, in turn, is obtained through active attentional and behavioral exploration of the environment. The computational models described in this paper will support the construction of a simultaneously flexible and powerful robotic implementation of multimodal active perception to be used in real-world applications, such as human-machine interaction or mobile robot navigation. PMID:23014760

  11. Respiratory impact on motion sickness induced by linear motion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mert, A.; Klöpping-Ketelaars, I.; Bles, W.

    2009-01-01

    Motion sickness incidence (MSI) for vertical sinusoidal motion reaches a maximum at 0.167 Hz. Normal breathing frequency is close to this frequency. There is some evidence for synchronization of breathing with this stimulus frequency. If this enforced breathing takes place over a larger frequency ra

  12. Perception, time of perception, perception of the time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barata, André

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available From a conceptual point of view, time is independent of its experience. That is: it can be given a conceptual description of time without any reference to terms related to the subjective consciousness of time. But concerning a phenomenology of that subjective experience of time, it can it be showed that such experience of time is, in itself, temporal. The very same terms employed in a conceptual description of time – terms like “change” and “duration”– are implied in the phenomenological description of every perception, including perception of time. This authorizes a characterization of subjective time experience as subjective time. At last, based on temporal nature of perception of time, I will suggest an explanation for our common experience of asymmetries subjective time and objective time.Desde un punto de vista conceptual, el tiempo es independiente respecto de la experiencia del tiempo. Es decir: puede darse una descripción conceptual del tiempo sin referencia ninguna a términos relacionados con la conciencia subjetiva del tiempo. Pero en lo concerniente a una fenomenología de esa experiencia subjetiva del tiempo, puede revelarse que tal experiencia de tiempo es, ella en sí misma, temporal? Los mismísimos términos empleados en una descripción conceptual del tiempo, como “cambio” y “duración”, están implicados en la descripción fenomenológica de toda percepción, incluida la percepción del tiempo. Esto autoriza una caracterización de la experiencia subjetiva del tiempo como tiempo subjetivo. Finalmente, sobre la base de la naturaleza temporal de la percepción del tiempo, sugeriré una explicación racional de nuestra experiencia común de asimetrías entre el tiempo subjetivo y el tiempo objetivo.

  13. Coordinates of Human Visual and Inertial Heading Perception

    OpenAIRE

    Crane, Benjamin Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Heading estimation involves both inertial and visual cues. Inertial motion is sensed by the labyrinth, somatic sensation by the body, and optic flow by the retina. Because the eye and head are mobile these stimuli are sensed relative to different reference frames and it remains unclear if a perception occurs in a common reference frame. Recent neurophysiologic evidence has suggested the reference frames remain separate even at higher levels of processing but has not addressed the resulting pe...

  14. Integrating Perception and Planning for Autonomous Navigation of Urban Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Benenson, Rodrigo; Petti, Stéphane; Parent, Michel,; Fraichard, Thierry

    2006-01-01

    The paper addresses the problem of autonomous navigation of a car-like robot evolving in an urban environment. Such an environment exhibits an heterogeneous geometry and is cluttered with moving obstacles. Furthermore, in this context, motion safety is a critical issue. The proposed approach to the problem lies in the coupling of two crucial robotic capabilities, namely perception and planning. The main contributions of this work are the development and integration of these modules into one s...

  15. Variance After-Effects Distort Risk Perception in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payzan-LeNestour, Elise; Balleine, Bernard W; Berrada, Tony; Pearson, Joel

    2016-06-01

    In many contexts, decision-making requires an accurate representation of outcome variance-otherwise known as "risk" in economics. Conventional economic theory assumes this representation to be perfect, thereby focusing on risk preferences rather than risk perception per se [1-3] (but see [4]). However, humans often misrepresent their physical environment. Perhaps the most striking of such misrepresentations are the many well-known sensory after-effects, which most commonly involve visual properties, such as color, contrast, size, and motion. For example, viewing downward motion of a waterfall induces the anomalous biased experience of upward motion during subsequent viewing of static rocks to the side [5]. Given that after-effects are pervasive, occurring across a wide range of time horizons [6] and stimulus dimensions (including properties such as face perception [7, 8], gender [9], and numerosity [10]), and that some evidence exists that neurons show adaptation to variance in the sole visual feature of motion [11], we were interested in assessing whether after-effects distort variance perception in humans. We found that perceived variance is decreased after prolonged exposure to high variance and increased after exposure to low variance within a number of different visual representations of variance. We demonstrate these after-effects occur across very different visual representations of variance, suggesting that these effects are not sensory, but operate at a high (cognitive) level of information processing. These results suggest, therefore, that variance constitutes an independent cognitive property and that prolonged exposure to extreme variance distorts risk perception-a fundamental challenge for economic theory and practice. PMID:27161500

  16. VFI-based Robotic Arm Control for Natural Adaptive Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woosung Yang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Since neural oscillator based control methods can generate rhythmic motion without information on system dynamics, they can be a promising alternative to traditional motion planning based control approaches. However, for field application, they still need to be robust against unexpected forces or changes in environments so as to be able to generate “natural motion” like most biological systems. In this study a biologically inspired control algorithm that combines neural oscillators and virtual force is proposed. This work gives the condition with respect to parameters tuning to stably activate the neural oscillators. This is helpful to achieve motion adaptability to environmental changes keeping the motion repeatability. He efficacy and efficiency of the proposed methods are tested in the control of a planar three-linkage robotic arm. It is shown that the proposed controller generates a given circular path stably and repeatedly, even with unexpected contact with a wall. The adaptivity of motion control is also tested in control of a robotic arm with redundant degrees of freedom. The proposed control algorithm works throughout the simulations and experiments.

  17. Hierarchical Categorical Perception in Sensing and Cognitive Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruni, Luis Emilio

    2008-01-01

    This article considers categorical perception (CP) as a crucial process involved in all sort of communication throughout the biological hierarchy, i.e. in all of biosemiosis. Until now, there has been consideration of CP exclusively within the functional cycle of perception-cognition-action and it...... communication processes in living systems, including intracellular, intercellular, metabolic, physiological, cognitive and ecological levels. The main idea is to provide an account that considers the heterarchical embeddedness of many instances of CP and CS. This will take me to relate the hierarchical nature...... of categorical sensing and perception with the equally hierarchical issues of the "binding problem", "triadic causality", the "emergent interpretant" and the increasing semiotic freedom observed in biological and cognitive systems....

  18. Biological Oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    Within the framework of global biogeochemical cycles and ocean productivity, there are two areas that will be of particular interest to biological oceanography in the 1990s. The first is the mapping in space time of the biomass and productivity of phytoplankton in the world ocean. The second area is the coupling of biological and physical processes as it affects the distribution and growth rate of phytoplankton biomass. Certainly other areas will be of interest to biological oceanographers, but these two areas are amenable to observations from satellites. Temporal and spatial variability is a regular feature of marine ecosystems. The temporal and spatial variability of phytoplankton biomass and productivity which is ubiquitous at all time and space scales in the ocean must be characterized. Remote sensing from satellites addresses these problems with global observations of mesocale (2 to 20 days, 10 to 200 km) features over a long period of time.

  19. Biological preconcentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Bunker, Bruce C.; Huber, Dale L.

    2008-09-09

    A biological preconcentrator comprises a stimulus-responsive active film on a stimulus-producing microfabricated platform. The active film can comprise a thermally switchable polymer film that can be used to selectively absorb and desorb proteins from a protein mixture. The biological microfabricated platform can comprise a thin membrane suspended on a substrate with an integral resistive heater and/or thermoelectric cooler for thermal switching of the active polymer film disposed on the membrane. The active polymer film can comprise hydrogel-like polymers, such as poly(ethylene oxide) or poly(n-isopropylacrylamide), that are tethered to the membrane. The biological preconcentrator can be fabricated with semiconductor materials and technologies.

  20. Primary School Children's Perceptions of Parent and Teacher Roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Anne B.

    Children's perceptions of the roles of mother, father, and teacher were examined in a sample of 98 children of 7 to 9 years. Children of working mothers numbered 54. Interview data were coded into five main role categories: Domestic, Child Care, Paid Work, Biological, and Personal. Results showed no effect of age or maternal work status on…

  1. Use of Animation in Teaching Cell Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Stith, Bradley J.

    2004-01-01

    To address the different learning styles of students, and because students can access animation from off-campus computers, the use of digital animation in teaching cell biology has become increasingly popular. Sample processes from cell biology that are more clearly presented in animation than in static illustrations are identified. The value of animation is evaluated on whether the process being taught involves motion, cellular location, or sequential order of numerous events. Computer progr...

  2. Coupled motions direct electrons along human microsomal P450 Chains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R Pudney

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein domain motion is often implicated in biological electron transfer, but the general significance of motion is not clear. Motion has been implicated in the transfer of electrons from human cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR to all microsomal cytochrome P450s (CYPs. Our hypothesis is that tight coupling of motion with enzyme chemistry can signal "ready and waiting" states for electron transfer from CPR to downstream CYPs and support vectorial electron transfer across complex redox chains. We developed a novel approach to study the time-dependence of dynamical change during catalysis that reports on the changing conformational states of CPR. FRET was linked to stopped-flow studies of electron transfer in CPR that contains donor-acceptor fluorophores on the enzyme surface. Open and closed states of CPR were correlated with key steps in the catalytic cycle which demonstrated how redox chemistry and NADPH binding drive successive opening and closing of the enzyme. Specifically, we provide evidence that reduction of the flavin moieties in CPR induces CPR opening, whereas ligand binding induces CPR closing. A dynamic reaction cycle was created in which CPR optimizes internal electron transfer between flavin cofactors by adopting closed states and signals "ready and waiting" conformations to partner CYP enzymes by adopting more open states. This complex, temporal control of enzyme motion is used to catalyze directional electron transfer from NADPH→FAD→FMN→heme, thereby facilitating all microsomal P450-catalysed reactions. Motions critical to the broader biological functions of CPR are tightly coupled to enzyme chemistry in the human NADPH-CPR-CYP redox chain. That redox chemistry alone is sufficient to drive functionally necessary, large-scale conformational change is remarkable. Rather than relying on stochastic conformational sampling, our study highlights a need for tight coupling of motion to enzyme chemistry to give vectorial electron

  3. Minimal basilar membrane motion in low-frequency hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Rebecca L; Ramamoorthy, Sripriya; Ciganović, Nikola; Zhang, Yuan; Wilson, Teresa M; Petrie, Tracy; Wang, Ruikang K; Jacques, Steven L; Reichenbach, Tobias; Nuttall, Alfred L; Fridberger, Anders

    2016-07-26

    Low-frequency hearing is critically important for speech and music perception, but no mechanical measurements have previously been available from inner ears with intact low-frequency parts. These regions of the cochlea may function in ways different from the extensively studied high-frequency regions, where the sensory outer hair cells produce force that greatly increases the sound-evoked vibrations of the basilar membrane. We used laser interferometry in vitro and optical coherence tomography in vivo to study the low-frequency part of the guinea pig cochlea, and found that sound stimulation caused motion of a minimal portion of the basilar membrane. Outside the region of peak movement, an exponential decline in motion amplitude occurred across the basilar membrane. The moving region had different dependence on stimulus frequency than the vibrations measured near the mechanosensitive stereocilia. This behavior differs substantially from the behavior found in the extensively studied high-frequency regions of the cochlea. PMID:27407145

  4. Minimal basilar membrane motion in low-frequency hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Rebecca L.; Ramamoorthy, Sripriya; Ciganović, Nikola; Zhang, Yuan; Wilson, Teresa M.; Petrie, Tracy; Wang, Ruikang K.; Jacques, Steven L.; Reichenbach, Tobias; Nuttall, Alfred L.; Fridberger, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Low-frequency hearing is critically important for speech and music perception, but no mechanical measurements have previously been available from inner ears with intact low-frequency parts. These regions of the cochlea may function in ways different from the extensively studied high-frequency regions, where the sensory outer hair cells produce force that greatly increases the sound-evoked vibrations of the basilar membrane. We used laser interferometry in vitro and optical coherence tomography in vivo to study the low-frequency part of the guinea pig cochlea, and found that sound stimulation caused motion of a minimal portion of the basilar membrane. Outside the region of peak movement, an exponential decline in motion amplitude occurred across the basilar membrane. The moving region had different dependence on stimulus frequency than the vibrations measured near the mechanosensitive stereocilia. This behavior differs substantially from the behavior found in the extensively studied high-frequency regions of the cochlea. PMID:27407145

  5. Fusion of motion segmentation algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Ellis, Anna-Louise

    2008-01-01

    Many algorithms have been developed to achieve motion segmentation for video surveillance. The algorithms produce varying performances under the infinite amount of changing conditions. It has been recognised that individually these algorithms have useful properties. Fusing the statistical result of these algorithms is investigated, with robust motion segmentation in mind.

  6. Algorithmic Issues in Modeling Motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agarwal, P. K; Guibas, L. J; Edelsbrunner, H.;

    2003-01-01

    This article is a survey of research areas in which motion plays a pivotal role. The aim of the article is to review current approaches to modeling motion together with related data structures and algorithms, and to summarize the challenges that lie ahead in producing a more unified theory...

  7. Isynchronous motion in classical mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Those oscillatory motions for which the period is independent of the total energy are investigated. There is only one corresponding symmetric potential, the quadratic potential of the simple harmonic motion but infinite classes of asymmetric potentials must be considered. Geometric and analytic requirements of isochronism are discussed and several specific examples are given

  8. Motion-corrected Fourier ptychography

    CERN Document Server

    Bian, Liheng; Guo, Kaikai; Suo, Jinli; Yang, Changhuei; Chen, Feng; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-01-01

    Fourier ptychography (FP) is a recently proposed computational imaging technique for high space-bandwidth product imaging. In real setups such as endoscope and transmission electron microscope, the common sample motion largely degrades the FP reconstruction and limits its practicability. In this paper, we propose a novel FP reconstruction method to efficiently correct for unknown sample motion. Specifically, we adaptively update the sample's Fourier spectrum from low spatial-frequency regions towards high spatial-frequency ones, with an additional motion recovery and phase-offset compensation procedure for each sub-spectrum. Benefiting from the phase retrieval redundancy theory, the required large overlap between adjacent sub-spectra offers an accurate guide for successful motion recovery. Experimental results on both simulated data and real captured data show that the proposed method can correct for unknown sample motion with its standard deviation being up to 10% of the field-of-view scale. We have released...

  9. Entropic forces in Brownian motion

    CERN Document Server

    Roos, Nico

    2013-01-01

    The interest in the concept of entropic forces has risen considerably since E. Verlinde proposed to interpret the force in Newton s second law and Gravity as entropic forces. Brownian motion, the motion of a small particle (pollen) driven by random impulses from the surrounding molecules, may be the first example of a stochastic process in which such forces are expected to emerge. In this note it is shown that at least two types of entropic motion can be identified in the case of 3D Brownian motion (or random walk). This yields simple derivations of known results of Brownian motion, Hook s law and, applying an external (nonradial) force, Curie s law and the Langevin-Debye equation.

  10. Brownian Motion Theory and Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, K; Basu, Kasturi; Baishya, Kopinjol

    2003-01-01

    Brownian motion is the perpetual irregular motion exhibited by small particles immersed in a fluid. Such random motion of the particles is produced by statistical fluctuations in the collisions they suffer with the molecules of the surrounding fluid. Brownian motion of particles in a fluid (like milk particles in water) can be observed under a microscope. Here we describe a simple experimental set-up to observe Brownian motion and a method of determining the diffusion coefficient of the Brownian particles, based on a theory due to Smoluchowski. While looking through the microscope we focus attention on a fixed small volume, and record the number of particles that are trapped in that volume, at regular intervals of time. This gives us a time-series data, which is enough to determine the diffusion coefficient of the particles to a good degree of accuracy.

  11. Interpretation of Simulations in Interactive VR Environments: Depth Perception in Cave and Panorama

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mullins, Michael

    2006-01-01

    of architectural concepts. Architects need to heed the dynamics set in motion by these technologies and especially of how laypersons interpret building forms and their simulations in interactive VR environments. The article presents a study which compares aspects of spatial perception in a physical...... environment, CAVE and Panorama. In a report, statistical analysis and discussion of the results, the paper addresses three hypothetical assertions - that depth perception in physical reality and its virtual representations in CAVE and Panorama are quantifiably different, that differences are attributable to...... asserted that perception of shape and distance display here fundamental conditions of the CAVE and Panorama....

  12. Student Perceived and Determined Knowledge of Biology Concepts in an Upper-Level Biology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Brittany; Montplaisir, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Students who lack metacognitive skills can struggle with the learning process. To be effective learners, students should recognize what they know and what they do not know. This study examines the relationship between students' perception of their knowledge and determined knowledge in an upper-level biology course utilizing a pre/posttest…

  13. Marine Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewees, Christopher M.; Hooper, Jon K.

    1976-01-01

    A variety of informational material for a course in marine biology or oceanology at the secondary level is presented. Among the topics discussed are: food webs and pyramids, planktonic blooms, marine life, plankton nets, food chains, phytoplankton, zooplankton, larval plankton and filter feeders. (BT)

  14. Biology Notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Describes laboratory procedures, demonstrations, and classroom activities/materials, including water relation exercise on auxin-treated artichoke tuber tissue; aerobic respiration in yeast; an improved potometer; use of mobiles in biological classification, and experiments on powdery mildews and banana polyphenol oxidase. Includes reading lists…

  15. An Examination of the Biology Teachers’ Laboratory Self-Efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Gülay EKİCİ

    2009-01-01

    This study is prepared for two basic aims: first one is to prepare a valid and reliable scale which determines laboratory selfefficacyperceptions of biology teachers and the second is to examine biology teachers’ laboratory self-efficacy perceptions from the personal characteristics points of view. The participants of this study are 126 biology teachers. In this study, to collect the data the Laboratory Self-Efficacy Scale was developed by the researcher. Frequency, arithmetic mean, t-test, f...

  16. A Study on the Bio-mimetic Motion of Reptiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hochelo; Kim, Changhoi; Eom, Heungseop; Jeong, Kyungmin; Jung, Seungjo

    2013-10-15

    After investigating the locomotion based on the biological characteristics about the from a literature search about the reptile, the locomotion of lizards is captured with marker based motion capture system. Tested lizards are Cuban anole, bearded dragon, domestic lizards such as a white-striped grass lizard and a leopard lizard, After analyzing the motion of the lizards with the measured data, a 25 DOF kinematics model of a lizard was proposed. A periodic gait of the lizard was modeled by defining gait parameters. The body structure of the lizard was analyzed with a bone specimen for the kinematics modeling. Dynamics parameters such as a mass and a inertia of a link are obtained by measuring the weight and the volume of each link. The crawl and the trot gait were simulated with the dynamics model. To control the poly-morphic motion of snake robot, various locomotions of snakes and the motion algorithm of snake robots were investigated. A test model of snake robot and a control system were developed to analyzed the motion and energy efficiency according to the gaits and to realize the poly-morphic motion control.

  17. Seismic risk perception test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescimbene, Massimo; La Longa, Federica; Camassi, Romano; Pino, Nicola Alessandro

    2013-04-01

    The perception of risks involves the process of collecting, selecting and interpreting signals about uncertain impacts of events, activities or technologies. In the natural sciences the term risk seems to be clearly defined, it means the probability distribution of adverse effects, but the everyday use of risk has different connotations (Renn, 2008). The two terms, hazards and risks, are often used interchangeably by the public. Knowledge, experience, values, attitudes and feelings all influence the thinking and judgement of people about the seriousness and acceptability of risks. Within the social sciences however the terminology of 'risk perception' has become the conventional standard (Slovic, 1987). The mental models and other psychological mechanisms which people use to judge risks (such as cognitive heuristics and risk images) are internalized through social and cultural learning and constantly moderated (reinforced, modified, amplified or attenuated) by media reports, peer influences and other communication processes (Morgan et al., 2001). Yet, a theory of risk perception that offers an integrative, as well as empirically valid, approach to understanding and explaining risk perception is still missing". To understand the perception of risk is necessary to consider several areas: social, psychological, cultural, and their interactions. Among the various research in an international context on the perception of natural hazards, it seemed promising the approach with the method of semantic differential (Osgood, C.E., Suci, G., & Tannenbaum, P. 1957, The measurement of meaning. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press). The test on seismic risk perception has been constructed by the method of the semantic differential. To compare opposite adjectives or terms has been used a Likert's scale to seven point. The test consists of an informative part and six sections respectively dedicated to: hazard; vulnerability (home and workplace); exposed value (with reference to

  18. Perceptions as Hypotheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, R. L.

    1980-07-01

    Perceptions may be compared with hypotheses in science. The methods of acquiring scientific knowledge provide a working paradigm for investigating processes of perception. Much as the information channels of instruments, such as radio telescopes, transmit signals which are processed according to various assumptions to give useful data, so neural signals are processed to give data for perception. To understand perception, the signal codes and the stored knowledge or assumptions used for deriving perceptual hypotheses must be discovered. Systematic perceptual errors are important clues for appreciating signal channel limitations, and for discovering hypothesis-generating procedures. Although this distinction between `physiological' and `cognitive' aspects of perception may be logically clear, it is in practice surprisingly difficult to establish which are responsible even for clearly established phenomena such as the classical distortion illusions. Experimental results are presented, aimed at distinguishing between and discovering what happens when there is mismatch with the neural signal channel, and when neural signals are processed inappropriately for the current situation. This leads us to make some distinctions between perceptual and scientific hypotheses, which raise in a new form the problem: What are `objects'?

  19. Decoding the direction of auditory motion in blind humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolbers, Thomas; Zahorik, Pavel; Giudice, Nicholas A

    2011-05-15

    Accurate processing of nonvisual stimuli is fundamental to humans with visual impairments. In this population, moving sounds activate an occipito-temporal region thought to encompass the equivalent of monkey area MT+, but it remains unclear whether the signal carries information beyond the mere presence of motion. To address this important question, we tested whether the processing in this region retains functional properties that are critical for accurate motion processing and that are well established in the visual modality. Specifically, we focussed on the property of 'directional selectivity', because MT+ neurons in non-human primates fire preferentially to specific directions of visual motion. Recent neuroimaging studies have revealed similar properties in sighted humans by successfully decoding different directions of visual motion from fMRI activation patterns. Here we used fMRI and multivariate pattern classification to demonstrate that the direction in which a sound is moving can be reliably decoded from dorsal occipito-temporal activation in the blind. We also show that classification performance is at chance (i) in a control region in posterior parietal cortex and (ii) when motion information is removed and subjects only hear a sequence of static sounds presented at the same start and end positions. These findings reveal that information about the direction of auditory motion is present in dorsal occipito-temporal responses of blind humans. As such, this area, which appears consistent with the hMT+ complex in the sighted, provides crucial information for the generation of a veridical percept of moving non-visual stimuli. PMID:20451630

  20. Aging affects postural tracking of complex visual motion cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotirakis, H; Kyvelidou, A; Mademli, L; Stergiou, N; Hatzitaki, V

    2016-09-01

    Postural tracking of visual motion cues improves perception-action coupling in aging, yet the nature of the visual cues to be tracked is critical for the efficacy of such a paradigm. We investigated how well healthy older (72.45 ± 4.72 years) and young (22.98 ± 2.9 years) adults can follow with their gaze and posture horizontally moving visual target cues of different degree of complexity. Participants tracked continuously for 120 s the motion of a visual target (dot) that oscillated in three different patterns: a simple periodic (simulated by a sine), a more complex (simulated by the Lorenz attractor that is deterministic displaying mathematical chaos) and an ultra-complex random (simulated by surrogating the Lorenz attractor) pattern. The degree of coupling between performance (posture and gaze) and the target motion was quantified in the spectral coherence, gain, phase and cross-approximate entropy (cross-ApEn) between signals. Sway-target coherence decreased as a function of target complexity and was lower for the older compared to the young participants when tracking the chaotic target. On the other hand, gaze-target coherence was not affected by either target complexity or age. Yet, a lower cross-ApEn value when tracking the chaotic stimulus motion revealed a more synchronous gaze-target relationship for both age groups. Results suggest limitations in online visuo-motor processing of complex motion cues and a less efficient exploitation of the body sway dynamics with age. Complex visual motion cues may provide a suitable training stimulus to improve visuo-motor integration and restore sway variability in older adults. PMID:27126061

  1. Dual-isotope motion correction technique for gated exercise scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In exercise multigated blood-pool imaging, significant degradation of image quality occurs as a result of patient movement under the gamma camera. Motion correction devices using centroid tracking of x-y events emanating from the organ of interest cannot be applied to blood-pool studies, because cardiac contraction and rotation masks the correctable patient motion component. We have developed a dual-isotope motion correction technique (DIMC) which utilizes a second point source of dissimilar energy (241Am) to monitor movement. Positional centroids from events incident in the 241Am window are used to develop correction coordinates which are applied to the 99mTc blood-pool events. The ability of DIMC to reduce blur due to motion has been evaluated qualitatively with phantoms and quantitatively by using spatial resolution measurements obtained from stationary line sources and from sources moving at varying rates. Based on these criteria, we have found the device to be capable of reducing over 90% of the image blur of objects moving at 5.1 cm per sec. In preliminary gated exercise studies, subjective perception of image quality was shown to be significantly improved in the DIMC corrected image, when compared to images obtained without DIMC. Improvement in image quality for exercise gated studies is of particular importance because of the low count density obtained during these procedures

  2. On the Support that the Special and General Theories of Relativity Provide for Rock's Argument Concerning Induced Self-Motion

    OpenAIRE

    Snyder, D. M.

    1999-01-01

    Though Einstein and other physicists recognized the importance of an observer being at rest in an inertial reference frame for the special theory of relativity, the supporting psychological structures were not discussed much by physicists. On the other hand, Rock, a psychologist, wrote of the factors involved in the perception of motion, including one's own motion. Rock thus came to discuss issues of significance to relativity theory, apparently without any significant understanding of how hi...

  3. A review on otolith models in human perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, Houshyar; Mohamed, Shady; Lim, Chee Peng; Nahavandi, Saeid

    2016-08-01

    The vestibular system, which consists of semicircular canals and otolith, are the main sensors mammals use to perceive rotational and linear motions. Identifying the most suitable and consistent mathematical model of the vestibular system is important for research related to driving perception. An appropriate vestibular model is essential for implementation of the Motion Cueing Algorithm (MCA) for motion simulation purposes, because the quality of the MCA is directly dependent on the vestibular model used. In this review, the history and development process of otolith models are presented and analyzed. The otolith organs can detect linear acceleration and transmit information about sensed applied specific forces on the human body. The main purpose of this review is to determine the appropriate otolith models that agree with theoretical analyses and experimental results as well as provide reliable estimation for the vestibular system functions. Formulating and selecting the most appropriate mathematical model of the vestibular system is important to ensure successful human perception modelling and simulation when implementing the model into the MCA for motion analysis. PMID:27091675

  4. Perception of nuclear risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many factors are involved in the perception of a risk by individuals. Some are individual related (psychology, knowledge, experience), others describe the social environment (culture, ideology), others at end precise the nature of the risk. The word risk has various meanings and is understood differently by the three main categories involved in risk management, that is engineers, administrators and lay public. Several models which describe the perception phenomenon are presented. The dimensions affecting perception are listed. Based on public opinion poll data, a risk taxonomy is proposed, perceived nuclear risks are compared with other risks, and results are given concerning trust in the information diffused and the credibility of those in charge of nuclear activities. (author)

  5. The perception of hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fourth chapter deals with the profusion of factors determining the differing assessment of hazards by our society. Subjective factors influencing risk perception comprise, among others, general knowledge and recognition of a hazard; the degree of voluntariness when taking the risk and its influencibility; the problem of large scale accidents; immediate and delayed results. Next to the objective and the subjective risks, the individual and the social or collective risks are assessed differently. The author dicusses in detail recent investigations into and study methods for the determination of risk perception, while eliminating systematic trends from subjective perception since common assessments are shared by whole groups of individuals time and again which allow a better understanding of today's handling of hazards. (HSCH)

  6. Spatiotemporal processing in crossmodal interactions for perception of the external world: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souta eHidaka

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Research regarding crossmodal interactions has garnered much interest in the last few decades. A variety of studies have demonstrated that multisensory information (vision, audition, tactile sensation, and so on can perceptually interact with each other in the spatial and temporal domains. Findings regarding crossmodal interactions in the spatiotemporal domain (i.e., motion processing have also been reported, with updates in the last few years. In this review, we summarize past and recent findings on spatiotemporal processing in crossmodal interactions regarding perception of the external world. A traditional view regarding crossmodal interactions holds that vision is superior to audition in spatial processing, but audition is dominant over vision in temporal processing. Similarly, vision is considered to have dominant effects over the other sensory modalities (i.e., visual capture in spatiotemporal processing. However, recent findings demonstrate that sound could have a driving effect on visual motion perception. Moreover, studies regarding perceptual associative learning reported that, after association is established between a sound sequence without spatial information and visual motion information, the sound sequence could trigger visual motion perception. Other sensory information, such as motor action or smell, has also exhibited similar driving effects on visual motion perception. Additionally, recent brain imaging studies demonstrate that similar activation patterns could be observed in several brain areas, including the motion processing areas, between spatiotemporal information from different sensory modalities. Based on these findings, we suggest that multimodal information could mutually interact in spatiotemporal processing in the percept of the external world and that common perceptual and neural underlying mechanisms would exist for spatiotemporal processing.

  7. Mesoscopic biology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G V Shivashankar

    2002-02-01

    In this paper we present a qualitative outlook of mesoscopic biology where the typical length scale is of the order of nanometers and the energy scales comparable to thermal energy. Novel biomolecular machines, governed by coded information at the level of DNA and proteins, operate at these length scales in biological systems. In recent years advances in technology have led to the study of some of the design principles of these machines; in particular at the level of an individual molecule. For example, the forces that operate in molecular interactions, the stochasticity involved in these interactions and their spatio-temporal dynamics are beginning to be explored. Understanding such design principles is opening new possibilities in mesoscopic physics with potential applications.

  8. Adaptive Motion Compensation in Radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    External-beam radiotherapy has long been challenged by the simple fact that patients can (and do) move during the delivery of radiation. Recent advances in imaging and beam delivery technologies have made the solution--adapting delivery to natural movement--a practical reality. Adaptive Motion Compensation in Radiotherapy provides the first detailed treatment of online interventional techniques for motion compensation radiotherapy. This authoritative book discusses: Each of the contributing elements of a motion-adaptive system, including target detection and tracking, beam adaptation, and pati

  9. Vision as subjective perception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human brain is not very different of the monkey's one: at least, its visual cortex is organized as a similar scheme. Specialized areas in the movement analysis are found and others in the forms perception. In this work, the author tries to answer to the following questions: 1)why so many visual areas? What are exactly their role in vision? Thirteen years of experimentation have not allowed to answer to these questions. The cerebral NMR imaging gives the opportunity of understanding the subjective perception of the visual world. One step which is particularly described in this work is to know how the visual cortex reacts to the optical illusions. (O.M.)

  10. Perception of radiation risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The perception of risk depends on the context of a hazard, on the type of hazard, and on the type of persons who make the judgements. In addition, investigations of perceived risk are sensitive to the choice of methodology and study design. Perceptions of hazards, and risk ratings, must therefore be evaluated in relation to the specific objective or event at hand. Given these guidelines, public as well as individual reactions to hazards and risks can be understood and predicted fairly well. 46 refs, 3 figs

  11. A method for real-time visual stimulus selection in the study of cortical object perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeds, Daniel D; Tarr, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    The properties utilized by visual object perception in the mid- and high-level ventral visual pathway are poorly understood. To better establish and explore possible models of these properties, we adopt a data-driven approach in which we repeatedly interrogate neural units using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to establish each unit's image selectivity. This approach to imaging necessitates a search through a broad space of stimulus properties using a limited number of samples. To more quickly identify the complex visual features underlying human cortical object perception, we implemented a new functional magnetic resonance imaging protocol in which visual stimuli are selected in real-time based on BOLD responses to recently shown images. Two variations of this protocol were developed, one relying on natural object stimuli and a second based on synthetic object stimuli, both embedded in feature spaces based on the complex visual properties of the objects. During fMRI scanning, we continuously controlled stimulus selection in the context of a real-time search through these image spaces in order to maximize neural responses across pre-determined 1cm(3) rain regions. Elsewhere we have reported the patterns of cortical selectivity revealed by this approach (Leeds et al., 2014). In contrast, here our objective is to present more detailed methods and explore the technical and biological factors influencing the behavior of our real-time stimulus search. We observe that: 1) Searches converged more reliably when exploring a more precisely parameterized space of synthetic objects; 2) real-time estimation of cortical responses to stimuli is reasonably consistent; 3) search behavior was acceptably robust to delays in stimulus displays and subject motion effects. Overall, our results indicate that real-time fMRI methods may provide a valuable platform for continuing study of localized neural selectivity, both for visual object representation and beyond. PMID

  12. Hysteresis in Audiovisual Synchrony Perception

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Jean-Remy; Kösem, Anne; van Wassenhove, Virginie

    2015-01-01

    The effect of stimulation history on the perception of a current event can yield two opposite effects, namely: adaptation or hysteresis. The perception of the current event thus goes in the opposite or in the same direction as prior stimulation, respectively. In audiovisual (AV) synchrony perception, adaptation effects have primarily been reported. Here, we tested if perceptual hysteresis could also be observed over adaptation in AV timing perception by varying different experimental conditio...

  13. Biological programming

    OpenAIRE

    Ramsden, Jeremy J.; Bándi, Gergely

    2010-01-01

    Biology offers a tremendous set of concepts that are potentially very powerfully usable for the software engineer, but they have been barely exploited hitherto. In this position paper we propose a fresh attempt to create the building blocks of a programming technology that could be as successful as life. A key guiding principle is to develop and make use of unambiguous definitions of the essential features of life.

  14. Biological radioprotector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the patent description, the biological radioprotector is deuterium depleted water, DDW, produced by vacuum distillation with an isotopic content lower than natural value. It appears as such or in a mixture with natural water and carbon dioxide. It can be used for preventing and reducing the ionizing radiation effects upon humans or animal organisms, exposed therapeutically, professionally or accidentally to radiation. The most significant advantage of using DDW as biological radioprotector results from its way of administration. Indeed no one of the radioprotectors currently used today can be orally administrated, what reduces the patients' compliance to prophylactic administrations. The biological radioprotector is an unnoxious product obtained from natural water, which can be administrated as food additive instead of drinking water. Dose modification factor is according to initial estimates around 1.9, what is a remarkable feature when one takes into account that the product is toxicity-free and side effect-free and can be administrated prophylactically as a food additive. A net radioprotective action of the deuterium depletion was evidenced experimentally in laboratory animals (rats) hydrated with DDW of 30 ppm D/(D+H) concentration as compared with normally hydrated control animals. Knowing the effects of irradiation and mechanisms of the acute radiation disease as well as the effects of administration of radiomimetic chemicals upon cellular lines of fast cell division, it appears that the effects of administrating DDW result from stimulation of the immunity system. In conclusion, the biological radioprotector DDW presents the following advantages: - it is obtained from natural products without toxicity; - it is easy to be administrated as a food additive, replacing the drinking water; - besides radioprotective effects, the product has also immunostimulative and antitumoral effects

  15. Evolution and Personal Religious Belief: Christian University Biology-Related Majors' Search for Reconciliation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, Mark W.; Staver, John R.; Scharmann, Lawrence C.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study was to explore Christian biology-related majors' perceptions of conflicts between evolution and their religious beliefs. This naturalistic study utilized a case study design of 15 undergraduate biology-related majors at or recent biology-related graduates from a mid-western Christian university. The broad sources of data…

  16. Arts Education and Student's Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nderu-Boddington, Eulalee

    2008-01-01

    This article investigates students' perceptions of their experience with arts education and their perceptions of its impact on their academic achievement and academic goals. Specifically, it relates to academic achievement, goals, cognition, and students' perceptions. Educational outcomes and policy issues are also reviewed as they related to the…

  17. Active Brownian motion of an asymmetric rigid particle

    CERN Document Server

    Mammadov, Gulmammad

    2012-01-01

    Individual movements of a rod-like self-propelled particle on a flat substrate are quantified. Biological systems that fit into this description may be the Gram-negative delta-proteobacterium Myxococcus xanthus, Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli, and Mitochondria. There are also non-living analogues such as vibrated polar granulates and self-driven anisotropic colloidal particles. For that we study the Brownian motion of an asymmetric rod-like rigid particle self-propelled at a fixed speed along its long axis in two dimensions. The motion of such a particle in a uniform external potential field is also considered. The theoretical model presented here is anticipated to better describe individual cell motion as well as intracellular transport in 2D than previous models.

  18. Circular random motion in diatom gliding under isotropic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    How cells migrate has been investigated primarily for the case of trajectories composed by joined straight segments. In contrast, little is known when cellular motion follows intrinsically curved paths. Here, we use time-lapse optical microscopy and automated trajectory tracking to investigate how individual cells of the diatom Nitzschia communis glide across surfaces under isotropic environmental conditions. We find a distinct kind of random motion, where trajectories are formed by circular arcs traveled at constant speed, alternated with random stoppages, direction reversals and changes in the orientation of the arcs. Analysis of experimental and computer-simulated trajectories show that the circular random motion of diatom gliding is not optimized for long-distance travel but rather for recurrent coverage of limited surface area. These results suggest that one main biological role for this type of diatom motility is to efficiently build the foundation of algal biofilms. (paper)

  19. Swarming dynamics of a model for biological groups in two dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Topaz, C. M.; Bertozzi, A. L.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate a class of continuum models for the motion of a two-dimensional biological group under the influence of nonlocal social interactions. The dynamics may be uniquely decomposed into incompressible motion and potential motion. When the motion is purely incompressible, the model possesses solutions which have constant population density and sharp boundaries for all time. Numerical simulations of these "swarm patches'' reveal rotating mill-like swarms with circular cores and spiral a...

  20. Exhibition of Stochastic Resonance in Vestibular Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan-Garza, R. C.; Clark, T. K.; Merfeld, D. M.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Oman, C. M.; Mulavara, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Astronauts experience sensorimotor changes during spaceflight, particularly during G-transitions. Post flight sensorimotor changes include spatial disorientation, along with postural and gait instability that may degrade operational capabilities of the astronauts and endanger the crew. A sensorimotor countermeasure that mitigates these effects would improve crewmember safety and decrease risk. The goal of this research is to investigate the potential use of stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) as a technology to improve sensorimotor function. We hypothesize that low levels of SVS will improve sensorimotor perception through the phenomenon of stochastic resonance (SR), when the response of a nonlinear system to a weak input signal is enhanced by the application of a particular nonzero level of noise. This study aims to advance the development of SVS as a potential countermeasure by 1) demonstrating the exhibition of stochastic resonance in vestibular perception, a vital component of sensorimotor function, 2) investigating the repeatability of SR exhibition, and 3) determining the relative contribution of the semicircular canals (SCC) and otolith (OTO) organs to vestibular perceptual SR. A constant current stimulator was used to deliver bilateral bipolar SVS via electrodes placed on each of the mastoid processes, as previously done. Vestibular perceptual motion recognition thresholds were measured using a 6-degree of freedom MOOG platform and a 150 trial 3-down/1-up staircase procedure. In the first test session, we measured vestibular perceptual thresholds in upright roll-tilt at 0.2 Hz (SCC+OTO) with SVS ranging from 0-700 µA. In a second test session a week later, we re-measured roll-tilt thresholds with 0, optimal (from test session 1), and 1500 µA SVS levels. A subset of these subjects, plus naive subjects, participated in two additional test sessions in which we measured thresholds in supine roll-rotation at 0.2 Hz (SCC) and upright y-translation at 1 Hz