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Sample records for biological mixed colloids

  1. Probing self assembly in biological mixed colloids by SANS, deuteration and molecular manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small-angle neutron scattering was used to obtain information on the form and molecular arrangement of particles in mixed colloids of bile salts with phosphatidylcholine, and bile salts with monoolein. Both types of systems showed the same general characteristics. The particle form was highly dependent on total lipid concentration. At the highest concentrations the particles were globular mixed micelles with an overall size of 50 Angstrom. As the concentration was reduced the mixed micelles elongated, becoming rodlike with diameter about 50 Angstrom. The rods had a radial core-shell structure in which the phosphatidylcholine or monoolein fatty tails were arranged radially to form the core with the headgroups pointing outward to form the shell. The bile salts were at the interface between the shell and core with the hydrophilic parts facing outward as part of the shell. The lengths of the rods increased and became more polydispersed with dilution. At sufficiently low concentrations the mixed micelles transformed into single bilayer vesicles. These results give insight on the physiological function of bile and on the rules governing the self assembly of bile particles in the hepatic duct and the small intestine

  2. Probing self assembly in biological mixed colloids by SANS, deuteration and molecular manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjelm, R.P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States); Thiyagarajan, P. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States); Hoffman, A. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Alkan-Onyuksel, H. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Small-angle neutron scattering was used to obtain information on the form and molecular arrangement of particles in mixed colloids of bile salts with phosphatidylcholine, and bile salts with monoolein. Both types of systems showed the same general characteristics. The particle form was highly dependent on total lipid concentration. At the highest concentrations the particles were globular mixed micelles with an overall size of 50{Angstrom}. As the concentration was reduced the mixed micelles elongated, becoming rodlike with diameter about 50{Angstrom}. The rods had a radial core-shell structure in which the phosphatidylcholine or monoolein fatty tails were arranged radially to form the core with the headgroups pointing outward to form the shell. The bile salts were at the interface between the shell and core with the hydrophilic parts facing outward as part of the shell. The lengths of the rods increased and became more polydispersed with dilution. At sufficiently low concentrations the mixed micelles transformed into single bilayer vesicles. These results give insight on the physiological function of bile and on the rules governing the self assembly of bile particles in the hepatic duct and the small intestine.

  3. How a "pinch of salt" can tune chaotic mixing of colloidal suspensions

    CERN Document Server

    Deseigne, Julien; Stroock, Abraham D; Bocquet, Lydéric; Ybert, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Efficient mixing of colloids, particles or molecules is a central issue in many processes. It results from the complex interplay between flow deformations and molecular diffusion, which is generally assumed to control the homogenization processes. In this work we demonstrate on the contrary that despite fixed flow and self-diffusion conditions, the chaotic mixing of colloidal suspensions can be either boosted or inhibited by the sole addition of trace amount of salt as a co-mixing species. Indeed, this shows that local saline gradients can trigger a chemically-driven transport phenomenon, diffusiophoresis, which controls the rate and direction of molecular transport far more efficiently than usual Brownian diffusion. A simple model combining the elementary ingredients of chaotic mixing with diffusiophoretic transport of the colloids allows to rationalize our observations and highlights how small-scale out-of-equilibrium transport bridges to mixing at much larger scales in a very effective way. Considering cha...

  4. Experimental Aspects of Colloidal Interactions in Mixed Systems of Liposome and Inorganic Nanoparticle and Their Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Gradzielski

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In the past few years, growing attention has been devoted to the study of the interactions taking place in mixed systems of phospholipid membranes (for instance in the form of vesicles and hard nanoparticles (NPs. In this context liposomes (vesicles may serve as versatile carriers or as a model system for biological membranes. Research on these systems has led to the observation of novel hybrid structures whose morphology strongly depends on the charge, composition and size of the interacting colloidal species as well as on the nature (pH, ionic strength of their dispersing medium. A central role is played by the phase behaviour of phospholipid bilayers which have a tremendous influence on the liposome properties. Another central aspect is the incorporation of nanoparticles into vesicles, which is intimately linked to the conditions required for transporting a nanoparticle through a membrane. Herein, we review recent progress made on the investigations of the interactions in liposome/nanoparticle systems focusing on the particularly interesting structures that are formed in these hybrid systems as well as their potential applications.

  5. Formation of drug-bearing vesicles in mixed colloids of bile salts and phosphatidylcholine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjelm, R.P.; Mang, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Hofmann, A.F.; Schteingart, C. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Alkan-Onyuksel, H.; Ayd, S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1997-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors used small-angle neutron scattering to study drug interactions with mixed colloids of bile salt and phosphatidylcholine. Because the mixed colloids form liposomes spontaneously, this system is a model for drug-bile interactions that are important in understanding the efficacy of oral drug formulations and in advanced applications for liposome drug delivery systems. The authors studied particle formation in incorporation of enzymatic products formed in the gut and the effects of cholesteric drugs and taxol on vesicle formation. The studies show that particle morphology is not affected by inclusion of most cholesteric drugs and taxol, and is not affected by incorporation of the products of enzymatic action. The findings suggest that particle form is important for the physiological function of bile and they are beginning to show which drugs affect liposome formation.

  6. 9 CFR 114.6 - Mixing biological products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mixing biological products. 114.6... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS PRODUCTION REQUIREMENTS FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 114.6 Mixing biological products. Each biological product, when in liquid form,...

  7. Transformation of organic carbon, trace element, and organo-mineral colloids in the mixing zone of the largest European Arctic river

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Pokrovsky

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The estuarine behavior of organic carbon (OC and trace elements (TE was studied for the largest European sub-Arctic river, which is the Severnaya Dvina; this river is a deltaic estuary covered in ice during several hydrological seasons: summer (July 2010, 2012 and winter (March 2009 baseflow, and the November–December 2011 ice-free period. Colloidal forms of OC and TE were assessed using three pore size cutoff (1, 10, and 50 kDa using an in-situ dialysis procedure. Conventionally dissolved ( The most important result of this study is the elucidation of the behavior of the "truly" dissolved low molecular weight LMW fraction containing Fe, OC, and a number of insoluble elements. The concentration of the LMW fraction either remains constant or increases its relative contribution to the overall dissolved ( Overall, the observed decrease of the colloidal fraction may be related to the coagulation of organo-ferric colloids at the beginning of the mixing zone and therefore the replacement of the HMW1 kDa–0.22 μm portion by the LMW fraction. These patterns are highly reproducible across different sampling seasons, suggesting significant enrichment of the mixing zone by the most labile (and potentially bioavailable fraction of the OC, Fe and insoluble TE. The size fractionation of the colloidal material during estuarine mixing reflects a number of inorganic and biological processes, the relative contribution of which to element speciation varies depending on the hydrological stage and time of year. In particular, LMW ligand production in the surface horizons of the mixing zone may be linked to heterotrophic mineralization of allochthonous DOM and/or photodestruction. Given the relatively low concentration of particulate vs. dissolved load of most trace elements, desorption from the river suspended material was less pronounced than in other rivers in the world. As a result, the majority of dissolved components exhibited either a conservative (OC and

  8. Biological colloid engineering: Self-assembly of dipolar ferromagnetic chains in a functionalized biogenic ferrofluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruder, Warren C.; Hsu, Chia-Pei D.; Edelman, Brent D.; Schwartz, Russell; LeDuc, Philip R.

    2012-08-01

    We have studied the dynamic behavior of nanoparticles in ferrofluids consisting of single-domain, biogenic magnetite (Fe3O4) isolated from Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum (MS-1). Although dipolar chains form in magnetic colloids in zero applied field, when dried upon substrates, the solvent front disorders nanoparticle aggregation. Using avidin-biotin functionalization of the particles and substrate, we generated self-assembled, linear chain motifs that resist solvent front disruption in zero-field. The engineered self-assembly process we describe here provides an approach for the creation of ordered magnetic structures that could impact fields ranging from micro-electro-mechanical systems development to magnetic imaging of biological structures.

  9. Use of colloidal gold cytochemistry in the study of the basic cell biology of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willingham, M C

    1989-01-01

    We are currently investigating the morphologic aspects of two areas of the basic cell biology of cancer: tumor-specific surface antigens as targets for immunotoxins, and the phenomenon of multidrug resistance in chemotherapy of human tumors. Colloidal gold cytochemistry has provided a useful method for the electron-microscopic cytochemical detection of materials endocytosed by cells in culture. This technique has been used to study the internalization pathway of ligands bound to the surface of cancer cells, particularly antibodies for use as immunologic targeting reagents for the construction of immunotoxins. These colloidal gold conjugates with monoclonal antibodies have demonstrated the internalization of these immunologic reagents through coated pits and receptosomes, which is a necessary step in the delivery of immunotoxins into the cell where they can mediate their cell-killing functions. Morphologic methods have been employed for the screening and selection of monoclonal antibodies reactive with the surface of human ovarian cancer cells for use as immunotoxins and have demonstrated the in vivo activity of immunotoxins made with these antibodies and Pseudomonas exotoxin in a nude mouse model system. In other studies, we have employed such reagents for the immunocytochemical detection of the surface expression of P170, the cell-surface efflux pump protein responsible for the phenotype of multidrug resistance in tumor cells, and to investigate the distribution of this protein by using immunocytochemistry in normal human tissues. These results have suggested a role for P170 in normal cell membrane transport of metabolites in various organ systems.

  10. Biological colloid engineering: Self-assembly of dipolar ferromagnetic chains in a functionalized biogenic ferrofluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruder, Warren C; Hsu, Chia-Pei D; Edelman, Brent D; Schwartz, Russell; Leduc, Philip R

    2012-08-01

    We have studied the dynamic behavior of nanoparticles in ferrofluids consisting of single-domain, biogenic magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) isolated from Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum (MS-1). Although dipolar chains form in magnetic colloids in zero applied field, when dried upon substrates, the solvent front disorders nanoparticle aggregation. Using avidin-biotin functionalization of the particles and substrate, we generated self-assembled, linear chain motifs that resist solvent front disruption in zero-field. The engineered self-assembly process we describe here provides an approach for the creation of ordered magnetic structures that could impact fields ranging from micro-electro-mechanical systems development to magnetic imaging of biological structures. PMID:22952408

  11. Colloidal size spectra, composition and estuarine mixing behavior of DOM in river and estuarine waters of the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhengzhen; Stolpe, Björn; Guo, Laodong; Shiller, Alan M.

    2016-05-01

    Flow field-flow fractionation (FlFFF) coupled on-line with UV absorbance and fluorescence detectors was used to examine the colloidal composition and size distribution of optically active dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the lower Mississippi River (MR), the East Pearl River (EPR), the St. Louis Bay (SLB) estuary, and coastal waters of the northern Gulf of Mexico. In addition to field studies, laboratory mixing experiments using river and seawater end-members were carried out to study the processes controlling the estuarine mixing behavior and size partitioning of colloids with different sizes and composition. The colloidal size spectra of chromophoric DOM and humic-like DOM showed one dominant peak in the 0.5-4 nm size range, representing >75% of the total FlFFF-recoverable colloids. In contrast, protein-like DOM showed a bi-modal distribution with peaks at 0.5-4 nm and 4-8 nm, as well as a major portion (from ∼41% in the EPR to ∼72% in the Mississippi Bight) partitioned to the >20 nm size fraction. Bulk DOM was lower in abundance and molecular-weight in the MR compared with the EPR, while the proportion of colloidal protein-like DOM in the >20 nm size range was slightly larger in the MR compared with the EPR. These features are consistent with differences in land use, hydrological conditions, and water residence time between the two river basins, with more autochthonous DOM in MR waters. In the SLB estuary, different DOM components demonstrated different mixing behaviors. The abundance of colloidal chromophoric DOM decreased with increasing salinity and showed evident removal during estuarine mixing even though the bulk DOM appeared to be conservative. In contrast, colloidal humic-like DOM behaved conservatively inside SLB and during laboratory mixing experiments. The ratio of colloidal protein-like to humic-like DOM generally increased with increasing salinity, consistent with increasing autochthonous protein-like DOM and removal of terrestrially

  12. Duplication: a Mechanism Producing Disassortative Mixing Networks in Biology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Dan; LIU Zeng-Rong; WANG Jia-Zeng

    2007-01-01

    Assortative/disassortative mixing is an important topological property of a network. A network is called assortative mixing if the nodes in the network tend to connect to their connectivity peers, or disassortative mixing if nodes with low degrees are more likely to connect with high-degree nodes. We have known that biological networks such as protein-protein interaction networks (PPI), gene regulatory networks, and metabolic networks tend to be disassortative. On the other hand, in biological evolution, duplication and divergence are two fundamental processes. In order to make the relationship between the property of disassortative mixing and the two basic biological principles clear and to study the cause of the disassortative mixing property in biological networks, we present a random duplication model and an anti-preference duplication model. Our results show that disassortative mixing networks can be obtained by both kinds of models from uncorrelated initial networks.Moreover, with the growth of the network size, the disassortative mixing property becomes more obvious.

  13. Comparative Study of the Effects of Long and Short Term Biological Processes on the Cycling of Colloidal Trace Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinedo, P.; Sanudo-Wilhelmy, S. A.; West, A.

    2013-05-01

    Nanoparticle (or colloids), with sizes operationally defined as ranging from 1nm to 1000nm diameter, are thought to play an important role in metal cycling in the ocean due to their high surface area to volume ratio and abundance in marine systems. In coastal waters, the bulk of marine nanoparticles are organic, so short and long term biological processes are expected to influence the dynamics of these types of particles in marine environments. This is, in turn, expected to influence metal concentrations. Here we selected two different environments to study the influence of long-term biological events (phytoplankton blooms) and short-term biological events (diel cycles of photosynthesis and respiration) on the cycling of colloidal trace metals. We focus on Cu and Fe, both biogeochemically important metals but with differing colloidal behavior. Long term processes (West Neck Bay): A bay (West Neck Bay, Long Island) with predictable natural phytoplankton blooms, but with limited inputs of freshwater, nutrients and metals, was selected to study the partitioning of Cu and Fe between colloidal and soluble pools over the course of a bloom. During the bloom, there was a significant build-up of Cu associated with DOM accumulation and a removal of Fe via particle stripping. Fraction-specific metal concentrations, and metal accumulation and removal rates, were found to be significantly correlated with chlorophyll-a concentration and with dissolved organic matter (DOM). Short term processes (Catalina Island): To identify the cyclical variation in metal speciation during diel (24-hour) cycles of photosynthesis and respiration, we conducted a study off Catalina Island, a pristine environment where trace metal cycling is solely controlled by biological processes and changes in the phytoplankton community are well characterized. The speciation of Fe between soluble and colloidal pools showed that Fe has a high affinity for colloidal material and that the distribution between

  14. The influence of ionic strength and mixing ratio on the colloidal stability of PDAC/PSS polyelectrolyte complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanpu; Yildirim, Erol; Antila, Hanne S; Valenzuela, Luis D; Sammalkorpi, Maria; Lutkenhaus, Jodie L

    2015-10-01

    Polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) form by mixing polycation and polyanion solutions together, and have been explored for a variety of applications. One challenge for PEC processing and application is that under certain conditions the as-formed PECs aggregate and precipitate out of suspension over the course of minutes to days. This aggregation is governed by several factors such as electrostatic repulsion, van der Waals attractions, and hydrophobic interactions. In this work, we explore the boundary between colloidally stable and unstable complexes as it is influenced by polycation/polyanion mixing ratio and ionic strength. The polymers examined are poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDAC) and poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS). Physical properties such as turbidity, hydrodynamic size, and zeta potential are investigated upon complex formation. We also perform detailed molecular dynamics simulations to examine the structure and effective charge distribution of the PECs at varying mixing ratios and salt concentrations to support the experimental findings. The results suggest that the colloidally stable/unstable boundary possibly marks the screening effects from added salt, resulting in weakly charged complexes that aggregate. At higher salt concentrations, the complexes initially form and then gradually dissolve into solution.

  15. The influence of ionic strength and mixing ratio on the colloidal stability of PDAC/PSS polyelectrolyte complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanpu; Yildirim, Erol; Antila, Hanne S; Valenzuela, Luis D; Sammalkorpi, Maria; Lutkenhaus, Jodie L

    2015-10-01

    Polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) form by mixing polycation and polyanion solutions together, and have been explored for a variety of applications. One challenge for PEC processing and application is that under certain conditions the as-formed PECs aggregate and precipitate out of suspension over the course of minutes to days. This aggregation is governed by several factors such as electrostatic repulsion, van der Waals attractions, and hydrophobic interactions. In this work, we explore the boundary between colloidally stable and unstable complexes as it is influenced by polycation/polyanion mixing ratio and ionic strength. The polymers examined are poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDAC) and poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS). Physical properties such as turbidity, hydrodynamic size, and zeta potential are investigated upon complex formation. We also perform detailed molecular dynamics simulations to examine the structure and effective charge distribution of the PECs at varying mixing ratios and salt concentrations to support the experimental findings. The results suggest that the colloidally stable/unstable boundary possibly marks the screening effects from added salt, resulting in weakly charged complexes that aggregate. At higher salt concentrations, the complexes initially form and then gradually dissolve into solution. PMID:26268471

  16. Colloid Transport and Retention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Hao; Shapiro, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    different colloidal materials and their applications in chemistry, physics, biological, medical sciences and environment. Graduate students, academic and industrial researchers and medical professionals will discover recently developed colloidal materials and their applications in many areas of human...

  17. Elaboration of hybrid materials by templating with mineral liquid crystals stabilization of a mixed sol of YSZ nanoparticles and V2O5 ribbon-like colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this PhD was to investigate innovative soft chemistry ways to prepare hybrid materials with ordered nano-structures. Concretely, research were conducted on the development of a hybrid material made of an yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) matrix templated by a mineral liquid crystal, namely V2O5. In aqueous solutions, vanadium oxide exhibits ribbon-like colloids of typical dimensions 1 nm x 25 nm x 500 nm, stabilized by a strong negative surface charge. Above a critical concentration, the anisotropic colloids assemble into a nematic liquid crystal, whose domains can be oriented within the same direction over a macroscopic range under a weak magnetic field. The idea is to use V2O5 anisotropic colloids as a template for a hybrid material, taking advantage of their ordering behavior. Preliminary experiments revealed a strong reactivity between molecular compounds of zirconium and vanadium oxide. Therefore, the studies were directed toward the preparation of a mixed colloidal sol containing YSZ nanoparticles and vanadium oxide ribbon-like colloids, as a precursor sol for the intended hybrid material. The YSZ nanoparticles are obtained through an outstanding hydrothermal synthesis leading to a stable suspension of nanocrystalline particles of ca. 5 nm, in pure water. Providing a mixed sol of YSZ and V2O5 is a key challenge for it implies the co-stabilization of two types of colloids having different shape, size and surface properties. Besides, the existence of V2O5 in its ribbon-like form requires acidic conditions and very low ionic strength. The first part of this work was then dedicated to the study of electro-steric stabilization of zirconia suspension by addition of acidic poly-electrolytes. Different polymers with carboxylic and/or sulfonic acidic functions were investigated. Based on zeta potential measurements and adsorption isotherms, the influence of molecular weight and polymer charge were discussed. Among the studied polymers, poly vinylsulfonic

  18. Numerical issues for coupling biological models with isopycnal mixing schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanadesikan, Anand

    1999-01-01

    In regions of sloping isopycnals, isopycnal mixing acting in conjunction with biological cycling can produce patterns in the nutrient field which have negative values of tracer in light water and unrealistically large values of tracer in dense water. Under certain circumstances, these patterns can start to grow unstably. This paper discusses why such behavior occurs. Using a simple four-box model, it demonstrates that the instability appears when the isopycnal slopes exceed the grid aspect ratio ( Δz/ Δx). In contrast to other well known instabilities of the CFL type, this instability does not depend on the time step or time-stepping scheme. Instead it arises from a fundamental incompatibility between two requirements for isopycnal mixing schemes, namely that they should produce no net flux of passive tracer across an isopycnal and everywhere reduce tracer extrema. In order to guarantee no net flux of tracer across an isopycnal, some upgradient fluxes across certain parts of an isopycnal are required to balance downgradient fluxes across other parts of the isopycnal. However, these upgradient fluxes can cause local maxima in the nutrient field to become self-reinforcing. Although this is less of a problem in larger domains, there is still a strong tendency for isopycnal mixing to overconcentrate tracer in the dense water. The introduction of eddy-induced advection is shown to be capable of counteracting the upgradient fluxes of nutrient which cause problems, stabilizing the solution. The issue is not simply a numerical curiosity. When used in a GCM, different parameterizations of eddy mixing result in noticeably different distributions of nutrient and large differences in biological production. While much of this is attributable to differences in convection and circulation, the numerical errors described here may also play an important role in runs with isopycnal mixing alone.

  19. Biological vs. physical mixing effects on benthic food web dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Braeckman

    Full Text Available Biological particle mixing (bioturbation and solute transfer (bio-irrigation contribute extensively to ecosystem functioning in sediments where physical mixing is low. Macrobenthos transports oxygen and organic matter deeper into the sediment, thereby likely providing favourable niches to lower trophic levels (i.e., smaller benthic animals such as meiofauna and bacteria and thus stimulating mineralisation. Whether this biological transport facilitates fresh organic matter assimilation by the metazoan lower part of the food web through niche establishment (i.e., ecosystem engineering or rather deprives them from food sources, is so far unclear. We investigated the effects of the ecosystem engineers Lanice conchilega (bio-irrigator and Abra alba (bioturbator compared to abiotic physical mixing events on survival and food uptake of nematodes after a simulated phytoplankton bloom. The (13C labelled diatom Skeletonema costatum was added to 4 treatments: (1 microcosms containing the bioturbator, (2 microcosms containing the bio-irrigator, (3 control microcosms and (4 microcosms with abiotic manual surface mixing. Nematode survival and subsurface peaks in nematode density profiles were most pronounced in the bio-irrigator treatment. However, nematode specific uptake (Δδ(13C of the added diatoms was highest in the physical mixing treatment, where macrobenthos was absent and the diatom (13C was homogenised. Overall, nematodes fed preferentially on bulk sedimentary organic material rather than the added diatoms. The total C budget (µg C m(-2, which included TO(13C remaining in the sediment, respiration, nematode and macrobenthic uptake, highlighted the limited assimilation by the metazoan benthos and the major role of bacterial respiration. In summary, bioturbation and especially bio-irrigation facilitated the lower trophic levels mainly over the long-term through niche establishment. Since the freshly added diatoms represented only a limited food

  20. Biological vs. physical mixing effects on benthic food web dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braeckman, Ulrike; Provoost, Pieter; Moens, Tom; Soetaert, Karline; Middelburg, Jack J; Vincx, Magda; Vanaverbeke, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Biological particle mixing (bioturbation) and solute transfer (bio-irrigation) contribute extensively to ecosystem functioning in sediments where physical mixing is low. Macrobenthos transports oxygen and organic matter deeper into the sediment, thereby likely providing favourable niches to lower trophic levels (i.e., smaller benthic animals such as meiofauna and bacteria) and thus stimulating mineralisation. Whether this biological transport facilitates fresh organic matter assimilation by the metazoan lower part of the food web through niche establishment (i.e., ecosystem engineering) or rather deprives them from food sources, is so far unclear. We investigated the effects of the ecosystem engineers Lanice conchilega (bio-irrigator) and Abra alba (bioturbator) compared to abiotic physical mixing events on survival and food uptake of nematodes after a simulated phytoplankton bloom. The (13)C labelled diatom Skeletonema costatum was added to 4 treatments: (1) microcosms containing the bioturbator, (2) microcosms containing the bio-irrigator, (3) control microcosms and (4) microcosms with abiotic manual surface mixing. Nematode survival and subsurface peaks in nematode density profiles were most pronounced in the bio-irrigator treatment. However, nematode specific uptake (Δδ(13)C) of the added diatoms was highest in the physical mixing treatment, where macrobenthos was absent and the diatom (13)C was homogenised. Overall, nematodes fed preferentially on bulk sedimentary organic material rather than the added diatoms. The total C budget (µg C m(-2)), which included TO(13)C remaining in the sediment, respiration, nematode and macrobenthic uptake, highlighted the limited assimilation by the metazoan benthos and the major role of bacterial respiration. In summary, bioturbation and especially bio-irrigation facilitated the lower trophic levels mainly over the long-term through niche establishment. Since the freshly added diatoms represented only a limited food source

  1. Probing droplets with biological colloidal suspensions on smart surfaces by synchrotron radiation micro- and nano-beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinaro, G.; Accardo, A.; Benseny-Cases, N.; Burghammer, M.; Castillo-Michel, H.; Cotte, M.; Dante, S.; De Angelis, F.; Di Cola, E.; Di Fabrizio, E.; Hauser, C.; Riekel, C.

    2016-01-01

    Droplets with colloidal biological suspensions evaporating on substrates with defined wetting properties generate confined environments for initiating aggregation and self-assembly processes. We describe smart micro- and nanostructured surfaces, optimized for probing single droplets and residues by synchrotron radiation micro- and nanobeam diffraction techniques. Applications are presented for Ac-IVD and β-amyloid (1-42) peptides capable of forming cross-β sheet structures. Complementary synchrotron radiation FTIR microspectroscopy addresses secondary structure formation. The high synchrotron radiation source brilliance enables fast raster-scan experiments.

  2. Probing droplets with biological colloidal suspensions on smart surfaces by synchrotron radiation micro- and nano-beams

    KAUST Repository

    Marinaro, Giovanni

    2015-03-01

    Droplets with colloidal biological suspensions evaporating on substrates with defined wetting properties generate confined environments for initiating aggregation and self-assembly processes. We describe smart micro- and nanostructured surfaces, optimized for probing single droplets and residues by synchrotron radiation micro- and nanobeam diffraction techniques. Applications are presented for Ac-IVD and β-amyloid (1-42) peptides capable of forming cross-β sheet structures. Complementary synchrotron radiation FTIR microspectroscopy addresses secondary structure formation. The high synchrotron radiation source brilliance enables fast raster-scan experiments. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Biological alkylation and colloid formation of selenium in methanogenic UASB reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenz, M.; Smit, M.P.J.; Binder, P.; Aelst, van A.C.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2008-01-01

    Bioalkylation and colloid formation of selenium during selenate removal in upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) bioreactors was investigated, The mesophilic (30 degrees C) UASB reactor (pH = 7.0) was operated for 175 d with lactate as electron donor at an organic loading rate of 2 g COD L-1 d(-1) and

  4. Colloid dynamics and transport of major elements through a boreal river - brackish bay mixing zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Ö.; Widerlund, A.; Andersson, P.;

    2000-01-01

    A range of biogeochemical methodologies were applied to investigate how aggregation processes affected the phase distribution and mixing of Fe, Si, and organic carbon between the Kalix River and the Bothnic Bay, northernmost Baltic Sea salinityF3; the low-salinity zone LSZ. was stretching over 60...... similar to that of neighboring Russian Arctic rivers, is hypothesized to result from a comparatively high organic-to-detrital matter characteristic of the aggregates. While first principles would indeed suggest that decreasing electrostatic repulsion during mixing lead to aggregation, a low specific...... density of mineral-poor amorphous organic aggregates may lead to transport of these authigenic particles further away from the river mouth. The role of detrital ‘‘sinkers’’ on vertical removal of suspended organic matter is discussed in the wider context of scavenging mechanisms in the ocean. q2000...

  5. Biological colloid engineering: Self-assembly of dipolar ferromagnetic chains in a functionalized biogenic ferrofluid

    OpenAIRE

    Ruder, Warren C.; Hsu, Chia-Pei D.; Edelman, Brent D.; Schwartz, Russell; Leduc, Philip R.

    2012-01-01

    We have studied the dynamic behavior of nanoparticles in ferrofluids consisting of single-domain, biogenic magnetite (Fe3O4) isolated from Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum (MS-1). Although dipolar chains form in magnetic colloids in zero applied field, when dried upon substrates, the solvent front disorders nanoparticle aggregation. Using avidin-biotin functionalization of the particles and substrate, we generated self-assembled, linear chain motifs that resist solvent front disruption in zer...

  6. PEGylation of SPIONs by polycondensation reactions: a new strategy to improve colloidal stability in biological media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viali, Wesley Renato; Silva Nunes, Eloiza da; Santos, Caio Carvalho dos [Universidade Estadual Paulista, Laboratorio de Materiais Magneticos e Coloides, Departamento de Fisico-quimica, Instituto de Quimica (Brazil); Silva, Sebastiao William da; Aragon, Fermin Herrera; Coaquira, Jose Antonio Huamani; Morais, Paulo Cesar [Universidade de Brasilia, Instituto de Fisica, Nucleo de Fisica Aplicada (Brazil); Jafelicci, Miguel, E-mail: jafeli@iq.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista, Laboratorio de Materiais Magneticos e Coloides, Departamento de Fisico-quimica, Instituto de Quimica (Brazil)

    2013-08-15

    In this study, we report on a new route of PEGylation of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) by polycondensation reaction with carboxylate groups. Structural and magnetic characterizations were performed by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). The XRD confirmed the spinel structure with a crystallite average diameter in the range of 3.5-4.1 nm in good agreement with the average diameter obtained by TEM (4.60-4.97 nm). The TGA data indicate the presence of PEG attached onto the SPIONs' surface. The SPIONs were superparamagnetic at room temperature with saturation magnetization (M{sub S}) from 36.7 to 54.1 emu/g. The colloidal stability of citrate- and PEG-coated SPIONs was evaluated by means of dynamic light scattering measurements as a function of pH, ionic strength, and nature of dispersion media (phosphate buffer and cell culture media). Our findings demonstrated that the PEG polymer chain length plays a key role in the coagulation behavior of the Mag-PEG suspensions. The excellent colloidal stability under the extreme conditions we evaluated, such as high ionic strength, pH near the isoelectric point, and cell culture media, revealed that suspensions comprising PEG-coated SPION, with PEG of molecular weight 600 and above, present steric stabilization attributed to the polymer chains attached onto the surface of SPIONs.

  7. Nanoparticle sensor for label free detection of swine DNA in mixed biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, M E; Hashim, U [Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering (INNE), Universiti Malaysia Perlis, Lot 104-108, Tingkat 1, Block A, Taman Pertiwi Indah, Jalan Kangar-Alor Star, Seriab, 01000 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Mustafa, S; Che Man, Y B; Yusop, M H M [Halal Products Research Institute, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Bari, M F [School of Materials Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, Seriab 01000, Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Islam, Kh N [Department of Preclinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Hasan, M F, E-mail: uda@unimap.edu.my [Department of Crop Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2011-05-13

    We used 40 {+-} 5 nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as colorimetric sensor to visually detect swine-specific conserved sequence and nucleotide mismatch in PCR-amplified and non-amplified mitochondrial DNA mixtures to authenticate species. Colloidal GNPs changed color from pinkish-red to gray-purple in 2 mM PBS. Visually observed results were clearly reflected by the dramatic reduction of surface plasmon resonance peak at 530 nm and the appearance of new features in the 620-800 nm regions in their absorption spectra. The particles were stabilized against salt-induced aggregation upon the adsorption of single-stranded DNA. The PCR products, without any additional processing, were hybridized with a 17-base probe prior to exposure to GNPs. At a critical annealing temperature (55 {sup 0}C) that differentiated matched and mismatched base pairing, the probe was hybridized to pig PCR product and dehybridized from the deer product. The dehybridized probe stuck to GNPs to prevent them from salt-induced aggregation and retained their characteristic red color. Hybridization of a 27-nucleotide probe to swine mitochondrial DNA identified them in pork-venison, pork-shad and venison-shad binary admixtures, eliminating the need of PCR amplification. Thus the assay was applied to authenticate species both in PCR-amplified and non-amplified heterogeneous biological samples. The results were determined visually and validated by absorption spectroscopy. The entire assay (hybridization plus visual detection) was performed in less than 10 min. The LOD (for genomic DNA) of the assay was 6 {mu}g ml{sup -1} swine DNA in mixed meat samples. We believe the assay can be applied for species assignment in food analysis, mismatch detection in genetic screening and homology studies between closely related species.

  8. Nanoparticle sensor for label free detection of swine DNA in mixed biological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M. E.; Hashim, U.; Mustafa, S.; Che Man, Y. B.; Yusop, M. H. M.; Bari, M. F.; Islam, Kh N.; Hasan, M. F.

    2011-05-01

    We used 40 ± 5 nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as colorimetric sensor to visually detect swine-specific conserved sequence and nucleotide mismatch in PCR-amplified and non-amplified mitochondrial DNA mixtures to authenticate species. Colloidal GNPs changed color from pinkish-red to gray-purple in 2 mM PBS. Visually observed results were clearly reflected by the dramatic reduction of surface plasmon resonance peak at 530 nm and the appearance of new features in the 620-800 nm regions in their absorption spectra. The particles were stabilized against salt-induced aggregation upon the adsorption of single-stranded DNA. The PCR products, without any additional processing, were hybridized with a 17-base probe prior to exposure to GNPs. At a critical annealing temperature (55 °C) that differentiated matched and mismatched base pairing, the probe was hybridized to pig PCR product and dehybridized from the deer product. The dehybridized probe stuck to GNPs to prevent them from salt-induced aggregation and retained their characteristic red color. Hybridization of a 27-nucleotide probe to swine mitochondrial DNA identified them in pork-venison, pork-shad and venison-shad binary admixtures, eliminating the need of PCR amplification. Thus the assay was applied to authenticate species both in PCR-amplified and non-amplified heterogeneous biological samples. The results were determined visually and validated by absorption spectroscopy. The entire assay (hybridization plus visual detection) was performed in less than 10 min. The LOD (for genomic DNA) of the assay was 6 µg ml - 1 swine DNA in mixed meat samples. We believe the assay can be applied for species assignment in food analysis, mismatch detection in genetic screening and homology studies between closely related species.

  9. Formation and colloidal behaviour of elemental sulphur produced from the biological oxidation of hydrogensulphide.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, A.J.H.

    1996-01-01

    The formation and aggregation of elemental sulphur from the microbiological oxidation of hydrogensulphide (H 2 S) by a mixed population of aerobic Thiobacillus -like bacteria has been investigated. Sulphide is formed during the anaerobic treatment of wastewaters whi

  10. Formation and colloidal behaviour of elemental sulphur produced from the biological oxidation of hydrogensulphide.

    OpenAIRE

    Janssen, A.J.H.

    1996-01-01

    The formation and aggregation of elemental sulphur from the microbiological oxidation of hydrogensulphide (H 2 S) by a mixed population of aerobic Thiobacillus -like bacteria has been investigated. Sulphide is formed during the anaerobic treatment of wastewaters which contain oxidized sulphur compounds such as thiosulphate, sulphite and sulphate. This sulphide has to be removed from the effluent solution of anaerobic reactors because of its detrimental characteristics e.g. toxicity, corrosive...

  11. Colloidal organization

    CERN Document Server

    Okubo, Tsuneo

    2015-01-01

    Colloidal Organization presents a chemical and physical study on colloidal organization phenomena including equilibrium systems such as colloidal crystallization, drying patterns as an example of a dissipative system and similar sized aggregation. This book outlines the fundamental science behind colloid and surface chemistry and the findings from the author's own laboratory. The text goes on to discuss in-depth colloidal crystallization, gel crystallization, drying dissipative structures of solutions, suspensions and gels, and similar-sized aggregates from nanosized particles. Special emphas

  12. Biological treatment of concentrated hazardous, toxic, and radionuclide mixed wastes without dilution

    OpenAIRE

    Stringfellow, William T.; Komada, Tatsuyuki; Chang, Li-Yang

    2004-01-01

    Approximately 10 percent of all radioactive wastes produced in the U. S. are mixed with hazardous or toxic chemicals and therefore can not be placed in secure land disposal facilities. Mixed wastes containing hazardous organic chemicals are often incinerated, but volatile radioactive elements are released directly into the biosphere. Some mixed wastes do not currently have any identified disposal option and are stored locally awaiting new developments. Biological treatment has been propo...

  13. Stories of staying and leaving: A mixed methods analysis of biology undergraduate choice, persistence, and departure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Sarah Adrienne

    Using a sequential, explanatory mixed methods design, this dissertation study compared students who persist in the biology major (persisters) with students who leave the biology major (switchers) in terms of how their pre-college experiences, college biology experiences, and biology performance figured into their choice of biology and their persistence in or departure from the biology major. This study combined (1) quantitative comparisons of biology persisters and switchers via a questionnaire developed for the study and survival analysis of a larger population of biology freshmen with (2) qualitative comparison of biology switchers and persisters via semi-structured life story interviews and homogenous focus groups. 319 students (207 persisters and 112 switchers) participated in the questionnaire and 36 students (20 persisters and 16 switchers) participated in life story and focus group interviews. All participants were undergraduates who entered The University of Texas at Austin as biology freshmen in the fall semesters of 2000 through 2004. Findings of this study suggest: (1) Regardless of eventual major, biology students enter college with generally the same suite of experiences, sources of personal encouragement, and reasons for choosing the biology major; (2) Despite the fact that they have also had poor experiences in the major, biology persisters do not actively decide to stay in the biology major; they simply do not leave; (3) Based upon survival analysis, biology students are most at-risk of leaving the biology major during the first two years of college and if they are African-American or Latino, women, or seeking a Bachelor of Arts degree (rather than a Bachelor of Science); (4) Biology switchers do not leave biology due to preference for other disciplines; they leave due to difficulties or dissatisfaction with aspects of the biology major, including their courses, faculty, and peers; (5) Biology performance has a differential effect on persistence in

  14. Biological treatment of concentrated hazardous, toxic, and radionuclide mixed wastes without dilution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Approximately 10 percent of all radioactive wastes produced in the U. S. are mixed with hazardous or toxic chemicals and therefore can not be placed in secure land disposal facilities. Mixed wastes containing hazardous organic chemicals are often incinerated, but volatile radioactive elements are released directly into the biosphere. Some mixed wastes do not currently have any identified disposal option and are stored locally awaiting new developments. Biological treatment has been proposed as a potentially safer alternative to incineration for the treatment of hazardous organic mixed wastes, since biological treatment would not release volatile radioisotopes and the residual low-level radioactive waste would no longer be restricted from land disposal. Prior studies have shown that toxicity associated with acetonitrile is a significant limiting factor for the application of biotreatment to mixed wastes and excessive dilution was required to avoid inhibition of biological treatment. In this study, we demonstrate that a novel reactor configuration, where the concentrated toxic waste is drip-fed into a complete-mix bioreactor containing a pre-concentrated active microbial population, can be used to treat a surrogate acetonitrile mixed waste stream without excessive dilution. Using a drip-feed bioreactor, we were able to treat a 90,000 mg/L acetonitrile solution to less than 0.1 mg/L final concentration using a dilution factor of only 3.4. It was determined that the acetonitrile degradation reaction was inhibited at a pH above 7.2 and that the reactor could be modeled using conventional kinetic and mass balance approaches. Using a drip-feed reactor configuration addresses a major limiting factor (toxic inhibition) for the biological treatment of toxic, hazardous, or radioactive mixed wastes and suggests that drip-feed bioreactors could be used to treat other concentrated toxic waste streams, such as chemical warfare materiel

  15. Mixed cropping systems for biological control of weeds and pests in organic oilseed crops

    OpenAIRE

    Paulsen, Hans Marten; Schochow, Martin; Ulber, B; Kühne, Stefan; Rahmann, Gerold

    2006-01-01

    Agricultural advantages of mixed cropping are gained by biological effects like light competition, offering weed-suppressing capacities or by diversification of plant covers to break development cycles of pests. In a two-year project on mixed cropping with organic oilseed crops these effects were measured. It was found that weeds can be efficiently suppressed in organic linseed (Linum usitatissivum) in crop combinations with wheat (Triticum aestivum) or false flax (Camelina sativa). But linse...

  16. Biological treatment of concentrated hazardous, toxic, andradionuclide mixed wastes without dilution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stringfellow, William T.; Komada, Tatsuyuki; Chang, Li-Yang

    2004-06-15

    Approximately 10 percent of all radioactive wastes produced in the U. S. are mixed with hazardous or toxic chemicals and therefore can not be placed in secure land disposal facilities. Mixed wastes containing hazardous organic chemicals are often incinerated, but volatile radioactive elements are released directly into the biosphere. Some mixed wastes do not currently have any identified disposal option and are stored locally awaiting new developments. Biological treatment has been proposed as a potentially safer alternative to incineration for the treatment of hazardous organic mixed wastes, since biological treatment would not release volatile radioisotopes and the residual low-level radioactive waste would no longer be restricted from land disposal. Prior studies have shown that toxicity associated with acetonitrile is a significant limiting factor for the application of biotreatment to mixed wastes and excessive dilution was required to avoid inhibition of biological treatment. In this study, we demonstrate that a novel reactor configuration, where the concentrated toxic waste is drip-fed into a complete-mix bioreactor containing a pre-concentrated active microbial population, can be used to treat a surrogate acetonitrile mixed waste stream without excessive dilution. Using a drip-feed bioreactor, we were able to treat a 90,000 mg/L acetonitrile solution to less than 0.1 mg/L final concentration using a dilution factor of only 3.4. It was determined that the acetonitrile degradation reaction was inhibited at a pH above 7.2 and that the reactor could be modeled using conventional kinetic and mass balance approaches. Using a drip-feed reactor configuration addresses a major limiting factor (toxic inhibition) for the biological treatment of toxic, hazardous, or radioactive mixed wastes and suggests that drip-feed bioreactors could be used to treat other concentrated toxic waste streams, such as chemical warfare materiel.

  17. EDITORIAL: Colloidal suspensions Colloidal suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petukhov, Andrei; Kegel, Willem; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    Colloid-polymer mixtures and depletion interactions Phase stability of a reversible supramolecular polymer solution mixed with nanospheres Remco Tuinier When depletion goes critical Roberto Piazza, Stefano Buzzaccaro, Alberto Parola and Jader Colombo Tuning the demixing of colloid-polymer systems through the dispersing solvent E A G Jamie, R P A Dullens and D G A L Aarts Polydispersity effects in colloid-polymer mixtures S M Liddle, T Narayanan and W C K Poon Colloidal dynamics and crystallization Crystallization and aging in hard-sphere glasses C Valeriani, E Sanz, E Zaccarelli, W C K Poon, M E Cates and P N Pusey Real-time monitoring of complex moduli from micro-rheology Taiki Yanagishima, Daan Frenkel, Jurij Kotar and Erika Eiser Brownian motion of a self-propelled particle B ten Hagen, S van Teeffelen and H Löwen Crystallization in suspensions of hard spheres: a Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulation study T Schilling, S Dorosz, H J Schöpe and G Opletal Structural signature of slow dynamics and dynamic heterogeneity in two-dimensional colloidal liquids: glassy structural order Takeshi Kawasaki and Hajime Tanaka

  18. Crack formation and prevention in colloidal drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Young; Cho, Kun; Ryu, Seul-a; Kim, So Youn; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-01-01

    Crack formation is a frequent result of residual stress release from colloidal films made by the evaporation of colloidal droplets containing nanoparticles. Crack prevention is a significant task in industrial applications such as painting and inkjet printing with colloidal nanoparticles. Here, we illustrate how colloidal drops evaporate and how crack generation is dependent on the particle size and initial volume fraction, through direct visualization of the individual colloids with confocal laser microscopy. To prevent crack formation, we suggest use of a versatile method to control the colloid-polymer interactions by mixing a nonadsorbing polymer with the colloidal suspension, which is known to drive gelation of the particles with short-range attraction. Gelation-driven crack prevention is a feasible and simple method to obtain crack-free, uniform coatings through drying-mediated assembly of colloidal nanoparticles. PMID:26279317

  19. Preservice Teachers' Epistemological Beliefs in Physics, Chemistry, and Biology: A Mixed Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topcu, Mustafa Sami

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of the study were to assess preservice teachers' domain-specific epistemological beliefs and to investigate whether preservice teachers distinguish disciplinary differences (physics, chemistry, and biology) in domain-specific epistemological beliefs. Mixed-method research design guided the present research. The researcher explored…

  20. The immersion freezing behavior of mineral dust particles mixed with biological substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustin-Bauditz, S.; Wex, H.; Denjean, C.; Hartmann, S.; Schneider, J.; Schmidt, S.; Ebert, M.; Stratmann, F.

    2015-10-01

    Biological particles such as bacteria, fungal spores or pollen are known to be efficient ice nucleating particles. Their ability to nucleate ice is due to ice nucleation active macromolecules (INM). It has been suggested that these INM maintain their nucleating ability even when they are separated from their original carriers. This opens the possibility of an accumulation of such INM in e.g., soils, resulting in an internal mixture of mineral dust and INM. If particles from such soils which contain biological INM are then dispersed into the atmosphere due to wind erosion or agricultural processes, they could induce ice nucleation at temperatures typical for biological substances, i.e., above -20 up to almost 0 °C. To explore this hypothesis, we performed a measurement campaign within the research unit INUIT, where we investigated the ice nucleation behavior of mineral dust particles internally mixed with INM. Specifically, we mixed a pure mineral dust sample (illite-NX) with ice active biological material (birch pollen washing water) and quantified the immersion freezing behavior of the resulting particles utilizing the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS). To characterize the mixing state of the generated aerosol we used different methods which will also be discussed. We found that internally mixed particles, containing ice active biological material, follow the ice nucleation behavior observed for the purely biological particles, i.e. freezing occurs at temperatures at which mineral dusts themselves are not yet ice active. It can be concluded that INM located on a mineral dust particle determine the freezing behavior of that particle.

  1. The immersion freezing behavior of mineral dust particles mixed with biological substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Augustin-Bauditz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Biological particles such as bacteria, fungal spores or pollen are known to be efficient ice nucleating particles. Their ability to nucleate ice is due to ice nucleation active macromolecules (INM. It has been suggested that these INM maintain their nucleating ability even when they are separated from their original carriers. This opens the possibility of an accumulation of such INM in e.g., soils, resulting in an internal mixture of mineral dust and INM. If particles from such soils which contain biological INM are then dispersed into the atmosphere due to wind erosion or agricultural processes, they could induce ice nucleation at temperatures typical for biological substances, i.e., above −20 up to almost 0 °C. To explore this hypothesis, we performed a measurement campaign within the research unit INUIT, where we investigated the ice nucleation behavior of mineral dust particles internally mixed with INM. Specifically, we mixed a pure mineral dust sample (illite-NX with ice active biological material (birch pollen washing water and quantified the immersion freezing behavior of the resulting particles utilizing the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS. To characterize the mixing state of the generated aerosol we used different methods which will also be discussed. We found that internally mixed particles, containing ice active biological material, follow the ice nucleation behavior observed for the purely biological particles, i.e. freezing occurs at temperatures at which mineral dusts themselves are not yet ice active. It can be concluded that INM located on a mineral dust particle determine the freezing behavior of that particle.

  2. Colloidal superballs

    OpenAIRE

    Rossi, L.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is organized in four parts as follows. Part 1 focuses on the synthetic aspects of the colloidal model systems that will be used throughout the work described in this thesis. In Chapter 2 we describe synthetic procedures for the preparation of polycrystalline hematite superballs and superellipsoids. The internal structure of the particles is also investigated and will be used later to understand the magnetic properties of colloidal hematite. The same hematite particles are used as ...

  3. Topological colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Liu, Qingkun; He, Sailing; Kamien, Randall D; Kusner, Robert B; Lubensky, Tom C; Smalyukh, Ivan I

    2013-01-10

    Smoke, fog, jelly, paints, milk and shaving cream are common everyday examples of colloids, a type of soft matter consisting of tiny particles dispersed in chemically distinct host media. Being abundant in nature, colloids also find increasingly important applications in science and technology, ranging from direct probing of kinetics in crystals and glasses to fabrication of third-generation quantum-dot solar cells. Because naturally occurring colloids have a shape that is typically determined by minimization of interfacial tension (for example, during phase separation) or faceted crystal growth, their surfaces tend to have minimum-area spherical or topologically equivalent shapes such as prisms and irregular grains (all continuously deformable--homeomorphic--to spheres). Although toroidal DNA condensates and vesicles with different numbers of handles can exist and soft matter defects can be shaped as rings and knots, the role of particle topology in colloidal systems remains unexplored. Here we fabricate and study colloidal particles with different numbers of handles and genus g ranging from 1 to 5. When introduced into a nematic liquid crystal--a fluid made of rod-like molecules that spontaneously align along the so-called 'director'--these particles induce three-dimensional director fields and topological defects dictated by colloidal topology. Whereas electric fields, photothermal melting and laser tweezing cause transformations between configurations of particle-induced structures, three-dimensional nonlinear optical imaging reveals that topological charge is conserved and that the total charge of particle-induced defects always obeys predictions of the Gauss-Bonnet and Poincaré-Hopf index theorems. This allows us to establish and experimentally test the procedure for assignment and summation of topological charges in three-dimensional director fields. Our findings lay the groundwork for new applications of colloids and liquid crystals that range from

  4. Surface mixing and biological activity in the four Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Rossi

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS are characterized by a high productivity of plankton associated with large commercial fisheries, thus playing key biological and socio-economical roles. Since they are populated by several physical oceanic structures such as filaments and eddies, which interact with the biological processes, it is a major challenge to study this sub- and mesoscale activity in connection with the chlorophyll distribution. The aim of this work is to make a comparative study of these four upwelling systems focussing on their surface stirring, using the Finite Size Lyapunov Exponents (FSLEs, and their biological activity, based on satellite data. First, the spatial distribution of horizontal mixing is analysed from time averages and from probability density functions of FSLEs, which allow us to divide each areas in two different subsystems. Then we studied the temporal variability of surface stirring focussing on the annual and seasonal cycle. We also proposed a ranking of the four EBUS based on the averaged mixing intensity. When investigating the links with chlorophyll concentration, the previous subsystems reveal distinct biological signatures. There is a global negative correlation between surface horizontal mixing and chlorophyll standing stocks over the four areas. To try to better understand this inverse relationship, we consider the vertical dimension by looking at the Ekman-transport and vertical velocities. We suggest the possibility of a changing response of the phytoplankton to sub/mesoscale turbulence, from a negative effect in the very productive coastal areas to a positive one in the open ocean. This study provides new insights for the understanding of the variable biological productivity in the ocean, which results from both dynamics of the marine ecosystem and of the 3-D turbulent medium.

  5. Radioactive colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different techniques for the characterization of radioactive colloids, used in nuclear medicine, have been evaluated and compared. Several radioactive colloids have been characterized in vitro and in vivo and tested experimentally. Colloid biokinetics following interstitial or intravenous injection were evaluated with a scintillation camera technique. Lymphoscintigraphy with a Tc-99-labelled antimony sulphur colloid was performed in 32 patients with malignant melanoma in order to evaluate the technique. Based on the biokinetic results, absorbed doses in tissues and organs were calculated. The function of the reticuloendothelial system has been evaluated in rats after inoculation with tumour cells. Microfiltration and photon correlation spectroscopy were found to be suitable in determining activity-size and particle size distributions, respectively. Maximal lymph node uptake following subcutaneous injection was found to correspond to a colloid particle size between 10 and 50 nm. Lymphoscintigraphy was found to be useful in the study of lymphatic drainage from the primary tumour site in patients with malignant melanoma on the trunk. Quantitative analysis of ilio-inguinal lymph node uptake in patients with malignant melanoma on the lower extremities was, however, found to be of no value for the detection of metastatic disease in lymph nodes. High absorbed doses may be received in lymph nodes (up to 1 mGy/MBq) and at the injection site (about 10 mGy/MBq). In an experimental study it was found that the relative colloid uptake in bone marrow and spleen depended on the total number of intravenously injected particles. This may considerably affect the absorbed dose in these organs. (author)

  6. Colloidal nematostatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Pergamenshchik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We give a review of the theory of large distance colloidal interaction via the nematic director field. The new area of nematic colloidal systems (or nematic emulsions has been guided by the analogy between the colloidal nematostatics and electrostatics. The elastic charge density representation of the colloidal nematostatics [V.M. Pergamenshchik, V.O. Uzunova, Eur. Phys. J. E, 2007, 23, 161; Phys. Rev. E, 2007, 76, 011707] develops this analogy at the level of charge density and Coulomb interaction. The analogy is shown to lie in common mathematics based on the solutions of Laplace equation. However, the 3d colloidal nematostatics substantially differs from electrostatics both in its mathematical structure and physical implications. The elastic charge is a vector fully determined by the torque exerted upon colloid, the role of Gauss' theorem is played by conservation of the torque components. Elastic multipoles consist of two tensors (dyads. Formulas for the elastic multipoles, the Coulomb-like, dipole-dipole, and quadrupole-quadrupole pair interaction potentials are derived and illustrated by particular examples. Based on the tensorial structure, we list possible types of elastic dipoles and quadrupoles. An elastic dipole is characterized by its isotropic strength, anisotropy, chirality, and its longitudinal component. An elastic quadrupole can be uniaxial and biaxial. Relation between the multipole type and its symmetry is discussed, sketches of some types of multipoles are given. Using the mirror image method of electrostatics as a guiding idea, we develop the mirror image method in nematostatics for arbitrary director tilt at the wall. The method is applied to the charge-wall and dipole-wall interaction.

  7. Colloidal superballs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossi, L.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is organized in four parts as follows. Part 1 focuses on the synthetic aspects of the colloidal model systems that will be used throughout the work described in this thesis. In Chapter 2 we describe synthetic procedures for the preparation of polycrystalline hematite superballs and super

  8. The reduction of biological production induced by mesoscale mixing: a modelling study in the Benguela upwelling

    CERN Document Server

    Hernández-Carrasco, Ismael; Hernández-García, Emilio; Garçon, Veronique; López, Cristóbal

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies, both based on remote sensed data and coupled models, showed a reduction of biological productivity due to vigorous horizontal mixing in upwelling systems. In order to better understand this phenomenon, we have considered a system of oceanic flow in the Benguela area coupled with a simple biogeochemical model of Nutrient-Phyto-Zooplankton (NPZ) type. For the flow three different surface velocity fields are considered: one derived from satellite altimetry data, and the other two from a regional numerical model at two different spatial resolutions. We computed horizontal particle dispersion in terms of Lyapunov Exponents, and analyzed their correlations with phytoplankton concentrations. Our modelling approach confirms that in the south Benguela, there is a reduction of biological activity when stirring is increased. Two-dimensional offshore advection seems to be the dominant process involved. In the northern area, other factors not taken into account in our simulation are influencing the ecosyst...

  9. Integrative Approach for Producing Hydrogen and Polyhydroxyalkanoate from Mixed Wastes of Biological Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sanjay K S; Lee, Jung-Kul; Kalia, Vipin C

    2016-09-01

    In this study, an integrative approach to produce biohydrogen (H2) and polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) from the wastes of biological origin was investigated. A defined set of mixed cultures was used for hydrolysis and the hydrolysates were used to produce H2. The effluent from H2 production stage was used for PHA production. Under batch culture, a maximum of 62 l H2/kg of pure potato peels (Total solid, TS 2 %, w/v) and 54 l H2/kg of mixed biowastes (MBW1) was recorded. Using effluent from the H2 production stage of biowaste mixture (MBW1), Bacillus cereus EGU43 could produce 195 mg PHA/l and 15.6 % (w/w). Further, supplementation of GM-2 medium (0.1×) and glucose (0.5 %) in H2 production stage effluents, resulted in significant improvements of up to 11 and 41.7 % of PHA contents, respectively. An improvement of 3.9- and 17-fold in PHA yields as compared to with and without integrative H2 production from the MBW1 has been recorded. This integrative approach seems to be a suitable process to improve the yields of H2 and PHA by mixing biowastes. PMID:27407293

  10. Mixing regime as a key factor to determine DON formation in drinking water biological treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Changqing; Li, Shuai; Gong, Song; Yuan, Shoujun; Yu, Xin

    2015-11-01

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) can act as precursor of nitrogenous disinfection by-products formed during chlorination disinfection. The performances of biological fluidized bed (continuous stirred tank reactor, CSTR) and bio-ceramic filters (plug flow reactor, PFR) were compared in this study to investigate the influence of mixing regime on DON formation in drinking water treatment. In the shared influent, DON ranged from 0.71mgL(-1) to 1.20mgL(-1). The two biological fluidized bed reactors, named BFB1 (mechanical stirring) and BFB2 (air agitation), contained 0.12 and 0.19mgL(-1) DON in their effluents, respectively. Meanwhile, the bio-ceramic reactors, labeled as BCF1 (no aeration) and BCF2 (with aeration), had 1.02 and 0.81mgL(-1) DON in their effluents, respectively. Comparative results showed that the CSTR mixing regime significantly reduced DON formation. This particular reduction was further investigated in this study. The viable/total microbial biomass was determined with propidium monoazide quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PMA-qPCR) and qPCR, respectively. The results of the investigation demonstrated that the microbes in BFB2 had higher viability than those in BCF2. The viable bacteria decreased more sharply than the total bacteria along the media depth in BCF2, and DON in BCF2 accumulated in the deeper media. These phenomena suggested that mixing regime determined DON formation by influencing the distribution of viable, total biomass, and ratio of viable biomass to total biomass. PMID:25585870

  11. Preparation of radioactive colloidal gold 198Au

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preparation with simple equipment of radioactive colloidal gold of particle size about approximately 300 A from seed colloid stabilized by gelatine is described. Some physico-chemical parameters which can affect the process of formation of these colloidal particles are analysed; particle size has been meassured with an electron microscope. The colloid stability has been studied as a function of dilution, age and pH. Nucleation and growth of radioactive colloidal gold have been studied using spectrophotometry. Absorption spectra of the two ones are presented and compared. Quality control of the production process is verified through measurement of parameters, such as radioactive and radiochemical purity and biological distribution in laboratorial animals. This distribution was evalusted for rats injected endovenously with the gold colloidal solution.(Author)

  12. InteractoMIX: a suite of computational tools to exploit interactomes in biological and clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poglayen, Daniel; Marín-López, Manuel Alejandro; Bonet, Jaume; Fornes, Oriol; Garcia-Garcia, Javier; Planas-Iglesias, Joan; Segura, Joan; Oliva, Baldo; Fernandez-Fuentes, Narcis

    2016-06-15

    Virtually all the biological processes that occur inside or outside cells are mediated by protein-protein interactions (PPIs). Hence, the charting and description of the PPI network, initially in organisms, the interactome, but more recently in specific tissues, is essential to fully understand cellular processes both in health and disease. The study of PPIs is also at the heart of renewed efforts in the medical and biotechnological arena in the quest of new therapeutic targets and drugs. Here, we present a mini review of 11 computational tools and resources tools developed by us to address different aspects of PPIs: from interactome level to their atomic 3D structural details. We provided details on each specific resource, aims and purpose and compare with equivalent tools in the literature. All the tools are presented in a centralized, one-stop, web site: InteractoMIX (http://interactomix.com). PMID:27284060

  13. Mixed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pau Baya

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Remenat (Catalan (Mixed, "revoltillo" (Scrambled in Spanish, is a dish which, in Catalunya, consists of a beaten egg cooked with vegetables or other ingredients, normally prawns or asparagus. It is delicious. Scrambled refers to the action of mixing the beaten egg with other ingredients in a pan, normally using a wooden spoon Thought is frequently an amalgam of past ideas put through a spinner and rhythmically shaken around like a cocktail until a uniform and dense paste is made. This malleable product, rather like a cake mixture can be deformed pulling it out, rolling it around, adapting its shape to the commands of one’s hands or the tool which is being used on it. In the piece Mixed, the contortion of the wood seeks to reproduce the plasticity of this slow heavy movement. Each piece lays itself on the next piece consecutively like a tongue of incandescent lava slowly advancing but with unstoppable inertia.

  14. Towards Directional Colloidal Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamp, M.

    2015-01-01

    Colloids are particles with a size on the scale of microns in at least one dimension. The central theme of this thesis is the synthesis of model colloids with anisotropic interactions - often called `patchy' colloids, as well as the search for new ways to assemble such colloids. Methods to build non

  15. Characterization and stability investigation of water dispersible colloids (WDCs) in natural soils

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Canlan

    2013-01-01

    In this work, surface properties, colloidal behaviours and mobilization processes of easily dispersed soil colloids or water dispersible colloids (WDCs) from three TERENO silt loam soils (arable, grassland and forest soils) have been investigated. Firstly, the colloidal behavior of soil mineral colloids (quartz and illite) was investigated in Na, Ca and mixed Na-Ca systems with photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) and microeletrophoretic method, respectively. The critical coagulation concent...

  16. Electrochromism with colloidal WO3 and IrO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalak, Franck; Rault, L.; Aldebert, Pierre

    1992-11-01

    Colloidal particles of WO3 and IrO2 are synthesized and dispersed within a gelatinous perfluorinated ionomer matrix. Experimental procedures are established in order to obtain percolation between the electrochromic particles. Colloidal particle sizes are measured by quasi elastic light scattering. Electrochemical properties of the mixed colloid electrodes are determined by cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy. Preliminary optical tests are performed in order to measure transmission and contrast of electrochromic half cells with a mixed colloid electrode, and also a sputtered oxide electrode.

  17. Effect of chaotic mixing on enhanced biological growth and implications for wastewater treatment: A test case with Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mixing patterns and modes have a great influence on the efficiency of biological treatment systems. A series of laboratory experiments was conducted with a controlled, small-scale analog of a pilot wastewater aeration tank, consisting of two eccentrically placed cylinders. By controlling the rotation direction and speed of the two cylinders, it has been possible to develop chaotic flow fields in the space between the walls of the cylinders. Our experiments utilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae as the biological oxidation organism and air bubbles as the mixing agent supplied by a large fine pore diffuser to the cells in their exponential growth phase. The effect of various mixing patterns on cell growth was studied at different cylinder eccentricities, rotation directions and speeds. It was found that chaotic advection flow patterns: (a) enhanced growth, and (b) sped up the onset of maximal growth of the organism by 15-18% and 14-20%, respectively

  18. Biological Cycles of Mineral Elements in a Young Mixed Stand in Abandoned Mining Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Da-Lun Tian; Wen-Hua Xiang; Wen-De Yan; Wen-Xing Kang; Xiang-Wen Deng; Zhu Fan

    2007-01-01

    Phytoremediation as a sustainable and inexpensive technology based on the removal of pollutants from the environment by plants is becoming an increasingly important objective in plant research. In this study, biological cycles of five nutrient elements (N, P, K, Ca, and Mg) and eight heavy metal elements (Fe, Cu, Zn, Mn, Cd, Ni, Pb and Co) were examined in young paniculed goldraintree (Koelreuteria paniculata Laxm) and common elaeocarpus (Elaeocarpus decipens) mixed stands in an abandoned mining area. We found that after vegetation restoration in abandoned mining areas, the organic matter and concentrations of nutrient elements were significantly increased and the heavy metal elements were significantly decreased, the annual retention, uptake and return were 75.0, 115.4, and 40.3 kg/hm2 for nutrient elements, and 1 878.0,3 231.0 and 1 353.0 g/hm2 for heavy metal elements, respectively, with the utilization coefficient, cycling coefficient and turnover rate of 0.92, 0.35 and 0.32 for nutrient elements, and 1.24, 0.42 and 1.92 for heavy metal elements, respectively.Our results suggested that the vegetation restoration in abandoned mining areas had significant effects in improving environmental conditions, enhancing soil available nutrients, and ensuring human health.

  19. Synthesis, structural elucidation, biological, antioxidant and nuclease activities of some 5-Fluorouracil-amino acid mixed ligand complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shobana, Sutha; Subramaniam, Perumal; Mitu, Liviu; Dharmaraja, Jeyaprakash; Arvind Narayan, Sundaram

    2015-01-01

    Some biologically active mixed ligand complexes (1-9) have been synthesized from 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU; A) and amino acids (B) such as glycine (gly), L-alanine (ala) and L-valine (val) with Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions. The synthesized mixed ligand complexes (1-9) were characterized by various physico-chemical, spectral, thermal and morphological studies. 5-Fluorouracil and its mixed ligand complexes have been tested for their in vitro biological activities against some pathogenic bacterial and fungal species by the agar well diffusion method. The in vitro antioxidant activities of 5-Fluorouracil and its complexes have also been investigated by using the DPPH assay method. The results demonstrate that Cu(II) mixed ligand complexes (4-6) exhibit potent biological as well as antioxidant activities compared to 5-Fluorouracil and Ni(II) (1-3) and Zn(II) (7-9) mixed ligand complexes. Further, the cleaving activities of CT DNA under aerobic conditions show moderate activity with the synthesized Cu(II) and Ni(II) mixed ligand complexes (1-6) while no activity is seen with Zn(II) complexes (7-9). Binding studies of CT DNA with these complexes show a decrease in intensity of the charge transfer band to the extent of 5-15% along with a minor red shift. The free energy change values (Δ‡G) calculated from intrinsic binding constants indicate that the interaction between mixed ligand complex and DNA is spontaneous.

  20. Interactions between radioactively labeled colloids and natural particles: Evidence for colloidal pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Liang-Saw; Santschi, Peter H.; Tang, Degui

    1997-07-01

    It has been hypothesized that colloidal forms of trace metals can be reactive intermediaries in the scavenging processes leading to the removal of their particulate forms. A series of radiotracer experiments using natural colloidal organic matter from Galveston Bay, USA were carried out in order to test this hypothesis. Suspended particle uptake of originally colloidally bound trace metals occurred in a matter of hours to days in estuarine waters. After ten days, the majority (>50%) of the colloidal trace metals had been transferred into the particulate phase (≥0.45 μm), except for 65Zn. Two distinctively different temporal regions of removal of colloidal trace metals were identified: a faster reaction during the first four hours, followed by a slower reaction after approximately one day. In a separate river water-seawater mixing experiment, the solid/solution partitioning of the radiotracers was investigated in the absence of suspended matter. About 30% of most of the elements, except Ag and Fe (˜60%), were associated with a newly formed particulate phase after eight days. There were two major trends: (1) the particulate fraction of 59Fe and 110Ag increased while the colloidal fraction decreased, suggesting a colloidal pumping mechanism. (2) The particulate fraction of 54Mn, 133Ba, 65Zn, 109Cd, 113Sn, and 60CO increased while the LMW (≤ 1 kDa) fraction decreased, suggesting a direct uptake into the particulate fraction with less involvement of a transitory colloidal phase. The values of the particle-water ( Kd) and colloid-water partitioning ( Kc) coefficients for most trace metals were similar to those observed in Galveston Bay waters, suggesting complementary results to field studies. The results from these experiments suggested two different pathways for colloidal tracer uptake by particles: (1) colloidal pumping of a major component (e.g., biopolymer) of the colloidal pool and (2) coagulation of trace components (e.g., phytochelatins) with varying

  1. Colloidal Plasmas : Basic physics of colloidal plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C B Dwivedi

    2000-11-01

    Colloidal plasma is a distinct class of the impure plasmas with multispecies ionic composition. The distinction lies in the phase distribution of the impurity-ion species. The ability to tailor the electrostatic interactions between these colloidal particles provides a fertile ground for scientists to investigate the fundamental aspects of the Coulomb phase transition behavior. The present contribution will review the basic physics of the charging mechanism of the colloidal particles as well as the physics of the collective normal mode behavior of the general multi-ion species plasmas. Emphasis will be laid on the clarification of the prevailing confusing ideas about distinct qualities of the various acoustic modes, which are likely to exist in colloidal plasmas as well as in normal multi-ion species plasmas. Introductory ideas about the proposed physical models for the Coulomb phase transition in colloidal plasma will also be discussed.

  2. Interactions between radioactively labeled colloids and natural particles: Evidence for colloidal pumping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, L.S.; Santschi, P.H.; Tang, D. [Texas A & M Univ., Galveston, TX (United States)

    1997-07-01

    It has been hypothesized that colloidal forms of trace metals can be reactive intermediaries in the scavenging processes leading to the removal of their particulate forms. A series of radiotracer experiments using natural colloidal organic matter from Galveston Bay, USA were carried out in order to test this hypothesis. Suspended particle uptake of originally colloidally bound trace metals occurred in a matter of hours to days in estuarine waters. After ten days, the majority ( >50%) of the colloidal trace metals had been transferred into the particulate phase ({ge} 0.45{mu}m), except for {sup 65}Zn. Two distinctively different temporal regions of removal of colloidal trace metals were identified: a faster reaction during the first four hours, followed by a slower reaction after approximately one day. In a separate river water-seawater mixing experiment, the solid/solution partitioning of the radiotracers was investigated in the absence of suspended matter. About 30% of most of the elements, except Ag and Fe ({approximately}60%), were associated with a newly formed particulate phase after eight days. There were two major trends: (1) the particulate fraction of {sup 59}Fe and {sup 110}Ag increased while the colloidal fraction decreased, suggesting a colloidal pumping mechanism. (2) The particulate fraction of {sup 54}Mn, {sup 133}Ba, {sup 65}Zn, {sup 109}Cd, {sup 113}Sn, and {sup 60}Co increased while the LMW({le}1 kDa) fraction decreased, suggesting a direct uptake into the particulate fraction with less involvement of a transitory colloidal phase. The results from these experiments suggested two different pathways for colloidal tracer uptake by particles: (1) colloidal pumping of a major component (e.g., biopolymer) of the colloidal pool and (2) coagulation of trace components (e.g., phytochelatins) with varying affinities for different trace metals. 39 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Biological behavior of mixed LMFBR-fuel-sodium aerosols in rodents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clearance of 239Pu from lung and other tissues was determined after nose-only exposure of rats to mixed aerosols of sodium-LMFBR fuel or to LMFBR fuels only. The rates of clearance from lung and from total body were both higher after exposure to the mixed sodium-fuel than after exposure to fuel-only aerosols

  4. Lagrangian evolution of DMS during the Southern Ocean gas exchange experiment: The effects of vertical mixing and biological community shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, M.; Archer, S. D.; Blomquist, B. W.; Ho, D. T.; Lance, V. P.; Torres, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    Concentrations of dimethylsulfide (DMS) and its precursor dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) are highly variable in time and space. What is driving the variability in DMS(P), and can those variability be explained by physical processes and changes in the biological community? During the Southern Ocean Gas Exchange Experiment (SO GasEx) in the austral fall of 2008, two 3He/SF6 labeled patches were created in the surface water. SF6 and DMS were surveyed continuously in a Lagrangian framework, while direct measurements of air-sea exchange further constrained the gas budgets. Turbulent diffusivity at the base of the mixed layer was estimated from SF6 profiles and used to calculate the vertical fluxes of DMS and nutrients. Increasing mixed layer nutrient concentrations due to mixing were associated with a shift in the phytoplankton community structure, which in turned likely affected the sulfur dynamics on timescales of days. DMS concentration as well as air-sea DMS flux appeared to be decoupled from the DMSP concentration, possibly due to grazing and bacterial DMS production. Contrary to expectations, in an environment with high winds and modest productivity, physical processes (air-sea exchange, photochemistry, vertical mixing) only accounted for a small fraction of DMS loss from the surface water. Among the DMS sinks, inferred biological consumption most likely dominated during SO GasEx.

  5. Microfluidic colloid filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkhorst, John; Beckmann, Torsten; Go, Dennis; Kuehne, Alexander J. C.; Wessling, Matthias

    2016-03-01

    Filtration of natural and colloidal matter is an essential process in today’s water treatment processes. The colloidal matter is retained with the help of micro- and nanoporous synthetic membranes. Colloids are retained in a “cake layer” - often coined fouling layer. Membrane fouling is the most substantial problem in membrane filtration: colloidal and natural matter build-up leads to an increasing resistance and thus decreasing water transport rate through the membrane. Theoretical models exist to describe macroscopically the hydrodynamic resistance of such transport and rejection phenomena; however, visualization of the various phenomena occurring during colloid retention is extremely demanding. Here we present a microfluidics based methodology to follow filter cake build up as well as transport phenomena occuring inside of the fouling layer. The microfluidic colloidal filtration methodology enables the study of complex colloidal jamming, crystallization and melting processes as well as translocation at the single particle level.

  6. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Mixed-Valence Compounds : Theory and Applications in Chemistry, Physics, Geology, and Biology

    CERN Document Server

    1980-01-01

    It has been a decade since two seminal reviews demonstrated that mixed-valence compounds share many unique and fascinating features. The insight pro­ vided by those early works has promoted a great deal of both experimental and theoretical study. As a result of extensive efforts, our understanding of the bonding and properties of mixed-valence compounds has advanced substantially. There has been no compre­ hensive treatment of mixed-valence compounds since 1967, and the meeting convened at Oxford in September, 1979, provided a unique opportunity to examine the subject and its many ramifications. Mixed-valence compounds play an important role in many fields. Although the major impact of the subject has been in chemistry, its importance has become increasingly clear in solid state physics, geology, and biology. Extensive interest and effort in the field of molecular metals has demonstrated that mixed-valency is a prerequisite for high elec­ trical conductivity. The intense colors of many minerals have been s...

  7. UZ Colloid Transport Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. McGraw

    2000-04-13

    The UZ Colloid Transport model development plan states that the objective of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the development of a model for simulating unsaturated colloid transport. This objective includes the following: (1) use of a process level model to evaluate the potential mechanisms for colloid transport at Yucca Mountain; (2) Provide ranges of parameters for significant colloid transport processes to Performance Assessment (PA) for the unsaturated zone (UZ); (3) Provide a basis for development of an abstracted model for use in PA calculations.

  8. Colloid process engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Peukert, Wolfgang; Rehage, Heinz; Schuchmann, Heike

    2015-01-01

    This book deals with colloidal systems in technical processes and the influence of colloidal systems by technical processes. It explores how new measurement capabilities can offer the potential for a dynamic development of scientific and engineering, and examines the origin of colloidal systems and its use for new products. The future challenges to colloidal process engineering are the development of appropriate equipment and processes for the production and obtainment of multi-phase structures and energetic interactions in market-relevant quantities. The book explores the relevant processes and for controlled production and how they can be used across all scales.

  9. EFFECT OF MIXING CONDITIONS ON FLOCCULATION KINETICS OF WASTEWATERS CONTAINING PROTEINS AND OTHER BIOLOGICAL COMPOUNDS USING FIBROUS MATERIALS AND POLYELECTROLYTES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. CHEN

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available The application of a combined system of a polyelectrolyte, carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC, and highly fibrillated fibrous materials, cellulose triacetate fibrets (CTF, for the recovery of proteins and other biological compounds from model and actual biological systems has been demonstrated . In the present work, reaction batches were scaled-up to a one-liter agitated vessel, with a standard configuration. The effect of mixing conditions on the adsorption and flocculation process was studied. It was observed that flocculation time was very fast, occurring within the period of polymer addition. Long term shearing did not result in floc breakage and the values of percentage light transmission and protein concentration of the final filtrate remained the same during the incubation period. Increasing the shear rate resulted in improved process efficiency, up to an optimum value, above which performance was poorer. Perikinetic and orthokinetic rate parameters were calculated and results analyzed in view of these parameters.

  10. Shape-shifting colloids via stimulated dewetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Mena; Hueckel, Theodore; Yi, Gi-Ra; Sacanna, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    The ability to reconfigure elementary building blocks from one structure to another is key to many biological systems. Bringing the intrinsic adaptability of biological systems to traditional synthetic materials is currently one of the biggest scientific challenges in material engineering. Here we introduce a new design concept for the experimental realization of self-assembling systems with built-in shape-shifting elements. We demonstrate that dewetting forces between an oil phase and solid colloidal substrates can be exploited to engineer shape-shifting particles whose geometry can be changed on demand by a chemical or optical signal. We find this approach to be quite general and applicable to a broad spectrum of materials, including polymers, semiconductors and magnetic materials. This synthetic methodology can be further adopted as a new experimental platform for designing and rapidly prototyping functional colloids, such as reconfigurable micro swimmers, colloidal surfactants and switchable building blocks for self-assembly.

  11. Shape-shifting colloids via stimulated dewetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Mena; Hueckel, Theodore; Yi, Gi-Ra; Sacanna, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The ability to reconfigure elementary building blocks from one structure to another is key to many biological systems. Bringing the intrinsic adaptability of biological systems to traditional synthetic materials is currently one of the biggest scientific challenges in material engineering. Here we introduce a new design concept for the experimental realization of self-assembling systems with built-in shape-shifting elements. We demonstrate that dewetting forces between an oil phase and solid colloidal substrates can be exploited to engineer shape-shifting particles whose geometry can be changed on demand by a chemical or optical signal. We find this approach to be quite general and applicable to a broad spectrum of materials, including polymers, semiconductors and magnetic materials. This synthetic methodology can be further adopted as a new experimental platform for designing and rapidly prototyping functional colloids, such as reconfigurable micro swimmers, colloidal surfactants and switchable building blocks for self-assembly. PMID:27426418

  12. Inventions Utilizing Microfluidics and Colloidal Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, David W.; Gong, Tieying; Oakey, John; Terray, Alexander V.; Wu, David T.

    2009-01-01

    Several related inventions pertain to families of devices that utilize microfluidics and/or colloidal particles to obtain useful physical effects. The families of devices can be summarized as follows: (1) Microfluidic pumps and/or valves wherein colloidal-size particles driven by electrical, magnetic, or optical fields serve as the principal moving parts that propel and/or direct the affected flows. (2) Devices that are similar to the aforementioned pumps and/or valves except that they are used to manipulate light instead of fluids. The colloidal particles in these devices are substantially constrained to move in a plane and are driven to spatially order them into arrays that function, variously, as waveguides, filters, or switches for optical signals. (3) Devices wherein the ultra-laminar nature of microfluidic flows is exploited to effect separation, sorting, or filtering of colloidal particles or biological cells in suspension. (4) Devices wherein a combination of confinement and applied electrical and/or optical fields forces the colloidal particles to become arranged into three-dimensional crystal lattices. Control of the colloidal crystalline structures could be exploited to control diffraction of light. (5) Microfluidic devices, incorporating fluid waveguides, wherein switching of flows among different paths would be accompanied by switching of optical signals.

  13. Preparation of 99mTc- Tin colloid: a freeze-dried kit for liver imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    99mTc-tin-colloid was formulated as a useful agent for liver imaging. The radiochemical purity and stability of the labeled colloid were determined by paper chromatography and 85% methanol solvent, the labelling efficiency was > 95%. The comparative studies of the biological distribution of 99mTc-tin-colloid and 99Tc-Sulphur-colloid were made with Wistar rats. The results of organ distribution were similar in both products; > 90% liver uptake. (author)

  14. An efficient planar accordion-shaped micromixer: from biochemical mixing to biological application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, Armando; Madadi, Hojjat; Vergara, Paola; Vecchione, Raffaele; Causa, Filippo; Netti, Paolo Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Micromixers are the key component that allow lab-on-a-chip and micro total analysis systems to reach the correct level of mixing for any given process. This paper proposes a novel, simple, passive micromixer design characterized by a planar accordion-shape geometry. The geometrical characteristics of the presented design were analyzed numerically in the range of 0.01 experimentally investigated by means of fluorescence microscopy for a range of low diffusion coefficients, 10(-12) structure was fabricated in a simple single-step process using maskless lithography and soft lithography. The experimental results showed a very good agreement with the predicted numerical results. This micromixer design including a single serpentine unit (1-SERP) displayed an efficiency higher than 90% (mixing length = 6.4 mm) creating a pressure drop of about 500 Pa at Re = 0.1 and 60 kPa at Re = 10. A mixing efficiency of almost 100% was readily reached when three serpentine units were included (3-SERP). Finally, the potential diagnostic value of the presented microdevice was validated experimentally for Red Blood Cell (RBC) lysis. PMID:26658848

  15. Oxidation of Mixed Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients in Biologically Treated Wastewater by ClO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moradas, Gerly; Fick, Jerker; Ledin, Anna;

    2011-01-01

    Biologically treated wastewater containing a mixture of 53 active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs)was treated with 0-20 mg/l chlorine dioxide (ClO2) solution. Wastewater effluents were taken from two wastewater treatment plants in Sweden, one with (low COD) and one without (high COD) extended...

  16. The influence of colloids on the migration of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a concept of deep geological disposal of high level nuclear waste, the repository will be designed as a multiple-barrier system including bentonite as the buffer/backfill material and the host rock formation as the geological barrier. The engineered barrier (compacted bentonite) will be in contact with the host rock formation (e.g. granite). Consequently the bentonite will be saturated over time with formation groundwater, which will induce swelling and gel formation of the bentonite. At the gel-groundwater boundary, colloid detachment might be a possible colloid source and therefore might enhance the mobility of strong sorbing actinides. This work will focus on three aspects of colloidal transport: (a) Colloid stability in the mixing zone between granite groundwater and bentonite pore water, including its description with an extended DLVO model. (b) Colloid generation and erosion of the bentonite at the interface between compacted bentonite and granitic groundwater, as well as formation of new colloids in the mixing zone between the bentonite porewater and the granitic groundwater. (c) Colloid transport and the interaction of U, Th, Hf, Tb, Eu and Cm with bentonite colloids and fracture filling material, as well as their mobility in a natural fracture.

  17. Interface colloidal robotic manipulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aronson, Igor; Snezhko, Oleksiy

    2015-08-04

    A magnetic colloidal system confined at the interface between two immiscible liquids and energized by an alternating magnetic field dynamically self-assembles into localized asters and arrays of asters. The colloidal system exhibits locomotion and shape change. By controlling a small external magnetic field applied parallel to the interface, structures can capture, transport, and position target particles.

  18. Integrated chemical/biological treatment of paint stripper mixed waste: Metals toxicity and separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DOE complex has generated vast quantities of complex heterogeneous mixed wastes. Paint stripper waste (PSW) is a complex waste that arose from decontamination and decommissioning activities. It contains paint stripper, cheesecloth, cellulose-based paints with Pb and Cr, and suspect Pu. Los Alamos National Laboratory has 150--200 barrels of PSW and other national laboratories such as Rocky Flats Plant have many more barrels of heterogeneous waste. Few technologies exist that can treat this complex waste. Our approach to solving this problem is the integration of two established technologies: biodegradation and metals chelation

  19. Abundance of fluorescent biological aerosol particles at temperatures conducive to the formation of mixed-phase and cirrus clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twohy, Cynthia H.; McMeeking, Gavin R.; DeMott, Paul J.; McCluskey, Christina S.; Hill, Thomas C. J.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Tanarhte, Meryem; Kafle, Durga N.; Toohey, Darin W.

    2016-07-01

    Some types of biological particles are known to nucleate ice at warmer temperatures than mineral dust, with the potential to influence cloud microphysical properties and climate. However, the prevalence of these particle types above the atmospheric boundary layer is not well known. Many types of biological particles fluoresce when exposed to ultraviolet light, and the Wideband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor takes advantage of this characteristic to perform real-time measurements of fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAPs). This instrument was flown on the National Center for Atmospheric Research Gulfstream V aircraft to measure concentrations of fluorescent biological particles from different potential sources and at various altitudes over the US western plains in early autumn. Clear-air number concentrations of FBAPs between 0.8 and 12 µm diameter usually decreased with height and generally were about 10-100 L-1 in the continental boundary layer but always much lower at temperatures colder than 255 K in the free troposphere. At intermediate temperatures where biological ice-nucleating particles may influence mixed-phase cloud formation (255 K ≤ T ≤ 270 K), concentrations of fluorescent particles were the most variable and were occasionally near boundary-layer concentrations. Predicted vertical distributions of ice-nucleating particle concentrations based on FBAP measurements in this temperature regime sometimes reached typical concentrations of primary ice in clouds but were often much lower. If convection was assumed to lift boundary-layer FBAPs without losses to the free troposphere, better agreement between predicted ice-nucleating particle concentrations and typical ice crystal concentrations was achieved. Ice-nucleating particle concentrations were also measured during one flight and showed a decrease with height, and concentrations were consistent with a relationship to FBAPs established previously at the forested surface site below. The vertical

  20. A colloidal singularity reveals the crucial role of colloidal stability for nanomaterials in-vitro toxicity testing: nZVI-microalgae colloidal system as a case study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soledad Gonzalo

    Full Text Available Aggregation raises attention in Nanotoxicology due to its methodological implications. Aggregation is a physical symptom of a more general physicochemical condition of colloidal particles, namely, colloidal stability. Colloidal stability is a global indicator of the tendency of a system to reduce its net surface energy, which may be achieved by homo-aggregation or hetero-aggregation, including location at bio-interfaces. However, the role of colloidal stability as a driver of ENM bioactivity has received little consideration thus far. In the present work, which focuses on the toxicity of nanoscaled Fe° nanoparticles (nZVI towards a model microalga, we demonstrate that colloidal stability is a fundamental driver of ENM bioactivity, comprehensively accounting for otherwise inexplicable differential biological effects. The present work throws light on basic aspects of Nanotoxicology, and reveals a key factor which may reconcile contradictory results on the influence of aggregation in bioactivity of ENMs.

  1. Oxidation of Mixed Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients in Biologically Treated Wastewater by ClO2

    OpenAIRE

    Moradas, Gerly; Fick, Jerker; Ledin, Anna; Jansen, Jes la Cour; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2011-01-01

    Biologically treated wastewater containing a mixture of 53 active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs)was treated with 0-20 mg/l chlorine dioxide (ClO2) solution. Wastewater effluents were taken from two wastewater treatment plants in Sweden, one with (low COD) and one without (high COD) extended nitrogen removal. The removal of the APIs varied from no significant removal at the highest dose of ClO2 (20 mg/l) to 90% removal at a dose of 0.5 mg/l of the oxidant. From the low COD effluent, only 4 ...

  2. BIOLOGICAL NITROGEN REMOVAL FROM WASTEWATER BY DENITRIFICATION OF MIX-CULTURING FUNGI AND BACTERIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAKAYA; Naoki; SHOUN; Hirofumi

    2006-01-01

    Denitrificationis a biological processin which nitrateand/or nitrite is reduced to gaseous nitrogen,dinitrogen(N2)or nitrous oxide(N2O)while carbon dioxide is thesecond gaseous product of the process.This is one of themain mechanisms of the global nitrogen cycle,and playsanimportant role as the reverse reaction of nitrogen fixa-tion in maintaining global environmental homeostasis[1].Denitrification has beenlongthought to be a unique char-acteristic of prokaryotes[2,3].Anumber of bacteria(suchasPseudomonas s...

  3. Biological hydrogen production from probiotic wastewater as substrate by selectively enriched anaerobic mixed microflora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivaramakrishna, D.; Sreekanth, D.; Himabindu, V. [Centre for Environment, Institute of Science and Technology, Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Kukatpally, Hyderabad 500072, Andhra Pradesh (India); Anjaneyulu, Y. [TLGVRC, JSU Box 18739, JSU, Jackson, MS 32917-0939 (United States)

    2009-03-15

    Biohydrogen production from probiotic wastewater using mixed anaerobic consortia is reported in this paper. Batch tests are carried out in a 5.0 L batch reactor under constant mesophillic temperature (37 C). The maximum hydrogen yield 1.8 mol-hydrogen/mol-carbohydrate is obtained at an optimum pH of 5.5 and substrate concentration 5 g/L. The maximum hydrogen production rate is 168 ml/h. The hydrogen content in the biogas is more than 65% and no significant methane is observed throughout the study. In addition to hydrogen, acetate, propionate, butyrate and ethanol are found to be the main by-products in the metabolism of hydrogen fermentation. (author)

  4. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. S. Viswanathan

    2004-10-07

    This scientific analysis provides retardation factors for colloids transporting in the saturated zone (SZ) and the unsaturated zone (UZ). These retardation factors represent the reversible chemical and physical filtration of colloids in the SZ. The value of the colloid retardation factor, R{sub col} is dependent on several factors, such as colloid size, colloid type, and geochemical conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, and ionic strength). These factors are folded into the distributions of R{sub col} that have been developed from field and experimental data collected under varying geochemical conditions with different colloid types and sizes. Attachment rate constants, k{sub att}, and detachment rate constants, k{sub det}, of colloids to the fracture surface have been measured for the fractured volcanics, and separate R{sub col} uncertainty distributions have been developed for attachment and detachment to clastic material and mineral grains in the alluvium. Radionuclides such as plutonium and americium sorb mostly (90 to 99 percent) irreversibly to colloids (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025], Section 6.3.3.2). The colloid retardation factors developed in this analysis are needed to simulate the transport of radionuclides that are irreversibly sorbed onto colloids; this transport is discussed in the model report ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]). Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this scientific analysis especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste-degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and americium may be irreversibly attached to colloids for the time scales of interest. A section of this report will also discuss the validity of using microspheres as analogs to colloids in some of the lab and field experiments used to obtain the colloid retardation factors. In addition, a small fraction of colloids travels with the groundwater without any significant

  5. Lock and key colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacanna, S; Irvine, W T M; Chaikin, P M; Pine, D J

    2010-03-25

    New functional materials can in principle be created using colloids that self-assemble into a desired structure by means of a programmable recognition and binding scheme. This idea has been explored by attaching 'programmed' DNA strands to nanometre- and micrometre- sized particles and then using DNA hybridization to direct the placement of the particles in the final assembly. Here we demonstrate an alternative recognition mechanism for directing the assembly of composite structures, based on particles with complementary shapes. Our system, which uses Fischer's lock-and-key principle, employs colloidal spheres as keys and monodisperse colloidal particles with a spherical cavity as locks that bind spontaneously and reversibly via the depletion interaction. The lock-and-key binding is specific because it is controlled by how closely the size of a spherical colloidal key particle matches the radius of the spherical cavity of the lock particle. The strength of the binding can be further tuned by adjusting the solution composition or temperature. The composite assemblies have the unique feature of having flexible bonds, allowing us to produce flexible dimeric, trimeric and tetrameric colloidal molecules as well as more complex colloidal polymers. We expect that this lock-and-key recognition mechanism will find wider use as a means of programming and directing colloidal self-assembly. PMID:20336142

  6. Colloids in Biotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Fanun, Monzer

    2010-01-01

    Colloids have come a long way from when Thomas Graham coined the term colloid to describe 'pseudo solutions'. This book enables scientists to close the gap between extensive research and translation into commercial options in biomedicine and biotechnology. It covers biosurfactants and surface properties, phase behavior, and orientational change of surfactant mixtures with peptides at the interface. It also covers adsorption of polymers and biopolymers on the surface and interface, discusses colloidal nanoparticles and their use in biotechnology, and delves into bioadhesion and microencapsulati

  7. Relative biological efficiency of powerful 252Cf mixed α-neutron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comprehensive radiobiological studies of the relative biological and genetic efficacy (RBE and RGE) of powerful 252Cf radiation (the ANET-B unit) were conducted using research tools of various radiosensitivity (bacteria, Drosophila, Chinese hamster cells, murine thymocytes, human and murine bone marrow stem cells, human peripheral blood lymphocytes, Lewis lung carcinoma cells). It was shown in the tests of reproductive or interphase death and chromosome aberrations that the RBE and the RGE values of a sup(252)Cf new source varied within the same limits from 1.3 to 3.0 whereas in the tests of gene mutations the RGE of the source did not exceed the efficacy of 60Co γ-radiation and in some cases it was much lower. Thus the RBE of the new source in induced lethal and chromosome demages was 2-4 times lower than the efficacy of a low-activity sup(252)Cf source used now in radiotherapy

  8. Inhibitory effects of butyrate on biological hydrogen production with mixed anaerobic cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xian-Jun; Yu, Han-Qing

    2005-01-01

    In this study batch experiments were conducted to investigate the inhibitory effects of butyrate addition on hydrogen production from glucose by using anaerobic mixed cultures. Experimental results showed that addition of butyrate at 4.18 and 6.27 g/l only slightly inhibited hydrogen production, and addition of butyrate at 8.36-12.54 g/l imposed a moderate inhibitory effect on hydrogen production. At addition of 25.08 g/l, butyrate had a strong inhibitory influence on substrate degradation and hydrogen production. The distribution of the volatile fatty acids produced from the acidogeneisis of glucose was significantly influenced by the addition of butyrate. The inhibition of butyrate addition on hydrogen production was described well by a non-competitive and non-linear inhibition model, with the maximum hydrogen production rate of 59.3 ml/g-SS/h, critical added butyrate concentration of 25.08 g/l, and inhibition degree of 0.323, respectively. The C(I,50) values (the butyrate concentration at which bioactivity is reduced by 50%) for hydrogen production rate and yield were estimated as 19.39 and 20.78 g/l of added butyrate, respectively.

  9. Biological removal of phenol from saline wastewater using a moving bed biofilm reactor containing acclimated mixed consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhli, Seyyed Ali Akbar; Ahmadizadeh, Kimia; Fereshtehnejad, Mahmood; Rostami, Mohammad Hossein; Safari, Mojtaba; Borghei, Seyyed Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the performance of an aerobic moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) was assessed for the removal of phenol as the sole substrate from saline wastewater. The effect of several parameters namely inlet phenol concentration (200-1200 mg/L), hydraulic retention time (8-24 h), inlet salt content (10-70 g/L), phenol shock loading, hydraulic shock loading and salt shock loading on the performance of the 10 L MBBR inoculated with a mixed culture of active biomass gradually acclimated to phenol and salt were evaluated in terms of phenol and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiencies. The results indicated that phenol and COD removal efficiencies are affected by HRT, phenol and salt concentration in the bioreactor saline feed. The MBBR could remove up to 99% of phenol and COD from the feed saline wastewater at inlet phenol concentrations up to 800 mg/L, HRT of 18 h and inlet salt contents up to 40 g/L. The reactor could also resist strong shock loads. Furthermore, measuring biological quantitative parameters indicated that the biofilm plays a main role in phenol removal. Overall, the results of this investigation revealed that the developed MBBR system with high concentration of the active mixed biomass can play a prominent role in order to treat saline wastewaters containing phenol in industrial applications as a very efficient and flexible technology.

  10. Copper(ii) mixed-ligand polypyridyl complexes with doxycycline - structures and biological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abosede, Olufunso O; Vyas, Nilima A; Singh, Sushma B; Kumbhar, Avinash S; Kate, Anup; Kumbhar, Anupa A; Khan, Ayesha; Erxleben, Andrea; Smith, Peter; de Kock, Carmen; Hoffmann, Frank; Obaleye, Joshua A

    2016-02-21

    Mixed-ligand Cu(ii) complexes of the type [Cu(doxycycline)(L)(H2O)2](NO3)2, where doxycycline = [4-(dimethylamino)-3,5,10,12,12a-pentahydroxy-6-methyl-1,11-dioxo-1,4,4a,5,5a,6,11,12a-octahydrotetracene-2-carboxamide] and L = 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy, 1), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen, 2), dipyrido[3,2-d:2',3'-f]quinoxaline (dpq, 3) and dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine (dppz, 4) have been synthesised and characterised by structural, analytical, and spectral methods. The single-crystal X-ray structures of 1 and 2 exhibited two different geometries, distorted square-pyramidal and octahedral respectively as well as different coordination modes of doxycycline. Complexes 2-4 exhibit prominent plasmid DNA cleavage at significantly low concentrations probably by an oxidative mechanism. Matrix Metalloproteinase (MMP-2) inhibition studies revealed that all complexes inhibit MMP-2 similar to doxycycline which is a well-known MMP inhibitor with 3 being the most potent. IC50 values of doxycycline and 1-4 against MCF-7 (human breast cancer) and HeLa cell lines were almost equal in which 3 showed the highest efficiency (IC50 = 0.46 ± 0.05 μM), being consistent with its increased MMP inhibition potency. The antimalarial activities of these complexes against the chloroquine-sensitive Plasmodium falciparum NF54 and chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum Dd2 strains reveal that complex 3 exhibited a higher activity than artesunate drug against the chloroquine-resistant Dd2 strain.

  11. Confocal microscopy of colloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, V; Semwogerere, D; Weeks, Eric R [Department of Physics, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States)

    2007-03-21

    Colloids have increasingly been used to characterize or mimic many aspects of atomic and molecular systems. With confocal microscopy these colloidal particles can be tracked spatially in three dimensions with great precision over large time scales. This review discusses equilibrium phases such as crystals and liquids, and non-equilibrium phases such as glasses and gels. The phases that form depend strongly on the type of particle interaction that dominates. Hard-sphere-like colloids are the simplest, and interactions such as the attractive depletion force and electrostatic repulsion result in more non-trivial phases which can better model molecular materials. Furthermore, shearing or otherwise externally forcing these colloids while under microscopic observation helps connect the microscopic particle dynamics to the macroscopic flow behaviour. Finally, directions of future research in this field are discussed. (topical review)

  12. Highly uniform polyhedral colloids formed by colloidal crystal templating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifan; McGinley, James; Crocker, John; Crocker Research Group Team

    2015-03-01

    We seek to create polyhedral solid particles by trapping oil droplets in a colloidal crystal, and polymerizing them in situ, resulting in polyhedral particles containing spherical dimples in an ordered arrangement. Specifically, highly monodisperse, micron-sized droplets of 3-methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane (TPM) were first prepared through a poly condensation reaction, following well established methods. The droplets were mixed with an excess of polystyrene(PS) particles (diameter in 2.58 μm), which formed close packed (FCC or HCP) colloidal crystals by natural sedimentation and compression under partial drying to an extent, with TPM oil droplets trapped into their tetrahedral and octahedral interstitial sites and wet PS particles. Depending on the initial particle volume fraction and extent of drying, a high yield of dimpled particles having different shapes including tetrahedra and cubes were obtained after oil initiated polymerization and dissolution of the host PS particles, as seen under SEM. The effects of TPM to PS particles size ratio, drying time, and other factors in relation to the yield of tetrahedral and cubic dimpled particles will be presented. Finally, fractionation techniques were used to obtain suspensions of uniform polyhedral particles of high purity.

  13. Abundance of fluorescent biological aerosol particles at temperatures conducive to the formation of mixed-phase and cirrus clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twohy, C. H.; McMeeking, G. R.; DeMott, Paul J.; McCluskey, Christina; Hill, TC J.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Tanarhte, M.; Kafle, D. N.; Toohey, D. W.

    2016-07-08

    Some types of biological particles are known to efficiently nucleate ice at relatively warm temperatures in the atmosphere, with the potential to influence cloud microphysical properties and climate. However, the prevalence of these particle types above the atmospheric boundary layer is not well known. Many types of biological particles fluoresce when exposed to ultraviolet light, and the Wideband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor takes advantage of this characteristic to perform real-time measurements of fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAP). This relatively new instrument was flown on the National Center for Atmospheric Research Gulfstream-V aircraft to measure concentrations of fluorescent biological particles from different potential sources and at various altitudes over the U. S. western plains states in early autumn. Clear-air concentrations of FBAP larger than 0.8 µm in diameter usually decreased with height, and generally were about 10-100 L-1 in the continental boundary layer, but were always much lower in the free troposphere at temperatures colder than about 255K. Ice nucleating particle number concentrations measured during one flight also showed a decrease with height, and were consistent with a relationship to FBAP established previously at the surface at the same location. At intermediate ambient temperatures where biological ice nucleating particles may influence mixed-phase cloud formation (255K≤T≤270K), concentrations of fluorescent particles were the most variable, and were occasionally near boundary layer values. Predicted vertical profiles of ice nucleating particle concentrations based on FBAP measurements in this temperature regime sometimes reached typical ice crystal concentrations in clouds, but were often much lower. If convection was assumed to lift boundary layer FBAP particles without losses to the free troposphere, better agreement between predicted ice-nucleating particle concentrations and typical ice crystal number

  14. Laboratory-generated mixtures of mineral dust particles with biological substances: characterization of the particle mixing state and immersion freezing behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustin-Bauditz, Stefanie; Wex, Heike; Denjean, Cyrielle; Hartmann, Susan; Schneider, Johannes; Schmidt, Susann; Ebert, Martin; Stratmann, Frank

    2016-05-01

    Biological particles such as bacteria, fungal spores or pollen are known to be efficient ice nucleating particles. Their ability to nucleate ice is due to ice nucleation active macromolecules (INMs). It has been suggested that these INMs maintain their nucleating ability even when they are separated from their original carriers. This opens the possibility of an accumulation of such INMs in soils, resulting in an internal mixture of mineral dust and INMs. If particles from such soils which contain biological INMs are then dispersed into the atmosphere due to wind erosion or agricultural processes, they could induce ice nucleation at temperatures typical for biological substances, i.e., above -20 up to almost 0 °C, while they might be characterized as mineral dust particles due to a possibly low content of biological material. We conducted a study within the research unit INUIT (Ice Nucleation research UnIT), where we investigated the ice nucleation behavior of mineral dust particles internally mixed with INM. Specifically, we mixed a pure mineral dust sample (illite-NX) with ice active biological material (birch pollen washing water) and quantified the immersion freezing behavior of the resulting particles utilizing the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS). A very important topic concerning the investigations presented here as well as for atmospheric application is the characterization of the mixing state of aerosol particles. In the present study we used different methods like single-particle aerosol mass spectrometry, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), and a Volatility-Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyser (VH-TDMA) to investigate the mixing state of our generated aerosol. Not all applied methods performed similarly well in detecting small amounts of biological material on the mineral dust particles. Measuring the hygroscopicity/volatility of the mixed particles with the VH-TDMA was the most

  15. In vitro and in vivo measurements of the dissolution parameters of uranium and plutonium mixed oxides in biological environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the mixed-oxide fuel fabrication process, inhalation is potentially the main route of internal contamination. The International Commission on Radiological Protection recommends experimental measurement of parameters such as size and dissolution rate for specific industrial compounds. First, we validated the use of PERALS (Photon Electron Rejecting Alpha Liquid Scintillation) for alpha measurement in biological samples which, in some cases, could improve detection limit. We characterised physical chemical properties in terms of size, specific area and activity of 3 different powders: MOX made according to either the MIMAS process, which showed heterogeneous chemical composition, or the SOLGEL, which showed homogeneous chemical composition and industrial PuO2. Their dissolution parameters, fr and ss, as defined in the simplest model proposed by ICRP 66 were measured in vivo, after inhalation in the rat, and in vitro. The statistical variation of these values were expressed as standard deviation. Moreover, in vitro studies demonstrated variation of the ss value depending on the duration of the incubation. We also developed methods to characterise interactions between UO2 particles and phosphate ions which could be involved in the actinide toxicity. (author)

  16. Synthesis, Characterization, and Biological Activity Studies of Copper(II Mixed Compound with Histamine and Nalidixic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egla Yareth Bivián-Castro

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A mixed copper complex with deprotonated nalidixic acid (nal and histamine (hsm was synthesized and characterized by FTIR, UV-Vis, elemental analysis, and conductivity. The crystal structure of [Cu(hsm(nalH2O]Cl·3H2O (chn showed a pentacoordinated cooper(II in a square pyramidal geometry surrounded by two N atoms from hsm, two O atoms from the quinolone, and one apical water oxygen. Alteration of bacterial DNA structure and/or associated functions in vivo by [Cu(hsm(nalH2O]Cl·3H2O was demonstrated by the induction of a recA-lacZ fusion integrated at the amyE locus of a recombinant Bacillus subtilis strain. Results from circular dichroism and denaturation of calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA suggested that increased amounts of copper complex were able to stabilize the double helix of DNA in vitro mainly by formation of hydrogen bonds between chn and the sugars of DNA minor groove. In vivo and in vitro biological activities of the chn complex were compared with the chemical nuclease [Cu(phen(nalH2O]NO3·3H2O (cpn where phen is phenanthroline.

  17. Anisotropic Model Colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kats, C. M.

    2008-10-01

    The driving forces for fundamental research in colloid science are the ability to manage the material properties of colloids and to unravel the forces that play a role between colloids to be able to control and understand the processes where colloids play an important role. Therefore we are searching for colloidal materials with specific physical properties to better understand our surrounding world.Until recently research in colloid science was mainly focused on spherical (isotropic) particles. Monodisperse spherical colloids serve as a model system as they exhibit similar phase behaviour as molecular and atomic systems. Nevertheless, in many cases the spherical shape is not sufficient to reach the desired research goals. Recently the more complex synthesis methods of anisotropic model colloids has strongly developed. This thesis should be regarded as a contribution to this research area. Anisotropic colloids can be used as a building block for complex structures and are expected not only to lead to the construction of full photonic band gap materials. They will also serve as new, more realistic, models systems for their molecular analogues. Therefore the term ‘molecular colloids” is sometimes used to qualify these anisotropic colloidal particles. In the introduction of this thesis, we give an overview of the main synthesis techniques for anisotropic colloids. Chapter 2 describes the method of etching silicon wafers to construct monodisperse silicon rods. They subsequently were oxidized and labeled (coated) with a fluorescent silica layer. The first explorative phase behaviour of these silica rods was studied. The particles showed a nematic ordering in charge stabilized suspensions. Chapter 3 describes the synthesis of colloidal gold rods and the (mesoporous) silica coating of gold rods. Chapter 4 describes the physical and optical properties of these particles when thermal energy is added. This is compared to the case where the particles are irradiated with

  18. Optimal Hydrodynamic Synchronization of Colloidal Rotors

    OpenAIRE

    Kotar, Jurij; Debono, Luke; Bruot, Nicolas; Box, Stuart; Phillips, David; Simpson, Stephen,; Hanna, Simon; Cicuta, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    Synchronization of driven oscillators is a key aspect of flow generation in artificial and biological filaments such as cilia. Previous theoretical and numerical studies have considered the “rotor” model of a cilium in which the filament is coarse grained into a colloidal sphere driven with a given force law along a predefined trajectory to represent the oscillating motion of the cilium. These studies pointed to the importance of two factors in the emergence of synchronization: the modulation...

  19. Viscosity of colloidal suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, E.G.D. [Rockefeller Univ., New York, NY (United States); Schepper, I.M. de [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)

    1995-12-31

    Simple expressions are given for the effective Newtonian viscosity as a function of concentration as well as for the effective visco-elastic response as a function of concentration and imposed frequency, of monodisperse neutral colloidal suspensions over the entire fluid range. The basic physical mechanisms underlying these formulae are discussed. The agreement with existing experiments is very good.

  20. Liquid crystal colloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This special issue of "Condensed Matter Physics" focuses on the most recent developments in the study of a fascinating soft matter system, representing colloidal particles in a liquid crystalline environment. Furthermore, some articles address pioneering steps in the discovery of liquid crystals going back to 1861 paper by Julius Planer.

  1. Chiral Colloidal Molecules And Observation of The Propeller Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Chiral molecules play an important role in biological and chemical processes, but physical effects due to their symmetry-breaking are generally weak. Several physical chiral separation schemes which could potentially be useful, including the propeller effect, have therefore not yet been demonstrated at the molecular scale. However, it has been proposed that complex nonspherical colloidal particles could act as “colloidal molecules” in mesoscopic model systems to permit the visualization of molecular phenomena that are otherwise difficult to observe. Unfortunately, it is difficult to synthesize such colloids because surface minimization generally favors the growth of symmetric particles. Here we demonstrate the production of large numbers of complex colloids with glancing angle physical vapor deposition. We use chiral colloids to demonstrate the Baranova and Zel’dovich (BaranovaN. B.Zel’dovichB. Y.Chem. Phys. Lett.1978, 57, 435) propeller effect: the separation of a racemic mixture by application of a rotating field that couples to the dipole moment of the enantiomers and screw propels them in opposite directions. The handedness of the colloidal suspensions is monitored with circular differential light scattering. An exact solution for the colloid’s propulsion is derived, and comparisons between the colloidal system and the corresponding effect at the molecular scale are made. PMID:23883328

  2. Using a biological aerated filter to treat mixed water-borne volatile organic compounds and assessing its emissions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Wen-Hsi

    2009-01-01

    A biological aerated filter (BAF) was evaluated as a fixed-biofilm processes to remove water-borne volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a multiple layer ceramic capacitor (MLCC) manufacturing plant in southern Taiwan.The components of VOC were identified to be toluene,1,2,4-trimethylbenzene,1,3,5-trimethylbenzene,bromodichloromethane and isopropanol (IPA).The full-scale BAF was constructed of two separate reactors in series,respectively using 10-cm and 15-cm diameter polypropylene balls as the packing materials and a successful preliminary bench-scale experiment was performed to feasibility.Performance results show that the BAF removed over 90% chemical oxygen demand (COD) from the influent with (1188 ± 605) mg/L of COD.A total organic loading of 2.76 kg biochemical oxygen demand (BOD)/(m~3 packing·d) was determined for the packed bed,in which the flow pattern approached that of a mixed flow.A limited VOC concentration of (0.97 ± 0.29) ppmv (as methane) was emitted from the BAF system.Moreover,the emission rate of VOC was calculated using the proposed formula,based on an air-water mass equilibrium relationship,and compared to the simulated results obtained using the Water 9 model.Both estimation approaches of calculation and model simulation using Water 9 evaluating VOC emissions reveal that 0.1% IPA (0.0031-0.0037 kg/d) was aerated into a gaseous phase,and 30% to 40% (0.006-0.008 kg/d) of the toluene was aerated.

  3. Synthesis characterization and biological evaluation of a novel mixed ligand 99mTc complex as potential brain imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One approach in the design of neutral oxotechnetium complexes is based on the simultaneous substitution of a tridentate dianionic ligand and a monodentate monoanionic coligand on a [Tc(V)O]+3 precursor. Following this ''mixed ligand'' concept, a novel 99mTc complex with N,N-bis(2-mercaptoethyl)-N'N'-diethylethylenediamine as ligand and 1-octanethiol as coligand is prepared and evaluated as potential brain radiopharmaceutical. Preparation of the complex at tracer level was accomplished by using 99mTc-glucoheptonate as precursor. The substitution was optimized and a coligand/ligand ratio of 5 was selected. Under this conditions the labeling yield was over 80% and a major product (with radiochemical purity > 80%) was isolated by HPLC methods and used for biological evaluation. Chemical characterization at carrier level was developed using the corresponding rhenium complex as structural model. The Re complex was also prepared by substitution method and isolated as a crystalline product. The crystals were characterized by UV-vis and IR spectra and elemental analysis. Results were consistent with the expected ReOLC structure. X ray crystallographic study demonstrated that the complex adopts a distorted trigonal bipyramidal geometry. The basal plane is defined by the SS atoms of the ligand and the oxo group, while the N of the ligand and the S of the colligand occupy the two apical positions. All sulphur atoms underwent ionization leading to the formation of a neutral compound. 99Tc complex was also prepared. Although it was not isolated due to the small amount of reagents employed, the HPLC profile was identical to the one observed for the rhenium complex suggesting the same chemical structure. Biodistribution in mice demonstrated early brain uptake, fast blood clearance, excretion through hepatobiliary system and a brain/blood ratio that increased significantly with time. (author)

  4. Chaotic mixing in effective compressible flows

    CERN Document Server

    Volk, Romain; Bourgoin, Mickael; Cottin-Bizonne, Cécile; Ybert, Christophe; Raynal, Florence

    2014-01-01

    We study numerically joint mixing of salt and colloids by a chaotic velocity field $\\mathbf{V}$, and how salt inhomogeneities accelerate or delay colloid mixing by inducing a velocity drift $\\mathbf{V}_{\\rm dp}$ between colloids and fluid particles as proposed in recent experiments \\cite{Deseigne2013}. We demonstrate that because the drift velocity is no longer divergence free, small variations to the total velocity field drastically affect the evolution of colloid variance $\\sigma^2=\\langle C^2 \\rangle - \\langle C \\rangle^2$. A consequence is that mixing strongly depends on the mutual coherence between colloid and salt concentration fields, the short time evolution of scalar variance being governed by a new variance production term $P=- \\langle C^2 \

  5. Biologic

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffman, L H

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we explore the boundary between biology and the study of formal systems (logic). In the end, we arrive at a summary formalism, a chapter in "boundary mathematics" where there are not only containers but also extainers ><, entities open to interaction and distinguishing the space that they are not. The boundary algebra of containers and extainers is to biologic what boolean algebra is to classical logic. We show how this formalism encompasses significant parts of the logic of DNA replication, the Dirac formalism for quantum mechanics, formalisms for protein folding and the basic structure of the Temperley Lieb algebra at the foundations of topological invariants of knots and links.

  6. Colloidal Double Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitelboim, Ayelet; Meir, Noga; Kazes, Miri; Oron, Dan

    2016-05-17

    Pairs of coupled quantum dots with controlled coupling between the two potential wells serve as an extremely rich system, exhibiting a plethora of optical phenomena that do not exist in each of the isolated constituent dots. Over the past decade, coupled quantum systems have been under extensive study in the context of epitaxially grown quantum dots (QDs), but only a handful of examples have been reported with colloidal QDs. This is mostly due to the difficulties in controllably growing nanoparticles that encapsulate within them two dots separated by an energetic barrier via colloidal synthesis methods. Recent advances in colloidal synthesis methods have enabled the first clear demonstrations of colloidal double quantum dots and allowed for the first exploratory studies into their optical properties. Nevertheless, colloidal double QDs can offer an extended level of structural manipulation that allows not only for a broader range of materials to be used as compared with epitaxially grown counterparts but also for more complex control over the coupling mechanisms and coupling strength between two spatially separated quantum dots. The photophysics of these nanostructures is governed by the balance between two coupling mechanisms. The first is via dipole-dipole interactions between the two constituent components, leading to energy transfer between them. The second is associated with overlap of excited carrier wave functions, leading to charge transfer and multicarrier interactions between the two components. The magnitude of the coupling between the two subcomponents is determined by the detailed potential landscape within the nanocrystals (NCs). One of the hallmarks of double QDs is the observation of dual-color emission from a single nanoparticle, which allows for detailed spectroscopy of their properties down to the single particle level. Furthermore, rational design of the two coupled subsystems enables one to tune the emission statistics from single photon

  7. Collective motion in populations of colloidal robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolo, Denis; Bricard, Antoine; Caussin, Jean-Baptiste; Dauchot, Olivier; Desreumaux, Nicolas

    2014-03-01

    Could the behavior of bacteria swarms, fish schools, and bird flocks be understood within a unified framework? Can one ignore the very details of the interaction mechanisms at the individual level to elucidate how strikingly similar collective motion emerges at the group level in this broad range of motile systems? These seemingly provocative questions have triggered significant advance in the physics and the biology, communities over the last decade. In the physics language these systems, made of motile individuals, can all be though as different realizations of ``active matter.'' In this talk, I will show how to gain more insight into this vivid field using self-propelled colloids as a proxy for motile organism. I will show how to motorize colloidal particles capable of sensing the orientation of their neighbors. Then, I will demonstrate that these archetypal populations display spontaneous transitions to swarming motion, and to global directed motion with very few density and orientation fluctuations.

  8. Movie of phase separation during physics of colloids in space experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Still photographs taken over 16 hours on Nov. 13, 2001, on the International Space Station have been condensed into a few seconds to show the de-mixing -- or phase separation -- process studied by the Experiment on Physics of Colloids in Space. Commanded from the ground, dozens of similar tests have been conducted since the experiment arrived on ISS in 2000. The sample is a mix of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA or acrylic) colloids, polystyrene polymers and solvents. The circular area in the video is 2 cm (0.8 in.) in diameter. The phase separation process occurs spontaneously after the sample is mechanically mixed. The evolving lighter regions are rich in colloid and have the structure of a liquid. The dark regions are poor in colloids and have the structure of a gas. This behavior carnot be observed on Earth because gravity causes the particles to fall out of solution faster than the phase separation can occur. While similar to a gas-liquid phase transition, the growth rate observed in this test is different from any atomic gas-liquid or liquid-liquid phase transition ever measured experimentally. Ultimately, the sample separates into colloid-poor and colloid-rich areas, just as oil and vinegar separate. The fundamental science of de-mixing in this colloid-polymer sample is the same found in the annealing of metal alloys and plastic polymer blends. Improving the understanding of this process may lead to improving processing of these materials on Earth.

  9. Phase separation during the Experiment on Physics of Colloids in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Still photographs taken over 16 hours on Nov. 13, 2001, on the International Space Station have been condensed into a few seconds to show the de-mixing -- or phase separation -- process studied by the Experiment on Physics of Colloids in Space. Commanded from the ground, dozens of similar tests have been conducted since the experiment arrived on ISS in 2000. The sample is a mix of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA or acrylic) colloids, polystyrene polymers and solvents. The circular area is 2 cm (0.8 in.) in diameter. The phase separation process occurs spontaneously after the sample is mechanically mixed. The evolving lighter regions are rich in colloid and have the structure of a liquid. The dark regions are poor in colloids and have the structure of a gas. This behavior carnot be observed on Earth because gravity causes the particles to fall out of solution faster than the phase separation can occur. While similar to a gas-liquid phase transition, the growth rate observed in this test is different from any atomic gas-liquid or liquid-liquid phase transition ever measured experimentally. Ultimately, the sample separates into colloid-poor and colloid-rich areas, just as oil and vinegar separate. The fundamental science of de-mixing in this colloid-polymer sample is the same found in the annealing of metal alloys and plastic polymer blends. Improving the understanding of this process may lead to improving processing of these materials on Earth.

  10. Colloidal self-assembly at an interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan McGorty

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Mix a drop of water into a vial of oil. With some surfactant and a vigorous shake, that one droplet has become thousands, and the total interfacial area has increased by an order of magnitude or more. Like the folded membranes in our mitochondria, the alveoli in our lungs, and the catalytic converters in our cars, oil-water emulsions contain a vast reservoir of interfacial area that can be used to control and transform the things that encounter it. The oil-water interface is especially well-suited to directing the assembly of colloidal particles, which bind to it rapidly and often irreversibly.

  11. Colloidal stability and chemical reactivity of complex colloids containing Fe³⁺.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, Y M; Velikov, K P; Kegel, W K

    2014-07-15

    The reactivity of iron contained within insoluble colloidal metal-pyrophosphate salts was determined and compared to the reactivity of a soluble iron salt (FeCl3). As a model system for the reactivity of iron in food products, the formation of an iron-polyphenol complex was followed with spectrophotometry. Three types of systems were prepared and their colloidal stability and reactivity studied: Fe(3+) pyrophosphate, protein-coated Fe(3+) pyrophosphate and mixed-metal pyrophosphates containing Fe(3+) and a second cation M. The additional cation used was either monovalent (sodium) or divalent (M(2+)). It was found that: (i) incorporating iron in a colloidal salt reduced its reactivity compared to free Fe(3+) ions; (ii) coating the particles with a layer of hydrophobic protein (zein) increased stability and further decreased the reactivity. Finally, the most surprising result was that (iii) a mixed system containing more Fe(3+) than M actually increased the reactivity of the contained iron, while the reverse, a system containing excess M, inhibited the reactivity completely. PMID:24594169

  12. U1-RNP and Toll-like receptors in the pathogenesis of mixed connective tissue diseasePart II. Endosomal TLRs and their biological significance in the pathogenesis of mixed connective tissue disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradowska-Gorycka, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is a chronic autoimmune immunopathological disease of unknown etiology, which is characterized by the presence of various clinical symptoms and the presence of autoantibodies against U1-RNP particles. The U1-RNP component engages immune cells and their receptors in a complex network of interactions that ultimately lead to autoimmunity, inflammation, and tissue injury. The anti-U1-RNP autoantibodies form an immune complex with self-RNA, present in MCTD serum, which can act as endosomal Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands. Inhibition of TLRs by nucleic acids is a promising area of research for the development of novel therapeutic strategies against pathogenic infection, tumorigenesis and autoimmunity. In this review we summarize current knowledge of endogenous TLRs and discuss their biological significance in the pathogenesis of MCTD. In part I we described the structure, biological function and significance of the U1-RNP complex in MCTD.

  13. Size Control of 99mTc-tin Colloid Using PVP and Buffer Solution for Sentinel Lymph Node Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Eun-Mi; Lim, Seok Tae; Sohn, Myung-Hee; Jeong, Hwan-Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Colloidal particle size is an important characteristic that allows mapping sentinel nodes in lymphoscintigraphy. This investigation aimed to introduce different ways of making a 99mTc-tin colloid with a size of tens of nanometers. All agents, tin fluoride, sodium fluoride, poloxamer-188, and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), were mixed and labeled with 99mTc. Either phosphate or sodium bicarbonate buffers were used to adjust the pH levels. When the buffers were added, the size of the colloids incre...

  14. Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE) Science Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ronald J.; Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Luna, Unique J.; Chaiken, Paul M.; Hollingsworth, Andrew; Secanna, Stefano; Weitz, David; Lu, Peter; Yodh, Arjun; Yunker, Peter; Lohr, Matthew; Gratale, Matthew; Lynch, Matthew; Kodger, Thomas; Piazza, Roberto; Buzzaccaro, Stefano; Cipelletti, Luca; Schall, Peter; Veen, Sandra; Wegdam, Gerhard; Lee, Chand-Soo; Choi, Chang-Hyung; Paul, Anna-Lisa; Ferl, Robert J.; Cohen, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    The Advanced Colloids Experiment is being conducted on the International Space Station (ISS) using the Light Microscopy Module (LMM) in the Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR). Work to date will be discussed and future plans and opportunities will be highlighted. The LMM is a microscope facility designed to allow scientists to process, manipulate, and characterize colloidal samples in micro-gravity where the absence of gravitational settling and particle jamming enables scientists to study such things as:a.The role that disordered and ordered-packing of spheres play in the phase diagram and equation of state of hard sphere systems,b.crystal nucleation and growth, growth instabilities, and the glass transition, c.gelation and phase separation of colloid polymer mixtures,d.crystallization of colloidal binary alloys,e.competition between crystallization and phase separation,f.effects of anisotropy and specific interactions on packing, aggregation, frustration and crystallization,g.effects of specific reversible and irreversible interactions mediated in the first case by hybridization of complementary DNA strands attached to separate colloidal particles,h.Lock and key interactions between colloids with dimples and spheres which match the size and shape of the dimples,i.finding the phase diagrams of isotropic and interacting particles,j.new techniques for complex self-assembly including scenarios for self-replication, k.critical Casimir forces,l.biology (real and model systems) in microgravity,m.etc. By adding additional microscopy capabilities to the existing LMM, NASA will increase the tools available for scientists that fly experiments on the ISS enabling scientists to observe directly what is happening at the particle level. Presently, theories are needed to bridge the gap between what is being observed (at a macroscopic level when photographing samples) with what is happening at a particle (or microscopic) level. What is happening at a microscopic level will be directly

  15. TECHNIQUES FOR MAKING BIOLOGICS AND MINERAL NITROGEN AND THEIR INFLUENCE ON THE YIELD OF THE MIXED CROPS IN THE CONDITIONS OF GREY FOREST SOILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shkotova O. N.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In the conditions of grey forest soils in the Bryansk region among the fodder crops widespread mixed legume-cereal crops. The results showed that the photosynthetic activity of cereals and leguminous crops and their yields in mixed crops depended on made of biological and mineral nitrogen fertilizers. It is established that the nitrogen in the form of ammonium nitrate has a positive impact on the formation of assimilating leaf surface, photosynthetic potential and net productivity and yield of grain mixture in lupine-barley and soybean -barley cropping and pea-barley crops the use of nitrogen in the form of potassium nitrate was more favorable. It was found that in lupine-barley crops the active symbiotic potential has increased by 25,5% and the yield increased by 21,3% , in soybean-barley crops 28,5% and 19,2% respectively, due to the joint use of a mixture of symbiotic and associative rhizobacteria and mineral nitrogen in the form of ammonium nitrate in the dose of N60. In pea-barley agrocenosis it has improved the efficiency of cultivation of joint application of mixed inoculant symbiotic and associative rhizobacteria on the background of the application of mineral nitrogen in the form of potassium nitrate in the dose of N60, where there was an increase of the active symbiotic potential by 34,7% and grain yield by 24,7% compared to the option when adding the mixture of biological products

  16. Comparison of complex permittivities of isotonic colloids containing single-wall carbon nanotubes of varying chirality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Tejas; Symanowski, James T; Gach, H Michael

    2012-02-01

    The application of bio-compatible, conductive nanoparticles in combination with radiofrequency (RF) irradiation to raise tissue temperatures between 40 and 60 °C for hyperthermia and ablation spurred interest in the complex permittivities of isotonic nanoparticle-based colloids. Nanoparticles with large aspect ratios and high permittivities increase the bulk permittivity of the colloid and RF losses at the macroscopic scale. The complex permittivities of isotonic colloids with and without single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) containing either metallic, semiconducting, or mixed chiralities were measured from 20 MHz to 1 GHz at room temperature. The colloids were made with one of three different isotonic solvents: phosphate buffered saline (PBS), and Dulbecco's modified eagle medium (DMEM) with and without 0.5% weight/volume bovine serum albumin to simulate cytosol and blood, respectively. The concentration of elemental carbon from the SWCNTs in the colloids ranged from 16 to 17 mM. The permittivities were corrected for electrode polarization effects by fitting the data to the Cole-Cole relaxation model with a constant phase angle element. The presence of SWCNTs increased both the real and imaginary components of the permittivities of the colloids. For all three solvents, the direct current (DC) components of the real and imaginary permittivities were greatest for the colloids containing the mixed chirality SWCNTs, followed by the colloids with semiconducting SWCNTs, and then metallic SWCNTs.

  17. Polymers and colloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schurtenberger, P. [ETH Zurich, Inst. fuer Polymere, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1996-11-01

    A wealth of structural information from colloid and polymer solutions on a large range of length scales can be obtained using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments. After a general introduction to the field of soft condensed matter, I shall give a few selected examples on how SANS combined with suitable contrast variation schemes can be used to extract information on the size and conformation of polymer coils in solution and in the melt, and on the local structure and flexibility of polymerlike micelles and microemulsions. (author) 8 figs., tabs., 44 refs.

  18. A mass-balance model to separate and quantify colloidal and solute redistributions in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bern, C.R.; Chadwick, O.A.; Hartshorn, A.S.; Khomo, L.M.; Chorover, J.

    2011-01-01

    Studies of weathering and pedogenesis have long used calculations based upon low solubility index elements to determine mass gains and losses in open systems. One of the questions currently unanswered in these settings is the degree to which mass is transferred in solution (solutes) versus suspension (colloids). Here we show that differential mobility of the low solubility, high field strength (HFS) elements Ti and Zr can trace colloidal redistribution, and we present a model for distinguishing between mass transfer in suspension and solution. The model is tested on a well-differentiated granitic catena located in Kruger National Park, South Africa. Ti and Zr ratios from parent material, soil and colloidal material are substituted into a mixing equation to quantify colloidal movement. The results show zones of both colloid removal and augmentation along the catena. Colloidal losses of 110kgm-2 (-5% relative to parent material) are calculated for one eluviated soil profile. A downslope illuviated profile has gained 169kgm-2 (10%) colloidal material. Elemental losses by mobilization in true solution are ubiquitous across the catena, even in zones of colloidal accumulation, and range from 1418kgm-2 (-46%) for an eluviated profile to 195kgm-2 (-23%) at the bottom of the catena. Quantification of simultaneous mass transfers in solution and suspension provide greater specificity on processes within soils and across hillslopes. Additionally, because colloids include both HFS and other elements, the ability to quantify their redistribution has implications for standard calculations of soil mass balances using such index elements. ?? 2011.

  19. International workshop on colloids and colloid-facilitated transport of contaminants in soils and sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The workshop was organized to review the present knowledge of colloid behavior and transport in porous media systems and the possibility of colloid-bound transport of contaminants, pesticide and nutrients in soil and groundwater. The four main topics at the workshop were 1) colloidal behavior and properties, 2) colloid mobilization and transport, 3) sorption onto colloids and facilitated transport of contaminants, and 4) modeling of colloidal and colloid-facilitated transport

  20. A Novel Sintered Porous Micromixer for the Effective Mixing of Biologics and Scale Model Investigation of Micromixing Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Stevens

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a parametric investigation of a porous 3D micro-mixer as well as a 10:1 scale model of the same used to examine the influence of the contributions of both diffusion and advection to successful mixing of fluids of different viscosity. Experiments at both scales implement the laser induced fluorescence technique to capture the evolution of concentration gradients at the mixer outlet. Mixing performance strongly increases with flow rate in the micromixing apparatus but only moderately in the scale-up suggesting important scale-dependent manipulation of diffusion.

  1. Quantitative and qualitative examination of particle-particle interactions using colloidal probe nanoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Sa, Dexter; Chan, Hak-Kim; Kim, Hae-Won; Chrzanowski, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Colloidal Probe Nanoscopy (CPN), the study of the nano-scale interactive forces between a specifically prepared colloidal probe and any chosen substrate using the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), can provide key insights into physical interactions present within colloidal systems. Colloidal systems are widely existent in several applications including, pharmaceuticals, foods, paints, paper, soil and minerals, detergents, printing and much more.1-3 Furthermore, colloids can exist in many states such as emulsions, foams and suspensions. Using colloidal probe nanoscopy one can obtain key information on the adhesive properties, binding energies and even gain insight into the physical stability and coagulation kinetics of the colloids present within. Additionally, colloidal probe nanoscopy can be used with biological cells to aid in drug discovery and formulation development. In this paper we describe a method for conducting colloidal probe nanoscopy, discuss key factors that are important to consider during the measurement, and show that both quantitative and qualitative data that can be obtained from such measurements. PMID:25080136

  2. Probing Interfacial Water on Nanodiamonds in Colloidal Dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Tristan; Yuzawa, Hayato; Nagasaka, Masanari; Yamanoi, Ryoko; Osawa, Eiji; Kosugi, Nobuhiro; Aziz, Emad F

    2015-08-01

    The structure of interfacial water layers around nanoparticles dispersed in an aqueous environment may have a significant impact on their reactivity and on their interaction with biological species. Using transmission soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy in liquid, we demonstrate that the unoccupied electronic states of oxygen atoms from water molecules in aqueous colloidal dispersions of nanodiamonds have a different signature than bulk water. X-ray absorption spectroscopy can thus probe interfacial water molecules in colloidal dispersions. The impacts of nanodiamond surface chemistry and concentration on interfacial water electronic signature are discussed. PMID:26267179

  3. MORE: mixed optimization for reverse engineering--an application to modeling biological networks response via sparse systems of nonlinear differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambo, Francesco; de Oca, Marco A Montes; Di Camillo, Barbara; Toffolo, Gianna; Stützle, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Reverse engineering is the problem of inferring the structure of a network of interactions between biological variables from a set of observations. In this paper, we propose an optimization algorithm, called MORE, for the reverse engineering of biological networks from time series data. The model inferred by MORE is a sparse system of nonlinear differential equations, complex enough to realistically describe the dynamics of a biological system. MORE tackles separately the discrete component of the problem, the determination of the biological network topology, and the continuous component of the problem, the strength of the interactions. This approach allows us both to enforce system sparsity, by globally constraining the number of edges, and to integrate a priori information about the structure of the underlying interaction network. Experimental results on simulated and real-world networks show that the mixed discrete/continuous optimization approach of MORE significantly outperforms standard continuous optimization and that MORE is competitive with the state of the art in terms of accuracy of the inferred networks.

  4. Surface Chemical Properties of Colloids in Main Soils of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAYI-JIE; YUANCHAO-LIANG

    1991-01-01

    Surface chemical properties of soil colloids are the important factor affecting soil fertility and genesis.To provide scientific basis for soil genetic classification,promotion of soil fertility and reasonable fertilizqation,the specific surface area and electric charge of soil colloids in relation to clay minerals and organic matter are further discussed on the basis of the results obtained from the studies on surface chemical properties of soil colloids in five main soils of China.Results from the studies show that the effect of clay minerals and organic matter on the surface chemical properties of soil colloids is very complicated because the siloxane surface,hydrated oxide surface and organic matter surface do not exist separately,but they are always mixed together and influenced each other.The understanding of the relationship among clay minerals,organic matter and surface chemical properties of soil colloids depends upon further study of the relevant disciplines of soil science,especially the study on the mechanisms of organo-mineral complexes.

  5. Shelf-life extension and improving micro-biological quality of mixed peas with diced carrot by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mixed peas with diced carrot were collected and examined for their microbiological quality. All the examined samples had high level of microbial load. All examined samples contained Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Enterococcus faecalis (Ent. faecalis). Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) was detected in only 4 of samples (26.3%). The tested samples were free from Aeromonas hydrophila (A. hydrophila), Listeria monocytogenes (L monocytogenes) and Salmonella species. Gamma irradiation caused a great reduction in all microbial loads. During refrigerated storage, the counts of all microorganisms increased, but the rate of increase was slower as the irradiation dose increased. Irradiation dose of 3 kGy was the optimum dose for preservation of mixed peas with diced carrot which extended the refrigeration shelf-life up to 21 days and it was sufficient in eliminating pathogenic bacteria without affecting their sensory quality and with negligible effect on chemical quality.

  6. Public views on the donation and use of human biological samples in biomedical research: a mixed methods study

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, C.; Clotworthy, M.; Hilton, S; MaGee, C.; Robertson, M. J.; Stubbins, L.J.; Corfield, J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective A mixed methods study exploring the UK general public's willingness to donate human biosamples (HBSs) for biomedical research. Setting Cross-sectional focus groups followed by an online survey. Participants Twelve focus groups (81 participants) selectively sampled to reflect a range of demographic groups; 1110 survey responders recruited through a stratified sampling method with quotas set on sex, age, geographical location, socioeconomic group and ethnicity. Main outcom...

  7. Liquid crystal boojum-colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colloidal particles dispersed in a liquid crystal (LC) lead to distortions of the director field. The distortions are responsible for long-range effective colloidal interactions whose asymptotic behaviour is well understood. The short-distance behaviour depends on the structure and dynamics of the topological defects nucleated near the colloidal particles and a full nonlinear theory is required to describe it. Spherical colloidal particles with strong planar degenerate anchoring nucleate a pair of antipodal surface topological defects, known as boojums. We use the Landau-de Gennes theory to resolve the mesoscopic structure of the boojum cores and to determine the pairwise colloidal interactions. We compare the results in three (3D) and two (2D) spatial dimensions for spherical and disc-like colloidal particles, respectively. The corresponding free energy functionals are minimized numerically using finite elements with adaptive meshes. Boojums are always point-like in 2D, but acquire a rather complex structure in 3D, which depends on the combination of the anchoring potential, the radius of the colloid, the temperature and the LC elastic anisotropy. We identify three types of defect cores in 3D that we call single, double and split-core boojums, and investigate the associated structural transitions. The split-core structure is favoured by low temperatures, strong anchoring and small twist to splay or bend ratios. For sufficiently strong anchoring potentials characterized by a well-defined uniaxial minimum, the split-core boojums are the only stable configuration. In the presence of two colloidal particles, we observe substantial re-arrangements of the inner defects in both 3D and 2D. These re-arrangements lead to qualitative changes in the force-distance profile when compared to the asymptotic quadrupole-quadrupole interaction. In line with the experimental results, the presence of the defects prevents coalescence of the colloidal particles in 2D, but not in 3D

  8. Interaction between the biological effects of high- and low-LET radiation dose components in a mixed field exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mason, Anna J.; Giusti, Valerio; Green, Stuart;

    2011-01-01

    The relative biological effectiveness of two epithermal neutron sources, a reactor based source at Studsvik, Sweden, and a proton accelerator-based source in Birmingham, UK, was studied in relation to the proportional absorbed dose distribution as a function of neutron energy. Evidence for any...

  9. High School Biology Students' Transfer of the Concept of Natural Selection: A Mixed-Methods Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Kevin J.; Koskey, Kristin L. K.; Linnenbrink-Garcia, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    The concept of natural selection serves as a foundation for understanding diverse biological concepts and has broad applicability to other domains. However, we know little about students' abilities to transfer (i.e. apply to a new context or use generatively) this concept and the relation between students' conceptual understanding and…

  10. Evidence for anecdotes: Examining use of stories in introductory biology courses with a mixed-methods approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreps, Jennifer Susan

    2005-11-01

    Instructional stories can be an effective way to teach science concepts. However, research has not examined the extent to which stories are being used, and how they are received. More research on the use of story in biology classes may lead to more conscious use of story by instructors, which may lead to a better understanding of biological concepts by students. The purpose of this study was to examine how instructors and students use stories in university introductory biology courses, and the degree to which these stories are perceived to be effective. To examine this phenomenon, a nationwide instructor survey, a university-wide student survey, and multiple case studies were used. Two case studies included observation of lectures, interviews with (36) students, and interviews with instructors (4) over two semesters of an organismal biology course. Instructor survey participants (N = 78) were gathered by posting email invitations, and student survey participants (N = 260) were volunteers from introductory biology courses at a middle-sized university. Several types of stories were observed, including personal experience stories, historical anecdotes, and "you" stories. Students reported increased affective learning when stories were told, and remembered mostly humorous stories. In the instructor survey, no significant differences emerged between genders, type of biology taught, or communicator style and instructional story frequency. However, reports of personal experience story frequency did increase significantly (p differences in story use by gender or ethnicity, although non-science majors reported that their instructors used stories significantly more frequently (p < .01) than did science majors. Simultaneous-entry multiple regression analyses indicated that there was a significant positive relationship between story use and cognitive and affective learning for all groups of students. Story use was a significant predictor of perceived learning loss for non

  11. Mixed hemimicelles solid-phase extraction of cephalosporins in biological samples with ionic liquid-coated magnetic graphene oxide nanoparticles coupled with high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianrong; Zhao, Hongyan; Xiao, Deli; Chuong, Pham-Huy; He, Jia; He, Hua

    2016-07-01

    A novel mixed hemimicelles solid phase extraction based on magnetic graphene oxide (Fe3O4/GO) and ionic liquid (IL) was developed for the simultaneous extraction and determination of trace cephalosporins in spiked human urine. The high surface area and excellent adsorption capacity of the graphene oxide after modification with1-hexadecyl-3-methylmidazoliumbromide(C16mimBr) were utilized adequately in the solid phase extraction(SPE) process. A comprehensive study of the parameters affecting the extraction recovery, such as the zeta-potential of magnetic graphene oxide, amounts of magnetic graphene oxide and surfactant, pH of solution, ionic strength, extraction time, and desorption condition were optimized. A comparative study on the use of different surfacant-coated Fe3O4/GO NPs as sorbents was presented. Good linearity (R(2)>0.9987) for all calibration curves was obtained. The LODs were ranged between 0.6 and 1.9ng mL(-1) for the cephalosporins and the LOQs were 1.5 to 5.5, respectively. Satisfactory recoveries(84.3% to 101.7%)and low relative standard deviations from 1.7% to 6.3% in biological matrices were achieved. The mixed hemimicelles magnetic SPE (MSPE) method based on ILs and Fe3O4/GO NPs magnetic separation has ever been successfully used for pretreatment of complex biological samples. PMID:27266334

  12. Colloidal microcapsules: Surface engineering of nanoparticles for interfacial assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Debabrata

    2011-12-01

    Colloidal Microcapsules (MCs), i.e. capsules stabilized by nano-/microparticle shells are highly modular inherently multi-scale constructs with applications in many areas of material and biological sciences e.g. drug delivery, encapsulation and microreactors. These MCs are fabricated by stabilizing emulsions via self-assembly of colloidal micro/nanoparticles at liquid-liquid interface. In these systems, colloidal particles serve as modular building blocks, allowing incorporation of the particle properties into the functional capabilities of the MCs. As an example, nanoparticles (NPs) can serve as appropriate antennae to induce response by external triggers (e.g. magnetic fields or laser) for controlled release of encapsulated materials. Additionally, the dynamic nature of the colloidal assembly at liquid-liquid interfaces result defects free organized nanostructures with unique electronic, magnetic and optical properties which can be tuned by their dimension and cooperative interactions. The physical properties of colloidal microcapsules such as permeability, mechanical strength, and biocompatibility can be precisely controlled through the proper choice of colloids and preparation conditions for their. This thesis illustrates the fabrication of stable and robust MCs through via chemical crosslinking of the surface engineered NPs at oil-water interface. The chemical crosslinking assists NPs to form a stable 2-D network structure at the emulsion interface, imparting robustness to the emulsions. In brief, we developed the strategies for altering the nature of chemical interaction between NPs at the emulsion interface and investigated their role during the self-assembly process. Recently, we have fabricated stable colloidal microcapsule (MCs) using covalent, dative as well as non-covalent interactions and demonstrated their potential applications including encapsulation, size selective release, functional devices and biocatalysts.

  13. Colloids in Paints Colloids and Interface Science, Volume 6

    CERN Document Server

    Tadros, Tharwat F

    2011-01-01

    The first modern approach to relate fundamental research to the applied science of colloids, this series bridges academic research and practical applications, thus providing the information vital to both. Written by the very best scientists in their respective disciplines, this volume describes the role of colloids in paints, highlighting the importance of fundamental research in industrial applications.For surface, polymer and physicochemists, materials scientists, and chemical engineers.

  14. Are All Colloids Same? How to Select the Right Colloid?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukanya Mitra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The administration of intravenous fluids is one of the most common and universal interventions in medicine. Colloids are an alternative to the frequently used crystalloids, with highly variable use depending on a myriad of clinical variables. A colloid is defined as a high molecular weight (MW substance that largely remains in the intravas-eular compartment, thereby generating an oncotic pressure. Colloids are considered to have a greater intravaseular persistence when compared to crystalloids. All colloids, however, are clearly not the same. Differences in the physi-cochemical properties, pharmacokinetics and safety profile exist amongst various colloids. This review explores the different types of colloids, with their properties and usefulness as well as adverse effects. While all the available colloids are reviewed briefly (e.g., albumin, gelatin, dextran with respect to their pharmacology, indications, advan-tages and disadvantages, particular emphasis is laid on the hydroxyethyl starches (HES because of their rising prominence. It is shown that HES differ widely in their physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties, composition, usefulness, and especially in their adverse effect profiles. The third generation HES (tetrastarches, in particular, seem to offer a unique combination of safety and efficacy. Several issues related to this are discussed in detail. This review of the available clinical data demonstrates that HES should not be regarded as one homogenous group, and data for one product should not be automatically extrapolated to another. Thus, among the synthetic colloids, the tetrastarches appear to offer the best currently available compromise between efficacy, safety profile, and cost. They also appear to be the best suited for use in the intensive care setting. Finally, balanced (rather than saline-based HES solutions appear promising as a plasma-adapted volume replacement strategy and may further refine the ongoing quest of

  15. Controlling the Transient Interface Shape and Deposition Profile Left by Desiccation of Colloidal Droplets on Multiple Polymer Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning, Peter David

    A colloidal suspension is a small constituent of insoluble solid particles suspended in a liquid medium. Control over the wetting, evaporation, and deposition patterns left by colloidal suspensions is valuable in many biological, medical, industrial, and agricultural applications. Understanding the governing principles of wetting and evaporative phenomena of these colloidal suspensions may lead to greater control over resultant deposition patterns. Perhaps the most familiar pattern forms when an initially heterogeneous colloidal suspension leaves a dark ring pattern at the edge of a drop. This pattern is referred to as a coffee-stain and it can be seen from dried droplets of spilled coffee. This coffee-stain effect was first investigated by Deegan et. al. who discovered that these patterns occur when outward radial flows driven by evaporation at the triple contact line dominate over other effects. While the presence of coffee-stain patterns is undesirable in many printing and medical diagnostic processes, it can also be advantageous in the production of low cost transparent conductive films, the deposition of metal vapor, and the manipulation of biological structures. Controlling the interactions between the substrate, liquid, vapor, and particles can lead to control over the size and morphology of evaporative deposition patterns left by aqueous colloidal suspensions. Several methods have been developed to control the evaporation of colloidal suspensions to either suppress or enhance the coffee stain effect. Electrowetting on Dielectric (EWOD) is one promising method that has been used to control colloidal depositions by applying either an AC or DC electric field. EWOD actuation has the potential to dynamically control colloidal deposition left by desiccated droplets to either suppress or enhance the coffee stain effect. It may also allow for independent control of the fluidic interface and deposition of particles via electrowetting and electrokinetic forces

  16. Effect of additives on properties of colloidal silica bonded Al2O3-SiC-C iron trough ramming mix%添加剂对硅溶胶结合 Al2O3-SiC-C 铁沟捣打料性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐勇

    2015-01-01

    以特级矾土(粒径8~5、5~3和3~1 mm)、棕刚玉(粒径3~1、≤1和≤0.074 mm)、碳化硅(粒径≤1和≤0.074 mm)和球状沥青为主要原料,金属硅和碳化硼为抗氧化剂和促烧剂,添加超微粉或焦作黏土,以硅溶胶作结合剂,采用手工捣打成型工艺来制备 Al2 O3-SiC-C 铁沟捣打料。研究了硅微粉、α-Al2 O3微粉、焦作黏土和有机防爆纤维对硅溶胶结合 Al2 O3-SiC-C 铁沟捣打料性能的影响。结果表明:添加2%质量分数硅微粉、3%质量分数焦作黏土或0.05%质量分数有机防爆纤维对硅溶胶结合 Al2 O3-SiC-C 铁沟捣打料的体积密度影响不大。含9%质量分数α-Al2 O3微粉的试样和含6%质量分数α-Al2 O3微粉、3%质量分数焦作黏土的试样显示出更好的常温强度。合理的颗粒级配可以提高铁沟捣打料试样的抗高炉渣侵蚀性。含6%质量分数α-Al2 O3微粉、3%质量分数焦作黏土的试样的抗渣侵蚀性最好;含7%质量分数α-Al2 O3微粉、2%质量分数硅微粉的试样的抗渣侵蚀性次之;含9%质量分数α-Al2 O3微粉的试样的抗渣侵蚀性最差。有机防爆纤维提高了捣打料的烘后强度,但使抗渣性能有所降低。硅溶胶结合 Al2 O3-SiC-C 铁沟捣打料试样在1450℃煅烧后质量增加,有利于体积稳定性和抗渣性能。%The Al2 O3-SiC-C iron trough ramming mix was prepared using extra grade bauxite (particle size:8-5 ,5-3 and 3-1 mm),brown corundum (particle size:3-1、≤1 and ≤0.074 mm),silicon carbide (particle size:≤1 and ≤0.074 mm)and ball pitch as main starting materials,metallic silicon and boron carbide as antioxidant and sintering aid,adding ultra-micro powders or Jiaozuo clay,colloidal silica as binder,ramming and shaping.Effect of silica mi-cropowder,α-Al2 O3 micropowder,Jiaozuo clay and organic explosion-proof fiber on properties of colloidal silica bonded Al2 O3-SiC-C iron

  17. Active colloids in complex fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Patteson, Alison E; Arratia, Paulo E

    2016-01-01

    We review recent work on active colloids or swimmers, such as self-propelled microorganisms, phoretic colloidal particles, and artificial micro-robotic systems, moving in fluid-like environments. These environments can be water-like and Newtonian but can frequently contain macromolecules, flexible polymers, soft cells, or hard particles, which impart complex, nonlinear rheological features to the fluid. While significant progress has been made on understanding how active colloids move and interact in Newtonian fluids, little is known on how active colloids behave in complex and non-Newtonian fluids. An emerging literature is starting to show how fluid rheology can dramatically change the gaits and speeds of individual swimmers. Simultaneously, a moving swimmer induces time dependent, three dimensional fluid flows, that can modify the medium (fluid) rheological properties. This two-way, non-linear coupling at microscopic scales has profound implications at meso- and macro-scales: steady state suspension proper...

  18. Resonant phenomena in colloidal crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Palberg, Thomas; Würth, Mathias; König, Peter; Simnacher, Erwin; Leiderer, Paul

    1992-01-01

    Colloidal crystals of completely deionized suspensions of latex speres are subjected to oscillatory and steady shear, as well as to homogeneous and inhomogeneous electric fields. Various resonant phenomena observed in such experiments are reported.

  19. Accelerated lattice Boltzmann model for colloidal suspensions rheology and interface morphology

    CERN Document Server

    Farhat, Hassan; Kondaraju, Sasidhar

    2014-01-01

    Colloids are ubiquitous in the food, medical, cosmetics, polymers, water purification, and pharmaceutical industries. The thermal, mechanical, and storage properties of colloids are highly dependent on their interface morphology and their rheological behavior. Numerical methods provide a convenient and reliable tool for the study of colloids. Accelerated Lattice Boltzmann Model for Colloidal Suspensions introduce the main building-blocks for an improved lattice Boltzmann–based numerical tool designed for the study of colloidal rheology and interface morphology. This book also covers the migrating multi-block used to simulate single component, multi-component, multiphase, and single component multiphase flows and their validation by experimental, numerical, and analytical solutions.   Among other topics discussed are the hybrid lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for surfactant-covered droplets; biological suspensions such as blood; used in conjunction with the suppression of coalescence for investigating the...

  20. Re-shaping colloidal clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Daniela

    2015-03-01

    Controlling the geometry and yield of anisotropic colloidal particles remains a challenge for hierarchical self-assembly. I will discuss a synthetic strategy for fabricating colloidal clusters by creating order in randomly aggregated polymer spheres using surface tension and geometrical constraints. The technique can be extended to a variety of charge-stabilized polymer spheres and offers control over the cluster size distribution. VENI grant from The Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO).

  1. Mechanical Failure in Colloidal Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodger, Thomas Edward

    When colloidal particles in a dispersion are made attractive, they aggregate into fractal clusters which grow to form a space-spanning network, or gel, even at low volume fractions. These gels are crucial to the rheological behavior of many personal care, food products and dispersion-based paints. The mechanical stability of these products relies on the stability of the colloidal gel network which acts as a scaffold to provide these products with desired mechanical properties and to prevent gravitational sedimentation of the dispersed components. Understanding the mechanical stability of such colloidal gels is thus of crucial importance to predict and control the properties of many soft solids. Once a colloidal gel forms, the heterogeneous structure bonded through weak physical interactions, is immediately subject to body forces, such as gravity, surface forces, such as adhesion to a container walls and shear forces; the interplay of these forces acting on the gel determines its stability. Even in the absence of external stresses, colloidal gels undergo internal rearrangements within the network that may cause the network structure to evolve gradually, in processes known as aging or coarsening or fail catastrophically, in a mechanical instability known as syneresis. Studying gel stability in the laboratory requires model colloidal system which may be tuned to eliminate these body or endogenous forces systematically. Using existing chemistry, I developed several systems to study delayed yielding by eliminating gravitational stresses through density matching and cyclic heating to induce attraction; and to study syneresis by eliminating adhesion to the container walls, altering the contact forces between colloids, and again, inducing gelation through heating. These results elucidate the varied yet concomitant mechanisms by which colloidal gels may locally or globally yield, but then reform due to the nature of the physical, or non-covalent, interactions which form

  2. Feedback control of colloidal transport

    OpenAIRE

    Gernert, R.; Loos, S. A. M.; Lichtner, K.; Klapp, S. H. L.

    2015-01-01

    We review recent work on feedback control of one-dimensional colloidal systems, both with instantaneous feedback and with time delay. The feedback schemes are based on measurement of the average particle position, a natural control target for an ensemble of colloidal particles, and the systems are investigated via the Fokker-Planck equation for overdamped Brownian particles. Topics include the reversal of current and the emergence of current oscillations, transport in ratchet systems, and the...

  3. Magnetic silica colloids for catalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Claesson, E.M.; Mehendale, N.C.; Klein Gebbink, R. J. M.; van Koten, G; Philipse, A. P.

    2007-01-01

    Monodisperse magnetizable colloidal silica particles in a stable dispersion have been functionalized with a homogeneous catalyst: a PCP–pincer Pd-complex. In a proof-of-principle experiment we demonstrate the catalytic activity of the colloids in a C–C bond formation reaction. Advantages of the magnetic silica carriers are the large surface-to-volume ratio and the easy recovery by magnetic separation. After magnetic separation, the catalyst-loaded particles are readily redispersed for further...

  4. STAR-POLYMER -- COLLOID MIXTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.Dzubiella

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent results in theory and simulation of star-polymer--colloid mixtures are reviewed. We present the effective interaction between hard, colloidal particles and star polymers in a good solvent derived by monomer-resolved Molecular Dynamics simulations and theoretical arguments. The relevant parameters are the size ratio q between the stars and the colloids, as well as the number of polymeric arms f (functionality attached to the common center of the star. By covering a wide range of q's ranging from zero (star against a flat wall up to about 0.5, we establish analytical forms for the star-colloid interaction which are in excellent agreement with simulation results. By employing this cross interaction and the effective interactions between stars and colloids themselves, a demixing transition in the fluid phase is observed and systematically investigated for different arm numbers and size ratios. The demixing binodals are compared with experimental observations and found to be consistent. Furthermore, we map the full two-component system on an effective one-component description for the colloids, by inverting the two-component Ornstein-Zernike equations. Some recent results for the depletion interaction and freezing transitions are shown.

  5. Semiconductor nanostructures in biological applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexson, Dimitri [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Chen Hongfeng [Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Cho, Michael [Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Dutta, Mitra [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Li Yang [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Shi, Peng [Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Raichura, Amit [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Ramadurai, Dinakar [Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Parikh, Shaunak [Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Stroscio, Michael A [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Vasudev, Milana [Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States)

    2005-07-06

    Semiconductor nanostructures in biological applications are discussed. Results are presented on the use of colloidal semiconductor quantum dots both as biological tags and as structures that interact with and influence biomolecules. Results are presented on the use of semiconducting carbon nanotubes in biological applications. (topical review)

  6. Dose calculation in biological samples in a mixed neutron-gamma field at the TRIGA reactor of the University of Mainz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitz, T.; Blaickner, M.; Schütz, C.;

    2010-01-01

    and pin-diodes. Material and methods. When L-α-alanine is irradiated with ionizing radiation, it forms a stable radical which can be detected by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The value of the ESR signal correlates to the amount of absorbed dose. The dose for each pellet is calculated using...... biological effectiveness (RBE) of liver and cancer cells in our mixed neutron and gamma field. We work with alanine detectors in combination with Monte Carlo simulations, where we can measure and characterize the dose. To verify our calculations we perform neutron flux measurements using gold foil activation...... to the neutron fluence directly. Results and discussion. Gold foil activation and the pin-diode are reliable fluence measurement systems for the TRIGA reactor, Mainz. Alanine dosimetry of the photon field and charged particle field from secondary reactions can in principle be carried out in combination with MC-calculations...

  7. Studies on the biological behaviour of uranium-plutonium mixed oxide aerosols: Inhalation experiments with rats and in vitro studies with alveolar macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The retention of spherical and of irregularly shaped (U, Pu) mixed oxides in rat lung was analyzed after inhalation and intratracheal instillation. Their biological behaviour was relatively independent of particle shape and application route with only a few percent of radioactivity being transferred to other organs. In vivo and in vitro uptake and intracellular distribution in rat and bovine alveolar macrophages were analyzed as dependent on various parameters. In addition, detailed electron microscopic studies were performed demonstrating particles within membrane limited vacuoles as well as lying free in the cytoplasm. Under in vitro conditions the uptake process was finished after a few hours. After differential centrifugation of lung or macrophage homogenates the particles sedimented in the first (1000 g) fraction. (orig.)

  8. Structure of binary mixed polymer Langmuir layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernardini, C.

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of preparing 2D stable emulsions through mixing of homopolymers in a Langmuir monolayer is the core topic of this thesis. While colloid science has achieved well established results in the study of bulk dispersed systems, accounts on properties of mixed monomolecular films are fewer,

  9. Mixed hemimicelles solid-phase extraction based on sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-coated nano-magnets for the spectrophotometric determination of Fingolomid in biological fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azari, Zhila; Pourbasheer, Eslam; Beheshti, Abolghasem

    2016-01-01

    In this study, mixed hemimicelles solid-phase extraction (SPE) based on sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-coated nano-magnets Fe3O4 was investigated as a novel method for the separation and determination of Fingolimod (FLM) in water, urine and plasma samples prior to spectrophotometeric determination. Due to the high surface area of these new sorbents and the excellent adsorption capacity after surface modification by SDS, satisfactory extraction recoveries can be produced. The main factors affecting the adsolubilization of analysts, such as pH, surfactant and adsorbent amounts, ionic strength, extraction time and desorption conditions were studied and optimized. Under the selected conditions, FLM has been quantitatively extracted. The accuracy of the method was evaluated by recovery measurements on spiked samples, and good recoveries of 96%, 95% and 88% were observed for water, urine and plasma respectively. Proper linear behaviors over the investigated concentration ranges of 2-26, 2-17 and 2-13 mg/L with good coefficients of determination, 0.998, 0.997 and 0.995 were achieved for water, urine and plasma samples, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that a mixed hemimicelles SPE method based on magnetic separation and nanoparticles has been used as a simple and sensitive method for monitoring of FLM in water and biological samples.

  10. Charged colloids, polyelectrolytes and biomolecules viewed as strongly coupled Coulomb systems

    CERN Document Server

    Löwen, H; Likos, C N; Blaak, R; Dzubiella, J; Jusufi, A; Hoffmann, N; Harreis, H M

    2003-01-01

    A brief review is given on recent studies of charged soft matter solutions, as modelled by the 'primitive' approach of strongly coupled Coulomb systems, where the solvent just enters as a dielectric background. These include charged colloids, biological macromolecules such as proteins and DNA, polyelectrolytes and polyelectrolyte stars. Also some original results are presented on colloid-polyelectrolyte complex formation near walls and on the anomalous fluid structure of polyelectrolyte stars as a function of increasing concentration.

  11. Charged colloids, polyelectrolytes and biomolecules viewed as strongly coupled Coulomb systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief review is given on recent studies of charged soft matter solutions, as modelled by the 'primitive' approach of strongly coupled Coulomb systems, where the solvent just enters as a dielectric background. These include charged colloids, biological macromolecules such as proteins and DNA, polyelectrolytes and polyelectrolyte stars. Also some original results are presented on colloid-polyelectrolyte complex formation near walls and on the anomalous fluid structure of polyelectrolyte stars as a function of increasing concentration

  12. Nodular colloid degeneration over herpes zoster scars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittal R

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available A rare case of nodular colloid degeneration is reported which presented clinically as plaques studded with soft yellow papules simulating adult colloid milia superimposed only on herpes zoster scars of right side of the face.

  13. Polymeric stabilization of colloidal asphaltenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashmi, Sara; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2010-03-01

    Asphaltenes, the heaviest component of crude oil, cause many problems in petroleum extraction and recovery. Operationally defined as insoluble in long chain alkanes but soluble in toluene, asphaltenes have been described by bulk thermodynamic models such as the Flory-Huggins theory. However, bulk models work well only for asphaltenes in good solvents. Characterization of asphaltenes in poor solvents remains elusive: molecular scale asphaltenes readily aggregate to the colloidal scale and become highly unstable in solution. We investigate the ability of polymers to stabilize colloidal asphaltene suspensions in heptane. In the absence of added polymer, sedimentation measurements reveal dynamics reminiscent of collapsing gels. Adding polymers to colloidal asphaltene suspensions can delay the characteristic sedimentation time by orders of magnitude. Light scattering results suggest that the mechanism of stabilization may be related to a decrease in both particle size and polydispersity as a function of added polymer.

  14. Colloid Release from Soil Aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per;

    2012-01-01

    content measured using a more classical end-over-end method (r > 0.89, P soil cores (r > 0.89, P ...The content of water-dispersible colloids (WDC) has a major impact on soil functions and structural stability. In addition, the presence of mobile colloids may increase the risk of colloid-facilitated transport of strongly sorbing environmental contaminants. The WDC content was measured in 39 soils......, using laser diffraction, by agitating the samples using a wet-dispersion unit. This approach eliminated the need for long sedimentation times required by the more classical end-over-end shaking approach and provided information about the time-dependent release of WDC. The total clay content of the soils...

  15. COLLOID RELEASE FROM DIFFERENT SOIL DEPTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring clay colloidal particles are heavily involved in sediment processes in the subsurface soil. Due to the import ance of these processes in the subsurface environment, the transport of clay colloidal particles has been studied in several disciplines, including soil sciences, petr ology, hydrology, etc. Specifically, in environmental engineering, clay colloid re lease and transport in the sediments have been extensively investigated, which are motiv ated by environmental concerns such as colloid-facilitated contaminant transport in groundwater and the subsurface soil. Clay colloid release is resulted from physical alteration of subsurface sediments. Despite the potential importance of clay colloid activiti es, the detailed mechanisms of release and transport of clay colloidal particles with in natural sediments are poorly understood. Pore medium structure, properties and flow dynamics, etc. are factors that affect clay colloid generation, mobilization, and subse quent transport. Possible mechanisms of clay colloid generation in the sediments in clude precipitation, erosion and mobilization by changes in pore water chemistry and clay colloid release depends on a balance of applied hydrodynamic and resisting adhesive torques and forces. The coupled role of pore water chemistry and fluid hydrodynamics thus play key roles in controlling clay colloid release and transport in the sediment s. This paper investigated clay colloidal particle release and transport, especially th e colloidal particle release mechanisms as well as the process modeling in the sediments. In this research, colloidal particle release from intact sediment columns with variable length was examined and colloidal particle release curves were simulated using an im plicit, finite-difference scheme. Colloidal particle release rate coefficient was found to be an exponential function of the sediment depth. The simulated results demonstrated that transport parameters were

  16. Self-assembly mechanism in colloids: perspectives from statistical physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacometti, Achille

    2012-06-01

    Motivated by recent experimental findings in chemical synthesis of colloidal particles, we draw an analogy between self-assembly processes occurring in biological systems (e.g. protein folding) and a new exciting possibility in the field of material science. We consider a self-assembly process whose elementary building blocks are decorated patchy colloids of various types, that spontaneously drive the system toward a unique and predetermined targeted macroscopic structure. To this aim, we discuss a simple theoretical model — the Kern-Frenkel model — describing a fluid of colloidal spherical particles with a pre-defined number and distribution of solvophobic and solvophilic regions on their surface. The solvophobic and solvophilic regions are described via a short-range square-well and a hard-sphere potentials, respectively. Integral equation and perturbation theories are presented to discuss structural and thermodynamical properties, with particular emphasis on the computation of the fluid-fluid (or gas-liquid) transition in the temperaturedensity plane. The model allows the description of both one and two attractive caps, as a function of the fraction of covered attractive surface, thus interpolating between a square-well and a hard-sphere fluid, upon changing the coverage. By comparison with Monte Carlo simulations, we assess the pros and the cons of both integral equation and perturbation theories in the present context of patchy colloids, where the computational effort for numerical simulations is rather demanding.

  17. Colloid properties in groundwaters from crystalline formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colloids are present in all groundwaters. The role they may play in the migration of safety-relevant radionuclides in the geosphere therefore must be studied. Colloid sampling and characterisation campaigns have been carried out in Switzerland. On the bases of the results from studies in the Grimsel area, Northern Switzerland and the Black Forest, as well as those obtained by other groups concerned with crystalline waters, a consistent picture is emerging. The groundwater colloids in crystalline formations are predominantly comprised of phyllosilicates and silica originating from the aquifer rock. Under constant hydrogeochemical conditions, the colloid concentration is not expected to exceed 100 ng.ml-1 when the calcium concentration is greater than 10-4. However, under transient chemical or physical conditions, such as geothermal or tectonic activity, colloid generation may be enhanced and the colloid concentration may reach 10 μg.ml-1 or more, if both the calcium and sodium concentrations are low. In the Nagra Crystalline Reference Water the expected colloid concentration is -1. This can be compared, for example, to a colloid concentration of about 10 ng.ml-1 found in Zurzach water. The small colloid concentration in the reference water is a consequence of an attachment factor for clay colloids (monmorillonite) close to 1. A model indicates that at pH 8, the nuclide partition coefficients between water and colloid (Kp) must be smaller than 107 ml.g-1 if sorption takes place by surface complexation on colloids, = AIOH active groups forming the dominant sorption sites. This pragmatic model is based on the competition between the formation of nuclide hydroxo complexes in solution and their sorption on colloids. Experimental nuclide sorption data on colloids are compared with those obtained by applying this model. For a low colloid concentration, a sorption capacity of the order of 10-9 M and reversible surface complexation, their presence in the crystalline rock

  18. Microbial effects on colloidal agglomeration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colloidal particles are known to enhance the transport of radioactive metals through soil and rock systems. This study was performed to determine if a soil microorganism, isolated from the surface samples collected at Yucca Mountain, NV, could affect the colloidal properties of day particles. The agglomeration of a Wyoming bentonite clay in a sterile uninoculated microbial growth medium was compared to the agglomeration in the medium inoculated with a Pseudomonas sp. In a second experiment, microorganisms were cultured in the succinate medium for 50 h and removed by centrifugation. The agglomeration of the clay in this spent was compared to sterile uninoculated medium. In both experiments, the agglomeration of the clay was greater than that of the sterile, uninoculated control. Based on these results, which indicate that this microorganism enhanced the agglomeration of the bentonite clay, it is possible to say that in the presence of microorganisms colloidal movement through a rock matrix could be reduced because of an overall increase in the size of colloidal particle agglomerates. 32 refs

  19. Supramolecular perspectives in colloid science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen Stuart, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Supramolecular chemistry puts emphasis on molecular assemblies held together by non-covalent bonds. As such, it is very close in spirit to colloid science which also focuses on objects which are small, but beyond the molecular scale, and for which other forces than covalent bonds are crucial. We dis

  20. Proteolytic stability in colloidal systems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maste, M.C.L.

    1996-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes in liquid detergents suffer from lack of stability in the sense that activity diminishes with time. Although the phenomenon could be attributed to several factors, the influence of colloidal surfaces on the enzymatic stability was investigated. Besides the types of surfaces that

  1. Colloidal aspects of texture perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, van T.

    2010-01-01

    The perception of complex textures in food is strongly related to the way food is processed during eating, and is modulated by other basic characteristics, such as taste and aroma. An understanding at the colloidal level of the basic processes in the mouth is essential in order to link the compositi

  2. A short textbook of colloid chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Jirgensons, B

    1962-01-01

    A Short Textbook of Colloid Chemistry, Second Revised Edition details the factual aspect of colloid chemistry that includes the basic facts, established empirical and mathematical relationships, and practical applications. The chapters of the title are organized into two parts. In the first part, the text discusses the general concepts of colloid chemistry, such as the history and scope, basic terms, and basic methods in experiment with colloids. Part Two covers the technical aspect of colloid chemistry, such as the optical properties, electrical properties, and viscosity. The book will be of

  3. Dose calculation in biological samples in a mixed neutron-gamma field at the TRIGA reactor of the University of Mainz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Tobias; Blaickner, Matthias; Schütz, Christian; Wiehl, Norbert; Kratz, Jens V; Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael H; Palmans, Hugo; Sharpe, Peter; Otto, Gerd; Hampel, Gabriele

    2010-10-01

    To establish Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) for non-resectable liver metastases and for in vitro experiments at the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Mainz, Germany, it is necessary to have a reliable dose monitoring system. The in vitro experiments are used to determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of liver and cancer cells in our mixed neutron and gamma field. We work with alanine detectors in combination with Monte Carlo simulations, where we can measure and characterize the dose. To verify our calculations we perform neutron flux measurements using gold foil activation and pin-diodes. Material and methods. When L-α-alanine is irradiated with ionizing radiation, it forms a stable radical which can be detected by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The value of the ESR signal correlates to the amount of absorbed dose. The dose for each pellet is calculated using FLUKA, a multipurpose Monte Carlo transport code. The pin-diode is augmented by a lithium fluoride foil. This foil converts the neutrons into alpha and tritium particles which are products of the (7)Li(n,α)(3)H-reaction. These particles are detected by the diode and their amount correlates to the neutron fluence directly. Results and discussion. Gold foil activation and the pin-diode are reliable fluence measurement systems for the TRIGA reactor, Mainz. Alanine dosimetry of the photon field and charged particle field from secondary reactions can in principle be carried out in combination with MC-calculations for mixed radiation fields and the Hansen & Olsen alanine detector response model. With the acquired data about the background dose and charged particle spectrum, and with the acquired information of the neutron flux, we are capable of calculating the dose to the tissue. Conclusion. Monte Carlo simulation of the mixed neutron and gamma field of the TRIGA Mainz is possible in order to characterize the neutron behavior in the thermal column. Currently we also

  4. Dose calculation in biological samples in a mixed neutron-gamma field at the TRIGA reactor of the Univ. of Mainz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To establish Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) for non-resectable liver metastases and for in vitro experiments at the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the Univ. of Mainz (DE), it is necessary to have a reliable dose monitoring system. The in vitro experiments are used to determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of liver and cancer cells in our mixed neutron and gamma field. We work with alanine detectors in combination with Monte Carlo simulations, where we can measure and characterize the dose. To verify our calculations we perform neutron flux measurements using gold foil activation and pin-diodes. Material and methods. When L-a-alanine is irradiated with ionizing radiation, it forms a stable radical which can be detected by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The value of the ESR signal correlates to the amount of absorbed dose. The dose for each pellet is calculated using FLUKA, a multipurpose Monte Carlo transport code. The pin-diode is augmented by a lithium fluoride foil. This foil converts the neutrons into alpha and tritium particles which are products of the 7Li(n,a)3H-reaction. These particles are detected by the diode and their amount correlates to the neutron fluence directly. Results and discussion. Gold foil activation and the pin-diode are reliable fluence measurement systems for the TRIGA reactor, Mainz. Alanine dosimetry of the photon field and charged particle field from secondary reactions can in principle be carried out in combination with MC-calculations for mixed radiation fields and the Hansen and Olsen alanine detector response model. With the acquired data about the background dose and charged particle spectrum, and with the acquired information of the neutron flux, we are capable of calculating the dose to the tissue. Conclusion. Monte Carlo simulation of the mixed neutron and gamma field of the TRIGA Mainz is possible in order to characterize the neutron behavior in the thermal column. Currently we also speculate on

  5. Dose calculation in biological samples in a mixed neutron-gamma field at the TRIGA reactor of the University of Mainz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Tobias; Blaickner, Matthias; Schütz, Christian; Wiehl, Norbert; Kratz, Jens V; Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael H; Palmans, Hugo; Sharpe, Peter; Otto, Gerd; Hampel, Gabriele

    2010-10-01

    To establish Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) for non-resectable liver metastases and for in vitro experiments at the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Mainz, Germany, it is necessary to have a reliable dose monitoring system. The in vitro experiments are used to determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of liver and cancer cells in our mixed neutron and gamma field. We work with alanine detectors in combination with Monte Carlo simulations, where we can measure and characterize the dose. To verify our calculations we perform neutron flux measurements using gold foil activation and pin-diodes. Material and methods. When L-α-alanine is irradiated with ionizing radiation, it forms a stable radical which can be detected by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The value of the ESR signal correlates to the amount of absorbed dose. The dose for each pellet is calculated using FLUKA, a multipurpose Monte Carlo transport code. The pin-diode is augmented by a lithium fluoride foil. This foil converts the neutrons into alpha and tritium particles which are products of the (7)Li(n,α)(3)H-reaction. These particles are detected by the diode and their amount correlates to the neutron fluence directly. Results and discussion. Gold foil activation and the pin-diode are reliable fluence measurement systems for the TRIGA reactor, Mainz. Alanine dosimetry of the photon field and charged particle field from secondary reactions can in principle be carried out in combination with MC-calculations for mixed radiation fields and the Hansen & Olsen alanine detector response model. With the acquired data about the background dose and charged particle spectrum, and with the acquired information of the neutron flux, we are capable of calculating the dose to the tissue. Conclusion. Monte Carlo simulation of the mixed neutron and gamma field of the TRIGA Mainz is possible in order to characterize the neutron behavior in the thermal column. Currently we also

  6. Structural, optical and thermal properties of silver colloidal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, S.; Ghaderi, A.; Solaymani, S.; Golzan, M. M.

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, colloidal silver nanoparticles were prepared by chemical reduction of AgNO3 and pure Sn in a new and simple method. The type of crystallite lattice and the size of nanopowders were estimated by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis. The geometric, heterogeneous and mixing structure of synthesized nanopowders were studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Optical properties such as plasmon absorption and frequency of soluble colloidal nanopowders in two solutions of distilled water and oil were investigated by UV-Visible spectroscopy, which was developed to calculate the absorbance spectra of nanoparticles solution containing a size distribution of particles using the Mie theory. Dipole and quadrupole plasmons related to molecular structure of water and oil were found by absorbance spectra. Also, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) analysis was used for determining the thermal behavior, endothermic and exothermic peaks of Ag nanopowder.

  7. Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon, Methods Of Making Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon, And Methods Of Using Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon

    KAUST Repository

    Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2015-04-09

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, methods of making a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, methods of using a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, and the like.

  8. Magnetic Assisted Colloidal Pattern Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ye

    Pattern formation is a mysterious phenomenon occurring at all scales in nature. The beauty of the resulting structures and myriad of resulting properties occurring in naturally forming patterns have attracted great interest from scientists and engineers. One of the most convenient experimental models for studying pattern formation are colloidal particle suspensions, which can be used both to explore condensed matter phenomena and as a powerful fabrication technique for forming advanced materials. In my thesis, I have focused on the study of colloidal patterns, which can be conveniently tracked in an optical microscope yet can also be thermally equilibrated on experimentally relevant time scales, allowing for ground states and transitions between them to be studied with optical tracking algorithms. In particular, I have focused on systems that spontaneously organize due to particle-surface and particle-particle interactions, paying close attention to systems that can be dynamically adjusted with an externally applied magnetic or acoustic field. In the early stages of my doctoral studies, I developed a magnetic field manipulation technique to quantify the adhesion force between particles and surfaces. This manipulation technique is based on the magnetic dipolar interactions between colloidal particles and their "image dipoles" that appear within planar substrate. Since the particles interact with their own images, this system enables massively parallel surface force measurements (>100 measurements) in a single experiment, and allows statistical properties of particle-surface adhesion energies to be extracted as a function of loading rate. With this approach, I was able to probe sub-picoNewton surface interactions between colloidal particles and several substrates at the lowest force loading rates ever achieved. In the later stages of my doctoral studies, I focused on studying patterns formed from particle-particle interaction, which serve as an experimental model of

  9. Interactions in Natural Colloid Systems "Biosolids" - Soil and Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinichenko, Kira V.; Nikovskaya, Galina N.; Ulberg, Zoya R.

    2016-04-01

    The "biosolids" are complex biocolloid system arising in huge amounts (mln tons per year) from biological municipal wastewater treatment. These contain clusters of nanoparticles of heavy metal compounds (in slightly soluble or unsoluble forms, such as phosphates, sulphates, carbonates, hydroxides, and etc.), cells, humic substances and so on, involved in exopolysaccharides (EPS) net matrix. One may consider that biosolids are the natural nanocomposite. Due to the presence of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and other macro- and microelements (heavy metals), vitamins, aminoacids, etc., the biosolids are a depot of bioelements for plant nutrition. Thus, it is generally recognized that most rationally to utilize them for land application. For this purpose the biocolloid process was developed in biosolids system by initiation of microbial vital ability followed by the synthesis of EPS, propagation of ecologically important microorganisms, loosening of the structure and weakening of the coagulation contacts between biosolids colloids, but the structure integrity maintaining [1,2]. It was demonstrated that the applying of biosolids with metabolizing microorganisms to soil provided the improving soil structure, namely the increasing of waterstable aggregates content (70% vs. 20%). It occurs due to flocculation ability of biosolids EPS. The experimental modelling of mutual interactions in systems of soils - biosolids (with metabolizing microorganisms) were realized and their colloid and chemical mechanisms were formulated [3]. As it is known, the most harmonious plant growth comes at a prolonged entering of nutrients under the action of plant roots exudates which include pool of organic acids and polysaccharides [4]. Special investigations showed that under the influence of exudates excreted by growing plants, the biosolids microelements can release gradually from immobilized state into environment and are able to absorb by plants. Thus, the biosolids can serve as an active

  10. [Mixed cryoglobulinemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque, R; Ramiro, S; Vinagre, F; Cordeiro, A; Godinho, F; Santos, Maria José; Gonçalves, P; Canas da Silva, J

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe two clinical cases of cryoglobulinemia. A 70 years old woman, having skin ulcers on lower limbs, arthralgias, paresthesias and constitutional symptoms, for about 10 months. Exams revealed mild anemia, elevation of the biological parameters of inflammation and aminotransferases, positive cryoglobulin and rheumatoid factor in serum, and a severe reduction in C4 complement fraction. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) serology was negative. Idiopathic mixed cryoglobulinemia was diagnosed and corticosteroid therapy started. Given the lack of response, cyclophosphamide and plasmapheresis were added. Two weeks later the patient died in septic shock. The second case refers to a 41 years old female, with untreated hepatitis C who developed over a 6 month period petechiae and livedoid lesions on the lower limbs, peripheral neuropathy, and constitutional symptoms and was admitted with intestinal necrosis. Exams were consistent with the diagnosis of mixed cryoglobulinemia associated, with HCV. She started therapy with ribavirin and pegylated interferon-alpha, with improvement. PMID:22113605

  11. What happens when pharmaceuticals meet colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yingna; Chen, Xijuan; Zhuang, Jie; Chen, Xin

    2015-12-01

    Pharmaceuticals (PCs) have been widely detected in natural environment due to agricultural application of reclaimed water, sludge and animal wastes. Their potential risks to various ecosystems and even to human health have caused great concern; however, little was known about their environmental behaviors. Colloids (such as clays, metal oxides, and particulate organics) are kind of substances that are active and widespread in the environment. When PCs meet colloids, their interaction may influence the fate, transport, and toxicity of PCs. This review summarizes the progress of studies on the role of colloids in mediating the environmental behaviors of PCs. Synthesized results showed that colloids can adsorb PCs mainly through ion exchange, complexation and non-electrostatic interactions. During this process the structure of colloids and the stability of PCs may be changed. The adsorbed PCs may have higher risks to induce antibiotic resistance; besides, their transport may also be altered considering they have great chance to move with colloids. Solution conditions (such as pH, ionic strength, and cations) could influence these interactions between PCs and colloids, as they can change the forms of PCs and alter the primary forces between PCs and colloids in the solution. It could be concluded that PCs in natural soils could bind with colloids and then co-transport during the processes of irrigation, leaching, and erosion. Therefore, colloid-PC interactions need to be understood for risk assessment of PCs and the best management practices of various ecosystems (such as agricultural and wetland systems). PMID:26427370

  12. Application of ESEM to environmental colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental colloids are toxic or radioactive particles suspended in ground or surface water. These hazardous particles can facilitate and accelerate the transport of toxicants and enhance the threat to humans by exposure to pathogenic substances. The chemical and physical properties of hazardous colloids have not been well characterized nor are there standard colloid remediation technologies to prevent their deleterious effects. Colloid characterization requires measurement of their size distribution, zeta potential, chemical composition, adsorption capacity and morphology. The environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) by ElectroScan, Inc., analyzes particle sizes, composition, and morphology. It is also used in this study to identify the attachment of colloids onto packing or rock surfaces in the development of a colloid remediation process. The ESEM has confirmed the composition of groundwater colloids in these studies to be generally the same material as the surrounding rock. The morphology studies have generally shown that colloids are simply small pieces of the rock surface that have exfoliated into the surrounding water. However, in general, the source and chemical composition of groundwater colloids is site dependent. The authors have found that an ESEM works best as a valuable analysis tool within a suite of colloid characterization instruments

  13. What happens when pharmaceuticals meet colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yingna; Chen, Xijuan; Zhuang, Jie; Chen, Xin

    2015-12-01

    Pharmaceuticals (PCs) have been widely detected in natural environment due to agricultural application of reclaimed water, sludge and animal wastes. Their potential risks to various ecosystems and even to human health have caused great concern; however, little was known about their environmental behaviors. Colloids (such as clays, metal oxides, and particulate organics) are kind of substances that are active and widespread in the environment. When PCs meet colloids, their interaction may influence the fate, transport, and toxicity of PCs. This review summarizes the progress of studies on the role of colloids in mediating the environmental behaviors of PCs. Synthesized results showed that colloids can adsorb PCs mainly through ion exchange, complexation and non-electrostatic interactions. During this process the structure of colloids and the stability of PCs may be changed. The adsorbed PCs may have higher risks to induce antibiotic resistance; besides, their transport may also be altered considering they have great chance to move with colloids. Solution conditions (such as pH, ionic strength, and cations) could influence these interactions between PCs and colloids, as they can change the forms of PCs and alter the primary forces between PCs and colloids in the solution. It could be concluded that PCs in natural soils could bind with colloids and then co-transport during the processes of irrigation, leaching, and erosion. Therefore, colloid-PC interactions need to be understood for risk assessment of PCs and the best management practices of various ecosystems (such as agricultural and wetland systems).

  14. Chancellor Water Colloids: Characterization and Radionuclide Association

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Fattah, Amr I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-18

    Concluding remarks about this paper are: (1) Gravitational settling, zeta potential, and ultrafiltration data indicate the existence of a colloidal phase of both the alpha and beta emitters in the Chancellor water; (2) The low activity combined with high dispersion homogeneity of the Chancellor water indicate that both alpha and beta emitters are not intrinsic colloids; (3) Radionuclides in the Chancellor water, particularly Pu, coexist as dissolved aqueous and sorbed phases - in other words the radionuclides are partitioned between the aqueous phase and the colloidal phase; (4) The presence of Pu as a dissolved species in the aqueous phase, suggests the possibility of Pu in the (V) oxidation state - this conclusion is supported by the similarity of the k{sub d} value of Pu determined in the current study to that determined for Pu(V) sorbed onto smectite colloids, and the similar electrokinetic behavior of the Chancellor water colloids to smectite colloids; (5) About 50% of the Pu(V) is in the aqueous phase and 50% is sorbed on colloids (mass concentration of colloids in the Chancellor water is 0.12 g/L); (6) The k{sub d} of the Pu and the beta emitters (fission products) between aqueous and colloidal phases in the Chancellor water is {approx}8.0 x 10{sup 3} mL/g using two different activity measurement techniques (LSC and alpha spectroscopy); (7) The gravitational settling and size distributions of the association colloids indicate that the properties (at least the physical ones) of the colloids to which the alpha emitters are associated with seem to be different that the properties of the colloids to which the beta emitters are associated with - the beta emitters are associated with very small particles ({approx}50 - 120 nm), while the alpha emitters are associated with relatively larger particles; and (8) The Chancellor water colloids are extremely stable under the natural pH and ionic strength conditions, indicating high potential for transport in the

  15. Analytic studies of colloid transport in fractured porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyze the interactive migration of radioactive colloids and solute in fractured rock. Two possible interactions between radionuclides as colloids and as solute are considered: solute sorption on nonradioactive colloids to form pseudocolloids, and dissolution of radioactive colloids. Previous studies have discussed the formation and transport of colloids in porous media, including removal of colloids by filtration and sedimentation. Colloids can migrate faster than solute because of weaker sorption on stationary solids and because of hydrochromatography of colloid particles in flow channels. However, the migration of colloids and pseudocolloids can be retarded by the interaction of colloids with solute, and the migration of solute in local equilibrium with colloids can be more rapid than if colloids were not present. Here we present a new quantative analysis to predict the interactive migration of colloids and solute in porous and fractured media. 4 figs

  16. Biaxial ferromagnetic liquid crystal colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingkun; Ackerman, Paul J; Lubensky, Tom C; Smalyukh, Ivan I

    2016-09-20

    The design and practical realization of composite materials that combine fluidity and different forms of ordering at the mesoscopic scale are among the grand fundamental science challenges. These composites also hold a great potential for technological applications, ranging from information displays to metamaterials. Here we introduce a fluid with coexisting polar and biaxial ordering of organic molecular and magnetic colloidal building blocks exhibiting the lowest symmetry orientational order. Guided by interactions at different length scales, rod-like organic molecules of this fluid spontaneously orient along a direction dubbed "director," whereas magnetic colloidal nanoplates order with their dipole moments parallel to each other but pointing at an angle to the director, yielding macroscopic magnetization at no external fields. Facile magnetic switching of such fluids is consistent with predictions of a model based on competing actions of elastic and magnetic torques, enabling previously inaccessible control of light. PMID:27601668

  17. Electrocoagulation of colloidal biogenic selenium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staicu, Lucian C; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Lens, Piet N L; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H; Oturan, Mehmet A

    2015-02-01

    Colloidal elemental selenium (Se(0)) adversely affects membrane separation processes and aquatic ecosystems. As a solution to this problem, we investigated for the first time the removal potential of Se(0) by electrocoagulation process. Colloidal Se(0) was produced by a strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens and showed limited gravitational settling. Therefore, iron (Fe) and aluminum (Al) sacrificial electrodes were used in a batch reactor under galvanostatic conditions. The best Se(0) turbidity removal (97 %) was achieved using iron electrodes at 200 mA. Aluminum electrodes removed 96 % of colloidal Se(0) only at a higher current intensity (300 mA). At the best Se(0) removal efficiency, electrocoagulation using Fe electrode removed 93 % of the Se concentration, whereas with Al electrodes the Se removal efficiency reached only 54 %. Due to the less compact nature of the Al flocs, the Se-Al sediment was three times more voluminous than the Se-Fe sediment. The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) test showed that the Fe-Se sediment released Se below the regulatory level (1 mg L(-1)), whereas the Se concentration leached from the Al-Se sediment exceeded the limit by about 20 times. This might be related to the mineralogical nature of the sediments. Electron scanning micrographs showed Fe-Se sediments with a reticular structure, whereas the Al-Se sediments lacked an organized structure. Overall, the results obtained showed that the use of Fe electrodes as soluble anode in electrocoagulation constitutes a better option than Al electrodes for the electrochemical sedimentation of colloidal Se(0).

  18. Implant materials modified by colloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zboromirska-Wnukiewicz Beata

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in general medicine led to the development of biomaterials. Implant material should be characterized by a high biocompatibility to the tissue and appropriate functionality, i.e. to have high mechanical and electrical strength and be stable in an electrolyte environment – these are the most important properties of bioceramic materials. Considerations of biomaterials design embrace also electrical properties occurring on the implant-body fluid interface and consequently the electrokinetic potential, which can be altered by modifying the surface of the implant. In this work, the surface of the implants was modified to decrease the risk of infection by using metal colloids. Nanocolloids were obtained using different chemical and electrical methods. It was found that the colloids obtained by physical and electrical methods are more stable than colloids obtained by chemical route. In this work the surface of modified corundum implants was investigated. The implant modified by nanosilver, obtained by electrical method was selected. The in vivo research on animals was carried out. Clinical observations showed that the implants with modified surface could be applied to wounds caused by atherosclerotic skeleton, for curing the chronic and bacterial inflammations as well as for skeletal reconstruction surgery.

  19. Janus Nematic Colloids with Designable Valence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Čopar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Generalized Janus nematic colloids based on various morphologies of particle surface patches imposing homeotropic and planar surface anchoring are demonstrated. By using mesoscopic numerical modeling, multiple types of Janus particles are explored, demonstrating a variety of novel complex colloidal structures. We also show binding of Janus particles to a fixed Janus post in the nematic cell, which acts as a seed and a micro-anchor for the colloidal structure. Janus colloidal structures reveal diverse topological defect configurations, which are effectively combinations of surface boojum and bulk defects. Topological analysis is applied to defects, importantly showing that topological charge is not a well determined topological invariant in such patchy nematic Janus colloids. Finally, this work demonstrates colloidal structures with designable valence, which could allow for targeted and valence-conditioned self-assembly at micro- and nano-scale.

  20. Nonequilibrium Forces between Dragged Ultrasoft Colloids

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, S.P.; Winkler, R. G.; Gompper, G.

    2011-01-01

    The dynamical deformation of ultrasoft colloids as well as their dynamic frictional forces are numerically investigated, when one colloid is dragged past another at constant velocity. Hydrodynamic interactions are captured by a particle-based mesoscopic simulation method. At vanishing relative velocity, the equilibrium repulsive force-distance curve is obtained. At large drag velocities, in contrast, we find an apparent attractive force for departing colloids along the dragging direction. The...

  1. COLLOID RELEASE FROM DIFFERENT SOIL DEPTH

    OpenAIRE

    Gang Chen; Yue Niu; Boya Wang; Kamal Tawfiq

    2013-01-01

    Naturally occurring clay colloidal particles are heavily involved in sediment processes in the subsurface soil. Due to the import ance of these processes in the subsurface environment, the transport of clay colloidal particles has been studied in several disciplines, including soil sciences, petr ology, hydrology, etc. Specifically, in environmental engineering, clay colloid re lease and transport in the sediments have been extensively investigated, which are motiv ated by environmental conce...

  2. Oppositely charged colloids out of equilibrium

    OpenAIRE

    Vissers, T.

    2010-01-01

    Colloids are particles with a size in the range of a few nanometers up to several micrometers. Similar to atomic and molecular systems, they can form gases, liquids, solids, gels and glasses. Colloids can be used as model systems because, unlike molecules, they are sufficiently large to be studied directly with light microscopy and move sufficiently slow to study their dynamics. In this thesis, we study binary systems of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) colloidal particles suspended in low-polar...

  3. Attractions between charged colloids at water interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Oettel, M.; Dominguez, A; Dietrich, S.

    2005-01-01

    The effective potential between charged colloids trapped at water interfaces is analyzed. It consists of a repulsive electrostatic and an attractive capillary part which asymptotically both show dipole--like behavior. For sufficiently large colloid charges, the capillary attraction dominates at large separations. The total effective potential exhibits a minimum at intermediate separations if the Debye screening length of water and the colloid radius are of comparable size.

  4. Dietary bioavailability of Cu adsorbed to colloidal hydrous ferric oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Daniel J.; Croteau, Marie-Noële; Fuller, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    The dietary bioavailability of copper (Cu) adsorbed to synthetic colloidal hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) was evaluated from the assimilation of 65Cu by two benthic grazers, a gastropod and a larval mayfly. HFO was synthesized, labeled with 65Cu to achieve a Cu/Fe ratio comparable to that determined in naturally formed HFO, and then aged. The labeled colloids were mixed with a food source (the diatom Nitzschia palea) to yield dietary 65Cu concentrations ranging from 211 to 2204 nmol/g (dry weight). Animals were pulse fed the contaminated diet and assimilation of 65Cu from HFO was determined following 1–3 days of depuration. Mass transfer of 65Cu from HFO to the diatom was less than 1%, indicating that HFO was the source of 65Cu to the grazers. Estimates of assimilation efficiency indicated that the majority of Cu ingested as HFO was assimilated (values >70%), implying that colloidal HFO potentially represents a source of dietary Cu to benthic grazers, especially where there is active formation and infiltration of these particles into benthic substrates.

  5. Nonequilibrium forces between dragged ultrasoft colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sunil P; Winkler, Roland G; Gompper, Gerhard

    2011-10-01

    The dynamical deformation of ultrasoft colloids as well as their dynamic frictional forces are numerically investigated, when one colloid is dragged past another at constant velocity. Hydrodynamic interactions are captured by a particle-based mesoscopic simulation method. At vanishing relative velocity, the equilibrium repulsive force-distance curve is obtained. At large drag velocities, in contrast, we find an apparent attractive force for departing colloids along the dragging direction. The deformation, in the close encounter of colloids, and the energy dissipation are examined as a function of the drag velocity and their separation. PMID:22107322

  6. Collective motion in populations of colloidal bots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolo, Denis

    One of the origins of active matter physics was the idea that flocks, herds, swarms and shoals could be quantitatively described as emergent ordered phases in self-driven materials. From a somehow dual perspective, I will show how to engineer active materials our of colloidal flocks. I will show how to motorize colloidal particles capable of sensing the orientation of their neighbors and how to handle them in microfluidic chips. These populations of colloidal bots display a non-equilibrium transition toward collective motion. A special attention will be paid to the robustness of the resulting colloidal flocks with respect to geometrical frustration and to quenched disorder.

  7. Conductivity maximum in a charged colloidal suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastea, S

    2009-01-27

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a charged colloidal suspension in the salt-free regime show that the system exhibits an electrical conductivity maximum as a function of colloid charge. We attribute this behavior to two main competing effects: colloid effective charge saturation due to counterion 'condensation' and diffusion slowdown due to the relaxation effect. In agreement with previous observations, we also find that the effective transported charge is larger than the one determined by the Stern layer and suggest that it corresponds to the boundary fluid layer at the surface of the colloidal particles.

  8. Pharmacological study of radioactive-gold colloid transport by blood and by serous exudate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After giving the essential physico-chemical properties of the colloids, the author considers the biological role of these substances and, in connection with their transport by the blood, their capture by elements of the reticula-endothelial system. A summary is given of present knowledge concerning the role of serous proteins in the transport of substances, particularly that of radio-active colloidal gold. The blood fractions which can take part in colloidal gold transport are the red blood corpuscles, the leukocytes and histiocytic elements as well as the plasma. The radioactive distribution in these various fractions is obtained by autoradiography of blood sediments. After showing the importance of the role of the plasma in radioactive particle transport, the author, describes the attempts made to detect a possible of colloidal gold 198 on the various serous proteins using various methods of separation. The ''in vitro'' and ''in vivo'' bonds between colloidal gold-198 particles and either the serous proteins or healthy specimens or the effusion liquids of pathological origin in man, or due to an experimental inflammation with carregenin in the rat, have been studied. The bonding appears to be effective because of the protective macromolecular layer formed by the gelatine. The different positions of the colloidal grains on the electrophoregram can only be explained by their different physico-chemical characteristics. Gold in the ionic form, on the other hand, is combined only with the albumen is the amount metal present does not exceed a certain value. (author)

  9. Analysis of colloid and tracer breakthrough curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindrod, Peter; Edwards, Mark S.; Higgo, Jenny J. W.; Williams, Geoffrey M.

    1996-02-01

    We consider the dispersion and elution of colloids and dissolved nonsorbing tracers within saturated heterogeneous porous media. Since flow path geometry in natural systems is often ill-characterized macroscopic (mean) flow rates and dispersion tensors are utilized in order to account for the sub-model scale microscopic fluctuations in media structure (and the consequent hydrodynamic profile). Even for tracer migration and dispersal this issue is far from settled. Here we consider how colloid and tracer migration phenomena can be treated consistently. Theoretical calculations for model flow geometries yield two quantitative predictions for the transport of free (not yet captured) colloids with reference to a non-sorbing dissolved tracer within the same medium: the average migration velocity of the free colloids is higher than that of the tracer; and that the ratio of the equivalent hydrodynamic dispersion rates of colloids and tracer is dependent only upon properties of the colloids and the porous medium, it is independent of pathlengths and fluid flux, once length scales are large enough. The first of these is well known, since even in simple flow paths free colloids must stay more centre stream. The second, if validated suggests how solute and colloid dispersion may be dealt with consistently in macroscopic migration models. This is crucial since dispersion is usually ill-characterized and unaddressed by the experimental literature. In this paper we present evidence based upon an existing Drigg field injection test for the validity of these predictions. We show that starting from experimental data the fitted dispersion rates of both colloids and non-sorbing tracers increase with the measured elution rates (obeying slightly different rules for tracers and colloids); and that the ratio of colloid and nonsorbing tracer elution rates, and the ratio of colloid and nonsorbing tracer dispersion rates may be dependent upon properties of the colloids and the medium (not

  10. On the Equivalence of Trapped Colloids, Pinned Vortices, and Spin Ice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nisoli, Cristiano [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-04-23

    We investigate the recently reported analogies between pinned vortices in nano-structured superconductors or colloids in optical traps, and spin ice materials. The frustration of the two models, one describing colloids and vortices, the other describing spin ice, differs essentially. However, their effective energetics is made identical by the contribution of an emergent field associated to a topological charge. This equivalence extends to the local low-energy dynamics of the ice manifold, yet breaks down in lattices of mixed coordination, because of topological charge transfer between sub-latices.

  11. Fabricating colloidal crystals and construction of ordered nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Zhiqiang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractColloidal crystals of polymeric or inorganic microspheres are of extensive interest due to their potential applications in such as sensing, optics, photonic bandgap and surface patterning. The article highlights a set of approaches developed in our group, which are efficient to prepare colloidal crystals with ordered voids, patterned colloidal crystals on non-planar surfaces, heterogeneous colloidal crystals of different building blocks, colloidal crystals composed of non-spherical polyhedrons, and colloidal crystals of non-close-packed colloidal microspheres in particular. The use of these colloidal crystals as templates for different microstructures range from nanoscale to micron-scale is also summarized.

  12. Structural color from colloidal glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magkiriadou, Sofia

    When a material has inhomogeneities at a lengthscale comparable to the wavelength of light, interference can give rise to structural colors: colors that originate from the interaction of the material's microstructure with light and do not require absorbing dyes. In this thesis we study a class of these materials, called photonic glasses, where the inhomogeneities form a dense and random arrangement. Photonic glasses have angle-independent structural colors that look like those of conventional dyes. However, when this work started, there was only a handful of colors accessible with photonic glasses, mostly hues of blue. We use various types of colloidal particles to make photonic glasses, and we study, both theoretically and experimentally, how the optical properties of these glasses relate to their structure and constituent particles. Based on our observations from glasses of conventional particles, we construct a theoretical model that explains the scarcity of yellow, orange, and red photonic glasses. Guided by this model, we develop novel colloidal systems that allow a higher degree of control over structural color. We assemble glasses of soft, core-shell particles with scattering cores and transparent shells, where the resonant wavelength can be tuned independently of the reflectivity. We then encapsulate glasses of these core-shell particles into emulsion droplets of tunable size; in this system, we observe, for the first time, angle-independent structural colors that cover the entire visible spectrum. To enhance color saturation, we begin experimenting with inverse glasses, where the refractive index of the particles is lower than the refractive index of the medium, with promising results. Finally, based on our theoretical model for scattering from colloidal glasses, we begin an exploration of the color gamut that could be achieved with this technique, and we find that photonic glasses are a promising approach to a new type of long-lasting, non-toxic, and

  13. Fluctuation interactions of colloidal particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For like-charged colloidal particles, two mechanisms of attraction between them survive when the interparticle distance is larger than the Debye screening length. One of them is the conventional van der Waals attraction and the second is the attraction mechanism mediated by thermal fluctuations of particle position. The latter is related to the effective variable mass (Euler mass) of the particles produced by the fluid motion. The strongest attraction potential (up to the value of the temperature T) corresponds to the case of uncharged particles and a relatively large Debye screening length. In this case, the third attraction mechanism is involved. It is mediated by thermal fluctuations of the fluid density.

  14. Structured fluids polymers, colloids, surfactants

    CERN Document Server

    Witten, Thomas A

    2010-01-01

    Over the last thirty years, the study of liquids containing polymers, surfactants, or colloidal particles has developed from a loose assembly of facts into a coherent discipline with substantial predictive power. These liquids expand our conception of what condensed matter can do. Such structured-fluid phenomena dominate the physical environment within living cells. This book teaches how to think of these fluids from a unified point of view showing the far-reaching effects ofthermal fluctuations in producing forces and motions. Keeping mathematics to a minimum, the book seeks the simplest expl

  15. Frost Heave in Colloidal Soils

    KAUST Repository

    Peppin, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    We develop a mathematical model of frost heave in colloidal soils. The theory accountsfor heave and consolidation while not requiring a frozen fringe assumption. Two solidificationregimes occur: a compaction regime in which the soil consolidates to accommodate the ice lenses, and a heave regime during which liquid is sucked into the consolidated soil from an external reservoir, and the added volume causes the soil to heave. The ice fraction is found to vary inversely with thefreezing velocity V , while the rate of heave is independent of V , consistent with field and laboratoryobservations. © 2011 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  16. Optical cavity modes in gold shell colloids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penninkhof, J.J.; Sweatlock, L.A.; Moroz, A.; Atwater, H.A.; van Blaaderen, A.; Polman, A.

    2008-01-01

    Core-shell colloids composed of a dielectric core surrounded by a metal shell show geometric cavity resonances with optical properties that are distinctly different than those of the collective plasmon modes of the metal shell. We use finite-difference time domain calculations on silica colloids wit

  17. Dynamics of colloidal crystals in shear flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derks, D.; Wu, Y.L.; van Blaaderen, A.; Imhof, A.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate particle dynamics in nearly hard sphere colloidal crystals submitted to a steady shear flow. Both the fluctuations of single colloids and the collective motion of crystalline layers as a whole are studied by using a home-built counter rotating shear cell in combination with confocal m

  18. Colloidal iron(III) pyrophosphate particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossi, L.; Velikov, K. P.; Philipse, A.P.

    2014-01-01

    Ferric pyrophosphate is a widely used material in the area of mineral fortification but its synthesis and properties in colloidal form are largely unknown. In this article, we report on the synthesis and characterisation of colloidal iron(III) pyrophosphate particles with potential for application a

  19. Oppositely charged colloids out of equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, T.

    2010-01-01

    Colloids are particles with a size in the range of a few nanometers up to several micrometers. Similar to atomic and molecular systems, they can form gases, liquids, solids, gels and glasses. Colloids can be used as model systems because, unlike molecules, they are sufficiently large to be studied d

  20. Organic and organo-mineral colloids in discontinuous permafrost zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Manasypov, Rinat M.; Loiko, Sergey V.; Shirokova, Liudmila S.

    2016-09-01

    On-going permafrost thaw in discontinuous permafrost regions produces significant amounts of small permafrost subsidence and depressions, while large lakes are likely to drain into streams and rivers. The intensification of permafrost thaw may alter the size distribution and chemical composition of organo-Fe-Al colloids in lakes and rivers. We used a continuum of surface water bodies, from permafrost subsidence, small depressions and thaw ponds to large lakes and rivers that drain the Western Siberia Lowland (WSL), to assess OC, major and the trace element size distribution between the 20-μm, 5-μm, 1.2-μm, 0.45-μm, 0.22-μm, 0.025-μm and 1-kDa (∼1.4 nm) size fractions. This approach allowed us to distinguish the organic and organo-ferric colloids that were responsible for the transport of trace elements in surface waters and address their evolution during possible physico-chemical and biological processes. Both conventionally dissolved (warming climate scenario, an increase in the thickness of the thawing depth will intensify the input of inorganic components from deep mineral horizons and possibly underground waters thus producing the enrichment of large lakes in Fe-rich colloids and particles. The speciation of divalent metal micronutrients (Cu, Ni, and Co) and toxic metals (Al, Cd, Pb, and U) that are complexed within DOM will most likely remain conservative. Overall, the WSL's surface water colloidal composition may shift from DOM-rich and DOM-Al-rich to Fe-rich, and the export of low-soluble trivalent and tetravalent hydrolysates from the soil to rivers will increase.

  1. Size Control of (99m)Tc-tin Colloid Using PVP and Buffer Solution for Sentinel Lymph Node Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Mi; Lim, Seok Tae; Sohn, Myung-Hee; Jeong, Hwan-Jeong

    2015-06-01

    Colloidal particle size is an important characteristic that allows mapping sentinel nodes in lymphoscintigraphy. This investigation aimed to introduce different ways of making a (99m)Tc-tin colloid with a size of tens of nanometers. All agents, tin fluoride, sodium fluoride, poloxamer-188, and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), were mixed and labeled with (99m)Tc. Either phosphate or sodium bicarbonate buffers were used to adjust the pH levels. When the buffers were added, the size of the colloids increased. However, as the PVP continued to increase, the size of the colloids was controlled to within tens of nanometers. In all samples, phosphate buffer added PVP (30 mg) stabilized tin colloid ((99m)Tc-PPTC-30) and sodium bicarbonate solution added PVP (50 mg) stabilized tin colloid ((99m)Tc-BPTC-50) were chosen for in vitro and in vivo studies. (99m)Tc-BPTC-50 (PPTC-30 (>100 nm) mainly accumulated in the liver. When a rabbit was given a toe injection, the node uptake of (99m)Tc-PPTC-30 decreased over time, while (99m)Tc-BPTC-50 increased. Therefore, (99m)Tc-BPTC-50 could be a good candidate radiopharmaceutical for sentinel node detection. The significance of this study is that nano-sized tin colloid can be made very easily and quickly by PVP. PMID:26028937

  2. Size Control of (99m)Tc-tin Colloid Using PVP and Buffer Solution for Sentinel Lymph Node Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Mi; Lim, Seok Tae; Sohn, Myung-Hee; Jeong, Hwan-Jeong

    2015-06-01

    Colloidal particle size is an important characteristic that allows mapping sentinel nodes in lymphoscintigraphy. This investigation aimed to introduce different ways of making a (99m)Tc-tin colloid with a size of tens of nanometers. All agents, tin fluoride, sodium fluoride, poloxamer-188, and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), were mixed and labeled with (99m)Tc. Either phosphate or sodium bicarbonate buffers were used to adjust the pH levels. When the buffers were added, the size of the colloids increased. However, as the PVP continued to increase, the size of the colloids was controlled to within tens of nanometers. In all samples, phosphate buffer added PVP (30 mg) stabilized tin colloid ((99m)Tc-PPTC-30) and sodium bicarbonate solution added PVP (50 mg) stabilized tin colloid ((99m)Tc-BPTC-50) were chosen for in vitro and in vivo studies. (99m)Tc-BPTC-50 (100 nm) mainly accumulated in the liver. When a rabbit was given a toe injection, the node uptake of (99m)Tc-PPTC-30 decreased over time, while (99m)Tc-BPTC-50 increased. Therefore, (99m)Tc-BPTC-50 could be a good candidate radiopharmaceutical for sentinel node detection. The significance of this study is that nano-sized tin colloid can be made very easily and quickly by PVP.

  3. Chemical, colloidal and mechanical contributions to the state of water in wood cell walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertinetti, L.; Fratzl, P.; Zemb, T.

    2016-08-01

    The properties of wood depend strongly on its water content, but the physicochemical basis for the interaction of water with cell wall components is poorly understood. Due to the importance of the problem both in the context of wood technology and the biological function of swelling and dehydration for growth stresses and seed dispersal, a wealth of descriptive data has been accumulated but a microscopic theory of water-biomolecular interactions is missing. We develop here, at a primitive level, a minimal parameter-free, coarse-grained, model of wood secondary cell walls to predict water absorption, in the form of an equation of state. It includes for the first time all three—mechanical, colloidal and chemical—contributions, taking into account the cell walls microstructure. The hydration force around the elongated cellulose crystals and entropy of mixing of the matrix polymers (hemicelluloses and lignin) are the dominant contributions driving the swelling. The elastic energy needed to swell the composite is the main term opposing water uptake. Hysteresis is not predicted but water uptake versus humidity, is reproduced in a large temperature range. Within this framework, the origin of wood dissolution and different effects of wood treatments on water sorption can be understood at the molecular level.

  4. Single Molecule Raman Detection of Enkephalin on Silver Colloidal Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneipp, Katrin; Kneipp, Holger; Abdali, Salim;

    2004-01-01

    Enkephalin, an endogeneous substance in the human brain showing morphine-like biological functions, has been detected at the single molecule level based on the surface-enhanced Raman signal of the ring breathing mode of phenylalanine, which is one building block of the molecule. For enhancing...... the Raman signal the enkephalin molecules have been attached to silver colloidal cluster structures. The experiments demonstrate that the SERS signal of the strongly enhanced ring breathing vibration of phenylalanine at 1000 cm-1 can be used as “intrinsic marker” for detecting a single enkephalin molecule...

  5. Tunable optical properties of colloidal quantum dots in electrolytic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadurai, D; Kohanpour, B; Alexson, D; Shi, P; Sethuraman, A; Li, Y; Saini, V; Dutta, M; Stroscio, M A

    2004-12-01

    The absorption spectra of colloidal cadmium sulfide quantum dots in electrolytic solutions are found to manifest a shift in the absorption threshold as the concentration of the electrolyte is varied. These results are consistent with a shift in the absorption threshold that would be caused by electrolytic screening of the field caused by the intrinsic spontaneous polarisation of these würtzite structured quantum dots. These electrolyte-dependent absorption properties provide a potential means of gaining insights on the variable extracellular and intracellular electrolytic concentrations that are present in biological systems.

  6. Cocklebur-shaped colloidal dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestage, David J; Urban, Marek W

    2005-11-01

    Unique cocklebur-shaped colloidal dispersions were prepared using a combination of a nanoextruder applied to the aqueous solution containing methyl methacrylate (MMA) and n-butyl acrylate (n-BA) with azo-bis-isobutyronitrile (AIBN) or potassium persulfate (KPS) initiators and stabilized by a mixture of sodium dioctyl sulfosuccinate (SDOSS) and 1,2-bis(10,12-tricosadiynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DCPC) phospholipid. Upon extrusion and heating to 75 degrees C, methyl methacrylate/n-butyl acrylate (MMA/nBA) colloidal particles containing tubules pointing outward were obtained as a result of DCPC phospholipids present at the particle surfaces. The same cocklebur-shaped particles were obtained when classical polymerization was used without a nanoextruder under similar compositional and thermal conditions, giving a particle size of 159 nm. However, when Ca(2+) ions are present during polymerization, cocklebur morphologies are disrupted. Because DCPC tubules undergo a transition at 38 degrees C, such cocklebur morphologies may offer numerous opportunities for devices with stimuli-responsive characteristics. PMID:16262269

  7. Diffusion in active magnetic colloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taukulis, R.; Cebers, A., E-mail: aceb@tesla.sal.lv

    2014-11-15

    Properties of active colloids of circle swimmers are reviewed. As a particular example of active magnetic colloids the magnetotactic bacteria under the action of a rotating magnetic field is considered. The relation for a diffusion coefficient due to the random switching of the direction of rotation of their rotary motors is derived on the basis of the master equation. The obtained relation is confirmed by the direct numerical simulation of random trajectory of a magnetotactic bacterium under the action of the Poisson type internal noise due to the random switching of rotary motors. The results obtained are in qualitative and quantitative agreement with the available experimental results and allow one to determine the characteristic time between the switching events of a rotary motor of the bacterium. - Highlights: • Magnetotactic bacteria in a rotating field behaves as circle swimmers. • Diffusion coefficient of these swimmers due to the random switching of rotary motors is calculated. • Results are in good qualitative and quantitative agreement with available experimental results.

  8. Dynamics of the colloidal suspensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hai-yan; MA Hong-ru

    2006-01-01

    This article offers a survey on our current knowledge of the dynamics of the colloidal suspension,where each particle experiences the friction force with solvent,hydrodynamic interaction,and potential force from surrounding particles and thermodynamic force.It further contains a summary of the basic concepts about microstructures and equilibrium properties,and of analytical and numerical methods,which are relevant for the theoretical description of the suspensions.The description of the dynamics of colloidal particles,based on the generalized Smoluchowski equation,is justified for the time scale accessible in DLS experiments.The combined influence of hard sphere or electrostatic potential and solvent-mediated hydrodynamic interaction on the short-time dynamics of monodisperse suspensions is investigated in detail.A thorough study of tracer-diffusion in hard sphere and charge-stabilized suspensions is presented.Mean-square displacements and long-time tracer-diffusion coefficients are calculated with two alternative approximations,i.e.,a mode-coupling scheme and a single relaxation time ansatz.

  9. Colloid-Associated Radionuclide Concentration Limits: ANL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose and scope of this report is to describe the analysis of available colloidal data from waste form corrosion tests at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to extract characteristics of these colloids that can be used in modeling their contribution to the source term for sparingly soluble radioelements (e.g., Pu). Specifically, the focus is on developing a useful description of the following waste form colloid characteristics: (1) composition, (2) size distribution, and (3) quantification of the rate of waste form colloid generation. The composition and size distribution information are intended to support analysis of the potential transport of the sparingly soluble radionuclides associated with the waste form colloids. The rate of colloid generation is intended to support analysis of the waste form colloid-associated radionuclide concentrations. In addressing the above characteristics, available data are interpreted to address mechanisms controlling colloid formation and stability. This report was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report for SR'' (CRWMS M and O 2000). Because the end objective is to support the source term modeling we have organized the conclusions into two categories: (1) data analysis conclusions and (2) recommendations for colloid source term modeling. The second category is included to facilitate use of the conclusions from the data analysis in the abstraction of a colloid source term model. The data analyses and conclusions that are presented in this report are based on small-scale laboratory tests conducted on a limited number of waste glass compositions and spent fuel types

  10. Au, Ag and Au:Ag colloidal nanoparticles synthesized by pulsed laser ablation as SERS substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vinod

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Chemically pure colloidal suspensions of gold and silver nanoparticles were synthesized using pulsed laser ablation. The dependence of laser fluence on the surface plasmon characteristics of the nanoparticles was investigated. Au:Ag colloidal suspensions were prepared by mixing highly monodisperse Au and Ag nanocolloids. The plasmon band of these mixtures was found to be highly sensitive to Au:Ag concentration ratio and wavelength of the laser beam used in the ablation process. The Au:Ag mixture consists of almost spherical shaped nanostructures with a tendency to join with adjacent ones. The surface enhanced Raman scattering activity of the Au, Ag and Au:Ag colloidal suspensions was tested using crystal violet as probe molecules. Enhancement in Raman signal obtained with Au:Ag substrates was found to be promising and strongly depends on its plasmon characteristics.

  11. Au, Ag and Au:Ag colloidal nanoparticles synthesized by pulsed laser ablation as SERS substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Vinod; K.G.Gopchandran

    2014-01-01

    Chemically pure colloidal suspensions of gold and silver nanoparticles were synthesized using pulsed laser ablation. The dependence of laser fluence on the surface plasmon characteristics of the nanoparticles was investigated. Au:Ag colloidal suspensions were prepared by mixing highly monodisperse Au and Ag nanocolloids. The plasmon band of these mixtures was found to be highly sensitive to Au:Ag concentration ratio and wavelength of the laser beam used in the ablation process. The Au:Ag mixture consists of almost spherical shaped nanostructures with a tendency to join with adjacent ones. The surface enhanced Raman scattering activity of the Au, Ag and Au:Ag colloidal suspensions was tested using crystal violet as probe molecules. Enhancement in Raman signal obtained with Au:Ag substrates was found to be promising and strongly depends on its plasmon characteristics.

  12. Fluid-bicontinuous gels stabilized by interfacial colloids: low and high molecular weight fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carefully tuned composite materials can have properties wholly unlike those of their separate constituents. We review the development of one example: colloid-stabilized emulsions with bicontinuous liquid domains. These non-equilibrium structures resemble the sponge mesophase of surfactants; however, in the colloid-stabilized case the interface separating the liquid domains is itself semi-solid. The arrangement of domains is created by arresting liquid-liquid phase separation via spinodal decomposition. Dispersed colloids exhibiting partial wettability become trapped on the newly created interface and jam together as the domains coarsen. Similar structures have been created in polymer blends stabilized using either interfacial nanoparticles or clay platelets. Here it has been possible to create the domain arrangement either by phase separation or by direct mixing of the melt. The low molecular weight liquid and polymer based structures have been developed independently and much can be learnt by comparing the two. (topical review)

  13. PREFACE: Colloidal and molecular electro-optics Colloidal and molecular electro-optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palberg, Thomas; Löwen, Hartmut

    2010-12-01

    The Kerr effect, also known as the quadratic electro-optic effect, was discovered more than a hundred years ago by John Kerr, a Scottish physicist [1]. It describes the change in the refractive index of a material in response to an applied electric field. Around 1950 its application swayed from simple to complex fluids. A strong contribution was made through a number of seminal papers by the French polymer scientist H Benoit [2-4]. These and others initiated wide interest from researchers working on macromolecular solutions or colloidal dispersions. Experimental activities were further boosted by the advent of the laser and theoretical approaches strongly drew from growing computer power. Use of AC or pulsed field techniques, as well as of inhomogeneous fields, including laser tweezers, studies of electrophoretic, dielectrophoretic, electro-osmotic and other types of motion by advanced optical methods and combinations with other external fields have had the greatest impact on our understanding of the electric field induced optical properties of soft matter systems. Today the field has matured and its techniques are broadly employed as versatile tools with applications ranging from biological systems to electronic ink. Fundamental interest still continues but more and more side branches have evolved fruitfully. This collection of papers was, therefore, brought together to take a fresh look at this traditional field. Further, we are to celebrate 35 years of a successful conference series, ELOPTO, with the last one held at Waldthausen Castle hosted by the Johannes Gutenberg University, MainzNote1 and the DFG Collaborative Research Centre TR6 'Physics of colloidal dispersions in external fields'Note2. In this issue we have collected the articles of some of the leading experts in the area, well garnished with novel approaches and clever ideas by younger colleagues. With our selection we hope to cover a representative spectrum of the ongoing research, catch the most

  14. Plutonium and Cesium Colloid Mediated Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukhalfa, H.; Dittrich, T.; Reimus, P. W.; Ware, D.; Erdmann, B.; Wasserman, N. L.; Abdel-Fattah, A. I.

    2013-12-01

    Plutonium and cesium have been released to the environment at many different locations worldwide and are present in spent fuel at significant levels. Accurate understanding of the mechanisms that control their fate and transport in the environment is important for the management of contaminated sites, for forensic applications, and for the development of robust repositories for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. Plutonium, which can be present in the environment in multiple oxidations states and various chemical forms including amorphous oxy(hydr)oxide phases, adsorbs/adheres very strongly to geological materials and is usually immobile in all its chemical forms. However, when associated with natural colloids, it has the potential to migrate significant distances from its point of release. Like plutonium, cesium is not very mobile and tends to remain adhered to geological materials near its release point, although its transport can be enhanced by natural colloids. However, the reactivity of plutonium and cesium are very different, so their colloid-mediated transport might be significantly different in subsurface environments. In this study, we performed controlled experiments in two identically-prepared columns; one dedicated to Pu and natural colloid transport experiments, and the other to Cs and colloid experiments. Multiple flow-through experiments were conducted in each column, with the effluent solutions being collected and re-injected into the same column two times to examine the persistence and scaling behavior of the natural colloids, Pu and Cs. The data show that that a significant fraction of colloids were retained in the first elution through each column, but the eluted colloids collected from the first run transported almost conservatively in subsequent runs. Plutonium transport tracked natural colloids in the first run but deviated from the transport of natural colloids in the second and third runs. Cesium transport tracked natural

  15. Morphological and Structural Control of Organic Monolayer Colloidal Crystal Based on Plasma Etching and Its Application in Fabrication of Ordered Gold Nanostructured Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangqiang Liu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The organic monolayer colloidal crystals, which are usually prepared by self-assembling, could be used as templates, due to their interstitial geometry, for the periodically arranged nanostructured arrays, which have important applications in many fields, such as photonic crystals, information storage, super-hydrophobicity, biological and chemical sensing. Obviously, the structures of the obtained arrays mainly depend on those of the templates. However, the self-assembled monolayer colloidal crystal is exclusive in structure and for its hexagonal close-packed colloidal arrangement, leading to the limitation of the monolayer colloidal crystal as the template for the nanostructured arrays. Therefore, structural diversity is important in order for colloidal crystals to be used as the templates for various nanostructured arrays. Recently, there have been some reports on the morphological and structural manipulation of the organic monolayer colloidal crystals. In this review article, we focus on the recent progress in morphological and structural manipulation of polystyrene monolayer colloidal crystals based on plasma etching, and its application in the fabrication of the ordered gold nanostructured arrays with different structures, mainly including close-packed monolayer colloidal crystal and its transferrable property; structural manipulation based on plasma etching; and fabrication of gold nanostructured arrays based on varied monolayer colloidal crystals as template.

  16. Spontaneous Formation of Eutectic Crystal Structures in Binary and Ternary Charged Colloids due to Depletion Attraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyotama, Akiko; Okuzono, Tohru; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2016-03-01

    Crystallization of colloids has extensively been studied for past few decades as models to study phase transition in general. Recently, complex crystal structures in multi-component colloids, including alloy and eutectic structures, have attracted considerable attention. However, the fabrication of 2D area-filling colloidal eutectics has not been reported till date. Here, we report formation of eutectic structures in binary and ternary aqueous colloids due to depletion attraction. We used charged particles + linear polyelectrolyte systems, in which the interparticle interaction could be represented as a sum of the electrostatic, depletion, and van der Waals forces. The interaction was tunable at a lengthscale accessible to direct observation by optical microscopy. The eutectic structures were formed because of interplay of crystallization of constituent components and accompanying fractionation. An observed binary phase diagram, defined by a mixing ratio and inverse area fraction of the particles, was analogous to that for atomic and molecular eutectic systems. This new method also allows the adjustment of both the number and wavelengths of Bragg diffraction peaks. Furthermore, these eutectic structures could be immobilized in polymer gel to produce self-standing materials. The present findings will be useful in the design of the optical properties of colloidal crystals.

  17. Structural evolution of Colloidal Gels under Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boromand, Arman; Maia, Joao; Jamali, Safa

    Colloidal suspensions are ubiquitous in different industrial applications ranging from cosmetic and food industries to soft robotics and aerospace. Owing to the fact that mechanical properties of colloidal gels are controlled by its microstructure and network topology, we trace the particles in the networks formed under different attraction potentials and try to find a universal behavior in yielding of colloidal gels. Many authors have implemented different simulation techniques such as molecular dynamics (MD) and Brownian dynamics (BD) to capture better picture during phase separation and yielding mechanism in colloidal system with short-ranged attractive force. However, BD neglects multi-body hydrodynamic interactions (HI) which are believed to be responsible for the second yielding of colloidal gels. We envision using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) with modified depletion potential and hydrodynamic interactions, as a coarse-grain model, can provide a robust simulation package to address the gel formation process and yielding in short ranged-attractive colloidal systems. The behavior of colloidal gels with different attraction potentials under flow is examined and structural fingerprints of yielding in these systems will be discussed.

  18. Synthesis and Analytical Centrifugation of Magnetic Model Colloids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luigjes, B.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is a study of the preparation and thermodynamic properties of magnetic colloids. First, two types of magnetic model colloids are investigated: composite colloids and single-domain nanoparticles. Thermodynamics of magnetic colloids is studied using analytical centrifugation, including a s

  19. Carbon Nanomaterials as Antibacterial Colloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Maas

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanomaterials like graphene, carbon nanotubes, fullerenes and the various forms of diamond have attracted great attention for their vast potential regarding applications in electrical engineering and as biomaterials. The study of the antibacterial properties of carbon nanomaterials provides fundamental information on the possible toxicity and environmental impact of these materials. Furthermore, as a result of the increasing prevalence of resistant bacteria strains, the development of novel antibacterial materials is of great importance. This article reviews current research efforts on characterizing the antibacterial activity of carbon nanomaterials from the perspective of colloid and interface science. Building on these fundamental findings, recent functionalization strategies for enhancing the antibacterial effect of carbon nanomaterials are described. The review concludes with a comprehensive outlook that summarizes the most important discoveries and trends regarding antibacterial carbon nanomaterials.

  20. Colloidal QDs-polymer nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordillo, H.; Suárez, I.; Rodríguez-Cantó, P.; Abargues, R.; García-Calzada, R.; Chyrvony, V.; Albert, S.; Martínez-Pastor, J.

    2012-04-01

    Nanometer-size colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals, or Quantum Dots (NQD), are very prospective active centers because their light emission is highly efficient and temperature-independent. Nanocomposites based on the incorporation of QDs inside a polymer matrix are very promising materials for application in future photonic devices because they combine the properties of QDs with the technological feasibility of polymers. In the present work some basic applications of these new materials have been studied. Firstly, the fabrication of planar and linear waveguides based on the incorporation of CdS, CdSe and CdTe in PMMA and SU-8 are demonstrated. As a result, photoluminescence (PL) of the QDs are coupled to a waveguide mode, being it able to obtain multicolor waveguiding. Secondly, nanocomposite films have been evaluated as photon energy down-shifting converters to improve the efficiency of solar cells.

  1. Accelerated lattice Boltzmann model for colloidal suspensions rheology and interface morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Hassan

    Colloids are ubiquitous in the food, medical, cosmetic, polymer, water purification and pharmaceutical industries. Colloids thermal, mechanical and storage properties are highly dependent on their interface morphology and their rheological behavior. Numerical methods provide a cheap and reliable virtual laboratory for the study of colloids. However efficiency is a major concern to address when using numerical methods for practical applications. This work introduces the main building-blocks for an improved lattice Boltzmann-based numerical tool designed for the study of colloidal rheology and interface morphology. The efficiency of the proposed model is enhanced by using the recently developed and validated migrating multi-block algorithms for the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The migrating multi-block was used to simulate single component, multi-component, multiphase and single component multiphase flows. Results were validated by experimental, numerical and analytical solutions. The contamination of the fluid-fluid interface influences the colloids morphology. This issue was addressed by the introduction of the hybrid LBM for surfactant-covered droplets. The module was used for the simulation of surfactant-covered droplet deformation under shear and uniaxial extensional flows respectively and under buoyancy. Validation with experimental and theoretical results was provided. Colloids are non-Newtonian fluids which exhibit rich rheological behavior. The suppression of coalescence module is the part of the proposed model which facilitates the study of colloids rheology. The model results for the relative viscosity were in agreement with some theoretical results. Biological suspensions such as blood are macro-colloids by nature. The study of the blood flow in the microvasculature was heuristically approached by assuming the red blood cells as surfactant covered droplets. The effects of interfacial tension on the flow velocity and the droplet exclusion from the walls

  2. Colloid and interface chemistry for nanotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Kralchevsky, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Colloid and interface science dealt with nanoscale objects for nearly a century before the term nanotechnology was coined. An interdisciplinary field, it bridges the macroscopic world and the small world of atoms and molecules. Colloid and Interface Chemistry for Nanotechnology is a collection of manuscripts reflecting the activities of research teams that have been involved in the networking project Colloid and Interface Chemistry for Nanotechnology (2006-2011), Action D43, the European Science Foundation. The project was a part of the intergovernmental framework for Cooperation in Science an

  3. A colloidal quantum dot spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Jie; Bawendi, Moungi G.

    2015-07-01

    Spectroscopy is carried out in almost every field of science, whenever light interacts with matter. Although sophisticated instruments with impressive performance characteristics are available, much effort continues to be invested in the development of miniaturized, cheap and easy-to-use systems. Current microspectrometer designs mostly use interference filters and interferometric optics that limit their photon efficiency, resolution and spectral range. Here we show that many of these limitations can be overcome by replacing interferometric optics with a two-dimensional absorptive filter array composed of colloidal quantum dots. Instead of measuring different bands of a spectrum individually after introducing temporal or spatial separations with gratings or interference-based narrowband filters, a colloidal quantum dot spectrometer measures a light spectrum based on the wavelength multiplexing principle: multiple spectral bands are encoded and detected simultaneously with one filter and one detector, respectively, with the array format allowing the process to be efficiently repeated many times using different filters with different encoding so that sufficient information is obtained to enable computational reconstruction of the target spectrum. We illustrate the performance of such a quantum dot microspectrometer, made from 195 different types of quantum dots with absorption features that cover a spectral range of 300 nanometres, by measuring shifts in spectral peak positions as small as one nanometre. Given this performance, demonstrable avenues for further improvement, the ease with which quantum dots can be processed and integrated, and their numerous finely tuneable bandgaps that cover a broad spectral range, we expect that quantum dot microspectrometers will be useful in applications where minimizing size, weight, cost and complexity of the spectrometer are critical.

  4. Magnetic assembly route to colloidal responsive photonic nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Le; Wang, Mingsheng; Ge, Jianping; Yin, Yadong

    2012-09-18

    Responsive photonic structures can respond to external stimuli by transmitting optical signals. Because of their important technological applications such as color signage and displays, biological and chemical sensors, security devices, ink and paints, military camouflage, and various optoelectronic devices, researchers have focused on developing these functional materials. Conventionally, self-assembled colloidal crystals containing periodically arranged dielectric materials have served as the predominant starting frameworks. Stimulus-responsive materials are incorporated into the periodic structures either as the initial building blocks or as the surrounding matrix so that the photonic properties can be tuned. Although researchers have proposed various versions of responsive photonic structures, the low efficiency of fabrication through self-assembly, narrow tunability, slow responses to the external stimuli, incomplete reversibility, and the challenge of integrating them into existing photonic devices have limited their practical application. In this Account, we describe how magnetic fields can guide the assembly of superparamagnetic colloidal building blocks into periodically arranged particle arrays and how the photonic properties of the resulting structures can be reversibly tuned by manipulating the external magnetic fields. The application of the external magnetic field instantly induces a strong magnetic dipole-dipole interparticle attraction within the dispersion of superparamagnetic particles, which creates one-dimensional chains that each contains a string of particles. The balance between the magnetic attraction and the interparticle repulsions, such as the electrostatic force, defines the interparticle separation. By employing uniform superparamagnetic particles of appropriate sizes and surface charges, we can create one-dimensional periodicity, which leads to strong optical diffraction. Acting remotely over a large distance, magnetic forces drove the

  5. PRELIMINARY STUDY ON THE DISSOLVED AND COLLOIDAL ORGANIC CARBON IN THE ZHUJIANG RIVER ESTUARY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper reports data on the dissolved and colloidal organic carbon in the Zhujiang (Pearl) River estuary. DOC concentration was 142 to 239 μmol/L in the freshwater taken in March 1997 from the four Zhujiang River tributaries flowing into the Lingdingyang estuary. High concentration was observed in the Humen tributary located near Guangzhou. The rapidly increased DOC concentration at low salinities (~5) may be attributed to the exchange between macroparticulate and dissolved organic matter during the early stage of estuarine mixing. DOC concentration overall followed the mixing line until salinity ~25, where the Deep Bay is located and where DOC was elevated. This elevated DOC may suggest a local organic matter source from Shenzhen. Using a cross-flow ultrafiltration (CFF) system equipped with a Millipore Prep-scale CFF 1 kD regenerated cellulose membrane, we also separated the colloidal organic matter from the truly dissolved fraction (<1 kD). CFF membranes were carefully evaluated for their applicability (retention characteristics, blank level and mass balance) to separate colloidal organic matter. COC in the study area ranged from 5 to 85 μmol/L, representing ~ 3%-32% of DOC. The highest COC percentage was found at low salinities (< 5) in both winter and summer. Evidence suggests in-situ production of colloidal material at this salinity range. Beyond this point, a very modest removal was observable until high salinities. Again, an increase in COC concentration was shown in the samples taken from the Deep Bay.

  6. Anisotropic Colloids: Synthesis and Phase Behavior of Eccentric, Dimer and String-like Colloids

    OpenAIRE

    Demirors, A.F.

    2010-01-01

    The research described in this thesis focuses on synthesis and phase behavior of anisotropic colloids prepared through different synthetic strategies. Namely, eccentric core-shell particles, dimers, string-like particles and core-shell particles are the systems investigated throughout this work. The synthesis routes are described for these colloidal systems and their physical/chemical properties are extensively characterized. Furthermore, potential applications of these colloidal systems in f...

  7. Grimsel colloid exercise, an international intercomparison exercise on the sampling and characterization of groundwater colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Grimsel colloid exercise was an intercomparison exercise which consisted of an in situ sampling phase followed by a colloid characterization step. The goal of this benchmark exercise, which involved 12 laboratories, was to evaluate both sampling and characterization techniques with emphasis on the colloid specific size distribution. The sampling phase took place at the Grimsel test site between 1 and 13 February 1988 and the participating groups produced colloid samples using various methods. This work was carried out within the Community COCO Club, as a component of the Mirage project (second phase)

  8. Surface-enhanced Raman Scattering Activity Study of Molecule in Mixed Negatively and Positively Charged Silver Colloidal Solution%混合正、负电性银胶体系的表面增强拉曼散射活性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方靖淮; 黄云霞; 李霞; 窦晓明

    2004-01-01

    Both negatively and positively charged silver colloids were prepared in aqueous solution for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) by the reduction of silver nitrate with sodium citrate and hydrogen peroxide under basic condition, respectively. By means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the observation of morphologies of negatively charged silver colloid (NSC) and positively charged silver colloid (PSC) has been presented, and the aggregation behaviors of NSC and PSC as well as the mixture of NSC and PSC induced by the addition of fuchsine basic molecules examined. SERS from fuchsine basic molecules in above mentioned colloidal systems were recorded respectively and compared with each other. The results show that the mixture of NSC and PSC could form the aggregation morphology different from that of single NSC and PSC and bring about the favorable effect on SERS behavior for the adsorbed fuchsine basic.%通过化学还原的方法分别制备了具有正、负电性的纳米银胶.利用透射电子显微镜表征了正、负电性银胶以及混合银胶体系中加入碱性品红分子后的聚集行为.通过测定碱性品红分子在正、负电性银胶以及混合银胶体系中的表面增强拉曼光谱的变化,探讨了不同电性银胶基底对碱性品红表面增强拉曼活性的影响.实验结果表明,混合溶胶体系所具有的不同于单一溶胶的聚集特性能有效的改善单银胶体系的表面增强拉曼散射活性.

  9. Self-assembly of microcapsules via colloidal bond hybridization and anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Chris H. J.; Luiken, Jurriaan A.; Bolhuis, Peter G.; Kegel, Willem K.

    2016-06-01

    Particles with directional interactions are promising building blocks for new functional materials and may serve as models for biological structures. Mutually attractive nanoparticles that are deformable owing to flexible surface groups, for example, may spontaneously order themselves into strings, sheets and large vesicles. Furthermore, anisotropic colloids with attractive patches can self-assemble into open lattices and the colloidal equivalents of molecules and micelles. However, model systems that combine mutual attraction, anisotropy and deformability have not yet been realized. Here we synthesize colloidal particles that combine these three characteristics and obtain self-assembled microcapsules. We propose that mutual attraction and deformability induce directional interactions via colloidal bond hybridization. Our particles contain both mutually attractive and repulsive surface groups that are flexible. Analogously to the simplest chemical bond—in which two isotropic orbitals hybridize into the molecular orbital of H2—these flexible groups redistribute on binding. Via colloidal bond hybridization, isotropic spheres self-assemble into planar monolayers, whereas anisotropic snowman-shaped particles self-assemble into hollow monolayer microcapsules. A modest change in the building blocks thus results in much greater complexity of the self-assembled structures. In other words, these relatively simple building blocks self-assemble into markedly more complex structures than do similar particles that are isotropic or non-deformable.

  10. Self-assembly of microcapsules via colloidal bond hybridization and anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Chris H J; Luiken, Jurriaan A; Bolhuis, Peter G; Kegel, Willem K

    2016-06-16

    Particles with directional interactions are promising building blocks for new functional materials and may serve as models for biological structures. Mutually attractive nanoparticles that are deformable owing to flexible surface groups, for example, may spontaneously order themselves into strings, sheets and large vesicles. Furthermore, anisotropic colloids with attractive patches can self-assemble into open lattices and the colloidal equivalents of molecules and micelles. However, model systems that combine mutual attraction, anisotropy and deformability have not yet been realized. Here we synthesize colloidal particles that combine these three characteristics and obtain self-assembled microcapsules. We propose that mutual attraction and deformability induce directional interactions via colloidal bond hybridization. Our particles contain both mutually attractive and repulsive surface groups that are flexible. Analogously to the simplest chemical bond--in which two isotropic orbitals hybridize into the molecular orbital of H2--these flexible groups redistribute on binding. Via colloidal bond hybridization, isotropic spheres self-assemble into planar monolayers, whereas anisotropic snowman-shaped particles self-assemble into hollow monolayer microcapsules. A modest change in the building blocks thus results in much greater complexity of the self-assembled structures. In other words, these relatively simple building blocks self-assemble into markedly more complex structures than do similar particles that are isotropic or non-deformable. PMID:27281213

  11. A Course in Colloid and Surface Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scamehorn, John F.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a course for chemical engineers, chemists, and petroleum engineers that focuses on colloid and surface science. Major topic areas in the course include capillarity, surface thermodynamics, adsorption contact angle, micelle formation, solubilization in micelles, emulsions, foams, and applications. (JN)

  12. Polydispersity effects in colloid-polymer mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liddle, S M; Poon, W C K [SUPA and School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Edinburgh, Kings Buildings, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Narayanan, T, E-mail: S.Liddle@ed.ac.uk, E-mail: narayan@esrf.fr, E-mail: w.poon@ed.ac.uk [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2011-05-18

    We study phase separation and transient gelation experimentally in a mixture consisting of polydisperse colloids (polydispersity: {approx} 6%) and non-adsorbing polymers, where the ratio of the average size of the polymer to that of the colloid is {approx} 0.062. Unlike what has been reported previously for mixtures with somewhat lower colloid polydispersity ({approx} 5%), the addition of polymers does not expand the fluid-solid coexistence region. Instead, we find a region of fluid-solid coexistence which has an approximately constant width but an unexpected re-entrant shape. We detect the presence of a metastable gas-liquid binodal, which gives rise to two-stepped crystallization kinetics that can be rationalized as the effect of fractionation. Finally, we find that the separation into multiple coexisting solid phases at high colloid volume fractions predicted by equilibrium statistical mechanics is kinetically suppressed before the system reaches dynamical arrest.

  13. Mobility of radioactive colloidal particles in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiocolloids are a major factor in the rapid migration of radioactive waste in groundwater. For at least two Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sites, researchers have shown that groundwater colloidal particles were responsible for the rapid transport of radioactive waste material in groundwater. On an international scale, a review of reported field observations, laboratory column studies, and carefully collected field samples provides compelling evidence that colloidal particles enhance both radioactive and toxic waste migration. The objective of this project is to understand and predict colloid-contaminant migration through fundamental mathematical models, water sampling, and laboratory experiments and use this information to develop an effective and scientifically based colloid immobilization strategy. The article focuses on solving the suspected radiocolloid transport problems at LANL's Mortandad Canyon site. (author) 6 figs., 5 tabs., 18 refs

  14. Suspensions of colloidal particles and aggregates

    CERN Document Server

    Babick, Frank

    2016-01-01

    This book addresses the properties of particles in colloidal suspensions. It has a focus on particle aggregates and the dependency of their physical behaviour on morphological parameters. For this purpose, relevant theories and methodological tools are reviewed and applied to selected examples. The book is divided into four main chapters. The first of them introduces important measurement techniques for the determination of particle size and interfacial properties in colloidal suspensions. A further chapter is devoted to the physico-chemical properties of colloidal particles—highlighting the interfacial phenomena and the corresponding interactions between particles. The book’s central chapter examines the structure-property relations of colloidal aggregates. This comprises concepts to quantify size and structure of aggregates, models and numerical tools for calculating the (light) scattering and hydrodynamic properties of aggregates, and a discussion on van-der-Waals and double layer interactions between ...

  15. Size determinations of colloidal fat emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuntsche, Judith; Klaus, Katrin; Steiniger, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Size and size distributions of colloidal dispersions are of crucial importance for their performance and safety. In the present study, commercially available fat emulsions (Lipofundin N, Lipofundin MCT and Lipidem) were analyzed by photon correlation spectroscopy, laser diffraction with adequate...

  16. Linear Optical Properties of Gold Colloid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingmin XIA

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Gold colloid was prepared by reducing HAuCl4·4H2O with Na3C6H5O7·2H2O. The morphology, size of gold nanoparticles and the optical property of colloid were characterized by transmission electron microscope and UV-Vis spectrophotometer, respectively. It shows that the gold nanoparticles are in the shape of spheres with diameters less than 8 nm, and the surface plasmon resonance absorption peak is located at about 438 nm. As the volume fraction of gold particles increases, the intensity of absorption peak strengthens. The optical property of gold colloid was analyzed by Maxwell-Garnett (MG effective medium theory in the company of Drude dispersion model. The results show that the matrix dielectric constant is a main factor, which influences the optical property of gold colloid.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.4.9558

  17. Crust formation in drying colloidal suspensions

    OpenAIRE

    Style, R. W.; Peppin, S. S. L.

    2010-01-01

    During the drying of colloidal suspensions, the desiccation process causes the suspension near the air interface to consolidate into a connected porous matrix or crust. Fluid transport in the porous medium is governed by Darcy’s law and the equations of poroelasticity, while the equations of colloid physics govern processes in the suspension. We derive new equations describing this process, including unique boundary conditions coupling the two regions, yielding a moving-boundary model of the ...

  18. Autonomous colloidal crystallization in a galvanic microreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punckt, Christian; Jan, Linda; Jiang, Peng; Frewen, Thomas A.; Saville, Dudley A.; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G.; Aksay, Ilhan A.

    2012-10-01

    We report on a technique that utilizes an array of galvanic microreactors to guide the assembly of two-dimensional colloidal crystals with spatial and orientational order. Our system is comprised of an array of copper and gold electrodes in a coplanar arrangement, immersed in a dilute hydrochloric acid solution in which colloidal micro-spheres of polystyrene and silica are suspended. Under optimized conditions, two-dimensional colloidal crystals form at the anodic copper with patterns and crystal orientation governed by the electrode geometry. After the aggregation process, the colloidal particles are cemented to the substrate by co-deposition of reaction products. As we vary the electrode geometry, the dissolution rate of the copper electrodes is altered. This way, we control the colloidal motion as well as the degree of reaction product formation. We show that particle motion is governed by a combination of electrokinetic effects acting directly on the colloidal particles and bulk electrolyte flow generated at the copper-gold interface.

  19. Density functional theory of charged colloidal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phase behavior of charged colloidal systems has been studied recently by the density functional theory formalism (DFT) [R. van Roij, M. Dijkstra, and J. P. Hansen, Phys. Rev. E >59, 2010 (1999)]. A key feature of this approach is the appearance of a density and temperature-dependent effective Hamiltonian between the charged colloids. Under certain approximations, the effective Hamiltonian is made up only of a sum of position-independent one-body or volume terms and two-body colloid-separation dependent terms. In the limit of low colloidal densities, the DFT results do not reduce to the familiar Debye-Huckel limiting law nor do the results agree with previous work based on an identical approach but were developed using traditional statistical-mechanical methods [B. Beresford-Smith, D. Y. C. Chan, and D. J. Mitchell J. Colloid Interface Sci. >105, 216 (1985)]. This paper provides a reconciliation of these differences and comments on the significance of the one-body volume terms in the effective Hamiltonian of a system of charged colloids in determining thermodynamics and phase behavior

  20. Complex coacervation between colloidal silica and polyacrylamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawase, Kaoru; Sakami, Hiroshi; Hayakawa, Kiyoshi

    1989-03-01

    Complex coacervation introduced by gamma-ray induced polymerization of acrylamide in colloidal silica was studied. The complex coaservate was formed by polymerization of acrylamide dissolved in a colloidal silica and methanol mixture. Complex coacervation (two-phase separation of the mixture) was observed only when the concentration of methanol was between 33 and 41 percent by volume, and the concentration of colloidal silica did not affect it. Although two phase separation was not influenced by pH change, the content of polyacrylamide was bigger in the equilibrated solution in acidic regions. It was, however, bigger in the complex coacervate at neutral and in alkaline regions. The content of polyacrylamide was also calculated from the particle diameter of complex coacervate measured by small angle X-ray scattering, and the result was well coincided with the analytical result. The stability of the complex coacervate against the addition of salts was better than that of the untreated colloidal silica. The rate of electrophoretic transport of the complex coacervate was also lower than that of the colloidal silica. From these observation it was concluded that the hydrophobic colloidal silica particles were protected by the surrounding hydrophilic polyacrylamide. (author).

  1. Sterically stabilized colloids with tunable repulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gruijthuijsen, Kitty; Obiols-Rabasa, Marc; Heinen, Marco; Nägele, Gerhard; Stradner, Anna

    2013-09-10

    When studying tunable electrostatic repulsions in aqueous suspensions of charged colloids, irreversible colloid aggregation or gelation may occur at high salt concentrations. For many commonly used synthetic colloids, such as polystyrene and silica particles, the reason for coagulation is the presence of unbalanced, strongly attractive, and short-ranged van der Waals (VDW) forces. Here, we present an aqueous polystyrene model colloid that is sterically stabilized against VDW attractions. We show that the synthesis procedure, based on a neutral initiator couple and a nonionic surfactant, introduces surface charges that can be further increased by the addition of charged comonomer methacrylic acid. Thus, the interactions between the polystyrene spheres can be conveniently tuned from hard-sphere-like to charge-stabilized with long-ranged electrostatic repulsions described by a Yukawa-type pair potential. The particle size, grafting density, core-shell structure, and surface charge are characterized by light and neutron scattering. Using X-ray and neutron scattering in combination with an accurate analytic integral equation scheme for the colloidal static structure factor, we deduce effective particle charges for colloid volume fractions ≥0.1 and salt concentrations in the range of 1.5 to 50 mM. PMID:23937718

  2. Colloidal behavior of clay in whiteware suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossington, Katherine Rose

    2000-10-01

    This research investigated the colloidal behavior of kaolinitic clay in aqueous suspensions. The foundation of most current clay suspension behavior is based on early studies conducted prior to the application of colloidal concepts in ceramic systems and also when many of the colloidal theories were being developed. Technological advances in colloid science and the application of the theories greatly enhance the interpretation of the clay suspension behavior. Kaolinitic clay is the primary component responsible for the colloidal behavior of in traditional ceramics because the clay accounts for of the total surface area and active charge sites. The impact of cations and anions on colloidal behavior, specifically the dispersion and coagulation, of a whiteware suspension was examined using rheology and electrophoretic mobility measurements. The results indicate the cations are responsible for coagulating the suspension, including sodium, which has been labeled both a dispersant and a coagulant. The anionic species are responsible for dispersing the clay suspension, but zeta potential is an inaccurate measure of suspension stability. The influence of chemistry changes via cation and anion additions observed in suspensions are also detected in plastic bodies. The plasticity measured by the cohesion stress decreases with increasing cation concentration. It is suggested that the magnitude of the cohesion stress directly influences the formability and stress gradients established during drying.

  3. Colloidal oatmeal: history, chemistry and clinical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, Ellen S; Wallo, Warren

    2007-02-01

    Oatmeal has been used for centuries as a soothing agent to relieve itch and irritation associated with various xerotic dermatoses. In 1945, a ready to use colloidal oatmeal, produced by finely grinding the oat and boiling it to extract the colloidal material, became available. Today, colloidal oatmeal is available in various dosage forms from powders for the bath to shampoos, shaving gels, and moisturizing creams. Currently, the use of colloidal oatmeal as a skin protectant is regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) according to the Over-The-Counter Final Monograph for Skin Protectant Drug Products issued in June 2003. Its preparation is also standardized by the United States Pharmacopeia. The many clinical properties of colloidal oatmeal derive from its chemical polymorphism. The high concentration in starches and beta-glucan is responsible for the protective and water-holding functions of oat. The presence of different types of phenols confers antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. Some of the oat phenols are also strong ultraviolet absorbers. The cleansing activity of oat is mostly due to saponins. Its many functional properties make colloidal oatmeal a cleanser, moisturizer, buffer, as well as a soothing and protective anti-inflammatory agent.

  4. Direct measurement of colloidal interactions between polyaniline surfaces in a uv-curable coating formulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jafarzadeh, Shadi; Claesson, Per M.; Pan, Jinshan;

    2014-01-01

    The interactions between polyaniline particles and polyaniline surfaces in polyester acrylate resin mixed with 1,6-hexanediol diacrylate monomer have been investigated using contact angle measurements and the atomic force microscopy colloidal probe technique. Polyaniline with different characteri......The interactions between polyaniline particles and polyaniline surfaces in polyester acrylate resin mixed with 1,6-hexanediol diacrylate monomer have been investigated using contact angle measurements and the atomic force microscopy colloidal probe technique. Polyaniline with different...... cantilever and a pressed pellet of either hydrophilic or hydrophobic polyaniline powders, in resins of various polymer:monomer ratios. A short-range purely repulsive interaction was observed between hydrophilic polyaniline (doped with phosphoric acid) surfaces in polyester acrylate resin. In contrast......, interactions between hydrophobic polyaniline (doped with n-decyl phosphonic acid) were dominated by attractive forces, suggesting less compatibility and higher tendency for aggregation of these particles in liquid polyester acrylate compared to hydrophilic polyaniline. Both observations are in agreement...

  5. A colloidal singularity reveals the crucial role of colloidal stability for nanomaterials in-vitro toxicity testing: nZVI-microalgae colloidal system as a case study

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalo, Soledad; Pulido-Reyes, Gerardo; Fernández-Piñas, Francisca; Bonzongo, Jean Claude; Leganés, Francisco; Rosal, Roberto; García-Calvo, Eloy; Rodea-Palomares, Ismael

    2014-01-01

    Aggregation raises attention in Nanotoxicology due to its methodological implications. Aggregation is a physical symptom of a more general physicochemical condition of colloidal particles, namely, colloidal stability. Colloidal stability is a global indicator of the tendency of a system to reduce its net surface energy, which may be achieved by homo-aggregation or hetero-aggregation, including location at bio-interfaces. However, the role of colloidal stability as a driver of ENM bioactivity ...

  6. Radio-active colloids in the functional exploration of the reticulo-endothelium system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A historical review describes the reticulo-endothelial system (R.E.S.) and aims at defining it and at explaining its operation. The methods used for its examination and the colloids utilized are considered. The author has been led to prepare a special type of colloid: an albuminous complex containing radio-iodine, 'C.A. 131I', whose method of preparation and physical and biological examination are described. A human albumin, having a known optical density in solution, is heated until a change in the optical density indicates that an aggregation of the proteinic molecules has occurred. The denatured protein is iodated with 131I. Electrophoretic, ultracentrifuge and autoradiographic controls are then carried out. This atoxic and metabolisable preparation of biological origin is compared with the better defined colloidal gold which serves as reference. C.A.131I is injected into mice. It is shown by radioactivity measurements, auto-radiographies on sections of the whole animal, and anthropo-gamma-metric detections that a high concentration occurs in the S.R.E. of the liver. These static results are only of limited importance however compared to those obtained from an in vivo study of the phenomenon. The author records the changes in the radioactivity of the blood derived from the carotid artery using a well-scintillator. He obtains directly a curve of the radioactivity of blood having a decreasing exponential form; the mathematical expression describing this curve is given. The biological half-life T 1/2 of the colloid in the blood is a measure of its phagocytosis by the S.R.E. cells. A supplementary check is provided by the direct recording of the hepatic activity using a suitably collimated exterior detector. A curve of increasing-exponential form is obtained and its parameters are corollary to the preceding curve. These tests carried out on guinea-pigs and rats make it possible to give to the S.R.E. a phagocytic index which is characteristic of its state of activity

  7. Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Radionuclides Through The Vadose Zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main purpose of this project was to advance the basic scientific understanding of colloid and colloid-facilitated Cs transport of radionuclides in the vadose zone. We focused our research on the hydrological and geochemical conditions beneath the leaking waste tanks at the USDOE Hanford reservation. Specific objectives were (1) to determine the lability and thermodynamic stability of colloidal materials, which form after reacting Hanford sediments with simulated Hanford Tank Waste, (2) to characterize the interactions between colloidal particles and contaminants, i.e., Cs and Eu, (3) to determine the potential of Hanford sediments for in situ mobilization of colloids, (4) to evaluate colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport through sediments under unsaturated flow, (5) to implement colloid-facilitated contaminant transport mechanisms into a transport model, and (6) to improve conceptual characterization of colloid-contaminant-soil interactions and colloid-facilitated transport for clean-up procedures and long-term risk assessment

  8. Colloid's influences on microalgae growth as a potential environmental factor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵新淮; 张正斌; 刘莲生

    2003-01-01

    The role of colloid as "colloid pump" in the ocean is well known. The important influence of colloid in seawater on the growth of microalga was found in our 1999-2000 study. Colloid concentrates were obtained by employing a cross-flow filtration systen to ultrafilter seawater (which had been pre-filtrated by 0.45 μm acetate cellulose membrane) successively with different membranes. Ultrafiltration retentions (we called them colloid concentrates ) together with control sample ( seawater without colloid) were then inoculated with two species of microalgae and cultivated in selected conditions. Monitoring of microalgae growth during cultivation showed that all colloid concentrates had obvious influence on the growth of the microalgae studied. Addition of Fe(OH)3 colloid or organic colloid (protein or carbohydrate) to the control sample enhanced the microalgae's growth.

  9. Results From the Physics of Colloids Experiment on ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitz, David; Bailey, Arthur; Manley, Suliana; Prasad, Vikram; Christianson, Rebecca; Sankaran, Subramanian; Doherty, Michael; Jankovsky, Amy; Lorik, Tibor; Shiley, William

    2002-12-01

    The Physics of Colloids in Space (PCS) experiment was accommodated within International Space Station (ISS) EXpedite the PRocessing of Experiments to Space Station (EXPRESS) Rack 2 and was remotely operated from early June 2001 until February 2002 from NASA Glenn Research Center's Telescience Support Center (TSC) in Cleveland, Ohio, and from the remote site at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts. PCS was launched on 4/19/2001 on Space Shuttle STS-100. The experiment was activated on 5/31/2001. The entire experimental setup performed remarkably well, and accomplished 2400 hours of science operations on-orbit. The sophisticated instrumentation in PCS is capable of dynamic and static light scattering from 11 to 169 degrees, Bragg scattering over the range from 10 to 60 degrees, dynamic and static light scattering at low angles from 0.3 to 6.0 degrees, and color imaging. The long duration microgravity environment on the ISS facilitated extended studies on the growth and coarsening characteristics of binary crystals. The de-mixing of the colloid-polymer critical-point sample was also studied as it phase-separated into two phases. Further, aging studies on a col-pol gel, gelation rate studies in extremely low concentration fractal gels over several days, and studies on a glass sample, all provided valuable information. Several exciting and unique aspects of these results are discussed here.

  10. Effect of Solvation Film on the Viscosity of Colloidal Dispersions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Chang-Sheng; GU Qing-Bao; SONG Shao-Xian

    2005-01-01

    Viscosity is one of the most important properties of colloids in mixing, transportation, stabilization, energy consumption, and so on. According to Einstein's viscosity equation, the viscosity of a colloidal dispersion increases with the increase of particle concentration. And the equation can be applicable to all micro-particle dispersions, because the effect of solvation films coated on particles can be neglectable in that case. But with the decrease of particle size to nano-scale, the formation of solvation films on nano-particles can greatly affect the viscosity of a dispersion, and Einstein's equation may not be applicable to this case. In this work, one kind of micro-size silica particle and two kinds of nano-size silica particles were used to investigate the effect of solvation films on dispersion viscosity, dispersed in water and ethyl alcohol solvents, respectively. The results of theoretical calculation and experimental investigation show that the increase of viscosity is contributed from solvation films by more than 95 percent for nano-particle dispersions, while less than 10 percent for micro-particle dispersions.

  11. Use of a New Ziprasidone-Selective Electrode in Mixed Solvents and Its Application in the Analysis of Pharmaceuticals and Biological Fluids

    OpenAIRE

    María Cuartero; Mª Soledad García; Mustafa Salem Abuherba; Ortuño, Joaquín A.

    2011-01-01

    The construction and characterization of a new ion-selective electrode for the determination of the antipsychotic ziprasidone in mixed solvents is presented. The electrode contains a plasticized polymeric membrane based on a ziprasidone-tetraphenylborate ion-exchanger. The influence of membrane composition on the electrode response towards ziprasidone in hydroalcoholic solutions was studied. The electrode displayed a stable response in a 2:3 (v/v) methanol/water medium from a ziprasidone conc...

  12. Analytical theory of polymer-network-mediated interaction between colloidal particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Michele, Lorenzo; Zaccone, Alessio; Eiser, Erika

    2012-06-26

    Nanostructured materials based on colloidal particles embedded in a polymer network are used in a variety of applications ranging from nanocomposite rubbers to organic-inorganic hybrid solar cells. Further, polymer-network-mediated colloidal interactions are highly relevant to biological studies whereby polymer hydrogels are commonly employed to probe the mechanical response of living cells, which can determine their biological function in physiological environments. The performance of nanomaterials crucially relies upon the spatial organization of the colloidal particles within the polymer network that depends, in turn, on the effective interactions between the particles in the medium. Existing models based on nonlocal equilibrium thermodynamics fail to clarify the nature of these interactions, precluding the way toward the rational design of polymer-composite materials. In this article, we present a predictive analytical theory of these interactions based on a coarse-grained model for polymer networks. We apply the theory to the case of colloids partially embedded in cross-linked polymer substrates and clarify the origin of attractive interactions recently observed experimentally. Monte Carlo simulation results that quantitatively confirm the theoretical predictions are also presented. PMID:22679289

  13. Colloidal Gelation-2 and Colloidal Disorder-Order Transition-2 Investigations Conducted on STS-95

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Monica T.

    2000-01-01

    The Colloidal Gelation-2 (CGEL 2) and Colloidal Disorder-Order Transition-2 (CDOT 2) investigations flew on Space Shuttle Discovery mission STS-95 (also known as the John Glenn Mission). These investigations were part of a series of colloid experiments designed to help scientists answer fundamental science questions and reduce the trial and error involved in developing new and better materials. Industries dealing with semiconductors, electro-optics, ceramics, and composites are just a few that may benefit from this knowledge. The goal of the CGEL 2 investigation was to study the fundamental properties of colloids to help scientists better understand their nature and make them more useful for technology. Colloids consist of very small (submicron) particles suspended in a fluid. They play a critical role in the technology of this country, finding uses in materials ranging from paints and coatings to drugs, cosmetics, food, and drink. Although these products are routinely produced and used, there are still many aspects of their behavior about which scientists know little. Understanding their structures may allow scientists to manipulate the physical properties of colloids (a process called "colloidal engineering") to produce new materials and products. Colloid research may even improve the processing of known products to enhance their desirable properties.

  14. U1-RNP and TLR receptors in the pathogenesis of mixed connective tissue diseasePart I. The U1-RNP complex and its biological significance in the pathogenesis of mixed connective tissue disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradowska-Gorycka, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is a rare autoimmune syndrome, signified by complex interactions between disease-related phenomena, including inflammation, proliferative vascular arteriopathy, thrombotic events and humoral autoimmune processes. It is still controversial whether MCTD is a distinct clinical entity among systemic connective tissue diseases, although several authors consider that it is distinct and underline characteristic, distinct clinical, serological and immunogenetic features. The putative target of autoimmunity in MCTD is U1-RNP, which is a complex of U1-RNA and small nuclear RNP. Both the U1-RNA component and the specific proteins, particularly U1-70K, engage immune cells and their receptors in a complex network of interactions that ultimately lead to autoimmunity, inflammation, and tissue injury. U1-RNA is capable of inducing manifestations consistent with TLR activation. Stimulation of innate immunity by native RNA molecules with a double-stranded secondary structure may help explain the high prevalence of autoimmunity to RNA binding proteins.

  15. Colloidal silica-grouting in demonstration tunnel 2 in ONKALO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posiva carried out grouting using colloidal silica as the grouting material and with the time stop method as the design approach.Three fans were pre-grouted at Posiva Oy's research space ONKALO demonstration tunnel 2 in autumn 2011 and early winter 2012. Colloidal silica is a mix of one-component colloidal silica and accelerator. Before gelling, colloidal silica behaves like a Newtonian liquid. Colloidal silica's efficiency of penetrating hydraulic apertures in small fractures in rock is significantly better than that of cement-based grout. The grouting design was based on an analytical calculation model. A new technique was used in the grouting implementation, which primarily differed from the previous technique in regard to vacuum pumping and packers. The goal of the first grouting fan in the demonstration tunnel was to check the functionality of the equipment and the method; therefore, the fan was drilled into rock mass with no hydraulic conducting fractures. The second grouting fan was drilled into rock mass with an observed fairly low hydraulic conductivity that was lower than the start criterion established in Posiva Oy's requirements to manage groundwater inflows. Nevertheless, the grouting was carried out. The sealing effect was estimated from the control holes, and a slight improvement in sealing was noted. The holes of the third grouting fan clearly penetrated a water conductive rock mass. The grouting was carried out in two phases, in which the new holes in the second phase were drilled between the existing ones that were drilled in the first phase. In the third fan, the grouting holes of the first phase were noted to be significantly crooked and the second phase grouting holes were drilled in locations that differed from the original design. The quantity of grouting holes was increased in the second phase. The sealing effect was estimated by monitoring the second phase holes and control holes. Based on observations from the control holes

  16. Colloidal silica-grouting in demonstration tunnel 2 in ONKALO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollmen, K.; Sievaenen, U. [Saanio and Riekkola Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Funehag, J.; Granberg, N. [Tyrens AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Lyytinen, T.; Syrjaenen, P. [ELY Management Oy, Espoo (Finland)

    2013-12-15

    Posiva carried out grouting using colloidal silica as the grouting material and with the time stop method as the design approach.Three fans were pre-grouted at Posiva Oy's research space ONKALO demonstration tunnel 2 in autumn 2011 and early winter 2012. Colloidal silica is a mix of one-component colloidal silica and accelerator. Before gelling, colloidal silica behaves like a Newtonian liquid. Colloidal silica's efficiency of penetrating hydraulic apertures in small fractures in rock is significantly better than that of cement-based grout. The grouting design was based on an analytical calculation model. A new technique was used in the grouting implementation, which primarily differed from the previous technique in regard to vacuum pumping and packers. The goal of the first grouting fan in the demonstration tunnel was to check the functionality of the equipment and the method; therefore, the fan was drilled into rock mass with no hydraulic conducting fractures. The second grouting fan was drilled into rock mass with an observed fairly low hydraulic conductivity that was lower than the start criterion established in Posiva Oy's requirements to manage groundwater inflows. Nevertheless, the grouting was carried out. The sealing effect was estimated from the control holes, and a slight improvement in sealing was noted. The holes of the third grouting fan clearly penetrated a water conductive rock mass. The grouting was carried out in two phases, in which the new holes in the second phase were drilled between the existing ones that were drilled in the first phase. In the third fan, the grouting holes of the first phase were noted to be significantly crooked and the second phase grouting holes were drilled in locations that differed from the original design. The quantity of grouting holes was increased in the second phase. The sealing effect was estimated by monitoring the second phase holes and control holes. Based on observations from the control holes

  17. Synthesis, Biological, and Quantum Chemical Studies of Zn(II) and Ni(II) Mixed-Ligand Complexes Derived from N,N-Disubstituted Dithiocarbamate and Benzoic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Anthony C. Ekennia; Damian C. Onwudiwe; Aderoju A Osowole; Olasunkanmi, Lukman O.; Eno E. Ebenso

    2016-01-01

    Some mixed-ligand complexes of Zn(II) and Ni(II) derived from the sodium salt of N-alkyl-N-phenyl dithiocarbamate and benzoic acid have been prepared. The complexes are represented as ZnMDBz, ZnEDBz, NiMDBz, and NiEDBz (MD: N-methyl-N-phenyl dithiocarbamate, ED: N-ethyl-N-phenyl dithiocarbamate, and Bz: benzoate); and their coordination behavior was characterized on the basis of elemental analyses, IR, electronic spectra, magnetic and conductivity measurements, and quantum chemical calculatio...

  18. Saturated Zone Colloid-Facilitated Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Wolfsberg; P. Reimus

    2001-12-18

    The purpose of the Saturated Zone Colloid-Facilitated Transport Analysis and Modeling Report (AMR), as outlined in its Work Direction and Planning Document (CRWMS M&O 1999a), is to provide retardation factors for colloids with irreversibly-attached radionuclides, such as plutonium, in the saturated zone (SZ) between their point of entrance from the unsaturated zone (UZ) and downgradient compliance points. Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this AMR especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and perhaps other radionuclides may be irreversibly attached to colloids. This report establishes the requirements and elements of the design of a methodology for calculating colloid transport in the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain. In previous Total Systems Performance Assessment (TSPA) analyses, radionuclide-bearing colloids were assumed to be unretarded in their migration. Field experiments in fractured tuff at Yucca Mountain and in porous media at other sites indicate that colloids may, in fact, experience retardation relative to the mean pore-water velocity, suggesting that contaminants associated with colloids should also experience some retardation. Therefore, this analysis incorporates field data where available and a theoretical framework when site-specific data are not available for estimating plausible ranges of retardation factors in both saturated fractured tuff and saturated alluvium. The distribution of retardation factors for tuff and alluvium are developed in a form consistent with the Performance Assessment (PA) analysis framework for simulating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone. To improve on the work performed so far for the saturated-zone flow and transport modeling, concerted effort has been made in quantifying colloid retardation factors in both fractured tuff and alluvium. The fractured tuff analysis used recent data

  19. Interparticle interactions and polarization effects in colloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayter, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    The physics of simple colloidal systems is usually dominated by three independent length scales: the particle size, the average interparticle distance, and the range of the interparticle potential. The dispersed particles typically have characteristic dimensions in the range 5 to 100 nm, often with spherical or cylindrical symmetry. Dispersion densities vary over volume fractions ranging from 0.5 to 10/sup -4/, with the corresponding mean interparticle distances ranging from about 1 to 10 diameters (in spherical systems). The interaction potential may be very short ranged (hard sphere), very long ranged (Coulomb or dipolar), or anywhere in between (screened Coulomb), and the correlations exhibited in the dispersion may be gas-like, liquid-like or crystalline, depending on the range of the potential relative to the interparticle distance. This rich phase behavior is responsible for the remarkable importance of colloidal studies in many areas of condensed matter physics and biophysics, but it poses often intractable problems in developing the statistical mechanical descriptions necessary for an understanding of scattering data from colloids. This paper will review the considerable recent progress in this field, in the context of SANS experiments on colloids in which the potentials are dominated by either screened Coulomb or magnetic dipolar interactions; in the case of magnetic colloids (ferrofluids), the use of polarization analysis will also be discussed. 32 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Synthesis, Biological, and Quantum Chemical Studies of Zn(II and Ni(II Mixed-Ligand Complexes Derived from N,N-Disubstituted Dithiocarbamate and Benzoic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony C. Ekennia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Some mixed-ligand complexes of Zn(II and Ni(II derived from the sodium salt of N-alkyl-N-phenyl dithiocarbamate and benzoic acid have been prepared. The complexes are represented as ZnMDBz, ZnEDBz, NiMDBz, and NiEDBz (MD: N-methyl-N-phenyl dithiocarbamate, ED: N-ethyl-N-phenyl dithiocarbamate, and Bz: benzoate; and their coordination behavior was characterized on the basis of elemental analyses, IR, electronic spectra, magnetic and conductivity measurements, and quantum chemical calculations. The magnetic moment measurement and electronic spectra were in agreement with the four proposed coordinate geometries for nickel and zinc complexes and were corroborated by the theoretical quantum chemical calculations. The quantum chemically derived thermodynamics parameters revealed that the formation of N-methyl-N-phenyl dithiocarbamate complexes is more thermodynamically favourable than that of the N-ethyl-N-phenyl dithiocarbamate complexes. The bioefficacy of the mixed-ligand complexes examined against different microbes showed moderate to high activity against the test microbes. The anti-inflammatory and antioxidant studies of the metal complexes showed that the ethyl substituted dithiocarbamate complexes exhibited better anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties than the methyl substituted dithiocarbamate complexes.

  1. Organic and organo-mineral colloids in discontinuous permafrost zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Manasypov, Rinat M.; Loiko, Sergey V.; Shirokova, Liudmila S.

    2016-09-01

    On-going permafrost thaw in discontinuous permafrost regions produces significant amounts of small permafrost subsidence and depressions, while large lakes are likely to drain into streams and rivers. The intensification of permafrost thaw may alter the size distribution and chemical composition of organo-Fe-Al colloids in lakes and rivers. We used a continuum of surface water bodies, from permafrost subsidence, small depressions and thaw ponds to large lakes and rivers that drain the Western Siberia Lowland (WSL), to assess OC, major and the trace element size distribution between the 20-μm, 5-μm, 1.2-μm, 0.45-μm, 0.22-μm, 0.025-μm and 1-kDa (∼1.4 nm) size fractions. This approach allowed us to distinguish the organic and organo-ferric colloids that were responsible for the transport of trace elements in surface waters and address their evolution during possible physico-chemical and biological processes. Both conventionally dissolved (depressions and permafrost subsidence → thaw ponds → thermokarst lakes → streams → rivers". Thermodynamic modeling and on-site size separation suggested that a number of trace elements (TEs), including alkaline earth elements and several micronutrients (Zn, Ba, Mn, and Ni), decreased the degree of their binding to DOM along the landscape continuum, whereas the majority of insoluble TEs (Al, Fe, Co, Cd, Cu, Pb, REEs, Th, and U) remained complexed with DOM in the LMWclimate scenario, an increase in the thickness of the thawing depth will intensify the input of inorganic components from deep mineral horizons and possibly underground waters thus producing the enrichment of large lakes in Fe-rich colloids and particles. The speciation of divalent metal micronutrients (Cu, Ni, and Co) and toxic metals (Al, Cd, Pb, and U) that are complexed within DOM will most likely remain conservative. Overall, the WSL's surface water colloidal composition may shift from DOM-rich and DOM-Al-rich to Fe-rich, and the export of low

  2. Synthesis of Ag-colloids in sol-gel derived SiO2-coatings on glass

    OpenAIRE

    Mennig, Martin; Schmitt, Mike; Schmidt, Helmut K.

    1997-01-01

    Ag colloid-containing coatings on soda lime glass and fused silica are prepared via the sol-gel process. To incorporate Ag+-ions in the coatings homogeneously, they are stabilized by a functionalised silane (aminosilane) and then mixed with the basic sol prepared from 3-glycidoxypropyl trimethoxysilane (GPTS) and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS). Crack-free and transparent coatings with a thickness of 0.5 to 1.2 µm, are obtained by heat treatment between 120°C and 600°C. The Ag-colloid formatio...

  3. Dumping topological charges on neighbors: ice manifolds for colloids and vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisoli, Cristiano

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the recently reported analogies between pinned vortices in nano-structured superconductors or colloids in optical traps, and spin ice materials. It has been found experimentally and numerically that both colloids and vortices exhibit ice or quasi-ice manifolds. However, the frustration of colloids and vortices differs essentially from spin ice at the vertex level. We show that the effective vertex energetics of the colloidal/vortex systems is made identical to that of spin ice materials by the contribution of an emergent field associated to the topological charge of the vertex. The similarity extends to the local low-energy dynamics of the ice manifold, where the effect of geometric hard constraints can be subsumed into the spatial modulation of the emergent field, which mediates an entropic interaction between topological charges. There, as in spin ice materials, genuine ice manifolds enter a Coulomb phase, whereas quasi-ice manifolds posses a well defined screening length, provided by a plasma of embedded topological charges. We also show that such similarities break down in lattices of mixed coordination because of topological charge transfer between sub-latices. This opens interesting perspective for extensions beyond physics, to social and economical networks.

  4. Phase I - Laboratory Study Effects of Cement Grout Structures on Colloid Formation from SRS Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies were conducted to better understand the influence of grout structures and fills on colloid formation. Low-Level Waste is disposed in concrete vaults and trenches at the E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility (LLWF). Two types of enhanced trench disposal are approved for use including; Intimately-Mixed Cement-Stabilized waste forms, such as Ashcrete and Blowcrete resulting from operation of the Consolidated Incinerator Facility, and Cement-Stabilized Encapsulated waste, where waste forms (e.g., contaminated equipment) will be surrounded by a grout or other cementitious material. The presence of concrete structures and process of grouting in trenches are expected to generate colloids, both from the grout itself and as a result of the interactions of these cementitious materials and their degradation products with the surrounding soils. The extent of occurrence, mobility, and influence on contaminant transport of colloidal materials in aquifer systems is the subject of this study. The intent of this study is not to modify the PA but to aid in our understanding of the significance of this phenomenon. Information generated in this study will help in considering whether colloid-enhanced contaminant migration should be considered in establishing waste acceptance criteria and in the design and development of waste disposal systems

  5. In vivo biodegradation of colloidal quantum dots by a freshwater invertebrate, Daphnia magna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Dongwook; Kim, Min Jung; Park, Chansik; Park, Jaehong [Department of Chemistry, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kyungho [Department of Environmental Health, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Tae Hyun, E-mail: thyoon@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    Impacts of planktonic invertebrate, Daphnia magna, on the speciation of colloidal quantum dots (QD) were investigated using fluorescence spectromicroscopic technique. Well-dispersed {sup GA/TOPO}QD were prepared by forming a supramolecular assembly of hydrophobic {sup TOPO}QD with biomacromolecules (i.e., Gum Arabic, GA). Biological degradation of this nanomaterial was monitored by fluorescence spectromicroscopic methods. Our study confirmed the major uptake pathway of manufactured nanomaterials and in vivo biodegradation processes in a well-known toxicity test organism, D. magna. In addition, we also found that D. magna can induce significant deterioration of aquatic media by releasing fragments of partially degraded QD colloids. These biological processes may significantly change the predicted toxicities of nanomaterials in aquatic environments. Thus, we propose that the impacts of aquatic living organisms on the environmental fate of manufactured nanomaterials (MNs) should be carefully taken into account when assessing the risk of MNs to the environment and human health.

  6. Inorganic passivation and doping control in colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Hoogland, Sjoerd H.

    2012-01-01

    We discuss strategies to reduce midgap trap state densities in colloidal quantum dot films and requirements to control doping type and magnitude. We demonstrate that these improvements result in colloidal quantum dot solar cells with certified 7.0% efficiency.

  7. Neptunium Colloidal Behaviors in Present of Humic Acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>The colloidal-borne facilitated transport of actinides is an important part of radionuclide migration investigation in HLW geological disposal. In the present studies, Np colloidal behaviors in present of

  8. Boundaries Matter for Confined Colloidal Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary; Edmond, Kazem V.; Weeks, Eric R.

    2012-02-01

    We confine dense colloidal suspensions within emulsion droplets to examine how confinement and properties of the confining medium affect the colloidal glass transition. Samples are imaged via fast confocal microscopy. By observing a wide range of droplet sizes and varying the viscosity of the external continuous phase, we separate finite size and boundary effects on particle motions within the droplet. Suspensions are composed of binary PMMA spheres in organic solvents while the external phases are simple mixtures of water and glycerol. In analogy with molecular super-cooled liquids and thin-film polymers, we find that confinement effects in colloidal systems are not merely functions of the finite size of the system, but are strongly dependent on the viscosity of the confining medium and interactions between particles and the interface of the two phases.

  9. Manipulating semiconductor colloidal stability through doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleharty, Mark E; van Swol, Frank; Petsev, Dimiter N

    2014-10-10

    The interface between a doped semiconductor material and electrolyte solution is of considerable fundamental interest, and is relevant to systems of practical importance. Both adjacent domains contain mobile charges, which respond to potential variations. This is exploited to design electronic and optoelectronic sensors, and other enabling semiconductor colloidal materials. We show that the charge mobility in both phases leads to a new type of interaction between semiconductor colloids suspended in aqueous electrolyte solutions. This interaction is due to the electrostatic response of the semiconductor interior to disturbances in the external field upon the approach of two particles. The electrostatic repulsion between two charged colloids is reduced from the one governed by the charged groups present at the particles surfaces. This type of interaction is unique to semiconductor particles and may have a substantial effect on the suspension dynamics and stability.

  10. Colloid migration in groundwaters: Geochemical interactions of radionuclides with natural colloids. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this joint research programme the significance of groundwater colloids in far field radionuclide migration has been studied. The characterization, quantification and theoretical interpretation of colloid-borne transport phenomena for radionuclides were the main objectives of this research programme. Groundwaters, colloids and sediments were sampled from aquifer system overlying a saltdome in the Gorleben area in northern Germany and were characterized by various analytical methods (ICP-MS, ICP-AES, neutron activation analysis (NAA), DOC-Analyser, HPIC, potentiometric titration). Different natural isotopes (2H, 3H, 13C, 14C, 18O, 34S, U/Th decay series) were determined and their ratios were compared with one another in the order to ascertain the provenance of the groundwater colloids. The investigated groundwaters contain substantial amounts of colloids mainly composed of humic and fulvic acids loaded with various metal ions. The chemical interaction of radionuclide ions of various oxidation states (Am, Eu, for M(III), Th, Pu for M(IV), Np for M(V) and U for M(VI)) with groundwater colloids was investigated in order to elucidate the colloid facilitated migration behaviour of actinides in a given aquifer system. Transport process studies with generated pseudocolloids of radionuclides in various oxidation states were undertaken in scaled column experiments, pre-equilibrated with colloid rich Gorleben groundwater. A modelling programme was developed to predict chemical transport of radionuclides in the presence of humic colloids using a modified version of the CHEMTARD code. Modelling predictions have generated acceptable results for Eu, Am and U and poorer agreement between experimental and modelling results for Th and Np as a result of more limited data. (orig.)

  11. Biological synthesis of very small silver nanoparticles by culture supernatant of Klebsiella pneumonia: The effects of visible-light irradiation and the liquid mixing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study has investigated different visible-light irradiation's effect on the formation of silver nanoparticles from silver nitrate using the culture supernatant of Klebsiella pneumonia. Our study shows that visible-light emission can significantly prompt the synthesis of silver nanoparticles. Also, the study experimentally investigated the liquid mixing process effect on silver nanoparticle synthesis by visible-light irradiation. This study successfully synthesized uniformly dispersed silver nanoparticles with a uniform size and shape in the range of 1-6 nm with an average size of 3 nm. Furthermore, the study investigated the mechanism of the reduction of silver ions by culture supernatant of K. pneumonia, and used X-ray diffraction to characterize silver chloride as an intermediate compound. Silver chloride was prepared synthetically and used as a substrate for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles by culture supernatant of K. pneumonia. The silver nanoparticles have been prepared from silver chloride during this investigation for the first time.

  12. Colloidal interactions in two-dimensional nematic emulsions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N M Silvestre; P Patrício; M M Telo Da Gama

    2005-06-01

    We review theoretical and experimental work on colloidal interactions in two-dimensional (2D) nematic emulsions. We pay particular attention to the effects of (i) the nematic elastic constants, (ii) the size of the colloids, and (iii) the boundary conditions at the particles and the container. We consider the interactions between colloids and fluid (deformable) interfaces and the shape of fluid colloids in smectic-C films.

  13. Can secondary nucleation exist in ice banding of freezing colloidal suspensions?

    OpenAIRE

    You, Jiaxue; Wang, Jincheng; Wang, Lilin; Wang, Zhijun; Li, Junjie; Lin, Xin

    2015-01-01

    The formation mechanism of ice banding in the system of freezing colloidal suspensions, which is of significance in frost heaving, ice-templating porous materials and biological materials, still remains a mystery. Recently, the theory of secondary nucleation and growth of ice has been proposed to explain the emergence of a new ice lens. However, this theory has not been quantitatively examined. Here, we quantitatively measured the initial interfacial undercooling of a new ice lens and the nuc...

  14. Synthesis of functional nanomaterials via colloidal mask templating and glancing angle deposition (GLAD)”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolatshahi-Pirouz, Alireza; Jensen, Thomas Bo; Vorup-Jensen, Thomas;

    2010-01-01

    We present a simple method for the fabrication of separated brush-like networks with both improved optical and biological properties. The brush networks were fabricated by combing the glancing angle deposition (GLAD) technique with colloidal mask templating. By changing the deposition angle durin...... of multifunctional nanomaterials which could have potential impact on devices where both controlled optical properties and cell surface interactions are needed (for instance controlled cell adhesion on optical biosensor materials)....

  15. Preparation and Characterization of Polymer-Stabilized Ruthenium-Platinum and Ruthenium-Palladium Bimetallic Colloids and Their Catalytic Properties for Hydrogenation of o-Chloronitrobenzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu; Yu; Liu; Zheng

    1999-06-15

    Colloidal dispersions of poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) (PVP)-stabilized ruthenium-platinum and ruthenium-palladium bimetallic colloids were prepared by NaBH4 reduction of the corresponding mixed-metal salts at room temperature and characterized by TEM, XPS, and XRD. The resulting bimetallic colloids were used as catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of o-chloronitrobenzene (o-CNB) in methanol at 303 K under 0.1 MPa of hydrogen. It was observed that the catalytic performance of PVP-stabilized ruthenium-platinum colloids (PVP-Ru/Pt) and ruthenium-palladium colloids (PVP-Ru/Pd) was dependent on their compositions and could be remarkably affected by some added metal cations. In the presence of cobalt ion, nearly 100% selectivity to o-chloroaniline (o-CAN) was achieved over PVP-Ru/Pt colloids at 100% conversion of o-CNB, with an activity two orders of magnitude higher than that of monometallic PVP-Ru colloid. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:10339363

  16. Adsorption of phenanthrene, 2-naphthol, and 1-naphthylamine to colloidal oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes: effects of humic acid and surfactant modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Lei; Zhu, Dongqiang; Wang, Ximeng; Wang, Lilin; Zhang, Chengdong; Chen, Wei

    2013-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can exist in the form of colloidal suspension in aquatic environments, particularly in the presence of natural organic matter or surfactants, and may significantly affect the fate and transport of organic contaminants. In the present study, the authors examined the adsorption of phenanthrene, 2-naphthol, and 1-naphthylamine to three colloidal CNTs, including a stable suspension of oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (O-MWNT), a humic acid (HA)-modified colloidal O-MWNT, and a sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-modified colloidal O-MWNT. All three colloidal O-MWNTs exhibit strong adsorption affinities to the three test compounds (with K(OC) values orders of magnitude greater than those of natural organic matter), likely resulting from strong nonhydrophobic interactions such as π-π electron donor-acceptor interactions and Lewis acid-base interactions. When thoroughly mixed, HA (at ∼310 mg HA/g CNT) and SDS (at ∼750 mg SDS/g CNT) significantly affected the aggregation properties of O-MWNT, causing individually dispersed tubes to form a loosely entangled network. The effects of HA or SDS modification on adsorption are twofold. Adsorption of HA/SDS significantly reduces surface areas of O-MWNT; however, the entangled network allows adsorbate molecules to interact simultaneously with multiple tubes. An important implication is that humic substances and surfactant-like materials not only facilitate the formation of colloidal carbon nanoparticles but also affect how these colloidal carbon nanoparticles adsorb organic contaminants.

  17. Silica Colloidal Crystals with Ethanol Solvent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhao-Lin; NI Pei-Gen; CHENG Bing-Ying; JIN Chong-Jun; ZHANG Dao-Zhong; DONG Peng; GUO Xing-Cai

    2000-01-01

    We have prepared a silica colloidal crystal with ethanol, which has a face-centered cubic structure and a corresponding photonic band gap located in the visible region, determined by Kossel ring analysis and the transmission spectra. A special feature is an apparent variation of its lattice constant, as well as the gap frequency, with sample height. The Raman scattering induced by a picosecond laser at different heights of the colloidal crystal has been measured. It is found that the intensity of the Raman scattering is not related sensitively to the photonic gap, even though the Raman-Stokes wavelength is inside the gap.

  18. Binary Colloidal Alloy Test-5: Phase Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Matthew; Weitz, David A.; Lu, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    The Binary Colloidal Alloy Test - 5: Phase Separation (BCAT-5-PhaseSep) experiment will photograph initially randomized colloidal samples onboard the ISS to determine their resulting structure over time. This allows the scientists to capture the kinetics (evolution) of their samples, as well as the final equilibrium state of each sample. BCAT-5-PhaseSep studies collapse (phase separation rates that impact product shelf-life); in microgravity the physics of collapse is not masked by being reduced to a simple top and bottom phase as it is on Earth.

  19. Collective sliding states for colloidal molecular crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichhardt, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reichhardt, Cynthia [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We study the driving of colloidal molecular crystals over periodic substrates such as those created with optical traps. The n-merization that occurs in the colloidal molecular crystal states produces a remarkably rich variety of distinct dynamical behaviors, including polarization effects within the pinned phase and the formation of both ordered and disordered sliding phases. Using computer simulations, we map the dynamic phase diagrams as a function of substrate strength for dimers and trimers on a triangular substrate, and correlate features on the phase diagram with transport signatures.

  20. Dynamics of colloidal particles in ice

    KAUST Repository

    Spannuth, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    We use x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) to probe the dynamics of colloidal particles in polycrystalline ice. During freezing, the dendritic ice morphology and rejection of particles from the ice created regions of high particle density, where some of the colloids were forced into contact and formed disordered aggregates. The particles in these high density regions underwent ballistic motion, with a characteristic velocity that increased with temperature. This ballistic motion is coupled with both stretched and compressed exponential decays of the intensity autocorrelation function. We suggest that this behavior could result from ice grain boundary migration. © 2011 American Institute of Physics.

  1. Introduction to Applied Colloid and Surface Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Kiil, Søren

    Colloid and Surface Chemistry is a subject of immense importance and implications both to our everyday life and numerous industrial sectors, ranging from coatings and materials to medicine and biotechnology. How do detergents really clean? (Why can’t we just use water ?) Why is milk “milky” Why do......, to the benefit of both the environment and our pocket. Cosmetics is also big business! Creams, lotions and other personal care products are really just complex emulsions. All of the above can be explained by the principles and methods of colloid and surface chemistry. A course on this topic is truly valuable...

  2. Self-assembly of colloidal surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegel, Willem

    2012-02-01

    We developed colloidal dumbbells with a rough and a smooth part, based on a method reported in Ref. [1]. Specific attraction between the smooth parts occurs upon addition of non-adsorbing polymers of appropriate size. We present the first results in terms of the assemblies that emerge in these systems. [4pt] [1] D.J. Kraft, W.S. Vlug, C.M. van Kats, A. van Blaaderen, A. Imhof and W.K. Kegel, Self-assembly of colloids with liquid protrusions, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 131, 1182, (2009)

  3. Shape recognition of microbial cells by colloidal cell imprints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borovicka, J.; Stoyanov, S.D.; Paunov, V.N.

    2013-01-01

    We have engineered a class of colloids which can recognize the shape and size of targeted microbial cells and selectively bind to their surfaces. These imprinted colloid particles, which we called "colloid antibodies", were fabricated by partial fragmentation of silica shells obtained by templating

  4. A general method to coat colloidal particles with titiana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demirors, A.F.; van Blaaderen, A.; Imhof, A.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a general one-pot method for coating colloidal particles with amorphous titania. Various colloidal particles such as silica particles, large silver colloids, gibbsite platelets, and polystyrene spheres were successfully coated with a titania shell. Although there are several ways of coat

  5. Interplay between Colloids and Interfaces : Emulsions, Foams and Microtubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Folter, J.W.J.

    2013-01-01

    The central theme of this thesis is the interplay between colloids and interfaces. The adsorption of colloids at fluid-fluid interfaces is the main topic and covers Chapters 2-6. Pickering emulsions where colloidal particles act as emulsion stabilizers in the absence of surfactants are studied in a

  6. Dimeric and dipolar ground state orders in colloidal molecular crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Emmanuel Trizac; Samir El Shawish; Jure Dobnikar

    2010-01-01

    A two dimensional colloidal suspension subject to a periodic substrate evolves into a colloidal molecular crystal under situationsofstrongconfinement. Wefocusonthelongrangeorientationalordertherebyemerging, inthegroundstate. We study by simulations the situations where in each trap lies a pair of identical colloids, or alternatively a pair of oppositelychargedmacroions. We consider square or triangular geometries for the periodic confinement, together with less symmetric distorted lattices.Um...

  7. Analytical phase diagram for colloid-polymer mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleer, G.J.; Tuinier, R.

    2007-01-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the phase behavior of colloid-polymer mixtures which applies to all polymer/colloid size ratios q. It accounts for the crossover from a constant length scale R (radius of gyration) in the colloid limit (small q) to the concentration-dependent correlation length x

  8. Adjuvant therapy of Dukes' C colon cancer by intra-arterial P-32 colloid for internal radiation therapy of the liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grady, E.D.

    1984-09-01

    To prevent probable occult metastatic liver cancer from progressing to clinical disease, the author used internal radiation therapy as an effective adjuvant to surgical excision of primary Dukes' C colonic cancer. A calculated radiation dose of 5000 rads was delivered to the liver by injecting radioactive 32-P chromic phosphate colloid through the superior mesenteric and celiac arteries. When this was done, the colloid passed through the intestines and was mixed thoroughly with the blood and delivered to the liver by the portal vein. The Kupffer cells in the liver trapped the colloid, and a minimum amount passed through the liver and got into the general circulation. This kept the amount of colloid deposited in the bone marrow to a minimum. In a phase-I pilot study in which nine patients were treated, no serious side effects were noted. In eight patients, the liver has remained free of cancer for more than 1 year.

  9. A new mixed-ligand copper(II) complex of (E)-N";-(2-hydroxybenzylidene) acetohydrazide: Synthesis, characterization, NLO behavior, DFT calculation and biological activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef Ebrahimipour, S.; Sheikhshoaie, Iran; Crochet, Aurelien; Khaleghi, Moj; Fromm, Katharina M.

    2014-08-01

    A tridentate hydrazone Schiff base ligand, (E)-N";-(2-hydroxybenzylidene)acetohydrazide [HL], and its mixed-ligand Cu(II) complex [CuL(phen)], have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, FT-IR, molar conductivity, UV-Vis spectroscopy. The structure of the complex has been determined by X-ray diffraction. This complex has square pyramidal geometry and the positions around central atom are occupied with donor atoms of Schiff base ligand and two nitrogens of 1,10-phenanthroline. Computational studies of compounds were performed by using DFT calculations. The linear polarizabilities and first hyperpolarizabilities of the studied molecules indicate that these compounds can be good candidates of nonlinear optical materials. It is in accordance with experimental data. In addition, invitro antimicrobial results show that these compounds specially [CuL(phen)] have great potential of antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Listeria monocytogenes bacteria and antifungal activity against Candida Albicans in comparison to some standard drugs.

  10. Sampling and analysis of groundwater colloids. A literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this literature study was to give basic information of colloids: their formation, colloid material, sampling and characterisation of groundwater colloids. Colloids are commonly refereed to as particles in the size range of 1 nm to 1000 nm. They are defined as a suspension of solid material in a liquid that does not appear to separate even after a long period of time. Colloids can be formed from a variety of inorganic or organic material. Inorganic colloids in natural groundwaters are formed by physical fragmentation of the host rock or by precipitation. The water chemistry strongly controls the stability of colloids. The amount of colloid particles in a solution tends to decrease with the increasing ionic strength of the solution. Increases in pH and organic material tend to increase the stability of colloids. The mobility of colloids in a porous medium is controlled mainly by groundwater movement, sedimentation, diffusion and interception. Factors controlling sampling artefacts are oxygen diffusion: leads to e.g. calcite precipitation, pumping rates and filtering techniques. Efforts to minimise artefact formation should be taken if the scope of the sampling programme is to study the colloid particles. The colloid phase size distribution can be determined by light scattering systems, laser induced break down or by single particle analysis using SEM micrographs. Elemental compositions can be analysed with EDS spectrometry from single colloid particles. Bulk compositions of the colloid phase can be analysed with e.g. ICP-MS analyser. The results of this study can be used as guidelines for groundwater colloid samplings. Recommendations for future work are listed in the conclusions of this report. (orig.)

  11. Pore water colloid properties in argillaceous sedimentary rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degueldre, Claude; Cloet, Veerle

    2016-11-01

    The focus of this work is to evaluate the colloid nature, concentration and size distribution in the pore water of Opalinus Clay and other sedimentary host rocks identified for a potential radioactive waste repository in Switzerland. Because colloids could not be measured in representative undisturbed porewater of these host rocks, predictive modelling based on data from field and laboratory studies is applied. This approach allowed estimating the nature, concentration and size distributions of the colloids in the pore water of these host rocks. As a result of field campaigns, groundwater colloid concentrations are investigated on the basis of their size distribution quantified experimentally using single particle counting techniques. The colloid properties are estimated considering data gained from analogue hydrogeochemical systems ranging from mylonite features in crystalline fissures to sedimentary formations. The colloid concentrations were analysed as a function of the alkaline and alkaline earth element concentrations. Laboratory batch results on clay colloid generation from compacted pellets in quasi-stagnant water are also reported. Experiments with colloids in batch containers indicate that the size distribution of a colloidal suspension evolves toward a common particle size distribution independently of initial conditions. The final suspension size distribution was found to be a function of the attachment factor of the colloids. Finally, calculations were performed using a novel colloid distribution model based on colloid generation, aggregation and sedimentation rates to predict under in-situ conditions what makes colloid concentrations and size distributions batch- or fracture-size dependent. The data presented so far are compared with the field and laboratory data. The colloid occurrence, stability and mobility have been evaluated for the water of the considered potential host rocks. In the pore water of the considered sedimentary host rocks, the clay

  12. Responsivity improvement in PbS colloidal quantum dot photoconductors using colloidal gold nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Heves, Emre; Öztürk, Cem; Ozturk, Cem; Gürbüz, Yaşar; Gurbuz, Yasar

    2013-01-01

    A study is presented on improving the absorption of the PbS colloidal quantum dot (CQD) films using plasmonic scattering. Unlike previous methods that include high temperature annealing, an integrated circuits (IC) compatible method of introducing colloidal gold nanoparticles to PbS film during the spin deposition process is developed. The devices are composed of eight layers of PbS and gold nanoparticles are spin cast after the fourth layer that places them in the middle, sandwiched between ...

  13. Colloidal models. A bit of history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyklema, J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper offers an anthology on developments in colloid and interface science emphasizing themes that may be of direct or indirect interest to Interfaces Against Pollution. Topics include the determination of Avogadro’s number, development in the insight into driving forces for double layer format

  14. Designing Zirconium Coated Polystyrene Colloids and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Chira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple technique has been developed to prepare core colloids that are modified using zirconium oxychloride, based on heating a solution of core colloid composites, consisting of poly (ethylenimine (PEI and zirconium oxychloride. The interaction of zirconium oxychloride with the polystyrene (PS core colloids has been investigated using Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM data. FT-IR studies confirm the occurrence of amine groups present in PEI which are oxidized to carboxyl groups after the reaction. The EDX data and the SEM images confirm the presence of zirconium particles immobilized on the polystyrene surfaces. Demeton, a highly toxic nerve agent, was used due to its ability to easily bind through its organophosphate group illustrating a practical application of the PS-PEI-Zr particles. Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR Spectroscopy was used to assess the interactions between the toxic nerve agent demeton-S and the PS-PEI-Zr particles. The results show that the presented technique for coating polystyrene core colloids with zirconium was successfully accomplished, and the newly formed particles easily bond with demeton agents through the P=O functional group.

  15. Colloidal crystals by electrospraying polystyrene nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This work introduces the electrospray technique as a suitable option to fabricate large-scale colloidal nanostructures, including colloidal crystals, in just a few minutes. It is shown that by changing the deposition conditions, different metamaterials can be fabricated: from scattered monolayers of polystyrene nanospheres to self-assembled three-dimensional ordered nanolayers having colloidal crystal properties. The electrospray technique overcomes the main problems encountered by top-down fabrication approaches, largely simplifying the experimental setup. Polystyrene nanospheres, with 360-nm diameter, were typically electrosprayed using off-the-shelf nanofluids. Several parameters of the setup and deposition conditions were explored, namely the distance between electrodes, nanofluid conductivity, applied voltage, and deposition rate. Layers thicker than 20 μm and area of 1 cm2 were typically produced, showing several domains of tens of microns wide with dislocations in between, but no cracks. The applied voltage was in the range of 10 kV, and the conductivity of the colloidal solution was in the range of 3 to 4 mS. Besides the morphology of the layers, the quality was also assessed by means of optical reflectance measurements showing an 80% reflectivity peak in the vicinity of 950-nm wavelength. PMID:23311494

  16. Cubic colloids : Synthesis, functionalization and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castillo, S.I.R.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis is a study on cubic colloids: micron-sized cubic particles with rounded corners (cubic superballs). Owing to their shape, particle packing for cubes is more efficient than for spheres and results in fascinating phase and packing behavior. For our cubes, the particle volume fraction when

  17. Nucleation in suspensions of anisotropic colloids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schilling, T.; Frenkel, D.

    2005-01-01

    We report Monte Carlo studies of liquid crystal nucleation in two types of anisotropic colloidal systems: hard rods and hard ellipsoids. In both cases we find that nucleation pathways differ strongly from the pathways in systems of spherical particles. Short hard rods show an effect of self-poisonin

  18. Geochemistry of colloid systems. For earth scientists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nickel, E.

    1979-01-01

    The second part of the title of this book gives an indication for whom it has been written. It is a real 'synthesizer'. Throughout ten chapters the reader is introduced into the highly complex matter of colloid chemistry and its role in geochemistry, pedology, oceanography, and geology.

  19. Dynamics of Colloids Confined in Microcylinders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghosh, S.; Wijnperle, D.; Mugele, F.; Duits, M.H.G.

    2016-01-01

    We studied both global and local effects of cylindrical confinement on the diffusive behavior of hard sphere (HS) colloids. Using confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) and particle tracking, we measured the mean squared displacement (MSD) of 1 micron sized silica particles in water–glycerol. Thi

  20. Metal speciation dynamics in colloidal ligand dispersions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pinheiro, J.P.; Minor, M.; Leeuwen, van H.P.

    2005-01-01

    In this work we propose a dynamic metal speciation theory for colloidal systems in which the complexing ligands are localized on the surface of the particles; i.e., there is spatial heterogeneity of binding sites within the sample volume. The differences between the complex formation and dissociatio

  1. Synthesis and properties of colloidal heteronanocrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mello Donegá, C.

    2011-01-01

    Colloidal heteronanocrystals (HNCs) can be regarded as solution-grown inorganic–organic hybrid nanomaterials, since they consist of inorganic nanoparticles that are coated with a layer of organic ligand molecules. The hybrid nature of these nanostructures provides great flexibility in engineering th

  2. Random packing of colloids and granular matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouterse, A.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis deals with the random packing of colloids and granular matter. A random packing is a stable disordered collection of touching particles, without long-range positional and orientational order. Experimental random packings of particles with the same shape but made of different materials sh

  3. Repeptization and the theory of electrocratic colloids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frens, G.; Overbeek, J.Th.G.

    1972-01-01

    The coagulation and the repeptization of electrocratic colloids can be treated in one theory provided that the appropriate boundary conditions are chosen. From this version of the DLVO theory it follows that for each sol there exists a critical value Z∞c of the double layer parameter Z∞, Z∞ = zeδ/kT

  4. Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-T1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ron; Brown, Dan; Eustace, John

    2015-01-01

    Increment 45 - 46 Science Symposium presentation of Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-T1) to RPO. The purpose of this event is for Principal Investigators to present their science objectives, testing approach, and measurement methods to agency scientists, managers, and other investigators.

  5. Dipolar structures in colloidal magnetite dispersions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klokkenburg, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Dipolar structures in liquid colloidal dispersions comprising well-defined magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles with a permanent magnetic dipole moment are analyzed on a single-particle level by in situ cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (2D). Compared to conventional ferrofluids, these dispersio

  6. Turbulent mixing

    OpenAIRE

    Dimotakis, Paul E.

    2005-01-01

    The ability of turbulent flows to effectively mix entrained fluids to a molecular scale is a vital part of the dynamics of such flows, with wide-ranging consequences in nature and engineering. It is a considerable experimental, theoretical, modeling, and computational challenge to capture and represent turbulent mixing which, for high Reynolds number (Re) flows, occurs across a spectrum of scales of considerable span. This consideration alone places high-Re mixing phenomena beyond the reach o...

  7. Colloid suspension stability and transport through unsaturated porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGraw, M.A.; Kaplan, D.I.

    1997-04-01

    Contaminant transport is traditionally modeled in a two-phase system: a mobile aqueous phase and an immobile solid phase. Over the last 15 years, there has been an increasing awareness of a third, mobile solid phase. This mobile solid phase, or mobile colloids, are organic or inorganic submicron-sized particles that move with groundwater flow. When colloids are present, the net effect on radionuclide transport is that radionuclides can move faster through the system. It is not known whether mobile colloids exist in the subsurface environment of the Hanford Site. Furthermore, it is not known if mobile colloids would likely exist in a plume emanating from a Low Level Waste (LLW) disposal site. No attempt was made in this study to ascertain whether colloids would form. Instead, experiments and calculations were conducted to evaluate the likelihood that colloids, if formed, would remain in suspension and move through saturated and unsaturated sediments. The objectives of this study were to evaluate three aspects of colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides as they specifically relate to the LLW Performance Assessment. These objectives were: (1) determine if the chemical conditions likely to exist in the near and far field of the proposed disposal site are prone to induce flocculation (settling of colloids from suspension) or dispersion of naturally occurring Hanford colloids, (2) identify the important mechanisms likely involved in the removal of colloids from a Hanford sediment, and (3) determine if colloids can move through unsaturated porous media.

  8. Colloid suspension stability and transport through unsaturated porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contaminant transport is traditionally modeled in a two-phase system: a mobile aqueous phase and an immobile solid phase. Over the last 15 years, there has been an increasing awareness of a third, mobile solid phase. This mobile solid phase, or mobile colloids, are organic or inorganic submicron-sized particles that move with groundwater flow. When colloids are present, the net effect on radionuclide transport is that radionuclides can move faster through the system. It is not known whether mobile colloids exist in the subsurface environment of the Hanford Site. Furthermore, it is not known if mobile colloids would likely exist in a plume emanating from a Low Level Waste (LLW) disposal site. No attempt was made in this study to ascertain whether colloids would form. Instead, experiments and calculations were conducted to evaluate the likelihood that colloids, if formed, would remain in suspension and move through saturated and unsaturated sediments. The objectives of this study were to evaluate three aspects of colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides as they specifically relate to the LLW Performance Assessment. These objectives were: (1) determine if the chemical conditions likely to exist in the near and far field of the proposed disposal site are prone to induce flocculation (settling of colloids from suspension) or dispersion of naturally occurring Hanford colloids, (2) identify the important mechanisms likely involved in the removal of colloids from a Hanford sediment, and (3) determine if colloids can move through unsaturated porous media

  9. Colloid Bound Transport of Contaminats In The Unsaturated Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, T.; Christ, A.

    Colloids can play a major role in the relocation of contaminants in the unsaturated zone. The amount of colloid driven transport is defined by soil chemistry, soil water chemistry and water flow velocity as well as colloid composition and formation. In a current research project we investigate the filtration and mobilization of colloids in unsaturated column studies. We use different soil types, chosen by a wide range of mean grain size and heterogeneity. Particle tracers are polystyrene solids with a de- fined negative surface charge and defined size from 50 nm to 10 µm. In addition, we use natural colloids extracted from a wide range of contaminated and uncontaminated land. Experimental conditions are exactly controlled throughout all the time. We alter mainly flow velocity ionic strength in order to study the filtration behaviour of the soils. In addition, Pyrene and Lead are are used as model contaminants. First results show the colloids are not retarded in many coarse structured soil types. Preferential colloid flow shows a major impact in breakthrough behaviour. Colloid bound lead is relocated significant through the unsaturated zone, whereas non colloid bound lead species are strongly retarded. In the presentation we will show results of contami- nant processes and present new results on the filtration behaviour of colloids in the unsaturated zone depending on flow velocity, soil type and colloid size.

  10. Colloidal processing of Fe-based metal ceramic composites with high content of ceramic reinforcement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escribano, J. A.; Ferrari, B.; Alvaredo, P.; Gordo, E.; Sanchez-Herencia, A. J.

    2013-07-01

    Major difficulties of processing metal-matrix composites by means of conventional powder metallurgy techniques are the lack of dispersion of the phases within the final microstructure. In this work, processing through colloidal techniques of the Fe-based metal-matrix composites, with a high content of a ceramic reinforcement (Ti(C,N) ), is presented for the first time in the literature. The colloidal approach allows a higher control of the powders packing and a better homogenization of phases since powders are mixed in a liquid medium. The chemical stability of Fe in aqueous medium determines the dispersion conditions of the mixture. The Fe slurries were formulated by optimising their zeta potential and their rheology, in order to shape bulk pieces by slip-casting. Preliminary results demonstrate the viability of this procedure, also opening new paths to the microstructural design of fully sintered Fe-based hard metal, with 50 vol. % of Ti(C,N) in its composition. (Author)

  11. Colloidal processing of Fe-based metal ceramic composites with high content of ceramic reinforcement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major difficulties of processing metal-matrix composites by means of conventional powder metallurgy techniques are the lack of dispersion of the phases within the final microstructure. In this work, processing through colloidal techniques of the Fe-based metal-matrix composites, with a high content of a ceramic reinforcement (Ti(C,N) ), is presented for the first time in the literature. The colloidal approach allows a higher control of the powders packing and a better homogenization of phases since powders are mixed in a liquid medium. The chemical stability of Fe in aqueous medium determines the dispersion conditions of the mixture. The Fe slurries were formulated by optimising their zeta potential and their rheology, in order to shape bulk pieces by slip-casting. Preliminary results demonstrate the viability of this procedure, also opening new paths to the microstructural design of fully sintered Fe-based hard metal, with 50 vol. % of Ti(C,N) in its composition. (Author)

  12. LONG-TERM COLLOID MOBILIZATION AND COLLOID-FACILITATED TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES IN A SEMI-ARID VADOSE ZONE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markus Flury; James B. Harsh; Fred Zhang; Glendon W. Gee; Earl D. Mattson; Peter C. L

    2012-08-01

    The main purpose of this project was to improve the fundamental mechanistic understanding and quantification of long-term colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides in the vadose zone, with special emphasis on the semi-arid Hanford site. While we focused some of the experiments on hydrogeological and geochemical conditions of the Hanford site, many of our results apply to colloid and colloid-facilitated transport in general. Specific objectives were (1) to determine the mechanisms of colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport in undisturbed Hanford sediments under unsaturated flow, (2) to quantify in situ colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated radionuclidetransport from Hanford sediments under field conditions, and (3) to develop a field-scale conceptual and numerical model for colloid mobilization and transport at the Hanford vadose zone, and use that model to predict long-term colloid and colloid- facilitated radionuclide transport. To achieve these goals and objectives, we have used a combination of experimental, theoretical, and numerical methods at different spatial scales, ranging from microscopic investigationsof single particle attachment and detachment to larger-scale field experiments using outdoor lysimeters at the Hanford site. Microscopic and single particle investigations provided fundamental insight into mechanisms of colloid interactions with the air-water interface. We could show that a moving air water interface (such as a moving water front during infiltration and drainage) is very effective in removing and mobilizing particles from a stationary surface. We further demonstrated that it is particularly the advancing air-water interface which is mainly responsible for colloid mobilization. Forces acting on the colloids calculated from theory corroborated our experimental results, and confirm that the detachment forces (surface tension forces) during the advancing air-water interface

  13. Dissolved and colloidal trace elements in the Mississippi River delta outflow after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Moo-Joon; Swarzenski, Peter W.; Shiller, Alan M.

    2012-07-01

    The Mississippi River delta outflow region is periodically disturbed by tropical weather systems including major hurricanes, which can terminate seasonal bottom water hypoxia and cause the resuspension of shelf bottom sediments which could result in the injection of trace elements into the water column. In the summer of 2005, Hurricanes Katrina and Rita passed over the Louisiana Shelf within a month of each other. Three weeks after Rita, we collected water samples in the Mississippi River delta outflow, examining the distributions of trace elements to study the effect of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. We observed limited stratification on the shelf and bottom waters that were no longer hypoxic. This resulted, for instance, in bottom water dissolved Mn being lower than is typically observed during hypoxia, but with concentrations still compatible with Mn-O2 trends previously reported. Interestingly, for no element were we able to identify an obvious effect of sediment resuspension on its distribution. In general, elemental distributions were compatible with previous observations in the Mississippi outflow system. Co and Re, which have not been reported for this system previously, showed behavior consistent with other systems: input for Co likely from desorption and conservative mixing for Re. For Cs, an element for which there is little information regarding its estuarine behavior, conservative mixing was also observed. Our filtration method, which allowed us to distinguish the dissolved (<0.02 μm) from colloidal (0.02-0.45 μm) phase, revealed significant colloidal fractions for Fe and Zn, only. For Fe, the colloidal phase was the dominant fraction and was rapidly removed at low salinity. Dissolved Fe, in contrast, persisted out to mid-salinities, being removed in a similar fashion to nitrate. This ability to distinguish the smaller Fe (likely dominantly organically complexed) from larger colloidal suspensates may be useful in better interpreting the bioavailablity

  14. Dissolved and colloidal trace elements in the Mississippi River Delta outflow after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Moo-Joon; Swarzenski, Peter W.; Shiller, Alan M.

    2012-01-01

    The Mississippi River delta outflow region is periodically disturbed by tropical weather systems including major hurricanes, which can terminate seasonal bottom water hypoxia and cause the resuspension of shelf bottom sediments which could result in the injection of trace elements into the water column. In the summer of 2005, Hurricanes Katrina and Rita passed over the Louisiana Shelf within a month of each other. Three weeks after Rita, we collected water samples in the Mississippi River delta outflow, examining the distributions of trace elements to study the effect of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. We observed limited stratification on the shelf and bottom waters that were no longer hypoxic. This resulted, for instance, in bottom water dissolved Mn being lower than is typically observed during hypoxia, but with concentrations still compatible with Mn–O2 trends previously reported. Interestingly, for no element were we able to identify an obvious effect of sediment resuspension on its distribution. In general, elemental distributions were compatible with previous observations in the Mississippi outflow system. Co and Re, which have not been reported for this system previously, showed behavior consistent with other systems: input for Co likely from desorption and conservative mixing for Re. For Cs, an element for which there is little information regarding its estuarine behavior, conservative mixing was also observed. Our filtration method, which allowed us to distinguish the dissolved (<0.02 μm) from colloidal (0.02–0.45 μm) phase, revealed significant colloidal fractions for Fe and Zn, only. For Fe, the colloidal phase was the dominant fraction and was rapidly removed at low salinity. Dissolved Fe, in contrast, persisted out to mid-salinities, being removed in a similar fashion to nitrate. This ability to distinguish the smaller Fe (likely dominantly organically complexed) from larger colloidal suspensates may be useful in better interpreting the

  15. Mixing Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kandzia, Claudia; Kosonen, Risto; Melikov, Arsen Krikor;

    In this guidebook most of the known and used in practice methods for achieving mixing air distribution are discussed. Mixing ventilation has been applied to many different spaces providing fresh air and thermal comfort to the occupants. Today, a design engineer can choose from large selection...

  16. Hydrogel-colloid interfacial interactions: a study of tailored adhesion using optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhi, Amir; Hill, Reghan J

    2016-08-21

    Dynamics of colloidal particles adhering to soft, deformable substrates, such as tissues, biofilms, and hydrogels play a key role in many biological and biomimetic processes. These processes, including, but not limited to colloid-based delivery, stitching, and sorting, involve microspheres exploring the vicinity of soft, sticky materials in which the colloidal dynamics are affected by the fluid environment (e.g., viscous coupling), inter-molecular interactions between the colloids and substrates (e.g., Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory), and the viscoelastic properties of contact region. To better understand colloidal dynamics at soft interfaces, an optical tweezers back-focal-plane interferometry apparatus was developed to register the transverse Brownian motion of a silica microsphere in the vicinity of polyacrylamide (PA) hydrogel films. The time-dependent mean-squared displacements are well described by a single exponential relaxation, furnishing measures of the transverse interfacial diffusion coefficient and binding stiffness. Substrates with different elasticities were prepared by changing the PA crosslinking density, and the inter-molecular interactions were adjusted by coating the microspheres with fluid membranes. Stiffer PA hydrogels (with bulk Young's moduli ≈1-10 kPa) immobilize the microspheres more firmly (lower diffusion coefficient and position variance), and coating the particles with zwitterionic lipid bilayers (DOPC) completely eliminates adhesion, possibly by repulsive dispersion forces. Remarkably, embedding polyethylene glycol-grafted lipid bilayers (DSPE-PEG2k-Amine) in the zwitterionic fluid membranes produces stronger adhesion, possibly because of polymer-hydrogel attraction and entanglement. This study provides new insights to guide the design of nanoparticles and substrates with tunable adhesion, leading to smarter delivery, sorting, and screening of micro- and nano-systems. PMID:27425660

  17. Suspension membrane reactor for biological elimination of non-degradable materials from mixed effluents. Final report; Suspensionsmembranreaktor zur biologischen Eliminierung schwer abbaubarer Stoffe aus Abwassergemischen. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raebiger, N.; Schierenbeck, A.

    2002-07-01

    An earlier research project had shown that a combined process involving membrane filtration and a bioreactor ensure substrate-specific times of residue inside the reactor, i.e. high selective conversation at low discharge rates. The second project aimed at higher flexibility. For this purpose, a two-stage suspension membrane reactor was developed in which the filtration stage and the bioreactor were decoupled. The liquid effluents are concentrated first in a nanofiltration stage, and the permeate, which should be free of non-degradable materials, is discharged. The concentrate is treated in the biological reaction stage and recirculated into the nanofiltration stage in order to ensure complete degradation during a substrate-specific time of residue. An intermediate microfiltration stage serves to retain biomass and prevent the growth of a biofilm in the nanofiltration stage. The method was tested with the practically relevant model pollutant 4-chlorophenol and a real industrial effluent from the antifelting stage of a Bremen woollen mill (Bremer Wollkaemmerei), with a high AOX concentration. [German] Im vorhergehenden Teil des Forschungsvorhabens konnte gezeigt werden, dass durch eine kombinierte Anwendung der Membranfiltration mit einem Bioreaktor eine substratspezifische Verweilzeitverteilung im Reaktor und damit eine hohe selektive Umsatzleistung bei gleichzeitig niedrigen Ablaufwerten realisierbar ist. Um eine groessere Flexibilitaet bei dem Einsatz verschiedener Membranmodule zu realisieren, wurde in dem zweiten Abschnitt des Forschungsvorhabens eine zweistufige Anlage vom Typ des Suspensions-Membranreaktors entwickelt, bei der Filtration und Bioreaktor entkoppelt werden. Das zu reinigende Abwasser wird zunaechst in einer Nanofiltrationsstufe aufkonzentriert, das moeglichst an schwer abbaubaren Stoffen freie Permeat bildet den Ablauf der Anlage. Der Konzentratstrom wird in der nachfolgenden Reaktionsstufe biologisch behandelt und in die Nanofiltrationsstufe

  18. Monovalent plasmonic nanoparticles for biological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Daeha; Lee, Hyunjung; Lee, Jung-uk; Haas, Thomas J.; Jun, Young-wook

    2016-03-01

    The multivalent nature of commercial nanoparticle imaging agents and the difficulties associated with producing monovalent nanoparticles challenge their use in biology, where clustering of target biomolecules can perturb dynamics of biomolecular targets. Here, we report production and purification of monovalent gold and silver nanoparticles for their single molecule imaging application. We first synthesized DNA-conjugated 20 nm and 40 nm gold and silver nanoparticles via conventional metal-thiol chemistry, yielding nanoparticles with mixed valency. By employing an anion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography (AE-HPLC) method, we purified monovalent nanoparticles from the mixtures. To allow efficient peak-separation resolution while keeping the excellent colloidal stability of nanoparticles against harsh purification condition (e.g. high NaCl), we optimized surface properties of nanoparticles by modulating surface functional groups. We characterized the monovalent character of the purified nanoparticles by hybridizing two complementary conjugates, forming dimers. Finally, we demonstrate the use of the monovalent plasmonic nanoprobes as single molecule imaging probes by tracking single TrkA receptors diffusing on the cell membrane and compare to monovalent quantum dot probes.

  19. Colloids related to low level and intermediate level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive investigation has been undertaken to improve the understanding of the potential role of colloids in the context of disposal and storage of low and intermediate level waste immobilised in cement. Several topics have been investigated using a wide range of advanced physico-chemical and analytical techniques. These include: (a) the study of formation and characteristics of colloids in cement leachates, (b) the effects of the near-field aqueous chemistry on the characteristics of colloids in repository environments, (c) colloid sorption behaviour, (d) interactions of near-field materials with leachates, and (e) preliminary assessment of colloid migration behaviour. It has been shown that the generation of colloids in cement leachates can arise from a process of nucleation and growth leading to an amorphous phase which is predominantly calcium silicate hydrate. Such colloidal material has a capacity for association with polyvalent rare earths and actinides and these may be significant in the source term and processes involving radionuclide retention in the near field. It has also been shown that the near-field aqueous chemistry (pH, Ca2+ concentration) has a marked effect on colloid behaviour (deposition and stability). A mechanistic approach to predict colloid sorption affinity has been developed which highlights the importance of colloid characteristics and the nature of the ionic species. (author)

  20. From one to many: dynamic assembly and collective behavior of self-propelled colloidal motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Duan, Wentao; Ahmed, Suzanne; Sen, Ayusman; Mallouk, Thomas E

    2015-07-21

    The assembly of complex structures from simpler, individual units is a hallmark of biology. Examples include the pairing of DNA strands, the assembly of protein chains into quaternary structures, the formation of tissues and organs from cells, and the self-organization of bacterial colonies, flocks of birds, and human beings in cities. While the individual behaviors of biomolecules, bacteria, birds, and humans are governed by relatively simple rules, groups assembled from many individuals exhibit complex collective behaviors and functions that do not exist in the absence of the hierarchically organized structure. Self-assembly is a familiar concept to chemists who study the formation and properties of monolayers, crystals, and supramolecular structures. In chemical self-assembly, disorder evolves to order as the system approaches equilibrium. In contrast, living assemblies are typically characterized by two additional features: (1) the system constantly dissipates energy and is not at thermodynamic equilibrium; (2) the structure is dynamic and can transform or disassemble in response to stimuli or changing conditions. To distinguish them from equilibrium self-assembled structures, living (or nonliving) assemblies of objects with these characteristics are referred to as active matter. In this Account, we focus on the powered assembly and collective behavior of self-propelled colloids. These nano- and microparticles, also called nano- and micromotors or microswimmers, autonomously convert energy available in the environment (in the form of chemical, electromagnetic, acoustic, or thermal energy) into mechanical motion. Collections of these colloids are a form of synthetic active matter. Because of the analogy to living swimmers of similar size such as bacteria, the dynamic interactions and collective behavior of self-propelled colloids are interesting in the context of understanding biological active matter and in the development of new applications. The progression

  1. Improvement Effects of Rice Straw Mixed with Biological Agent on Plastic Shed Continuous Cultivation Soil%稻草配施生物菌剂对大棚连作土壤的改良效果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩玉珠; 宋述尧

    2012-01-01

    The decomposition characteristics in soil and the improvement effects of rice straw mixed with biological agent used in plastic shed continuous cultivation soil were studied. The results showed that, the decomposition of rice straw mixed with biological agent was rapidly in the beginning and then weaken. The decomposition efficiency of rice straw mixed with EM bacterium was higher. Soil capacity and solid fraction was decreased; soil moisture content and porosity was increased; and soil water infiltration was strengthened. The content of organic materials, total N, total P and available N, P and K was in-crensed. The pH and EC value of the soil decreased. The soil salinity was restrained to migrate to surface. The soil cation exchange ratio was increased; and the soil nutrient preserving capability was improved. The quantity of bacteria and action-mycetes and their ratio (B/F) increased. The plastic shed soil's continuous cultivation obstacle was relieved. From the comprehensive analysis of soil's improvement,0.8% rice straw mixed with 1.0% EM bacterium had great effect.%研究了稻草配合两种生物菌剂施入塑料大棚连作土壤后,在土壤中的分解特性及对连作土壤的改良效果.结果表明,稻草配施生物菌剂(EM菌、乐土菌)在大棚土壤中腐解,开始迅速,以后逐渐减缓,以稻草+EM菌处理腐解效率较高.稻草配施生物菌剂可降低土壤的容重和固相率,提高土壤的含水量和孔隙度,增加土壤通透性,改善了土壤结构;提高了土壤有机质、全氮、全磷含量及碱解氮、速效磷、速效钾含量,降低了土壤pH和EC,抑制了大棚土壤盐分的表聚,提高了土壤阳离子交换量,增强了土壤的保肥供肥能力;增加了土壤中细菌、放线菌的数量,B/F提高,可从根本上缓解大棚土壤连作的障碍.从大棚土壤改良效果的综合分析看,0.8%稻草与1.0%EM菌配施效果较好.

  2. Colloid-probe AFM studies of the interaction forces of proteins adsorbed on colloidal crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurvinder; Bremmell, Kristen E; Griesser, Hans J; Kingshott, Peter

    2015-04-28

    In recent years, colloid-probe AFM has been used to measure the direct interaction forces between colloidal particles of different size or surface functionality in aqueous media, as one can study different forces in symmerical systems (i.e., sphere-sphere geometry). The present study investigates the interaction between protein coatings on colloid probes and hydrophilic surfaces decorated with hexagonally close packed single particle layers that are either uncoated or coated with proteins. Controlled solvent evaporation from aqueous suspensions of colloidal particles (coated with or without lysozyme and albumin) produces single layers of close-packed colloidal crystals over large areas on a solid support. The measurements have been carried out in an aqueous medium at different salt concentrations and pH values. The results show changes in the interaction forces as the surface charge of the unmodified or modified particles, and ionic strength or pH of the solution is altered. At high ionic strength or pH, electrostatic interactions are screened, and a strong repulsive force at short separation below 5 nm dominates, suggesting structural changes in the absorbed protein layer on the particles. We also study the force of adhesion, which decreases with an increment in the salt concentration, and the interaction between two different proteins indicating a repulsive interaction on approach and adhesion on retraction. PMID:25758979

  3. Colloid Release From Differently Managed Loess Soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad; Schjønning, Per; Møldrup, Per;

    2012-01-01

    of the total clay not associated with organic matter. No significant difference in release rate was found for air-dry aggregates. The low-carbon soils initially had a higher content of WSA but were more susceptible to disaggregation than the high-carbon soils. Furthermore, the application of NPK fertilizer had......The content of water-dispersible colloids (WDC) in a soil can have a major impact on soil functions, such as permeability to water and air, and on soil strength, which can impair soil fertility and workability. In addition, the content of WDC in the soil may increase the risk of nutrient loss...... and of colloid-facilitated transport of strongly sorbing compounds. In the present study, soils from the Bad Lauchstadt long-term static fertilizer experiment with different management histories were investigated to relate basic soil properties to the content of WDC, the content of water-stable aggregates (WSA...

  4. Interaction between colloidal particles. Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longcheng Liu; Neretnieks, Ivars (Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology)

    2010-02-15

    This report summarises the commonly accepted theoretical basis describing interaction between colloidal particles in an electrolyte solution. The two main forces involved are the van der Waals attractive force and the electrical repulsive force. The report describes in some depth the origin of these two forces, how they are formulated mathematically as well as how they interact to sometimes result in attraction and sometimes in repulsion between particles. The report also addresses how the mathematical models can be used to quantify the forces and under which conditions the models can be expected to give fair description of the colloidal system and when the models are not useful. This report does not address more recent theories that still are discussed as to their applicability, such as ion-ion correlation effects and the Coulombic attraction theory (CAT). These and other models will be discussed in future reports

  5. Viscoelasticity of colloidal polycrystals doped with impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louhichi, Ameur; Tamborini, Elisa; Oberdisse, Julian; Cipelletti, Luca; Ramos, Laurence

    2015-09-01

    We investigate how the microstructure of a colloidal polycrystal influences its linear visco-elasticity. We use thermosensitive copolymer micelles that arrange in water in a cubic crystalline lattice, yielding a colloidal polycrystal. The polycrystal is doped with a small amount of nanoparticles, of size comparable to that of the micelles, which behave as impurities and thus partially segregate in the grain boundaries. We show that the shear elastic modulus only depends on the packing of the micelles and varies neither with the presence of nanoparticles nor with the crystal microstructure. By contrast, we find that the loss modulus is strongly affected by the presence of nanoparticles. A comparison between rheology data and small-angle neutron-scattering data suggests that the loss modulus is dictated by the total amount of nanoparticles in the grain boundaries, which in turn depends on the sample microstructure.

  6. Crust formation in drying colloidal suspensions

    KAUST Repository

    Style, R. W.

    2010-06-30

    During the drying of colloidal suspensions, the desiccation process causes the suspension near the air interface to consolidate into a connected porous matrix or crust. Fluid transport in the porous medium is governed by Darcy\\'s law and the equations of poroelasticity, while the equations of colloid physics govern processes in the suspension. We derive new equations describing this process, including unique boundary conditions coupling the two regions, yielding a moving-boundary model of the concentration and stress profiles during drying. A solution is found for the steady-state growth of a nedimensional crust during constant evaporation rate from the surface. The solution is used to demonstrate the importance of the system boundary conditions on stress profiles and diffusivity in a drying crust. © 2011 The Royal Society.

  7. Structure and hydrodynamics of colloidal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayter, John B.

    1986-02-01

    Invited paperColloidal phases (for example, micellar solutions, latex suspensions, ferrofluids and microemulsions) provide excellent model systems with which to test structural and hydrodynamic theories of the liquid state. Interparticle potentials may be attractive or repulsive, and the experimentalist is often free to control the strength, range and symmetry of the interactions. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and small-angle neutron spin-echo (SANSE) provide excellent complementary tools for studying the structure and time-dependence of these systems, where correlation lengths typically vary from about one to several tens of nm. Correlation times are usually in the nsec to μsec range, but may be of order minutes in certain systems. This paper will review some of the current theories and their recent experimental tests, using colloidal systems in which the direct interaction potentials may have spherical, dipolar or cylindrical symmetry and the hydrodynamic interactions may be weak or strong.

  8. Forging Colloidal Nanostructures via Cation Exchange Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Among the various postsynthesis treatments of colloidal nanocrystals that have been developed to date, transformations by cation exchange have recently emerged as an extremely versatile tool that has given access to a wide variety of materials and nanostructures. One notable example in this direction is represented by partial cation exchange, by which preformed nanocrystals can be either transformed to alloy nanocrystals or to various types of nanoheterostructures possessing core/shell, segmented, or striped architectures. In this review, we provide an up to date overview of the complex colloidal nanostructures that could be prepared so far by cation exchange. At the same time, the review gives an account of the fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic parameters governing these types of reactions, as they are currently understood, and outlines the main open issues and possible future developments in the field. PMID:26891471

  9. Ultrasonic wave interactions with magnetic colloids

    CERN Document Server

    Chapman, J R

    2001-01-01

    fluids have been performed in an effort to determine the relative stability of the fluids. The experimental results have been compared with a combined scattering and hydrodynamic model (Allegra and Hawley 1972) and the ultrasonic anisotropy theory of Skumiel (1997). An on-line quality assurance process is proposed. Originally invented as a method for moving spacecraft fuel in weightless conditions, magnetic colloids or ferrofluids are now used in applications as diverse as the dissipation of heat in the voice coils of a loudspeaker, and for the separation of scrap metal. It has been found that aqueous ferrofluids become unstable after a period of time and with dilution. Therefore, there is a need to characterize the colloidal fluid to study the effects of degradation. Additionally, due to the high cost of ferrofluids and the large volumes required for some applications, the fluid is recycled. It is therefore necessary to develop a system for quality assurance for the fluid reclamation process. Ultrasonic meth...

  10. Slab photonic crystals with dimer colloid bases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Erin K.; Liddell Watson, Chekesha M., E-mail: cliddell@ccmr.cornell.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, 128 Bard Hall Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

    2014-06-14

    The photonic band gap properties for centered rectangular monolayers of asymmetric dimers are reported. Colloids in suspension have been organized into the phase under confinement. The theoretical model is inspired by the range of asymmetric dimers synthesized via seeded emulsion polymerization and explores, in particular, the band structures as a function of degree of lobe symmetry and degree of lobe fusion. These parameters are varied incrementally from spheres to lobe-tangent dimers over morphologies yielding physically realizable particles. The work addresses the relative scarcity of theoretical studies on photonic crystal slabs with vertical variation that is consistent with colloidal self-assembly. Odd, even and polarization independent gaps in the guided modes are determined for direct slab structures. A wide range of lobe symmetry and degree of lobe fusion combinations having Brillouin zones with moderate to high isotropy support gaps between odd mode band indices 3-4 and even mode band indices 1-2 and 2-3.

  11. Structure and hydrodynamics of colloidal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayter, J.B.

    1985-07-01

    Colloidal phases (for example, micellar solutions, latex suspensions, ferrofluids and microemulsions) provide excellent model systems with which to test structural and hydrodynamic theories of the liquid state. Interparticle potentials may be attractive or repulsive, and the experimentalist is often free to control the strength, range and symmetry of the interactions. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and small-angle neutron spin-echo (SANSE) provide excellent complementary tools for studying the structure and time-dependence of these systems, where correlation lengths typically vary from about one to several tens of nm. Correlation times are usually in the nsec to ..mu..sec range, but may be of order minutes in certain systems. This paper will review some of the current theories and their recent experimental tests, using colloidal systems in which the direct interaction potentials may have spherical, dipolar or cylindrical symmetry and the hydrodynamic interactions may be weak or strong.

  12. Thermal Jamming of a Colloidal Glass

    KAUST Repository

    Agarwal, Praveen

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the effect of temperature on structure and dynamics of a colloidal glass created by tethering polymers to the surface of inorganic nanoparticles. Contrary to the conventional assumption, an increase in temperature slows down glassy dynamics of the material, yet causes no change in its static structure factor. We show that these findings can be explained within the soft glassy rheology framework if the noise temperature X of the glass phase is correlated with thermodynamic temperature. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  13. Non-Fickian diffusion in colloidal glasses

    OpenAIRE

    Hagen, M.H.J.; Frenkel, D.; Lowe, C.P.

    1998-01-01

    We have studied numerically the decay of the self-dynamic structure factor (SDSF) for a small particle diffusing in a colloidal glass. We show that, in line with theoretical predictions, the super-Burnett coefficient (characterizing the deviation of the fourth moment of the single particle distribution from its Gaussian value) is finite. However, our results also show that large scale deviations from Fick's law of diffusion should still be easy to detect experimentally. These deviations take ...

  14. The Silicon:Colloidal Quantum Dot Heterojunction

    KAUST Repository

    Masala, Silvia

    2015-10-13

    A heterojunction between crystalline silicon and colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) is realized. A special interface modification is developed to overcome an inherent energetic band mismatch between the two semiconductors, and realize the efficient collection of infrared photocarriers generated in the CQD film. This junction is used to produce a sensitive near infrared photodetector. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Shear modulus titration in crystalline colloidal suspensions

    OpenAIRE

    Palberg, Thomas; Kottal, Johannes; Bitzer, Franz; Simon, Rolf; Würth, Mathias; Leiderer, Paul

    1995-01-01

    We present the first direct experimental access to the actual surface charge number Z of colloidal particles under conditions of strong electrostatic interaction. We further calculate a renormalized charge number Z *(Z) using the modified DLVO approximation and the dependence of the shear modulus G(Z*) on the concentration of neutral electrolyte ns. The excellent agreement of predicted and measured values provides an experimental verification of the renormalization concept under variation of ...

  16. Colloidal suspensions as model liquids and solids

    OpenAIRE

    Palberg, Thomas; Simon, Rolf; Würth, Mathias; Leiderer, Paul

    1994-01-01

    We here review some of our recent results on fluid-like and crystalline ordered colloidal suspensions. We have investigated the structure and the dynamical properties of strongly interacting charged latex particles. The interaction can be varied experimentally over a wide range and in a precisely controlled way. It gives rise to pronounced correlations between the particles, leading to ordered mesoscopic structures which bear striking similarities with atomic or molecular liquids and solids. ...

  17. Repulsive depletion interactions in colloid polymer mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Rudhardt, Daniel; Bechinger, Clemens; Leiderer, Paul

    1999-01-01

    Depletion forces in colloidal systems are known to be entirely attractive, as long as the background of macromolecules is small enough that an ideal gas approach is valid. At higher densities, however, structural correlation effects of the macromolecules which lead to additional repulsive parts in the depletion interaction, have to be taken into account. We have measured the depletion interaction between a single polystyrene sphere and a wall in the presence of non-ionic polymer coils. Althou...

  18. Photonic Binding in Silicon-Colloid Microcavities

    OpenAIRE

    Xifré-Pérez, E.; García de Abajo, Francisco Javier; Fenollosa Esteve, Roberto; Meseguer, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    Photonic binding between two identical silicon-colloid-based microcavities is studied by using a generalized multipolar expansion. In contrast with previous works, we focus on low-order cavity modes that resemble low-energy electronic orbitals. For conservative light intensities, the interaction between cavity modes with moderate Q factors produces extremely large particle acceleration values. Optical forces dominate over vanderWaals, gravity, and Brownian motion, and they show a binding-anti...

  19. Geometric frustration in small colloidal clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Malins, Alex; Stephen R Williams; Eggers, Jens; Tanaka, Hajime; Royall, C. Patrick

    2009-01-01

    We study the structure of clusters in a model colloidal system with competing interactions using Brownian dynamics simulations. A short-ranged attraction drives clustering, while a weak, long-ranged repulsion is used to model electrostatic charging in experimental systems. The former is treated with a short-ranged Morse attractive interaction, the latter with a repulsive Yukawa interaction. We consider the yield of clusters of specific structure as a function of the strength of the interactio...

  20. Colloidal Electrostatic Interactions Near a Conducting Surface

    OpenAIRE

    Polin, Marco; Grier, David G.; Han, Yilong

    2006-01-01

    Charge-stabilized colloidal spheres dispersed in deionized water are supposed to repel each other. Instead, artifact-corrected video microscopy measurements reveal an anomalous long-ranged like-charge attraction in the interparticle pair potential when the spheres are confined to a layer by even a single charged glass surface. These attractions can be masked by electrostatic repulsions at low ionic strengths. Coating the bounding surfaces with a conducting gold layer suppresses the attraction...

  1. Strong electrostatic interactions in spherical colloidal systems

    OpenAIRE

    Messina, René; Holm, Christian; Kremer, Kurt

    2001-01-01

    We investigate spherical macroions in the strong Coulomb coupling regime within the primitive model in salt-free environment. We first show that the ground state of an isolated colloid is naturally overcharged by simple electrostatic arguments illustrated by the Gillespie rule. We furthermore demonstrate that in the strong Coulomb coupling this mechanism leads to ionized states and thus to long range attractions between like-charged spheres. We use molecular dynamics simulations to study in d...

  2. Depleted Bulk Heterojunction Colloidal Quantum Dot Photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Barkhouse, D. Aaron R.

    2011-05-26

    The first solution-processed depleted bulk heterojunction colloidal quantum dot solar cells are presented. The architecture allows for high absorption with full depletion, thereby breaking the photon absorption/carrier extraction compromise inherent in planar devices. A record power conversion of 5.5% under simulated AM 1.5 illumination conditions is reported. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Optimization of Optical Absorption of Colloids of SiO2@Au and Fe3O4@Au Nanoparticles with Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xiaozheng; Sukhotskiy, Viktor; Furlani, Edward P.

    2016-01-01

    We study the optical response of monodisperse colloids of core-shell plasmonic nanoparticles and introduce a computational approach to optimize absorption for photothermal applications that require dilute colloids of non-interacting particles with a prescribed volume fraction. Since the volume fraction is held constant, the particle concentration is size-dependent. Optimization is achieved by comparing the absorption spectra of colloids as a function of particle size and structure. We demonstrate the approach via application to colloids of core-shell SiO2@Au and Fe3O4@Au nanoparticles with particle sizes that range from 5–100 nm and with the incident wavelength varying from 600–1200 nm. The absorption spectra are predicted using Mie theory and the analysis shows that there is a unique mix of parameters (core radius, shell thickness, wavelength) that maximize absorption, independent of the value of volume fraction. We show that lossy Fe3O4 cores produce a much broader absorption peak with much less sensitivity to variations in particle structure and wavelength than lossless SiO2 cores. This approach can be readily adapted to colloids of nanoparticles with arbitrary materials, shapes and structure using appropriate numerical methods to compute the absorption spectra. As such, it is useful for the rational design of colloids and process variables for a broad range of photothermal applications. PMID:27786279

  4. Silica colloids and their effect on radionuclide sorption - experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-cementitious grouts have been tested in ONKALO for the sealing of fractures with the small hydraulic aperture. A non-cementitious inorganic grout material for sealing the fractures of the apertures less than 0.05 mm is colloidal silica called silica sol. In this work, the release of silica colloids from the silica sol gel, the stability of silica sol colloids and sorption of Europium-152 on silica sol colloids were determined in saline OLSO and low salinity Allard groundwater simulates, de-ionized water and NaCl and CaCl2 solutions. The salinity of groundwater had a significant influence on the release and stability of silica colloids. In OLSO, particle size distribution was at first wide from nanometres to thousands of nanometres. According to the disappearance of large particles, aggregation and sedimentation had been occurred after one year. Zeta potential values around zero indicated the instability of colloids. In Allard, particle size distribution was narrow and the particle diameter remained less than 60 nm. High negative zeta potential values were in accordance with the existence of stable silica colloids. Europium sorption on silica sol colloids was significantly dependent on solution pH. The Kd-values were 2-10 m3 kg-1 for OLSO pH 7-8 and Allard pH 8-9 and 100-140 m3 kg-1 for OLSO pH 10-11. In OLSO pH 10-11 samples Eu-152 was rapidly sorbed onto silica sol colloids and measured radioactivity in a liquid phase was at the background level resulting in inaccurate Kd determination. The concentrations of the released silica colloids were some higher than concentrations of natural colloids determined in granitic groundwater. The main uncertainties remain in the quantification of colloid generation under realistic repository conditions and how mobile colloids are. Irreversible sorption on silica colloids may increase radionuclide transport if colloids are sufficiently stable. Under the prevailing medium saline to saline groundwater conditions in Olkiluoto

  5. Equilibrium crystal phases of triblock Janus colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhart, Wesley F; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z

    2016-09-01

    Triblock Janus colloids, which are colloidal spheres decorated with attractive patches at each pole, have recently generated significant interest as potential building blocks for functional materials. Their inherent anisotropy is known to induce self-assembly into open structures at moderate temperatures and pressures, where they are stabilized over close-packed crystals by entropic effects. We present a numerical investigation of the equilibrium phases of triblock Janus particles with many different patch geometries in three dimensions, using Monte Carlo simulations combined with free energy calculations. In all cases, we find that the free energy difference between crystal polymorphs is less than 0.2 kBT per particle. By varying the patch fraction and interaction range, we show that large patches stabilize the formation of structures with four bonds per patch over those with three. This transition occurs abruptly above a patch fraction of 0.30 and has a strong dependence on the interaction range. Furthermore, we find that a short interaction range favors four bonds per patch, with longer range increasingly stabilizing structures with only three bonds per patch. By quantifying the effect of patch geometry on the stability of the equilibrium crystal structures, we provide insights into the fundamental design rules for constructing complex colloidal crystals. PMID:27609002

  6. Equilibrium crystal phases of triblock Janus colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhart, Wesley F.; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.

    2016-09-01

    Triblock Janus colloids, which are colloidal spheres decorated with attractive patches at each pole, have recently generated significant interest as potential building blocks for functional materials. Their inherent anisotropy is known to induce self-assembly into open structures at moderate temperatures and pressures, where they are stabilized over close-packed crystals by entropic effects. We present a numerical investigation of the equilibrium phases of triblock Janus particles with many different patch geometries in three dimensions, using Monte Carlo simulations combined with free energy calculations. In all cases, we find that the free energy difference between crystal polymorphs is less than 0.2 kBT per particle. By varying the patch fraction and interaction range, we show that large patches stabilize the formation of structures with four bonds per patch over those with three. This transition occurs abruptly above a patch fraction of 0.30 and has a strong dependence on the interaction range. Furthermore, we find that a short interaction range favors four bonds per patch, with longer range increasingly stabilizing structures with only three bonds per patch. By quantifying the effect of patch geometry on the stability of the equilibrium crystal structures, we provide insights into the fundamental design rules for constructing complex colloidal crystals.

  7. Potential Distribution Around a Spherical Colloidal Particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When it is immersed into an electrolyte solution, surface of a colloidal particle will be charged. The charge creates repulsion force among particles. This causes that agglomeration among colloidal particles will be difficult to occur. This paper discusses in brief the surface charging process and then followed by calculation to determine the potential distribution, Ψ, around a spherical colloid particle. The particle has radius of a and zeta potential, ζ, at it's surface. The poisson-Boltzmann equation, εε0∇2Ψ= -σkN ezknk, that determines the potential distribution outside the particle will be solved analytically. Its nonlinearity causes that the equation only can be solved for symmetric, 1-1 electrolyte and with approximation that the double layer thickness is much less than the particle radius. Because of this, the area outside the particle can be divided into two regions, i.e. the electroneutral region far from the surface and the ion diffused region closed to the surface. Solutions to the PB equation will be determined for each region and constants in the solutions will be determined by matching. For the neutral region it is found that ψ = eζ/kTr exp (κa(1-r), with correction factor in the order of O (1/κa)

  8. Colloidal forming of metal/ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Herencia, A.J.; Gutierrez, C.A.; Millan, A.J.; Nieto, M.I.; Moreno, R. [Inst. de Ceramica y Vidrio, Madrid (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    Metal/Ceramic composites have very attractive properties as either structural or electronic materials. For certain applications, complex microstructures and shapes are required. Colloidal processing of ceramics has proved to provide better properties and allows to obtain near net complex shaped parts. However colloidal processing has not received a similar attention in powder metallurgy. This work deals with the colloidal approach to the forming of metallic and metal/ceramic composites in an aqueous medium. Rheological behavior of concentrated pure nickel, nickel/alumina and nickel/zirconia suspensions is studied and optimized for obtaining flat surfaces or near net shaped parts by tape casting and gel casting respectively. In each case the influence of the processing additives (acrylic binders for tape casting and carrageenans for gel casting) on the rheological behavior of the slurries is determined. Pure nickel and nickel/ceramic composites with different compositions have been prepared. Static and dynamic sintering studies were performed at different conditions in order to control the porosity and microstructure of the final bodies, which were characterized by optical microscopy. (orig.)

  9. Improving feed slurry rheology by colloidal techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heath, W.O.; Ternes, R.L.

    1984-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PSN) has investigated three colloidal techniques in the laboratory to improve the sedimentation and flowability of Hanford simulated (nonradioactive) current acid waste (CAW) melter feed slurry: polymer-induced bridging flocculation; manipulating glass former (raw SiO/sub 2/ or frit) particle size; and alteration of nitric acid content. All three methods proved successful in improving the rheology of the simulated CAW feed. This initially had exhibited nearly worst-case flow and clogging properties, but was transformed into a flowable, resuspendable (nonclogging) feed. While each has advantages and disadvantages, the following three specific alternatives proved successful: addition of a polyelectrolyte in 2000 ppM concentration to feed slurry; substitution of a 49 wt % SiO/sub 2/ colloidal suspension (approx. 10-micron particle size) for the -325 mesh (less than or equal to 44-micron particle size) raw-chemical SiO/sub 2/; and increase of nitric acid content from the reference 1.06 M to optimum 1.35 M. The first method, polymer-induced bridging flocculation, results in a high sediment volume, nonclogging CAW feed. The second method, involving the use of colloidal silica particles results in a nonsedimenting feed that when left unagitated forms a gel. The third method, increase in feed acidity, results in a highly resuspendable (nonclogging) melter feed. Further research is therefore required to determine which of the three alternatives is the preferred method of achieving rheological control of CAW melter feeds.

  10. Synthesis of metal colloids in inverse microemulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnickel, P.; Wokaun, A.

    Colloidal silver and gold particles have been prepared by reduction of aqueous metal salt solutions in inverse microemulsions. The sols are characterized by absorption spectroscopy and electron microscopy. Ultrasound treatment during reduction results in a narrower size distribution of the colloidal particles, as evidenced by a narrower absorption band. Photochemical silver and gold sol formation, without the addition of a reducing agent, has been observed for inverse microemulsions of metal salt solutions in a medium consisting of dodecyl-heptaethyleneglycol-ether and hexane. The particle sizes determined from electron microscopy have been used as input parameters for the simulation of absorption spectra, based on the electromagnetic theory of localized surface plasmon excitation. For the gold sols a quantitative agreement between experimental and simulated spectra is obtained. With the silver colloids, the observed red-shift of the absorption maximum points to the presence of an ionic layer on the surface of the particles. When this layer is included in the theoretical model, good agreement with the experiment is achieved.

  11. Behavior of colloidal gold nanoparticles in different ionic strength media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increased applications of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) may lead to environmental release and transport to estuarine environments where NPs are expected to aggregate/agglomerate with increasing ionic strength. However, more stable NPs that may be resistant to high ionic strength media and more dispersed in the aquatic environment are being synthesized. Thus, understanding colloidal NPs’ behavior in different ionic strength media is crucial for the assessment of the consequences of their environmental release. This work assessed the behavior of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), with diverse sizes and coatings, in media with different ionic strengths (from biological buffers to artificial seawater). Overall, in biological buffers and artificial seawater, citrate-coated AuNPs were unstable, displaying significantly increased sizes (between 100 and 400 nm), whereas no significant alterations (less than 5 % oscillation) were found for AuNPs with other coatings (bovine serum albumin, polyvinylpyrrolidone, and polyethylene glycol). Data suggest that coated AuNPs, and probably other NPs, may be dispersed in the environment from freshwater to estuarine systems

  12. Behavior of colloidal gold nanoparticles in different ionic strength media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreto, Ângela; Luis, Luis G. [University of Aveiro, Department of Biology & CESAM (Portugal); Girão, Ana V.; Trindade, Tito [University of Aveiro, Department of Chemistry & CICECO (Portugal); Soares, Amadeu M. V. M.; Oliveira, Miguel, E-mail: migueloliveira@ua.pt [University of Aveiro, Department of Biology & CESAM (Portugal)

    2015-12-15

    The increased applications of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) may lead to environmental release and transport to estuarine environments where NPs are expected to aggregate/agglomerate with increasing ionic strength. However, more stable NPs that may be resistant to high ionic strength media and more dispersed in the aquatic environment are being synthesized. Thus, understanding colloidal NPs’ behavior in different ionic strength media is crucial for the assessment of the consequences of their environmental release. This work assessed the behavior of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), with diverse sizes and coatings, in media with different ionic strengths (from biological buffers to artificial seawater). Overall, in biological buffers and artificial seawater, citrate-coated AuNPs were unstable, displaying significantly increased sizes (between 100 and 400 nm), whereas no significant alterations (less than 5 % oscillation) were found for AuNPs with other coatings (bovine serum albumin, polyvinylpyrrolidone, and polyethylene glycol). Data suggest that coated AuNPs, and probably other NPs, may be dispersed in the environment from freshwater to estuarine systems.

  13. Realizing the Physics of Motile Cilia Synchronization with Driven Colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruot, Nicolas; Cicuta, Pietro

    2016-03-01

    Cilia and flagella in biological systems often show large scale cooperative behaviors such as the synchronization of their beats in "metachronal waves." These are beautiful examples of emergent dynamics in biology, and are essential for life, allowing diverse processes from the motility of eukaryotic microorganisms, to nutrient transport and clearance of pathogens from mammalian airways. How these collective states arise is not fully understood, but it is clear that individual cilia interact mechanically, and that a strong and long-ranged component of the coupling is mediated by the viscous fluid. We review here the work by ourselves and others aimed at understanding the behavior of hydrodynamically coupled systems, and particularly a set of results that have been obtained both experimentally and theoretically by studying actively driven colloidal systems. In these controlled scenarios, it is possible to selectively test aspects of living motile cilia, such as the geometrical arrangement, the effects of the driving profile and the distance to no-slip boundaries. We outline and give examples of how it is possible to link model systems to observations on living systems, which can be made on microorganisms, on cell cultures or on tissue sections. This area of research has clear clinical application in the long term, as severe pathologies are associated with compromised cilia function in humans.

  14. Design and elaboration of colloidal molecules: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duguet, Etienne; Désert, Anthony; Perro, Adeline; Ravaine, Serge

    2011-02-01

    The concept of colloidal molecules was first evoked by van Blaaderen in 2003 for describing small non-spherical colloids made of the aggregation of a small number of particles. He predicted original properties to the complex assemblies of such colloids, in particular in optics. This critical review deals with the different strategies reported for creating robust clusters of spherical particles which could mimic the space-filling models of simple conventional molecules. These routes concern either the controlled clustering of preformed colloids directed by coalescence, physical routes, chemical routes, or 2-D/3-D geometrical confinement, or strategies starting from a single colloid which is decorated by satellite colloids by taking advantage of controlled phase separation or nucleation and growth phenomena. These routes are compared from the viewpoint of the accessible shapes, their tunability and scalability (146 references). PMID:21212874

  15. Radio-active colloids in the functional exploration of the reticulo-endothelium system; Les colloides radioactifs dans l'exploration fonctionnelle du systeme reticulo-endothelial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chivot, J.J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-03-01

    A historical review describes the reticulo-endothelial system (R.E.S.) and aims at defining it and at explaining its operation. The methods used for its examination and the colloids utilized are considered. The author has been led to prepare a special type of colloid: an albuminous complex containing radio-iodine, 'C.A. {sup 131}I', whose method of preparation and physical and biological examination are described. A human albumin, having a known optical density in solution, is heated until a change in the optical density indicates that an aggregation of the proteinic molecules has occurred. The denatured protein is iodated with {sup 131}I. Electrophoretic, ultracentrifuge and autoradiographic controls are then carried out. This atoxic and metabolisable preparation of biological origin is compared with the better defined colloidal gold which serves as reference. C.A.{sup 131}I is injected into mice. It is shown by radioactivity measurements, auto-radiographies on sections of the whole animal, and anthropo-gamma-metric detections that a high concentration occurs in the S.R.E. of the liver. These static results are only of limited importance however compared to those obtained from an in vivo study of the phenomenon. The author records the changes in the radioactivity of the blood derived from the carotid artery using a well-scintillator. He obtains directly a curve of the radioactivity of blood having a decreasing exponential form; the mathematical expression describing this curve is given. The biological half-life T 1/2 of the colloid in the blood is a measure of its phagocytosis by the S.R.E. cells. A supplementary check is provided by the direct recording of the hepatic activity using a suitably collimated exterior detector. A curve of increasing-exponential form is obtained and its parameters are corollary to the preceding curve. These tests carried out on guinea-pigs and rats make it possible to give to the S.R.E. a phagocytic index which is

  16. Colloid migration in groundwaters: Geochemical interactions of radionuclides with natural colloids. 5. progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the joint research programme is to determine the significance of groundwater colloids in far field radionuclide migration. The characterization, quantification and theoretical interpretation of colloid-borne transport phenomena of radionuclides in selected Gorleben aquifer systems are the main objectives of the present research programme. Gorleben aquifer systems are chosen because they are well characterized in terms of their hydrological and geological properties and because they contain substantial amounts of colloids of different chemical compositions as well as considerable quantities of chemical homologues and natural analogues of radionuclides, e.g. M(III), M(IV), M(VI), and Th and U decay series. The research tasks are investigated jointly by the four laboratories (listed below) in close coordination of experimental capacities of each laboratory. (orig.)

  17. Effect of starting powders on the sintering of nanostructured ZrO2 ceramics by colloidal processing

    OpenAIRE

    Gustavo Suárez, Yoshio Sakka, Tohru S Suzuki, Tetsuo Uchikoshi, Xinwen Zhu and Esteban F Aglietti

    2009-01-01

    The effect of starting powders on the sintering of nanostructured tetragonal zirconia was evaluated. Suspensions were prepared with a concentration of 10 vol.% by mixing a bicomponent mixture of commercial powders (97 mol.% monoclinic zirconia with 3 mol.% yttria) and by dispersing commercially available tetragonal zirconia (3YTZ, Tosoh). The preparation of the slurry by bead-milling was optimized. Colloidal processing using 50 μm zirconia beads at 4000 rpm generated a fully deagglomerated su...

  18. Influence of Nanoscale Surface Roughness on Colloidal Force Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yi; Jayasuriya, Sunil; Manke, Charles W; Mao, Guangzhao

    2015-09-29

    Forces between colloidal particles determine the performances of many industrial processes and products. Colloidal force measurements conducted between a colloidal particle AFM probe and particles immobilized on a flat substrate are valuable in selecting appropriate surfactants for colloidal stabilization. One of the features of inorganic fillers and extenders is the prevalence of rough surfaces-even the polymer latex particles, often used as model colloidal systems including the current study, have rough surfaces albeit at a much smaller scale. Surface roughness is frequently cited as the reason for disparity between experimental observations and theoretical treatment but seldom verified by direct evidence. This work reports the effect of nanoscale surface roughness on colloidal force measurements carried out in the presence of surfactants. We applied a heating method to reduce the mean surface roughness of commercial latex particles from 30 to 1 nm. We conducted force measurements using the two types of particles at various salt and surfactant concentrations. The surfactants used were pentaethylene glycol monododecyl ether, Pluronic F108, and a styrene/acrylic copolymer, Joncryl 60. In the absence of the surfactant, nanometer surface roughness affects colloidal forces only in high salt conditions when the Debye length becomes smaller than the surface roughness. The adhesion is stronger between colloids with higher surface roughness and requires a higher surfactant concentration to be eliminated. The effect of surface roughness on colloidal forces was also investigated as a function of the adsorbed surfactant layer structure characterized by AFM indentation and dynamic light scattering. We found that when the layer thickness exceeds the surface roughness, the colloidal adhesion is less influenced by surfactant concentration variation. This study demonstrates that surface roughness at the nanoscale can influence colloidal forces significantly and should be taken

  19. Colloidal Stability and Thermal Stability of Magnetic Fluids

    OpenAIRE

    I.M. Arefyev; T.A. Arefyeva; Yu.B. Kazakov

    2013-01-01

    Colloidal and thermal stabilities of magnetic fluids define the service life of magneto-liquid equipment. The results of the research into colloidal and thermal stabilities of original synthesized magnetic fluids based on kerosene, siloxane fluid and synthetic hydrocarbon oil are presented. The method of carrying agent substitution was used in the research into colloidal stability. The thermal tests were conducted in the research into thermal stability. The conclusions about the prospects of ...

  20. General elastic interaction in nematic liquid crystals colloids

    OpenAIRE

    Chernyshuk, S. B.; Lev, B. I.

    2009-01-01

    The new free energy functional that describes general elastic interaction between colloidal particles and nematic liquid crystal has been proposed. It generalizes results of the paper \\cite{lupe} on the case of arbitrary orientation of colloidal particles and is valid for arbitrary surface anchoring strength. Formal analogies and differences between electric particles and colloidal particles in LC are found. It is first time shown that spur of the quadrupole moment tensor is different from ze...

  1. Thermal conductivity of concentrated colloids in different states

    OpenAIRE

    Shalkevich, Natallia; Shalkevich, Andrey; Brügi, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of concentrated colloids in fluid, glass, and gel states was analyzed. SiO₂ colloids at 10−31 vol % and Al₂O₃ colloids at 4.8 vol % in the fluid, the gel, and the glassy states were studied by dynamic light scattering, rheology, and transmission electron microscopy. Thermal conductivity of the three states was measured as a function of volume fraction. For the fluid and gel states the thermal conductivity increases almost linearly with concentration, reaching roughly ...

  2. Short-wave infrared colloidal quantum dot photodetectors on silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Chen; Gassenq, Alban; Justo, Yolanda; Yakunin, Sergii; Heiss, Wolfgang; Hens, Zeger; Roelkens, Gunther

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, two kinds of colloidal quantum dots, PbS and HgTe, are explored for SWIR photodetectors application. The colloidal dots are prepared by hot injection chemical synthesis, with organic ligands around the dots keeping them stable in solution. For the purpose of achieving efficient carrier transport between the dots in a film, these long organic ligands are replaced by shorter, inorganic ligands. We report uniform, ultra-smooth colloidal QD films without cracks realized by dip-coat...

  3. Recent research progress in wettability of colloidal crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The wettability of solid surfaces has attracted extensive interest in both theoretical research and industrial applications. This paper reviews recent research progress in the fabrication and applications of the colloidal crystals with special wettability. Based on the modified equation of Wenzel and Cassie, the colloidal crystals with special wettability have been obtained by either application of the intrinsic rough structure or modification of the surface chemical composition. Some typical applications of colloidal crystals with special wettability have also been demonstrated.

  4. Soft X-Ray Spectromicroscopy Investigation of the Interaction of Aquatic Humic Acid and Clay Colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothe; Denecke; Dardenne

    2000-11-01

    Soft X-ray spectromicroscopy investigations of the interaction of aquatic humic acid (HA) and montmorillonite colloids have been performed in situ at the NSLS X1-A STXM endstation. Images have been recorded of montmorillonite particles, HA aggregates, and mixed suspensions of both montmorillonite + HA and montmorillonite + carboxyl polystyrene microspheres, as reference organic colloids. Special emphasis has been placed on the sample preparation technique in order to keep the colloid particles hydrated during all measurements. C 1s near edge absorption fine structure extracted from STXM image stacks reveals electronic transitions corresponding to functional -COOH and -C(6)H(5) groups present in HA and polystyrene. XANES peak intensities reflect the relative amounts of these two carbon functional groups in the organic particles. For example, the greater amount of carboxyl groups in HA compared to the latex reference particles affects a larger 1s-->pi* transition intensity. A specific form of montmorillonite-HA particle agglomeration at near-neutral pH has been observed. Under these conditions, we found no separate clustering of HA. Instead, STXM images show the HA to coat the clay mineral surface, leading to nearly a fractal manner of aggregation. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  5. Partial structure factors in star polymer/colloid mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Stellbrink, J; Richter, D; Moussaid, A; Schofield, A B; Poon, W C K; Pusey, P N; Lindner, P; Dzubiella, J; Likos, C N; Löwen, H

    2002-01-01

    Addition of polymer to colloidal suspensions induces an attractive part to the colloid pair potential, which is of purely entropic origin (''depletion interaction''). We investigated the influence of polymer branching on depletion forces by studying mixtures of hard sphere colloids and star polymers with increasing arm number f=2-32, but constant R sub g approx 500 A. We found a pronounced effect of branching on the position of the gas/liquid demixing transition. Using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) we were able to measure partial structure factors in star polymer/colloid mixtures. The relative distance to the demixing transition is reflected in our scattering data. (orig.)

  6. Mixed Movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Helle

    2010-01-01

    Mixed Movements is a research project engaged in performance-based architectural drawing. Architectonic implementation questions relations between the human body and a body of architecture by the different ways we handle drawing materials. A drawing may explore architectonic problems at other...... levels than those related to building, and this exploration is a special challenge and competence implicit artistic development work. The project Mixed Movements generates drawing-material, not primary as representation, but as a performance-based media, making the body being-in-the-media felt and appear...... as possible operational moves....

  7. Stoichiometric control of DNA-grafted colloid self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Thi; Venkatasubramanian, Venkat; Kumar, Sanat; Srinivasan, Babji; Pal, Suchetan; Zhang, Yugang; Gang, Oleg

    2015-04-21

    There has been considerable interest in understanding the self-assembly of DNA-grafted nanoparticles into different crystal structures, e.g., CsCl, AlB2, and Cr3Si. Although there are important exceptions, a generally accepted view is that the right stoichiometry of the two building block colloids needs to be mixed to form the desired crystal structure. To incisively probe this issue, we combine experiments and theory on a series of DNA-grafted nanoparticles at varying stoichiometries, including noninteger values. We show that stoichiometry can couple with the geometries of the building blocks to tune the resulting equilibrium crystal morphology. As a concrete example, a stoichiometric ratio of 3:1 typically results in the Cr3Si structure. However, AlB2 can form when appropriate building blocks are used so that the AlB2 standard-state free energy is low enough to overcome the entropic preference for Cr3Si. These situations can also lead to an undesirable phase coexistence between crystal polymorphs. Thus, whereas stoichiometry can be a powerful handle for direct control of lattice formation, care must be taken in its design and selection to avoid polymorph coexistence.

  8. Methods for preparing colloidal nanocrystal-based thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kagan, Cherie R.; Fafarman, Aaron T.; Choi, Ji-Hyuk; Koh, Weon-kyu; Kim, David K.; Oh, Soong Ju; Lai, Yuming; Hong, Sung-Hoon; Saudari, Sangameshwar Rao; Murray, Christopher B.

    2016-05-10

    Methods of exchanging ligands to form colloidal nanocrystals (NCs) with chalcogenocyanate (xCN)-based ligands and apparatuses using the same are disclosed. The ligands may be exchanged by assembling NCs into a thin film and immersing the thin film in a solution containing xCN-based ligands. The ligands may also be exchanged by mixing a xCN-based solution with a dispersion of NCs, flocculating the mixture, centrifuging the mixture, discarding the supernatant, adding a solvent to the pellet, and dispersing the solvent and pellet to form dispersed NCs with exchanged xCN-ligands. The NCs with xCN-based ligands may be used to form thin film devices and/or other electronic, optoelectronic, and photonic devices. Devices comprising nanocrystal-based thin films and methods for forming such devices are also disclosed. These devices may be constructed by depositing NCs on to a substrate to form an NC thin film and then doping the thin film by evaporation and thermal diffusion.

  9. Anisotropic Colloids: Synthesis and Phase Behavior of Eccentric, Dimer and String-like Colloids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demirors, A.F.

    2010-01-01

    The research described in this thesis focuses on synthesis and phase behavior of anisotropic colloids prepared through different synthetic strategies. Namely, eccentric core-shell particles, dimers, string-like particles and core-shell particles are the systems investigated throughout this work. The

  10. Scanning electron and atomic force microscopy investigation of extracellular polymeric substances, hematite and EPS-hematite colloids and aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Arkadiusz K.; Narvekar, Sneha; Totsche, Kai Uwe

    2013-04-01

    Natural colloids are involved in a multitude of biogeochemical and physicochemical processes in aqueous systems. However, the chemical composition, mineralogical diversity and morphological variability of natural colloids are the reasons for the difficulty to understand their formation, stability and mechanisms of interaction with other solutes. In this study we explore the effects of different amount of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of Bacillus subtilis on the aggregation and stability of hematite colloids. The hematite colloids were synthesized using Schwertmann and Cornell method [1], where ferric nitrite solution slowly drops into the boiling water. Bacillus subtilis EPS was obtained using Omoike and Chorover method [2], where EPS was precipitated from the supernatant solution by using three volumes of cold ethanol. Then the mixture was centrifuged and dialyzed to remove ethanol and residual media components and stored at -20C. Synthetic hematite was mixed with different amounts of EPS resulting in solutions with EPS/hematite ratios of 1:5, 1:2, 1:0.5 and 1:0.2. Droplets of the colloidal suspension were put on silicon wafer and subject to air drying. The wafers were then analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive Xray spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). A control sample with pure synthetic hematite colloid was also prepared and analyzed. Pure hematite colloids form homogenic distribution of relatively small aggregates of 40 to 100 nm size. Theses aggregates loosely connect to each other creating skeletal or fisher-net like structures. The smallest amount of EPS results in coagulation of hematite in very large (up to 80 µm) islands/aggregates of tightly packed hematite nanoparticles. Adding EPS decreases the size of islands to the point where again only 40 to 100 nm size aggregates are visible, but they are strictly separated in comparison to the pure hematite colloid. Although separation of hematite aggregates

  11. Explorative analysis of microbes, colloids and gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallbeck, Lotta; Pedersen, Karsten (Microbial Analytics Sweden AB, Goeteborg (Sweden))

    2008-08-15

    The overall objectives of the hydrogeochemical description for Forsmark are to establish a detailed understanding of the hydrogeochemical conditions at the site and to develop models that fulfil the needs identified by the safety assessment groups during the site investigation phase. Issues of concern to safety assessment are radionuclide transport and technical barrier behaviour, both of which are dependent on the chemistry of groundwater and pore water and their evolution with time. In this report, part of the final hydrogeochemical evaluation work of the site investigation at the Forsmark site, is presented. The work was conducted by SKB's hydrogeochemical project group, ChemNet, which consists of independent consultants and Univ. researchers with expertise in geochemistry, hydrochemistry, hydrogeochemistry, microbiology, geomicrobiology, analytical chemistry etc. The resulting site descriptive model version, mainly based on 2.2 data and complementary 2.3 data, was carried out during September 2006 to December 2007. This report focuses on microbiology, colloids and gases: - Microbes (Chapter 1): Several methods must be used to characterize active microbial communities in groundwater. Microbial parameters of interest are the total number of cells (TNC) and the presence of various metabolic groups of microorganisms. Different microbial groups influence the environment in different ways, depending on what metabolic group is dominant. Typically, the following redox couples are utilized by bacteria in granitic groundwater: H{sub 2}O/O{sub 2}, NO{sub 3}-/N{sub 2}, Mn2+/Mn(IV), Fe2+/Fe(III), S2-/SO{sub 4}2-, CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}COOH/CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}/H+. The data will indicate the activity of specific microbial populations at particular sites and how they may affect the geochemistry. - Colloids (Chapter 2): Particles in the size range from 1 to 1x10-3 mum are regarded as colloids. Their small size prohibits them from settling, which gives them the

  12. Explorative analysis of microbes, colloids and gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overall objectives of the hydrogeochemical description for Forsmark are to establish a detailed understanding of the hydrogeochemical conditions at the site and to develop models that fulfil the needs identified by the safety assessment groups during the site investigation phase. Issues of concern to safety assessment are radionuclide transport and technical barrier behaviour, both of which are dependent on the chemistry of groundwater and pore water and their evolution with time. In this report, part of the final hydrogeochemical evaluation work of the site investigation at the Forsmark site, is presented. The work was conducted by SKB's hydrogeochemical project group, ChemNet, which consists of independent consultants and Univ. researchers with expertise in geochemistry, hydrochemistry, hydrogeochemistry, microbiology, geomicrobiology, analytical chemistry etc. The resulting site descriptive model version, mainly based on 2.2 data and complementary 2.3 data, was carried out during September 2006 to December 2007. This report focuses on microbiology, colloids and gases: - Microbes (Chapter 1): Several methods must be used to characterize active microbial communities in groundwater. Microbial parameters of interest are the total number of cells (TNC) and the presence of various metabolic groups of microorganisms. Different microbial groups influence the environment in different ways, depending on what metabolic group is dominant. Typically, the following redox couples are utilized by bacteria in granitic groundwater: H2O/O2, NO3-/N2, Mn2+/Mn(IV), Fe2+/Fe(III), S2-/SO42-, CH4/CO2, CH3COOH/CO2, and H2/H+. The data will indicate the activity of specific microbial populations at particular sites and how they may affect the geochemistry. - Colloids (Chapter 2): Particles in the size range from 1 to 1x10-3 μm are regarded as colloids. Their small size prohibits them from settling, which gives them the potential to transport radionuclides in groundwater. The aim of

  13. Luminescence properties of II/VI semiconductor colloidal nanocrystals at collective and single scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vion, Celine; Barthou, Carlos; Coolen, Laurent; Bennaloul, Paul; MaItre, Agnes [Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, Unite Mixte de Recherche-CNRS 7588, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Vu Duc Chinh; Pham Thuy Linh; Vu Thi Bich; Pham Thu Nga [Institute of Materials Science, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Hanoi (Viet Nam)], E-mail: celine.vion@insp.jussieu.fr

    2009-09-01

    Colloidal nanocrystals are crystalline spheres of semiconductors of a few nanometers, obtained by chemical synthesis. At this size scale, lower than Bohr radius of the exciton, emission properties are dominated by quantum confinement effects and depend crucially on the nanocrystal radius, which can be controlled by adjusting the synthesis parameters. Nanocrystals present high photostability and good quantum efficiency, even at room temperature. Their emission wavelength can be tuned over the whole visible range, making them very attractive solid state light sources which are already used in optoelectronic devices or for biological labeling. The luminescence properties of CdSe colloidal nanocrystals synthesized at the Institute of Materials Science in Hanoi are presented. At collective scale, the emission properties reveal the synthesis quality. Temperature effects from ambient to 4 K on spectra and decay rates will be presented and analyzed in terms of emitting level fine structure. The study of CdSe colloidal quantum dots at the single emitter scale is of great interest as it reveals properties which are hidden by collective studies, such as luminescence 'blinking', a random switching from a fluorescent to a non fluorescent state, which is closely related to the crystalline defects of a nanocrystal and its interaction with its environment. We will present the blinking properties of the prepared nanocrystals, and relate them to the nanocrystals synthesis quality and shell quality.

  14. Rapid adhesion and proliferation of keratinocytes on the gold colloid/chitosan film scaffold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gold colloid/chitosan film scaffold, which could enhance the attached ratio and accelerate proliferation of newborn mice keratinocytes, was fabricated by nanotechnology and self-assembly technology. This nanometer scaffold was characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The keratinocytes were cultured and observed on three different extracellular matrices (ECM): gold colloid/chitosan film scaffold, chitosan film and cell culture plastic (control groups). 6 h, 12 h, 24 h after inoculation, the cell attached ratios were calculated respectively. In comparison to control groups, this scaffold could significantly (P < 0.01) increase the attached ratio of keratinocytes and promote their growth. Meanwhile, there were not any fusiform fibroblasts growing on this scaffold. The rapidly proliferating keratinocytes were indentified and characterized by immunohistochemistry and transmissive electron microscope (TEM), which showed the cells maintain their biological activity well. The results indicated that gold colloid/chitosan film scaffold was nontoxic to keratinocytes, and was a good candidate for wound dressing in skin tissue engineering.

  15. Generation of stable colloidal gold nanoparticles by ultrashort laser-induced melting and fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on generation of stable colloidal gold nanoparticles by ultrashort laser-induced melting and fragmentation. Irradiation of colloidal gold nanoparticles (of initial size larger than 25 nm) by 56 fs long, near-IR pulses of moderate fluence (1.3–5.3 J cm−2) generates very small (2.5 nm) nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution (±0.5 nm). Systematic measurements show the final size of fragmented nanoparticles to be (i) very weakly dependent on the original size and particle shape as well as of pump laser wavelength (800 nm, 1200 nm and 1350 nm), but (ii) strongly dependent on laser parameters; moreover, fragmentation is effectively controllable by pulse fluence and irradiation time. The fragmented particles appear to be contaminant free and have high crystalline quality. We find that the fragmented particles are stable over a time period of more than three months. Stable, contaminant-free, crystalline colloidal gold nanoparticles of sizes around 3 nm, with very narrow size distribution, have potential utility in diverse nanotechnological applications, ranging from biologically relevant imaging to nanoscopic generators of high-frequency mechanical vibrations in the GHz range. (paper)

  16. Sulfate—Exchange Alkalinity of Ferralsol Colloid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGGANGYA; ZHANGXIAONIAN

    1999-01-01

    The amount of OH- replaced by sulfate,i.e.,sulfate-exchange alkalinity,from the electric double layer of ferralsol colloid was measured quantitatively in different conditions with an automatic titration equipment.The amount of OH- release increased with the amount of Na2SO4 added and decreased with raising pH in the suspension of ferralsol colloid.The exchange acidity was displayed as pH was higher than 5.6,If the negative effect of sodium ions was offset,the amount of OH- replaced by sulfate was larger than the original amount of OH- released in the pH range of lower than 5.8.The amount of OH- released decreased rapidly as pH was higher than 6.0 and dropped to zero when pH reached 6.5.In the solution of 2.0molL-1 NaClO4,the amount of OH- repleaced by sulfate from the surface of ferralsol colloid could be considered as the amount of OH- adsorbed by ligand exchange reaction.The amount of OH- released in the solution of NaClO4 concentration below 2.0mol L-1 from which the amount of OH- adsorbed by ligand exchange reaction was subtracted could be conidered as the OH- adsorbed by electrostatic force,The OH- adsorbed by electrostatic force decreased with increases in the concentration of NaClO4 and pH and increased almost linearly with the increasing amount of Na2SON4 added.The percentages of OH- adsorbed by electrostatic force in water and in the electrolyte solutions of 0.05 and 0.5mol L-1 NaClO4 in the total OH- released were calculated,respectively.

  17. Flavor mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, some researchers have been talking about the so-called 'fifth force'. This name suggests that four forces are already known to exist, which are generally called the strong, electromagnetic, weak, and gravitational interactions. However, the standard model of particle physics tells a different story; they are the gauge interactions, Yukawa interactions, Higgs interactions, and gravity. Of the first three, only the gauge interactions have been verified experimentally. However, the other two are truly necessary ingredients of the standard model to make it work. The present report discusses such matters as Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix, KM matrix elements, CP violation, particle antiparticle mixing, flavor-charging neutral current decays, generation crossover, FCNC decay, and lepton flavor mixing. It is concluded that the Kobayashi-Maskawa scheme for the quark mixing is in good shape. So far five out of nine matrix elements are experimentally determined. Nonzero value of the sixth matrix element Kub is essential for the KM scenario of CP violation. The observed large B-B-bar mixing suggests a heavy top quark. A lot of work is still needed towards the understanding of 'flavor'. (N.K.)

  18. Generation, stability and migration of montmorillonite colloids in aqueous systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Sweden the encapsulated nuclear waste will be surrounded by compacted bentonite in the granitic host rock. In contact with water-bearing fractures the bentonite barrier may release montmorillonite colloids that may be further transported in groundwater. If large amounts of material are eroded from the barrier, the buffer functionality can be compromised. Furthermore, in the scenario of a leaking canister, strongly sorbing radionuclides, can be transported by montmorillonite colloids towards the biosphere. This thesis addresses the effects of groundwater chemistry on the generation, stability, sorption and transport of montmorillonite colloids in water bearing rock fractures. To be able to predict quantities of montmorillonite colloids released from the bentonite barrier in contact with groundwater of varying salinity, generation and sedimentation test were performed. The aim is first to gain understanding on the processes involved in colloid generation from the bentonite barrier. Secondly it is to test if concentration gradients of montmorillonite colloids outside the barrier determined by simple sedimentation experiments are comparable to generation tests. Identical final concentrations and colloid size distributions were achieved in both types of tests. Colloid stability is strongly correlated to the groundwater chemistry. The impact of pH, ionic strength and temperature was studied. Aggregation kinetics experiments revealed that for colloid aggregation rate increased with increasing ionic strength. The aggregation rate decreased with increasing pH. The temperature effect on montmorillonite colloid stability is pH-dependent. At pH≤4, the rate constant for colloid aggregation increased with increasing temperature, regardless of ionic strength. At pH≥10, the aggregation rate constant decreased with increasing temperature. In the intermediate pH interval, the aggregation rate constant decreased with increasing temperature except at the highest ionic strength

  19. Three-dimensional lock and key colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Yufeng; Zheng, Xiaolong; Yi, Gi-Ra; Sacanna, Stefano; Pine, David J; Weck, Marcus

    2014-05-14

    Colloids with well-defined multicavities are synthesized through the hydrolytic removal of silica cluster templates from organo-silica hybrid patchy particles. The geometry of the cavities stems from the originally assembled cluster templates, displaying well-defined three-dimensional symmetries, ranging from spherical, linear, triangular, tetrahedral, trigonal dipyramidal, octahedral, to pentagonal dipyramidal. The concave surface of the cavities is smooth, and the cavity shallowness and size can be varied. These particles with multicavities can act as "lock" particles with multiple "key holes". Up to n "key" particles can self-assemble into the lock particles via depletion interaction, resulting in multivalent, site-specific, reversible, and flexible bonding. PMID:24785203

  20. Fractal-like structures in colloid science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzari, S; Nicoud, L; Jaquet, B; Lattuada, M; Morbidelli, M

    2016-09-01

    The present work aims at reviewing our current understanding of fractal structures in the frame of colloid aggregation as well as the possibility they offer to produce novel structured materials. In particular, the existing techniques to measure and compute the fractal dimension df are critically discussed based on the cases of organic/inorganic particles and proteins. Then the aggregation conditions affecting df are thoroughly analyzed, pointing out the most recent literature findings and the limitations of our current understanding. Finally, the importance of the fractal dimension in applications is discussed along with possible directions for the production of new structured materials. PMID:27233526

  1. Room temperature synthesis of colloidal platinum nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Sarala Devi; V J Rao

    2000-12-01

    Efficient preparation of stable dispersions of platinum nanoparticles from platinous chloride (K2PtCl4) was achieved by simultaneous addition of capping polymer material. The size of platinum nanoparticles was controlled by changing the ratio of concentration of capping polymer material to the concentration of platinum cation used. The morphology of colloidal particles were studied by means of UV-visible spectrophotometry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Particle size increased with low reagent concentration. The change in absorption spectra with the particle size was observed, i.e. blue shift attributed to decrease in particle size.

  2. Extinction and Scattering of Light by Magnetic Colloidal Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.V. Yerin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The peculiarities of scattering and extinction of light by colloids with different concentrations of magnetite nanoparticles are investigated. The light absorption effect on spectral dependencies of optical density of magnetic colloid are observed. According to dynamic light scattering experiments, particle size distributions for samples with different concentration of nanoparticles are defined.

  3. Reentrant phase transitions from depletion: colloidal crystals to flocculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Lang; Laderman, Bezia; Sacanna, Stefano; Chaikin, Paul

    2014-03-01

    Conventional depletion is supposed to be temperature independent. However, we find that many typical colloid-depletion systems show remarkable phenomena as temperature is varied. 1 μm polystyrene spheres in water are known to form colloidal crystals when PEO is added as a depletant. When this system is heated the crystal melts at a first critical temperature T1 ~ 60 C , and then at higher temperature T2 ~ 70 C the colloids flocculate. We argue that a weak temperature-dependent interaction between polymer and colloid is responsible for the observed phenomena: crystals form when the colloid-polymer interaction is repulsive, flocculation occurs when the interaction is attractive, and melting occurs in between when both phases are frustrated. The melted phase occurs due to an unexpected cancelation when combining both entropic and enthalpic attractions. We propose a simple statistical model to map out the observed transitions and fill the theoretical gap between the two established scenarios for colloid-polymer systems, namely depletion and flocculation. We have seen the same temperature dependent phenomena for TPM, PS and silica spheres with PEO and dextran as depletants. Our discovery provides a fundamental understanding of the polymer-colloid system and opens new possibilities for colloidal self-assembly and temperature-controlled viscoelastic materials.

  4. Experiments in which oil, water and colloidal particles meet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elbers, N.A.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, the results are reported of experimental studies in which oil, water and colloidal particles meet. Colloidal particles are particles that have at least one characteristic length scale in the range between a few nanometers (nm) and several micrometers (μm). Mixtures of oil and water,

  5. Formation, characterization, and stability of plutonium (IV) colloid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plutonium is expected to be a major component of the waste element package in any high-level nuclear waste repository. Plutonium(IV) is known to form colloids under chemical conditions similar to those found in typical groundwaters. In the event of a breach of a repository, these colloids represent a source of radionuclide transport to the far-field environment, in parallel with the transport of dissolved waste element species. In addition, the colloids may decompose or disaggregate into soluble ionic species. Thus, colloids represent an additional term in determining waste element solubility limits. A thorough characterization of the physical and chemical properties of these colloids under relevant conditions is essential to assess the concentration limits and transport mechanisms for the waste elements at the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository site. This report is concerned primarily with recent results obtained by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) Solubility Determination Task pertaining to the characterization of the structural and chemical properties of Pu(IV) colloid. Important results will be presented which provides further evidence that colloidal plutonium(IV) is structurally similar to plutonium dioxide and that colloidal plutonium(IV) is electrochemically reactive. 13 refs., 7 figs

  6. Colloid-Facilitated Plutonium Transport in Saturated Alluvium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural groundwater colloids have been recognized as possible agents for enhancing the subsurface transport of strongly-sorbing radionuclides. To evaluate this mechanism, packed-bed column experiments were conducted comparing the simultaneous transport of dissolved plutonium (Pu), Pu sorbed onto natural colloids, 190-nm and 500-nm diameter fluorescent CML microspheres, and tritiated water in saturated alluvium. Experiments were conducted in two columns having slightly different porosities at two flow rates, resulting in average linear velocities (vz) of 0.6 to 3.65 cm/hr in one column and 0.57 to 2.85 cm/hr in the other. In all experiments, Pu associated with natural colloids transported through alluvium essentially unretarded, while dissolved Pu was entirely retained. These results were consistent with the strong sorption of Pu to alluvium and the negligible desorption from natural colloids, observed in separate batch experiments, over time scales exceeding those of the column experiments. Breakthroughs of natural colloids preceded tritiated water in all experiments, indicating a slightly smaller effective pore volume for the colloids. The enhancement of colloids transport over tritiated water decreased with vz, implying ∼ 40% enhancement at vz = 0. The 500-nm CML microspheres were significantly attenuated in the column experiments compared to the 190-nm microspheres, which exhibited slightly more attenuation than natural colloids

  7. Optical properties of spherical and oblate spheroidal gold shell colloids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penninkhof, J.J.; Moroz, A.; van Blaaderen, A.; Polman, A.

    2008-01-01

    The surface plasmon modes of spherical and oblate spheroidal core−shell colloids composed of a 312 nm diameter silica core and a 20 nm thick Au shell are investigated. Large arrays of uniaxially aligned core−shell colloids with size aspect ratios ranging from 1.0 to 1.7 are fabricated using a novel

  8. Avalanches, plasticity, and ordering in colloidal crystals under compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, D.; Reichhardt, C. J. Olson; Reichhardt, C.

    2016-06-01

    Using numerical simulations we examine colloids with a long-range Coulomb interaction confined in a two-dimensional trough potential undergoing dynamical compression. As the depth of the confining well is increased, the colloids move via elastic distortions interspersed with intermittent bursts or avalanches of plastic motion. In these avalanches, the colloids rearrange to minimize their colloid-colloid repulsive interaction energy by adopting an average lattice constant that is isotropic despite the anisotropic nature of the compression. The avalanches take the form of shear banding events that decrease or increase the structural order of the system. At larger compression, the avalanches are associated with a reduction of the number of rows of colloids that fit within the confining potential, and between avalanches the colloids can exhibit partially crystalline or anisotropic ordering. The colloid velocity distributions during the avalanches have a non-Gaussian form with power-law tails and exponents that are consistent with those found for the velocity distributions of gliding dislocations. We observe similar behavior when we subsequently decompress the system, and find a partially hysteretic response reflecting the irreversibility of the plastic events.

  9. Reversible assembly of oppositely charged hairy colloids in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruijt, E.; Bakker, H.E.; Kodger, T.E.; Sprakel, J.H.B.; Stuart, M.A.C.; Gucht, van der J.

    2011-01-01

    We present an experimental study of the fully reversible assembly of oppositely charged colloidal particles in aqueous solutions. Our polystyrene colloids are charged by a grafted polyelectrolyte brush on their surface and stabilized at all salt concentrations by a neutral adsorbed polymer layer. Be

  10. Particle Trapping and Banding in Rapid Colloidal Solidification

    KAUST Repository

    Elliott, J. A. W.

    2011-10-11

    We derive an expression for the nonequilibrium segregation coefficient of colloidal particles near a moving solid-liquid interface. The resulting kinetic phase diagram has applications for the rapid solidification of clay soils, gels, and related colloidal systems. We use it to explain the formation of bandlike defects in rapidly solidified alumina suspensions. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  11. Statistical Mechanics of Superparamegnetic Colloidal Dispersions Under Magnetic Fields

    OpenAIRE

    Andreu, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Colloidal dispersions, a term coined by the Scottish scientist Thomas Graham in 1861, have been the subject of interest in different scientific areas during more than a century. A colloidal dispersion is characterized by the existence of a dispersed phase uniformly distributed throughout a dispersion medium.

  12. Fluorescent colloidal silica rods - synthesis and phase behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijk, A.

    2012-01-01

    Although the experimental study of spherical colloids has been extensive, similar studies on rod-like particles are rare because suitable model systems are scarce. To fulfill this need, we present the synthesis of monodisperse rod-like silica colloids with tunable dimensions. Rods were produced with

  13. Enhanced adhesion of bioinspired nanopatterned elastomets via colloidal surface assembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akerboom, S.; Appel, J.; Labonte, D.; Federle, W.; Sprakel, J.H.B.; Kamperman, M.M.G.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a scalable method to fabricate nanopatterned bioinspired dry adhesives using colloidal lithography. Close-packed monolayers of polystyrene particles were formed at the air/water interface, on which polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was applied. The order of the colloidal monolayer and the imme

  14. Direct measurement of thermodynamic properties of colloidal hard spheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dullens, R.P.A.; Kegel, W.K.; Aarts, D.G.A.L.

    2008-01-01

    Recently, we have shown how to measure thermodynamic properties of colloidal hard sphere suspensions by microscopy [Dullens et al. (2006) PNAS 103, 529]. Here, we give full experimental details on how to acquire three dimensional snapshots of a colloidal hard sphere suspension over a wide range of d

  15. Fabrication and Characterization of Colloidal Crystal Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, I.; Ramiro-Manzano, F.; Meseguer, F.; Bonet, E.

    2011-01-01

    We present a laboratory experiment that allows undergraduate or graduate students to get introduced to colloidal crystal research concepts in an interesting way. Moreover, such experiments and studies can also be useful in the field of crystallography or solid-state physics. The work concerns the growth of colloidal crystal thin films obtained…

  16. Fluctuation forces and wetting layers in colloid-polymer mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennequin, Y.; Aarts, D.G.A.L.; Indekeu, J.O.; Lekkerkerker, H.N.W.; Bonn, D.

    2008-01-01

    We present confocal microscopy experiments on the wetting of phase-separated colloid-polymer mixtures. We observe that an unusually thick wetting layer of the colloid-rich phase forms at the walls of the glass container that holds the mixture. Because of the ultralow interfacial tension between the

  17. Pharmacological study of radioactive-gold colloid transport by blood and by serous exudate; Contribution a l'etude pharmacologique du transport des colloides d'or radioactif par le sang et les exsudats sereux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousselet, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-06-01

    After giving the essential physico-chemical properties of the colloids, the author considers the biological role of these substances and, in connection with their transport by the blood, their capture by elements of the reticula-endothelial system. A summary is given of present knowledge concerning the role of serous proteins in the transport of substances, particularly that of radio-active colloidal gold. The blood fractions which can take part in colloidal gold transport are the red blood corpuscles, the leukocytes and histiocytic elements as well as the plasma. The radioactive distribution in these various fractions is obtained by autoradiography of blood sediments. After showing the importance of the role of the plasma in radioactive particle transport, the author, describes the attempts made to detect a possible of colloidal gold 198 on the various serous proteins using various methods of separation. The ''in vitro'' and ''in vivo'' bonds between colloidal gold-198 particles and either the serous proteins or healthy specimens or the effusion liquids of pathological origin in man, or due to an experimental inflammation with carregenin in the rat, have been studied. The bonding appears to be effective because of the protective macromolecular layer formed by the gelatine. The different positions of the colloidal grains on the electrophoregram can only be explained by their different physico-chemical characteristics. Gold in the ionic form, on the other hand, is combined only with the albumen is the amount metal present does not exceed a certain value. (author) [French] Apres avoir enonce les proprietes physicochimiques essentielles des colloides nous etudions le devenir biologique de ces substances et, en relation avec leur transport par le sang, leur captation par les elements du Systeme Reticulo-Endothelial. Nous resumons les connaissances acquises jusqu'alors sur le role des proteines seriques dans le transport des

  18. Preface to special topic: papers from the 82nd american chemical society colloid and surface science symposium, raleigh, north Carolina, 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petsev, Dimiter N; Doyle, Patrick S

    2009-03-30

    This Special Topic section of Biomicrofluidics contains original contributions that were presented at the 82nd Colloid and Surface Science Symposium, which took place on 15-18 June 2008 at North Carolina State University. The Symposium covered a wide range of topics that are relevant to the fundamentals of fluidics and their application to biological systems.

  19. Aqueous Synthesis of PEGylated Quantum Dots with Increased Colloidal Stability and Reduced Cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulusoy, Mehriban; Jonczyk, Rebecca; Walter, Johanna-Gabriela; Springer, Sergej; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Stahl, Frank; Green, Mark; Scheper, Thomas

    2016-02-17

    Ligands used on the surface of colloidal nanoparticles (NPs) have a significant impact on physiochemical properties of NPs and their interaction in biological environments. In this study, we report a one-pot aqueous synthesis of 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA)-functionalized CdTe/CdS/ZnS quantum dots (Qdots) in the presence of thiol-terminated methoxy polyethylene glycol (mPEG) molecules as a surface coordinating ligand. The resulting mPEG-Qdots were characterized by using ζ potential, FTIR, thermogravimetric (TG) analysis, and microscale thermophoresis (MST) studies. We investigated the effect of mPEG molecules and their grafting density on the Qdots photophysical properties, colloidal stability, protein binding affinity, and in vitro cellular toxicity. Moreover, cellular binding features of the resulting Qdots were examined by using three-dimensional (3D) tumor-like spheroids, and the results were discussed in detail. Promisingly, mPEG ligands were found to increase colloidal stability of Qdots, reduce adsorption of proteins to the Qdot surface, and mitigate Qdot-induced side effects to a great extent. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy studies revealed that PEGylated Qdots exhibited distinctive cellular interactions with respect to their mPEG grafting density. As a result, mPEG molecules demonstrated a minimal effect on the ZnS shell deposition and the Qdot fluorescence efficiency at a low mPEG density, whereas they showed pronounced effect on Qdot colloidal stability, protein binding affinity, cytotoxicity, and nonspecific binding at a higher mPEG grafting amount. PMID:26567697

  20. Bismuth oxide aqueous colloidal nanoparticles inhibit Candida albicans growth and biofilm formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernandez-Delgadillo R

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Rene Hernandez-Delgadillo,1 Donaji Velasco-Arias,3 Juan Jose Martinez-Sanmiguel,2 David Diaz,3 Inti Zumeta-Dube,3 Katiushka Arevalo-Niño,1 Claudio Cabral-Romero2 1Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Instituto de Biotecnologia, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, UANL, Monterrey, Mexico; 2Facultad de Odontología, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, UANL, Monterrey, México; 3Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, UNAM, Distrito Federal, México Abstract: Multiresistance among microorganisms to common antimicrobials has become one of the most significant concerns in modern medicine. Nanomaterials are a new alternative to successfully treat the multiresistant microorganisms. Nanostructured materials are used in many fields, including biological sciences and medicine. Recently, it was demonstrated that the bactericidal activity of zero-valent bismuth colloidal nanoparticles inhibited the growth of Streptococcus mutans; however the antimycotic potential of bismuth nanostructured derivatives has not yet been studied. The main objective of this investigation was to analyze the fungicidal activity of bismuth oxide nanoparticles against Candida albicans, and their antibiofilm capabilities. Our results showed that aqueous colloidal bismuth oxide nanoparticles displayed antimicrobial activity against C. albicans growth (reducing colony size by 85% and a complete inhibition of biofilm formation. These results are better than those obtained with chlorhexidine, nystatin, and terbinafine, the most effective oral antiseptic and commercial antifungal agents. In this work, we also compared the antimycotic activities of bulk bismuth oxide and bismuth nitrate, the precursor metallic salt. These results suggest that bismuth oxide colloidal nanoparticles could be a very interesting candidate as a fungicidal agent to be incorporated into an oral antiseptic. Additionally, we determined the minimum inhibitory concentration for the synthesized

  1. Enhanced fluorescence imaging performance of hydrophobic colloidal ZnO nanoparticles by a facile method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A dual phase hydrothermal method was developed to synthesize ZnO nanoparticles. • ZnO nanoparticles show a stability and solubility in the aqueous environment. • ZnO nanoparticles with a blue emission wavelength at around 420 nm and small size (30 nm). • ZnO nanoparticles as biological labeling agent was also shown. - Abstract: A facile synthesis method for the formation of ZnO nanoparticles by using a double-phase reaction was demonstrated in this paper. The morphology of the synthesized ZnO nanoparticles shows a flower-shape. Hydrogen peroxide was used as a unique oxygenic source to promote the formation of ZnO in the presence of organic zinc precursor. The as-synthesized ZnO nanoparticles also show a stability and solubility in the aqueous environment. The structure and properties of ZnO nanoparticles were investigated by the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) as well as UV–vis and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The as-prepared hydrophobic colloidal ZnO nanoparticles could be modified to become water-soluble via ligand exchange with amineothanethiol⋅HCl while retaining the photoluminescence properties. In addition, the potential application for biological label of water-soluble ZnO nanoparticles were also demonstrated. These results not only have applications towards using colloidal ZnO nanoparticles effectively in biological fluorescence imaging, but also promote its application in the field of targeted drug delivery

  2. Colloidal layers in magnetic fields and under shear flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviour of colloidal mono- and bilayers in external magnetic fields and under shear is discussed and recent progress is summarized. Superparamagnetic colloidal particles form monolayers when they are confined to a air-water interface in a hanging water droplet. An external magnetic field allows us to tune the strength of the mutual dipole-dipole interaction between the colloids and the anisotropy of the interaction can be controlled by the tilt angle of the magnetic field relative to the surface normal of the air-water interface. For sufficiently large magnetic field strength crystalline monolayers are found. The role of fluctuations in these two-dimensional crystals is discussed. Furthermore, clustering phenomena in binary mixtures of superparamagnetic particles forming fluid monolayers are predicted. Finally, we address sheared colloidal bilayers and find that the orientation of confined colloidal crystals can be tailored by a previously applied shear direction

  3. Colloids related to low level and intermediate level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive research investigation has been undertaken to improve the understanding of the potential role of colloids in the context of disposal and storage of low level and intermediate level waste immobilized in cement. Several topics have been investigated which include: (a) the study of the formation and characteristics of colloids in cement leachates; (b) the effects of the near-field aqueous chemistry on the characteristics of colloids in repository environments; (c) colloid sorption behaviour; (d) interactions of near-field materials with leachates; (e) characteristics of near-field materials in EC repository simulation tests; and (f) colloid migration behaviour. These experimental investigations should provide data and a basis for the development of transport models and leaching mechanisms, and thus relate directly to the part of the Task 3 programme concerned with migration and retention of radionuclides in the near field. 114 Figs.; 39 Tabs.; 12 Refs

  4. The effects of corrosion product colloids on actinide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report assesses the possible effects of colloidal corrosion products on the transport of actinides from the near field of radioactive waste repositories. The desorption of plutonium and americium from colloidal corrosion products of iron and zirconium was studied under conditions simulating a transition from near-field to far-field environmental conditions. Desorption of actinides occurred slowly from the colloids under far-field conditions. Measurements of particle stability showed all the colloids to be unstable in the near field. Stability increased under far-field conditions or as a result of the evolution of the near field. Migration of colloids from the near field is unlikely except in the presence of organic materials. (Author)

  5. Studies of colloids and their importance for repository performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The processes, parameters and data used to evaluate the potential of nuclide transport by a colloid facilitated mechanism are reviewed and discussed in this report. Both steady-state (present situation) and possible future non-steady-state hydrogeochemistry in the geosphere are covered. In the steady-state scenario, the colloid (clay, silica, iron(III)hydroxide) concentration is around 20-45 micrograms/l which is considered to be a low value. The low colloid concentration is justified by the large attachment factor to the rock which reduces the stability of the colloids in the aquifer. Both reversible and irreversible sorption processes are reviewed. In the non-steady-state scenario, changes of hydrogeochemical properties may induce larger colloid concentrations. The increase of concentration is however limited and relaxation is always observed after any change. Emphasis is placed on the glaciation-deglaciation scenario. 53 refs, 12 figs, 3 tabs

  6. Asymmetrical phase separation and gelation in binary mixtures of oppositely charged colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Yiwu; Yuan, Guangcui; Han, Charles C.

    2016-07-01

    Two types of colloidal particles, which are nearly the same in chemical composition but carry opposite surface charges, are mixed in water. Depending on the relative proportion of the oppositely charged particles, the process of aggregation leads to the formation of discrete clusters of various sizes in dilute dispersions, and to the development of particle gel networks in more concentrated systems. Due to the significant difference in the absolute values of surface charges (negative particle: -48 mV, positive particle: +24 mV), the phase separation and the gelation behaviors are asymmetric with respect to the mixing ratio. Mixtures with excess negative particles are more stable, while mixtures with excess positive particles are easily affected by phase separation. The hetero-aggregation triggered by the addition of microscopically large macro-ions is similar to what is often observed in a mono-component charged colloidal system, i.e., phase separation occurs through addition of small electrolyte ions. Within the concentration region investigated here, it is clear that the gel line is buried inside the phase separation region. Gelation occurs only when the number and size of the clusters are large and big enough to connect up into a space-spanning network. Our results indicate that, in this binary mixture of oppositely charged colloids, although the interaction between unlike species is attractive and that between like species is repulsive, the onset of gelation is in fact governed by the equilibrium phase separation, as in the case of purely attractive systems with short-range isotropic interaction.

  7. Asymmetrical phase separation and gelation in binary mixtures of oppositely charged colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Yiwu; Yuan, Guangcui; Han, Charles C

    2016-07-01

    Two types of colloidal particles, which are nearly the same in chemical composition but carry opposite surface charges, are mixed in water. Depending on the relative proportion of the oppositely charged particles, the process of aggregation leads to the formation of discrete clusters of various sizes in dilute dispersions, and to the development of particle gel networks in more concentrated systems. Due to the significant difference in the absolute values of surface charges (negative particle: -48 mV, positive particle: +24 mV), the phase separation and the gelation behaviors are asymmetric with respect to the mixing ratio. Mixtures with excess negative particles are more stable, while mixtures with excess positive particles are easily affected by phase separation. The hetero-aggregation triggered by the addition of microscopically large macro-ions is similar to what is often observed in a mono-component charged colloidal system, i.e., phase separation occurs through addition of small electrolyte ions. Within the concentration region investigated here, it is clear that the gel line is buried inside the phase separation region. Gelation occurs only when the number and size of the clusters are large and big enough to connect up into a space-spanning network. Our results indicate that, in this binary mixture of oppositely charged colloids, although the interaction between unlike species is attractive and that between like species is repulsive, the onset of gelation is in fact governed by the equilibrium phase separation, as in the case of purely attractive systems with short-range isotropic interaction. PMID:27394122

  8. Structure and Frictional Properties of Colloid Gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Tokita

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Polymer gels are known to be opaque when the preparation conditions, such as the reaction temperature and the composition, are changed. The increase of the opaqueness of the gel suggests strongly the change of network structure. Here, we are going to review the recent studies on the structure and the frictional study of the opaque poly(acrylamide gel. The results indicate that the opaque poly(acrylamide gel consists of the fractal aggregate of the colloidal particles of sub-micrometer in size. The density of the colloid particle is calculated from the structural parameters and is found to be of the order of about 1 g/cm3. The results indicate that the main chain component and the cross-linker is densely cross-linked into the particle. The frictional property of poly(acrylamide gel is analyzed in terms of the structural parameters of the gel. It is found that the frictional property of the opaque gel is well explained in terms of the structural parameters of the opaque gel.

  9. Dynamics and Rheology of Soft Colloidal Glasses

    KAUST Repository

    Wen, Yu Ho

    2015-01-20

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. The linear viscoelastic (LVE) spectrum of a soft colloidal glass is accessed with the aid of a time-concentration superposition (TCS) principle, which unveils the glassy particle dynamics from in-cage rattling motion to out-of-cage relaxations over a broad frequency range 10-13 rad/s < ω < 101 rad/s. Progressive dilution of a suspension of hairy nanoparticles leading to increased intercenter distances is demonstrated to enable continuous mapping of the structural relaxation for colloidal glasses. In contrast to existing empirical approaches proposed to extend the rheological map of soft glassy materials, i.e., time-strain superposition (TSS) and strain-rate frequency superposition (SRFS), TCS yields a LVE master curve that satis fies the Kramers-Kronig relations which interrelate the dynamic moduli for materials at equilibrium. The soft glassy rheology (SGR) model and literature data further support the general validity of the TCS concept for soft glassy materials.

  10. Critical Casimir forces for colloidal assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, V. D.; Dang, M. T.; Nguyen, T. A.; Schall, P.

    2016-02-01

    Critical Casimir forces attract increasing interest due to their opportunities for reversible particle assembly in soft matter and nano science. These forces provide a thermodynamic analogue of the celebrated quantum mechanical Casimir force that arises from the confinement of vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. In its thermodynamic analogue, solvent fluctuations, confined between suspended particles, give rise to an attractive or repulsive force between the particles. Due to its unique temperature dependence, this effect allows in situ control of reversible assembly. Both the force magnitude and range vary with the solvent correlation length in a universal manner, adjusting with temperature from fractions of the thermal energy, k B T, and nanometre range to several ten kT and micrometer length scale. Combined with recent breakthroughs in the synthesis of complex particles, critical Casimir forces promise the design and assembly of complex colloidal structures, for fundamental studies of equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium phase behaviour. This review highlights recent developments in this evolving field, with special emphasis on the dynamic interaction control to assemble colloidal structures, in and out of equilibrium.

  11. Critical Casimir forces for colloidal assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Critical Casimir forces attract increasing interest due to their opportunities for reversible particle assembly in soft matter and nano science. These forces provide a thermodynamic analogue of the celebrated quantum mechanical Casimir force that arises from the confinement of vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. In its thermodynamic analogue, solvent fluctuations, confined between suspended particles, give rise to an attractive or repulsive force between the particles. Due to its unique temperature dependence, this effect allows in situ control of reversible assembly. Both the force magnitude and range vary with the solvent correlation length in a universal manner, adjusting with temperature from fractions of the thermal energy, k B T, and nanometre range to several ten kT and micrometer length scale. Combined with recent breakthroughs in the synthesis of complex particles, critical Casimir forces promise the design and assembly of complex colloidal structures, for fundamental studies of equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium phase behaviour. This review highlights recent developments in this evolving field, with special emphasis on the dynamic interaction control to assemble colloidal structures, in and out of equilibrium. (topical review)

  12. Colloidal Quantum dot photovoltaics: Tuning optoelectronic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Colloidal quantum dots combine processing from the solution phase with tunability of the bandgap. Via the size-effect the optical properties can be matched to the solar spectrum for a wide-range photon harvesting. To engineer photovoltaic devices, quantum dots are compressed from their colloidal form into a close-packed nanocrystal matrix, while undergoing a systematic layer-by-layer process. The resulting quantum dot solid is treated as semiconductor medium - one having electron-hole mobilites, free carrier densities and a dielectric constant. While the size-effect determined the band-gap before, it is now the nature of ligand and the treatment route, that influences mentioned electronic parameters. We took the view on the processing steps and found a concept for analysing trap states, moblility and device performance in real quantum dot solids. Our findings emphasize the interplay of mobility and trap-distribution with routes that take special care on the nanocrystal surface and hence conserve optoelectronic qualities of quantum dots for efficient photovoltaic cells. (author)

  13. Critical Casimir forces for colloidal assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, V D; Dang, M T; Nguyen, T A; Schall, P

    2016-02-01

    Critical Casimir forces attract increasing interest due to their opportunities for reversible particle assembly in soft matter and nano science. These forces provide a thermodynamic analogue of the celebrated quantum mechanical Casimir force that arises from the confinement of vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. In its thermodynamic analogue, solvent fluctuations, confined between suspended particles, give rise to an attractive or repulsive force between the particles. Due to its unique temperature dependence, this effect allows in situ control of reversible assembly. Both the force magnitude and range vary with the solvent correlation length in a universal manner, adjusting with temperature from fractions of the thermal energy, k B T, and nanometre range to several ten kT and micrometer length scale. Combined with recent breakthroughs in the synthesis of complex particles, critical Casimir forces promise the design and assembly of complex colloidal structures, for fundamental studies of equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium phase behaviour. This review highlights recent developments in this evolving field, with special emphasis on the dynamic interaction control to assemble colloidal structures, in and out of equilibrium. PMID:26750980

  14. Colloidal Quantum Dot Photovoltaics: A Path Forward

    KAUST Repository

    Kramer, Illan J.

    2011-11-22

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) offer a path toward high-efficiency photovoltaics based on low-cost materials and processes. Spectral tunability via the quantum size effect facilitates absorption of specific wavelengths from across the sun\\'s broad spectrum. CQD materials\\' ease of processing derives from their synthesis, storage, and processing in solution. Rapid advances have brought colloidal quantum dot photovoltaic solar power conversion efficiencies of 6% in the latest reports. These achievements represent important first steps toward commercially compelling performance. Here we review advances in device architecture and materials science. We diagnose the principal phenomenon-electronic states within the CQD film band gap that limit both current and voltage in devices-that must be cured for CQD PV devices to fulfill their promise. We close with a prescription, expressed as bounds on the density and energy of electronic states within the CQD film band gap, that should allow device efficiencies to rise to those required for the future of the solar energy field. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  15. Large-scale production and characterization of biocompatible colloidal nanoalumina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razali, W A W; Sreenivasan, V K A; Goldys, E M; Zvyagin, A V

    2014-12-23

    The rapid uptake of nanomaterials in life sciences calls for the development of universal, high-yield techniques for their production and interfacing with biomolecules. Top-down methods take advantage of the existing variety of bulk and thin-film solid-state materials for improved prediction and control of the resultant nanomaterial properties. We demonstrate the power of this approach using high-energy ball milling (HEBM) of alumina (Al2O3). Nanoalumina particles with a mean size of 25 nm in their most stable α-crystallographic phase were produced in gram quantities, suitable for biological and biomedical applications. Nanomaterial contamination from zirconia balls used in HEBM was reduced from 19 to 2% using a selective acid etching procedure. The biocompatibility of the milled nanomaterial was demonstrated by forming stable colloids in water and physiological buffers, corroborated by zeta potentials of +40 mV and -40 mV and characterized by in vitro cytotoxicity assays. Finally, the feasibility of a milled nanoalumina surface in anchoring a host of functional groups and biomolecules was demonstrated by the functionalization of their surface using facile silane chemistry, resulting in the decoration of the nanoparticle surface with amino groups suitable for further conjugation of biomolecules. PMID:25434921

  16. Agglomeration of Luminescent Porous Silicon Nanoparticles in Colloidal Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herynková, Kateřina; Šlechta, Miroslav; Šimáková, Petra; Fučíková, Anna; Cibulka, Ondřej

    2016-12-01

    We have prepared colloidal solutions of clusters composed from porous silicon nanoparticles in methanol, water and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Even if the size of the nanoclusters is between 60 and 500 nm, due to their highly porous "cauliflower"-like structure, the porous silicon nanoparticles are composed of interconnected nanocrystals having around 2.5 nm in size and showing strong visible luminescence in the orange-red spectral region (centred at 600-700 nm). Hydrophilic behaviour and good solubility of the nanoclusters in water and water-based solutions were obtained by adding hydrogen peroxide into the etching solution during preparation and 16 min long after-bath in hydrogen peroxide. By simple filtration of the solutions with syringe filters, we have extracted smaller nanoclusters with sizes of approx. 60-70 nm; however, these nanoclusters in water and PBS solution (pH neutral) are prone to agglomeration, as was confirmed by zeta potential measurements. When the samples were left at ambient conditions for several weeks, the typical nanocluster size increased to approx. 330-400 nm and then remained stable. However, both freshly filtered and aged samples (with agglomerated porous silicon nanoparticles) of porous silicon in water and PBS solutions can be further used for biological studies or as luminescent markers in living cells.

  17. Single-File Escape of Colloidal Particles from Microfluidic Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Emanuele; Pierno, Matteo; Baldovin, Fulvio; Orlandini, Enzo; Tan, Yizhou; Pagliara, Stefano

    2016-07-15

    Single-file diffusion is a ubiquitous physical process exploited by living and synthetic systems to exchange molecules with their environment. It is paramount to quantify the escape time needed for single files of particles to exit from constraining synthetic channels and biological pores. This quantity depends on complex cooperative effects, whose predominance can only be established through a strict comparison between theory and experiments. By using colloidal particles, optical manipulation, microfluidics, digital microscopy, and theoretical analysis we uncover the self-similar character of the escape process and provide closed-formula evaluations of the escape time. We find that the escape time scales inversely with the diffusion coefficient of the last particle to leave the channel. Importantly, we find that at the investigated microscale, bias forces as tiny as 10^{-15}  N determine the magnitude of the escape time by drastically reducing interparticle collisions. Our findings provide crucial guidelines to optimize the design of micro- and nanodevices for a variety of applications including drug delivery, particle filtering, and transport in geometrical constrictions. PMID:27472142

  18. Single-File Escape of Colloidal Particles from Microfluidic Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Emanuele; Pierno, Matteo; Baldovin, Fulvio; Orlandini, Enzo; Tan, Yizhou; Pagliara, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    Single-file diffusion is a ubiquitous physical process exploited by living and synthetic systems to exchange molecules with their environment. It is paramount to quantify the escape time needed for single files of particles to exit from constraining synthetic channels and biological pores. This quantity depends on complex cooperative effects, whose predominance can only be established through a strict comparison between theory and experiments. By using colloidal particles, optical manipulation, microfluidics, digital microscopy, and theoretical analysis we uncover the self-similar character of the escape process and provide closed-formula evaluations of the escape time. We find that the escape time scales inversely with the diffusion coefficient of the last particle to leave the channel. Importantly, we find that at the investigated microscale, bias forces as tiny as 10-15 N determine the magnitude of the escape time by drastically reducing interparticle collisions. Our findings provide crucial guidelines to optimize the design of micro- and nanodevices for a variety of applications including drug delivery, particle filtering, and transport in geometrical constrictions.

  19. Agglomeration of Luminescent Porous Silicon Nanoparticles in Colloidal Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herynková, Kateřina; Šlechta, Miroslav; Šimáková, Petra; Fučíková, Anna; Cibulka, Ondřej

    2016-08-01

    We have prepared colloidal solutions of clusters composed from porous silicon nanoparticles in methanol, water and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Even if the size of the nanoclusters is between 60 and 500 nm, due to their highly porous "cauliflower"-like structure, the porous silicon nanoparticles are composed of interconnected nanocrystals having around 2.5 nm in size and showing strong visible luminescence in the orange-red spectral region (centred at 600-700 nm). Hydrophilic behaviour and good solubility of the nanoclusters in water and water-based solutions were obtained by adding hydrogen peroxide into the etching solution during preparation and 16 min long after-bath in hydrogen peroxide. By simple filtration of the solutions with syringe filters, we have extracted smaller nanoclusters with sizes of approx. 60-70 nm; however, these nanoclusters in water and PBS solution (pH neutral) are prone to agglomeration, as was confirmed by zeta potential measurements. When the samples were left at ambient conditions for several weeks, the typical nanocluster size increased to approx. 330-400 nm and then remained stable. However, both freshly filtered and aged samples (with agglomerated porous silicon nanoparticles) of porous silicon in water and PBS solutions can be further used for biological studies or as luminescent markers in living cells.

  20. Large-scale assembly of colloidal particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongta

    This study reports a simple, roll-to-roll compatible coating technology for producing three-dimensional highly ordered colloidal crystal-polymer composites, colloidal crystals, and macroporous polymer membranes. A vertically beveled doctor blade is utilized to shear align silica microsphere-monomer suspensions to form large-area composites in a single step. The polymer matrix and the silica microspheres can be selectively removed to create colloidal crystals and self-standing macroporous polymer membranes. The thickness of the shear-aligned crystal is correlated with the viscosity of the colloidal suspension and the coating speed, and the correlations can be qualitatively explained by adapting the mechanisms developed for conventional doctor blade coating. Five important research topics related to the application of large-scale three-dimensional highly ordered macroporous films by doctor blade coating are covered in this study. The first topic describes the invention in large area and low cost color reflective displays. This invention is inspired by the heat pipe technology. The self-standing macroporous polymer films exhibit brilliant colors which originate from the Bragg diffractive of visible light form the three-dimensional highly ordered air cavities. The colors can be easily changed by tuning the size of the air cavities to cover the whole visible spectrum. When the air cavities are filled with a solvent which has the same refractive index as that of the polymer, the macroporous polymer films become completely transparent due to the index matching. When the solvent trapped in the cavities is evaporated by in-situ heating, the sample color changes back to brilliant color. This process is highly reversible and reproducible for thousands of cycles. The second topic reports the achievement of rapid and reversible vapor detection by using 3-D macroporous photonic crystals. Capillary condensation of a condensable vapor in the interconnected macropores leads to the

  1. [Mixed marriages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmsen, C N

    1998-08-01

    The author examines the extent and characteristics of mixed marriages in the Netherlands. "Nine out of ten married persons born in Turkey or Morocco have a partner who was born in the same country. The majority of married Surinamese also have a partner originating from the same country. Those who spend (a part of) their youth in Indonesia (the former Dutch East Indies), on the other hand, are mostly married to someone born in the Netherlands." (EXCERPT) PMID:12294179

  2. Marketing mix

    OpenAIRE

    Staniková, Aneta

    2014-01-01

    Summary This diploma thesis focuses on the design of marketing mix emerging object. The building is located in the village Hejtmankovice in Broumov. Originally a farm house undergoing complete renovation in 2011. Now the owner's aim is to establish this object like accommodation establishments. This thesis is not only focused on this aim, but is extended by providing additional options and catering services. The thesis is completed with the analysis of micro and macro environment, pricing ...

  3. POLYMER COLLOIDS FORMED BY POLYELECTROLYTE COMPLEXATION OF VINYL POLYMERS AND POLYSACCHARIDES IN AQUEOUS SOLUTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-dan Liu; Takahiro Sato

    2013-01-01

    The polyelectrolyte complex formed from the polyanion and polycation was studied by turbidimetry,static and electrophoretic light scattering,and elementary analysis.Sodium salts of polyacrylate (PA) and heparin (Hep) were chosen as the polyanion,and hydrochloric salts of poly(vinyl amine) (PVA) and chitosan (Chts) as the polycation.Although these vinyl polymers and polysaccharides have remarkably different backbone chemical structures and linear charge densities,all the four combinations PA-PVA,PA-Chts,Hep-PVA,and Hep-Chts provide almost stoichiometric polyelectrolyte complexes which are slightly charged owing to the adsorption of the excess polyelectrolyte component onto the neutral complex.The charges stabilize the complex colloids in aqueous solution of a non-stoichiometric mixture,and the aggregation number of the complex colloids increases with approaching to the stoichiometric mixing ratio.The mixing ratio dependence of the aggregation number for the four complexes is explained by the model proposed in the previous study.

  4. Shaken, and stirred: oscillatory segmented flow for controlled size-evolution of colloidal nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolhasani, Milad; Oskooei, Ali; Klinkova, Anna; Kumacheva, Eugenia; Günther, Axel

    2014-07-01

    We introduce oscillatory segmented flow as a compact microfluidic format that accommodates slow chemical reactions for the solution-phase processing of colloidal nanomaterials. The strategy allows the reaction progress to be monitored at a dynamic range of up to 80 decibels (i.e., residence times of up to one day, equivalent to 720-14,400 times the mixing time) from only one sensing location. A train of alternating gas bubbles and liquid reaction compartments (segmented flow) was initially formed, stopped and then subjected to a consistent back-and-forth motion. The oscillatory segmented flow was obtained by periodically manipulating the pressures at the device inlet and outlet via square wave signals generated by non-wetted solenoid valves. The readily implementable format significantly reduced the device footprint as compared with continuous segmented flow. We investigated mixing enhancement for varying liquid segment lengths, oscillation amplitudes and oscillation frequencies. The etching of gold nanorods served as a case study to illustrate the utility of the approach for dynamic characterization and precise control of colloidal nanomaterial size and shape for 5 h. Oscillatory segmented flows will be beneficial for a broad range of lab-on-a-chip applications that require long processing times. PMID:24828153

  5. Effects of kaolinite colloids on Cd2 + transport through saturated sand under varying ionic strength conditions: Column experiments and modeling approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikiniyadhanee, Rakkreat; Chotpantarat, Srilert; Ong, Say Kee

    2015-11-01

    Column experiments were performed under various ionic strengths (0.0-0.9 mM) using 10 mg L- 1 of Cd2 + without kaolinite colloids and 10 mg L- 1 Cd2 + mixed with 100 mg L- 1 kaolinite colloids. The nonequilibrium two-site model (TSM) described the behavior of both Cd2 + transport and Cd2 + co-transported with kaolinite colloids better than the equilibrium model (CDeq) (R2 = 0.978-0.996). The results showed that an increase in ionic strength negatively impacted the retardation factors (R) of both Cd2 + and Cd2 + mixed with kaolinite colloids. The presence of kaolinite colloids increased the retardation factors of Cd2 + from 7.23 to 7.89, 6.76 to 6.61 and 3.79 to 6.99 for ionic strengths of 0.225, 0.45 and 0.9 mM, respectively. On the other hand, the presence of kaolinite colloids decreased the retardation factor of Cd2 + from 8.13 to 7.83 for ionic strength of 0.0 mM. The fraction of instantaneous sorption sites (f) parameters, kinetic constant for sorption sites (α) and Freundlich constant (Kf) were estimated from HYDRUS-1D of TSM for Cd2 + transport. The fraction of instantaneous sorption sites was found to increase for an increase in ionic strength. Kf values of Cd2 + transport without kaolinite colloids for 0.0, 0.225 and 0.45 mM were found to be higher than those of Cd2 + transport with kaolinite colloids, except for ionic strength of 0.9 mM. Hence, the presence of kaolinite colloids probably retarded the mobility of Cd2 + in porous media for higher ionic strengths. Furthermore, retardation factors and Kf values of both Cd2 + transport and Cd2 + co-transport were shown to decrease when ionic strength increased. Interestingly, according to TSM, the fraction of instantaneous sorption sites tends to increase for an increase in ionic strength, which imply that the mechanism of Cd2 + sorption onto quartz sand can be better described using equilibrium sorption rather than nonequilibrium sorption for an increase in ionic strength.

  6. Use and abuse of mixing models (MixSIAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background/Question/MethodsCharacterizing trophic links in food webs is a fundamental ecological question. In our efforts to quantify energy flow through food webs, ecologists have increasingly used mixing models to analyze biological tracer data, often from stable isotopes. Whil...

  7. Linking carbon and iron cycles by investigating transport, fate and mineralogy of iron-bearing colloids from peat-draining rivers - Scotland as model for high-latitude rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Deborah; Crocket, Kirsty; Brand, Tim; Stutter, Marc; Wilson, Clare; Schröder, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Linking carbon and iron cycles by investigating transport, fate and mineralogy of iron-bearing colloids from peat-draining rivers - Scotland as model for high-latitude rivers Wood, D.A¹, Crocket, K², Brand, T², Stutter, M³, Wilson, C¹ & Schröder, C¹ ¹Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA ²Scottish Association for Marine Science, University of the Highlands and Islands, Dunbeg, Oban, PA37 1QA ³James Hutton Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen, AB15 8QH The biogeochemical iron cycle exerts significant control on the carbon cycle¹. Iron is a limiting nutrient in large areas of the world's oceans and its bioavailability controls CO2 uptake by marine photosynthesizing microorganisms. While atmospheric iron inputs to the open ocean have been extensively measured, global river inputs have likely been underestimated because most major world rivers exhibit extensive iron removal by flocculation and sedimentation during seawater mixing. Iron minerals and organic matter mutually stabilise each other², which results in a 'rusty carbon sink' in sediments³ on the one hand but may also enhance transport beyond the salinity gradient on the other. Humic-rich, high latitude rivers have a higher iron-carrying capacity⁴-⁶ but are underrepresented in iron flux calculations. The West Coast sea lochs in Scotland are fed by predominantly peatland drainage catchments, and the rivers entering the sea lochs carry a high load of organic matter. The short distance between many of these catchments and the coastal ocean facilitates source-to-sea research investigating transport, fate and mineralogy of iron-bearing colloids providing a good analogue for similar high latitude fjordic systems. We use SeaFAST+ICP-MS and Mössbauer spectroscopy to survey trace metal concentrations, with emphasis on iron concentrations, speciation and mineralogy, across salinity gradients. In combination with ultra-filtration techniques, this allows

  8. EDITORIAL: Colloidal dispersions in external fields Colloidal dispersions in external fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwen, Hartmut

    2012-11-01

    Colloidal dispersions have long been proven as pivotal model systems for equilibrium phase transition such as crystallization, melting and liquid-gas phase transition. The last decades have revealed that this is also true for nonequilibrium phenomena. In fact, the fascinating possibility to track the individual trajectories of colloidal particles has greatly advanced our understanding of collective behaviour in classical many-body systems and has helped to reveal the underlying physical principles of glass transition, crystal nucleation, and interfacial dynamics (to name just a few typical nonequilibrium effects). External fields can be used to bring colloids out of equilibrium in a controlled way. Different kinds of external fields can be applied to colloidal dispersions, namely shear flow, electric, magnetic and laser-optical fields, and confinement. Typical research areas can be sketched with the by now traditional complexity diagram (figure 1). The complexity of the colloidal system itself as embodied in statistical degrees of freedom is shown on the x-axis while the complexity of the problem posed, namely bulk, an inhomogeneity in equilibrium, steady state nonequilibrium and full time-dependent nonequilibrium are shown on the y-axis. The different external fields which can be imposed are indicated by the different hatched areas. figure1 Figure 1. Diagram of complexity for colloidal dispersions in external fields: while the x-axis shows the complexity of the system, the y-axis shows the complexity of the problem. Regions which can be accessed by different kinds of external fields are indicated. The arrows indicate recent research directions. Active particles are also indicated with a special complexity of internal degrees of freedom [1]. This collection of papers reflects the scientific programme of the International Conference on Colloidal Dispersions in External Fields III (CODEF III) which took place in Bonn-Bad Godesberg from 20-23 March 2012. This was the

  9. Erodibility of a mixed mudflat dominated by microphytobenthos and Cerastoderma edule, East Frisian Wadden Sea, Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest; Lanuru, Mahatma; van Bernem, Carlo;

    2010-01-01

    Sediment erodibility and a range of physical and biological parameters were measured at an intertidal site in the German Wadden Sea area in June, September and November 2002 and February and April 2003 in order to examine the influence of macrozoobenthos and microphytobenthos on sediment erodibil......Sediment erodibility and a range of physical and biological parameters were measured at an intertidal site in the German Wadden Sea area in June, September and November 2002 and February and April 2003 in order to examine the influence of macrozoobenthos and microphytobenthos on sediment...... erodibility and the temporal variation. The study site was a mixed mudflat situated in the mesotidal Baltrum-Langeoog tidal basin at the East Frisian barrier coast. The mud content at the site was about 35% and the filter-feeding cockle Cerastoderma edule was the dominating macrozoobenthic species (by biomass......). The erodibility of the sediment showed strong temporal variation with high erosion thresholds in spring and late summer and significantly lower thresholds during the rest of the study period. The erosion thresholds were strongly dependent on the contents of chlorophyll a (chl a) and colloidal carbohydrates, both...

  10. Bead-Based Microfluidic Sediment Analogues: Fabrication and Colloid Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yang; Huang, Jingwei; Xiao, Feng; Yin, Xiaolong; Chun, Jaehun; Um, Wooyong; Neeves, Keith B; Wu, Ning

    2016-09-13

    Mobile colloids can act as carriers for low-solubility contaminants in the environment. However, the dominant mechanism for this colloid-facilitated transport of chemicals is unclear. Therefore, we developed a bead-based microfluidic platform of sediment analogues and measured both single and population transport of model colloids. The porous medium is assembled through a bead-by-bead injection method. This approach has the versatility to build both electrostatically homogeneous and heterogeneous media at the pore scale. A T-junction at the exit also allowed for encapsulation and enumeration of colloids effluent at single particle resolution to give population dynamics. Tortuosity calculated from pore-scale trajectory analysis and its comparison with lattice Boltzmann simulations revealed that transport of colloids was influenced by the size exclusion effect. The porous media packed by positively and negatively charged beads into two layers showed distinctive colloidal particle retention and significant remobilization and re-adsorption of particles during water flushing. We demonstrated the potential of our method to fabricate porous media with surface heterogeneities at the pore scale. With both single and population dynamics measurement, our platform has the potential to connect pore-scale and macroscale colloid transport on a lab scale and to quantify the impact of grain surface heterogeneities that are natural in the subsurface environment. PMID:27548505

  11. Search for an optimal colloid for sentinel node imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims at finding a cost-effective and stable colloid of appropriate size to replace antimony sulfide colloid which is now in routine use in Australia for sentinel lymph node (SLN) imaging. For this reason we evaluated three colloids; namely phytate, hepatate and stannous fluoride (SnF2). As colloids of particle size of 100-200 nm seem to be appropriate for sentinel node imaging, the three radiolabelled colloid preparations were filtered through 0.1 and 0.22 μm filters and then studied on electron microscope. Electron microscopy showed that unlike phytate, the particle size of the hepatate and SnF2 colloids did not increase beyond the size limit of 200 nm over a period of as long as 26 hours. Instead, they remained well within the size limits chosen. The stability of particle size is required for intra-operative gamma probe lymphatic mapping that sometimes may be performed on the following day. Hepatate and SnF2 colloids appeared to be more suited for sentinel lymph node imaging, the latter being an inhouse product is more cost-effective. Further studies based on nodal uptake and the behavior of these two radiopharmaceuticals in animals is suggested in order to evaluate their potential for future wide-spread application in human sentinel node imaging. (author)

  12. The kinetics of phagocytosis of 198Au colloids ''in vitro''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of the phagocytosis of 198-Au colloids by macrophages ''in vitro'' was studied by incubating during 5 hours phagocytic cells from the liver and the spleen of Wistar rats with colloidal radiogold particles, in the presence of an adequate culture medium (TC-199 with 10 per cent of Bovine Fetal Serum). In each experiment, the number of colloidal gold particles offered to each phatocytic cell, (Au)0 and the mean rate of phagocytosis v, were calculated. The latter value was determined by measuring the radioactivity incorporated into the phagocytic cells during the incubation; it was expressed as the number of phagocytized colloidal gold particles per cell per minute. The values of log v = f [log (Au)0] were plotted. The Lineweaver-Burk analysis of the results demonstrates that the kinetics of the phagocytosis of colloidal radiogold particles ''in vitro'' follows a model similar to Michaelis-Menten equations for enzyme reactions. The values of the substratum constant Ks and maximun velocity Vm were obtained by the regression analysis of the 1/v vs. 1/(Au)0 graph. Vm was equal to 9.44 x 10 and 1.63 x 10 phagocytized colloidal gold particles per cell per minute for liver and spleen macrophages, respectively. Ks was equal to 6.01 x 109 and 8.02 x 108 colloidal gold particles per cell for liver and spleen macrophages, respectively. The significance of these differences is discussed and attributed mainly to a change of the specific engulfment rate constant. (author)

  13. The colloid investigations conducted at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory during 2000-2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laaksoharju, Marcus [Geopoint AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Wold, Susanna [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Nuclear Chemistry] (eds.)

    2005-12-15

    In 2000, SKB decided to initiate an international colloid project at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory in Sweden. The objectives of the colloid project are to: (i) study the role of bentonite as a colloid source, (ii) verify the background colloid concentration at Aespoe HRL and, (iii) investigate the potential for colloid formation/transport in natural groundwater concentrations. The experimental concepts for the colloid project are: laboratory experiments with bentonite, background field measurements of natural colloids, borehole specific bentonite colloid stability experiments and a fracture specific transport experiment. The activities concerning the laboratory experiments and background field measurements are described in this work; the other activities are ongoing or planned. The following conclusions were made: The bentonite colloid stability is strongly dependent on the groundwater ionic strength. Natural colloids are organic degradation products such as humic and fulvic acids, inorganic colloids (clay, calcite, iron hydroxide) and microbes. Microbes form few but large particles and their concentration increase with increasing organic carbon concentrations. The small organic colloids are present in very low concentrations in deep granitic groundwater. The concentrations can be rather high in shallow waters. The colloid concentration decreases with depth and salinity, since colloids are less stable in saline waters. The colloid content at Aespoe is less than 300 ppb. The colloid content at repository level is less than 50 ppb. The groundwater variability obtained in the boreholes reflects well the natural groundwater variability along the whole HRL tunnel.

  14. Study on Colloidal Model of Petroleum Residues through the Attraction Potential between Colloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long-li Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The samples of DaGang atmospheric residue (DG-AR, Middle East atmospheric residue (ME-AR, TaHe atmospheric residue (TH-AR, and their thermal reaction samples were chosen for study. All the samples were fractioned into six components separately, including saturates plus light aromatics, heavy aromatics, light resins, middle resins, heavy resins, and asphaltenes. The dielectric permittivity of the solutions of these components was measured, and the dielectric permittivity values of the components can be determined by extrapolation, which increased steadily from saturates plus light aromatics to asphaltenes. Moreover, the Hamaker constants of the components were calculated from their dielectric permittivity values. The Van der Waals attractive potential energy between colloids corresponding to various models could be calculated from the fractional composition and the Hamaker constants of every component. It was assumed that the cores of colloidal particles were formed by asphaltenes and heavy resins mainly; the other fractions acted as dispersion medium. For the three serials of thermal reaction samples, the Van der Waals attraction potential energy between colloids for this kind of model was calculated. For TH-AR thermal reaction samples, the Van der Waals attraction potential energy presented the maximum as thermal reaction is going on, which was near to the end of coke induction period.

  15. Study on Colloidal Model of Petroleum Residues through the Attraction Potential between Colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Long-Li; Yang, Guo-Hua; Yang, Chao-He; Que, Guo-He

    2016-01-01

    The samples of DaGang atmospheric residue (DG-AR), Middle East atmospheric residue (ME-AR), TaHe atmospheric residue (TH-AR), and their thermal reaction samples were chosen for study. All the samples were fractioned into six components separately, including saturates plus light aromatics, heavy aromatics, light resins, middle resins, heavy resins, and asphaltenes. The dielectric permittivity of the solutions of these components was measured, and the dielectric permittivity values of the components can be determined by extrapolation, which increased steadily from saturates plus light aromatics to asphaltenes. Moreover, the Hamaker constants of the components were calculated from their dielectric permittivity values. The Van der Waals attractive potential energy between colloids corresponding to various models could be calculated from the fractional composition and the Hamaker constants of every component. It was assumed that the cores of colloidal particles were formed by asphaltenes and heavy resins mainly; the other fractions acted as dispersion medium. For the three serials of thermal reaction samples, the Van der Waals attraction potential energy between colloids for this kind of model was calculated. For TH-AR thermal reaction samples, the Van der Waals attraction potential energy presented the maximum as thermal reaction is going on, which was near to the end of coke induction period. PMID:27274729

  16. Optics of Nanostructured Fractal Silver Colloids

    CERN Document Server

    Karpov, S V; Popov, A K; Slabko, V V; George, T F; George, Thomas F.

    2003-01-01

    Based on the theory of the optical properties of fractal clusters, which is an operator-based modification of the coupled-dipole method, an alternate solution is proposed for the problem of adequately describing the evolution of optical spectra of any polydisperse silver colloid with particles falling within the range of most characteristic sizes (5 - 30 nm). This is the range over which the results of the application of the well-known methods of classical electrodynamics, including the Mie theory, disagree with experimental data. The effect of variation of the parameters of such media on optical spectra is studied by a numerical simulation, which accounts for particle electrodynamic dipole-dipole interactions. Indeed, such interactions are shown to be a key factor in determining the broadening of the sol absorption spectra during the course of fractal aggregation. A quantitative explanation is given for the reasons for the appearance of individual specific features in the contours of the spectral absorption ...

  17. Self-assembly of colloidal rafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prerna; Gibaud, Thoams; Ward, Andrew; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2013-03-01

    Interactions between nanometer-sized particles or molecules suspended in a bulk fluid are well understood. However, when such particles are embedded in a membrane, the inter-particle potential is significantly modified by membrane mediated forces and gives rise to novel phase behavior. Visualizing and manipulating such inclusions in a lipid bilayer is difficult due to the nanometer length scales involved. Here, we use a model system of micron sized colloidal membranes doped with molecules shorter or longer than that of the bulk. Surprisingly, the dopant molecules form self-limited finite size clusters. These clusters further self-organize into a wide variety of higher order structures such as hexagonal and square lattice arrays, lamellar patterns and saddle shaped surfaces. Understanding the phase behavior and measuring repulsive forces between such clusters may have implications for the similar mechanisms that operate in conventional lipid bilayers.

  18. Hydrodynamically driven colloidal assembly in dip coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colosqui, Carlos E; Morris, Jeffrey F; Stone, Howard A

    2013-05-01

    We study the hydrodynamics of dip coating from a suspension and report a mechanism for colloidal assembly and pattern formation on smooth substrates. Below a critical withdrawal speed where the coating film is thinner than the particle diameter, capillary forces induced by deformation of the free surface prevent the convective transport of single particles through the meniscus beneath the film. Capillary-induced forces are balanced by hydrodynamic drag only after a minimum number of particles assemble within the meniscus. The particle assembly can thus enter the thin film where it moves at nearly the withdrawal speed and rapidly separates from the next assembly. The interplay between hydrodynamic and capillary forces produces periodic and regular structures below a critical ratio Ca(2/3)/sqrt[Bo] particles in suspension. The hydrodynamically driven assembly documented here is consistent with stripe pattern formations observed experimentally in dip coating.

  19. Energy landscapes of planar colloidal clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, John W R; Wales, David J

    2014-09-21

    A short-ranged pairwise Morse potential is used to model colloidal clusters with planar morphologies. Potential and free energy global minima as well as rearrangement paths, obtained by basin-hopping global optimisation and discrete path sampling, are characterised. The potential and free energy landscapes are visualised using disconnectivity graphs. The short-ranged potential is found to favour close-packed structures, with the potential energy primarily controlled by the number of nearest neighbour contacts. In the case of quasi-degeneracy the free energy global minimum may differ from the potential energy global minimum. This difference is due to symmetry effects, which result in a higher entropy for structures with lower symmetry.

  20. 'Thermal forces': colloids in temperature gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Roberto

    2004-09-01

    In the presence of a thermal gradient, macromolecular solutes or dispersed particles drift to the cold or to the hot side: this effect is known as thermophoresis, and is the counterpart of particle suspensions of the Soret effect (or thermal diffusion) in simple fluid mixtures. Here I review recent experimental results on colloid thermophoresis and present new data suggesting a universal nature for the temperature dependence of thermophoresis in aqueous systems. There are strong analogies between thermophoresis in liquids and other thermally induced flow processes like gas thermal creep and membrane thermo-osmosis; starting from these, I present some guidelines for a general model of thermophoresis in disperse systems, accounting both for single-particle and collective effects.

  1. Building devices from colloidal quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Cherie R; Lifshitz, Efrat; Sargent, Edward H; Talapin, Dmitri V

    2016-08-26

    The continued growth of mobile and interactive computing requires devices manufactured with low-cost processes, compatible with large-area and flexible form factors, and with additional functionality. We review recent advances in the design of electronic and optoelectronic devices that use colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). The properties of materials assembled of QDs may be tailored not only by the atomic composition but also by the size, shape, and surface functionalization of the individual QDs and by the communication among these QDs. The chemical and physical properties of QD surfaces and the interfaces in QD devices are of particular importance, and these enable the solution-based fabrication of low-cost, large-area, flexible, and functional devices. We discuss challenges that must be addressed in the move to solution-processed functional optoelectronic nanomaterials. PMID:27563099

  2. Multimodal Plasmonics in Fused Colloidal Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Teulle, Alexandre; Girard, C; Gurunatha, Kargal L; Li, Mei; Mann, Stephen; Dujardin, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Harnessing the optical properties of noble metals down to the nanometer-scale is a key step towards fast and low-dissipative information processing. At the 10-nm length scale, metal crystallinity and patterning as well as probing of surface plasmon (SP) properties must be controlled with a challenging high level of precision. Here, we demonstrate that ultimate lateral confinement and delocalization of SP modes are simultaneously achieved in extended self-assembled networks comprising linear chains of partially fused gold nanoparticles. The spectral and spatial distributions of the SP modes associated with the colloidal superstructures are evidenced by performing monochromated electron energy loss spectroscopy with a nanometer-sized electron probe. We prepare the metallic bead strings by electron beam-induced interparticle fusion of nanoparticle networks. The fused superstructures retain the native morphology and crystallinity but develop very low energy SP modes that are capable of supporting long range and s...

  3. Active microrheology in a colloidal glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, M.; Abade, G. C.; Puertas, A. M.; Fuchs, M.

    2016-10-01

    We study the dynamics of a probe particle driven by a constant force through a colloidal glass of hard spheres. This nonequilibrium and anisotropic problem is investigated using a new implementation of the mode-coupling approximation with multiple relaxation channels and Langevin dynamics simulations. A force threshold is found, below which the probe remains localized, while above it the probe acquires a finite velocity. We focus on the localized regime, comparing theory and simulations concerning the dynamics in the length scale of the cage and the properties of the transition to the delocalized regime, such as the critical power-law decay of the probe correlation function. Probe van Hove functions predicted by the theory show exponential tails reminiscent of an intermittent dynamics of the probe. This scenario is microscopically supported by simulations.

  4. Photoactivated colloidal dockers for cargo transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacci, Jérémie; Sacanna, Stefano; Vatchinsky, Adrian; Chaikin, Paul M; Pine, David J

    2013-10-30

    We introduce a self-propelled colloidal hematite docker that can be steered to a small particle cargo many times its size, dock, transport the cargo to a remote location, and then release it. The self-propulsion and docking are reversible and activated by visible light. The docker can be steered either by a weak uniform magnetic field or by nanoscale tracks in a textured substrate. The light-activated motion and docking originate from osmotic/phoretic particle transport in a concentration gradient of fuel, hydrogen peroxide, induced by the photocatalytic activity of the hematite. The docking mechanism is versatile and can be applied to various materials and shapes. The hematite dockers are simple single-component particles and are synthesized in bulk quantities. This system opens up new possibilities for designing complex micrometer-size factories as well as new biomimetic systems. PMID:24131488

  5. Effects of confinement and external fields on structure and transport in colloidal dispersions in reduced dimensionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilms, D; Deutschländer, S; Siems, U; Franzrahe, K; Henseler, P; Keim, P; Schwierz, N; Virnau, P; Binder, K; Maret, G; Nielaba, P

    2012-11-21

    In this work, we focus on low-dimensional colloidal model systems, via simulation studies and also some complementary experiments, in order to elucidate the interplay between phase behavior, geometric structures and transport properties. In particular, we try to investigate the (nonlinear!) response of these very soft colloidal systems to various perturbations: uniform and uniaxial pressure, laser fields, shear due to moving boundaries and randomly quenched disorder. We study ordering phenomena on surfaces or in monolayers by Monte Carlo computer simulations of binary hard-disk mixtures, the influence of a substrate being modeled by an external potential. Weak external fields allow a controlled tuning of the miscibility of the mixture. We discuss the laser induced de-mixing for the three different possible couplings to the external potential. The structural behavior of hard spheres interacting with repulsive screened Coulomb or dipolar interaction in 2D and 3D narrow constrictions is investigated using Brownian dynamics simulations. Due to misfits between multiples of the lattice parameter and the channel widths, a variety of ordered and disordered lattice structures have been observed. The resulting local lattice structures and defect probabilities are studied for various cross sections. The influence of a self-organized order within the system is reflected in the velocity of the particles and their diffusive behavior. Additionally, in an experimental system of dipolar colloidal particles confined by gravity on a solid substrate we investigate the effect of pinning on the dynamics of a two-dimensional colloidal liquid. This work contains sections reviewing previous work by the authors as well as new, unpublished results. Among the latter are detailed studies of the phase boundaries of the de-mixing regime in binary systems in external light fields, configurations for shear induced effects at structured walls, studies on the effect of confinement on the structures

  6. Biological Threats

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Workplace Plans School Emergency Plans Main Content Biological Threats Biological agents are organisms or toxins that can ... for Disease Control and Prevention . Before a Biological Threat Unlike an explosion, a biological attack may or ...

  7. Colloidal Stability and Thermal Stability of Magnetic Fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.M. Arefyev

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal and thermal stabilities of magnetic fluids define the service life of magneto-liquid equipment. The results of the research into colloidal and thermal stabilities of original synthesized magnetic fluids based on kerosene, siloxane fluid and synthetic hydrocarbon oil are presented. The method of carrying agent substitution was used in the research into colloidal stability. The thermal tests were conducted in the research into thermal stability. The conclusions about the prospects of synthesized magnetic fluids using in technical equipment are made on the basis of received experimental data.

  8. Stable colloidal Co-Pd nanocatalysts for carbon nanotube growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berenguer, A.; Golovko, V.B.; Johnson, B.F.G.; Robertson, John [Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Cantoro, M.; Hofmann, S.; Wirth, C.T. [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-15

    The standard preparation method for catalysts for surface-bound growth of carbon nanotubes (CNT) is to sputter or evaporate the metal catalyst (Fe, Co, and Ni) onto the surface. A lower cost method for large areas is to use liquid delivery. Colloids have the advantage of containing the catalyst in nanocluster form. Our previously developed colloidal catalysts were successful for growth but had limited shelf-life due to oxidation and coagulation. Here, we develop an air-stable colloidal catalyst with long shelf-life of many months to years. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  9. Electric double layer of anisotropic dielectric colloids under electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, M.; Wu, H.; Luijten, E.

    2016-07-01

    Anisotropic colloidal particles constitute an important class of building blocks for self-assembly directed by electrical fields. The aggregation of these building blocks is driven by induced dipole moments, which arise from an interplay between dielectric effects and the electric double layer. For particles that are anisotropic in shape, charge distribution, and dielectric properties, calculation of the electric double layer requires coupling of the ionic dynamics to a Poisson solver. We apply recently proposed methods to solve this problem for experimentally employed colloids in static and time-dependent electric fields. This allows us to predict the effects of field strength and frequency on the colloidal properties.

  10. Discrete solvent effects on the effective interaction between charged colloids

    CERN Document Server

    Allahyarov, E

    2000-01-01

    Using computer simulations of two charged colloidal spheres with their counterions in a hard sphere solvent, we show that the granular nature of the solvent significantly influences the effective colloidal interaction. For divalent counterions, the total effective force can become attractive generated by counterion hydration, while for monovalent counterions the forces are repulsive and well-described by a solvent-induced colloidal charge renormalization. Both effects are not contained in the traditional "primitive" approaches but can be accounted for in a solvent-averaged primitive model.

  11. Formation and stability of aluminosilicate colloids by coprecipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putri, Kirana Yuniati

    2011-02-15

    Colloids are ubiquitous in natural waters. Colloid-facilitated migration is of importance in safety assessment of a nuclear waste disposal. Aluminosilicate colloids are considered to be the kernel of aquatic colloids. Their stability is affected by a number of geochemical parameters. This work aims to study qualitatively and quantitatively the stability of aluminosilicate colloids formed by coprecipitation under various geochemical conditions, i.e. pH, concentration of Al and Si metal ions, ionic strength, and omnipresent cations (Na{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+}, and Mg{sup 2+}). The work is performed by colorimetric method and laser-induced breakdown detection (LIBD). Two consecutive phase separations at 450 nm and 1 kDa are applied to separate the precipitates and colloids from the ionic species. By means of colorimetry, Si and Al can be detected down to 5.8 x10{sup -8} M and 7.4x10{sup -7} M, respectively. On the other hand, LIBD is able to quantify the colloidal size and its number density down to several ppt. Depending on the concentration of Al and Si metal ions, the formation trend of aluminosilicate colloid changes following its solubility curve. The lower the concentration, the higher the pH range in which the colloids start to emerge. Furthermore, the colloids are stable at higher Al and Si concentration and at low ionic strength. In the low pH range, cations provide different effects at low and high ionic strengths. At high ionic strength, the colloids are stable in the presence of a larger cation, while all cations exhibit similar effects at low ionic strength. However, in the high pH range, valence seems to have a stronger effect than ionic radius; colloids are more stable in the presence of monovalent cations than divalent ones. Meanwhile, XRD shows non- and/or poor crystalline structure of the aluminosilicate species. Nevertheless, results from XPS may suggest that the chemical composition (Si/Al ∼ 0.6) of the aluminosilicate precipitates is sillimanite or

  12. Zeta potential in colloid science principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hunter, Robert J; Rowell, R L

    2013-01-01

    Zeta Potential in Colloid Science: Principles and Applications covers the concept of the zeta potential in colloid chemical theory. The book discusses the charge and potential distribution at interfaces; the calculation of the zeta potential; and the experimental techniques used in the measurement of electrokinetic parameters. The text also describes the electroviscous and viscoelectric effects; applications of the zeta potential to areas of colloid science; and the influence of simple inorganic ions or more complex adsorbates on zeta potential. Physical chemists and people involved in the stu

  13. Fabrication of Phase-Change Polymer Colloidal Photonic Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianyi Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the preparation of phase-change polymer colloidal photonic crystals (PCs by assembling hollow latex spheres encapsulated with dodecanol for the first time. The monodispersed hollow latex spheres were obtained by phase reversion of monodispersed core-shell latex spheres in the n-hexane, which dissolves the PS core and retains the PMMA/PAA shell. The as-prepared phase-change colloidal PCs show stable phase-change behavior. This fabrication of phase-change colloidal PCs would be significant for PC’s applications in functional coatings and various optic devices.

  14. Colloidal 234Th and the turnover of oceanic DOC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    234Th has been proposed to be a tracer for the labile, colloidal fraction of DOC in seawater. During the recent North Atlantic Bloom Experiment (NABE) the turnover of DOC was directly measured. 234Th and total suspended matter (Cp) were also measured by different research groups. Using the NABE 234Th data the authors have calculated the turnover rate of colloidal material using the Brownian Pumping model of Honeyman and Santschi and the 4-box particle cycling model of Moran and Buesseler. The rate constants for colloid cycling determined from the 234Th data agree well with the experimentally determined rate constants for turnover of DOC

  15. Hybrid passivated colloidal quantum dot solids

    KAUST Repository

    Ip, Alex

    2012-07-29

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) films allow large-area solution processing and bandgap tuning through the quantum size effect. However, the high ratio of surface area to volume makes CQD films prone to high trap state densities if surfaces are imperfectly passivated, promoting recombination of charge carriers that is detrimental to device performance. Recent advances have replaced the long insulating ligands that enable colloidal stability following synthesis with shorter organic linkers or halide anions, leading to improved passivation and higher packing densities. Although this substitution has been performed using solid-state ligand exchange, a solution-based approach is preferable because it enables increased control over the balance of charges on the surface of the quantum dot, which is essential for eliminating midgap trap states. Furthermore, the solution-based approach leverages recent progress in metal:chalcogen chemistry in the liquid phase. Here, we quantify the density of midgap trap states in CQD solids and show that the performance of CQD-based photovoltaics is now limited by electrong-"hole recombination due to these states. Next, using density functional theory and optoelectronic device modelling, we show that to improve this performance it is essential to bind a suitable ligand to each potential trap site on the surface of the quantum dot. We then develop a robust hybrid passivation scheme that involves introducing halide anions during the end stages of the synthesis process, which can passivate trap sites that are inaccessible to much larger organic ligands. An organic crosslinking strategy is then used to form the film. Finally, we use our hybrid passivated CQD solid to fabricate a solar cell with a certified efficiency of 7.0%, which is a record for a CQD photovoltaic device. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  16. Restructuring of colloidal cakes during dewatering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeline, J B; Meireles, M; Bourgerette, C; Botet, R; Schweins, R; Cabane, B

    2007-02-13

    Aqueous suspensions of aggregated silica particles have been dewatered to the point where the colloidal aggregates connect to each other and build a macroscopic network. These wet cakes have been compressed through the application of osmotic pressure. Some cakes offer a strong resistance to osmotic pressure and remain at a low volume fraction of solids; other cakes yield at low applied pressures, achieving nearly complete solid/liquid separation. We used small angle neutron scattering and transmission electron microscopy to determine the processes by which the particles move and reorganize during cake collapse. We found that these restructuring processes follow a general course composed of three stages: (1) at all scales, voids are compressed, with large voids compressed more extensively than smaller ones; the local order remains unchanged; (2) all voids with diameters in the range of 2-20 particle diameters collapse, and a few dense regions (lumps) are formed; and (3) the dense lumps build a rigid skeleton that resists further compression. Depending on the nature of interparticle bonds, some cakes jump spontaneously into stage 3 while others remain stuck in stage 1. To elucidate the relation between bond strength and compression resistance, we have constructed a numerical model of the colloidal network. In this model, particles interact through noncentral forces that are produced by springs attached to their surfaces. Networks made of bonds that break upon stretching evolve through a plastic deformation that reproduces the three stages of restructuring evidenced by the experiments. Networks made of bonds that are fragile jump into stage 3. Networks made of bonds that can be stretched without breaking evolve through elastic compression and restructure only according to stage 1.

  17. The dynamical crossover in attractive colloidal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallamace, Francesco [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Corsaro, Carmelo [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); Stanley, H. Eugene [Center for Polymer Studies and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Mallamace, Domenico [Dipartimento di Scienze dell’Ambiente, della Sicurezza, del Territorio, degli Alimenti e della Salute, Università di Messina, I-98166 Messina (Italy); Chen, Sow-Hsin [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2013-12-07

    We study the dynamical arrest in an adhesive hard-sphere colloidal system. We examine a micellar suspension of the Pluronic-L64 surfactant in the temperature (T) and volume fraction (ϕ) phase diagram. According to mode-coupling theory (MCT), this system is characterized by a cusp-like singularity and two glassy phases: an attractive glass (AG) phase and a repulsive glass (RG) phase. The T − ϕ phase diagram of this system as confirmed by a previous series of scattering data also exhibits a Percolation Threshold (PT) line, a reentrant behavior (AG-liquid-RG), and a glass-to-glass transition. The AG phase can be generated out of the liquid phase by using T and ϕ as control parameters. We utilize viscosity and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. NMR data confirm all the characteristic properties of the colloidal system phase diagram and give evidence of the onset of a fractal-like percolating structure at a precise threshold. The MCT scaling laws used to study the shear viscosity as a function of ϕ and T show in both cases a fragile-to-strong liquid glass-forming dynamic crossover (FSC) located near the percolation threshold where the clustering process is fully developed. These results suggest a larger thermodynamic generality for this phenomenon, which is usually studied only as a function of the temperature. We also find that the critical values of the control parameters, coincident with the PT line, define the locus of the FSC. In the region between the FSC and the glass transition lines the system dynamics are dominated by clustering effects. We thus demonstrate that it is possible, using the conceptual framework provided by extended mode-coupling theory, to describe the way a system approaches dynamic arrest, taking into account both cage and hopping effects.

  18. Geometric frustration in small colloidal clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malins, Alex; Royall, C Patrick [School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom); Williams, Stephen R [Research School of Chemistry, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Eggers, Jens [School of Mathematics, University of Bristol, University Walk, Bristol BS8 1TW (United Kingdom); Tanaka, Hajime, E-mail: paddy.royall@bristol.ac.u [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan)

    2009-10-21

    We study the structure of clusters in a model colloidal system with competing interactions using Brownian dynamics simulations. A short-ranged attraction drives clustering, while a weak, long-ranged repulsion is used to model electrostatic charging in experimental systems. The former is treated with a short-ranged Morse attractive interaction, the latter with a repulsive Yukawa interaction. We consider the yield of clusters of specific structure as a function of the strength of the interactions, for clusters with m = 3,4,5,6,7,10 and 13 colloids. At sufficient strengths of the attractive interaction (around 10k{sub B}T), the average bond lifetime approaches the simulation timescale and the system becomes nonergodic. For small clusters, m<=5, where geometric frustration is not relevant, despite nonergodicity, for sufficient strengths of the attractive interaction the yield of clusters which maximize the number of bonds approaches 100%. However for m = 7 and higher, in the nonergodic regime we find a lower yield of these structures where we argue geometric frustration plays a significant role. m = 6 is a special case, where two structures, of octahedral and C{sub 2v} symmetry, compete, with the latter being favoured by entropic contributions in the ergodic regime and by kinetic trapping in the nonergodic regime. We believe that our results should be valid as long as the one-component description of the interaction potential is valid. A system with competing electrostatic repulsions and van der Waals attractions may be such an example. However, in some cases, the one-component description of the interaction potential may not be appropriate.

  19. [Protoplasm, coagulation and colloids : Forgotten chapter in the research history of anesthesia between Zeitgeist and paradigm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perouansky, M

    2015-05-01

    The historically most important mechanistic theories attributed the fundamental cause of anesthesia to interactions betweeen anesthetics and proteins as early as the 1870s. According to the underlying thought, the resulting changes in the consistency of cellular protoplasm were the cause of the anesthetized state of the whole organism.These protoplasm coagulation theories, as they were collectively referred to, brought the contemporary enthusiasm for protoplasm, the rapid advances in colloid chemistry and the unified theory of narcosis proclamed by Claude Bernard under a unified mechanistic theory that reflected the Zeitgeist of the epoch.This research effort, on the intersection of the developing disciplines of cellular biology and colloid chemistry, lasted for almost a century. It involved scientists of worldwide reputation and resulted in a number of elegant theories. Contrary to widespread opinion, proteins and not lipids were recognized and investigated first as the critical molecular target of anesthetics more than a century prior to their much publicized rediscovery in 1984.The protoplasm coagulation theories of anesthesia were pursued after the First World War across ideological trenches by scientists in Europe, the Soviet Union and the United States. They united research in anesthesia with research of fundamental cell biology.In contrast to the much less fruitful lipid theories, protoplasm coagulation theories are largely forgotten without leaving a trace in contemporary discussions of the history of anesthesia. For many tyears, however, they constituted an essential part of fundamental anesthetic research and must therefore be mentioned in any historical review. PMID:25776209

  20. Quantitative and Qualitative Examination of Particle-particle Interactions Using Colloidal Probe Nanoscopy

    OpenAIRE

    D'Sa, Dexter; Chan, Hak-Kim; Kim, Hae-Won; Chrzanowski, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Colloidal Probe Nanoscopy (CPN), the study of the nano-scale interactive forces between a specifically prepared colloidal probe and any chosen substrate using the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), can provide key insights into physical interactions present within colloidal systems. Colloidal systems are widely existent in several applications including, pharmaceuticals, foods, paints, paper, soil and minerals, detergents, printing and much more.1-3 Furthermore, colloids can exist in many states ...

  1. Long-Ranged Oppositely Charged Interactions for Designing New Types of Colloidal Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Demirors, Ahmet Faik; Stiefelhagen, Johan C. P.; Vissers, Teun; Smallenburg, Frank; Dijkstra, Marjolein; Imhof, Arnout; van Blaaderen, Alfons

    2015-01-01

    Getting control over the valency of colloids is not trivial and has been a long-desired goal for the colloidal domain. Typically, tuning the preferred number of neighbors for colloidal particles requires directional bonding, as in the case of patchy particles, which is difficult to realize experimentally. Here, we demonstrate a general method for creating the colloidal analogs of molecules and other new regular colloidal clusters without using patchiness or complex bonding schemes (e.g., DNA ...

  2. DNA-controlled dynamic colloidal nanoparticle systems for mediating cellular interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Seiichi; Glancy, Dylan; Chan, Warren C. W.

    2016-02-01

    Precise control of biosystems requires development of materials that can dynamically change physicochemical properties. Inspired by the ability of proteins to alter their conformation to mediate function, we explored the use of DNA as molecular keys to assemble and transform colloidal nanoparticle systems. The systems consist of a core nanoparticle surrounded by small satellites, the conformation of which can be transformed in response to DNA via a toe-hold displacement mechanism. The conformational changes can alter the optical properties and biological interactions of the assembled nanosystem. Photoluminescent signal is altered by changes in fluorophore-modified particle distance, whereas cellular targeting efficiency is increased 2.5 times by changing the surface display of targeting ligands. These concepts provide strategies for engineering dynamic nanotechnology systems for navigating complex biological environments.

  3. Synthetic Strategies Toward DNA-Coated Colloids that Crystallize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yufeng; Wang, Yu; Zheng, Xiaolong; Ducrot, Étienne; Lee, Myung-Goo; Yi, Gi-Ra; Weck, Marcus; Pine, David J

    2015-08-26

    We report on synthetic strategies to fabricate DNA-coated micrometer-sized colloids that, upon thermal annealing, self-assemble into various crystal structures. Colloids of a wide range of chemical compositions, including poly(styrene), poly(methyl methacrylate), titania, silica, and a silica-methacrylate hybrid material, are fabricated with smooth particle surfaces and a dense layer of surface functional anchors. Single-stranded oligonucleotides with a short sticky end are covalently grafted onto particle surfaces employing a strain-promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition reaction resulting in DNA coatings with areal densities an order of magnitude higher than previously reported. Our approach allows the DNA-coated colloids not only to aggregate upon cooling but also to anneal and rearrange while still bound together, leading to the formation of colloidal crystal compounds when particles of different sizes or different materials are combined. PMID:26192470

  4. Controlled assembly of jammed colloidal shells on fluid droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Anand Bala; Abkarian, Manouk; Stone, Howard A

    2005-07-01

    Assembly of colloidal particles on fluid interfaces is a promising technique for synthesizing two-dimensional microcrystalline materials useful in fields as diverse as biomedicine, materials science, mineral flotation and food processing. Current approaches rely on bulk emulsification methods, require further chemical and thermal treatments, and are restrictive with respect to the materials used. The development of methods that exploit the great potential of interfacial assembly for producing tailored materials have been hampered by the lack of understanding of the assembly process. Here we report a microfluidic method that allows direct visualization and understanding of the dynamics of colloidal crystal growth on curved interfaces. The crystals are periodically ejected to form stable jammed shells, which we refer to as colloidal armour. We propose that the energetic barriers to interfacial crystal growth and organization can be overcome by targeted delivery of colloidal particles through hydrodynamic flows. Our method allows an unprecedented degree of control over armour composition, size and stability. PMID:15937488

  5. Charge-extraction strategies for colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Lan, Xinzheng

    2014-02-20

    The solar-power conversion efficiencies of colloidal quantum dot solar cells have advanced from sub-1% reported in 2005 to a record value of 8.5% in 2013. Much focus has deservedly been placed on densifying, passivating and crosslinking the colloidal quantum dot solid. Here we review progress in improving charge extraction, achieved by engineering the composition and structure of the electrode materials that contact the colloidal quantum dot film. New classes of structured electrodes have been developed and integrated to form bulk heterojunction devices that enhance photocharge extraction. Control over band offsets, doping and interfacial trap state densities have been essential for achieving improved electrical communication with colloidal quantum dot solids. Quantum junction devices that not only tune the optical absorption spectrum, but also provide inherently matched bands across the interface between p-and n-materials, have proven that charge separation can occur efficiently across an all-quantum-tuned rectifying junction. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited.

  6. PCR detection of groundwater bacteria associated with colloidal transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz-Perez, P.; Stetzenbach, L.D.; Alvarez, A.J.

    1996-02-29

    Colloidal transport may increase the amount of contaminant material than that which could be transported by water flow alone. The role of colloids in groundwater contaminant transport is complicated and may involve many different processes, including sorption of elements onto colloidal particles, coagulation/dissolution, adsorption onto solid surfaces, filtration, and migration. Bacteria are known to concentrate minerals and influence the transport of compounds in aqueous environments and may also serve as organic colloids, thereby influencing subsurface transport of radionuclides and other contaminants. The initial phase of the project consisted of assembling a list of bacteria capable of sequestering or facilitating mineral transport. The development and optimization of the PCR amplification assay for the detection of the organisms of interest, and the examination of regional groundwaters for those organisms, are presented for subsequent research.

  7. Bulk synthesis of polymer-inorganic colloidal clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perro, Adeline; Manoharan, Vinothan N

    2010-12-21

    We describe a procedure to synthesize colloidal clusters with polyhedral morphologies in high yield (liter quantities at up to 70% purity) using a combination of emulsion polymerization and inorganic surface chemistry. We show that the synthesis initially used for silica-polystyrene hybrid clusters can be generalized to create clusters from other inorganic and polymer particles. We also show that high yields of particular morphologies can be obtained by precise control of the inorganic seed particle size, a finding that can be explained using a hard-sphere packing model. These clusters can be further chemically modified for a variety of applications. Introducing a cross-linker leads to colloidal clusters that can be index matched in an appropriate solvent, allowing them to be used for particle tracking or optical studies of colloidal self-assembly. Also, depositing a thin silica layer on these colloids allows the surface properties to be controlled using silane chemistry. PMID:21080658

  8. Giant Leaking Colloid Cyst Presenting with Aseptic Meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakhtevari, Mehrdad Hosseinzadeh; Sharifi, Guive; Jabbari, Reza;

    2015-01-01

    status, and meningismus. Microbiological examination of the cerebrospinal fluid revealed aseptic meningitis. Brain imaging revealed a third ventricular colloid cyst with hydrocephalus. RESULTS: The tumor was resected via endoscopic intervention. There were no persistent operative complications related...

  9. Flow Electrification in Nonaqueous Colloidal Suspensions, Studied with Video Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolpekin, V.A.; Ende, van den D.; Duits, M.H.G.; Mellema, J.

    2004-01-01

    Flow electrification in nonaqueous suspensions has been scarcely reported in the literature but can significantly affect colloidal stability and (phase) behavior, perhaps even without being recognized. We have observed it in shear flow experiments on concentrated binary suspensions of hydrophobized

  10. Colloidal structural evolution of asphaltene studied by confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Jannett; Castillo, Jimmy A.; Reyes, A.

    2004-10-01

    In this work, a detail analysis of the flocculation kinetic of asphaltenes colloidal particles has been carried out usng confocal microscopy. The colloidal structural evolution of the asphaltene flocculated has had varies postulated; however, the aggregation process of asphaltene is still not fully understood. In a recent paper, using Confocal microscope (homemade), we reported high-resolution micrographic images of asphaltenes flocculated and the correlation between crude oil stability and flocculation process. This technique permitted visualizes directly the physical nature of asphaltene flocculated. In this work, a detail analysis of the flocculation kinetic of asphaltene colloidal particles has been carried out using confocal microscopy. The physical nature of asphaltene flocculated from different crude oils is showed through of high-resolution image micrographies and its colloidal structural evolution.

  11. CrⅥ adsorption on four typical soil colloids: equilibrium and kinetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    It is observed that the adsorption of chromium are greater on kaolinite minerals, red soil (R) and laterite (L) colloids than that on montmorillonite, indicotic black (IB) and yellow brown (YB) soil colloids. The adsorption process of CrⅥ on these media can be further described by Langmuir or Freundlich equation quite well. The adsorption reaction of CrⅥ is fast, and the adsorption equilibrium can be reached within the first two hours in moderate temperature. The adsorption quantity of CrⅥ to kaolinite mineral increased with the increasing pH in the range of 2.0 to 7.0, then decreased at higher pH. But it showed some consistence among the four soil colloids. The lower the pH, the stronger the adsorption. The possible mechanisms are further discussed here. Meanwhile the influence of temperature on CrⅥ adsorption on different soil colloid and clay minerals are also investigated.

  12. Depletion interaction measured by colloidal probe atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijting, W.K.; Knoben, W.; Besseling, N.A.M.; Leermakers, F.A.M.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the depletion interaction between stearylated silica surfaces in cyclohexane in the presence of dissolved polydimethylsiloxane by means of colloidal probe atomic force microscopy. We found that the range of the depletion interaction decreases with increasing concentration. Furthermor

  13. Colloidal Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanoparticles: Properties and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Suslov, Sergey; Kildishev, Alexander V.;

    2015-01-01

    Optical properties of colloidal plasmonic titanium nitride nanoparticles are examined with an eye on their photothermal and photocatalytic applications via transmission electron microscopy and optical transmittance measurements. Single crystal titanium nitride cubic nanoparticles with an average ...

  14. PCR detection of groundwater bacteria associated with colloidal transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colloidal transport may increase the amount of contaminant material than that which could be transported by water flow alone. The role of colloids in groundwater contaminant transport is complicated and may involve many different processes, including sorption of elements onto colloidal particles, coagulation/dissolution, adsorption onto solid surfaces, filtration, and migration. Bacteria are known to concentrate minerals and influence the transport of compounds in aqueous environments and may also serve as organic colloids, thereby influencing subsurface transport of radionuclides and other contaminants. The initial phase of the project consisted of assembling a list of bacteria capable of sequestering or facilitating mineral transport. The development and optimization of the PCR amplification assay for the detection of the organisms of interest, and the examination of regional groundwaters for those organisms, are presented for subsequent research

  15. Mesoscopic model of temporal and spatial heterogeneity in aging colloids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, Nikolaj; Sibani, Paolo; Boettcher, Stefan;

    2014-01-01

    We develop a simple and effective description of the dynamics of dense hard sphere colloids in the aging regime deep in the glassy phase. Our description complements the many efforts to understand the onset of jamming in low density colloids, whose dynamics is still time-homogeneous. Based...... on a small set of principles, our model provides emergent dynamic heterogeneity, reproduces the known results for dense hard sphere colloids and makes detailed, experimentally-testable predictions for canonical observables in glassy dynamics. In particular, we reproduce the shape of the intermediate...... scattering function and particle mean-square displacements for jammed colloidal systems, and we predict a growth for the peak of the χ4 mobility correlation function that is logarithmic in waiting-time. At the same time, our model suggests a novel unified description for the irreversible aging dynamics...

  16. Hydrogen emission under laser exposure of colloidal solutions of nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Barmina, E V; Shafeev, G A

    2016-01-01

    We report the generation of molecular hydrogen from water by laser irradiation, without any electrodes and photocatalysts. A near infrared pulsed nanosecond laser is used for exposure of colloidal solution of Au nanoparticles suspended in water. Laser exposure of the colloidal solution results in formation of plasma of laser breakdown of liquid and emission of H2. The rate of H2 emission depends critically on the energy of laser pulses. There is a certain threshold in laser fluence in liquid (around 50 J/cm2) below which plasma disappears and H2 emission stops. H2 emission from colloidal solution of Au nanoparticles in ethanol is higher than that from similar water colloid. It is found that formation of plasma and emission of H2 or D2 can be induced by laser exposure of pure liquids, either H2O or D2O, respectively. The results are interpreted as water molecules splitting by direct electron impact from breakdown plasma.

  17. Designed Assembly and Integration of Colloidal Nanocrystals for Device Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiwoong; Choi, Moon Kee; Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2016-02-10

    Colloidal nanocrystals have been intensively studied over the past three decades due to their unique properties that originate, in large part, from their nanometer-scale sizes. For applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices, colloidal nanoparticles are generally employed as assembled nanocrystal solids, rather than as individual particles. Consequently, tailoring 2D patterns as well as 3D architectures of assembled nanocrystals is critical for their various applications to micro- and nanoscale devices. Here, recent advances in the designed assembly, film fabrication, and printing/integration methods for colloidal nanocrystals are presented. The advantages and drawbacks of these methods are compared, and various device applications of assembled/integrated colloidal nanocrystal solids are discussed. PMID:26707709

  18. 20mN, Variable Specific Impulse Colloid Thruster Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Colloid thrusters have long been known for their exceptional thrust efficiency and ability to operate over a range of specific impulse due to easily variable...

  19. Linking Colloid Deposit Morphology and Clogging in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, E. J.; Mont-eton, M. E.; Mays, D. C.

    2012-12-01

    Innovations in the field of groundwater remediation have been hampered by delivery limitations in the porous media. For example, colloid deposits (comprising clays or silts) can cause a detrimental reduction in permeability, or clogging, which is problematic for groundwater remediation as well as granular media filtration and aquifer storage and recovery. During remediation, clogging creates preferential pathways in the media, leading to localized rather than spatially extensive contaminant treatment. Consequentially, remediation efforts become more expensive, less effective, and take a very long time. This presentation describes ongoing research investigating the link between colloid deposit morphology and clogging in porous media. As described by Darcy's Law, the velocity of fluid flow through porous media is proportional to permeability, which depends, in part, on porosity. However, changes in permeability are not in accord with changes in porosity as predicted by the Kozeny-Carman equation. It is hypothesized that unmeasured aspects of colloid deposit morphology could be the cause of this anomaly. Colloidal phenomena have important and dynamic effects on the permeability of natural porous media, and several lines of evidence suggest a correlation between clogging in porous media and the fractal dimension of colloid deposits. Here, a custom-built static light scattering apparatus is used to measure the fractal dimension of colloid deposits in refractive index matched porous media within a flow column. The media in our flow column is Nafion, which becomes essentially invisible when saturated by a solution of isopropanol and water. Polystyrene microspheres are then added to the influent through the column as a surrogate for natural colloids. Light from a laser is passed through the column, scattering from the deposited colloids, but not from the index matched Nafion. The resulting intensity of scattered light is measured as a function of scattering angle, and then

  20. Study of a micro force sensor for colloidal engines applications

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez Consarnau, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study is the design, manufacturing and test of micro-force sensors based on MEMS technology. With a wide range of application it focuses on the characterization of the propulsive properties of the colloidal engines in the aerospace field. There is a wide range of applications for microforce sensors but in this project we have focused on the characteristics of colloidal engines for aerospace field in order to determine the resolution and the ranges of forces tha...

  1. Fluorescent colloidal silica rods - synthesis and phase behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Kuijk, A.

    2012-01-01

    Although the experimental study of spherical colloids has been extensive, similar studies on rod-like particles are rare because suitable model systems are scarce. To fulfill this need, we present the synthesis of monodisperse rod-like silica colloids with tunable dimensions. Rods were produced with diameters of 200 nm and larger and lengths up to 10 µm, which resulted in aspect ratios ranging from 1 to 25. The growth mechanism of these rods involves emulsion droplets of water in pentanol, in...

  2. Using Light Scattering to Track, Characterize and Manipulate Colloids

    OpenAIRE

    van Oostrum, P.D.J.

    2011-01-01

    A new technique is developed to analyze in-line Digital Holographic Microscopy images, making it possible to characterize, and track colloidal particles in three dimensions at unprecedented accuracy. We took digital snapshots of the interference pattern between the light scattered by micrometer particles and the unaltered portion of a laser beam that was used to illuminate dilute colloidal dispersions on a light microscope in transmission mode. We numerically fit Mie-theory for the light-scat...

  3. Light transport and rotational diffusion in optically anisotropic colloidal suspensions

    OpenAIRE

    Sandomirski, Kirill

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated for the first time the influence of magnetic field on rotational diffusion in anisotropic colloidal suspensions by the method of diffusing wave spectroscopy. It has been established that the change of static properties of the sample in magnetic field exceeds the influence of rotational Brawnian motion of colloidal particles.The main dependencies of magnitude and direction of a magnetic field B on anisotropic diffusion of light has been established. It has been shown that...

  4. Anisotropic diffusion in confined colloidal dispersions: The evanescent diffusivity

    OpenAIRE

    Swan, James W.; Brady, John F.

    2011-01-01

    We employ an analogy to traditional dynamic light scattering to describe the inhomogeneous and anisotropic diffusion of colloid particles near a solid boundary measured via evanescent wave dynamic light scattering. Following this approach, we generate new expressions for the short-time self- and collective diffusivities of colloidal dispersions with arbitrary volume fraction. We use these expressions in combination with accelerated Stokesian dynamics simulations to calculate the diffusivities...

  5. Synthesis of Colloidal Ruthenium Nanocatalyst by Chemical Reduction Method

    OpenAIRE

    Patharkar, R. G.; S. U. Nandanwar; Chakraborty, M.

    2013-01-01

    Colloidal ruthenium nanoparticles were prepared by chemical reduction of ruthenium trichloride (RuCl3) using sodium borohydrate (NaBH4) as reducing agent and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as a stabilizer. Size and size distribution of synthesized colloidal Ru nanoparticles were studied by varying different parameters such as molar ratio (MR) of SDS/RuCl3, NaBH4/RuCl3, effects of different stabilizers, and reducing agents. Prepared nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron micro...

  6. Charge renormalization and phase separation in colloidal suspensions

    OpenAIRE

    Diehl, Alexandre; Barbosa, Marcia C.; Levin, Yan

    2000-01-01

    We explore the effects of counterion condensation on fluid-fluid phase separation in charged colloidal suspensions. It is found that formation of double layers around the colloidal particles stabilizes suspensions against phase separation. Addition of salt, however, produces an instability which, in principle, can lead to a fluid-fluid separation. The instability, however, is so weak that it should be impossible to observe a fully equilibrated coexistence experimentally.

  7. Bulk and confinement-induced phase transitions in colloidal suspensions

    OpenAIRE

    Fortini, A.

    2007-01-01

    In the thesis, we have presented computer simulation results on the bulk and interfacial phase behaviour of colloidal suspensions. In the first part, we have developed and tested a simulation technique to calculate the free energy of hard-core systems. This technique was used to calculate the interfacial free energy of colloidal hard spheres and with the addition of non-adsorbing polymer coils. Good agreement was found between the simulation results and those from density functional theory. F...

  8. Quantitatively mimicking wet colloidal suspensions with dry granular media

    OpenAIRE

    René Messina; Sarah Aljawhari; Lydiane Bécu; Julien Schockmel; Geoffroy Lumay; Nicolas Vandewalle

    2015-01-01

    Athermal two-dimensional granular systems are exposed to external mechanical noise leading to Brownian-like motion. Using tunable repulsive interparticle interaction, it is shown that the same microstructure as that observed in colloidal suspensions can be quantitatively recovered at a macroscopic scale. To that end, experiments on granular and colloidal systems made up of magnetized particles as well as computer simulations are performed and compared. Excellent agreement throu...

  9. CURRENT COLLOIDAL DISPERSION GELS ARE NOT SUPERIOR TO POLYMER FLOODING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seright Randy; Han Peihui; Wang Dongmei

    2006-01-01

    The suggestion that the colloidal-dispersion-gel (CDG) process is superior to normal polymer flooding is misleading and generally incorrect. Colloidal dispersion gels, in their present state of technological development, should not be advocated as an improvement to, or substitute for, polymer flooding. Gels made from aluminum-citrate crosslinked polyacrylamides can act as conventional gels and provide effective conformance improvement in treating some types of excess water production problems if sound scientific and engineering principles are respected.

  10. SANS (small-angle neutron scattering) from polymers and colloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayter, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been remarkably successful in providing detailed quantitative structural information on complex everyday materials, such as polymers and colloids, which are often of considerable industrial as well as academic interest. This paper reviews some recent SANS experiments on polymers and colloids, including ferrofluids, and discusses the use of these apparently complex systems as general physical models of the liquid or solid state.

  11. Microgel/SiO2 Hybrid Colloids with Different Architectures

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, Garima

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation deals with the development and characterization of microgel/silica hybrid colloids of different complexity based on different derivatives of hyperbranched polyalkoxysiloxanes (PAOS) as functional silica precursor polymers.Microgels are porous polymeric crosslinked particles which are swollen in a solvent like water. Additionally, these soft colloids provide an opportunity to combine different functionalities in a confined space. Taking advantage of this, a water based method...

  12. Radiologic manifestations of colloid cysts: a pictorial essay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algin, Oktay; Ozmen, Evrim; Arslan, Halil

    2013-02-01

    Colloid cysts are among rare benign tumours of the third ventricle. Although the most frequent symptoms are headache and syncope, arrest hydrocephalus or sudden death could appear with colloid cysts. The aim of this pictorial essay was to increase awareness of the clinical presentation, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging spectrum, and treatment options of the colloid cysts. The data of 11 patients with histopathologically and/or clinically proven colloid cyst were analysed, retrospectively; and the neuroradiologic appearances of the cysts were evaluated. The CT and MR appearance of colloid cysts may change, depending on the viscosity or the cholesterol content of the cysts. However, the cystic content is the most important factor that could affect the success of treatment. Cysts that are especially rich in protein and cholesterol tend to be hyperdense on CT, hypointense on T2-weighted sequences and hyperintense on T1-weighted sequences. These cysts are viscous, and the success of aspiration is significantly low. In the diagnosis and evaluation of small-sized cysts that have an ingredient similar to cerebrospinal fluid, 3-dimensional sequences might be useful. The radiologic appearances of colloid cysts could play an important role in directing these patients to alternative surgical modalities, including resection. PMID:22575594

  13. Assembly of colloidal strings in a simple fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Yu; Francis, Lorraine; Cheng, Xiang

    Colloidal particles self-assemble into ordered structures ranging from face- and body-centered cubic crystals to binary ionic crystals and to kagome lattices. Such diverse micron-scale structures are of practical importance for creating photonic materials and also of fundamental interest for probing equilibrium and non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. As a particularly interesting example, 1D colloidal strings provide a unique system for investigating non-equilibrium dynamics of crystal lattices. Here, we report a simple experimental method for constructing 1D colloidal crystals, where colloidal particles self-assemble into flow-aligned string structures near solid boundary under unidirectional flows. Using fast confocal microscopy, we explore the degree of particle alignment as functions of flow rate, particle concentrations, wetting properties of solid boundary and ionic strength of solvent. Through our systematic experiments, we show that these colloidal strings arise from hydrodynamic coupling, facilitated by electrostatic attractions between particles and the boundary. Compared with previous methods, our work provides a much simpler experimental procedure for assembling a large number of colloidal strings.

  14. Colloidal self-assembly concepts for light management in photovoltaics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Karg

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal particles show interaction with electromagnetic radiation at optical frequencies. At the same time clever colloid design and functionalization concepts allow for versatile particle assembly providing monolayers of macroscopic dimensions. This has led to a significant interest in assembled colloidal structures for light harvesting in photovoltaic devices. In particular thin-film solar cells suffer from weak absorption of incoming photons. Consequently light management using assembled colloidal structures becomes vital for enhancing the efficiency of a given device. This review aims at giving an overview of recent developments in colloid synthesis, functionalization and assembly with a focus on light management structures in photovoltaics. We distinguish between optical effects related to the single particle properties as well as collective optical effects, which originate from the assembled structures. Colloidal templating approaches open yet another dimension for controlling the interaction with light. We focus in this respect on structured electrodes that have received much attention due to their dual functionality as light harvesting systems and conductive electrodes and highlight the impact of inter-particle spacing for templating.

  15. Luminescent Colloidal Semiconductor Nanocrystals Containing Copper: Synthesis, Photophysics, and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Kathryn E; Hartstein, Kimberly H; Kilburn, Troy B; Marchioro, Arianna; Nelson, Heidi D; Whitham, Patrick J; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2016-09-28

    Copper-doped semiconductors are classic phosphor materials that have been used in a variety of applications for many decades. Colloidal copper-doped semiconductor nanocrystals have recently attracted a great deal of interest because they combine the solution processability and spectral tunability of colloidal nanocrystals with the unique photoluminescence properties of copper-doped semiconductor phosphors. Although ternary and quaternary semiconductors containing copper, such as CuInS2 and Cu2ZnSnS4, have been studied primarily in the context of their photovoltaic applications, when synthesized as colloidal nanocrystals, these materials have photoluminescence properties that are remarkably similar to those of copper-doped semiconductor nanocrystals. This review focuses on the luminescent properties of colloidal copper-doped, copper-based, and related copper-containing semiconductor nanocrystals. Fundamental investigations into the luminescence of copper-containing colloidal nanocrystals are reviewed in the context of the well-established luminescence mechanisms of bulk copper-doped semiconductors and copper(I) molecular coordination complexes. The use of colloidal copper-containing nanocrystals in applications that take advantage of their luminescent properties, such as bioimaging, solid-state lighting, and luminescent solar concentrators, is also discussed.

  16. Stratification of colloidal aggregation coupled with sedimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Agustín E

    2006-12-01

    One of the consequences of sedimentation in colloidal aggregation is the stratification of the system in the sense that, after a sufficiently long elapsed time, the large clusters lie preferentially at the bottom zones of the confinement prism, and the structural and dynamical quantities describing the aggregates depend on the depth at which they are measured. A few years ago a computer simulation using particles for colloidal aggregation coupled with sedimentation was proposed by the author [A. E. González, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 1243 (2001)]. In that simulation, due to computational limitations, the mentioned quantities were averaged over all clusters in the prism, independently of the depth at which they were located, in order to have good statistics for the evaluation of the cluster fractal dimension and the cluster size distribution function. In this work we present a computer simulation using particles of colloidal aggregation coupled with sedimentation, for which the clusters in the simulation box represent those clusters inside a layer at a fixed depth and of arbitrary thickness in the prism. It would then be possible to compare the results with an eventual validation experiment, in which an aggregating sample is sipped out with a pipette at a fixed depth in the prism and subjected to further studies, or with a light scattering study in which the laser beam is focused at a fixed depth in the system. We confirm the acceleration of the aggregation rate, followed by a slowing down, compared with an aggregating system driven purely by diffusion (DLCA). In the present system, the large clusters when drifting downwards sweep smaller ones, which in turn occlude the holes and cavities of these large clusters, increasing in this way their compacticity. We also confirm that (i) in some cases of sedimentation strengths and layer depths, the mean width (perpendicular to the gravitational field direction) and the mean height of the large settling clusters scale with the

  17. Influence of colloidal particle transfer on the quality of self-assembling colloidal photonic crystal under confined condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵永强; 李娟; 刘秋艳; 董文钧; 陈本永; 李超荣

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between colloidal particle transfer and quality of colloidal photonic crystal (CPC) is investigated by comparing colloidal particle self-assembling under the vertical channel (VC) and horizontal channel (HC) conditions. Both the theoretical analyses and the experimental measurements indicate that crystal quality depends on the stability of mass transfer. For the VC, colloidal particle transfer takes place in a stable laminar flow, which is conducive to forming high-quality crystal. In contrast, it happens in an unstable turbulent flow for the HC. Crystals with cracks and uneven surface formed under the HC condition can be seen from the images of field emission scanning electron microscope (SEM) and three-dimensional (3D) laser scanning microscope (LSM), respectively.

  18. Chancellor Water Colloids: Characterization and Radionuclide Associated Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimus, Paul William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Boukhalfa, Hakim [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-09-26

    Column transport experiments were conducted in which water from the Chancellor nuclear test cavity was transported through crushed volcanic tuff from Pahute Mesa. In one experiment, the cavity water was spiked with solute 137Cs, and in another it was spiked with 239/240Pu(IV) nanocolloids. A third column experiment was conducted with no radionuclide spike at all, although the 137Cs concentrations in the water were still high enough to quantify in the column effluent. The radionuclides strongly partitioned to natural colloids present in the water, which were characterized for size distribution, mass concentration, zeta potential/surface charge, critical coagulation concentration, and qualitative mineralogy. In the spiked water experiments, the unanalyzed portion of the high-concentration column effluent samples were combined and re-injected into the respective columns as a second pulse. This procedure was repeated again for a third injection. Measurable filtration of the colloids was observed after each initial injection of the Chancellor water into the columns, but the subsequent injections (spiked water experiments only) exhibited no apparent filtration, suggesting that the colloids that remained mobile after relatively short transport distances were more resistant to filtration than the initial population of colloids. It was also observed that while significant desorption of 137Cs from the colloids occurred after the first injection in both the spiked and unspiked waters, subsequent injections of the spiked water exhibited much less 137Cs desorption (much greater 137Cs colloid-associated transport). This result suggests that the 137Cs that remained associated with colloids during the first injection represented a fraction that was more strongly adsorbed to the mobile colloids than the initial 137Cs associated with the colloids. A greater amount of the 239/240

  19. Chemical Routes to Colloidal Chalcogenide Nanosheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaak, Raymond

    2015-02-19

    This project sought to develop new low-temperature synthetic pathways to intermetallic and chalcogenide nanostructures and powders, with an emphasis on systems that are relevant to advancing the synthesis, processing, and discovery of superconducting materials. The primary synthetic routes involved solution chemistry methods, and several fundamental synthetic challenges that underpinned the formation of these materials were identified and investigated. Methods for incorporating early transition metals and post transition metals into nanoscale and bulk crystals using low-temperature solution chemistry methods were developed and studied, leading to colloidal nanocrystals of elemental indium, manganese, and germanium, as well as nanocrystalline and bulk intermetallic compounds containing germanium, gallium, tin, indium, zinc, bismuth, and lithium. New chemical tools were developed to help target desired phases in complex binary intermetallic and metal chalcogenide systems that contain multiple stable phases, including direct synthesis methods and chemical routes that permit post-synthetic modification. Several phases that are metastable in bulk systems were targeted, synthesized, and characterized as nanocrystalline solids and bulk powders, including the L12-type intermetallic compounds Au3Fe, Au3Ni, and Au3Co, as well as wurtzite-type MnSe. Methods for accessing crystalline metal borides and carbides using direct solution chemistry methods were also developed, with an emphasis on Ni3B and Ni3C, which revealed useful correlations of composition and magnetic properties. Methods for scale-up and nanoparticle purification were explored, providing access to centimeter-scale pressed pellets of polyol-synthesized nanopowders and a bacteriophage-mediated method for separating impure nanoparticle mixtures into their components. Several advances were made in the synthesis of iron selenide and related superconducting materials, including the production of colloidal Fe

  20. Colloid Aspects of Chemical-Mechanical Planarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matijević, E.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The essential parts of interconnects for silicon based logic and memory devices consist of metal wiring (e.g. copper, a barrier metal (Ta, TaN, and of insulation (SiO2 , low-k polymer. The deposition of the conducting metal cannot be confined to trenches, resulting in additional coverage of Cu and Ta/TaN on the surface of the dielectrics, yielding an electrically conducting continuous but an uneven surface. The surplus metal must be removed until a perfectly flat surface consisting of electrically isolated metal lines is achieved with no imperfections. This task is accomplished by the chemical-mechanical planarization (CMP process, in which the wafer is polished with a slurry containing abrasives of finely dispersed particles in submicrometer to nanometer size. The slurries also contain dissolved chemicals to modify the surfaces to be planarized. Eventually the final product must be cleared of any adhered particles and debris left after polishing is completed. Obviously the entire process deals with materials and interactions which are the focal subjects of colloid and surface science, such as the natures of abrasive particles and their stability in the slurry, the properties of various surfaces and their modifications, adhesion and detachment of the particles and different methods for the characterization of constituents, as well as elucidation of the relevant interfacial phenomena. This review endeavors to describe the colloid approach to optimize the materials and processes in order to achieve desirable polish rates and final surfaces with no imperfections. Specifically, the effects of the composition, size, shape, and charge of abrasive particles on the polish process and the quality of planarized wafers is described in detail. Furthermore, the interactions of metal surfaces with oxidizing, chelating, and other species which affect the dissolution and surface modification of metal (copper surfaces are illustrated and related to the