WorldWideScience

Sample records for biological materials including

  1. Multi trace element analysis of dry biological materials by neutron activation analysis including a chemical group separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weers, C.A.

    1980-07-01

    Multi-element analysis of dry biological material by neutron activation analysis has to include radiochemical separation. The evaporation process is described in terms of the half-volume. The pretreatment of the samples and the development of the destruction-evaporation apparatus are described. The successive adsorption steps with active charcoal, Al 2 O 3 and coprecipitation with Fe(OH) 3 are described. Results obtained for standard reference materials are summarized. (G.T.H.)

  2. Extended automated separation techniques in destructive neutron activation analysis; application to various biological materials, including human tissues and blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tjioe, P.S.; Goeij, J.J.M. de; Houtman, J.P.W.

    1976-09-01

    Neutron activation analysis may be performed as a multi-element and low-level technique for many important trace elements in biological materials, provided that post-irradiation chemical separations are applied. This paper describes a chemical separation consisting of automated procedures for destruction, distillation, and anion-chromatography. The system developed enables the determination of 14 trace elements in biological materials, viz. antimony, arsenic, bromine, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, gold, iron, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, and zinc. The aspects of sample preparation, neutron irradiation, gamma-spectrum evaluation, and blank-value contribution are also discussed

  3. Multiscale Biological Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølich, Simon

    materials are characterized by their hierarchical and composite design, where features with sizes ranging from nanometers to centimeters provide the basis for the functionality of the material. Understanding of biological materials is, while very interesting from a basic research perspective, also valuable...... as inspiration for the development of new materials for medical and technological applications. In order to successfully mimic biological materials we must first have a thorough understanding of their design. As such, the purpose of the characterization of biological materials can be defined as the establishment...... mineral and the organic matrix in biomineralized calcite. High resolution powder diffraction was used to study how calcite in chalk, coccoliths, and mollusk shell is affected by the co-existent organic matrix. The calcified attachment organ in the saddle oyster, Anomia simplex serves as a brilliant...

  4. Flotation of Biological Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Z. Kyzas

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Flotation constitutes a gravity separation process, which originated from the minerals processing field. However, it has, nowadays, found several other applications, as for example in the wastewater treatment field. Concerning the necessary bubble generation method, typically dispersed-air or dissolved-air flotation was mainly used. Various types of biological materials were tested and floated efficiently, such as bacteria, fungi, yeasts, activated sludge, grape stalks, etc. Innovative processes have been studied in our Laboratory, particularly for metal ions removal, involving the initial abstraction of heavy metal ions onto a sorbent (including a biosorbent: in the first, the application of a flotation stage followed for the efficient downstream separation of metal-laden particles. The ability of microorganisms to remove metal ions from dilute aqueous solutions (as most wastewaters are is a well-known property. The second separation process, also applied effectively, was a new hybrid cell of microfiltration combined with flotation. Sustainability in this field and its significance for the chemical and process industry is commented.

  5. BIOLOGIC AND ECONOMIC EFFECTS OF INCLUDING DIFFERENT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The biologic and economic effects of including three agro-industrial by-products as ingredients in turkey poult diets were investigated using 48 turkey poults in a completely randomised design experiment. Diets were formulated to contain the three by-products – wheat offal, rice husk and palm kernel meal, each at 20% level ...

  6. Biological Responses to Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James M.

    2001-08-01

    All materials intended for application in humans as biomaterials, medical devices, or prostheses undergo tissue responses when implanted into living tissue. This review first describes fundamental aspects of tissue responses to materials, which are commonly described as the tissue response continuum. These actions involve fundamental aspects of tissue responses including injury, inflammatory and wound healing responses, foreign body reactions, and fibrous encapsulation of the biomaterial, medical device, or prosthesis. The second part of this review describes the in vivo evaluation of tissue responses to biomaterials, medical devices, and prostheses to determine intended performance characteristics and safety or biocompatibility considerations. While fundamental aspects of tissue responses to materials are important from research and development perspectives, the in vivo evaluation of tissue responses to these materials is important for performance, safety, and regulatory reasons.

  7. Studies of the reproductive biology of deep-sea megabenthos. 7: The Porcellanasteridae (Asteroidea: Echinodermata) including material collected at Great Meteor East, during Discovery cruise 156

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyler, P.A.; Muirhead, A.

    1986-07-01

    The reproductive biology of Porcellanaster ceruleus, Hyphalaster inermis and Styrachaster horridus is described. P. ceruleus was collected as part of the time series study in the rockall Trough, N.E. Atlantic. This species had a maximum size of 7.0mm arm radius although maximum size known is 36.0mm arm radius. Relatively few eggs are produced and in these samples grow to a maximum size of 230μm. There was no evidence of reproductive seasonality. In Hyphalaster inermis and Styrachaster horridus the eggs grow to 600μm diameter. At this size the cytoplasm is reticulate and filled with neutral fat whilst the periphery is an amorphous layer. Development of the testes in all three species appears typical of deep-sea asteroids. (author)

  8. Armor systems including coated core materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Henry S [Idaho Falls, ID; Lillo, Thomas M [Idaho Falls, ID; McHugh, Kevin M [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-07-31

    An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

  9. 37 CFR 1.801 - Biological material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Biological material. 1.801... Biological Material § 1.801 Biological material. For the purposes of these regulations pertaining to the deposit of biological material for purposes of patents for inventions under 35 U.S.C. 101, the term...

  10. Flexoelectricity in soft materials and biological membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Qian; Liu, Liping; Sharma, Pradeep

    2014-01-01

    Flexoelectricity and the concomitant emergence of electromechanical size-effects at the nanoscale have been recently exploited to propose tantalizing concepts such as the creation of "apparently piezoelectric" materials without piezoelectric materials, e.g. graphene, emergence of "giant" piezoelectricity at the nanoscale, enhanced energy harvesting, among others. The aforementioned developments pertain primarily to hard ceramic crystals. In this work, we develop a nonlinear theoretical framework for flexoelectricity in soft materials. Using the concept of soft electret materials, we illustrate an interesting nonlinear interplay between the so-called Maxwell stress effect and flexoelectricity, and propose the design of a novel class of apparently piezoelectric materials whose constituents are intrinsically non-piezoelectric. In particular, we show that the electret-Maxwell stress based mechanism can be combined with flexoelectricity to achieve unprecedentedly high values of electromechanical coupling. Flexoelectricity is also important for a special class of soft materials: biological membranes. In this context, flexoelectricity manifests itself as the development of polarization upon changes in curvature. Flexoelectricity is found to be important in a number of biological functions including hearing, ion transport and in some situations where mechanotransduction is necessary. In this work, we present a simple linearized theory of flexoelectricity in biological membranes and some illustrative examples.

  11. NBS activities in biological reference materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasberry, S.D.

    1988-12-01

    NBS activities in biological reference materials during 1986-1988 are described with a preview of plans for future certifications of reference materials. During the period, work has been completed or partially completed on about 40 reference materials of importance to health, nutrition, and environmental quality. Some of the reference materials that have been completed during the period and are described include: creatinine (SRM 914a), bovine serum albumin (SRM 927a), cholesterol in human serum (SRM's 1951-1952), aspartate aminotransferase (RM 8430), cholesterol and fat-soluble vitamins in coconut oil (SRM 1563), wheat flour (SRM 1567a), rice flour (SRM 1568a), mixed diet (RM 8431a), dinitropyrene isomers and 1-nitropyrene (SRM 1596), and complex PAH's from coal tar (SRM 1597). Oyster tissue (SRM 1566a) is being analyzed and should be available in 1988.

  12. Measuring fracture toughness in biological materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, David

    2018-01-01

    Many biological materials fail by cracking. Examples are bone fractures, contact damage in eggs, splits in bamboo culm and defects in cartilage. The mechanical property that best describes failure by cracking is fracture toughness, which quantifies the ease with which cracks propagate and defines a material's tolerance for pre-existing cracks and other stress concentrating features. The measurement of fracture toughness presents some challenges, especially for biological materials. To obtain valid results requires care and, in many cases, considerable ingenuity to design an appropriate specimen and test protocol. Common mistakes include incorrect interpretation of the mechanics of loading in unusual specimen designs, and failures occurring at the material's ultimate tensile strength as a result of specimens or cracks being too small. Interpretation of the resulting toughness data may also present challenges, for example when R-curve behaviour is present. In this article, examples of good and bad practice are described, and some recommendations made. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Biological treatment of inorganic ion contamination including radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherry, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    Microorganisms and plants are capable of a broad range of activities useful in treating inorganic contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface runoff water Among the advantages of biological processes for this purpose are relatively low costs (related to their mild conditions) and the practicality of letting them run unattended. This talk will review both kinds of treatment chemistry that can be done biologically as well as present data from INEEL projects on bioremediation of specific elements. Biological processes can either solubilize or immobilize metals and other ions depending on the need. Uranium ions are solubilized from soil by the local bioproduction of organic acids as chelating agents, allowing removal of this ion as part of an ex-situ treatment process. Further, the microbial production of sulfuric acid can be used to solubilize Cs contamination in concrete surfaces. More usual though is the need to control metal movement in soil or water. Various metals such as Se and Cd are taken up from soil by hyper-accumulating plants, where they can be harvested in concentrated form in the leaves and stems. Excess acidity and a broad variety of toxic metals in acid rock drainage, such as Hg, Cd, Zn and others, can be removed by the production of sulfide ion in an easily fielded biological reactor which may be useful on phosphate processing runoff water contaminated with naturally occuring radioactive materials. Soluble Co, Cu, and Cd can be treated by sorption onto immobilized algae. Inorganic ions can also be directly reduced by bacteria as part of treatment, for example the conversion of soluble selenate ion to insoluble elemental selenium and the conversion of highly toxic CR(VI) to the far less soluble and less toxic Cr(III)

  14. Magnetically responsive biological materials and their applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šafařík, Ivo; Pospíšková, K.; Baldíková, E.; Šafaříková, Miroslava

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 4 (2016), s. 254-261 ISSN 0976-3961 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : adsorbents * biological materials * carriers * magnetic modification * whole-cell biocatalyst Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics

  15. Conduit for regeneration of biological material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention relates to a conduit comprising a first material, having 1) a through-going hole, 2) fibers aligned along the long-axis in the through-going hole, each fiber having a diameter in the range 200-2000 nm. The conduit is preferably for regeneration of biological material, even...

  16. Solid freeform fabrication of biological materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiwen

    This thesis investigates solid freeform fabrication of biological materials for dental restoration and orthopedic implant applications. The basic approach in this study for solid freeform fabrication of biological materials is micro-extrusion of single or multiple slurries for 3D components and inkjet color printing of multiple suspensions for functionally graded materials (FGMs). Common issues associated with micro-extrusion and inkjet color printing are investigated. These common issues include (i) formulation of stable slurries with a pseudoplastic property, (ii) cross-sectional geometry of the extrudate as a function of the extrusion parameters, (iii) fabrication path optimization for extrusion process, (iv) extrusion optimization for multi-layer components, (v) composition control in functionally graded materials, and (vi) sintering optimization to convert the freeform fabricated powder compact to a dense body for biological applications. The present study clearly shows that the rheological and extrusion behavior of dental porcelain slurries depend strongly on the pH value of the slurry and extrusion conditions. A slurry with pseudoplastic properties is a basic requirement for obtaining extruded lines with rectangular cross-sections. The cross-sectional geometry of the extrudate is also strongly affected by extrusion parameters including the extrusion nozzle height, nozzle moving speed, extrusion rate, and critical nozzle height. Proper combinations of these extrusion parameters are necessary in order to obtain single line extrudates with near rectangular cross-sections and 3D objects with dimensional accuracy, uniform wall thickness, good wall uprightness, and no wall slumping. Based on these understandings, single-wall, multi-wall, and solid teeth have been fabricated via micro-extrusion of the dental slurry directly from a CAD digital model in 30 min. Inkjet color printing using stable Al2O3 and ZrO 2 aqueous suspensions has been developed to fabricate

  17. AC Calorimetric Design for Dynamic of Biological Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Shigeo Imaizumi

    2006-01-01

    We developed a new AC calorimeter for the measurement of dynamic specific heat capacity in liquids, including aqueous suspensions of biological materials. This method has several advantages. The first is that a high-resolution measurement of heat capacity, inmillidegrees, can be performed as a function of temperature, even with a very small sample. Therefore, AC calorimeter is a powerful tool to study critical behavior a tphase transition in biological materials. The second advantage is that ...

  18. Structural biological materials: critical mechanics-materials connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Marc André; McKittrick, Joanna; Chen, Po-Yu

    2013-02-15

    Spider silk is extraordinarily strong, mollusk shells and bone are tough, and porcupine quills and feathers resist buckling. How are these notable properties achieved? The building blocks of the materials listed above are primarily minerals and biopolymers, mostly in combination; the first weak in tension and the second weak in compression. The intricate and ingenious hierarchical structures are responsible for the outstanding performance of each material. Toughness is conferred by the presence of controlled interfacial features (friction, hydrogen bonds, chain straightening and stretching); buckling resistance can be achieved by filling a slender column with a lightweight foam. Here, we present and interpret selected examples of these and other biological materials. Structural bio-inspired materials design makes use of the biological structures by inserting synthetic materials and processes that augment the structures' capability while retaining their essential features. In this Review, we explain this idea through some unusual concepts.

  19. Study of biocompatible and biological materials

    CERN Document Server

    Pecheva, Emilia

    2017-01-01

    The book gives an overview on biomineralization, biological, biocompatible and biomimetic materials. It reveals the use of biomaterials alone or in composites, how their performance can be improved by tailoring their surface properties by external factors and how standard surface modification techniques can be applied in the area of biomaterials to beneficially influence their growth on surfaces.

  20. THE DEVELOPMENT OF BIOLOGY MATERIAL RESOURCES BY METACOGNITIVE STRATEGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endang Susantini

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Development of Biology Material Resources by Metacognitive Strategy The study was aimed at finding out the suitability of Biology Materials using the metacognitive strategy. The materials were textbooks, self-understanding Evaluation Sheet and the key, lesson plan, and tests including the answer key. The criteria of appropriateness included the relevance of the resources with the content validity, face va­lidity and the language. This research and development study was carried out employing a 3D model, namely define, design and develop. At the define stage, three topics were selected for analysis, they were virus, Endocrine System, and Genetic material. During the design phase, the physical appearance of the materials was suited with the Metacognitive Strategy. At the develop phase, the material resources were examined and validated by two Biology experts and senior teachers of Biology. The results showed that the Biology material Resources using Metacognitive Strategy developed in the study has fell into the category of very good ( score > 3.31 and was therefore considered suitable.

  1. BIOLOGY OF HUMAN MALARIA PLASMODIA INCLUDING PLASMODIUM KNOWLESI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spinello Antinori

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a vector-borne infection caused by unicellular parasite of the genus Plasmodium. Plasmodia are obligate intracellular parasites that in humans after a clinically silent replication phase in the liver are able to infect and replicate within the erythrocytes. Four species (P.falciparum, P.malariae, P.ovale and P.vivax are traditionally recognized as responsible of natural infection in human beings but the recent upsurge of P.knowlesi malaria in South-East Asia has led clinicians to consider it as the fifth human malaria parasite. Recent studies in wild-living apes in Africa have revealed that P.falciparum, the most deadly form of human malaria, is not only human-host restricted as previously believed and its phylogenetic lineage is much more complex with new species identified in gorilla, bonobo and chimpanzee. Although less impressive, new data on biology of P.malariae, P.ovale and P.vivax are also emerging and will be briefly discussed in this review.

  2. A routine chromium determination in biological materials; application to various reference materials and standard reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tjioe, P.S.; Goeij, J.J.M. de; Volkers, K.J.

    1979-01-01

    The determination limit under standard working conditions of chromium in biological materials is discussed. Neutron activation analysis and atomic spectrometry have been described for some analytical experiences with NBS SRM 1577 reference material. The chromium determination is a part of a larger multi-element scheme for the determination of 12 elements in biological materials

  3. A hydrodynamic model for granular material flows including segregation effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberg Dominik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The simulation of granular flows including segregation effects in large industrial processes using particle methods is accurate, but very time-consuming. To overcome the long computation times a macroscopic model is a natural choice. Therefore, we couple a mixture theory based segregation model to a hydrodynamic model of Navier-Stokes-type, describing the flow behavior of the granular material. The granular flow model is a hybrid model derived from kinetic theory and a soil mechanical approach to cover the regime of fast dilute flow, as well as slow dense flow, where the density of the granular material is close to the maximum packing density. Originally, the segregation model has been formulated by Thornton and Gray for idealized avalanches. It is modified and adapted to be in the preferred form for the coupling. In the final coupled model the segregation process depends on the local state of the granular system. On the other hand, the granular system changes as differently mixed regions of the granular material differ i.e. in the packing density. For the modeling process the focus lies on dry granular material flows of two particle types differing only in size but can be easily extended to arbitrary granular mixtures of different particle size and density. To solve the coupled system a finite volume approach is used. To test the model the rotational mixing of small and large particles in a tumbler is simulated.

  4. A hydrodynamic model for granular material flows including segregation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilberg, Dominik; Klar, Axel; Steiner, Konrad

    2017-06-01

    The simulation of granular flows including segregation effects in large industrial processes using particle methods is accurate, but very time-consuming. To overcome the long computation times a macroscopic model is a natural choice. Therefore, we couple a mixture theory based segregation model to a hydrodynamic model of Navier-Stokes-type, describing the flow behavior of the granular material. The granular flow model is a hybrid model derived from kinetic theory and a soil mechanical approach to cover the regime of fast dilute flow, as well as slow dense flow, where the density of the granular material is close to the maximum packing density. Originally, the segregation model has been formulated by Thornton and Gray for idealized avalanches. It is modified and adapted to be in the preferred form for the coupling. In the final coupled model the segregation process depends on the local state of the granular system. On the other hand, the granular system changes as differently mixed regions of the granular material differ i.e. in the packing density. For the modeling process the focus lies on dry granular material flows of two particle types differing only in size but can be easily extended to arbitrary granular mixtures of different particle size and density. To solve the coupled system a finite volume approach is used. To test the model the rotational mixing of small and large particles in a tumbler is simulated.

  5. Composite material including nanocrystals and methods of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bawendi, Moungi G.; Sundar, Vikram C.

    2010-04-06

    Temperature-sensing compositions can include an inorganic material, such as a semiconductor nanocrystal. The nanocrystal can be a dependable and accurate indicator of temperature. The intensity of emission of the nanocrystal varies with temperature and can be highly sensitive to surface temperature. The nanocrystals can be processed with a binder to form a matrix, which can be varied by altering the chemical nature of the surface of the nanocrystal. A nanocrystal with a compatibilizing outer layer can be incorporated into a coating formulation and retain its temperature sensitive emissive properties.

  6. Nanobiotechnology: synthetic biology meets materials science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewett, Michael C; Patolsky, Fernando

    2013-08-01

    Nanotechnology, the area of science focused on the control of matter in the nanometer scale, allows ground-breaking changes of the fundamental properties of matter that are often radically different compared to those exhibited by the bulk counterparts. In view of the fact that dimensionality plays a key role in determining the qualities of matter, the realization of the great potential of nanotechnology has opened the door to other disciplines such as life sciences and medicine, where the merging between them offers exciting new applications, along with basic science research. The application of nanotechnology in life sciences, nanobiotechnology, is now having a profound impact on biological circuit design, bioproduction systems, synthetic biology, medical diagnostics, disease therapy and drug delivery. This special issue is dedicated to the overview of how we are learning to control biopolymers and biological machines at the molecular- and nanoscale. In addition, it covers far-reaching progress in the design and synthesis of nanoscale materials, thus enabling the construction of integrated systems in which the component blocks are comparable in size to the chemical and biological entities under investigation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Teaching Methods in Biology Education and Sustainability Education Including Outdoor Education for Promoting Sustainability--A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeronen, Eila; Palmberg, Irmeli; Yli-Panula, Eija

    2017-01-01

    There are very few studies concerning the importance of teaching methods in biology education and environmental education including outdoor education for promoting sustainability at the levels of primary and secondary schools and pre-service teacher education. The material was selected using special keywords from biology and sustainable education…

  8. The preparation of four biological reference materials for QUASIMEME

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, van S.P.J.; Pieters, H.; Boer, de J.

    2004-01-01

    Four biological materials have been prepared for use in QUASIMEME interlaboratory studies including a shrimp sample for metal analysis (QM01-1) and two mussel (QO01-3 and QO02-2) and one mackerel sample (QO02-1) for organic contaminant analysis.

  9. Mechanical properties of nanostructure of biological materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Baohua; Gao, Huajian

    2004-09-01

    Natural biological materials such as bone, teeth and nacre are nanocomposites of protein and mineral with superior strength. It is quite a marvel that nature produces hard and tough materials out of protein as soft as human skin and mineral as brittle as classroom chalk. What are the secrets of nature? Can we learn from this to produce bio-inspired materials in the laboratory? These questions have motivated us to investigate the mechanics of protein-mineral nanocomposite structure. Large aspect ratios and a staggered alignment of mineral platelets are found to be the key factors contributing to the large stiffness of biomaterials. A tension-shear chain (TSC) model of biological nanostructure reveals that the strength of biomaterials hinges upon optimizing the tensile strength of the mineral crystals. As the size of the mineral crystals is reduced to nanoscale, they become insensitive to flaws with strength approaching the theoretical strength of atomic bonds. The optimized tensile strength of mineral crystals thus allows a large amount of fracture energy to be dissipated in protein via shear deformation and consequently enhances the fracture toughness of biocomposites. We derive viscoelastic properties of the protein-mineral nanostructure and show that the toughness of biocomposite can be further enhanced by the viscoelastic properties of protein.

  10. Cladding material, tube including such cladding material and methods of forming the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, John E.; Griffith, George W.

    2016-03-01

    A multi-layered cladding material including a ceramic matrix composite and a metallic material, and a tube formed from the cladding material. The metallic material forms an inner liner of the tube and enables hermetic sealing of thereof. The metallic material at ends of the tube may be exposed and have an increased thickness enabling end cap welding. The metallic material may, optionally, be formed to infiltrate voids in the ceramic matrix composite, the ceramic matrix composite encapsulated by the metallic material. The ceramic matrix composite includes a fiber reinforcement and provides increased mechanical strength, stiffness, thermal shock resistance and high temperature load capacity to the metallic material of the inner liner. The tube may be used as a containment vessel for nuclear fuel used in a nuclear power plant or other reactor. Methods for forming the tube comprising the ceramic matrix composite and the metallic material are also disclosed.

  11. Evaluation of the Materials Developed For Biology Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İ. Ümit YAPICI

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the course materials developed for biology teaching in Instructional Technologies and Material Design course by the pre-service biology teachers. The research group consist of 34 students who attending Instructional Technologies and Material Design course and studying at Department of Biology Education of Ziya Gökalp Education Faculty in Dicle University. The evaluation questionnaire which includes 17 items developed by İşman (2008 was used as data collection tool. Materials are organized as follows: Classical Educational Technologies 1 (black board, white board, magnetic board, swivel plate, etc.; Classical Educational Technologies 2 (graphics, modelsampling, posters, etc..; Modern Educational Technologies (video-TV, overhead projector, data projector, smart board, etc.. The findings of the means as follows: Classical Education Technology 1 X = 3.62; Classic Educational Technology 2 X = 3.64, respectively Modern Education Technology X = 3.81. As a result, pe-service biology teachers’ views about Modern Education Technology were more positive. Technology laboratories can be established for the students to prepare the materials. Also; the course time can be increased

  12. Femtosecond laser patterning of biological materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Jeon, Hojeong; Hidai, Hirofumi; Hwang, David J.

    2011-03-01

    This paper aims at presenting a review of work at the Laser Thermal Laboratory on the microscopic laser modification of biological materials using ultrafast laser pulses. We have devised a new method for fabricating high aspect ratio patterns of varying height by using two-photon polymerization process in order to study contact guidance and directed growth of biological cells. Studies using NIH-3T3 and MDCK cells indicate that cell morphology on fiber scaffolds is influenced by the pattern of actin microfilament bundles. Cells experienced different strength of contact guidance depending on the ridge height. Cell morphology and motility was investigated on micronscale anisotropic cross patterns and parallel line patterns having different aspect ratios. A significant effect on cell alignment and directionality of migration was observed. Cell morphology and motility were influenced by the aspect ratio of the cross pattern, the grid size, and the ridge height. Cell contractility was examined microscopically in order to measure contractile forces generated by individual cells on self-standing fiber scaffolds.

  13. Reaction behaviour of reactor materials, including concrete during core meltdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holleck, H.; Hofmann, P.; Skokan, A.

    1976-01-01

    The problems dealt with in the studies on the material behaviour of core meltdowns are sketched, and an outline is given on the experimental investigations now in progress. These studies aim at establishing a model which is as realistic as possible, and the paper tries to show that knowledge on the reaction behaviour is a basic prerequisite for this. (orig./TK) [de

  14. Thermal and Electrical Properties of Nanocomposites, Including Material Properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kochetov, R.

    2012-01-01

    The research described in this thesis is part of a state-funded IOP-EMVT project in cooperation with industrial companies, aiming at the design, assessment and implementation of new, environmental friendly (e.g. oil and SF6 - free) solid dielectric materials. A large disadvantage of solid polymer

  15. Programmable temperature control system for biological materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmo, V. J.; Harrison, R. G.; Rinfret, A. P.

    1982-01-01

    A system was constructed which allows programmable temperature-time control for a 5 cu cm sample volume of arbitrary biological material. The system also measures the parameters necessary for the determination of the sample volume specific heat and thermal conductivity as a function of temperature, and provides a detailed measurement of the temperature during phase change and a means of calculating the heat of the phase change. Steady-state and dynamic temperature control is obtained by supplying heat to the sample volume through resistive elements constructed as an integral part of the sample container. For cooling purposes, this container is totally immersed into a cold heat sink. Using a mixture of dry ice and alcohol at 79 C, the sample volume can be controlled from +40 to -60 C at rates from steady state to + or - 65 C/min. Steady-state temperature precision is better than 0.2 C, while the dynamic capability depends on the temperature rate of change as well as the mass of both the sample and the container.

  16. Laser interaction with biological material mathematical modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Kulikov, Kirill

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the principles of laser interaction with biological cells and tissues of varying degrees of organization. The problems of biomedical diagnostics are considered. Scattering of laser irradiation of blood cells is modeled for biological structures (dermis, epidermis, vascular plexus). An analytic theory is provided which is based on solving the wave equation for the electromagnetic field. It allows the accurate analysis of interference effects arising from the partial superposition of scattered waves. Treated topics of mathematical modeling are: optical characterization of biological tissue with large-scale and small-scale inhomogeneities in the layers, heating blood vessel under laser irradiation incident on the outer surface of the skin and thermo-chemical denaturation of biological structures at the example of human skin.

  17. Social justice and research using human biological material: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Social justice in the context of research using human biological material is an important contemporary legal-ethical issue. A question at the heart of this issue is the following: Is it fair to expect a research participant (a person who participates in such research by, among others, making available biological material from his or ...

  18. e-Biologics: Fabrication of Sustainable Electronics with "Green" Biological Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovley, Derek R

    2017-06-27

    The growing ubiquity of electronic devices is increasingly consuming substantial energy and rare resources for materials fabrication, as well as creating expansive volumes of toxic waste. This is not sustainable. Electronic biological materials (e-biologics) that are produced with microbes, or designed with microbial components as the guide for synthesis, are a potential green solution. Some e-biologics can be fabricated from renewable feedstocks with relatively low energy inputs, often while avoiding the harsh chemicals used for synthesizing more traditional electronic materials. Several are completely free of toxic components, can be readily recycled, and offer unique features not found in traditional electronic materials in terms of size, performance, and opportunities for diverse functionalization. An appropriate investment in the concerted multidisciplinary collaborative research required to identify and characterize e-biologics and to engineer materials and devices based on e-biologics could be rewarded with a new "green age" of sustainable electronic materials and devices. Copyright © 2017 Lovley.

  19. Functionalized apertures for the detection of chemical and biological materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letant, Sonia E.; van Buuren, Anthony W.; Terminello, Louis J.; Thelen, Michael P.; Hope-Weeks, Louisa J.; Hart, Bradley R.

    2010-12-14

    Disclosed are nanometer to micron scale functionalized apertures constructed on a substrate made of glass, carbon, semiconductors or polymeric materials that allow for the real time detection of biological materials or chemical moieties. Many apertures can exist on one substrate allowing for the simultaneous detection of numerous chemical and biological molecules. One embodiment features a macrocyclic ring attached to cross-linkers, wherein the macrocyclic ring has a biological or chemical probe extending through the aperture. Another embodiment achieves functionalization by attaching chemical or biological anchors directly to the walls of the apertures via cross-linkers.

  20. Laser-matter structuration of optical and biological materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallo, L., E-mail: hallo@celia.u-bordeaux1.fr [CELIA, Universite Bordeaux 1 (France); Mezel, C., E-mail: candice.mezel@cea.fr [CELIA, Universite Bordeaux 1 (France); CEA Le Ripault, 37260 Monts (France); Guillemot, F., E-mail: fabien.guillemot@inserm.fr [UMR 577 INSERM, Universite Bordeaux 2 (France); Chimier, B., E-mail: chimier@celia.u-bordeaux1.fr [CELIA, Universite Bordeaux 1 (France); Bourgeade, A., E-mail: antoine.bourgeade@cea.fr [CEA-CESTA, Le Barp (France); Regan, C., E-mail: regan@celia.u-bordeaux1.fr [CELIA, Universite Bordeaux 1 (France); Duchateau, G., E-mail: duchateau@celia.u-bordeaux1.fr [CELIA, Universite Bordeaux 1 (France); Souquet, A., E-mail: agnes.souquet@inserm.fr [UMR 577 INSERM, Universite Bordeaux 2 (France); Hebert, D., E-mail: david.hebert@cea.fr [CEA-CESTA, Le Barp (France)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In this study we model nanomaterial structuring. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The laser energy deposition is discussed first. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Full and approximate models are discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynamic material response is addressed via hydrodynamics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sild effects are accounted for - Abstract: Interaction of ultrafast laser, i.e. from the femtosecond (fs) to the nanosecond (ns) regime, with initially transparent matter may produce very high energy density hot spots in the bulk as well as at the material surface, depending on focusing conditions. In the fs regime, absorption is due to ionisation of the dielectric, which enables absorption process to begin, and then hydrodynamic to take place. In the ns regime both absorption and hydrodynamic are coupled to each other, which complexifies considerably the comprehension but matter structuration looks similar. A numerical tool including solution of 3D Maxwell equations and a rate equation for free electrons is first compared to some available simple models of laser energy absorption. Then, subsequent material deformation, i.e. structuration, is determined by solving hydrodynamic equations, including or not solid behaviour. We show that nature of the final structures strongly depends on the amount of deposited energy and on the shape of the absorption zone. Then we address some problems related to laser-matter structuration of optical and biological materials in the fs, ps and ns regimes.

  1. Nuclear, biological and chemical contamination survivability of Army material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feeney, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    Army Regulation (AR) 70-71, Nuclear, Biological and Chemical (NBC) Contamination Survivability of Army Material, published during 1984, establishes Army policy and procedures for the development and acquisition of material to ensure its survivablility and sustainability on the NBC-contaminated battlefield. This regulation defines NBC contamination as a term that includes both the individual and collective effects of residual radiological, biological, and chemical contamination. AR 70-71 applies to all mission-essential equipment within the Army. NBC contamination survivability is the capability of a system and its crew to withstand an NBC-contaminated environment, including decontamination, without losing the ability to accomplish the assigned mission. Characteristics of NBC contamination survivability are decontaminability, hardness, and compatability. These characteristics are engineering design criteria which are intended for use only in a developmental setting. To comply with AR 70-71, each mission-essential item must address all three criteria. The Department of Defense (DOD) has published a draft instruction addressing acquisition of NBC contamination survivable systems. This instruction will apply throughout DOD to those programs, systems and subsystems designated by the Secretary of Defense as major systems acquisition programs and to those non-major systems that have potential impact on critical functions

  2. REPRESENTASI VISUAL BUKU BIOLOGI SMA PADA MATERI KINGDOM PLANTAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asep Mulyani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini berjudul “Representasi Visual Buku Biologi SMA pada Materi Kingdom Plantae”. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui representasi visual yang terdapat pada buku teks biologi SMA. Pendekatan penelitian yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini adalah deskriptif. Sampel dalam penelitian ini adalah tujuh buku biologi SMA kelas X. Instrument yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini yaitu lembar observasi dalam bentuk checklist untuk mengidentifikasi representasi visual yang terdapat pada buku biologi. Data yang telah didapatkan dideskripsikan berdasarkan tipe-tipe representasi visual. Hasil penelitian menunjukan, jenis representasi visual dalam bentuk gambar menunjukan tingkat yang paling banyak digunakan dibandingkan dengan diagram. Hubungan antara representasi visual dengan isi materi banyak yang bermakna. Hubungan representasi visual dengan realitas menunjukan hubungan yang realistis. Representasi visual yang terdapat dalam buku biologi mayoritas berfungsi dalam memberikan contoh. Kesimpulan yang didapatkan dalam penelitian ini menunjukan kalau representasi visual dalam buku biologi mempunyai peranan yang penting. Kata Kunci: Representasi visual, Buku teks, gambar, diagram.

  3. REPRESENTASI VISUAL BUKU BIOLOGI SMA PADA MATERI KINGDOM PLANTAE

    OpenAIRE

    Asep Mulyani

    2014-01-01

    Penelitian ini berjudul “Representasi Visual Buku Biologi SMA pada Materi Kingdom Plantae”. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui representasi visual yang terdapat pada buku teks biologi SMA. Pendekatan penelitian yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini adalah deskriptif. Sampel dalam penelitian ini adalah tujuh buku biologi SMA kelas X. Instrument yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini yaitu lembar observasi dalam bentuk checklist untuk mengidentifikasi representasi visual yang terdapat pada bu...

  4. Mechanical–biological treatment: Performance and potentials. An LCA of 8 MBT plants including waste characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montejo, Cristina; Tonini, Davide; Márquez, María del Carmen

    2013-01-01

    In the endeavour of avoiding presence of biodegradable waste in landfills and increasing recycling, mechanical–biological treatment (MBT) plants have seen a significant increase in number and capacity in the last two decades. The aim of these plants is separating and stabilizing the quickly...... of the MBT plants. These widely differed in type of biological treatment and recovery efficiencies. The results indicated that the performance is strongly connected with energy and materials recovery efficiency. The recommendation for upgrading and/or commissioning of future plants is to optimize materials...... recovery through increased automation of the selection and to prioritize biogas-electricity production from the organic fraction over direct composting. The optimal strategy for refuse derived fuel (RDF) management depends upon the environmental compartment to be prioritized and the type of marginal...

  5. Analytical Chemistry at the Interface Between Materials Science and Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Janese C. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2000-09-21

    Likedlessentid sciences, anal~cd chetis~continues toreinvent itself. Moving beyond its traditional roles of identification and quantification, analytical chemistry is now expanding its frontiers into areas previously reserved to other disciplines. This work describes several research efforts that lie at the new interfaces between analytical chemistry and two of these disciplines, namely materials science and biology. In the materials science realm, the search for new materials that may have useful or unique chromatographic properties motivated the synthesis and characterization of electrically conductive sol-gels. In the biology realm, the search for new surface fabrication schemes that would permit or even improve the detection of specific biological reactions motivated the design of miniaturized biological arrays. Collectively, this work represents some of analytical chemistry’s newest forays into these disciplines. The introduction section to this dissertation provides a literature review on several of the key aspects of this work. In advance of the materials science discussion, a brief introduction into electrochemically-modulated liquid chromatography (EMLC) and sol-gel chemistry is provided. In advance of the biological discussions, brief overviews of scanning force microscopy (SFM) and the oxidative chemistry used to construct our biological arrays are provided. This section is followed by four chapters, each of which is presented as a separate manuscript, and focuses on work that describes some of our cross-disciplinary efforts within materials science and biology. This dissertation concludes with a general summary and future prospectus.

  6. New Materials for Biological Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    been demonstrated to produce their own conductive nanowires (called pilli) that aid in the transfer of electrons via DET between the microbe and the... biopolymer chitosan, aids dispersion of various nanomaterials, including graphene, easing the formation of thin film electrodes. Again the model...electrodes have been shown to be advantageous when used as enzyme anodes with immobilized oxidases or dehydrogenases or with microorganisms

  7. Materiomics: biological protein materials, from nano to macro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Cranford

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Steven Cranford, Markus J BuehlerCenter for Materials Science and Engineering, Laboratory for Atomistic and Molecular Mechanics, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USAAbstract: Materiomics is an emerging field of science that provides a basis for multiscale material system characterization, inspired in part by natural, for example, protein-based materials. Here we outline the scope and explain the motivation of the field of materiomics, as well as demonstrate the benefits of a materiomic approach in the understanding of biological and natural materials as well as in the design of de novo materials. We discuss recent studies that exemplify the impact of materiomics – discovering Nature’s complexity through a materials science approach that merges concepts of material and structure throughout all scales and incorporates feedback loops that facilitate sensing and resulting structural changes at multiple scales. The development and application of materiomics is illustrated for the specific case of protein-based materials, which constitute the building blocks of a variety of biological systems such as tendon, bone, skin, spider silk, cells, and tissue, as well as natural composite material systems (a combination of protein-based and inorganic constituents such as nacre and mollusk shells, and other natural multiscale systems such as cellulose-based plant and wood materials. An important trait of these materials is that they display distinctive hierarchical structures across multiple scales, where molecular details are exhibited in macroscale mechanical responses. Protein materials are intriguing examples of materials that balance multiple tasks, representing some of the most sustainable material solutions that integrate structure and function despite severe limitations in the quality and quantity of material building blocks. However, up until now, our attempts to analyze and

  8. Integrative Biological Chemistry Program Includes the Use of Informatics Tools, GIS and SAS Software Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Malcolm J.; Kashmar, Richard J.; Hurst, Kent; Fiedler, Frank; Gross, Catherine E.; Deol, Jasbir K.; Wilson, Alora

    2015-01-01

    Wesley College is a private, primarily undergraduate minority-serving institution located in the historic district of Dover, Delaware (DE). The College recently revised its baccalaureate biological chemistry program requirements to include a one-semester Physical Chemistry for the Life Sciences course and project-based experiential learning…

  9. Materials and methods for delivery of biological drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelikin, Alexander N.; Ehrhardt, Carsten; Healy, Anne Marie

    2016-11-01

    Biological drugs generated via recombinant techniques are uniquely positioned due to their high potency and high selectivity of action. The major drawback of this class of therapeutics, however, is their poor stability upon oral administration and during subsequent circulation. As a result, biological drugs have very low bioavailability and short therapeutic half-lives. Fortunately, tools of chemistry and biotechnology have been developed into an elaborate arsenal, which can be applied to improve the pharmacokinetics of biological drugs. Depot-type release systems are available to achieve sustained release of drugs over time. Conjugation to synthetic or biological polymers affords long circulating formulations. Administration of biological drugs through non-parenteral routes shows excellent performance and the first products have reached the market. This Review presents the main accomplishments in this field and illustrates the materials and methods behind existing and upcoming successful formulations and delivery strategies for biological drugs.

  10. Materials Manufactured from 3D Printed Synthetic Biology Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, Diana; Micks, Ashley

    2013-01-01

    Many complex, biologically-derived materials have extremely useful properties (think wood or silk), but are unsuitable for space-related applications due to production, manufacturing, or processing limitations. Large-scale ecosystem-based production, such as raising and harvesting trees for wood, is impractical in a self-contained habitat such as a space station or potential Mars colony. Manufacturing requirements, such as the specialized equipment needed to harvest and process cotton, add too much upmass for current launch technology. Cells in nature are already highly specialized for making complex biological materials on a micro scale. We envision combining these strengths with the recently emergent technologies of synthetic biology and 3D printing to create 3D-structured arrays of cells that are bioengineered to secrete different materials in a specified three-dimensional pattern.

  11. Occupational accidents involving biological material among public health workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodi, Mônica Bonagamba; Marziale, Maria Helena Palucci; Robazzi, Maria Lúcia do Carmo Cruz

    2007-01-01

    This descriptive research aimed to recognize the occurrence of work accidents (WA) involving exposure to biological material among health workers at Public Health Units in Ribeirão Preto-SP, Brazil. A quantitative approach was adopted. In 2004, 155 accidents were notified by means of the Work Accident Communication (WAC). Sixty-two accidents (40%) involved exposure to biological material that could cause infections like Hepatitis and Aids. The highest number of victims (42 accidents) came from the category of nursing aids and technicians. Needles were responsible for 80.6% of accidents and blood was the biological material involved in a majority of occupational exposure cases. This subject needs greater attention, so that prevention measures can be implemented, which consider the peculiarities of the activities carried out by the different professional categories.

  12. Composite materials and bodies including silicon carbide and titanium diboride and methods of forming same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillo, Thomas M.; Chu, Henry S.; Harrison, William M.; Bailey, Derek

    2013-01-22

    Methods of forming composite materials include coating particles of titanium dioxide with a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon, and reacting the titanium dioxide with the substance including boron and the substance including carbon to form titanium diboride. The methods may be used to form ceramic composite bodies and materials, such as, for example, a ceramic composite body or material including silicon carbide and titanium diboride. Such bodies and materials may be used as armor bodies and armor materials. Such methods may include forming a green body and sintering the green body to a desirable final density. Green bodies formed in accordance with such methods may include particles comprising titanium dioxide and a coating at least partially covering exterior surfaces thereof, the coating comprising a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon.

  13. XPS analysis of nanostructured materials and biological surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, D.R.; Engelhard, M.H.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the types of information that XPS can provide about a variety of nanostructured materials. Although it is sometimes not considered a 'nanoscale analysis method,' XPS can provide a great deal of information about elemental distributions, layer or coating structure and thicknesses, surface functionality, and even particles sizes on the 1-20 nm scale for sample types that may not be readily analyzed by other methods. This information is important for both synthetic nanostructured or nanosized materials and a variety of natural materials with nanostructure. Although the links between nanostructure materials and biological systems may not at first be obvious, many biological molecules and some organisms are the sizes of nanoparticles. The nanostructure of cells and microbes plays a significant role in how they interact with their environment. The interaction of biomolecules with nanoparticles is important for medical and toxicity studies. The interaction of biomolecules is important for sensor function and many nanomaterials are now the active elements in sensors. This paper first discusses how nanostructures influences XPS data as a part of understanding how simple models of sample structure and data analysis can be used to extract information about the physical and chemical structures of the materials being analyzed. Equally important, aspects of sample and analysis limitations and challenges associated with understanding nanostructured materials are indicated. Examples of the application of XPS to nanostructured and biological systems and materials are provided.

  14. Social justice and research using human biological material: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and provide that a person from whose body human biological material is withdrawn for research purposes may only be reimbursed for reasonable expenses incurred by him or her.[1,reg11] Accordingly, our law as it currently stands upholds an altruistic paradigm for participation in research and effectively outlaws any form ...

  15. The determination of copper in biological materials by flame spectrophotometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, G. E.; Ryan, M.

    1962-01-01

    A method for the determination of the copper content of biological materials by flame spectrophotometry is described. The effects of interference by ions such as sodium and phosphate were eliminated by isolating copper as the dithizonate in CCl4. Results obtained for the urinary excretion of copper by a patient with Wilson's disease before and after treatment with penicillamine are reported. PMID:14479334

  16. Theory of light transfer in food and biological materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this chapter, we first define the basic radiometric quantities that are needed for describing light propagation in food and biological materials. Radiative transfer theory is then derived, according to the principle of the conservation of energy. Because the radiative transfer theory equation is ...

  17. Evaluation of geologic materials to limit biological intrusion into low-level radioactive waste disposal sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakonson, T.E.

    1986-02-01

    This report describes the results of a three-year research program to evaluate the performance of selected soil and rock trench cap designs in limiting biological intrusion into simulated waste. The report is divided into three sections including a discussion of background material on biological interactions with waste site trench caps, a presentation of experimental data from field studies conducted at several scales, and a final section on the interpretation and limitations of the data including implications for the user

  18. Aluminum analysis in biological reference material by nondestructive methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landsberger, S.; Arendt, A.; Keck, B.; Glascock, M.

    1988-01-01

    In recent years, the determination of aluminum in biological materials has become the subject of many research projects. This interest stems from an increasing knowledge of the toxicity of aluminum to both aquatic and human life. Unfortunately, the detection of aluminum in biological materials has proven troublesome. The use of traditional chemical determinations has been shown to be very long and somewhat complicated. Several attempts have been made using neutron activation analysis, but an interfering reaction must be taken into account. In this experiment the rabbit irradiation facilities at the University of Missouri Research Reactor were used. The aluminum concentrations for eight certified reference materials are shown. When US National Bureau of Standards (NBS) value is given as certified or as an information value, results agree very well. The results for NBS 1572 citrus leaves agree, and NBS 1577 results agree very well with that of Glascock et al

  19. Systems and Methods for Fabricating Structures Including Metallic Glass-Based Materials Using Low Pressure Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Douglas C. (Inventor); Kennett, Andrew (Inventor)

    2018-01-01

    Systems and methods to fabricate objects including metallic glass-based materials using low-pressure casting techniques are described. In one embodiment, a method of fabricating an object that includes a metallic glass-based material includes: introducing molten alloy into a mold cavity defined by a mold using a low enough pressure such that the molten alloy does not conform to features of the mold cavity that are smaller than 100 microns; and cooling the molten alloy such that it solidifies, the solid including a metallic glass-based material.

  20. Charged particle activation analysis of phosphorus in biological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masumoto, K.; Yagi, M.

    1983-01-01

    Charged particle activation analysis of phosphorus in biological materials using the 31 P(α,n) sup(34m)Cl reaction has been studied. Since sup(34m)Cl is also produced by the 32 S(α,pn) and the 35 Cl(α,α'n) reactions, the thick-target yield curves on phosphorus, sulfur and chlorine were determined in order to choose the optimum irradiation conditions. As a result, it was found that the activation analysis for phosphorus without interferences from sulfur and chlorine is possible by bombarding with less than 17 MeV alphas. The applicability of this method to biological samples was then examined by irradiating several standard reference materials. It was confirmed that phosphorus can readily be determined at the detection limit of 1μg free from interferences due to the matrix elements. (author)

  1. Routine Determination of Arsenic in Biological Materials. RCN Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroon, J.J.; Das, H.A.

    1970-08-01

    This text describes a routine procedure for the determination of arsenic in biological materials by neutron activation analysis. Unlike most methods published in literature the present analysis is not based on chemical separation by destination. After a first purification by anion-exchange the 76 As-activity (T1/2 = 26,4 h) is isolated by precipitation as the metal. The method was tested by analysis of the standard kale powder. This material was prepared and issued by Bowen in 1966, to provide a reliable standard for the intercomparison of various methods. (author)

  2. WHO standards for biotherapeutics, including biosimilars: an example of the evaluation of complex biological products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knezevic, Ivana; Griffiths, Elwyn

    2017-11-01

    The most advanced regulatory processes for complex biological products have been put in place in many countries to provide appropriate regulatory oversight of biotherapeutic products in general, and similar biotherapeutics in particular. This process is still ongoing and requires regular updates to national regulatory requirements in line with scientific developments and up-to-date standards. For this purpose, strong knowledge of and expertise in evaluating biotherapeutics in general and similar biotherapeutic products, also called biosimilars, in particular is essential. Here, we discuss the World Health Organization's international standard-setting role in the regulatory evaluation of recombinant DNA-derived biotherapeutic products, including biosimilars, and provide examples that may serve as models for moving forward with nonbiological complex medicinal products. A number of scientific challenges and regulatory considerations imposed by the advent of biosimilars are described, together with the lessons learned, to stimulate future discussions on this topic. In addition, the experiences of facilitating the implementation of guiding principles for evaluation of similar biotherapeutic products into regulatory and manufacturers' practices in various countries over the past 10 years are briefly explained, with the aim of promoting further developments and regulatory convergence of complex biological and nonbiological products. © 2017 The Authors. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. The World Health Organization retains copyright and all other rights in the manuscript of this article as submitted for publication.

  3. Biologically inspired autonomous structural materials with controlled toughening and healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Michael E.; Sodano, Henry A.

    2010-04-01

    The field of structural health monitoring (SHM) has made significant contributions in the field of prognosis and damage detection in the past decade. The advantageous use of this technology has not been integrated into operational structures to prevent damage from propagating or to heal injured regions under real time loading conditions. Rather, current systems relay this information to a central processor or human operator, who then determines a course of action such as altering the mission or scheduling repair maintenance. Biological systems exhibit advanced sensory and healing traits that can be applied to the design of material systems. For instance, bone is the major structural component in vertebrates; however, unlike modern structural materials, bone has many properties that make it effective for arresting the propagation of cracks and subsequent healing of the fractured area. The foremost goal for the development of future adaptive structures is to mimic biological systems, similar to bone, such that the material system can detect damage and deploy defensive traits to impede damage from propagating, thus preventing catastrophic failure while in operation. After sensing and stalling the propagation of damage, the structure must then be repaired autonomously using self healing mechanisms motivated by biological systems. Here a novel autonomous system is developed using shape memory polymers (SMPs), that employs an optical fiber network as both a damage detection sensor and a network to deliver stimulus to the damage site initiating adaptation and healing. In the presence of damage the fiber optic fractures allowing a high power laser diode to deposit a controlled level of thermal energy at the fractured sight locally reducing the modulus and blunting the crack tip, which significantly slows the crack growth rate. By applying a pre-induced strain field and utilizing the shape memory recovery effect, thermal energy can be deployed to close the crack and return

  4. Scanning probe microscopy in material science and biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cricenti, A; Colonna, S; Girasole, M; Gori, P; Ronci, F; Longo, G; Dinarelli, S; Luce, M; Rinaldi, M; Ortenzi, M

    2011-01-01

    A review of the activity of scanning probe microscopy at our Institute is presented, going from instrumentation to software development of scanning tunnelling microscopy, atomic force microscopy and scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM). Some of the most important experiments in material science and biology performed by our group through the years with these SPM techniques will be presented. Finally, infrared applications by coupling a SNOM with a free electron laser will also be presented.

  5. Diffusion theory in biology: a relic of mechanistic materialism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agutter, P S; Malone, P C; Wheatley, D N

    2000-01-01

    Diffusion theory explains in physical terms how materials move through a medium, e.g. water or a biological fluid. There are strong and widely acknowledged grounds for doubting the applicability of this theory in biology, although it continues to be accepted almost uncritically and taught as a basis of both biology and medicine. Our principal aim is to explore how this situation arose and has been allowed to continue seemingly unchallenged for more than 150 years. The main shortcomings of diffusion theory will be briefly reviewed to show that the entrenchment of this theory in the corpus of biological knowledge needs to be explained, especially as there are equally valid historical grounds for presuming that bulk fluid movement powered by the energy of cell metabolism plays a prominent note in the transport of molecules in the living body. First, the theory's evolution, notably from its origins in connection with the mechanistic materialist philosophy of mid nineteenth century physiology, is discussed. Following this, the entrenchment of the theory in twentieth century biology is analyzed in relation to three situations: the mechanism of oxygen transport between air and mammalian tissues; the structure and function of cell membranes; and the nature of the intermediary metalbolism, with its implicit presumptions about the intracellular organization and the movement of molecules within it. In our final section, we consider several historically based alternatives to diffusion theory, all of which have their precursors in nineteenth and twentieth century philosophy of science.

  6. Flexible Organic Electronics in Biology: Materials and Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Caizhi; Zhang, Meng; Yao, Mei Yu; Hua, Tao; Li, Li; Yan, Feng

    2015-12-09

    At the convergence of organic electronics and biology, organic bioelectronics attracts great scientific interest. The potential applications of organic semiconductors to reversibly transmit biological signals or stimulate biological tissues inspires many research groups to explore the use of organic electronics in biological systems. Considering the surfaces of movable living tissues being arbitrarily curved at physiological environments, the flexibility of organic bioelectronic devices is of paramount importance in enabling stable and reliable performances by improving the contact and interaction of the devices with biological systems. Significant advances in flexible organic bio-electronics have been achieved in the areas of flexible organic thin film transistors (OTFTs), polymer electrodes, smart textiles, organic electrochemical ion pumps (OEIPs), ion bipolar junction transistors (IBJTs) and chemiresistors. This review will firstly discuss the materials used in flexible organic bioelectronics, which is followed by an overview on various types of flexible organic bioelectronic devices. The versatility of flexible organic bioelectronics promises a bright future for this emerging area. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. MAK and BAT values list 2014. Maximum permissible concentrations at the place of work and biological tolerance values for working materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The book on the MAK (maximum permissible concentrations at the place of work) and BAT (biological tolerance values for working materials) value list 2014 includes the following chapters: (a) Maximum permissible concentrations at the place of work: definition, application and determination of MAT values, list of materials; carcinogenic working materials, sensibilizing working materials, aerosols, limiting the exposition peaks, skin resorption, MAK values during pregnancy, germ cell mutagens, specific working materials; (b) Biological tolerance values for working materials: definition and application of BAT values, list of materials, carcinogenic working materials, biological guide values, biological working material reference values.

  8. MAK and BAT values list 2015. Maximum permissible concentrations at the place of work and biological tolerance values for working materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The book on the MAK (maximum permissible concentrations at the place of work) and BAT (biological tolerance values for working materials) value list 2015 includes the following chapters: (a) Maximum permissible concentrations at the place of work: definition, application and determination of MAT values, list of materials; carcinogenic working materials, sensibilizing working materials, aerosols, limiting the exposition peaks, skin resorption, MAK values during pregnancy, germ cell mutagens, specific working materials; (b) Biological tolerance values for working materials: definition and application of BAT values, list of materials, carcinogenic working materials, biological guide values, biological working material reference values.

  9. Certification of biological candidates reference materials by neutron activation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabanov, Denis V.; Nesterova, Yulia V.; Merkulov, Viktor G.

    2018-03-01

    The paper gives the results of interlaboratory certification of new biological candidate reference materials by neutron activation analysis recommended by the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (Warsaw, Poland). The correctness and accuracy of the applied method was statistically estimated for the determination of trace elements in candidate reference materials. The procedure of irradiation in the reactor thermal fuel assembly without formation of fast neutrons was carried out. It excluded formation of interfering isotopes leading to false results. The concentration of more than 20 elements (e.g., Ba, Br, Ca, Co, Ce, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, La, Lu, Rb, Sb, Sc, Ta, Th, Tb, Yb, U, Zn) in candidate references of tobacco leaves and bottom sediment compared to certified reference materials were determined. It was shown that the average error of the applied method did not exceed 10%.

  10. Teaching Methods in Biology Education and Sustainability Education Including Outdoor Education for Promoting Sustainability—A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eila Jeronen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available There are very few studies concerning the importance of teaching methods in biology education and environmental education including outdoor education for promoting sustainability at the levels of primary and secondary schools and pre-service teacher education. The material was selected using special keywords from biology and sustainable education in several scientific databases. The article provides an overview of 24 selected articles published in peer-reviewed scientific journals from 2006–2016. The data was analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Altogether, 16 journals were selected and 24 articles were analyzed in detail. The foci of the analyses were teaching methods, learning environments, knowledge and thinking skills, psychomotor skills, emotions and attitudes, and evaluation methods. Additionally, features of good methods were investigated and their implications for teaching were emphasized. In total, 22 different teaching methods were found to improve sustainability education in different ways. The most emphasized teaching methods were those in which students worked in groups and participated actively in learning processes. Research points toward the value of teaching methods that provide a good introduction and supportive guidelines and include active participation and interactivity.

  11. A model of engineering materials inspired by biological tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holeček M.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The perfect ability of living tissues to control and adapt their mechanical properties to varying external conditions may be an inspiration for designing engineering materials. An interesting example is the smooth muscle tissue since this "material" is able to change its global mechanical properties considerably by a subtle mechanism within individual muscle cells. Multi-scale continuum models may be useful in designing essentially simpler engineering materials having similar properties. As an illustration we present the model of an incompressible material whose microscopic structure is formed by flexible, soft but incompressible balls connected mutually by linear springs. This simple model, however, shows a nontrivial nonlinear behavior caused by the incompressibility of balls and is very sensitive on some microscopic parameters. It may elucidate the way by which "small" changes in biopolymer networks within individual muscular cells may control the stiffness of the biological tissue, which outlines a way of designing similar engineering materials. The 'balls and springs' material presents also prestress-induced stiffening and allows elucidating a contribution of extracellular fluids into the tissue’s viscous properties.

  12. OECD Policy Recommendations on Security for Biological Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radisch, J.

    2007-01-01

    Biomedical innovations derived from research on pathogenic micro-organisms promise astounding health and economic benefits. Some such biological resources employed in the RandD for diagnostic kits, vaccines and therapeutics, however, possess capacity for dual-use; they may be misused to develop biological weapons. Research facilities entrusted with possession of such dual-use materials have a responsibility to comply with biosecurity measures that are designed to prevent loss or theft and thereby reduce the probability of a bioterrorist attack. The OECD has provided a forum for its Member countries to engage in a dialogue of international co-operation with a view to produce policies that achieve a research environment fortified by biosecurity measures and capable of producing health innovations. In 2007, the OECD developed a risk assessment framework and risk management principles for Biological Resource Centres. Ongoing policy work at the OECD will look to design biosecurity guidelines appropriate to a broader range of facilities in possession of dual-use materials, such as university and industrial laboratories.(author)

  13. Interfacing materials science and biology for drug carrier design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Such, Georgina K; Yan, Yan; Johnston, Angus P R; Gunawan, Sylvia T; Caruso, Frank

    2015-04-08

    Over the last ten years, there has been considerable research interest in the development of polymeric carriers for biomedicine. Such delivery systems have the potential to significantly reduce side effects and increase the bioavailability of poorly soluble therapeutics. The design of carriers has relied on harnessing specific variations in biological conditions, such as pH or redox potential, and more recently, by incorporating specific peptide cleavage sites for enzymatic hydrolysis. Although much progress has been made in this field, the specificity of polymeric carriers is still limited when compared with their biological counterparts. To synthesize the next generation of carriers, it is important to consider the biological rationale for materials design. This requires a detailed understanding of the cellular microenvironments and how these can be harnessed for specific applications. In this review, several important physiological cues in the cellular microenvironments are outlined, with a focus on changes in pH, redox potential, and the types of enzymes present in specific regions. Furthermore, recent studies that use such biologically inspired triggers to design polymeric carriers are highlighted, focusing on applications in the field of therapeutic delivery. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Organization and diffusion in biological and material fabrication problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, Niall Mari

    anhydrase and RuBisCO in a smaller volume raises the concentration of carbon dioxide around RuBisCO by switching from a regime where the carbonic anhydrase is saturated to non-saturated. Hyper-doping with femto-second lasers offers a versatile method for creating new materials including semi-conductor materials doped at beyond the equilibrium solubility limit. Silicon hyper-doped with sulfur has been shown to absorb highly in the infra-red region. Hyper-doped silicon already is already used in night-vision infra-red sensors and is being explored for other applications such as photovoltaics. Being able to finely tune the dopant profile in the material will allow us to achieve more efficient and effective devices. To better control the doping profile, we develop a model which correctly represents the physics of melting of Si and diffusion of dopant into the material. The thermal and solute diffusion model produces melt dynamics and dopant profiles consistent with experimental data. We present the results of numerical simulations. We identify two distinct mechanisms which account for the characteristic dopant profiles in experiments. A change in laser absorption such that the melt depth increases or a change in the mechanism of dopant integration from an "instant surface dose" to a surface flux can both account for changes in dopant profile with subsequent laser pulses.

  15. The material and biological characteristics of osteoinductive calcium phosphate ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhurong; Li, Xiangfeng; Tan, Yanfei

    2018-01-01

    Abstract The discovery of osteoinductivity of calcium phosphate (Ca-P) ceramics has set an enduring paradigm of conferring biological regenerative activity to materials with carefully designed structural characteristics. The unique phase composition and porous structural features of osteoinductive Ca-P ceramics allow it to interact with signaling molecules and extracellular matrices in the host system, creating a local environment conducive to new bone formation. Mounting evidence now indicate that the osteoinductive activity of Ca-P ceramics is linked to their physicochemical and three-dimensional structural properties. Inspired by this conceptual breakthrough, many laboratories have shown that other materials can be also enticed to join the rank of tissue-inducing biomaterials, and besides the bones, other tissues such as cartilage, nerves and blood vessels were also regenerated with the assistance of biomaterials. Here, we give a brief historical recount about the discovery of the osteoinductivity of Ca-P ceramics, summarize the underlying material factors and biological characteristics, and discuss the mechanism of osteoinduction concerning protein adsorption, and the interaction with different types of cells, and the involvement of the vascular and immune systems. PMID:29423267

  16. Activation analysis of biological materials at the Activation Analysis Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukula, F.; Obrusnik, I.; Simkova, M.; Kucera, J.; Krivanek, M.

    1976-01-01

    A review is presented of the work of the Activation Analysis Centre of the Nuclear Research Institute for different fields of the Czechoslovak economy, aimed primarily at analyzing biological materials with the purpose of determining the contents of the so-called vital trace elements and of elements which already have a toxic effect on the organism in trace concentrations. Another important field of research is the path of trace elements from the environment to the human organism. A destructive method for the simultaneous determination of 12 trace elements in 11 kinds of human tissue has been studied. (Z.M.)

  17. The role of material in homogeneities in biological growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grillo A.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the influence of the material in homogeneities that are generated by an isotropic growth on the source of mass acting within a growing living tissue. In order to do that, we need to study the interaction between these material in homogeneities and the chemical agents dissolved within the tissue. For this purpose, we use some ideas and methods from Condensed Matter Physics (e.g., the Path Integral technique employed in modeling Brownian processes and apply them to the Continuum Mechanics description of volumetric Growth. We believe that this approach may provide new physical insight into the interactions between the macroscopic dynamics of living systems and the evolution of the subsystems which activate biological processes.

  18. Micro-buckling in the nanocomposite structure of biological materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yewang; Ji, Baohua; Hwang, Keh-Chih; Huang, Yonggang

    2012-10-01

    Nanocomposite structure, consisting of hard mineral and soft protein, is the elementary building block of biological materials, where the mineral crystals are arranged in a staggered manner in protein matrix. This special alignment of mineral is supposed to be crucial to the structural stability of the biological materials under compressive load, but the underlying mechanism is not yet clear. In this study, we performed analytical analysis on the buckling strength of the nanocomposite structure by explicitly considering the staggered alignment of the mineral crystals, as well as the coordination among the minerals during the buckling deformation. Two local buckling modes of the nanostructure were identified, i.e., the symmetric mode and anti-symmetric mode. We showed that the symmetric mode often happens at large aspect ratio and large volume fraction of mineral, while the anti-symmetric happens at small aspect ratio and small volume fraction. In addition, we showed that because of the coordination of minerals with the help of their staggered alignment, the buckling strength of these two modes approached to that of the ideally continuous fiber reinforced composites at large aspect ratio given by Rosen's model, insensitive to the existing "gap"-like flaws between mineral tips. Furthermore, we identified a mechanism of buckling mode transition from local to global buckling with increase of aspect ratio, which was attributed to the biphasic dependence of the buckling strength on the aspect ratio. That is, for small aspect ratio, the local buckling strength is smaller than that of global buckling so that it dominates the buckling behavior of the nanocomposite; for comparatively larger aspect ratio, the local buckling strength is higher than that of global buckling so that the global buckling dominates the buckling behavior. We also found that the hierarchical structure can effectively enhance the buckling strength, particularly, this structural design enables

  19. Invited review liquid crystal models of biological materials and silk spinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Alejandro D; Herrera-Valencia, Edtson E

    2012-06-01

    A review of thermodynamic, materials science, and rheological liquid crystal models is presented and applied to a wide range of biological liquid crystals, including helicoidal plywoods, biopolymer solutions, and in vivo liquid crystals. The distinguishing characteristics of liquid crystals (self-assembly, packing, defects, functionalities, processability) are discussed in relation to biological materials and the strong correspondence between different synthetic and biological materials is established. Biological polymer processing based on liquid crystalline precursors includes viscoelastic flow to form and shape fibers. Viscoelastic models for nematic and chiral nematics are reviewed and discussed in terms of key parameters that facilitate understanding and quantitative information from optical textures and rheometers. It is shown that viscoelastic modeling the silk spinning process using liquid crystal theories sheds light on textural transitions in the duct of spiders and silk worms as well as on tactoidal drops and interfacial structures. The range and consistency of the predictions demonstrates that the use of mesoscopic liquid crystal models is another tool to develop the science and biomimetic applications of mesogenic biological soft matter. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Biological and environmental reference materials for trace elements, nuclides and organic microcontaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortes Toro, E.; Parr, R.M.; Clements, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    This report has been produced from a database on analytical reference materials of biological and environmental origin, which is maintained at the International Atomic Energy Agency. It is an updated version of an earlier report, published in 1985, which focussed mainly on reference materials for trace elements. In the present version of the report, reference materials for trace elements still constitute the major part of the data; however, information is also now included on a number of other selected analytes of relevance to IAEA programmes, i.e. radionuclides, stable isotopes and organic microcontaminants. The database presently contains 2,694 analyte values for 117 analytes in 116 biological and 77 environmental (non-biological) reference materials produced by 20 different suppliers. Additional information on the cost of the material, the unit size supplied, (weight or volume), and the minimum weight of material recommended for analysis is also provided (if available to the authors). It is expected that this report will help analysts to select the reference material that matches as closely as possible, with respect to matrix type and concentrations of the analytes of interest, the ''real'' samples that are to be analysed. Refs, 12 tabs

  1. The Widespread Prevalence and Functional Significance of Silk-Like Structural Proteins in Metazoan Biological Materials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmel McDougall

    Full Text Available In nature, numerous mechanisms have evolved by which organisms fabricate biological structures with an impressive array of physical characteristics. Some examples of metazoan biological materials include the highly elastic byssal threads by which bivalves attach themselves to rocks, biomineralized structures that form the skeletons of various animals, and spider silks that are renowned for their exceptional strength and elasticity. The remarkable properties of silks, which are perhaps the best studied biological materials, are the result of the highly repetitive, modular, and biased amino acid composition of the proteins that compose them. Interestingly, similar levels of modularity/repetitiveness and similar bias in amino acid compositions have been reported in proteins that are components of structural materials in other organisms, however the exact nature and extent of this similarity, and its functional and evolutionary relevance, is unknown. Here, we investigate this similarity and use sequence features common to silks and other known structural proteins to develop a bioinformatics-based method to identify similar proteins from large-scale transcriptome and whole-genome datasets. We show that a large number of proteins identified using this method have roles in biological material formation throughout the animal kingdom. Despite the similarity in sequence characteristics, most of the silk-like structural proteins (SLSPs identified in this study appear to have evolved independently and are restricted to a particular animal lineage. Although the exact function of many of these SLSPs is unknown, the apparent independent evolution of proteins with similar sequence characteristics in divergent lineages suggests that these features are important for the assembly of biological materials. The identification of these characteristics enable the generation of testable hypotheses regarding the mechanisms by which these proteins assemble and direct the

  2. Results of a Saxitoxin Proficiency Test Including Characterization of Reference Material and Stability Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsi Harju

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A saxitoxin (STX proficiency test (PT was organized as part of the Establishment of Quality Assurance for the Detection of Biological Toxins of Potential Bioterrorism Risk (EQuATox project. The aim of this PT was to provide an evaluation of existing methods and the European laboratories’ capabilities for the analysis of STX and some of its analogues in real samples. Homogenized mussel material and algal cell materials containing paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP toxins were produced as reference sample matrices. The reference material was characterized using various analytical methods. Acidified algal extract samples at two concentration levels were prepared from a bulk culture of PSP toxins producing dinoflagellate Alexandrium ostenfeldii. The homogeneity and stability of the prepared PT samples were studied and found to be fit-for-purpose. Thereafter, eight STX PT samples were sent to ten participating laboratories from eight countries. The PT offered the participating laboratories the possibility to assess their performance regarding the qualitative and quantitative detection of PSP toxins. Various techniques such as official Association of Official Analytical Chemists (AOAC methods, immunoassays, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry were used for sample analyses.

  3. Enhancing Reuse of Data and Biological Material in Medical Research: From FAIR to FAIR-Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holub, Petr; Kohlmayer, Florian; Prasser, Fabian; Mayrhofer, Michaela Th; Schlünder, Irene; Martin, Gillian M; Casati, Sara; Koumakis, Lefteris; Wutte, Andrea; Kozera, Łukasz; Strapagiel, Dominik; Anton, Gabriele; Zanetti, Gianluigi; Sezerman, Osman Ugur; Mendy, Maimuna; Valík, Dalibor; Lavitrano, Marialuisa; Dagher, Georges; Zatloukal, Kurt; van Ommen, GertJan B; Litton, Jan-Eric

    2018-01-23

    The known challenge of underutilization of data and biological material from biorepositories as potential resources for medical research has been the focus of discussion for over a decade. Recently developed guidelines for improved data availability and reusability-entitled FAIR Principles (Findability, Accessibility, Interoperability, and Reusability)-are likely to address only parts of the problem. In this article, we argue that biological material and data should be viewed as a unified resource. This approach would facilitate access to complete provenance information, which is a prerequisite for reproducibility and meaningful integration of the data. A unified view also allows for optimization of long-term storage strategies, as demonstrated in the case of biobanks. We propose an extension of the FAIR Principles to include the following additional components: (1) quality aspects related to research reproducibility and meaningful reuse of the data, (2) incentives to stimulate effective enrichment of data sets and biological material collections and its reuse on all levels, and (3) privacy-respecting approaches for working with the human material and data. These FAIR-Health principles should then be applied to both the biological material and data. We also propose the development of common guidelines for cloud architectures, due to the unprecedented growth of volume and breadth of medical data generation, as well as the associated need to process the data efficiently.

  4. Standard operating procedure for combustion of 14C - samples with OX-500 biological material oxidizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nashriyah Mat.

    1995-01-01

    This procedure is for the purpose of safe operation of OX-500 biological material oxidizer. For ease of operation, the operation flow chart (including testing the system and sample combustion) and end of day maintenance flow chart were simplified. The front view, diagrams and switches are duly copied from operating manual. Steps on sample preparation are also included for biotic and a biotic samples. This operating procedure is subjected to future reviews

  5. Experience in nuclear materials accountancy, including the use of computers, in the UKAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, A.R.; Adamson, A.S.; Good, P.T.; Terrey, D.R.

    1976-01-01

    The UKAEA have operated systems of nuclear materials accountancy in research and development establishments handling large quantities of material for over 20 years. In the course of that time changing requirements for nuclear materials control and increasing quantities of materials have required that accountancy systems be modified and altered to improve either the fundamental system or manpower utilization. The same accountancy principles are applied throughout the Authority but procedures at the different establishments vary according to the nature of their specific requirements; there is much in the cumulative experience of the UKAEA which could prove of value to other organizations concerned with nuclear materials accountancy or safeguards. This paper reviews the present accountancy system in the UKAEA and summarizes its advantages. Details are given of specific experience and solutions which have been found to overcome difficulties or to strengthen previous weak points. Areas discussed include the use of measurements, the establishment of measurement points (which is relevant to the designation of MBAs), the importance of regular physical stock-taking, and the benefits stemming from the existence of a separate accountancy section independent of operational management at large establishments. Some experience of a dual system of accountancy and criticality control is reported, and the present status of computerization of nuclear material accounts is summarized. Important aspects of the relationship between management systems of accountancy and safeguards' requirements are discussed briefly. (author)

  6. New Nuclear Materials Including Non Metallic Fuel Elements. Vol. II. Proceedings of the Conference on New Nuclear Materials Technology, Including Non Metallic Fuel Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1963-01-01

    One of the major aims of the International Atomic Energy Agency in furthering the peaceful uses of atomic energy is to encourage the development of economical nuclear power. Certainly, one of the more obvious methods of producing economical nuclear power is the development of economical fuels that can be used at high temperatures for long periods of time, and which have sufficient strength and integrity to operate under these conditions without permitting the release of fission products. In addition it is desirable that after irradiation these new fuels be economically reprocessed to reduce further the cost of the fuel cycle. As nuclear power becomes more and more competitive with conventional power the interest in new and more efficient higher-temperature fuels naturally increases rapidly. For these reasons, the Agency organized a Conference on New Nuclear Materials Technology, Including Non-Metallic Fuel Elements, which was held from 1 to 5 July 1963 at the International Hotel, Prague, with the assistance and co-operation of the Government of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic. A total of 151 scientists attended, from 23 countries and 4 international organizations. The participants heard and discussed more than 60 scientific papers. The Agency wishes to thank the scientists who attended this Conference for their papers and for many spirited discussions that truly mark a successful meeting. The Agency wishes also to record its gratitude for the assistance and generous hospitality accorded the Conference, the participants and the Agency's staff by the Government of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic and by the people of Prague. The scientific information contained in these Proceedings should help to quicken the pace of progress in the fabrication of new and m ore economical fuels, and it is hoped that these proceedings will be found useful to all workers in this and related fields

  7. Interactions Between Biological Cells and Layered Double Hydroxides: Towards Functional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forano, Claude; Bruna, Felipe; Mousty, Christine; Prevot, Vanessa

    2018-03-08

    This review highlights the current research on the interactions between biological cells and Layered Double Hydroxides (LDH). The as-prepared biohybrid materials appear extremely attractive in diverse fields of application relating to health care, environment and energy production. We describe how thanks to the main features of biological cells and LDH layers, various strategies of assemblies can be carried out for constructing smart biofunctional materials. The interactions between the two components are described with a peculiar attention to the adsorption, biocompatibilization, LDH layer internalization, antifouling and antimicrobial properties. The most significant achievements including authors' results, involving biological cells and LDH assemblies in waste water treatment, bioremediation and bioenergy generation are specifically addressed. © 2018 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Millimeter wave and terahertz dielectric properties of biological materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Usman Ansar

    Broadband dielectric properties of materials can be employed to identify, detect, and characterize materials through their unique spectral signatures. In this study, millimeter wave, submillimeter wave, and terahertz dielectric properties of biological substances inclusive of liquids, solids, and powders were obtained using Dispersive Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DFTS). Two broadband polarizing interferometers were constructed to test materials from 60 GHz to 1.2 THz. This is an extremely difficult portion of the frequency spectrum to obtain a material's dielectric properties since neither optical nor microwave-based techniques provide accurate data. The dielectric characteristics of liquids such as cyclohexane, chlorobenzene, benzene, ethanol, methanol, 1,4 dioxane, and 10% formalin were obtained using the liquid interferometer. Subsequently the solid interferometer was utilized to determine the dielectric properties of human breast tissues, which are fixed and preserved in 10% formalin. This joint collaboration with the Tufts New England Medical Center demonstrated a significant difference between the dielectric response of tumorous and non-tumorous breast tissues across the spectrum. Powders such as anthrax, flour, talc, corn starch, dry milk, and baking soda have been involved in a number of security threats and false alarms around the globe in the last decade. To be able to differentiate hoax attacks and serious security threats, the dielectric properties of common household powders were also examined using the solid interferometer to identify the powders' unique resonance peaks. A new sample preparation kit was designed to test the powder specimens. It was anticipated that millimeter wave and terahertz dielectric characterization will enable one to clearly distinguish one powder from the other; however most of the powders had relatively close dielectric responses and only Talc had a resonance signature recorded at 1.135 THz. Furthermore, due to

  9. MAK and BAT values list 2017. Maximum permissible concentrations at the place of work and biological tolerance values for working materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    The MAK and BAT values list 2017 includes the maximum permissible concentrations at the place of work and biological tolerance values for working materials. The following working materials are covered: carcinogenic working materials, sensitizing materials and aerosols. The report discusses the restriction of exposure peaks, skin resorption, MAK (maximum working place concentration) values during pregnancy, germ cell mutagens and specific working materials. Importance and application of BAT (biological working material tolerance) values, list of materials, carcinogens, biological guide values and reference values are also included.

  10. MAK and BAT values list 2016. Maximum permissible concentrations at the place of work and biological tolerance values for working materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    The MAK and BAT values list 2016 includes the maximum permissible concentrations at the place of work and biological tolerance values for working materials. The following working materials are covered: carcinogenic working materials, sensitizing materials and aerosols. The report discusses the restriction of exposure peaks, skin resorption, MAK (maximum working place concentration) values during pregnancy, germ cell mutagens and specific working materials. Importance and application of BAT (biological working material tolerance) values, list of materials, carcinogens, biological guide values and reference values are also included.

  11. Occupational accidents with exposure to biological material: Description of cases in Bahia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Técia Maria Santos Carneiro e Cordeiro

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: This study is included in the field of public health in Brazil, in particular occupational health, by the occupational accidents with exposure to biological material consists of a preventable injury. Thus, the objective was to describe risk factors the of occupational accidents with exposure to biological material and the conduct postexposure adopted notified of cases in Notifiable Diseases Information System (SINAN in the State of Bahia in 2012. Methods: This is a descriptive epidemiological study realized with data from the injuries of notifications SINAN in February 2013, the analysis was realized using descriptive statistics in absolute frequencies and relative. Results: The results indicate a higher occurrence of occupational accidents involving exposure to biological materials in Bahia in the female population (78.1% and aged between 30-49 years (51.5%; the blood was fluid larger contact in accidents 75.2% by percutaneous (71.5%; post-exposure procedures were adopted in accordance recommended by the Ministry of Health; divers information were not fulfilled in the notifications and only 23.8% of Occupational Accidents Comunication (CAT were issued. Conclusion: It is considered necessary to draw up strategies on occupational health and safety, consciousness of workers about the relevance of the measures adopted after occupational accidents with exposure to biological material and the training of professionals for case notification and research to fill all the fields of the notification form and also the issuance of CAT.

  12. HRI catalytic two-stage liquefaction (CTSL) process materials: chemical analysis and biological testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, C.W.; Later, D.W.

    1985-12-01

    This report presents data from the chemical analysis and biological testing of coal liquefaction materials obtained from the Hydrocarbon Research, Incorporated (HRI) catalytic two-stage liquefaction (CTSL) process. Materials from both an experimental run and a 25-day demonstration run were analyzed. Chemical methods of analysis included adsorption column chromatography, high-resolution gas chromatography, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, low-voltage probe-inlet mass spectrometry, and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The biological activity was evaluated using the standard microbial mutagenicity assay and an initiation/promotion assay for mouse-skin tumorigenicity. Where applicable, the results obtained from the analyses of the CTSL materials have been compared to those obtained from the integrated and nonintegrated two-stage coal liquefaction processes. 18 refs., 26 figs., 22 tabs.

  13. PROTECTION OF WOODEN MATERIALS AGAINST BIOLOGICAL ATTACK BY USING NANOTECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Havrlik

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This article is focused on protection of wooden materials by using nanofibrous textiles with biocidal addition, which continues on the work of a group at the Center for Nanotechnology at the Faculty of Civil Engineering in the CTU. Timber is a natural material which is predisposed for biodegradation and therefore it is essential to study suitable and effective protection against microorganisms. Wood is a material susceptible to biological corrosion and therefore it is necessary to protect it. The study compares biocidal efficiency of polymer solution as a coating and as a layer from nanofiber textiles. We used polyvinyl alcohol (PVA as a basic polymer which was enriched by substances from commercial Lignofix E – profi, solution of CuSO4 · 5H2O and AgNO3 and finally colloidal silver as an example of nanoparticles. The final concentration of the biocidal substance was 1 (v/wt% in fiber. The nanofiber textiles are produced on the device Nanospider NS LAB 500 (Elmarco, CR on cylinder rotating electrode. The study was divided into two parts, the first being an agar plate test and the second a test on samples from timber. The mixture of mold was used as the model organism. (Alternaria tenuissima, Pochonia bulbiosa, Trichoderma viride and Acremonium sclerotigenum. Comparison of efficiency between the polymer paint and nanofiber textiles showed no difference. The best results were shown by PVA with an addition of substances from the commercial biocidal treatment Lignofix-E Profi on the agar plate. The difference of result was shown on timbre samples, finding that the best results were with treatment by PVA doped by Silver nitrate. The anticipated results were shown by treatment with non-doped PVA, which does not have any fungicidal protective effect.

  14. Survey of currently available reference materials for use in connection with the determination of trace elements in biological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parr, R.M.

    1983-09-01

    Elemental analysis of biological materials is at present the subject of intensive study by many different research groups throughout the world, in view of the importance of these trace elements in health and medical diagnosis. IAEA and other organizations are now making a variety of suitable reference materials available for use in connection with the determination of trace elements in biological materials. To help analysts in making a selection from among these various materials, the present report provides a brief survey of data for all such biological reference materials known to the author. These data are compiled by the author from January 1982 to June 1983

  15. Managing nuclear knowledge: IAEA activities and international coordination. Including resource material full text CD-ROM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-06-01

    The present CD-ROM summarizes some activities carried out by the Departments of Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Safety and Security in the area of nuclear knowledge management in the period 2003-2005. It comprises, as open resource, most of the relevant documents in full text, including policy level documents, reports, presentation material by Member States and meeting summaries. The collection starts with a reprint of the report to the IAEA General Conference 2004 on Nuclear Knowledge [GOV/2004/56-GC(48)/12] summarizing the developments in nuclear knowledge management since the 47th session of the General Conference in 2003 and covers Managing Nuclear Knowledge including safety issues and Information and Strengthening Education and Training for Capacity Building. It contains an excerpt on Nuclear Knowledge from the General Conference Resolution [GC(48)/RES/13] on Strengthening the Agency's Activities Related to Nuclear Science, Technology and Applications. On the CD-ROM itself, all documents can easily be accessed by clicking on their titles on the subject pages (also printed at the end of this Working Material). Part 1 of the CD-ROM covers the activities in the period 2003-2005 and part 2 presents a resource material full text CD-ROM on Managing Nuclear Knowledge issued in October 2003

  16. Low cost materials of construction for biological processes: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-13

    The workshop was held, May 1993 in conjunction with the 15th Symposium on Biotechnology for Fuels and Chemicals. The purpose of this workshop was to present information on the biomass to ethanol process in the context of materials selection and through presentation and discussion, identify promising avenues for future research. Six technical presentations were grouped into two sessions: process assessment and technology assessment. In the process assessment session, the group felt that the pretreatment area would require the most extensive materials research due the complex chemical, physical and thermal environment. Discussion centered around the possibility of metals being leached into the process stream and their effect on the fermentation mechanics. Linings were a strong option for pretreatment assuming the economics were favorable. Fermentation was considered an important area for research also, due to the unique complex of compounds and dual phases present. Erosion in feedstock handling equipment was identified as a minor concern. In the technology assessment session, methodologies in corrosion analysis were presented in addition to an overview of current coatings/linings technology. Widely practiced testing strategies, including ASTM methods, as well as novel procedures for micro-analysis of corrosion were discussed. Various coatings and linings, including polymers and ceramics, were introduced. The prevailing recommendations for testing included keeping the testing simple until the problem warranted a more detailed approach and developing standardized testing procedures to ensure the data was reproducible and applicable. The need to evaluate currently available materials such as coatings/linings, carbon/stainless steels, or fiberglass reinforced plastic was emphasized. It was agreed that economic evaluation of each material candidate must be an integral part of any research plan.

  17. Using Fourier transform IR spectroscopy to analyze biological materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Matthew J; Trevisan, Júlio; Bassan, Paul; Bhargava, Rohit; Butler, Holly J; Dorling, Konrad M; Fielden, Peter R; Fogarty, Simon W; Fullwood, Nigel J; Heys, Kelly A; Hughes, Caryn; Lasch, Peter; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre L; Obinaju, Blessing; Sockalingum, Ganesh D; Sulé-Suso, Josep; Strong, Rebecca J; Walsh, Michael J; Wood, Bayden R; Gardner, Peter; Martin, Francis L

    2014-08-01

    IR spectroscopy is an excellent method for biological analyses. It enables the nonperturbative, label-free extraction of biochemical information and images toward diagnosis and the assessment of cell functionality. Although not strictly microscopy in the conventional sense, it allows the construction of images of tissue or cell architecture by the passing of spectral data through a variety of computational algorithms. Because such images are constructed from fingerprint spectra, the notion is that they can be an objective reflection of the underlying health status of the analyzed sample. One of the major difficulties in the field has been determining a consensus on spectral pre-processing and data analysis. This manuscript brings together as coauthors some of the leaders in this field to allow the standardization of methods and procedures for adapting a multistage approach to a methodology that can be applied to a variety of cell biological questions or used within a clinical setting for disease screening or diagnosis. We describe a protocol for collecting IR spectra and images from biological samples (e.g., fixed cytology and tissue sections, live cells or biofluids) that assesses the instrumental options available, appropriate sample preparation, different sampling modes as well as important advances in spectral data acquisition. After acquisition, data processing consists of a sequence of steps including quality control, spectral pre-processing, feature extraction and classification of the supervised or unsupervised type. A typical experiment can be completed and analyzed within hours. Example results are presented on the use of IR spectra combined with multivariate data processing.

  18. Biological review of 82 species of coral petitioned to be included in the Endangered Species Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, Russell E.; Birkeland, Charles; Eakin, C. Mark; McElhany, Paul; Miller, Margaret W.; Patterson, Matt; Piniak, G.A.

    2011-01-01

    list 83 coral species as threatened or endangered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. The petition was based on a predicted decline in available habitat for the species, citing anthropogenic climate change and ocean acidification as the lead factors among the various stressors responsible for the potential decline. The NMFS identified 82 of the corals as candidate species, finding that the petition provided substantive information for a potential listing of these species. The NMFS established a Biological Review Team (BRT) to prepare this Status Review Report that examines the status of these 82 candidate coral species and evaluates extinction risk for each of them. This document makes no recommendations for listing, as that is a separate evaluation to be conducted by the NMFS.

  19. Commentary on guidelines for radiation measurement and treatment of substances including naturally occurring radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Naoyuki; Ishiguro, Hideharu

    2007-01-01

    Study group on safety regulation on research reactors in Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) reported the guidelines of 'Guidelines on radiation measurement and treatment of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM)' on 6 February 2006. RANDEC made the website contents 'Study on use and safety of the substances including uranium or thorium', based on the contract with MEXT to make theirs contents. This paper describes the outline of the website in MEXT homepage, background and contents of NORM guidelines in order to understand easily and visually the NORM guidelines, adding in some flowcharts and figures. (author)

  20. Effects of industrial chemicals and radioactive materials in biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangopadhyay, A.; Chatterjee, S.

    1987-01-01

    Much has been written on the effects of radiation and toxic chemicals on biological systems. In this communication general considerations regarding these topics will be discussed very briefly; the major emphasis will be focused on the effects of chemicals, namely ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS) on Amoeba, Advantages to the use of amoeba for studying the effects of radiation and chemicals include the following: large mononucleate unicellular organisms having a long generation time; opportunity to study cellular organelles and biochemical and genetic alterations in a single cell system; and a long cell cycle, the stages of which can be synchronized without resorting to chemical treatment or temperature shock and thereby readily permitting study at defined stages of the cell's life cycle. This, in turn, is discussed in light of current disposal methods for this type of waste and how it might be safely disposed of

  1. Flame Spectrophotometric Determination of Strontium in Water and Biological Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joensson, G.

    1964-10-01

    A flame spectrophotometric method has been developed for the determination of strontium in biological material and water samples. Strontium is determined in the presence of calcium at a wavelength of 4607 A. The intensity of the strontium emission from the sample is increased if n-butanol is added to a solution of the sample in water. With a 6 vol% solution of n-butanol in water, an optimum intensity of 3.5 times that obtained with pure water solution is obtained. Anions and alkali metals which might interfere with the flame spectrophotometric determination are separated from the sample by a simple ion exchange operation. The method allows determination of strontium in solutions down to 0.1μg/ml. In this case the standard deviation is 3.1 % and with a strontium concentration of 1 μg/ml the deviation is 0.9 %. This method has been used for the determination of strontium in samples of varying composition such as bone, meat and skin from fishes, samples of human bones, shell-fish, milk, and water, in which case Sr quantities of 5μg were determined with an analytical error of less than 5 % and Sr q uantities greater than 10 μg with an error of less than 3 %

  2. Heavy metal ion removal by adsorption on to biological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansson-Charrier, M.; Guibal, E.; Le Cloirec, P.; Surjous, R.

    1994-01-01

    The development of regulations constraints in the industrial waste-waters management leads to the study of new treatment processes, using raw or functionalized biological materials. These processes show competitive performances in metal ion sorption efficiency for the low metal content effluents. Uptake capacities of Uranium as high as 400 mg.g -1 chitosan, equivalent to the double of the uptake capacity of fungal origin biomass, can be reached. The application of these processes to real mine wastewaters gives efficiency coefficient upper to 90%, the residual concentrations are compatible to a direct injection into the environment. The grafting of functional groups onto the chitosan scales up the sorption performances to uptake capacity upper than 600 mg.g -1 polymer. pH, metal concentration are cited as major parameters, particle size influences both uptake kinetics and sorption equilibrium, in the case of the uranium accumulation by chitosan. The desorption of uranium from the sorbent allows the valorization of uranium and the re-use of the sorbent. (authors). 21 refs., 10 figs

  3. Challenges for INAA in studies of materials from advanced material research including rare earth concentrates and carbon based ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bode, P.; Van Meerten, Th.G.

    2000-01-01

    Rare-earth elements are increasingly applied in advanced materials to be used, e.g., in electronic industry, automobile catalysts, or lamps and optical devices. Trace element analysis of these materials might be an interesting niche for NAA because of the intrinsic high accuracy of this technique, and the shortage of matrix matching reference materials with other methods for elemental analysis. The carbon composite materials form another category of advanced materials, where sometimes a very high degree of purity is required. Also for these materials, NAA has favorable analytical characteristics. Examples are given of the use of NAA in the analysis of both categories of materials. (author)

  4. Deliverable 4.2: Methodology for including specific biological effects and pathogen aspects into LCA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Henrik Fred; Olsen, Stig Irving; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2009-01-01

    .e. endocrine disruptors) and the possibilities and relevance of including impact categories on land use and site-specific assessments have been addressed. Further, the special problems on how to deal with land fill and how to do normalization and weighting of impact potentials are also dealt with. The problem...

  5. Analysis of biological materials using a nuclear microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulware, Stephen Juma

    The use of nuclear microprobe techniques including: Particle induced x-ray emission (PIXE) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) for elemental analysis and quantitative elemental imaging of biological samples is especially useful in biological and biomedical research because of its high sensitivity for physiologically important trace elements or toxic heavy metals. The nuclear microprobe of the Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory (IBMAL) has been used to study the enhancement in metal uptake of two different plants. The roots of corn (Zea mays) have been analyzed to study the enhancement of iron uptake by adding Fe (II) or Fe(III) of different concentrations to the germinating medium of the seeds. The Fe uptake enhancement effect produced by lacing the germinating medium with carbon nanotubes has also been investigated. The aim of this investigation is to ensure not only high crop yield but also Fe-rich food products especially from calcareous soil which covers 30% of world's agricultural land. The result will help reduce iron deficiency anemia, which has been identified as the leading nutritional disorder especially in developing countries by the World Health Organization. For the second plant, Mexican marigold (Tagetes erecta ), the effect of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Glomus intraradices ) for the improvement of lead phytoremediation of lead contaminated soil has been investigated. Phytoremediation provides an environmentally safe technique of removing toxic heavy metals (like lead), which can find their way into human food, from lands contaminated by human activities like mining or by natural disasters like earthquakes. The roots of Mexican marigold have been analyzed to study the role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in enhancement of lead uptake from the contaminated rhizosphere.

  6. OCV Hysteresis in Li-Ion Batteries including Two-Phase Transition Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Roscher

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The relation between batteries' state of charge (SOC and open-circuit voltage (OCV is a specific feature of electrochemical energy storage devices. Especially NiMH batteries are well known to exhibit OCV hysteresis, and also several kinds of lithium-ion batteries show OCV hysteresis, which can be critical for reliable state estimation issues. Electrode potential hysteresis is known to result from thermodynamical entropic effects, mechanical stress, and microscopic distortions within the active electrode materials which perform a two-phase transition during lithium insertion/extraction. Hence, some Li-ion cells including two-phase transition active materials show pronounced hysteresis referring to their open-circuit voltage. This work points out how macroscopic effects, that is, diffusion limitations, superimpose the latte- mentioned microscopic mechanisms and lead to a shrinkage of OCV hysteresis, if cells are loaded with high current rates. To validate the mentioned interaction, Li-ion cells' state of charge is adjusted to 50% with various current rates, beginning from the fully charged and the discharged state, respectively. As a pronounced difference remains between the OCV after charge and discharge adjustment, obviously the hysteresis vanishes as the target SOC is adjusted with very high current rate.

  7. Process For Controlling Flow Rate Of Viscous Materials Including Use Of Nozzle With Changeable Openings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellingson, William A.; Forster, George A.

    1999-11-02

    Apparatus and a method for controlling the flow rate of viscous materials through a nozzle includes an apertured main body and an apertured end cap coupled together and having an elongated, linear flow channel extending the length thereof. An end of the main body is disposed within the end cap and includes a plurality of elongated slots concentrically disposed about and aligned with the flow channel. A generally flat cam plate having a center aperture is disposed between the main body and end cap and is rotatable about the flow channel. A plurality of flow control vane assemblies are concentrically disposed about the flow channel and are coupled to the cam plate. Each vane assembly includes a vane element disposed adjacent the end of the flow channel. Rotation of the cam plate in a first direction causes a corresponding rotation of each of the vane elements for positioning the individual vane elements over the aperture in the end cap blocking flow through the flow channel, while rotation in an opposite direction removes the vane elements from the aperture and positions them about the flow channel in a nested configuration in the full open position, with a continuous range of vane element positions available between the full open and closed positions.

  8. Simulation tool for optical design of PET detector modules including scintillator material and sensor array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jatekos, B.; Erdei, G.; Lorincz, E. [Budapest Univ. of Technology and Economics, Dept. of Atomic Physics, Budafoki ut 8, H-1111 Budapest (Hungary)

    2011-07-01

    The appearance of single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) in the field of PET detector modules made it necessary to apply more complex optical design methods to refine the performance of such assemblies. We developed a combined simulation tool that is capable to model complex detector structures including scintillation material, light guide, light collection optics and sensor, correctly taking into account the statistical behavior of emission of scintillation light and its absorbance in SPADs. As a validation we compared simulation results obtained by our software and another optical design program. Calculations were performed for a simple PET detector arrangement used for testing purposes. According to the results, deviation of center of gravity coordinates between the two simulations is 0.0195 mm, the average ratio of total counts 1.0052. We investigated the error resulting from finite sampling in wavelength space and we found that 20 nm pitch is sufficient for the simulation in case of the given spectral dependencies. (authors)

  9. Controlled Carbon Source Addition to an Alternating Nitrification-Denitrification Wastewater Treatment Process Including Biological P Removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaacs, Steven Howard; Henze, Mogens

    1995-01-01

    The paper investigates the effect of adding an external carbon source on the rate of denitrification in an alternating activated sludge process including biological P removal. Two carbon sources were examined, acetate and hydrolysate derived from biologically hydrolyzed sludge. Preliminary batch...... that external carbon source addition may serve as a suitable control variable to improve process performance....... process, the addition of either carbon source to the anoxic zone also resulted in an instantaneous and fairly reproducible increase in the denitrification rate. Some release of phosphate associated with the carbon source addition was observed. With respect to nitrogen removal, these results indicate...

  10. Specialists meeting on properties of primary circuit structural materials including environmental effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The Specialists Meeting on Properties of Primary Circuit Structural Materials of LMFBRs covered the following topics: overview of materials program in different countries; mechanical properties of materials in air; fracture mechanics studies - component related activities; impact of environmental influences on mechanical properties; relationship of material properties and design methods. The purpose of the meeting was to provide a forum for exchange of information on structural materials behaviour in primary circuit of fast breeder reactors. Special emphasis was placed on environmental effects such as influence of sodium and irradiation on mechanical properties of reactor materials

  11. Urban Biomining: Biological Extraction of Metals and Materials from Electronics Waste Using a Synthetic Biology Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbina-Navarrete, J.; Rothschild, L.

    2016-12-01

    End-of-life electronics waste (e-waste) containing toxic and valuable materials is a rapidly progressing human health and environmental issue. Using synthetic biology tools, we have developed a recycling method for e-waste. Our innovation is to use a recombinant version of a naturally-occurring silica-degrading enzyme to depolymerize the silica in metal- and glass- containing e-waste components, and subsequently, to use engineered bacterial surfaces to bind and separate metals from a solution. The bacteria with bound metals can then be used as "bio-ink" to print new circuits using a novel plasma jet electronics printing technology. Here, we present the results from our initial studies that focus on the specificity of metal-binding motifs for a cognate metal. The candidate motifs that show high affinity and specificity will be engineered into bacterial surfaces for downstream applications in biologically-mediated metal recycling. Since the chemistry and role of Cu in metalloproteins is relatively well-characterized, we are using Cu as a proxy to elucidate metal and biological ligand interactions with various metals in e-waste. We assess the binding parameters of 3 representative classes of Cu-binding motifs using isothermal titration calorimetry; 1) natural motifs found in metalloproteins, 2) consensus motifs, and 3) rationally designed peptides that are predicted, in silico, to bind Cu. Our results indicate that naturally-occurring motifs have relative high affinity and specificity for Cu (association constant for Cu Ka 104 M-1, Zn Ka 103 M-1) when competing ions are present in the aqueous milieu. However, motifs developed through rational design by applying quantum mechanical methods that take into account complexation energies of the elemental binding partners and molecular geometry of the cognate metal, not only show high affinity for the cognate metal (Cu Ka 106 M-1), but they show specificity and discrimination against other metal ions that would be

  12. Digital Learning Material for Model Building in Molecular Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aegerter-Wilmsen, Tinri; Janssen, Fred; Hartog, Rob; Bisseling, Ton

    2005-01-01

    Building models to describe processes forms an essential part of molecular biology research. However, in molecular biology curricula little attention is generally being paid to the development of this skill. In order to provide students the opportunity to improve their model building skills, we decided to develop a number of digital cases about…

  13. Distinguishability of Biological Material Using Ultraviolet Multi-Spectral Fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, P.C.; Heinen, R.J.; Rigdon, L.D.; Rosenthal, S.E.; Shokair, I.R.; Siragusa, G.R.; Tisone, G.C.; Wagner, J.S.

    1998-10-14

    Recent interest in the detection and analysis of biological samples by spectroscopic methods has led to questions concerning the degree of distinguishability and biological variability of the ultraviolet (W) fluorescent spectra from such complex samples. We show that the degree of distinguishability of such spectra is readily determined numerically.

  14. Deciphering the language between biological and synthetic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo A. Netti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemical signals propagating through aqueous environment are at the basis of the language utilized by living systems to exchange information. In the last years, molecular biology has partly disclosed the grammar and the syntax of this complex language revealing the fascinating world of molecular communication that is the foundation of biological development.

  15. Analysis of hazardous biological material by MALDI mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KL Wahl; KH Jarman; NB Valentine; MT Kingsley; CE Petersen; ST Cebula; AJ Saenz

    2000-03-21

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) has become a valuable tool for analyzing microorganisms. The speed with which data can be obtained from MALDI-MS makes this a potentially important tool for biological health hazard monitoring and forensic applications. The excitement in the mass spectrometry community in this potential field of application is evident by the expanding list of research laboratories pursuing development of MALDI-MS for bacterial identification. Numerous research groups have demonstrated the ability to obtain unique MALDI-MS spectra from intact bacterial cells and bacterial cell extracts. The ability to differentiate strains of the same species has been investigated. Reproducibility of MALDI-MS spectra from bacterial species under carefully controlled experimental conditions has also been demonstrated. Wang et al. have reported on interlaboratory reproducibility of the MALDI-MS analysis of several bacterial species. However, there are still issues that need to be addressed, including the careful control of experimental parameters for reproducible spectra and selection of optimal experimental parameters such as solvent and matrix.

  16. [HLA-DQA1, AB0 and AMEL genotyping of biological material by biochips].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesenko, D O; Mitiaeva, O N; Nasedkina, T V; Rubtsov, P M; Lysov, Iu P; Zasedatelev, A S

    2010-01-01

    A genotyping method of biological material for ABO, HLA-DQA1 and AMEL loci is described. The method is based on allele-specific SNP determination using the hydrogel biochips technology. The amplified fluorescently labeled fragments of the genes were hybridized with specific DNA probes immobilized on a biochip. The allele/genotype assignment was done according to the distribution of fluorescent signal. The minimal amount of biological material is corresponded to 100 pg of DNA. The method was proved using control samples with known genotype. Using biochips 442 DNA samples belonging to the East Slavic population group were genotyped. The allele frequencies of ABO and HLA-DQA1 loci were determined. The possibility of genotyping of biological traces, including the stubs of filter cigarettes, material from the lip of the glass was demonstrated. This method can be used for genetic testing in forensic studies. The probability that the determined genotype belongs to a concrete individual was estimated as 99.6%.

  17. Development and Applications Of Photosensitive Device Systems To Studies Of Biological And Organic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruner, Sol

    2012-01-20

    The primary focus of the grant is the development of new x-ray detectors for biological and materials work at synchrotron sources, especially Pixel Array Detectors (PADs), and the training of students via research applications to problems in biophysics and materials science using novel x-ray methods. This Final Progress Report provides a high-level overview of the most important accomplishments. These major areas of accomplishment include: (1) Development and application of x-ray Pixel Array Detectors; (2) Development and application of methods of high pressure x-ray crystallography as applied to proteins; (3) Studies on the synthesis and structure of novel mesophase materials derived from block co-polymers.

  18. Open literature review of threats including sabotage and theft of fissile material transport in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochran, John Russell; Furaus, James Phillip; Marincel, Michelle K.

    2005-01-01

    This report is a review of open literature concerning threats including sabotage and theft related to fissile material transport in Japan. It is intended to aid Japanese officials in the development of a design basis threat. This threat includes the external threats of the terrorist, criminal, and extremist, and the insider threats of the disgruntled employee, the employee forced into cooperation via coercion, the psychotic employee, and the criminal employee. Examination of the external terrorist threat considers Japanese demographics, known terrorist groups in Japan, and the international relations of Japan. Demographically, Japan has a relatively homogenous population, both ethnically and religiously. Japan is a relatively peaceful nation, but its history illustrates that it is not immune to terrorism. It has a history of domestic terrorism and the open literature points to the Red Army, Aum Shinrikyo, Chukaku-Ha, and Seikijuku. Japan supports the United States in its war on terrorism and in Iraq, which may make Japan a target for both international and domestic terrorists. Crime appears to remain low in Japan; however sources note that the foreign crime rate is increasing as the number of foreign nationals in the country increases. Antinuclear groups' recent foci have been nuclear reprocessing technology, transportation of MOX fuel, and possible related nuclear proliferation issues. The insider threat is first defined by the threat of the disgruntled employee. This threat can be determined by studying the history of Japan's employment system, where Keiretsu have provided company stability and lifetime employment. Recent economic difficulties and an increase of corporate crime, due to sole reliability on the honor code, have begun to erode employee loyalty

  19. Empirical Validation of a Thermal Model of a Complex Roof Including Phase Change Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Guichard

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the empirical validation of a building thermal model of a complex roof including a phase change material (PCM. A mathematical model dedicated to PCMs based on the heat apparent capacity method was implemented in a multi-zone building simulation code, the aim being to increase the understanding of the thermal behavior of the whole building with PCM technologies. In order to empirically validate the model, the methodology is based both on numerical and experimental studies. A parametric sensitivity analysis was performed and a set of parameters of the thermal model has been identified for optimization. The use of the generic optimization program called GenOpt® coupled to the building simulation code enabled to determine the set of adequate parameters. We first present the empirical validation methodology and main results of previous work. We then give an overview of GenOpt® and its coupling with the building simulation code. Finally, once the optimization results are obtained, comparisons of the thermal predictions with measurements are found to be acceptable and are presented.

  20. Dynamic Light Scattering Microrheology Reveals Multiscale Viscoelasticity of Polymer Gels and Precious Biological Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The development of experimental techniques capable of probing the viscoelasticity of soft materials over a broad range of time scales is essential to uncovering the physics that governs their behavior. In this work, we develop a microrheology technique that requires only 12 μL of sample and is capable of resolving dynamic behavior ranging in time scales from 10–6 to 10 s. Our approach, based on dynamic light scattering in the single-scattering limit, enables the study of polymer gels and other soft materials over a vastly larger hierarchy of time scales than macrorheology measurements. Our technique captures the viscoelastic modulus of polymer hydrogels with a broad range of stiffnesses from 10 to 104 Pa. We harness these capabilities to capture hierarchical molecular relaxations in DNA and to study the rheology of precious biological materials that are impractical for macrorheology measurements, including decellularized extracellular matrices and intestinal mucus. The use of a commercially available benchtop setup that is already available to a variety of soft matter researchers renders microrheology measurements accessible to a broader range of users than existing techniques, with the potential to reveal the physics that underlies complex polymer hydrogels and biological materials. PMID:29296670

  1. A constitutive model for the superplastic material ALNOVI-1 including leak risk information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snippe, Corijn H.C.; Snippe, Q.H.C.; Meinders, Vincent T.; Pietzyk, M.; Kusiak, J.; Majta, J.; Hartley, P.; Lin, J.; Mori, K.

    2008-01-01

    For some applications, it is important that a formed sheet of material is completely gas tight, therefore it is beneficial to be able to predict whether a formed sheet will be leak tight for gases or not. Superplastic materials show the ability to attain very high plastic strains before failure.

  2. Photoconversion of gasified organic materials into biologically-degradable plastics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, P.F.; Pinching Maness.

    1993-10-05

    A process is described for converting organic materials (such as biomass wastes) into a bioplastic suitable for use as a biodegradable plastic. In a preferred embodiment the process involves thermally gasifying the organic material into primarily carbon monoxide and hydrogen, followed by photosynthetic bacterial assimilation of the gases into cell material. The process is ideally suited for waste recycling and for production of useful biodegradable plastic polymer. 3 figures.

  3. Photoconversion of gasified organic materials into biologically-degradable plastics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Paul F. (Golden, CO); Maness, Pin-Ching (Golden, CO)

    1993-01-01

    A process is described for converting organic materials (such as biomass wastes) into a bioplastic suitable for use as a biodegradable plastic. In a preferred embodiment the process involves thermally gasifying the organic material into primarily carbon monoxide and hydrogen, followed by photosynthetic bacterial assimilation of the gases into cell material. The process is ideally suited for waste recycling and for production of useful biodegradable plastic polymer.

  4. 75 FR 16514 - Bayer Material Science, LLC, Formally Known as Sheffield Plastics, Including On-Site Leased...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Employment and Training Administration Bayer Material Science, LLC, Formally Known as Sheffield Plastics... Material Science, LLC, formally known as Sheffield Plastics, including on-site leased workers from... that Bayer Material Science, LLC was formally known as Sheffield Plastics. Some workers separated from...

  5. Thermoelectric material including a multiple transition metal-doped type I clathrate crystal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jihui [Lakeshore, CA; Shi, Xun [Troy, MI; Bai, Shengqiang [Shanghai, CN; Zhang, Wenqing [Shanghai, CN; Chen, Lidong [Shanghai, CN; Yang, Jiong [Shanghai, CN

    2012-01-17

    A thermoelectric material includes a multiple transition metal-doped type I clathrate crystal structure having the formula A.sub.8TM.sub.y.sub.1.sup.1TM.sub.y.sub.2.sup.2 . . . TM.sub.y.sub.n.sup.nM.sub.zX.sub.46-y.sub.1.sub.-y.sub.2.sub.- . . . -y.sub.n.sub.-z. In the formula, A is selected from the group consisting of barium, strontium, and europium; X is selected from the group consisting of silicon, germanium, and tin; M is selected from the group consisting of aluminum, gallium, and indium; TM.sup.1, TM.sup.2, and TM.sup.n are independently selected from the group consisting of 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metals; and y.sub.1, y.sub.2, y.sub.n and Z are actual compositions of TM.sup.1, TM.sup.2, TM.sup.n, and M, respectively. The actual compositions are based upon nominal compositions derived from the following equation: z=8q.sub.A-|.DELTA.q.sub.1|y.sub.1-|.DELTA.q.sub.2|y.sub.2- . . . -|.DELTA.q.sub.n|y.sub.n, wherein q.sub.A is a charge state of A, and wherein .DELTA.q.sub.1, .DELTA.q.sub.2, .DELTA.q.sub.n are, respectively, the nominal charge state of the first, second, and n-th TM.

  6. Strategy on biological evaluation for biodegradable/absorbable materials and medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chenghu; Luo, Hongyu; Wan, Min; Hou, Li; Wang, Xin; Shi, Yanping

    2018-01-01

    During the last two decades, biodegradable/absorbable materials which have many benefits over conventional implants are being sought in clinical practices. However, to date, it still remains obscure for us to perform full physic-chemical characterization and biological risk assessment for these materials and related devices due to their complex design and coherent processing. In this review, based on the art of knowledge for biodegradable/absorbable materials and biological risk assessment, we demonstrated some promising strategies to establish and improve the current biological evaluation systems for these biodegradable/absorbable materials and related medical devices.

  7. Compositions of graphene materials with metal nanostructures and microstructures and methods of making and using including pressure sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Ye

    2017-01-26

    Composition comprising at least one graphene material and at least one metal. The metal can be in the form of nanoparticles as well as microflakes, including single crystal microflakes. The metal can be intercalated in the graphene sheets. The composition has high conductivity and flexibility. The composition can be made by a one-pot synthesis in which a graphene material precursor is converted to the graphene material, and the metal precursor is converted to the metal. A reducing solvent or dispersant such as NMP can be used. Devices made from the composition include a pressure sensor which has high sensitivity. Two two- dimension materials can be combined to form a hybrid material.

  8. Exploring matter through photons and neutrons: from biological molecules to designer materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chidambaram, R.; Hosur, M.V.; Ramanadham, M.; Godwal, B.K.

    2000-01-01

    Understanding structure-property relationships of naturally occurring materials has been the aim of scientific research for centuries. The discovery of short wavelength x-rays and neutrons in the 20th century provided a means of studying molecular structure. The methodology of x-ray and neutron diffraction has been successfully applied to determine structures of molecules across disciplines of physics, chemistry, biology, biochemistry and medicine. Typical applications in physics include study of phase transformations, elasticity measurements, magnetic structure, surface scattering etc. In chemistry, the applications have ranged from routine structure determinations of reaction intermediates or natural products to refinement of quantum chemical parameters of atomic and molecular charge densities. The science of crystallography has had a profound effect on the disciplines of biology and medicine. A whole new discipline and industry was created when the structure of DNA was discovered through x-ray diffraction

  9. Discrete Material and Thickness Optimization of laminated composite structures including failure criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Erik

    2017-01-01

    This work extends the Discrete Material and Thickness Optimization approach to structural optimization problems where strength considerations in the form of failure criteria are taken into account for laminated composite structures. It takes offset in the density approaches applied for stress...... constrained topology optimization of single-material problems and develops formulations for multi-material topology optimization problems applied for laminated composite structures. The method can be applied for both stress- and strain-based failure criteria. The large number of local constraints is reduced...

  10. MAK and BAT values list 2015. Maximum permissible concentrations at the place of work and biological tolerance values for working materials; MAK- und BAT-Werte-Liste 2015. Maximale Arbeitsplatzkonzentrationen und Biologische Arbeitsstofftoleranzwerte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-11-01

    The book on the MAK (maximum permissible concentrations at the place of work) and BAT (biological tolerance values for working materials) value list 2015 includes the following chapters: (a) Maximum permissible concentrations at the place of work: definition, application and determination of MAT values, list of materials; carcinogenic working materials, sensibilizing working materials, aerosols, limiting the exposition peaks, skin resorption, MAK values during pregnancy, germ cell mutagens, specific working materials; (b) Biological tolerance values for working materials: definition and application of BAT values, list of materials, carcinogenic working materials, biological guide values, biological working material reference values.

  11. Controlled Carbon Source Addition to an Alternating Nitrification-Denitrification Wastewater Treatment Process Including Biological P Removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaacs, Steven Howard; Henze, Mogens

    1995-01-01

    The paper investigates the effect of adding an external carbon source on the rate of denitrification in an alternating activated sludge process including biological P removal. Two carbon sources were examined, acetate and hydrolysate derived from biologically hydrolyzed sludge. Preliminary batch...... experiments performed in 5 liter bottles indicated that the denitrification rate can be instantaneously increased through the addition of either carbon source. The amount by which the rate was increased depended on the amount of carbon added. In the main experiments performed in a pilot scale alternating...... process, the addition of either carbon source to the anoxic zone also resulted in an instantaneous and fairly reproducible increase in the denitrification rate. Some release of phosphate associated with the carbon source addition was observed. With respect to nitrogen removal, these results indicate...

  12. BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF FIBRONECTIN AT THE CELL-MATERIAL INTERFACE

    OpenAIRE

    González García, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Esta tesis aborda la actividad biológica de la fibronectina (FN) como proteína de interfase en la interacción célula-material. La tesis investiga la respuesta de la proteína, en términos de cantidad adsorbida y conformación, ante diferentes propiedades físico-químicas del material. Además, se correlaciona la respuesta celular temprana y la funcionalidad celular con el estado de la proteína adsorbida sobre el material. Para ello se prepararon diferentes series de materiales con propiedades...

  13. Management of Biological Materials in Wastewater from Research and Development Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raney, Elizabeth A.; Moon, Thomas W.; Ballinger, Marcel Y.

    2011-01-01

    PNNL has developed and instituted a systematic approach to managing work with biological material that begins in the project planning phase and carries through implementation to waste disposal. This paper describes two major processes used at PNNL to analyze and mitigate the hazards associated with working with biological materials and evaluate them for disposal to the sewer, ground, or surface water in a manner that protects human health and the environment. The first of these processes is the Biological Work Permit which is used to identify requirements for handling, storing, and working with biological materials and the second is the Sewer Approval process which is used to evaluate discharges of wastewaters containing biological materials to assure they meet industrial wastewater permits and other environmental regulations and requirements.

  14. Biological and Biomimetic Low-Temperature Routes to Materials for Energy Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morse, Daniel E. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Inst. for Collaborative Biotechnologies

    2016-08-29

    New materials are needed to significantly improve the efficiencies of energy harnessing, transduction and storage, yet the synthesis of advanced composites and multi-metallic semiconductors with nanostructures optimized for these functions remains poorly understood and even less well controlled. To help address this need, we proposed three goals: (1) to further investigate the hierarchical structure of the biologically synthesized silica comprising the skeletal spicules of sponges that we discovered, to better resolve the role and mechanism of templating by the hierarchically assembled silicatein protein filament; (2) to extend our molecular and genetic analyses and engineering of silicatein, the self-assembling, structure-directing, silica-synthesizing enzyme we discovered and characterized, to better understand and manipulate the catalysis and templating of semiconductor synthesis,; and (3) to further investigate, scale up and harness the biologically inspired, low-temperature, kinetically controlled catalytic synthesis method we developed (based on the mechanism we discovered in silicatein) to investigate the kinetic control of the structure-function relationships in magnetic materials, and develop new materials for energy applications. The bio-inspired catalytic synthesis method we have developed is low-cost, low temperature, and operates without the use of polluting chemicals. In addition to direct applications for improvement of batteries and fuel cells, the broader impact of this research includes a deeper fundamental understanding of the factors governing kinetically controlled synthesis and its control of the emergent nanostructure and performance of a wide range of nanomaterials for energy applications.

  15. Deterministic Integration of Biological and Soft Materials onto 3D Microscale Cellular Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCracken, Joselle M; Xu, Sheng; Badea, Adina; Jang, Kyung-In; Yan, Zheng; Wetzel, David J; Nan, Kewang; Lin, Qing; Han, Mengdi; Anderson, Mikayla A; Lee, Jung Woo; Wei, Zijun; Pharr, Matt; Wang, Renhan; Su, Jessica; Rubakhin, Stanislav S; Sweedler, Jonathan V; Rogers, John A; Nuzzo, Ralph G

    2017-09-01

    Complex 3D organizations of materials represent ubiquitous structural motifs found in the most sophisticated forms of matter, the most notable of which are in life-sustaining hierarchical structures found in biology, but where simpler examples also exist as dense multilayered constructs in high-performance electronics. Each class of system evinces specific enabling forms of assembly to establish their functional organization at length scales not dissimilar to tissue-level constructs. This study describes materials and means of assembly that extend and join these disparate systems-schemes for the functional integration of soft and biological materials with synthetic 3D microscale, open frameworks that can leverage the most advanced forms of multilayer electronic technologies, including device-grade semiconductors such as monocrystalline silicon. Cellular migration behaviors, temporal dependencies of their growth, and contact guidance cues provided by the nonplanarity of these frameworks illustrate design criteria useful for their functional integration with living matter (e.g., NIH 3T3 fibroblast and primary rat dorsal root ganglion cell cultures).

  16. Method of extruding and packaging a thin sample of reactive material including forming the extrusion die

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewandowski, E.F.; Peterson, L.L.

    1985-01-01

    This invention teaches a method of cutting a narrow slot in an extrusion die with an electrical discharge machine by first drilling spaced holes at the ends of where the slot will be, whereby the oil can flow through the holes and slot to flush the material eroded away as the slot is being cut. The invention further teaches a method of extruding a very thin ribbon of solid highly reactive material such as lithium or sodium through the die in an inert atmosphere of nitrogen, argon or the like as in a glovebox. The invention further teaches a method of stamping out sample discs from the ribbon and of packaging each disc by sandwiching it between two aluminum sheets and cold welding the sheets together along an annular seam beyond the outer periphery of the disc. This provides a sample of high purity reactive material that can have a long shelf life

  17. Bioreceptivity evaluation of cementitious materials designed to stimulate biological growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manso, Sandra; De Muynck, Willem; Segura, Ignacio; Aguado, Antonio; Steppe, Kathy; Boon, Nico; De Belie, Nele

    2014-05-15

    Ordinary Portland cement (OPC), the most used binder in construction, presents some disadvantages in terms of pollution (CO2 emissions) and visual impact. For this reason, green roofs and façades have gain considerable attention in the last decade as a way to integrate nature in cities. These systems, however, suffer from high initial and maintenance costs. An alternative strategy to obtain green facades is the direct natural colonisation of the cementitious construction materials constituting the wall, a phenomenon governed by the bioreceptivity of such material. This work aims at assessing the suitability of magnesium phosphate cement (MPC) materials to allow a rapid natural colonisation taking carbonated OPC samples as a reference material. For that, the aggregate size, the w/c ratio and the amount of cement paste of mortars made of both binders were modified. The assessment of the different bioreceptivities was conducted by means of an accelerated algal fouling test. MPC samples exhibited a faster fouling compared to OPC samples, which could be mainly attributed to the lower pH of the MPC binder. In addition to the binder, the fouling rate was governed by the roughness and the porosity of the material. MPC mortar with moderate porosity and roughness appears to be the most feasible material to be used for the development of green concrete walls. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of UV and microwave radiation on biological material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fielitz, J.; Boegl, W.; Stockhausen, K.; Kossel, F.

    1977-01-01

    For the present study, ten publications on the effect of UV radiation were analyzed. In vitro tests were carried out with one biological substance and seven different human or animal organs and biocytocultures. In vivo, three bacterial strains were irradiated and four irradiation experiments were carried out on mice. As to the effect of microwave radiation, eleven publications were analyzed. In vitro tests were carried out with one biological substance and three animal organs. In vivo, one bacterial strain was irradiated and eight irradiation experiments were carried out on different types of animals. The study's aim was to obtain a survey on biochemical changes of the organisms. Phenomenological changes were given only when the corresponding articles contained further investigation results. Behavioral changes were not taken into account. The results published by the authors of the original papers were compiled in a kind of dictionary. All relevant data are listed in a defined order. (orig.) [de

  19. Inactivation of Aerosolized Biological Agents using Filled Nanocomposite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Reviewing Environmental Risk Assessment Reports, CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL. Brock , T.D., Madigan, M.T., Markinko, J.M., and Parker, J. (1994). Biology of... microorganisms in combustion environments: development and evaluation 7 - 26 Chapter 2. Thermal inactivation of airborne viable Bacillus subtilis...Hoffmann, V., Trunov M. (2010) Method for Studying Survival of Airborne Viable Microorganisms in Combustion Environments: Development and Evaluation

  20. Source Identification of Human Biological Materials and Its Prospect in Forensic Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, K N; Gui, C; Gao, Y; Yang, F; Zhou, H G

    2016-06-01

    Source identification of human biological materials in crime scene plays an important role in reconstructing the crime process. Searching specific genetic markers to identify the source of different human biological materials is the emphasis and difficulty of the research work of legal medical experts in recent years. This paper reviews the genetic markers which are used for identifying the source of human biological materials and studied widely, such as DNA methylation, mRNA, microRNA, microflora and protein, etc. By comparing the principles and methods of source identification of human biological materials using different kinds of genetic markers, different source of human biological material owns suitable marker types and can be identified by detecting single genetic marker or combined multiple genetic markers. Though there is no uniform standard and method for identifying the source of human biological materials in forensic laboratories at present, the research and development of a series of mature and reliable methods for distinguishing different human biological materials play the role as forensic evidence which will be the future development direction. Copyright© by the Editorial Department of Journal of Forensic Medicine.

  1. Oxygen diffusivity of biologic and synthetic scaffold materials for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentin, Jolene E; Freytes, Donald O; Grasman, Jonathan M; Pesyna, Colin; Freund, John; Gilbert, Thomas W; Badylak, Stephen F

    2009-12-15

    Scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications are commonly manufactured from synthetic materials, intact or isolated components of extracellular matrix (ECM), or a combination of such materials. After surgical implantation, the metabolic requirements of cells that populate the scaffold depend upon adequate gas and nutrient exchange with the surrounding microenvironment. The present study measured the oxygen transfer through three biologic scaffold materials composed of ECM including small intestinal submucosa (SIS), urinary bladder submucosa (UBS), and urinary bladder matrix (UBM), and one synthetic biomaterial, Dacron. The oxygen diffusivity was calculated from Fick's first law of diffusion. Each material permitted measurable oxygen diffusion. The diffusivity of SIS was found to be dependent on the direction of oxygen transfer; the oxygen transfer in the abluminal-to-luminal direction was significantly greater than the luminal-to-abluminal direction. The oxygen diffusivity of UBM and UBS were similar despite the presence of an intact basement membrane on the luminal surface of UBM. Dacron showed oxygen diffusivity values seven times greater than the ECM biomaterials. The current study showed that each material has unique oxygen diffusivity values, and these values may be dependent on the scaffold's ultrastructure.

  2. New improved method for evaluation of growth by food related fungi on biologically derived materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergenholtz, Karina P.; Nielsen, Per Væggemose

    2002-01-01

    Biologically derived materials, obtained as commercial and raw materials (Polylactate (PLA), Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB), potato, wheat and corn starch) were tested for their ability to support fungal growth using a modified ASTM G21-96 (American Society for Testing and Materials) standard as well...

  3. Recharacterization of Rhinophis dorsimaculatus Deraniyagala, 1941 (Serpentes: Uropeltidae), including description of new material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gower, David J; Wickramasinghe, L J Mendis

    2016-08-29

    The Sri Lankan uropeltid (shieldtail) snake Rhinophis dorsimaculatus Deraniyagala, 1941 was described originally from two specimens that were subsequently lost. The small amount of previously published data and lack of published colour photographs made this one of South Asia's most poorly known snake species, and this resulted in at least one instance of taxonomic misidentification. An additional 10 specimens from a historical collection from the vicinity of the type locality recently came to light. This material is reviewed and documented and the species recharacterized. An additional locality for the species is reported. The newly reported material helps to corroborate the taxonomic validity and distinctiveness of Rhinophis dorsimaculatus. The species is readily distinguished from congeners by having 227 or more ventral scales; a large, dorsally carinate rostral shield; posterior margins of paired anals that are largely separated by the posteriormost ventral scale; and a distinctive colour pattern with bilaterally asymmetrical dark blotches within a broad, pale middorsal stripe and regularly punctate flanks.

  4. Mechanical experiments on the superplastic material ALNOVI-1, including leak information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snippe, Q.H.C., E-mail: csnippe@nikhef.nl; Meinders, T.

    2011-01-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Mechanical testing of superplastic materials, in particular ALNOVI-1. {yields} Uniaxial tests to show the one-dimensional stress-strain behaviour and the high amount of strain rate sensitivity. {yields} Void volume fractions have been observed. {yields} Free bulge experiments to show the dependence on the backpressure during the forming stage. {yields} Measuring leak tightness of superplastically formed sheets. {yields} Experiments are used in order to develop a constitutive model in a later stage. - Abstract: In subatomic particle physics, unstable particles can be detected with a so-called vertex detector, placed inside a particle accelerator. A detecting unit close to the accelerator bunch of charged particles must be separated from the accelerator vacuum. A thin sheet with a complex 3D shape prevents the detector vacuum from polluting the accelerator vacuum. Therefore, this sheet has to be completely leak tight. However, this can conflict with restrictions concerning maximum sheet thickness of the product. To produce such a complex thin sheet, superplastic forming can be very attractive in cases where a small number of products is needed. In order to predict gas permeability of these formed sheets, many mechanical experiments are necessary, where the gas leak has to be measured. To obtain insight in the mechanical behaviour of the used material, ALNOVI-1, tensile experiments were performed to describe the uniaxial stress-strain behaviour. From these experiments, a high strain rate sensitivity was measured. The flow stress of this material under superplastic conditions was low and the material behaved in an isotropic manner upon large plastic strains. The results of these experiments were used to predict the forming pressure as a function of time in a free bulge experiment, such that a predefined target strain rate will not be exceeded in the material. An extra parameter within these bulging experiments is the application of a

  5. Adsorption of heavy metals in waste water using biological materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candelaria Tejada-Tovar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biosorption is a process that allows active or passive uptake of metal ions due to the property that different living or dead biomass have to bind and accumulate these pollutants by different mechanisms. The application of low-cost materials obtained from different biomass from microbial flora, agro-industrial waste and algae has been investigated to replace the use of conventional methods for the removal of contaminants such as heavy metals. Some of the metals of greatest impact to the environment due to its high toxicity and difficult to remove are chromium, nickel, cadmium, lead, and mercury. In this paper, an overview of adsorption as an alternative process for the removal of contaminants in solution and biomass commonly used in these processes, as well as some of the modifications made to improve the efficiency of adsorption of these materials is presented. It was concluded that the use of adsorption in the removal of pollutants in aqueous solution using waste biomass is applicable to these decontamination processes avoiding subsequent problems such as the generation of chemical sludge, and generating an alternative to use materials considered as waste. It is further identified that such factors as the pH of the solution, particle size, temperature, and concentration of metal effect on the process.

  6. Three Peaks of 2011 Draconid Activity Including that Connected with Pre-1900 Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koten, Pavel; Vaubaillon, Jeremie; Tóth, Juraj; Margonis, Anastasios; Ďuriš, František

    2014-08-01

    A Draconid meteor shower outburst was observed from on board two scientific aircraft deployed above Northern Europe on 8th October 2011. The activity profile was measured using a set of photographic and video cameras. The main peak of the activity occurred around 20:15 ± 0:0.5 UT which is consistent with the model prediction as well as with the IMO network visual observations. The corrected hourly rates reached a value of almost 350. The brighter meteors peaked about 15-20 min earlier than the dimmer ones. This difference can be explained by different directions of the ejection of the meteoroids from the parent comet. One of the instruments was even able to detect meteors connected with the material ejected from the parent comet before 1900 and thus confirmed the prediction of the model, although it was based on uncertain pre-1900 cometary data. Another small peak of the activity, which was caused by material ejected during the 1926 perihelion passage of the parent comet, was detected around 21:10 UT. The mass distribution index determined using the narrow field-of-view video camera was 2.0 ± 0.1. This work shows that the observation of meteor outbursts can constrain the orbital elements, outgassing activity and existence of jets at the surface of a comet.

  7. Development of microwave absorbing materials prepared from a polymer binder including Japanese lacquer and epoxy resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamaru, T.; Katsumata, H.; Uekusa, S.; Ooyagi, H.; Ishimura, T.; Miyakoshi, T.

    Microwave absorption composites were synthesized from a poly urushiol epoxy resin (PUE) mixed with one of microwave absorbing materials; Ni-Zn ferrite, Soot, Black lead, and carbon nano tube (CNT) to investigate their microwave absorption properties. PUE binders were specially made from Japanese lacquer and epoxy resin, where Japanese lacquer has been traditionally used for bond and paint because it has excellent beauty. Japanese lacquer solidifies with oxygen contained in air's moisture, which has difficulty in making composite, but we improved Japanese lacquer's solidification properties by use of epoxy resin. We made 10 mm thickness composite samples and cut them into toroidal shape to measure permittivity, permeability, and reflection loss in frequencies ranging from 50 Hz to 20 GHz. Electric magnetic absorber's composites synthesized from a PUE binders mixed either with Soot or CNT showed significantly higher wave absorption over -27 dB than the others at frequencies around 18 GHz, although Japanese lacquer itself doesn't affect absorption. This means Japanese lacquer can be used as binder materials for microwave absorbers.

  8. Simultaneous Low-Level Determination of Iodine and Manganese in Biological Materials by

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kučera, Jan; Mizera, Jiří; Repinc, U.; Smodiš, B.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 56, - (2006), s. 151-157 ISSN 0011-4626 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : iodine * , radiochemical * biological materials Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 0.568, year: 2006

  9. Watermelon origin solved with molecular phylogenetics including Linnaean material: another example of museomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomicki, Guillaume; Renner, Susanne S

    2015-01-01

    Type specimens are permanently preserved biological specimens that fix the usage of species names. This method became widespread from 1935 onwards and is now obligatory. We used DNA sequencing of types and more recent collections of wild and cultivated melons to reconstruct the evolutionary history of the genus Citrullus and the correct names for its species. We discovered that the type specimen of the name Citrullus lanatus, prepared by a Linnaean collector in South Africa in 1773, is not the species now thought of as watermelon. Instead, it is a representative of another species that is sister to C. ecirrhosus, a tendril-less South African endemic. The closest relative of the watermelon instead is a West African species. Our nuclear and plastid data furthermore reveal that there are seven species of Citrullus, not four as assumed. Our study implies that sweet watermelon originates from West, not southern Africa as previously believed, and that the South African citron melon has been independently domesticated. These findings affect and explain numerous studies on the origin of these two crops that led to contradictory results because of the erroneous merging of several distinct species. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  10. New improved method for evaluation of growth by food related fungi on biologically derived materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergenholtz, Karina P.; Nielsen, Per Væggemose

    2002-01-01

    Biologically derived materials, obtained as commercial and raw materials (Polylactate (PLA), Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB), potato, wheat and corn starch) were tested for their ability to support fungal growth using a modified ASTM G21-96 (American Society for Testing and Materials) standard as well...... as a new method where 10 mul of a spore suspension is placed in a spot on the test sample. The new method gave additional information about fungal growth on biologically derived materials, revealing a clear difference between survival and growth. PHB and PIA turned out to be most suitable for food...

  11. Impacts of Insufficient Instructional Materials on Teaching Biology: Higher Education Systems in Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edessa, Sutuma

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess and determine impacts of insufficient instructional materials and ineffective lesson delivery methods on teaching in biology higher education. The participants of this study were 60 trainees who graduated in Bachelor of Sciences from eight public universities in majoring biology. Data for the study was…

  12. Analysis of Textbooks and Teaching Materials about Teaching Unit of Evolution in High School Biology

    OpenAIRE

    佐藤, 崇之; 大鹿, 聖公

    2006-01-01

    There are few studies to discuss the contents comprehensively and to develop teaching materials for experiments and observations for studying evolution. In this study, we investigated the contents of teaching unit of evolution in Japanese high school biology textbooks and the papers concerned with the development of teaching materials for studying evolution in Japanese, UK and USA biology educational journals. We discussed the features and trends in teaching of evolution by the point at exper...

  13. Modelling effective dielectric properties of materials containing diverse types of biological cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huclova, Sonja; Froehlich, Juerg; Erni, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    An efficient and versatile numerical method for the generation of different realistically shaped biological cells is developed. This framework is used to calculate the dielectric spectra of materials containing specific types of biological cells. For the generation of the numerical models of the cells a flexible parametrization method based on the so-called superformula is applied including the option of obtaining non-axisymmetric shapes such as box-shaped cells and even shapes corresponding to echinocytes. The dielectric spectra of effective media containing various cell morphologies are calculated focusing on the dependence of the spectral features on the cell shape. The numerical method is validated by comparing a model of spherical inclusions at a low volume fraction with the analytical solution obtained by the Maxwell-Garnett mixing formula, resulting in good agreement. Our simulation data for different cell shapes suggest that around 1MHz the effective dielectric properties of different cell shapes at different volume fractions significantly deviate from the spherical case. The most pronounced change exhibits ε eff between 0.1 and 1 MHz with a deviation of up to 35% for a box-shaped cell and 15% for an echinocyte compared with the sphere at a volume fraction of 0.4. This hampers the unique interpretation of changes in cellular features measured by dielectric spectroscopy when simplified material models are used.

  14. Planar optical waveguide based sandwich assay sensors and processes for the detection of biological targets including early detection of cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Jennifer S [Santa Fe, NM; Swanson, Basil I [Los Alamos, NM; Shively, John E [Arcadia, CA; Li, Lin [Monrovia, CA

    2009-06-02

    An assay element is described including recognition ligands adapted for binding to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) bound to a film on a single mode planar optical waveguide, the film from the group of a membrane, a polymerized bilayer membrane, and a self-assembled monolayer containing polyethylene glycol or polypropylene glycol groups therein and an assay process for detecting the presence of CEA is described including injecting a possible CEA-containing sample into a sensor cell including the assay element, maintaining the sample within the sensor cell for time sufficient for binding to occur between CEA present within the sample and the recognition ligands, injecting a solution including a reporter ligand into the sensor cell; and, interrogating the sample within the sensor cell with excitation light from the waveguide, the excitation light provided by an evanescent field of the single mode penetrating into the biological target-containing sample to a distance of less than about 200 nanometers from the waveguide thereby exciting any bound reporter ligand within a distance of less than about 200 nanometers from the waveguide and resulting in a detectable signal.

  15. Cellular responses to implant materials: biological, physical and chemical factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, H

    1983-12-01

    Adhesion of bone and epithelial cells to the dental implant are vital to its retention in alveolar bone and to the prevention of infection via its 'gingival' margin. Studies of cytotoxicity, tissue irritability and carcinogenicity of implantable polymers, metals and ceramics and of tissue adhesion to them have been carried out in tissue culture and in animal experiments. The more similar the polymeric materials are chemically to living tissue the more easily are they dissolved and digested in the host. Therefore, implant materials having a molecular structure similar to protein or polysaccharide, e.g. Nylon, cannot be expected to function. On the other hand, silicones, polyethylene and Teflon (polytetrafluroethylene), which have molecular structures completely different from living substances, are generally more stable in the tissues. However, these polymers are hydrophobic and have little adhesion to living cells in spite of their high stability. They are not, therefore, suitable materials for the construction of implants. Studies on antithrombotic polymers have demonstrated the possibility of creating implantable polymers which have high stability as well as strong adhesion to the surrounding tissues. These properties may be conferred by grafting a hydrophilic polymer on to the surface of a hydrophobic polymer. Of the metals, Ti, Zr and Ta are fairly stable in living tissue, and allow cells to adhere strongly. Alloys of Co-Cr-Mo, Fe-Ni-Cr-Mo, Ti-Al-V, Ti-Mo, Ti-Pd and Ti-Pt deserve to be better evaluated because they are low in density, have high mechanical strength, stability and corrosion resistance in living tissue, and there is direct adhesion to the surrounding tissues. Biodegradable or bioactive ceramics which induce bone formation around the implant do not have sufficient mechanical strength. Implant ceramics have to be stable, e.g. crystal alumina, vitreous carbon, synthetic hydroxypatite and silicon nitrate. These exhibit high biocompatibility and

  16. On the relationship between indentation hardness and modulus, and the damage resistance of biological materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labonte, David; Lenz, Anne-Kristin; Oyen, Michelle L

    2017-07-15

    The remarkable mechanical performance of biological materials is based on intricate structure-function relationships. Nanoindentation has become the primary tool for characterising biological materials, as it allows to relate structural changes to variations in mechanical properties on small scales. However, the respective theoretical background and associated interpretation of the parameters measured via indentation derives largely from research on 'traditional' engineering materials such as metals or ceramics. Here, we discuss the functional relevance of indentation hardness in biological materials by presenting a meta-analysis of its relationship with indentation modulus. Across seven orders of magnitude, indentation hardness was directly proportional to indentation modulus. Using a lumped parameter model to deconvolute indentation hardness into components arising from reversible and irreversible deformation, we establish criteria which allow to interpret differences in indentation hardness across or within biological materials. The ratio between hardness and modulus arises as a key parameter, which is related to the ratio between irreversible and reversible deformation during indentation, the material's yield strength, and the resistance to irreversible deformation, a material property which represents the energy required to create a unit volume of purely irreversible deformation. Indentation hardness generally increases upon material dehydration, however to a larger extent than expected from accompanying changes in indentation modulus, indicating that water acts as a 'plasticiser'. A detailed discussion of the role of indentation hardness, modulus and toughness in damage control during sharp or blunt indentation yields comprehensive guidelines for a performance-based ranking of biological materials, and suggests that quasi-plastic deformation is a frequent yet poorly understood damage mode, highlighting an important area of future research. Instrumented

  17. Molecular depth profiling of organic and biological materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, John S. [Surface Analysis Research Centre, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: John.Fletcher@manchester.ac.uk; Conlan, Xavier A. [Surface Analysis Research Centre, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Lockyer, Nicholas P. [Surface Analysis Research Centre, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Vickerman, John C. [Surface Analysis Research Centre, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-30

    Atomic depth profiling using secondary ion mass spectrometry, SIMS, is common in the field micro-electronics; however, the generation of molecular information as a function of sample depth is difficult due to the accumulation of damage both on and beneath the sample surface. The introduction of polyatomic ion beams such as SF{sub 5} and C{sub 60} have raised the possibility of overcoming this problem as they deposit the majority of their energy in the upper surface of the sample resulting in increased sputter yields but with a complimentary reduction in sub-surface damage accumulation. In this paper we report the depth profile analysis of the bio-polymer polycaprolactone, PCL, using the polyatomic ions Au{sub 3}{sup +} and C{sub 60}{sup +} and the monoatomic Au{sup +}. Results are compared to recent analysis of a similar sample using SF{sub 5}{sup +}. C{sub 60}{sup +} depth profiling of cellulose is also demonstrated, an experiment that has been reported as unsuccessful when attempted with SF{sub 5}{sup +} implications for biological analysis are discussed.

  18. Radiation damage with biological specimens and organic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaeser, R.M.

    1979-01-01

    The radiation damage referred to in this chapter is defined as any changes in the physical structure or chemical makeup of the specimen which occur as a result of exposure to the electron beam. Radiation damage occurs in organic materials predominantly as a consequence of inelastic scattering of the incident electrons which frequently results in molecular ionization and radiolysis. Other types of radiation damage which can occur are specimen etching, which occurs as the result of synergistic action of electron irradiation and the presence of certain residual gasses, and specimen heating which occurs only at electron current densities that are large on the scale of ionization damage. The primary events in radiation physics and radiation chemistry and signal-to-noise considerations are also discussed in some detail

  19. Manipulating lipid bilayer material properties using biologically active amphipathic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafuzzaman, Md; Lampson, M. A.; Greathouse, D. V.; Koeppe, R. E., II; Andersen, O. S.

    2006-07-01

    Lipid bilayers are elastic bodies with properties that can be manipulated/controlled by the adsorption of amphipathic molecules. The resulting changes in bilayer elasticity have been shown to regulate integral membrane protein function. To further understand the amphiphile-induced modulation of bilayer material properties (thickness, intrinsic monolayer curvature and elastic moduli), we examined how an enantiomeric pair of viral anti-fusion peptides (AFPs)—Z-Gly-D-Phe and Z-Gly-Phe, where Z denotes a benzyloxycarbonyl group, as well as Z-Phe-Tyr and Z-D-Phe-Phe-Gly—alters the function of enantiomeric pairs of gramicidin channels of different lengths in planar bilayers. For both short and long channels, the channel lifetimes and appearance frequencies increase as linear functions of the aqueous AFP concentration, with no apparent effect on the single-channel conductance. These changes in channel function do not depend on the chirality of the channels or the AFPs. At pH 7.0, the relative changes in channel lifetimes do not vary when the channel length is varied, indicating that these compounds exert their effects primarily by causing a positive-going change in the intrinsic monolayer curvature. At pH 4.0, the AFPs are more potent than at pH 7.0 and have greater effects on the shorter channels, indicating that these compounds now change the bilayer elastic moduli. When AFPs of different anti-fusion potencies are compared, the rank order of the anti-fusion activity and the channel-modifying activity is similar, but the relative changes in anti-fusion potency are larger than the changes in channel-modifying activity. We conclude that gramicidin channels are useful as molecular force transducers to probe the influence of small amphiphiles upon lipid bilayer material properties.

  20. Determination of lead and cadmium in biological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoeppler, M.; Backhaus, F.; Dahl, R.; Hagedorn-Goetz, H.; Hilpert, K.; Klahre, P.; Rutzel, H.; Valenta, P.; Nuernberg, H.W.; Dumont, M.

    1975-01-01

    Sampling techniques and experience, and decomposition methods are presented. The processes used in flameless atomic absorption spectrometry (including the method using automatic insertion of samples), pulse polarography and isotope dilution mass spectrometry are described. Finally, the results of lead and cadmium measurements in bovine liver, blood, urine and hair samples are reported and discussed with a comparison of methods in some cases

  1. Curriculum and Course Materials for a Forensic DNA Biology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Kelly M.

    2014-01-01

    The Forensic Science Education Programs Accreditation Commission (FEPAC) requires accredited programs offer a "coherent curriculum" to ensure each student gains a "thorough grounding of the natural…sciences." Part of this curriculum includes completion of a minimum of 15 semester-hours forensic science coursework, nine of which…

  2. Nano-FTIR chemical mapping of minerals in biological materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergiu Amarie

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Methods for imaging of nanocomposites based on X-ray, electron, tunneling or force microscopy provide information about the shapes of nanoparticles; however, all of these methods fail on chemical recognition. Neither do they allow local identification of mineral type. We demonstrate that infrared near-field microscopy solves these requirements at 20 nm spatial resolution, highlighting, in its first application to natural nanostructures, the mineral particles in shell and bone. "Nano-FTIR" spectral images result from Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy combined with scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM. On polished sections of Mytilus edulis shells we observe a reproducible vibrational (phonon resonance within all biocalcite microcrystals, and distinctly different spectra on bioaragonite. Surprisingly, we discover sparse, previously unknown, 20 nm thin nanoparticles with distinctly different spectra that are characteristic of crystalline phosphate. Multicomponent phosphate bands are observed on human tooth sections. These spectra vary characteristically near tubuli in dentin, proving a chemical or structural variation of the apatite nanocrystals. The infrared band strength correlates with the mineral density determined by electron microscopy. Since nano-FTIR sensitively responds to structural disorder it is well suited for the study of biomineral formation and aging. Generally, nano-FTIR is suitable for the analysis and identification of composite materials in any discipline, from testing during nanofabrication to even the clinical investigation of osteopathies.

  3. Electric fields, weighting fields, signals and charge diffusion in detectors including resistive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riegler, W.

    2016-01-01

    In this report we discuss static and time dependent electric fields in detector geometries with an arbitrary number of parallel layers of a given permittivity and weak conductivity. We derive the Green's functions i.e. the field of a point charge, as well as the weighting fields for readout pads and readout strips in these geometries. The effect of 'bulk' resistivity on electric fields and signals is investigated. The spreading of charge on thin resistive layers is also discussed in detail, and the conditions for allowing the effect to be described by the diffusion equation is discussed. We apply the results to derive fields and induced signals in Resistive Plate Chambers, MICROMEGAS detectors including resistive layers for charge spreading and discharge protection as well as detectors using resistive charge division readout like the MicroCAT detector. We also discuss in detail how resistive layers affect signal shapes and increase crosstalk between readout electrodes.

  4. Method for contamination control and barrier apparatus with filter for containing waste materials that include dangerous particulate matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinson, Paul A.

    1998-01-01

    A container for hazardous waste materials that includes air or other gas carrying dangerous particulate matter has incorporated in barrier material, preferably in the form of a flexible sheet, one or more filters for the dangerous particulate matter sealably attached to such barrier material. The filter is preferably a HEPA type filter and is preferably chemically bonded to the barrier materials. The filter or filters are preferably flexibly bonded to the barrier material marginally and peripherally of the filter or marginally and peripherally of air or other gas outlet openings in the barrier material, which may be a plastic bag. The filter may be provided with a backing panel of barrier material having an opening or openings for the passage of air or other gas into the filter or filters. Such backing panel is bonded marginally and peripherally thereof to the barrier material or to both it and the filter or filters. A coupling or couplings for deflating and inflating the container may be incorporated. Confining a hazardous waste material in such a container, rapidly deflating the container and disposing of the container, constitutes one aspect of the method of the invention. The chemical bonding procedure for producing the container constitutes another aspect of the method of the invention.

  5. Sampling and sample preparation methods for the analysis of trace elements in biological material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sansoni, B.; Iyengar, V.

    1978-05-01

    The authors attempt to give a most systamtic possible treatment of the sample taking and sample preparation of biological material (particularly in human medicine) for trace analysis (e.g. neutron activation analysis, atomic absorption spectrometry). Contamination and loss problems are discussed as well as the manifold problems of the different consistency of solid and liquid biological materials, as well as the stabilization of the sample material. The process of dry and wet ashing is particularly dealt with, where new methods are also described. (RB) [de

  6. Elemental analysis of biological materials. Current problems and techniques with special reference to trace elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Selected techniques were reviewed for the assay of trace and minor elements in biological materials. Other relevant information is also presented on the need for such analyses, sampling, sample preparation and analytical quality control. In order to evaluate and compare the applicability of the various analytical techniques on a meaningful and objective basis, the materials chosen for consideration were intended to be typical of a wide range of biological matrics of different elemental compositions, namely Bowen's kale, representing a plant material, and NBS bovine liver, IAEA animal muscle, and blood serum, representing animal tissues. The subject is reviewed under the following headings: on the need for trace element analyses in the life sciences (4 papers); sampling and sample preparation for trace element analysis (2 papers); analytical techniques for trace and minor elements in biological materials (7 papers); analytical quality control (2 papers)

  7. Biological evaluation of a new pulp capping material developed from Portland cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negm, Ahmed M; Hassanien, Ehab E; Abu-Seida, Ashraf M; Nagy, Mohamed M

    2017-03-02

    This study evaluates the biological properties of a new pulp capping material developed from Portland cement. This study was conducted on 48 teeth in 4 dogs (12 teeth/dog). The dogs were classified into two equal groups (n=24 teeth) according to the evaluation period including: group A (3 weeks) and group B (3 months). Each group was further subdivided into three equal subgroups (n=8 teeth) according to the capping material including: subgroup 1: mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), subgroup2: Portland cement+10% calcium hydroxide+20% bismuth oxide (Port Cal) and subgroup 3: Portland cement+bismuth oxide. After general anesthesia, a class V buccal cavity was prepared coronal to the gingival margin. After pulp exposure and hemostasis,the capping materials and glass ionomer filling were placed on the exposure sites. All histopathological findings, inflammatory cell count and dentin bridge formation were recorded. Data were analyzed statistically. After 3 months, the histopathological picture of the pulp in subgroup 1 showed normal pulp, continuous odontoblastic layer and complete dentin bridge formation while subgroup 2 showed partial and complete dentin bridge over a normal and necrotic pulps. Subgroup 3 showed loss of normal architecture, areas of necrosis, complete, or incomplete dentin bridge formation, attached and detached pulp stones and fatty degeneration in group B. For group A, MTA subgroup showed the least number of inflammatory cell infiltrate followed by Port Cal subgroup. While subgroup 3 showed the highest number of inflammatory cell infiltrate. For group B, the mean inflammatory cell count increased with the three tested materials with no statistical difference. Regarding dentin bridge formation at group A, no significant differences was found between subgroups, while at group B, MTA subgroup exhibited significantly higher scores than other subgroups. In conclusion, addition of calcium hydroxide to Portland cement improves the dentin bridge formation

  8. Dosimetry using environmental and biological materials. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haskell, E.; Kenner, G.; Hayes, R.

    1998-02-01

    This report summarizes a five year effort to improve the sensitivity and reliability of retrospective dosimetry methods, to collaborate with laboratories engaged in related research and to share the technology with startup laboratories seeking similar capabilities. This research program has focused on validation of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) as a dosimetry tool and on optimization of the technique by reducing the lower limits of detection, simplifying the process of sample preparation and analysis and speeding analysis to allow greater throughput in routine measurement situations. The authors have investigated the dosimetric signal of hard tissues in enamel, deorganified dentin, synthetic carbonated apatites and synthetic hydroxyapatite. This research has resulted in a total of 27 manuscripts which have been published, are in press, or have been submitted for publication. Of these manuscripts, 14 are included in this report and were indexed separately for inclusion in the data base

  9. Dosimetry using environmental and biological materials. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haskell, E.; Kenner, G.; Hayes, R.

    1998-02-01

    This report summarizes a five year effort to improve the sensitivity and reliability of retrospective dosimetry methods, to collaborate with laboratories engaged in related research and to share the technology with startup laboratories seeking similar capabilities. This research program has focused on validation of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) as a dosimetry tool and on optimization of the technique by reducing the lower limits of detection, simplifying the process of sample preparation and analysis and speeding analysis to allow greater throughput in routine measurement situations. The authors have investigated the dosimetric signal of hard tissues in enamel, deorganified dentin, synthetic carbonated apatites and synthetic hydroxyapatite. This research has resulted in a total of 27 manuscripts which have been published, are in press, or have been submitted for publication. Of these manuscripts, 14 are included in this report and were indexed separately for inclusion in the data base.

  10. The effect of terminal sterilization on the material properties and in vivo remodeling of a porcine dermal biologic scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearth, Christopher L; Keane, Timothy J; Carruthers, Christopher A; Reing, Janet E; Huleihel, Luai; Ranallo, Christian A; Kollar, Elizabeth W; Badylak, Stephen F

    2016-03-01

    Biologic scaffolds composed of extracellular matrix are commonly used in a variety of surgical procedures. The Food and Drug Administration typically regulates biologic scaffolds as medical devices, thus requiring terminal sterilization prior to clinical use. However, to date, no consensus exists for the most effective yet minimally destructive sterilization protocol for biologic scaffold materials. The objective of the present study was to characterize the effect of ethylene oxide, gamma irradiation and electron beam (e-beam) irradiation on the material properties and the elicited in vivo remodeling response of a porcine dermal biologic scaffold. Outcome measures included biochemical, structural, and mechanical properties as well as cytocompatibility in vitro. In vivo evaluation utilized a rodent model to examine the host response to the materials following 7, 14, and 35 days. The host response to each experimental group was determined by quantitative histologic methods and by immunolabeling for macrophage polarization (M1/M2). In vitro results show that increasing irradiation dosage resulted in a dose dependent decrease in mechanical properties compared to untreated controls. Ethylene oxide-treated porcine dermal ECM resulted in decreased DNA content, extractable total protein, and bFGF content compared to untreated controls. All ETO treated, gamma irradiated, and e-beam irradiated samples had similar cytocompatibility scores in vitro. However, in vivo results showed that increasing dosages of e-beam and gamma irradiation elicited an increased rate of degradation of the biologic scaffold material following 35 days. The FDA typically regulates biologic scaffolds derived from mammalian tissues as medical devices, thus requiring terminal sterilization prior to clinical use. However, there is little data and no consensus for the most effective yet minimally destructive sterilization protocol for such materials. The present study characterized the effect of common

  11. MAK and BAT values list 2017. Maximum permissible concentrations at the place of work and biological tolerance values for working materials; MAK- und BAT-Werte-Liste 2017. Maximale Arbeitsplatzkonzentrationen und Biologische Arbeitsstofftoleranzwerte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2017-08-01

    The MAK and BAT values list 2017 includes the maximum permissible concentrations at the place of work and biological tolerance values for working materials. The following working materials are covered: carcinogenic working materials, sensitizing materials and aerosols. The report discusses the restriction of exposure peaks, skin resorption, MAK (maximum working place concentration) values during pregnancy, germ cell mutagens and specific working materials. Importance and application of BAT (biological working material tolerance) values, list of materials, carcinogens, biological guide values and reference values are also included.

  12. Chemical analysis and biological testing of materials from the EDS coal liquefaction process: a status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Later, D.W.; Pelroy, R.A.; Wilson, B.W.

    1984-05-01

    Representative process materials were obtained from the EDS pilot plant for chemical and biological analyses. These materials were characterized for biological activity and chemical composition using a microbial mutagenicity assay and chromatographic and mass spectrometric analytical techniques. The two highest boiling distillation cuts, as well as process solvent (PS) obtained from the bottoms recycle mode operation, were tested for initiation of mouse skin tumorigenicity. All three materials were active; the crude 800/sup 0 +/F cut was substantially more potent than the crude bottoms recycle PS or 750 to 800/sup 0/F distillate cut. Results from chemical analyses showed the EDS materials, in general, to be more highly alkylated and have higher hydroaromatic content than analogous SRC II process materials (no in-line process hydrogenation) used for comparison. In the microbial mutagenicity assays the N-PAC fractions showed greater activity than did the aliphatic hydrocarbon, hydroxy-PAH, or PAH fractions, although mutagenicity was detected in certain PAH fractions by a modified version of the standard microbial mutagenicity assay. Mutagenic activities for the EDS materials were lower, overall, than those for the corresponding materials from the SRC II process. The EDS materials produced under different operational modes had distinguishable differences in both their chemical constituency and biological activity. The primary differences between the EDS materials studied here and their SRC II counterparts used for comparison are most likely attributable to the incorporation of catalytic hydrogenation in the EDS process. 27 references, 28 figures, 27 tables.

  13. Impacts of insufficient instructional materials on teaching biology: Higher education systems in focus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutuma Edessa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of this study was to assess and determine impacts of insufficient instructional materials and ineffective lesson delivery methods on teaching in biology higher education. The participants of this study were 60 trainees who graduated in Bachelor of Sciences from eight public universities in majoring biology. Data for the study was collected while these trainees were attending the course of Biology Teaching Methods in the Post Graduate Diploma in Teaching, both in the regular and summer 2015/2016 training programs at Addis Ababa University. The study employs a mixed method design of both qualitative and quantitative data evaluations. Data was collected through classroom observations and interviews with the trainees. The findings indicated that insufficient instructional materials and ineffective teaching methods in higher education had negative impacts; that have affected the skills of performing biological tasks of graduates 71%. In the course of the Post Graduate Diploma in Teaching training, trainees were unsuccessful to conduct essential biological tasks expected from graduates of biology upon the completion of their undergraduate study program. The study was concluded with emphasis on the need to integrate theory and practice through using adequate instructional materials and proper teaching methods in the higher education biology teaching.

  14. Shear bond strengths of tooth coating materials including the experimental materials contained various amounts of multi-ion releasing fillers and their effects for preventing dentin demineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arita, Shoko; Suzuki, Masaya; Kazama-Koide, Miku; Shinkai, Koichi

    2017-10-01

    We examined shear bond strengths (SBSs) of various tooth-coating-materials including the experimental materials to dentin and demineralization resistance of a fractured adhesive surface after the SBS testing. Three resin-type tooth-coating-materials (BC, PRG Barrier Coat; HC, Hybrid Coat II; and SF, Shield force plus) and two glass-ionomer-type tooth-coating-materials (CV, Clinpro XT Varnish; and FJ, Fuji VII) were selected. The experimental PRG Barrier Coat containing 0, 17, and 33 wt% S-PRG filler (BC0, BC17, and BC33, respectively) were developed. Each tooth-coating-material was applied to flattened dentin surfaces of extracted human teeth for SBS testing. After storing in water for 32 days with 4000 thermal cycling, the specimens were subjected to the SBS test. Specimens after SBS testing were subjected to a pH cycling test, and then, demineralization depths were measured using a polarized-light microscope. ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test were used for statistical analysis. The SBS value of FJ and CV was significantly lower than those of other materials except for BC (p coating-materials demonstrated significantly higher SBS for dentin than the glass-ionomer-type tooth-coating-materials; however, they were inferior to the glass ionomer-type tooth-coating-materials in regards to the acid resistance of the fractured adhesion surface.

  15. Survey of currently available reference materials for use in connection with the determination of trace elements in biological and environmental materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Y.; Parr, R.M.

    1985-12-01

    This report focuses on analytical reference materials which have been developed for use in connection with the determination of toxic and essential trace elements in biomedical and health-related environmental samples. Data are reported on 60 biological and 40 environmental (non-biological) reference materials from 11 suppliers. Certified concentration values (or their equivalents) and non-certified concentration values (or information values) are presented in various tables which are intended to help the user select a reference material that matches as closely as possible (i.e. with respect to matrix type and concentration of the element of interest) the ''real'' samples that are to be analysed. These tables have been generated from a database characterized by the following parameters: total number of reference materials=100; total number of elements recorded=69; total number of concentration values recorded=1771. Also included in the report is information (where available) on the cost of each material, the unit weight or volume supplied, and the minimum weight of material recommended for analysis. (author)

  16. Alternatives of informed consent for storage and use of human biological material for research purposes: Brazilian regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marodin, Gabriela; França, Paulo Henrique Condeixa de; Salgueiro, Jennifer Braathen; Motta, Marcia Luz da; Tannous, Gysélle Saddi; Lopes, Anibal Gil

    2014-12-01

    Informed consent is recognized as a primary ethical requirement to conduct research involving humans. In the investigations with the use of human biological material, informed consent (IC) assumes a differentiated condition on account of the many future possibilities. This work presents suitable alternatives for IC regarding the storage and use of human biological material in research, according to new Brazilian regulations. Both norms - Resolution 441/11 of the National Health Council, approved on 12 May 2011, and Ordinance 2.201 (NATIONAL GUIDELINES FOR BIOREPOSITORIES AND BIOBANKS OF HUMAN BIOLOGICAL MATERIAL FOR RESEARCH PURPOSE) of the Brazil Ministry of Health, approved on 14 September 2011 - state that the consent of subjects for the collection, storage and use of samples stored in Biobanks is necessarily established by means of a Free and Informed Consent Form (ICF). In order to obtain individual and formal statements, this form should contain the following two mutually exclusive options: an explanation about the use of the stored material in each research study, and the need for new consent or the waiver thereof when the material is used for a new study. On the other hand, ICF suitable for Biorepositories must be exclusive and related to specific research. Although Brazilian and international regulations identify the main aspects to be included in the IC, efforts are still necessary to improve the consent process, so that the document will become a bond of trust between subject and researcher. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Periodontal materials and cell biology for guided tissue and bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrei, Mihai; Dinischiotu, Anca; Didilescu, Andreea Cristiana; Ionita, Daniela; Demetrescu, Ioana

    2018-03-01

    The present review is intended to find links between periodontal materials of the dentomaxillary apparatus and cell biology at the beginning of a century fraught with various forms of periodontal diseases and needing new treatment strategies. The manuscript has two different parts. The first describes the anatomy of tooth supporting structures, as well as related pathologies. The second part is related to cell and molecular biology in the context of periodontal regeneration. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  18. OCCUPATIONAL ACCIDENTS WITH BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS IN CLINICAL ANALYSIS LABORATORY: CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Azevedo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Accidents involving biological material can cause diseases to the professional healthcare and also bring psychosocial effects. The aim of this study was to characterize the accidents occurring with biological material with professional of clinical laboratories of Sinop-MT. Data were collected by a questionnaire consisting of sociodemographic and health variables. 21 (87.5% of respondents stated that they never suffered any kind of accident. One of the injured workers reported that there was involvement in your emotional life. It is observed underreporting of occupational accidents by employees affected, making it difficult to increase research on the subject and actions about the problem.

  19. Determination of mercury concentration in biological materials by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, L.; Gras, N.; Cortes, E.; Cassorla, V.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of this work was to obtain a confident analytical method for measuring the mercury concentration in biological materials. Destructive neutron activation analysis was used for this purpose and a radiochemical separation method was studied to isolate the mercury from its main interferences: sodium and phosphorus, because these elements in biological materials are in high concentrations. The method developed was based on the copper amalgamation under controlled conditions. Yield and reproductibility studies were performed using 203 Hg as radioactive tracer. Finally, food samples of regular consumption were analyzed and the results were compared with those recommended by FAO/WHO. (Author)

  20. Digital learning material for experimental design and model building in molecular biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aegerter-Wilmsen, T.

    2005-01-01

    Designing experimental approaches is a major cognitive skill in molecular biology research, and building models, including quantitative ones, is a cognitive skill which is rapidly gaining importance. Since molecular biology education at university level is aimed at educating future researchers, we

  1. Instrumental neutron activation analysis of phosphorus in biological materials by Bremsstrahlung measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajo, S.; Wyttenbach, A.

    1986-12-01

    The determination of phosphorus in biological materials by instrumental neutron activation via the reaction 31 P (n,γ) 32 P is described. The Bremsstrahlung produced by 32 P is measured in a well-type NaI(Tl) detector. The samples are measured within the polyethylene irradiation container with no changes between irradiation and measurement. The sources of error were studied and the proposed method was applied to the determination of phosphorus in ten internationally certified materials. (author)

  2. Current studies of biological materials using instrumental and radiochemical neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fardy, J.J.; McOrist, G.D.; Farrar, Y.J.

    1985-01-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis still remains the preferred option when analysing the trace element distribution in a wide rage of materials by neutron activation analysis. However, when lower limits of detection are required or major interferences reduce the effectiveness of this technique, radiochemical neutron activation analysis is applied. This paper examines the current use of both methods and the development of rapid radiochemical techniques for analysis of the biological materials, hair, cow's milk, human's milk, milk powder, blood and blood serum

  3. Including a Service Learning Educational Research Project in a Biology Course-I: Assessing Community Awareness of Childhood Lead Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Shakra, Amal; Saliim, Eric

    2012-01-01

    A university course project was developed and implemented in a biology course, focusing on environmental problems, to assess community awareness of childhood lead poisoning. A set of 385 questionnaires was generated and distributed in an urban community in North Carolina, USA. The completed questionnaires were sorted first into yes and no sets…

  4. Measuring the complex permittivity tensor of uniaxial biological materials with coplanar waveguide transmission line

    Science.gov (United States)

    A simple and accurate technique is described for measuring the uniaxial permittivity tensor of biological materials with a coplanar waveguide transmission-line configuration. Permittivity tensor results are presented for several chicken and beef fresh meat samples at 2.45 GHz....

  5. Evaluation of Botanical Reference Materials for the Determination of Vanadium in Biological Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, Kaj; Damsgaard, Else

    1982-01-01

    Three botanical reference materials prepared by the National Bureau of Standards have been studied by neutron activation analysis to evaluate their suitability with respect to the determination of vanadium in biological samples. Various decomposition methods were applied in connection with chemical...

  6. Materiality, Symbolicity, and the Rhetoric of Order: "Dialectical Biologism" as Motive in Burke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engnell, Richard A.

    1998-01-01

    Considers how the work of Kenneth Burke has recently been critiqued for its lack of attention to the role of non-symbolic motivation in rhetoric. Describes Burke's contributions as a "dialectical biologism" that sets forth a system of five symbolic/material dialectics that undergird all rhetorical appeal. Suggests that the most effective…

  7. Simultaneous Determination of Arsenic, Manganese, and Selenium in Biological Materials by Neutron-Activation Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, Kaj; Damsgaard, Else

    1973-01-01

    A new method was developed for the simultaneous determination of arsenic, manganese, and selenium in biological material by thermal-neutron activation analysis. The use of 81 mSe as indicator for selenium permitted a reduction of activation time to 1 hr for a 1 g sample, and the possibility of loss...

  8. Optimization of spatial frequency domain imaging technique for estimating optical properties of food and biological materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spatial frequency domain imaging technique has recently been developed for determination of the optical properties of food and biological materials. However, accurate estimation of the optical property parameters by the technique is challenging due to measurement errors associated with signal acquis...

  9. Neutron-Activation Analysis of Biological Material with High Radiation Levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samsahl, K.

    1966-09-15

    A method has been developed for the chemical separation and subsequent gamma-spectrometric analysis of the alkali metals, the alkaline earths, the rare earths, chromium, hafnium, lanthanum, manganese, phosphorus, scandium and silver in neutron-activated biological material. The separation steps, being fully automatic, are based on a combination of ion-exchange and partition chromatography and require 40 min.

  10. Neutron-Activation Analysis of Biological Material with High Radiation Levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samsahl, K.

    1966-09-01

    A method has been developed for the chemical separation and subsequent gamma-spectrometric analysis of the alkali metals, the alkaline earths, the rare earths, chromium, hafnium, lanthanum, manganese, phosphorus, scandium and silver in neutron-activated biological material. The separation steps, being fully automatic, are based on a combination of ion-exchange and partition chromatography and require 40 min

  11. Human biological monitoring for exposure assessment in response to an incident involving hazardous materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheepers, P.T.J.; Brederode, N.E. van; Bos, P.M.J.; Nijhuis, N.J.; Weerdt, R.H. van de; Woude, I. van der; Eggens, M.L.

    2014-01-01

    Biological monitoring in humans (HBM) is widely used in the field of occupational and environmental health. In the situation of an unexpected release of hazardous materials HBM may contribute to the medical support and treatment of exposed individuals from the general population or of emergency

  12. Selenium determination in biological material by atomic absorption spectrophotometry in graphite furnace and using vapor generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho Vidal, M. de F. de.

    1984-01-01

    The applicability of the atomic absorption spectrophotometry to the determination of selenium in biological material using vapor generation and electrothermal atomization in the graphite furnace was investigated. Instrumental parameters and the analytical conditions of the methods were studied. Decomposition methods for the samples were tested, and the combustion in the Wickbold apparatus was chosen. (author) [pt

  13. EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES THERMOELECTRIC SYSTEMS FOR SHORT-TERM STORAGE AND TRANSPORTATION OF BIOLOGICAL MATERIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Ismailov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Described a schematic diagram of an experimental stand thermoelectric system for shortterm storage and transportation of biological material. The technique of the pilot study of the thermoelectric system. The results of the pilot study.

  14. Guide for Operational Configuration Management Program including the adjunct programs of design reconstitution and material condition and aging management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    This standard presents program criteria and implementation guidance for an operational configuration management program for DOE nuclear and non-nuclear facilities in the operational phase. Portions of this standard are also useful for other DOE processes, activities, and programs. This Part 1 contains foreword, glossary, acronyms, bibliography, and Chapter 1 on operational configuration management program principles. Appendices are included on configuration management program interfaces, and background material and concepts for operational configuration management

  15. How to Choose between the Implant Materials Steel and Titanium in Orthopedic Trauma Surgery: Part 2 - Biological Aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perren, S M; Regazzoni, P; Fernandez, A A

    2017-01-01

    BIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF STEEL AND TITANIUM AS IMPLANT MATERIAL IN ORTHOPEDIC TRAUMA SURGERY The following case from the ICUC database, where a titanium plate was implanted into a flourishing infection, represents the clinical experience leading to preferring titanium over steel. (Fig. 1) (6). Current opinions regarding biological aspects of implant function. The "street" opinions regarding the biological aspects of the use of steel versus titanium as a surgical trauma implant material differ widely. Statements of opinion leaders range from "I do not see any difference in the biological behavior between steel and titanium in clinical application" to "I successfully use titanium implants in infected areas in a situation where steel would act as foreign body "sustaining" infection." Furthermore, some comments imply that clinical proof for the superiority of titanium in human application is lacking. The following tries to clarify the issues addressing the different aspects more through a practical clinical approach than a purely scientific one, this includes simplifications. Today's overall biocompatibility of implant materials is acceptable but: As the vast majority of secondary surgeries are elective procedures this allows the selection of implant materials with optimal infection resistance. The different biological reactions of stainless steel and titanium are important for this segment of clinical pathologies. Biological tole - rance (18) depends on the toxicity and on the amount of soluble implant material released. Release, diffusion and washout through blood circulation determine the local concentration of the corrosion products. Alloying components of steel, especially nickel and chromium, are less than optimal in respect to tissue tolerance and allergenicity. Titanium as a pure metal provides excellent biological tolerance (3, 4, 16). Better strength was obtained by titanium alloys like TiAl6V4. The latter found limited application as surgical implants. It

  16. How accelerated biological aging can affect solar reflective polymeric based building materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, C.; Santunione, G.; Libbra, A.; Muscio, A.; Sgarbi, E.

    2017-11-01

    Among the main issues concerning building materials, in particular outdoor ones, one can identify the colonization by microorganisms referred to as biological aggression. This can affect not only the aesthetical aspect but also the thermal performance of solar reflective materials. In order to improve the reliability of tests aimed to assess the resistance to biological aggression and contextually reduce the test duration, an accelerated test method has been developed. It is based on a lab reproducible setup where specific and controlled environmental and boundary conditions are imposed to accelerate as much as possible biological growth on building materials. Due to their widespread use, polymeric materials have been selected for the present analysis, in the aim of reaching an advanced bio-aged level in a relatively short time (8 weeks or less) and at the same time comparatively evaluate different materials under a given set of ageing conditions. Surface properties before, during and after ageing have been investigated by surface, microstructural and chemical analyses, as well as by examination of time progressive images to assess bacterial and algal growth rate.

  17. Including a service learning educational research project in a biology course-I: Assessing community awareness of childhood lead poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    Abu-Shakra, Amal; Saliim, Eric

    2012-01-01

    A university course project was developed and implemented in a biology course, focusing on environmental problems, to assess community awareness of childhood lead poisoning. A set of 385 questionnaires was generated and distributed in an urban community in North Carolina, USA. The completed questionnaires were sorted fırst into yes and no sets based on the responses obtained for the fırst question, which gauged the participants' awareness of lead as an indoor pollutant at 71% (n=273)...

  18. Searching for biological traces on different materials using a forensic light source and infrared photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterzik, V; Panzer, S; Apfelbacher, M; Bohnert, M

    2016-05-01

    Because biological traces often play an important role in the investigation process of criminal acts, their detection is essential. As they are not always visible to the human eye, tools like a forensic light source or infrared photography can be used. The intention of the study presented was to give advice how to visualize biological traces best. Which wavelengths and/or filters give the best results for different traces on different fabrics of different colors? Therefore, blood (undiluted and diluted), semen, urine, saliva, and perspiration have been examined on 29 different materials.

  19. Piezo- and Flexoelectric Membrane Materials Underlie Fast Biological Motors in the Ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breneman, Kathryn D; Rabbitt, Richard D

    2009-01-01

    The mammalian inner ear is remarkably sensitive to quiet sounds, exhibits over 100dB dynamic range, and has the exquisite ability to discriminate closely spaced tones even in the presence of noise. This performance is achieved, in part, through active mechanical amplification of vibrations by sensory hair cells within the inner ear. All hair cells are endowed with a bundle of motile microvilli, stereocilia, located at the apical end of the cell, and the more specialized outer hair cells (OHC's) are also endowed with somatic electromotility responsible for changes in cell length in response to perturbations in membrane potential. Both hair bundle and somatic motors are known to feed energy into the mechanical vibrations in the inner ear. The biophysical origin and relative significance of the motors remains a subject of intense research. Several biological motors have been identified in hair cells that might underlie the motor(s), including a cousin of the classical ATP driven actin-myosin motor found in skeletal muscle. Hydrolysis of ATP, however, is much too slow to be viable at audio frequencies on a cycle-by-cycle basis. Heuristically, the OHC somatic motor behaves as if the OHC lateral wall membrane were a piezoelectric material and the hair bundle motor behaves as if the plasma membrane were a flexoelectric material. We propose these observations from a continuum materials perspective are literally true. To examine this idea, we formulated mathematical models of the OHC lateral wall "piezoelectric" motor and the more ubiquitous "flexoelectric" hair bundle motor. Plausible biophysical mechanisms underlying piezo- and flexoelectricity were established. Model predictions were compared extensively to the available data. The models were then applied to study the power conversion efficiency of the motors. Results show that the material properties of the complex membranes in hair cells provide them with the ability to convert electrical power available in the inner

  20. Hyperdry amniotic membrane as a suitable biological dressing material for raw wounds in the oral cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Noguchi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Raw wounds in the oral cavity are prone not only to infection but also contraction by scaring and often need a proper dressing to prevent these complications. Autografts using free mucosal and split-skin grafts, which seem biologically ideal, have been used to cover raw wounds in the oral cavity. Those grafts, however, require a separate surgical procedure at donor sites and often cause morbidity associated with delayed healing of the donor site. The amnion has been considered a suitable tissue for allografts, based on its low immunogenicity. It also possesses anti-inflammatory, would –protecting, and scar-reducing properties. Preserved amnions have been used for decades in various clinical fields.  However, there have been some problems in the storage and sterilization of the material. To resolve these problems, we developed hyperdry amniotic membrane (HAM, which can be stored at room temperature for a long period. In my lecture, I will share our clinical experiences of applying HAM into oral surgery, including results of experimental studies on would healing of the oral cavity.

  1. Determination of 25 elements in biological standard reference materials by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzzi, G.; Pietra, R.; Sabbioni, E.

    1974-12-01

    Standard and Certified Reference Materials programme of the JRC includes the determination of trace elements in complex biological samples delivered by the U.S. National Bureau of Standards: Bovine liver (NBS SRM 1577), Orchard Leaves (NBS SRM 1571) and Tomato Leaves. The study has been performed by the use of neutron activation analysis. Due to the very low concentration of some elements, radiochemical groups or elemental separation procedures were necessary. The paper describes the techniques used to analyse 25 elements. Computer assisted instrumental neutron activation analysis with high resolution Ge(Li) spectrometry was considerably advantageous in the determination of Na, K, Cl, Mn, Fe, Rb and Co and in some cases of Ca, Zn, Cs, Sc, and Cr. For low contents of Ca, Mg, Ni and Si special chemical separation schemes, followed by Cerenkov counting have been developped. Two other separation procedures allowing the determination of As, Cd, Ga, Hg, Mo, Cu, Sr Se, Ba and P have been set up. The first, the simplified one involves the use of high resolution Ge(Li) detectors, the second, the more complete one involves a larger number of shorter measurements performed by simpler and more sensitive techniques, such as NaI(Tl) scintillation spectrometry and Cerenkov counting. The results obtained are presented and discussed

  2. Organizational influence on the occurrence of work accidents involving exposure to biological material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marziale, Maria Helena Palucci; Rocha, Fernanda Ludmilla Rossi; Robazzi, Maria Lúcia do Carmo Cruz; Cenzi, Camila Maria; dos Santos, Heloisa Ehmke Cardoso; Trovó, Marli Elisa Mendes

    2013-01-01

    to analyze work accidents involving exposure to biological materials which took place among personnel working in nursing and to evaluate the influence of the organizational culture on the occurrence of these accidents. a retrospective, analytical study, carried out in two stages in a hospital that was part of the Network for the Prevention of Work Accidents. The first stage involved the analysis of the characteristics of the work accidents involving exposure to biological materials as recorded over a seven-year period by the nursing staff in the hospital studied, and registered in the Network databank. The second stage involved the analysis of 122 nursing staff members' perception of the institutional culture, who were allocated to the control group (workers who had not had an accident) and the case group (workers who had had an accident). 386 accidents had been recorded: percutaneous lesions occurred in 79% of the cases, needles were the materials involved in 69.7% of the accidents, and in 81.9% of the accident there was contact with blood. Regarding the influence of the organizational culture on the occurrence of accidents, the results obtained through the analysis of the two groups did not demonstrate significant differences between the average scores attributed by the workers in each organizational value or practice category. It is concluded that accidents involving exposure to biological material need to be avoided, however, it was not possible to confirm the influence of organizational values or practices on workers' behavior concerning the occurrence of these accidents.

  3. Wetland Biomass Production: emergent aquatic management options and evaluations. A final subcontract report. [Includes a bibliography containing 686 references on Typha from biological abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, D.C.; Dubbe, D.R.; Garver, E.G.; Linton, P.J.

    1984-07-01

    The high yield potential and attractive chemical composition of Typha make it a particularly viable energy crop. The Minnesota research effort has demonstrated that total annual biomass yields equivalent to 30 dry tonnes/ha (13 tons/acre) are possible in planted stands. This compares with yields of total plant material between 9 and 16 dry tonnes/ha (4 to 7 tons/acre) in a typical Minnesota corn field. At least 50% of the Typha plant is comprised of a belowground rhizome system containing 40% starch and sugar. This high level of easily fermentable carbohydrate makes rhizomes an attractive feedstock for alcohol production. The aboveground portion of the plant is largely cellulose, and although it is not easily fermentable, it can be gasified or burned. This report is organized in a manner that focuses on the evaluation of the management options task. Results from stand management research performed at the University of Minnesota during 1982 and 1983 are integrated with findings from an extensive survey of relevant emergent aquatic plant research and utilization. These results and findings are then arranged in sections dealing with key steps and issues that need to be dealt with in the development of a managed emergent aquatic bio-energy system. A brief section evaluating the current status of rhizome harvesting is also included along with an indexed bibliography of the biology, ecology, and utilization of Typha which was completed with support from this SERI subcontract. 686 references, 11 figures, 17 tables.

  4. The use of an ion-beam source to alter the surface morphology of biological implant materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigand, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    An electron-bombardment ion-thruster was used as a neutralized-ion-beam sputtering source to texture the surfaces of biological implant materials. The materials investigated included 316 stainless steel; titanium-6% aluminum, 4% vanadium; cobalt-20% chromium, 15% tungsten; cobalt-35% nickel, 20% chromium, 10% molybdenum; polytetrafluoroethylene; polyoxymethylene; silicone and polyurethane copolymer; 32%-carbon-impregnated polyolefin; segmented polyurethane; silicone rubber; and alumina. Scanning electron microscopy was used to determine surface morphology changes of all materials after ion-texturing. Electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis was used to determine the effects of ion-texturing on the surface chemical composition of some polymers. Liquid contact angle data were obtained for ion-textured and untextured polymer samples. Results of tensile and fatigue tests of ion-textured metal alloys are presented. Preliminary data of tissue response to ion-textured surfaces of some metals, polytetrafluoroethylene, alumina, and segmented polyurethane have been obtained.

  5. Applications of mass spectrometry in the trace element analysis of biological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moens, L.

    1997-01-01

    The importance of mass spectrometry for the analysis of biological material is illustrated by reviewing the different mass spectrometric methods applied and describing some typical applications published recently. Though atomic absorption spectrometry is used in the majority of analyses of biological material, most mass spectrometric methods have been used to some extent for trace element determination in biomedical research. The relative importance of the different methods is estimated by reviewing recent research papers. It is striking that especially inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is increasingly being applied, partly because the method can be used on-line after chromatographic separation, in speciation studies. Mass spectrometric methods prove to offer unique possibilities in stable isotope tracer studies and for this purpose also experimentally demanding methods such as thermal ionization mass spectrometry and accelerator mass spectrometry are frequently used. (orig.)

  6. A method to determine site-specific, anisotropic fracture toughness in biological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechtle, Sabine; Özcoban, Hüseyin; Yilmaz, Ezgi D.; Fett, Theo; Rizzi, Gabriele; Lilleodden, Erica T.; Huber, Norbert; Schreyer, Andreas; Swain, Michael V.; Schneider, Gerold A.

    2012-01-01

    Many biological materials are hierarchically structured, with highly anisotropic structures and properties on several length scales. To characterize the mechanical properties of such materials, detailed testing methods are required that allow precise and site-specific measurements on several length scales. We propose a fracture toughness measurement technique based on notched focused ion beam prepared cantilevers of lower and medium micron size scales. Using this approach, site-specific fracture toughness values in dental enamel were determined. The usefulness and challenges of the method are discussed.

  7. The spectral applications of Beer-Lambert law for some biological and dosimetric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Içelli, Orhan; Yalçin, Zeynel; Karakaya, Vatan; Ilgaz, Işıl P.

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study is to conduct quantitative and qualitative analysis of biological and dosimetric materials which contain organic and inorganic materials and to make the determination by using the spectral theorem Beer-Lambert law. Beer-Lambert law is a system of linear equations for the spectral theory. It is possible to solve linear equations with a non-zero coefficient matrix determinant forming linear equations. Characteristic matrix of the linear equation with zero determinant is called point spectrum at the spectral theory.

  8. Virus-based surface patterning of biological molecules, probes, and inorganic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Suji; Jeon, Seongho; Kwak, Eun-A; Kim, Jong-Man; Jaworski, Justyn

    2014-10-01

    An essential requirement for continued technological advancement in many areas of biology, physics, chemistry, and materials science is the growing need to generate custom patterned materials. Building from recent achievements in the site-specific modification of virus for covalent surface tethering, we show in this work that stable 2D virus patterns can be generated in custom geometries over large area glass surfaces to yield templates of biological, biochemical, and inorganic materials in high density. As a nanomaterial building block, filamentous viruses have been extensively used in recent years to produce materials with interesting properties, owing to their ease of genetic and chemical modification. By utilizing un-natural amino acids generated at specific locations on the filamentous fd bacteriophage protein coat, surface immobilization is carried out on APTES patterned glass resulting in precise geometries of covalently linked virus material. This technique facilitated the surface display of a high density of virus that were labeled with biomolecules, fluorescent probes, and gold nanoparticles, thereby opening the possibility of integrating virus as functional components for surface engineering. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Active matter at the interface between materials science and cell biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needleman, Daniel; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2017-09-01

    The remarkable processes that characterize living organisms, such as motility, self-healing and reproduction, are fuelled by a continuous injection of energy at the microscale. The field of active matter focuses on understanding how the collective behaviours of internally driven components can give rise to these biological phenomena, while also striving to produce synthetic materials composed of active energy-consuming components. The synergistic approach of studying active matter in both living cells and reconstituted systems assembled from biochemical building blocks has the potential to transform our understanding of both cell biology and materials science. This methodology can provide insight into the fundamental principles that govern the dynamical behaviours of self-organizing subcellular structures, and can lead to the design of artificial materials and machines that operate away from equilibrium and can thus attain life-like properties. In this Review, we focus on active materials made of cytoskeletal components, highlighting the role of active stresses and how they drive self-organization of both cellular structures and macroscale materials, which are machines powered by nanomachines.

  10. Planar optical waveguide based sandwich assay sensors and processes for the detection of biological targets including protein markers, pathogens and cellular debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Jennifer S [Santa Fe, NM; Swanson, Basil I [Los Alamos, NM; Grace, Karen M [Los Alamos, NM; Grace, Wynne K [Los Alamos, NM; Shreve, Andrew P [Santa Fe, NM

    2009-06-02

    An assay element is described including recognition ligands bound to a film on a single mode planar optical waveguide, the film from the group of a membrane, a polymerized bilayer membrane, and a self-assembled monolayer containing polyethylene glycol or polypropylene glycol groups therein and an assay process for detecting the presence of a biological target is described including injecting a biological target-containing sample into a sensor cell including the assay element, with the recognition ligands adapted for binding to selected biological targets, maintaining the sample within the sensor cell for time sufficient for binding to occur between selected biological targets within the sample and the recognition ligands, injecting a solution including a reporter ligand into the sensor cell; and, interrogating the sample within the sensor cell with excitation light from the waveguide, the excitation light provided by an evanescent field of the single mode penetrating into the biological target-containing sample to a distance of less than about 200 nanometers from the waveguide thereby exciting the fluorescent-label in any bound reporter ligand within a distance of less than about 200 nanometers from the waveguide and resulting in a detectable signal.

  11. Application of cathodoluminescence microscopy to recent and past biological materials: a decade of progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbin, Vincent

    2013-06-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) microscopy is a powerful technique for studying biominerals. New progress on CL observation of biological materials is discussed especially the Mn2+ incorporation in shells during life and the relationship with environmental and/or diagenetic parameters. The aragonite-calcite transformation temperature during heating is reviewed, for example, in order to trace the chemical alteration of archaeological fired shells. New data are presented for Mn2+ activated luminescence in crystalline vaterite.

  12. Determination of arsenic in biological materials using ammonium molybdate labelled with 99Mo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Y.; Nagaoka, Y.

    1983-01-01

    A new radiometric method for the determination of arsenic in biological materials has been developed. An excess of ammonium molybdate labelled with 99 Mo was added to the sample solution and the arsenomolybdic acid formed was extracted into n-butyl alcohol and ethyl acetate mixture. The activity of the organic phase was directly proportional to the amount of arsenic. The method was applied for the determination of arsenic in Orchard Leaves obtained from the National Bureau of Standards. (author)

  13. Collaborative Research. Fundamental Science of Low Temperature Plasma-Biological Material Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, David Barry [Univ. California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Oehrlein, Gottlieb [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Low temperature plasma (LTP) treatment of biological tissue is a promising path toward sterilization of bacteria due to its versatility and ability to operate under well-controlled and relatively mild conditions. The present collaborative research of an interdisciplinary team of investigators at University of Maryland, College Park (UMD), and University of California, Berkeley (UCB) focused on establishing our knowledge based with regard to low temperature plasma-induced chemical modifications in biomolecules that result in inactivation due to various plasma species, including ions, reactive radicals, and UV/VUV photons. The overall goals of the project were to identify and quantify the mechanisms by which low and atmospheric pressure plasma deactivates endotoxic biomolecules. Additionally, we wanted to understand the mechanism by which atmospheric pressure plasmas (APP) modify surfaces and how these modifications depend on the interaction of APP with the environment. Various low pressure plasma sources, a vacuum beam system and several atmospheric pressure plasma sources were used to accomplish this. In our work we elucidated for the first time the role of ions, VUV photons and radicals in biological deactivation of representative biomolecules, both in a UHV beam system and an inductively coupled, low pressure plasma system, and established the associated atomistic biomolecule changes. While we showed that both ions and VUV photons can be very efficient in deactivation of biomolecules, significant etching and/or deep modification (~200 nm) accompanied these biological effects. One of the most important findings in this work is the significant radical-induced deactivation and surface modification can occur with minimal etching. However, if radical fluxes and corresponding etch rates are relatively high, for example at atmospheric pressure, endotoxic biomolecule film inactivation may require near-complete removal of the film. These findings motivated further work at

  14. A quasi-static algorithm that includes effects of characteristic time scales for simulating failures in brittle materials

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Jinxing

    2013-04-24

    When the brittle heterogeneous material is simulated via lattice models, the quasi-static failure depends on the relative magnitudes of Telem, the characteristic releasing time of the internal forces of the broken elements and Tlattice, the characteristic relaxation time of the lattice, both of which are infinitesimal compared with Tload, the characteristic loading period. The load-unload (L-U) method is used for one extreme, Telem << Tlattice, whereas the force-release (F-R) method is used for the other, Telem T lattice. For cases between the above two extremes, we develop a new algorithm by combining the L-U and the F-R trial displacement fields to construct the new trial field. As a result, our algorithm includes both L-U and F-R failure characteristics, which allows us to observe the influence of the ratio of Telem to Tlattice by adjusting their contributions in the trial displacement field. Therefore, the material dependence of the snap-back instabilities is implemented by introducing one snap-back parameter γ. Although in principle catastrophic failures can hardly be predicted accurately without knowing all microstructural information, effects of γ can be captured by numerical simulations conducted on samples with exactly the same microstructure but different γs. Such a same-specimen-based study shows how the lattice behaves along with the changing ratio of the L-U and F-R components. © 2013 The Author(s).

  15. Review of the IAEA nuclear fuel cycle and material section activities connected with nuclear fuel including WWER fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, F.

    2001-01-01

    Program activities on Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Materials cover the areas of: 1) raw materials (B.1.01); 2) fuel performance and technology (B.1.02); 3) pent fuel (B.1.03); 4) fuel cycle issues and information system (B.1.04); 5) support to technical cooperation activities (B.1.05). The IAEA activities in fuel performance and technology in 2001 include organization of the fuel experts meetings and completion of the Co-ordinate Research Projects (CRP). The special attention is given to the advanced post-irradiation examination techniques for water reactor fuel and fuel behavior under transients and LOCA conditions. An international research program on modeling of activity transfer in primary circuit of NPP is finalized in 2001. A new CRP on fuel modeling at extended burnup (FUMEX II) has planed to be carried out during the period 2002-2006. In the area of spent fuel management the implementation of burnup credit (BUC) in spent fuel management systems has motivated to be used in criticality safety applications, based on economic consideration. An overview of spent fuel storage policy accounting new fuel features as higher enrichment and final burnup, usage of MOX fuel and prolongation of the term of spent fuel storage is also given

  16. Convex reformulation of biologically-based multi-criteria intensity-modulated radiation therapy optimization including fractionation effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Aswin L; den Hertog, Dick; Siem, Alex Y D; Kaanders, Johannes H A M; Huizenga, Henk

    2008-11-21

    Finding fluence maps for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can be formulated as a multi-criteria optimization problem for which Pareto optimal treatment plans exist. To account for the dose-per-fraction effect of fractionated IMRT, it is desirable to exploit radiobiological treatment plan evaluation criteria based on the linear-quadratic (LQ) cell survival model as a means to balance the radiation benefits and risks in terms of biologic response. Unfortunately, the LQ-model-based radiobiological criteria are nonconvex functions, which make the optimization problem hard to solve. We apply the framework proposed by Romeijn et al (2004 Phys. Med. Biol. 49 1991-2013) to find transformations of LQ-model-based radiobiological functions and establish conditions under which transformed functions result in equivalent convex criteria that do not change the set of Pareto optimal treatment plans. The functions analysed are: the LQ-Poisson-based model for tumour control probability (TCP) with and without inter-patient heterogeneity in radiation sensitivity, the LQ-Poisson-based relative seriality s-model for normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) under the LQ-Poisson model and the fractionation-corrected Probit-based model for NTCP according to Lyman, Kutcher and Burman. These functions differ from those analysed before in that they cannot be decomposed into elementary EUD or generalized-EUD functions. In addition, we show that applying increasing and concave transformations to the convexified functions is beneficial for the piecewise approximation of the Pareto efficient frontier.

  17. The determination of plutonium alpha activity in urine, faeces and biological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bains, M.E.D.

    1963-07-01

    Methods have been developed for the determination of plutonium alpha activity in urine, faeces and biological materials. The chemical stages involved give practically complete separation of all extraneous material from the plutonium, which is electrodeposited on to a 0.5 inch stainless steel disc to produce a thin high resolution source. The limit of detection is 0.025 μμc/sample (sixteen-hour count) when the sources are counted in a small scintillator counter, but is lowest when counted in a counter which counts particles of energy 5.05-5.25 MeV only, and which therefore discriminates against small quantities of α-active materials introduced with the reagents in the final electrodeposition stage of the process. (Any such alpha activity may readily be identified by alpha pulse height analysis). (author)

  18. Enhanced Removal of Lead by Chemically and Biologically Treated Carbonaceous Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed E. Mahmoud

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid sorbents and biosorbents were synthesized via chemical and biological treatment of active carbon by simple and direct redox reaction followed by surface loading of baker’s yeast. Surface functionality and morphology of chemically and biologically modified sorbents and biosorbents were studied by Fourier Transform Infrared analysis and scanning electron microscope imaging. Hybrid carbonaceous sorbents and biosorbents were characterized by excellent efficiency and superiority toward lead(II sorption compared to blank active carbon providing a maximum sorption capacity of lead(II ion as 500 μmol g−1. Sorption processes of lead(II by these hybrid materials were investigated under the influence of several controlling parameters such as pH, contact time, mass of sorbent and biosorbent, lead(II concentration, and foreign ions. Lead(II sorption mechanisms were found to obey the Langmuir and BET isotherm models. The potential applications of chemically and biologically modified-active carbonaceous materials for removal and extraction of lead from real water matrices were also studied via a double-stage microcolumn technique. The results of this study were found to denote to superior recovery values of lead (95.0–99.0±3.0–5.0% by various carbonaceous-modified-bakers yeast biosorbents.

  19. Graphene-Based Materials as Solid Phase Extraction Sorbent for Trace Metal Ions, Organic Compounds, and Biological Sample Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Wan Aini Wan; Nodeh, Hamid Rashidi; Sanagi, Mohd Marsin

    2016-07-03

    Graphene is a new carbon-based material that is of interest in separation science. Graphene has extraordinary properties including nano size, high surface area, thermal and chemical stability, and excellent adsorption affinity to pollutants. Its adsorption mechanisms are through non-covalent interactions (π-π stacking, electrostatic interactions, and H-bonding) for organic compounds and covalent interactions for metal ions. These properties have led to graphene-based material becoming a desirable adsorbent in a popular sample preparation technique known as solid phase extraction (SPE). Numerous studies have been published on graphene applications in recent years, but few review papers have focused on its applications in analytical chemistry. This article focuses on recent preconcentration of trace elements, organic compounds, and biological species using SPE-based graphene, graphene oxide, and their modified forms. Solid phase microextraction and micro SPE (µSPE) methods based on graphene are discussed.

  20. Development of Standards for NanoSIMS Analyses of Biological Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davission, M L; Weber, P K; Pett-Ridge, J; Singer, S

    2008-07-31

    NanoSIMS is a powerful analytical technique for investigating element distributions at the nanometer scale, but quantifying elemental abundances requires appropriate standards, which are not readily available for biological materials. Standards for trace element analyses have been extensively developed for secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) in the semiconductor industry and in the geological sciences. The three primary approaches for generating standards for SIMS are: (1) ion implantation (2) using previously characterized natural materials, and (3) preparing synthetic substances. Ion implantation is a reliable method for generating trace element standards, but it is expensive, which limits investigation of the analytical issues discussed above. It also requires low background levels of the elements of interest. Finding or making standard materials has the potential to provide more flexibility than ion implantation, but realizing homogeneity at the nano-scale is in itself a significant challenge. In this study, we experiment with all three approaches, but with an emphasis toward synthetic organic polymers in order to reduce costs, increase flexibility, and achieve a wide dynamic concentration range. This emphasis serves to meet the major challenge for biological samples of identifying matrix matched, homogeneous material. Biological samples themselves are typically heterogeneous at the scale of microns to 100s of microns, and therefore they are poor SIMS standards. Therefore, we focused on identifying 'biological-like' materials--either natural or synthetic--that can be used for standards. The primary criterion is that the material be as compositionally similar to biological samples as possible (primarily C, H, O, and N). For natural material we adsorbed organic colloids consisting of peptidoglycan (i.e., amino sugars), activated charcoal, and humic acids. Experiments conducted with Si on peptidoglycan showed low affinity as SiO{sub 2}, yet its

  1. Marketing the use of the space environment for the processing of biological and pharmaceutical materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    The perceptions of U.S. biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies concerning the potential use of the space environment for the processing of biological substances was examined. Physical phenomena that may be important in space-base processing of biological materials are identified and discussed in the context of past and current experiment programs. The capabilities of NASA to support future research and development, and to engage in cooperative risk sharing programs with industry are discussed. Meetings were held with several biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies to provide data for an analysis of the attitudes and perceptions of these industries toward the use of the space environment. Recommendations are made for actions that might be taken by NASA to facilitate the marketing of the use of the space environment, and in particular the Space Shuttle, to the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries.

  2. Headspace solid-phase microextraction procedures for gas chromatographic analysis of biological fluids and materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, G A; Walker, V

    2000-12-01

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) is a new solventless sample preparation technique that is finding wide usage. This review provides updated information on headspace SPME with gas chromatographic separation for the extraction and measurement of volatile and semivolatile analytes in biological fluids and materials. Firstly the background to the technique is given in terms of apparatus, fibres used, extraction conditions and derivatisation procedures. Then the different matrices, urine, blood, faeces, breast milk, hair, breath and saliva are considered separately. For each, methods appropriate for the analysis of drugs and metabolites, solvents and chemicals, anaesthetics, pesticides, organometallics and endogenous compounds are reviewed and the main experimental conditions outlined with specific examples. Then finally, the future potential of SPME for the analysis of biological samples in terms of the development of new devices and fibre chemistries and its coupling with high-performance liquid chromatography is discussed.

  3. "Rinse and trickle": a protocol for TEM preparation and investigation of inorganic fibers from biological material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigliaturo, Ruggero; Capella, Silvana; Rinaudo, Caterina; Belluso, Elena

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this work is to define a sample preparation protocol that allows inorganic fibers and particulate matter extracted from different biological samples to be characterized morphologically, crystallographically and chemically by transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy (TEM-EDS). The method does not damage or create artifacts through chemical attacks of the target material. A fairly rapid specimen preparation is applied with the aim of performing as few steps as possible to transfer the withdrawn inorganic matter onto the TEM grid. The biological sample is previously digested chemically by NaClO. The salt is then removed through a series of centrifugation and rinse cycles in deionized water, thus drastically reducing the digestive power of the NaClO and concentrating the fibers for TEM analysis. The concept of equivalent hydrodynamic diameter is introduced to calculate the settling velocity during the centrifugation cycles. This technique is applicable to lung tissues and can be extended to a wide range of organic materials. The procedure does not appear to cause morphological damage to the fibers or modify their chemistry or degree of crystallinity. The extrapolated data can be used in interdisciplinary studies to understand the pathological effects caused by inorganic materials.

  4. Comprehensive capacitance-voltage analysis including quantum effects for high-k interfaces on germanium and other alternative channel materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Sarkar R. M.

    High mobility alternative channel materials to silicon are critical to the continued scaling of metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) devices. However, before they can be incorporated into advanced devices, some major issues need to be solved. The high mobility materials suffer from lower allowable thermal budgets compared to Si (before desorption and defect formation becomes an issue) and the absence of a good quality native oxide has further increased the interest in the use of high-k dielectrics. However, the high interface state density and high electric fields at these semiconductor/high-k interfaces can significantly impact the capacitance-voltage (C-V) profile, and current C-V modeling software cannot account for these effects. This in turn affects the parameters extracted from the C-V data of the high mobility semiconductor/high-k interface, which are crucial to fully understand the interface properties and expedite process development. To address this issue, we developed a model which takes into account quantum corrections which can be applied to a number of these alternative channel materials including SixGe1-x, Ge, InGaAs, and GaAs. The C-V simulation using this QM correction model is orders of magnitude faster compared to a full band Schrodinger-Poisson solver. The simulated C-V is directly benchmarked to a self consistent Schrodinger-Poisson solution for each bulk semiconductor material, and from the benchmarking process the QM correction parameters are extracted. The full program, C-V Alternative Channel Extraction (CV ACE), incorporates a quantum mechanical correction model, along with the interface state density model, and can extract device parameters such as equivalent oxide thickness (EOT), doping density and flat band voltage (Vfb) as well as the interface state density profile using multiple measurements performed at different frequencies and temperatures, simultaneously. The program was used to analyze experimentally measured C-V profiles and the

  5. Analytical methods for determination of terbinafine hydrochloride in pharmaceuticals and biological materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basavaiah Kanakapura

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Terbinafine is a new powerful antifungal agent indicated for both oral and topical treatment of mycosessince. It is highly effective in the treatment of determatomycoses. The chemical and pharmaceutical analysis of the drug requires effective analytical methods for quality control and pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic studies. Ever since it was introduced as an effective antifungal agent, many methods have been developed and validated for its assay in pharmaceuticals and biological materials. This article reviews the various methods reported during the last 25 years.

  6. Utilisation of biological and secondary raw materials IX. Recycling - conversion to energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiemer, Klaus; Kern, Michael; Raussen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The book on the utilization of biological and secondary raw materials covers the following issues: Perspectives of the circular flow and resource economy, waste avoidance, closed substance cycle waste management law and biowaste assessment, economic evaluation and usage alternatives for biogas, consequences of the 4th BlmschV, the BioAbfV and the DueV for the biowaste treatment, alternative techniques of the Biowaste collection, alternative models of the recyclable substance assessment, future of the packaging and recyclable substance utilization, ElectroG and E-scrape recycling, innovative concepts for the municipal waste management, future of the MBA, MVA and EBS management.

  7. A complex neutron activation method for the analysis of biological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordogh, M.

    1978-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to deal primarily with a few essential trace elements and to obtain reliable results of adequate accuracy and precision for the analysis of biological samples. A few other than trace elements were determined by the nondestructive technique as they can be well evaluated from the gamma-spectra. In the development of the method BOWEN's kale was chosen as model material. To confirm the reliability of the method two samples were analysed proposed by the IAEA in the frame of an international comparative analysis series. The comparative analysis shows the present method to be reliable, the precision and accuracy are good. (author)

  8. Non-proliferation issues in the field of biological technologies and dual-use materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamadaliev, S.M.; Troitskij, E.N.; Ibraev, R.

    2001-01-01

    In the paper the results of the DTRA 01-00-C-0030 'Strengthening of physical and biological protection' project at the Research Agricultural Institute (Kazakhstan) are discussed. The project was directed on the organization of a reliable physical integrity of dangerous pathogens, on the provision reliable protection around the periphery and outside security of the whole object as well as on the exclusion of possibility of pathogens expansion of dangerous infection material out the controlled working conditions. The central section of the protection is storehouse of microorganism culture

  9. Numerical modeling of nonisothermal moisture transfer in biological colloidal porous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strumillo, C.; Grinchik, N. N.; Kuts, P. S.; Akulich, P. V.; Zbicinski, I.

    1994-02-01

    The authors derive and substantiate a system of equations of heat and moisture transfer in colloidal capillary-porous undersaturated media with account for the mutual effect of the vapor and liquid pressure, determined by the contribution of surface forces, and the temperature on the rate of interphase mass transfer and the thermocapillary flows. Examples are given of the numerical calculation of evolution of the moisture content and temperature fields and the kinetic dependences in a wide moisture content range for materials of biological origin, namely, yeast, soil. A comparison is made with experimental data.

  10. CONFERENCE SUMMARY: Summary and comment on superconducting analogue electronics research, including materials and fabrication, as presented at ISEC 07

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, C. P.

    2007-11-01

    The main theme at ISEC 2007 for superconducting materials, fabrication and analogue electronics was the description of incremental developments, including a few new directions that indicate breakthroughs in this area of research. The work on applications focused on their cost-benefit analysis (in order to improve their appeal), the development of simpler systems, making more of the data collected, improving packaging and being responsive to the power handling requirements for commercial systems. All papers presenting this level of research highlighted the importance of obtaining all the necessary details in order to investigate analogue devices and the effectiveness and commercial viability of their systems. This stage of development is important if we are to achieve the transition of superconducting electronics from the laboratory to commercial use. There were some exciting disruptive breakthroughs reported. These were in the areas of nano-SQUIDs, rotating gradiometers, superconducting scanning tunnelling microscopy (Hayashi et al) and the potential of superconducting photonics using optical interfaces with superconducting vortex flow transistors, for example. The materials research in low (LTS), high (HTS) and medium (MTS) critical temperature superconductors was reported. In LTS, nitrides emerged as important materials for use as new tunnel barriers, either insulating or semiconducting. Papers on BaN, NbN, TaN, GaN and Nb-Si superconducting materials were also presented. The MTS material of MgB2 is still under development (Zhao et al). There were also new research groups from South Africa and Turkey attending the conference. The fabrication research presented covered the areas of critical current Ic spread, which is still an issue in reducing the reproducibility of Josephson junctions, a 150 mm process for Nb/Al-AlOx/Nb and methods to improve barrier layers using both new materials and smooth surfaces at thin film interfaces (Du et al). New methods to make sub

  11. Particle Accelerator Applications: Ion and Electron Irradiation in Materials Science, Biology and Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Fernández, Luis

    2010-09-01

    Although the developments of particle accelerators are devoted to basic study of matter constituents, since the beginning these machines have been applied with different purposes in many areas also. Today particle accelerators are essential instruments for science and technology. This work presents an overview of the main application for direct particle irradiation with accelerator in material science, biology and medicine. They are used for material synthesis by ion implantation and charged particle irradiation; to make coatings and micromachining; to characterize broad kind of samples by ion beam analysis techniques; as mass spectrometers for atomic isotopes determination. In biomedicine the accelerators are applied for the study of effects by charged particles on cells. In medicine the radiotherapy by electron irradiation is widely used, while hadrontherapy is still under development. Also, they are necessary for short life radioisotopes production required in radiodiagnostic.

  12. Diamond-like carbon as biological compatible material for cell culture and medical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, L; Jones, M W; Wu, R L

    1993-01-01

    Ion beam assisted diamond-like carbon (DLC) films have been used for growing the human hematopoietic myeloblastic ML-1 cells and human embryo kidney 293 cells in the control environment. DLC films were directly deposited onto the P-35 plastic dishes by impacting the high kinetic energy (1000 eV) of methane ions at room temperature. The present results showed that both ML-1 and HEK 293 cells continuously grow with and without DLC films. It has demonstrated that human cells proliferated on DLC film with very high viability and DLC material had no toxicity to cultured human ML-1 and HEK 293 cells. We conclude that DLC film is a biological compatible material for potential cell culture matrix and bio-medical applications.

  13. Teacher-Made Tactile Science Materials with Critical and Creative Thinking Activities for Learners Including Those with Visual Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teske, Jolene K.; Gray, Phyllis; Kuhn, Mason A.; Clausen, Courtney K.; Smith, Latisha L.; Alsubia, Sukainah A.; Ghayoorad, Maryam; Rule, Audrey C.; Schneider, Jean Suchsland

    2014-01-01

    Gifted students with visual impairments are twice exceptional learners and may not evidence their advanced science aptitudes without appropriate accommodations for learning science. However, effective tactile science teaching materials may be easily made. Recent research has shown that when tactile materials are used with "all" students…

  14. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS): A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials. Includes May 1979 edition and Supplements 1-15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH. Information Reference Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

    Compiled are abstracts and indexes to selected print and non-print materials related to wastewater treatment and water quality education and instruction, as well as materials related to pesticides, hazardous wastes, and public participation. Sources of abstracts/indexed materials include all levels of government, private concerns, and educational…

  15. Occupational exposure to potentially infectious biological material in a dental teaching environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado-Carvalhais, Helenaura P; Ramos-Jorge, Maria L; Auad, Sheyla M; Martins, Laura H P M; Paiva, Saul M; Pordeus, Isabela A

    2008-10-01

    The aims of this cross-sectional study were to determine the prevalence of occupational accidents with exposure to biological material among undergraduate students of dentistry and to estimate potential risk factors associated with exposure to blood. Data were collected through a self-administered questionnaire (86.4 percent return rate), which was completed by a sample of 286 undergraduate dental students (mean age 22.4 +/-2.4 years). The students were enrolled in the clinical component of the curriculum, which corresponds to the final six semesters of study. Descriptive, bivariate, simple logistic regression and multiple logistic regression (Forward Stepwise Procedure) analyses were performed. The level of statistical significance was set at 5 percent. Percutaneous and mucous exposures to potentially infectious biological material were reported by 102 individuals (35.6 percent); 26.8 percent reported the occurrence of multiple episodes of exposure. The logistic regression analyses revealed that the incomplete use of individual protection equipment (OR=3.7; 95 percent CI 1.5-9.3), disciplines where surgical procedures are carried out (OR=16.3; 95 percent CI 7.1-37.2), and handling sharp instruments (OR=4.4; 95 percent CI 2.1-9.1), more specifically, hollow-bore needles (OR=6.8; 95 percent CI 2.1-19.0), were independently associated with exposure to blood. Policies of reviewing the procedures during clinical practice are recommended in order to reduce occupational exposure.

  16. Ethical and legal considerations regarding the ownership and commercial use of human biological materials and their derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrini C

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Carlo PetriniItalian National Institute of Health, Rome, ItalyAbstract: This article considers some of the ethical and legal issues relating to the ownership and use – including for commercial purposes – of biological material and products derived from humans. The discussion is divided into three parts: after first examining the general notion of ownership, it moves to the particular case of possible commercial use, and finally reflects on the case in point in the light of the preceding considerations. Units of cord blood donated altruistically for transplantation and which are found unsuitable for storage and transplantation, or which become unsuitable while stored in biobanks, are taken as an example. These cord-blood units can be discarded together with other biological waste, or they can be used for research or the development of blood-derived products such as platelet gel. Several ethical questions (eg, informed consent, property, distribution of profits, and others arise from these circumstances. In this regard, some criteria and limits to use are proposed.Keywords: bioethics, biological specimen banks, cord-blood stem cell transplantation, ethics, informed consent, legislation

  17. Analytic determination of the activation of essential and toxic trace elements in biological material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schelenz, R.

    1980-01-01

    A neutron activation-analysis technique for the multielement determination in biological material was developed. The individual steps of this procedure comprise radiochemical and also instrumental analytic techniques. After radiochemical separation 34 elements can be determined, after only instrumental procedures 26 elements can be detected in biological material. The radiochemical analysis of 34 elements lasts 4 days. Tracer investigations on the radionuclide retention of the anorganic separators HAP, TiP and ZP in 9N aqueous HNO 3 solution indicated that apart from Na-24, K-42 and P-32 the radionuclides Cs-134, Rb-86 and Se-75 are almost quantitatively adsorbed at the separators. For the remaining investigated radionuclides different but well-reproducible retention values resulted. The pH-value only slightly influences the extent of the radionuclide retention. Kinetic investigations on the radiochemical precipitation of some radionuclides on Cu and Cu(Hg)sub(x) were carried out. The depositing of the radionuclides Ag-110m, Hg-203 and Se-75 at 0 0 C and room temperature on Cu(Hg)sub(x) and Cu foil is a first order reaction. The half-life periods and the velocity constants of the depositing on Cu and Cu(Hg)sub(x) were determined for the investigated radionuclides in dependency of the temperature. The technique was examined by means of international biological multielement standards of known element combinations. The realisation of ring tests for the multielement determination in potatoe and milk powder showed that this method provides precise results. The applicability of the radiochemical method was confirmed by the simultaneous determination of 25 elements in overall nutrition samples. The instrumental technique was applied for the multielement determination in human hair (of the head) and in river water. (orig./MG) [de

  18. Nonlinear Thermo-mechanical Finite Element Analysis of Polymer Foam Cored Sandwich Structures including Geometrical and Material Nonlinearity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palleti, Hara Naga Krishna Teja; Thomsen, Ole Thybo; Taher, Siavash Talebi

    In this paper, polymer foam cored sandwich structures with fibre reinforced composite face sheets subjected to combined mechanical and thermal loads will be analysed using the commercial FE code ABAQUS® incorporating both material and geometrical nonlinearity. Large displacements and rotations...

  19. Differences in Tribological Behaviors upon Switching Fixed and Moving Materials of Tribo-pairs including Metal and Polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Aijie; Tian, Pengyi; Wen, Shizhu; Guo, Fei; Hu, Yueqiang; Jia, Wenpeng; Dong, Conglin; Tian, Yu

    2017-10-12

    The coefficient of friction (COF) between two materials is usually believed to be an intrinsic property of the materials themselves. In this study, metals of stainless steel (304) and brass (H62), and polymers of polypropylene (PP) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) were tested on a standard ball-on-three-plates test machine. Significantly different tribological behaviors were observed when fixed and moving materials of tribo-pairs (metal/polymer) were switched. As an example, under the same applied load and rotating speed, the COF (0.49) between a rotating PP ball and three fixed H62 plates was approximately 2.3 times higher than that between switched materials of tribo-pairs. Meanwhile, the COF between H62 and PTFE was relatively stable. The unexpected tribological behaviors were ascribed to the thermal and mechanical properties of tribo-pairs. Theoretical analysis revealed that the differences in the maximum local temperature between switching the fixed and moving materials of tribo-pairs were consistent with the differences in the tested COF. This result indicated the precise prediction of the COF of two materials is complexcity, and that thermal and mechanical properties should be properly considered in designing tribo-pairs, because these properties may significantly affect tribological performance.

  20. Evaluation of flow injection analysis for determination of cholinesterase activities in biological material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabal, Jiri; Bajgar, Jiri; Kassa, Jiri

    2010-09-06

    The method for automatic continual monitoring of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in biological material is described. It is based on flexible system of plastic pipes mixing samples of biological material with reagents for enzyme determination; reaction product penetrates through the semipermeable membrane and it is spectrophotometrically determined (Ellman's method). It consists of sampling (either in vitro or in vivo), adding the substrate and flowing to dialyzer; reaction product (thiocholine) is dialyzed and mixed with 5,5'-dithio-bis-2-nitrobenzoic acid (DTNB) transported to flow spectrophotometer. Flowing of all materials is realised using peristaltic pump. The method was validated: time for optimal hydratation of the cellophane membrane; type of the membrane; type of dialyzer; conditions for optimal permeation of reaction components; optimization of substrate and DTNB concentrations (linear dependence); efficacy of peristaltic pump; calibration of analytes after permeation through the membrane; excluding of the blood permeation through the membrane. Some examples of the evaluation of the effects of AChE inhibitors are described. It was demonstrated very good uniformity of peaks representing the enzyme activity (good reproducibility); time dependence of AChE inhibition caused by VX in vitro in the rat blood allowing to determine the half life of inhibition and thus, bimolecular rate constants of inhibition; reactivation of inhibited AChE by some reactivators, and continual monitoring of the activity in the whole blood in vivo in intact and VX-intoxicated rats. The method is simple and not expensive, allowing automatic determination of AChE activity in discrete or continual samples in vitro or in vivo. It will be evaluated for further research of cholinesterase inhibitors. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Determination of tin in biological reference materials by atomic absorption spectrophotometry and neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, M.; Iyengar, V.; Gills, T.

    1991-01-01

    Because of a lack of reliable analytical techniques for the determination of tin in biological materials, there have been no reference materials certified for this element. However, the authors' experience has shown that it is feasible to use both atomic absorption and nuclear activation techniques at least for selected matrices. Therefore, an investigation was undertaken to determine tin in several biological materials such as non-fat milk powder (NBS-SRM-1549), citrus leaves (NBS-SRM-1572), total diet (NIST-SRM-1548), mixed diet (NBS-RM-8431), and USDIET-I by atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) and neutron activation analysis (NAA). AAS-ashed samples were extracted with MIBK and assayed using a Perkin Elmer model 5000 apparatus. NAA was carried out by irradiating the samples at the NIST reactor in the RT-4 facility and counting with the help of a Ge(Li) detector connected to a multichannel analyzer. The concentration of tin measured by both AAS and NAA agree well for USDIET-I, total diet, citrus leaves and non-fat milk powder (the concentration ranges for tin in these matrices were from 0.0025 to 3.8 micro g/g). However, in the case of mixed diet (RM-8431), the mean values found were 47 ± 5.6 (n = 19) by AAS and 55.5 ± 2.5 (n = 6) by INAA. Since RM-8431 is not certified it is difficult to draw conclusions. For apple and peach leaves, a distillation step was required. The results were apple leaves 0.085 ± 0.015 (n = 10) by AAS and < 0.2 (n = 3) by RNAA; for peach leaves 0.077 ± 0.02 (n = 9) by AAS and < 0.1 (n = 3) by RNAA. All concentrations are expressed in micro g/g dry weight

  2. Occupational exposure to contaminated biological material: perceptions and feelings experienced among dental students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila PINELLI

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Dental students may be a particularly vulnerable group exposed to the risk of acquiring infections through occupational injuries.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the perceptions with regard to their occupational exposure to potentially infectious biologic materials.MATERIAL AND METHOD: Interviews were conducted by means of a script with open questions. The speeches were recorded, transcribed and qualitative analysis was performed with the aid of QUALIQUANTISOFT® software. The Collective Subject Discourse (CSD was obtained.RESULT: The feeling most frequently experienced was related to the fear of contagion. Most accidents occurred during the handling of sharp dental instruments. Respondents attributed the occurrence of accidents especially the lack of attention, carelessness while handling sharp instruments, and lack of use of Personal Protective Equipment. As regards the measures taken right after the exposure, they "washed the local area". Other respondents reported they "continued the dental treatment". They complained mostly about the fear of having been infected, and because they had to leave the faculty to take blood exams for HIV screening. As part of the learning experience the injured reported they paid more attention when handling sharp instruments. The students informed that any type of injury due to contact with contaminated material must be notified. However, they were neglectful about reporting their own injury.CONCLUSION: Education strategies for preventive measures related to occupational exposure must be restructured, because the knowledge and the fear of contagion among dental students were not always sufficient for a complete adherence to treatment protocols and notification.

  3. 10 CFR 170.31 - Schedule of fees for materials licenses and other regulatory services, including inspections, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... production of accelerator-produced radionuclides. Application [Program Code(s): 03210] $6,500 4. Waste.... Users. Application $3,100 Inspections Full Cost C. Evaluation of security plans, route approvals, route... under the reciprocity provisions of 10 CFR 150.20. Application $1,800 17. Master materials licenses of...

  4. Analysis of alternative transportation methods for radioactive materials shipments including the use of special trains for spent fuel and wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.R.; Luna, R.E.; Taylor, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    Two studies were completed which evaluate the environmental impact of radioactive material transport. The first was a generic study which evaluated all radioactive materials and all transportation modes; the second addressed spent fuel and fuel-cycle wastes shipped by truck, rail and barge. A portion of each of those studies dealing with the change in impact resulting from alternative shipping methods is presented in this paper. Alternatives evaluated in each study were mode shifts, operational constraints, and, in generic case, changes in material properties and package capabilities. Data for the analyses were obtained from a shipper survey and from projections of shipments that would occur in an equilibrium fuel cycle supporting one hundred 1000-MW(e) reactors. Population exposures were deduced from point source radiation formulae using separation distances derived for scenarios appropriate to each shipping mode and to each exposed population group. Fourteen alternatives were investigated for the generic impact case. All showed relatively minor changes in the overall radiological impact. Since the radioactive material transport is estimated to be fewer than 3 latent cancer fatalities (LCF) for each shipment year (compared to some 300,000 yearly cancer fatalities or 5000 LCF's calculated for background radiation using the same radiological effects model), a 15% decrease caused by shifting from passenger air to cargo air is a relatively small effect. Eleven alternatives were considered for the fuel cycle/special train study, but only one produced a reduction in total special train baseline LCF's (.047) that was larger than 5%

  5. Wood-Derived Materials for Green Electronics, Biological Devices, and Energy Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongli; Luo, Wei; Ciesielski, Peter N; Fang, Zhiqiang; Zhu, J Y; Henriksson, Gunnar; Himmel, Michael E; Hu, Liangbing

    2016-08-24

    goal of this study is to review the fundamental structures and chemistries of wood and wood-derived materials, which are essential for a wide range of existing and new enabling technologies. The scope of the review covers multiscale materials and assemblies of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin as well as other biomaterials derived from wood, in regard to their major emerging applications. Structure-properties-application relationships will be investigated in detail. Understanding the fundamental properties of these structures is crucial for designing and manufacturing products for emerging applications. Today, a more holistic understanding of the interplay between the structure, chemistry, and performance of wood and wood-derived materials is advancing historical applications of these materials. This new level of understanding also enables a myriad of new and exciting applications, which motivate this review. There are excellent reviews already on the classical topic of woody materials, and some recent reviews also cover new understanding of these materials as well as potential applications. This review will focus on the uniqueness of woody materials for three critical applications: green electronics, biological devices, and energy storage and bioenergy.

  6. Wood-Derived Materials for Green Electronics, Biological Devices, and Energy Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Hongli; Luo, Wei; Ciesielski, Peter N.; Fang, Zhiqiang; Zhu, J. Y.; Henriksson, Gunnar; Himmel, Michael E.; Hu, Liangbing

    2016-08-24

    goal of this study is to review the fundamental structures and chemistries of wood and wood-derived materials, which are essential for a wide range of existing and new enabling technologies. The scope of the review covers multiscale materials and assemblies of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin as well as other biomaterials derived from wood, in regard to their major emerging applications. Structure-properties-application relationships will be investigated in detail. Understanding the fundamental properties of these structures is crucial for designing and manufacturing products for emerging applications. Today, a more holistic understanding of the interplay between the structure, chemistry, and performance of wood and wood-derived materials is advancing historical applications of these materials. This new level of understanding also enables a myriad of new and exciting applications, which motivate this review. There are excellent reviews already on the classical topic of woody materials, and some recent reviews also cover new understanding of these materials as well as potential applications. This review will focus on the uniqueness of woody materials for three critical applications: green electronics, biological devices, and energy storage and bioenergy.

  7. Sample preparation for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis: considering the composition of biological material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knigge, Thomas; Letendre, Julie; Monsinjon, Tiphaine

    2013-11-01

    Comparative proteomic analyses in ecotoxicology and related fields require reproducible display of as many proteins as possible. In addition, it should be possible to carry out a quantitative comparison in a reliable manner. Sample preparation represents one of the essential steps toward these aims. In their work, Wu et al. describe how to deal with different recalcitrant tissues of varying species (Proteomics 2013, 13, 3205-3210). Their work underlines the necessity to adapt sample preparation to the specific requirements of the biological material. Beyond that Wu et al. present TRIzol® as feasible means for combined extraction of proteins and RNA. Indeed, using TRI-reagent extraction for proteomics, they resolve two problems at a time: that of removing contaminating compounds and that of simultaneous analysis of gene and protein expression. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Ultratrace determination of platinum in biological materials via neutron activation and radiochemical separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeisler, R.; Greenberg, R.R.

    1982-01-01

    A neutron activation analysis scheme based upon a radiochemical separation of the activation products has been developed. The method utilizes the inherent sensitivity of the activation reaction 198 Pt(n,ν) 199 Pt and counting of the daughter nuclide 199 Au. This nuclide is radiochemically separated from interfering activities by homogeneous precipitation as elemental gold. The remaining interference of the secondary reaction 197 Au(n,ν) 198 Au(n,ν) 199 Au from gold in the samples is quantitatively assessed and corrected. During this process accurate gold concentrations in the samples are obtained at ultratrace levels. The analysis scheme is applied to gold and platinum determinations in biological Standard Reference Materials and human liver specimens. Gold and platinum are determined at concentrations of 5x10 - 11 g/g, and at higher levels. (author)

  9. A rapid screening method for heavy metals in biological materials by emission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacklock, E C; Sadler, P A

    1981-06-02

    A semi-quantitative screening method for heavy metals in biological material is described. The metals are complexed with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, sodium diethyl dithiocarbamate and potassium sodium tartrate. The solutions are adjusted to pH 4 and then extracted into chloroform. The chloroform phase is evaporated onto a matrix mixture of lithium fluoride and graphite. The sample is analysed by direct current arc emission spectroscopy using a 3 metre grating spectrograph. The spectra are recorded on a photographic plate. The method is developed on aqueous and spiked samples and then applied to in vivo samples containing toxic levels of heavy metals. Atomic absorption spectroscopy is used to check standard concentrations and to monitor the efficiency of the extraction procedure.

  10. Activation analytical determination of essential and toxic trace elements in biological material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schelenz, R.

    1980-01-01

    In order to determine the essential trace elements Hg, Ag, Cu and Se in food (potatoes, milk powder) and biological standard materials (fruit tree leaves), simple, fast radiochemical separation methods are worked out. Following oxidative decomposition and destillation of Hg, the elements silver, copper and selenium are found in the destillation residue and can be electrochemically enriched on an amalgamated Cu foil (determination of Ag and Se in the concentration range of 10 -9 to 10 -8 g, of Cu in the range of 10 -12 to 10 -10 g), whilst the matrix elements Na, K, P are adsorbed on a column with 3 different inorganic ion exchangers. The eluate of the ion exchanger can be added directly to the multielement gamma spectroscopy. The possiblity of working purely instrumentally is demonstrated by 2 examples: multielement analysis of human hair and river water. (RB) [de

  11. [Intervening factors in attention flow of professionals injured by biological material].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Luana Cássia Miranda; Souza, Adenícia Custódia Silva E; Tipple, Anaclara Ferreira Veiga; Melo, Dulcelene Sousa; Peixoto, Myrian Karla Ayres Veronez; Munari, Denize Bouttelet

    2014-06-01

    To describe the barriers and facilitator factors to follow the attention flow of professionals injured by biological material in the worker perspective. Qualitative descriptive study with data collected through individual interviews with 18 injured workers, assisted in reference public units in the city of Goiânia. The content analysis was carried out with assistance of the ATLAS.ti 6.2 software, under the work organization and subjective perspectives. From the interviews regarding the barriers and facilitator factors emerged the categories: organizational structure, Support from close people, and Knowledge influence. The organized services have enabled more qualified consultations and the workers follow-up, which caused a satisfaction feeling in relation to the working environment.

  12. [Work accidents with biological material occurred in municipalities of Minas Gerais].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julio, Renata Siqueira; Filardi, Monique Borsato Silva; Marziale, Maria Helena Palucci

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to identify the profile accidents involving exposure to biological material occurring in Minas Gerais. A descriptive study carried out by querying the Information System for Notifiable Diseases, 50 cities in south of Minas Gerais State, Brazil, in the period of 2007-2011. Were recorded 460 accidents, and about half occurred among nursing assistants and technicians, followed by nurses and physicians. There were more accidents due to improper disposal of sharps. Among the source patients, there was a 8.0% prevalence of positive serology for HIV, 1.0% for HBsAg, 6.0% for anti-HBc and 3% for anti-HCV. Among the injured 14.0% were not immunized to hepatitis B; however, the vaccine and immunoglobulin prescription was lower than necessary. The results will subsidize the plan preventive measures and new approach towards the occurrence of such accidents.

  13. Intervening factors in attention flow of professionals injured by biological material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Cássia Miranda Ribeiro

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the barriers and facilitator factors to follow the attention flow of professionals injured by biological material in the worker perspective. Method: Qualitative descriptive study with data collected through individual interviews with 18 injured workers, assisted in reference public units in the city of Goiânia. The content analysis was carried out with assistance of the ATLAS.ti 6.2 software, under the work organization and subjective perspectives. Results: From the interviews regarding the barriers and facilitator factors emerged the categories: organizational structure, Support from close people, and Knowledge influence. Conclusion: The organized services have enabled more qualified consultations and the workers follow-up, which caused a satisfaction feeling in relation to the working environment.

  14. Intervening factors in attention flow of professionals injured by biological material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Cássia Miranda Ribeiro

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the barriers and facilitator factors to follow the attention flow of professionals injured by biological material in the worker perspective. Method: Qualitative descriptive study with data collected through individual interviews with 18 injured workers, assisted in reference public units in the city of Goiânia. The content analysis was carried out with assistance of the ATLAS.ti 6.2 software, under the work organization and subjective perspectives. Results: From the interviews regarding the barriers and facilitator factors emerged the categories: organizational structure, Support from close people, and Knowledge influence. Conclusion: The organized services have enabled more qualified consultations and the workers follow-up, which caused a satisfaction feeling in relation to the working environment.

  15. Method for determination of radioactive iodine isotopes in environmental objects and biologic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubynin, O.D.; Pogodin, R.I.

    1981-01-01

    The method proposed for determination of radioactive iodine isotopes content in environmental objects and biologic materials is based on the extraction of iodine with carbon tetrachloride and subsequent precipitation of bismuthyl iodine (BiOI) in perchloric medium. Sample preparation for analysis is carried out using conventional alkaline ashing methods. Quantitative iodine separation is hampered if macroquantities of Cl - , Br - , SO 4 2 - , SO 8 2 - , Cr 2 O 7 2 - and other ions are present in the solution. Iodine extraction is carried out before its precipitation. Separated iodine preparation activity is measured using scintillation (NaI) Tl gamma spectrometer. The method's sensitivity when measuring iodine-131 preparations makes up 0.07 Bq per 1 sample with the error +-25 %

  16. Biological material for microslides to diagnose human infectious and parasitic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S. Arakelian

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The material for microscopic examination were blood, bone marrow, cerebrospinal fluid, lymph node puncture, feces, duodenal contents and bile, urine, sputum, urogenital tract secretions, tissue biopsies, smears from the mucous membranes of the mouth, tonsils, nose, etc. The final diagnosis of helminth infections can be established only on the basis of the positive findings of laboratory research. The basic method of laboratory diagnosis of these invasions is the detection of helminth eggs or larvae. The material for the research is the feces, the contents of the duodenum, blood, sputum, tissue biopsies, and other materials. Slides of blood microscopy are usually prepared on glass slides, their quality and purity greatly impact the effectiveness of detection and identification of blood parasites. The material from leishmaniasis patients is studied under immersion; Leishmania locate mainly outside the cell, but often they are found in the cytoplasm of mononuclear cells and neutrophils. The number of Leishmania in a single cell can reach several tens. They are in the form of small round or oval cells ranging in size from 2.5 to 5 microns. The cytoplasm is gray-blue co­lored, the nucleus are red or red-purple, kinetoplasts are dark purple color. The presence of a nucleus and kinetoplasts is the main feature that distinguishes Leishmania from platelets, cocci, and yeast cells. In a laboratory study (painting by Romanovsky — ­Giemsa, microfilaria are colored in dark blue and resemble crimped fibers. Inside the larvae nuclear grain is easy visible. The causative agents of parasitic and infectious diseases can also be found in other biological substances of the human body: the urine, cerebrospinal fluid, bone marrow, secretion of urinary organs, duodenal contents, bile, and phlegm.

  17. Very accurate determination of trace amounts of selenium in biological materials by Radiochemical Neutron Activation Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chajduk, E.; Polkowska-Motrenko, H.; Dybczynski, R.

    2006-01-01

    Selenium is both a toxic and an essential trace element for humans and animals. The purpose of this work was to elaborate a very accurate (definitive) method for the determination of selenium traces in different types of biological materials. The method is based on a combination of neutron activation and quantitative and very selective radiochemical separation of selenium by ion-exchange and extraction chromatography, followed by gamma-spectrometric measurement of 75 Se. Three amines: 2,3-diaminonaphtalene, 3,3'-diaminobenzidine and 4-nitro-phenyldiamine supported on Bio Beads SM-2 or Amberlite XAD-4 were chosen to batch experiments. Using 3,3'-diaminobenzidine tracer experiments were carried out with the unirradiated biological samples. They have proved that the whole radiochemical separation procedure is quantitative. Gamma-ray spectrum of the selenium fraction practically did not show any other activities except background peaks. The obtained results demonstrate good agreement of results obtained by our new '' definitive '' method for the determination of selenium with the certified values

  18. Determination of zinc stable isotopes in biological materials using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, K.Y.; Veillon, Claude

    1992-01-01

    A method is described for using isotope dilution to determine both the amount of natural zinc and enriched isotopes of zinc in biological samples. Isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry offers a way to quantify not only the natural zinc found in a sample but also the enriched isotope tracers of zinc. Accurate values for the enriched isotopes and natural zinc are obtained by adjusting the mass count rate data for measurable instrumental biases. Analytical interferences from the matrix are avoided by extracting the zinc from the sample matrix using diethylammonium diethyldithiocarbamate. The extraction technique separates the zinc from elements which form interfering molecular ions at the same nominal masses as the zinc isotopes. Accuracy of the method is verified using standard reference materials. The detection limit is 0.06 μg Zn per sample. Precision of the abundance ratios range from 0.3-0.8%. R.S.D. for natural zinc concentrations is about 200-600 μg g -1 . The accuracy and precision of the measurements make it possible to follow enriched isotopic tracers of zinc in biological samples in metabolic tracer studies. (author). 19 refs.; 1 fig., 4 tabs

  19. Measuring spatially- and directionally-varying light scattering from biological material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Todd Alan; Bostwick, Kimberly S; Marschner, Steve

    2013-05-20

    Light interacts with an organism's integument on a variety of spatial scales. For example in an iridescent bird: nano-scale structures produce color; the milli-scale structure of barbs and barbules largely determines the directional pattern of reflected light; and through the macro-scale spatial structure of overlapping, curved feathers, these directional effects create the visual texture. Milli-scale and macro-scale effects determine where on the organism's body, and from what viewpoints and under what illumination, the iridescent colors are seen. Thus, the highly directional flash of brilliant color from the iridescent throat of a hummingbird is inadequately explained by its nano-scale structure alone and questions remain. From a given observation point, which milli-scale elements of the feather are oriented to reflect strongly? Do some species produce broader "windows" for observation of iridescence than others? These and similar questions may be asked about any organisms that have evolved a particular surface appearance for signaling, camouflage, or other reasons. In order to study the directional patterns of light scattering from feathers, and their relationship to the bird's milli-scale morphology, we developed a protocol for measuring light scattered from biological materials using many high-resolution photographs taken with varying illumination and viewing directions. Since we measure scattered light as a function of direction, we can observe the characteristic features in the directional distribution of light scattered from that particular feather, and because barbs and barbules are resolved in our images, we can clearly attribute the directional features to these different milli-scale structures. Keeping the specimen intact preserves the gross-scale scattering behavior seen in nature. The method described here presents a generalized protocol for analyzing spatially- and directionally-varying light scattering from complex biological materials at multiple

  20. Protein Structure Initiative Material Repository: an open shared public resource of structural genomics plasmids for the biological community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, Catherine Y.; Mohr, Stephanie E.; Zuo, Dongmei; Hu, Yanhui; Rolfs, Andreas; Kramer, Jason; Taycher, Elena; Kelley, Fontina; Fiacco, Michael; Turnbull, Greggory; LaBaer, Joshua

    2010-01-01

    The Protein Structure Initiative Material Repository (PSI-MR; http://psimr.asu.edu) provides centralized storage and distribution for the protein expression plasmids created by PSI researchers. These plasmids are a resource that allows the research community to dissect the biological function of proteins whose structures have been identified by the PSI. The plasmid annotation, which includes the full length sequence, vector information and associated publications, is stored in a freely available, searchable database called DNASU (http://dnasu.asu.edu). Each PSI plasmid is also linked to a variety of additional resources, which facilitates cross-referencing of a particular plasmid to protein annotations and experimental data. Plasmid samples can be requested directly through the website. We have also developed a novel strategy to avoid the most common concern encountered when distributing plasmids namely, the complexity of material transfer agreement (MTA) processing and the resulting delays this causes. The Expedited Process MTA, in which we created a network of institutions that agree to the terms of transfer in advance of a material request, eliminates these delays. Our hope is that by creating a repository of expression-ready plasmids and expediting the process for receiving these plasmids, we will help accelerate the accessibility and pace of scientific discovery. PMID:19906724

  1. Biology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I am particularly happy that the Academy is bringing out this document by Professor M S. Valiathan on Ayurvedic Biology. It is an effort to place before the scientific community, especially that of India, the unique scientific opportunities that arise out of viewing Ayurveda from the perspective of contemporary science, its tools ...

  2. Evaluation of the anti-inflammatory actions of various functional food materials including glucosamine on synovial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Yoshie; Someya, Akimasa; Imai, Kensuke; Nagao, Junji; Nagaoka, Isao

    2017-08-01

    The anti-inflammatory actions of glucosamine (GlcN) on arthritic disorders involve the suppression of inflammatory mediator production from synovial cells. GlcN has also been reported to inhibit the activation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. The present study aimed to determine the cooperative and anti‑inflammatory actions of functional food materials and evaluated the production of interleukin (IL)‑8 and phosphorylation of p38 MAPK in IL-1β-activated synovial cells, incubated with the combination of GlcN and various functional food materials containing L‑methionine (Met), undenatured type II collagen (UC‑II), chondroitin sulfate (CS), methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) and agaro-oligosaccharide (AO). The results indicated that Met, UC‑II, CS, MSM and AO slightly or moderately suppressed the IL-1β-stimulated IL‑8 production by human synovial MH7A cells. The same compounds further decreased the IL‑8 level lowered by GlcN. Similarly, they slightly suppressed the phosphorylation level of p38 MAPK and further reduced the phosphorylation level lowered by GlcN. These observations suggest a possibility that these functional food materials exert an anti‑inflammatory action (inhibition of IL‑8 production) in combination with GlcN by cooperatively suppressing the p38 MAPK signaling (phosphorylation).

  3. Synthesis and Sintering Behavior of Cordierite Prepared from Multi-Component Materials Including Alkaline-Earth Minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Suk-In; Kim, Nam-Il; Lee, Sang-Jin [Mokpo National University, Muan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Cordierite was synthesized using multi-component materials based on a talc-alumina-clay system. The cordierite sintered at 1360 °C showed a high relative density of 98.8% and a low thermal expansion coefficient of 1.59×10{sup -}6/°C. To study the effect of adding alkaline-earth minerals on the cordierite properties, petalite, potash-feldspar, and dicalcium phosphate were added to the synthesized cordierite. In the case of 9 wt% petalite or potash-feldspar addition, the cordierite was more densified; however, the thermal expansion coefficient and the pyroplasticity index were increased. In particular, a 5 μm thick self-glazed coating was formed with the addition of 9 wt% potash-feldspar. In the case of adding dicalcium phosphate, a glass phase was formed at low temperature and gas bubbles formed at high temperature above 1320 ℃. The cordierite synthesized using multi-component materials is expected to be employed as a material for high thermal shock, dense-microstructure flameware.

  4. Radiation distribution through serpentine concrete using local materials and its application as a reactor biological shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kansouh, W.A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► New serpentine concrete was made and examined as a reactor biological shield. ► Ilmenite–limonite concrete is a better reactor biological shield. ► New serpentine concrete is a better reactor fast neutrons shield than ordinary and hematite–serpentine concretes. ► Serpentine concrete has lower properties as a reactor total gamma rays shields. - Abstract: In the present work attempt has been made to estimate the shielding parameters of the new serpentine concrete (density = 2.4 g/cm 3 ) using local materials on the shielding parameters for two types of heat resistant concretes, namely hematite–serpentine (density = 2.5 g/cm 3 ) and ilmenite–limonite (density = 2.9 g/cm 3 ). Shielding parameters for ordinary concrete (density = 2.3 g/cm 3 ) were also discussed. These parameters were determined experimentally for serpentine concrete and compared with previously published values for other concretes, which had also been obtained using local materials. The leakage spectra of reactor fast neutrons and total gamma photon beams from cylindrical samples of these concrete shields were also investigated using a collimated beam from ET-RR-1 reactor. A neutron–gamma spectrometer was used in order to obtain pulse height spectra of reactor fast neutrons and the total gamma rays leakage through the investigated concrete samples. These spectra were utilized to obtain the energy spectra required in these investigations. Removal cross section Σ R (E n ) and linear attenuation coefficient μ(E g ) for reactor fast neutrons and total gamma rays and their relative coefficients were evaluated and presented. Measured results were compared with those previously measured for other concretes. The results show that ilmenite–limonite concrete is a better reactor biological shield than the other three concretes. Serpentine concrete under investigation is a better reactor fast neutrons shield than ordinary and hematite–serpentine concretes. Serpentine concrete

  5. Novel Aspects of Materials Processing by Ultrafast Lasers: From Electronic to Biological and Cultural Heritage Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fotakis, C; Zorba, V; Stratakis, E; Athanassiou, A; Tzanetakis, P; Zergioti, I; Papagoglou, D G; Sambani, K; Filippidis, G; Farsari, M; Pouli, V; Bounos, G; Georgiou, S

    2007-01-01

    Materials processing by ultrafast lasers offers several distinct possibilities for micro/nano scale applications. This is due to the unique characteristics of the laser-matter interactions involved, when sub-picosecond pulses are employed. Prospects arising will be discussed in the context of surface and in bulk laser induced modifications. In particular, examples of diverse applications including the development and functionalization of laser engineered surfaces, the laser transfer of biomolecules and the functionalization of 3D structures constructed by three-photon stereolithography will be presented. Furthermore, the removal of molecular substrates by ultrafast laser ablation will be discussed with emphasis placed on assessing the photochemical changes induced in the remaining bulk material. The results indicate that in femtosecond laser processing of organic materials, besides the well acknowledged morphological advantages, a second fundamental factor responsible for its success pertains to the selective chemical effects. This is crucial for the laser cleaning of sensitive painted artworks

  6. Automated extraction of DNA from reference samples from various types of biological materials on the Qiagen BioRobot EZ1 Workstation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Jørgensen, Mads; Hansen, Anders Johannes

    2009-01-01

    We have validated and implemented a protocol for DNA extraction from various types of biological materials using a Qiagen BioRobot EZ1 Workstation. The sample materials included whole blood, blood from deceased, buccal cells on Omni swabs and FTA Cards, blood on FTA Cards and cotton swabs......, and muscle biopsies. The DNA extraction was validated according to EN/ISO 17025 for the STR kits AmpFlSTR« Identifiler« and AmpFlSTR« Yfiler« (Applied Biosystems). Of 298 samples extracted, 11 (4%) did not yield acceptable results. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that extraction of DNA from various types...... of biological material can be performed quickly and without the use of hazardous chemicals, and that the DNA may be successfully STR typed according to the requirements of forensic genetic investigations accredited according to EN/ISO 17025...

  7. Effects of addictive substances during pregnancy and infancy and their analysis in biological materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płotka, Justyna; Narkowicz, Sylwia; Polkowska, Zaneta; Biziuk, Marek; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    The use of addictive substances during pregnancy is a serious social problem, not only because of effects on the health of the woman and child, but also because drug or alcohol dependency detracts from child care and enhances the prospect of child neglect and family breakdown. Developing additive substance abuse treatment programs for pregnant women is socially important and can help ensure the health of babies, prevent subsequent developmental and behavioral problems (i.e., from intake of alcohol or other additive substances such as methamphetamine, cocaine,or heroine) and can reduce addiction costs to society. Because women of childbearing age often abuse controlled substances during their pregnancy, it is important to undertake biomonitoring of these substances in biological samples taken from the pregnant or nursing mother (e.g., blood, urine,hair, breast milk, sweat, oral fluids, etc.), from the fetus and newborn (e.g., meconium,cord blood, neonatal hair and urine) and from both the mother and fetus (i.e.,amniotic fluids and placenta). The choice of specimens to be analyzed is determined by many factors; however, the most important is knowledge of the chemical and physical characteristics of a substance and the route of it administration. Maternal and neonatal biological materials reflect exposures that occur over a specific time period, and each of these biological specimens has different advantages and disadvantages,in terms of accuracy, time window of exposure and cost/benefit ratio.Sampling the placenta may be the most important biomonitoring choice for assessing in utero exposure to addictive substances. The use of the placenta in scientific research causes a minimum of ethical problems, partly because its sampling is noninvasive, causes no harm to mother or child, and partly because, in any case,placentas are discarded and incinerated after birth. Such samples, when properly analyzed, may provide key essential information about fetal exposure to toxic

  8. Studies of iron, cobalt and chromium distribution in some continental aquatic ecosystems and biological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostic, K.

    1982-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate iron, cobalt and chromium distribution in samples of living and non-living matter by using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). The samples were irradiated by thermal neutron flux of 1-5x10 17 n/m 2 xs (for 3-7 days). Investigations were carried out starting with water systems components, such also species living in these systems and biological tissues from rat and human organs. The following conclusions have been drawn for elements distribution in the relation environment/living matter: (1) iron, cobalt and chromium contents in plankton are very close to these found in suspended materials; (2) among all the investigated living organisms, the highest contents of investigated elements have been found in fish; (3) inspite of the contents of iron, cobalt and chromium being somewhat lower in bentos and crustacea than in suspended materials, all the obtained values are very close, and (4) human liver has somewhat higher iron- and cobalt- contents than rat liver, which, however, has higher chromium concentration. Of all the investigated living organisms chromium content was the lowest in human liver. (author)

  9. Propulsion of swimming microrobots inspired by metachronal waves in ciliates: from biology to material specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palagi, Stefano; Mazzolai, Barbara; Beccai, Lucia; Jager, Edwin WH

    2013-01-01

    The quest for swimming microrobots originates from possible applications in medicine, especially involving navigation in bodily fluids. Swimming microorganisms have become a source of inspiration because their propulsion mechanisms are effective in the low-Reynolds number regime. In this study, we address a propulsion mechanism inspired by metachronal waves, i.e. the spontaneous coordination of cilia leading to the fast swimming of ciliates. We analyse the biological mechanism (referring to its particular embodiment in Paramecium caudatum), and we investigate the contribution of its main features to the swimming performance, through a three-dimensional finite-elements model, in order to develop a simplified, yet effective artificial design. We propose a bioinspired propulsion mechanism for a swimming microrobot based on a continuous cylindrical electroactive surface exhibiting perpendicular wave deformations travelling longitudinally along its main axis. The simplified propulsion mechanism is conceived specifically for microrobots that embed a micro-actuation system capable of executing the bioinspired propulsion (self-propelled microrobots). Among the available electroactive polymers, we select polypyrrole as the possible actuation material and we assess it for this particular embodiment. The results are used to appoint target performance specifications for the development of improved or new electroactive materials to attain metachronal-waves-like propulsion. (paper)

  10. Determination of copper in biological materials by neutron activation analysis using short-lived 66Cu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dybczynski, R.; Danko, B.; Kaczorowski, J.

    1989-01-01

    A method for determination of copper traces in biological materials based on neutron activation employing 65 Cu(n, γ) 66 Cu reaction and preconcentration by extraction chromatography has been devised. The 200-500 mg samples after wet digestion and evaporation were dissolved in glycine solution and after pH adjusting to ca. 4.4 were passed through the column with Lix 64N on Bio Beads SM-1 for isolation of copper traces from the matrix elements. Other cations were selectively eluted with 0.1 mol x 1 -1 (glycine-HNO 3 ) buffer, 1 mol x 1 -1 in NH 4 NO 3 (pH = 3.6). The resin bed with quantitatively retained copper was sealed in the PE bag and irradiated together with Cu standards in EWA reactor using pneumatic tube facility. The activity of the short-lived 66 Cu was measured in samples and standard by gamma-ray spectrometry with Ge(Li) detector. Good accuracy of the method was confirmed by analysis of the following certified reference materials: NBS 1571 Orchad leaves, IAEA H-4 Animal muscle, IAEA V-8 Rye flour, IAEA A-11 milk powder. The detection limit amounted to 0.34 mg/kg, for the sample weight of 500 mg. (author)

  11. Modeling the Nonlinear, Strain Rate Dependent Deformation of Shuttle Leading Edge Materials with Hydrostatic Stress Effects Included

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Carney, Kelly S.

    2004-01-01

    An analysis method based on a deformation (as opposed to damage) approach has been developed to model the strain rate dependent, nonlinear deformation of woven ceramic matrix composites, such as the Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) material used on the leading edges of the Space Shuttle. In the developed model, the differences in the tension and compression deformation behaviors have also been accounted for. State variable viscoplastic equations originally developed for metals have been modified to analyze the ceramic matrix composites. To account for the tension/compression asymmetry in the material, the effective stress and effective inelastic strain definitions have been modified. The equations have also been modified to account for the fact that in an orthotropic composite the in-plane shear response is independent of the stiffness in the normal directions. The developed equations have been implemented into LS-DYNA through the use of user defined subroutines (UMATs). Several sample qualitative calculations have been conducted, which demonstrate the ability of the model to qualitatively capture the features of the deformation response present in woven ceramic matrix composites.

  12. A comparison of methods for the determination of sound velocity in biological materials: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Konrad W; Markowski, Marek

    2013-07-01

    Non-destructive ultrasonic methods for testing biological materials are applied in medicine as well as in food engineering to determine the physical parameters and the quality of agricultural products and raw materials such as meat. The purpose of this work was to identify the simplest and the most accurate of five methods for sound velocity determination across the fibers of the porcine longissimus dorsi muscle. The through-transmission technique (TT) was used for ultrasound signal acquisition with 2MHz transducers. The first two methods (M1, M2) are based on the acquisition of a single ultrasound signal in the analyzed material, another two methods (M3, M4) rely on the acquisition of two ultrasound signals in samples with different thicknesses (two-distance method) and the last method (M5) involves the acquisition of a single ultrasound signal in the analyzed material and the acquisition of a single ultrasound signal in distilled water at the same distance between ultrasonic transducers (relative method). The results were processed by the nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test and compared with published data. The mean values of sound velocity obtained with the use of the above methods in pork samples at post-storage, room and vital temperatures were as follows: method M1-1549.2/1581.7/1597.4m/s, method M2-1477.7/1509.8/1597.4m/s, method M3-1552.0/1599.0/1623.3m/s, method M4-1557.4/1598.3/1623.6m/s, method M5-1554.3/1583.7/1598m/s. The experiment indicates that the choice of method for determining sound velocity significantly influences the results. Two of the five analyzed methods (namely M3 and M4), which involved measurements of the time of sound wave propagation through samples of the same material with varied thickness, produced velocity values most consistent with published data. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Development and validation of a biologically realistic tissue-mimicking material for photoacoustics and other bimodal optical-acoustic modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, William C.; Jia, Congxian; Wear, Keith A.; Garra, Brian S.; Pfefer, T. Joshua

    2017-03-01

    Recent years have seen rapid development of hybrid optical-acoustic imaging modalities with broad applications in research and clinical imaging, including photoacoustic tomography (PAT), photoacoustic microscopy, and ultrasound-modulated optical tomography. Tissue-mimicking phantoms are an important tool for objectively and quantitatively simulating in vivo imaging system performance. However, no standard tissue phantoms exist for such systems. One major challenge is the development of tissue-mimicking materials (TMMs) that are both highly stable and possess biologically realistic properties. To address this need, we have explored the use of various formulations of PVC plastisol (PVCP) based on varying mixtures of several liquid plasticizers. We developed a custom PVCP formulation with optical absorption and scattering coefficients, speed of sound, and acoustic attenuation that are tunable and tissue-relevant. This TMM can simulate different tissue compositions and offers greater mechanical strength than hydrogels. Optical properties of PVCP samples with varying composition were characterized using integrating sphere spectrophotometry and the inverse adding-doubling method. Acoustic properties were determined using a broadband pulse-transmission technique. To demonstrate the utility of this bimodal TMM, we constructed an image quality phantom designed to enable quantitative evaluation of PAT spatial resolution. The phantom was imaged using a custom combined PAT-ultrasound imaging system. Results indicated that this more biologically realistic TMM produced performance trends not captured in simpler liquid phantoms. In the future, this TMM may be broadly utilized for performance evaluation of optical, acoustic, and hybrid optical-acoustic imaging systems.

  14. The Frontlines of Medicine Project: a proposal for the standardized communication of emergency department data for public health uses including syndromic surveillance for biological and chemical terrorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthell, Edward N; Cordell, William H; Moorhead, John C; Handler, Jonathan; Feied, Craig; Smith, Mark S; Cochrane, Dennis G; Felton, Christopher W; Collins, Michael A

    2002-04-01

    The Frontlines of Medicine Project is a collaborative effort of emergency medicine (including emergency medical services and clinical toxicology), public health, emergency government, law enforcement, and informatics. This collaboration proposes to develop a nonproprietary, "open systems" approach for reporting emergency department patient data. The common element is a standard approach to sending messages from individual EDs to regional oversight entities that could then analyze the data received. ED encounter data could be used for various public health initiatives, including syndromic surveillance for chemical and biological terrorism. The interlinking of these regional systems could also permit public health surveillance at a national level based on ED patient encounter data. Advancements in the Internet and Web-based technologies could allow the deployment of these standardized tools in a rapid time frame.

  15. Theoretical investigation of five-layer waveguide structure including two left-handed material layers for refractometric applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkanoo, Anas A.; Taya, Sofyan A.

    2018-03-01

    A slab waveguide structure consisting of five layers is studied for optical sensing applications. The five-layer waveguide structure has a guiding dielectric film, two left-handed material (LHM) layers and two dielectric layers as a substrate and a cladding. The dispersion relation and the sensitivity to any change in the index of the analyte layer are derived. The sensitivity is explored with different parameters of the structure. It is found that the sensitivity of the proposed structure can be significantly improved with the increase of the index of the guiding layer and the decrease of the permittivity of the LHM layers. Moreover, it can be also improved with the increase of the thickness of the LHM layers.

  16. End of FY2014 Report - Filter Measurement System for Nuclear Material Storage Canisters (Including Altitude Correction for Filter Pressure Drop)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Murray E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reeves, Kirk Patrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-24

    Two LANL FTS (Filter Test System ) devices for nuclear material storage canisters are fully operational. One is located in PF-4 ( i.e. the TA-55 FTS) while the other is located at the Radiation Protection Division’s Aerosol Engineering Facility ( i.e. the TA-3 FTS). The systems are functionally equivalent , with the TA-3 FTS being the test-bed for new additions and for resolving any issues found in the TA-55 FTS. There is currently one unresolved issue regarding the TA-55 FTS device. The canister lid clamp does not give a leak tight seal when testing the 1 QT (quart) or 2 QT SAVY lids. An adapter plate is being developed that will ensure a correct test configuration when the 1 or 2 QT SAVY lid s are being tested .

  17. 2012 best practices for repositories collection, storage, retrieval, and distribution of biological materials for research international society for biological and environmental repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Third Edition [Formula: see text] [Box: see text] Printed with permission from the International Society for Biological and Environmental Repositories (ISBER) © 2011 ISBER All Rights Reserved Editor-in-Chief Lori D. Campbell, PhD Associate Editors Fay Betsou, PhD Debra Leiolani Garcia, MPA Judith G. Giri, PhD Karen E. Pitt, PhD Rebecca S. Pugh, MS Katherine C. Sexton, MBA Amy P.N. Skubitz, PhD Stella B. Somiari, PhD Individual Contributors to the Third Edition Jonas Astrin, Susan Baker, Thomas J. Barr, Erica Benson, Mark Cada, Lori Campbell, Antonio Hugo Jose Froes Marques Campos, David Carpentieri, Omoshile Clement, Domenico Coppola, Yvonne De Souza, Paul Fearn, Kelly Feil, Debra Garcia, Judith Giri, William E. Grizzle, Kathleen Groover, Keith Harding, Edward Kaercher, Joseph Kessler, Sarah Loud, Hannah Maynor, Kevin McCluskey, Kevin Meagher, Cheryl Michels, Lisa Miranda, Judy Muller-Cohn, Rolf Muller, James O'Sullivan, Karen Pitt, Rebecca Pugh, Rivka Ravid, Katherine Sexton, Ricardo Luis A. Silva, Frank Simione, Amy Skubitz, Stella Somiari, Frans van der Horst, Gavin Welch, Andy Zaayenga 2012 Best Practices for Repositories: Collection, Storage, Retrieval and Distribution of Biological Materials for Research INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR BIOLOGICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL REPOSITORIES (ISBER) INTRODUCTION T he availability of high quality biological and environmental specimens for research purposes requires the development of standardized methods for collection, long-term storage, retrieval and distribution of specimens that will enable their future use. Sharing successful strategies for accomplishing this goal is one of the driving forces for the International Society for Biological and Environmental Repositories (ISBER). For more information about ISBER see www.isber.org . ISBER's Best Practices for Repositories (Best Practices) reflect the collective experience of its members and has received broad input from other repository professionals. Throughout this document

  18. Behaviors of intercellular materials and nutrients in biological nutrient removal process supplied with domestic wastewater and food waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, So-Ryong; Jeong, Hyeong-Seok; Lim, Jae-Lim; Kang, Seok-Tae; Shin, Hang-Sik; Paik, Byeong-Cheon; Youn, Jong-Ho

    2004-01-01

    A four-stage biological nutrient removal (BNR) process was operated to investigate the effect of anaerobically fermented leachate of food waste (AFLFW) as an external carbon source on nutrient removal from domestic wastewater having a low carbon-to-nitrogen ratio. The BNR system that was supplemented with AFLFW showed a good performance at a sludge retention time (SRT) of 30 days, despite low temperature. With this wastewater, average removal efficiencies of soluble chemical oxygen demand (COD), total nitrogen (T-N), and total phosphorus (T-P) were 88 to 93%, 70 to 74%, and 63 to 68%, respectively. In this study, several kinds of poly-hydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) were observed in cells. These included 24% poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB), 41% poly-3-hydroxyvalerate (PHV), 18% poly-3-hydroxyhexanoate (PHH), 10% poly-3-hydroxyoctanoate (PHO), 5% poly-3-hydroxydecanoate (PHD). and 2% poly-3-hydroxydodecanoate (PHDD), indicating that microorganisms could store various PHAs through the different metabolic pathways. However, breakdown of the enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) mechanism was observed when SRT increased from 30 to 50 days for the enhancement of nitrification. To study the effect of SRT on EBPR, a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) system that was supplied with glucose was operated at various SRTs of 5, 10, and 15 days. Nitrification and denitrification efficiencies increased as SRT increased. However, the content of intracellular materials such as PHAs, glycogen. and poly-P in cells decreased. From these results, it was concluded that SRT should be carefully controlled to increase nitrification activity and to maintain biological phosphorus removal activity in the BNR process.

  19. Environmental routes for platinum group elements to biological materials--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ek, Kristine H; Morrison, Gregory M; Rauch, Sebastien

    2004-12-01

    The increased use of platinum group elements (PGE) in automobile catalysts has led to concern over potential environmental and biological accumulation. Platinum (Pt), palladium (Pd) and rhodium (Rh) concentrations have increased in the environment since the introduction of automobile catalysts. This review summarises current knowledge concerning the environmental mobility, speciation and bioavailability of Pt, Pd and Rh. The greater proportion of PGE emissions is from automobile catalysts, in the form of nanometer-sized catalyst particles, which deposit on roadside surfaces, as evidenced in samples of road dust, grass and soil. In soil, PGE can be transformed into more mobile species through complexation with organic matter and can be solubilised in low pH rainwater. There are indications that environmentally formed Pd species are more soluble and hence more mobile in the environment than Rh and Pt. PGE can reach waterbodies through stormwater transport and deposition in sediments. Besides external contamination of grass close to roads, internal PGE uptake has been observed for plants growing on soil contaminated with automobile catalyst PGE. Fine particles of PGE were also detected on the surface of feathers sampled from passerines and raptors in their natural habitat, and internal organs of these birds also contained PGE. Uptake has been observed in sediment-dwelling invertebrates, and laboratory studies have shown an uptake of PGE in eel and fish exposed to water containing road dust. The available evidence indicates that the PGE, especially Pd, are transported to biological materials through deposition in roots by binding to sulphur-rich low molecular weight species in plants. PGE uptake to exposed animals have uptake rates in the following order: Pd>Pt>Rh. The liver and kidney accumulate the highest levels of PGE, especially Pd. Urinary Pd and Rh, but not Pt, levels are correlated with traffic intensity. Dental alloys may lead to elevated urinary Pt levels

  20. Graphene: One Material, Many Possibilities—Application Difficulties in Biological Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Skoda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Energetic technologies, nanoelectronics, biomedicine including gene therapy, cell imaging or tissue engineering are only few from all possible applications for graphene, the thinnest known carbon configuration and a basic element for other more complicated, better discovered and widely used nanostructures such as graphite, fullerenes and carbon nanotubes. The number of researches concerning graphene applications is rising every day which proves the great interest in its unique structure and properties. Ideal pristine graphene sheet presents a flat membrane of unlimited size with no imperfections while in practice we get different flakes with irregular edges and structural defects which influence the reactivity. Nanomaterials from graphene family differ in size, shape, layer number, lateral dimension, surface chemistry and defect density causing the existence of graphene samples with various influence on biological systems. Whether graphene induces cellular stress and activates apoptosis, or on the contrary facilitates growth and differentiation of the cells depends on its structure, chemical modifications and the growth process. A certain number of in vitro studies has indicated cytotoxic effects of graphene while the other show that it is safe. The diversity of the samples and methods of the production make it impossible to establish clearly the biological impact of graphene.

  1. [Materiality Analysis of Health Plans Based on Stakeholder Engagement and the Issues Included at ISO 26000:2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyano Santiago, Miguel Angel; Rivera Lirio, Juana María

    2017-01-18

    Health plans of the Spanish autonomous communities can incorporate sustainable development criteria in its development. There have been no analysis or proposals about development and indicators. The goal is to add a contribution to help build better health plans aimed at sustainable development and help to manage economic, social and environmental impacts of health systems criteria. We used a variation of the RAND/UCLA or modified Delphi technique method. The process consisted of a bibliographical and context matters and issues related to health and social responsibility analysis based on ISO 26000: 2010. A survey by deliberately to a selection of 70 expert members of the identified stakeholders was carried out and a discussion group was held to determine the consensus on the issues addressed in the survey sample. The research was conducted in 2015. From the literature review 33 health issues included in ISO 26000:2010 were obtained. 7 survey proved relevant high consensus, 8 relevance and average consensus and 18 with less relevance and high level of dissent. The expert group excluded 4 of the 18 subjects with less consensus. 29 issues included 33 at work, divided into 7 subjects contained in the guide ISO 26000 of social responsibility, were relevant stakeholders regarding possible inclusion in health plans. Considering the direct relationship published by ISO (International Organization for Standardization) among the issues ISO 26000 and the economic, social and environmental indicators in GRI (Global Reporting Initiative) in its G4 version, a panel with monitoring indicators related to relevant issues were elaborated.

  2. Nematodes that associate with terrestrial molluscs as definitive hosts, including Phasmarhabditis hermaphrodita (Rhabditida: Rhabditidae) and its development as a biological molluscicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieterse, A; Malan, A P; Ross, J L

    2017-09-01

    Terrestrial molluscs (Mollusca: Gastropoda) are important economic pests worldwide, causing extensive damage to a variety of crop types, and posing a health risk to both humans and wildlife. Current knowledge indicates that there are eight nematode families that associate with molluscs as definitive hosts, including Agfidae, Alaninematidae, Alloionematidae, Angiostomatidae, Cosmocercidae, Diplogastridae, Mermithidae and Rhabditidae. To date, Phasmarhabditis hermaphrodita (Schneider, 1859) Andrássy, 1983 (Rhabditida: Rhabditidae) is the only nematode that has been developed as a biological molluscicide. The nematode, which was commercially released in 1994 by MicroBio Ltd, Littlehampton, UK (formally Becker Underwood, now BASF) under the tradename Nemaslug®, is now sold in 15 different European countries. This paper reviews nematodes isolated from molluscs, with specially detailed information on the life cycle, host range, commercialization, natural distribution, mass production and field application of P. hermaphrodita.

  3. Human alveolar macrophage responses to air pollution particulates are associated with insoluble components of coarse material, including particulate endotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukup, J M; Becker, S

    2001-02-15

    Inhalation of particulate matter in the ambient air has been shown to cause pulmonary morbidity and exacerbate asthma. Alveolar macrophage (AM) are essential for effective removal of inhaled particles and microbes in the lower airways. While some particles minimally effect AM function others inhibit antimicrobial activity or cause cytokine and growth factor production leading to inflammation and tissue remodeling. This study has investigated the effects of water soluble (s) and insoluble (is) components of Chapel Hill, North Carolina ambient particulate matter in the size ranges 0.1-2.5 microm (PM2.5) and 2.5-10 microm (PM10) diameter, on human AM IL-6, TNFalpha, and MCP-1 cytokine production and host defense mechanisms including phagocytosis and oxidant production. Cytokines were found to be induced by isPM10 to a much higher extent (>50-fold) than sPM10, which in turn stimulated production better than isPM2.5, while sPM2.5 was inactive. Previous studies have indicated that endotoxin (ETOX) is a component of sPM10 responsible for cytokine production. Here, it is shown that inhibition of isPM10-induced cytokine production was partially achieved with polymyxin B and LPS-binding protein (LBP), but not with a metal chelator, implicating ETOX as a cytokine-inducing moiety also in isPM10. In addition to inducing cytokines, exposure to isPM10, but not the other PM fractions, also inhibited phagocytosis and oxidant generation in response to yeast. This inhibition was ETOX independent. The decrease in host defenses may be the result of apoptosis in the AM population, which was also found to be specifically caused by isPM10. These results show that the functional capacity of AM is selectively modulated by insoluble components of coarse PM, including the biocontaminant ETOX.

  4. Sample sizing of biological materials analyzed by energy dispersion X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paiva, Jose D.S.; Franca, Elvis J.; Magalhaes, Marcelo R.L.; Almeida, Marcio E.S.; Hazin, Clovis A.

    2013-01-01

    Analytical portions used in chemical analyses are usually less than 1g. Errors resulting from the sampling are barely evaluated, since this type of study is a time-consuming procedure, with high costs for the chemical analysis of large number of samples. The energy dispersion X-ray fluorescence - EDXRF is a non-destructive and fast analytical technique with the possibility of determining several chemical elements. Therefore, the aim of this study was to provide information on the minimum analytical portion for quantification of chemical elements in biological matrices using EDXRF. Three species were sampled in mangroves from the Pernambuco, Brazil. Tree leaves were washed with distilled water, oven-dried at 60 deg C and milled until 0.5 mm particle size. Ten test-portions of approximately 500 mg for each species were transferred to vials sealed with polypropylene film. The quality of the analytical procedure was evaluated from the reference materials IAEA V10 Hay Powder, SRM 2976 Apple Leaves. After energy calibration, all samples were analyzed under vacuum for 100 seconds for each group of chemical elements. The voltage used was 15 kV and 50 kV for chemical elements of atomic number lower than 22 and the others, respectively. For the best analytical conditions, EDXRF was capable of estimating the sample size uncertainty for further determination of chemical elements in leaves. (author)

  5. Sample sizing of biological materials analyzed by energy dispersion X-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva, Jose D.S.; Franca, Elvis J.; Magalhaes, Marcelo R.L.; Almeida, Marcio E.S.; Hazin, Clovis A., E-mail: dan-paiva@hotmail.com, E-mail: ejfranca@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: marcelo_rlm@hotmail.com, E-mail: maensoal@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: chazin@cnen.gov.b [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Analytical portions used in chemical analyses are usually less than 1g. Errors resulting from the sampling are barely evaluated, since this type of study is a time-consuming procedure, with high costs for the chemical analysis of large number of samples. The energy dispersion X-ray fluorescence - EDXRF is a non-destructive and fast analytical technique with the possibility of determining several chemical elements. Therefore, the aim of this study was to provide information on the minimum analytical portion for quantification of chemical elements in biological matrices using EDXRF. Three species were sampled in mangroves from the Pernambuco, Brazil. Tree leaves were washed with distilled water, oven-dried at 60 deg C and milled until 0.5 mm particle size. Ten test-portions of approximately 500 mg for each species were transferred to vials sealed with polypropylene film. The quality of the analytical procedure was evaluated from the reference materials IAEA V10 Hay Powder, SRM 2976 Apple Leaves. After energy calibration, all samples were analyzed under vacuum for 100 seconds for each group of chemical elements. The voltage used was 15 kV and 50 kV for chemical elements of atomic number lower than 22 and the others, respectively. For the best analytical conditions, EDXRF was capable of estimating the sample size uncertainty for further determination of chemical elements in leaves. (author)

  6. [Accidents with biological materials among nurses in a training hospital: case-control study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalarosa, Micheline Gisele; Lautert, Liana

    2009-03-01

    This case-control study aimed at analyzing the association between occupational stress and disagreement between chronotype and the work shift of nurses who suffered accidents with biological materials in a hospital of Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. A number of 99 workers who suffered accidents (cases) and 232 that had not suffered accidents (controls) were interviewed. Data were collected through the Job Stress Scale according to Karasek's model and the Horne-Ostberg scale The occurrence of accident was not statistically associated with high work requirement scores (p = 0.317), with a chronobiological profile discordant with work shift (p = 0.563), or with other labor variables associated to accidents--overtime, having two jobs (p = 1.000). In addition, there was no significant difference (chi2 Pearson; p = 1.00) among the scores of professionals with high work requirements who work in shifts discordant with their chronotype, both in the case group and in the control group as well.

  7. Obstructive sleep apnea patients can be identified by ion mobility spectrometry-derived smell prints of different biological materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greulich, Timm; Fischer, Hannes; Lubbe, Dirk; Nell, Christoph; Ingo Baumbach, Jörg; Koehler, Ulrich; Boeselt, Tobias; Vogelmeier, Claus; Rembert Koczulla, Andreas

    2018-02-06

    The analysis of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is time- and cost-intensive. A number of studies demonstrated that the non-invasive analysis of exhaled breath (EB) may be suitable to distinguish between OSAS patients and healthy subjects (HS). Methods/Population: We included OSAS patients (n = 15) and HS (n = 15) in this diagnostic proof-of-concept-study. All participants underwent polygraphy to verify or exclude OSAS and performed spirometry to exclude pulmonary ventilatory diseases. The volatile organic compound profile of EB and of the headspaces over EB condensate, pharyngeal washing fluid, and serum was measured using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) (BioScout ® ) and an e-nose (Cyranose ® 320). For the statistical analysis, we fitted classification tree models using recursive partitioning, followed by a leave-one-out cross-validation. For the cross-validated predictions we calculated descriptive classification statistics, p-values from a [Formula: see text]-test with continuity correction, as well as ROC curves. Using IMS, OSAS patients and HS could be distinguished with high accuracy (values ranged from 79% to 97%). The results of the e-nose-derived analyses (with the exception of EB) were less accurate. However, the cross-validated accuracy for EB was very good (0.9), reflecting a positive predictive value of 100% and a negative predictive value of 83%. For each material, we identified the best five substances that may be used for diagnostic purposes. 2-Methylfluran was found in three different biological materials to be discriminative between OSAS and HS. The results strengthen the hypothesis that substances detectable in headspace measurements of different airway and blood materials may undergo a transition from blood into the alveoli (and EB) or vice versa. This means that substances from different compartments could be used to distinguish patients with airway diseases (in this case OSAS) from healthy controls.

  8. The development of peptide-based interfacial biomaterials for generating biological functionality on the surface of bioinert materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Steven R; Khoo, Xiaojuan; Huang, Xin; Walsh, Elisabeth B; Grinstaff, Mark W; Kenan, Daniel J

    2009-01-01

    Biomaterials used in implants have traditionally been selected based on their mechanical properties, chemical stability, and biocompatibility. However, the durability and clinical efficacy of implantable biomedical devices remain limited in part due to the absence of appropriate biological interactions at the implant interface and the lack of integration into adjacent tissues. Herein, we describe a robust peptide-based coating technology capable of modifying the surface of existing biomaterials and medical devices through the non-covalent binding of modular biofunctional peptides. These peptides contain at least one material binding sequence and at least one biologically active sequence and thus are termed, "Interfacial Biomaterials" (IFBMs). IFBMs can simultaneously bind the biomaterial surface while endowing it with desired biological functionalities at the interface between the material and biological realms. We demonstrate the capabilities of model IFBMs to convert native polystyrene, a bioinert surface, into a bioactive surface that can support a range of cell activities. We further distinguish between simple cell attachment with insufficient integrin interactions, which in some cases can adversely impact downstream biology, versus biologically appropriate adhesion, cell spreading, and cell survival mediated by IFBMs. Moreover, we show that we can use the coating technology to create spatially resolved patterns of fluorophores and cells on substrates and that these patterns retain their borders in culture.

  9. Effects of different radio-opacifying agents on physicochemical and biological properties of a novel root-end filling material.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Zhong Chen

    Full Text Available Radio-opacity is an essential attribute of ideal root-end filling materials because it is important for clinicians to observe root canal filling and to facilitate the follow-up instructions. The novel root-end filling material (NRFM has good cytocompatibility and physicochemical properties but low intrinsic radio-opacity value. To improve its radio-opacity value, three novel radio-opaque root-end filling materials (NRRFMs were developed by adding barium sulphate (NRFM-Ba, bismuth trioxide (NRFM-Bi and zirconium dioxide (NRFM-Zr to NRFM, respectively. The purpose of this study was to identify the suitable radio-opacifier for NRFM through evaluating their physicochemical and biological properties, in comparison with NRFM and glass ionomer cement (GIC.NRRFMs were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD and Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry (FTIR. Physicochemical properties including setting time, compressive strength, porosity, pH variation, solubility, washout resistance, contact angle and radiopacity were investigated. Cytocompatibility of both freshly mixed and set NRRFMs was investigated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity assay and alizarin red staining were used to investigate the osteogenic differentiation potential of NRFM-Zr. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA (pH variation, solubility and ALP activity and one-way ANOVA (for the other variables.(1 NRRFMs were primarily composed of hydroxyapatite, calcium carboxylate salt and the corresponding radio-opacity agents (barium sulphate, bismuth trioxide or zirconium dioxide. (2 Besides similar physicochemical properties in terms of setting time, pH variation, solubility, washout resistance and contact angle to NRFM, NRFM-Bi and NRFM-Zr exhibited lower porosity and greater compressive strength after being set for 7 days and their radio-opacity were greater than the 3 mm aluminium thickness specified in ISO

  10. Biology Notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Outlines a variety of laboratory procedures, techniques, and materials including construction of a survey frame for field biology, a simple tidal system, isolation and applications of plant protoplasts, tropisms, teaching lung structure, and a key to statistical methods for biologists. (DS)

  11. Detection of small number of Giardia in biological materials prepared from stray dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmailikia, Leila; Ebrahimzade, Elahe; Shayan, Parviz; Amininia, Narges

    2017-12-20

    Giardia lamblia is an intestinal protozoa with intermittent and low shedding especially in dogs, and the detection of Giardia is accompanied with problems such as sampling and diagnostic method. The objective of this study was to detection of Giardia in biological materials with low number of parasite using parasitological and molecular methods, and also to determine whether the examined stray dogs harbor known zoonotic genotype of Giardia. For this aim 85 fecal and duodenal samples were studied from which 1 was positive by Trichrome staining of stool, 4 were positive by staining of duodenal samples. The nested PCR analysis with primers derived from 18 SrRNA showed that the specific PCR product could be amplified in 4 stool and 4 duodenal samples. All positive samples in staining analysis were also positive in nested PCR. No amplification could be observed by nested PCR with primers derived from β giardin gene due to the single copy of gene. Interestingly, the extracted DNA from old fixed stained Giardia positive smears could be also amplified with primers derived from 18SrRNA gene. The sequence analysis of nested PCR products showed that they belong to the genotype D. In conclusion, it is to denote that the Trichrome or Giemsa methods were not suitable for the detection of small number of this parasite in stool and the nested PCR with primers derived from 18S rRNA gene can replace the traditional methods successfully. For detection of Giardia in stool, primers derived from β giardin will not be recommended.

  12. Enhancement in biological response of Ag-nano composite polymer membranes using plasma treatment for fabrication of efficient bio materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Narendra Kumar; Sharma, Tamanna Kumari; Chauhan, Manish; Agarwal, Ravi; Vijay, Y. K.; Swami, K. C.

    2016-05-01

    Biomaterials are nonviable material used in medical devices, intended to interact with biological systems, which are becoming necessary for the development of artificial material for biological systems such as artificial skin diaphragm, valves for heart and kidney, lenses for eye etc. Polymers having novel properties like antibacterial, antimicrobial, high adhesion, blood compatibility and wettability are most suitable for synthesis of biomaterial, but all of these properties does not exist in any natural or artificial polymeric material. Nano particles and plasma treatment can offer these properties to the polymers. Hence a new nano-biomaterial has been developed by modifying the surface and chemical properties of Ag nanocomposite polymer membranes (NCPM) by Argon ion plasma treatment. These membranes were characterized using different techniques for surface and chemical modifications occurred. Bacterial adhesion and wettability were also tested for these membranes, to show direct use of this new class of nano-biomaterial for biomedical applications.

  13. Optimization of biological and instrumental detection of explosives and ignitable liquid residues including canines, SPME/ITMS and GC/MSn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furton, Kenneth G.; Harper, Ross J.; Perr, Jeannette M.; Almirall, Jose R.

    2003-09-01

    A comprehensive study and comparison is underway using biological detectors and instrumental methods for the rapid detection of ignitable liquid residues (ILR) and high explosives. Headspace solid phase microextraction (SPME) has been demonstrated to be an effective sampling method helping to identify active odor signature chemicals used by detector dogs to locate forensic specimens as well as a rapid pre-concentration technique prior to instrumental detection. Common ignitable liquids and common military and industrial explosives have been studied including trinitrotoluene, tetryl, RDX, HMX, EGDN, PETN and nitroglycerine. This study focuses on identifying volatile odor signature chemicals present, which can be used to enhance the level and reliability of detection of ILR and explosives by canines and instrumental methods. While most instrumental methods currently in use focus on particles and on parent organic compounds, which are often involatile, characteristic volatile organics are generally also present and can be exploited to enhance detection particularly for well-concealed devices. Specific examples include the volatile odor chemicals 2-ethyl-1-hexanol and cyclohexanone, which are readily available in the headspace of the high explosive composition C-4; whereas, the active chemical cyclo-1,3,5-trimethylene-2,4,6-trinitramine (RDX) is not. The analysis and identification of these headspace 'fingerprint' organics is followed by double-blind dog trials of the individual components using certified teams in an attempt to isolate and understand the target compounds to which dogs are sensitive. Studies to compare commonly used training aids with the actual target explosive have also been undertaken to determine their suitability and effectiveness. The optimization of solid phase microextraction (SPME) combined with ion trap mobility spectrometry (ITMS) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (GC/MSn) is detailed including interface development

  14. Quantification of ultraviolet photon emission from interaction of charged particles in materials of interest in radiation biology research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Syed Bilal; McNeill, Fiona E.; Prestwich, William V.; Byun, Soo Hyun; Seymour, Colin; Mothersill, Carmel E.

    2014-01-01

    In radiation biology experiments often cells are irradiated using charged particles with the intention that only a specified number of cells are hit by the primary ion track. However, in doing so several other materials such as the cell container and the growth media etc. are also irradiated, and UV radiation emitted from these materials can potentially interact with the cells. We have hypothesized that some "bystander effects" that are thought to be chemically mediated, may be, in fact, a physical effect, where UV is interacting with non-targeted cells. Based upon our hypothesis we quantified the emission of UV from Polypropylene, Mylar, Teflon, and Cellophane which are all commonly used materials in radiation biology experiments. Additionally we measured the NIST standard materials of Oyster tissue and Citrus leaves as these powdered materials are derived from living cells. Protons accelerated up to an energy of 2.2 MeV, in a 3 MV Van de Graff accelerator, were used for irradiation. Beam current was kept to 10 nA, which corresponds to a proton fluence rate of 2.7 × 1010 protons mm-2 s-1. All the materials were found to emit light at UV frequencies and intensities that were significant enough to conduct a further investigation for their biological consequences. Mylar and polypropylene are commonly used in radiation induced bystander effect studies and are considered to be non-fluorescent. However our study showed that this is not the case. Significant luminescence observed from the irradiated NIST standard reference materials for Oyster tissue and Citrus leaves verified that the luminescence emission is not restricted only to the polymeric materials that are used to contain cells. It can also occur from ion interactions within the cells as well.

  15. Quantification of ultraviolet photon emission from interaction of charged particles in materials of interest in radiation biology research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Syed Bilal, E-mail: ahmadsb@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Islamabad (Pakistan); McNeill, Fiona E., E-mail: fmcneill@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Prestwich, William V., E-mail: prestwic@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Byun, Soo Hyun, E-mail: soohyun@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Seymour, Colin, E-mail: seymouc@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Mothersill, Carmel E., E-mail: mothers@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2014-01-15

    In radiation biology experiments often cells are irradiated using charged particles with the intention that only a specified number of cells are hit by the primary ion track. However, in doing so several other materials such as the cell container and the growth media etc. are also irradiated, and UV radiation emitted from these materials can potentially interact with the cells. We have hypothesized that some “bystander effects” that are thought to be chemically mediated, may be, in fact, a physical effect, where UV is interacting with non-targeted cells. Based upon our hypothesis we quantified the emission of UV from Polypropylene, Mylar, Teflon, and Cellophane which are all commonly used materials in radiation biology experiments. Additionally we measured the NIST standard materials of Oyster tissue and Citrus leaves as these powdered materials are derived from living cells. Protons accelerated up to an energy of 2.2 MeV, in a 3 MV Van de Graff accelerator, were used for irradiation. Beam current was kept to 10 nA, which corresponds to a proton fluence rate of 2.7 × 10{sup 10} protons mm{sup −2} s{sup −1}. All the materials were found to emit light at UV frequencies and intensities that were significant enough to conduct a further investigation for their biological consequences. Mylar and polypropylene are commonly used in radiation induced bystander effect studies and are considered to be non-fluorescent. However our study showed that this is not the case. Significant luminescence observed from the irradiated NIST standard reference materials for Oyster tissue and Citrus leaves verified that the luminescence emission is not restricted only to the polymeric materials that are used to contain cells. It can also occur from ion interactions within the cells as well.

  16. EDITORIAL: Nanotechnology at the interface of cell biology, materials science and medicine Nanotechnology at the interface of cell biology, materials science and medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Andreas; Miles, Mervyn

    2008-09-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) and related scanning probe microscopes have become resourceful tools to study cells, supramolecular assemblies and single biomolecules, because they allow investigations of such structures in native environments. Quantitative information has been gathered about the surface structure of membrane proteins to lateral and vertical resolutions of 0.5 nm and 0.1 nm, respectively, about the forces that keep protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid assemblies together as well as single proteins in their native conformation, and about the nanomechanical properties of cells in health and disease. Such progress has been achieved mainly because of constant development of AFM instrumentation and sample preparation methods. This special issue of Nanotechnology presents papers from leading laboratories in the field of nanobiology, covering a wide range of topics in the form of original and novel scientific contributions. It addresses achievements in instrumentation, sample preparation, automation and in biological applications. These papers document the creativity and persistence of researchers pursuing the goal to unravel the structure and dynamics of cells, supramolecuar structures and single biomolecules at work. Improved cantilever sensors, novel optical probes, and quantitative data on supports for electrochemical experiments open new avenues for characterizing biological nanomachines down to the single molecule. Comparative measurements of healthy and metastatic cells promise new methods for early detection of tumors, and possible assessments of drug efficacy. High-speed AFMs document possibilities to monitor crystal growth and to observe large structures at video rate. A wealth of information on amyloid-type fibers as well as on membrane proteins has been gathered by single molecule force spectroscopy—a technology now being automated for large-scale data collection. With the progress of basic research and a strong industry supporting

  17. Chemically-functionalized microcantilevers for detection of chemical, biological and explosive material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnaduwage, Lal A [Knoxville, TN; Thundat, Thomas G [Knoxville, TN; Brown, Gilbert M [Knoxville, TN; Hawk, John Eric [Olive Branch, MS; Boiadjiev, Vassil I [Knoxville, TN

    2007-04-24

    A chemically functionalized cantilever system has a cantilever coated on one side thereof with a reagent or biological species which binds to an analyte. The system is of particular value when the analyte is a toxic chemical biological warfare agent or an explosive.

  18. Radioprotection, biological effects of the radiations and security in the handling of radioactive material

    CERN Document Server

    Teran, M

    2000-01-01

    The development of the philosophy of the radioprotection is dependent on the understanding of the effects of the radiation in the man. Behind the fact that the radiation is able to produce biological damages there are certain factors with regard to the biological effects of the radiations that determine the boarding of the radioprotection topics.

  19. Enhanced surface functionality via plasma modification and plasma deposition techniques to create more biologically relevant materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Jeffrey C.

    Functionalizing nanoparticles and other unusually shaped substrates to create more biologically relevant materials has become central to a wide range of research programs. One of the primary challenges in this field is creating highly functionalized surfaces without modifying the underlying bulk material. Traditional wet chemistry techniques utilize thin film depositions to functionalize nanomaterials with oxygen and nitrogen containing functional groups, such as --OH and --NHx. These functional groups can serve to create surfaces that are amenable to cell adhesion or can act as reactive groups for further attachment of larger structures, such as macromolecules or antiviral agents. Additional layers, such as SiO2, are often added between the nanomaterial and the functionalized coating to act as a barrier films, adhesion layers, and to increase overall hydrophilicity. However, some wet chemistry techniques can damage the bulk material during processing. This dissertation examines the use of plasma processing as an alternative method for producing these highly functionalized surfaces on nanoparticles and polymeric scaffolds through the use of plasma modification and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition techniques. Specifically, this dissertation will focus on (1) plasma deposition of SiO2 barrier films on nanoparticle substrates; (2) surface functionalization of amine and alcohol groups through (a) plasma co-polymerization and (b) plasma modification; and (3) the design and construction of plasma hardware to facilitate plasma processing of nanoparticles and polymeric scaffolds. The body of work presented herein first examines the fabrication of composite nanoparticles by plasma processing. SiOxC y and hexylamine films were coated onto TiO2 nanoparticles to demonstrate enhanced water dispersion properties. Continuous wave and pulsed allyl alcohol plasmas were used to produce highly functionalized Fe2 O3 supported nanoparticles. Specifically, film composition was

  20. Application Of A New Semi-Empirical Model For Forming Limit Prediction Of Sheet Material Including Superposed Loads Of Bending And Shearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Christian; Liewald, Mathias; Schleich, Ralf; Sindel, Manfred

    2010-06-01

    The use of lightweight materials offers substantial strength and weight advantages in car body design. Unfortunately such kinds of sheet material are more susceptible to wrinkling, spring back and fracture during press shop operations. For characterization of capability of sheet material dedicated to deep drawing processes in the automotive industry, mainly Forming Limit Diagrams (FLD) are used. However, new investigations at the Institute for Metal Forming Technology have shown that High Strength Steel Sheet Material and Aluminum Alloys show increased formability in case of bending loads are superposed to stretching loads. Likewise, by superposing shearing on in plane uniaxial or biaxial tension formability changes because of materials crystallographic texture. Such mixed stress and strain conditions including bending and shearing effects can occur in deep-drawing processes of complex car body parts as well as subsequent forming operations like flanging. But changes in formability cannot be described by using the conventional FLC. Hence, for purpose of improvement of failure prediction in numerical simulation codes significant failure criteria for these strain conditions are missing. Considering such aspects in defining suitable failure criteria which is easy to implement into FEA a new semi-empirical model has been developed considering the effect of bending and shearing in sheet metals formability. This failure criterion consists of the combination of the so called cFLC (combined Forming Limit Curve), which considers superposed bending load conditions and the SFLC (Shear Forming Limit Curve), which again includes the effect of shearing on sheet metal's formability.

  1. Application Of A New Semi-Empirical Model For Forming Limit Prediction Of Sheet Material Including Superposed Loads Of Bending And Shearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Held, Christian; Liewald, Mathias; Schleich, Ralf; Sindel, Manfred

    2010-01-01

    The use of lightweight materials offers substantial strength and weight advantages in car body design. Unfortunately such kinds of sheet material are more susceptible to wrinkling, spring back and fracture during press shop operations. For characterization of capability of sheet material dedicated to deep drawing processes in the automotive industry, mainly Forming Limit Diagrams (FLD) are used. However, new investigations at the Institute for Metal Forming Technology have shown that High Strength Steel Sheet Material and Aluminum Alloys show increased formability in case of bending loads are superposed to stretching loads. Likewise, by superposing shearing on in plane uniaxial or biaxial tension formability changes because of materials crystallographic texture. Such mixed stress and strain conditions including bending and shearing effects can occur in deep-drawing processes of complex car body parts as well as subsequent forming operations like flanging. But changes in formability cannot be described by using the conventional FLC. Hence, for purpose of improvement of failure prediction in numerical simulation codes significant failure criteria for these strain conditions are missing. Considering such aspects in defining suitable failure criteria which is easy to implement into FEA a new semi-empirical model has been developed considering the effect of bending and shearing in sheet metals formability. This failure criterion consists of the combination of the so called cFLC (combined Forming Limit Curve), which considers superposed bending load conditions and the SFLC (Shear Forming Limit Curve), which again includes the effect of shearing on sheet metal's formability.

  2. A common basis for facilitated legitimate exchange of biological materials proposed by the European Culture Collections' Organisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Fritze

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Being charged with the task of accessioning and supplying of living microbiological material, microbial culture collections are institutions that play a central role between the interests of a variety of user communities. On the one side are the providers of living microbiological material, such as individual scientists, institutions and countries of origin and on the other side are the various kinds of recipients/users of cultures of microorganisms from academia and industry. Thus, providing access to high quality biological material and scientific services while at the same time observing donor countries' rights, intellectual property rights, biosafety and biosecurity aspects poses demanding challenges. E.g. donor countries rights relate to Article 15 of the Convention on Biological Diversity: "Contracting parties …. recognize the sovereign rights of states over their natural resources …. shall facilitate access to resources … and not impose restrictions that run counter to the aims of the Convention. Access to natural resources shall be by mutually agreed terms and subject to prior informed consent ..." The use of a proposed standard contract by culture collections is discussed as a way of contractually safeguarding the existing research commons, while observing the new rights established in the Convention on Biological Diversity as well as other existing and new legislation impacting on the accessibility of living microbial material.

  3. A 36 m SANS BATAN spectrometer (SMARTer) for materials science and biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edy Giri Rachman Putra

    2009-01-01

    structural investigations in the length scale of 1 - 100 nm in materials science and biology. (author)

  4. Preparation and certification of the Polish reference material Virginia Tobacco Leaves (CTA-VTL-2) for inorganic trace analysis including microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dybczynski, R.; Polkowska-Motrenko, H.; Samczynski, Z.; Szopa, Z.

    1997-01-01

    A new Polish certified reference material Virginia Tobacco Leaves (CTA-VTL-2) for inorganic trace analysis including microanalysis has been prepared. Certification of the candidate reference material was based on the world-wide interlaboratory comparison in which 60 laboratories from 18 countries, participated using various analytical methods and techniques. Data evaluation performed by means of the new multifunctional software package -SSQC. Recommended values were assigned for 33 and 'information' values for 10 elements, respectively. The validity of 'certified' values was confirmed for several elements using 'very accurate' methods developed in this Laboratory. (author)

  5. Preparation and certification of the Polish reference material Virginia Tobacco Leaves (CTA-VTL-2) for inorganic trace analysis including microanalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dybczynski, R.; Polkowska-Motrenko, H.; Samczynski, Z.; Szopa, Z.

    1997-12-31

    A new Polish certified reference material Virginia Tobacco Leaves (CTA-VTL-2) for inorganic trace analysis including microanalysis has been prepared. Certification of the candidate reference material was based on the world-wide interlaboratory comparison in which 60 laboratories from 18 countries, participated using various analytical methods and techniques. Data evaluation performed by means of the new multifunctional software package -SSQC. Recommended values were assigned for 33 and `information` values for 10 elements, respectively. The validity of `certified` values was confirmed for several elements using `very accurate` methods developed in this Laboratory. (author). 47 refs, 28 figs, 12 tabs.

  6. Night time cooling by ventilation or night sky radiation combined with in-room radiant cooling panels including phase change materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bourdakis, Eleftherios; Olesen, Bjarne W.; Grossule, Fabio

    constructed at the Technical University of Denmark, where the outside PVT panels are connected through a storage tank to in-room radiant ceiling panels. The radiant ceiling panels include phase change material (PCM) and embedded pipes for circulating water. Due to the phase change material it is possible...... depending on the sky clearness. This cooling power was enough to remove the stored heat and regenerate the ceiling panels. The validation simulation model results related to PCM were close to the corresponding results extracted from the experiment, while the results related to the production of cold water...

  7. Biological degradation of gas-filled composite materials on the base of polyethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoreva, E. A.; Kolesnikova, N. N.; Popov, A. A.; Olkhov, A. A.

    2017-12-01

    Gas-filled composite materials based on polyethylene were obtained. It was assumed that introduction of porosity in polyethylene will improve the biodegradability of synthetic materials. The morphological and structural changes were estimated, physical and mechanical properties, stability in water and soil of these materials were determined. It is stated that filling the polymer matrix with pores increases the ability to degrade in nature.

  8. PENGEMBANGAN HANDOUT BERBASIS KONTEKSTUAL PADA PELAJARAN BIOLOGI MATERI BIOTEKNOLOGI UNTUK SISWA KELAS XII SMK NEGERI 02 BATU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fega Rahmayani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The teaching learning activity in SMK is inappropriate with the purpose of teaching and learning in SMK, which the students are taught to be able to apply the materials in the real life. Teaching material is taken from the biology book of SMA that the content is theoretically, so the explanation on the material is unsuitable and not applicative that makes the student less in ability and skill for application in daily life. From the problem above, this research purpose on developing the contextual basic handout of the biological course in biotechnology material in SMK N 02 Batu.This research is developing research based on research and development by Sugiyono’s model that use a few developing steps, those are: (1 Potential and problem, (2 Collecting data, (3 Product design, (4 Validation design, (5 Design revision, (6 Try out the product, (7 Product revision. The data collecting methods is using validation from the expert of handout, material expert and try out to the study club. The technique of analyze data using quantitative and qualitative data. The result of quantitative data is the percentage of handout product value that classify in the handout quality and the result of qualitative data come from comment and advise of validator and try out in SMK.The result quality of the handout found that the developing contextual basic handout reach out the good quality after following the procedure of validation with percentage 80.90% and try out to the student that use the handout with percentage very good, 97.75% and get the positive respond from student with percentage 90.82%. From the whole of the contextual basic handout have a good quality and appropriate in use for teaching material of Biology in teaching learning process in SMK N 02 Batu.

  9. The Influence of Mechanical, and Material Factors on the Biological Adaptation Processes of the Femoral Bone Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasik A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The study covers some aspects of the issue of determination of mutual connections between the mechanical and material factors, as well the biological implant adaptation processes. The main objective of the operation was adopted to develop models of cementless hip prosthesis company Fitmore Zimmer, taking into account the heterogeneity of material properties of bone tissue. These models were loaded in particular stages of the human gate and then they were used for the analysis of stress changes. The identification of the relations between the mechanical properties of osseous tissue required the conducting of computer simulations by means of the Finite Element Method (FEM.

  10. Effects of different radio-opacifying agents on physicochemical and biological properties of a novel root-end filling material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yao-Zhong; Lü, Xiao-Ying; Liu, Gen-Di

    2018-01-01

    Radio-opacity is an essential attribute of ideal root-end filling materials because it is important for clinicians to observe root canal filling and to facilitate the follow-up instructions. The novel root-end filling material (NRFM) has good cytocompatibility and physicochemical properties but low intrinsic radio-opacity value. To improve its radio-opacity value, three novel radio-opaque root-end filling materials (NRRFMs) were developed by adding barium sulphate (NRFM-Ba), bismuth trioxide (NRFM-Bi) and zirconium dioxide (NRFM-Zr) to NRFM, respectively. The purpose of this study was to identify the suitable radio-opacifier for NRFM through evaluating their physicochemical and biological properties, in comparison with NRFM and glass ionomer cement (GIC). NRRFMs were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry (FTIR). Physicochemical properties including setting time, compressive strength, porosity, pH variation, solubility, washout resistance, contact angle and radiopacity were investigated. Cytocompatibility of both freshly mixed and set NRRFMs was investigated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity assay and alizarin red staining were used to investigate the osteogenic differentiation potential of NRFM-Zr. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA (pH variation, solubility and ALP activity) and one-way ANOVA (for the other variables). (1) NRRFMs were primarily composed of hydroxyapatite, calcium carboxylate salt and the corresponding radio-opacity agents (barium sulphate, bismuth trioxide or zirconium dioxide). (2) Besides similar physicochemical properties in terms of setting time, pH variation, solubility, washout resistance and contact angle to NRFM, NRFM-Bi and NRFM-Zr exhibited lower porosity and greater compressive strength after being set for 7 days and their radio-opacity were greater than the 3 mm aluminium thickness specified in ISO

  11. A review of cutting mechanics and modeling techniques for biological materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takabi, Behrouz; Tai, Bruce L

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive survey on the modeling of tissue cutting, including both soft tissue and bone cutting processes. In order to achieve higher accuracy in tissue cutting, as a critical process in surgical operations, the meticulous modeling of such processes is important in particular for surgical tool development and analysis. This review paper is focused on the mechanical concepts and modeling techniques utilized to simulate tissue cutting such as cutting forces and chip morphology. These models are presented in two major categories, namely soft tissue cutting and bone cutting. Fracture toughness is commonly used to describe tissue cutting while Johnson-Cook material model is often adopted for bone cutting in conjunction with finite element analysis (FEA). In each section, the most recent mathematical and computational models are summarized. The differences and similarities among these models, challenges, novel techniques, and recommendations for future work are discussed along with each section. This review is aimed to provide a broad and in-depth vision of the methods suitable for tissue and bone cutting simulations. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Combination Antimicrobial Nanocomposite Materials for Neutralization of Biological Threat Agents (PREPRINT)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eby, D. M; Farrington, Karen E; Johnson, Glenn R

    2008-01-01

    .... We are exploring approaches that integrate molecules of the innate immune system and nanoscale inorganic materials in order to create novel antimicrobial composites and self-sterilizing coatings...

  13. Enhanced Electromagnetic and Chemical/Biological Sensing. Properties of Atomic Cluster-Derived Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schatz, George

    2003-01-01

    The Center for Atomic Clusters-derived Materials performed a broad range of research concerned with synthesizing, characterizing and utilizing atomic and molecular clusters, nanoparticles and nanomaterial...

  14. Multi-objective optimization of a compact pressurized water nuclear reactor computational model for biological shielding design using innovative materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tunes, M.A., E-mail: matheus.tunes@usp.br [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Escola Politécnica da Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes, 2463 – CEP 05508 – 030 São Paulo (Brazil); Oliveira, C.R.E. de, E-mail: cassiano@unm.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, The University of New Mexico, Farris Engineering Center, 221, Albuquerque, NM 87131-1070 (United States); Schön, C.G., E-mail: schoen@usp.br [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Escola Politécnica da Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes, 2463 – CEP 05508 – 030 São Paulo (Brazil)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Use of two n-γ transport codes leads to optimized model of compact nuclear reactor. • It was possible to safely reduce both weight and volume of the biological shielding. • Best configuration obtained by using new composites for both γ and n attenuation. - Abstract: The aim of the present work is to develop a computational model of a compact pressurized water nuclear reactor (PWR) to investigate the use of innovative materials to enhance the biological shielding effectiveness. Two radiation transport codes were used: the first one – MCNP – for the PWR design and the GEM/EVENT to simulate (in a 1D slab) the behavior of several materials and shielding thickness on gamma and neutron radiation. Additionally MATLAB Optimization Toolbox was used to provide new geometric configurations of the slab aiming at reducing the volume and weight of the walls by means of a cost/objective function. It is demonstrated in the reactor model that the dose rate outside biological shielding has been reduced by one order of magnitude for the optimized model compared with the initial configuration. Volume and weight of the shielding walls were also reduced. The results indicated that one-dimensional deterministic code to reach an optimized geometry and test materials, combined with a three-dimensional model of a compact nuclear reactor in a stochastic code, is a fast and efficient procedure to test shielding performance and optimization before the experimental assessment. A major outcome of this research is that composite materials (ECOMASS 2150TU96) may replace (with advantages) traditional shielding materials without jeopardizing the nuclear power plant safety assurance.

  15. Wood-derived materials for green electronics, biological Devices, and energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongli Zhu; Wei Luo; Peter N. Ciesielski; Zhiqiang Fang; Junyong Zhu; Gunnar Henriksson; Michael E. Himmel; Liangbing Hu

    2016-01-01

    With the arising of global climate change and resource shortage, in recent years, increased attention has been paid to environmentally friendly materials. Trees are sustainable and renewable materials, which give us shelter and oxygen and remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Trees are a primary resource that human society depends upon every day, for example,...

  16. Merton and Ziman's modes of science: the case of biological and similar material transfer agreements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez, V.F.

    2007-01-01

    This paper makes a connection between recent studies on research materials exchange and its effect on the progress of science. Academia fears that scientific development could be hampered by the privatised practices of research material exchange. Since post-academic science represents a sufficient

  17. Evaluation of biological activities and chemical constituent of storage medicinal plant materials used as a traditional medicine in Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishnu Prasad Pandey

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The main aims of the study were to evaluate the phytochemicals, antioxidant, antibacterial and chemical constituents of storage medicinal plant materials used as a traditional medicine in Nepal. Methods: Phytochemical screening, total phenolic content, total flavonoid content, antibacterial activities, anti-oxidant assay of the crude extract (water, methanol, n-hexane and acetone were carried out to identify the biological activities and phytonutrients present in the different extract. The chemical constituents present in the crude extract were analyzed using the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC equipped with UV detector. Results: Evaluated medicinal plant materials were found to have diverse phytonutrients. Results revealed that methanol extract of Pakhanved and Jethimadhu have highest total flavonoids and polyphenol content. Among the selected medicinal plant materials Jethimadhu extract revealed the highest antioxidant activities. Furthermore, evaluated medicinal plants extract were found to exert a range of in vitro growth inhibition activity against both gram positive and gram negative species. The highest antibacterial activities were observed in the case of methanol extract, whereas, least activity was observed with the hexane extract. HPLC analysis of the acetone extract of Jethimadhu reveals the presence of diosmetin. Conclusions: Our result revealed that among the five evaluated medicinal plant materials, Jethimadhu extract revealed biological activities and exhibits a higher amount of polyphenol and flavonoid content. [J Complement Med Res 2017; 6(4.000: 369-377

  18. Dynamic Processes in Biology, Chemistry, and Materials Science: Opportunities for UltraFast Transmission Electron Microscopy - Workshop Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabius, Bernd C.; Browning, Nigel D.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Diehl, Barbara L.; Stach, Eric A.

    2012-07-25

    mission. This workshop built on previous workshops and included three breakout sessions identifying scientific challenges in biology, biogeochemistry, catalysis, and materials science frontier areas of fundamental science that underpin energy and environmental science that would significantly benefit from ultrafast transmission electron microscopy (UTEM). In addition, the current status of time-resolved electron microscopy was examined, and the technologies that will enable future advances in spatio-temporal resolution were identified in a fourth breakout session.

  19. Digital Learning Material for Student-Directed Model Building in Molecular Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aegerter-Wilmsen, Tinri; Coppens, Marjolijn; Janssen, Fred; Hartog, Rob; Bisseling, Ton

    2005-01-01

    The building of models to explain data and make predictions constitutes an important goal in molecular biology research. To give students the opportunity to practice such model building, two digital cases had previously been developed in which students are guided to build a model step by step. In this article, the development and initial…

  20. Development of a Free-Electron Laser Center and Research in Medicine, Biology and Materials Science,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-14

    where enhanced nonproton ion movements can be observed during the photocycle ( Marinetti and Mauzerall, 1986). We do not have the possibility to measure...Biological Membranes. C.L. 17 Bolis, E.J.M. Helmreich and H. Passow, editors. Alan R. Liss Inc., NY 39-50. Marinetti , T., and D. Mauzerall 1986. Large

  1. Determination of carbon-14 content in biological materials and its application to vinegars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grau Malonda, A.; Martin-Casallo, M.T.; Chereguini, S.

    1976-01-01

    A radiometric method for the determination of synthetic acetic acid in the presence of biological vinegar has been developed. The activity of 1 4C is measured by liquid scintillation counting and the sensitivity is optimized by taking into account the composition of several liquid scintillation solutions and the concentration of their components. (author) [es

  2. Development and applications of photosensitive device systems to studies of biological and organic materials. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The purpose was to develop and improve appropriate experimental techniques to the point where they could be applied to specific classes of biological problems. Progress is reported in the following areas: (1) area detectors; (2) x-ray diffraction studies of membranes; (3) electron transfer in loosely coupled systems; (4) bioluminescence and fluorescence; and (5) sonoluminescence

  3. ANALISIS KUALITAS PERAIRAN SUNGAI RAMAN DESA PUJODADI TRIMURJO SEBAGAI SUMBER BELAJAR BIOLOGI SMA PADA MATERI EKOSISTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Sutanto

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available River is one of fresh water ecosystem which is very important in human life since it is the most practical and economical source in fulfilling domestic and industrial needs. Therefore, it should meet the quality standards. The research objectives were: 1 knowing the quality of waterway in Raman River, Pujodadi, Trimurjo, based on the physical, chemical and biological aspects; 2 turning the information intoa Biology learning source on Ecosystem subject. The data were directly observed in the river by measuring the physical factors (temperature, stream, turbidity; chemical factors (pH, DO; and biological factor (macro invertebrates. The results were: temperature 24-29oC ; stream 0.3 – 0.6 mm/s; turbidity 33.5-3.7 NTU; pH 4.1-5.2; and DO 2.07-2.35 ml/I. Furthermore, micro vertebrates found were; a Plecoptra; b Tricoptra; c Mollusca, d Ephemeroptra; and e Hemiptra. In each station, they were classified as insects and non-insects. The insects found were: 1 Odonata; 2 Tricoptra; 3 Ephemeroptra; 4 Plecoptra. Based on those parameters, the waterway quality was qualified as light wasted. The results can be turned into student worksheet as a Biology learning source, especially on Ecosystem subject.

  4. A comprehensive assessment protocol including patient reported outcomes, physical tests, and biological sampling in newly diagnosed patients with head and neck cancer: is it feasible?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nieuwenhuizen, A.J.; Buffart, L.M.; Smit, J.H.; Brakenhoff, R.H.; Braakhuis, B.J.; de Bree, R.; Leemans, C.; Verdonck-de Leeuw, I.M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Large cohort studies are needed taking into account cancer-related, personal, biological, psychobehavioral, and lifestyle-related factors, to guide future research to improve treatment and supportive care. We aimed to evaluate the feasibility of a comprehensive baseline assessment of a

  5. Estimation of biological chromophores using diffuse optical spectroscopy: benefit of extending the UV-VIS wavelength range to include 1000 to 1600 nm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nachabé, Rami; Hendriks, Benno H. W.; van der Voort, Marjolein; Desjardins, Adrien E.; Sterenborg, Henricus J. C. M.

    2010-01-01

    With an optical fiber probe, we acquired spectra from swine tissue between 500 and 1600 nm by combining a silicon and an InGaAs spectrometer. The concentrations of the biological chromophores were estimated by fitting a mathematical model derived from diffusion theory. The advantage of our technique

  6. Estimation of biological chromophores using diffuse optical spectroscopy: Benefit of extending the UV-VIS wavelength range to include 1000 to 1600 nm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Nachabé (Rami); B.H.W. Hendriks (Benno); M. van der Voort (Marjolein); A.E. Desjardins (Adrien); H.J.C.M. Sterenborg (Dick)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractWith an optical fiber probe, we acquired spectra from swine tissue between 500 and 1600 nm by combining a silicon and an InGaAs spectrometer. The concentrations of the biological chromophores were estimated by fitting a mathematical model derived from diffusion theory. The advantage of

  7. GGVS. Ordinance on road transport of hazardous materials, including the European agreement on international road transport of hazardous materials (ADR), in their wording. Annexes A and B. Ordinances regarding exceptions from GGVS and from the ordinance on rail transport of hazardous materials, GGVE. Reasons. Selected guidelines. List of materials. 6. rev. and enlarged ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridder, K.

    1990-01-01

    The brochure contains the following texts: (1) Ordinance on road transport of hazardous materials (GGVS), including the European agreement on international road transport of hazardous materials (ADR), as of 1990: Skeleton ordinance, annexes A and B, reasons given for the first version, and for the first amendment in 1988, execution guidelines - RS 002 (guidelines for executing the ordinance on road transport of hazardous materials, with catalogue of penalties), guidelines for drawing up written instructions for the event of accidents - RS 006, guiding principles for the training of vehicle conductors; (2) ordinance regarding exceptions from the ordinance on road transport of hazardous materials; (3) ordinance regarding exceptions from the ordinance on rail transport of hazardous materials; (4) selected guidelines: Technical guidelines TR IBC K 001, TRS 003, TRS 004, TRS 005, TRS 006; (5) listing of materials and objects governed by the ordinance on hazardous materials transport; (6) catalogue of penalties relative to road transport of hazardous materials. (orig./HP) [de

  8. Portable magnetic tweezers device enables visualization of the three-dimensional microscale deformation of soft biological materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yali; Lin, Jun; Meschewski, Ryan; Watson, Erin; Valentine, Megan T

    2011-07-01

    We have designed and built a magnetic tweezers device that enables the application of calibrated stresses to soft materials while simultaneously measuring their microscale deformation using confocal microscopy. Unlike previous magnetic tweezers designs, our device is entirely portable, allowing easy use on microscopes in core imaging facilities or in collaborators' laboratories. The imaging capabilities of the microscope are unimpaired, enabling the 3-D structures of fluorescently labeled materials to be precisely determined under applied load. With this device, we can apply a large range of forces (~1-1200 pN) over micron-scale contact areas to beads that are either embedded within 3-D matrices or attached to the surface of thin slab gels. To demonstrate the usefulness of this instrument, we have studied two important and biologically relevant materials: polyacrylamide-based hydrogel films typical of those used in cell traction force microscopy, and reconstituted networks of microtubules, essential cytoskeletal filaments.

  9. Biological effects of emissions from resistance spot welding of zinc-coated material after controlled exposure of healthy human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gube, Monika; Kraus, Thomas; Lenz, Klaus; Reisgen, Uwe; Brand, Peter

    2014-06-01

    Do emissions from a resistance spot welding process of zinc-coated materials induce systemic inflammation in healthy subjects after exposure for 6 hours? Twelve healthy male subjects were exposed once for 6 hours either to filtered ambient air or to welding fume from resistance spot welding of zinc-coated material (mass concentration approximately 100 μg m). Biological effects were measured before, after, and 24 hours after exposure. At the concentrations used in this study, however, the suspected properties of ultrafine particles did not lead to systemic inflammation as reflected by high-sensitivity C-reactive protein or other endpoint parameters under consideration. Ultrafine particles from a resistance spot welding process of zinc-covered materials with a number concentration of about 10 cm and a mass concentration of about 100 μg m did not induce systemic inflammation.

  10. BIOLOGICAL FULL VALUE OF MEAT RAW MATERIALS OF PIGS IN THE TECHNOGENIC POLLUTION CONDITIONS OF TERRITORIES

    OpenAIRE

    A. G. Isaeva*, A S. Krivonogova, I. M. Donnik, I. A. Shkuratova, L. I. Drozdova, E. N. Bespamyatnykh

    2017-01-01

    In article influence of technogenic pollution of agricultural territories by heavy metals on quality of meat raw materials of pigs is described. Also research results of heavy metals accumulation in bodies and tissues of pigs, their influences on amino-acid composition of meat raw materials, intensity of lipid peroxydation processes, features of a muscular tissue morphogenesis are given in article. Keywords: heavy metals, pigs, liver, muscular tissue, amino-acid structure, malondialdehyde (MD...

  11. Potential of the PIGE method in the analysis of biological and mineral materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Havranek, V.

    2006-01-01

    A possible application of the PIGE method for the analysis of the biological and mineral samples has been tested using a 3.5 MeV Van de Graaff accelerator. The limits of detection of 4 mg/kg for fluorine, 10 mg/kg for aluminium and 200 mg/kg for phosphorus were achieved with a 3.15 MeV proton beam (8 mm in diameter, 20 nA current and 1000 s irradiation time). The PIGE method was found to be a suitable method for the determination of fluorine in the samples analyzed. With this technique, total fluorine in the sample can be quantitated without any chemical treatment. In the analysis of the phosphorus in thick biological samples, PIGE can compete with PIXE and is probably less sensitive to matrix effects and spectra fitting, which may bring about a higher accuracy of the results

  12. Comparative study of the efficacy of chemically and biologically extracted humic substances from various materials on the development of Poinsettia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgieva, Teodora; Metodieva, Tsvetelina; Again, Nadia; Angelova, Gergana; Popova, Todorka; Chakalov, Konstantin; Savov, Valentin

    2017-04-01

    There is a lot of research proving the positive influence of humic substances on the development of plants in combination with soil isolates such as Pseudomonas and Bacillus. Humic substances obtained by chemical extraction and biosolubilization of various sources of organic materials were tested for their effect on the growth of Poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima) cultivar „Mirat red". The test included the following variants: 1. Humic substances chemically extracted from "Humintech" leonardite (Ht); 2. Humic substances obtained from "Humintech" leonardite by biosolubilization with Pseudomonas putida (Pp) and Bacillus pasteurii (Bp) (Ht Bp Pp); 3. Humic substances chemically extracted from "Sachalin" leonardite; 4. Humic substances obtained from "Sachalin" leonardite by biosolubilization with Pseudomonas putida (Pp) and Bacillus pasteurii (Bp) (Sachalin Bp Pp); 5. Fulvic substances exracted after biosolubilization of "Staniantsy" lignite with Pseudomonas putida (Pp) and Bacillus pasteurii (Bp) (FB Plantagra); 6. Humic substances exracted after biosolubilization of "Staniantsy" lignite with Pseudomonas putida (Pp) and Bacillus pasteurii (Bp) (Lignohumate); 7. Biohumax - commercial product of "Project Studio" EOOD, Varna Bulgaria; 8.Vermicompost inoculated with Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus pasteurii (Strong BG); 9. Control - Nutrient solution (background of nutrition). The test results indicate that as a result of microbial activity active bacterial compounds are probably present in the composition of the extracted humates, thus affecting the formation of red leaves.The application of all tested substances results in red leaves area increase of treated plants compared to the control plants, except the humates chemically extracted from Humintech leonardite. The ration between humic and fulvic acids determines the effect on the treated plants. The biosolubilized preparations contain more fulvic acids. Plants treated with them form up to three times more

  13. Analytical approaches to determination of carnitine in biological materials, foods and dietary supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dąbrowska, Monika; Starek, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    l-Carnitine is a vitamin-like amino acid derivative, which is an essential factor in fatty acid metabolism as acyltransferase cofactor and in energy production processes, such as interconversion in the mechanisms of regulation of cetogenesis and termogenesis, and it is also used in the therapy of primary and secondary deficiency, and in other diseases. The determination of carnitine and acyl-carnitines can provide important information about inherited or acquired metabolic disorders, and for monitoring the biochemical effect of carnitine therapy. The endogenous carnitine pool in humans is maintained by biosynthesis and absorption of carnitine from the diet. Carnitine has one asymmetric carbon giving two stereoisomers d and l, but only the l form has a biological positive effect, thus chiral recognition of l-carnitine enantiomers is extremely important in biological, chemical and pharmaceutical sciences. In order to get more insight into carnitine metabolism and synthesis, a sensitive analysis for the determination of the concentration of free carnitine, carnitine esters and the carnitine precursors is required. Carnitine has been investigated in many biochemical, pharmacokinetic, metabolic and toxicokinetic studies and thus many analytical methods have been developed and published for the determination of carnitine in foods, dietary supplements, pharmaceutical formulations, biological tissues and body fluid. The analytical procedures presented in this review have been validated in terms of basic parameters (linearity, limit of detection, limit of quantitation, sensitivity, accuracy, and precision). This article presented the impact of different analytical techniques, and provides an overview of applications that address a diverse array of pharmaceutical and biological questions and samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Development and application of an ultratrace method for speciation of organotin compounds in cryogenically archived and homogenized biological materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Point, David; Davis, W.C.; Christopher, Steven J.; Ellisor, Michael B.; Pugh, Rebecca S.; Becker, Paul R. [Hollings Marine Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Analytical Chemistry Division, Charleston, SC (United States); Donard, Olivier F.X. [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique BioInorganique et Environnement UMR 5034 du CNRS, Pau (France); Porter, Barbara J.; Wise, Stephen A. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Analytical Chemistry Division, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    2007-04-15

    An accurate, ultra-sensitive and robust method for speciation of mono, di, and tributyltin (MBT, DBT, and TBT) by speciated isotope-dilution gas chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (SID-GC-ICPMS) has been developed for quantification of butyltin concentrations in cryogenic biological materials maintained in an uninterrupted cryo-chain from storage conditions through homogenization and bottling. The method significantly reduces the detection limits, to the low pg g{sup -1} level (as Sn), and was validated by using the European reference material (ERM) CE477, mussel tissue, produced by the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements. It was applied to three different cryogenic biological materials - a fresh-frozen mussel tissue (SRM 1974b) together with complex materials, a protein-rich material (whale liver control material, QC03LH03), and a lipid-rich material (whale blubber, SRM 1945) containing up to 72% lipids. The commutability between frozen and freeze-dried materials with regard to spike equilibration/interaction, extraction efficiency, and the absence of detectable transformations was carefully investigated by applying complementary methods and by varying extraction conditions and spiking strategies. The inter-method results enabled assignment of reference concentrations of butyltins in cryogenic SRMs and control materials for the first time. The reference concentrations of MBT, DBT, and TBT in SRM 1974b were 0.92 {+-} 0.06, 2.7 {+-} 0.4, and 6.58 {+-} 0.19 ng g{sup -1} as Sn (wet-mass), respectively; in SRM 1945 they were 0.38 {+-} 0.06, 1.19 {+-} 0.26, and 3.55 {+-} 0.44 ng g{sup -1}, respectively, as Sn (wet-mass). In QC03LH03, DBT and TBT concentrations were 30.0 {+-} 2.7 and 2.26 {+-} 0.38 ng g{sup -1} as Sn (wet-mass). The concentration range of butyltins in these materials is one to three orders of magnitude lower than in ERM CE477. This study demonstrated that cryogenically processed and stored biological materials are

  15. Dense Plasma Focus: physics and applications (radiation material science, single-shot disclosure of hidden illegal objects, radiation biology and medicine, etc.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribkov, V. A.; Miklaszewski, R.; Paduch, M.; Zielinska, E.; Chernyshova, M.; Pisarczyk, T.; Pimenov, V. N.; Demina, E. V.; Niemela, J.; Crespo, M.-L.; Cicuttin, A.; Tomaszewski, K.; Sadowski, M. J.; Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Pytel, K.; Zawadka, A.; Giannini, G.; Longo, F.; Talab, A.; Ul'yanenko, S. E.

    2015-03-01

    The paper presents some outcomes obtained during the year of 2013 of the activity in the frame of the International Atomic Energy Agency Co-ordinated research project "Investigations of Materials under High Repetition and Intense Fusion-Relevant Pulses". The main results are related to the effects created at the interaction of powerful pulses of different types of radiation (soft and hard X-rays, hot plasma and fast ion streams, neutrons, etc. generated in Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) facilities) with various materials including those that are counted as perspective ones for their use in future thermonuclear reactors. Besides we discuss phenomena observed at the irradiation of biological test objects. We examine possible applications of nanosecond powerful pulses of neutrons to the aims of nuclear medicine and for disclosure of hidden illegal objects. Special attention is devoted to discussions of a possibility to create extremely large and enormously diminutive DPF devices and probabilities of their use in energetics, medicine and modern electronics.

  16. EFFECT OF MIXING CONDITIONS ON FLOCCULATION KINETICS OF WASTEWATERS CONTAINING PROTEINS AND OTHER BIOLOGICAL COMPOUNDS USING FIBROUS MATERIALS AND POLYELECTROLYTES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. CHEN

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available The application of a combined system of a polyelectrolyte, carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC, and highly fibrillated fibrous materials, cellulose triacetate fibrets (CTF, for the recovery of proteins and other biological compounds from model and actual biological systems has been demonstrated . In the present work, reaction batches were scaled-up to a one-liter agitated vessel, with a standard configuration. The effect of mixing conditions on the adsorption and flocculation process was studied. It was observed that flocculation time was very fast, occurring within the period of polymer addition. Long term shearing did not result in floc breakage and the values of percentage light transmission and protein concentration of the final filtrate remained the same during the incubation period. Increasing the shear rate resulted in improved process efficiency, up to an optimum value, above which performance was poorer. Perikinetic and orthokinetic rate parameters were calculated and results analyzed in view of these parameters.

  17. Evaluation of natural materials as exogenous carbon sources for biological treatment of low carbon-to-nitrogen wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Godínez, Juan; Beltrán-Hernández, Icela; Álvarez-Hernández, Alejandro; Coronel-Olivares, Claudia; Contreras-López, Elizabeth; Quezada-Cruz, Maribel; Vázquez-Rodríguez, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    In the bacterial processes involved in the mitigation of nitrogen pollution, an adequately high carbon-to-nitrogen (C : N) ratio is key to sustain denitrification. We evaluated three natural materials (woodchips, barley grains, and peanut shells) as carbon sources for low C : N wastewater. The amount of organic matter released from these materials to aqueous media was evaluated, as well as their pollution swapping potential by measuring the release of total Kjeldahl nitrogen, N-NH4 (+), NO2 (-), and NO3 (-), and total phosphorous. Barley grains yielded the highest amount of organic matter, which also showed to be the most easily biodegradable. Woodchips and peanut shells released carbon rather steadily and so they would not require frequent replenishment from biological reactors. These materials produced eluates with lower concentrations of nutrients than the leachates from barley grains. However, as woodchips yielded lower amounts of suspended solids, they constitute an adequate exogenous source for the biological treatment of carbon-deficient effluents.

  18. Evaluation of Natural Materials as Exogenous Carbon Sources for Biological Treatment of Low Carbon-to-Nitrogen Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ramírez-Godínez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the bacterial processes involved in the mitigation of nitrogen pollution, an adequately high carbon-to-nitrogen (C : N ratio is key to sustain denitrification. We evaluated three natural materials (woodchips, barley grains, and peanut shells as carbon sources for low C : N wastewater. The amount of organic matter released from these materials to aqueous media was evaluated, as well as their pollution swapping potential by measuring the release of total Kjeldahl nitrogen, N-NH4+, NO2-, and NO3-, and total phosphorous. Barley grains yielded the highest amount of organic matter, which also showed to be the most easily biodegradable. Woodchips and peanut shells released carbon rather steadily and so they would not require frequent replenishment from biological reactors. These materials produced eluates with lower concentrations of nutrients than the leachates from barley grains. However, as woodchips yielded lower amounts of suspended solids, they constitute an adequate exogenous source for the biological treatment of carbon-deficient effluents.

  19. Graphene and graphene-like two-denominational materials based fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assays for biological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Feng; Lyu, Jing; Shi, Jingyu; Yang, Mo

    2017-03-15

    In the past decades, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) has been applied in many biological applications to reveal the biological information at the nanoscale. Recently, graphene and graphene-like two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials started to be used in FRET assays as donors or acceptors including graphene oxide (GO), graphene quantum dot (GQD), graphitic-carbon nitride nanosheets (g-C 3 N 4 ) and transition metal dichalcogenides (e.g. MoS 2 , MnO 2, and WS 2 ). Due to the remarkable properties such as large surface to volume ratio, tunable energy band, photoluminescence and excellent biocompatibility, these 2D nanomaterials based FRET assays have shown great potential in various biological applications. This review summarizes the recent development of graphene and graphene-like 2D nanomaterials based FRET assays in applications of biosensing, bioimaging, and drug delivery monitoring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A New Approach to Studying Biological and Soft Materials Using Focused Ion Beam Scanning Electron Microscopy (FIB SEM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stokes, D J; Morrissey, F; Lich, B H

    2006-01-01

    Over the last decade techniques such as confocal light microscopy, in combination with fluorescent labelling, have helped biologists and life scientists to study biological architectures at tissue and cell level in great detail. Meanwhile, obtaining information at very small length scales is possible with the combination of sample preparation techniques and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is well known for the determination of surface characteristics and morphology. However, the desire to understand the three dimensional relationships of meso-scale hierarchies has led to the development of advanced microscopy techniques, to give a further complementary approach. A focused ion beam (FIB) can be used as a nano-scalpel and hence allows us to reveal internal microstructure in a site-specific manner. Whilst FIB instruments have been used to study and verify the three-dimensional architecture of man made materials, SEM and FIB technologies have now been brought together in a single instrument representing a powerful combination for the study of biological specimens and soft materials. We demonstrate the use of FIB SEM to study three-dimensional relationships for a range of length scales and materials, from small-scale cellular structures to the larger scale interactions between biomedical materials and tissues. FIB cutting of heterogeneous mixtures of hard and soft materials, resulting in a uniform cross-section, has proved to be of particular value since classical preparation methods tend to introduce artefacts. Furthermore, by appropriate selection, we can sequentially cross-section to create a series of 'slices' at specific intervals. 3D reconstruction software can then be used to volume-render information from the 2D slices, enabling us to immediately see the spatial relationships between microstructural components

  1. Synthesis and biological evaluation of PMMA/MMT nanocomposite as denture base material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Junping; Su, Qiang; Wang, Chen; Cheng, Gang; Zhu, Ran; Shi, Jin; Yao, Kangde

    2011-04-01

    Inorganic-polymer nanocomposites are of significant interest for emerging materials due to their improved properties and unique combination of properties. Poly (methylmethacrylate) (PMMA)/montmorillonite (MMT) nanocomposites were prepared by in situ suspension polymerization with dodecylamine used as MMT-modifier. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to characterize the structures of the nanocomposites. Cytotoxicity test, hemolysis test, acute systemic toxicity test, oral mucous membrane irritation test, guinea-pig maximization test and mouse bone-marrow micronucleus test were used to evaluate the biocompatibility of PMMA/MMT nanocomposites. The results indicated that an exfoliated nanocomposite was achieved, and the resulting nanocomposites exhibited excellent biocompatibility as denture base material and had potential application in dental materials.

  2. Comparison of Principal Component Analysis and Linear Discriminant Analysis applied to classification of excitation-emission matrices of the selected biological material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Leśkiewicz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Quality of two linear methods (PCA and LDA applied to reduce dimensionality of feature analysis is compared and efficiency of their algorithms in classification of the selected biological materials according to their excitation-emission fluorescence matrices is examined. It has been found that LDA method reduces the dimensions (or a number of significant variables more effectively than PCA method. A relatively good discrimination within the examined biological material has been obtained with the use of LDA algorithm.[b]Keywords[/b]: Feature Analysis, Fluorescence Spectroscopy, Biological Material Classification

  3. Environmental Impact Assessment of a School Building in Iceland Using LCA-Including the Effect of Long Distance Transport of Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nargessadat Emami

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Buildings are the key components of urban areas and society as a complex system. A life cycle assessment was applied to estimate the environmental impacts of the resources applied in the building envelope, floor slabs, and interior walls of the Vættaskóli-Engi building in Reykjavik, Iceland. The scope of this study included four modules of extraction and transportation of raw material to the manufacturing site, production of the construction materials, and transport to the building site, as described in the standard EN 15804. The total environmental effects of the school building in terms of global warming potential, ozone depletion potential, human toxicity, acidification, and eutrophication were calculated. The total global warming potential impact was equal to 255 kg of CO2 eq/sqm, which was low compared to previous studies and was due to the limited system boundary of the current study. The effect of long-distance overseas transport of materials was noticeable in terms of acidification (25% and eutrophication (31% while it was negligible in other impact groups. The results also concluded that producing the cement in Iceland caused less environmental impact in all five impact categories compared to the case in which the cement was imported from Germany. The major contribution of this work is that the environmental impacts of different plans for domestic production or import of construction materials to Iceland can be precisely assessed in order to identify effective measures to move towards a sustainable built environment in Iceland, and also to provide consistent insights for stakeholders.

  4. Biological cell as a soft magnetoelectric material: Elucidating the physical mechanisms underpinning the detection of magnetic fields by animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krichen, S.; Liu, L.; Sharma, P.

    2017-10-01

    Sharks, birds, bats, turtles, and many other animals can detect magnetic fields. Aside from using this remarkable ability to exploit the terrestrial magnetic field map to sense direction, a subset is also able to implement a version of the so-called geophysical positioning system. How do these animals detect magnetic fields? The answer to this rather deceptively simple question has proven to be quite elusive. The currently prevalent theories, while providing interesting insights, fall short of explaining several aspects of magnetoreception. For example, minute magnetic particles have been detected in magnetically sensitive animals. However, how is the detected magnetic field converted into electrical signals given any lack of experimental evidence for relevant electroreceptors? In principle, a magnetoelectric material is capable of converting magnetic signals into electricity (and vice versa). This property, however, is rare and restricted to a rather small set of exotic hard crystalline materials. Indeed, such elements have never been detected in the animals studied so far. In this work we quantitatively outline the conditions under which a biological cell may detect a magnetic field and convert it into electrical signals detectable by biological cells. Specifically, we prove the existence of an overlooked strain-mediated mechanism and show that most biological cells can act as nontrivial magnetoelectric materials provided that the magnetic permeability constant is only slightly more than that of a vacuum. The enhanced magnetic permeability is easily achieved by small amounts of magnetic particles that have been experimentally detected in magnetosensitive animals. Our proposed mechanism appears to explain most of the experimental observations related to the physical basis of magnetoreception.

  5. The use of a single technique for the separation and determination of actinides in biological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camera, V.; Giubileo.

    1975-01-01

    For the radiotoxicological survey of workers exposed to different types of alpha-emitting contaminants, a procedure was developed which permits the estimate of Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, Am and Cm in biological samples with a single technique. The radionuclides are extracted on a column by tri-n-octylphosphine oxide and separated by elution at different pH values. Afterwards, the quantitative determinations are done by physical methods (alpha counting or spectrometry). In the case of an accident it is possible to use a simplification of the procedure (extraction in a beaker) for checks. A procedure for the rapid determination of actinides in faeces and in nasal secretions is described

  6. Determination of trace elements in Brazilian rice grains and in biological reference materials by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maihara, V.A.; Vasconcellos, M.B.A.

    1989-01-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis was applied to the determination of the elements Na, K, Br, As, Rb, Zn, Co, Fe and Sc in Brazilian rice samples and in biological standards. Hg and Se concentrations were determined by using a simple radiochemical separation. The chemical procedure was carried out by means of distillation of Hg and Se in HBr medium and subsequent precipitation of selenium by sodium methabissulfide and mercury by thioacetamide. The accuracy of the instrumental and radiochemical methods was evaluated by means of analysis of the Reference Materials NBS-Bovine Liver, Bowen's Kale and NBS-Rice Flour. (author) [pt

  7. An accurate method for the determination of copper in biological materials by neutron activation analysis and extraction chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dybczynski, R.; Maleszewska, H.; Wasek, M.

    1985-01-01

    Distribution coefficients of 14 elements between LIX 70 in toluene and aqueous 1M NaNOsub(3) solution containing varying concentrations of HCl or suitable buffer, respectively, were determined by batch equilibration. It was shown that very selective separations of Cu from other elements can be achieved on columns with LIX 70 supported on Bio-Beads SM-1. Highly accurate and precise method for the determination of trace amounts of Cu in biological materials was devised by combining NAA with extraction chromatography. Results of copper determination in NBS 1570 (Spinach), IAEA H-4 (Animal muscle) and IAEA V-8 (Rye flour) are presented. (author)

  8. INAA applied to halogen (Br and I) stability in long-term storage of lyophilized biological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaichick, V.; Zaichick, S.

    2000-01-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) was used to determine the Br and I concentration in the same ten lyophilized and homogenized human thyroid samples prior and after a 20-year storage at room temperature. It was found that long-term storage had no effect on the iodine content. At the same time, the bromine content was about 2-fold lower (p<0.01). It was assumed that possible losses of other halogens can occur under long-term storage of lyophilized biological materials at room temperature. (author)

  9. Modification, Assembly and Characterization of Biological Evolved Electronic and Magnetic Hybrid Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Belcher, Angela

    2003-01-01

    ... devices with higher storage capabilities and other such devices. We have successfully grown and optimized the process of synthesizing single crystal annealed wires of ZnS materials as well as CoPt wires grown on an engineered viral template...

  10. Synthesis of Precision for the Certification of Phosphorus in Biological Materials by INAA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, E.; Heydorn, K.

    1987-01-01

    The β-emitter32P was used to determine total phosphorus by INAA in Skim Milk Powder RM 63, a material now certified by the EEC Bureau of Reference (BCR). Samples and comparator were irradiated in the Danish reactor DR 3. One month later the samples were dissolved in water and aliquots counted...

  11. Biomechanical and biological properties of the implant material carbon-carbon composite covered with pyrolytic carbon

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pešáková, V.; Klézl, Z.; Balík, Karel; Adam, M.

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 11 (2000), s. 793-798 ISSN 0957-4530 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/96/1066 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3046908 Keywords : carbon-carbon composite * pyrolytic carbon * biocompatibility Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.621, year: 2000

  12. The influence of surface biological modification of selected implant materials on the viability of bone cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pešáková, V.; Hulejová, H.; Riedel, Tomáš; Kubies, Dana

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 7 (2007), s. 1764 ISSN 1076-3279. [Annual Meeting of the Tissue Engineering & Regenerative Medicine Society (TERMIS-EU Meeting). 04.09.2007-07.09.2007, London] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : implant materials * bone cells Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  13. Compilation of elemental concentration data for NBS Biological and Environmental Standard Reference Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladney, E.S.

    1980-07-01

    Concentration data on up to 76 elementals in 19 NBS Standard Reference Materials have been collected from 325 journal articles and technical reports. These data are summarized into mean +- one standard deviation values and compared with available data from NBS and other review articles. Data are presented on the analytical procedures employed and all raw data are presented in appendixes

  14. Intercomparison of enriched stable isotope reference materials for medical and biological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parr, R.M.; Clements, S.A.

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of an intercomparison exercise organized by the IAEA during the latter part of 1988 and 1989. Data are presented for 13 different kinds of enriched stable isotope reference material containing 2 H, 13 C, 15 N and 18 O. Results were submitted by forty participants in twenty countries. 2 refs, 13 figs, 18 tabs

  15. The double radio-isotope derivative techniques for the assay of drugs in biological material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riess, W.

    1977-01-01

    The neuroleptic drug opipramol and its deshydroxyethyl metabolite can be determined simultaneously in the same biological sample. Known amounts of 14 C-labelled opipramol and 14 C-labelled metabolite are added to the sample to serve as internal standards. After suitable extraction, both compounds are acetylated by 3 H-labelled acetic anhydride. Together with μg-amounts of carrier compounds, the O-acetyl derivative of opipramol and the N-acetyl derivative of the metabolite are purified and separated by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography. Each of the derivatives is isolated and counted for 14 C- and 3 H-activity. The 14 C-activities recovered serve to determine the overall yield of the opipramol and metabolite, and to convert the measured 3 H-activity to 100% theoretical yield. From analyses of standard samples, the specific 3 H-activities of the acetyl derivatives were calculated and these values were used to convert the measured 3 H-activites from biological samples to concentrations of original opipramol and metabolite. For both compounds the standard deviations of blank samples were +- 1 ng/ml. For concentrations up to 100 ng/ml the standard deviation was +- 3 ng/ml

  16. Biological testing and chemical analysis of process materials from an integrated two stage coal liquefaction: a status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, B.W.; Buhl, P.; Moroni, E.C.

    1983-07-01

    Samples for chemical characterization and biological testing were obtained from ITSL runs 3LCF7, 3LCF8 and 3LCF9. Chemical analysis of these materials showed that SCT products were composed of fewer compounds than analogous materials from Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) processes. Major components in the SCT materials were three-, four-, five- and six-ring neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Methyl(C/sub 1/) and C/sub 2/ homologs of these compounds were present in relatively low concentrations, compared to their non-alkylated homologs. Organic nitrogen was primarily in the form of tertiary polycyclic aromatic nitrogen heterocycles and carbazoles. Little or no amino PAH (APAH) or cyano PAH were detected in samples taken during normal PDU operations, however, mutagenic APAH were produced during off-normal operation. Microbial mutagenicity appeared to be due mainly to the presence of APAH which were probably formed in the LC finer due to failure of the catalyst to promote deamination following carbon-nitrogen bond scission of nitrogen-containing hydroaromatics. This failure was observed for the off-normal runs where it was likely that the catalyst had been deactivated. Carcinogenic activity of ITSL materials as assessed by (tumors per animal) in the initiation/promotion mouse skin painting assay was slightly reduced for materials produced with good catalyst under normal operation compared to those collected during recycle of the LC Finer feed. Initiation activity of the latter samples did not appear to be significantly different from that of other coal derived materials with comparable boiling ranges. The observed initiation activity was not unexpected, considering analytical data which showed the presence of four-, five- and six-ring PAH in ITSL materials.

  17. The acquisition of dangerous biological materials: Technical facts sheets to assist risk assessments of 46 potential BW agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aceto, Donato Gonzalo [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Astuto-Gribble, Lisa M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gaudioso, Jennifer M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2007-11-01

    Numerous terrorist organizations have openly expressed interest in producing and deploying biological weapons. However, a limiting factor for many terrorists has been the acquisition of dangerous biological agents, as evidenced by the very few successful instances of biological weapons use compared to the number of documented hoaxes. Biological agents vary greatly in their ability to cause loss of life and economic damage. Some agents, if released properly, can kill many people and cause an extensive number of secondary infections; other agents will sicken only a small number of people for a short period of time. Consequently, several biological agents can potentially be used to perpetrate a bioterrorism attack but few are likely capable of causing a high consequence event. It is crucial, from a US national security perspective, to more deeply understand the likelihood that terrorist organizations can acquire the range of these agents. Few studies have attempted to comprehensively compile the technical information directly relevant to the acquisition of dangerous bacteria, viruses and toxins. In this report, technical fact sheets were assembled for 46 potentially dangerous biological agents. Much of the information was taken from various research sources which could ultimately and significantly expedite and improve bioterrorism threat assessments. By systematically examining a number of specific agent characteristics included in these fact sheets, it may be possible to detect, target, and implement measures to thwart future terrorist acquisition attempts. In addition, the information in these fact sheets may be used as a tool to help laboratories gain a rudimentary understanding of how attractive a method laboratory theft is relative to other potential acquisition modes.

  18. Homogeneity study on biological candidate reference materials: the role of neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Daniel P.; Moreira, Edson G.

    2015-01-01

    Instrumental Neutron activation Analysis (INAA) is a mature nuclear analytical technique able to accurately determine chemical elements without the need of sample digestion and, hence, without the associated problems of analyte loss or contamination. This feature, along with its potentiality use as a primary method of analysis, makes it an important tool for the characterization of new references materials and in the assessment of their homogeneity status. In this study, the ability of the comparative method of INAA for the within-bottle homogeneity of K, Mg, Mn and V in a mussel reference material was investigated. Method parameters, such as irradiation time, sample decay time and distance from sample to the detector were varied in order to allow element determination in subsamples of different sample masses in duplicate. Sample masses were in the range of 1 to 250 mg and the limitations of the detection limit for small sample masses and dead time distortions for large sample masses were investigated. (author)

  19. Homogeneity study on biological candidate reference materials: the role of neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Daniel P.; Moreira, Edson G., E-mail: dsilva.pereira@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Instrumental Neutron activation Analysis (INAA) is a mature nuclear analytical technique able to accurately determine chemical elements without the need of sample digestion and, hence, without the associated problems of analyte loss or contamination. This feature, along with its potentiality use as a primary method of analysis, makes it an important tool for the characterization of new references materials and in the assessment of their homogeneity status. In this study, the ability of the comparative method of INAA for the within-bottle homogeneity of K, Mg, Mn and V in a mussel reference material was investigated. Method parameters, such as irradiation time, sample decay time and distance from sample to the detector were varied in order to allow element determination in subsamples of different sample masses in duplicate. Sample masses were in the range of 1 to 250 mg and the limitations of the detection limit for small sample masses and dead time distortions for large sample masses were investigated. (author)

  20. Biologically Inspired Materials for Electro-Responsive Coatings and the Photo-Oxidation of Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    nucleate magnetic iron based nanoparticles used for navigation, but few other inorganic materials are nanostructurally assembled in naturally occuring bio...synthesis for applications as pedestrian as cosmetics . Merrifield’s revolutionary idea was to build peptides in a stepwise manner with one end of the...Increasing the applied potential led to gas bubble formation and damage to the aluminum surface, which masked any electro-responsive behavior of the

  1. Synchronization in material flow networks with biologically inspired self-organized control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donner, Reik; Laemmer, Stefan [TU Dresden (Germany); Helbing, Dirk [ETH Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2009-07-01

    The efficient operation of material flows in traffic or production networks is a subject of broad economic interest. Traditional centralized as well as decentralized approaches to operating material flow networks are known to have severe disadvantages. As an alternative approach that may help to overcome these problems, we propose a simple self-organization mechanism of conflicting flows that is inspired by oscillatory phenomena of pedestrian or animal counter-flows at bottlenecks. As a result, one may observe a synchronization of the switching dynamics at different intersections in the network. For regular grid topologies, we find different synchronization regimes depending on the inertia of the switching from one service state to the next one. In order to test the robustness of our corresponding observations, we study how the detailed properties of the network as well as dynamic feedbacks between the relevant state variables affect the degree of achievable synchronization and the resulting performance of the network. Our results yield an improved understanding of the conditions that have to be present for efficiently operating material flow networks by a decentralized control, which is of paramount importance for future implementations in real-world traffic or production systems.

  2. Biological Effects of Provisional Resin Materials on Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, S-K; Mahapatra, C; Lee, H-H; Kim, H-W; Lee, J-H

    This study investigated the in vitro cytotoxicity as well as the proinflammatory cytokine expression of provisional resin materials on primary cultured human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs). Five commercially available provisional resin materials were chosen (SNAP [SN], Luxatemp [LT], Jet [JE], Revotek LC [RL], and Vipi block [VB]). Eluates that were either polymerizing or already set were added to hDPSCs under serially diluted conditions divided into three different setting times (25% set, 50% set, and 100% set) and incubated for 24 hours with 2× concentrated culture media. Cell cytotoxicity tests were performed by LDH assay and live and dead confocal microscope images. The expression of proinflammatory cytokines in SN and VB was measured using cytokine antibody arrays. Data were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) or ANOVA followed by the Tukey post hoc test at a significance level of pprovisional resin materials during polymerization (SN, LT, and JE) were cytotoxic to hDPSCs and may adversely affect pulp tissue.

  3. Material balance and diets in biological life support systems: a relationship with a coefficient of closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manukovsky, N. S.; Kovalev, V. S.; Somova, L. A.

    Biological life support systems (BLSS) of various coefficients of closure were considered The basic coefficient of closure was accepted equal to 66%. With increase in coefficient of closure food requirements for the greater degree should be satisfied due to the manufacture of food inside the BLSS. In this connection food values were estimated both in the basic variant, and in those with increased coefficients of closure. Metabolic massflow rates were estimated at the input and output of the BLSS as well as inside it. Human massflow rates were submitted on the basis of characteristics of the 'reference man'. Stoichiometric synthesis - degradation equations of organic substances in the BLSS were obtained. A problem of nitrogen imbalance was shown to occur under an incomplete BLSS closure. To compensate losses of nitrogen with urine and feces, food and nitrogen-containing additives should be introduced into the BLSS.

  4. Boron analysis and boron imaging in biological materials for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittig, Andrea; Michel, Jean; Moss, Raymond L; Stecher-Rasmussen, Finn; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F; Bendel, Peter; Mauri, Pier Luigi; Altieri, Saverio; Hilger, Ralf; Salvadori, Piero A; Menichetti, Luca; Zamenhof, Robert; Sauerwein, Wolfgang A G

    2008-10-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is based on the ability of the stable isotope 10B to capture neutrons, which leads to a nuclear reaction producing an alpha- and a 7Li-particle, both having a high biological effectiveness and a very short range in tissue, being limited to approximately one cell diameter. This opens the possibility for a highly selective cancer therapy. BNCT strongly depends on the selective uptake of 10B in tumor cells and on its distribution inside the cells. The chemical properties of boron and the need to discriminate different isotopes make the investigation of the concentration and distribution of 10B a challenging task. The most advanced techniques to measure and image boron are described, both invasive and non-invasive. The most promising approach for further investigation will be the complementary use of the different techniques to obtain the information that is mandatory for the future of this innovative treatment modality.

  5. Diretrizes nacionais para biorrepositório e biobanco de material biológico humano Brazilian guidelines for biorepositories and biobanks of human biological material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Marodin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Caracterizar a construção participativa e democrática das Diretrizes Nacionais para Biorrepositório e Biobanco de Material Biológico Humano com Finalidade de Pesquisa, baseada nos princípios éticos da dignidade humana, da autonomia, da beneficência, da justiça e da precaução. MÉTODOS: Para a elaboração do documento formou-se um grupo de trabalho interdisciplinar Bioética considerando os seguintes critérios: experiência na operacionalização de biobancos, Biobancos representatividade regional, tipo de material biológico acondicionado e especialistas em Biorrepositório bioética. Participaram, também, membros da Agência Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária Diretrizes - Anvisa, pela competência regulatória e da Comissão Nacional de Ética em Pesquisa - Conep, enquanto controle social. RESULTADOS: O documento, baseado nos preceitos éticos, legais e técnicos, apresenta os conceitos, as atividades, finalidades e diferenças entre biorrepositórios e biobancos, as formas de consentimento do sujeito, além de outros aspectos permeados pela preocupação do uso adequado da informação. As Diretrizes Nacionais para Biorrepositório e Biobanco de Material Biológico Humano com Finalidade de Pesquisa contém 39 artigos, dispostos em cinco capítulos. CONCLUSÃO: A importância de uma regulamentação surge da reflexão ética, considerando a moral, e tendo como norteador os aspectos legais, os quais se traduzem em um documento que não se esgota em si mesmo. A dinamicidade da ciência sempre nos remete à mudança de paradigmas, que podem ir além das legislações existentes.OBJECTIVE: To characterize the participatory and democratic creation of the Brazilian guidelines for biorepositories and biobanks of human biological material with the purpose of research based on the ethical principles of human dignity, autonomy, beneficence, justice, and precaution. METHODS: An interdisciplinary work group was constituted to

  6. Sustainable Materials Management (SMM) Web Academy Webinar: Compost from Food Waste: Understanding Soil Chemistry and Soil Biology on a College/University Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains information about the Sustainable Materials Management (SMM) Web Academy Webinar Series titled Compost from Food Waste:Understanding Soil Chemistry and Soil Biology on a College/University Campus

  7. Laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for direct profiling and imaging of small molecules from raw biological materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Sangwon [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization(MALDI) mass spectrometry(MS) has been widely used for analysis of biological molecules, especially macromolecules such as proteins. However, MALDI MS has a problem in small molecule (less than 1 kDa) analysis because of the signal saturation by organic matrixes in the low mass region. In imaging MS (IMS), inhomogeneous surface formation due to the co-crystallization process by organic MALDI matrixes limits the spatial resolution of the mass spectral image. Therefore, to make laser desorption/ionization (LDI) MS more suitable for mass spectral profiling and imaging of small molecules directly from raw biological tissues, LDI MS protocols with various alternative assisting materials were developed and applied to many biological systems of interest. Colloidal graphite was used as a matrix for IMS of small molecules for the first time and methodologies for analyses of small metabolites in rat brain tissues, fruits, and plant tissues were developed. With rat brain tissues, the signal enhancement for cerebroside species by colloidal graphite was observed and images of cerebrosides were successfully generated by IMS. In addition, separation of isobaric lipid ions was performed by imaging tandem MS. Directly from Arabidopsis flowers, flavonoids were successfully profiled and heterogeneous distribution of flavonoids in petals was observed for the first time by graphite-assisted LDI(GALDI) IMS.

  8. ANALISIS KUALITAS REPRESENTASI VISUAL BUKU BIOLOGI SMA KELAS XI KURIKULUM 2013 PADA MATERI SEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivi Sophie Elfada

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Representasi Visual (RV yang ditampilkan di dalam buku teks akan menambah nilai estetika buku, namun buku yang berkualis akan memperhatikan seluruh aspek tampilan buku agar bermanfaat dalam penyampaian materi, termasuk tampilan RV. Penggunaan RV yang tepat akan mempermudah pembaca dalam mempelajari konsep materi dan menghindari terjadinya miskonsepsi. Keberadaan RV sangat signifikan di dalam buku teks, oleh karena itu perlu adanya penelitian RV pada buku teks.Penelitian analisis RV bertujuan untuk mengetahui kualitas buku teks dari segi ketepatan RV yang digunakan di dalam buku teks. Analisis yang dilakukan meliputi: 1 ketepatan konsep; 2 tipe RV; 3 hubungan RV dengan konten materi; 4 hubungan RV dengan realitas; dan 5 fungsi RV. Buku teks yang dianalisis meliputi tiga penerbit buku kurikulum 2013 yaitu penerbit Erlangga  (buku sampel A, Platinum (buku sampel B, dan Yrama Widya (buku sampel C. Analisis RV yang dilakukan yaitu pada materi sel kelas XI semester I. Penelitian ini termasuk ke dalam penelitian kualitatif yang bersifat deskriptif. Instrumen yang digunakan pada penelitian ini ialah tabel daftar (list table yang terdiri dari tabel analisis ketepatan konsep dan tabel analisis RV. Konsep materi sel terlebih dahulu dianalisis, kemudian dilakukan analisis RV.   Penelitian menghasilkan data bahwa buku sampel yang memiliki ketepatan konsep memadai yang tertinggi ialah buku sampel A sebesar 65,85%. Buku sampel B memiliki ketepatan konsep memadai sebesar 51,22%, dan buku sampel C sebesar 41,46%. Buku sampel A, B, dan C ditinjau dari segi tipe RV, masing – masing sudah relatif tepat dalam menampilkan tipe RV karena disesuaikan dengan kebutuhan bacaan. Tipe RV buku sampel A, B, dan C yang tertinggi ialah tipe sketsa – komik sebesar 30,00% pada buku sampel A; 28,26% pada buku sampel B; dan  28,99% pada buku sampel C. Analisis hubungan RV dengan konten materi menghasilkan data bahwa Buku sampel B memiliki hubungan bermakna dengan konten

  9. Proceedings of the two day national workshop on advanced materials for engineering applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John Alexis, S.; Jayakumar, S.

    2012-01-01

    The subjects like material preparation, material forming, material properties, materials testing, material mechanics, material structure, metal materials, non-metallic materials, composite materials, medical materials, chemical materials, food materials, electrician/electrical materials, building materials, biological materials, electronic/magnetic/optical materials, advanced materials applications in engineering are included in the workshop. Processing of advanced materials, studies on novel ceramic coatings, high strength, light weight and nanostructured materials are discussed in this proceedings. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  10. Hidden biodiversity in entomological collections: The overlooked co-occurrence of dipteran and hymenopteran ant parasitoids in stored biological material.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Pérez-Lachaud

    Full Text Available Biological collections around the world are the repository of biodiversity on Earth; they also hold a large quantity of unsorted, unidentified, or misidentified material and can house behavioral information on species that are difficult to access or no longer available to science. Among the unsorted, alcohol-preserved material stored in the Formicidae Collection of the 'El Colegio de la Frontera Sur' Research Center (Chetumal, Mexico, we found nine colonies of the ponerine ant Neoponera villosa, that had been collected in bromeliads at Calakmul (Campeche, Mexico in 1999. Ants and their brood were revised for the presence of any sign of parasitism. Cocoons were dissected and their content examined under a stereomicroscope. Six N. villosa prepupae had been attacked by the ectoparasitoid syrphid fly Hypselosyrphus trigonus Hull (Syrphidae: Microdontinae, to date the only known dipteran species of the Microdontinae with a parasitoid lifestyle. In addition, six male pupae from three colonies contained gregarious endoparasitoid wasps. These were specialized in parasitizing this specific host caste as no gyne or worker pupae displayed signs of having been attacked. Only immature stages (larvae and pupae of the wasp could be obtained. Due to the long storage period, DNA amplification failed; however, based on biological and morphological data, pupae were placed in the Encyrtidae family. This is the first record of an encyrtid wasp parasitizing N. villosa, and the second example of an encyrtid as a primary parasitoid of ants. Furthermore, it is also the first record of co-occurrence of a dipteran ectoparasitoid and a hymenopteran endoparasitoid living in sympatry within the same population of host ants. Our findings highlight the importance of biological collections as reservoirs of hidden biodiversity, not only at the taxonomic level, but also at the behavioral level, revealing complex living networks. They also highlight the need for funding in order

  11. 25 years and still going strong: 2'-O-(pyren-1-yl)methylribonucleotides - versatile building blocks for applications in molecular biology, diagnostics and materials science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrdlicka, Patrick J; Karmakar, Saswata

    2017-11-29

    Oligonucleotides (ONs) modified with 2'-O-(pyren-1-yl)methylribonucleotides have been explored for a range of applications in molecular biology, nucleic acid diagnostics, and materials science for more than 25 years. The first part of this review provides an overview of synthetic strategies toward 2'-O-(pyren-1-yl)methylribonucleotides and is followed by a summary of biophysical properties of nucleic acid duplexes modified with these building blocks. Insights from structural studies are then presented to rationalize the reported properties. In the second part, applications of ONs modified with 2'-O-(pyren-1-yl)methyl-RNA monomers are reviewed, which include detection of RNA targets, discrimination of single nucleotide polymorphisms, formation of self-assembled pyrene arrays on nucleic acid scaffolds, the study of charge transfer phenomena in nucleic acid duplexes, and sequence-unrestricted recognition of double-stranded DNA. The predictable binding mode of the pyrene moiety, coupled with the microenvironment-dependent properties and synthetic feasibility, render 2'-O-(pyren-1-yl)methyl-RNA monomers as a promising class of pyrene-functionalized nucleotide building blocks for new applications in molecular biology, nucleic acid diagnostics, and materials science.

  12. Bioprospecting finds the toughest biological material: extraordinary silk from a giant riverine orb spider.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingi Agnarsson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Combining high strength and elasticity, spider silks are exceptionally tough, i.e., able to absorb massive kinetic energy before breaking. Spider silk is therefore a model polymer for development of high performance biomimetic fibers. There are over 41,000 described species of spiders, most spinning multiple types of silk. Thus we have available some 200,000+ unique silks that may cover an amazing breadth of material properties. To date, however, silks from only a few tens of species have been characterized, most chosen haphazardly as model organisms (Nephila or simply from researchers' backyards. Are we limited to 'blindly fishing' in efforts to discover extraordinary silks? Or, could scientists use ecology to predict which species are likely to spin silks exhibiting exceptional performance properties? METHODOLOGY: We examined the biomechanical properties of silk produced by the remarkable Malagasy 'Darwin's bark spider' (Caerostris darwini, which we predicted would produce exceptional silk based upon its amazing web. The spider constructs its giant orb web (up to 2.8 m(2 suspended above streams, rivers, and lakes. It attaches the web to substrates on each riverbank by anchor threads as long as 25 meters. Dragline silk from both Caerostris webs and forcibly pulled silk, exhibits an extraordinary combination of high tensile strength and elasticity previously unknown for spider silk. The toughness of forcibly silked fibers averages 350 MJ/m(3, with some samples reaching 520 MJ/m(3. Thus, C. darwini silk is more than twice tougher than any previously described silk, and over 10 times better than Kevlar®. Caerostris capture spiral silk is similarly exceptionally tough. CONCLUSIONS: Caerostris darwini produces the toughest known biomaterial. We hypothesize that this extraordinary toughness coevolved with the unusual ecology and web architecture of these spiders, decreasing the likelihood of bridgelines breaking and collapsing the web

  13. Modifications of a calcium phosphate cement with biomolecules--influence on nanostructure, material, and biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vater, Corina; Lode, Anja; Bernhardt, Anne; Reinstorf, Antje; Nies, Berthold; Gelinsky, Michael

    2010-12-01

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPC), forming hydroxyapatite during the setting reaction, are characterized by good biocompatibility and osteoconductivity, however, their remodeling into native bone tissue is slow. One strategy to improve remodeling and bone regeneration is the directed modification of their nanostructure. In this study, a CPC was set in the presence of cocarboxylase, glucuronic acid, tartaric acid, α-glucose-1-phosphate, L-arginine, L-aspartic acid, and L-lysine, respectively, with the aim to influence formation and growth of hydroxyapatite crystals through the functional groups of these biomolecules. Except for glucuronic acid, all these modifications resulted in the formation of smaller and more agglomerated hydroxyapatite particles which had a positive impact on the biological performance indicated by first experiments with the human osteoblast cell line hFOB 1.19. Moreover, adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSC) as well as binding of the growth factors BMP-2 and VEGF was investigated on CPC modified with cocarboxylase, arginine, and aspartic acid. Initial adhesion of hBMSC was improved on these three modifications and proliferation was enhanced on CPC modified with cocarboxylase and arginine whereas osteogenic differentiation remained unaffected. Modification of the CPC with arginine and aspartic acid, but not with cocarboxylase, led to a higher BMP-2 binding. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A, 2010.

  14. A multipurpose hybrid conventional/scanning near-field optical microscope for applications in materials science and biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longo, G; Girasole, M; Pompeo, G; Generosi, R; Luce, M; Cricenti, A

    2010-01-01

    A hybrid conventional/scanning near-field optical microscope is presented. The instrument is obtained coupling an Olympus IX-70 inverted optical microscope with a SNOM head, to combine the versatility and ease of use of the conventional microscope with the high-resolution and three-dimensional reconstruction achieved by the SNOM. The head can be run in shear or tapping mode and is optimized to characterize soft, biological samples including living cells in physiological environment by including the SNOM in a cylindrical chamber that insulates it from external noise, while maintaining a controlled temperature and atmosphere

  15. [Alternative biological materials to detect prenatal exposure to drugs of abuse in the third trimester of pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Serra, J; Ramis, J; Simó, S; Joya, X; Pichini, S; Vall, O; García-Algar, O

    2012-11-01

    Detection of prenatal drug abuse exposure is essential to ensure an appropriate monitoring of affected children. A maternal questionnaire is not an efficient screening tool. The usefulness of maternal hair and meconium as biological materials to assess this exposure has been described in last few years. The aim of this study was to compare both these alternative biological materials for prenatal drug exposure detection in the third trimester of pregnancy, in order to assess its use as a screening tool. Between January and March 2010, samples of maternal hair and meconium from 107 mother-infant dyads were collected in Can Misses Hospital, Ibiza. The presence of opiates, cocaine, cannabis, and amphetamines, was determined in both materials, using standard chromatographic techniques. Maternal hair analysis showed a 15.9% positivity for drugs of abuse (17 cases): 11 cannabis, 7 cocaine, 1 cannabis and ecstasy, and 1 cannabis and cocaine. Only one mother reported cannabis consumption and another one, cocaine. Of the 7 cocaine positive cases in hair, 6 were confirmed in meconium analysis, while of 11 cannabis positive cases, only 3 were confirmed in meconium. Two different consumer profiles were defined: cocaine consumers and cannabis consumers (with only 2 cases of multiple drug use). The highest level of cocaine ever published was detected (1.582ng/g) in one case. This study reveals a high prevalence of drug abuse in this cohort during pregnancy. Improved screening methods may optimize prevention and monitoring of exposed infants. Maternal hair seems to be more sensitive than meconium to detect prenatal exposure to cannabis during the third trimester, so it might become a good screening tool. Copyright © 2011 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. A novel three-dimensional scaffold for regenerative endodontics: materials and biological characterizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottino, Marco C; Yassen, Ghaeth H; Platt, Jeffrey A; Labban, Nawaf; Windsor, L Jack; Spolnik, Kenneth J; Bressiani, Ana H A

    2015-11-01

    An electrospun nanocomposite fibrous material holds promise as a scaffold, as well as a drug-delivery device to aid in root maturogenesis and the regeneration of the pulp-dentine complex. A novel three-dimensional (3D) nanocomposite scaffold composed of polydioxanone (PDS II®) and halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) was designed and fabricated by electrospinning. Morphology, structure, mechanical properties and cell compatibility studies were carried out to evaluate the effects of HNTs incorporation (0.5-10 wt% relative to PDS w/w). Overall, a 3D porous network was seen in the different fabricated electrospun scaffolds, regardless of the HNT content. The incorporation of HNTs at 10 wt% led to a significant (p endodontics. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Berstein's anti-reductionistic materialism: On the road towards a biology of activity (1965).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongaardt, R; Pickenhain, L; Meijer, O G

    2000-10-01

    Bernstein's paper, "On the Road Towards a Biology of Activity," appeared the year before his death.2 With this paper, Bernstein closed several lines of argument that he had been developing from the onset of his career in the early 1920s. The paper converges on the notion of activity. In accordance with his own shifting focus heuristic (cf. Bongaardt, 1996), Bernstein challenged future researchers of movement to integrate models of the movement functions that constitute activity. He suggested that these functions are: the coordination of movement, the planning of movement, and the exploration of better, optimal ways to move. In the 1920s, Bernstein had collaborated with his friend and colleague L.S. Vygotsky at the Moscow Institute of Experimental Psychology. Vygotsky (cf. 1926/1994) was the first to place activity at the core of Soviet psychology. According to Vygotsky, reflexology and behaviorism, then dominant approaches in psychology, were fundamentally wrong; they focus on building-blocks of behavior without addressing phenomena that stand out as typically human, most importantly, consciousness. Rather than starting with building blocks, psychology should start with the daily activity of human beings in their environment and show how this activity relates to consciousness. Forty years later, in his 1965 paper, Bernstein stressed a point that mirrors Vygotsky's: Reflexes are not building blocks of movement. The general characteristics of any movement precede the specificity of such units, whether reflexes or synergies, and this primacy pertains to the actual organization of movements as well as to the study of movement. The development and relevance of the activity concept in Bernstein's work in the period from 1925 to 1965 deserves a study of its own; here, a brief historical sketch of Bernstein's activity concept is offered, along with a few theoretical considerations concerning activity's constituent functions.

  18. IDENTIFIKASI NEMATODA PARASIT PADA SALURAN PENCERNAAN MARMUT (Cavia cobaya SEBAGAI SUMBER BELAJAR BIOLOGI PADA MATERI INVERTEBRATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Septia Nurhasanah

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The research was conducted in the Laboratory of Science Education, University of Muhammadiyah Metro. The research is a descriptive analysis, morphological observations were made by identifying the nematode parasite found that Trichostrongylus sp, Strongyloides sp, Trichuris sp, Trichuris sp. The results showed the prevalence and intensity values is the large number of guinea pigs to parasites divided by the number of guinea pigs that are 100% inspected. While the intensity is seen from the total number of nematode parasites that infect in the number of guinea pigs infected with a parasite that is 2,3. The population in this study was 10 cows pigs (Cavia cobaya . This study took a part in the digestion of marmots (Cavia cobaya the intestines and stomach , then cut and taken part in the large intestine and be Indian ink or coloring 2-3 drops to be easily identified microscopically . Put the preparations into a petri dish , and given alcohol as much as 96 % with 2-3 drops . Taking part in the examination of the large intestine to taste then used the nematode worm structure with Indian ink dye to be observed , and placed in the glass object . Observed with a microscope. Document if the parasites are found by using the camera Erlina 2008. Identification of the observations made have found 3 types of parasites that attack the guinea pig (Cavia cobaya is Strongyloides sp on samples 1,2,3,4,5,6 , dan10 . Then parasite Trichuris sp species found in samples 8 and 9. Trichostrongylus sp parasite species found in sample 7 . Parasitic nematodes found were 3 types of Trichostrongylus sp, Strongyloides sp, Trichuris sp. Number of samples that have been observed as many as 10 cows pigs (Cavia cobaya , with the overall result is as much as 23 tails parasites.               Kata kunci: nematode parasit, marmut (Cavia cobaya, sumber belajar biologi.

  19. Endothelin-2/Vasoactive Intestinal Contractor: Regulation of Expression via Reactive Oxygen Species Induced by CoCl22, and Biological Activities Including Neurite Outgrowth in PC12 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiichi Kotake-Nara

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the local hormone endothelin-2 (ET-2, or vasoactive intestinal contractor (VIC, a member of the vasoconstrictor ET peptide family, where ET-2 is the human orthologous peptide of the murine VIC. While ET-2/VIC gene expression has been observed in some normal tissues, ET-2 recently has been reported to act as a tumor marker and as a hypoxia-induced autocrine survival factor in tumor cells. A recently published study reported that the hypoxic mimetic agent CoCl2 at 200 µM increased expression of the ET-2/VIC gene, decreased expression of the ET-1 gene, and induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS increase and neurite outgrowth in neuronal model PC12 cells. The ROS was generated by addition of CoCl2 to the culture medium, and the CoCl2-induced effects were completely inhibited by the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine. Furthermore, interleukin-6 (IL-6 gene expression was up-regulated upon the differentiation induced by CoCl2. These results suggest that expression of ET-2/VIC and ET-1 mediated by CoCl2-induced ROS may be associated with neuronal differentiation through the regulation of IL-6 expression. CoCl2 acts as a pro-oxidant, as do Fe(II, III and Cu(II. However, some biological activities have been reported for CoCl2 that have not been observed for other metal salts such as FeCl3, CuSO4, and NiCl2. The characteristic actions of CoCl2 may be associated with the differentiation of PC12 cells. Further elucidation of the mechanism of neurite outgrowth and regulation of ET-2/VIC expression by CoCl2 may lead to the development of treatments for neuronal disorders.

  20. Branching processes in biology

    CERN Document Server

    Kimmel, Marek

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a theoretical background of branching processes and discusses their biological applications. Branching processes are a well-developed and powerful set of tools in the field of applied probability. The range of applications considered includes molecular biology, cellular biology, human evolution and medicine. The branching processes discussed include Galton-Watson, Markov, Bellman-Harris, Multitype, and General Processes. As an aid to understanding specific examples, two introductory chapters, and two glossaries are included that provide background material in mathematics and in biology. The book will be of interest to scientists who work in quantitative modeling of biological systems, particularly probabilists, mathematical biologists, biostatisticians, cell biologists, molecular biologists, and bioinformaticians. The authors are a mathematician and cell biologist who have collaborated for more than a decade in the field of branching processes in biology for this new edition. This second ex...

  1. High resolution X-ray tomography with applications in biology and materials science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, G.; Denbeaux, G.; Anderson, E.; Pearson, A.; Bates, W.; Vogt, S.; Knochen, C.; Meyer, M. A.; Zschech, E.

    2003-03-01

    With the new tomography setup developed for the x-ray microscope XM-1 installed at the Advanced Light Source, tomography of immunolabelled frozen-hydrated cells to detect protein distributions inside of cells was performed. The distribution of the nuclear protein, male specific lethal 1 (MSL-1) in the Drosophila melanogaster cell was studied. Another application field for high resolution tomography which is of fundamental interest in materials science is electromigration in advanced copper interconnects. In this work, quantitative time-resolved x-ray microscopy mass transport studies of the early stages of electromigration in an inlaid Cu line/via structure were performed with 40 nm spatial resolution at 1.8 keV photon energy. Correlation of the real time x-ray microscopy images with post mortem high voltage electron micrographs of the sample shows that the void nucleation occurs at the site of grain boundaries in Cu and that the voids migrate along these grain boundaries during electromigration. To provide 3D information about the exact location (bulk or interface) of void nucleation and migration during an EM experiment, as well as to measure quantitatively the mass transport in the volume, future experiments must be based on time-resolved x-ray tomography.

  2. Developing Materials for Biology Teaching. Asian Programme of Educational Innovation for Development (APEID) Report of a Sub-Regional Workshop (Bangkok, Thailand, August 3-12, 1981).

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and the Pacific.

    The major purposes of this workshop were to develop teaching and learning materials on certain selected key biology concepts relevant to environmental, genetic, and agricultural aspects, and to develop exemplary training materials on certain teacher competencies relating to laboratory and field techniques. Chapter One reports on the status and…

  3. Examination of the regulatory frameworks applicable to biologic drugs (including stem cells and their progeny) in Europe, the U.S., and Australia: part I--a method of manual documentary analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilic, Nina; Savic, Snezana; Siegel, Evan; Atkinson, Kerry; Tasic, Ljiljana

    2012-12-01

    Recent development of a wide range of regulatory standards applicable to production and use of tissues, cells, and other biologics (or biologicals), as advanced therapies, indicates considerable interest in the regulation of these products. The objective of this study was to analyze and compare high-tier documents within the Australian, European, and U.S. biologic drug regulatory environments using qualitative methodology. Cohort 1 of the selected 18 high-tier regulatory documents from the European Medicines Agency (EMA), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) regulatory frameworks were subject to a manual documentary analysis. These documents were consistent with the legal requirements for manufacturing and use of biologic drugs in humans and fall into six different categories. Manual analysis included a terminology search. The occurrence, frequency, and interchangeable use of different terms and phrases were recorded in the manual documentary analysis. Despite obvious differences, manual documentary analysis revealed certain consistency in use of terminology across analyzed frameworks. Phrase search frequencies have shown less uniformity than the search of terms. Overall, the EMA framework's documents referred to "medicinal products" and "marketing authorization(s)," the FDA documents discussed "drug(s)" or "biologic(s)," and the TGA documents referred to "biological(s)." Although high-tier documents often use different terminology they share concepts and themes. Documents originating from the same source have more conjunction in their terminology although they belong to different frameworks (i.e., Good Clinical Practice requirements based on the Declaration of Helsinki, 1964). Automated (software-based) documentary analysis should be obtained for the conceptual and relational analysis.

  4. Materials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wyk, Llewellyn V

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available community. The construction industry is a significantly consumer of materials, using 50 per cent of all products produced globally. Building materials is any material which is used for a construction purpose. Many of these materials are sources from natural...

  5. Evaluation of some procedures relevant to the determination of trace elemental components in biological materials by destructive neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, D.L.

    1979-01-01

    The development of a simplified procedure for the analysis of biological materials by destructive neutron activation analysis (DNAA) is described. The sample manipulations preceding gamma ray assay were investigated as five specific stages of processing: (1) pre-irradiation treatment; (2) sample irradiation; (3) removal of the organic matrix; (4) removal of interfering radioactivities; and (5) concentration and separation of analyte activities. Each stage was evaluated with respect to susceptibility to sample contamination, loss of trace elemental components, and compatibility with other operations in the overall DNAA procedures. A complete DNAA procedure was proposed and evaluated for the analysis of standard bovine liver and blood samples. The DNAA system was effective for the determination of As, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mo, Rb, Sb, Se, and Zn without yield determinations and with a minimum turn-around time of approximately 3 days

  6. Evaluation of some procedures relevant to the determination of trace elemental components in biological materials by destructive neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, D.L.

    1979-01-01

    The development of a simplified procedure for the analysis of biological materials by destructive neutron activation analysis (DNAA) is described. The sample manipulations preceding gamma ray assay were investigated as five specific stages of processing: (1) pre-irradiation treatment; (2) sample irradiation; (3) removal of the organic matrix; (4) removal of interfering radioactivities; and (5) concentration and separation of analyte activities. Each stage was evaluated with respect to susceptibility to sample contamination, loss of trace elemental components, and compatibility with other operations in the overall DNAA procedures. A complete DNAA procedure was proposed and evaluated for the analysis of standard bovine liver and blood samples. The DNAA system was effective for the determination of As, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mo, Rb, Sb, Se, and Zn without yield determinations and with a minimum turn-around time of approximately 3 days.

  7. Biological regeneration of ferric (Fe3+) solution during desulphurisation of gaseous streams: effect of nutrients and support material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulopo, Jean; Schaefer, L

    2015-01-01

    This paper evaluates the biological regeneration of ferric Fe3+ solution during desulphurisation of gaseous streams. Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is absorbed into aqueous ferric sulphate solution and oxidised to elemental sulphur, while ferric ions Fe3+ are reduced to ferrous ions Fe2+. During the industrial regeneration of Fe3+, nutrients and trace minerals usually provided in a laboratory setup are not present and this depletion of nutrients may have a negative impact on the bacteria responsible for ferrous iron oxidation and may probably affect the oxidation rate. In this study, the effect of nutrients and trace minerals on ferrous iron oxidation have been investigated and the results showed that the presence of nutrients and trace minerals affects the efficiency of bacterial Fe2+oxidation. The scanning electron microscopy analysis of the geotextile support material was also conducted and the results showed that the iron precipitate deposits appear to play a direct role on the bacterial biofilm formation.

  8. Determination of several trace metals in biological materials by PIXE analysis after solvent extraction and polystyrene-film collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Yoshihiro; Korenaga, Tatsumi; Suzuki, Nobuo

    1991-01-01

    Traces of vanadium, manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, and zinc were quantitatively extracted with diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) in benzene from a digested solution of biological materials and the metal-DDTC complexes were collected into a small amount of polystyrene foam produced by lyophilization of the benzene extract after addition of polystyrene. The polystyrene foam was dissolved in benzene and spread on Mylar film. After drying, a polystyrene film containing metal-DDTC complexes was produced on Mylar film, and then the polystyrene film was peeled from the Mylar film. This film was subjected to PIXE analysis. This method was applied to NBS SRM 1572 citrus leaves and a marine macroalgal sample, and 6 trace metals were simultaneously and accurately determined. (author)

  9. Transmission microscopy of unmodified biological materials: comparative radiation dosages with electrons and ultrasoft X-ray photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayre, D.; Feder, R.; Spiller, E.; Kirz, J.; Kim, D.M.

    1977-01-01

    The minimum radiation dosage in a specimen consistent with transmission microscopy at resolution d and specimen thickness t is calculated for model specimens resembling biological materials in their natural state. The calculations cover 10 4 -10 7 eV electrons and 1.3-90 A photons in a number of microscopy modes. The results indicate that over a considerable part of the (t,d)-plane transmission microscopy on such specimens can be carried out at lower dosage with photons than with electrons. Estimates of the maximum resolutions obtainable with electrons and photons, consistent with structural survival of the specimen, are obtained, as are data on optimal operating conditions for microscopy with the two particles

  10. Microdetermination of lead, cadmium, zinc and tin in biological and related materials by atomic absorption spectrometry after mineralisation and extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boiteau, H.L.; Metayer, C.

    1978-01-01

    Two technics permitting to determine either lead, cadmium and zinc, or tin in any biological material (blood, urines, organs, alimentary products of animal or vegetable origin) are described. Every operation (mineralisation and extraction) is made in the same tube and technics, conceived in a way to simplify the manipulations and to reduce the more possible the contamination risks are suitable for determination in series. By working on trial samples near 250 mg, the lower determination limits are around 2 ppb for cadmium, 40 ppb for lead and tin and 2 ppm for zinc. The repeatability studies of different technical stages show that mineralisation and extraction only have a weak incidence on the acccuracy of the results [fr

  11. Standardization of digestion procedure for the determination of heavy metals in biological materials by atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalid, N.; Chaudhri, S.A.

    1999-01-01

    Proper decomposition of the sample is one of the basic requirements of the atomic absorption spectroscopic analysis. In the present studies, heavy metals (Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn) were determined in biological samples by designating them in a mixture of nitric acid and perchloric acid. The quantification was made with atomic absorption spectrometry using an air-acetylene flame. The reliability of the procedure used was checked by analysing standard reference materials from NBS and IAEA, such as Rice flour (NBS-SRM-1568), Horse Kidney (IAEA H-8), Mixed Human diet(IAEA H-9), Copepod (IAEA MA-A-1) and fish flesh (IAEA MA-A-2) under identical conditions. A good agreement was observed between determined and the certified values reported by NBS and IAEA. (author)

  12. Light-based theranostics using hybrid structures derived from biological and organic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vankayala, Raviraj; Burns, Joshua M.; Mac, Jenny T.; Anvari, Bahman

    2016-09-01

    We have engineered hybrid nanostructures derived from erythrocytes, which can be doped with various near infrared (NIR) organic chromophores, including the FDA-approved indocyanine green (ICG). We refer to these vesicles as NIR erythrocyte-mimicking transducers (NETs), as they are capable of generating heat, reactive oxygen species (ROS) or emit fluorescence light. We present preliminary results that demonstrate the effectiveness of NETs for fluorescence imaging and photodynamic therapeutic destruction of breast cancer cells, upon photo-excitation using NIR light. These hybrid nanostructures present a promising platform with theranostic capability for future biomedical clinical applications.

  13. Small-angle x-ray scattering/diffraction system for studies of biological and other materials at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakatsuki, S.; Hodgson, K.O.; Eliezer, D.; Rice, M.; Hubbard, S.; Gillis, N.; Doniach, S.; Spann, U.

    1992-01-01

    A versatile small-angle x-ray diffraction/scattering system has been developed at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory for studies of biological and other materials. The system includes two sets of collimation slits separated by an ionization chamber, a sample holder cooled by a circulation bath, a vacuum/He scattering path after the sample holder and a detector, either a linear one-dimensional position-sensitive proportional counter or a position-sensitive quadrant detector. Data aquisition is controlled by a VAXstation through a CAMAC interface. Menu-driven data acquisition and on-line analysis software has been developed. The system can be used to collect small- to intermediate-angle x-ray scattering and diffraction data. Monochromatic, anomalous, and time-resolved diffraction/scattering experiments are possible. A time-resolved spectrophotometer using photodiode arrays has also been developed for simultaneous measurements of optical absorption spectra and x-ray scattering/diffraction

  14. Molecular Self-Assembly of Short Aromatic Peptides: From Biology to Nanotechnology and Material Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazit, Ehud

    2013-03-01

    The formation of ordered amyloid fibrils is the hallmark of several diseases of unrelated origin. In spite of grave clinical consequence, the mechanism of amyloid formation is not fully understood. We have suggested, based on experimental and bioinformatic analysis, that aromatic interactions may provide energetic contribution as well as order and directionality in the molecular-recognition and self-association processes that lead to the formation of these assemblies. This is in line with the well-known central role of aromatic-stacking interactions in self-assembly processes. Our works on the mechanism of aromatic peptide self-assembly, lead to the discovery that the diphenylalanine recognition motif self-assembles into peptide nanotubes with a remarkable persistence length. Other aromatic homodipeptides could self-assemble in nano-spheres, nano-plates, nano-fibrils and hydrogels with nano-scale order. We demonstrated that the peptide nanostructures have unique chemical, physical and mechanical properties including ultra-rigidity as aramides, semi-conductive, piezoelectric and non-linear optic properties. We also demonstrated the ability to use these peptide nanostructures as casting mold for the fabrication of metallic nano-wires and coaxial nano-cables. The application of the nanostructures was demonstrated in various fields including electrochemical biosensors, tissue engineering, and molecular imaging. Finally, we had developed ways for depositing of the peptide nanostructures and their organization. We had use inkjet technology as well as vapour deposition methods to coat surface and from the peptide ``nano-forests''. We recently demonstrated that even a single phenylalanine amino-acid can form well-ordered fibrilar assemblies.

  15. Ethical issues in DNA identification of human biological material from mass disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caenazzo, Luciana; Tozzo, Pamela; Rodriguez, Daniele

    2013-08-01

    Each mass disaster has its own characteristics and will involve a different approach, so the safeguarding and collection of forensic evidence have to be considered as part of the field response procedure. DNA typing has played a more prominent role in the identification of human remains, and particularly so for highly decomposed and fragmented remains. Although the ultimate goal is to obtain the identification, the specific context of each application of human identity testing has its specific problems, ranging from technical approach, through statistical interpretation, to ethical issues. The preparedness plan of the forensic genetics laboratory needs to include policies for family notification, long-term sample storage, and data archiving. For this reason, DNA sample collection and a strategy for DNA-based victim identification needs to be part of the preparedness plan. In this paper, the authors seek to define three of these ethical aspects: (1) the humanitarian importance of identification; (2) resource allocation in the victims' DNA identification; and (3) the secondary use for research of the samples initially collected for identification purposes. DNA analysis for the purpose of identifying victims of mass disasters has complex implications that demand much more rigorous examination than they have received until now.

  16. Test and standardization of a radiometric method for free testosterone assay in biological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathor, M.B.

    1983-01-01

    The principles of equilibrium dialysis technique using semi-permeable cellulose membranes were analysed and a modification was presented for the calculation of the unbound or free fraction of plasma steroids. The results were compared with those from the classical way of calculation used in the equilibrium dialysis technique in which it is necessary to include the change in weight of the dialysis bags. Technical aspects of the method were studied such as weight variation of the dialysis bags during dialysis, comparison of the results obtained using multiple plasma dilutions or one dilution only and comparing serum and plasma. The results obtained with the multiple dilutions technique were similar to those with non-diluted plasma while significantly different from those using one dilution only. The operational characteristics of the method were evaluated showing its specificity at least by the dilution test, besides being precise considering intra and interassay reproductibility. The mean + - s.d. of the percent free testosterone levels were 2.57 + - 0.45% and 1.67 + - 0.30% for males and females at the mid-follicular phase respectively. (Author) [pt

  17. Collaborative international research: ethical and regulatory issues pertaining to human biological materials at a South African institutional research ethics committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathar, Aslam; Dhai, Amaboo; van der Linde, Stephan

    2014-12-01

    Human Biological Materials (HBMs) are an invaluable resource in biomedical research. To determine if researchers and a Research Ethics Committee (REC) at a South African institution addressed ethical issues pertaining to HBMs in collaborative research with developed countries. Ethically approved retrospective cross-sectional descriptive audit. Of the 1305 protocols audited, 151 (11.57%) fulfilled the study's inclusion criteria. Compared to other developed countries, a majority of sponsors (90) were from the USA (p = 0.0001). The principle investigators (PIs) in all 151 protocols informed the REC of their intent to store HBMs. Only 132 protocols informed research participants (P research participants, 116 protocols (76.8%) solicited broad consent compared to specific consent (32; 21.2%) [p research participants (67) that HBMs would be exported (p = 0.011). Export permits (EPs) and Material Transfer Agreements (MTAs) were not available in 109 and 143 protocols, respectively. Researchers and the REC did not adequately address the inter-related ethical and regulatory issues pertaining to HBMs. There was a lack of congruence between the ethical guidelines of developed countries and their actions which are central to the access to HBMs in collaborative research. HBMs may be leaving South Africa without EPs and MTAs during the process of international collaborative research. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Influence of Pichia pastoris cellular material on polymerase chain reaction performance as a synthetic biology standard for genome monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templar, Alexander; Woodhouse, Stefan; Keshavarz-Moore, Eli; Nesbeth, Darren N

    2016-08-01

    Advances in synthetic genomics are now well underway in yeasts due to the low cost of synthetic DNA. These new capabilities also bring greater need for quantitating the presence, loss and rearrangement of loci within synthetic yeast genomes. Methods for achieving this will ideally; i) be robust to industrial settings, ii) adhere to a global standard and iii) be sufficiently rapid to enable at-line monitoring during cell growth. The methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris (P. pastoris) is increasingly used for industrial production of biotherapeutic proteins so we sought to answer the following questions for this particular yeast species. Is time-consuming DNA purification necessary to obtain accurate end-point polymerase chain reaction (e-pPCR) and quantitative PCR (qPCR) data? Can the novel linear regression of efficiency qPCR method (LRE qPCR), which has properties desirable in a synthetic biology standard, match the accuracy of conventional qPCR? Does cell cultivation scale influence PCR performance? To answer these questions we performed e-pPCR and qPCR in the presence and absence of cellular material disrupted by a mild 30s sonication procedure. The e-pPCR limit of detection (LOD) for a genomic target locus was 50pg (4.91×10(3) copies) of purified genomic DNA (gDNA) but the presence of cellular material reduced this sensitivity sixfold to 300pg gDNA (2.95×10(4) copies). LRE qPCR matched the accuracy of a conventional standard curve qPCR method. The presence of material from bioreactor cultivation of up to OD600=80 did not significantly compromise the accuracy of LRE qPCR. We conclude that a simple and rapid cell disruption step is sufficient to render P. pastoris samples of up to OD600=80 amenable to analysis using LRE qPCR which we propose as a synthetic biology standard. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of oyster shell on soil chemical and biological properties and cabbage productivity as a liming materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang Hoon; Lee, Do Kyoung; Ali, Muhammad Aslam; Kim, Pil Joo

    2008-12-01

    Oyster shell, a byproduct of shellfish-farming in Korea and containing a high amount of CaCO(3), has a high potential to be used as a liming material in agriculture. However, the agricultural utilization of oyster shell is limited due to its high concentration NaCl. The oyster-shell meal collected had a low concentration of water soluble NaCl (mean 2.7 g kg(-1)), which might be a result of stacking the material for 6 months in the open field. It has a very similar liming potential with calcium carbonate, with 3.4 and 3.8 Mg ha(-1) for silt loam (SiL, pH 6.2) and sandy loam (SL, pH 5.8) to bring the soil pH to 6.5, respectively. To determine the effect of crushed oyster-shell meal on improving soil chemical and biological properties and crop plant productivity, oyster-shell meal was applied at rates of 0, 4, 8, 12, and 16 Mg ha(-1) before transplanting Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris L.) in the two soils mentioned above. Soil pH was significantly increased to 6.9 and 7.4 by 16 Mg ha(-1) shell meal application (4 times higher level than the recommendation) in SiL and SL, respectively, at harvesting stage. The effect of liming was found higher in SL compared to SiL soil, probably due to the different buffering capacity of the two soils. The concentration of NaCl and EC value of soils were found slightly increased with shell meal applications, but no salt damage was observed. Oyster-shell meal application increased soil organic matter, available P, and exchangeable cations concentrations. The improved soil pH and nutrient status significantly increased the microbial biomass C and N concentrations and stimulated soil enzyme activities. With the exception of acid phosphomonoesterase (PMEase) activity, which decreased with increasing soil pH in SL but slightly increased in SiL, the activities of urease and alkali PMEase increased markedly with increasing soil pH by shell meal application. The improved soil chemical and biological properties resulted in increased crop

  20. Inalienably Yours? The new case for an inalienable property right in human biological material: Empowerment of sample donors or a recipe for a tragic Anti-Commons?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasper A. Bovenberg

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Modern biomedical research into the genetic component of common diseases calls for broad access to existing and novel collections of samples of human biological material, aka Biobanks. Groups of donors of these samples, however, increasingly claim a property right in their samples. They perceive the recognition of a personal property right in their biological material as the best means to serve two goals: to secure ongoing control over their samples after donation and to underpin their claim for a share in the proceeds that the research on their samples may yield. Given the objective of ensuring ongoing control, this property right is claimed to be inalienable. Recognition of a personal property right in one’s biological material is problematic, especially where the requirement of inalienability seems at odds with the claim for a share of the profits. Yet, property rights in human biological material may be justified in a certain context, e.g. to enable subsets of patients to negotiate the terms and conditions of the research into their specific disorders. Biobanks, however, contain so many samples, which can be used for so many research purposes, that the unrestricted exercise of personal property rights by the sample donors will lead to a proliferation of rights. This proliferation is likely to deter or slow down both the creation of de novo Biobanks and the use of existing sample collections. Thus, recognising inalienable property rights in human biological material may lead to suboptimal use of these resources and create a classic ‘anticommons property’ scenario. It would also undermine the current trend to simplify existing informed consent requirements which aims to facilitate broad and previously unanticipated research on de novo and existing Biobanks. In addition, the tradition of altruistic participation in research and the notion that large-scale collections of human biological material are global public goods are arguments against

  1. A biological method of including mineralized human liquid and solid wastes into the mass exchange of bio-technical life support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushakova, S. A.; Tikhomirov, A. A.; Tikhomirova, N. A.; Kudenko, Yu. A.; Litovka, Yu. A.; Anishchenko, O. V.

    2012-10-01

    The main obstacle to using mineralized human solid and liquid wastes as a source of mineral elements for plants cultivated in bio-technical life support systems (BLSS) is that they contain NaCl. The purpose of this study is to determine whether mineralized human wastes can be used to prepare the nutrient solution for long-duration conveyor cultivation of uneven-aged wheat and Salicornia europaea L. plant community. Human solid and liquid wastes were mineralized by the method of "wet incineration" developed by Yu. Kudenko. They served as a basis for preparing the solutions that were used for conveyor-type cultivation of wheat community represented by 5 age groups, planted with a time interval of 14 days. Wheat was cultivated hydroponically on expanded clay particles. To reduce salt content of the nutrient solution, every two weeks, after wheat was harvested, 12 L of solution was removed from the wheat irrigation tank and used for Salicornia europaea cultivation in water culture in a conveyor mode. The Salicornia community was represented by 2 age groups, planted with a time interval of 14 days. As some portion of the nutrient solution used for wheat cultivation was regularly removed, sodium concentration in the wheat irrigation solution did not exceed 400 mg/L, and mineral elements contained in the removed portion were used for Salicornia cultivation. The experiment lasted 4 months. The total wheat biomass productivity averaged 30.1 g · m-2 · day-1, and the harvest index amounted to 36.8%. The average productivity of Salicornia edible biomass on a dry weight basis was 39.3 g · m-2 · day-1, and its aboveground mass contained at least 20% of NaCl. Thus, the proposed technology of cultivation of wheat and halophyte plant community enables using mineralized human wastes as a basis for preparing nutrient solutions and including NaCl in the mass exchange of the BLSS; moreover, humans are supplied with additional amounts of leafy vegetables.

  2. Promoting Scientific Transparency to Facilitate the Safe and Open International Exchange of Biological Materials and Electronic Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth B. Yeh

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Scientific communication, collaboration and progress are enhanced through the exchange of data, materials and ideas. Recent advances in technology, commercial proprietary discovery and current local and global events (e.g., emerging human, animal and plant disease outbreaks have increased the demand, and shortened optimal timelines for material and data exchange, both domestically and internationally. Specific circumstances in each case, such as the type of material being transferred (i.e., select agent, disease-causing agent and assessed biosafety risk level and current events, dictate the level of agreements and requirements. Recent lessons learned from emerging disease issues and emergencies have demonstrated that human engagement and increased science diplomacy are needed to reinforce and sustain biosafety and biosecurity practices and processes, for better scientific transparency. A reasonable and accepted framework of guidance for open sharing of data and materials is needed that can be applied on multiple cooperative levels, including global and national. Although numerous agreement variations already exist for the exchange of materials and data, regulations to guide the development of both the language and implementation of such agreements are limited. Without such regulations, scientific exchange is often restricted, limiting opportunities for international capacity building, collaboration and cooperation. In this article, we present and discuss several international case histories that illustrate the complex nature of scientific exchange. Recommendations are made for a dual bottom-up and top-down approach that includes all stakeholders from beginning negotiation stages to emphasize trust and cooperation. The broader aim of this approach is to increase international scientific transparency and trust in a safe and open manner, supporting increased global one health security.

  3. Investigations on construction material and construction concepts in order to obtain dose-reducing effects in the dismantling of the biological shield of a 1300 MWe-PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittner, A.; Jungwirth, D.; Knell, M.; Schnitzler, L.

    1984-04-01

    Numerical values of neutron fluxes, activations, dose rates etc. as a function of characteristic values of materials required for optimization purposes to reduce the radiation effect of the biological shield of a PWR are not available. Design concepts are presented for biological shields of PWRs made of concrete with respect to both the most suitable application of materials and the design principles aiming at reduced radiation exposure as compared to present designs during entering, waste disposal and ultimate storage. To evaluate the present-state design the above values have been calculated. Suggested alternative designs are biological shields with selective material application, built from precast elements with or without boron carbide layer arranged in front of it. (orig./HP) [de

  4. Mechanical, Biological and Electrochemical Investigations of Advanced Micro/Nano Materials for Tissue Engineering and Energy Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Juan

    Various micro/nano materials have been extensively studied for applications in tissue engineering and energy storage. Tissue engineering seeks to repair or replace damaged tissue by integrating approaches from cellular/molecular biology and material chemistry/engineering. A major challenge is the consistent design of three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds that mimic the structure and biological functions of extracellular matrix (ECM), guide cell migration, provide mechanical support, and regulate cell activity. Electrospun micro/nanofibers have been investigated as promising tissue engineering scaffolds because they resemble native ECM and possess tunable surface morphologies. Supercapacitors, one of the energy storage devices, bridge the performance gap between rechargeable batteries and conventional capacitors. Active electrode materials of supercapacitors must possess high specific surface area, high conductivity, and good electrochemical properties. Carbon-based micro/nano-particles, such as graphene, activated carbon (AC), and carbon nanotubes, are commonly used as active electrode materials for storing charge in supercapacitors by the electrical double layer mechanism due to their high specific surface area and excellent conductivity. In this thesis, the mechanical properties of electrospun bilayer microfibrous membranes were investigated for potential applications in tissue engineering. Bilayer microfibrous membranes of poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) were fabricated by electrospinning using a parallel-disk mandrel configuration, which resulted in the sequential deposition of a layer with aligned fibers (AFL) across the two parallel disks and a layer with random fibers (RFL), both deposited by a single process step. The membrane structure and fiber alignment were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and two-dimensional fast Fourier transform. Because of the intricacies of the generated electric field, the bilayer membranes exhibited higher porosity than the

  5. A rapid neutron activation method for the determination of traces of mercury. The mercury content of biological material of differing geographical and chronological origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohde, H.

    1975-08-01

    A rapid method based on activation analysis has been developed for the determination of mercury in biological material. The method employs the delayed gamma rays as prompt gamma rays have been shown to display insufficient sensitivity. The mercury content of 182 fish derived from the waters of the region of South Western Germany has been determined. Relatively high concentrations (> 1 ppm) have been measured in the muscle of Rhine fish. Similar mercury contents have been observed in aged biological material (birds feathers and human hair) and contemporary living organisms. (orig.) [de

  6. Three-year summary report of biological monitoring at the Southwest Ocean dredged-material disposal site and additional locations off Grays Harbor, Washington, 1990--1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antrim, L.D.; Shreffler, D.K.; Pearson, W.H.; Cullinan, V.I. [Battelle Marine Research Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1992-12-01

    The Grays Harbor Navigation Improvement Project was initiated to improve navigation by widening and deepening the federal channel at Grays Harbor. Dredged-material disposal sites were selected after an extensive review process that included inter-agency agreements, biological surveys, other laboratory and field studies, and preparation of environmental impact statements The Southwest Site, was designated to receive materials dredged during annual maintenance dredging as well as the initial construction phase of the project. The Southwest Site was located, and the disposal operations designed, primarily to avoid impacts to Dungeness crab. The Final Environmental Impact Statement Supplement for the project incorporated a Site Monitoring Plan in which a tiered approach to disposal site monitoring was recommended. Under Tier I of the Site Monitoring Plan, Dungeness crab densities are monitored to confirm that large aggregations of newly settled Dungeness crab have not moved onto the Southwest Site. Tier 2 entails an increased sampling effort to determine whether a change in disposal operations is needed. Four epibenthic surveys using beam trawls were conducted in 1990, 1991, and 1992 at the Southwest Site and North Reference area, where high crab concentrations were found in the spring of 1985. Survey results during these three years prompted no Tier 2 activities. Epibenthic surveys were also conducted at two nearshore sites where construction of sediment berms has been proposed. This work is summarized in an appendix to this report.

  7. [Toxicological analysis of biological material originating from the body of general Władysław Sikorski for organic poisons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechowicz, Wojciech

    2009-01-01

    Toxicological analyses performed in individuals who died in unclear circumstances constitute a key element of research aiming at providing a complete explanation of cause of death. The entire panel of examinations of the corpse of general Sikorski also included toxicological analyses for drugs and organic poisons of synthetic and natural origin. Attention was focused on fast-acting and potent poisons known and used in the forties of the century. The internal organs (stomach, liver, lung, brain) and hair, as well as other materials collected from the body and found in the coffin were analyzed. The classic method of sample preparation, i.e. homogenization, deproteinization, headspace and liquid-liquid extraction were applied. Hyphenated methods, mainly chromatographic with mass spectrometry were used for identification of the analytes. Organic poisons were not identified in the material as a result of the research.

  8. Materialism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnyk, Andrew

    2012-05-01

    Materialism is nearly universally assumed by cognitive scientists. Intuitively, materialism says that a person's mental states are nothing over and above his or her material states, while dualism denies this. Philosophers have introduced concepts (e.g., realization and supervenience) to assist in formulating the theses of materialism and dualism with more precision, and distinguished among importantly different versions of each view (e.g., eliminative materialism, substance dualism, and emergentism). They have also clarified the logic of arguments that use empirical findings to support materialism. Finally, they have devised various objections to materialism, objections that therefore serve also as arguments for dualism. These objections typically center around two features of mental states that materialism has had trouble in accommodating. The first feature is intentionality, the property of representing, or being about, objects, properties, and states of affairs external to the mental states. The second feature is phenomenal consciousness, the property possessed by many mental states of there being something it is like for the subject of the mental state to be in that mental state. WIREs Cogn Sci 2012, 3:281-292. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1174 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Biologic Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Alessandra; Naranjo, Juan Diego; Londono, Ricardo; Badylak, Stephen F

    2017-09-01

    Biologic scaffold materials composed of allogeneic or xenogeneic extracellular matrix are commonly used for the repair and functional reconstruction of injured and missing tissues. These naturally occurring bioscaffolds are manufactured by the removal of the cellular content from source tissues while preserving the structural and functional molecular units of the remaining extracellular matrix (ECM). The mechanisms by which these bioscaffolds facilitate constructive remodeling and favorable clinical outcomes include release or creation of effector molecules that recruit endogenous stem/progenitor cells to the site of scaffold placement and modulation of the innate immune response, specifically the activation of an anti-inflammatory macrophage phenotype. The methods by which ECM biologic scaffolds are prepared, the current understanding of in vivo scaffold remodeling, and the associated clinical outcomes are discussed in this article. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  10. The Accessibility of Learning Content for All Students, Including Students with Disabilities, Must Be Addressed in the Shift to Digital Instructional Materials. SETDA Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Geoff; Levin, Doug; Lipper, Katherine; Leichty, Reg

    2014-01-01

    This is a time of rapid technological advancement, with innovations in education holding great promise for improving teaching and learning, particularly for students with unique needs. High-quality digital educational materials, tools, and resources offer students relevant, up-to-date, and innovative ways to acquire knowledge and skills. Created…

  11. Biologically active nanocomposite of DNA-PbS nanoparticles: A new material for non-volatile memory devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgunde, B. K.; Rabinal, M. K.; Kalasad, M. N.

    2018-01-01

    Composite films of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and lead sulfide (PbS) nanoparticles are prepared to fabricate biological memory devices. A simple solution based electrografting is developed to deposit large (few cm2) uniform films of DNA:PbS on conducting substrates. The films are studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, field emission SEM, FTIR and optical spectroscopy to understand their properties. Charge transport measurements are carried out on ITO-DNA:PbS-metal junctions by cyclic voltage scans, electrical bi-stability is observed with ON/OFF ratio more than ∼104 times with good stability and endurance, such performance being rarely reported. The observed results are interpreted in the light of strong electrostatic binding of nanoparticles and DNA stands, which leads doping of Pb atoms into DNA. As a result, these devices exhibit negative differential resistance (NDR) effect due to oxidation of doped metal atoms. These composites can be the potential materials in the development of new generation non-volatile memory devices.

  12. Carbon nanotube-reinforced mesoporous hydroxyapatite composites with excellent mechanical and biological properties for bone replacement material application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haipeng; Song, Xiaoqing; Li, Baoe; Kang, Jianli; Liang, Chunyong; Wang, Hongshui; Yu, Zhenyang; Qiao, Zhijun

    2017-08-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)-reinforced mesoporous hydroxyapatite (HA) composites with excellent mechanical and biological properties were fabricated successfully by the in situ chemical deposition of mesoporous HA on homogeneously dispersed CNTs. The CNTs are first synthesized in situ on HA nanopowders by chemical vapor deposition, and then, the HA particles with mesoporous structures are deposited in situ onto the as-grown CNTs by using cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide as templates to form mesoporous HA encapsulated CNTs (CNT@meso-HA). The modification of CNTs by mesoporous HA leads to strong CNT-HA interfacial bonding, resulting in efficient load transfer between CNT and HA and improved mechanical properties of CNT/HA composites. More importantly, the mesoporous HA structure has a high specific surface area and large surface roughness that greatly promote the cell adhesion and proliferation, resulting in better biocompatibility and improved osteoblast viability (MC3T3-E1) compared to those fabricated by traditional methods. Therefore, the obtained CNT@meso-HA composites are expected to be promising materials for bone regeneration and implantation applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Instrumental neutron activation analysis of biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guinn, V.P.; Gavrilas, M.

    1990-01-01

    The elemental compositions of 18 biological reference materials have been processed, for 14 stepped combinations of irradiation/decay/counting times, by the INAA Advance Prediction Computer Program. The 18 materials studied include 11 plant materials, 5 animal materials, and 2 other biological materials. Of these 18 materials, 14 are NBS Standard Reference Materials and four are IAEA reference materials. Overall, the results show that a mean of 52% of the input elements can be determined to a relative standard deviation of ±10% or better by reactor flux (thermal plus epithermal) INAA

  14. Restricted access magnetic materials prepared by dual surface modification for selective extraction of therapeutic drugs from biological fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Yu; Wang Yuxia; Chen Lei [School of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Wan Qianhong, E-mail: qhwan@tju.edu.cn [School of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2012-02-15

    Magnetic porous particles with dual functionality have been prepared by a two-step procedure and evaluated as novel restricted access materials for extraction of therapeutic agents from biological fluids. The magnetic silica particles served as scaffolds were first modified with diol groups, which were then converted to octadecyl esters through reaction with stearoyl chloride. In the second step, the octadecyl esters on the exterior surface were hydrolyzed by the action of lipase to yield magnetic particles with hydrophobic reversed-phase ligands on the inner surface and biocompatible diol groups on the outer surface. The restricted access behavior of the resulting materials was confirmed by differential binding of small molecules such as methotrexate (MTX), leucovorin (LV) and folic acid (FA) relative to bovine serum albumin. While MTX, LV and FA were all bound to the magnetic particles with high affinity, the adsorption of the protein was markedly reduced due to size exclusion effect. The utility of the magnetic particles for sample preparation was tested in solid-phase extraction of MTX, LV and FA from spiked human serum and the effects of the SPE conditions on the recovery of the analytes were systematically studied. Moreover, the magnetic particle-based sample preparation procedure coupled with reversed-phase liquid chromatography analysis was validated in terms of specificity, linearity and reproducibility. The method was shown to be free from interference of endogenous compounds and linear over the concentration range of 0.5-10 {mu}g/mL for the three drugs studied. The limits of detection for the three drugs in serum were in the range of 0.160-0.302 {mu}g/mL. Reproducibility expressed as the RSD of the recovery for ten replicated extractions at three different concentrations was found to be less than 8.93%. With a unique combination of surface functionality with magnetic cores, the restricted access magnetic particles may be adapted in automated and high

  15. Restricted access magnetic materials prepared by dual surface modification for selective extraction of therapeutic drugs from biological fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yu; Wang Yuxia; Chen Lei; Wan Qianhong

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic porous particles with dual functionality have been prepared by a two-step procedure and evaluated as novel restricted access materials for extraction of therapeutic agents from biological fluids. The magnetic silica particles served as scaffolds were first modified with diol groups, which were then converted to octadecyl esters through reaction with stearoyl chloride. In the second step, the octadecyl esters on the exterior surface were hydrolyzed by the action of lipase to yield magnetic particles with hydrophobic reversed-phase ligands on the inner surface and biocompatible diol groups on the outer surface. The restricted access behavior of the resulting materials was confirmed by differential binding of small molecules such as methotrexate (MTX), leucovorin (LV) and folic acid (FA) relative to bovine serum albumin. While MTX, LV and FA were all bound to the magnetic particles with high affinity, the adsorption of the protein was markedly reduced due to size exclusion effect. The utility of the magnetic particles for sample preparation was tested in solid-phase extraction of MTX, LV and FA from spiked human serum and the effects of the SPE conditions on the recovery of the analytes were systematically studied. Moreover, the magnetic particle-based sample preparation procedure coupled with reversed-phase liquid chromatography analysis was validated in terms of specificity, linearity and reproducibility. The method was shown to be free from interference of endogenous compounds and linear over the concentration range of 0.5-10 μg/mL for the three drugs studied. The limits of detection for the three drugs in serum were in the range of 0.160-0.302 μg/mL. Reproducibility expressed as the RSD of the recovery for ten replicated extractions at three different concentrations was found to be less than 8.93%. With a unique combination of surface functionality with magnetic cores, the restricted access magnetic particles may be adapted in automated and high

  16. Evaluation of the physicochemical properties of coffee chaff when subjected to a biological treatment and its potential impact as a raw material in subsequent biological processes or thermochemical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valverde Camacho, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    An investigation is carried out using white rot fungi in coffee pulp to study the impact on the physicochemical properties. The use of brushwood in thermochemical processes, biochemists is evaluated for later use and production of energy or any product with added value. The strain is selected by growth in Petri dishes and fresh pulp is then inoculated with a strain of Trametes versicolor and Pleurotus ostreatus one. Each treatment was maintained in growth for seven weeks . The measurement of each of the response variables used were subsequently performed to characterize the fresh pulp, including: concentration of cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, extractables total polyphenols, total ash, moisture, combustion heat and thermal gravimetric analysis. Measurements in the fresh pulp and brushwood-fungal matrix is performed at the end of treatment. An impact on the concentration of extractable total polyphenols is obtained with an apparent reduction of 87.7% in the treated Pult with Trametes versicolor and 80.5% in the treated with Pleurotus ostreatus, with regard to the fresh brushwood. Lignin concentration was affected; however, errors were found in the analytical method associated with the presence of the fungus in the analysis, leading to erroneous readings in the measurement parameter. Thermogravimetric analysis have allowed to observe a change in the whole matrix microorganism-brushwood. The biological treatment has generated a positive impact on the region pyrolysis at temperatures in the range of 150 to 400 degrees centigrade, improving processes of decomposition. Both treatments have shown a stabilization of the thermolysis in the region of temperatures above 400 degrees centigrade. The impact on a larger scale of the pre-treatment is evaluated on the gasification process, specifically on the production of tars has been necessary for field tests in a pilot team and in the same way for the case of enzymatic fermentation. Tests of ergosterol concentration and

  17. Two-stage coal liquefaction process materials from the Wilsonville Facility operated in the nonintegrated and integrated modes: chemical analyses and biological testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Later, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    This document reports the results from chemical analyses and biological testing of process materials sampled during operation of the Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility (Wilsonville, Alabama) in both the noncoupled or nonintegrated (NTSL Run 241) and coupled or integrated (ITSL Run 242) two-stage liquefaction operating modes. Mutagenicity and carcinogenicity assays were conducted in conjunction with chromatographic and mass spectrometric analyses to provide detailed, comparative chemical and biological assessments of several NTSL and ITSL process materials. In general, the NTSL process materials were biologically more active and chemically more refractory than analogous ITSL process materials. To provide perspective, the NTSL and ITSL results are compared with those from similar testing and analyses of other direct coal liquefaction materials from the solvent refined coal (SRC) I, SRC II and EDS processes. Comparisons are also made between two-stage coal liquefaction materials from the Wilsonville pilot plant and the C.E. Lummus PDU-ITSL Facility in an effort to assess scale-up effects in these two similar processes. 36 references, 26 figures, 37 tables.

  18. Development of symmetric composition-gradient materials including hard particles in its surface layer; Hyosobu ni koshitsu ryushi wo fukumu taishogata sosei keisha zairyo no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    Development of new materials with both thermal resistance and thermal shock resistance was studied on the basis of symmetric ceramics/metal/ceramics gradient composition. Al2O3/TiC/Ni/TiC/Al2O3 was used as material model of basic composition, and the system was selected where WC-Co system alloy hard particles were dispersed into the Al2O3 ceramic surface layer. The layered material was sintered in N2 gas atmosphere by SHS/HIP method using exothermic caused by nitriding reaction. Since cracks were generated in some specimens of 5-layer structure, improved specimens of 7-layer structure were prepared. To examine the effect of a particle size on toughness, WC-Co system alloy specimens with different particle sizes were also prepared. As a result, no cracks were found, and residual stress and fracture toughness were affected by particle size. In addition, the following were studied: technique of mass production, observation of fine structures, analysis of thermal stress, thermal shock resistance, and friction and abrasion characteristics. 13 refs., 65 figs., 15 tabs.

  19. The Development of Biology Teaching Material Based on the Local Wisdom of Timorese to Improve Students Knowledge and Attitude of Environment in Caring the Preservation of Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardan, Andam S.

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were (1) to describe the biology learning such as lesson plans, teaching materials, media and worksheets for the tenth grade of High School on the topic of Biodiversity and Basic Classification, Ecosystems and Environment Issues based on local wisdom of Timorese; (2) to analyze the improvement of the environmental…

  20. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; preparation procedure for aquatic biological material determined for trace metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Gerald L.

    1996-01-01

    A method for the chemical preparation of tissue samples that are subsequently analyzed for 22 trace metals is described. The tissue-preparation procedure was tested with three National Institute of Standards and Technology biological standard reference materials and two National Water Quality Laboratory homogenized biological materials. A low-temperature (85 degrees Celsius) nitric acid digestion followed by the careful addition of hydrogen peroxide (30-percent solution) is used to decompose the biological material. The solutions are evaporated to incipient dryness, reconstituted with 5 percent nitric acid, and filtered. After filtration the solutions were diluted to a known volume and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), and cold vapor-atomic absorption spectrophotometry (CV-AAS). Many of the metals were determined by both ICP-MS and ICP-AES. This report does not provide a detailed description of the instrumental procedures and conditions used with the three types of instrumentation for the quantitation of trace metals determined in this study. Statistical data regarding recovery, accuracy, and precision for individual trace metals determined in the biological material tested are summarized.

  1. Thermomechanical model for NiTi-based shape memory alloys including R-phase and material anisotropy under multi-axial loadings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedlák, Petr; Frost, Miroslav; Benešová, Barbora; Zineb, T.B.; Šittner, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 39, DEC 2012 (2012), s. 132-151 ISSN 0749-6419 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/10/1296; GA ČR GA106/09/1573; GA ČR(CZ) GA101/09/0702; GA ČR GAP107/12/0800 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514; CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : shape memory alloys * constitutive modeling * R-phase * non-proportional loading * dissipation function Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics; JJ - Other Materials (FZU-D) Impact factor: 4.356, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0749641912001027

  2. Restricted access magnetic materials prepared by dual surface modification for selective extraction of therapeutic drugs from biological fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Yuxia; Chen, Lei; Wan, Qian-Hong

    2012-02-01

    Magnetic porous particles with dual functionality have been prepared by a two-step procedure and evaluated as novel restricted access materials for extraction of therapeutic agents from biological fluids. The magnetic silica particles served as scaffolds were first modified with diol groups, which were then converted to octadecyl esters through reaction with stearoyl chloride. In the second step, the octadecyl esters on the exterior surface were hydrolyzed by the action of lipase to yield magnetic particles with hydrophobic reversed-phase ligands on the inner surface and biocompatible diol groups on the outer surface. The restricted access behavior of the resulting materials was confirmed by differential binding of small molecules such as methotrexate (MTX), leucovorin (LV) and folic acid (FA) relative to bovine serum albumin. While MTX, LV and FA were all bound to the magnetic particles with high affinity, the adsorption of the protein was markedly reduced due to size exclusion effect. The utility of the magnetic particles for sample preparation was tested in solid-phase extraction of MTX, LV and FA from spiked human serum and the effects of the SPE conditions on the recovery of the analytes were systematically studied. Moreover, the magnetic particle-based sample preparation procedure coupled with reversed-phase liquid chromatography analysis was validated in terms of specificity, linearity and reproducibility. The method was shown to be free from interference of endogenous compounds and linear over the concentration range of 0.5-10 μg/mL for the three drugs studied. The limits of detection for the three drugs in serum were in the range of 0.160-0.302 μg/mL. Reproducibility expressed as the RSD of the recovery for ten replicated extractions at three different concentrations was found to be less than 8.93%. With a unique combination of surface functionality with magnetic cores, the restricted access magnetic particles may be adapted in automated and high

  3. Determination of Single Sugars, Including Inulin, in Plants and Feed Materials by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography and Refraction Index Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Weiß

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The exact and reliable detection of sugar monomers and fructans provides important information for the evaluation of carbohydrate metabolism in plants and animals. Using the HPLC method; a large number of samples and single sugars; with both high sensitivity and selectivity; may be analysed. It was shown that the described method—using a Nucleosil column loaded with Pb2+ ions; a refractive index detector (RID; and HPLC-grade water as the eluent—gives precise and reproducible results regarding the detection of individual sugars in extracts of plants and feed materials. The method can be applied for the detection of sucrose; maltose; lactose; xylose; glucose; galactose; arabinose; fructose; ribose; and mannitol. Furthermore; depending on the plant material; the sugars verbascose; stachyose; and raffinose can be separated. The peaks were well resolved and the reproducibility of the analysis; with 94–108% of recovery (RC and relative standard deviation (RSD of up to 5%; was very good. The method was successfully applied to a variety of green forages and samples of sugar beet pulp silages. It is also possible to determine fructan with inulin as a standard; together with the other sugars; or alone by a different protocol and column.

  4. Creating biological nanomaterials using synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, MaryJoe K; Ruder, Warren C

    2014-02-01

    Synthetic biology is a new discipline that combines science and engineering approaches to precisely control biological networks. These signaling networks are especially important in fields such as biomedicine and biochemical engineering. Additionally, biological networks can also be critical to the production of naturally occurring biological nanomaterials, and as a result, synthetic biology holds tremendous potential in creating new materials. This review introduces the field of synthetic biology, discusses how biological systems naturally produce materials, and then presents examples and strategies for incorporating synthetic biology approaches in the development of new materials. In particular, strategies for using synthetic biology to produce both organic and inorganic nanomaterials are discussed. Ultimately, synthetic biology holds the potential to dramatically impact biological materials science with significant potential applications in medical systems.

  5. Creating biological nanomaterials using synthetic biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice, MaryJoe K; Ruder, Warren C

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic biology is a new discipline that combines science and engineering approaches to precisely control biological networks. These signaling networks are especially important in fields such as biomedicine and biochemical engineering. Additionally, biological networks can also be critical to the production of naturally occurring biological nanomaterials, and as a result, synthetic biology holds tremendous potential in creating new materials. This review introduces the field of synthetic biology, discusses how biological systems naturally produce materials, and then presents examples and strategies for incorporating synthetic biology approaches in the development of new materials. In particular, strategies for using synthetic biology to produce both organic and inorganic nanomaterials are discussed. Ultimately, synthetic biology holds the potential to dramatically impact biological materials science with significant potential applications in medical systems. (review)

  6. Discharge and water-quality data for selected streams at low flow including some bottom-material analyses, and limnological study of six lakes, Westchester County, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Roger J.; Turk, John T.

    1977-01-01

    Water-quality data collected at sites on 33 Westchester County, N.Y., streams August 4 to 6, 1976 during low flow (80-percent or more duration) indicate that although the chemical characteristics of most streams met State standards for water-supply source waters, none met the coliform standard, and several failed to meet standards for organic nitrogen, pH, and dissolved oxygen. Chemical analyses of bottom materials indicated detectable concentrations of the insecticides chlordane, dieldrin, and DDT at most of the 17 stream sites sampled. Polychlorinated biphenyls(PCB's) were found in more than half the samples, and the lead concentration on one stream was significantly higher than at the other sites. The six lakes studied are similar in bedrock geology, climate, and algal types and numbers. Minor differences in the chemistry of the lakes is attributable to the presence or absence of marble (calcium carbonate) in the gneissic basins, septic loadings of soluble constituents, or runoff containing salt from winter road deicing. The lakes probably receive most of their water by direct runoff and groundwater seepage rather than from major streams. All six lakes can be classed as eutrophic on the basis of algal type and density, dissolved-oxygen distribution, and nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations. (Woodard-USGS)

  7. High Precision Zinc Stable Isotope Measurement of Certified Biological Reference Materials Using the Double Spike Technique and Multiple Collector-ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Rebekah E T; Larner, Fiona; Coles, Barry J; Rehkämper, Mark

    2017-04-01

    Biological reference materials with well-characterised stable isotope compositions are lacking in the field of 'isotope biochemistry', which seeks to understand bodily processes that rely on essential metals by determining metal stable isotope ratios. Here, we present Zn stable isotope data for six biological reference materials with certified trace metal concentrations: fish muscle, bovine muscle, pig kidney, human hair, human blood serum and human urine. Replicate analyses of multiple aliquots of each material achieved reproducibilities (2sd) of 0.04-0.13‰ for δ 66/64 Zn (which denotes the deviation of the 66 Zn/ 64 Zn ratio of a sample from a pure Zn reference material in parts per 1000). This implies only very minor isotopic heterogeneities within the samples, rendering them suitable as quality control materials for Zn isotope analyses. This endorsement is reinforced by (i) the close agreement of our Zn isotope data for two of the samples (bovine muscle and human blood serum) to previously published results for different batches of the same material and (ii) the similarity of the isotopic data for the samples (δ 66/64 Zn ≈ -0.8 to 0.0‰) to previously published Zn isotope results for similar biological materials. Further tests revealed that the applied Zn separation procedure is sufficiently effective to enable accurate data acquisition even at low mass resolving power (M/ΔM ≈ 400), as measurements and analyses conducted at much higher mass resolution (M/ΔM ≈ 8500) delivered essentially identical results.

  8. Final Report of “Collaborative research: Fundamental science of low temperature plasma-biological material interactions” (Award# DE-SC0005105)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oehrlein, Gottlieb S. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Seog, Joonil [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Graves, David [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Chu, J. -W. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-09-24

    Low temperature plasma (LTP) treatment of biological tissue is a promising path toward sterilization of bacteria due to its versatility and ability to operate under well-controlled and relatively mild conditions. The present collaborative research of an interdisciplinary team of investigators at University of Maryland, College Park (UMD), and University of California, Berkeley (UCB) focused on establishing our knowledge on low temperature plasma-induced chemical modifications in biomolecules that result in inactivation due to various plasma species, including ions, reactive radicals, and UV/VUV photons. The overall goals of the project were to identify the mechanisms by which low and atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) deactivates endotoxic biomolecules. Additionally, we wanted to understand how deactivation processes depend on the interaction of APP with the environment. Various low pressure plasma sources, a vacuum beam system and several atmospheric pressure plasma sources were used to accomplish these objectives. In our work we elucidated for the first time the role of ions, VUV photons and radicals in biological deactivation of model endotoxic biomolecules, both in a UHV beam system and an inductively coupled, low pressure plasma system, and established the associated atomistic modifications in biomolecules. While we showed that both ions and VUV photons can be very efficient in deactivation of biomolecules, significant etching and/or deep modification (~200 nm) were accompanied by these biological effects. One of the most important findings in this work is that the significant deactivation and surface modification can occur with minimal etching using radical species. However, if radical fluxes and corresponding etch rates are relatively high, for example, at atmospheric pressure, inactivation of endotoxic biomolecule film may require near-complete removal of the film. These findings motivated further work at atmospheric pressure using several types of low

  9. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) Facility at BATAN for Nanostructure Studies in Materials Science and Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putra, E. Giri Rachman

    2010-01-01

    structure of n-dodecyl-β-D-maltoside (β-DMS) core-shell micelle has been revealed by applying a contrast variation, H2O/D2O mixture. Preliminary investigation of globular protein on folding-unfolding, protein denaturation and protein self-assembly studies is being performed. It can be concluded that SMARTer, a 36 m SANS BATAN spectrometer becomes a major tool for structural investigations in the effective length scale of 1-100 nm in materials science and biology.

  10. Research on condensed matter and atomic physics using major experimental facilities and devices: Physics, chemistry, biology. Reports on results. Vol. 2. 3. Solid state physics and materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report in three volumes substantiates the contents of the programme survey published in September 1989. The progress reports cover the following research areas: Vol. I, (1). Atomic and molecular physics - free atoms, molecules, macromolecules, clusters, matrix-isolated atoms and molecules. (2) Physics and chemistry of surfaces and interfaces - epitaxy, surface structure, adsorption, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties, thin films, synthetic layer structure. Vol. II, (3). Solid-state physics, and materials science -structural research, lattice dynamics, magnetic structure and dynamics, electronic states; load; spin and pulse density fluctuations; diffusion and internal motion, defects, unordered systems and liquids. Vol. III, (4). Chemistry - bonding and structure, kinetics and reaction mechanisms, polymer research, analysis and synthesis. (5). Biology, - structure and dynamics of biological macromolecules, membrane and cell biology. (6) Development of methods and instruments - neutron sources, synchrotron sources, special accelerators, research with interlinked systems and devices. (orig.) [de

  11. Biological therapeutics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Greenstein, Ben; Brook, Daniel A

    2011-01-01

    This introductory textbook covers all the main categories of biological medicines, including vaccines, hormonal preparations, drugs for rheumatoid arthritis and other connective tissue diseases, drugs...

  12. Application of direct solid sample analysis for the determination of chlorine in biological materials using electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos de Gois, Jefferson; Pereira, Éderson R. [Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-970 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Welz, Bernhard [Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-970 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); INCT de Energia e Ambiente do CNPq (Brazil); Borges, Daniel L.G., E-mail: daniel.borges@ufsc.br [Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-970 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); INCT de Energia e Ambiente do CNPq (Brazil)

    2015-03-01

    This work describes a methodology developed to carry out Cl determination in biological materials using electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and direct solid sample analysis. The solid samples were directly weighed into graphite ‘cups’ and inserted into the graphite furnace. The RF power and the carrier gas flow rate were optimized at 1300 W and 0.7 L min{sup −1}, respectively. Calibration could be carried out using aqueous standard solutions with pre-dried modifiers (Pd + Nd or Pd + Ca) or using solid certified reference materials with the same pre-dried modifiers or without the use of modifiers. The limit of quantification was determined as 5 μg g{sup −1} under optimized conditions and the Cl concentration was determined in five certified reference materials with certified concentrations for Cl, in addition to three certified reference materials, for which certified values for Cl were unavailable; in the latter case, the results were compared with those obtained using high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption spectrometry. Good agreement at a 95% statistical confidence level was achieved between determined and certified or reference values. - Highlights: • Direct determination of chlorine in solid biological materials is described for the first time using ICP-MS. • Calibration against aqueous standards is feasible. • The method is accurate and sensitive, regardless of the composition of the solid sample.

  13. Pakistan's national legislation entitled: 'Export Control on Goods, Technologies, Material and Equipment related to Nuclear and Biological Weapons and their Delivery Systems Act, 2004'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The Director General has received a letter from the Permanent Mission of Pakistan, dated 4 November 2004, concerning Pakistan's national legislation entitled 'Export Control on Goods, Technologies, Material and Equipment related to Nuclear and Biological Weapons and their Delivery Systems Act, 2004'. As requested by the Permanent Mission of Pakistan, the letter and the Export Control Act of 2004, are reproduced herein for the information of the Member States

  14. Detecting Illicit Nuclear Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouzes, Richard T.

    2005-01-01

    The threat that weapons of mass destruction might enter the United States has led to a number of efforts for the detection and interdiction of nuclear, radiological, chemical, and biological weapons at our borders. There have been multiple deployments of instrumentation to detect radiation signatures to interdict radiological material, including weapons and weapons material worldwide

  15. Verification of biological activity of irradiated Sopoongsan, an oriental medicinal prescription, for industrial application of functional cosmetic material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jin-Young; Park, Tae-Soon; Ho Son, Jun; Jo, Cheorun; Woo Byun, Myung; Jeun An, Bong

    2007-01-01

    Sopoongsan is an oriental medicinal prescription including 12 medicinal herbs. Sopoongsan is known to have anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, anti-allergic, and anti-cancer effects on human skin. To use Sopoongsan extract for functional cosmetic composition, its dark color should be brighter for seeking consumer demand, clear products, without any adverse change in its function. Irradiation with doses 0, 5, 10, and 20 kGy was applied to improve color of ethanol- or water-extracted Sopoongsan and also superoxide dismutase (SOD), xanthine oxidase (XO), melanoma cell growth inhibition, and anti-microbial activity was investigated. Generally, ethanol extract was better than water extract in function and irradiation up to 20 kGy did not change any functional effect. Especially, the inhibition of melanin deposition on skin measured by inhibition of B16F10 (melanoma) cell growth was as high as arbutin, commercially available product, when the ethanol-extracted Sopoongsan was irradiated for 20 kGy. Results showed that when irradiation technology is used, the limitation of addition amount of natural materials for food or cosmetic composition caused by color problem can be decreased significantly with time saving and cost benefit compared to conventional color removal process. Therefore, irradiation would be one of the good methods to pose an additional value for related industry

  16. Verification of biological activity of irradiated Sopoongsan, an oriental medicinal prescription, for industrial application of functional cosmetic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Young; Park, Tae-Soon; Ho Son, Jun; Jo, Cheorun; Woo Byun, Myung; Jeun An, Bong

    2007-11-01

    Sopoongsan is an oriental medicinal prescription including 12 medicinal herbs. Sopoongsan is known to have anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, anti-allergic, and anti-cancer effects on human skin. To use Sopoongsan extract for functional cosmetic composition, its dark color should be brighter for seeking consumer demand, clear products, without any adverse change in its function. Irradiation with doses 0, 5, 10, and 20 kGy was applied to improve color of ethanol- or water-extracted Sopoongsan and also superoxide dismutase (SOD), xanthine oxidase (XO), melanoma cell growth inhibition, and anti-microbial activity was investigated. Generally, ethanol extract was better than water extract in function and irradiation up to 20 kGy did not change any functional effect. Especially, the inhibition of melanin deposition on skin measured by inhibition of B16F10 (melanoma) cell growth was as high as arbutin, commercially available product, when the ethanol-extracted Sopoongsan was irradiated for 20 kGy. Results showed that when irradiation technology is used, the limitation of addition amount of natural materials for food or cosmetic composition caused by color problem can be decreased significantly with time saving and cost benefit compared to conventional color removal process. Therefore, irradiation would be one of the good methods to pose an additional value for related industry.

  17. Verification of biological activity of irradiated Sopoongsan, an oriental medicinal prescription, for industrial application of functional cosmetic material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin-Young; Park, Tae-Soon; Ho Son, Jun [Department of Cosmeceutical Science, Daegu Haany University, Kyungsan 712-715 (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Cheorun [Department of Animal Science and Biotechnology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Woo Byun, Myung [Radiation Food Science and Biotechnology Team, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Jeun An, Bong [Department of Cosmeceutical Science, Daegu Haany University, Kyungsan 712-715 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: anbj@dhu.ac.kr

    2007-11-15

    Sopoongsan is an oriental medicinal prescription including 12 medicinal herbs. Sopoongsan is known to have anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, anti-allergic, and anti-cancer effects on human skin. To use Sopoongsan extract for functional cosmetic composition, its dark color should be brighter for seeking consumer demand, clear products, without any adverse change in its function. Irradiation with doses 0, 5, 10, and 20 kGy was applied to improve color of ethanol- or water-extracted Sopoongsan and also superoxide dismutase (SOD), xanthine oxidase (XO), melanoma cell growth inhibition, and anti-microbial activity was investigated. Generally, ethanol extract was better than water extract in function and irradiation up to 20 kGy did not change any functional effect. Especially, the inhibition of melanin deposition on skin measured by inhibition of B16F10 (melanoma) cell growth was as high as arbutin, commercially available product, when the ethanol-extracted Sopoongsan was irradiated for 20 kGy. Results showed that when irradiation technology is used, the limitation of addition amount of natural materials for food or cosmetic composition caused by color problem can be decreased significantly with time saving and cost benefit compared to conventional color removal process. Therefore, irradiation would be one of the good methods to pose an additional value for related industry.

  18. Biological conversion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, C.D.

    A system for bioconversion of organic material comprises a primary bioreactor column wherein a biological active agent (zymomonas mobilis) converts the organic material (sugar) to a product (alcohol), a rejuvenator column wherein the biological activity of said biological active agent is enhanced, and means for circulating said biological active agent between said primary bioreactor column and said rejuvenator column.

  19. Biological and medical sensor technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Iniewski, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    Biological and Medical Sensor Technologies presents contributions from top experts who explore the development and implementation of sensors for various applications used in medicine and biology. Edited by a pioneer in the area of advanced semiconductor materials, the book is divided into two sections. The first part covers sensors for biological applications. Topics include: Advanced sensing and communication in the biological world DNA-derivative architectures for long-wavelength bio-sensing Label-free silicon photonics Quartz crystal microbalance-based biosensors Lab-on-chip technologies fo

  20. Biological regeneration of ferric ("Fe3+") solution during desulphurisation of gaseous streams: effect of nutrients and support material

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mulopo, J

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates the biological regeneration of ferric Fe3+ solution during desulphurisation of gaseous streams. Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is absorbed into aqueous ferric sulphate solution and oxidised to elemental sulphur, while ferric ions Fe3...

  1. Physics and biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frauenfelder, H.

    1988-01-01

    The author points out that the coupling between physics and biology is becoming closer as time goes on. He tries to show that physical studies on biological systems not only yield insight into biology but also provide results of interest to physics. Biological systems are extremly complex system. Ideally one would like to understand the behavior of such systems in terms of the behavior of its constituent atoms. Since in small organisms this may be 10 20 atoms, it is clear these are not simple many-body systems. He reviews the basic elements of cells and then considers the broader questions of structure, complexity, and function, which must be looked at on levels from the cell to the organism. Despite the vast amount of observational material already in existence, biophysics and biological physics are only at a beginning. We can expect that physics will continue to interact strongly with biology. Actually, the connection also includes chemistry and mathematics. New tools that become available in physics will continue to be applied to biological problems. We can expect that the flow of information will not be one way; biological systems will provide new information on many old and new parts of physics, from reaction theory and transport phenomena to complexity, cooperativity, and nonlinear processes

  2. Genetic relationship of organic bases of the quinoline and isoquinoline series from lignite semicoking tars with the initial biological material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Podshibyakin, S.I.; Domogatskii, V.V.; Shvykin, A.Y.; Shavyrina, O.A.; Chilachava, K.B. [Leo Tolstoy State Pedagog University, Tula (Russian Federation)

    2002-07-01

    The genetic relationship of quinoline and isoquinoline compounds present in semicoking tars of Kimovsk lignites (near-Moscow fields) with the initial vegetable material is discussed. Transformation pathways of the native compounds in the course of lignite formation are suggested.

  3. Cytocompatibility and biologic characteristics of synthetic scaffold materials of rabbit acellular vascular matrix combining with human-like collagen I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuqian; Wang, Jie; Dong, Fusheng; Song, Peng; Tian, Songbo; Li, Hexiang; Hou, Yali

    2017-10-01

    Scaffold material provides a three-dimensional growing environment for seed cells in the research field of tissue engineering. In the present study, rabbit arterial blood vessel cells were chemically removed with trypsin and Triton X-100 to prepare rabbit acellular vascular matrix scaffold material. Observation by He&Masson staining revealed that no cellular components or nuclei existed in the vascular intima and media after decellularization. Human-like collagen I was combined with acellular vascular matrix by freeze-drying to prepare an acellular vascular matrix-0.25% human-like collagen I scaffold to compensate for the extracellular matrix loss during the decellularization process. We next performed a series of experiments to test the water absorbing quality, biomechanics, pressure resistance, cytotoxicity, and ultra-micro structure of the acellular vascular matrix composite material and natural rabbit artery and found that the acellular vascular matrix-0.25% human-like collagen I material behaved similarly to natural rabbit artery. In conclusion, the acellular vascular matrix-0.25% human-like collagen I composite material provides a new approach and lays the foundation for novel scaffold material research into tissue engineering of blood vessels.

  4. Rapid determination of selenium in three kinds of biological standard reference materials using {sup 77m}Se nuclide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Jong Hwa; Kim, Sun Ha; Chung, Yong Sam; Kim, Young Jin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    A number of researches on essential trace elements have been performed in the field of human nutrition and health studies. From this viewpoint, selenium is well known as a strong antioxidant trace element for scavenging free radicals and a fast analytical technique of selenium in biological samples is indispensable for the satisfaction of a customer's request. This study was aimed at establishing an analytical method for the determination of the selenium in biological samples by a neutron activation analysis using the {sup 77m}Se short-lived nuclide. For this purpose, three NIST SRMs were chosen and the concentrations of the selenium were determined under prefixed analytical conditions such as the irradiation time, cooling time and measuring time. The measured values were compared with the certified values. In addition, the detection limits and measurement uncertainty were evaluated for the analytical results using {sup 77m}Se.

  5. Rapid determination of selenium in three kinds of biological standard reference materials using 77mSe nuclide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Jong Hwa; Kim, Sun Ha; Chung, Yong Sam; Kim, Young Jin

    2005-01-01

    A number of researches on essential trace elements have been performed in the field of human nutrition and health studies. From this viewpoint, selenium is well known as a strong antioxidant trace element for scavenging free radicals and a fast analytical technique of selenium in biological samples is indispensable for the satisfaction of a customer's request. This study was aimed at establishing an analytical method for the determination of the selenium in biological samples by a neutron activation analysis using the 77m Se short-lived nuclide. For this purpose, three NIST SRMs were chosen and the concentrations of the selenium were determined under prefixed analytical conditions such as the irradiation time, cooling time and measuring time. The measured values were compared with the certified values. In addition, the detection limits and measurement uncertainty were evaluated for the analytical results using 77m Se

  6. Peningkatan Minat Dan Hasil Belajar Biologi Materi Sistem Transportasi Manusia Melalui Pembelajaran Role Playing Siswa Kelas VIII-H SMPN 5 Surakarta Semester I Tahun 2013/2014

    OpenAIRE

    RAHMAWATI, BANATI

    2014-01-01

    SMPN5 Surakarta has outstanding vision and cultured on faith and Piety.the subjects of biology in this Surakarta SMPN5 not as expected, on his way to the front of learning in general should be improved particularly in the teaching of science including biology science subjects. research that has been conducted on 32 students are 47.5% of students who pay attention to the lessons, 12.5% of students dreamy, sleepy students 7.5%, 12.5% of students do not focus on the subject and only 20% of stude...

  7. Restricted access materials and large particle supports for on-line sample preparation: an attractive approach for biological fluids analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souverain, S; Rudaz, S; Veuthey, J-L

    2004-03-05

    An analytical process generally involves four main steps: (1) sample preparation; (2) analytical separation; (3) detection; and (4) data handling. In the bioanalytical field, sample preparation is often considered as the time-limiting step. Indeed, the extraction techniques commonly used for biological matrices such as liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and solid-phase extraction (SPE) are achieved in the off-line mode. In order to perform a high throughput analysis, efforts have been engaged in developing a faster sample purification process. Among different strategies, the introduction of special extraction sorbents, such as the restricted access media (RAM) and large particle supports (LPS), allowing the direct and repetitive injection of complex biological matrices, represents a very attractive approach. Integrated in a liquid chromatography (LC) system, these extraction supports lead to the automation, simplification and speeding up of the sample preparation process. In this paper, RAM and LPS are reviewed and particular attention is given to commercially available supports. Applications of these extraction supports, are presented in single column and column-switching configurations, for the direct analysis of compounds in various biological fluids.

  8. Standard practice for prediction of the long-term behavior of materials, including waste forms, used in engineered barrier systems (EBS) for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This practice describes test methods and data analyses used to develop models for the prediction of the long-term behavior of materials, such as engineered barrier system (EBS) materials and waste forms, used in the geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and other high-level nuclear waste in a geologic repository. The alteration behavior of waste form and EBS materials is important because it affects the retention of radionuclides by the disposal system. The waste form and EBS materials provide a barrier to release either directly (as in the case of waste forms in which the radionuclides are initially immobilized), or indirectly (as in the case of containment materials that restrict the ingress of groundwater or the egress of radionuclides that are released as the waste forms and EBS materials degrade). 1.1.1 Steps involved in making such predictions include problem definition, testing, modeling, and model confirmation. 1.1.2 The predictions are based on models derived from theoretical considerat...

  9. The Use of Alternative Raw Material in Production of Pastry Products as a Progressive Direction in Creating the Products of High Biological Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janа Bachinska

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the impact of the use of alternative vegetable raw materials in the manufacture of pastry products with high biological value; it presents the results of evaluation of commodity of the developed products and compares them with the main samples presented in Kharkiv trade network. The feasibility of using a mixture of fiber and pumpkin seeds in the technology of pastry production to extend the range of confectionery products of high biological value and products with reduced calories has been proved. Adding the mixture of fiber and pumpkin seeds to biscuits and cakes positively affected the chemical composition of the ready-made product, saturating it with useful and necessary to human body mineral elements, vitamins, dietary fiber.

  10. Use of Nuclear Techniques in Biological Control: Managing Pests, Facilitating Trade and Protecting the Environment. Report of a Consultants Group Meeting. Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    High-priority opportunities are proposed for use of nuclear techniques to effect improved production and shipping of augmentative biological control agents. Proposed subprojects include use of ionizing radiation to improve the production of insect natural enemies on natural hosts/prey or on artificial diets. Other subprojects pertain to improving the ability to move beneficial organisms in international trade, and in using them in the field. Additional high priority activities were identified proposing use of nuclear techniques to produce sterile and/or substerile F-1 weed biological control agents to help evaluate potential impact on non-target species in the pre-release phase, integration of augmentative releases and F-1 sterility in IPM and area-wide pest management programmes, and utilization of by-products from SIT mass-rearing facilities in augmentative biological control programmes. (author)

  11. On the Rule of Mixtures for Predicting Stress-Softening and Residual Strain Effects in Biological Tissues and Biocompatible Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Elías-Zúñiga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we use the rule of mixtures to develop an equivalent material model in which the total strain energy density is split into the isotropic part related to the matrix component and the anisotropic energy contribution related to the fiber effects. For the isotropic energy part, we select the amended non-Gaussian strain energy density model, while the energy fiber effects are added by considering the equivalent anisotropic volumetric fraction contribution, as well as the isotropized representation form of the eight-chain energy model that accounts for the material anisotropic effects. Furthermore, our proposed material model uses a phenomenological non-monotonous softening function that predicts stress softening effects and has an energy term, derived from the pseudo-elasticity theory, that accounts for residual strain deformations. The model’s theoretical predictions are compared with experimental data collected from human vaginal tissues, mice skin, poly(glycolide-co-caprolactone (PGC25 3-0 and polypropylene suture materials and tracheal and brain human tissues. In all cases examined here, our equivalent material model closely follows stress-softening and residual strain effects exhibited by experimental data.

  12. Similar effects of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, glucocorticoids, and biologic agents on radiographic progression in rheumatoid arthritis: meta-analysis of 70 randomized placebo-controlled or drug-controlled studies, including 112 comparisons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graudal, Niels; Jürgens, Gesche

    2010-01-01

    To define the differences in effects on joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients between therapy with single and combination disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), glucocorticoids, and biologic agents.......To define the differences in effects on joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients between therapy with single and combination disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), glucocorticoids, and biologic agents....

  13. Evaluation of Natural Materials as Exogenous Carbon Sources for Biological Treatment of Low Carbon-to-Nitrogen Wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    Ramírez-Godínez, Juan; Beltrán-Hernández, Icela; Álvarez-Hernández, Alejandro; Coronel-Olivares, Claudia; Contreras-López, Elizabeth; Quezada-Cruz, Maribel; Vázquez-Rodríguez, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    In the bacterial processes involved in the mitigation of nitrogen pollution, an adequately high carbon-to-nitrogen (C : N) ratio is key to sustain denitrification. We evaluated three natural materials (woodchips, barley grains, and peanut shells) as carbon sources for low C : N wastewater. The amount of organic matter released from these materials to aqueous media was evaluated, as well as their pollution swapping potential by measuring the release of total Kjeldahl nitrogen, N-NH4 +, NO2 −, ...

  14. Marine molecular biology: an emerging field of biological sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Narsinh L; Jain, Roopesh; Natalio, Filipe; Hamer, Bojan; Thakur, Archana N; Müller, Werner E G

    2008-01-01

    An appreciation of the potential applications of molecular biology is of growing importance in many areas of life sciences, including marine biology. During the past two decades, the development of sophisticated molecular technologies and instruments for biomedical research has resulted in significant advances in the biological sciences. However, the value of molecular techniques for addressing problems in marine biology has only recently begun to be cherished. It has been proven that the exploitation of molecular biological techniques will allow difficult research questions about marine organisms and ocean processes to be addressed. Marine molecular biology is a discipline, which strives to define and solve the problems regarding the sustainable exploration of marine life for human health and welfare, through the cooperation between scientists working in marine biology, molecular biology, microbiology and chemistry disciplines. Several success stories of the applications of molecular techniques in the field of marine biology are guiding further research in this area. In this review different molecular techniques are discussed, which have application in marine microbiology, marine invertebrate biology, marine ecology, marine natural products, material sciences, fisheries, conservation and bio-invasion etc. In summary, if marine biologists and molecular biologists continue to work towards strong partnership during the next decade and recognize intellectual and technological advantages and benefits of such partnership, an exciting new frontier of marine molecular biology will emerge in the future.

  15. Systems Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiley, H S.

    2006-06-01

    The biology revolution over the last 50 years has been driven by the ascendancy of molecular biology. This was enthusiastically embraced by most biologists because it took us into increasingly familiar territory. It took mysterious processes, such as the replication of genetic material and assigned them parts that could be readily understood by the human mind. When we think of ''molecular machines'' as being the underlying basis of life, we are using a paradigm derived from everyday experience. However, the price that we paid was a relentless drive towards reductionism and the attendant balkanization of biology. Now along comes ''systems biology'' that promises us a solution to the problem of ''knowing more and more about less and less''. Unlike molecular biology, systems biology appears to be taking us into unfamiliar intellectual territory, such as statistics, mathematics and computer modeling. Not surprisingly, systems biology has met with widespread skepticism and resistance. Why do we need systems biology anyway and how does this new area of research promise to change the face of biology in the next couple of decades?

  16. Physical properties and biological/odontogenic effects of an experimentally developed fast-setting α-tricalcium phosphate-based pulp capping material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun-Bong; Park, Su-Jung; Kim, Hyun-Ha; Kwon, Young-Sun; Lee, Kwang-Won; Min, Kyung-San

    2014-07-11

    Recently, fast-setting α-tricalcium-phosphate (TCP) cement was developed for use in the pulp capping process. The aim of this study was to investigate the physical properties and biological effects of α-TCP cement in comparison with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). We measured the setting time, pH values, compressive strength, and solubility of the two materials. We evaluated biocompatibility on the basis of cell morphology and a viability test using human dental pulp cells (hDPCs). Chemical composition of each material was analyzed by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopic (EDS) analysis. The expression of odontogenic-related genes was evaluated by Western blotting and immunofluorescence. The calcified nodule formation was measured by Alizarin red staining. We performed the pulp capping procedure on rat teeth for histological investigation. The data were analyzed by an independent t-test for physical properties, one-way ANOVA for biological effects, and the Mann-Whitney U test for tertiary dentin formation. A P value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant for all tests. The setting time, pH values, and compressive strength of α-TCP was lower than that of MTA (P  0.05). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that cells attached to both materials were flat and had cytoplasmic extensions. The expression of odontogenic-related markers and mineralized nodule formation were higher in the two experimental groups compared to the control group (P < 0.05). Continuous tertiary dentin was formed underneath the capping materials in all samples of the tested groups. Our study demonstrated that the α-TCP exhibited biocompatibility and odontogenicity comparable to MTA, whereas it had a quicker setting time.

  17. Procurement of a Large Area Mapping FTIR Microscope for Organic-Inorganic Interfacial Analysis in Biological Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-31

    of abrasion resistant rice plants , which contain silica in their plant walls. Beyond this, many additional projects that need FTIR microscope...materials. Project 1: AFOSR funded “MURI: Convergent Evolution to Engineering: Multiscale Structures and Mechanics in Damage Tolerant Functional Bio...found in Japan (Trypoxylus dichotomus). Here, we investigate region-specific domains within the exo- and endo- cuticle regions of the elytra from this

  18. Matrix separation by chelation to prepare biological materials for isotopic zinc analysis by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durrant, S.F.; Krushevska, A.; Amarasiriwardena, D.; Argentine, M.D.; Romon-Guesnier, S.; Barnes, R.M.

    1994-01-01

    Following an evaluation of three chelating resins [Chelex-100, poly(dithiocarbamate) (PDTC) and carboxymethylated poly(ethyleneimine)-poly(methylenepolyphenylene) isocyanate (CPPI)], a procedure was established with the last of these for the separation of Zn from biological matrix elements prior to 70 Zn: 68 Zn isotopic analysis by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The method was verified by establishing Zn recoveries and by determining its effectiveness in removing Cl and Na from buffered test solutions. Calcium, Na, and Zn concentration data were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. Chlorine was measured by electrothermal vaporization ICP-MS. The efficacy of the technique was demonstrated by the determination of zinc isotope ratios in bovine milk and human urine. (Author)

  19. Volume Segmentation and Analysis of Biological Materials Using SuRVoS (Super-region Volume Segmentation) Workbench.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Michele C; Luengo, Imanol; Basham, Mark; Spink, Matthew C; Irvine, Sarah; French, Andrew P; Ashton, Alun W; Duke, Elizabeth M H

    2017-08-23

    Segmentation is the process of isolating specific regions or objects within an imaged volume, so that further study can be undertaken on these areas of interest. When considering the analysis of complex biological systems, the segmentation of three-dimensional image data is a time consuming and labor intensive step. With the increased availability of many imaging modalities and with automated data collection schemes, this poses an increased challenge for the modern experimental biologist to move from data to knowledge. This publication describes the use of SuRVoS Workbench, a program designed to address these issues by providing methods to semi-automatically segment complex biological volumetric data. Three datasets of differing magnification and imaging modalities are presented here, each highlighting different strategies of segmenting with SuRVoS. Phase contrast X-ray tomography (microCT) of the fruiting body of a plant is used to demonstrate segmentation using model training, cryo electron tomography (cryoET) of human platelets is used to demonstrate segmentation using super- and megavoxels, and cryo soft X-ray tomography (cryoSXT) of a mammalian cell line is used to demonstrate the label splitting tools. Strategies and parameters for each datatype are also presented. By blending a selection of semi-automatic processes into a single interactive tool, SuRVoS provides several benefits. Overall time to segment volumetric data is reduced by a factor of five when compared to manual segmentation, a mainstay in many image processing fields. This is a significant savings when full manual segmentation can take weeks of effort. Additionally, subjectivity is addressed through the use of computationally identified boundaries, and splitting complex collections of objects by their calculated properties rather than on a case-by-case basis.

  20. SEM examination of human erythrocytes in uncoated bloodstains on stone: use of conventional as environmental-like SEM in a soft biological tissue (and hard inorganic material).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortolà, P

    2005-05-01

    Although nowadays the so-called environmental scanning electron microscopes (ESEMs) allow the observation of the samples without metal or carbon coating, many conventional scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) are still in use. On the other hand, the presence of erythrocytes (red blood cells, RBCs) in a smear is considered a blood confirmation. Such a presence has been previously reported even in Lower Stone Age implements. In previous works, I have reported several studies dealing with cytomorphology of RBCs in bloodstains using scanning electron microscopy with standard specimen preparation procedures, i.e. via coating the samples before SEM analysis. In order to explore the potential of conventional SEM as environmental-like SEM in haemotaphonomical studies, two alkaline (limestone) and two acid (flint) rock fragments were smeared with human blood from a male and a female. The bloodstains obtained in this way were then air dried indoors and stored into a non-hermetic plastic box. Afterwards, the smears and their rock substrates were examined directly without coating, via secondary electrons, using a JEOL JSM-6400 scanning electron microscope. Satisfactory results reveal the capability of a conventional SEM to work in secondary-electron mode as an environmental-like SEM on these kinds of biological and inorganic materials, and probably in many other biological and non-biological samples.

  1. Preliminary assessment of geologic materials to minimize biological intrusion of low-level waste trench covers and plans for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakonson, T.E.; White, G.C.; Gladney, E.S.; Muller, M.

    1981-01-01

    The long-term integrity of low-level waste shallow land burial sites is dependent on the interaction of physical, chemical, and biological factors that modify the waste containment system. Past research on low-level waste shallow land burial methods has emphasized physical (i.e., water infiltration, soil erosion) and chemical (radionuclide leaching) processes that can cause radionuclide transport from a waste site. Preliminary results demonstrate that a sandy backfill material offers little resistance to root and animal intrusion through the cover profile. However, bentonite clay, cobble, and cobble-gravel combinations do reduce plant root and animal intrusion through cover profiles compared with sandy backfill soil. However, bentonite clay barrier systems appear to be degraded by plant roots through time. Desiccation of the clay barrier by invading plant roots may limit the usefulness of bentonite clay as a moisture and/or biological carrier unless due consideration is given to this interaction. Future experiments are described that further examine the effect of plant roots on clay barrier systems and that determine the effectiveness of proposed biological barriers on larger scales and under various stress conditions

  2. [Analysis of biological material originating from the body of general Władysław Sikorski for inorganic poisons and diatoms presence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadlik, Józefa Krystyna; Brozek-Mucha, Zuzanna

    2009-01-01

    Results of the analysis of biological materials originating from the body of general Sikorski are presented in the paper. Samples of the liver, kidney, intestine and lung were analysed for metals and As content, and samples of the lung, liver, kidney, stomach, intestine and bone marrow--for diatoms presence. The analysis for metals and As was performed by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Before the analysis, the samples were wet digested by the classic and microwave assisted method. The analysis did not result in detecting the presence of As, Co, Ni, and Tl in any of the studied materials, while Hg was not revealed in the liver, intestines and lung and Pb in the intestines and lung. The content of Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Sr and Zn in all the studied materials, Hg in the kidney, and Pb in the liver and kidney did not indicate poisoning by the above-mentioned metals or arsenic. No diatoms were found in the studied materials.

  3. Devising of the method for the determination of small and very small amounts of cadmium in biological materials by radiochemical version of neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dybczynski, R.; Samczynski, Z.

    1996-01-01

    The newly modified version of the method for the determination of cadmium in biological materials by radiochemical NAA based on selective post irradiation separation of Cd using ion exchange rasin Retardion 11A8 is presented. The conditions necessary for the selective retaining of Cd on the column exploiting both anionic and cationic ion exchange function of the resin have been discussed. Depending on the composition of the external solution, cadmium existing in the form of either anionic chloride complexes or cationic amine species is taken up by quaternary ammonium or carboxylate functional groups, respectively while accompanying elements are eluted. The elaborated method was further verified by determine Cd content in several certified biological reference materials using neutron activation analysis. The ion exchange separation procedure assures very high radiochemical purity of the cadmium fraction. Decontamination factors obtained for Mo, Sb, Na, Zn, Co, Sc amounted to 10 3 - 10 6 . Detection limit for Cd was 0.5 μg kg -1 . Analytical results show good agreement with the certified values. (author). 10 refs, 7 figs, 1 tab

  4. Comparative physicochemical and biological characterization of NIST Interim Reference Material PM2.5 and SRM 1648 in human A549 and mouse RAW264.7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitkus, Robert J; Powell, Jan L; Zeisler, Rolf; Squibb, Katherine S

    2013-12-01

    The epidemiological association between exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and adverse health effects is well-known. Here we report the size distribution, metals content, endotoxin content, and biological activity of National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Interim Reference Material (RM) PM2.5. Biological activity was measured in vitro by effects on cell viability and the release of four inflammatory immune mediators, from human A549 alveolar epithelial cells or murine RAW264.7 monocytes. A dose range covering three orders of magnitude (1-1000μg/mL) was tested, and biological activity was compared to an existing Standard Reference Material (SRM) for urban PM (NIST SRM 1648). Robust release of IL-8 and MCP-1 from A549 cells was observed in response to IRM PM2.5 exposures. Significant TNF-α, but not IL-6, secretion from RAW264.7 cells was observed in response to both IRM PM2.5 and SRM 1648 particle types. Cytokine or chemokine release at high doses often occurred in the presence of cytotoxicity, likely as a result of externalization of preformed mediator. Our results are consistent with a local cytotoxic and pro-inflammatory mechanism of response to exposure to inhaled ambient PM2.5 and reinforce the continued relevance of in vitro assays for mechanistic research in PM toxicology. Our study furthers the goal of developing reference samples of environmentally relevant particulate matter of various sizes that can be used for hypothesis testing by multiple investigators. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. GGVS, Ordinance on road transport of hazardous materials, latest amendment as of 1993, including the European agreement on international road transport of hazardous materials (ADR). Annexes A and B. Selected directives, Act on Transport of Hazardous Materials, list of materials. 8. rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridder, K.

    1993-01-01

    The publication presents the authentic texts of the: (1) Ordinance on road transport of hazardous materials (GGVS) with the ADR, as of 1993, skeleton ordinance, annexes A and B, reasons underlying the 4th ordinance amending the GGVS, directives for implementation, RS 002, instructions for accident management, RS-006, design approval standards for packaging materials and IBC-R002. (2) Ordinance on exemptions under the GGVS (GGAV). (3) Guiding principles for the training of vehicle drivers. (4) Catalogue of monetary fines under the GGVS, BKatV. (5) Draft version of catalogue of on-the-spot cautionary fines. (6) List of materials. (7) Technical rules TR IBC 003, non-electrical equipment, TRS 003, TRS 004, TRS 005, TRS 006. (HP) [de

  6. Computational investigation and synthesis of a sol-gel imprinted material for sensing application of some biologically active molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atta, Nada F., E-mail: Nada_fah1@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Cairo, Post Code 12613, Giza (Egypt); Hamed, Maher M.; Abdel-Mageed, Ali M. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Cairo, Post Code 12613, Giza (Egypt)

    2010-05-14

    A hybrid sol-gel material was molecularly imprinted with a group of neurotransmitters. Imprinted material is a sol-gel thin film that is spin coated on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode. Imprinted films were characterized electrochemically using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and the encapsulated molecules were extracted from the films and complementary molecular cavities are formed that enable their rebind. The films were tested in their corresponding template solutions for rebinding using square wave voltammetry (SWV). Computational approach for exploring the primary intermolecular forces between templates and hydrolyzed form of the precursor monomer, tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS), were carried out using Hartree-Fock method (HF). Interaction energy values were computed for each adduct formed between a monomer and a template. Analysis of the optimized conformations of various adducts could explain the mode of interaction between the templates and the monomer units. We found that interaction via the amino group is the common mode among the studied compounds and the results are in good agreement with the electrochemical measurements.

  7. An Investigation into the Effects of Interface Stress and Interfacial Arrangement on Temperature Dependent Thermal Properties of a Biological and a Biomimetic Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomar, Vikas [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2015-01-12

    A significant effort in the biomimetic materials research is on developing materials that can mimic and function in the same way as biological tissues, on bio-inspired electronic circuits, on bio-inspired flight structures, on bio-mimetic materials processing, and on structural biomimetic materials, etc. Most structural biological and biomimetic material properties are affected by two primary factors: (1) interfacial interactions between an organic and an inorganic phase usually in the form of interactions between an inorganic mineral phase and organic protein network; and (2) structural arrangement of the constituents. Examples are exoskeleton structures such as spicule, nacre, and crustacean exoskeletons. A significant effort is being directed towards making synthetic biomimetic materials based on a manipulation of the above two primary factors. The proposed research is based on a hypothesis that in synthetic materials with biomimetic morphology thermal conductivity, k, (how fast heat is carried away) and thermal diffusivity, D, (how fast a material’s temperature rises: proportional to the ratio of k and heat capacity) can be engineered to be either significantly low or significantly high based on a combination of chosen interface orientation and interfacial arrangement in comparison to conventional material microstructures with the same phases and phase volume fractions. METHOD DEVELOPMENT 1. We have established a combined Raman spectroscopy and nanomechanical loading based experimental framework to perform environment (liquid vs. air vs. vacuum) dependent and temperature dependent (~1000 degree-C) in-situ thermal diffusivity measurements in biomaterials at nanoscale to micron scale along with the corresponding analytical theoretic calculations. (Zhang and Tomar, 2013) 2. We have also established a new classical molecular simulation based framework to measure thermal diffusivity in biomolecular interfaces. We are writing a publication currently (Qu and Tomar

  8. Determination of rare earth and uranium in reference biological materials certified by the method of neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Lais H.P.; Saiki, Mitiko

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the precision and accuracy of the determinations of Sc, La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb, Yb, Lu and U in certified reference materials (CRMs). To solve the problem of interference from fission products of U in the determination of lanthanides were obtained correction factors for this interference for 140 La, 141 Ce, 143 Ce, 153 Sm and 147 Nd. The experimental procedure of Neutron Activation Analysis consisted of irradiating aliquots of each of the CRMs with synthetic standards of elements under thermal neutron flux of the IEA-R1 nuclear reactor, followed by gamma-ray spectrometry using a high-resolution hyperpurity GE detector. The analyzes of CRMs indicate good accuracy and precision of results, demonstrating the feasibility of applying of established procedure in NAA of elements studied in organic vegetable matrices

  9. Radiochemical neutron-activation analysis of uncertified ultra-trace rare earth elements in two biological certified reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Lei; Tian, Weizhi; Ni, Bangfa; Wang, Pingsheng; Zhang, Yangmei

    2002-01-01

    Radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) has been used for the determination of eight rare earth elements (La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb, Yb, and Lu) in two Chinese certified reference materials (CRM), GBW 08503 (wheat powder) and GBW 09101 (human hair). These determinations are important for possible certification of the above mentioned ultra-trace elements, so far not certified. A simple one-step (REE)F 3 precipitation was used. Chemical yields were determined for all relevant elements by means of tracer experiments. The two CRM were also analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to compare the merits and drawbacks of these two major trace analytical techniques for these particular elements. RNAA was proven to be a reliable technique for ultra-trace analysis, especially in the certification of some ultra-trace elements. (orig.)

  10. Marine Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewees, Christopher M.; Hooper, Jon K.

    1976-01-01

    A variety of informational material for a course in marine biology or oceanology at the secondary level is presented. Among the topics discussed are: food webs and pyramids, planktonic blooms, marine life, plankton nets, food chains, phytoplankton, zooplankton, larval plankton and filter feeders. (BT)

  11. Biological digestion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosevear, A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the biological degradation of non-radioactive organic material occurring in radioactive wastes. The biochemical steps are often performed using microbes or isolated enzymes in combination with chemical steps and the aim is to oxidise the carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and sulphur to their respective oxides. (U.K.)

  12. Synthesis and Characterization of PEDOT Derivative with Carboxyl Group and Its Chemo/Bio Sensing Application as Nanocomposite, Immobilized Biological and Enhanced Optical Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Long; Wen, Yangping; Yao, Yuanyuan; Xu, Jingkun; Duan, Xuemin; Zhang, Ge

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Electropolymerization of C4-EDOT-COOH and corresponding polymer's sensing application for environmental, pharmaceutical, biology and food. -- Highlights: •C4-EDOT-COOH monomer with good solubility in water was synthesized by an efficient five-step route. •That acidic conditions were favorable for the electropolymerization of C4-EDOT-COOH. •The resulting high-quality polymer film can be employed for the fabrication of chemo/bio-sensors and optical sensors. •These as-prepared sensors can be applied to the simple, fast and sensitive detection of different analytes. -- Abstract: Various electrochemical chemo/bio-sensors and optical sensors are facilely explored for the sensitive determination of biomolecules, drug molecules, environmental pollutants, and metal ions using a carboxylic-functionalized poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) derivative (PC4), which is easily obtained by the direct electropolymerization of a water-soluble 4-((2,3-dihydrothieno[3,4-b][1,4] dioxin-2-yl) methoxy)-4-oxobutanoic acid (C4-EDOT-COOH) monomer in a microemulsion system. The effect of different pH values on the electropolymerization of C4-EDOT-COOH monomer is investigated, and the as-prepared PC4 film is characterized by electrochemical method, infrared spectrum, and scanning electron microscope. The resulting high-quality PC4 film as a sensing material not only can combine with various biologically active species via covalent linkage and inorganic materials via layer-by-layer self-assembly for the construction of electrochemical chemo/bio-sensors, but also excellent optical performance of PC4 can be employed for the fabrication of optical sensors. These as-prepared chemo/bio-sensors can be applied to the simple, fast and sensitive detection of environmental pollutants, pharmaceuticals, hazardous substances, and biological active substance and nutrients present in food by means of electrochemistry, ultraviolet and fluorescence spectroscopy. Satisfactory results

  13. The role of silicon on the bioactivity of Skelite(TM) bioceramic: A material and biological characterization of silicon alpha-tricalcium phosphate based ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietak, Alexis Mari

    Skelite(TM) bioceramics are novel synthetic skeletal replacement materials that participate in the full remodeling process of bone. Skelite contains a high fraction of Silicon Stabilized alpha-Tricalcium Phosphate (Si-TCP), a novel phase to which the unique bioactive properties of Skelite have been attributed. The role of Si in the development of the microporous, interconnected microstructure and mixed phase composition of Skelite was investigated using crystallization kinetics and defect characterization studies. The kinetics of the phase transformation to Si-TCP were studied using rapid thermal processing of thin films on quartz substrates. The results, interpreted using a novel Avrami model, show that Si acts as a nucleation agent for Si-TCP, and also that Si pins the microstructure of the films at higher concentrations. Characterization of defects induced by Si substitution into the phases of Skelite material utilized electron spin resonance (ESR) and thermoluminescence (TL) techniques. These results identify two unique paramagnetic defect centers associated with Si substitution in the hydroxyapatite lattice. Quantification of the relative level of these centers supports a novel chemical model that describes the development of the mixed phase system of Skelite as a function of silica addition. The significance of the Si-TCP phase, sample morphology, and surface chemistry on the activity of osteoclast and osteoblast cells was investigated using cell culture and protein functionalized atomic force microscopy techniques. The biological characterization identifies three interaction mechanisms between Skelite and the biological system. Skelite releases a soluble molecular complex containing Si to the extracellular media, which has a significant bioactive effect on osteoclast and osteoblast growth and activity. Using protein functionalized atomic force microscopy the surface chemistry and reactivity of samples is shown to influence osteopontin affinity for Skelite

  14. Biological materials: Part A. tuning LCST of raft copolymers and gold/copolymer hybrid nanoparticles and Part B. Biobased nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ning

    material) was copolymerized with poly-(3-hydroxybutyrate), a common polyhydroxyalkanoate produced by bacteria with the objective of determining if a useful material could be obtained with a less rigorous work-up on harvesting polyhydroxyalkanoates. The copolyesteramide product having 25 wt.% peptidoglycan from a highly purified peptidoglycan increased thermal stability by 100-200 °C compared to the poly-(3-hydroxybutyrate) control, while a less pure peptidoglycan, harvested from B. megaterium (ATCC 11561), gave a 25-50 °C increase in thermal stability. Both copolymers absorbed more moisture than pure poly-(3-hydroxybutyrate). The results suggest that a less rigorously harvested and purified polyhydroxyalkanoate might be useful for some applications.

  15. Teaching systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, R; Vilaprinyo, E; Sorribas, A

    2011-03-01

    Advances in systems biology are increasingly dependent upon the integration of various types of data and different methodologies to reconstruct how cells work at the systemic level. Thus, teams with a varied array of expertise and people with interdisciplinary training are needed. So far this training was thought to be more productive if aimed at the Masters or PhD level. At this level, multiple specialised and in-depth courses on the different subject matters of systems biology are taught to already well-prepared students. This approach is mostly based on the recognition that systems biology requires a wide background that is hard to find in undergraduate students. Nevertheless, and given the importance of the field, the authors argue that exposition of undergraduate students to the methods and paradigms of systems biology would be advantageous. Here they present and discuss a successful experiment in teaching systems biology to third year undergraduate biotechnology students at the University of Lleida in Spain. The authors' experience, together with that from others, argues for the adequateness of teaching systems biology at the undergraduate level. [Includes supplementary material].

  16. Biological Soft Robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Adam W

    2015-01-01

    In nature, nanometer-scale molecular motors are used to generate force within cells for diverse processes from transcription and transport to muscle contraction. This adaptability and scalability across wide temporal, spatial, and force regimes have spurred the development of biological soft robotic systems that seek to mimic and extend these capabilities. This review describes how molecular motors are hierarchically organized into larger-scale structures in order to provide a basic understanding of how these systems work in nature and the complexity and functionality we hope to replicate in biological soft robotics. These span the subcellular scale to macroscale, and this article focuses on the integration of biological components with synthetic materials, coupled with bioinspired robotic design. Key examples include nanoscale molecular motor-powered actuators, microscale bacteria-controlled devices, and macroscale muscle-powered robots that grasp, walk, and swim. Finally, the current challenges and future opportunities in the field are addressed.

  17. Influence of radiation on the content of biologically active substances in herbal raw materials. Pharmacological activity of herbal drugs after microbiological decontamination by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migdal, W.; Owczarczyk, H.B.

    2005-01-01

    Several thousand tons of medical herbs are produced annually by pharmaceutical industry in Poland. This product should be of highest quality and microbial purity. Recently chemical methods of decontamination are recognized as less safe, thus irradiation technique was chosen to replace them in use. In the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology research work on microbiological decontamination of herbal raw materials and herbal drugs by irradiation has been carried out since 1996. It was shown that using ionizing radiation (a dose 10 kGy) can obtain satisfactory results of microbiological decontamination of these products. The content of biologically substances such a essential oils, flavonoids, glycosides, anthocyans, antra-compounds, poliphenoloacids, triterpene saponins, oleanosides and plants mucus did not change significantly after irradiation. Pharmacological activity of herbal drugs has been found satisfactory after microbiological decontamination by irradiation. (author)

  18. Preface - From molecules to molecular materials, biological molecular systems and nanostructures: A collection of contributions presented at the XIIIth International Conference on Molecular Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratajczak, Henryk; Drozd, Marek; Fausto, Rui

    2016-12-01

    This volume contains a series of selected contributions presented at the XIIIth International Conference on Molecular Spectroscopy (ICMS): "From Molecules to Molecular Materials, Biological Molecular Systems and Nanostructures" held in Wrocław, Poland, 9-12 September 2015, under the auspices of the Mayor of Wrocław and the European Academy of Sciences, Arts and Humanities. Wrocław was chosen not accidentally as venue for the conference. With more than a thousand years of history, Wrocław is the location of one of the oldest universities in Central Europe. Being a place where education and science play major roles in the daily life of its inhabitants, Wrocław is also a privileged center for spectroscopy in Poland.

  19. Simultaneous determination of asrenic, mercury, antimony and selenium in biological materials with prior collection of gaseous products followed by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, C.Y.; Chen, P.Y.; Yang, M.H.

    1986-01-01

    A method combining prior collection of gaseous products with subsequent neutron activation analysis has been developed for simultaneous determination of traces of arsenic, mercury, antimony and selenium in biological materials. The generation of hydrides of arsenic, antimony and selenium and cold vapor of mercury in the generation and collection system was investigated by the use of radiotracers of the respective elements. The result indicates that selenium and mercury can be completely evaporated from the digested sample solution in 5M HCl with the addition of 5% sodium tetrahydroborate solution, while additional reduction process by potassium iodide and ascorbic acid is needed for complete evaporation of arsenic and antiomony. The gaseous products were collected in a quartz tube for neutron irradiation. The detection limits of these elements were found to be in the range of 10 -7 to 10 -8 g under the present experimental conditions. The reliability was checked with NBS standard reference materisl. (author)

  20. The on-line detection of biological particle emissions from selected agricultural materials using the WIBS-4 (Waveband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor) technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, David J.; Healy, David A.; Sodeau, John R.

    2013-12-01

    Agricultural activities have, for some time, been linked to adverse health effects such as Farmers' lung, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, aspergillosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) This connection is known to be, at least in part, due to the numerous microbiological organisms that live and grow on materials found in occupational settings such as barns, animal shelters, stables and composting sites. Traditional techniques for determining biological release of fungal spores and bacteria require intensive, experienced human resources and considerable time to determine ambient concentrations. However more recently the fluorescence and light scattering signals obtained from primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP) have been utilised for their near real-time counting and characterisation abilities. In the current study, data collected for the bioaerosol types released from hay and silage were counted and identified using a combination of the WIBS-4 bioaerosol sensor approach and impaction/optical microscopy. Particle emissions were characterised according to particle numbers, their size distributions, particle asymmetry values and fluorescence characteristics. The variables obtained were shown to provide potential “fingerprint” signatures for PBAP emissions emanating from two important compost components, namely, silage and hay. Comparisons between the data acquired by the WIBS-4 bioaerosol sensor, optical microscopy findings and also previous literature suggest that the likely identification of Aspergillus/Penicillium type spores and bacterial species released from hay and silage was achieved on a relatively rapid time-scale.

  1. Determination iodine in biological materials using instrumental neutron activation and anti-coincidence gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, W.H.; Chatt, A.

    1997-01-01

    Iodine is an element of interest in nutritional research. Its lower limit of safe and adequate daily dietary intake for adults varies between 150 and 200 micrograms per day. In the present study, an epithermal instrumental neutron activation analysis (EINAA) method in conjunction with anti-coincidence counting has been developed for the determination of ppb levels of iodine in individual food items. Typically 200-300 mg of a sample are irradiated for 10 or 20 minutes at the Dalhousie University SLOWPOKE-2 reactor in an epithermal flux of 1x10 11 n cm -2 s -1 , followed by 1 min decay and then counting for 30 min. The 443-keV gamma-ray of 128 I is used for measuring iodine content by anti-coincidence counting. The anti-coincidence spectrometer consists of a 25% HPGe detector surrounded by a 10''x10'' NaI(TI) annulus and a 3''x3'' NaI(TI) plug. This system has a peak-to-Compton ratio of about 650 to 1 for the 661.6-keV photopeak of 137 Cs. The Compton background resulting from the scattering of many gamma-rays of energies higher than 443 keV can be reduced by a factor of about 4 using anti-coincidence counting compared to conventional counting. The detection limit for iodine can be improved by a factor of 2 to 5 depending on the sample matrix, dead time, position of the annulus and counting geometry among several other factors.The lowest detection limit of 5 ppb can be achieved for low-salt foods. This limit is comparable to that obtained by a preconcentration NAA (PNAA) method. However, a detection limit of 20 ppb is more realistic for samples containing high amounts of Na, Cl and Al. The results obtained for many reference materials are in good agreement with the certified values and those reported by the PNAA method. Details of the methods and results will be reported

  2. Determination iodine in biological materials using instrumental neutron activation and anti-coincidence gamma-ray spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, W.H.; Chatt, A. [Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada). Radiochemistry Research Laboratory

    1997-10-01

    Iodine is an element of interest in nutritional research. Its lower limit of safe and adequate daily dietary intake for adults varies between 150 and 200 micrograms per day. In the present study, an epithermal instrumental neutron activation analysis (EINAA) method in conjunction with anti-coincidence counting has been developed for the determination of ppb levels of iodine in individual food items. Typically 200-300 mg of a sample are irradiated for 10 or 20 minutes at the Dalhousie University SLOWPOKE-2 reactor in an epithermal flux of 1x10{sup 11} n cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, followed by 1 min decay and then counting for 30 min. The 443-keV gamma-ray of {sup 128}I is used for measuring iodine content by anti-coincidence counting. The anti-coincidence spectrometer consists of a 25% HPGe detector surrounded by a 10``x10`` NaI(TI) annulus and a 3``x3`` NaI(TI) plug. This system has a peak-to-Compton ratio of about 650 to 1 for the 661.6-keV photopeak of {sup 137}Cs. The Compton background resulting from the scattering of many gamma-rays of energies higher than 443 keV can be reduced by a factor of about 4 using anti-coincidence counting compared to conventional counting. The detection limit for iodine can be improved by a factor of 2 to 5 depending on the sample matrix, dead time, position of the annulus and counting geometry among several other factors.The lowest detection limit of 5 ppb can be achieved for low-salt foods. This limit is comparable to that obtained by a preconcentration NAA (PNAA) method. However, a detection limit of 20 ppb is more realistic for samples containing high amounts of Na, Cl and Al. The results obtained for many reference materials are in good agreement with the certified values and those reported by the PNAA method. Details of the methods and results will be reported 6 refs., 2 tabs.

  3. Admissible loads in wastewater treatment, using a recycled support materials in a biological aerated filter; Cargas admisibles en depuracion de aguas residuales, usando material reciclado como soporte de un filtro sumergido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osorio Robles, F. [E.T.S.I. de Caminos Canales y Puertos de Granada (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    This study places in the context of the research into Biological Aerated Filters that the Environmental Technology and Environmental Microbiology Research Group (University of Granada, Spain) has been developing for several years. We have achieved a high level of optimization of the system, using a recycled ceramic-based materials as biofilm support. It enables to give some design parameters, which will make possible the practical application in the future. In this article the relations among volumetric and hydraulic loads applied and effluent concentrations and elimination rates in relation to several pollutants are presented. The oxygen supplied has been accurately controlled, and the relation among the consumption value and the loads applied and the system efficiency obtained is presented. The tests were performed at a pilot plant with full scale height. The influent used was the primary effluent of a conventional treatment plant and the operational flow was counter-current flow. (Author) 11 refs.

  4. PENGEMBANGAN PETUNJUK PRAKTIKUM BIOLOGI PADA MATERI JAMUR DENGAN POLA PEMBERDAYAAN BERPIKIR MELALUI PERTANYAAN (STUDI KASUS DI KELAS X.3 SMA MUHAMMADIYAH 1 METROTAHUN PELAJARAN (2013/2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astri Anggraini

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to produce practical guidance with patterns of thinking empowerment by questioning. This researchdevelopment starting from the definition phase, the planning phase, and the development phase. The development phase includes three steps, namely validation by expert teacher and two lecturers, product revision, and produk testing. Validation expert is testing materials and the quality of the results obtained 100% with a very high category. Readability level got result>60% with ten indicators of getting high category. Aplicatibility level got result> 60% with two indicators of gettinh veri high category and eight indicators of getting high category. Practice guidancehas beendevelopedin accordancewith thecriteria ofgoodpracticeguidance. Practice guidance developed has advantages which can develop students' critical thinking skills, but this guide also has the disadvantage that only limited one material is Mushroom material. KataKunci:Penelitiandanpengembangan,  petunjuk praktikum, berpikir melalui pertanyaan.

  5. Biological Oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyhrman, Sonya

    2004-10-01

    The ocean is arguably the largest habitat on the planet, and it houses an astounding array of life, from microbes to whales. As a testament to this diversity and its importance, the discipline of biological oceanography spans studies of all levels of biological organization, from that of single genes, to organisms, to their population dynamics. Biological oceanography also includes studies on how organisms interact with, and contribute to, essential global processes. Students of biological oceanography are often as comfortable looking at satellite images as they are electron micrographs. This diversity of perspective begins the textbook Biological Oceanography, with cover graphics including a Coastal Zone Color Scanner image representing chlorophyll concentration, an electron micrograph of a dinoflagellate, and a photograph of a copepod. These images instantly capture the reader's attention and illustrate some of the different scales on which budding oceanographers are required to think. Having taught a core graduate course in biological oceanography for many years, Charlie Miller has used his lecture notes as the genesis for this book. The text covers the subject of biological oceanography in a manner that is targeted to introductory graduate students, but it would also be appropriate for advanced undergraduates.

  6. Válvula mecânica em carbono, de disco basculante, com revestimento de material biológico: princípios e desenvolvimento Pivoting disc carbon mechanical valve covered with biological material: principles and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio Pereira de Magalhães

    1995-12-01

    . RESULTADOS INICIAIS: como o número de pacientes é pequeno, destacam-se apenas algumas observações iniciais: ausência de tromboembolismo, ausência de disfunção mecânica primária, ocorrência de dois acidentes hemorrágicos maiores e um episódio de trombose em paciente com dois meses de evolução, por anticoagulação inadequada, com reoperação e mantendo a mesma prótese com achado de depósito difuso de fibrina e boa evolução após dez meses. CONCLUSÕES: os resultados dos testes mecânicos do material e da válvula e os aspectos clínicos iniciais são favoráveis, devendo-se ampliar a casuística, com proteção anticoagulante mais efetiva e uniforme nos três primeiros meses. Após três meses, a presença do material biológico e as baixas doses de anticoagulante parecem ser eficientes no controle das complicações pós-operatórias da válvula mecânica, contra a trombose, o tromboembolismo e os acidentes hemorrágicos.INTRODUCTION: a hybrid valve was developed for improving a durable mechanic disc valve with good biocompatibility, by promoting easy healing around the ring valve and making the maximum isolation of the synthetic material in the blood stream. Lining the mechanical valve with porcine biologic tissue (pericardium and vein is a tentative to reduce the morbidity and mortality on respect of thrombosis, thromboembolism, reoperations and minor use of anticoagulants to reduce the hemorrhagic events. Some principles were established on hybrid valve: durable mechanical system, points of contact without biologic material, use of biological material with minor organic reaction, movable parts without biologic material outside its perimeter, preferential closing system with superposition on a track seat and loose joints for accept biologic material limited growth. MATERIAL AND METHOD: the valve is the type of perforated tilting disc and all made of Carbolite (hardened polymeric carbon. The prosthesis is all covered except the central pivot, the disc

  7. Material and energy balances of an integrated biological hydrogen production and purification system and their implications for its potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Yasuhiro; Huang, Yu-Jung; Chen, Jhen-Wei; Lin, Hung-Chun; Whang, Liang-Ming; Chu, Hsin; Lo, Young-Chong; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2011-09-01

    The materials and energy in an integrated biological hydrogen production and purification system involving hydrolysis, dark fermentation, photo fermentation, CO2 fixation and anaerobic digestion are balanced by integrating the results from multiple experiments, simulations and the literature. The findings are two fold. First, using 1000 kg rice straw as a substrate, 19.8 kg H2 and 138.0 kg CH4 are obtained. The net energy balance (NEB) and net energy ratio (NER) are -738.4 kWh and 77.8%, respectively, both of which imply an unfavorable energy production system. Opportunities to improve the performance particularly lie in the photo fermentation process. Second, greenhouse gas emissions are evaluated for various options. The results were comparable with the emission inventory of electricity generated from fossil fuels. NEB and NER under a zero-carbon-emission constraint were discussed in detail to clarify completely the implications of the energy and material balances on greenhouse gas emissions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterization of a tubular flow chamber for studying platelet interaction with biologic and prosthetic materials: deposition of indium 111-labeled platelets on collagen, subendothelium, and expanded polytetrafluoroethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badimon, L.; Turitto, V.; Rosemark, J.A.; Badimon, J.J.; Fuster, V.

    1987-01-01

    A plastic (Plexiglas) chamber for evaluating platelet deposition under controlled hemodynamic conditions has been developed. The perfusion chamber has been designed to retain the cylindrical shape typical of the vasculature, to be flexible enough to accept a variety of biologic and prosthetic materials, and to simulate a broad range of physiologic flow conditions in either an ex vivo or in vitro perfusion system. Three type of surfaces were exposed to blood flowing directly from the carotid artery of a heparinized pig through the perfusion chamber: de-endothelialized pig aorta, collagen strips from rabbit Achilles tendon, and an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene material (Gore-Tex). Platelets, previously radiolabeled with indium 111 and injected into the animal, were quantified on the material surface, and the total number of deposited platelets determined for a range of blood flow rates (5 to 40 ml/min) and exposure times (0.5 to 20 minutes). The deposition rates were correlated with theory for describing the mass transport of platelets to the test surface. At the wall shear rates investigated (105 to 850 sec-1), the deposition of platelets on subendothelium was strongly dependent on the local flow conditions. Values of deposition on Gore-Tex obtained at similar flow conditions (105 to 425 sec-1) were reduced compared with that observed on subendothelium and showed a markedly weaker dependence on the shear rate. In contrast, deposition of platelets on collagen was more than an order of magnitude greater than on subendothelium and showed a dependence on flow only at the lowest flow rate studied (10 ml/min). The results indicate that collagen is much more reactive than subendothelium and Gore-Tex with respect to the growth and stability of platelet aggregates and moreover suggest that flow mechanisms for depositing platelets on various surface may be substantially different

  9. Characterization of a tubular flow chamber for studying platelet interaction with biologic and prosthetic materials: deposition of indium 111-labeled platelets on collagen, subendothelium, and expanded polytetrafluoroethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badimon, L.; Turitto, V.; Rosemark, J.A.; Badimon, J.J.; Fuster, V.

    1987-12-01

    A plastic (Plexiglas) chamber for evaluating platelet deposition under controlled hemodynamic conditions has been developed. The perfusion chamber has been designed to retain the cylindrical shape typical of the vasculature, to be flexible enough to accept a variety of biologic and prosthetic materials, and to simulate a broad range of physiologic flow conditions in either an ex vivo or in vitro perfusion system. Three type of surfaces were exposed to blood flowing directly from the carotid artery of a heparinized pig through the perfusion chamber: de-endothelialized pig aorta, collagen strips from rabbit Achilles tendon, and an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene material (Gore-Tex). Platelets, previously radiolabeled with indium 111 and injected into the animal, were quantified on the material surface, and the total number of deposited platelets determined for a range of blood flow rates (5 to 40 ml/min) and exposure times (0.5 to 20 minutes). The deposition rates were correlated with theory for describing the mass transport of platelets to the test surface. At the wall shear rates investigated (105 to 850 sec-1), the deposition of platelets on subendothelium was strongly dependent on the local flow conditions. Values of deposition on Gore-Tex obtained at similar flow conditions (105 to 425 sec-1) were reduced compared with that observed on subendothelium and showed a markedly weaker dependence on the shear rate. In contrast, deposition of platelets on collagen was more than an order of magnitude greater than on subendothelium and showed a dependence on flow only at the lowest flow rate studied (10 ml/min). The results indicate that collagen is much more reactive than subendothelium and Gore-Tex with respect to the growth and stability of platelet aggregates and moreover suggest that flow mechanisms for depositing platelets on various surface may be substantially different.

  10. Biological preconcentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manginell, Ronald P [Albuquerque, NM; Bunker, Bruce C [Albuquerque, NM; Huber, Dale L [Albuquerque, NM

    2008-09-09

    A biological preconcentrator comprises a stimulus-responsive active film on a stimulus-producing microfabricated platform. The active film can comprise a thermally switchable polymer film that can be used to selectively absorb and desorb proteins from a protein mixture. The biological microfabricated platform can comprise a thin membrane suspended on a substrate with an integral resistive heater and/or thermoelectric cooler for thermal switching of the active polymer film disposed on the membrane. The active polymer film can comprise hydrogel-like polymers, such as poly(ethylene oxide) or poly(n-isopropylacrylamide), that are tethered to the membrane. The biological preconcentrator can be fabricated with semiconductor materials and technologies.

  11. Applications of thermal neutron scattering in biology, biochemistry and biophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worcester, D.L.

    1977-01-01

    Biological applications of thermal neutron scattering have increased rapidly in recent years. The following categories of biological research with thermal neutron scattering are presently identified: crystallography of biological molecules; neutron small-angle scattering of biological molecules in solution (these studies have already included numerous measurements of proteins, lippoproteins, viruses, ribosomal subunits and chromatin subunit particles); neutron small-angle diffraction and scattering from biological membranes and membrane components; and neutron quasielastic and inelastic scattering studies of the dynamic properties of biological molecules and materials. (author)

  12. Quantum Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Sergi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A critical assessment of the recent developmentsof molecular biology is presented.The thesis that they do not lead to a conceptualunderstanding of life and biological systems is defended.Maturana and Varela's concept of autopoiesis is briefly sketchedand its logical circularity avoided by postulatingthe existence of underlying living processes,entailing amplification from the microscopic to the macroscopic scale,with increasing complexity in the passage from one scale to the other.Following such a line of thought, the currently accepted model of condensed matter, which is based on electrostatics and short-ranged forces,is criticized. It is suggested that the correct interpretationof quantum dispersion forces (van der Waals, hydrogen bonding, and so onas quantum coherence effects hints at the necessity of includinglong-ranged forces (or mechanisms for them incondensed matter theories of biological processes.Some quantum effects in biology are reviewedand quantum mechanics is acknowledged as conceptually important to biology since withoutit most (if not all of the biological structuresand signalling processes would not even exist. Moreover, it is suggested that long-rangequantum coherent dynamics, including electron polarization,may be invoked to explain signal amplificationprocess in biological systems in general.

  13. Handbook of luminescent semiconductor materials

    CERN Document Server

    Bergman, Leah

    2011-01-01

    Photoluminescence spectroscopy is an important approach for examining the optical interactions in semiconductors and optical devices with the goal of gaining insight into material properties. With contributions from researchers at the forefront of this field, Handbook of Luminescent Semiconductor Materials explores the use of this technique to study semiconductor materials in a variety of applications, including solid-state lighting, solar energy conversion, optical devices, and biological imaging. After introducing basic semiconductor theory and photoluminescence principles, the book focuses

  14. A measuring system for the fast simultaneous isotope ratio and elemental analysis of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and sulfur in food commodities and other biological material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieper, Hans-Peter; Kupka, Hans-Joachim; Williams, Tony; Rossmann, Andreas; Rummel, Susanne; Tanz, Nicole; Schmidt, Hanns-Ludwig

    2006-01-01

    The isotope ratio of each of the light elements preserves individual information on the origin and history of organic natural compounds. Therefore, a multi-element isotope ratio analysis is the most efficient means for the origin and authenticity assignment of food, and also for the solution of various problems in ecology, archaeology and criminology. Due to the extraordinary relative abundances of the elements hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen and sulfur in some biological material and to the need for individual sample preparations for H and S, their isotope ratio determination currently requires at least three independent procedures and approximately 1 h of work. We present here a system for the integrated elemental and isotope ratio analysis of all four elements in one sample within 20 min. The system consists of an elemental analyser coupled to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer with an inlet system for four reference gases (N(2), CO(2), H(2) and SO(2)). The combustion gases are separated by reversible adsorption and determined by a thermoconductivity detector; H(2)O is reduced to H(2). The analyser is able to combust samples with up to 100 mg of organic material, sufficient to analyse samples with even unusual elemental ratios, in one run. A comparison of the isotope ratios of samples of water, fruit juices, cheese and ethanol from wine, analysed by the four-element analyser and by classical methods and systems, respectively, yielded excellent agreements. The sensitivity of the device for the isotope ratio measurement of C and N corresponds to that of other systems. It is less by a factor of four for H and by a factor of two for S, and the error ranges are identical to those of other systems. Copyright (c) 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Radiological/biological/aerosol removal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslam, Jeffery J

    2015-03-17

    An air filter replacement system for existing buildings, vehicles, arenas, and other enclosed airspaces includes a replacement air filter for replacing a standard air filter. The replacement air filter has dimensions and air flow specifications that allow it to replace the standard air filter. The replacement air filter includes a filter material that removes radiological or biological or aerosol particles.

  16. Biological activities of synthesized silver nanoparticles from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nanotechnology is interdisciplinary which includes physics, chemistry, biology, material science and medicine. Nanotechnology is a universal term for the creation, manip ... range of medical devices including bone cement, surgical instruments, surgical masks, etc. Synthesis of noble metal na- noparticles, in particular, silver ...

  17. Biological tracer method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong-Gunderson, Janet M.; Palumbo, Anthony V.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a biological tracer method for characterizing the movement of a material through a medium, comprising the steps of: introducing a biological tracer comprising a microorganism having ice nucleating activity into a medium; collecting at least one sample of the medium from a point removed from the introduction point; and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. The present invention is also a method for using a biological tracer as a label for material identification by introducing a biological tracer having ice nucleating activity into a material, collecting a sample of a portion of the labelled material and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer.

  18. Development and applications of photosensitive device systems to studies of biological and organic materials: Progress report for period June 1964-December 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, G.T.; Gruner, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    A broad range of devices based on electro-optical technologies were developed and applied to the study of biological and other organic materials, ranging from single cell organisms to complex lipid liquid crystals. The detector systems developed have incorporated state of the art image intensifiers, vidicons, and solid state detectors. A major emphasis has been on the development of an x-ray image intensifier system suitable for diffraction experiments at high flux synchrotron sources. The detector has been applied to time resolved studies of lipid membrane phase transitions, with time resolution of the order of 10 msec. In addition, the x-ray detectors have been used to discover 3 cubic phases in the 1-methylphosphatidylethanolamine-water system, permitting a refinement of the phase transition theory developed earlier. The detectors have also been applied to low level light detection of selected luminescence phenomena. In particular, the cellular sources of bioluminescence in many organisms have been discovered, along with detailed information on the spectral distributions. Using the photoprotein aequorin and fluorescence techniques detailed studies have been made of free calcium release and uptake in a number of important metabolic processes. 11 refs

  19. PENGARUH VARIASI LAMA FERMENTASI TERHADAP KANDUNGAN PROTEIN PADA TAPE TALAS (Colocasia esculenta SEBAGAI SUMBER BELAJAR BIOLOGI SMA KELAS XII PADA MATERI BIOTEKNOLOGI PENGOLAHAN BAHAN PANGAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eka Baskara Prasetyajati Agus Sujarwanta

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The purpose of this study was 1 to determine whether or not the effect of fermentation time variation of the protein produced on tape taro. 2 to determine variations in fermentation hours to obtain the highest protein content of the tape taro. The study design used was completely randomized design with 4 treatments and 5 replications. Parameters measured were crude protein content and organoleptic tape taro. The results showed that the fermentation time affect the protein content of the resulting tape taro, the highest protein content in treatment C (fermented 60 hours resulted in as much as 3.888 % protein. Based on the test results BNJ all treatments were significantly different with the exception of treatment B and D. Benefits in the manufacture of tape taro research are: the lecturer can be used as teaching materials practicum taro tape processing methods on the biology subject matter in the form of LKPS biotechnology, and science can contribute to the reader about alternative ways of processing of taro as a traditional food.

  20. New chiral and restricted-access materials containing glycopeptides as selectors for the high-performance liquid chromatographic determination of chiral drugs in biological matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparrini, Francesco; Cancelliere, Giovanna; Ciogli, Alessia; D'Acquarica, Ilaria; Misiti, Domenico; Villani, Claudio

    2008-05-16

    Two new chiral and restricted-access materials containing glycopeptide antibiotics as chiral selectors (chiro-Glyco-RAM) were designed, suitable for the direct HPLC injection of biological fluids containing chiral drugs without any sample pre-treatment or pre-columns coupling. The external surface of the porous silica support was covered with a bio-compatible hydrophilic polymeric network (polyvinyl alcohol, PVA) while the chiral phase based on either teicoplanin (TE) or teicoplanin aglycone (TAG) was exclusively confined to the internal region. The chiro-Glyco-RAM supports were synthesized by the following steps: (a) introduction of 3-aminopropyl groups on 100 A pore size silica gel; (b) activation of the aminopropylated silica with 1,6-diisocyanatohexane; (c) functionalization of the external region of the porous silica with PVA; (d) covalent linking of TE/TAG to the internal surface. The average pore diameter of the chiro-Glyco-RAM supports, calculated by inverse size-exclusion chromatography (ISEC), was about 80 A and able to exclude macromolecules heavier than about 20,000 Da (such as the most abundant serum proteins) from the pores. The recovery of bovine serum albumin (BSA) was almost quantitative. HPLC analyses of model chiral drugs were performed using hydro-organic mobile phases consisting of an organic solvent (acetonitrile or methanol) and aqueous solutions of ammonium acetate (0.020 M) or ammonium formate (0.0025-0.0050 M).