WorldWideScience

Sample records for biological lot distribution

  1. Simultaneous Optimal Placement of Distributed Generation and Electric Vehicle Parking Lots Based on Probabilistic EV Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H. Amini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available High penetration of distributed generations and the increasing demand for using electric vehicles provide a lot of issues for the utilities. If these two effective elements of the future power system are used in an unscheduled manner, it may lead to the loss increment in distribution networks, dramatically. In this paper, the simultaneous allocation of distributed generations (DGs and electric vehicles (EVs parking lots has been studied in a radial distribution network. A distribution network which is upgrading and equipped with DGs is considered and these resources' optimal placement is achieved in interaction with the EV parking lots in order to minimize the power distribution network loss. The proposed method considers not only the loss minimization but also the reliability of the parking lot from the investor's point of view. The output of this model is the daily electricity demand of parking lot. The proposed method includes two levels. At the first level of the proposed algorithm, the parking lot investor makes decision and selects three candidate buses for each parking based on three main criteria. After making decision by the parking lot investor, the candidate buses are introduced to the distribution network operator. At the second stage, the distribution network operator allocates the DGs and EV parking lots based on the candidate buses of investor in order to achieve the minimum loss of the distribution network. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed method is evaluated by allocating of DGs and EV parking lots simultaneously on the standard distribution test system.

  2. A collaborative ant colony metaheuristic for distributed multi-level lot-sizing

    CERN Document Server

    Buer, Tobias; Gehring, Hermann

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents an ant colony optimization metaheuristic for collaborative planning. Collaborative planning is used to coordinate individual plans of self-interested decision makers with private information in order to increase the overall benefit of the coalition. The method consists of a new search graph based on encoded solutions. Distributed and private information is integrated via voting mechanisms and via a simple but effective collaborative local search procedure. The approach is applied to a distributed variant of the multi-level lot-sizing problem and evaluated by means of 352 benchmark instances from the literature. The proposed approach clearly outperforms existing approaches on the sets of medium and large sized instances. While the best method in the literature so far achieves an average deviation from the best known non-distributed solutions of 46 percent for the set of the largest instances, for example, the presented approach reduces the average deviation to only 5 percent.

  3. Optimal pricing and lot-sizing decisions under Weibull distribution deterioration and trade credit policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manna S.K.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider the problem of simultaneous determination of retail price and lot-size (RPLS under the assumption that the supplier offers a fixed credit period to the retailer. It is assumed that the item in stock deteriorates over time at a rate that follows a two-parameter Weibull distribution and that the price-dependent demand is represented by a constant-price-elasticity function of retail price. The RPLS decision model is developed and solved analytically. Results are illustrated with the help of a base example. Computational results show that the supplier earns more profits when the credit period is greater than the replenishment cycle length. Sensitivity analysis of the solution to changes in the value of input parameters of the base example is also discussed.

  4. Countercurrent distribution of biological cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    It is known that the addition of phosphate buffer to two polymer aqueous phase systems has a strong effect on the partition behavior of cells and other particles in such mixtures. The addition of sodium phosphate to aqueous poly(ethylene glycol) dextran phase systems causes a concentration-dependent shift in binodial on the phase diagram, progressively lowering the critical conditions for phase separation as the phosphate concentration is increased. Sodium chloride produces no significant shift in the critical point relative to the salt-free case. Accurate determinations of the phase diagram require measurements of the density of the phases; data is presented which allows this parameter to be calculated from polarimetric measurements of the dextran concentrations of both phases. Increasing polymer concentrations in the phase systems produce increasing preference of the phosphate for the dextran-rich bottom phase. Equilibrium dialysis experiments showed that poly(ethylene glycol) effectively rejected phosphate, and to a lesser extent chloride, but that dextran had little effect on the distribution of either salt. Increasing ionic strength via addition of 0.15 M NaCl to phase systems containing 0.01 M phosphate produces an increased concentration of phosphate ions in the bottom dextran-rich phase, the expected effect in this type of Donnan distribution.

  5. Glycosides from Marine Sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae: Structures, Taxonomical Distribution, Biological Activities and Biological Roles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin A. Stonik

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Literature data about glycosides from sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae are reviewed. Structural diversity, biological activities, taxonomic distribution and biological functions of these natural products are discussed.

  6. Glycosides from Marine Sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae): Structures, Taxonomical Distribution, Biological Activities and Biological Roles

    OpenAIRE

    Valentin A. Stonik; Makarieva, Tatyana N.; Vladimir I. Kalinin; Krasokhin, Vladimir B.; Ivanchina, Natalia V.

    2012-01-01

    Literature data about glycosides from sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae) are reviewed. Structural diversity, biological activities, taxonomic distribution and biological functions of these natural products are discussed.

  7. Glycosides from marine sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae): structures, taxonomical distribution, biological activities and biological roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinin, Vladimir I; Ivanchina, Natalia V; Krasokhin, Vladimir B; Makarieva, Tatyana N; Stonik, Valentin A

    2012-08-01

    Literature data about glycosides from sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae) are reviewed. Structural diversity, biological activities, taxonomic distribution and biological functions of these natural products are discussed. PMID:23015769

  8. Three dimensional biological dose distribution of antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of external beam cancer therapy is to destroy the tumour while sparing the healthy tissue around it. In hadron therapy, the dose profile of heavy charged particles satisfies this request, because most of the energy is deposited at the end of the particle path, in the Bragg peak. Antiprotons are even more promising, thanks to the extra energy released by annihilation when captured in a normal atom at the end of range. The aim of the AD-4/ACE experiment at CERN is to determine the increase in biological dose near the Bragg peak due to densely ionizing particles emanating from the annihilation of antiprotons. Initial experiments showed the damage to cells inflicted at the end of the beam for identical damage at the skin level to be four times higher for antiprotons than for protons. The radiation field in a spread-out Bragg peak produced with antiprotons is highly mixed and for proper dose planning knowledge of linear energy transfer (LET) and relative biological efficiency (RBE) at any point in the target is needed. We are studying a number of detection methods for their response to mixed radiation fields with the goal to obtain a direct measurement of the 3D LET distribution and report on first results.

  9. Biological distribution of 51Cr-heparin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of heparin in normal Wistar rats using the radioactive tracer 51Cr, has been studied. The labeled and purified 51Cr-heparin was injected into rats intravenously and by intraperitoneal injection. In measuring the radioactivity of organs it was possible to conclude that the tissues rich in mast cells, liver and spleen, were found to take up the greater amounts of heparin. The curve that represents the logarithm of the concentration of heparin versus time is biexponential. The half-lives of the two exponential were determined. The volume of distribution, the rate constant and the renal clearance were determined by the values of the plasma levels and urinary excretions. The biological half-time, the turnover rate and the turnover time were determined by measuring the residual radioactivity of the total body and urinary excretions. With the data obtained from the mentioned experiments a compartmental model was performed in which the plasma is the central compartment for the distribution of the drug, exchanging with another extraplasmatic compartment and finally the drug being stored in reticulo endothelial system cells. (Author)

  10. Lots of Enthusiasm, Lots of Questions

    OpenAIRE

    Dalzell, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    A healthcare system that rewards overuse of low-value services runs counter to the concept of getting your money’s worth. It also isn’t fair. Value-based benefit design could be the strategy that is needed for effective management of biologics and other high-cost interventions. Now, how can we get all stakeholders to start the value ball rolling?

  11. LASER BIOLOGY: Visualisation of the distributions of melanin and indocyanine green in biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genina, E. A.; Fedosov, I. V.; Bashkatov, A. N.; Zimnyakov, D. A.; Altshuler, G. B.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2008-03-01

    A double-wavelength laser scanning microphotometer with the high spectral and spatial resolutions is developed for studying the distribution of endogenic and exogenic dyes in biological tissues. Samples of hair and skin biopsy with hair follicles stained with indocyanine green are studied. The spatial distribution of indocyanine green and melanin in the biological tissue is determined from the measured optical transmittance.

  12. Single-mode biological distributed feedback laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vannahme, Christoph; Maier-Flaig, Florian; Lemmer, Uli;

    2013-01-01

    Single-mode second order distributed feedback (DFB) lasers of riboflavin (vitamin B2) doped gelatine films on nanostructured low refractive index material are demonstrated. Manufacturing is based on a simple UV nanoimprint and spin-coating. Emission wavelengths of 543 nm and 562 nm for two...

  13. [Radiotherapy Techniques and Radiation Pneumonitis: A Lot To A Little Or A Little To A Lot?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bingqi; Wang, Jin; Xu, Yujin; Su, Feng; Shan, Guoping; Chen, Ming

    2015-12-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the main treatment for patients with lung cancer. Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) are widely used to deliver radiation. Here, we focus on the correlations between dose distribution in lung and radiation pneumonitis according to the analysis about radiotherapy for lung cancer: A lot to a little or a little to a lot, which is the main cause of radiation pneumonitis? PMID:26706952

  14. Analysis Of Harrell Monosodium Titanate LOT 03031

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monosodium titanate (MST) for use in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) must be qualified and verified in advance. A single qualification sample for each batch of material is sent to SRNL for analysis, as well as a statistical sampling of verification samples. The Harrell Industries Lot 030311 qualification and 9 verification samples met all the requirements in the specification indicating the material is acceptable for use in the process. Harrell Industries is under contract with Savannah River Remediation to provide MST for use in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP). A 500-mL qualification sample for Lot 030311 was sent to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to confirm the material meets the requirements specified in the purchase specification. The vendor is also obligated to send verification samples from ∼10% or more of the pails of MST product for each lot (distributed roughly evenly through the entire lot of pails). For the verification of this lot, Harrell Industries sent 9 samples, one each from pails 1, 5, 15, 20, 25, 30, 40, 45, and 55 of 59 total pails.

  15. Biological optimization of heterogeneous dose distributions in systemic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The standard computational method developed for internal radiation dosimetry is the MIRD (medical internal radiation dose) formalism, based on the assumption that tumor control is given by uniform dose and activity distributions. In modern systemic radiotherapy, however, the need for full 3D dose calculations that take into account the heterogeneous distribution of activity in the patient is now understood. When information on nonuniform distribution of activity becomes available from functional imaging, a more patient specific 3D dosimetry can be performed. Application of radiobiological models can be useful to correlate the calculated heterogeneous dose distributions to the current knowledge on tumor control probability of a homogeneous dose distribution. Our contribution to this field is the introduction of a parameter, the F factor, already used by our group in studying external beam radiotherapy treatments. This parameter allows one to write a simplified expression for tumor control probability (TCP) based on the standard linear quadratic (LQ) model and Poisson statistics. The LQ model was extended to include different treatment regimes involving source decay, incorporating the repair 'μ' of sublethal radiation damage, the relative biological effectiveness and the effective 'waste' of dose delivered when repopulation occurs. The sensitivity of the F factor against radiobiological parameters (α,β,μ) and the influence of the dose volume distribution was evaluated. Some test examples for 131I and 90Y labeled pharmaceuticals are described to further explain the properties of the F factor and its potential applications. To demonstrate dosimetric feasibility and advantages of the proposed F factor formalism in systemic radiotherapy, we have performed a retrospective planning study on selected patient case. F factor formalism helps to assess the total activity to be administered to the patient taking into account the heterogeneity in activity uptake and dose

  16. Radiotherapy Techniques and Radiation Pneumonitis: 
A Lot To A Little Or A Little To A Lot?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingqi YU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy is one of the main treatment for patients with lung cancer. Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT are widely used to deliver radiation. Here, we focus on the correlations between dose distribution in lung and radiation pneumonitis according to the analysis about radiotherapy for lung cancer: A lot to a little or a little to a lot, which is the main cause of radiation pneumonitis?

  17. 7 CFR 987.102 - Lot number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lot number. 987.102 Section 987.102 Agriculture... RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA Administrative Rules Definitions § 987.102 Lot number. Lot number is synonymous with code and means a combination of letters or numbers, or both, acceptable to the Committee,...

  18. 7 CFR 29.35 - Lot seal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lot seal. 29.35 Section 29.35 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Regulations Definitions § 29.35 Lot seal. A seal approved by the Director for sealing lots...

  19. Capacitated Dynamic Lot Sizing with Capacity Acquisition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Hongyan; Meissner, Joern

    model which combines the complexity of time-varying demand and cost functions and that of scale economies arising from dynamic lot-sizing costs with the purchase cost of capacity. We propose a heuristic algorithm that runs in polynomial time to determine a good capacity level and corresponding lot...

  20. Biological stability in drinking water distribution systems: A novel approach for systematic microbial water quality monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prest, E.I.E.D.

    2015-01-01

    Challenges to achieve biological stability in drinking water distribution systems Drinking water is distributed from the treatment facility to consumers through extended man-made piping systems. The World Health Organization drinking water guidelines (2006) stated that “Water entering the distribut

  1. Asymptotic Fitness Distribution in the Bak-Sneppen Model of Biological Evolution with Four Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlemm, Eckhard

    2012-08-01

    We suggest a new method to compute the asymptotic fitness distribution in the Bak-Sneppen model of biological evolution. As applications we derive the full asymptotic distribution in the four-species model, and give an explicit linear recurrence relation for a set of coefficients determining the asymptotic distribution in the five-species model.

  2. Asymptotic fitness distribution in the Bak-Sneppen model of biological evolution with four species

    OpenAIRE

    Schlemm, Eckhard

    2012-01-01

    We suggest a new method to compute the asymptotic fitness distribution in the Bak-Sneppen model of biological evolution. As applications we derive the full asymptotic distribution in the four-species model, and give an explicit linear recurrence relation for a set of coefficients determining the asymptotic distribution in the five-species model.

  3. LOT, a meso scale mechanistic tool for Porous Asphalt mixture design; winter damage and LOT validation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huurman, M.; Mo, L.T.; Woldekidan, M.F.

    2010-01-01

    By assignment of the Centre for Transport and Navigation (DVS) of the Dutch Ministry of Transport, Public Works and Water Management the Delft University of Technology developed LOT. LOT is a Lifetime Optimisation Tool for Porous Asphalt, PA, based on meso scale structural modelling. LOT sees an asp

  4. Environmental distribution and population biology of Candidatus Accumulibacter, a primary agent of Biological Phosphorus Removal

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, S. Brook; Warnecke, Falk; Madejska, Julita; McMahon, Katherine D.; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2008-01-01

    Members of the uncultured bacterial genus Candidatus Accumulibacter are capable of intracellular accumulation of inorganic phosphate (Pi) in activated sludge wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) performing enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR), but were also recently shown to inhabit freshwater and estuarine sediments. Additionally, metagenomic sequencing of two bioreactor cultures enriched in Candidatus Accumulibacter, but housed on separate continents, revealed the potential for glob...

  5. ANALYSIS OF HARRELL MONOSODIUM TITANATE LOT 46000908120

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2014-04-09

    Monosodium titanate (MST) for use in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) must be qualified and verified in advance. A single qualification sample for each batch of material is sent to SRNL for analysis, as well as a statistical sampling of verification samples. The original Harrell Industries Lot #46000908120 qualification and 16 verification samples received in October 2012 failed to meet the specification for weight percent solids. All of the pails sampled and tested contained less than 15 wt % MST solids. The lot was returned to the vendor, and in February 2014 a new qualification sample and set of 16 verification samples were received from this lot. The new lot met each of the selected specification requirements that were tested and, consequently, the material is acceptable for use in the ARP process.

  6. ANALYSIS OF HARRELL MONOSODIUM TITANATE LOT 46000824120

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2014-04-09

    Monosodium titanate (MST) for use in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) must be qualified and verified in advance. A single qualification sample for each batch of material is sent to SRNL for analysis, as well as a statistical sampling of verification samples. The original Harrell Industries Lot #46000824120 qualification and 16 verification samples received in September 2012 failed to meet the specification for weight percent solids. All of the pails sampled and tested contained less than 15 wt % MST solids. The lot was returned to the vendor, and in February 2014 a new qualification sample and set of 14 verification samples were received from this lot. The new lot met each of the selected specification requirements that were tested and, consequently, the material is acceptable for use in the ARP process.

  7. The distribution of cultural and biological diversity in Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Joslin L; Manne, Lisa; Brooks, Thomas;

    2002-01-01

    Anthropologists, biologists and linguists have all noted an apparent coincidence in species diversity and human cultural or linguistic diversity. We present, to our knowledge, one of the first quantitative descriptions of this coincidence and show that, for 2 degrees x 2 degrees grid cells across...... sub-Saharan Africa, cultural diversity and vertebrate species diversity exhibit marked similarities in their overall distribution. In addition, we show that 71% of the observed variation in species richness and 36% in language richness can be explained on the basis of environmental factors, suggesting...

  8. Powder characterization of HNS-II, Lot No. ENB-63

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, A.A.; Quinlin, W.T.

    1991-07-01

    This is a compilation of powder characterization data generated by Pantex on hexanitrostilbene type II (HNS-II) Lot No. ENG-63 recrystallized by Ensign-Bickford Aerospace. Characterization includes particle size distribution, specific surface area, N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) insoluble particles, melting point, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) endotherm and exotherm temperatures, purity determined by liquid chromatography, and photomicrographs of the bulk powder and foreign particles.

  9. [Biology, species biodiversity and distribution of Trichinella nematodes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskwa, Bozena

    2006-01-01

    From the time of the discovery of Trichinella larvae in 1835 until the middle of the next century it was commonly assumed that all trichinellosis was caused by a single species Trichinella spiralis. This species is an intracellular parasite in both a larva and an adult stage. The L1 larvae live in a modified skeletal muscles. The adult worms occupy a membrane-bound portion of columnar epitelium, living as intramulticellular parasite. More than century later T. spiralis have been reported from more than 150 different naturally or experimentally infected hosts and demonstrated worldwide distribution in domestic and/or sylvatic animals. Up to date, Trichinella genus comprised eight species (T. spiralis, T. nativa, T. britovi, T. murrelli, T. nelsoni, T. pseudospiralis, T. papuae and T. zimbabwensisi) and three additional genotypic variants that have not yet to be taxonomically defined (T6, T8, T9). Molecular markers revealed that Trichinella T6 is related to T. nativa, Trichinella T8 related to T. britovi. Two main clades are recognized in the genus Trichinella: the first encapsulated in host muscle tissue and the second--non-encapsulated. In this paper the history of Trichinella spp. discovery, their life cycle, taxonomy and phylogeny have been reviewed. PMID:17432238

  10. Burning Cars in a Parking Lot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoin, Jean

    2011-08-01

    Knuth's parking scheme is a model in computer science for hashing with linear probing. One may imagine a circular parking lot with n sites; cars arrive at each site with unit rate. When a car arrives at a vacant site, it parks there; otherwise it turns clockwise and parks at the first vacant site which is found. We incorporate fires into this model by throwing Molotov cocktails on each site at a smaller rate n - α , where 0 2/3, whereas for α < 2/3, the average occupation approaches 1 at time 1 but then quickly drops to 0 before the parking lot is ever saturated. Our study relies on asymptotics for the occupation of the parking lot without fires in certain regimes which may be of independent interest.

  11. Synthesis and Biology of Cyclic Imine Toxins, An Emerging Class of Potent, Globally Distributed Marine Toxins

    OpenAIRE

    Stivala, Craig E.; Benoit, Evelyne; Araoz, Romulo; Servent, Denis; Novikov, Alexei; Molgó, Jordi; Zakarian, Armen

    2015-01-01

    From a small group of exotic compounds isolated only two decades ago, Cyclic Imine (CI) toxins have become a major class of marine toxins with global distribution. Their distinct chemical structure, biological mechanism of action, and intricate chemistry ensures that CI toxins will continue to be the subject of fascinating fundamental studies in the broad fields of chemistry, chemical biology, and toxicology. The worldwide occurrence of potent CI toxins in marine environments, their accumulat...

  12. Discussion on wind factor influencing the distribution of biological soil crusts on surface of sand dunes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YongSheng Wu; Hasi Erdun; RuiPing Yin; Xin Zhang; Jie Ren; Jian Wang; XiuMin Tian; ZeKun Li; HengLu Miao

    2013-01-01

    Biological soil crusts are widely distributed in arid and semi-arid regions, whose formation and development have an important impact on the restoration process of the desert ecosystem. In order to explore the relationship between surface airflow and development characteristics of biological soil crusts, we studied surface airflow pattern and development characteristics of biological soil crusts on the fixed dune profile through field observation. Results indicate that the speed of near-surface airflow is the lowest at the foot of windward slope and the highest at the crest, showing an increasing trend from the foot to the crest. At the leeward side, although near-surface airflow increases slightly at the lower part of the slope after an initial sudden decrease at upper part of the slope, its overall trend decreases from the crest. Wind velocity variation coefficient varied at different heights over each observation site. The thickness, shear strength of biological soil crusts and percentage of fine particles at crusts layer decreased from the slope foot to the upper part, showing that biological soil crusts are less developed in high wind speed areas and well developed in low wind speed areas. It can be seen that there is a close relationship between the distribution of biological soil crusts in different parts of the dunes and changes in airflow due to geomorphologic variation.

  13. Single-mode biological distributed feedback lasers based on vitamin B2 doped gelatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vannahme, Christoph; Maier-Flaig, F.; Lemmer, U.;

    Biological second-order distributed feedback (DFB) lasers are presented. Riboflavin (vitamin B2) doped gelatin as active material is spin-coated onto nanoimprinted polymer with low refractive index. DFB grating periods of 368 nm and 384 nm yield laser emission at 543 nm and 562 nm, respectively....

  14. Evaluation of the biological and scanning distribution of hydroxyapatite-153Sm radiotherapeutic agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fixation of 153Sm labeled hydroxyapatite (HA) in the synovial capsule and extra articular localization were evaluated by means of biological distribution tests and gamma scanning studies. These were carried out using HA-153Sm with particle size ranging between 5 and μm, and radiochemical purity above 99%. Animal models used were wistar rats and new zealand rabbits. Rabbits were injected with 7,4 MBq of HA-153Sm while rats received between 1,85 and 92,6 MBq of HA-153Sm. In both cases injection was given in the intra articular area. After injection, scanning images were obtained in rabbits on the 1st, 3rd and 7st day and in rats on the 2nd and 7th day. Biological distribution studies are conducted in the 2 hours to 9 days range in rats and one the 7th day in rabbits. No extra articular localization of HA-153Sm was found in scanning conducted on rabbits by the 1st, 3rd and 7st day after injection, neither on rats by the 2nd and 7th day. Biological distributions for rabbits and rats show localization above 99% in the intra articular area, during the evaluated periods of time. The evaluations of the biological distribution and the scintigraphic images show that fixation of HA-153Sm in the synovial capsule up to the 9th day is very high

  15. Bumble bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Bombus spp.) of interior Alaska: Species composition, distribution, seasonal biology, and parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite the ecological and agricultural significance of bumble bees in Alaska, very little is known and published about this important group at the regional level. The objectives of this study were to provide baseline data on species composition, distribution, seasonal biology, and parasites of the ...

  16. Ford Whitman Harris's economical lot size model

    OpenAIRE

    Erlenkotter, D

    2014-01-01

    Here we celebrate the centennial of Ford Whitman Harris's model for determining economical lot sizes, which was published in the A.W. Shaw Company's magazine Factory, The Magazine of Management in February 1913. The square-root formula derived by Harris has become one of the most cited and applied results in production and operations management. We examine the circumstances under which this result was derived, and explore the probable causes for the later obscurity of Harris's paper, which wa...

  17. Analysis of Harrell Monosodium Titanate Lot #46000824120

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, K. M.L.

    2013-01-23

    Monosodium titanate (MST) for use in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) must be qualified and verified in advance. A single qualification sample for each batch of material is sent to SRNL for analysis, as well as a statistical sampling of verification samples. The Harrell Industries Lot #46000824120 qualification and the 16 verification samples failed to meet the specification for weight percent solids. All of the pails sampled and tested contained less than 15 wt % MST solids.

  18. Analysis of Harrell Monosodium Titanate Lot #46000908120

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, K. M.L.

    2013-01-23

    Monosodium titanate (MST) for use in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) must be qualified and verified in advance. A single qualification sample for each batch of material is sent to SRNL for analysis, as well as a statistical sampling of verification samples. The Harrell Industries Lot #46000908120 qualification and the 16 verification samples failed to meet the specification for weight percent solids. All of the pails sampled and tested contained less than 15 wt % MST solids.

  19. Theoretical and experimental study of the intensity distribution in biological tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Tang; Zhang Chun-Ping; Chen Gui-Ying; Tian Jian-Guo; Zhang Guang-Yin; Zhao Cheng-Mei

    2005-01-01

    Based on the diffusion approximate theory (DA ), a theoretical model about the distribution of the intensity of a narrow collimation beam illuminating on a semi-infinite biological tissue is developed. In order to verify the correctness of the model, a novel method of measuring the distributions of the intensity of light in Intralipid-10% suspension at 650 nm is presented and measurements of the distributions of the distance-dependent intensity of scattering light in different directions are made. The investigations show that the results from our diffusion model are in good agreement with the experimental results beyond and in the areas around the light source, and the distance-dependent intensity in the incident direction attenuates approximately in the exponential form. Furthermore, our theoretic results indicate the anisotropic characteristics of the intensity in different directions of scattering light inside the biological tissue.

  20. Light distribution in biological matter: a correlation with a Monte Carlo model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of the optical properties of biological tissues is in general very complex, but provides an important theoretical basis for many new medical procedures such as photodynamic diagnosis and therapy, photothermotherapy and diahanography, etc. Thus with this study, the problem of the control in light dosimetry in laser-tissue applications can be more effectively addressed and the optimum light dose to avoid regeneration of lesion tissue and damage to normal tissue be determined. In this project, some problems of tissue optics, i.e. the intrinsic, interactional mechanisms between laser and biological tissues were investigated. Employing the radiative transport theory, the properties of light distribution in some biological tissues were studied. The methods employed included actual experimentation and tissue simulation using the Monte Carlo method. (authors)

  1. Number size distribution measurements of biological aerosols under contrasting environments and seasons from southern tropical India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsan, Aswathy; Cv, Biju; Krishna, Ravi; Huffman, Alex; Poschl, Ulrich; Gunthe, Sachin

    2016-04-01

    Biological aerosols constitute a wide range of dead and alive biological materials and structures that are suspended in the atmosphere. They play an important role in the atmospheric physical, chemical and biological processes and health of living being by spread of diseases among humans, plants, and, animals. The atmospheric abundance, sources, physical properties of PBAPs as compared to non-biological aerosols, however, is poorly characterized. Though omnipresent, their concentration and composition exhibit large spatial and temporal variations depending up on their sources, land-use, and local meteorology. The Indian tropical region, which constitutes approximately 18% of the world's total population exhibits vast geographical extend and experiences a distinctive meteorological phenomenon by means of Indian Summer Monsoon (IMS). Thus, the sources, properties and characteristics of biological aerosols are also expected to have significant variations over the Indian subcontinent depending upon the location and seasons. Here we present the number concentration and size distribution of Fluorescent Biological Aerosol Particles (FBAP) from two contrasting locations in Southern tropical India measured during contrasting seasons using Ultra Violet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UV-APS). Measurements were carried out at a pristine high altitude continental site, Munnar (10.09 N, 77.06 E; 1605 m asl) during two contrasting seasons, South-West Monsoon (June-August, 2014) and winter (Jan - Feb, 2015) and in Chennai, a coastal urban area, during July - November 2015. FBAP concentrations at both the locations showed large variability with higher concentrations occurring at Chennai. Apart from regional variations, the FBAP concentrations also exhibited variations over two different seasons under the same environmental condition. In Munnar the FBAP concentration increased by a factor of four from South-West Monsoon to winter season. The average size distribution of FBAP at both

  2. Modelling income processes with lots of heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Browning, Martin; Ejrnæs, Mette; Alvarez, Javier

    2010-01-01

    We model earnings processes allowing for lots of heterogeneity across agents. We also introduce an extension to the linear ARMA model which allows the initial convergence in the long run to be different from that implied by the conventional ARMA model. This is particularly important for unit root...... this observable homogeneity, we find more latent heterogeneity than previous investigators. We show that allowance for heterogeneity makes substantial differences to estimates of model parameters and to outcomes of interest. Additionally, we find strong evidence against the hypothesis that any worker has a unit...

  3. The impact of climate-induced distributional changes on the validity of biological water quality metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassall, Christopher; Thompson, David J; Harvey, Ian F

    2010-01-01

    We present data on the distributional changes within an order of macroinvertebrates used in biological water quality monitoring. The British Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies) have been shown to be expanding their range northwards and this could potentially affect the use of water quality metrics. The results show that the families of Odonata that are used in monitoring are shifting their ranges poleward and that species richness is increasing through time at most UK latitudes. These past distributional shifts have had negligible effects on water quality indicators. However, variation in Odonata species richness (particularly in species-poor regions) has a significant effect on water quality metrics. We conclude with a brief review of current and predicted responses of aquatic macroinvertebrates to environmental warming and maintain that caution is warranted in the use of such dynamic biological indicators. PMID:19101810

  4. Roughhead grenadier (Macrourus berglax) in the waters off East Greenland: Distribution and biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fossen, Inge; Jørgensen, Ole A; Gundersen, Agnes C.

    2003-01-01

    The study focuses on distribution, catch rates and biological parameters of roughhead grenadier (Macrourus berglax) at East Greenland based on data from trawl surveys, longline surveys and commercial catches from the period 1994-2000. Roughhead grenadier was recorded at most fished stations at...... surveys and between 800 and 1 200 m in the trawl surveys. In both types of surveys the length distributions were dominated by a modal peak around 20 cm (PAF). Sex ratio changed with depth and length of 50% maturity (L50) was estimated to be at 16 and 29.5 cm for males and females, respectively. Estimate...

  5. Analysis Of Harrell Monosodium Titanate Lot 081811

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monosodium titanate (MST) for use in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) must be qualified and verified in advance. A single qualification sample for each batch of material is sent to SRNL for analysis, as well as a statistical sampling of verification samples. The Harrell Industries Lot No.081811 qualification and 12 verification samples met all the requirements in the specification, with the possible exception of the geometric standard deviation for particle size. Two subsamples from the qualification sample were analyzed, giving results of 3.82 and 3.28, respectively, for the geometric standard deviation. The specification is (le)3.5. The results for both samples met the remaining particle size specifications, i.e. <10 vol% below 0.8 μm and <1 vol% above 37 μm. Filtration behavior of the current batch is expected to be near that of recent batches. SRNL recommends acceptance of this material. SRNL also recommends performing a statistical review of particle size data for the MST lots from this vendor to assess whether an improved material specification is appropriate.

  6. Actual evapotranspiration and deficit: Biologically meaningful correlates of vegetation distribution across spatial scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, N.L.

    1998-01-01

    Correlative approaches to understanding the climatic controls of vegetation distribution have exhibited at least two important weaknesses: they have been conceptually divorced across spatial scales, and their climatic parameters have not necessarily represented aspects of climate of broad physiological importance to plants. Using examples from the literature and from the Sierra Nevada of California, I argue that two water balance parameters-actual evapotranspiration (AET) and deficit (D)-are biologically meaningful, are well correlated with the distribution of vegetation types, and exhibit these qualities over several orders of magnitude of spatial scale (continental to local). I reach four additional conclusions. (1) Some pairs of climatic parameters presently in use are functionally similar to AET and D; however, AET and D may be easier to interpret biologically. (2) Several well-known climatic parameters are biologically less meaningful or less important than AET and D, and consequently are poorer correlates of the distribution of vegetation types. Of particular interest, AET is a much better correlate of the distributions of coniferous and deciduous forests than minimum temperature. (3) The effects of evaporative demand and water availability on a site's water balance are intrinsically different. For example, the 'dry' experienced by plants on sunward slopes (high evaporative demand) is not comparable to the 'dry' experienced by plants on soils with low water-holding capacities (low water availability), and these differences are reflected in vegetation patterns. (4) Many traditional topographic moisture scalars-those that additively combine measures related to evaporative demand and water availability are not necessarily meaningful for describing site conditions as sensed by plants; the same holds for measured soil moisture. However, using AET and D in place of moisture scalars and measured soil moisture can solve these problems.

  7. Analysis Of Harrell Monosodium Titanate Lot 120111

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monosodium titanate (MST) for use in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) must be qualified and verified in advance. A single qualification sample for each batch of material is sent to SRNL for analysis, as well as a statistical sampling of verification samples. The Harrell Industries Lot No.120111 qualification and the first 12 verification samples met all the requirements in the specification indicating the material is acceptable for use in the process. Analyses of Pail 125 verification sample fails the criteria for solids content and has measurably lower pH, density, and total bottle weight. The verification sample for Pail 125 was retested for weight percent solids after checking that all of the solids had been suspended. The sample again failed to meet acceptance criteria. SRNL recommends accepting Pails 1 through 120. Pails 121 through 125 should be rejected and returned to the vendor.

  8. LOTS analysis of optical diffraction in Antares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffraction and aberration effects are calculated for the power-amplifier and target-system portions of the 100-kJ Antares laser fusion facility, using LOTS, a fast-Fourier-transform propagation code incorporating a model for saturating gain in CO2. Energy losses due to diffraction are found to be small compared to other losses. Diffraction 'hot spots' usually typical of propagation at low Fresnel numbers are effectively suppressed in the Antares power amplifier by gain saturation. Taking account of diffraction and aberrations over the whole optical train, the code predicts a target focal spot that has 82% of its energy in a 150-micron-diameter circle, a result essentially identical to what would be expected of the final focus mirror alone

  9. Geomorphic controls on biological soil crust distribution: A conceptual model from the Mojave Desert (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Amanda J.; Buck, Brenda J.; Soukup, Deborah A.; Merkler, Douglas J.

    2013-08-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are bio-sedimentary features that play critical geomorphic and ecological roles in arid environments. Extensive mapping, surface characterization, GIS overlays, and statistical analyses explored relationships among BSCs, geomorphology, and soil characteristics in a portion of the Mojave Desert (USA). These results were used to develop a conceptual model that explains the spatial distribution of BSCs. In this model, geologic and geomorphic processes control the ratio of fine sand to rocks, which constrains the development of three surface cover types and biogeomorphic feedbacks across intermontane basins. (1) Cyanobacteria crusts grow where abundant fine sand and negligible rocks form saltating sand sheets. Cyanobacteria facilitate moderate sand sheet activity that reduces growth potential of mosses and lichens. (2) Extensive tall moss-lichen pinnacled crusts are favored on early to late Holocene surfaces composed of mixed rock and fine sand. Moss-lichen crusts induce a dust capture feedback mechanism that promotes further crust propagation and forms biologically-mediated vesicular (Av) horizons. The presence of thick biogenic vesicular horizons supports the interpretation that BSCs are long-lived surface features. (3) Low to moderate density moss-lichen crusts grow on early Holocene and older geomorphic surfaces that display high rock cover and negligible surficial fine sand. Desert pavement processes and abiotic vesicular horizon formation dominate these surfaces and minimize bioturbation potential. The biogeomorphic interactions that sustain these three surface cover trajectories support unique biological communities and soil conditions, thereby sustaining ecological stability. The proposed conceptual model helps predict BSC distribution within intermontane basins to identify biologically sensitive areas, set reference conditions for ecological restoration, and potentially enhance arid landscape models, as scientists address impacts

  10. Concentrations, size distributions and temporal variations of fluorescent biological aerosol particles in southern tropical India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsan, Aswathy; Krishna R, Ravi; CV, Biju; Huffman, Alex; Poschl, Ulrich; Gunthe, Sachin

    2015-04-01

    Biological aerosols constitute a wide range of dead and alive biological materials and structures that are suspended in the atmosphere. They play an important role in the atmospheric physical, chemical and biological processes and health of living being by spread of diseases among humans, plants, and, animals. The atmospheric abundance, sources, physical properties of PBAPs as compared to non-biological aerosols, however, is poorly characterized. The Indian tropical region, where large fraction of the world's total population is residing, experiences a distinctive meteorological phenomenon by means of Indian Summer Monsoon (IMS). Thus, the properties and characteristics of biological aerosols are also expected to be very diverse over the Indian subcontinent depending upon the seasons. Here we characterize the number concentration and size distribution of Fluorescent Biological Aerosol Particles (FBAP) at a high altitude continental site, Munnar (10.09 N, 77.06 E; 1605 m asl) in South India during the South-West monsoon, which constitute around 80 percent of the annual rainfall in Munnar. Continuous three months measurements (from 01 June 2014 to 21 Aug 2104) FBAPs were carried out at Munnar using Ultra Violet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UVAPS) during IMS. The mean number and mass concentration of coarse FBAP averaged over the entire campaign was 1.7 x 10-2 cm-3 and 0.24 µg m-3 respectively, which corresponds to 2 percent and 6 percent of total aerosol particle number and mass concentration. In agreement to other previous measurements the number size distribution of FBAP also peaks at 3.2 micron indicating the strong presence of fungal spores. This was also supported by the Scanning Electron Microscopic analysis of bioaerosols on filter paper. They also displayed a strong diurnal cycle with maximum concentration occurring at early morning hours. During periods of heavy and continuous rain where the wind is consistently blowing from South-West direction it was

  11. Diversity of Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids in the Boraginaceae Structures, Distribution, and Biological Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assem El-Shazly

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Among the diversity of secondary metabolites which are produced by plants as means of defence against herbivores and microbes, pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs are common in Boraginaceae, Asteraceae and some other plant families. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids are infamous as toxic compounds which can alkylate DNA und thus cause mutations and even cancer in herbivores and humans. Almost all genera of the family Boraginaceae synthesize and store this type of alkaloids. This review reports the available information on the present status (literature up to early 2014 of the pyrrolizidine alkaloids in the Boraginaceae and summarizes the topics structure, distribution, chemistry, chemotaxonomic significance, and biological properties.

  12. Reconstruction of biologically equivalent dose distribution on CT-image from measured physical dose distribution of therapeutic beam in water phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From the standpoint of quality assurance in radiotherapy, it is very important to compare the dose distributions realized by an irradiation system with the distribution planned by a treatment planning system. To compare the two dose distributions, it is necessary to convert the dose distributions on CT images to distributions in a water phantom or convert the measured dose distributions to distributions on CT images. Especially in heavy-ion radiotherapy, it is reasonable to show the biologically equivalent dose distribution on the CT images. We developed tools for the visualization and comparison of these distributions in order to check the therapeutic beam for each patient at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). To estimate the distribution in a patient, the dose is derived from the measurement by mapping it on a CT-image. Fitting the depth-dose curve to the calculated SOBP curve also gives biologically equivalent dose distributions in the case of a carbon beam. Once calculated, dose distribution information can be easily handled to make a comparison with the planned distribution and display it on a grey-scale CT-image. Quantitative comparisons of dose distributions can be made with anatomical information, which also gives a verification of the irradiation system in a very straightforward way. (author)

  13. Discriminating different classes of biological networks by analyzing the graphs spectra distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, Daniel Yasumasa; Ferreira, Carlos Eduardo; Fujita, André

    2012-01-01

    The brain's structural and functional systems, protein-protein interaction, and gene networks are examples of biological systems that share some features of complex networks, such as highly connected nodes, modularity, and small-world topology. Recent studies indicate that some pathologies present topological network alterations relative to norms seen in the general population. Therefore, methods to discriminate the processes that generate the different classes of networks (e.g., normal and disease) might be crucial for the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of the disease. It is known that several topological properties of a network (graph) can be described by the distribution of the spectrum of its adjacency matrix. Moreover, large networks generated by the same random process have the same spectrum distribution, allowing us to use it as a "fingerprint". Based on this relationship, we introduce and propose the entropy of a graph spectrum to measure the "uncertainty" of a random graph and the Kullback-Leibl...

  14. Powder Lot Variations: A Case Study with Varget - Hodgdon Extreme

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Elya

    2015-01-01

    Small arms propellant distributor Hodgdon claims that rifle powders in its Extreme line have small velocity variations with both temperature changes and lot number. This paper reports on the variations in average velocity of four different lots of Hodgdon Extreme Varget tested in two .223 Remington loads. Compared to the lot with the slowest average velocity, the other three lots of powder had higher average velocities ranging from 23.4 ft/s faster up to 45.6 ft/s faster with a 69 grain Nosler Custom Competition bullet and from 7.9 ft/s faster to 15.3 ft/s with the 53 grain Hornady VMAX. The mean velocity differences between lots are slightly correlated between the two loads with a correlation coefficient of 0.54. This correlation suggests that factors other than lot to lot variations contribute significantly to the measured velocity variations. Unlike the much larger lot to lot variations that were reported previously for H4831, lot to lot variations in velocity for Varget seem consistent with Hodgdon's mark...

  15. Characteristics of particle size distribution and pollutants content of sediments in parking lots runoff in the coastal area of Korea%韩国西海岸地区停车场径流携带沉积物的粒径分布及污染特征研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于海霞; 于江华; 徐礼强; 金永喆

    2013-01-01

    为了解沿海地区城市停车场内径流携带沉积物的粒径分布及污染特征,于2011年4-6月在韩国西海岸12个不同停车场采集了沉积物样品,分别分析了其粒径分布和各粒径中污染物质的含量.结果表明,不同采样点的废弃物形态差异较大,主要表现在较大的植物茎叶、烟蒂及动物粪便等废弃物和含水率等方面.不同采样点的颗粒物粒径大小不同,其颗粒物的均一性也有所差异.总体来讲,106~500μm之间的颗粒物是径流携带沉积物的主要组成部分,其平均质量分数占总体(< 2360 μm)颗粒物的59.9%.对不同粒径中污染物质的含量分析得出,颗粒物中污染物质的含量随粒径增大而减小.其中,< 106 μm的颗粒物中总氮、总磷、COD和挥发性物质的质量分别占各污染物总量的18.9%、17.8%、20.41%和18.9%,而该部分颗粒物本身的平均质量分数只有3.9%.可见<106 μm的颗粒物处于高度污染状态.因此,在城市停车场面源污染管理中,应该对该部分高度污染的颗粒物给以足够的重视.对于不同污染特征的颗粒物应该采用不同的去除方法.%Road-deposit sediment samples were collected from twelve parking lots in the urban coastal area of Korea during April-June of 2004. The particle size distribution and concentrations of pollutants including total nitrogen, total phosphorus, chemical oxygen demand and volatile solids were analyzed. The sediments collected from different parking lots were distinct from each other and typically included contents of branches, cigarette-ends, animal wastes and water constituents. The particle size distribution and uniformity also differed from site to site. Particles in the range of 106 -500 μm contributed to a large portion of the sediments with a mass fraction of 59. 9% . Compared with larger particles, the smaller particles were determined as highly polluted. Around 18.9% of total nitrogen, 17.8% of total

  16. A lot to look forward to

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    CERN moves from momentous year to momentous year, and although 2013 will be very different for us than 2012, there is still a lot to look forward to. As I write, the proton-lead run is just getting under way, giving the LHC experiments a new kind of data to investigate. But the run will be short, and our main activity this year will be the start of the LHC’s first long shutdown.   This is the first year I can remember in which all of CERN’s accelerators will be off. The reason is that there is much to be done: the older machines need maintenance, and the LHC has to be prepared for higher energy running. That involves opening up the interconnections between each of the machine’s 1,695 main magnet cryostats, consolidating all of the 10,170 splices carrying current to the main dipole and quadrupole windings, and a range of other work to improve the machine. The CERN accelerator complex will start to come back to life in 2014, and it’s fair to say that when...

  17. Reproducibility of Elecsys anti-TSHR test results in a lot-to-lot comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermsen, D; Eckstein, A; Schinner, S; Willenberg, H S; Thiel, A; Scherbaum, W A; Schott, M

    2010-04-01

    Most recently, a new rapid and fully-automated TSH receptor autoantibody (TRAb) assay has been established. This assay system uses the M22 human monoclonal antibody for competing against the patient's TSH receptor autoantibodies (TRAb) to be detected. The aim of our present study was to compare the reproducibility of TRAb values based on measurements with different TSH receptor preparations in a lot-to-lot comparison. For TRAb values > 2 IU/l the relative differences ranged from -9.0 to +10.0%. The mean difference was 0.28 +/- 8%. For TRAb values around the cutoff for positivity (1.75 IU/l) a higher range of relative differences from -20 up to +15% was obtained. The overall mean of differences was -0.8+/-14%. The data clearly demonstrate that the automated TRAb assay has a high stability in regard to TSH receptor preparations. PMID:20131202

  18. Species composition,distribution patterns and ecological functions of biological soil crusts in the Gurbantunggut Desert

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    As one of the most important biological factors that maintain the stability of the largest fixed and semi-fixed desert in China,the Gurbantunggut Desert,the biological soil crusts (BSCs) develop well and play critical ecological roles in the desert ecosystem. In this paper,we briefly summarize our research findings since 2002 including species composition,distribution pattern and ecological functions of BSCs in the desert. Our results indicate abundant species diversity of BSCs in the Gurbantunggut Desert in comparison to other deserts in China. At the scales of sand dune or whole desert,the distribution patterns of BSCs are location-specific. The existence of BSCs in this desert could:(1) accelerate the formation of desert soil and the weathering of minerals; (2) accumulate organic matter in surface soil through related species in soil crusts; (3) enhance the abilities of sand surface to resist wind erosion; (4) influence seed germination of vascular plants; and (5) enhance the production of dew deposition on sandy soil surface.

  19. Assessing gull abundance and food availability in urban parking lots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Daniel E.; Whitney, Jillian J.; MacKenzie, Kenneth G.; Koenen, Kiana K. G.; DeStefano, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Feeding birds is a common activity throughout the world; yet, little is known about the extent of feeding gulls in urban areas. We monitored 8 parking lots in central Massachusetts, USA, during the fall and winter of 2011 to 2013 in 4 monitoring sessions to document the number of gulls present, the frequency of human–gull feeding interactions, and the effectiveness of signage and direct interaction in reducing human-provisioned food. Parking lots were divided between “education” and “no-education” lots. In education lots, we erected signs about problems caused when people feed birds and also asked people to stop feeding birds. We did not erect signs or ask people to stop feeding birds at no-education lots. We spent >1,200 hours in parking lots (range = 136 to 200 hours per parking lot), and gulls were counted every 20 minutes. We conducted >4,000 counts, and ring-billed gulls (Lorus delawarensis) accounted for 98% of all gulls. Our educational efforts were minimally effective. There were fewer feedings (P = 0.01) in education lots during one of the monitoring sessions but significantly more gulls (P = 0.008) in education lots during 2 monitoring sessions. While there was a marginal decrease (P = 0.055) in the number of feedings after no-education lots were transformed into education lots, there was no difference in gull numbers in these lots (P = 0.16). Education appears to have some influence in reducing the number of people feeding gulls, but our efforts were not able to reduce the number of human feeders or the amount of food enough to influence the number of gulls using parking lots.

  20. Predictive analysis of thermal distribution and damage in thermotherapy on biological tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanjul-Vélez, Félix; Arce-Diego, José Luis

    2007-05-01

    The use of optical techniques is increasing the possibilities and success of medical praxis in certain cases, either in tissue characterization or treatment. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) or low intensity laser treatment (LILT) are two examples of the latter. Another very interesting implementation is thermotherapy, which consists of controlling temperature increase in a pathological biological tissue. With this method it is possible to provoke an improvement on specific diseases, but a previous analysis of treatment is needed in order for the patient not to suffer any collateral damage, an essential point due to security margins in medical procedures. In this work, a predictive analysis of thermal distribution in a biological tissue irradiated by an optical source is presented. Optical propagation is based on a RTT (Radiation Transport Theory) model solved via a numerical Monte Carlo method, in a multi-layered tissue. Data obtained are included in a bio-heat equation that models heat transference, taking into account conduction, convection, radiation, blood perfusion and vaporization depending on the specific problem. Spatial-temporal differential bio-heat equation is solved via a numerical finite difference approach. Experimental temperature distributions on animal tissue irradiated by laser radiation are shown. From thermal distribution in tissue, thermal damage is studied, based on an Arrhenius analysis, as a way of predicting harmful effects. The complete model can be used for concrete treatment proposals, as a way of predicting treatment effects and consequently decide which optical source parameters are appropriate for the specific disease, mainly wavelength and optical power, with reasonable security margins in the process.

  1. Definition of the dose(tempo)-distribution in the biological irradiation-facility of the RIVM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RIVM biological irradiation facility (BBF) for the irradiation of biological samples and small animals is a self shielded device and can be safely operated in an existing laboratory environment. There are two 137Cs sources (15TBq) in a bilateral geometry to give maximum dose uniformity. The easily accessible irradiation chamber is housed in a rotating lead shielding. The dosimetry of BBF was performed by the Dosimetry Section of the RIVM. Experiments were made to determine the absorbed dose in plastic tubes filled with water and the dose distribution over the tube-holder. Separate experiments were made to determine the absorbed dose during the rotation of the irradiation chamber and to check the irradiation timer. For the experiments LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) extruded ribbons were used. The TLDs were calibrated in a collimated beam of 137Cs gamma rays. The determination of the absorbed dose in water was based on a users biological irradiation set up. The TLDs were individually sealed in thin plastic foil and put in plastic tubes filled for 1/3 with water. The tubes were vertically placed in the tube-holder and placed in the centre of the irradiation chamber. The results show that the absorbed dose in water (determined on January 1, 1990) is equal to 0.97 Gy/timer-unit, with a total uncertainty of 7 percent (1σ). During the rotation of the irradiation chamber the absorbed dose (determined on January 1, 1990) is equal to 0.38 Gy, with a total uncertainty of 15 percent (1σ). The variation of the dose distribution was determined at 15 different measurement points distributed over the tube-holder. The dosis in the measurement point in the centre of the tube-holder was taken as reference value. The maximum observed deviation over the other 14 measurement points amounts to -16 percent of it. The BBF-timer was checked against a special timer. The results indicate that within a range from 2-11 'timer-units' no differences are present. (author). 6 refs.; 6 figs.; 3 fotos; 11

  2. Biologic

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffman, L H

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we explore the boundary between biology and the study of formal systems (logic). In the end, we arrive at a summary formalism, a chapter in "boundary mathematics" where there are not only containers but also extainers ><, entities open to interaction and distinguishing the space that they are not. The boundary algebra of containers and extainers is to biologic what boolean algebra is to classical logic. We show how this formalism encompasses significant parts of the logic of DNA replication, the Dirac formalism for quantum mechanics, formalisms for protein folding and the basic structure of the Temperley Lieb algebra at the foundations of topological invariants of knots and links.

  3. The Distributed Biological Observatory (DBO)-A Change Detection Array in the Pacific Arctic Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebmeier, J. M.; Moore, S. E.; Cooper, L. W.; Frey, K. E.; Pickart, R. S.

    2011-12-01

    The Pacific sector of the Arctic Ocean is experiencing major reductions in seasonal sea ice extent and increases in sea surface temperatures. One of the key uncertainties in this region is how the marine ecosystem will respond to seasonal shifts in the timing of spring sea ice retreat and/or delays in fall sea ice formation. Variations in upper ocean water hydrography, planktonic production, pelagic-benthic coupling and sediment carbon cycling are all influenced by sea ice and temperature changes. Climate changes are likely to result in shifts in species composition and abundance, northward range expansions, and changes in lower trophic level productivity that can directly cascade and affect the life cycles of higher trophic level organisms. Several regionally critical marine sites in the Pacific Arctic sector that have very high biomass and are focused foraging points for apex predators have been re-occupied during multiple international cruises. The data documenting the importance of these ecosystem "hotspots" provide a growing marine time-series from the northern Bering Sea to Barrow Canyon at the boundary of the Chukchi and Beaufort seas. Results from these studies show spatial changes in carbon production and export to the sediments as indicated by infaunal community composition and biomass, shifts in sediment grain size on a S-to-N latitudinal gradient, and range extensions for lower trophic levels and further northward migration of higher trophic organisms, such as gray whales. There is also direct evidence of negative impacts on ice dependent species, such as walrus and polar bears. To more systematically track the broad biological response to sea ice retreat and associated environmental change, an international consortium of scientists are developing a "Distributed Biological Observatory" (DBO) that includes selected biological measurements at multiple trophic levels. The DBO currently focuses on five regional biological "hotspot" locations along a

  4. Relationship between biologic tissue heterogeneity and absorbed dose distribution in therapy of oncologic patients with cyclotron U-120 fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of biological tissue heterogeneity on the absorbed dose distribution of U-120 cyclotron fast neutron beam was studied by estimation and experimental method. It was found that adipose and bone tissues significantly changes the pattern of neutron absorbed dose distribution in patient body. Absorbed dose in adipose layer increase by 20% as compared to the dose in soft biological tissue. Approximation method for estimation of the absorbed dose distribution of fast neutrons in heterogeneities was proposed which could be applied in the dosimetric planning of U-120 cyclotron neutron therapy of neoplasms

  5. Manure and wastewater management systems for open lot dairy operations

    OpenAIRE

    Sweeten, J. M.; Wolfe, M L

    1994-01-01

    Dairy industry expansion using open lot designs has impacted water quality and groundwater usage in parts of Central Texas. Field research was conducted at commercial dairy farms in Erath County, Texas, to develop improved design criteria for storage, treatment, and land application systems for open lot dairies. Water use and wastewater from milking parlors were monitored along with runoff from open lots. Water use for milk sanitation and manure removal averaged 148 L per cow per day. Two-sta...

  6. The Distributed Biological Observatory (DBO): A Change Detection Array in the Pacific Arctic Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebmeier, J. M.; Moore, S. E.; Cooper, L. W.; Frey, K. E.; Pickart, R. S.

    2012-12-01

    The Pacific region of the Arctic Ocean is experiencing major reductions in seasonal sea ice extent and increases in sea surface temperatures. One of the key uncertainties in this region is how the marine ecosystem will respond to seasonal shifts in the timing of spring sea ice retreat and/or delays in fall sea ice formation. Climate changes are likely to result in shifts in species composition and abundance, northward range expansions, and changes in lower trophic level productivity that can directly cascade and affect the life cycles of higher trophic level organisms. The developing Distributed Biological Observatory (DBO) is composed of focused biological and oceanographic sampling at biological "hot spot" sites for lower and higher trophic organisms on a latitudinal S-to-N array. The DBO is being developed by an international consortium of scientists in the Pacific Arctic as a change detection array to systematically track the broad biological response to sea ice retreat and associated environmental change. Coordinated ship-based observations over various seasons, together with satellite and mooring data collections at the designated sites, can provide an early detection system for biological and ecosystem response to climate warming. The data documenting the importance of these ecosystem "hotspots" provide a growing marine time-series from the northern Bering Sea to Barrow Canyon at the boundary of the Chukchi and Beaufort seas. Results from these studies show spatial changes in carbon production and export to the sediments as indicated by infaunal community composition and biomass, shifts in sediment grain size on a S-to-N latitudinal gradient, and range extensions for lower trophic levels and further northward migration of higher trophic organisms, such as gray whales. There is also direct evidence of negative impacts on ice dependent species, such as walrus and polar bears. As a ramp up to a fully operational observatory, hydrographic transects and select

  7. A Gauss-Kronrod-Trapezoidal integration scheme for modeling biological tissues with continuous fiber distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Chieh; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2016-06-01

    Fibrous biological tissues may be modeled using a continuous fiber distribution (CFD) to capture tension-compression nonlinearity, anisotropic fiber distributions, and load-induced anisotropy. The CFD framework requires spherical integration of weighted individual fiber responses, with fibers contributing to the stress response only when they are in tension. The common method for performing this integration employs the discretization of the unit sphere into a polyhedron with nearly uniform triangular faces (finite element integration or FEI scheme). Although FEI has proven to be more accurate and efficient than integration using spherical coordinates, it presents three major drawbacks: First, the number of elements on the unit sphere needed to achieve satisfactory accuracy becomes a significant computational cost in a finite element (FE) analysis. Second, fibers may not be in tension in some regions on the unit sphere, where the integration becomes a waste. Third, if tensed fiber bundles span a small region compared to the area of the elements on the sphere, a significant discretization error arises. This study presents an integration scheme specialized to the CFD framework, which significantly mitigates the first drawback of the FEI scheme, while eliminating the second and third completely. Here, integration is performed only over the regions of the unit sphere where fibers are in tension. Gauss-Kronrod quadrature is used across latitudes and the trapezoidal scheme across longitudes. Over a wide range of strain states, fiber material properties, and fiber angular distributions, results demonstrate that this new scheme always outperforms FEI, sometimes by orders of magnitude in the number of computational steps and relative accuracy of the stress calculation. PMID:26291492

  8. Lot-sizing algorithms with applications to engineering and economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui; Ferreira, Jose S.

    1984-01-01

    The paper presents two new solution procedures for a deterministic lot size problem, a matrix algorithm and a heuristic matrix method. The algorithm is based on the dual of a linear programming model formulation of the lot size problem, and it provides optimal solutions even in the general case of...

  9. Time bucket size and lot-splitting approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riezebos, Jan

    2002-01-01

    We address the problem of lot splitting for various time bucket lengths in MRP systems. Two approaches for lot splitting can be applied: either use the same (equal) or a variable number of subbatches. Equal subbatching strategies have logistical and computational advantages. Literature states that v

  10. 7 CFR 800.98 - Weighing grain in combined lots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Weighing grain in combined lots. 800.98 Section 800.98... Provisions and Procedures § 800.98 Weighing grain in combined lots. (a) General. The weighing of bulk or sacked grain loaded aboard, or being loaded aboard, or unloaded from two or more carriers as a...

  11. Studi Kasus Perbandingan antara Lot-for-Lot dan Economic Order Quantity Sebagai Metode Perencanaan Penyediaan Bahan Baku

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oegik Soegihardjo

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Production and material requirements planning are interrelated. The number of required material depends on the quantity of products for a certain period. The are some methods for material requirements planning. Two of them are lot-for-lot and economic order quantity. Those two methods will be apllied to impeller requirements planning for centrifugal pumps and evaluated to determine which one is more appropriate for the case being studied. Those methods are chosen because each of them has different characteristic in determination of lot's quantity. In lot-for-lot the determination of quantity of the impeller is based on the requirements for single period. In economic order quantity the determination of quantity of the impeller is based on expected requirements. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Perencanaan produksi dan penyediaan bahan baku merupakan dua hal yang berkaitan. Berapa banyak bahan baku yang harus disediakan, ditentukan oleh berapa jumlah produk yang akan dibuat pada suatu periode tertentu. Metode perencanaan untuk penyediaan bahan baku ada beberapa macam. Dua di antara metode perencanaan penyiapan bahan baku adalah 'lot-for-lot' dan 'economic order quantity'. Dua metode tersebut akan dipakai untuk perencanaan penyediaan sudu pompa sentrifugal untuk dievaluasi mana yang lebih sesuai untuk kasus penyediaan sudu pompa sentrifugal tersebut. Dua metode ini dipilih karena kedua metode tersebut mempunyai karakter yang berbeda dalam penyediaan kebutuhan bahan baku (bahan baku dalam kasus ini adalah impeller pompa. Pada metode 'lot-for-lot' penentuan jumlah sediaan bahan baku ditetapkan sedemikian rupa untuk memenuhi kebutuhan bersih satu periode tunggal. Sedangkan pada metode 'economic order quantity' penentuan sediaan bahan baku ditetapkan berdasarkan kebutuhan yang diperkirakan (expected requirements. Kata kunci: kebutuhan bahan baku, kebutuhan bersih, 'lot-for-lot', 'economic order quantity'.

  12. Lot Sizing at the Operational Planning and Shop Floor Scheduling Levels of the Decision Hierarchy of Various Production Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Ming

    2007-01-01

    The research work presented in this dissertation relates to lot sizing and its applications in the areas of operational planning and shop floor scheduling and control. Lot sizing enables a proper loading of requisite number of jobs on the machines in order to optimize the performance of an underlying production system. We address lot sizing problems that are encountered at the order entry level as well as those that are faced at the time of distributing the jobs from one machine to another an...

  13. The study of trace element distribution in biological samples with NAA for human health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A one day representative mixed diet of an adult Korean was collected from the data based on the food intake of 108 healthy subjects between the ages 20 and 50. Sampling for the Korean total diet was carried out by the way of using a market basket study based on the Korean standard food consumption scheme reported by the Korean Nutrition Society. Average consumption frequency of different food items for a one day representative mixed diet of an adult Korean and the amount of each item to prepare a one day Korean representative total diet are surveyed. The analytical methods involve both instrumental and radiochemical neutron activation techniques developed for the determination of the elements Cs, I, Sr, Th and U in various kinds of food samples. Concentrations of trace elements including 5 important elements for radiological protection, U, Th, Cs, Sr and I in the Korean total diet and the 4 most frequently consumed Korean foodstuffs have been analyzed by neutron activation analysis. Detection limits for U, Th, Sr and I were improved to ppb levels by radiochemical separation after neutron irradiation. Five biological NIST reference materials were also analyzed for quality control of the analysis. Seventeen trace elements in the Korean total diet and four Korean representative foodstuffs were also analyzed quantitatively by instrumental neutron activation analysis. The elemental distributions in supplemental healthy food and Korean and Chinese origin oriental medicine were also identified. The amount of trace elements ingested with the hair analysis of oriental medicine takers were estimated. The amounts of trace elements inhaled with the analysis of foundry air, blood and hair of foundry workers were also estimated. The basic estimation method in view of health and environment with the neutron activation analysis of biological samples such as foods and hair was established with the result. Nationwide usage system of the NAA facility in Hanaro in many different and

  14. Preliminary assessment of the interaction of introduced biological agents with biofilms in water distribution systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinclair, Michael B.; Caldwell, Sara; Jones, Howland D. T.; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Souza, Caroline Ann; McGrath, Lucas K.

    2005-12-01

    Basic research is needed to better understand the potential risk of dangerous biological agents that are unintentionally or intentionally introduced into a water distribution system. We report on our capabilities to conduct such studies and our preliminary investigations. In 2004, the Biofilms Laboratory was initiated for the purpose of conducting applied research related to biofilms with a focus on application, application testing and system-scale research. Capabilities within the laboratory are the ability to grow biofilms formed from known bacteria or biofilms from drinking water. Biofilms can be grown quickly in drip-flow reactors or under conditions more analogous to drinking-water distribution systems in annular reactors. Biofilms can be assessed through standard microbiological techniques (i .e, aerobic plate counts) or with various visualization techniques including epifluorescent and confocal laser scanning microscopy and confocal fluorescence hyperspectral imaging with multivariate analysis. We have demonstrated the ability to grow reproducible Pseudomonas fluorescens biofilms in the annular reactor with plate counts on the order of 10{sup 5} and 10{sup 6} CFU/cm{sup 2}. Stationary phase growth is typically reached 5 to 10 days after inoculation. We have also conducted a series of pathogen-introduction experiments, where we have observed that both polystyrene microspheres and Bacillus cereus (as a surrogate for B. anthracis) stay incorporated in the biofilms for the duration of our experiments, which lasted as long as 36 days. These results indicated that biofilms may act as a safe harbor for bio-pathogens in drinking water systems, making it difficult to decontaminate the systems.

  15. Soil organic components distribution in a podzol and the possible relations with the biological soil activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Romero, Marta; Papa, Stefania; Verstraeten, Arne; Curcio, Elena; Cools, Nathalie; Lozano-Garcia, Beatriz; Parras-Alcántara, Luis; Coppola, Elio

    2016-04-01

    This research reports the preliminary results of a study based on the SOC (Soil Organic Carbon) fractionation in a pine forest soil (Pinus nigra). Hyperskeletic Albic Podzol soil (P113005, World Reference Base, 2014), described by the following sequence O-Ah-E-Bh-Bs-Cg, was investigated at Zoniën, Belgium. Total (TOC) and extractable (TEC) soil contents were determined by Italian official method of soil analysis. Different soil C fractions were also determined: Humic Acid Carbon (HAC) and Fulvic Acid Carbon (FAC). Not Humic Carbon (NHC) and Humin Carbon (Huc) fractions were obtained by difference. Along the mineral soil profile, therefore, were also tested some enzymatic activities, such as cellulase, xylanase, laccase and peroxidase, involved in the degradation of the main organic substance components, and dehydrogenase activity, like soil microbial biomass index. The results shows a differential TEC fractions distribution in the soil profile along three fronts of progress: (i) An E leaching horizon of TEC; Bh horizon (humic) of humic acids preferential accumulation, morphologically and analytically recognizable, in which humic are more insoluble that fulvic acids, and predominate over the latter; (ii) horizon Bs (spodic) in which fulvic acids are more soluble that humic acid, and predominate in their turn. All enzyme activities appear to be highest in the most superficial part of the mineral profile and decrease towards the deeper layers with different patterns. It is known that the enzymes production in a soil profile reflects the organic substrates availability, which in turn influences the density and the composition of the microbial population. The deeper soil horizons contain microbial communities adapted and specialized to their environment and, therefore, different from those present on the surface The results suggest that the fractionation technique of TEC is appropriate to interpret the podsolisation phenomenon that is the preferential distribution of

  16. FIRST DIGIT DISTRIBUTION IN SOME BIOLOGICAL DATA SETS. POSSIBLE EXPLANATIONS FOR DEPARTURES FROM BENFORD'S LAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Hernández Cáceres

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To explore whether the first digit law (FDL is abided by data sets from biological origin.Materials and Methods: Data were collected from different sources, including gene data length for bacteria, pre-vaccination measles incidence data and absolute values from human MEG recordings. First digit frequencies were computed and compared to predictions from FDL. Simulations included a simple model for two-dimensional epidemics spread and a randomly set upper bound model aimed to explain the behaviour of MEG data.Results: We observed that FDL is obeyed in a case of epidemic data reported at a putative focus of spread (pre-vaccination measles incidence for Preston, England. However, peculiar departures were observed for gene length distribution in microorganisms, magneto-encephalograms (MEG, and epidemic data pooled from large geographical regions.Conclusions: Simulation studies revealed that averaging data on a scenario of propagating waves can explain some of the observed distortions from FDL. This could help to understand the behaviour of epidemics data. A randomly set upper bound model (RUBM can likely explain the observed behaviour of MEG data. Explanation for gene length data behaviour requires further theoretical work.

  17. Chinese plasma-derived products supply under the lot release management system in 2007-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuejun; Ye, Shengliang; Du, Xi; Yuan, Jing; Zhao, Chaoming; Li, Changqing

    2013-11-01

    In 2007, the Chinese State Food and Drug Administration (SFDA) implemented a management system for lot release of all plasma-derived products. Since then, there have been only a few systematic studies of the blood supply, which is a concern when considering the small amount of plasma collected per capita (approximately 3 L/1000 people). As a result, there may be a threat to the safety of the available blood supply. In this study, we examined the characteristics of the supply of Chinese plasma-derived products. We investigated the reports of lot-released biological products derived from all 8 national or regional regulatory authorities in China from 2007 to 2011. The market supply characteristics of Chinese plasma-derived products were analyzed by reviewing the changes in supply varieties, the batches of lot-released plasma-derived products and the actual supply. As a result, the national regulatory authorities can more accurately develop a specific understanding of the production and quality management information provided by Chinese plasma product manufacturers. The implementation of the lot release system further ensures the clinical validity of the plasma-derived products in China and improves the safety of using plasma-derived products. This work provides an assessment of the future Chinese market supply of plasma-derived products and can function as a theoretical basis for the establishment of hemovigilance. PMID:23856276

  18. Comprehensive distributed-parameters modeling and experimental validation of microcantilever-based biosensors with an application to ultrasmall biological species detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanotechnological advancements have made a great contribution in developing label-free and highly sensitive biosensors. The detection of ultrasmall adsorbed masses has been enabled by such sensors which transduce molecular interaction into detectable physical quantities. More specifically, microcantilever-based biosensors have caught widespread attention for offering a label-free, highly sensitive and inexpensive platform for biodetection. Although there are a lot of studies investigating microcantilever-based sensors and their biological applications, a comprehensive mathematical modeling and experimental validation of such devices providing a closed form mathematical framework is still lacking. In almost all of the studies, a simple lumped-parameters model has been proposed. However, in order to have a precise biomechanical sensor, a comprehensive model is required being capable of describing all phenomena and dynamics of the biosensor. Therefore, in this study, an extensive distributed-parameters modeling framework is proposed for the piezoelectric microcantilever-based biosensor using different methodologies for the purpose of detecting an ultrasmall adsorbed mass over the microcantilever surface. An optimum modeling methodology is concluded and verified with the experiment. This study includes three main parts. In the first part, the Euler–Bernoulli beam theory is used to model the nonuniform piezoelectric microcantilever. Simulation results are obtained and presented. The same system is then modeled as a nonuniform rectangular plate. The simulation results are presented describing model's capability in the detection of an ultrasmall mass. Finally the last part presents the experimental validation verifying the modeling results. It was shown that plate modeling predicts the real situation with a degree of precision of 99.57% whereas modeling the system as an Euler–Bernoulli beam provides a 94.45% degree of precision. The detection of ultrasmall

  19. Causes and consequences of technical, biological and spatial interactions in fisheries management modelled from the individual distribution of fishing effort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bastardie, Francois; Nielsen, J. Rasmus; Vinther, Morten

    individual or overall economic and stock status indicators together with the size-based spatial distribution dynamics of the main fishery resources. In this application to the western Baltic Sea sprat, herring and cod fisheries of Danish, Swedish and German commercial vessels (>12 m) the biological...

  20. Competition under capacitated dynamic lot-sizing with capacity acquisition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Hongyan; Meissner, Joern

    2011-01-01

    Lot-sizing and capacity planning are important supply chain decisions, and competition and cooperation affect the performance of these decisions. In this paper, we look into the dynamic lot-sizing and resource competition problem of an industry consisting of multiple firms. A capacity competition...... model combining the complexity of time-varying demand with cost functions and economies of scale arising from dynamic lot-sizing costs is developed. Each firm can replenish inventory at the beginning of each period in a finite planning horizon. Fixed as well as variable production costs incur for each...... total capacity demand of all the competing firms. We solve the competition model and establish the existence of a capacity equilibrium over the firms and the associated optimal dynamic lot-sizing plan for each firm under mild conditions....

  1. Parking Lots at Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument, Montana

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This is a vector polygon file showing the parking lots at Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument (LIBI). The coordinates for this dataset were collected using...

  2. Cellular Manufacturing System with Dynamic Lot Size Material Handling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khannan, M. S. A.; Maruf, A.; Wangsaputra, R.; Sutrisno, S.; Wibawa, T.

    2016-02-01

    Material Handling take as important role in Cellular Manufacturing System (CMS) design. In several study at CMS design material handling was assumed per pieces or with constant lot size. In real industrial practice, lot size may change during rolling period to cope with demand changes. This study develops CMS Model with Dynamic Lot Size Material Handling. Integer Linear Programming is used to solve the problem. Objective function of this model is minimizing total expected cost consisting machinery depreciation cost, operating costs, inter-cell material handling cost, intra-cell material handling cost, machine relocation costs, setup costs, and production planning cost. This model determines optimum cell formation and optimum lot size. Numerical examples are elaborated in the paper to ilustrate the characterictic of the model.

  3. Automatic parking lot occupancy computation using motion tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justo, Francisco; Kalva, Hari; Raviv, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    Nowadays it is very hard to find available spots in public parking lots and even harder in public facilities such as universities and sports venues. A system that provides drivers with parking availability and parking lot occupancy will allow users find a parking space much easier and faster. This paper presents a system for automatic parking lot occupancy computation using motion tracking. Methods for complexity reduction are presented. The system showed approximately 96% accuracy in determining parking lot occupancy. We showed that by optimizing the resolution and bitrate of the input video, we can reduce the complexity by 70% and still achieved over 90% of accuracy. The results showed that high quality video is not necessary for the proposed algorithm to obtain accurate results.

  4. Evaluation of the synthesis of six lots of HNS I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stull, T.W.

    1978-09-01

    The analytical results of six lots of high purity 2,2',4,4',6,6'-hexanitrostilbene (HNS I) synthesized by the Development Division, Mason and Hanger, Pantex Plant are discussed. A total of approximately 130 kg was produced in lot sizes ranging from 5.2 to 46.4 kg. The results clearly indicate the excellent reproducibility of the process and high purity of the final product.

  5. Camp Pendleton Saves 91% in Parking Lot Lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-01-01

    Case study describes how Camp Pendleton Marine Corps Base replaced high-pressure sodium (HPS) fixtures in one parking lot with high-efficiency induction fixtures for 91% savings in energy use and $5,700 in cost savings annually. This parking lot is estimated to have a simple payback of 2.9 years. Sitewide up-grades yielded annual savings of 1 million kWh.

  6. Distribution and origin of biologically available phosphorus in the water of the Meiliang Bay in summer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The investigation and continuous monitoring with an innovative iron oxide embedded cellulose acetate membrane (FeO/CAM) on the concentrations of biologically available phosphorus (BAP) were conducted in the Meiliang Bay of the Taihu Lake during summer in 2004. The results showed that the concentrations of dissolved (FeO-DP), particulate (FeO-PP) and total bioavailable phosphorus (FeO-P) had similar horizontal distribution. The BAP concentrations were the highest in those estuaries in the northern bay. With the decrease of the distance to the estuary or long shore,there was little difference between BAP concentrations in an open lake area. During the observation period, algal blooms occurred in most waters of the northern bay, which was reflected from the high concentrations of chlorophyll a (Chl-a). While they were not highest in the estuarine waters of those major rivers, this is the case for the BAP concentrations. The concentrations of Chl-a had a significantly positive correlation with those of bioavailable phosphorus in the open area of the Meiliang Bay.With the sediment resuspension induced by wind and wave, BAP concentrations increased in a short-term, indicating that the riverine P inputs mainly contribute to the concentrations of BAP in the estuarine water while internal P release was the major source of BAP in the open lake area. In the eutrophic shallow lake, the blooms of alga may cause pH increase and further result in internal P release. The above results showed that the new membrane of FeO/CAM can be used to monitor the concentrations of BAP and provide the scientific justifications for the control strategy of the lake eutrophication.

  7. Changing the values of parameters on lot size reorder point model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Hung-Chi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The Just-In-Time (JIT philosophy has received a great deal of attention. Several actions such as improving quality, reducing setup cost and shortening lead time have been recognized as effective ways to achieve the underlying goal of JIT. This paper considers the partial backorders, lot size reorder point inventory system with an imperfect production process. The objective is to simultaneously optimize the lot size, reorder point, process quality, setup cost and lead time, constrained on a service level. We assume the explicit distributional form of lead time demand is unknown but the mean and standard deviation are given. The minimax distribution free approach is utilized to solve the problem and a numerical example is provided to illustrate the results. .

  8. Comparison between Monte Carlo simulation and measurement with a 3D polymer gel dosimeter for dose distributions in biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this research, we used a 135 MeV/nucleon carbon-ion beam to irradiate a biological sample composed of fresh chicken meat and bones, which was placed in front of a PAGAT gel dosimeter, and compared the measured and simulated transverse-relaxation-rate (R2) distributions in the gel dosimeter. We experimentally measured the three-dimensional R2 distribution, which records the dose induced by particles penetrating the sample, by using magnetic resonance imaging. The obtained R2 distribution reflected the heterogeneity of the biological sample. We also conducted Monte Carlo simulations using the PHITS code by reconstructing the elemental composition of the biological sample from its computed tomography images while taking into account the dependence of the gel response on the linear energy transfer. The simulation reproduced the experimental distal edge structure of the R2 distribution with an accuracy under about 2 mm, which is approximately the same as the voxel size currently used in treatment planning. (paper)

  9. Comparison between Monte Carlo simulation and measurement with a 3D polymer gel dosimeter for dose distributions in biological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, T.; Maeyama, T.; Ishikawa, K. L.; Fukunishi, N.; Fukasaku, K.; Takagi, S.; Noda, S.; Himeno, R.; Hayashi, S.

    2015-08-01

    In this research, we used a 135 MeV/nucleon carbon-ion beam to irradiate a biological sample composed of fresh chicken meat and bones, which was placed in front of a PAGAT gel dosimeter, and compared the measured and simulated transverse-relaxation-rate (R2) distributions in the gel dosimeter. We experimentally measured the three-dimensional R2 distribution, which records the dose induced by particles penetrating the sample, by using magnetic resonance imaging. The obtained R2 distribution reflected the heterogeneity of the biological sample. We also conducted Monte Carlo simulations using the PHITS code by reconstructing the elemental composition of the biological sample from its computed tomography images while taking into account the dependence of the gel response on the linear energy transfer. The simulation reproduced the experimental distal edge structure of the R2 distribution with an accuracy under about 2 mm, which is approximately the same as the voxel size currently used in treatment planning.

  10. A Biologically Inspired Model of Distributed Online Communication Supporting Efficient Search and Diffusion of Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Baneerjee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We inhabit a world that is not only “small” but supports efficient decentralized search – an individual using local information can establish a line of communication with another completely unknown individual. Here we augment a hierarchical social network model with communication between and within communities. We argue that organization into communities would decrease overall decentralized search times. We take inspiration from the biological immune system which organizes search for pathogens in a hybrid modular strategy. Our strategy has relevance in search for rare amounts of information in online social networks and could have implications for massively distributed search challenges. Our work also has implications for design of efficient online networks that could have an impact on networks of human collaboration, scientific collaboration and networks used in targeted manhunts. Real world systems, like online social networks, have high associated delays for long-distance links, since they are built on top of physical networks. Such systems have been shown to densify i.e. the average number of neighbours that an individual has increases with time. Hence such networks will have a communication cost due to space and the requirement of building and maintaining and increasing number of connections. We have incorporated such a non-spatial cost to communication in order to introduce the realism of individuals communicating within communities, which we call participation cost. We introduce the notion of a community size that increases with the size of the system, which is shown to reduce the time to search for information in networks. Our final strategy balances search times and participation costs and is shown to decrease time to find information in decentralized search in online social networks. Our strategy also balances strong-ties (within communities and weak-ties over long distances (between communities that bring in diverse ideas and

  11. Exploring the biological stability situation of a full scale water distribution system in south China by three biological stability evaluation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junpeng; Li, Wei-Ying; Wang, Feng; Qian, Lin; Xu, Chen; Liu, Yao; Qi, Wanqi

    2016-10-01

    Bacterial regrowth especially opportunistic pathogens regrowth and contamination in drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) have become an emerging threat to public health in the whole world. To explore bacterial regrowth and biological stability, assimilable organic carbon (AOC), biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) and bacterial regrowth potential (BRP) were evaluated in a full scale DWDS and bench tests in South China. A significant correlation between BRP and AOC in both water treatment processes (WTP) and DWDS was obtained. For BRP and BDOC, the correlation was more significant in WTP than in DWDS. Both AOC and BRP were significantly correlated with UV254, total organic carbon (TOC), and heterotrophic plate count (HPC) (p AOC concentration almost unchanged. On contrary the HPC level increased quickly and declined slightly, with chlorine lower than 0.15 mg/L, which was in accordance with the large amount of biological stability data obtained from DWDS. Through another bench test, the HPC level was positively correlated to AOC concentration and when AOC was below 135 μg/L, the growth rate of HPC was low, which was verified by the analysis of biological stability data from DWDS. PMID:27421100

  12. Folding@Home and Genome@Home: Using distributed computing to tackle previously intractable problems in computational biology

    CERN Document Server

    Larson, Stefan M; Shirts, Michael; Pande, Vijay S

    2009-01-01

    For decades, researchers have been applying computer simulation to address problems in biology. However, many of these "grand challenges" in computational biology, such as simulating how proteins fold, remained unsolved due to their great complexity. Indeed, even to simulate the fastest folding protein would require decades on the fastest modern CPUs. Here, we review novel methods to fundamentally speed such previously intractable problems using a new computational paradigm: distributed computing. By efficiently harnessing tens of thousands of computers throughout the world, we have been able to break previous computational barriers. However, distributed computing brings new challenges, such as how to efficiently divide a complex calculation of many PCs that are connected by relatively slow networking. Moreover, even if the challenge of accurately reproducing reality can be conquered, a new challenge emerges: how can we take the results of these simulations (typically tens to hundreds of gigabytes of raw data...

  13. Biological variation of lipid constituents and distribution of tocopherols and astaxanthin in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Refsgaard, Hanne; Brockhoff, Per B; Jensen, Benny

    1998-01-01

    The contents of fat, astaxanthin, and tocogherols and the fatty acid composition of a homogeneous group of 145 farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) were determined. The analytical variation of the data was stastistically-separated from the biological variation. The fat content in the muscle near...... concentrations of alpha-, gamma-, and delta-tocopherols were approximately 32, 2.9, and 0.4 mg/kg of muscle, respectively, and the biological standard deviations were 4.5, 0.4, and 0.07 mg/kg (14, 14, and 20%), respectively. in another group of five salmon the distributions throughout the fillet were determined......, longitudinally as well as transversally. The distribution of fat, astaxanthin, and tocopherols varied throughout the salmon. The fatty acid composition varied little between extracts from different locations of the fillet...

  14. Biological variation of lipid constituents and distribution of tocopherols and astaxanthin in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Refsgaard, Hanne; Brockhoff, Per B; Jensen, Benny

    1998-01-01

    concentrations of alpha-, gamma-, and delta-tocopherols were approximately 32, 2.9, and 0.4 mg/kg of muscle, respectively, and the biological standard deviations were 4.5, 0.4, and 0.07 mg/kg (14, 14, and 20%), respectively. in another group of five salmon the distributions throughout the fillet were determined......, longitudinally as well as transversally. The distribution of fat, astaxanthin, and tocopherols varied throughout the salmon. The fatty acid composition varied little between extracts from different locations of the fillet...

  15. An analysis of the positional distribution of DNA motifs in promoter regions and its biological relevance

    OpenAIRE

    Vinga Susana; Casimiro Ana C; Freitas Ana T; Oliveira Arlindo L

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Motif finding algorithms have developed in their ability to use computationally efficient methods to detect patterns in biological sequences. However the posterior classification of the output still suffers from some limitations, which makes it difficult to assess the biological significance of the motifs found. Previous work has highlighted the existence of positional bias of motifs in the DNA sequences, which might indicate not only that the pattern is important, but als...

  16. Applications of synchrotron μ-XRF to study the distribution of biologically important elements in different environmental matrices: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Sanghamitra; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Castillo-Michel, Hiram; Hong, Jie; Rico, Cyren M; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2012-11-28

    Environmental matrices including soils, sediments, and living organisms are reservoirs of several essential as well as non-essential elements. Accurate qualitative and quantitative information on the distribution and interaction of biologically significant elements is vital to understand the role of these elements in environmental and biological samples. Synchrotron micro-X-ray fluorescence (μ-SXRF) allows in situ mapping of biologically important elements at nanometer to sub-micrometer scale with high sensitivity, negligible sample damage and enable tuning of the incident energy as desired. Beamlines in the synchrotron facilities are rapidly increasing their analytical versatility in terms of focusing optics, detector technologies, incident energy, and sample environment. Although extremely competitive, it is now feasible to find stations offering complimentary techniques like micro-X-ray diffraction (μ-XRD) and micro-X-ray absorption spectroscopy (μ-XAS) that will allow a more complete characterization of complex matrices. This review includes the most recent literature on the emerging applications and challenges of μ-SXRF in studying the distribution of biologically important elements and manufactured nanoparticles in soils, sediments, plants, and microbes. The advantages of using μ-SXRF and complimentary techniques in contrast to conventional techniques used for the respective studies are discussed. PMID:23146389

  17. A comparison of biological effect and spray liquid distribution and deposition for different spray application techniques in different crops

    OpenAIRE

    Larsolle, Anders; Wretblad, Per; Westberg, Carl

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare a selection of spray application techniques with different application volumes, with respect to the spray liquid distribution on flat surfaces, the deposition in fully developed crops and the biological effect. The spray application techniques in this study were conventional spray technique with three different nozzles: Teelet XR, Lechler ID and Lurmark DriftBeta, and also AirTec, Danfoil, Hardi Twin, Kyndestoit and Släpduk. The dynamic spray liquid ...

  18. Shelf life extension for the lot AAE nozzle severance LSCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, M.

    1990-01-01

    Shelf life extension tests for the remaining lot AAE linear shaped charges for redesigned solid rocket motor nozzle aft exit cone severance were completed in the small motor conditioning and firing bay, T-11. Five linear shaped charge test articles were thermally conditioned and detonated, demonstrating proper end-to-end charge propagation. Penetration depth requirements were exceeded. Results indicate that there was no degradation in performance due to aging or the linear shaped charge curving process. It is recommended that the shelf life of the lot AAE nozzle severance linear shaped charges be extended through January 1992.

  19. Improving aggregate behavior in parking lots with appropriate local maneuvers

    KAUST Repository

    Rodriguez, Samuel

    2013-11-01

    In this paper we study the ingress and egress of pedestrians and vehicles in a parking lot. We show how local maneuvers executed by agents permit them to create trajectories in constrained environments, and to resolve the deadlocks between them in mixed-flow scenarios. We utilize a roadmap-based approach which allows us to map complex environments and generate heuristic local paths that are feasible for both pedestrians and vehicles. Finally, we examine the effect that some agent-behavioral parameters have on parking lot ingress and egress. © 2013 IEEE.

  20. Diagnosis of Physical and Biological Controls on Phytoplankton Distribution in the Sargasso Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Caixia; Paola Malanotte-Rizzoli

    2014-01-01

    The linkage between physical and biological processes is studied by applying a one-dimensional physical-biological coupled model to the Sargasso Sea. The physical model is the Princeton Ocean Model and the biological model is a five-component system including phytoplankton, zooplankton, nitrate, ammonium, and detritus. The coupling between the physical and biological model is accomplished through vertical mixing which is parameterized by the level 2.5 Mellor and Yamada turbulence closure scheme. The coupled model investigates the annual cycle of ecosystem production and the response to external forcing, such as heat flux, wind stress, and surface salinity, and the relative importance of physical processes in affecting the ecosystem. Sensitivity ex-periments are also carried out, which provide information on how the model bio-chemical parameters affect the biological system. The computed seasonal cycles compare reasonably well with the observations of the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS). The spring bloom of phytoplankton occurs in March and April, right after the weakening of the winter mixing and before the estab-lishment of the summer stratification. The bloom of zooplankton occurs about two weeks after the bloom of phytoplankton. The sen-sitivity experiments show that zooplankton is more sensitive to the variations of biochemical parameters than phytoplankton.

  1. Molecular biology in a distributed world. A Kantian perspective on scientific practices and the human mind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariagrazia Portera

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the number of scholarly publications devoted to Kant's theory of biology has rapidly growing, with particular attention being given to Kant's thoughts about the concepts of teleology, function, organism, and their respective roles in scientific practice. Moving from these recent studies, and distancing itself from their mostly evolutionary background, the main aim of the present paper is to suggest an original "cognitive turn" in the interpretation of Kant's theory of biology. More specifically, the Authors will trace a connection between some Kantian theses about the “peculiar” or special nature of the human mind (intellectus ectypus, advanced in the Critique of the Power of Judgement (§ 76, 77, and some specific epistemological issues pertaining to the research practice of contemporary molecular biology.

  2. Distributions of inorganic nitrogen and biological production in the equatorial Pacific: a basin-scale model sensitivity study of nitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiujun; Murtugudde, Raghu

    2015-12-01

    Recent evidence indicates that there is stronger nitrification in the euphotic zone than previously thought. We employ a physical-biogeochemical model to study the implications of nitrification for basin-scale distributions of nitrate, ammonium, and biological production in the equatorial Pacific. The model can faithfully reproduce observed features in nitrate distribution, with or without photoinhibition of nitrification in the euphotic zone. In addition, new production, net community production and export production are not very sensitive to the parameterization of nitrification in this model. However, simulated ammonium distribution, nitrate uptake and ammonium uptake are sensitive to this parameterization. High nitrification results in low ammonium concentration, low ammonium uptake rate, and high nitrate uptake rate in the euphotic zone. This study suggests that nitrification may be responsible for up to 40% of nitrate uptake in the equatorial Pacific. This modeling study also demonstrates large differences (in terms of the magnitude and spatial distribution) between nitrate uptake, new production and export production, reflecting decoupling of upward nutrient supply, biological uptake and downward export.

  3. Applications of synchrotron {mu}-XRF to study the distribution of biologically important elements in different environmental matrices: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majumdar, Sanghamitra; Peralta-Videa, Jose R. [Chemistry Department, University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Ave. El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Castillo-Michel, Hiram [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, B.P. 220, 38043 Grenoble, Cedex (France); Hong Jie [Environmental Science and Engineering PhD Program, University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Ave. El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Rico, Cyren M. [Chemistry Department, University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Ave. El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L., E-mail: jgardea@utep.edu [Chemistry Department, University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Ave. El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Environmental Science and Engineering PhD Program, University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Ave. El Paso, TX 79968 (United States)

    2012-11-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {mu}-SXRF is a state-of-the-art technique to map biologically important elements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {mu}-SXRF allows in situ mapping of the elements at nanometer to sub-micrometer scale. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {mu}-SXRF can be used in plant, soil, microbe and particulate matter samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {mu}-SXRF is coupled with other synchrotron techniques to study chemical speciation. - Abstract: Environmental matrices including soils, sediments, and living organisms are reservoirs of several essential as well as non-essential elements. Accurate qualitative and quantitative information on the distribution and interaction of biologically significant elements is vital to understand the role of these elements in environmental and biological samples. Synchrotron micro-X-ray fluorescence ({mu}-SXRF) allows in situ mapping of biologically important elements at nanometer to sub-micrometer scale with high sensitivity, negligible sample damage and enable tuning of the incident energy as desired. Beamlines in the synchrotron facilities are rapidly increasing their analytical versatility in terms of focusing optics, detector technologies, incident energy, and sample environment. Although extremely competitive, it is now feasible to find stations offering complimentary techniques like micro-X-ray diffraction ({mu}-XRD) and micro-X-ray absorption spectroscopy ({mu}-XAS) that will allow a more complete characterization of complex matrices. This review includes the most recent literature on the emerging applications and challenges of {mu}-SXRF in studying the distribution of biologically important elements and manufactured nanoparticles in soils, sediments, plants, and microbes. The advantages of using {mu}-SXRF and complimentary techniques in contrast to conventional techniques used for the respective studies are discussed.

  4. Applications of synchrotron μ-XRF to study the distribution of biologically important elements in different environmental matrices: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► μ-SXRF is a state-of-the-art technique to map biologically important elements. ► μ-SXRF allows in situ mapping of the elements at nanometer to sub-micrometer scale. ► μ-SXRF can be used in plant, soil, microbe and particulate matter samples. ► μ-SXRF is coupled with other synchrotron techniques to study chemical speciation. - Abstract: Environmental matrices including soils, sediments, and living organisms are reservoirs of several essential as well as non-essential elements. Accurate qualitative and quantitative information on the distribution and interaction of biologically significant elements is vital to understand the role of these elements in environmental and biological samples. Synchrotron micro-X-ray fluorescence (μ-SXRF) allows in situ mapping of biologically important elements at nanometer to sub-micrometer scale with high sensitivity, negligible sample damage and enable tuning of the incident energy as desired. Beamlines in the synchrotron facilities are rapidly increasing their analytical versatility in terms of focusing optics, detector technologies, incident energy, and sample environment. Although extremely competitive, it is now feasible to find stations offering complimentary techniques like micro-X-ray diffraction (μ-XRD) and micro-X-ray absorption spectroscopy (μ-XAS) that will allow a more complete characterization of complex matrices. This review includes the most recent literature on the emerging applications and challenges of μ-SXRF in studying the distribution of biologically important elements and manufactured nanoparticles in soils, sediments, plants, and microbes. The advantages of using μ-SXRF and complimentary techniques in contrast to conventional techniques used for the respective studies are discussed.

  5. Biological and ecological characteristics of soft ticks (Ixodida: Argasidae and their impact for predicting tick and associated disease distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vial L.

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available As evidence of global changes is accumulating, scientists are challenged to detect distribution changes of vectors, reservoirs and pathogens caused by anthropogenic and/or environmental changes. Statistical and mathematical distribution models are emerging for ixodid hard ticks whereas no prediction has ever been developed for argasid ones. These last organisms remain unknown and under-reported; they differ from hard ticks by many structural, biological and ecological properties, which complicate direct adaptation of hard tick models. However, investigations on bibliographic resources concerning these ticks suggest that distribution modelling based on natural niche concept and using environmental factors especially climate is also possible, bearing in mind the scale of prediction and their specificities including their nidicolous lifestyle, an indiscriminate host feeding and a short bloodmeal duration, as well as a flexible development cycle through diapause periods.

  6. New genetic loci link adipose and insulin biology to body fat distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Shungin (Dmitry); T.W. Winkler (Thomas W.); D.C. Croteau-Chonka (Damien); T. Ferreira (Teresa); A. Locke (Adam); R. Mägi (Reedik); R.J. Strawbridge (Rona); T.H. Pers (Tune); K. Fischer (Krista); A.E. Justice (Anne); T. Workalemahu (Tsegaselassie); J.M.W. Wu (Joseph M. W.); M.L. Buchkovich (Martin); N.L. Heard-Costa (Nancy); T.S. Roman (Tamara S.); A. Drong (Alexander); C. Song (Ci); S. Gustafsson (Stefan); F.R. Day (Felix); T. Esko (Tõnu); M. Fall (Magnus); Z. Kutalik (Zolta'n); J. Luan; J.C. Randall (Joshua); A. Scherag (Andre); S. Vedantam (Sailaja); A.R. Wood (Andrew); J. Chen (Jin); R.S.N. Fehrmann (Rudolf); J. Karjalainen (Juha); B. Kahali (Bratati); C.-T. Liu (Ching-Ti); E.M. Schmidt (Ellen); D. Absher (Devin); N. Amin (Najaf); D. Anderson (David); M. Beekman (Marian); J.L. Bragg-Gresham (Jennifer L.); S. Buyske (Steven); A. Demirkan (Ayşe); G.B. Ehret (Georg); M.F. Feitosa (Mary Furlan); A. Goel (Anuj); A.U. Jackson (Anne); T. Johnson (Toby); M.E. Kleber (Marcus); K. Kristiansson; M. Mangino (Massimo); I.M. Leach (Irene Mateo); M.C. Medina-Gomez (Carolina); C. Palmer (Cameron); D. Pasko (Dorota); S. Pechlivanis (Sonali); M.J. Peters (Marjolein); I. Prokopenko (Inga); A. Stanca'kova' (Alena); Y.J. Sung (Yun Ju); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); A. Teumer (Alexander); J.V. van Vliet-Ostaptchouk (Jana); L. Yengo (Loic); W. Zhang (Weihua); E. Albrecht (Eva); J. Ärnlöv (Johan); G.M. Arscott (Gillian M.); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); A. Barrett (Angela); C. Bellis (Claire); A.J. Bennett (Amanda); C. Berne (Christian); M. Blüher (Matthias); S. Böhringer (Stefan); F. Bonnet (Fabrice); Y. Böttcher (Yvonne); M. Bruinenberg (M.); D.B. Carba (Delia B.); I.H. Caspersen (Ida H.); R. Clarke (Robert); E.W. Daw (E. Warwick); J. Deelen (Joris); E. Deelman (Ewa); G. Delgado; A.S.F. Doney (Alex); N. Eklund (Niina); M.R. Erdos (Michael); K. Estrada Gil (Karol); E. Eury (Elodie); N. Friedrich (Nele); M. Garcia (Melissa); V. Giedraitis (Vilmantas); B. Gigante (Bruna); A. Go (Attie); A. Golay (Alain); H. Grallert (Harald); T.B. Grammer (Tanja); J. Gräsler (Jürgen); J. Grewal (Jagvir); C.J. Groves (Christopher); T. Haller (Toomas); G. Hallmans (Göran); C.A. Hartman (Catharina); M. Hassinen (Maija); C. Hayward (Caroline); K. Heikkilä (Kauko); K.H. Herzig; Q. Helmer (Quinta); H.L. Hillege (Hans); O.L. Holmen (Oddgeir); S.C. Hunt (Steven); A. Isaacs (Aaron); T. Ittermann (Till); A.L. James (Alan); I. Johansson (Inger); T. Juliusdottir (Thorhildur); I.-P. Kalafati (Ioanna-Panagiota); L. Kinnunen (Leena); W. Koenig (Wolfgang); I.K. Kooner (Ishminder K.); W. Kratzer (Wolfgang); C. Lamina (Claudia); K. Leander (Karin); N.R. Lee (Nanette R.); P. Lichtner (Peter); L. Lind (Lars); J. Lindström (Jaana); S. Lobbens (Stéphane); M. Lorentzon (Mattias); F. MacH (François); P.K. Magnusson (Patrik); A. Mahajan (Anubha); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); C. Menni (Cristina); S. Merger (Sigrun); E. Mihailov (Evelin); L. Milani (Lili); R. Mills (Rebecca); A. Moayyeri (Alireza); K.L. Monda (Keri); S.P. Mooijaart (Simon); T.W. Mühleisen (Thomas); A. Mulas (Antonella); G. Müller (Gabriele); M. Müller-Nurasyid (Martina); R. Nagaraja (Ramaiah); M.A. Nalls (Michael); N. Narisu (Narisu); N. Glorioso (Nicola); I.M. Nolte (Ilja M.); M. Olden (Matthias); N.W. Rayner (Nigel William); F. Renström (Frida); J.S. Ried (Janina); N.R. Robertson (Neil R.); L.M. Rose (Lynda); S. Sanna (Serena); H. Scharnagl (Hubert); S. Scholtens (Salome); B. Sennblad (Bengt); T. Seufferlein (Thomas); C.M. Sitlani (Colleen); G.D. Smith; K. Stirrups (Kathy); H.M. Stringham (Heather); J. Sundstrom (Johan); M. Swertz (Morris); A.J. Swift (Amy); A.C. Syvanen; B. Tayo (Bamidele); B. Thorand (Barbara); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); A. Tomaschitz (Andreas); C. Troffa (Chiara); F.V.A. van Oort (Floor); N. Verweij (Niek); J.M. Vonk (Judith); L. Waite (Lindsay); R. Wennauer (Roman); T. Wilsgaard (Tom); M.K. Wojczynski (Mary ); A. Wong (Andrew); Q. Zhang (Qunyuan); J.H. Zhao; E.P. Brennan (Eoin P.); M. Choi (Murim); P. Eriksson (Per); L. Folkersen (Lasse); A. Franco-Cereceda (Anders); A.G. Gharavi (Ali G.); A.K. Hedman (Asa); M.F. Hivert; J. Huang (Jinyan); S. Kanoni (Stavroula); F. Karpe (Fredrik); S. Keildson (Sarah); K. Kiryluk (Krzysztof); L. Liang (Liming); R.P. Lifton (Richard); B. Ma (Baoshan); A.J. McKnight (Amy J.); R. McPherson (Ruth); A. Metspalu (Andres); J.L. Min (Josine L.); M.F. Moffatt (Miriam); G.W. Montgomery (Grant); J. Murabito (Joanne); G. Nicholson (Ggeorge); A.S. Dimas (Antigone); C. Olsson (Christian); J.R.B. Perry (John); E. Reinmaa (Eva); R.M. Salem (Rany); N. Sandholm (Niina); E.E. Schadt (Eric); R.A. Scott (Robert A.); L. Stolk (Lisette); E.E. Vallejo (Edgar E.); H.J. Westra (Harm-Jan); K.T. Zondervan (Krina); P. Amouyel (Philippe); D. Arveiler (Dominique); S.J.L. Bakker (Stephan); J.P. Beilby (John); R.N. Bergman (Richard); J. Blangero (John); M.J. Brown (Morris); M. Burnier (Michel); H. Campbell (Harry); A. Chakravarti (Aravinda); P.S. Chines (Peter); S. Claudi-Boehm (Simone); F.S. Collins (Francis); D.C. Crawford (Dana); J. Danesh (John); U. de Faire (Ulf); E.J.C. de Geus (Eco); M. Dörr (Marcus); R. Erbel (Raimund); K. Hagen (Knut); M. Farrall (Martin); E. Ferrannini (Ele); J. Ferrieres (Jean); N.G. Forouhi (Nita); T. Forrester (Terrence); O.H. Franco (Oscar); R.T. Gansevoort (Ron); C. Gieger (Christian); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); T.B. Harris (Tamara); A.T. Hattersley (Andrew); M. Heliovaara (Markku); A.A. Hicks (Andrew); A. Hingorani (Aroon); W. Hoffmann (Wolfgang); A. Hofman (Albert); G. Homuth (Georg); S.E. Humphries (Steve); E. Hypponen (Elina); T. Illig (Thomas); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); B. Johansen (Berit); P. Jousilahti (Pekka); A. Jula (Antti); J. Kaprio (Jaakko); F. Kee (F.); S. Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi (Sirkka); J.S. Kooner (Jaspal S.); C. Kooperberg (Charles); P. Kovacs (Peter); A. Kraja (Aldi); M. Kumari (Meena); K. Kuulasmaa (Kari); J. Kuusisto (Johanna); T.A. Lakka (Timo); C. Langenberg (Claudia); L. Le Marchand (Loic); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); V. Lyssenko (Valeriya); S. Männistö (Satu); A. Marette (Andre'); T.C. Matise (Tara C.); C.A. McKenzie (Colin A.); B. McKnight (Barbara); A.W. Musk (Arthur); S. Möhlenkamp (Stefan); A.D. Morris (Andrew); M. Nelis (Mari); C. Ohlsson (Claes); A.J. Oldehinkel (Albertine); K.K. Ong (Ken K.); C. Palmer (Cameron); B.W.J.H. Penninx (Brenda); A. Peters (Annette); P.P. Pramstaller (Peter Paul); O. Raitakari (Olli); T. Rankinen (Tuomo); D.C. Rao (Dabeeru C.); T.K. Rice (Treva K.); P.M. Ridker (Paul); M.D. Ritchie (Marylyn D.); I. Rudan (Igor); V. Salomaa (Veikko); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); J. Saramies (Jouko); M.A. Sarzynski (Mark A.); P.E.H. Schwarz (Peter E. H.); A.R. Shuldiner (Alan); J.A. Staessen (Jan); V. Steinthorsdottir (Valgerdur); R.P. Stolk (Ronald); K. Strauch (Konstantin); A. Tönjes (Anke); A. Tremblay (Angelo); E. Tremoli (Elena); M.-C. Vohl (Marie-Claude); U. Völker (Uwe); P. Vollenweider (Peter); J.F. Wilson (James F); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); L.S. Adair (Linda); M. Bochud (Murielle); B.O. Boehm (Bernhard); S.R. Bornstein (Stefan R.); C. Bouchard (Claude); S. Cauchi (Ste'phane); M. Caulfield (Mark); J.C. Chambers (John C.); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); R.S. Cooper (Richard S.); G.V. Dedoussis (George); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); P. Froguel (Philippe); H.J. Grabe (Hans Jörgen); A. Hamsten (Anders); J. Hui (Jennie); K. Hveem (Kristian); K.-H. Jöckel (Karl-Heinz); M. Kivimaki (Mika); D. Kuh (Diana); M. Laakso (Markku); Y. Liu (Yongmei); W. März (Winfried); P. Munroe (Patricia); I. Njølstad (Inger); B.A. Oostra (Ben); C.N.A. Palmer (Colin); N.L. Pedersen (Nancy L.); M. Perola (Markus); L. Perusse (Louis); U. Peters (Ulrike); C. Power (Christopher); T. Quertermous (Thomas); R. Rauramaa (Rainer); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); T. Saaristo (Timo); D. Saleheen; J. Sinisalo (Juha); P.E. Slagboom (Eline); H. Snieder (Harold); T.D. Spector (Timothy); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); M. Stumvoll (Michael); J. Tuomilehto (Jaakko); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); M. Uusitupa (Matti); P. van der Harst (Pim); G. Veronesi (Giovanni); M. Walker (Mark); N.J. Wareham (Nick); H. Watkins (Hugh); H.E. Wichmann (Heinz Erich); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); T.L. Assimes (Themistocles); S.I. Berndt (Sonja); M. Boehnke (Michael); I.B. Borecki (Ingrid); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); L. Franke (Lude); T.M. Frayling (Timothy); L. Groop (Leif); D. Hunter (David); R.C. Kaplan (Robert); J.R. O´Connell; L. Qi (Lu); D. Schlessinger (David); D.P. Strachan (David); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); C.J. Willer (Cristen); P.M. Visscher (Peter); J. Yang (Joanna); J.N. Hirschhorn (Joel N.); M.C. Zillikens (Carola); M.I. McCarthy (Mark); E.K. Speliotes (Elizabeth); K.E. North (Kari); C.S. Fox (Caroline S.); I. Barroso (Inês); P.W. Franks (Paul); E. Ingelsson (Erik); I.M. Heid (Iris); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); L.A. Cupples (Adrienne); A.P. Morris (Andrew); C.M. Lindgren (Cecilia); K.L. Mohlke (Karen)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBody fat distribution is a heritable trait and a well-established predictor of adverse metabolic outcomes, independent of overall adiposity. To increase our understanding of the genetic basis of body fat distribution and its molecular links to cardiometabolic traits, here we conduct geno

  7. New genetic loci link adipose and insulin biology to body fat distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shungin, Dmitry; Winkler, Thomas W.; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C.; Ferreira, Teresa; Lockes, Adam E.; Maegi, Reedik; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Pers, Tune H.; Fischer, Krista; Justice, Anne E.; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Wu, Joseph M. W.; Buchkovich, Martin L.; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Roman, Tamara S.; Drong, Alexander W.; Song, Ci; Gustafsson, Stefan; Day, Felix R.; Esko, Tonu; Fall, Tove; Kutalik, Zoltan; Luan, Jian'an; Randall, Joshua C.; Scherag, Andre; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wood, Andrew R.; Chen, Jin; Fehrmann, Rudolf; Karjalainen, Juha; Kahali, Bratati; Liu, Ching-Ti; Schmidt, Ellen M.; Absher, Devin; Amin, Najaf; Anderson, Denise; Beekman, Marian; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Buyske, Steven; Demirkan, Ayse; Ehret, Georg B.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Goel, Anuj; Jackson, Anne U.; Johnson, Toby; Kleber, Marcus E.; Kristiansson, Kati; Mangino, Massimo; Leach, Irene Mateo; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Palmer, Cameron D.; Pasko, Dorota; Pechlivaniss, Sonali; Peters, Marjolein J.; Prokopenko, Inga; Stancakova, Alena; Sung, Yun Ju; Tanakam, Toshiko; Teumer, Alexander; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Yengo, Loic; Zhang, Weihua; Albrecht, Eva; Arnlov, Johan; Arscott, Gillian M.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barrett, Amy; Bellis, Claire; Bennett, Amanda J.; Berne, Christian; Blueher, Matthias; Buhringer, Stefan; Bonnet, Fabrice; Boettcher, Yvonne; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Carba, Delia B.; Caspersen, Ida H.; Clarke, Robert; Daw, E. Warwick; Deelen, Joris; Deelman, Ewa; Delgado, Graciela; Doney, Alex S. F.; Eklund, Niina; Erdos, Michael R.; Estrada, Karol; Eury, Elodie; Friedrichs, Nele; Garcia, Melissa E.; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Gigante, Bruna; Go, Alan S.; Golay, Alain; Grallert, Harald; Grammer, Tanja B.; Graessler, Juergen; Grewal, Jagvir; Groves, Christopher J.; Haller, Toomas; Hallmans, Goran; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hassinen, Maija; Hayward, Caroline; Heikkila, Kauko; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Helmer, Quinta; Hillege, Hans L.; Holmen, Oddgeir; Hunt, Steven C.; Isaacs, Aaron; Ittermann, Till; James, Alan L.; Johansson, Ingegerd; Juliusdottir, Thorhildur; Kalafati, Ioanna-Panagiota; Kinnunen, Leena; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kooner, Ishminder K.; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Lamina, Claudia; Leander, Karin; Lee, Nanette R.; Lichtner, Peter; Lind, Lars; Lindstrom, Jaana; Lobbens, Stephane; Lorentzon, Mattias; Mach, Francois; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Mahajan, Anubha; McArdle, Wendy L.; Menni, Cristina; Merger, Sigrun; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Mills, Rebecca; Moayyeri, Alireza; Monda, Ken L.; Mooijaart, Simon P.; Muehleisen, Thomas W.; Mulas, Antonella; Mueller, Gabriele; Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Nalls, Michael A.; Narisu, Narisu; Glorioso, Nicola; Nolte, Ilja M.; Olden, Matthias; Rayner, Nigel W.; Renstrom, Frida; Ried, Janina S.; Robertson, Neil R.; Rose, Lynda M.; Sanna, Serena; Scharnagl, Hubert; Scholtens, Salome; Sennblad, Bengt; Seufferlein, Thomas; Sitlani, Colleen M.; Smith, Albert Vernon; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stringham, Heather M.; Sundstrom, Johan; Swertz, Morris A.; Swift, Amy J.; Syvanen, Ann-Christine; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Thorand, Barbara; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tomaschitz, Andreas; Troffa, Chiara; van Oort, Floor V. A.; Verweij, Niek; Vonk, Judith M.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Wennauer, Roman; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wojczynski, Mary K.; Wong, Andrew; Zhang, Qunyuan; Zhao, Jing Hua; Brennan, Eoin P.; Choi, Murim; Eriksson, Per; Folkersen, Lasse; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Gharavi, Ali G.; Hedman, Asa K.; Hivert, Marie-France; Huang, Jinyan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Karpe, Fredrik; Keildson, Sarah; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Liang, Liming; Lifton, Richard P.; Ma, Baoshan; McKnight, Amy J.; McPherson, Ruth; Metspalu, Andres; Min, Josine L.; Moffatt, Miriam F.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Murabito, Joanne M.; Nicholson, George; Nyholt, Dale R.; Olsson, Christian; Perry, John R. B.; Reinmaa, Eva; Salem, Rany M.; Sandholm, Niina; Schadt, Eric E.; Scott, Robert A.; Stolk, Lisette; Vallejo, Edgar E.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Zondervan, Krina T.; Amouyel, Philippe; Arveiler, Dominique; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Beilby, John; Bergman, Richard N.; Blangero, John; Brown, Morris J.; Burnier, Michel; Campbell, Harry; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chiness, Peter S.; Claudi-Boehmi, Simone; Collins, Francis S.; Crawford, Dana C.; Danesh, John; de Faire, Ulf; de Geusl, Eco J. C.; Doerr, Marcus; Erbel, Raimund; Eriksson, Johan G.; Farrall, Martin; Ferrannini, Ele; Ferrieres, Jean; Forouhi, Nita G.; Forrester, Terrence; Franco, Oscar H.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Gieger, Christian; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Haiman, Christopher A.; Harris, Tamara B.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Heliovaara, Markku; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Humphries, Steve E.; Hyppoenen, Elina; Illig, Thomas; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Johansen, Berit; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti M.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kee, Frank; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Kooperberg, Charles; Kovacs, Peter; Kraja, Aldi T.; Kumari, Meena; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Kuusisto, Johanna; Lakka, Timo A.; Langenberg, Claudia; Le Marchand, Loic; Lehtimaki, Terho; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Mannisto, Satu; Marette, Andre; Matise, Tara C.; McKenzie, Colin A.; McKnight, Barbara; Musk, Arthur W.; Mohlenkamp, Stefan; Morris, Andrew D.; Nelis, Mari; Ohlsson, Claes; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Ong, Ken K.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Raitakari, Olli T.; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rao, D. C.; Rice, Treva K.; Ridker, Paul M.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J.; Saramies, Jouko; Sarzynski, Mark A.; Schwarz, Peter E. H.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Staessen, Jan A.; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stolk, Ronald P.; Strauch, Konstantin; Toenjes, Anke; Tremblay, Angelo; Tremoli, Elena; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Voelker, Uwe; Vollenweider, Peter; Wilson, James F.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.; Adair, Linda S.; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Bouchard, Claude; Cauchi, Stephane; Caulfield, Mark J.; Chambers, John C.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Cooper, Richard S.; Dedoussis, George; Ferrucci, Luigi; Froguel, Philippe; Grabe, Hans-Joergen; Hamsten, Anders; Hui, Jennie; Hveem, Kristian; Joeckel, Karl-Heinz; Kivimaki, Mika; Kuh, Diana; Laakso, Markku; Liu, Yongmei; Maerz, Winfried; Munroe, Patricia B.; Njolstad, Inger; Oostra, Ben A.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Perola, Markus; Perusse, Louis; Peters, Ulrike; Power, Chris; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Saaristo, Timo E.; Saleheen, Danish; Sinisalo, Juha; Slagboom, P. Eline; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Tim D.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur R.; Stumvoll, Michael; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Uusitupa, Math; van der Harst, Pim; Veronesi, Giovanni; Walker, Mark; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins, Hugh; Wichmann, H-Erich; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Boehnkes, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Deloukas, Panos; Franke, Lude; Frayling, Timothy M.; Groop, Leif C.; Hunter, David J.; Kaplan, Robert C.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Qi, Lu; Schlessinger, David; Strachan, David P.; Stefansson, Kari; van Dujin, Cornelia M.; Willer, Cristen J.; Visscher, Peter M.; Yang, Jian; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Zillikens, M. Carola; McCarthy, Mark I.; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; North, Kari E.; Fox, Caroline S.; Barroso, Ines; Franks, Paul W.; Ingelsson, Erik; Heid, Iris M.; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Morris, Andrew P.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Mohlke, Karen L.

    2015-01-01

    Body fat distribution is a heritable trait and a well-established predictor of adverse metabolic outcomes, independent of overall adiposity. To increase our understanding of the genetic basis of body fat distribution and its molecular links to cardiometabolic traits, here we conduct genome-wide asso

  8. Automotive Parking Lot and Theft Detection through Image Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Automotive parking lot and theft detection through image processing is a smart parking lot which will save time for the owner to park his car in a more organized way and also prevent theft of the car. It is a technology to optimize the checkout process by analysing a database of images of number plates of cars. The heart of the project is based on image processing. The images of number plates will be detected by Matlab and a picture of the driver will be saved in a similar database. As soon as both the images are saved, the garage entrance pole will shift 90 degrees upward using a DC MOTOR and will remain in that position for 30 seconds to allow the car to enter. After 30 seconds it will return back to its previous position. When the car exits the earlier steps will be repeated and Matlab will match both the images that were taken during entering and leaving. Meanwhile the seven segment display will show that a car has left the parking lot, by decrementing a number from its display. The cars are controlled by a microcontroller which is also able to detect and display if a vacant parking space is available. If there is no vacancy a red LED lights up, where as a green LED is used to display presence of parking space along with how many parking spots are available. It is applicable to be used in super market car parking lots and also apartment garages.

  9. The conquest of the terrestrial surface: a lot earlier?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author describes the importance from the discovery of two North American scientists when finding evidences of a possible invasion of life in the terrestrial surface a lot earlier of known until now is accepted, when found indications of organisms like bacteria or algae in rocks between 800 and 1200 million years

  10. Full-Depth Asphalt Pavements for Parking Lots and Driveways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asphalt Inst., College Park, MD.

    The latest information for designing full-depth asphalt pavements for parking lots and driveways is covered in relationship to the continued increase in vehicle registration. It is based on The Asphalt Institute's Thickness Design Manual, Series No. 1 (MS-1), Seventh Edition, which covers all aspects of asphalt pavement thickness design in detail,…

  11. New genetic loci link adipose and insulin biology to body fat distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shungin, Dmitry; Winkler, Thomas W; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C.;

    2015-01-01

    Body fat distribution is a heritable trait and a well-established predictor of adverse metabolic outcomes, independent of overall adiposity. To increase our understanding of the genetic basis of body fat distribution and its molecular links to cardiometabolic traits, here we conduct genome-wide a...... adipogenesis, angiogenesis, transcriptional regulation and insulin resistance as processes affecting fat distribution, providing insight into potential pathophysiological mechanisms.......Body fat distribution is a heritable trait and a well-established predictor of adverse metabolic outcomes, independent of overall adiposity. To increase our understanding of the genetic basis of body fat distribution and its molecular links to cardiometabolic traits, here we conduct genome......(-8)). In total, 20 of the 49 waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for BMI loci show significant sexual dimorphism, 19 of which display a stronger effect in women. The identified loci were enriched for genes expressed in adipose tissue and for putative regulatory elements in adipocytes. Pathway analyses implicated...

  12. Biology, Distribution And Control Of The Cactus Moth, Cactoblastis Cactorum (Berg) (Lepidoptera: Pyralide)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cactus moth, Cactoblastis cactorum (Berg) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) became a textbook example of successful classical biological control after it was imported from Argentina into Australia in 1926 to control invasive Opuntia cacti. To date, the moth continues to play an active role in controlling...

  13. Observations on the distribution and biology of Huffmanela huffmani (Nematoda: Trichosomoididae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cox, M. K.; Huffman, D. G.; Moravec, František

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 1 (2004), s. 50-54. ISSN 0015-5683 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA6022201 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6022909 Keywords : Nematoda * Trichosomoididae * Huffmanela Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 0.837, year: 2004

  14. Eco-biology of Mastacembelus pancalus (Ham.) and their distribution in different water bodies

    OpenAIRE

    Hussain, M. Afzal; Flowra, F. Adib; Hossain, M. Altaf

    2003-01-01

    The eco-biological of the spiny eel, Mastacembelus pailcalus in the river Padma, adjacent flood plains and ponds were influenced by various physico-chemical factors such as water temperature, water transparency, pH, dissolved oxygen, free carbon dioxide and alkalinity. Flood plain areas are the best habitat for the M. pancalus with maximum abundance.

  15. MODEL PENENTUAN UKURAN LOT PRODUKSI DENGAN POLA PERMINTAAN BERFLUKTUASI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Docki Saraswati

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of varying demand on the production lot size and the schedule of delivery in the integrated inventory system. This system is consisted of a single manufacturer as the supplier and a single buyer. Mostly, the problems on the economic lot size model are assumed that demand is continuous with time. Actually, demand occurs are varying in time rather than continuously over the planning time horizon. In this case, the buyer has decided the amount of order for each period is varied, because of the changing market environment. The integrated inventory system model between a supplier and a buyer are developed and implemented under the condition with varied demand. Forward dynamic programming is implemented for searching the solution. The objective is to minimize the total cost, associated with a single product for a deterministic varying demand. Two conditions are examined here, i.e., the integrated model with uncapacitated and capacitated production system. The difference between these two models is in the constraints formulation. The capacity constraints will give higher total cost, especially if the setup cost higher than the holding cost. A numerical example is presented to illustrate the implementation of the solution algorithm. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia: Pada makalah ini diteliti pengaruh permintaan yang berfluktuasi terhadap penentuan ukuran lot produksi dan jadwal pengiriman pada sistem persediaan terintegrasi, dengan total ongkos persediaan melibatkan sistem persediaan pemanufaktur dan pembeli secara bersama. Sistem terdiri atas pemanufaktur tunggal dan pembeli tunggal untuk pemesanan satu jenis produk.Umumnya permasalahan penentuan ukuran lot produksi memiliki asumsi bahwa permintaan bersifat kontinu terhadap waktu. Penentuan ukuran lot pada model integrasi sistem persediaan antara pemanufaktur dan pembeli dengan kondisi permintaan berfluktuatif bertujuan meminimasi total ongkos. Pencarian

  16. A microbiology-based multi-parametric approach towards assessing biological stability in drinking water distribution networks

    KAUST Repository

    Lautenschläger, Karin

    2013-06-01

    Biological stability of drinking water implies that the concentration of bacterial cells and composition of the microbial community should not change during distribution. In this study, we used a multi-parametric approach that encompasses different aspects of microbial water quality including microbial growth potential, microbial abundance, and microbial community composition, to monitor biological stability in drinking water of the non-chlorinated distribution system of Zürich. Drinking water was collected directly after treatment from the reservoir and in the network at several locations with varied average hydraulic retention times (6-52h) over a period of four months, with a single repetition two years later. Total cell concentrations (TCC) measured with flow cytometry remained remarkably stable at 9.5 (±0.6)×104cells/ml from water in the reservoir throughout most of the distribution network, and during the whole time period. Conventional microbial methods like heterotrophic plate counts, the concentration of adenosine tri-phosphate, total organic carbon and assimilable organic carbon remained also constant. Samples taken two years apart showed more than 80% similarity for the microbial communities analysed with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and 454 pyrosequencing. Only the two sampling locations with the longest water retention times were the exceptions and, sofar for unknown reasons, recorded a slight but significantly higher TCC (1.3(±0.1)×105cells/ml) compared to the other locations. This small change in microbial abundance detected by flow cytometry was also clearly observed in a shift in the microbial community profiles to a higher abundance of members from the Comamonadaceae (60% vs. 2% at other locations). Conventional microbial detection methods were not able to detect changes as observed with flow cytometric cell counts and microbial community analysis. Our findings demonstrate that the multi-parametric approach used provides a powerful

  17. The importance of biological interactions for the vertical distribution of nematodes in a temperate ultra-dissipative sandy beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria, Tatiana F.; Vanaverbeke, Jan; Esteves, André M.; De Troch, Marleen; Vanreusel, Ann

    2012-01-01

    This study of the vertical distribution of nematode communities in an ultra-dissipative sandy beach on the North Sea coast at De Panne, Belgium showed species-specific vertical migrations occurred over a tidal cycle. During the period of submersion, smaller deposit feeders were dominant at the subsurface, whereas large nematodes (originally classified as predators) were concentrated at the surface. The interstitial water content showed a weak correlation to the observed patterns and biological interactions among nematodes, such as predation and competition, which were measured through stable isotopes, also explained the observed segregation. The predator Enoplolaimus litoralis and its potential prey species did not co-exist in the same part of the sediment, suggesting avoidance of predation by prey species. In addition, the different prey species inhabited different subsurface layers, which can be explained by avoidance of competition for food. Stable isotope signatures further showed that the two major biological components of sandy beaches (macrofauna and meiofauna, including some species assumed to be predators) partly depend on microphytobenthos, demonstrating the importance of in situ primary producers in the diet of the fauna from ultra-dissipative sandy beaches. However, meiofauna and macrofauna do not seem to compete for these food sources. The combined examination of environmental and biological factors revealed the additional importance of the latter in controlling the vertical distribution of nematodes in environments that were previously assumed to be mainly physically controlled.

  18. Implementation of Complex Biological Logic Circuits Using Spatially Distributed Multicellular Consortia

    OpenAIRE

    Javier Macia; Romilde Manzoni; Núria Conde; Arturo Urrios; Eulàlia de Nadal; Ricard Solé; Francesc Posas

    2016-01-01

    Engineered synthetic biological devices have been designed to perform a variety of functions from sensing molecules and bioremediation to energy production and biomedicine. Notwithstanding, a major limitation of in vivo circuit implementation is the constraint associated to the use of standard methodologies for circuit design. Thus, future success of these devices depends on obtaining circuits with scalable complexity and reusable parts. Here we show how to build complex computational devices...

  19. Historical freshwater fish ecology: a long-term view of distribution changes and biological invasions

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel Clavero

    2015-01-01

    Past processes and events may have an important influence on contemporaneous ecological patterns, including current human impacts on landscapes and organisms. In spite of that, most of the ecological knowledge has been built upon short-term studies, which very rarely exceed one decade. Ecology and Conservation Biology have an important lack of historical approaches, a deficiency that may become a hindrance for the management of natural systems. In this talk I will present examples of how hist...

  20. A Biologically Inspired Model of Distributed Online Communication Supporting Efficient Search and Diffusion of Innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Soumya Baneerjee

    2016-01-01

    We inhabit a world that is not only “small” but supports efficient decentralized search – an individual using local information can establish a line of communication with another completely unknown individual. Here we augment a hierarchical social network model with communication between and within communities. We argue that organization into communities would decrease overall decentralized search times. We take inspiration from the biological immune system which organizes search for pathogen...

  1. Elemental distribution and sample integrity comparison of freeze-dried and frozen-hydrated biological tissue samples with nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis of biological samples in frozen-hydrated state with micro-PIXE technique at Jožef Stefan Institute (JSI) nuclear microprobe has matured to a point that enables us to measure and examine frozen tissue samples routinely as a standard research method. Cryotome-cut slice of frozen-hydrated biological sample is mounted between two thin foils and positioned on the sample holder. The temperature of the cold stage in the measuring chamber is kept below 130 K throughout the insertion of the samples and the proton beam exposure. Matrix composition of frozen-hydrated tissue is consisted mostly of ice. Sample deterioration during proton beam exposure is monitored during the experiment, as both Elastic Backscattering Spectrometry (EBS) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) in on–off axis geometry are recorded together with the events in two PIXE detectors and backscattered ions from the chopper in a single list-mode file. The aim of this experiment was to determine differences and similarities between two kinds of biological sample preparation techniques for micro-PIXE analysis, namely freeze-drying and frozen-hydrated sample preparation in order to evaluate the improvements in the elemental localisation of the latter technique if any. In the presented work, a standard micro-PIXE configuration for tissue mapping at JSI was used with five detection systems operating in parallel, with proton beam cross section of 1.0 × 1.0 μm2 and a beam current of 100 pA. The comparison of the resulting elemental distributions measured at the biological tissue prepared in the frozen-hydrated and in the freeze-dried state revealed differences in elemental distribution of particular elements at the cellular level due to the morphology alteration in particular tissue compartments induced either by water removal in the lyophilisation process or by unsatisfactory preparation of samples for cutting and mounting during the shock-freezing phase of sample preparation

  2. Elemental distribution and sample integrity comparison of freeze-dried and frozen-hydrated biological tissue samples with nuclear microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavpetič, P.; Vogel-Mikuš, K.; Jeromel, L.; Ogrinc Potočnik, N.; Pongrac, P.; Drobne, D.; Pipan Tkalec, Ž.; Novak, S.; Kos, M.; Koren, Š.; Regvar, M.; Pelicon, P.

    2015-04-01

    The analysis of biological samples in frozen-hydrated state with micro-PIXE technique at Jožef Stefan Institute (JSI) nuclear microprobe has matured to a point that enables us to measure and examine frozen tissue samples routinely as a standard research method. Cryotome-cut slice of frozen-hydrated biological sample is mounted between two thin foils and positioned on the sample holder. The temperature of the cold stage in the measuring chamber is kept below 130 K throughout the insertion of the samples and the proton beam exposure. Matrix composition of frozen-hydrated tissue is consisted mostly of ice. Sample deterioration during proton beam exposure is monitored during the experiment, as both Elastic Backscattering Spectrometry (EBS) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) in on-off axis geometry are recorded together with the events in two PIXE detectors and backscattered ions from the chopper in a single list-mode file. The aim of this experiment was to determine differences and similarities between two kinds of biological sample preparation techniques for micro-PIXE analysis, namely freeze-drying and frozen-hydrated sample preparation in order to evaluate the improvements in the elemental localisation of the latter technique if any. In the presented work, a standard micro-PIXE configuration for tissue mapping at JSI was used with five detection systems operating in parallel, with proton beam cross section of 1.0 × 1.0 μm2 and a beam current of 100 pA. The comparison of the resulting elemental distributions measured at the biological tissue prepared in the frozen-hydrated and in the freeze-dried state revealed differences in elemental distribution of particular elements at the cellular level due to the morphology alteration in particular tissue compartments induced either by water removal in the lyophilisation process or by unsatisfactory preparation of samples for cutting and mounting during the shock-freezing phase of sample preparation.

  3. Elemental distribution and sample integrity comparison of freeze-dried and frozen-hydrated biological tissue samples with nuclear microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vavpetič, P., E-mail: primoz.vavpetic@ijs.si [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Vogel-Mikuš, K. [Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, University of Ljubljana, Jamnikarjeva 101, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jeromel, L. [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Ogrinc Potočnik, N. [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); FOM-Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pongrac, P. [Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, University of Ljubljana, Jamnikarjeva 101, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Department of Plant Physiology, University of Bayreuth, Universitätstr. 30, 95447 Bayreuth (Germany); Drobne, D.; Pipan Tkalec, Ž.; Novak, S.; Kos, M.; Koren, Š.; Regvar, M. [Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, University of Ljubljana, Jamnikarjeva 101, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Pelicon, P. [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2015-04-01

    The analysis of biological samples in frozen-hydrated state with micro-PIXE technique at Jožef Stefan Institute (JSI) nuclear microprobe has matured to a point that enables us to measure and examine frozen tissue samples routinely as a standard research method. Cryotome-cut slice of frozen-hydrated biological sample is mounted between two thin foils and positioned on the sample holder. The temperature of the cold stage in the measuring chamber is kept below 130 K throughout the insertion of the samples and the proton beam exposure. Matrix composition of frozen-hydrated tissue is consisted mostly of ice. Sample deterioration during proton beam exposure is monitored during the experiment, as both Elastic Backscattering Spectrometry (EBS) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) in on–off axis geometry are recorded together with the events in two PIXE detectors and backscattered ions from the chopper in a single list-mode file. The aim of this experiment was to determine differences and similarities between two kinds of biological sample preparation techniques for micro-PIXE analysis, namely freeze-drying and frozen-hydrated sample preparation in order to evaluate the improvements in the elemental localisation of the latter technique if any. In the presented work, a standard micro-PIXE configuration for tissue mapping at JSI was used with five detection systems operating in parallel, with proton beam cross section of 1.0 × 1.0 μm{sup 2} and a beam current of 100 pA. The comparison of the resulting elemental distributions measured at the biological tissue prepared in the frozen-hydrated and in the freeze-dried state revealed differences in elemental distribution of particular elements at the cellular level due to the morphology alteration in particular tissue compartments induced either by water removal in the lyophilisation process or by unsatisfactory preparation of samples for cutting and mounting during the shock-freezing phase of sample preparation.

  4. Optimization of labeling conditions of n-isopropyl-p-iodoamphetamine chloridate (IMP) with radioiodine. Biological distribution studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of this work was based on a great interest from the medical community in the utilization of N-isopropyl-p-iodoamphetamine chloridate (IMP) labeled with 123l, for brain perfusion evaluation. The IMP was initially characterized by: Melting Point (MP), Infrared Spectrophotometry (IR), Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometry (NMR), Elemental Analysis and High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). After having chosen the ideal method (nucleophilic substitution) to label IMP with that used Cu(I) as reducing agent and ascorbic acid as catalyzing of Cu(II), studies were performed to optimize the labeling parameters of 123l-IMP: temperature reaction, time reaction, ascorbic acid mass, pH and molar ratio, and stability of the final product. The quality control method (ascending paper chromatographic) used to determine the radiochemistry purity showed to be efficient, fast and of easily handling for routine production. Biological distribution studies were performed with laboratory animals (mice) to determine the percent administered dose in the blood, different organs and whole body after intravenous administration of the radiopharmaceutical. Toxicological evaluation and in vitro study to determine the plasmatic protein binding were also done. The data of the biological distribution in mice have shown that the product crossed the intact blood brain barrier, for a enough time to obtain brain scintigraphic image, thus, allowing a follow up of further studies after the intravenous administration of the radiopharmaceutical. The 123l-IMP showed a blood clearance and then the principal elimination route was the urinary. The kinetic study of 123l-IMP, submitting blood samples data to BIEXP.BAS program, showed a biexponential pattern which allowed demonstrating that the compound presents a first phase of quick distribution and a second one slower corresponding to the equilibrium and elimination. Based on the results from radiochemical purity, stability and

  5. Sources of uncertainty in the quantification of genetically modified oilseed rape contamination in seed lots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begg, Graham S; Cullen, Danny W; Iannetta, Pietro P M; Squire, Geoff R

    2007-02-01

    Testing of seed and grain lots is essential in the enforcement of GM labelling legislation and needs reliable procedures for which associated errors have been identified and minimised. In this paper we consider the testing of oilseed rape seed lots obtained from the harvest of a non-GM crop known to be contaminated by volunteer plants from a GM herbicide tolerant variety. The objective was to identify and quantify the error associated with the testing of these lots from the initial sampling to completion of the real-time PCR assay with which the level of GM contamination was quantified. The results showed that, under the controlled conditions of a single laboratory, the error associated with the real-time PCR assay to be negligible in comparison with sampling error, which was exacerbated by heterogeneity in the distribution of GM seeds, most notably at a small scale, i.e. 25 cm3. Sampling error was reduced by one to two thirds on the application of appropriate homogenisation procedures. PMID:17106767

  6. Biological half-life and distribution of radiocesium in a contaminated population of green treefrogs Hyla cinerea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiocesium content of adult male green treefrogs Hyla cinerea from a contaminated habitat is adequately described by a log normal distribution with mean 2.277 log10 pCi g-1 dry wt (189.2 pCi g-1) and variance of 0.031. There was significant negative correlation of body burden with body length and weight (p 2 = 0.10). Biological half-life of radiocesium in unfed, captive frogs held at 20 deg - 30 deg C averaged 30.1 d. (author)

  7. Evaluation of biological stability and corrosion potential in drinking water distribution systems: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, C C; Kao, C M; Chen, C W; Dong, C D; Chien, H Y

    2009-06-01

    The appearance of assimilable organic carbon (AOC), microbial regrowth, disinfection by-products (DBPs), and pipe corrosion in drinking water distribution systems are among those major safe drinking water issues in many countries. The water distribution system of Cheng-Ching Lake Water Treatment Plant (CCLWTP) was selected in this study to evaluate the: (1) fate and transport of AOC, DBPs [e.g., trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids (HAAs)], and other organic carbon indicators in the selected distribution system, (2) correlations between AOC (or DBPs) and major water quality parameters [e.g. dissolved oxygen (DO), free residual chlorine, and bacteria, and (3) causes and significance of corrosion problems of the water pipes in this system. In this study, seasonal water samples were collected from 13 representative locations in the distribution system for analyses of AOC, DBPs, and other water quality indicators. Results indicate that residual free chlorine concentrations in the distribution system met the drinking water standards (0.2 to 1 mg l(-1)) established by Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration (TEPA). Results show that AOC measurements correlated positively with total organic carbon (TOC) and UV-254 (an organic indicator) values in this system. Moreover, AOC concentrations at some locations were higher than the 50 microg acetate-C l(-1) standard established by Taiwan Water Company. This indicates that the microbial regrowth might be a potential water quality problem in this system. Higher DO measurements (>5.7 mg l(-1)) might cause the aerobic biodegradation of THMs and HAAs in the system, and thus, low THMs (sampling locations. Results from the observed negative Langelier Saturation Index (LSI) values, higher Ryznar Stability Index (RSI) values, and high Fe3+ concentrations at some pipe-end locations indicate that highly oxidative and corrosive conditions occurred. This reveals that pipe replacement should be considered at these locations. These

  8. Biology of Myliobatis goodei (Springer, 1939), a widely distributed eagle ray, caught in northern Patagonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Juan Manuel; Lopez Cazorla, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Chondrichthyans play an important role in structuring marine communities. Myliobatis goodie is an eagle ray reported from South Carolina in the USA (35°N) to Santa Cuz, Argentina (44°S), however little is known about this species, which is considered data deficient by the IUCN. In order to create adequate management strategies for this species, biological information is sorely needed. The objective of this study was to describe the biology of the population of M. goodei and its relationships with season, sex and the geographic features of Anegada Bay, Argentina (from 39.96°S to 40.60°S and from 62.10°W to 62.46°W) in 2008. Specifically, the population structure of M. goodie was studied by sex, seasons and sites, its food habits by seasons and sites, and the reproductive biology by seasons and sex. The results show that M. goodei exhibits seasonal migrations. Young-of-the-year remain in the bay all year long, while adults enter during spring and summer. Juveniles in spring are likely to become first-time mating individuals that migrate into open sea at the end of summer. These individuals would return to give birth for the first time and mate for the second time during the next year at summer. Anegada Bay would then be a mating and nursery area for the species. M. goodei behave as a generalist feeder with a uniform diet composed mainly of bivalves. Seasonal differences in the diet found arise from differences in prey diversity between summer and spring. Spatial differences, however, arise from the different abundances of caprellids and bivalves. Trophic level was 3.2 and it constitutes the first reference for this species, characterizing it as a secondary consumer.

  9. Mapping molecular orientational distributions for biological sample in 3D (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    HE, Wei; Ferrand, Patrick; Richter, Benjamin; Bastmeyer, Martin; Brasselet, Sophie

    2016-04-01

    Measuring molecular orientation properties is very appealing for scientists in molecular and cell biology, as well as biomedical research. Orientational organization at the molecular scale is indeed an important brick to cells and tissues morphology, mechanics, functions and pathologies. Recent work has shown that polarized fluorescence imaging, based on excitation polarization tuning in the sample plane, is able to probe molecular orientational order in biological samples; however this applies only to information in 2D, projected in the sample plane. To surpass this limitation, we extended this approach to excitation polarization tuning in 3D. The principle is based on the decomposition of any arbitrary 3D linear excitation in a polarization along the longitudinal z-axis, and a polarization in the transverse xy-sample plane. We designed an interferometer with one arm generating radial polarization light (thus producing longitudinal polarization under high numerical aperture focusing), the other arm controlling a linear polarization in the transverse plane. The amplitude ratio between the two arms can vary so as to get any linear polarized excitation in 3D at the focus of a high NA objective. This technique has been characterized by polarimetry imaging at the back focal plane of the focusing objective, and modeled theoretically. 3D polarized fluorescence microscopy is demonstrated on actin stress fibers in non-flat cells suspended on synthetic polymer structures forming supporting pillars, for which heterogeneous actin orientational order could be identified. This technique shows a great potential in structural investigations in 3D biological systems, such as cell spheroids and tissues.

  10. Note---A Note on the Dynamic Lot-Size Model with Uncertainty in Demand and Supply Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, E. J.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper we give some extensions of a result of Nevison and Burstein (Nevison, C. H., M. Burstein. 1984. The dynamic lot-size model with stochastic lead times. Management Sci. 30 100--109.), who discuss a dynamic lot-sizing model with stochastic lead times. They consider a situation in which the lead time distribution is unaltered by the amount which is ordered, but is otherwise arbitrary, and characterize the optimal solution in terms of points at which there is zero inventory. Here we ...

  11. Analysis of Innovative and Modern Technology of Parking Lots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Damidavičius

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Management of urban communication systems and ensuring of residents demands are the main tasks of the sustainable city development. One of the most important areas that forms better urban image is sustainable mobility development. It has influence on social, economical viability and environmental quality. Nowadays, intensive rhythm of life and increasing transport demands, usage of cars become a significant problem which regards the air and noise pollution and lack of parking spaces. Due to the daily impossibility of residents to find vacant parking spaces influence unproper usage of public spaces, streets, pedestrian and bicycle paths, children backgrounds, green areas and other territories. This report provides an overview of concepts of parking lots and their technology, and property usage in city center, middle zones, suburban territories and as well an analysis of the evolution of parking spaces. The report presents modern and innovative concepts of parking lots, which improves quality of communication and life in city and improves architectural environment.

  12. LOT-G3: Plasma Lamp, Ozonator and CW transmitter

    CERN Document Server

    Gobato, Ricardo; Gobato, Alekssander

    2015-01-01

    The LOT-G3 is designed to be a versatile equipment that perform several simple experiments for use in helping the physics classes for high school. Easy construction, low cost, using easily accessible materials. Its construction involves simple practices and knowledge of electromagnetism. It has the function of a plasma globe to demonstrate the ionization of a low pressure gas, as well as the formation of magnetic field. Can be used as sanitizer closed environments such as automotive vehicles in ozonator function, demonstrating the ionization of oxygen in the atmosphere, producing ozone, essential to life on earth. And as a sparks transmitter, low power, low frequency modulated continuous wave in (CW), for signals in Morse code. Therefore the equipment here called LOT-G3, has three functions: a plasma lamp, ozonator and CW transmitter.

  13. A RELATIVE BENEFIT ALGORITHM FOR BASIC ECONOMIC LOT SIZE PROBLEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马辉民; 张子刚; 周少甫; 黄卫来

    2001-01-01

    The paper develops an algorithm that solves economic lot size problem in O(n2) time in the Wagner-Whitin case. The algorithm is based on the standard dynamic programming approach which requires the computation of the maximal relative benefit for some possible subplans of the production plan. In this algorithm the authors have studied the forward property and decomposition properties which can make computation easy. The proposed algorithm appears to perform quite reasonably for practical application.

  14. A JOINT PRICING, LOT-SIZING AND SUPPLIER SELECTION MODEL

    OpenAIRE

    Rezaei, Jafar; Davoodi, Mansoor

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In this paper, we integrate the three strategies that are important to most firms, namely pricing, lot-sizing and supplier selection. Combining the three objectives of total profit, inconsistency and deficiency with a set of constraints, we formulate this integrated problem as a multi-objective non-linear programming model, proposing a genetic algorithm (NSGA-II) that provides decision-makers with a number of Pareto-optimal solutions, one of which can be selected on the ba...

  15. Make 'em Laugh (& They'll Learn a Lot More)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Done, Phillip

    2006-01-01

    Learning and laughter go hand in hand. Teachers certainly do not need to be stand-up comedians and spew out one-liners or dress up like clowns to make their classes fun. A little comedy can bring a lot of joy and learning opportunities to the classroom. In this article, the author shares several strategies on how teachers can put in laughter into…

  16. Features of thermal adsorption spectroscopy to find the size distribution of biological polymers and their fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work deals with the determination of various biopolymer fragments' distribution (DNA and proteins) by their size on the basis of thermal adsorption technique. New features of thermal adsorption spectroscopy with the determination of the length of the DNA fragments and proteins, also analysis of the role of buffer solution in the thermal desorption of biopolymer fragments have been found. (authors)

  17. Roughhead grenadier (Macrourus berglax) in the waters off East Greenland: Distribution and biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fossen, Inge; Jørgensen, Ole A; Gundersen, Agnes C.

    2003-01-01

    surveys and between 800 and 1 200 m in the trawl surveys. In both types of surveys the length distributions were dominated by a modal peak around 20 cm (PAF). Sex ratio changed with depth and length of 50% maturity (L50) was estimated to be at 16 and 29.5 cm for males and females, respectively. Estimate...

  18. COAP BASED ACUTE PARKING LOT MONITORING SYSTEM USING SENSOR NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Aarthi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Vehicle parking is the act of temporarily maneuvering a vehicle in to a certain location. To deal with parking monitoring system issue such as traffic, this paper proposes a vision of improvements in monitoring the vehicles in parking lots based on sensor networks. Most of the existing paper deals with that of the automated parking which is of cluster based and each has its own overheads like high power, less energy efficiency, incompatible size of lots, space. The novel idea in this work is usage of CoAP (Constrained Application Protocol which is recently created by IETF (draft-ietf-core-coap-18, June 28, 2013, CoRE group to develop RESTful application layer protocol for communications within embedded wireless networks. This paper deals with the enhanced CoAP protocol using multi hop flat topology, which makes the acuters feel soothe towards parking vehicles. We aim to minimize the time consumed for finding free parking lot as well as increase the energy efficiency

  19. New water-soluble ruthenium(II) cytotoxic complex: biological activity and cellular distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Tânia S; Santos, Filipa C; Jorge, Tiago F; Côrte-Real, Leonor; Madeira, Paulo J Amorim; Marques, Fernanda; Robalo, M Paula; Matos, António; Santos, Isabel; Garcia, M Helena

    2014-01-01

    A novel water soluble organometallic compound, [RuCp(mTPPMSNa)(2,2'-bipy)][CF3SO3] (TM85, where Cp=η(5)-cyclopentadienyl, mTPPMS=diphenylphosphane-benzene-3-sulfonate and 2,2'-bipy=2,2'-bipyridine) is presented herein. Studies of interactions with relevant proteins were performed to understand the behavior and mode of action of this complex in the biological environment. Electrochemical and fluorescence studies showed that TM85 strongly binds to albumin. Studies carried out to study the formation of TM85 which adducts with ubiquitin and cytochrome c were performed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Antitumor activity was evaluated against a variety of human cancer cell lines, namely A2780, A2780cisR, MCF7, MDAMB231, HT29, PC3 and V79 non-tumorigenic cells and compared with the reference drug cisplatin. TM85 cytotoxic effect was reduced in the presence of endocytosis modulators at low temperatures, suggesting an energy-dependent mechanism consistent with endocytosis. Ultrastructural analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that TM85 targets the endomembranar system disrupting the Golgi and also affects the mitochondria. Disruption of plasma membrane observed by flow cytometry could lead to cellular damage and cell death. On the whole, the biological activity evaluated herein combined with the water solubility property suggests that complex TM85 could be a promising anticancer agent. PMID:24145065

  20. 50 CFR 260.61 - Sampling plans and procedures for determining lot compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... shall be selected from each lot in the exact number of sample units indicated for the lot size in the... requirements) in the sample does not exceed the acceptance number prescribed for the sample size the lot meets...) in the sample exceeds the acceptance number prescribed for the sample size the lot fails...

  1. The biological half life and distribution of 125Iodide and radioiodinated protein in the imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioisotope 125Iodide, a gamma emittor, was used in two different forms, as 125I mixed with egg yolk and as 125I covalently attached to egg albumin and mixed with egg yolk, to study food flow in the imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren. The biological half life of 125I-albumin in egg yolk powder was determined to be 96 hr in isolated workers, 108 hr in individuals held with small groups of unlabelled workers, and 1,008 hr in workers held in colonies exposed to labelled food for 48 hr. In contrast, the biological half life of free 125I mixed with egg yolk powder was 22 hr, 20 hr, and 40 hr, respectively. The internal distribution of radioactivity was checked after 24, 48, and 380 hr. There was a significant difference in distribution of 125I in ants fed either free 125I or 125I-albumin. Most of the free 125I was rapidly excreted. A high percentage of 125I-albumin was assimilated, apparently through protein digestion pathways with eventual storage in or below the cuticle. There was no evidence of gland involvement in food flow to either larvae or queens with the radio-iodinated protein. (orig.)

  2. Stochastic Reorder Point-Lot Size (r,Q) Inventory Model under Maximum Entropy Principle

    OpenAIRE

    Davide Castellano

    2015-01-01

    This paper takes into account the continuous-review reorder point-lot size (r,Q) inventory model under stochastic demand, with the backorders-lost sales mixture. Moreover, to reflect the practical circumstance in which full information about the demand distribution lacks, we assume that only an estimate of the mean and of the variance is available. Contrarily to the typical approach in which the lead-time demand is supposed Gaussian or is obtained according to the so-called minimax procedure,...

  3. Population biology of multispecies helminth infection: interspecific interactions and parasite distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Bottomley, C.; Isham, V.; Basanez, M. G.

    2005-01-01

    Despite evidence for the existence of interspecific interactions between helminth species, there has been no theoretical exploration of their effect on the distribution of the parasite species in a host population. We use a deterministic model for the accumulation and loss of adult worms of 2 interacting helminth species to motivate an individual-based stochastic model. The mean worm burden and variance: mean ratio (VMR) of each species, and the correlation between the two species are used to...

  4. Biological and Chemical Renovation of Wastewater with a Soil Infiltrator Low-Pressure Distribution System

    OpenAIRE

    DiPaola, Tracey Stickley

    1998-01-01

    An alternative on-site wastewater treatment and disposal system (OSWTDS) consisting of a soil infiltrator with low pressure distribution was evaluated in a soil that was unsuitable for a conventional OSWTDS under current Commonwealth of Virginia Sewage Handling and Disposal Regulations, due to a shallow seasonally perched water table and low hydraulic conductivity. The absorption field consisted of two subsystems numbered as 1 and 2 with effluent design loading rates of 5.1 and 10.2 Lpd/m2, ...

  5. Legume Diversity Patterns in West Central Africa: Influence of Species Biology on Distribution Models

    OpenAIRE

    Manuel de la Estrella; Mateo, Rubén G.; Wieringa, Jan J.; Barbara Mackinder; Jesús Muñoz

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Species Distribution Models (SDMs) are used to produce predictions of potential Leguminosae diversity in West Central Africa. Those predictions are evaluated subsequently using expert opinion. The established methodology of combining all SDMs is refined to assess species diversity within five defined vegetation types. Potential species diversity is thus predicted for each vegetation type respectively. The primary aim of the new methodology is to define, in more detail, areas of sp...

  6. New genetic loci link adipose and insulin biology to body fat distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strawbridge, Rona J; Pers, Tune H; Fischer, Krista; Justice, Anne E; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Wu, Joseph M.W.; Buchkovich, Martin L; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Roman, Tamara S; Drong, Alexander W; Song, Ci; Gustafsson, Stefan; Day, Felix R; Esko, Tonu; Fall, Tove; Kutalik, Zoltán; Luan, Jian’an; Randall, Joshua C; Scherag, André; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wood, Andrew R; Chen, Jin; Fehrmann, Rudolf; Karjalainen, Juha; Kahali, Bratati; Liu, Ching-Ti; Schmidt, Ellen M; Absher, Devin; Amin, Najaf; Anderson, Denise; Beekman, Marian; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Buyske, Steven; Demirkan, Ayse; Ehret, Georg B; Feitosa, Mary F; Goel, Anuj; Jackson, Anne U; Johnson, Toby; Kleber, Marcus E; Kristiansson, Kati; Mangino, Massimo; Leach, Irene Mateo; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Palmer, Cameron D; Pasko, Dorota; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Peters, Marjolein J; Prokopenko, Inga; Stančáková, Alena; Sung, Yun Ju; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teumer, Alexander; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Yengo, Loïc; Zhang, Weihua; Albrecht, Eva; Ärnlöv, Johan; Arscott, Gillian M; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barrett, Amy; Bellis, Claire; Bennett, Amanda J; Berne, Christian; Blüher, Matthias; Böhringer, Stefan; Bonnet, Fabrice; Böttcher, Yvonne; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Carba, Delia B; Caspersen, Ida H; Clarke, Robert; Daw, E Warwick; Deelen, Joris; Deelman, Ewa; Delgado, Graciela; Doney, Alex SF; Eklund, Niina; Erdos, Michael R; Estrada, Karol; Eury, Elodie; Friedrich, Nele; Garcia, Melissa E; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Gigante, Bruna; Go, Alan S; Golay, Alain; Grallert, Harald; Grammer, Tanja B; Gräßler, Jürgen; Grewal, Jagvir; Groves, Christopher J; Haller, Toomas; Hallmans, Goran; Hartman, Catharina A; Hassinen, Maija; Hayward, Caroline; Heikkilä, Kauko; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Helmer, Quinta; Hillege, Hans L; Holmen, Oddgeir; Hunt, Steven C; Isaacs, Aaron; Ittermann, Till; James, Alan L; Johansson, Ingegerd; Juliusdottir, Thorhildur; Kalafati, Ioanna-Panagiota; Kinnunen, Leena; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kooner, Ishminder K; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Lamina, Claudia; Leander, Karin; Lee, Nanette R; Lichtner, Peter; Lind, Lars; Lindström, Jaana; Lobbens, Stéphane; Lorentzon, Mattias; Mach, François; Magnusson, Patrik KE; Mahajan, Anubha; McArdle, Wendy L; Menni, Cristina; Merger, Sigrun; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Mills, Rebecca; Moayyeri, Alireza; Monda, Keri L; Mooijaart, Simon P; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Mulas, Antonella; Müller, Gabriele; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Nalls, Michael A; Narisu, Narisu; Glorioso, Nicola; Nolte, Ilja M; Olden, Matthias; Rayner, Nigel W; Renstrom, Frida; Ried, Janina S; Robertson, Neil R; Rose, Lynda M; Sanna, Serena; Scharnagl, Hubert; Scholtens, Salome; Sennblad, Bengt; Seufferlein, Thomas; Sitlani, Colleen M; Smith, Albert Vernon; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stringham, Heather M; Sundström, Johan; Swertz, Morris A; Swift, Amy J; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Tayo, Bamidele O; Thorand, Barbara; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tomaschitz, Andreas; Troffa, Chiara; van Oort, Floor VA; Verweij, Niek; Vonk, Judith M; Waite, Lindsay L; Wennauer, Roman; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wojczynski, Mary K; Wong, Andrew; Zhang, Qunyuan; Zhao, Jing Hua; Brennan, Eoin P.; Choi, Murim; Eriksson, Per; Folkersen, Lasse; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Gharavi, Ali G; Hedman, Åsa K; Hivert, Marie-France; Huang, Jinyan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Karpe, Fredrik; Keildson, Sarah; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Liang, Liming; Lifton, Richard P; Ma, Baoshan; McKnight, Amy J; McPherson, Ruth; Metspalu, Andres; Min, Josine L; Moffatt, Miriam F; Montgomery, Grant W; Murabito, Joanne M; Nicholson, George; Nyholt, Dale R; Olsson, Christian; Perry, John RB; Reinmaa, Eva; Salem, Rany M; Sandholm, Niina; Schadt, Eric E; Scott, Robert A; Stolk, Lisette; Vallejo, Edgar E.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Zondervan, Krina T; Amouyel, Philippe; Arveiler, Dominique; Bakker, Stephan JL; Beilby, John; Bergman, Richard N; Blangero, John; Brown, Morris J; Burnier, Michel; Campbell, Harry; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chines, Peter S; Claudi-Boehm, Simone; Collins, Francis S; Crawford, Dana C; Danesh, John; de Faire, Ulf; de Geus, Eco JC; Dörr, Marcus; Erbel, Raimund; Eriksson, Johan G; Farrall, Martin; Ferrannini, Ele; Ferrières, Jean; Forouhi, Nita G; Forrester, Terrence; Franco, Oscar H; Gansevoort, Ron T; Gieger, Christian; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Haiman, Christopher A; Harris, Tamara B; Hattersley, Andrew T; Heliövaara, Markku; Hicks, Andrew A; Hingorani, Aroon D; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Humphries, Steve E; Hyppönen, Elina; Illig, Thomas; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Johansen, Berit; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti M; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kee, Frank; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kooperberg, Charles; Kovacs, Peter; Kraja, Aldi T; Kumari, Meena; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Kuusisto, Johanna; Lakka, Timo A; Langenberg, Claudia; Le Marchand, Loic; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Männistö, Satu; Marette, André; Matise, Tara C; McKenzie, Colin A; McKnight, Barbara; Musk, Arthur W; Möhlenkamp, Stefan; Morris, Andrew D; Nelis, Mari; Ohlsson, Claes; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Ong, Ken K; Palmer, Lyle J; Penninx, Brenda W; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Raitakari, Olli T; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rao, DC; Rice, Treva K; Ridker, Paul M; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J; Saramies, Jouko; Sarzynski, Mark A; Schwarz, Peter EH; Shuldiner, Alan R; Staessen, Jan A; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stolk, Ronald P; Strauch, Konstantin; Tönjes, Anke; Tremblay, Angelo; Tremoli, Elena; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Völker, Uwe; Vollenweider, Peter; Wilson, James F; Witteman, Jacqueline C; Adair, Linda S; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O; Bornstein, Stefan R; Bouchard, Claude; Cauchi, Stéphane; Caulfield, Mark J; Chambers, John C; Chasman, Daniel I; Cooper, Richard S; Dedoussis, George; Ferrucci, Luigi; Froguel, Philippe; Grabe, Hans-Jörgen; Hamsten, Anders; Hui, Jennie; Hveem, Kristian; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kivimaki, Mika; Kuh, Diana; Laakso, Markku; Liu, Yongmei; März, Winfried; Munroe, Patricia B; Njølstad, Inger; Oostra, Ben A; Palmer, Colin NA; Pedersen, Nancy L; Perola, Markus; Pérusse, Louis; Peters, Ulrike; Power, Chris; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Saaristo, Timo E; Saleheen, Danish; Sinisalo, Juha; Slagboom, P Eline; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Tim D; Stefansson, Kari; Stumvoll, Michael; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, André G; Uusitupa, Matti; van der Harst, Pim; Veronesi, Giovanni; Walker, Mark; Wareham, Nicholas J; Watkins, Hugh; Wichmann, H-Erich; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Assimes, Themistocles L; Berndt, Sonja I; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B; Deloukas, Panos; Franke, Lude; Frayling, Timothy M; Groop, Leif C; Hunter, David J.; Kaplan, Robert C; O’Connell, Jeffrey R; Qi, Lu; Schlessinger, David; Strachan, David P; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Willer, Cristen J; Visscher, Peter M; Yang, Jian; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Zillikens, M Carola; McCarthy, Mark I; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; North, Kari E; Fox, Caroline S; Barroso, Inês; Franks, Paul W; Ingelsson, Erik; Heid, Iris M; Loos, Ruth JF; Cupples, L Adrienne; Morris, Andrew P; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Mohlke, Karen L

    2014-01-01

    Body fat distribution is a heritable trait and a well-established predictor of adverse metabolic outcomes, independent of overall adiposity. To increase our understanding of the genetic basis of body fat distribution and its molecular links to cardiometabolic traits, we conducted genome-wide association meta-analyses of waist and hip circumference-related traits in up to 224,459 individuals. We identified 49 loci (33 new) associated with waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for body mass index (WHRadjBMI) and an additional 19 loci newly associated with related waist and hip circumference measures (P<5×10−8). Twenty of the 49 WHRadjBMI loci showed significant sexual dimorphism, 19 of which displayed a stronger effect in women. The identified loci were enriched for genes expressed in adipose tissue and for putative regulatory elements in adipocytes. Pathway analyses implicated adipogenesis, angiogenesis, transcriptional regulation, and insulin resistance as processes affecting fat distribution, providing insight into potential pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:25673412

  7. New genetic loci link adipose and insulin biology to body fat distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shungin, Dmitry; Winkler, Thomas W; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C; Ferreira, Teresa; Locke, Adam E; Mägi, Reedik; Strawbridge, Rona J; Pers, Tune H; Fischer, Krista; Justice, Anne E; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Wu, Joseph M W; Buchkovich, Martin L; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Roman, Tamara S; Drong, Alexander W; Song, Ci; Gustafsson, Stefan; Day, Felix R; Esko, Tonu; Fall, Tove; Kutalik, Zoltán; Luan, Jian'an; Randall, Joshua C; Scherag, André; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wood, Andrew R; Chen, Jin; Fehrmann, Rudolf; Karjalainen, Juha; Kahali, Bratati; Liu, Ching-Ti; Schmidt, Ellen M; Absher, Devin; Amin, Najaf; Anderson, Denise; Beekman, Marian; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Buyske, Steven; Demirkan, Ayse; Ehret, Georg B; Feitosa, Mary F; Goel, Anuj; Jackson, Anne U; Johnson, Toby; Kleber, Marcus E; Kristiansson, Kati; Mangino, Massimo; Mateo Leach, Irene; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Palmer, Cameron D; Pasko, Dorota; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Peters, Marjolein J; Prokopenko, Inga; Stančáková, Alena; Ju Sung, Yun; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teumer, Alexander; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Yengo, Loïc; Zhang, Weihua; Albrecht, Eva; Ärnlöv, Johan; Arscott, Gillian M; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barrett, Amy; Bellis, Claire; Bennett, Amanda J; Berne, Christian; Blüher, Matthias; Böhringer, Stefan; Bonnet, Fabrice; Böttcher, Yvonne; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Carba, Delia B; Caspersen, Ida H; Clarke, Robert; Daw, E Warwick; Deelen, Joris; Deelman, Ewa; Delgado, Graciela; Doney, Alex S F; Eklund, Niina; Erdos, Michael R; Estrada, Karol; Eury, Elodie; Friedrich, Nele; Garcia, Melissa E; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Gigante, Bruna; Go, Alan S; Golay, Alain; Grallert, Harald; Grammer, Tanja B; Gräßler, Jürgen; Grewal, Jagvir; Groves, Christopher J; Haller, Toomas; Hallmans, Goran; Hartman, Catharina A; Hassinen, Maija; Hayward, Caroline; Heikkilä, Kauko; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Helmer, Quinta; Hillege, Hans L; Holmen, Oddgeir; Hunt, Steven C; Isaacs, Aaron; Ittermann, Till; James, Alan L; Johansson, Ingegerd; Juliusdottir, Thorhildur; Kalafati, Ioanna-Panagiota; Kinnunen, Leena; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kooner, Ishminder K; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Lamina, Claudia; Leander, Karin; Lee, Nanette R; Lichtner, Peter; Lind, Lars; Lindström, Jaana; Lobbens, Stéphane; Lorentzon, Mattias; Mach, François; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Mahajan, Anubha; McArdle, Wendy L; Menni, Cristina; Merger, Sigrun; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Mills, Rebecca; Moayyeri, Alireza; Monda, Keri L; Mooijaart, Simon P; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Mulas, Antonella; Müller, Gabriele; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Nalls, Michael A; Narisu, Narisu; Glorioso, Nicola; Nolte, Ilja M; Olden, Matthias; Rayner, Nigel W; Renstrom, Frida; Ried, Janina S; Robertson, Neil R; Rose, Lynda M; Sanna, Serena; Scharnagl, Hubert; Scholtens, Salome; Sennblad, Bengt; Seufferlein, Thomas; Sitlani, Colleen M; Vernon Smith, Albert; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stringham, Heather M; Sundström, Johan; Swertz, Morris A; Swift, Amy J; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Tayo, Bamidele O; Thorand, Barbara; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tomaschitz, Andreas; Troffa, Chiara; van Oort, Floor V A; Verweij, Niek; Vonk, Judith M; Waite, Lindsay L; Wennauer, Roman; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wojczynski, Mary K; Wong, Andrew; Zhang, Qunyuan; Hua Zhao, Jing; Brennan, Eoin P; Choi, Murim; Eriksson, Per; Folkersen, Lasse; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Gharavi, Ali G; Hedman, Åsa K; Hivert, Marie-France; Huang, Jinyan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Karpe, Fredrik; Keildson, Sarah; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Liang, Liming; Lifton, Richard P; Ma, Baoshan; McKnight, Amy J; McPherson, Ruth; Metspalu, Andres; Min, Josine L; Moffatt, Miriam F; Montgomery, Grant W; Murabito, Joanne M; Nicholson, George; Nyholt, Dale R; Olsson, Christian; Perry, John R B; Reinmaa, Eva; Salem, Rany M; Sandholm, Niina; Schadt, Eric E; Scott, Robert A; Stolk, Lisette; Vallejo, Edgar E; Westra, Harm-Jan; Zondervan, Krina T; Amouyel, Philippe; Arveiler, Dominique; Bakker, Stephan J L; Beilby, John; Bergman, Richard N; Blangero, John; Brown, Morris J; Burnier, Michel; Campbell, Harry; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chines, Peter S; Claudi-Boehm, Simone; Collins, Francis S; Crawford, Dana C; Danesh, John; de Faire, Ulf; de Geus, Eco J C; Dörr, Marcus; Erbel, Raimund; Eriksson, Johan G; Farrall, Martin; Ferrannini, Ele; Ferrières, Jean; Forouhi, Nita G; Forrester, Terrence; Franco, Oscar H; Gansevoort, Ron T; Gieger, Christian; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Haiman, Christopher A; Harris, Tamara B; Hattersley, Andrew T; Heliövaara, Markku; Hicks, Andrew A; Hingorani, Aroon D; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Humphries, Steve E; Hyppönen, Elina; Illig, Thomas; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Johansen, Berit; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti M; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kee, Frank; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kooperberg, Charles; Kovacs, Peter; Kraja, Aldi T; Kumari, Meena; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Kuusisto, Johanna; Lakka, Timo A; Langenberg, Claudia; Le Marchand, Loic; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Männistö, Satu; Marette, André; Matise, Tara C; McKenzie, Colin A; McKnight, Barbara; Musk, Arthur W; Möhlenkamp, Stefan; Morris, Andrew D; Nelis, Mari; Ohlsson, Claes; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Ong, Ken K; Palmer, Lyle J; Penninx, Brenda W; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Raitakari, Olli T; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rao, D C; Rice, Treva K; Ridker, Paul M; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J; Saramies, Jouko; Sarzynski, Mark A; Schwarz, Peter E H; Shuldiner, Alan R; Staessen, Jan A; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stolk, Ronald P; Strauch, Konstantin; Tönjes, Anke; Tremblay, Angelo; Tremoli, Elena; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Völker, Uwe; Vollenweider, Peter; Wilson, James F; Witteman, Jacqueline C; Adair, Linda S; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O; Bornstein, Stefan R; Bouchard, Claude; Cauchi, Stéphane; Caulfield, Mark J; Chambers, John C; Chasman, Daniel I; Cooper, Richard S; Dedoussis, George; Ferrucci, Luigi; Froguel, Philippe; Grabe, Hans-Jörgen; Hamsten, Anders; Hui, Jennie; Hveem, Kristian; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kivimaki, Mika; Kuh, Diana; Laakso, Markku; Liu, Yongmei; März, Winfried; Munroe, Patricia B; Njølstad, Inger; Oostra, Ben A; Palmer, Colin N A; Pedersen, Nancy L; Perola, Markus; Pérusse, Louis; Peters, Ulrike; Power, Chris; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Saaristo, Timo E; Saleheen, Danish; Sinisalo, Juha; Slagboom, P Eline; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Tim D; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stumvoll, Michael; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, André G; Uusitupa, Matti; van der Harst, Pim; Veronesi, Giovanni; Walker, Mark; Wareham, Nicholas J; Watkins, Hugh; Wichmann, H-Erich; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Assimes, Themistocles L; Berndt, Sonja I; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B; Deloukas, Panos; Franke, Lude; Frayling, Timothy M; Groop, Leif C; Hunter, David J; Kaplan, Robert C; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Qi, Lu; Schlessinger, David; Strachan, David P; Stefansson, Kari; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Willer, Cristen J; Visscher, Peter M; Yang, Jian; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Zillikens, M Carola; McCarthy, Mark I; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; North, Kari E; Fox, Caroline S; Barroso, Inês; Franks, Paul W; Ingelsson, Erik; Heid, Iris M; Loos, Ruth J F; Cupples, L Adrienne; Morris, Andrew P; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Mohlke, Karen L

    2015-02-12

    Body fat distribution is a heritable trait and a well-established predictor of adverse metabolic outcomes, independent of overall adiposity. To increase our understanding of the genetic basis of body fat distribution and its molecular links to cardiometabolic traits, here we conduct genome-wide association meta-analyses of traits related to waist and hip circumferences in up to 224,459 individuals. We identify 49 loci (33 new) associated with waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for body mass index (BMI), and an additional 19 loci newly associated with related waist and hip circumference measures (P < 5 × 10(-8)). In total, 20 of the 49 waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for BMI loci show significant sexual dimorphism, 19 of which display a stronger effect in women. The identified loci were enriched for genes expressed in adipose tissue and for putative regulatory elements in adipocytes. Pathway analyses implicated adipogenesis, angiogenesis, transcriptional regulation and insulin resistance as processes affecting fat distribution, providing insight into potential pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:25673412

  8. 3D Imaging of Nanoparticle Distribution in Biological Tissue by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez, Y.; Busser, B.; Trichard, F.; Kulesza, A.; Laurent, J. M.; Zaun, V.; Lux, F.; Benoit, J. M.; Panczer, G.; Dugourd, P.; Tillement, O.; Pelascini, F.; Sancey, L.; Motto-Ros, V.

    2016-07-01

    Nanomaterials represent a rapidly expanding area of research with huge potential for future medical applications. Nanotechnology indeed promises to revolutionize diagnostics, drug delivery, gene therapy, and many other areas of research. For any biological investigation involving nanomaterials, it is crucial to study the behavior of such nano-objects within tissues to evaluate both their efficacy and their toxicity. Here, we provide the first account of 3D label-free nanoparticle imaging at the entire-organ scale. The technology used is known as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and possesses several advantages such as speed of operation, ease of use and full compatibility with optical microscopy. We then used two different but complementary approaches to achieve 3D elemental imaging with LIBS: a volume reconstruction of a sliced organ and in-depth analysis. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the quantitative imaging of both endogenous and exogenous elements within entire organs and paves the way for innumerable applications.

  9. Implementation of Complex Biological Logic Circuits Using Spatially Distributed Multicellular Consortia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrios, Arturo; de Nadal, Eulàlia; Solé, Ricard; Posas, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    Engineered synthetic biological devices have been designed to perform a variety of functions from sensing molecules and bioremediation to energy production and biomedicine. Notwithstanding, a major limitation of in vivo circuit implementation is the constraint associated to the use of standard methodologies for circuit design. Thus, future success of these devices depends on obtaining circuits with scalable complexity and reusable parts. Here we show how to build complex computational devices using multicellular consortia and space as key computational elements. This spatial modular design grants scalability since its general architecture is independent of the circuit’s complexity, minimizes wiring requirements and allows component reusability with minimal genetic engineering. The potential use of this approach is demonstrated by implementation of complex logical functions with up to six inputs, thus demonstrating the scalability and flexibility of this method. The potential implications of our results are outlined. PMID:26829588

  10. Continuous Distributed Representation of Biological Sequences for Deep Proteomics and Genomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsaneddin Asgari

    Full Text Available We introduce a new representation and feature extraction method for biological sequences. Named bio-vectors (BioVec to refer to biological sequences in general with protein-vectors (ProtVec for proteins (amino-acid sequences and gene-vectors (GeneVec for gene sequences, this representation can be widely used in applications of deep learning in proteomics and genomics. In the present paper, we focus on protein-vectors that can be utilized in a wide array of bioinformatics investigations such as family classification, protein visualization, structure prediction, disordered protein identification, and protein-protein interaction prediction. In this method, we adopt artificial neural network approaches and represent a protein sequence with a single dense n-dimensional vector. To evaluate this method, we apply it in classification of 324,018 protein sequences obtained from Swiss-Prot belonging to 7,027 protein families, where an average family classification accuracy of 93%±0.06% is obtained, outperforming existing family classification methods. In addition, we use ProtVec representation to predict disordered proteins from structured proteins. Two databases of disordered sequences are used: the DisProt database as well as a database featuring the disordered regions of nucleoporins rich with phenylalanine-glycine repeats (FG-Nups. Using support vector machine classifiers, FG-Nup sequences are distinguished from structured protein sequences found in Protein Data Bank (PDB with a 99.8% accuracy, and unstructured DisProt sequences are differentiated from structured DisProt sequences with 100.0% accuracy. These results indicate that by only providing sequence data for various proteins into this model, accurate information about protein structure can be determined. Importantly, this model needs to be trained only once and can then be applied to extract a comprehensive set of information regarding proteins of interest. Moreover, this representation can be

  11. Distribution and Diversity of Organic and Biological Signatures in Soils From the Atacama Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Aditi

    2005-01-01

    The Atacama Desert is amongst the driest places on Earth. It is considered to be a suitable analog for the Martian surface in which to conduct studies of life and life detection. Soil samples were collected in June 2005 from the Atacama Desert and analyzed in the lab for amino acid content. HPLC was the primary tool used to analyze samples. The amino acids of interest are aspartic acid, serine, glutamic acid, glycine, and alanine. D and L isomers of each amino acid (except for glycine) were separated through HPLC. The purpose of this study is to find correlations between location of the sample collection sites and amino acid content as well as D/L isomer ratios in order to formulate theories of how different types of environments may affect the abundance and distribution of life forms. Initial analysis of data shows a general lack of or slight correlation between location and amino acid content. Some data appears to contradict the hypothesis that harsher environments would have lower amino acid content than less harsh environments. Further analysis of data is needed to come up with a more conclusive report of the distribution of amino acids in the Atacama Desert.

  12. Angiostrongylus cantonensis: a review of its distribution, molecular biology and clinical significance as a human pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barratt, Joel; Chan, Douglas; Sandaradura, Indy; Malik, Richard; Spielman, Derek; Lee, Rogan; Marriott, Deborah; Harkness, John; Ellis, John; Stark, Damien

    2016-08-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis is a metastrongyloid nematode found widely in the Asia-Pacific region, and the aetiological agent of angiostrongyliasis; a disease characterized by eosinophilic meningitis. Rattus rats are definitive hosts of A. cantonensis, while intermediate hosts include terrestrial and aquatic molluscs. Humans are dead-end hosts that usually become infected upon ingestion of infected molluscs. A presumptive diagnosis is often made based on clinical features, a history of mollusc consumption, eosinophilic pleocytosis in cerebral spinal fluid, and advanced imaging such as computed tomography. Serological tests are available for angiostrongyliasis, though many tests are still under development. While there is no treatment consensus, therapy often includes a combination of anthelmintics and corticosteroids. Angiostrongyliasis is relatively rare, but is often associated with morbidity and sometimes mortality. Recent reports suggest the parasites' range is increasing, leading to fatalities in regions previously considered Angiostrongylus-free, and sometimes, delayed diagnosis in newly invaded regions. Increased awareness of angiostrongyliasis would facilitate rapid diagnosis and improved clinical outcomes. This paper summarizes knowledge on the parasites' life cycle, clinical aspects and epidemiology. The molecular biology of Angiostrongylus spp. is also discussed. Attention is paid to the significance of angiostrongyliasis in Australia, given the recent severe cases reported from the Sydney region. PMID:27225800

  13. 3D Imaging of Nanoparticle Distribution in Biological Tissue by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez, Y.; Busser, B.; Trichard, F.; Kulesza, A.; Laurent, J. M.; Zaun, V.; Lux, F.; Benoit, J. M.; Panczer, G.; Dugourd, P.; Tillement, O.; Pelascini, F.; Sancey, L.; Motto-Ros, V.

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials represent a rapidly expanding area of research with huge potential for future medical applications. Nanotechnology indeed promises to revolutionize diagnostics, drug delivery, gene therapy, and many other areas of research. For any biological investigation involving nanomaterials, it is crucial to study the behavior of such nano-objects within tissues to evaluate both their efficacy and their toxicity. Here, we provide the first account of 3D label-free nanoparticle imaging at the entire-organ scale. The technology used is known as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and possesses several advantages such as speed of operation, ease of use and full compatibility with optical microscopy. We then used two different but complementary approaches to achieve 3D elemental imaging with LIBS: a volume reconstruction of a sliced organ and in-depth analysis. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the quantitative imaging of both endogenous and exogenous elements within entire organs and paves the way for innumerable applications. PMID:27435424

  14. Non-random distribution of homo-repeats: links with biological functions and human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanov, Michail Yu; Klus, Petr; Sokolovsky, Igor V; Tartaglia, Gian Gaetano; Galzitskaya, Oxana V

    2016-01-01

    The biological function of multiple repetitions of single amino acids, or homo-repeats, is largely unknown, but their occurrence in proteins has been associated with more than 20 hereditary diseases. Analysing 122 bacterial and eukaryotic genomes, we observed that the number of proteins containing homo-repeats is significantly larger than expected from theoretical estimates. Analysis of statistical significance indicates that the minimal size of homo-repeats varies with amino acid type and proteome. In an attempt to characterize proteins harbouring long homo-repeats, we found that those containing polar or small amino acids S, P, H, E, D, K, Q and N are enriched in structural disorder as well as protein- and RNA-interactions. We observed that E, S, Q, G, L, P, D, A and H homo-repeats are strongly linked with occurrence in human diseases. Moreover, S, E, P, A, Q, D and T homo-repeats are significantly enriched in neuronal proteins associated with autism and other disorders. We release a webserver for further exploration of homo-repeats occurrence in human pathology at http://bioinfo.protres.ru/hradis/. PMID:27256590

  15. Predicting potential global distributions of two Miscanthus grasses: implications for horticulture, biofuel production, and biological invasions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather A Hager

    Full Text Available In many regions, large proportions of the naturalized and invasive non-native floras were originally introduced deliberately by humans. Pest risk assessments are now used in many jurisdictions to regulate the importation of species and usually include an estimation of the potential distribution in the import area. Two species of Asian grass (Miscanthus sacchariflorus and M. sinensis that were originally introduced to North America as ornamental plants have since escaped cultivation. These species and their hybrid offspring are now receiving attention for large-scale production as biofuel crops in North America and elsewhere. We evaluated their potential global climate suitability for cultivation and potential invasion using the niche model CLIMEX and evaluated the models' sensitivity to the parameter values. We then compared the sensitivity of projections of future climatically suitable area under two climate models and two emissions scenarios. The models indicate that the species have been introduced to most of the potential global climatically suitable areas in the northern but not the southern hemisphere. The more narrowly distributed species (M. sacchariflorus is more sensitive to changes in model parameters, which could have implications for modelling species of conservation concern. Climate projections indicate likely contractions in potential range in the south, but expansions in the north, particularly in introduced areas where biomass production trials are under way. Climate sensitivity analysis shows that projections differ more between the selected climate change models than between the selected emissions scenarios. Local-scale assessments are required to overlay suitable habitat with climate projections to estimate areas of cultivation potential and invasion risk.

  16. The economic production lot size model with several production rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Christian

    should be chosen in the interval between the demand rate and the production rate, which minimize unit production costs, and should be used in an increasing order. Then, given the production rates, we derive closed form solutions for the optimal runtimes as well as the minimum average cost. Finally we......We study an extension of the economic production lot size model, where more than one production rate can be used during a cycle. The production rates and their corresponding runtimes are decision variables. We decompose the problem into two subproblems. First, we show that all production rates...... derive a near-optimal solution to the general problem....

  17. Potentiels urbains et îlots de chaleur

    OpenAIRE

    Cornélis, Bernard; Binard, Marc; Istvan NADASDI

    1998-01-01

    The present contribution aims at answering in a quantitative way the question: is there a relationship between urban heat island and urban potential ? If such a relationship exits, it tries to quantify it and to answer the following questions : - would the potential model allow the representation of the heat island phenomenon ? - If so, in which conditions ? La présente contribution vise à répondre de manière quantitative à la question: existe-t-il une relation entre les îlots de chaleur ...

  18. Preparation and biological distribution of some radiopharmaceutical compounds for human application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application of radiopharmaceutical for diagnostic purposes in egypt has increased so rapidly in the last few yeas that now most of the organs of the body could be imaged or scanned using a wide range of radiopharmaceuticals. Technetium - 99m labelled compounds are considered as the most widely spread radiopharmaceuticals which find wide applications in the area of nuclear medicine for either dianostic or therapeutic purposes. Among the important types of radiopharmaceuticals used for diagnostic purposes are the technetium - 99m labelled compounds of human serum albumin (HSA) in all its physical forms. The main objective of this thesis is to elucidate and investigate the best conditions for the preparatiion of followings: 1 - Technetium - 99m HSA which is widely used for blood pool, cardiac and placenta scanning. 2 - Tecnetium 99m HSA microsphere which are used for lung perfusion imaging, regional blood flow, cerebral perfusion imaging and reticuloendothelial system structure and function. 3 - Technetium - 99m HSA macroaggregate which is used for perfusion scintigraphy of the lung that is accomplished by microembolization of radionuclide - labelled particales in the pulmonary arterial circulation. Such particulate material embolization causes a minor obstruction to pulmonary arterial blood flow, but this effect is almost never physiologically significant . the number of particles which impact in a particular volume of the lung is proposional to the pulmonary arterial blood flow to that reason. Perfusion scintigraphy thus provides a visual representation of the relative distribution of pulmonary blood flow at the time of MAA injection.In all the previous preparations transchelation technique has been utilized using different co-ligands to overcome the problem of low affinity of HSA to the reduced technetium - 99m. The aim was planned to be achieved in the folllowing three chapters where detailed studies on the factors affecting the preparation of technetium -99m HSA

  19. Biological distribution of reactor produced 18F-FDG. Local experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Quality control through an animal model that relates bio distribution of a substance is fundamental prior to using it in human beings. For the evaluation of myocardial viability after recent myocardial infarction, the use of reactor produced 18F-FDG (a radiotracer usually obtained in cyclotron) is proposed, production of wish had never been attempted in our country. The aim of the study was to compare the specific activities found in the different tissues after the injection of this reactor produced radiopharmaceutical with those obtained by others authors with cyclotron 18F-FDG. Material WISTAR female white mice, men weight 25,28 +/- 1,09 g (23,8-26,9 range) in standard support conditions was used. 1,22 MBq (33 mCi) of 18F-FDG were injected in a lateral tail vein. Previously anaesthetised with Chloroform, the animals were sacrificed by jugular section at 5, 30 and 60 minutes intervals post injection. Blood and organs were removed (liver, lungs, heart, brain, urine plus bladder, kidneys, femur, muscle and quivers), placed in vials, then weighed, and finally taken to a Gamma Packard Minaxi γ Auto-gamma 5000 serie counter to obtain the counts per minute (cpm) (previously the empty vials were weighed too). At same time, STANDARDS (STD) (3 dilutions) cpm and BACKGROUND (BKG) cpm were collected. We calculate 1) mean BKG cpm, 2) mean STD cpm, who then were corrected by decay factor and dilution, and 3) each one of the tissues cpm, that then were corrected by decay factor, divided by the corresponding dilution cpm and multiplied by 100 to obtain the Injected Activity % (IA%). Finally, the IA% was divided by the tissue weight and get the Specific Activity (SA). Mean and standard deviation for each tissue at the 3 intervals were calculated. Results: The uptake distribution at 30 and 60 minutes were similar between reactor and cyclotron produced 18F-FDG, with significant bigger SA in heart and brain respect of the rest organs. There were significant

  20. New data on distribution, biology, and ecology of longhorn beetles from the area of west Tajikistan (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadyrov, Abdysalom Kh; Karpiński, Lech; Szczepański, Wojciech T; Taszakowski, Artur; Walczak, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    New data on distribution, biology, and ecology of some little-known cerambycid species, collected in the western part of Tajikistan, are presented. Arhopalus rusticus (Linnaeus, 1758) is recorded in Tajikistan for the first time. New localities of species considered pests or invasive species such as Aeolesthes sarta (Solsky, 1871) and Xylotrechus stebbingi Gahan, 1906 are also given. The list of the taxa collected by the first author during many years of field research in Tajikistan as well as photographs of poorly known species from his collection, including some endemics, are additionally provided. Furthermore, high quality photographs of some extremely rare species that were collected during our expedition, i.e., Turkaromia gromenkoi Danilevsky, 2000 and Ropalopus nadari Pic, 1894, with images of their habitats or feeding grounds are also presented for the first time. PMID:27551221

  1. Exact distribution of a pattern in a set of random sequences generated by a Markov source: applications to biological data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regad Leslie

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In bioinformatics it is common to search for a pattern of interest in a potentially large set of rather short sequences (upstream gene regions, proteins, exons, etc.. Although many methodological approaches allow practitioners to compute the distribution of a pattern count in a random sequence generated by a Markov source, no specific developments have taken into account the counting of occurrences in a set of independent sequences. We aim to address this problem by deriving efficient approaches and algorithms to perform these computations both for low and high complexity patterns in the framework of homogeneous or heterogeneous Markov models. Results The latest advances in the field allowed us to use a technique of optimal Markov chain embedding based on deterministic finite automata to introduce three innovative algorithms. Algorithm 1 is the only one able to deal with heterogeneous models. It also permits to avoid any product of convolution of the pattern distribution in individual sequences. When working with homogeneous models, Algorithm 2 yields a dramatic reduction in the complexity by taking advantage of previous computations to obtain moment generating functions efficiently. In the particular case of low or moderate complexity patterns, Algorithm 3 exploits power computation and binary decomposition to further reduce the time complexity to a logarithmic scale. All these algorithms and their relative interest in comparison with existing ones were then tested and discussed on a toy-example and three biological data sets: structural patterns in protein loop structures, PROSITE signatures in a bacterial proteome, and transcription factors in upstream gene regions. On these data sets, we also compared our exact approaches to the tempting approximation that consists in concatenating the sequences in the data set into a single sequence. Conclusions Our algorithms prove to be effective and able to handle real data sets with

  2. Development of an inverse optimization package to plan nonuniform dose distributions based on spatially inhomogeneous radiosensitivity extracted from biological images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An inverse optimization package which is capable of generating nonuniform dose distribution with subregional dose escalation is developed to achieve maximum equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for target while keeping the critical structure doses as low as possible. Relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) maps obtained with a dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced MRI technique were used to delineate spatial radiosensitivity distributions. The voxel rCBV was converted to voxel radiosensitivity parameters (e.g., α and α/β) based on previously reported correlations between rCBV, tumor grade, and radiosensitivity. A software package, DOSEPAINT, developed using MATLAB, optimizes the beamlet weights to achieve maximum EUD for target while limiting doses to critical structures. Using DOSEPAINT, we have generated nonuniform 3D-dose distributions for selected patient cases. Depending on the variation of the pixel radiosensitivity, the subregional dose escalation can be as high as 35% of the uniform dose as planned conventionally. The target dose escalation comes from both the inhomogeneous radiosensitivities and the elimination of integral target dose constraint. The target EUDs are found to be higher than those for the uniform dose planned ignoring the spatial inhomogeneous radiosensitivity. The EUDs for organs at risk are found to be approximately equal to or lower than those for the uniform dose plans. In conclusion, we have developed a package that is capable of generating nonuniform dose distributions optimized for spatially inhomogeneous radiosensitivity. Subregional dose escalation may lead to increased treatment effectiveness as indicated by higher EUDs. The current development will impact biological image guided radiotherapy

  3. Temporal-spatial dynamics of distribution patterns of microorganism relating to biological soil crusts in the Gurbantunggut Desert

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Nan; WANG Hongling; LIANG Shaoming; NIE Huali; ZHANG Yuanming

    2006-01-01

    Biological soil crusts serve as an important biological factor contributing to the sand fixation. This study was conducted to investigate the temporal-spatial variability of microorganism in crusts relating to locations, soil layers of sand dunes and seasons. At moss-dominated inter-dune areas,higher soil nutrient and water concentrations were likely to maintain the microbial activities. Bacteria showed the highest capabilities of settlement and growth in inter-dunes in both spring and autumn. Soil water content reached the highest value in soil crusts in the inter-dune areas, especially in spring. Variations of quantities of actinomyces and fungi basically showed the consistent trend in different locations of sand dunes. With the deepening of soil layers, vertical distribution of quantities of each microorganism group showed different characteristics because environmental factors fluctuated in both spring and autumn. Among different microorganism groups, bacteria were predominant, actinomyces the next and fungi the least in both spring and autumn in all soil layers (0-20 cm). The proportion of bacteria and soil water content were higher in spring than those in autumn in all soil layers (0-20 cm). No consistent trends were found in actinomyces and fungi. The results showed that the quantities of microorganisms were significantly positive correlated with organic matter content,soil water content, total N, total P, available P, available K, pH, electrical conductivity, total salt content,catalase, urease, phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase.

  4. Biological validation of physical coastal waters classification along the NE Atlantic region based on rocky macroalgae distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Elvira; Puente, Araceli; Juanes, José Antonio; Neto, João M.; Pedersen, Are; Bartsch, Inka; Scanlan, Clare; Wilkes, Robert; Van den Bergh, Erika; Ar Gall, Erwan; Melo, Ricardo

    2014-06-01

    A methodology to classify rocky shores along the North East Atlantic (NEA) region was developed. Previously, biotypes and the variability of environmental conditions within these were recognized based on abiotic data. A biological validation was required in order to support the ecological meaning of the physical typologies obtained. A database of intertidal macroalgae species occurring in the coastal area between Norway and the South Iberian Peninsula was generated. Semi-quantitative abundance data of the most representative macroalgal taxa were collected in three levels: common, rare or absent. Ordination and classification multivariate analyses revealed a clear latitudinal gradient in the distribution of macroalgae species resulting in two distinct groups: one northern and one southern group, separated at the coast of Brittany (France). In general, the results based on biological data coincided with the results based on physical characteristics. The ecological meaning of the coastal waters classification at a broad scale shown in this work demonstrates that it can be valuable as a practical tool for conservation and management purposes.

  5. Transcriptome phase distribution analysis reveals diurnal regulated biological processes and key pathways in rice flag leaves and seedling leaves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenying Xu

    Full Text Available Plant diurnal oscillation is a 24-hour period based variation. The correlation between diurnal genes and biological pathways was widely revealed by microarray analysis in different species. Rice (Oryza sativa is the major food staple for about half of the world's population. The rice flag leaf is essential in providing photosynthates to the grain filling. However, there is still no comprehensive view about the diurnal transcriptome for rice leaves. In this study, we applied rice microarray to monitor the rhythmically expressed genes in rice seedling and flag leaves. We developed a new computational analysis approach and identified 6,266 (10.96% diurnal probe sets in seedling leaves, 13,773 (24.08% diurnal probe sets in flag leaves. About 65% of overall transcription factors were identified as flag leaf preferred. In seedling leaves, the peak of phase distribution was from 2:00am to 4:00am, whereas in flag leaves, the peak was from 8:00pm to 2:00am. The diurnal phase distribution analysis of gene ontology (GO and cis-element enrichment indicated that, some important processes were waken by the light, such as photosynthesis and abiotic stimulus, while some genes related to the nuclear and ribosome involved processes were active mostly during the switch time of light to dark. The starch and sucrose metabolism pathway genes also showed diurnal phase. We conducted comparison analysis between Arabidopsis and rice leaf transcriptome throughout the diurnal cycle. In summary, our analysis approach is feasible for relatively unbiased identification of diurnal transcripts, efficiently detecting some special periodic patterns with non-sinusoidal periodic patterns. Compared to the rice flag leaves, the gene transcription levels of seedling leaves were relatively limited to the diurnal rhythm. Our comprehensive microarray analysis of seedling and flag leaves of rice provided an overview of the rice diurnal transcriptome and indicated some diurnal regulated

  6. Physical and biological processes controlling the distribution of fish larvae in the NW Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatés, A.; Olivar, M. P.; Salat, J.; Palomera, I.; Alemany, F.

    2007-08-01

    The Mediterranean is globally considered an oligotrophic sea. However, there are some places or certain seasons in which mechanisms that enhance fertility may occur. These mechanisms and related processes are especially relevant when they take place during the period of larval development. This study analyzes how environmental conditions occurring in the NW Mediterranean, at local and seasonal scales, contribute to determine the temporal and spatial patterns of fish reproductive activity in the region. The structure of the bathymetry, types of bottoms, diversity of adult fish habitats, as well as mechanisms conditioning the primary production of the region determine the location of spawning, whereas physical processes (e.g., shelf-slope density front and associated current, continental water inflows, winter mixing, stratification of the water column) determine the final distribution patterns of fish eggs and larvae. High larval concentrations occur over the edge of the continental shelf in relation to the presence of the shelf-slope front and its associated convergence. However, this pattern is subject to considerable spatio-temporal variability, due to frontal mesoscale activity. High larval abundance can also be observed near the coast in zones with topographic irregularities that can greatly modify circulation favouring penetration of slope waters into the shelf. Finally, larvae of large pelagic migratory species are mainly distributed in areas under the influence of recent Atlantic Water (AW) and near the frontal system between these inflowing AW and the more saline waters of the northern basin. A pronounced seasonal variability regarding both the number of species and the number of fish larvae in the plankton can be observed throughout the year. The two dominant species, sardine and anchovy, have non-overlapping spawning periods, autumn-winter and spring-summer, respectively. The diversity of feeding patterns as well as the fact that different fish species

  7. Legume diversity patterns in West Central Africa: influence of species biology on distribution models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel de la Estrella

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Species Distribution Models (SDMs are used to produce predictions of potential Leguminosae diversity in West Central Africa. Those predictions are evaluated subsequently using expert opinion. The established methodology of combining all SDMs is refined to assess species diversity within five defined vegetation types. Potential species diversity is thus predicted for each vegetation type respectively. The primary aim of the new methodology is to define, in more detail, areas of species richness for conservation planning. METHODOLOGY: Using Maxent, SDMs based on a suite of 14 environmental predictors were generated for 185 West Central African Leguminosae species, each categorised according to one of five vegetation types: Afromontane, coastal, non-flooded forest, open formations, or riverine forest. The relative contribution of each environmental variable was compared between different vegetation types using a nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis analysis followed by a post-hoc Kruskal-Wallis Paired Comparison contrast. Legume species diversity patterns were explored initially using the typical method of stacking all SDMs. Subsequently, five different ensemble models were generated by partitioning SDMs according to vegetation category. Ecological modelers worked with legume specialists to improve data integrity and integrate expert opinion in the interpretation of individual species models and potential species richness predictions for different vegetation types. RESULTS/CONCLUSIONS: Of the 14 environmental predictors used, five showed no difference in their relative contribution to the different vegetation models. Of the nine discriminating variables, the majority were related to temperature variation. The set of variables that played a major role in the Afromontane species diversity model differed significantly from the sets of variables of greatest relative important in other vegetation categories. The traditional approach of stacking all

  8. Distribution, abundance and biology of ringed seals (Phoca hispida: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randall R Reeves

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The ringed seal (Phoca hispida has a circumpolar Arctic distribution. Because of its great importance to northern communities and its role as the primary food of polar bears (Ursus maritimus the ringed seal has been studied extensively in Canada, Alaska, Russia, Svalbard and Greenland as well as in the Baltic Sea and Karelian lakes. No clear-cut boundaries are known to separate ringed seal stocks in marine waters. Adult seals are thought to be relatively sedentary, but sub-adults sometimes disperse over long distances. Stable ice with good snow cover is considered the most productive habitat although production in pack ice has been little studied. Populations appear to be structured so that immature animals and young adults are consigned to sub-optimal habitat during the spring pupping and breeding season. Annual production in ringed seal populations, defined as thepup percentage in the total population after the late winter pupping season, is probably in the order of 18-24%. Most estimates of maximum sustainable yield are in the order of 7%.The world population of ringed seals is at least a few million. Methods of abundance estimation have included aerial surveys, dog searches and remote sensing of lairs and breathing holes, acoustic monitoring, correlation analysis by reference to sizes of polar bear populations, and inference from estimated energy requirements of bear populations. Aerial strip survey has been the method of choice for estimating seal densities over large areas. Adjustment factors to account for seals not hauled out at the time of the survey, for seals that dove ahead of the aircraft, and for seals on the ice within the surveyed strip but not detected by the observers, are required for estimates of absolute abundance.Male and female ringed seals are sexually mature by 5-7 years of age (earlier at Svalbard. Pupping usually occurs in March or early April and is followed by 5-7 weeks of lactation. Breeding takes

  9. Parking lots owned and maintained by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service parking lot inventory includes parking lots owned and maintained by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on National Wildlife Refuges,...

  10. LOT SIZING WITH NON-ZERO SETUP TIMES FOR REWORK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rasoul HAJI; Alireza HAJI; Mehdi SAJADIFAR; Saeed ZOLFAGHARI

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we consider a single machine multi-product lot scheduling problem in which defective items are produced in any production run of each product. In each cycle after the normal production of each product the machine is setup for the rework of the defectives of the same product and then the rework process starts. We assume that the setup time for the normal production process as well as the rework process is non-zero. Further we consider the waiting time cost of defectives for rework. This paper has two objectives. The first objective is to obtain the economic batch quantity (EBQ) for a single product. The second objective is to extend the result of the first objective to the multi-product case. Adopting the common cycle scheduling policy we obtain optimal batch sizes for each product such that the total cost of the system per unit time is minimized.

  11. Note : Vierges de pitié du Lot

    OpenAIRE

    Castan, Félix-Marcel

    2013-01-01

    À l’initiative du Secrétariat départemental des Objets mobiliers du Lot, durant l’été 80, dans le Grenier du Chapitre de la Cathédrale de Cahors, une belle exposition a rassemblé les résultats d’une enquête de Mil,) Monique Escat, Conservateur adjoint, sur les Vierges de Pitié qui ont commencé à apparaître en Quercy à la fin du xvie siècle. En tête du catalogue, un commentaire du Professeur Marcel Durliat, de l’Université de Toulouse Le Mirail, synthétise les conclusions actuelles du point de...

  12. 7 CFR 27.12 - Classification request for each lot of cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Classification request for each lot of cotton. 27.12... CONTAINER REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Classification Requests § 27.12 Classification request for each lot of cotton. For each lot or mark of cotton of which...

  13. Patterns of Failure After Proton Therapy in Medulloblastoma; Linear Energy Transfer Distributions and Relative Biological Effectiveness Associations for Relapses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sethi, Roshan V. [Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Raiford, Michael; Malhi, Imran; Niemierko, Andrzej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Rapalino, Otto; Caruso, Paul [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Yock, Torunn I.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Paganetti, Harald [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); MacDonald, Shannon M., E-mail: smacdonald@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: The pattern of failure in medulloblastoma patients treated with proton radiation therapy is unknown. For this increasingly used modality, it is important to ensure that outcomes are comparable to those in modern photon series. It has been suggested this pattern may differ from photons because of variations in linear energy transfer (LET) and relative biological effectiveness (RBE). In addition, the use of matching fields for delivery of craniospinal irradiation (CSI) may influence patterns of relapse. Here we report the patterns of failure after the use of protons, compare it to that in the available photon literature, and determine the LET and RBE values in areas of recurrence. Methods and Materials: Retrospective review of patients with medulloblastoma treated with proton radiation therapy at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) between 2002 and 2011. We documented the locations of first relapse. Discrete failures were contoured on the original planning computed tomography scan. Monte Carlo calculation methods were used to estimate the proton LET distribution. Models were used to estimate RBE values based on the LET distributions. Results: A total of 109 patients were followed for a median of 38.8 months (range, 1.4-119.2 months). Of the patients, 16 experienced relapse. Relapse involved the supratentorial compartment (n=8), spinal compartment (n=11), and posterior fossa (n=5). Eleven failures were isolated to a single compartment; 6 failures in the spine, 4 failures in the supratentorium, and 1 failure in the posterior fossa. The remaining patients had multiple sites of disease. One isolated spinal failure occurred at the spinal junction of 2 fields. None of the 70 patients treated with an involved-field-only boost failed in the posterior fossa outside of the tumor bed. We found no correlation between Monte Carlo-calculated LET distribution and regions of recurrence. Conclusions: The most common site of failure in patients treated with protons for

  14. 7 CFR 201.30b - Lot number or other lot identification of vegetable seed in containers of more than 1 pound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... seed in containers of more than 1 pound. 201.30b Section 201.30b Agriculture Regulations of the... than 1 pound. The lot number or other lot identification of vegetable seed in containers of more than 1 pound shall be shown on the label and shall be the same as that used in the records pertaining to...

  15. Spatial and temporal distributions and some biological aspects of commercially important fish species of Lake Tana, Ethiopia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dereje Tewabe Kokebe

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To know spatial, temporal distributions and some biological aspects of commercially important fish species of Lake Tana. Methods:Distribution of fish species in Lake Tana was studied from November 2009 to October 2012 based on samples collected every other month using gillnets of 60, 80, 100, 120 and 140 mm stretched mesh sizes. Labeobarbus species, Clarias gariepinus, Oreochromis niloticus, and Varicorhinus beso are commercially important fish species and form 68%, 18%, 14%and 0.5%of the pooled experimental fish catch. There was significant variability among years and sampling sites of both temporal and spatial aspects;Mann-Whitney U tests were used for pair wise comparisons of sites and years. Results:The composition of Labeobarbus spp. and Varicorhinus beso shows significant decline. On the other hand, the composition of Oreochromis niloticus did not change, but Clarias gariepinus increased by 100%by catch composition. The most likely explanations for the total decline in abundance of fish species are the increase of the illegal commercial gillnet fishery targeting their spawning aggregations in the wetlands and river mouths, and the increasing trend of the degradation of spawning and nursery habitats both in the lake and major tributary rivers of the catchment area. Conclusions:There should be a need for urgent development of a management plan focusing on ensuring sustainable utilization of a resource by fishing effort, gear mesh size and gear type restrictions, and controlling the spawning grounds from different types of human encroachment and designing closing seasons and spawning grounds during the breeding seasons of different fish species of Lake Tana.

  16. Spatial and temporal distributions and some biological aspects of commercially important fish species of Lake Tana, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dereje Tewabe Kokebe

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To know spatial, temporal distributions and some biological aspects of commercially important fish species of Lake Tana. Methods: Distribution of fish species in Lake Tana was studied from November 2009 to October 2012 based on samples collected every other month using gillnets of 60, 80, 100, 120 and 140 mm stretched mesh sizes. Labeobarbus species, Clarias gariepinus, Oreochromis niloticus, and Varicorhinus beso are commercially important fish species and form 68%, 18%, 14% and 0.5% of the pooled experimental fish catch. There was significant variability among years and sampling sites of both temporal and spatial aspects; Mann-Whitney U tests were used for pair wise comparisons of sites and years. Results: The composition of Labeobarbus spp. and Varicorhinus beso shows significant decline. On the other hand, the composition of Oreochromis niloticus did not change, but Clarias gariepinus increased by 100% by catch composition. The most likely explanations for the total decline in abundance of fish species are the increase of the illegal commercial gillnet fishery targeting their spawning aggregations in the wetlands and river mouths, and the increasing trend of the degradation of spawning and nursery habitats both in the lake and major tributary rivers of the catchment area. Conclusions: There should be a need for urgent development of a management plan focusing on ensuring sustainable utilization of a resource by fishing effort, gear mesh size and gear type restrictions, and controlling the spawning grounds from different types of human encroachment and designing closing seasons and spawning grounds during the breeding seasons of different fish species of Lake Tana.

  17. Reproductive biology of Syzygiella rubricaulis (Nees) Steph. (Adelanthaceae, Marchantiophyta), a liverwort disjunctly distributed in high-altitude Neotropical mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel-Silva, A S; Gaspar, E P; da Conceição, F P; Dias Dos Santos, N; Pinheiro da Costa, D

    2016-07-01

    Syzygiella rubricaulis is a dioecious leafy liverwort disjunctly distributed and restricted to high-altitude mountains in the Neotropics and the Azores. This study is part of a larger project examining the phylogeography of S. rubricaulis in the Neotropics, and our main goals were to understand its reproductive biology, where sex expression occurs, if vegetative propagules are frequently found, how the sexes are distributed in populations, how frequently sporophytes are formed and what environmental conditions influence sexual expression. S. rubricaulis patches are mostly female, but all patches also contain non sex-expressing shoots. Out of 42 patches examined, 29 (69%) were sex-expressing: 25 were unisexual (21 female and four male) and four of mixed sex (two male-biased and two unbiased). At shoot level, out of 4200 shoots 18% were female and 7% male; among sex-expressing shoots, 73% were female, representing a sex ratio of 0.8 (female-biased). We encountered a total of 33 sporophytes in six patches (in Brazil, Venezuela and Ecuador). Leaf regenerants were found in one patch in Mexico. Low rates of sporophytes were likely related to low frequencies of male shoots and large distances between the sexes. As 25% of S. rubricaulis shoots expressed sex (occasionally producing sporophytes), we suggest that short-distance (and rarely long-distance) spore dispersal events occur in mountainous areas on a short-term basis. On a long-term basis, however, these events likely contribute to dynamic exchanges among populations in the Neotropics. PMID:26929143

  18. Biology and air–sea gas exchange controls on the distribution of carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) in the ocean

    OpenAIRE

    A. Schmittner; Gruber, N.; Mix, A. C.; Key, R.M.; Tagliabue, A.; Westberry, T. K.

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of observations and sensitivity experiments with a new three-dimensional global model of stable carbon isotope cycling elucidate the processes that control the distribution of δ13C in the contemporary and preindustrial ocean. Biological fractionation dominates the distribution of δ13CDIC of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) due to the sinking of isotopically light δ13C organic matter from the surface into the interior ocean. This process leads to low δ13CDI...

  19. Knowledge and theme discovery across very large biological data sets using distributed queries: a prototype combining unstructured and structured data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudunuri, Uma S; Khouja, Mohamad; Repetski, Stephen; Venkataraman, Girish; Che, Anney; Luke, Brian T; Girard, F Pascal; Stephens, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    As the discipline of biomedical science continues to apply new technologies capable of producing unprecedented volumes of noisy and complex biological data, it has become evident that available methods for deriving meaningful information from such data are simply not keeping pace. In order to achieve useful results, researchers require methods that consolidate, store and query combinations of structured and unstructured data sets efficiently and effectively. As we move towards personalized medicine, the need to combine unstructured data, such as medical literature, with large amounts of highly structured and high-throughput data such as human variation or expression data from very large cohorts, is especially urgent. For our study, we investigated a likely biomedical query using the Hadoop framework. We ran queries using native MapReduce tools we developed as well as other open source and proprietary tools. Our results suggest that the available technologies within the Big Data domain can reduce the time and effort needed to utilize and apply distributed queries over large datasets in practical clinical applications in the life sciences domain. The methodologies and technologies discussed in this paper set the stage for a more detailed evaluation that investigates how various data structures and data models are best mapped to the proper computational framework. PMID:24312478

  20. Knowledge and theme discovery across very large biological data sets using distributed queries: a prototype combining unstructured and structured data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma S Mudunuri

    Full Text Available As the discipline of biomedical science continues to apply new technologies capable of producing unprecedented volumes of noisy and complex biological data, it has become evident that available methods for deriving meaningful information from such data are simply not keeping pace. In order to achieve useful results, researchers require methods that consolidate, store and query combinations of structured and unstructured data sets efficiently and effectively. As we move towards personalized medicine, the need to combine unstructured data, such as medical literature, with large amounts of highly structured and high-throughput data such as human variation or expression data from very large cohorts, is especially urgent. For our study, we investigated a likely biomedical query using the Hadoop framework. We ran queries using native MapReduce tools we developed as well as other open source and proprietary tools. Our results suggest that the available technologies within the Big Data domain can reduce the time and effort needed to utilize and apply distributed queries over large datasets in practical clinical applications in the life sciences domain. The methodologies and technologies discussed in this paper set the stage for a more detailed evaluation that investigates how various data structures and data models are best mapped to the proper computational framework.

  1. Synthesis and biological distribution of 99mTc-norfloxacin complex, a novel agent for detecting sites of infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optimization of the radiolabeling yield of ciprofloxacin analogous, norfloxacin, with technetium-99m (99mTc) was described. Dependence of the labeling yield of 99mTc-norfloxacin complex on the concentration of norfloxacin, SnCl2 · 2H2O content, pH of the reaction mixture and reaction time was studied. Norfloxacin was labeled with 99mTc at pH 3 with a labeling yield of 95.4% by using 5 mg norfloxacin, 50 μg SnCl2 · 2H2O and 30 min reaction time. The formed 99mTc-norfloxacin complex was stable for a time up to 3 h. Biological distribution of 99mTc-norfloxacin complex was investigated in experimentally induced inflammation rats using Staphylococcus aureus (bacterial infection model) and heat killed Staphylococcus aureus and turpentine oil (sterile inflammation model). In case of bacterial infection, the T/NT value for 99mTc-norfloxacin complex was found to be 6.9 ± 0.4 which was higher than that of the commercially available 99mTc-ciprofloxacin under the same experimental condition. (author)

  2. Pedestrian and traffic safety in parking lots at SNL/NM : audit background report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Paul Ernest

    2009-03-01

    This report supplements audit 2008-E-0009, conducted by the ES&H, Quality, Safeguards & Security Audits Department, 12870, during fall and winter of FY 2008. The study evaluates slips, trips and falls, the leading cause of reportable injuries at Sandia. In 2007, almost half of over 100 of such incidents occurred in parking lots. During the course of the audit, over 5000 observations were collected in 10 parking lots across SNL/NM. Based on benchmarks and trends of pedestrian behavior, the report proposes pedestrian-friendly features and attributes to improve pedestrian safety in parking lots. Less safe pedestrian behavior is associated with older parking lots lacking pedestrian-friendly features and attributes, like those for buildings 823, 887 and 811. Conversely, safer pedestrian behavior is associated with newer parking lots that have designated walkways, intra-lot walkways and sidewalks. Observations also revealed that motorists are in widespread noncompliance with parking lot speed limits and stop signs and markers.

  3. Record Dynamics and the Parking Lot Model for granular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibani, Paolo; Boettcher, Stefan

    Also known for its application to granular compaction (E. Ben-Naim et al., Physica D, 1998), the Parking Lot Model (PLM) describes the random parking of identical cars in a strip with no marked bays. In the thermally activated version considered, cars can be removed at an energy cost and, in thermal equilibrium, their average density increases as temperature decreases. However, equilibration at high density becomes exceedingly slow and the system enters an aging regime induced by a kinematic constraint, the fact that parked cars may not overlap. As parking an extra car reduces the available free space,the next parking event is even harder to achieve. Records in the number of parked cars mark the salient features of the dynamics and are shown to be well described by the log-Poisson statistics known from other glassy systems with record dynamics. Clusters of cars whose positions must be rearranged to make the next insertion possible have a length scale which grows logarithmically with age, while their life-time grows exponentially with size. The implications for a recent cluster model of colloidal dynamics,(S. Boettcher and P. Sibani, J. Phys.: Cond. Matter, 2011 N. Becker et al., J. Phys.: Cond. Matter, 2014) are discussed. Support rom the Villum Foundation is gratefully acknowledged.

  4. Supplier selection and order lot sizing using dynamic programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Moqri

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider a multi-period integrated supplier selection and order lot sizing problem where a single buyer plans to purchase a single product in multiple periods from several qualified suppliers who are able to provide the required product with the needed quality in a timely manner. Product price and order cost differs among different suppliers. Buyer’s demand for the product is deterministic and varies for different time periods. The problem is to determine how much product from which supplier must be ordered in each period such that buyer’s demand is satisfied without violating some side constraints. We have developed a mathematical programming model to deal with this problem, and proposed a forward dynamic programming approach to obtain optimal solutions in reasonable amount of time even for large scale problems. Finally, a numerical example is conducted in which solutions obtained from the proposed dynamic programming algorithm is compared with solutions from the branch-and-bound algorithm. Through the numerical example we have shown the efficiency of our algorithm.

  5. Extending cluster lot quality assurance sampling designs for surveillance programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hund, Lauren; Pagano, Marcello

    2014-07-20

    Lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS) has a long history of applications in industrial quality control. LQAS is frequently used for rapid surveillance in global health settings, with areas classified as poor or acceptable performance on the basis of the binary classification of an indicator. Historically, LQAS surveys have relied on simple random samples from the population; however, implementing two-stage cluster designs for surveillance sampling is often more cost-effective than simple random sampling. By applying survey sampling results to the binary classification procedure, we develop a simple and flexible nonparametric procedure to incorporate clustering effects into the LQAS sample design to appropriately inflate the sample size, accommodating finite numbers of clusters in the population when relevant. We use this framework to then discuss principled selection of survey design parameters in longitudinal surveillance programs. We apply this framework to design surveys to detect rises in malnutrition prevalence in nutrition surveillance programs in Kenya and South Sudan, accounting for clustering within villages. By combining historical information with data from previous surveys, we design surveys to detect spikes in the childhood malnutrition rate. PMID:24633656

  6. 99m Tc of mercapto-acetyl-glycyl-glycyl-glycine: synthesis, preparation of lyophilization reactive kits and studies of biological distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synthesis of 99m Tc mercapto-acetyl-glycyl-glycyl-glycine was made in three steps with satisfactory yields. The studies of biological distribution in mice, showing the relation of radiopharmaceuticals with the kidneys and the suitable urinary excretion was also presented. (C.G.C.)

  7. Releases, distribution and abundance of Gratiana boliviana (Coleoptera:Chrysomelidae), a biological control agent of tropical soda apple (Solanum viarum, Solanaceae), in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    A biological control program against tropical soda apple (TSA) (Solanum viarum Dunal (Solanaceae)) released 176,643 Gratiana boliviana Spaeth (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in Florida from 2003 to 2008. The spatial distribution of releases was clustered with more beetles released in south/central Flor...

  8. Stochastic Reorder Point-Lot Size (r,Q Inventory Model under Maximum Entropy Principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Castellano

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper takes into account the continuous-review reorder point-lot size (r,Q inventory model under stochastic demand, with the backorders-lost sales mixture. Moreover, to reflect the practical circumstance in which full information about the demand distribution lacks, we assume that only an estimate of the mean and of the variance is available. Contrarily to the typical approach in which the lead-time demand is supposed Gaussian or is obtained according to the so-called minimax procedure, we take a different perspective. That is, we adopt the maximum entropy principle to model the lead-time demand distribution. In particular, we consider the density that maximizes the entropy over all distributions with given mean and variance. With the aim of minimizing the expected total cost per time unit, we then propose an exact algorithm and a heuristic procedure. The heuristic method exploits an approximated expression of the total cost function achieved by means of an ad hoc first-order Taylor polynomial. We finally carry out numerical experiments with a twofold objective. On the one hand we examine the efficiency of the approximated solution procedure. On the other hand we investigate the performance of the maximum entropy principle in approximating the true lead-time demand distribution.

  9. Storm water runoff for the Y-12 Plant and selected parking lots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparison of storm water runoff from the Y-12 Plant and selected employee vehicle parking lots to various industry data is provided in this document. This work is an outgrowth of and part of the continuing Non-Point Source Pollution Elimination Project that was initiated in the late 1980s. This project seeks to identify area pollution sources and remediate these areas through the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act/Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (RCRA/CERCLA) process as managed by the Environmental Restoration Organization staff. This work is also driven by the Clean Water Act Section 402(p) which, in part, deals with establishing a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit for storm water discharges. Storm water data from events occurring in 1988 through 1991 were analyzed in two reports: Feasibility Study for the Best Management Practices to Control Area Source Pollution Derived from Parking Lots at the DOE Y-12 Plant, September 1992, and Feasibility Study of Best Management Practices for Non-Point Source Pollution Control at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, February 1993. These data consisted of analysis of outfalls discharging to upper East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) within the confines of the Y-12 Plant (see Appendixes D and E). These reports identified the major characteristics of concern as copper, iron, lead, manganese, mercury, nitrate (as nitrogen), zinc, biological oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), total suspended solids (TSS), fecal coliform, and aluminum. Specific sources of these contaminants were not identifiable because flows upstream of outfalls were not sampled. In general, many of these contaminants were a concern in many outfalls. Therefore, separate sampling exercises were executed to assist in identifying (or eliminating) specific suspected sources as areas of concern

  10. Reubicación del parque de transformadores de los sistemas de distribución de Bogotá D.C. mediante algoritmos genéticos Relocation of electric transformers lot in Bogotá distribution systems using genetic algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnn Alejandro Quintero Salazar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Este documento presenta una metodología basada en algoritmos genéticos que permite adelantar el reordenamiento del parque de transformadores existente en el nivel de tensión I de los sistemas de distribución de Bogotá D.C., Colombia, con el fin de maximizar el reconocimiento de activos que el ente regulador CREG (Comisión Reguladora de Energía y Gas realiza a los distintos operadores de red, según lo establecido en la resolución 097 de 2008. Para la aplicación del algoritmo se obtuvieron mediciones de potencia activa máxima para cada hora del año 2009 en un conjunto de 94 transformadores de diferentes capacidades, escogidos de forma aleatoria, instalados en el sistema de distribución de CODENSA S.A. ESP, empresa encargada de prestar el servicio de energía eléctrica en la ciudad de Bogotá D.C. Con esta información se construyeron curvas de carga diarias representativas y se elaboró una base de datos que contiene los costos operativos del movimiento de los equipos y de las tarifas, a partir de los cuales fue posible modelar la función objetivo y las restricciones del problema, obteniéndose un elevado número de combinaciones posibles (alrededor de 1*10(134 debido al gran número de nodos y de transformadores presentes en el sistema de distribución. La búsqueda convencional de una solución en la anterior situación implicaría el empleo de tiempos prohibitivos, por lo cual se implementó un algoritmo genético clásico, obteniéndose de esta manera una solución óptima que ofrece una ganancia económica en el primer año, asociada al incremento en el cargo por uso, de $ 253.446.362,47 (COP, ganancias que podrían verse incrementadas considerablemente al ejecutar el algoritmo en parques de transformadores más grandes.This paper presents a methodology based on genetic algorithms that allows the reordering of the existing park transformers voltage level I of the distribution systems of Bogotá city, Colombia, in order to

  11. Occurrence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons below coal-tar-sealed parking lots and effects on stream benthic macroinvertebrate communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scoggins, M.; McClintock, N.L.; Gosselink, L.; Bryer, P. [City Austin, Austin, TX (United States)

    2007-12-15

    Parking-lot pavement sealants recently have been recognized as a major source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in urban stream sediments in Austin, Texas. Laboratory and field studies have shown that PAHs in sediments can be toxic to aquatic organisms and can degrade aquatic communities. After identifying increases in concentrations of PAHs in sediments below seal-coated parking lots, we investigated whether the increases had significant effects on stream biota in 5 Austin streams. We sampled sediment chemistry and biological communities above and below the point at which stormwater runoff from the parking lots discharged into the streams, thus providing 5 upstream reference sites and 5 downstream treatment sites. Differences between upstream and downstream concentrations of total PAH ranged from 3.9 to 32 mg/kg. Analysis of the species occurrence data from pool and riffle habitats indicated a significant decrease in community health at the downstream sites, including decreases in richness, intolerant taxa, Diptera taxa, and density. In pool sediments, Chironomidae density was negatively correlated with PAH concentrations, whereas Oligochaeta density responded positively to PAH concentrations. In general, pool taxa responded more strongly than riffle taxa to PAHs, but riffle taxa responded more broadly than pool taxa. Increases in PAH sediment-toxicity units between upstream and downstream sites explained decreases in taxon richness and density in pools between upstream and downstream sites.

  12. Geochemistry of pore-fluids related to the distribution of the biological communities on the giant Regab pockmark, off Gabon

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Prunelé, A.; Caprais, J.; Ruffine, L.; Cassarino, L.; Guyader, V.; Bollinger, C.; Ondréas, H.; Donval, J.; Olu, K.; Geli, L. B.; Cunningham, K. L.; Cauquil, E.

    2013-12-01

    The Regab pockmark is a giant structure located at 3200 m water depth offshore Gabon and ~ 10 km north to the deep Congo channel (Zaïre canyon) (Gay et al. 2006; Ondréas et al. 2005). It has been visited for the first time in 2000 during the Zairov cruise. Since that time, several scientific cruises have allowed further investigations of this pockmark. The last cruise, WACS, for West Africa Cold Seeps, in January- February 2010, was undertaken on board the R/V ';Pourquoi Pas?' with the aim of identifying changes which can occur over time on this pockmark. Besides intensive ROV dives, three calypso cores and several push cores have been collected to better understand the relationships between the distribution of the living communities and the pore-fluids chemistry. In two calypso cores one collected within the pockmark and one outside, and both in areas without visible biological communities, pore-fluids profiles of dissolved elements (Alk, SO42-, Mn2+, Fe2+) show that degradation of organic matter is occurring and likely plays an important role in the sulfate reduction (Froelich et al. 1979). Methane was not detected. The Analysis of the pore-fluids by Thermal Desorption-Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) has shown the presence of alcohols, acid and phenol. These molecules are likely related to the degradation of organic matter and/or the production of the biological communities. Further investigations are ongoing to provide us with a clearer picture regarding the source of these molecules. The third calypso core collected in the northeast part of the pockmark containing gas hydrates. Sulfate profiles from the push cores show significant difference from one community to another. The analyses of both major and minor dissolved elements, along with molecular and isotopic methane concentration measurements are in progress for the push cores. The latter was done using a new analyzer G2201-i from Picarro for which new methods applied to pore-fluids has

  13. Evaluating our understanding of the biological carbon pump using the transport matrix method and global nutrient distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardello, Raffaele; Martin, Adrian; Khatiwala, Samar; Kriest, Iris; Henson, Stephanie; Dunne, John; Totterdell, Ian; Allen, Icarus; Yool, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    Global net primary production by marine phytoplankton plays a key role in the Earth system, fuelling the marine ecosystem and supporting resources such as fisheries. A fraction of the resulting organic material sinks out of the euphotic zone as 'export production', sequestering large amounts of carbon at depth, away from the atmosphere. Model studies have demonstrated that atmospheric pCO2 concentrations can be very sensitive to small changes in the depth at which this organic material is remineralised into CO2 and nutrients. The accuracy of parameterisations for remineralisation has often been assessed by direct comparison of simulated and sparse observed fluxes of sinking material. The consequences of remineralisation, i.e. the global distribution of inorganic nutrients, provide a much stronger test of our knowledge concerning the impact of remineralisation on ocean nutrient cycles because they are much more densely sampled. In this study, we investigate how alternative paradigms for the Biological Carbon Pump (BCP) have distinctive signatures in the consequent global distribution of nutrients. We compare several combinations of parameterisations for export production and remineralisation within two different representations of ocean circulation using the Transport Matrix Method (Khatiwala, 2007). Export production is represented using an NPZD-DOP model (Kriest et al., 2010) and three remote sensing-derived estimates while remineralisation is represented by either constant or spatially variable values of the Martin's curve exponent (Martin et al., 1987). In order to evaluate the ability of each export-remineralisation combination to correctly represent the BCP, we introduce a set of diagnostics to allow the intercomparison between in-situ data and simulations. These diagnostics are based on both nutrient fields and water masses and are designed to minimize the influence of biases originating from the representation of ocean circulation on the model

  14. Spatial distribution of total, ammonia-oxidizing, and denitrifying bacteria in biological wastewater treatment reactors for bioregenerative life support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakano, Yuko; Pickering, Karen D.; Strom, Peter F.; Kerkhof, Lee J.; Janes, H. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Bioregenerative life support systems may be necessary for long-term space missions due to the high cost of lifting supplies and equipment into orbit. In this study, we investigated two biological wastewater treatment reactors designed to recover potable water for a spacefaring crew being tested at Johnson Space Center. The experiment (Lunar-Mars Life Support Test Project-Phase III) consisted of four crew members confined in a test chamber for 91 days. In order to recycle all water during the experiment, an immobilized cell bioreactor (ICB) was employed for organic carbon removal and a trickling filter bioreactor (TFB) was utilized for ammonia removal, followed by physical-chemical treatment. In this study, the spatial distribution of various microorganisms within each bioreactor was analyzed by using biofilm samples taken from four locations in the ICB and three locations in the TFB. Three target genes were used for characterization of bacteria: the 16S rRNA gene for the total bacterial community, the ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) gene for ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, and the nitrous oxide reductase (nosZ) gene for denitrifying bacteria. A combination of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), sequence, and phylogenetic analyses indicated that the microbial community composition in the ICB and the TFB consisted mainly of Proteobacteria, low-G+C gram-positive bacteria, and a Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides group. Fifty-seven novel 16S rRNA genes, 8 novel amoA genes, and 12 new nosZ genes were identified in this study. Temporal shifts in the species composition of total bacteria in both the ICB and the TFB and ammonia-oxidizing and denitrifying bacteria in the TFB were also detected when the biofilms were compared with the inocula after 91 days. This result suggests that specific microbial populations were either brought in by the crew or enriched in the reactors during the course of operation.

  15. Preparation and biological distribution of 99mTc-cefazolin complex, a novel agent for detecting sites of infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optimization of the radiolabeling yield of cefazolin with 99mTc was described. Dependence of the labeling yield of 99mTc-cefazolin complex on the amounts of cefazolin and SnCl2·2H2O, pH and reaction time was studied. Cefazolin was labeled with 99mTc with a labeling yield of 89.5 % by using 1 mg cefazolin, 5 μg SnCl2·2H2O at pH 4 and 30 min reaction time. The radiochemical purity of 99mTc-cefazolin was evaluated with ITLC. The formed 99mTc-cefazolin complex was stable for a time up to 3 h, after that the labeling yield decreased 64.0 % at 8 h. Biological distribution of 99mTc-cefazolin complex was investigated in experimentally induced inflammation mice, in the left thigh, using Staphylococcus aureus (bacterial infection model) and turpentine oil (sterile inflammation model). Both thighs of the mice were dissected and counted and the ratio of bacterial infected thigh/contralateral thigh was then evaluated. In case of bacterial infection, T/NT for 99mTc-cefazolin complex was 8.57 ± 0.4 after 0.5 h, which was higher than that of the commercially available 99mTc-ciprofloxacin under the same experimental conditions. The ability of 99mTc-cefazolin to differentiate between septic and aseptic inflammation indicates that 99mTc-cefazolin could undergo further clinical trials to be used for imaging sites of infection. (author)

  16. Purification of benzoyl-mercapto-acetyl-tri-glycine and ethyl cysteinate dimer complemented with biological evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purification of benzoyl-mercaptoacetyl triglycine (MAG3) and ethyl cysteinate dimer (L,L-ECD) has been conducted through fractionated recrystallization of its impurities and isomers; biological behavior of the main isomers has been evaluated through biological distribution in mice. Chemical purity of synthesized MAG3 is 69,9%; after purification, 98, 12% is obtained from the compound with adequate biological distribution; fusion points range between 194 and 196oC before and after purification; recrystallization yields is 12%. Radiochemical purity of testing lot is 98%. In biological evaluations conducted in mice, injection dose percentages for the purest one, after 5 minutes, is 31,20% in kidneys and 1,14% in the liver. Chemical purity of synthesized ECD is 80,29%; after purification, 98,76% is obtained from the isomer with adequate biological activity; fusion points range between 195 and 197oC; yield percentage in recrystallization is 29%. radiochemical purity of testing lot is 97%; in biological evaluations conducted in mice, injection dose percentages for the purest one, after 5 minutes, is 1,37% in the brain, 25,70% in the liver and 13,40% in kidneys

  17. Egg and a lot of science: an interdisciplinary experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Gayer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Egg and a lot of science: an interdisciplinary experimentGayer, M.C.1,2;Rodrigues, D.T.1,2; Escoto, D.F.1; Denardin, E.L.G.2, Roehrs, R.1,21Interdisciplinary Research Group on Teaching Practice, Graduate Program in Biochemistry, Unipampa, RS, Brazil2Laboratory of Physicochemical Studies and Natural Products, Post Graduate Program in Biochemistry, Unipampa, RS, BrazilIntroduction: How to tell if an egg is rotten? How to calculate the volume of an egg? Because the rotten egg float? Why has this characteristic rotten egg smell? Because the gray-green color is formed on the surface of the cooked egg yolk? These issues are commonplace and unnoticed in day-to-day. Our grandmothers know how to tell if an egg is rotten or not, you just put the egg in a glass of water. If it is rotten floating, sinking is good. But why this happens? That they do not know answer. With only one egg chemical reactions work, macromolecules (proteins, density, membranes and conservation of matter. Hydrogen sulphide is responsible for the aroma of a freshly cooked egg. This gas as they break down the molecules of albumin, a protein present in the egg is formed. The color comes from a sulfide precipitation, this time with the Fe2+ ion contained in the yolk (Fe2+ + S2  FeS. The use of simple and easy to perform experiments, correlating various knowledge proves a very useful tool in science education. Objectives: Develop multidisciplinary learning contents through the problem. Materials and methods: The teacher provides students with a boiled egg, salt, a syringe and a cup, a plate and water. The teacher lays the aforementioned issues for students and allows them to exchange information with each other, seeking answers through experimentation. Results and discussion: Students engaged with the activity and interaction of groups in order to solve the proposed problem. Still, through trial and error have sought in various ways to find the answers. This tool takes the student to

  18. A graphical user interface (GUI) toolkit for the calculation of three-dimensional (3D) multi-phase biological effective dose (BED) distributions including statistical analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauweloa, Kevin I; Gutierrez, Alonso N; Stathakis, Sotirios; Papanikolaou, Niko; Mavroidis, Panayiotis

    2016-07-01

    A toolkit has been developed for calculating the 3-dimensional biological effective dose (BED) distributions in multi-phase, external beam radiotherapy treatments such as those applied in liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and in multi-prescription treatments. This toolkit also provides a wide range of statistical results related to dose and BED distributions. MATLAB 2010a, version 7.10 was used to create this GUI toolkit. The input data consist of the dose distribution matrices, organ contour coordinates, and treatment planning parameters from the treatment planning system (TPS). The toolkit has the capability of calculating the multi-phase BED distributions using different formulas (denoted as true and approximate). Following the calculations of the BED distributions, the dose and BED distributions can be viewed in different projections (e.g. coronal, sagittal and transverse). The different elements of this toolkit are presented and the important steps for the execution of its calculations are illustrated. The toolkit is applied on brain, head & neck and prostate cancer patients, who received primary and boost phases in order to demonstrate its capability in calculating BED distributions, as well as measuring the inaccuracy and imprecision of the approximate BED distributions. Finally, the clinical situations in which the use of the present toolkit would have a significant clinical impact are indicated. PMID:27265044

  19. Neutron in biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niimura, Nobuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-11-01

    Neutron in biology can provide an experimental method of directly locating relationship of proteins and DNA. However, there are relatively few experimental study of such objects since it takes a lot of time to collect a sufficient number of Bragg reflections and inelastic spectra due to the low flux of neutron illuminating the sample. Since a next generation neutron source of JAERI will be 5MW spallation neutron source and its effective neutron flux will be 10{sup 2} to 10{sup 3} times higher than the one of JRR-3M, neutron in biology will open a completely new world for structural biology. (author)

  20. Biology and air–sea gas exchange controls on the distribution of carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) in the ocean

    OpenAIRE

    A. Schmittner; Gruber, N.; Mix, A. C.; Key, R.M.; Tagliabue, A.; Westberry, T. K.

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of observations and sensitivity experiments with a new three-dimensional global model of stable carbon isotope cycling elucidate processes that control the distribution of δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the contemporary and preindustrial ocean. Biological fractionation and the sinking of isotopically light δ13C organic matter from the surface into the interior ocean leads to low δ13CDIC values at depths and in high latitude surface waters and high...

  1. MODEL JOINT ECONOMIC LOT SIZE PADA KASUS PEMASOK-PEMBELI DENGAN PERMINTAAN PROBABILISTIK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wakhid Ahmad Jauhari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we consider single vendor single buyer integrated inventory model with probabilistic demand and equal delivery lot size. The model contributes to the current literature by relaxing the deterministic demand assumption which has been used for almost all integrated inventory models. The objective is to minimize expected total costs incurred by the vendor and the buyer. We develop effective iterative procedures for finding the optimal solution. Numerical examples are used to illustrate the benefit of integration. A sensitivity analysis is performed to explore the effect of key parameters on delivery lot size, safety factor, production lot size factor and the expected total cost. The results of the numerical examples indicate that our models can achieve a significant amount of savings. Finally, we compare the results of our proposed model with a simulation model. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia: Pada penelitian ini akan dikembangkan model gabungan pemasok-pembeli dengan permintaan probabilistik dan ukuran pengiriman sama. Pada model setiap lot pemesanan akan dikirim dalam beberapa lot pengiriman dan pemasok akan memproduksi barang dalam ukuran batch produksi yang merupakan kelipatan integer dari lot pengiriman. Dikembangkan pula suatu algoritma untuk menyelesaikan model matematis yang telah dibuat. Selain itu, pengaruh perubahan parameter terhadap perilaku model diteliti dengan analisis sensitivitas terhadap beberapa parameter kunci, seperti ukuran lot, stok pengaman dan total biaya persediaan. Pada penelitian ini juga dibuat model simulasi untuk melihat performansi model matematis pada kondisi nyata. Kata kunci: model gabungan, permintaan probabilistik, lot pengiriman, supply chain

  2. Statistical assessment of DNA extraction reagent lot variability in real-time quantitative PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushon, R.N.; Kephart, C.M.; Koltun, G.F.; Francy, D.S.; Schaefer, F. W., III; Lindquist, H.D. Alan

    2010-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the variability in lots of a DNA extraction kit using real-time PCR assays for Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis and Vibrio cholerae. Methods and Results: Replicate aliquots of three bacteria were processed in duplicate with three different lots of a commercial DNA extraction kit. This experiment was repeated in triplicate. Results showed that cycle threshold values were statistically different among the different lots. Conclusions: Differences in DNA extraction reagent lots were found to be a significant source of variability for qPCR results. Steps should be taken to ensure the quality and consistency of reagents. Minimally, we propose that standard curves should be constructed for each new lot of extraction reagents, so that lot-to-lot variation is accounted for in data interpretation. Significance and Impact of the Study: This study highlights the importance of evaluating variability in DNA extraction procedures, especially when different reagent lots are used. Consideration of this variability in data interpretation should be an integral part of studies investigating environmental samples with unknown concentrations of organisms. ?? 2010 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. 7 CFR 56.37 - Lot marking of officially identified shell eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lot marking of officially identified shell eggs. 56.37... (CONTINUED) VOLUNTARY GRADING OF SHELL EGGS Grading of Shell Eggs Identifying and Marking Products § 56.37 Lot marking of officially identified shell eggs. Shell eggs identified with the grademarks shown...

  4. 7 CFR 800.85 - Inspection of grain in combined lots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... for grain in a combined lot shall, subject to the provisions of paragraphs (e) through (g) of this... shall be determined in accordance with the instructions. (e) Infested grain. If the grain in a combined... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inspection of grain in combined lots. 800.85...

  5. Finite element modeling of finite deformable, biphasic biological tissues with transversely isotropic statistically distributed fibers: toward a practical solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, John Z.; Herzog, Walter; Federico, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    The distribution of collagen fibers across articular cartilage layers is statistical in nature. Based on the concepts proposed in previous models, we developed a methodology to include the statistically distributed fibers across the cartilage thickness in the commercial FE software COMSOL which avoids extensive routine programming. The model includes many properties that are observed in real cartilage: finite hyperelastic deformation, depth-dependent collagen fiber concentration, depth- and deformation-dependent permeability, and statistically distributed collagen fiber orientation distribution across the cartilage thickness. Numerical tests were performed using confined and unconfined compressions. The model predictions on the depth-dependent strain distributions across the cartilage layer are consistent with the experimental data in the literature.

  6. Finite element modeling of finite deformable, biphasic biological tissues with transversely isotropic statistically distributed fibers: toward a practical solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, John Z.; Herzog, Walter; Federico, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    The distribution of collagen fibers across articular cartilage layers is statistical in nature. Based on the concepts proposed in previous models, we developed a methodology to include the statistically distributed fibers across the cartilage thickness in the commercial FE software COMSOL which avoids extensive routine programming. The model includes many properties that are observed in real cartilage: finite hyperelastic deformation, depth-dependent collagen fiber concentration, depth- and deformation-dependent permeability, and statistically distributed collagen fiber orientation distribution across the cartilage thickness. Numerical tests were performed using confined and unconfined compressions. The model predictions on the depth-dependent strain distributions across the cartilage layer are consistent with the experimental data in the literature.

  7. Biology and air–sea gas exchange controls on the distribution of carbon isotope ratios (δ13C in the ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Schmittner

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of observations and sensitivity experiments with a new three-dimensional global model of stable carbon isotope cycling elucidate the processes that control the distribution of δ13C in the contemporary and preindustrial ocean. Biological fractionation dominates the distribution of δ13CDIC of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC due to the sinking of isotopically light δ13C organic matter from the surface into the interior ocean. This process leads to low δ13CDIC values at dephs and in high latitude surface waters and high values in the upper ocean at low latitudes with maxima in the subtropics. Air–sea gas exchange provides an important secondary influence due to two effects. First, it acts to reduce the spatial gradients created by biology. Second, the associated temperature dependent fractionation tends to increase (decrease δ13CDIC values of colder (warmer water, which generates gradients that oppose those arising from biology. Our model results suggest that both effects are similarly important in influencing surface and interior δ13CDIC distributions. However, air-sea gas exchange is slow, so biological effect dominate spatial δ13CDIC gradients both in the interior and at the surface, in constrast to conclusions from some previous studies. Analysis of a new synthesis of δ13CDIC measurements from years 1990 to 2005 is used to quantify preformed (δ13Cpre and remineralized (δ13Crem contributions as well as the effects of biology (Δδ13Cbio and air–sea gas exchange (δ13C*. The model reproduces major features of the observed large-scale distribution of δ13CDIC, δ13Cpre, δ13Crem, δ13C*, and Δδ13Cbio. Residual misfits are documented and analyzed. Simulated surface and subsurface δ13CDIC are influenced by details of the ecosystem model formulation. For example, inclusion of a simple parameterization of iron limitation of phytoplankton growth rates and temperature-dependent zooplankton grazing rates improves the agreement

  8. Application of the brittle fracture technique (BFT) to homogenise biological samples and some observations regarding the distribution behaviour of the trace elements at different concentration levels in a biological matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NAA was used to analyse K, P, Cl, Na, Fe, Zn, Rb, Mn, Se, Co, and Ag in bovine liver, before and after homogenization, using brittle fracture technique (BFT). The liver specimen analysed in this experiment did not present any extreme variation problem with respect to the trace element distribution profile in the liver matrix. Elaborate sample-handling and the possible influence of the interfering components such as resudial blood, blood vessels and fat on the concentration profile of the above mentioned elements are discussed. In another experiments using 60Co, 134Cs, 141Ce and 198Au radiotracers, the physical distribution of the added tracers following the process of biological matrix disintegration, for homogenization purposes was studied at 1 mg to 10 pg concentration levels. The results indicate that BFT is an efficient, clean and practical tool that meets the homogenization problems because of its suitability to practically all types of biomedical samples. (T.G.)

  9. Using hybrid concurrent constraint programming to model dynamic biological systems

    OpenAIRE

    Bockmayr, Alexander; Courtois, Arnaud

    2002-01-01

    Systems biology is a new area in biology that aims at achieving a systems-level understanding of biological systems. While current genome projects provide a huge amount of data on genes or proteins, lots of research is still necessary to understand how the different parts of a biological system interact in order to perform complex biological functions. Computational models that help to analyze, explain or predict the behavior of biological systems play a crucial role in systems biology. The g...

  10. A comprehensive mathematical model for hybrid flexible flowshop lot streaming problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fantahun M. Defersha

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Lot streaming is a technique of splitting production lots into smaller sublots in a multi-stage manufacturing systems so that operations of a given lot can be overlapped. This technique can reduce manufacturing makespan and is an effective tool for time-based manufacturing strategy. Several research articles appeared in literature to solve this problem and most of these studies are limited to pure flowshop environments where there is only a single machine in each stage. On the other hand, because of the applicability of hybrid flowshops in different manufacturing settings, the scheduling of these types of shops is also extensively studied by several authors. However, the issue of lot streaming in hybrid flowshop environment is not well studied. In this paper, we aim to initiate research in bridging the gap between the research efforts in flowshop lot streaming and hybrid flowshop scheduling. We present a comprehensive mathematical model for scheduling flexible hybrid flowshop with lot streaming. Numerical example demonstrated that lot streaming can result in larger makespan reduction in hybrid flowshop where there is a limited research than in pure flowshop where research is abundant.

  11. Determination of optimal lot size and production rate for multi-production channels with limited capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yeu-Shiang; Wang, Ruei-Pei; Ho, Jyh-Wen

    2015-07-01

    Due to the constantly changing business environment, producers often have to deal with customers by adopting different procurement policies. That is, manufacturers confront not only predictable and regular orders, but also unpredictable and irregular orders. In this study, from the perspective of upstream manufacturers, both regular and irregular orders are considered in coping with the situation in which an uncertain demand is faced by the manufacturer, and a capacity confirming mechanism is used to examine such demand. If the demand is less than or equal to the capacity of the ordinary production channel, the general supply channel is utilised to fully account for the manufacturing process, but if the demand is greater than the capacity of the ordinary production channel, the contingency production channel would be activated along with the ordinary channel to satisfy the upcoming high demand. Besides, the reproductive property of the probability distribution is employed to represent the order quantity of the two types of demand. Accordingly, the optimal production rates and lot sizes for both channels are derived to provide managers with insights for further production planning.

  12. Use of Lot Quality Assurance Sampling to Ascertain Levels of Drug Resistant Tuberculosis in Western Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Jezmir

    Full Text Available To classify the prevalence of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB in two different geographic settings in western Kenya using the Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS methodology.The prevalence of drug resistance was classified among treatment-naïve smear positive TB patients in two settings, one rural and one urban. These regions were classified as having high or low prevalence of MDR-TB according to a static, two-way LQAS sampling plan selected to classify high resistance regions at greater than 5% resistance and low resistance regions at less than 1% resistance.This study classified both the urban and rural settings as having low levels of TB drug resistance. Out of the 105 patients screened in each setting, two patients were diagnosed with MDR-TB in the urban setting and one patient was diagnosed with MDR-TB in the rural setting. An additional 27 patients were diagnosed with a variety of mono- and poly- resistant strains.Further drug resistance surveillance using LQAS may help identify the levels and geographical distribution of drug resistance in Kenya and may have applications in other countries in the African Region facing similar resource constraints.

  13. Use of Lot Quality Assurance Sampling to Ascertain Levels of Drug Resistant Tuberculosis in Western Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Ted; Zignol, Matteo; Nyakan, Edwin; Hedt-Gauthier, Bethany L.; Gardner, Adrian; Kamle, Lydia; Injera, Wilfred; Carter, E. Jane

    2016-01-01

    Objective To classify the prevalence of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in two different geographic settings in western Kenya using the Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS) methodology. Design The prevalence of drug resistance was classified among treatment-naïve smear positive TB patients in two settings, one rural and one urban. These regions were classified as having high or low prevalence of MDR-TB according to a static, two-way LQAS sampling plan selected to classify high resistance regions at greater than 5% resistance and low resistance regions at less than 1% resistance. Results This study classified both the urban and rural settings as having low levels of TB drug resistance. Out of the 105 patients screened in each setting, two patients were diagnosed with MDR-TB in the urban setting and one patient was diagnosed with MDR-TB in the rural setting. An additional 27 patients were diagnosed with a variety of mono- and poly- resistant strains. Conclusion Further drug resistance surveillance using LQAS may help identify the levels and geographical distribution of drug resistance in Kenya and may have applications in other countries in the African Region facing similar resource constraints. PMID:27167381

  14. Simulation studies of statistical distributions of cell membrane capacities and an ellipse model to assess the frequency behaviour of biological tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The frequency behaviour of biological tissues is commonly described by a Cole model reflecting a single-cell bio-impedance model extended with an exponent α. However, for this parameter α there is no physical or biological substrate, which impedes an interpretation. The present study confirms by computer simulations of tissue models that the factual frequency behaviour can be explained by assuming a distribution of the electrical impedance properties of cells and of the capacitive coupling between cells. This behaviour is modelled mathematically by an ellipse. A mathematical procedure is presented to estimate this ellipse from experimental data by a least square method. A model parameter β is introduced, representing the ratio of the axes of the ellipse. A higher value of β means a larger variation in cell properties, which makes a patho-physiological interpretation of changes possible.

  15. Spatial Distribution of Total, Ammonia-Oxidizing, and Denitrifying Bacteria in Biological Wastewater Treatment Reactors for Bioregenerative Life Support

    OpenAIRE

    Sakano, Yuko; Pickering, Karen D.; Strom, Peter F.; Kerkhof, Lee J.

    2002-01-01

    Bioregenerative life support systems may be necessary for long-term space missions due to the high cost of lifting supplies and equipment into orbit. In this study, we investigated two biological wastewater treatment reactors designed to recover potable water for a spacefaring crew being tested at Johnson Space Center. The experiment (Lunar-Mars Life Support Test Project—Phase III) consisted of four crew members confined in a test chamber for 91 days. In order to recycle all water during the ...

  16. Knowledge and Theme Discovery across Very Large Biological Data Sets Using Distributed Queries: A Prototype Combining Unstructured and Structured Data

    OpenAIRE

    Mudunuri, Uma S; Khouja, Mohamad; Repetski, Stephen; Venkataraman, Girish; Che, Anney; Luke, Brian T.; Girard, F. Pascal; Stephens, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    As the discipline of biomedical science continues to apply new technologies capable of producing unprecedented volumes of noisy and complex biological data, it has become evident that available methods for deriving meaningful information from such data are simply not keeping pace. In order to achieve useful results, researchers require methods that consolidate, store and query combinations of structured and unstructured data sets efficiently and effectively. As we move towards personalized me...

  17. Prediction uncertainty assessment of a systems biology model requires a sample of the full probability distribution of its parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Simon van Mourik; Cajo ter Braak; Hans Stigter; Jaap Molenaar

    2014-01-01

    Multi-parameter models in systems biology are typically ‘sloppy’: some parameters or combinations of parameters may be hard to estimate from data, whereas others are not. One might expect that parameter uncertainty automatically leads to uncertain predictions, but this is not the case. We illustrate this by showing that the prediction uncertainty of each of six sloppy models varies enormously among different predictions. Statistical approximations of parameter uncertainty may lead to dramatic...

  18. Lots of Physicists Are Nervous about the Speed of Light%Lots of Physicists Are Nervous about the Speed of Light

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eric Randall

    2011-01-01

    [1] Physicists spent their weekends walking back media hype over an experiment that at first glance seems to disprove Einstein's famed theory of relativity. They preached dispassionate skepticism, but behind all that careful cynicism, there seemed a lot of hand-wringing.

  19. The 'Thinking a Lot' Idiom of Distress and PTSD: An Examination of Their Relationship among Traumatized Cambodian Refugees Using the 'Thinking a Lot' Questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.E. Hinton; R. Reis; J. de Jong

    2015-01-01

    "Thinking a lot" (TAL)—also referred to as "thinking too much"—is a key complaint in many cultural contexts, and the current article profiles this idiom of distress among Cambodian refugees. The article also proposes a general model of how TAL generates various types of distress that then cause PTSD

  20. Biology and air-sea gas exchange controls on the distribution of carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmittner, A.; Gruber, N.; Mix, A. C.; Key, R. M.; Tagliabue, A.; Westberry, T. K.

    2013-09-01

    Analysis of observations and sensitivity experiments with a new three-dimensional global model of stable carbon isotope cycling elucidate processes that control the distribution of δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the contemporary and preindustrial ocean. Biological fractionation and the sinking of isotopically light δ13C organic matter from the surface into the interior ocean leads to low δ13CDIC values at depths and in high latitude surface waters and high values in the upper ocean at low latitudes with maxima in the subtropics. Air-sea gas exchange has two effects. First, it acts to reduce the spatial gradients created by biology. Second, the associated temperature-dependent fractionation tends to increase (decrease) δ13CDIC values of colder (warmer) water, which generates gradients that oppose those arising from biology. Our model results suggest that both effects are similarly important in influencing surface and interior δ13CDIC distributions. However, since air-sea gas exchange is slow in the modern ocean, the biological effect dominates spatial δ13CDIC gradients both in the interior and at the surface, in contrast to conclusions from some previous studies. Calcium carbonate cycling, pH dependency of fractionation during air-sea gas exchange, and kinetic fractionation have minor effects on δ13CDIC. Accumulation of isotopically light carbon from anthropogenic fossil fuel burning has decreased the spatial variability of surface and deep δ13CDIC since the industrial revolution in our model simulations. Analysis of a new synthesis of δ13CDIC measurements from years 1990 to 2005 is used to quantify preformed and remineralized contributions as well as the effects of biology and air-sea gas exchange. The model reproduces major features of the observed large-scale distribution of δ13CDIC as well as the individual contributions and effects. Residual misfits are documented and analyzed. Simulated surface and subsurface δ13CDIC are influenced by

  1. Biology and air–sea gas exchange controls on the distribution of carbon isotope ratios (δ13C in the ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Schmittner

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of observations and sensitivity experiments with a new three-dimensional global model of stable carbon isotope cycling elucidate processes that control the distribution of δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC in the contemporary and preindustrial ocean. Biological fractionation and the sinking of isotopically light δ13C organic matter from the surface into the interior ocean leads to low δ13CDIC values at depths and in high latitude surface waters and high values in the upper ocean at low latitudes with maxima in the subtropics. Air–sea gas exchange has two effects. First, it acts to reduce the spatial gradients created by biology. Second, the associated temperature-dependent fractionation tends to increase (decrease δ13CDIC values of colder (warmer water, which generates gradients that oppose those arising from biology. Our model results suggest that both effects are similarly important in influencing surface and interior δ13CDIC distributions. However, since air–sea gas exchange is slow in the modern ocean, the biological effect dominates spatial δ13CDIC gradients both in the interior and at the surface, in contrast to conclusions from some previous studies. Calcium carbonate cycling, pH dependency of fractionation during air–sea gas exchange, and kinetic fractionation have minor effects on δ13CDIC. Accumulation of isotopically light carbon from anthropogenic fossil fuel burning has decreased the spatial variability of surface and deep δ13CDIC since the industrial revolution in our model simulations. Analysis of a new synthesis of δ13CDIC measurements from years 1990 to 2005 is used to quantify preformed and remineralized contributions as well as the effects of biology and air–sea gas exchange. The model reproduces major features of the observed large-scale distribution of δ13CDIC as well as the individual contributions and effects. Residual misfits are documented and analyzed. Simulated surface and subsurface

  2. Evaluation of neutron flux distribution for radioactivity analysis of biological shield concrete required for study on decommissioning of Tokai 1 Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tokai Power Station, a 166 MWe gas cooled reactor, ceased commercial operation in March 31, 1998 and at present spent fuels are being discharged. Meanwhile, a specific plan for the decommissioning to be performed after the fuel discharging is being studied. The reactor is surrounded by thick primary biological shield, but large penetrations such as primary cooling gas ducts filled with CO2 and shield cooling ducts and also the large opening covered with thin steel doors called rapture doors exist in the primary biological shield. They cause big neutron leakages into the outer region, called duct enclosure area, surrounded by secondary biological shield, and then enhance the radioactive nuclide concentration in the surrounding shield wall concrete. The radioactive nuclide concentration in this area distributes widely from the low level radioactive waste to below the clearance level. Its precise evaluation, which depends on data of neutron flux distribution, is essential for estimation of dismantling work, dismantling cost, disposal cost of the dismantled waste etc. of the decommission planing. In order to obtain the neutron flux distribution data, a few kinds of activation metal foils were placed at many positions in the space and on the wall surface in the duct enclosure area during the reactor operations. Also neutron transport calculation covering several floors was performed with use of three-dimensional discrete ordinates code, which is suitable for complicated geometry with some neutron streaming paths from the reactor room through the primary shield. By comparing results of calculation and measurement, good correlation was confirmed between them. (author)

  3. Biology and Economics: Metaphors that Economists usually take from Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Danny García Callejas

    2007-01-01

    Adam Smith, Alfred Marshall, Stanley Jevons, Karl Marx, Francois Quesnay and Joseph Schumpeter all have at least one thing in common: they used biological metaphors when speaking about economics. Nonetheless, today, this relation subsists and biology and economics are viewed as complementary sciences that have a lot to gain from joint research in fields like: evolutionary economics, economic growth, cognitive economics and environmental and ecological economics, among others. This paper, divi...

  4. LOTS as Fixed Point Sets: An Application of Tarski's Fixed Point Theorem (draft)

    OpenAIRE

    Papadopoulos, Kyriakos

    2013-01-01

    The class of LOTS (linearly ordered topological spaces) contains many important spaces, like the set of real numbers, the set of rational numbers and the ordinals. Such spaces have rich topological properties, which are not necessarily hereditary.

  5. Hybrid Discrete Differential Evolution Algorithm for Lot Splitting with Capacity Constraints in Flexible Job Scheduling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinli Xu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A two-level batch chromosome coding scheme is proposed to solve the lot splitting problem with equipment capacity constraints in flexible job shop scheduling, which includes a lot splitting chromosome and a lot scheduling chromosome. To balance global search and local exploration of the differential evolution algorithm, a hybrid discrete differential evolution algorithm (HDDE is presented, in which the local strategy with dynamic random searching based on the critical path and a random mutation operator is developed. The performance of HDDE was experimented with 14 benchmark problems and the practical dye vat scheduling problem. The simulation results showed that the proposed algorithm has the strong global search capability and can effectively solve the practical lot splitting problems with equipment capacity constraints.

  6. Distribution and behaviour of transuranic elements in the physical and biological compartments of the Channel French shore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological samples (algae, suspension-feeder mollusks living in contact with sediments, annelids), sediments and sea water were taken at 5 stations along the Channel shore from 1978 to 1981 in order to determine 239+240Pu, 238Pu, 241Am and 244Cm levels. In Northern Cotentin, radioactivity levels for 239+240Pu, 238Pu and 241Am, were respectively about 1-10, 0.5-7 and 1-19 pCi kg-1 fresh weight in biological samples; 24-90, 11-28 and 24-31 pCi kg-1 dry weight in sediments; 1-7, 5-40 and 2-15 fCi l-1 in sea water. For stations far from the La Hague outlet (Seine river and Mont Saint-Michel bays) levels for 239+240Pu, 238Pu and 241Am were respectively about 0.3-5, 0.1-2 and 0.2-3 pCi kg-1 fresh weight in biological samples; 30-80, 5-26 and 14-40 pCi kg-1 dry weight in sediments and 1-3, 3-4 and 3-8 fCi l-1 in sea water. Labelling of industrial wastes was demonstrated by the values of the 238Pu/239+240Pu ratios. The evolution of plutonium isotopes in sea water and in the other environmental compartments and the bioavailability of americium are discussed. Sediment-animal transfers are quantified and their processes specified. An assessment of plutonium and americium hazards from ingestion of mollusks shows that the ingested activity represents 1.1 10-4 only of the ALI (ingestion) recommended by ICRP for members of the public

  7. An Inverse Power-Law Distribution of Molecular Bond Lifetimes Predicts Fractional Derivative Viscoelasticity in Biological Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, Bradley M.; Tanner, Bertrand C.W.; Toth, Michael J.; Miller, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    Viscoelastic characteristics of many materials falling under the category of soft glassy substances, including biological tissue, often exhibit a mechanical complex modulus Y(ω) well described by a fractional derivative model: Y(ω) = E(iω/ϕ)k, where E = a generalized viscoelastic stiffness; i = (−1)1/2; ω = angular frequency; ϕ = scaling factor; and k = an exponent valued between 0 and 1. The term “fractional derivative” refers to the value of k: when k = 0 the viscoelastic response is purely...

  8. The role of nuclear reactions in Monte Carlo calculations of absorbed and biological effective dose distributions in hadron therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Brons, S; Elsässer, T; Ferrari, A; Gadioli, E; Mairani, A; Parodi, K; Sala, P; Scholz, M; Sommerer, F

    2010-01-01

    Monte Carlo codes are rapidly spreading among hadron therapy community due to their sophisticated nuclear/electromagnetic models which allow an improved description of the complex mixed radiation field produced by nuclear reactions in therapeutic irradiation. In this contribution results obtained with the Monte Carlo code FLUKA are presented focusing on the production of secondary fragments in carbon ion interaction with water and on CT-based calculations of absorbed and biological effective dose for typical clinical situations. The results of the simulations are compared with the available experimental data and with the predictions of the GSI analytical treatment planning code TRiP.

  9. ENVIROMENTAL IMPACT OF THE POLLUTANTS FROM FEED-LOT WASTEWATER ON THE UNDERGROUND WATER

    OpenAIRE

    Walter M. Glessi; Nélida N. Pose; Ester C. Zamuner

    2012-01-01

    In this study is investigated the impact of pollutant from wastewater generated for twelve feed-lot of the southeast of Buenos Aires Province, Argentina, to determine the significant aspects on the vulnerability of the underground water. The Conesa (2010) methodological impact assessment guide was used starting from twelve Environmental Impact Assessment and is analyzed the influence of the feed-lot on the underground water. The amount of livestock, type of soil, groundwater deep, kind of pra...

  10. Solving a combined cutting-stock and lot-sizing problem with a column generating procedure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nonås, Sigrid Lise; Thorstenson, Anders

    In Nonås and Thorstenson [A combined cutting stock and lot sizing problem. European Journal of Operational Research 120(2) (2000) 327-42] a combined cutting-stock and lot-sizing problem is outlined under static and deterministic conditions. In this paper we suggest a new column generating solutio...... indicate that the procedure works well also for the extended cutting-stock problem with only a setup cost for each pattern change....

  11. Permeability measurement and scan imaging to assess clogging of pervious concrete pavements in parking lots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayhanian, Masoud; Anderson, Dane; Harvey, John T; Jones, David; Muhunthan, Balasingam

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes a study that used permeability measurement along with physical and hydrological characteristics of 20 pervious concrete pavements in parking lots throughout California. The permeability was measured at five locations: the main entrance, an area with no traffic, and three separate measurements within a parking space at each parking lot. Hydrological and physical site characteristics such as traffic flow, erosion, vegetation cover, sediments accumulation, maintenance practice, presence of cracking, rainfall, and temperature data were also collected for each parking lot. These data were used to perform detailed statistical analysis to determine factors influencing changes in permeability and hence assessing possible cause of clogging. In addition, seven representative core samples were obtained from four different parking lots with permeability ranging from very low to very high. Porosity profiles produced from CT scanning were used to assess the possible nature and extent of clogging. Results showed that there is a large variation in permeability within each parking lot and between different parking lots. In general, the age of the parking lot is the predominant factor influencing the permeability. Statistical analysis revealed that fine sediment (particles less than 38 μm) mass is also an important influencing factor. Other influencing factors with lower significance included number of days with a temperature greater than 30°C and the amount of vegetation next to the parking lot. The combined scanned image analysis and porosity profile of the cores showed that most clogging occurs near the surface of the pavement. While lower porosity generally appeared to be limited to the upper 25 mm, in some core samples evidence of lower porosity was found up to 100mm below the surface. PMID:22115516

  12. Changing the values of parameters on lot size reorder point model

    OpenAIRE

    Chang Hung-Chi

    2003-01-01

    The Just-In-Time (JIT) philosophy has received a great deal of attention. Several actions such as improving quality, reducing setup cost and shortening lead time have been recognized as effective ways to achieve the underlying goal of JIT. This paper considers the partial backorders, lot size reorder point inventory system with an imperfect production process. The objective is to simultaneously optimize the lot size, reorder point, process quality, setup cost and lead time, constrained on a s...

  13. Laboratory Assessment of Water Flow Simulator for Porous Parking Lots Reservoir and Soil Layers

    OpenAIRE

    Zul Fahmi Mohamed Jaafar; Meor Othman Hamzah; Fauziah Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    Porous parking lots were implemented to fill the scarcity and strengthen the sustainable development of impervious surfaces in Malaysia to reduce surface runoff. The new methodology proposed enable simulation of reservoir course at stipulated air voids despite details study on water levels and infiltration of porous parking lots system. A uniformly graded choker and reservoir stones functioned as reservoir structure for temporary storm water detention. A specially fabricated water flow simula...

  14. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae quinone oxidoreductase Lot6p: stability, inhibition and cooperativity

    OpenAIRE

    Megarity, Clare F.; Looi, Hong Keat; Timson, David J

    2014-01-01

    Lot6p (EC 1.5.1.39; Ylr011wp) is the sole quinone oxidoreductase in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using hexahistidine tagged, recombinant Lot6p, we determined the steady-state enzyme kinetic parameters with both NADH and NADPH as electron donors; no cooperativity was observed with these substrates. The NQO1 inhibitor curcumin, the NQO2 inhibitor resveratrol, the bacterial nitroreductase inhibitor nicotinamide and the phosphate mimic vanadate all stabilise the enzyme towards the...

  15. Size distributions and temporal variations of biological aerosol particles in the Amazon rainforest characterized by microscopy and real-time UV-APS fluorescence techniques during AMAZE-08

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Huffman

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available As a part of the AMAZE-08 campaign during the wet season in the rainforest of central Amazonia, an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS was operated for continuous measurements of fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAP. In the coarse particle size range (> 1 μm the campaign median and quartiles of FBAP number and mass concentration were 7.3 × 104 m−3 (4.0–13.2 × 104 m−3 and 0.72 μg m−3 (0.42–1.19 μg m−3, respectively, accounting for 24% (11–41% of total particle number and 47% (25–65% of total particle mass. During the five-week campaign in February–March 2008 the concentration of coarse-mode Saharan dust particles was highly variable. In contrast, FBAP concentrations remained fairly constant over the course of weeks and had a consistent daily pattern, peaking several hours before sunrise, suggesting observed FBAP was dominated by nocturnal spore emission. This conclusion was supported by the consistent FBAP number size distribution peaking at 2.3 μm, also attributed to fungal spores and mixed biological particles by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, light microscopy and biochemical staining. A second primary biological aerosol particle (PBAP mode between 0.5 and 1.0 μm was also observed by SEM, but exhibited little fluorescence and no true fungal staining. This mode may have consisted of single bacterial cells, brochosomes, various fragments of biological material, and small Chromalveolata (Chromista spores. Particles liquid-coated with mixed organic-inorganic material constituted a large fraction of observations, and these coatings contained salts likely from primary biological origin. We provide key support for the suggestion that real-time laser-induce fluorescence (LIF techniques using 355 nm excitation provide size-resolved concentrations of FBAP as a lower limit for the atmospheric abundance of biological particles in a pristine

  16. Species distribution modeling in the tropics: problems, potentialities, and the role of biological data for effective species conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cayuela, L.; Golicher, J.D.; Newton, A.C.; Kolb, M.; Alburquerque, de F.S.; Arets, E.J.M.M.; Alkemade, J.R.M.; Pérez, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we aim to investigate the problems and potentialities of species distribution modeling (SDM) as a tool for conservation planning and policy development and implementation in tropical regions. We reviewed 123 studies published between 1995 and 2007 in five of the leading journals in eco

  17. Coal-tar-based parking lot sealcoat: An unrecognized source of PAH to settled house dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, B.J.; Van Metre, P.C.; Wilson, J.T.; Musgrove, M.; Burbank, T.L.; Ennis, T.E.; Bashara, T.J.

    2010-01-01

    Despite much speculation, the principal factors controlling concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in settled house dust (SHD) have not yet been identified. In response to recent reports that dust from pavement with coaltar-based sealcoat contains extremely high concentrations of PAH, we measured PAH in SHD from 23 apartments and in dust from their associated parking lots, one-half of which had coal-tar-based sealcoat (CT). The median concentration of total PAH (T-PAH) in dust from CT parking lots (4760 ??g/g, n = 11) was 530 times higher than that from parking lots with other pavement surface types (asphalt-based sealcoat, unsealed asphalt, concrete [median 9.0 ??g/g, n = 12]). T-PAH in SHD from apartments with CT parking lots (median 129 ??g/g) was 25 times higher than that in SHD from apartments with parking lots with other pavement surface types (median 5.1 ??g/g). Presence or absence of CT on a parking lot explained 48% of the variance in log-transformed T-PAH in SHD. Urban land-use intensity near the residence also had a significant but weaker relation to T-PAH. No other variables tested, including carpeting, frequency of vacuuming, and indoor burning, were significant. ?? 2010 American Chemical Society.

  18. Discrete artificial bee colony algorithm for lot-streaming flowshop with total flowtime minimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Hongyan; Gao, Liang; Pan, Quanke

    2012-09-01

    Unlike a traditional flowshop problem where a job is assumed to be indivisible, in the lot-streaming flowshop problem, a job is allowed to overlap its operations between successive machines by splitting it into a number of smaller sub-lots and moving the completed portion of the sub-lots to downstream machine. In this way, the production is accelerated. This paper presents a discrete artificial bee colony (DABC) algorithm for a lot-streaming flowshop scheduling problem with total flowtime criterion. Unlike the basic ABC algorithm, the proposed DABC algorithm represents a solution as a discrete job permutation. An efficient initialization scheme based on the extended Nawaz-Enscore-Ham heuristic is utilized to produce an initial population with a certain level of quality and diversity. Employed and onlooker bees generate new solutions in their neighborhood, whereas scout bees generate new solutions by performing insert operator and swap operator to the best solution found so far. Moreover, a simple but effective local search is embedded in the algorithm to enhance local exploitation capability. A comparative experiment is carried out with the existing discrete particle swarm optimization, hybrid genetic algorithm, threshold accepting, simulated annealing and ant colony optimization algorithms based on a total of 160 randomly generated instances. The experimental results show that the proposed DABC algorithm is quite effective for the lot-streaming flowshop with total flowtime criterion in terms of searching quality, robustness and effectiveness. This research provides the references to the optimization research on lot-streaming flowshop.

  19. Evaluation of coverage of enriched UF6 cylinder storage lots by existing criticality accident alarms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) is leased from the US Department of Energy (DOE) by the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC), a government corporation formed in 1993. PORTS is in transition from regulation by DOE to regulation by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). One regulation is 10 CFR Part 76.89, which requires that criticality alarm systems be provided for the site. PORTS originally installed criticality accident alarm systems in all building for which nuclear criticality accidents were credible. Currently, however, alarm systems are not installed in the enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF6) cylinder storage lots. This report analyzes and documents the extent to which enriched UF6 cylinder storage lots at PORTS are covered by criticality detectors and alarms currently installed in adjacent buildings. Monte Carlo calculations are performed on simplified models of the cylinder storage lots and adjacent buildings. The storage lots modelled are X-745B, X-745C, X745D, X-745E, and X-745F. The criticality detectors modelled are located in building X-343, the building X-344A/X-342A complex, and portions of building X-330 (see Figures 1 and 2). These criticality detectors are those located closest to the cylinder storage lots. Results of this analysis indicate that the existing criticality detectors currently installed at PORTS are largely ineffective in detecting neutron radiation from criticality accidents in most of the cylinder storage lots at PORTS, except sometimes along portions of their peripheries

  20. Biological impacts of TiO2 on human lung cell lines A549 and H1299: particle size distribution effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increasing use of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles in many commercial applications has led to emerging concerns regarding the safety and environmental impact of these materials. In this study, we have investigated the biological impact of nano-TiO2 (with particle primary size of 20 nm Aeroxide P25) on human lung cell lines in vitro and also the effect of particle size distribution on the particle uptake and apparent toxicity. The biological impact of nano-TiO2 is shown to be influenced by the concentration and particle size distribution of the TiO2 and the impact was shown to differ between the two cell lines (A549 and H1299) investigated herein. A549 cell line was shown to be relatively resistant to the total amount of TiO2 particles uptaken, as measured by cell viability and metabolic assays, while H1299 had a much higher capacity to ingest TiO2 particles and aggregates, with consequent evidence of impact at concentrations as low as 30–150 μg/mL TiO2. Evidence gathered from this study suggests that both viability and metabolic assays (measuring metabolic and mitochondrial activities and also cellular ATP level) should be carried out collectively to gain a true assessment of the impact of exposure to TiO2 particles.

  1. Spectral and angular distributions of charged particles outside biological shielding of the 70 GeV Serpukhov accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Space, angular and energy distributions of the charged particle of radiation field outside the Serpukhov accelerator shielding at different protons beam energies obtained with the ΔE-E spectrometer are presented. The influence of the accelerating complex operation on the charged particles field shaping outside the concrete and heterogeneous steel-concrete shieldings has been analyzed. The ratios between neutrons and charged particles of the radiation field outside the 70 GeV accelerator shielding have been estimated

  2. Biological processes in the North Sea: comparison of Calanus helgolandicus and Calanus finmarchicus vertical distribution and production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonasdottir, Sigrun; Koski, Marja

    2011-01-01

    Comparison of abundance, vertical distribution and reproduction of the cousin species, the boreal Calanus finmarchicus and temperate Calanus helgolandicus was carried out on four cruises in July and August north of the Dogger Bank, North Sea. During this period, the water column was highly strati...... ecosystem longer than previously thought, and with warmer surface temperatures retreat to cooler, deeper waters utilizing the deep chlorophyll maximum. This implies that C. finmarchicus cannot be reliably sampled with the Continuous Plankton Recorder during summer....

  3. Drivers of extinction risk in African mammals: the interplay of distribution state, human pressure, conservation response and species biology

    OpenAIRE

    Di Marco, Moreno; BUCHANAN Graeme, M.; SZANTOI ZOLTAN; Holmgren, Milena; Grottolo Marasini, Gabriele; GROSS DORIT; Tranquilli, Sandra; Boitani, Luigi; Rondinini, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Although conservation intervention has reversed the decline of some species, our success is outweighed by a much larger number of species moving towards extinction. Extinction risk modelling can identify correlates of risk and species not yet recognized to be threatened. Here, we use machine learning models to identify correlates of extinction risk in African terrestrial mammals using a set of variables belonging to four classes: species distribution state, human pressures, ...

  4. Radiation induced damage to the cells of pig hairs: a biological indicator of radiation dose and dose distribution in skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation damage to the matrix cells of actively growing pig hairs resulted in a transient reduction in diameter. This was clearly dose dependent for doses in the range 0.5-5 Gy for 250 kV X rays and 3-8 Gy surface dose for 90Sr β rays. While the relationship between the percentage reduction in hair diameter and the X ray dose was linear between 0.5 and 5 Gy, the skin surface dose for β rays and the percentage reduction in hair diameter was found to be best fitted by a quadratic equation. Differences in the effect produced by X and β ray irradiation can be attributed to the absorption of β rays with depth in the dermis and a correction for this has been applied. This system would appear to have considerable potential for use as a biological dosemeter. (author)

  5. Floral biology of Commiphora wightii – a data deficient medicinal plant distributed in the arid zones of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarti Harshadbhai Kawane

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Commiphora wightii commonly known as Guggul is an important medicinal plant that contains oleo gum resin which is used as antiarthritic, hypocholesterolaemic and hypolipidaemic agents. It is an apomictic species native to India (Gujarat, Rajasthan and Pakistan. Due to over exploitation, it is enlisted under the ‘data deficient’ category in the IUCN Red Data Book. However, very little information is available about its reproductive biology. Knowledge of reproductive biology of any plant species is crucial for its genetic improvement and planning for effective conservation and management of genetic resources. The present paper reports our findings on the flower opening pattern, pollen grain viability, stigma receptivity, flowering behaviour and fruit set in C. wightii. The study showed that flowers do not open in the night hours and maximum flower opening occurs in the morning hours up to 8.00 am. Maximum stigma receptivity was observed on the first day of flower opening. Polymorphism in pollen grain size was observed and a significant difference in pollen grain size was observed between hermaphrodite and male accessions. Maximum number of pollen grains is produced by hermaphrodite accessions. Pollen viability ranged from 35.07 to 60.85 % among the accessions. Flowering studied in 37 accessions showed wide variability among the accessions. Peak flowering was observed from November to April. Based on data on peak flowering time, the accessions were grouped into profusely, medium and shy flowering types. The fruit set percentage was very low among the accessions; it remained between zero and 5%.

  6. Optimal and heuristic solutions for the single and multiple batch flow shop lot streaming problems with equal sublots

    OpenAIRE

    Kalir, Adar A.

    1999-01-01

    This research is concerned with the development of efficient solutions to various problems that arise in the flow-shop environments which utilize lot-streaming. Lot streaming is a commonly used process of splitting production lots into sublots and, then, of scheduling the sublots in an overlapping fashion on the machines, so as to expedite the progress of orders in production and to improve the overall performance of the production system. The different lot-streaming problems that arise i...

  7. Longevity of Juniperus procera seed lots under different storage conditions: implications for ex situ conservation in seed banks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Negash Mamo; Diriba Nigusie; Mulualem Tigabu; Demel Teketay; Miftah Fekadu

    2011-01-01

    Juniperus procera Endl. Is economically important timberspecies, but its populations are extremely small and fragmented in itsnatural habitat, thus, calling for immediate ex situ conservation. Here weexamined the effects of seed sources and storage temperature on thelongevity of Juniperus procera seed lots through collection and preserva-tion of seeds in seed banks. Seeds were collected from nine sites acrossthe species natural distribution in Ethiopia and stored in four warehouses:modern cold room (5℃), mud house (15℃), concrete block house (17℃)or corrugated iron house (20℃) for 42 months. Every three months, arandom sample of stored seeds were drawn and tested for germination. Ahighly significant variation (p 0.80; p<0.01). Cold storage also resulted in enhancement ofgermination through its stratification effect that terminated the non-deepphysiological dormancy of juniper seeds. In conclusion, seed lots withgood initial germination can be effectively stored in cold room (5℃) upto four years. In the absence of modern cold stores, mud houses can beused as a good altemative to store seeds at local level.

  8. Improvement of Biological Indicators by Uniformly Distributing Bacillus subtilis Spores in Monolayers To Evaluate Enhanced Spore Decontamination Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raguse, Marina; Fiebrandt, Marcel; Stapelmann, Katharina; Madela, Kazimierz; Laue, Michael; Lackmann, Jan-Wilm; Thwaite, Joanne E; Setlow, Peter; Awakowicz, Peter; Moeller, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    Novel decontamination technologies, including cold low-pressure plasma and blue light (400 nm), are promising alternatives to conventional surface decontamination methods. However, the standardization of the assessment of such sterilization processes remains to be accomplished. Bacterial endospores of the genera Bacillus and Geobacillus are frequently used as biological indicators (BIs) of sterility. Ensuring standardized and reproducible BIs for reliable testing procedures is a significant problem in industrial settings. In this study, an electrically driven spray deposition device was developed, allowing fast, reproducible, and homogeneous preparation of Bacillus subtilis 168 spore monolayers on glass surfaces. A detailed description of the structural design as well as the operating principle of the spraying device is given. The reproducible formation of spore monolayers of up to 5 × 10(7) spores per sample was verified by scanning electron microscopy. Surface inactivation studies revealed that monolayered spores were inactivated by UV-C (254 nm), low-pressure argon plasma (500 W, 10 Pa, 100 standard cubic cm per min), and blue light (400 nm) significantly faster than multilayered spores were. We have thus succeeded in the uniform preparation of reproducible, highly concentrated spore monolayers with the potential to generate BIs for a variety of nonpenetrating surface decontamination techniques. PMID:26801572

  9. In vitro determination of toxicity, binding, retention, subcellular distribution and biological efficacy of the boron neutron capture agent DAC-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), 10B is delivered selectively to the tumour cells and the nuclide then forms high-LET radiation (4He2+ and 7Li3+) upon neutron capture. Today much research is focused on development of a variety of boron compounds aimed for BNCT. The compounds must be thoroughly analysed in preclinical tests regarding basic characteristics such as binding and subcellular distribution to enable accurate estimations of dose-modifying factors. DAC-1, 2-[2-(3-amino-propyl)-1,2-dicarba-closo-dodecaboran(12)-1-yl-methoxyl]-1,3 -propanediol was synthesized at our laboratories and the human colon carcinoma cells LS-174T were used as an in vitro model. The boron compound showed a remarkable intracellular accumulation, 20-100 times higher than the boron content in the culture medium, in cultured cells and was not removed by extensive washes. Approximately half of the boron taken up also remained within the cells for at least 4 days. The DAC-1 compound alone was not toxic at boron concentrations below 2.5 μg B/g. The intracellular distribution of the boron compound was investigated by subcellular fractionation experiments and low pH treatments. It is possible that DAC-1 binds to some intracellular molecules or to membranes connected with organelles in the cytoplasm or even to the inside of the outer cell membrane. Another possibility is that the compound, due to the somewhat lipophilic properties, is embedded in the membranes. Thermal neutron irradiations were carried out at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). At a survival level of 0.1, DAC-1 + thermal neutrons were about 10.5 times more effective in cell inactivation than the thermal neutrons alone. Monte Carlo calculations gave a mean value of the 10B-dependent specific energy, the dose, of 0.22 Gy. The total physical dose during irradiation of DAC-1-containing cells with a neutron fluence of 0.18 x 1012 n/cm2 was 0.39 Gy. The dose-modifying factor, at survival level 0.1, when comparing

  10. In vitro determination of toxicity, binding, retention, subcellular distribution and biological efficacy of the boron neutron capture agent DAC-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilly, N; Olsson, P; Hartman, T; Coderre, J; Makar, M; Malmquist, J; Sjöberg, S; Pettersson, J; Carlsson, J; Glimelius, B

    1996-01-01

    In boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), 10B is delivered selectively to the tumour cells and the nuclide then forms high-LET radiation (4He2+ and 7Li3+) upon neutron capture. Today much research is focused on development of a variety of boron compounds aimed for BNCT. The compounds must be thoroughly analysed in preclinical tests regarding basic characteristics such as binding and subcellular distribution to enable accurate estimations of dose-modifying factors. DAC-1,2-[2-(3-amino-propyl)-1,2-dicarba-closo-dodecaboran (12)-1-yl-methoxy]- 1,3-propanediol was synthesized at our laboratories and the human colon carcinoma cells LS-174T were used as an in vitro model. The boron compound showed a remarkable intracellular accumulation, 20-100 times higher than the boron content in the culture medium, in cultured cells and was not removed by extensive washes. Approximately half of the boron taken up also remained within the cells for at least 4 days. The DAC-1 compound alone was not toxic at boron concentrations below 2.5 micrograms B/g. The intracellular distribution of the boron compound was investigated by subcellular fractionation experiments and low pH treatments. It is possible that DAC-1 binds to some intracellular molecules or to membranes connected with organelles in the cytoplasm or even to the inside of the outer cell membrane. Another possibility is that the compound, due to the somewhat lipophilic properties, is embedded in the membranes. Thermal neutron irradiations were carried out at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). At a survival level of 0.1, DAC-1 + thermal neutrons were about 10.5 times more effective in cell inactivation than the thermal neutrons alone. Monte Carlo calculations gave a mean value of the 10B-dependent specific energy, the dose, of 0.22 Gy. The total physical dose during irradiation of DAC-1-containing cells with a neutron fluence of 0.18 x 10(12) n/cm2 was 0.39 Gy. The dose-modifying factor, at survival level 0.1, when

  11. 珍稀植物景东报春的地理分布和生态生物学特性%Geographic distribution and ecologic-biological characteristics of a rare primrose: Primula interjacens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛大伟; 黄媛; 张长芹; 罗吉凤

    2003-01-01

    Primula interjacens Chen, an endemic and rare species to China, is restrictively distributed in Mt. Wuliangshan of Yunnan Province. Only three populations are found. The species has been fallen into endangered condition. Its present state of distribution, biological and ecological characteristics are investigated. In addition, the factors causing this species endangered and conservation strategies are analyzed briefly.

  12. Relationship between the herbaceous and woody vegetation caracteristics and biological soil crusts distribution in fallow and rangeland across a latitudinal gradient in Sahelian Western Niger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malam Issa, O.; Hiernaux, P.; Kalilou, A.; Rajot, J. L.; Languille, J.

    2012-04-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSC) are common soil feature in the Sahel, in Western Niger. They occur in association with various types of physical soil crusts in fallow, rangeland and 'tiger bush' biomes (landscape with a typical pattern consisting of alternating dense thicket bands composed of shrubs and small trees, and bare soil bands). Despite their widespread occurrence, little research has focussed on the spatial extent of microbiotic soil crusts at regional scale in Sahel. Moreover, little is known about the interrelations between the occurrence of those crusts and the characteristics of the vegetation. In this paper, field data on the distribution of biological soil crusts and some characteristics (cover, composition, mass) of herbaceous and woody vegetation co-occurring in fallows and rangelands are presented and analysed. The study was performed in ten sites selected in Western Niger along a south-north climatic gradient between 650 to 300 mm of annual rainfall. The soil surfaces features, specifically physical and biological soil crusts, were surveyed twice in july-october 2009 and October-november 2011. The second survey combined the assessment of soil surfaces features with systematic observations of vegetation. Herbaceous cover, mass and species composition were assessed by stratified sampling along a 200 meter axis. PCQ distance method was used to characterise the density, cover and species composition of the woody plant population. The extends of BSC observed in the 10 sites in 2011 are in the same order as those observed in 2009, i.e. ranging between 4 and 59% in 2009 vs 1.5 and 48 % in 2011. The results showed a significant increase of BSC coverage with increasing annual rainfall towards the south of the gradient. The actual cover of herbaceous vegetation, taking the extends of bare soil patches in account, averages 14.2 % over the different sites. Similarly to BSC repartition, a slight increase of herbaceous cover is observed from the northern dryer

  13. Optimal Method of Capacitated Lot-Sizing Planning in Manufacturing Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Jian-feng; ZHONG Yue-xian; HAN Zan-dong

    2006-01-01

    This paper analyzes the capacitated lot-sizing problem considering an individual machine's production capacity using a two-layer hierarchical method to minimize the sum of the dynamic inventory cost and the overtime penalty cost.The genetic algorithm,the parameter linear programming method,and a heuristic method were used in the developed methOd.The method uses the genetic operator to define the lot-sizing matrix(the first layer),linear prograrnming to determine each machine's schedule(the second layer)according to the lot-sizing matrix,and the heuristic method to verify the feasibility ofthe solutions by adiusting them to meet the constraint requirements.The scheduling of machines in a press shop demonstrates the effectiveness Of the algorithm.The result shows that the algorithm is convergent.

  14. Parallel ant colony algorithm and its application in the capacitated lot sizing problem for an agile supply chain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李树刚; 吴智铭; 庞小红

    2004-01-01

    In order to study the capacitated lot sizing problem for a supply chain of corporate multi-location fac-tories to minimize the total costs of production, inventory and transportation under the system capacity restriction and product due date, while at the same time considering the menu distributed balance, the mathematical pro-gramming models are decomposed and reduced from the 3 levels into 2 levels according to the idea of just-in-time production. In order to overcome the premature convergence of ACA (ant colony algorithms) , the idea of mute operation is adopted in genetic algorithms and a PACA (parallel ant colony algorithms) is proposed forsupply chain optimization. Finally, an illustrative example is given, and a comparison is made with standard BAR ( Branch and Bound) and PACA approach. The result shows that the latter is more effective and promis-ing.

  15. Characterization, distribution, biology and impact on Italian walnut orchards of the invasive North-American leafminer Coptodisca lucifluella (Lepidoptera: Heliozelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, U; van Nieukerken, E J; Sasso, R; Gebiola, M; Gualtieri, L; Viggiani, G

    2015-04-01

    The leafminer Coptodisca sp. (Lepidoptera: Heliozelidae), recently recorded for the first time in Europe on Italian black and common walnut trees, is shown to be the North-American Coptodisca lucifluella (Clemens) based on morphological (forewing pattern) and molecular (cytochrome oxidase c subunit I sequence) evidence. The phylogenetic relatedness of three species feeding on Juglandaceae suggests that C. lucifluella has likely shifted, within the same host plant family, from its original North-American hosts Carya spp. to Juglans spp. Over the few years since its detection, it has established in many regions in Italy and has become a widespread and dominant invasive species. The leafminer completes three to four generations per year, with the first adults emerging in April-May and mature larvae of the last generation starting hibernation in September-October. Although a high larval mortality was recorded in field observations (up to 74%), the impact of the pest was substantial with all leaves infested at the end of the last generation in all 3 years tested. The distribution of the leafminer in the canopy was homogeneous. The species is redescribed and illustrated, a lectotype is designated and a new synonymy is established. PMID:25630620

  16. High concentrations of drug in target tissues following local controlled release are utilized for both drug distribution and biologic effect: an example with epicardial inotropic drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslov, Mikhail Y; Edelman, Elazer R; Wei, Abraham E; Pezone, Matthew J; Lovich, Mark A

    2013-10-28

    Local drug delivery preferentially loads target tissues with a concentration gradient from the surface or point of release that tapers down to more distant sites. Drug that diffuses down this gradient must be in unbound form, but such drug can only elicit a biologic effect through receptor interactions. Drug excess loads tissues, increasing gradients and driving penetration, but with limited added biological response. We examined the hypothesis that local application reduces dramatically systemic circulating drug levels but leads to significantly higher tissue drug concentration than might be needed with systemic infusion in a rat model of local epicardial inotropic therapy. Epinephrine was infused systemically or released locally to the anterior wall of the heart using a novel polymeric platform that provides steady, sustained release over a range of precise doses. Epinephrine tissue concentration, upregulation of cAMP, and global left ventricular response were measured at equivalent doses and at doses equally effective in raising indices of contractility. The contractile stimulation by epinephrine was linked to drug tissue levels and commensurate cAMP upregulation for IV systemic infusion, but not with local epicardial delivery. Though cAMP was a powerful predictor of contractility with local application, tissue epinephrine levels were high and variable--only a small fraction of the deposited epinephrine was utilized in second messenger signaling and biologic effect. The remainder of deposited drug was likely used in diffusive transport and distribution. Systemic side effects were far more profound with IV infusion which, though it increased contractility, also induced tachycardia and loss of systemic vascular resistance, which were not seen with local application. Local epicardial inotropic delivery illustrates then a paradigm of how target tissues differentially handle and utilize drug compared to systemic infusion. PMID:23872515

  17. Biology and Economics: Metaphors that Economists usually take from Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny García Callejas

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Adam Smith, Alfred Marshall, Stanley Jevons, Karl Marx, Francois Quesnay and Joseph Schumpeter all have at least one thing in common: they used biological metaphors when speaking about economics. Nonetheless, today, this relation subsists and biology and economics are viewed as complementary sciences that have a lot to gain from joint research in fields like: evolutionary economics, economic growth, cognitive economics and environmental and ecological economics, among others. This paper, divided in four sections, will show this conclusion and explain that biology and economics are more sisters than strangers

  18. VERTEX: biological implications of total attenuation and chlorophyll and phycoerythrin fluorescence distributions along a 2000 m deep section in the Gulf of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broenkow, William W.; Yuen, Marilyn A.; Yarbrough, Mark A.

    1992-04-01

    A 2000 m deep section of total attenuation and chlorophyll and phycoerythrin fluorescence from 26° to 59°N latitude in the northeast Pacific is discussed in terms of inferred biological processes. Photic zone distributions of these quantities vary from nutrient-limited conditions in the subtropics to light-limited conditions in the subarctic. Phycoerythrin-containing organisms, probably Synechococcus, contribute to a strong, near-surface orange fluorescence signal in the Gulf of Alaska. We now recognize that the fluorescence minimum (about 300 m) between the photic zone and the tertiary fluorescence maximum may be related to secondary producers that "repackage" organic matter produced in the photic zone. The tertiary fluorescence maximum (about 1000 m) is a continuous feature of the oxygen minimum zone in the North Pacific. The presence of phycoerythrin in the tertiary maximum is consistent with heterotrophic cyanobacteria and other unidentified microbial assemblages in the oxygen minimum, though there is no strong biological evidence that this is true.

  19. Modeling of Multi-Level Capacitated Lot-Size Scheduling Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhaimy Ismail

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Lot-size is the clustering of items for transportation or manufacturing processes occurring at the same time. The issue in lot-size problem is to design production processes so that the feasible production quantities are equal to customer demand quantities and the timing of production is such that inventory positions are almost zero. Approach: In this study, we explore the multi-level lot-size and scheduling problem. It is on a multi-level capacitated lot-size problem or known as the multi-level lot-size problem with bottlenecks. Two models were introduced to solve the multi-level lot-size problem namely the Billington model and Alf Kimms model. Using these models, a simple heuristic method was designed to solve a multi level capacitated lot sizing scheduling problem. Results: In this study, we showed that Alf Kimms model is more efficient than Billington model. The result given by Alf Kimms model is always feasible without further modification unlike the Billington model. This is due to the way the constraint is devised to ensure the inventory balance. The constraint used in Alf Kimms model ensures that inventory in hand is always sufficient to fulfill the demand occurred in each period. However, the use of this constraint in Billington model is to ensure that the total production for each item is always greater than or equal to the total external demand in the time horizon. Therefore, without some form of modification, the result given by Billington model will be infeasible production plan. Conclusion: A comparative study between these models shows that both models were successfully devised to solve capacitated multi-level lot sizing problem with the objective function to minimize the total holding costs and setup- cost. This study also shows that the production schedule will always start at the last period because this will give the lowest costs and it also shows that Alf Kimms model gives a set of

  20. Effects of Imperfect Quality and Defective Items on Economic Production Lot Size

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raafat; N; Ibrahim; Paul; Lochert

    2002-01-01

    The classical EPQ model has been used for a long ti me and is widely accepted and implemented. Nevertheless, the analysis for finding an economic lot size has based on a number of unrealistic assumptions. A common unrealistic assumption in using EPQ is that all units produced are of good quali ty. The classical EPQ model shows that the optimal lot size will generate minimum ma nufacturing cost, thus producing minimum setup cost and inventory cost. However, this is only true if all products manufactured...

  1. Heuristic procedures for a stochastic lot-sizing problem in make-to-order manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Dellaert, Nico; Melo, M. T.

    1995-01-01

    textabstractWe consider a single item, uncapacitated stochastic lot-sizing problem motivated by a Dutch make-to-order company producing steel pipes. Since no finished goods inventory is kept, a delivery date is fixed upon arrival of each order. The objective is to determine the optimal size of production lots so that delivery dates are met as closely as possible with a limited number of set-ups. Orders that are not satisfied on time are backordered and a penalty cost is incurred in those case...

  2. Field Performance of Differentially Deteriorated Seed Lots of Maize (Zea mays) under Different Irrigation Treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Kazem GHASSEMI-GOLEZANI; Bahareh DALIL; Mohammad MOGHADDAM; Yaeghoob RAEY

    2011-01-01

    A sub-sample of maize (cv. KSC301) seeds was kept as control or vigorous seed lot and two other sub-samples with about 16% moisture content were artificially deteriorated at 40C for 16 and 18 days. The three seed lots had seed viabilities of 99% (V1), 91% (V2) and 79% (V3). Laboratory tests were carried out as CR design with four replicates. However, the field experiment was conducted as factorial based on RCB design with three replicates to investigate the performance of differentiall...

  3. Particle induced X-ray emission and ion dose distribution in a biological micro-beam: Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    data. Two other factors can affect the pattern of dose deposition in the biological medium: the phase space distribution of the beam particles and the production of secondary electrons (known as δ-rays). We investigated this by projecting simulated particles oriented at small angles with the beam axis. For lower fluence (2.6 × 104 protons mm−2), we determined that despite only the target cell being assumed to be hit by the particle beam, some significant level of radiation dose was, in fact, delivered to the adjacent cells. This was most probably due to secondary electrons. The simulation showed that two of the cells adjacent to the target cell received 42% and 5% of the dose delivered to the target cell per proton. When the incident fluence on the collimator was increased to 1.3 × 106 protons mm−2, it was observed that a significant number of protons deflected from the collimator spread into an area of 4340 μm2. This is a significant spread when compared to the target area of 25 μm2. The maximum number of particles that were delivered off-target was 25% of the particles delivered to the target cell. This equates to a probability of delivering 1 particle anywhere in an area of 4340 μm2 for every 4 particles delivered to the target cell. This result has significant implications. Results of this work warrant a further investigation because if these results can be re validated, perhaps experimentally or through another simulation code, then they may have significant implications on the interpretation of published data from biological microbeam experiments

  4. Thermo-hydro-geochemical modelling of the bentonite buffer. LOT A2 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sena, Clara; Salas, Joaquin; Arcos, David (Amphos 21 Consulting S.L., Barcelona (Spain))

    2010-12-15

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and waste management company (SKB) is conducting a series of long term buffer material (LOT) tests at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) to test the behaviour of the bentonite buffer under conditions similar to those expected in a KBS-3 deep geological repository for high level nuclear waste (HLNW). In the present work a numerical model is developed to simulate (i) the thermo-hydraulic, (ii) transport and (iii) geochemical processes that have been observed in the LOT A2 test parcel. The LOT A2 test lasted approximately 6 years, and consists of a 4 m long vertical borehole drilled in diorite rock, from the ground of the Aespoe HRL tunnel. The borehole is composed of a central heater, maintained at 130 deg C in the lower 2 m of the borehole, a copper tube surrounding the heater and a 100 mm thick ring of pre-compacted Wyoming MX-80 bentonite around the copper tube /Karnland et al. 2009/. The numerical model developed here is a 1D axis-symmetric model that simulates the water saturation of the bentonite under a constant thermal gradient; the transport of solutes; and, the geochemical reactions observed in the bentonite blocks. Two cases have been modelled, one considering the highest temperature reached by the bentonite (at 3 m depth in the borehole, where temperatures of 130 and 85 deg C have been recorded near the copper tube and near the granitic host rock, respectively) and the other case assuming a constant temperature of 25 deg C, representing the upper part of borehole, where the bentonite has not been heated. In the LOT A2 test, the initial partially saturated bentonite becomes progressively water saturated, due to the injection of Aespoe granitic groundwater at granite - bentonite interface. The transport of solutes during the bentonite water saturation stage is believed to be controlled by water uptake from the surrounding groundwater to the wetting front and, additionally, in the case of heated bentonite, by a cyclic evaporation

  5. Thermo-hydro-geochemical modelling of the bentonite buffer. LOT A2 experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and waste management company (SKB) is conducting a series of long term buffer material (LOT) tests at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) to test the behaviour of the bentonite buffer under conditions similar to those expected in a KBS-3 deep geological repository for high level nuclear waste (HLNW). In the present work a numerical model is developed to simulate (i) the thermo-hydraulic, (ii) transport and (iii) geochemical processes that have been observed in the LOT A2 test parcel. The LOT A2 test lasted approximately 6 years, and consists of a 4 m long vertical borehole drilled in diorite rock, from the ground of the Aespoe HRL tunnel. The borehole is composed of a central heater, maintained at 130 deg C in the lower 2 m of the borehole, a copper tube surrounding the heater and a 100 mm thick ring of pre-compacted Wyoming MX-80 bentonite around the copper tube /Karnland et al. 2009/. The numerical model developed here is a 1D axis-symmetric model that simulates the water saturation of the bentonite under a constant thermal gradient; the transport of solutes; and, the geochemical reactions observed in the bentonite blocks. Two cases have been modelled, one considering the highest temperature reached by the bentonite (at 3 m depth in the borehole, where temperatures of 130 and 85 deg C have been recorded near the copper tube and near the granitic host rock, respectively) and the other case assuming a constant temperature of 25 deg C, representing the upper part of borehole, where the bentonite has not been heated. In the LOT A2 test, the initial partially saturated bentonite becomes progressively water saturated, due to the injection of Aespoe granitic groundwater at granite - bentonite interface. The transport of solutes during the bentonite water saturation stage is believed to be controlled by water uptake from the surrounding groundwater to the wetting front and, additionally, in the case of heated bentonite, by a cyclic evaporation

  6. TRAF2 regulates the cytoplasmic/nuclear distribution of TRAF4 and its biological function in breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiaoli [Department of Pathology, The First Affiliated Hospital and College of Basic Medical Sciences of China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Wen, Zhifeng [Department of Neurosurgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Sun, Limei; Wang, Jian; Song, Min; Wang, Enhua [Department of Pathology, The First Affiliated Hospital and College of Basic Medical Sciences of China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Mi, Xiaoyi, E-mail: xiaoyi_mi@163.com [Department of Pathology, The First Affiliated Hospital and College of Basic Medical Sciences of China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China)

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •TRAF2 appears to interact with TRAF4 in breast cancer cell lines. •TRAF2 affects the localization and function of TRAF4 in breast cancer cell lines. •TRAF4 may play an important role in the activation of NF-κB via TRAF2. -- Abstract: Although numerous studies have shown that tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 4 (TRAF4) plays an important role in the carcinogenesis of many tumor types, its exact molecular mechanism remains elusive. In this study, we examined the regulation function of TRAF2 to the cytoplasmic/nuclear distribution of TRAF4 in the breast cancer cell line. Using cell immunofluorescent staining, we found that TRAF2 and TRAF4 were co-localized to the cytoplasm in MCF-7 cells. Co-immunoprecipitation showed that TRAF2 could interact with TRAF4 in MCF-10A, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines. Western blotting showed TRAF2 depletion by targeted siRNA in MDA-MB-231 cells led to reduced TRAF4 expression in the cytoplasm and augmented TRAF4 expression in the nucleus. Cytoplasmic expression of TRAF4 was augmented and nuclear expression was reduced when MCF-7 cells were transfected with hTRAF2pLPCX-HA-Flag/P874. MCF-7 cells expressing hTRAF2pLPCX-HA-Flag/P874 had enhanced cell proliferation rates. The nuclear expression of NF-κB significantly increased after TNF-α treatment. When hTRAF2pLPCX-HA-Flag/P874 and the siRNA-TRAF4 plasmid were cotransfected, the nuclear expression of NF-κB was significantly reduced compared with cells transfected with hTRAF2pLPCX-HA-Flag/P874 only. In conclusion, TRAF2 appears to interact with TRAF4 and affect the localization of TRAF4 in breast cancer cell lines. The overexpression of TRAF2 augmented the cytoplasmic expression of TRAF4 which promoted cell proliferation and inhibited cell apoptosis by activating NF-κB nuclear transcription. TRAF4 may play an important role in the activation of NF-κB via TRAF2.

  7. Fluorescent biological aerosol particle concentrations and size distributions measured with an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS in Central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Huffman

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs, including bacteria, spores and pollen, are essential for the spread of organisms and disease in the biosphere, and numerous studies have suggested that they may be important for atmospheric processes, including the formation of clouds and precipitation. The atmospheric abundance and size distribution of PBAPs, however, are largely unknown. At a semi-urban site in Mainz, Germany, we used an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS to measure fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAPs, which can be regarded as viable bioaerosol particles representing a lower limit for the actual abundance of PBAPs. Fluorescence of non-biological aerosol components are likely to influence the measurement results obtained for fine particles (<1 μm, but not for coarse particles (1–20 μm.

    Averaged over the four-month measurement period (August–December 2006, the mean number concentration of coarse FBAPs was ~3×10−2 cm−3, corresponding to ~4% of total coarse particle number. The mean mass concentration of FBAPs was ~1 μg m−3, corresponding to ~20% of total coarse particle mass. The FBAP number size distributions exhibited alternating patterns with peaks at various diameters. A pronounced peak at ~3 μm was essentially always observed and can be described by the following campaign-average lognormal fit parameters: geometric mean diameter 3.2 μm, geometric standard deviation 1.3, number concentration 1.6×10−2 cm−3. This peak is likely due to fungal spores or agglomerated bacteria, and it exhibited a pronounced diel cycle with maximum intensity during early/mid-morning. FBAP peaks around ~1.5 μm, ~5 μm, and ~13 μm were also observed, but less pronounced and less frequent. These may be explained by single bacterial cells, larger fungal spores, and pollen grains, respectively.

    The observed number concentrations and

  8. Fluorescent biological aerosol particle concentrations and size distributions measured with an Ultraviolet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UV-APS in Central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Huffman

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Primary Biological Aerosol Particles (PBAPs, including bacteria, spores and pollen, are essential for the spread of organisms and disease in the biosphere, and numerous studies have suggested that they may be important for atmospheric processes, including the formation of clouds and precipitation. The atmospheric abundance and size distribution of PBAPs, however, are largely unknown. At a semi-urban site in Mainz, Germany we used an Ultraviolet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UV-APS to measure Fluorescent Biological Aerosol Particles (FBAPs, which provide an estimate of viable bioaerosol particles and can be regarded as an approximate lower limit for the actual abundance of PBAPs. Fluorescence of non-biological aerosol components are likely to influence the measurement results obtained for fine particles (<1 μm, but not for coarse particles (1–20 μm.

    Averaged over the four-month measurement period (August–December 2006, the mean number concentration of coarse FBAPs was ~3×10−2 cm−3, corresponding to ~4% of total coarse particle number. The mean mass concentration of FBAPs was ~1μg m−3, corresponding to ~20% of total coarse particle mass. The FBAP number size distributions exhibited alternating patterns with peaks at various diameters. A pronounced peak at ~3 μm was essentially always observed and can be described by the following campaign-average lognormal fit parameters: geometric mean diameter 3.2 μm, geometric standard deviation 1.3, number concentration 1.6×10−2 cm−3. This peak is likely due to fungal spores or agglomerated bacteria, and it exhibited a pronounced diel cycle (24-h with maximum intensity during early/mid-morning. FBAP peaks around ~1.5 μm, ~5 μm, and ~13 μm were also observed, but less pronounced and less frequent. These may be single bacterial cells, larger fungal spores, and pollen grains, respectively.

    The observed number

  9. High Sensitivity Method to Estimate Distribution of Hyaluronan Molecular Sizes in Small Biological Samples Using Gas-Phase Electrophoretic Mobility Molecular Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Do

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyaluronan is a negatively charged polydisperse polysaccharide where both its size and tissue concentration play an important role in many physiological and pathological processes. The various functions of hyaluronan depend on its molecular size. Up to now, it has been difficult to study the role of hyaluronan in diseases with pathological changes in the extracellular matrix where availability is low or tissue samples are small. Difficulty to obtain large enough biopsies from human diseased tissue or tissue from animal models has also restricted the study of hyaluronan. In this paper, we demonstrate that gas-phase electrophoretic molecular mobility analyzer (GEMMA can be used to estimate the distribution of hyaluronan molecular sizes in biological samples with a limited amount of hyaluronan. The low detection level of the GEMMA method allows for estimation of hyaluronan molecular sizes from different parts of small organs. Hence, the GEMMA method opens opportunity to attain a profile over the distribution of hyaluronan molecular sizes and estimate changes caused by disease or experimental conditions that has not been possible to obtain before.

  10. Population biology and distribution of the portunid crab Callinectes ornatus (Decapoda: Brachyura in an estuary-bay complex of southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timoteo T. Watanabe

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Trawl fisheries are associated with catches of swimming crabs, which are an important economic resource for commercial as well for small-scale fisheries. This study evaluated the population biology and distribution of the swimming crab Callinectes ornatus (Ordway, 1863 in the Estuary-Bay of São Vicente, state of São Paulo, Brazil. Crabs were collected from a shrimp fishing boat equipped with a semi-balloon otter-trawl net, on eight transects (four in the estuary and four in the bay from March 2007 through February 2008. Specimens caught were identified, sexed and measured. Samples of bottom water were collected and the temperature and salinity measured. A total of 618 crabs were captured (332 males, 267 females and 19 ovigerous females, with a sex ratio close to 1:1. A large number of juveniles were captured (77.67%. Crab spatial distributions were positively correlated with salinity (Rs = 0.73, p = 0.0395 and temperature (Rs = 0.71, p = 0.0092. Two peaks of recruitment occurred, in summer and autumn, and ovigerous females were mostly captured during summer, showing a seasonal reproductive pattern. The results showed that C. ornatus uses the bay as a nursery area for juvenile development. Callinectes ornatus is not yet a legally protected species, and the minimum allowed size of crabs caught in the area, although already restricted, should be carefully evaluated since the removal of large numbers of juveniles could negatively impact the local population.

  11. Biological Oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    Within the framework of global biogeochemical cycles and ocean productivity, there are two areas that will be of particular interest to biological oceanography in the 1990s. The first is the mapping in space time of the biomass and productivity of phytoplankton in the world ocean. The second area is the coupling of biological and physical processes as it affects the distribution and growth rate of phytoplankton biomass. Certainly other areas will be of interest to biological oceanographers, but these two areas are amenable to observations from satellites. Temporal and spatial variability is a regular feature of marine ecosystems. The temporal and spatial variability of phytoplankton biomass and productivity which is ubiquitous at all time and space scales in the ocean must be characterized. Remote sensing from satellites addresses these problems with global observations of mesocale (2 to 20 days, 10 to 200 km) features over a long period of time.

  12. Multi-Level Lot Sizing Problem with Deterioration Inventory and Disposal Costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Vahdani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, the multi-level lot sizing problem which is used to determine the production lot sizes in industrial environments, has been investigated. A new problem which we refer to it as “multi-level lot sizing problem with deterioration inventory and disposal costs” is introduced. The aim of multi-level lot sizing problem is to determine the production quantity of production periods for each product in each level, such the the total cost containing production costs, holding costs and setup costs to be minimized. In the proposed model, the deterioration property of the inventory is assumed. Furthermore, disposal costs that represents the costs for removing the perishable inventories from the storage environments, is combined with the generalized model in order to make the model closer to reality. The aim of the new problem, are determining the production quantity of production periods for each product in each level, and determining the periods in which the perishable inventory to be disposed. Therefore, the disposal costs is considered in the objective function of the problem. Two meta heuristic algorithms consist of genetic algorithm and simulated annealing algorithm is used to solve the proposed problem. In order to compare the performance of the proposed algorithms with existing methods in the literature, instance problems are created, and the results are analyzed.

  13. Variation in quality of individual seeds within a seed lot of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merrill).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Illipronti, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    The research described in this thesis aimed at increasing insight into the sources of variation in quality attributes of individual seeds within a soybean seed lot, into the relations between physical attributes and performance of seeds in seed tests and in controlled seed production conditions, and

  14. Heuristic procedures for a stochastic lot-sizing problem in make-to-order manufacturing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.P. Dellaert (Nico); M.T. Melo

    1995-01-01

    textabstractWe consider a single item, uncapacitated stochastic lot-sizing problem motivated by a Dutch make-to-order company producing steel pipes. Since no finished goods inventory is kept, a delivery date is fixed upon arrival of each order. The objective is to determine the optimal size of produ

  15. Vacant urban lot soils and their potential to support ecosystem services

    Science.gov (United States)

    AimsUrban soils are the basis of many ecosystem services in cities. Here, we examine formerly residential vacant lot soils in Cleveland, Ohio and Detroit, Michigan, USA for their potential to provide multiple ecosystem services. We examine two key contrasts: 1) differences betwee...

  16. Field Performance of Differentially Deteriorated Seed Lots of Maize (Zea mays under Different Irrigation Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazem GHASSEMI-GOLEZANI

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A sub-sample of maize (cv. KSC301 seeds was kept as control or vigorous seed lot and two other sub-samples with about 16% moisture content were artificially deteriorated at 40C for 16 and 18 days. The three seed lots had seed viabilities of 99% (V1, 91% (V2 and 79% (V3. Laboratory tests were carried out as CR design with four replicates. However, the field experiment was conducted as factorial based on RCB design with three replicates to investigate the performance of differentially deteriorated seed lots under four irrigation treatments (irrigation after 70, 90, 110 and 130 mm evaporation from class A pan. Germination and emergence times significantly increased with increasing seed deterioration, but mean viability percentage, seedling dry weight, seedling emergence and protein and grain yields decreased as seed deterioration increased. Even plants from less deteriorated seed lot (V2 with acceptable germination (91% showed 25.1% reduction in grain yield per unit area. The superiority of V1 to V2 seeds of maize increased as water limitation increased. Protein yield was also decreased as a result of seed deterioration. Seedling dry weight highly correlated with the field emergence and grain and protein yields. Thus, it is necessary to produce and cultivate high vigor seeds of maize, in order to ensure satisfactory yield achievement, particularly under adverse environmental conditions.

  17. 3. Mercury pollution in the Lot River system (France): fluxes and sedimentary record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, J.; Blanc, G.; Audry, S.; Bossy, C.; Vu Duc, L.; Lissalde, J.-P.

    2003-04-01

    We present first data on Hg concentrations and fluxes in the Lot River system (southwest France), known for its historic Zn and Cd pollution affecting seafood production in the Gironde Estuary. Present day Hg fluxes (1999-2000) were estimated from daily measured discharge and SPM concentrations and concentrations of particulate and dissolved Hg in monthly collected samples. The data show that Hg is essentially (up to 98 %) transported in the particulate phase. Particulate Hg concentrations in SPM show a distinct decrease between 1992 and 1999 but, since then, tend to increase in magnitude and variability. The evolution of Hg fluxes in the Lot River in 1992, 1994, 1995 and 1998-2001 reflect hydrological variations and the decrease of direct Hg inputs from the point source at the Riou-Mort River, draining a small watershed polluted by former mining and ore treatment. However, the data also indicate important Hg remobilization from the sediment by dredging due to lock construction along the Lot River. Mercury concentrations in sediment cores from a dam lake downstream of the Riou-Mort watershed are up to 30 mg.kg-1, i.e. more than 300-fold higher than geochemical background measured in the same riverbed upstream the confluence with the Riou-Mort River. In the sediment cores Hg from the Lot River dam lakes Hg concentration profiles are comparable to those of Cd and Zn. This indicates common sources and transport. Element ratios (e.g. Cd/Zn) in the sediment reflect SPM values and suggest an important Hg stock (7 t) in these sediments. Historic (˜40 years) Hg records in the sediment cores dated by using 137Cs activities and Cd-concentrations (e.g. Chernobyl accident and accidental Cd pollution in 1986) confirm the decreasing Hg level in SPM since the early nineties. Nevertheless Hg concentrations in the upper sediment and SPM remain high compared to background values from reference sites in the upper Lot River system.

  18. Parking Lot Runoff Quality and Treatment Efficiency of a Stormwater-Filtration Device, Madison, Wisconsin, 2005-07

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwatich, Judy A.; Bannerman, Roger T.

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the treatment efficiency of a stormwater-filtration device (SFD) for potential use at Wisconsin Department of Transportation (WisDOT) park-and-ride facilities, a SFD was installed at an employee parking lot in downtown Madison, Wisconsin. This type of parking lot was chosen for the test site because the constituent concentrations and particle-size distributions (PSDs) were expected to be similar to those of a typical park-and-ride lot operated by WisDOT. The objective of this particular installation was to reduce loads of total suspended solids (TSS) in stormwater runoff to Lake Monona. This study also was designed to provide a range of treatment efficiencies expected for a SFD. Samples from the inlet and outlet were analyzed for 33 organic and inorganic constituents, including 18 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Samples were also analyzed for physical properties, including PSD. Water-quality samples were collected for 51 runoff events from November 2005 to August 2007. Samples from all runoff events were analyzed for concentrations of suspended sediment (SS). Samples from 31 runoff events were analyzed for 15 constituents, samples from 15 runoff events were analyzed for PAHs, and samples from 36 events were analyzed for PSD. The treatment efficiency of the SFD was calculated using the summation of loads (SOL) and the efficiency ratio methods. Constituents for which the concentrations and (or) loads were decreased by the SFD include TSS, SS, volatile suspended solids, total phosphorous (TP), total copper, total zinc, and PAHs. The efficiency ratios for these constituents are 45, 37, 38, 55, 22, 5, and 46 percent, respectively. The SOLs for these constituents are 32, 37, 28, 36, 23, 8, and 48 percent, respectively. The SOL for chloride was -21 and the efficiency ratio was -18. Six chemical constituents or properties-dissolved phosphorus, chemical oxygen demand, dissolved zinc, total dissolved solids, dissolved chemical oxygen demand, and

  19. A comparison of LMC and SDL complexity measures on binomial distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piqueira, José Roberto C.

    2016-02-01

    The concept of complexity has been widely discussed in the last forty years, with a lot of thinking contributions coming from all areas of the human knowledge, including Philosophy, Linguistics, History, Biology, Physics, Chemistry and many others, with mathematicians trying to give a rigorous view of it. In this sense, thermodynamics meets information theory and, by using the entropy definition, López-Ruiz, Mancini and Calbet proposed a definition for complexity that is referred as LMC measure. Shiner, Davison and Landsberg, by slightly changing the LMC definition, proposed the SDL measure and the both, LMC and SDL, are satisfactory to measure complexity for a lot of problems. Here, SDL and LMC measures are applied to the case of a binomial probability distribution, trying to clarify how the length of the data set implies complexity and how the success probability of the repeated trials determines how complex the whole set is.

  20. Biological distribution of 131I-labeled anti-nucleus antigen monoclonal antibody chTNT in patients with pulmonary metastases from differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Qingjie; GAO Shi; ZHAO Jie; WEN Qiang; BAI Lin; ZHANG Haoran; ZHAO Guoqing

    2008-01-01

    This work is to study the in vivo biological distribution of 131I-labeled mouse/human chimeric monoclonal antibody (131I-chTNT) in patients with pulmonary metastases from differentiated thyroid carcinoma.Ten patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma were injected intravenously with a single dose of 131I-chTNT (5 MBq.kg-1 body weight).Radioactivity of blood and urine samples was measured at different time points.The in vivo stability and the metabolic status of 131I-chTNT were detected with supersaturated trichloroacetic acid.Continuous imaging was performed to outline the region of interest (ROD and estimate the intake level on the whole body,major organs and tumor lesions at different time points.The serum time-radioactivity curve of 131I-ehTNT accorded with the two-compartment model after a single intravenous injection:T1/2(h)=65.28±14.83,AUC0-t(MBq.h.mL-1)=8.93±1.32,AUC0-∞(MBq-h-mL-1)=10.58±2.19,and CL(mL.min-1.kg-1)=1635±359.The time-radioactivity percentage curve of 131I-chTNT urine excretion accorded with the one-compartment model after a single intravenous injection:T1/2(h)=99±10,and accumulative (31±9) % radioactivity of the injected dose was excreted in urine in one week.The percentages of serum 131I-ehTNT in radioactive components at 24,48 and 72 h were over 95% and it was still (88±7)% at 168 h.As for chemical composition of radioactive substances in urine,radioactivity in urine samples originated from free 131I by 100%.Radioactivity of 131I-chTNT after intravenous administration was mainly concentrated in the lung and liver,least in the brain.Radioactivity of tumor tissues reached the maximum at 24 h and the tumor/normal tissue (T/N) ratio reached the maximum (1.28~3.83) during 3~7 d.The characteristics of in vivo biological distribution of 131I-chTNT in patients with pulmonary metastases from differentiated thyroid carcinoma are favorable for its therapeutic application for the metastasis tumors.

  1. Biological distribution of 131I-labeled anti-nucleus antigen monoclonal antibody chTNT in patients with pulmonary metastases from differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is to study the in vivo biological distribution of 131I-labeled mouse/human chimeric monoclonal antibody (131I-chTNT) in patients with pulmonary metastases from differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Ten patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma were injected intravenously with a single dose of 131I-chTNT (5 MBq·kg-1 body weight). Radioactivity of blood and urine samples was measured at different time points. The in vivo stability and the metabolic status of 131I-chTNT were detected with supersaturated trichloroacetic acid. Continuous imaging was performed to outline the region of interest (ROI) and estimate the intake level on the whole body, major organs and tumor lesions at different time points. The serum time-radioactivity curve of 131I-chTNT accorded with the two-compartment model after a single intravenous injection: T1/2(h)=65.28±14.83, AUC0-t(MBq·h·mL-1)=8.93±1.32, AUC0-∞(MBq·h·mL-1)=10.58±2.19, and CL(mL·min-1·kg-1)=1635±359. The time-radioactivity percentage curve of 131I-chTNT urine excretion accorded with the one-compartment model after a single intravenous injection: T1/2(h)=99±10, and accumulative (31±9)% radioactivity of the injected dose was excreted in urine in one week. The percentages of serum 131I-chTNT in radioactive components at 24, 48 and 72 h were over 95% and it was still (88±7)% at 168 h. As for chemical composition of radioactive substances in urine, radioactivity in urine samples originated from free 131I by 100%. Radioactivity of 131I-chTNT after intravenous administration was mainly concentrated in the lung and liver, least in the brain. Radioactivity of tumor tissues reached the maximum at 24 h and the tumor/normal tissue (T/N) ratio reached the maximum (1.28-3.83) during 3-7 d. The characteristics of in vivo biological distribution of 131I-chTNT in patients with pulmonary metastases from differentiated thyroid carcinoma are favorable for its therapeutic application for the metastasis tumors. (authors)

  2. Diazotrophy in the Deep: An analysis of the distribution, magnitude, geochemical controls, and biological mediators of deep-sea benthic nitrogen fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekas, Anne Elizabeth

    Biological nitrogen fixation (the conversion of N2 to NH3) is a critical process in the oceans, counteracting the production of N2 gas by dissimilatory bacterial metabolisms and providing a source of bioavailable nitrogen to many nitrogen-limited ecosystems. One currently poorly studied and potentially underappreciated habitat for diazotrophic organisms is the sediments of the deep-sea. Although nitrogen fixation was once thought to be negligible in non-photosynthetically driven benthic ecosystems, the present study demonstrates the occurrence and expression of a diversity of nifH genes (those necessary for nitrogen fixation), as well as a widespread ability to fix nitrogen at high rates in these locations. The following research explores the distribution, magnitude, geochemical controls, and biological mediators of nitrogen fixation at several deep-sea sediment habitats, including active methane seeps (Mound 12, Costa Rica; Eel River Basin, CA, USA; Hydrate Ridge, OR, USA; and Monterey Canyon, CA, USA), whale-fall sites (Monterey Canyon, CA), and background deep-sea sediment (off-site Mound 12 Costa Rica, off-site Hydrate Ridge, OR, USA; and Monterey Canyon, CA, USA). The first of the five chapters describes the FISH-NanoSIMS method, which we optimized for the analysis of closely associated microbial symbionts in marine sediments. The second describes an investigation of methane seep sediment from the Eel River Basin, where we recovered nifH sequences from extracted DNA, and used FISH-NanoSIMS to identify methanotrophic archaea (ANME-2) as diazotrophs, when associated with functional sulfate-reducing bacterial symbionts. The third and fourth chapters focus on the distribution and diversity of active diazotrophs (respectively) in methane seep sediment from Mound 12, Costa Rica, using a combination of 15N-labeling experiments, FISH-NanoSIMS, and RNA and DNA analysis. The fifth chapter expands the scope of the investigation by targeting diverse samples from methane

  3. Study on the uptake and distribution of gadolinium based contrast agents in biological samples using laser ablation with inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadolinium based contrast agents are used for magnetic resonance imaging. After their excretion by medicated patients they reach surface water passing waste water treatment plants where they are not removed sufficiently. The behavior of the contrast agents in the environment and the interaction with organisms was investigated in this work due to the toxicity of the free Gd3+ ion and the associated risks, such as accumulation in the human food chain. In this work, the two elemental analytical imaging methods laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence analysis (SRXRF) have been used to investigate the uptake, distribution, and excretion of Gd-based contrast agents by various biological systems. Both methods were analytically characterized and compared for this application. The detection limits of gadolinium were determined under optimized conditions by LA-ICP-MS and SRXRF. With calibration by remains of dried elemental standard droplets detection limits of 0.78 pg absolute amount of gadolinium (LA-ICP-MS), respectively 89 pg (SRXRF) were reached. Based on filamentous algae as water plants the uptake and the excretion of Gd-based contrast agents were revealed. The dependence on concentration of the contrast agent in the exposition solution and the independence of temporal uptake within one to seven days were studied for duckweed. By LA-ICP-MS gadolinium was quantified in a leaf of cress plant. The verification of the results was performed by SRXRF and ICP-MS after digestion. Furthermore, the uptake and distribution of Gd-based contrast agents in higher organisms (water flea) were observed. The exact location of gadolinium was resolved by three-dimensional μ-computed tomography by the comparison of an exposed with a Gd-free water flea. In all studies, gadolinium was detected in the investigated exposed model organisms. It can be concluded that the contrast agents were taken from the environment.

  4. BIOLOGICAL AND ECOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS, DISTRIBUTION AND CONSERVATION STATUS OF NERETVAN RUDD, Scardinius plotizza (HECKEL AND KNER, 1858 (PISCES, CYPRINIDAE IN THE HUTOVO BLATO WETLAND, BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakov Dulčić

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents data on the biological and ecological characteristics, distribution and habitat, vulnerability and the need for protection of Neretvan rudd Scardinius plotizza (Heckel and Kner, 1858 (Pisces, Cyprinidae, an endemic species of the lower River Neretva in Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina. In the area of Hutovo Blato wetland in Bosnia and Herzegovina, this species are numerously represented. It is a resident species and generally prevalent in the colder water areas of the Gornje Blato, such as Lake Deran where it inhabits the deeper central area covered with underwater vegetation. In the choice of habitat, less difference between juvenile and adult populations was observed. Although the current population status of this species in the Hutovo Blato may be assessed as stable, it is likely to be considered endangered in the future if the trends of various negative impacts that threaten its existence prolong. The wetland area of the Hutovo Blato, which is characterized by a large number of endemic species of narrow distribution range, is threatened by significant negative changes in habitat, hence urgent evaluation and protection measures are needed. In order to improve the conservation status of this species, as well as high ichthyological diversity of this area, of particular importance are the following: effective protection of habitat, improved water management measures and prevention of further introduction and spreading of exotic species. Also, it is necessary to accurately determine its taxonomic position. It is proposed that IUCN classifies this species as Near Threatened (NT in Bosnia and Herzegovina on the basis of its current status, as well as projections for future development and the IUCN criteria.

  5. Biodiversity's big wet secret: the global distribution of marine biological records reveals chronic under-exploration of the deep pelagic ocean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J Webb

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Understanding the distribution of marine biodiversity is a crucial first step towards the effective and sustainable management of marine ecosystems. Recent efforts to collate location records from marine surveys enable us to assemble a global picture of recorded marine biodiversity. They also effectively highlight gaps in our knowledge of particular marine regions. In particular, the deep pelagic ocean--the largest biome on Earth--is chronically under-represented in global databases of marine biodiversity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We use data from the Ocean Biogeographic Information System to plot the position in the water column of ca 7 million records of marine species occurrences. Records from relatively shallow waters dominate this global picture of recorded marine biodiversity. In addition, standardising the number of records from regions of the ocean differing in depth reveals that regardless of ocean depth, most records come either from surface waters or the sea bed. Midwater biodiversity is drastically under-represented. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The deep pelagic ocean is the largest habitat by volume on Earth, yet it remains biodiversity's big wet secret, as it is hugely under-represented in global databases of marine biological records. Given both its value in the provision of a range of ecosystem services, and its vulnerability to threats including overfishing and climate change, there is a pressing need to increase our knowledge of Earth's largest ecosystem.

  6. Quality Costs (IRR Impact on Lot Size Considering Work in Process Inventory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misbah Ullaha

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Economic order quantity model and production quantity model assume that production processes are error free. However, variations exist in processes which result in imperfection particularly in high machining environments. Processes variations result in nonconformities that increase quality costs in the form of rework, rejects and quality control techniques implementations to ensure quality product delivery. This paper is an attempt towards development of inventory model which incorporate inspection, rework, and rejection (IRR quality costs in optimum lot size calculation focusing work in process inventory. Mathematical model is derived for optimum lot size based on minimum average cost function using analytical approach. This new developed model (GTOQIRR assume an imperfect production environment. Numerical examples are used to visualize the significant effect of quality cost in the proposed model in comparison to the previously developed models. The proposed model is highly recommendable for quality based high machining manufacturing environments considering work in process inventories.

  7. A joint lot-sizing and marketing model with reworks, scraps and imperfect products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Fathollah Bayati

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we establish an economic production quantity (EPQ based inventory model by considering various types of non-perfect products .We classify products in four groups of perfect, imperfect, defective but reworkable and non-reworkable defective items. The demand is a power function of price and marketing expenditure and production unit cost is considered to be a function of lot size. The objective of this paper is to determine lot size, marketing expenditure, selling price, set up cost and inventory holding cost, simultaneously. The problem is modeled as a nonlinear posynomial geometric programming and an optimal solution is derived. The implementation of the proposed method is demonstrated using a numerical example and the sensitivity analysis is also performed to study the behavior of the model.

  8. The first case of drug-dependent memory: the biblical Lot in Talmudic and Midrashic exegesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnall, Eliezer; Saperstein, Yair; Saperstein, Yona

    2013-01-01

    The literature on alcohol and alcoholism has long noted how the effects of alcohol are reported in early sources, including religious texts such as the Bible and Talmud. In that vein, we suggest that the Bible, as elucidated according to long-established rabbinic interpretation, contains the earliest recorded case of drug-dependent memory, in the account of Lot's alcohol-facilitated incestuous relationships with his daughters (Genesis 19:29-38). We posit that the Talmudic, Midrashic, and traditional rabbinic commentaries that support our reading of the Lot narrative convey keen understanding of the effects of alcohol on recall. These Jewish sources, written centuries ago, demonstrate insight into the nature of alcohol-influenced cognitive function, which was thought to have been unknown prior to contemporary times. PMID:23586543

  9. A software development for establishing optimal production lots and its application in academic and business environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Valencia Mendez

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The recent global economic downturn has increased an already perceived need in organizations for cost savings. To cope with such need, companies can opt for different strategies. This paper focuses on optimizing processes and, more specifically, determining the optimal lot production. To determine the optimal lot of a specific production process, a new software was developed that not only incorporates various productive and logistical elements in its calculations but also affords users a practical way to manage the large number of input parameters required to determine the optimal batch. The developed software has not only been validated by several companies, both Spanish and Mexican, who achieved significant savings, but also used as a teaching tool in universities with highly satisfactory results from the point of view of student learning. A special contribution of this work is that the developed tool can be sent to the interested reader free of charge upon request.

  10. Inventory Lot-Sizing Problem with Supplier Selection under Storage Space and Budget Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chirawat Woarawichai

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider a multi-period inventory lot-sizing problem with supplier selection under storage space and budget constraints. The objective of this research is to calculate the optimal inventory lot-sizing for each supplier and minimize the total inventory cost which includes joint purchase cost of the products, transaction cost for the suppliers, and holding cost for remaining inventory. It is assumed that demand of multiple products is known over a planning horizon. The problem is formulated as a mixed integer linear programming and is solved with optimization package like LINGO12. Finally, numerical example is provided to illustrate the solution procedure. The results determine what products to order in what quantities with which suppliers in which periods, in order to satisfy overall demand.

  11. A review of lot streaming in a flow shop environment with makespan criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Gómez-Gasquet

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper reviews current literature and contributes a set of findings that capture the current state-of-the-art of the topic of lot streaming in a flow-shop. Design/methodology/approach: A literature review to capture, classify and summarize the main body of knowledge on lot streaming in a flow-shop with makespan criteria and, translate this into a form that is readily accessible to researchers and practitioners in the more mainstream production scheduling community. Findings and Originality/value: The existing knowledge base is somewhat fragmented. This is a relatively unexplored topic within mainstream operations management research and one which could provide rich opportunities for further exploration. Originality/value: This paper sets out to review current literature, from an advanced production scheduling perspective, and contributes a set of findings that capture the current state-of-the-art of this topic.

  12. LABORATORY SIMULATION OF POROUS ASPHALT PARKING LOT SYSTEM AND MIX DESIGN FOR STORM WATER MANAGEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    M.O. Hamzah; Z. F. M. JAAFAR; Ahmad, F

    2013-01-01

    Porous asphalt pavement was initially developed for the purpose of improving road safety, best candidate material for quiet pavement and to avoid aquaplaning and skidding in wet weather. However, from previous studies, porous asphalt is able to mitigate surface runoff. Porous asphalt parking lots with underlying reservoir course perform as additional temporary water storage matrix that enables reduction of flash flood. This paper elaborates the development of a new porous asphalt aggregate g...

  13. Bioactive properties of Mentha spicata L. infusions: a comparison between standard and reserve lots

    OpenAIRE

    Rita, Íngride; Pereira, Carla; Heleno, Sandrina A.; Ferreira, Isabel C.F.R.

    2015-01-01

    Mentha spicata L., commonly known as spearmint and belonging to the Lamiaceae family, is widely used as infusion due to its exquisite and outstanding flavour [1]. This medicinal and aromatic plant is also known for its antioxidant properties due to naturally occurring active compounds, such as phenolic compounds including flavonoids. [2] Recently, with the increased consumption of herbal infusions, several novel products are emerging and different lots with distinct composition...

  14. Antioxidant activity and nutritional value of Mentha spicata L.: a comparison between reserve and standard lots

    OpenAIRE

    Rita, Íngride; Heleno, Sandrina A.; Martins, Natália; Pereira, Carla; Barros, Lillian; Ferreira, Isabel C.F.R.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the consumption of tea and herbal infiisions is increasing só much that its daily worldwide consumption is evaluated in more than three million cups. Therefore, in a competitive and sophisticated sector as the tea market, the innovation and development of new products is imperative (Hicks, 2009; Li et al., 2013). Nowadays, we have at our disposal a new range of emerging products, such as the designated "reserve lots" exclusively prepared by using the younger parts (a...

  15. Intelligent Simulation-based Lot Scheduling of Photolithography Toolsets in a Wafer Fabrication Facility

    OpenAIRE

    Arisha, Amr; Young, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Scheduling of a semiconductor manufacturing facility is one of the most complex tasks encountered. Confronted with a high technology product market, semiconductor manufacturing is increasingly more dynamic and competitive in the introduction of new products in shorter time intervals. Photolithography, being one of the processes repeated often, is a fabrication bottleneck. Lot scheduling within photolithography is a challenging activity where substantial improvements in factory performance can...

  16. APPLICATION OF LOT QUALITY ASSURANCE SAMPLING FOR ASSESSING DISEASE CONTROL PROGRAMMES - EXAMINATION OF SOME METHODOLOGICAL ISSUES

    OpenAIRE

    T. R. RAMESH RAO

    2011-01-01

    Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS), a statistical tool in industrial setup, has been in use since 1980 for monitoring and evaluation of programs on disease control / immunization status among children / health workers performance in health system. While conducting LQAS in the field, there are occasions, even after due care of design, there are practical and methodological issues to be addressed before it is recommended for implementation and intervention. LQAS is applied under the assumpti...

  17. Reduction of in-lot overlay variation with integrated metrology, and a holistic control strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hong-Goo; Han, Sang-Jun; Ma, Won-Kwang; Kim, Young-Sik; Kwak, Noh-Jung; Böcker, Paul; Deckers, David; Kou, Weitian; Kupers, Michiel; Ryan, Kevin; McNamara, Elliott; Kim, Gwang-Gon; Sun, Kyu-Tae; Lim, Young-Wan; Byun, Jin-Moo; Suh, Jung-Joon

    2015-10-01

    As DRAM semiconductor manufacturing approaches high volume for 1x nm nodes with immersion lithography, an increased emphasis is being placed on reducing the influence of the systematic wafer-level contribution to the on-product overlay budget. The cost of the needed metrology has hitherto been challenging. However, it will be shown that the availability of fast, accurate diffraction based metrology integrated within the Lithography cluster can enable cost-effective solutions. Together with applications software we will use any relevant context information to optimize control of all exposure-tool actuators during lot processing, to deliver the needed on-product performance. Current process corrections typically are done based on feedback per lot and per exposure chuck. Wafers exposed on the same chuck, belonging to the same lot get exactly the same process corrections. In current HVM processing however, an important contribution to the wafer variation is the differences in processing of the individual wafers. These differences can be related to variations in the usage of the processing tools (e.g. different etch chambers). An extension of the process corrections from chuck-based to process-context based can help in reducing the systematic wafer-level variation. With Integrated Metrology the sampling of wafers through the lot can be adjusted to make sure all different processing-contexts are covered in the measurements. Finally, the impact on Litho process cycle time of the total metrology effort required to enable these performance improvements, will be evaluated, and a proposal will be made on the optimum strategy to enable high-volume manufacturing.

  18. Balancing and lot-sizing mixed-model lines in the footwear industry

    OpenAIRE

    Sadeghi, Parisa

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the full research proposal for the project \\Balancing and lot-sizing mixed-model lines in the footwear industry", to be developed as part of the master program in Engenharia Electrotécnica e de Computadores - Sistemas de Planeamento Industrial of the Instituto Superior de Engenharia do Porto. The Portuguese footwear industry is undergoing a period of great development and innovation. The numbers speak for themselves, Portugal footwear exported 71 million pairs of shoes t...

  19. Strength testing of production grade H-451 graphite; lots 472, 478, and 482

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninety-eight production logs of H-451 graphite, from three separate extrusion lots, were sampled for tensile testing. Eight replicate axial specimens from the midlength center and four replicate radial specimens from the end center of each log were tested. The axial strengths (average value 12.7 MPa) showed wide lot-to-lot and log-to-log variations, while the radial strengths (average value 15.8 MPa) were more uniform. Statistically based acceptance criteria which could be used for assigning a log to a minimum strength category were derived for two alternative definitions of ''minimum'' strength. The first definition would require 90 percent of the material at the midlength center of the log to exceed the specified minimum strength, with 90 percent confidence (90/90); the second, more stringent, definition would require 99 percent of the material to exceed the specified minimum, with 95 percent confidence (99/95). If three minimum strength categories are assumed, with category A requiring a minimum strength of 10.3 MPa, category B requiring 8.3 MPa, and category C requiring 5.5 MPa, use of the 90/90 definition of minimum strength would cause the rejection of two logs. Use of the 99/95 definition of minimum strength would increase the number of rejected logs to 18; however, this would include only 2 out of the 56 logs in the best extrusion lot. Decreasing the number of tests per log from eight to four would cause only small differences in the yields of logs accepted in each category

  20. Estimating aflatoxin in farmers' stock peanut lots by measuring aflatoxin in various peanut-grade components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, T B; Hagler, W M; Giesbrecht, F G; Dorner, J W; Dowell, F E; Cole, R J

    1998-01-01

    Five, 2 kg test samples were taken from each of 120 farmers' stock peanut lots contaminated with aflatoxin. Kernels from each 2 kg sample were divided into the following grade components: sound mature kernels plus sound splits (SMKSS), other kernels (OK), loose shelled kernels (LSK), and damaged kernels (DAM). Kernel mass, aflatoxin mass, and aflatoxin concentration were measured for each of the 2400 component samples. For 120 lots tested, average aflatoxin concentrations in SMKSS, OK, LSK, and DAM components were 235, 2543, 11,775, and 69,775 ng/g, respectively. Aflatoxins in SMKSS, OK, LSK, and DAM components represented 6.9, 7.9, 33.3, and 51.9% of the total aflatoxin mass, respectively. Cumulatively, 3 aflatoxin risk components--OK, LSK, and DAM--accounted for 93.1% of total aflatoxin, but only 18.4% percent of test sample mass. Correlation analysis suggests that the most accurate predictor of aflatoxin concentration in the lot is the cumulative aflatoxin mass in the high 3 risk components OK + LSK + DAM (correlation coefficient, r = 0.996). If the aflatoxin in the combined OK + LSK + DAM components is expressed in concentration units, r decreases to 0.939. Linear regression equations relating aflatoxin in OK + LSK + DAM to aflatoxin concentration in the lot were developed. The cumulative aflatoxin in the OK + LSK + DAM components was not an accurate predictor (r = 0.539) of aflatoxin in the SMKSS component. Statistical analyses of 3 other data sets published previously yielded similar results. PMID:9477563

  1. L'ichnospace de Luzech (Lot, France) : un exemple de valorisation d'empreintes de pas

    OpenAIRE

    Lange-Badré, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    The Ichnospace is a specific exhibition dedicated to traces and tracks left by recent and fossil animals on ground. The Ichnospace is located at Luzech, a little town with a long historic past, near Cahors (about 17 km W) in the valley of the river Lot. Every living being leaves traces of its activities (habitat, locomotion, diet, etc.) in its environment. These traces are the signing of the individual and they may be preserved and fossilised in geological time. They provide information about...

  2. Inter- and Intra-Manufacturer Variability in Pharmaceutical Grades and Lots of Xanthan Gum

    OpenAIRE

    Thacker, Ankur; Fu, Shao; Boni, Riccardo L.; Block, Lawrence H.

    2010-01-01

    A pharmaceutical formulation typically contains one or more excipients in addition to the active pharmaceutical ingredient(s). Though excipients have been considered inert components of a formulation, variability in their properties has been shown to affect the performance of drug dosage forms and delivery systems. This study investigates the inter- and intra-manufacturer variability among different NF grades and lots of xanthan gum made by two manufacturers. As many formulators rely on compe...

  3. Effect of sample preparation techniques on the concentrations and distributions of elements in biological tissues using µSRXRF: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Routine tissue sample preparation using chemical fixatives is known to preserve the morphology of the tissue being studied. A competitive method, cryofixation followed by freeze drying, involves no chemical agents and maintains the biological function of the tissue. The possible effects of both sample preparation techniques in terms of the distribution of bio-metals (calcium (Ca), copper (Cu) zinc (Zn), and iron (Fe) specifically) in human skin tissue samples was investigated. Micro synchrotron radiation x-ray fluorescence (μSRXRF) was used to map bio-metal distribution in epidermal and dermal layers of human skin samples from various locations of the body that have been prepared using both techniques. For Ca, Cu and Zn, there were statistically significant differences between the epidermis and dermis using the freeze drying technique (p = 0.02, p < 0.01, and p < 0.01, respectively). Also using the formalin fixed, paraffin embedded technique the levels of Ca, Cu and Zn, were significantly different between the epidermis and dermis layers (p = 0.03, p < 0.01, and p < 0.01, respectively). However, the difference in levels of Fe between the epidermis and dermis was unclear and further analysis was required. The epidermis was further divided into two sub-layers, one mainly composed of the stratum corneum and the other deeper layer, the stratum basale. It was found that the difference between the distribution of Fe in the two epidermal layers using the freeze drying technique resulted in a statistically significant difference (p = 0.012). This same region also showed a difference in Fe using the formalin fixed, paraffin embedded technique (p < 0.01). The formalin fixed, paraffin embedded technique also showed a difference between the deeper epidermal layer and the dermis (p < 0.01). It can be concluded that studies involving Ca, Cu and Zn might show similar results using both sample preparation techniques, however studies involving Fe would need more

  4. A genetic algorithm-based approach to flexible flow-line scheduling with variable lot sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I; Sikora, R; Shaw, M J

    1997-01-01

    Genetic algorithms (GAs) have been used widely for such combinatorial optimization problems as the traveling salesman problem (TSP), the quadratic assignment problem (QAP), and job shop scheduling. In all of these problems there is usually a well defined representation which GA's use to solve the problem. We present a novel approach for solving two related problems-lot sizing and sequencing-concurrently using GAs. The essence of our approach lies in the concept of using a unified representation for the information about both the lot sizes and the sequence and enabling GAs to evolve the chromosome by replacing primitive genes with good building blocks. In addition, a simulated annealing procedure is incorporated to further improve the performance. We evaluate the performance of applying the above approach to flexible flow line scheduling with variable lot sizes for an actual manufacturing facility, comparing it to such alternative approaches as pair wise exchange improvement, tabu search, and simulated annealing procedures. The results show the efficacy of this approach for flexible flow line scheduling. PMID:18255838

  5. LABORATORY SIMULATION OF POROUS ASPHALT PARKING LOT SYSTEM AND MIX DESIGN FOR STORM WATER MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. O. HAMZAH

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Porous asphalt pavement was initially developed for the purpose of improving road safety, best candidate material for quiet pavement and to avoid aquaplaning and skidding in wet weather. However, from previous studies, porous asphalt is able to mitigate surface runoff. Porous asphalt parking lots with underlying reservoir course perform as additional temporary water storage matrix that enables reduction of flash flood. This paper elaborates the development of a new porous asphalt aggregate grading design for storm water mitigation using the Nominal Maximum Aggregate Size (NMAS 20 mm. The properties of the mixes were quantified and evaluated in terms of air voids, permeability, abrasion loss and indirect tensile strength. It was found that the proposed gradation has the best permeability and Indirect Tensile Strength (ITS values when compacted at 50 blows per face with a standard Marshal compactor. The porous asphalt slab was prepared using a slab compactor to simulate porous parking lot paving at site. The porous asphalt slab was finally placed inside a locally fabricated water flow simulator to simulate a porous asphalt pavement system for parking lots.

  6. Invasive Bruchid species Bruchidius siliquastri Delobel, 2007 and Megabruchidius tonkineus (Pic, 1914) (Insecta: Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae) new in the fauna of Serbia: Review of the distribution, biology and host plants

    OpenAIRE

    Gavrilović, Bojan; Savić, Dragiša

    2013-01-01

    Two invasive bruchid species - Bruchidius siliquastri Delobel, 2007 and Megabruchidius tonkineus (Pic, 1914) - found on Mt. Fruška Gora during 2011 and 2012 were recorded for the first time in Serbian fauna. Originating from Asia, these beetles were accidentally introduced into Europe. Data on their introduction into Serbia, distribution, biology and host plant associations are presented and discussed.

  7. A multi-phase algorithm for a joint lot-sizing and pricing problem with stochastic demands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenny Li, Hongyan; Thorstenson, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Stochastic lot-sizing problems have been addressed quite extensively, but relatively few studies also consider marketing factors, such as pricing. In this paper, we address a joint stochastic lot-sizing and pricing problem with capacity constraints and backlogging for a firm that produces a single...... that the multi-phase heuristic algorithm solves the example problems effectively....

  8. Three Permeable Pavements Performances for Priority Metal Pollutants and Metals Associated with Deicing Chemicals from Edison Parking Lot, NJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency constructed a 4000-m2 parking lot in Edison, New Jersey in 2009. The parking lot is surfaced with three permeable pavements [permeable interlocking concrete pavers (PICP), pervious concrete (PC), and porous asphalt (PA)]. Samples of each p...

  9. Three Permeable Pavements Performances for Priority Metal Pollutants and Metals associated with Deicing Chemicals from Edison Parking Lot, NJ - abstract

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency constructed a 4000-m2 parking lot in Edison, New Jersey in 2009. The parking lot is surfaced with three permeable pavements [permeable interlocking concrete pavers (PICP), pervious concrete (PC), and porous asphalt (PA)]. Samples of each p...

  10. The use of knowledge-based Genetic Algorithm for starting time optimisation in a lot-bucket MRP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridwan, Muhammad; Purnomo, Andi

    2016-01-01

    In production planning, Material Requirement Planning (MRP) is usually developed based on time-bucket system, a period in the MRP is representing the time and usually weekly. MRP has been successfully implemented in Make To Stock (MTS) manufacturing, where production activity must be started before customer demand is received. However, to be implemented successfully in Make To Order (MTO) manufacturing, a modification is required on the conventional MRP in order to make it in line with the real situation. In MTO manufacturing, delivery schedule to the customers is defined strictly and must be fulfilled in order to increase customer satisfaction. On the other hand, company prefers to keep constant number of workers, hence production lot size should be constant as well. Since a bucket in conventional MRP system is representing time and usually weekly, hence, strict delivery schedule could not be accommodated. Fortunately, there is a modified time-bucket MRP system, called as lot-bucket MRP system that proposed by Casimir in 1999. In the lot-bucket MRP system, a bucket is representing a lot, and the lot size is preferably constant. The time to finish every lot could be varying depends on due date of lot. Starting time of a lot must be determined so that every lot has reasonable production time. So far there is no formal method to determine optimum starting time in the lot-bucket MRP system. Trial and error process usually used for it but some time, it causes several lots have very short production time and the lot-bucket MRP would be infeasible to be executed. This paper presents the use of Genetic Algorithm (GA) for optimisation of starting time in a lot-bucket MRP system. Even though GA is well known as powerful searching algorithm, however, improvement is still required in order to increase possibility of GA in finding optimum solution in shorter time. A knowledge-based system has been embedded in the proposed GA as the improvement effort, and it is proven that the

  11. Biological Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaviena Baskaran

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Biology has entered a new era in distributing information based on database and this collection of database become primary in publishing information. This data publishing is done through Internet Gopher where information resources easy and affordable offered by powerful research tools. The more important thing now is the development of high quality and professionally operated electronic data publishing sites. To enhance the service and appropriate editorial and policies for electronic data publishing has been established and editors of article shoulder the responsibility.

  12. Establishing biological reference intervals for novel platelet parameters (immature platelet fraction, high immature platelet fraction, platelet distribution width, platelet large cell ratio, platelet-X, plateletcrit, and platelet distribution width and their correlations among each other

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritesh Sachdev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This study aims to establish biological reference interval for novel platelet parameters. Settings and Design: A total of 945 healthy individuals, age ranges from 18 to 64 years (881 males and 64 females coming for voluntary blood donation from June to August 2012 (3 months were enrolled after exclusion of rejection criteria. Materials and Methods: The samples were assayed by running in complete blood count + reticulocyte mode on the Sysmex XE-2100 hematology analyzer and the reference interval for the population was calculated using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. Statistical analysis used: Tests were performed using SPSS (Statistical Product and Service Solutions , developed by IBM corporation, version 13. Student t test and pearsons correlation analysis were also used. Results: The normal range for various parameters was platelet count: 150-520 × 10 3 /cu mm, immature platelet fraction (IPF: 0.3-8.7%, platelet distribution width (PDW: 8.3-25.0 fL, mean platelet volume (MPV: 8.6-15.5 fL, plateletcrit (PCT: 0.15-0.62%, high immature platelet fraction (H-IPF: 0.1-2.7%, platelet large cell ratio (P-LCR: 11.9-66.9% and platelet-X (PLT-X (ch: 11.0-22.0. Negative correlation was observed between platelet count (r = −0.468 to r = −0.531; P < 0.001 and PCT (r = −0.080 to r = −0.235; P < 0.05 to P < 0.001 with IPF, PDW, MPV, H-IPF, P-LCR, and platelet-X. IPF/H-IPF showed a positive correlation among them and also with PDW, MPV, P-LCR, platelet-X (r = +0.662 to r = +0.925; P < 0.001. Conclusions: These novel platelet parameters offer newer avenues in research and clinical use. Establishing biological reference interval for different platelet parameters would help determine true high and low values and help guide treatment decisions.

  13. Biological Threats

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Workplace Plans School Emergency Plans Main Content Biological Threats Biological agents are organisms or toxins that can ... for Disease Control and Prevention . Before a Biological Threat Unlike an explosion, a biological attack may or ...

  14. Dynamic programming algorithm for economic lot-sizing problem with bounded inventory and out-sourcing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiao; WANG Cheng-en

    2005-01-01

    This paper addresses a single item dynamic lot-sizing model with inventory capacity and out-sourcing. The goal is to minimize the total costs of production, setup, inventory holding and out-sourcing. Two versions of an out-sourcing model with time-varying costs are considered: stock out case and conservation case. Zero Inventory Order property has been found and some new properties are obtained in an optimal solution. Dynamic programming algorithms are developed to solve the problem in strongly polynomial time respectively. Furthermore, some numerical results demonstrate that the approach proposed is efficient and applicable.

  15. Where is my car? Examining wayfinding behavior in a parking lot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Mora

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This article examines wayfinding behavior in an extended parking lot belonging to one of the largest shopping malls in Santiago, Chile. About 500 people were followed while going to the mall and returning from it, and their trajectories were mapped and analyzed. The results indicate that inbound paths were, in average, 10% shorter that outbound paths, and that people stopped three times more frequently when leaving the mall than when accessing it. It is argued that these results are in line with previous research on the subject, which stress the importance of environmental information in shaping people`s behavior.

  16. Detonation shock dynamics calibration for pBX 9502 with temperature, density, and material lot variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Larry G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aslam, Tariq D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    We present a methodology for scaling the detonation shock dynamics D{sub n}[{kappa}] calibration function to accommodate variations in the HE starting material. We apply our model to the insensitive TATB-based explosive PBX 9502, for which we have enough front curvature rate stick data to characterize three material attributes: initial temperature T{sub 0}, nominal density {rho}{sub 0}, and manufacturing lot (representing different microstructures). A useful feature of the model is that it returns an absolute estimate for the reaction zone thickness, {delta}. Lacking demonstrated material metrics(s), we express microstructural variation indirectly, in terms of its effect on {delta}. This results in a D{sub n}[{kappa}] function that depends on T{sub 0}, {rho}{sub 0}, and {delta}. After examining the separate effects of each parameter on D{sub n}[{kappa}], we compute an arc geometry as a validation problem. We compare the calculation to a PBX 9502 arc experiment that was pressed from one of the calibrated HE lots. The agreement between the model and experiment is excellent. We compute worst, nominal, and best-performing material parameter combinations to show how much difference accrues throughout the arc.

  17. Consuming Web Services on Android Mobile Platform for Finding Parking Lots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isak Shabani

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Many web applications over the last decade are built using Web services based on Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP, because these Web services are the best choice for web applications and mobile applications in general. Researches and the results of them show how architectures and the systems primarily designed for use on desktop such as Web services calls with SOAP messaging, now are possible to be used on mobile platforms such as Android. The purpose of this paper is the study of Android mobile platform, more precisely the ability of this platform for consuming Web services and exploring existing alternatives for consuming Web services from this platform. People use their vehicles every day for transport and this of course leads to a constant demand for finding a parking lot. In this paper is proposed the system, named as MyParking through which it is aimed to facilitate users finding a parking lot for their vehicle depending on their current location. MyParking consists of three modules: Android client, administration and Web services.

  18. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Parking Lot Lighting in Leavenworth, KS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myer, Michael; Kinzey, Bruce R.; Curry, Ku' uipo

    2011-05-06

    This report describes the process and results of a demonstration of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology in a commercial parking lot lighting application, under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solid-State Lighting Technology GATEWAY Demonstration Program. The parking lot is for customers and employees of a Walmart Supercenter in Leavenworth, Kansas and this installation represents the first use of the LED Parking Lot Performance Specification developed by the DOE’s Commercial Building Energy Alliance. The application is a parking lot covering more than a half million square feet, lighted primarily by light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Metal halide wall packs were installed along the building facade. This site is new construction, so the installed baseline(s) were hypothetical designs. It was acknowledged early on that deviating from Walmart’s typical design would reduce the illuminance on the site. Walmart primarily uses 1000W pulse-start metal halide (PMH) lamps. In order to provide a comparison between both typical design and a design using conventional luminaires providing a lower illuminance, a 400W PMH design was also considered. As mentioned already, the illuminance would be reduced by shifting from the PMH system to the LED system. The Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES) provides recommended minimum illuminance values for parking lots. All designs exceeded the recommended illuminance values in IES RP-20, some by a wider margin than others. Energy savings from installing the LED system compared to the different PMH systems varied. Compared to the 1000W PMH system, the LED system would save 63 percent of the energy. However, this corresponds to a 68 percent reduction in illuminance as well. In comparison to the 400W PMH system, the LED system would save 44 percent of the energy and provide similar minimum illuminance values at the time of relamping. The LED system cost more than either of the PMH systems when comparing initial costs

  19. Intelligent optimization to integrate a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle smart parking lot with renewable energy resources and enhance grid characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The proposed algorithms handled design steps of an efficient parking lot of PHEVs. • Optimizations are performed with 1 h intervals to find optimum charging rates. • Multi-objective optimization is performed to find the optimum size and site of DG. • Optimal sizing of a PV–wind–diesel HRES is attained. • Charging rates are optimized intelligently during peak and off-peak times. - Abstract: Widespread application of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) as an important part of smart grids requires drivers and power grid constraints to be satisfied simultaneously. We address these two challenges with the presence of renewable energy and charging rate optimization in the current paper. First optimal sizing and siting for installation of a distributed generation (DG) system is performed through the grid considering power loss minimization and voltage enhancement. Due to its benefits, the obtained optimum site is considered as the optimum location for constructing a movie theater complex equipped with a PHEV parking lot. To satisfy the obtained size of DG, an on-grid hybrid renewable energy system (HRES) is chosen. In the next set of optimizations, optimal sizing of the HRES is performed to minimize the energy cost and to find the best number of decision variables, which are the number of the system’s components. Eventually, considering demand uncertainties due to the unpredictability of the arrival and departure times of the vehicles, time-dependent charging rate optimizations of the PHEVs are performed in 1 h intervals for the 24-h of a day. All optimization problems are performed using genetic algorithms (GAs). The outcome of the proposed optimization sets can be considered as design steps of an efficient grid-friendly parking lot of PHEVs. The results indicate a reduction in real power losses and improvement in the voltage profile through the distribution line. They also show the competence of the utilized energy delivery method in

  20. High concentrations of drug in target tissues following local controlled release are utilized for both drug distribution and biologic effect: An example with epicardial inotropic drug delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Maslov, Mikhail Y.; Edelman, Elazer R.; Wei, Abraham E.; Pezone, Matthew J.; Lovich, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Local drug delivery preferentially loads target tissues with a concentration gradient from the surface or point of release that tapers down to more distant sites. Drug that diffuses down this gradient must be in unbound form, but such drug can only elicit a biologic effect through receptor interactions. Drug excess loads tissues, increasing gradients and driving penetration, but with limited added biological response. We examined the hypothesis that local application reduces dramatically syst...

  1. Extended Generalized Riccati Equation Mapping for Thermal Traveling-Wave Distribution in Biological Tissues through a Bio-Heat Transfer Model with Linear/Quadratic Temperature-Dependent Blood Perfusion

    OpenAIRE

    Emmanuel Kengne; Fathi Ben Hamouda; Ahmed Lakhssassi

    2013-01-01

    Analytical thermal traveling-wave distribution in biological tissues through a bio-heat transfer (BHT) model with linear/quadratic temperature-dependent blood perfusion is discussed in this paper. Using the extended generalized Riccati equation mapping method, we find analytical traveling wave solutions of the considered BHT equation. All the travelling wave solutions obtained have been used to explicitly investigate the effect of linear and quadratic coefficients of te...

  2. Evaluation of coverage of enriched UF{sub 6} cylinder storage lots by existing criticality accident alarms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B.L. Jr.; Dobelbower, M.C.; Woollard, J.E.; Sutherland, P.J.; Tayloe, R.W. Jr.

    1995-03-01

    The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) is leased from the US Department of Energy (DOE) by the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC), a government corporation formed in 1993. PORTS is in transition from regulation by DOE to regulation by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). One regulation is 10 CFR Part 76.89, which requires that criticality alarm systems be provided for the site. PORTS originally installed criticality accident alarm systems in all building for which nuclear criticality accidents were credible. Currently, however, alarm systems are not installed in the enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) cylinder storage lots. This report analyzes and documents the extent to which enriched UF{sub 6} cylinder storage lots at PORTS are covered by criticality detectors and alarms currently installed in adjacent buildings. Monte Carlo calculations are performed on simplified models of the cylinder storage lots and adjacent buildings. The storage lots modelled are X-745B, X-745C, X745D, X-745E, and X-745F. The criticality detectors modelled are located in building X-343, the building X-344A/X-342A complex, and portions of building X-330. These criticality detectors are those located closest to the cylinder storage lots. Results of this analysis indicate that the existing criticality detectors currently installed at PORTS are largely ineffective in detecting neutron radiation from criticality accidents in most of the cylinder storage lots at PORTS, except sometimes along portions of their peripheries.

  3. "Thinking a Lot" Among the Khwe of South Africa: A Key Idiom of Personal and Interpersonal Distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hertog, T N; de Jong, M; van der Ham, A J; Hinton, D; Reis, R

    2016-09-01

    "Thinking too much", and variations such as "thinking a lot", are common idioms of distress across the world. The contextual meaning of this idiom of distress in particular localities remains largely unknown. This paper reports on a systematic study of the content and cause, consequences, and social response and coping related to the local terms |x'an n|a te and |eu-ca n|a te, both translated as "thinking a lot", and was part of a larger ethnographic study among the Khwe of South Africa. Semi-structured exploratory interviews with community members revealed that "thinking a lot" refers to a common experience of reflecting on personal and interpersonal problems. Consequences were described in emotional, psychological, social, behavioral, and physical effects. Coping strategies included social support, distraction, and religious practices. Our contextualized approach revealed meanings and experiences of "thinking a lot" that go beyond a psychological state or psychopathology. The common experience of "thinking a lot" is situated in socio-political, economic, and social context that reflect the marginalized and displaced position of the Khwe. We argue that "thinking a lot" and associated local meanings may vary across settings, may not necessarily indicate psychopathology, and should be understood in individual, interpersonal, community, and socio-political dimensions. PMID:26487660

  4. Reaction difference of glue-lipiodol mixture according to the different lot number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We noted that in a catheter, glue-lipiodol mixtures (GLM) prematurely turned into a cast during embolization of brain arteriovenous malformation, and to avoid this problem, added tungsten to GLM. The reaction time and hardness of GLM were then evaluated in vitro. Materials and Methods : Six lots of Lipiodol (Nos.97LU009A, 96LU018A, 96LU017A, 96LUollA and 95Lu020A)(Laboratoire Guerbet, Cedex, France) and three lots Histoacryl Blue (2/7121, Ex. Date 03/99 (993);2/6263, 06/98 (986);2/6132 03/98 (983))(B. Brown, Melsungen, Germany) were mixed in a 5 cc bottle at concentrations of 25-50%(glue:lipiodol=1:1 to 1:3) and observed for two weeks. The hardness of polymerized GLM was classified as liquid, gel, semi-solid or solid. After the addition of tungsten or tantalum powder (0.2 gm) and a drop of blood to GLM, different series of experiments were performed. pH was measured in distilled water mixed with tungsten of tantalum(0.1 to 0.5 gm). Results : At a concentration of 50%,most GLM turned into solid casts within 48 hours;at one of 25%, most GLM gelled within 24 hrs. At concentrations of 28 and 33%, hardness was between that of a solid and that of a gel. After the addition of tungsten to 50% and 25 %GLM, this remained in a liquid state until two weeks later, regardless of lipiodol products. In 5 cc distilled water with 0.1 to 0.5 gm tungsten, pH changed from 3.5 to 2.6, and on the addition of tantalum from 6.4 to 5.7.The addition of blood to the mixture immediately turned the cast solid at a GLM concentration of 50%, and semi-solid at one of 25%. Conclusion : The reaction time of GLM differed according to the lot number of lipiodol.The addition of tungsten seemed to prevent premature cast formation by decreasing pH;the mechanism was similar to that observed when acetic acid was added

  5. Influence of low intensity laser radiation on different biological systems

    OpenAIRE

    Tsivunchyk, Olga S.

    2004-01-01

    Abstract There are a lot of examples and contradictory results concerning influence of low intensity laser irradiation (LILI) on biological objects. In this work with a number of experiments the influence of LILI on different biological systems was investigated. For the carried out experiments the following biological objects and systems were used: * different enzymes of anti-oxidant system of animals (i.e. catalase, superoxide-di...

  6. Comparison of heuristics for an economic lot scheduling problem with deliberated coproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar I. Vidal-Carreras

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We built on the Economic Lot Scheduling Problem Scheduling (ELSP literature by making some modifications in order to introduce new constraints which had not been thoroughly studied with a view to simulating specific real situations. Specifically, our aim is to propose and simulate different scheduling policies for a new ELSP variant: Deliberated Coproduction. This problem comprises a product system in an ELSP environment in which we may choose if more than one product can be produced on the machine at a given time. We expressly consider the option of coproducing two products whose demand is not substitutable. In order to draw conclusions, a simulation model and its results were developed in the article by employing modified Bomberger data which include two items that could be produced simultaneously.

  7. COSMO OIL makes the stand lot into securities; COSMO, sutandoyouchi wo shokenka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-09-01

    COSMO OIL is national about 1000 on third The policy which made lot assets around the 800 places into securities by lumping together within the gas station which this company in the mosquito place possesses, was clarified. The financing amount has expected about 60 billion yen, and by allocating reduction of the interest-bearing debt which is improved at about 6000 hundred million yen, the improvement on the finance content is attempted. It will be formally announced near. Though the movement which makes real estate of large client into securities expands to each company, that individual assets of about 800 which develops nationally is made into securities in arranging, is for the first time. (translated by NEDO)

  8. QUALITY ASSESSEMENT OF ANTE-NATAL CARE USING THE METHOD OF LOT QUALITY ASSURANCE SAMPLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh. Salarilak

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available To determine the coverage rate, timeliness and quality of ante-natal care in rural areas under the coverage of Health Houses in West Azerbaijan province, 30 Health Houses (HH were randomly selected out of 731 HH in the province. In each HH, using the method of Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS 28 women having recently born babies was selected. Data were collected using check-list for facilities, and questionnaires and forms to be completed from the files by interview. The study showed that the method of LQAS is quite effective for evaluation of this service at HH level. The weighted total coverage of ante-natal care was 46.2%. Quality of care was acceptable for 53.9% of mothers. The weighted average of time lines of care was 49.8%. Availability of facilities in delivery of this service was 100%, showing there was no short coming in this respect.

  9. Measurements of the Cosmic Radiation Doses at Board of Aircraft of Polish Airlines LOT. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation doses received by a group of 30 pilots of the Polish Airlines LOT were investigated between July and October 2000. The measurement of the low-LET component of the cosmic radiation, lasting in average 2 months, was performed with 7LiF:Mg,Ti and 7LiF:Mg,Cu,P thermoluminescent detectors. The neutron component was measured with the thermoluminescent albedo cassettes. Additionally for all flights, records of altitude profiles were kept and effective doses were then calculated with the CARI-6 computer code. In total, about 560 flights were included in the calculations. The highest obtained dose was about 0.8 mSv in 2 months. Results of calculations are mostly consistent with the results of measurements. (author)

  10. Use of Occupancy Sensors in LED Parking Lot and Garage Applications: Early Experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinzey, Bruce R.; Myer, Michael; Royer, Michael P.; Sullivan, Greg P.

    2012-11-07

    Occupancy sensor systems are gaining traction as an effective technological approach to reducing energy use in exterior commercial lighting applications. Done correctly, occupancy sensors can substantially enhance the savings from an already efficient lighting system. However, this technology is confronted by several potential challenges and pitfalls that can leave a significant amount of the prospective savings on the table. This report describes anecdotal experiences from field installations of occupancy sensor controlled light-emitting diode (LED) lighting at two parking structures and two parking lots. The relative levels of success at these installations reflect a marked range of potential outcomes: from an additional 76% in energy savings to virtually no additional savings. Several issues that influenced savings were encountered in these early stage installations and are detailed in the report. Ultimately, care must be taken in the design, selection, and commissioning of a sensor-controlled lighting installation, else the only guaranteed result may be its cost.

  11. Neutron structural biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niimura, Nobuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    Neutron diffraction provides an experimental method of directly locating hydrogen atoms in protein which play important roles in physiological functions. However, there are relatively few examples of neutron crystallography in biology since it takes a lot of time to collect a sufficient number of Bragg reflections due to the low flux of neutrons illuminating the sample. In order to overcome the flux problem, we have successfully developed the neutron IP, where the neutron converter, {sup 6}Li or Gd, was mixed with a photostimulated luminescence material on flexible plastic support. Neutron Laue diffraction 2A data from tetragonal lysozyme were collected for 10 days with neutron imaging plates, and 960 hydrogen atoms in the molecule and 157 bound water molecules were identified. These results explain the proposed hydrolysis mechanism of the sugar by the lysozyme molecule and that lysozyme is less active at pH7.0. (author)

  12. Estudo de homogeneidade de lote de material silício metálico candidato a material de referência Homogeneity testing of a lot of silicon metal prepared as a reference material

    OpenAIRE

    Queenie Siu Hang Chui; Celia Omine Iamashita; João Marcos de Almeida Bispo

    2005-01-01

    From the perspective of the uncertainties in chemical measurements all uncertainty sources should be part of the uncertainty of the reference material. When the primary methods are not available, interlaboratorial comparisons are used as a means of certification. The material to be distributed to the laboratories should have its homogeneity confirmed. The uncertainty due to this factor will be added to the characterization uncertainty. This work presents a homogeneity study of a lot of silico...

  13. Modeling of a lot scale rainwater tank system in XP-SWMM: a case study in Western Sydney, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sterren, Marlène; Rahman, Ataur; Ryan, Garry

    2014-08-01

    Lot scale rainwater tank system modeling is often used in sustainable urban storm water management, particularly to estimate the reduction in the storm water run-off and pollutant wash-off at the lot scale. These rainwater tank models often cannot be adequately calibrated and validated due to limited availability of observed rainwater tank quantity and quality data. This paper presents calibration and validation of a lot scale rainwater tank system model using XP-SWMM utilizing data collected from two rainwater tank systems located in Western Sydney, Australia. The modeling considers run-off peak and volume in and out of the rainwater tank system and also a number of water quality parameters (Total Phosphorus (TP), Total Nitrogen (TN) and Total Solids (TS)). It has been found that XP-SWMM can be used successfully to develop a lot scale rainwater system model within an acceptable error margin. It has been shown that TP and TS can be predicted more accurately than TN using the developed model. In addition, it was found that a significant reduction in storm water run-off discharge can be achieved as a result of the rainwater tank up to about one year average recurrence interval rainfall event. The model parameter set assembled in this study can be used for developing lot scale rainwater tank system models at other locations in the Western Sydney region and in other parts of Australia with necessary adjustments for the local site characteristics. PMID:24835081

  14. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in harbor sediments from Sea Lots, Port-of-Spain, Trinidad and Tobago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Azad; Peterman, Paul; Echols, Kathy; Feltz, Kevin; Tegerdine, George; Manoo, Anton; Maraj, Dexter; Agard, John; Orazio, Carl

    2011-01-01

    Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) were determined in nearshore marine surficial sediments from three locations in Trinidad. Sediments were sampled at Sea Lots on the west coast, in south Port-of-Spain Harbor, south of Sea Lots at Caroni Lagoon National Park, and on Trinidad's east coast at Manzanilla. Total PCB concentrations in Sea Lots sediments ranged from 62 to 601 ng/g (dry weight {dw}), which was higher than at Caroni and Manzanilla, 13 and 8 ng/g dw, respectively. Total OCP concentrations at Sea Lots were ranged from 44.5 to 145 ng/g dw, compared with 13.1 and 23.8 n/g (dw), for Caroni and Manzanilla respectively. The concentrations of PCBs and of some OCPs in sediments from Sea Lots were above the Canadian interim sediment quality guidelines. To date, this data is the first report on the levels of PCBs and other organochlorine compounds from Trinidad and Tobago.

  15. A hybrid flowshop scheduling model considering dedicated machines and lot-splitting for the solar cell industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Chih; Chen, Yin-Yann; Chen, Tzu-Li; Cheng, Chen-Yang; Chang, Chin-Wei

    2014-10-01

    This paper studies a solar cell industry scheduling problem, which is similar to traditional hybrid flowshop scheduling (HFS). In a typical HFS problem, the allocation of machine resources for each order should be scheduled in advance. However, the challenge in solar cell manufacturing is the number of machines that can be adjusted dynamically to complete the job. An optimal production scheduling model is developed to explore these issues, considering the practical characteristics, such as hybrid flowshop, parallel machine system, dedicated machines, sequence independent job setup times and sequence dependent job setup times. The objective of this model is to minimise the makespan and to decide the processing sequence of the orders/lots in each stage, lot-splitting decisions for the orders and the number of machines used to satisfy the demands in each stage. From the experimental results, lot-splitting has significant effect on shortening the makespan, and the improvement effect is influenced by the processing time and the setup time of orders. Therefore, the threshold point to improve the makespan can be identified. In addition, the model also indicates that more lot-splitting approaches, that is, the flexibility of allocating orders/lots to machines is larger, will result in a better scheduling performance.

  16. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in harbor sediments from Sea Lots, Port-of-Spain, Trinidad and Tobago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Azad; Peterman, Paul; Echols, Kathy; Feltz, Kevin; Tegerdine, George; Manoo, Anton; Maraj, Dexter; Agard, John; Orazio, Carl

    2011-06-01

    Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) were determined in nearshore marine surficial sediments from three locations in Trinidad. Sediments were sampled at Sea Lots on the west coast, in south Port-of-Spain Harbor, south of Sea Lots at Caroni Lagoon National Park, and on Trinidad's east coast at Manzanilla. Total PCB concentrations in Sea Lots sediments ranged from 62 to 601ng/g (dry weight {dw}), which was higher than at Caroni and Manzanilla, 13 and 8ng/g dw, respectively. Total OCP concentrations at Sea Lots were ranged from 44.5 to 145ng/g dw, compared with 13.1 and 23.8n/g (dw), for Caroni and Manzanilla respectively. The concentrations of PCBs and of some OCPs in sediments from Sea Lots were above the Canadian interim sediment quality guidelines. To date, this data is the first report on the levels of PCBs and other organochlorine compounds from Trinidad and Tobago. PMID:21529852

  17. Environmental assessment of the Alaskan continental shelf. Volume 4. Biological studies: distribution and abundance of some epibenthic invertebrates of the northeastern Gulf of Alaska with notes on the feeding biology of selected species. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feder, H.M.; Jewett, S.C.

    1979-03-01

    The operations connected with oil exploration, production, and transportation in the northeast Gulf of Alaska will present a wide spectrum of potential dangers to the marine environment. The report is an inventory of dominant invertebrates, their abundance and distribution patterns in the area of the Gulf of Alaska.

  18. Species distribution in relation to varying temperatures of microorganisms with enhanced biological phosphorus storage; Zusammensetzung und Temperaturabhaengigkeit der Mikroflora phosphatspeichernder belebter Schlaemme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmer, C. [Hannover Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Siedlungswasserwirtschaft und Abfalltechnik; Kunst, S. [Hannover Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Siedlungswasserwirtschaft und Abfalltechnik

    1996-01-01

    A continuous flow pilot plant with a mixed population of activated sludge was used to investigate the influence of varying temperatures between 20 C and 5 C on the efficiency of biological phosphorus removal and the composition of bacterial communities. Besides the registration of parameters, determinating - according to the models - the biological phosphorus removal, the sludge microflora was analysed regularly. Nearly all isolated strains were tested for their ability of polyphosphate storage. (orig.) [Deutsch] In einer kontinuierlich betriebenen Laborklaeranlage wurde an den Mischbiozoenosen belebter Schlaemme der Einfluss von Temepraturvariationen zwischen 20 C und 5 C auf die vermehrte biologische Phosphorelimination und die Zusammensetzung der Bakterienflora untersucht. Neben einer Erfassung der prozessbestimmenden Parameter der biologischen Phosphorelimination wurden regelmaessig Populationsanalysen und Versuche zum Polyphosphatspeichervermoegen der isolierten Reinkulturen durchgefuehrt. (orig.)

  19. 激光照射下生物组织内部温度分布的数值模拟%Numerical sinulation of the internal temperature distribution in biological tissues under laser irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋伟宏; 熊国欣; 李立本

    2011-01-01

    基于生物热传导理论和有限元算法,采用Matlab软件中的偏微分方程工具箱,模拟激光照射下生物组织的温度分布,并用三维图展现生物组织的温度随时间、空间的变化规律.对激光临床应用有理论指导意义.%Based on the bio - heal transfer theory, numerical simulation results for temperature distribution in biological tissue under irradiation of laser are presented by using Partial Differential Equation Toolbox of Matlab. 3 - dimensional graphs showing the temperature of biological tissue with time and space variation is derived. This study is beneficial for the clinical practices of laser surgery on human body.

  20. Distribution and Abundance of Parasites of the Rhodesgrass Mealybug, Antonina graminis: Reassessment of a Classic Example of Biological Control in the Southeastern United States

    OpenAIRE

    Chantos, Jillian M.; S. Bradleigh Vinson; Helms, Ken R.

    2009-01-01

    Control of the rhodesgrass mealybug, Antonina graminis Maskell (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae), by the encyrtid wasp Neodusmetia sangwani is considered a textbook example of classical biological control. However, recent evidence suggests that A. graminis is abundant in the southeastern United States and no recent surveys have been conducted to determine the status of N. sangwani or other A. graminis parasites. A survey was conducted and it was found that N. sangwani was uncommon overall, occurrin...

  1. Long term test of buffer material at the Aespoe HRL, LOT project. Final report on the A0 test parcel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Swedish repository concept for nuclear waste (KBS-3 concept), the spent nuclear fuel will be stored in copper canisters surrounded by compacted bentonite. The decaying power of the fuel will increase the temperature in the repository which, in combination with the uptake of ground-water, could be expected to produce minor mineralogical changes in the bentonite. The ongoing LOT test series at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory are focused on identifying and quantifying any mineralogical alterations in the bentonite exposed to typical repository-like conditions. Further, buffer-related processes concerning copper corrosion, cation transport, and bacterial survival/activity are studied. In total, the LOT project includes seven test parcels, which contain a central Cu-tube surrounded by cylindrical bentonite blocks to a total diameter of 30 cm as well as temperature, total pressure, water pressure and humidity sensors. In each test parcel, an electrical heater placed inside the copper tube is used to simulate the heat generation from the decaying spent fuel. Three test parcels (S1 to S3) have been exposed to standard KBS-3 conditions (maximum temperature below 100 deg C) and three parcels (A1 to A3) to adverse conditions (maximum temperature below ∼140 deg C). Both the standard and the adverse test series include short term tests (1 to 2 years), medium term tests (> 5 years) and long term tests (> 10 years). The present report concerns an additional short term test, thereby the designation A0, which was exposed to adverse conditions for approximately 1.5 years. Cu-coupons, 134Cs and 57Co tracers and specific chemical agents were placed in the bentonite at defined positions. After field exposure, the entire test parcel was released from the rock by overlapping percussion drilling and wire sawing. The parcel was lifted and divided at the test site and the bentonite material was sampled for specified analyses. The main aspects of the various tests and analyses may

  2. Long term test of buffer material at the Aespoe HRL, LOT project. Final report on the A0 test parcel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnland, Ola; Olsson, Siv; Sanden, Torbjoern; Faelth, Billy (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)); Jansson, Mats; Eriksen, Trygve E.; Svaerdstroem, Kjell (KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)); Rosborg, Bo (Studsvik AB, Nykoeping (Sweden); Rosborg Consulting, Nykoeping (Sweden)); Muurinen, Arto (VTT, Espoo (Finland))

    2011-02-15

    In the Swedish repository concept for nuclear waste (KBS-3 concept), the spent nuclear fuel will be stored in copper canisters surrounded by compacted bentonite. The decaying power of the fuel will increase the temperature in the repository which, in combination with the uptake of ground-water, could be expected to produce minor mineralogical changes in the bentonite. The ongoing LOT test series at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory are focused on identifying and quantifying any mineralogical alterations in the bentonite exposed to typical repository-like conditions. Further, buffer-related processes concerning copper corrosion, cation transport, and bacterial survival/activity are studied. In total, the LOT project includes seven test parcels, which contain a central Cu-tube surrounded by cylindrical bentonite blocks to a total diameter of 30 cm as well as temperature, total pressure, water pressure and humidity sensors. In each test parcel, an electrical heater placed inside the copper tube is used to simulate the heat generation from the decaying spent fuel. Three test parcels (S1 to S3) have been exposed to standard KBS-3 conditions (maximum temperature below 100 deg C) and three parcels (A1 to A3) to adverse conditions (maximum temperature below approx140 deg C). Both the standard and the adverse test series include short term tests (1 to 2 years), medium term tests (> 5 years) and long term tests (> 10 years). The present report concerns an additional short term test, thereby the designation A0, which was exposed to adverse conditions for approximately 1.5 years. Cu-coupons, 134Cs and 57Co tracers and specific chemical agents were placed in the bentonite at defined positions. After field exposure, the entire test parcel was released from the rock by overlapping percussion drilling and wire sawing. The parcel was lifted and divided at the test site and the bentonite material was sampled for specified analyses. The main aspects of the various tests and analyses

  3. Effect of some parameters in the response of the Perspex 3042, Lot L amber dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The answer of the dosimetric systems is affected by several factors, for what should know as these factors they influence in each one of the different dosimetric systems and by this way to minimize its effect in the value of the absorbed dose and to obtain exact dose values. One of the dosimetric systems more used in the high dose dosimetry like routine dosemeter for the control of the irradiation process are the Perspex dosemeters, for their speed in the obtaining the information, their easy manipulation and the precision that they present. To this dosemeters group they belong the same as the Red and Clear the Amber, which are adequate for the measurement of the radiation dose in the range of high doses. The objective of the present work is to obtain the calibration curves of the dosemeters Amber Perspex 3042, Lot L under our work conditions, like they are the irradiation temperatures and of storage and to know the influence of the rate dose in the value of the absorbed dose for different measurement wavelengths, as well as, the relationship among the one post-irradiation time and the specific absorbance value induced in function of the absorbed dose. (Author)

  4. International reactions after the resumption of nuclear tests: lot of noise for nothing?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1995, the French President announced that France would perform an ultimate campaign of nuclear tests before a complete banishment as soon as spring 1996. The campaign effectively ended on time and six tests took place between September 5, 1995 and January 27, 1996. The disarmament process went on and the international negotiations in progress at that time were not affected by the French policy. However, this campaign has caused a strong emotion, if not in the entire World, at least in part of the planet and in particular in Western Europe. This report analyses the reactions from the different governments and from the public opinion and shows their impact on the French diplomacy. Content: Part 1 - general considerations: 1 - lot of noise for nothing?: the objectives of French diplomacy; the acts (a quasi lack of sanctions, a temporary degradation of our relations with a limited number of countries); the rhetoric (diplomatic regrets in first time, slip-ups in the second time, the public opinion weight); 2 - the lessons learnt: the opinion and the management of the foreign policy (the image of France, the communication fight); the geopolitical lessons (European Union: community solidarity and European defense; the South Pacific area); 3 - a case study: Japan: the time of uncertainties (domestic situation, external policy); the Japanese reactions after the tests resumption. Part 2 - synthesis of reactions after the resumption of nuclear tests by France: Pacific bordering countries (South Pacific, Latin America); Western Europe countries; non-European countries; Conclusions

  5. Sampling and analysis plan for the former Atomic Energy Commission bus lot property

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielson, R.R.

    1998-07-01

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) presents the rationale and strategy for the sampling and analysis activities proposed in support of an initial investigation of the former Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) bus lot property currently owned by Battelle Memorial Institute. The purpose of the proposed sampling and analysis activity is to investigate the potential for contamination above established action levels. The SAP will provide defensible data of sufficient quality and quantity to support recommendations of whether any further action within the study area is warranted. To assist in preparing sampling plans and reports, the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) has published Guidance on Sampling and Data Analysis Methods. To specifically address sampling plans for petroleum-contaminated sites, Ecology has also published Guidance for Remediation of Petroleum Contaminated Sites. Both documents were used as guidance in preparing this plan. In 1992, a soil sample was taken within the current study area as part of a project to remove two underground storage tanks (USTs) at Battelle`s Sixth Street Warehouse Petroleum Dispensing Station (Section 1.3). The results showed that the sample contained elevated levels of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in the heavy distillate range. This current study was initiated in part as a result of that discovery. The following topics are considered: the historical background of the site, current site conditions, previous investigations performed at the site, an evaluation based on the available data, and the contaminants of potential concern (COPC).

  6. Sampling and analysis plan for the former Atomic Energy Commission bus lot property

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) presents the rationale and strategy for the sampling and analysis activities proposed in support of an initial investigation of the former Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) bus lot property currently owned by Battelle Memorial Institute. The purpose of the proposed sampling and analysis activity is to investigate the potential for contamination above established action levels. The SAP will provide defensible data of sufficient quality and quantity to support recommendations of whether any further action within the study area is warranted. To assist in preparing sampling plans and reports, the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) has published Guidance on Sampling and Data Analysis Methods. To specifically address sampling plans for petroleum-contaminated sites, Ecology has also published Guidance for Remediation of Petroleum Contaminated Sites. Both documents were used as guidance in preparing this plan. In 1992, a soil sample was taken within the current study area as part of a project to remove two underground storage tanks (USTs) at Battelle's Sixth Street Warehouse Petroleum Dispensing Station (Section 1.3). The results showed that the sample contained elevated levels of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in the heavy distillate range. This current study was initiated in part as a result of that discovery. The following topics are considered: the historical background of the site, current site conditions, previous investigations performed at the site, an evaluation based on the available data, and the contaminants of potential concern (COPC)

  7. Integrated scheduling of renewable generation and electric vehicles parking lot in a smart microgrid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Integrated operation of renewable generation and electric vehicles is presented. • The capability of electric vehicles in providing reserve has been analyzed. • A new electric vehicles charging/discharging management system is proposed. • The technical features of electric vehicle’s batteries are considered. - Abstract: Integration of Electric Vehicles (EVs) and Renewable Energy Sources (RESs) into the electric power system may bring up many technical issues. The power system may put at risk the security and reliability of operation due to intermittent nature of renewable generation and uncontrolled charging/discharging procedure of EVs. In this paper, an energy resources management model for a microgrid (MG) is proposed. The proposed method considers practical constraints, renewable power forecasting errors, spinning reserve requirements and EVs owner satisfaction. A case study with a typical MG including 200 EVs is used to illustrate the performance of the proposed method. The results show that the proposed energy resource scheduling method satisfies financial and technical goals of parking lot as well as the security and economic issues of MG. Moreover, EV owners could earn profit by discharging their vehicles’ batteries or providing the reserve capacity and finally have desired State Of Charge (SOC) in the departure time

  8. Benders-based approach for an integrated Lot-Sizing and Scheduling problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ouerfelli hala

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The main concern of the current paper is to present mathematical model and a decision method for production planning issues of a manufacturing organization. We aim at integrating the medium term and the short term as two levels of decision. These consist in periodical planning with determining the intended produced quantity and scheduling the functioning of machines. It is worth noting that in the literature there exist only few works on the issue of integration because of the shortage of numerical results. Thus, the integrated model presented here allows us to take into consideration the scheduling constraints in the Lot-sizing model. A recent algorithm, based on a heuristic approach to find a production planning with a feasible schedule for each period, has recently been published in which the two levels of decision were applied. In this paper, some of these ideas are developed in order to get an optimal solution. For this, an exact algorithm of Benders’ decomposition method is adopted to the integration problem. This has been proved efficient with reliance primarily on modeling view and the link between the two levels of decision and secondly on the numerical view.

  9. A new approach for solving capacitated lot sizing and scheduling problem with sequence and period-dependent setup costs

    OpenAIRE

    Imen Chaieb Memmi; Sondes Hammami Laaroussi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We aim to examine the capacitated multi-item lot sizing problem which is a typical example of a large bucket model, where many different items can be produced on the same machine in one time period. We propose a new approach to determine the production sequence and lot sizes that minimize the sum of start up and setup costs, inventory and production costs over all periods.Design/methodology/approach: The approach is composed of three steps. First, we compute a lower bound on total co...

  10. A new method for assessing judgmental distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moors, J.J.A.; Schuld, M.H.; Mathijssen, A.C.A.

    1995-01-01

    For a number of statistical applications subjective estimates of some distributional parameters - or even complete densities are needed. The literature agrees that it is wise behaviour to ask only for some quantiles of the distribution; from these, the desired quantities are extracted. Quite a lot o

  11. Multiple category-lot quality assurance sampling: a new classification system with application to schistosomiasis control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey Olives

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Originally a binary classifier, Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS has proven to be a useful tool for classification of the prevalence of Schistosoma mansoni into multiple categories (≤10%, >10 and <50%, ≥50%, and semi-curtailed sampling has been shown to effectively reduce the number of observations needed to reach a decision. To date the statistical underpinnings for Multiple Category-LQAS (MC-LQAS have not received full treatment. We explore the analytical properties of MC-LQAS, and validate its use for the classification of S. mansoni prevalence in multiple settings in East Africa. METHODOLOGY: We outline MC-LQAS design principles and formulae for operating characteristic curves. In addition, we derive the average sample number for MC-LQAS when utilizing semi-curtailed sampling and introduce curtailed sampling in this setting. We also assess the performance of MC-LQAS designs with maximum sample sizes of n=15 and n=25 via a weighted kappa-statistic using S. mansoni data collected in 388 schools from four studies in East Africa. PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: Overall performance of MC-LQAS classification was high (kappa-statistic of 0.87. In three of the studies, the kappa-statistic for a design with n=15 was greater than 0.75. In the fourth study, where these designs performed poorly (kappa-statistic less than 0.50, the majority of observations fell in regions where potential error is known to be high. Employment of semi-curtailed and curtailed sampling further reduced the sample size by as many as 0.5 and 3.5 observations per school, respectively, without increasing classification error. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This work provides the needed analytics to understand the properties of MC-LQAS for assessing the prevalance of S. mansoni and shows that in most settings a sample size of 15 children provides a reliable classification of schools.

  12. Lots of Librarians Can Keep Stuff Safe: Libraries Are Able to Safeguard Content with LOCKSS, Open Source Digital Preservation Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Karen G.

    2007-01-01

    Over the next several decades, libraries will face the potential loss of all the e-journals, ebooks, electronic theses, local digital collections, and other "e-stuff" curated for the public good. A solution to this problem is LOCKSS ("Lots of Copies Keep Stuff Safe"), a free, open-source digital-preservation software from Stanford University that…

  13. GERMINATION PERFORMANCE OF SEQUENTIALLY HARVESTED TOMATO (LYCOPERSICON ESCULENTUM MILL.) SEED LOTS DURING SEED DEVELOPMENT UNDER SALT AND OSMOTIC STRESS

    OpenAIRE

    OZCOBAN, Mustafa; Demir, Ibrahim

    2006-01-01

    This work concluded that tomato seeds harvested 70 days after anthesis showed the maximum germination not only under water but also salt stress. Seeds harvested earlier or later were more sensitive to stress at germinations. High Ki value of the lots indicated high resistance under stress conditions.

  14. 7 CFR 800.86 - Inspection of shiplot, unit train, and lash barge grain in single lots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... grade 0.2 Protein As specified by contract or load order grade 0.5 Class and Subclass Hard red spring... result shall, unless a material error is found, be averaged with the original inspection determination... issuing the official inspection certificate for the first lot. (3) Protein. A special statement...

  15. Detection of Leptosphaeria maculans and Leptosphaeria biglobosa Causing Blackleg Disease in Canola from Canadian Canola Seed Lots and Dockage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, W G Dilantha; Zhang, Xuehua; Amarasinghe, Chami C

    2016-01-01

    Blackleg, caused by Leptosphaeria maculans, is a major threat to canola production in Canada. With the exception of China, L. maculans is present in areas around the world where cruciferous crops are grown. The pathogen can cause trade barriers in international canola seed export due to its potential risk as a seed contaminant. The most recent example is China restricting canola seeds imported from Canada and Australia in 2009. Therefore, it is important to assess the level of Blackleg infection in Canadian canola seed lots and dockage (seeds and admixture). In this study, canola seed lots and dockage samples collected from Western Canada were tested for the presence of the aggressive L. maculans and the less aggressive L. biglobosa. Results showed that both L. maculans and L. biglobosa were present in seed lots and dockage samples, with L. biglobosa being predominant in infected seeds. Admixture separated from dockage had higher levels of L. maculans and L. biglobosa infection than samples from seed lots. Admixture appears to harbour higher levels of L. maculans infection compared to seeds and is more likely to be a major source of inoculum for the spread of the disease than infected seeds. PMID:27135232

  16. Occurrence and trends of weed seed and ergot contaminants in Oregon grown Poa pratensis and Poa trivialis seed lots

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was conducted to assess the diversity and frequency of occurrence of weed seeds and sclerotia of the fungus Claviceps purpurea (ergot) in certified seed lots of P. pratensis (Kentucky bluegrass) and P. trivialis (rough bluegrass) based on purity analysis at the Oregon State University See...

  17. Polysaccharies of higher fungi: Biological role, structure and antioxidative activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kozarski, M.S.; Klaus, A.; Niksic, M.; Griensven, van L.J.L.D.; Vrvic, M.M.; Jakovljevic, D.M.

    2014-01-01

    The fungal polysaccharides attract a lot of attention due to their multiple challenging bio-logical properties, such as: anti-tumor, anti-viral, anticomplementary, anticoagulant, hypo-lipidemic, immunomodulatory and immune-stimulatory activities, which all together make them suitable for application

  18. Polysaccharides of higher fungi: Biological role, structure, and antioxidative activity

    OpenAIRE

    Kozarski Maja S.; Klaus Anita S.; Nikšić Miomir P.; van Griensven Leo J.L.D.; Vrvić Miroslav M.; Jakovljević Dragica M.

    2014-01-01

    Fungal polysaccharides attract a lot of attention due to their multiple challenging biological properties, such as: anti-tumor, anti-viral, anticomplementary, anticoagulant, hypolipidemic and immunomodulatory and immune-stimulatory activities, which all together make them suitable for application in many quite distinctive areas, such as food industry, biomedicine, cosmetology, agriculture, environmental protection and waste water management. This article pr...

  19. Fifty-year sedimentary record of heavy metal pollution (Cd, Zn, Cu, Pb) in the Lot River reservoirs (France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Lot-Garonne fluvial system is known for its historic heavy metal pollution resulting from mining and smelting activities since the late 19th century. Here, we report 137Cs activities and heavy metal (Cd, Zn, Cu, Pb and V) concentration-depth profiles from sediment cores retrieved in 2001 from three reservoirs in the Lot River. High mean sedimentation rates of 2.4-2.8 cm a-1 are indicated by 137Cs dating. The reservoir sediments have recorded the heavy metal deposition and thus allow establishing a connection between the temporal evolution of the heavy metal pollution and historical changes in smelting and waste-treatment proceedings. Based on heavy metal concentrations in sediments upstream of the anthropogenic inputs and bottom-sediments of the furthest downstream core (interpreted as old soil or riverbed), concentrations of ∼17, ∼82, ∼0.33 and ∼28 mg kg-1 for Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb, respectively, are proposed as natural background values for the Lot fluvial system. The geoaccumulation index (Igeo [Mueller, G., 1979. Schwermetalle in den Sedimenten des Rheins-Veraenderungen seit. Umschav 79, 133-149.]) revealed that the Lot River sediments must be considered as 'severely polluted' in Cd and Zn. Moreover, despite remediation efforts undertaken in the former smelting site, the Lot River is still ''severely'' (Igeo ∼ 4) and ''moderately to severely'' (Igeo > 2) impacted by Cd and Zn inputs, respectively. - Capsule: Reservoir sediments provide fine-scale information on the historical record of metal pollution in a watershed

  20. Choosing between rocks, hard places and a lot more. The economic interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    decisions: for deciding whether or not to explore or develop, for choosing between exploration prospects ('rocks') in a licensing round, for choosing between basins or countries ('places') in which one wants to explore and produce, and for choosing between development concepts, recovery mechanisms, plateau rates, ... (and a lot more), in field development planning. Due to the largely unpredictable nature of the subsurface and the future oil price, the concepts of 'risk' (=possibility of a financial loss or an unachieved objective) and unfortunately, to a lesser extent 'grisk' (possibility of a financial gain in excess of the objective) are quite central in the oil business. Illustrations of 'risk' and 'grisk' will be presented. 24 refs

  1. The biology and distribution of Haplochromis spp in the Nyanza Gulf prior to the total invasion of the Gulf of Nile perch, Lates niloticus (L)

    OpenAIRE

    Mwalo, O.M.

    1994-01-01

    The work reported was conducted during the watershed period of 1976 when Nile perch (Lates niloticus) started to replace Haplochromis spp. in dominance in the Nyanza Gulf of Lake Victoria. Seventy four "groups" of Haplochromis species flock obtained from a stock assessment survey of that year were used in the study. The length of fish examined varied between 57 and 237 mm total length, and between 1 and 182 g wet weight, with means of 101.05 mm and 18.53 g respectively. Frequency distribution...

  2. A Brief Introduction to Chinese Biological Abstracts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Chinese Biological Abstracts (CBA), a state-level indexing and abstracting journal published monthly, is jointly sponsored by the Library of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences as well as the Biological Information Network of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, published and distributed by the Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, and approved by the State Scientific and Technological Commission.

  3. The distribution of Biomphalaria spp. in different habitats in relation to physical, biological, water contact and cognitive factors in a rural area in Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kloos Helmut

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 256 sites in 11 habitats were surveyed for Biomphalaria in Melquiades rural area (State of Minas Gerais in August and November 1999 and in March 2000. Of the 1,780 Biomphalaria collected, 1,721 (96.7% were B. glabrata and 59 (3.3% B. straminea. Snails were found in all habitats except in wells, with the largest mean numbers in tanks, seepage ponds and canals, and the smallest numbers in springs, rice fields and fishponds. People's knowledge of the occurrence of Biomphalaria at the collection sites and the presence of Biomphalaria ova were strongly correlated with the occurrence of snails, and distance between houses and collection sites, as well as water velocity were inversely correlated with Biomphalaria occurrence (p < 0.001. The strongest predictor o f Biomphalaria occurrence was the presence of tilapia fish in fishponds. Fourteen Biomphalaria (0.8% of all snails found at 6 sites were infected with Schistosoma mansoni. Suggestions are made for the utilization of local people's knowledge in snail surveys and further studies are recommended on the possible use of tilapia for biological control of Biomphalaria in fishponds, as well as modeling of S. mansoni transmission and reinfection.

  4. Biology of the subtropical sac-spawning euphausiid Nyctiphanes simplex in the northwestern seas of Mexico: Vertical and horizontal distribution patterns and seasonal variability of brood size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Gutiérrez, Jaime; Tremblay, Nelly; Martínez-Gómez, Samuel; Robinson, Carlos J.; Del Ángel-Rodríguez, Jorge; Rodríguez-Jaramillo, Carmen; Zavala-Hernández, Christian

    2010-04-01

    Vertical and horizontal distributions of the subtropical euphausiid juvenile and adult Nyctiphanes simplex were mapped from samples collected during winter and summer 2007 in the Gulf of California, Mexico. During winter, wide-ranging high densities occurred in most of the Gulf of California. Densities decreased considerably during summer, with only at few locations having high densities. N. simplex made short daily vertical migrations of 50 m, clearly avoiding layers with temperatures >20 °C. In both seasons, N. simplex occurred above the low-oxygen layer (low-oxygen layer acts as the bottom limit of vertical distribution and horizontal distribution is limited at the southern part of the gulf to temperatures >23 °C. Seasonal brood size and reproductive effort were estimated for both sides of the Baja California Peninsula under ship board experiments as a proxy of the relative effect of seasonal environmental conditions for euphausiid reproduction. Experiments were done during March, July, and December 2004 at the entrance to Bahía Magdalena and its westward continental shelf and in November 2005 and January and July 2007 in the Gulf of California. Contrary to broadcast-spawning euphausiids, N. simplex, a sac-spawning euphausiid, has a significant association of the brood size as a function of the total length of females. N. simplex produces an average brood of 52 eggs female -1 (range 5-116 eggs female -1) with a estimated total fecundity of 936 eggs female -1 in a life span (360-1337 eggs female -1), of which about 8% of its carbon weight is released per spawn, significantly higher than estimates of previous studies. In Bahía Magdalena, broods contained more embryos in March and July 2004 than in December 2004 when temperatures increased to >23 °C. In the Gulf of California, broods had higher numbers of embryos in November and July than in January 2007, suggesting that N. simplex has an out-of-phase reproductive season on both coasts of the peninsula

  5. Processes and procedures for a worldwide biological samples distribution; product assurance and logistic activities to support the mice drawer system tissue sharing event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benassai, Mario; Cotronei, Vittorio

    The Mice Drawer System (MDS) is a scientific payload developed by the Italian Space Agency (ASI), it hosted 6 mice on the International Space Station (ISS) and re-entered on ground on November 28, 2009 with the STS 129 at KSC. Linked to the MDS experiment, a Tissue Sharing Program (TSP), was developed in order to make available to 16 Payload Investigators (PI) (located in USA, Canada, EU -Italy, Belgium and Germany -and Japan) the biological samples coming from the mice. ALTEC SpA (a PPP owned by ASI, TAS-I and local institutions) was responsible to support the logistics aspects of the MDS samples for the first MDS mission, in the frame of Italian Space Agency (ASI) OSMA program (OSteoporosis and Muscle Atrophy). The TSP resulted in a complex scenario, as ASI, progressively, extended the original OSMA Team also to researchers from other ASI programs and from other Agencies (ESA, NASA, JAXA). The science coordination was performed by the University of Genova (UNIGE). ALTEC has managed all the logistic process with the support of a specialized freight forwarder agent during the whole shipping operation phases. ALTEC formalized all the steps from the handover of samples by the dissection Team to the packaging and shipping process in a dedicated procedure. ALTEC approached all the work in a structured way, performing: A study of the aspects connected to international shipments of biological samples. A coopera-tive work with UNIGE/ASI /PIs to identify all the needs of the various researchers and their compatibility. A complete revision and integration of shipment requirements (addresses, tem-peratures, samples, materials and so on). A complete definition of the final shipment scenario in terms of boxes, content, refrigerant and requirements. A formal approach to identification and selection of the most suited and specialized Freight Forwarder. A clear identification of all the processes from sample dissection by PI Team, sample processing, freezing, tube preparation

  6. Reproducibility of toxicity test data as a function of mouse strain, animal lot, and operator. [for bisphenol A polycarbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilado, C. J.; Furst, A.

    1978-01-01

    The toxicity screening test method developed at the University of San Francisco was evaluated for reproducibility. The variables addressed were strain of mouse, lot of animals, and operator. There was a significant difference in response between Swiss Webster mice and ICR mice, with the latter exhibiting greater resistance. These two strains of mice are not interchangeable in this procedure. Variation between individual animals was significant and unavoidable. In view of this variation, between-lot and between-operator variations appear to have no practical significance. The significant variation between individual animals stresses the need for average values based on at least four animals, and preferably values based on at least two experiments and eight animals. Efforts to compare materials should be based on the evaluation of relatively simple responses using substantial numbers of animals, rather than on elaborate evaluation of single animals

  7. Evaluation pré-clinique et clinique de l'autogreffe intramusculaire d'îlots de Langerhans

    OpenAIRE

    Sterkers, Adrien

    2013-01-01

    La transplantation d'îlots permet la restauration d'une insulino-sécrétion endogène chez les patients diabétiques de type 1 par greffe allogénique et limite les conséquences métaboliques d'une pancréatectomie en cas d'autogreffe. Le site de référence intrahépatique présente néanmoins de nombreuses limites. Dans le cadre d'autogreffe, le risque hémorragique accru chez les patients récemment opérés liée à l'injection nécessairement conjointe des îlots et d'héparine en intraportal doit faire pri...

  8. Teaching evolutionary biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tidon Rosana

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary Biology integrates several disciplines of Biology in a complex and interactive manner, where a deep understanding of the subject demands knowledge in diverse areas. Since this knowledge is often inaccessible to the majority of specialized professionals, including the teachers, we present some reflections in order to stimulate discussions aimed at the improvement of the conditions of education in this area. We examine the profile of evolutionary teaching in Brazil, based on questionnaires distributed to teachers in Secondary Education in the Federal District, on data provided by the "National Institute for Educational Studies and Research", and on information collected from teachers working in various regions of this country. Issues related to biological misconceptions, curriculum and didactic material are discussed, and some proposals are presented with the objective of aiding discussions aimed at the improvement of the teaching of evolutionary biology.

  9. The impact of large-lot zoning and open space acquisition on home building in rural communities

    OpenAIRE

    Gottlieb, Paul D.; O'Donnell, Anthony; Rudel, Thomas; O'Neill, Karen; McDermott, Melanie

    2009-01-01

    Local governments in the United States use a wide range of tools to preserve rural landscapes. Some of these tools, like the purchase or transfer of development rights, are generally welcomed by farmers and other large landowners. Other tools, like increasing the minimum lot size in a town’s agricultural zone, are more controversial because they are believed to have negative effects on landowner wealth. In this contentious policy environment, it would be useful to know which land use tools ac...

  10. Standard versus reserve lots of Thymus x citriodorus L. and Mentha spicata L. : nutritional contribution of the infusions

    OpenAIRE

    Rita, Íngride; Pereira, Carla; Barros, Lillian; Ferreira, Isabel C.F.R.

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays we can notice a significant increase in the consumption of tea and herbal infusions, in such a way that their daily worldwide consumption is valuated in more than three million cups. Hence, as expected, the tea market became a highly competitive and sophisticated sector, where a wide range of products continue to be developed for added-value [1, 2]. An example in the tea industry of a new range of emerging products, are the designated "reserve lots" exclusively made up...

  11. Approximating the Nonlinear Newsvendor and Single-Item Stochastic Lot-Sizing Problems When Data Is Given by an Oracle

    OpenAIRE

    Halman, Nir; Simchi-Levi, David; Orlin, James B., 1953-.

    2011-01-01

    The single-item stochastic lot-sizing problem is to find an inventory replenishment policy in the presence of discrete stochastic demands under periodic review and finite time horizon. A closely related problem is the single-period newsvendor model. It is well known that the newsvendor problem admits a closed formula for the optimal order quantity whenever the revenue and salvage values are linear increasing functions and the procurement (ordering) cost is fixed plus linear. The optimal polic...

  12. Field trial of applicability of lot quality assurance sampling survey method for rapid assessment of prevalence of active trachoma.

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the applicability of lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS) for the rapid assessment of the prevalence of active trachoma. METHODS: Prevalence of active trachoma in six communities was found by examining all children aged 2-5 years. Trial surveys were conducted in these communities. A sampling plan appropriate for classifying communities with prevalences or =40% was applied to the survey data. Operating characteristic and average sample number curves were plo...

  13. The effect of clustering on lot quality assurance sampling: a probabilistic model to calculate sample sizes for quality assessments

    OpenAIRE

    Hedt-Gauthier, Bethany L; Mitsunaga, Tisha; Hund, Lauren; Olives, Casey; Pagano, Marcello

    2013-01-01

    Background: Traditional Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS) designs assume observations are collected using simple random sampling. Alternatively, randomly sampling clusters of observations and then individuals within clusters reduces costs but decreases the precision of the classifications. In this paper, we develop a general framework for designing the cluster(C)-LQAS system and illustrate the method with the design of data quality assessments for the community health worker program in Rw...

  14. An efficient computational method for a stochastic dynamic lot-sizing problem under service-level constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Tarim, S. Armagan; Dogru, Mustafa K.; Oezen, Ulas; Rossi, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    We provide an efficient computational approach to solve the mixed integer programming (MIP) model developed by Tarim and Kingsman [8] for solving a stochastic lot-sizing problem with service level constraints under the static-dynamic uncertainty strategy. The effectiveness of the proposed method hinges on three novelties: (i) the proposed relaxation is computationally efficient and provides an optimal solution most of the time, (ii) if the relaxation produces an infeasible solution, then this...

  15. Demand uncertainty and lot sizing in manufacturing systems: the effects of forecasting errors and mis-specification

    OpenAIRE

    Kingsman, B G; R A Fildes

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes a methodology for examining the effect of demand uncertainty and forecast error on lot sizing methods, unit costs and customer service levels in MRP type manufacturing systems. A number of cost structures were considered which depend on the expected time between orders. A simple two-level MRP system where the product is manufactured for stock was then simulated. Stochastic demand for the final product was generated by two commonly occurring processes and with different var...

  16. Effect of Unequal Lot Sizes, Variable Setup Cost, and Carbon Emission Cost in a Supply Chain Model

    OpenAIRE

    Biswajit Sarkar; Sharmila Saren; Debjani Sinha; Sun Hur

    2015-01-01

    Due to heavy transportation for single-setup multidelivery (SSMD) policy in supply chain management, this model assumes carbon emission cost to obtain a realistic behavior for world environment. The transportation for buyer and vendor is considered along with setup cost reduction by using an investment function. It is assumed that the shipment lot size of each delivery is unequal and variable. The buyer inspects all received products and returns defective items to vendor for reworking process...

  17. Seasonal spatial patterns in seabird and marine mammal distribution in the eastern Chukchi and western Beaufort seas: Identifying biologically important pelagic areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuletz, Kathy J.; Ferguson, Megan C.; Hurley, Brendan; Gall, Adrian E.; Labunski, Elizabeth A.; Morgan, Tawna C.

    2015-08-01

    The Chukchi and Beaufort seas are undergoing rapid climate change and increased human activity. Conservation efforts for upper trophic level predators such as seabirds and marine mammals require information on species' distributions and identification of important marine areas. Here we describe broad-scale distributions of seabirds and marine mammals. We examined spatial patterns of relative abundance of seabirds and marine mammals in the eastern Chukchi and western Beaufort seas during summer (15 June-31 August) and fall (1 September-20 November) from 2007 to 2012. We summarized 49,206 km of shipboard surveys for seabirds and 183,157 km of aerial surveys for marine mammals into a grid of 40-km × 40-km cells. We used Getis-Ord Gi∗ hotspot analysis to test for cells with higher relative abundance than expected when compared to all cells within the study area. We identified cells representing single species and taxonomic group hotspots, cells representing hotspots for multiple species, and cells representing hotspots for both seabirds and marine mammals. The locations of hotspots varied among species but often were located near underwater canyons or over continental shelf features and slopes. Hotspots for seabirds, walrus, and gray whales occurred primarily in the Chukchi Sea. Hotspots for bowhead whales and other pinnipeds (i.e., seals) occurred near Barrow Canyon and along the Beaufort Sea shelf and slope. Hotspots for belugas occurred in both the Chukchi and Beaufort seas. There were three hotspots shared by both seabirds and marine mammals in summer: off Wainwright in the eastern Chukchi Sea, south of Hanna Shoal, and at the mouth of Barrow Canyon. In fall, the only identified shared hotspot occurred at the mouth of Barrow Canyon. Shared hotspots are characterized by strong fronts caused by upwelling and currents, and these areas can have high densities of euphausiids in summer and fall. Due to the high relative abundance of animals and diversity of taxa

  18. The acoustic climate at the rest and service areas – parking lots by the Silesian section of A4 motorway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert WIESZAŁA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to describe the state of the acoustic climate at the rest and service areas (MOPs situated by A4 motorway in Silesia The analysis includes the research results conducted at these parking lots from May till August 2010. The research was conducted with the digital noise meter, which was connected with the computer during measurement. The research results indicate the essential differences in the noise intensity between the particular rest and service area reaching up to 12 dB(A, in spite of the similar value of the traffic noise in all of the places where the research was conducted. It was assumed that the level of noise on each of the parking lots should be similar to standing norms for the recreation areas i.e. below 55 dB(A. The research conducted at 4 MOPs indicated that only at two of them, MOP Halemba and Wirek, these norms are fulfilled. The lack of the proper anti-noise protection in the form of the sound absorbing screens at the parking lots situated by the motorway causes the situation in which the level of noise at the places devoted to rest highly decreases the possibility to relax before the next stage of a journey.

  19. Biology Notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents procedures, exercises, demonstrations, and information on a variety of biology topics including labeling systems, biological indicators of stream pollution, growth of lichens, reproductive capacity of bulbous buttercups, a straw balance to measure transpiration, interaction of fungi, osmosis, and nitrogen fixation and crop production. (DC)

  20. Lots of Brass, Lots of Colors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steijn, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    Those entering the foyer ahead of the brass concert find several installations on the ground floor of the Copenhagen Opera House. Each installation explores the relationship between music and color, and there are musical instruments (trombones) available for people to play. On a large TV screen......, streams of colored particles represent the musical sounds that are picked up by a microphone when playing the trombone. People are also invited to take their own ‘particle LED light’ into the concert hall and use them to accompany the music. When seated, the link becomes obvious: Music and colors become...

  1. Lot Size Decisions for Vendor-Buyer System with Quantity Discount, Partial Backorder, and Stochastic Demand

    OpenAIRE

    Wakhid Ahmad Jauhari

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents production-inventory model for two-echelon system consisting of single vendor and single buyer. The proposed model contributes to the current inventory literature by incorporating quantity discount scheme into stochastic vendor-buyer model. Almost all vendor-buyer inventory models have discussed this scheme in single-echelon system and deterministic demand situation. Here, we assume that the demand of the buyer is normally distributed and the unmet demand is considered to ...

  2. Current viral infections and epidemics of flaviviridae; lots of grief but also some hope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Kossida

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Flaviviridae is a family of RNA viruses that includes numerous important human and animal pathogens. Recent studies on subgenomic flaviviridae replicons have revealed that the non-structural (NS proteins, which are encoded by the C-terminal part of the polyprotein, play a crucial role in viral RNA replication. Accordingly, these proteins are assumed to form replication complexes in conjunction with genomic RNA and possibly with other cellular factors. One the most important non-structural enzymes that plays a key role in the life cycle of flaviviridae viruses is the viral helicase. Sequence alignments of the viral helicases from this family identified several conserved sequence motifs that are important for biological functions. Herein, an effort is made to summarize the current epidemics associated with the flaviviridae family worldwide, the potential of helicase enzymes as a promising pharmacological target and the use of nucleoside analogs as simple, efficient and rather versatile antiviral agents.

  3. The colonial ascidian Didemnum sp. A: current distribution, basic biology and potential threat to marine communities of the northeast and west coasts of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullard, S.G.; Lambert, G.; Carman, M.R.; Byrnes, J.; Whitlatch, R.B.; Ruiz, G.; Miller, R.J.; Harris, L.; Valentine, P.C.; Collie, J.S.; Pederson, J.; McNaught, D.C.; Cohen, A.N.; Asch, R.G.; Dijkstra, J.; Heinonen, K.

    2007-01-01

    Didemnum sp. A is a colonial ascidian with rapidly expanding populations on the east and west coasts of North America. The origin of Didemum sp. A is unknown. Populations were first observed on the northeast coast of the U.S. in the late 1980s and on the west coast during the 1990s. It is currently undergoing a massive population explosion and is now a dominant member of many subtidal communities on both coasts. To determine Didemnum sp. A's current distribution, we conducted surveys from Maine to Virginia on the east coast and from British Columbia to southern California on the west coast of the U.S. between 1998 and 2005. In nearshore locations Didemnum sp. A currently ranges from Eastport, Maine to Shinnecock Bay, New York on the east coast. On the west coast it has been recorded from Humboldt Bay to Port San Luis in California, several sites in Puget Sound, Washington, including a heavily fouled mussel culture facility, and several sites in southwestern British Columbia on and adjacent to oyster and mussel farms. The species also occurs at deeper subtidal sites (up to 81 m) off New England, including Georges, Stellwagen and Tillies Banks. On Georges Bank numerous sites within a 230 km2 area are 50–90% covered by Didemnum sp. A; large colonies cement the pebble gravel into nearly solid mats that may smother infaunal organisms. These observations suggest that Didemnum sp. A has the potential to alter marine communities and affect economically important activities such as fishing and aquaculture.

  4. Auditing for Distributed Storage Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Le, Anh; Markopoulou, Athina; Dimakis, Alexandros G.

    2012-01-01

    Distributed storage codes have recently received a lot of attention in the community. Independently, another body of work has proposed integrity checking schemes for cloud storage, none of which, however, is customized for coding-based storage or can efficiently support repair. In this work, we bridge the gap between these two currently disconnected bodies of work. We propose NC-Audit, a novel cryptography-based remote data integrity checking scheme, designed specifically for network coding-b...

  5. Physical and biological control of protistan community composition, distribution and abundance in the seasonal ice zone of the Southern Ocean between 30 and 80°E

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Andrew T.; Scott, Fiona J.; Nash, Geraldine V.; Wright, Simon W.; Raymond, Ben

    2010-05-01

    Protists are critical components of the Antarctic marine ecosystem as they comprise most of the living carbon and are the base of the Antarctic food web. They are also key determinants of vertical carbon flux and mediate draw-down of atmospheric CO 2 by the ocean. The community composition, abundance and distribution of marine protists (phytoplankton and protozoa) was studied during the Baseline Research on Oceanography, Krill and the Environment-West (BROKE-West) survey, in the seasonal ice zone during the 2005-2006 austral summer between 30°E and 80°E. Light and electron microscopy were used to determine the protistan composition and abundance in samples obtained at 30 sites from surface waters and at 26 sites from the depth of the maximum in situ chlorophyll fluorescence (Chl max). Cluster analysis was used to identify 5 groups of sample sites at the surface and 5 at the Chl max that were of similar protist composition and abundance. The physical characteristics, taxonomic composition, indicator taxa, and taxonomic diversity were determined for each group. In the southwest, a bloom of colonial Phaeocystis antarctica dominated the protistan community composition and biomass amongst the receding ice, but this was replaced by the flagellate life stage/s of this haptophyte in waters to the north. In the southeast, a diatom bloom had the highest diversity of protist taxa observed during the survey and centric diatoms dominated the biomass. Outside these blooms, grazing by krill probably reduced the composition and abundance of large diatoms and autotrophic dinoflagellates in coastal to mid-inshore waters. Only in offshore waters did large diatoms and dinoflagellates increase in abundance and diversity, despite low concentrations of iron and silicate at many of these sites. This increase was probably due to reduced top-down control by krill and other large zooplankton. Large diatoms dominated in offshore waters, despite other coincident studies showing that the

  6. Quantum Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Sergi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A critical assessment of the recent developmentsof molecular biology is presented.The thesis that they do not lead to a conceptualunderstanding of life and biological systems is defended.Maturana and Varela's concept of autopoiesis is briefly sketchedand its logical circularity avoided by postulatingthe existence of underlying living processes,entailing amplification from the microscopic to the macroscopic scale,with increasing complexity in the passage from one scale to the other.Following such a line of thought, the currently accepted model of condensed matter, which is based on electrostatics and short-ranged forces,is criticized. It is suggested that the correct interpretationof quantum dispersion forces (van der Waals, hydrogen bonding, and so onas quantum coherence effects hints at the necessity of includinglong-ranged forces (or mechanisms for them incondensed matter theories of biological processes.Some quantum effects in biology are reviewedand quantum mechanics is acknowledged as conceptually important to biology since withoutit most (if not all of the biological structuresand signalling processes would not even exist. Moreover, it is suggested that long-rangequantum coherent dynamics, including electron polarization,may be invoked to explain signal amplificationprocess in biological systems in general.

  7. Quantum Biology

    CERN Document Server

    Sergi, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    A critical assessment of the recent developments of molecular biology is presented. The thesis that they do not lead to a conceptual understanding of life and biological systems is defended. Maturana and Varela's concept of autopoiesis is briefly sketched and its logical circularity avoided by postulating the existence of underlying {\\it living processes}, entailing amplification from the microscopic to the macroscopic scale, with increasing complexity in the passage from one scale to the other. Following such a line of thought, the currently accepted model of condensed matter, which is based on electrostatics and short-ranged forces, is criticized. It is suggested that the correct interpretation of quantum dispersion forces (van der Waals, hydrogen bonding, and so on) as quantum coherence effects hints at the necessity of including long-ranged forces (or mechanisms for them) in condensed matter theories of biological processes. Some quantum effects in biology are reviewed and quantum mechanics is acknowledge...

  8. Polyphenol in grape pomace:the compositional distribution, biological properties and potential applications in food%葡萄渣多酚的分布、生物活性及其在食品中的应用研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张路路; 陈奕; 王玉婷; 吴辰; 石婷; 朱梦婷

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT:Lots of by-products can be produced from the processing of fruits. Grape pomace (GP) is such a by-product from wine industry. GP contains abundant bioactive phytochemicals, such as phenolics, dietary fiber, organic acid and unsaturated fatty acids. Therefore, GP has been an inexpensive source for the extraction of phytochemicals which are used in the pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and food industries. Especially the phenolics have attracted more and more attentions. These phenolics are secondary plant metabolites with potential beneficial effects on human health because of their antioxidant activity and antimicrobial, antiviral, anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties. Thus more and more efforts have been made to extract the phenolics from GP and to use it as the materials of the functional food. This review summarizes current knowledge on the composition distribution of GP polyphenols, their biological activities, their stability in food system, and their applications in food. The aim is to provide a reference for the development of new functional food from polyphenols of grape pomace.%许多水果在加工过程中会产生大量的副产物,如葡萄酒酿造过程中产生的葡萄果渣(grape pomace,GP),由于其中含有丰富的生物活性物质,如多酚、膳食纤维、有机酸和不饱和脂肪酸等,已成为医药、化妆品和食品工业提取植物活性物质的廉价来源。尤其是酚类化合物受到越来越多的关注,葡萄渣中的酚类化合物是一类次生代谢产物,主要包括类黄酮、花青素和白藜芦醇等,很多研究已经证实这些酚类化合物具有抗氧化、抗菌、抗病毒、抗炎和抗癌等生物活性,因此,如何从葡萄渣中提取多酚化合物并将其开发成功能性食品配料,成为越来越多的企业和学者的关注。在此本文对GP多酚的组成分布、生物活性、在食品中的稳定性及其应用等进行了较全面的总结,旨在为葡萄渣多酚功能性食品的开发提供参考。

  9. Polyphenol in grape pomace:the compositional distribution, biological properties and potential applications in food%葡萄渣多酚的分布、生物活性及其在食品中的应用研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张路路; 陈奕; 王玉婷; 吴辰; 石婷; 朱梦婷

    2015-01-01

    许多水果在加工过程中会产生大量的副产物,如葡萄酒酿造过程中产生的葡萄果渣(grape pomace,GP),由于其中含有丰富的生物活性物质,如多酚、膳食纤维、有机酸和不饱和脂肪酸等,已成为医药、化妆品和食品工业提取植物活性物质的廉价来源。尤其是酚类化合物受到越来越多的关注,葡萄渣中的酚类化合物是一类次生代谢产物,主要包括类黄酮、花青素和白藜芦醇等,很多研究已经证实这些酚类化合物具有抗氧化、抗菌、抗病毒、抗炎和抗癌等生物活性,因此,如何从葡萄渣中提取多酚化合物并将其开发成功能性食品配料,成为越来越多的企业和学者的关注。在此本文对GP多酚的组成分布、生物活性、在食品中的稳定性及其应用等进行了较全面的总结,旨在为葡萄渣多酚功能性食品的开发提供参考。%ABSTRACT:Lots of by-products can be produced from the processing of fruits. Grape pomace (GP) is such a by-product from wine industry. GP contains abundant bioactive phytochemicals, such as phenolics, dietary fiber, organic acid and unsaturated fatty acids. Therefore, GP has been an inexpensive source for the extraction of phytochemicals which are used in the pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and food industries. Especially the phenolics have attracted more and more attentions. These phenolics are secondary plant metabolites with potential beneficial effects on human health because of their antioxidant activity and antimicrobial, antiviral, anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties. Thus more and more efforts have been made to extract the phenolics from GP and to use it as the materials of the functional food. This review summarizes current knowledge on the composition distribution of GP polyphenols, their biological activities, their stability in food system, and their applications in food. The aim is to provide a reference for the development of new functional food from

  10. Researchers Reveal Ecological Roles of Biological Soil Crusts in Desert

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Biological soil crust is a complex organic integrity of cyanobacteria, green algae, lichens and mosses, fungi, and other bacteria. This is a common and widespread phenomenon in desert areas all over the world. Biologically,this kind of soil crust differs a lot from physical ones in terms of physical and chemical properties, and become important biological factors in vegetation succession. Despite its unassuming appearance, the crust plays a significant role in the desert ecosystem, involving the process of soil formation, stability and fertility,the prevention of soil erosion by water or wind, the increased possibility of vascular plants colonization, and the stabilization of sand dunes.

  11. Prevalence study of yaws in the Democratic Republic of Congo using the lot quality assurance sampling method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibylle Gerstl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Until the 1970s the prevalence of non-venereal trepanomatosis, including yaws, was greatly reduced after worldwide mass treatment. In 2005, cases were again reported in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. We carried out a survey to estimate the village-level prevalence of yaws in the region of Equator in the north of the country in order to define appropriate strategies to effectively treat the affected population. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We designed a community-based survey using the Lot Quality Assurance Sampling method to classify the prevalence of active yaws in 14 groups of villages (lots. The classification into high, moderate, or low yaws prevalence corresponded to World Health Organization prevalence thresholds for identifying appropriate operational treatment strategies. Active yaws cases were defined by suggestive clinical signs and positive rapid plasma reagin and Treponema pallidum hemagglutination serological tests. The overall prevalence in the study area was 4.7% (95% confidence interval: 3.4-6.0. Two of 14 lots had high prevalence (>10%, three moderate prevalence (5-10% and nine low prevalence (<5%.. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Although yaws is no longer a World Health Organization priority disease, the presence of yaws in a region where it was supposed to be eradicated demonstrates the importance of continued surveillance and control efforts. Yaws should remain a public health priority in countries where previously it was known to be endemic. The integration of sensitive surveillance systems together with free access to effective treatment is recommended. As a consequence of our study results, more than 16,000 people received free treatment against yaws.

  12. Performance of the Lot Quality Assurance Sampling Method Compared to Surveillance for Identifying Inadequately-performing Areas in Matlab, Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Bhuiya, Abbas; Hanifi, S M A; Roy, Nikhil; Streatfield, P. Kim

    2007-01-01

    This paper compared the performance of the lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS) method in identifying inadequately-performing health work-areas with that of using health and demographic surveillance system (HDSS) data and examined the feasibility of applying the method by field-level programme supervisors. The study was carried out in Matlab, the field site of ICDDR,B, where a HDSS has been in place for over 30 years. The LQAS method was applied in 57 work-areas of community health workers i...

  13. A Hybrid Cuckoo Algorithm for Lot Scheduling Problem Using Extended Basic Period and Power of Two Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Syed Hassan Adil; Kamran Raza; Manzoor Ahmed Hashmani

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses ELSP (Economic Lot Scheduling Problem) using EBPA (Extended Basic Period Approach) model with PoT (Power of Two) policy. The objective is to solve the ELSP using HCA (Hybrid Cuckoo Search Algorithm). The proposed approach improves the solution (i.e. minimizes the total cost which is the sum of setup and inventory holding costs) obtained through GA (Genetic Algorithm).The solution obtained from HCA is compared with GA on 17 Bomberger?s problems. The comparison indicates th...

  14. A new approach for solving capacitated lot sizing and scheduling problem with sequence and period-dependent setup costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imen Chaieb Memmi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We aim to examine the capacitated multi-item lot sizing problem which is a typical example of a large bucket model, where many different items can be produced on the same machine in one time period. We propose a new approach to determine the production sequence and lot sizes that minimize the sum of start up and setup costs, inventory and production costs over all periods.Design/methodology/approach: The approach is composed of three steps. First, we compute a lower bound on total cost. Then we propose a three sub-steps iteration procedure. We solve optimally the lot sizing problem without considering products sequencing and their cost. Then, we determine products quantities to produce each period while minimizing the storage and variable production costs. Given the products to manufacture each period, we determine its correspondent optimal products sequencing, by using a Branch and Bound algorithm. Given the sequences of products within each period, we evaluate the total start up and setup cost. We compare then the total cost obtained to the lower bound of the total cost. If this value riches a prefixed value, we stop. Otherwise, we modify the results of lot sizing problem.Findings and Originality/value: We show using an illustrative example, that the difference between the total cost and its lower bound is only 10%. This gap depends on the significance of the inventory and production costs and the machine’s capacity. Comparing the approach we develop with a traditional one, we show that we manage to reduce the total cost by 30%.Research limitations/implications: Our model fits better to real-world situations where production systems run continuously. This model is applied for limited number of part types and periods.Practical implications: Our approach determines the products to manufacture each time period, their economic amounts, and their scheduling within each period. This outcome should help decision makers bearing expensive

  15. Biologic characteristic studies of DNA mismatch—repair enzyme hMSH2—deficient cell strain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HeY; ZhuaZX

    2002-01-01

    The effect of hMSH2 enzyme-deficiency on the cell growing phenotypes,cell ultrastructure,growth character and cell cycle were observed with electronic microscopy examination,cell counting and flow cytometry.hMSH2-deficient cell strain was constructed by transfecting hMSH2 recombination plasmid of antisense RNA into human embryo lung fibroblasts(HLF).In hMSH2-deficient cells,there were a lot of morphological changes under electronic microscopy,such as irregular shape,a lot of protuberances on the surface of cell,the enlarged nuclei.The average time of double increment of HLF and hMSH2-deficient cells were 1.0d and 0.78d,respectively.This suggested that the cell proliferation of hMSH2-deficient cells was greater than that of HLF.The distribution of HLF and hMSH2-deficient cells in G1,G2 and S phases was different.A large part of hMSH2-deficient cells was blocked in G1 phase.hMSH2-deficient cells increased,but it is still not a typical malignant cells.Thus,this cell strain could be used as biologic material to detect mutagenesis of environmental chemicals.

  16. Academic Training: Evolutionary Heuristic Optimization: Genetic Algorithms and Estimation of Distribution Algorithms - Lecture series

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE REGULAR PROGRAMME 1, 2, 3 and 4 June From 11:00 hrs to 12:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Evolutionary Heuristic Optimization: Genetic Algorithms and Estimation of Distribution Algorithms V. Robles Forcada and M. Perez Hernandez / Univ. de Madrid, Spain In the real world, there exist a huge number of problems that require getting an optimum or near-to-optimum solution. Optimization can be used to solve a lot of different problems such as network design, sets and partitions, storage and retrieval or scheduling. On the other hand, in nature, there exist many processes that seek a stable state. These processes can be seen as natural optimization processes. Over the last 30 years several attempts have been made to develop optimization algorithms, which simulate these natural optimization processes. These attempts have resulted in methods such as Simulated Annealing, based on natural annealing processes or Evolutionary Computation, based on biological evolution processes. Geneti...

  17. Thermal Behavior of an Asphalt Pavement in the Laboratory and in the Parking Lot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. Martinkauppi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The urban, constructed areas are full of buildings and different kinds of pavements and have a noticeable lack of trees and flora. These areas are accumulating the heat from the Sun, people, vehicles, and constructions. One interesting heat collector is the asphalt pavement. How does the heat transfer to different layers under the pavement or does it? What are the temperatures under the pavement in Finland where the winter can be pretty hard? How can those temperatures be measured accurately? These are the main questions this paper gives the preliminary answers to. First the thermal behavior of asphalt and the layers beneath are researched in the laboratory and then the measurement field is bored and dug in the parking in the Western coast of Finland, 63°5′45′′ N. Distributed temperature sensing method was found to be a good choice for temperature measurements. Thermal behavior of pavement has been monitored in different layers and the preliminary results have been published here. The goal of this research is to assess the applicability of asphalt pavements for heat energy collection.

  18. An optimal lot sizing and pricing in two echelon supply chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Naeij

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies inventory and pricing policies in a non-cooperative supply chain with onesupplier and several retailers who are involved in producing, delivering and selling a singleproduct. We consider inventory policies in an information-asymmetric vendor managedinventory. The study consists of different scenarios where a supplier produces the product at thewholesale price to multiple retailers. The retailers also distribute the product in dispersed andindependent markets at retail selling prices. The demand rate for each market is a nondecreasingconcave function of the marketing expenditures of both local retailers and themanufacturer, but a non-increasing and convex function of the retail selling prices. The primarypurpose is to determine wholesale price, marketing expenditure for supplier and retailers,replenishment cycles for the product, and backorder quantity to maximize the total profit forboth groups of supplier and retailers. All scenarios are modeled as a Stackelberg game wherethe manufacturer is the leader and the retailers are the followers. A numerical study arepresented to demonstrate the influences of decision variables and/or parameters in variousscenarios.

  19. Biological preconcentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Bunker, Bruce C.; Huber, Dale L.

    2008-09-09

    A biological preconcentrator comprises a stimulus-responsive active film on a stimulus-producing microfabricated platform. The active film can comprise a thermally switchable polymer film that can be used to selectively absorb and desorb proteins from a protein mixture. The biological microfabricated platform can comprise a thin membrane suspended on a substrate with an integral resistive heater and/or thermoelectric cooler for thermal switching of the active polymer film disposed on the membrane. The active polymer film can comprise hydrogel-like polymers, such as poly(ethylene oxide) or poly(n-isopropylacrylamide), that are tethered to the membrane. The biological preconcentrator can be fabricated with semiconductor materials and technologies.

  20. Species Distribution Modeling in the Cloud

    OpenAIRE

    Candela, Leonardo; Castelli, Donatella; Coro, Gianpaolo; Pagano, Pasquale (ISTI-CNR); Sinibaldi, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    Species distribution modeling is a process aiming at computationally predicting the distribution of species in geographic areas on the basis of environmental parameters including climate data. Such a quantitative approach has a lot of potentialities in many areas that include setting up conservation priorities, testing biogeographic hypotheses, assessing the impact of accelerated land use. In order to further promote the diffusion of such an approach it is fundamental to develop a flexible, c...

  1. Les îlots forestiers au sud du Togo : Dynamique et relations avec les végétations périphériques

    OpenAIRE

    K. Kokou; Caballé, G.; Akpagana, K.; Batawila, K.

    1999-01-01

    Cette étude traite des relations floristiques et dynamiques entre îlots forestiers et végétations périphérique dans la plaine côtière du sud du Togo. Les îlots forestiers sont essentiellement des fôrets sacrées et des forêts "pare-feu" à proximité des villages. Des relations évidentes ont été établies entre les îlots forestiers et les végétations périphériques : 1) phytogéographique, 51,8 % des espéces des îlots et 32,4 % des espèces des végétations périphérique sont d'origine forestière; 2...

  2. Study of the biological and clinical effects caused by neutron on charged-particle radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the particle therapy, a lot of secondly particles are generated through nuclear reactions in a patient's body or irradiation devices. Because the neutron is distributed broadly and its relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is high, an evaluation of second cancer risk should be associated with neutrons. Therefore we studied the distribution of secondly neutrons in a human phantom by metal foil activation method and compared with the estimation of Monte Carlo code PHITS (Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System). The experiment was performed at BIO beam port of the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) in National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) with 400 MeV/u carbon beam. Al, Co, Fe and Bi foils were used in this study. The metal foils were placed in a human phantom. The yield of isotopes produced in the foil by the incidence of neutrons was measured by counting corresponding emitted gamma ray with a Ge detector. Activation rate was estimated with the experimental result and calculation by PHITS. Neutron distribution inside of the human phantom was measured by metal foil activation method and the result was compared with PHITS. Through the comparison it is found that estimation of neutron spectrum by PHITS reproduces experimental result around a several dozen MeV. (author)

  3. Marine Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewees, Christopher M.; Hooper, Jon K.

    1976-01-01

    A variety of informational material for a course in marine biology or oceanology at the secondary level is presented. Among the topics discussed are: food webs and pyramids, planktonic blooms, marine life, plankton nets, food chains, phytoplankton, zooplankton, larval plankton and filter feeders. (BT)

  4. Biology Notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Describes laboratory procedures, demonstrations, and classroom activities/materials, including water relation exercise on auxin-treated artichoke tuber tissue; aerobic respiration in yeast; an improved potometer; use of mobiles in biological classification, and experiments on powdery mildews and banana polyphenol oxidase. Includes reading lists…

  5. Distribution variation of a metabolic uncoupler, 2,6-dichlorophenol (2,6-DCP) in long-term sludge culture and their effects on sludge reduction and biological inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yu; Zhang, Jun; Wu, Di; Li, Zhipeng; Cui, Yanni

    2013-01-01

    Distribution variation of a metabolic uncoupler, 2,6-dichlorophenol (2,6-DCP), in long-term sludge culture was studied, and the effects on sludge reduction and biological inhibition of this chemical during the 90-day operation were established. The extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) matrix functioned as a protective barrier for the bacteria inside sludge flocs to 2,6-DCP, resulting in the transfer of 2,6-DCP from the liquid phase to the activated sludge fraction. Significant sludge reduction (about 40%) was observed after the addition of 2,6-DCP in the first 40 days, while the ineffective function of 2,6-DCP in sludge reduction (days 70-90) might be correlated to the EPS protection mechanism. The inhibitory effect of 2,6-DCP on the COD removal was extremely lower than on the nitrification performance due to the fact that 2,6-DCP was much more toxic to autotrophic microorganisms than heterotrophic microorganisms. Moreover, both of them recovered to a higher level again with the transfer potential of 2,6-DCP to sludge. Thus, the application of metabolic uncoupler for excess sludge reduction should be cautious. PMID:23123050

  6. Contrats de stabilité pour la planification tactique dans une chaîne logistique : nouveaux modèles de dimensionnement de lot

    OpenAIRE

    Hellion, Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    Our focus is the supply relationship between a retailer and its suppliers. In fact, we defined stability contracts between these actors and study their impacts. At a tactical level, it is equivalent to solve a lot sizing problem under specific constraints, which are defined by the contract features. We showed that several variants of the lot sizing problem can be optimally solved in polynomial time. We studied the stability contract by performing numerous experiments. Then we tried to adapt t...

  7. Environmental Management Waste Management Facility Waste Lot Profile for the K-770 Scrap Yard Soils and Miscellaneous Debris, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee - EMWMF Waste Lot 4.12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davenport M.

    2009-04-15

    Waste Lot 4.12 consists of approximately 17,500 yd{sup 3} of low-level, radioactively contaminated soil, concrete, and incidental metal and debris generated from remedial actions at the K-770 Scrap Metal Yard and Contaminated Debris Site (the K-770 Scrap Yard) at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). The excavated soil will be transported by dump truck to the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF). This profile provides project-specific information to demonstrate compliance with Attainment Plan for Risk/Toxicity-based Waste Acceptance Criteria at the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2001). The K-770 Scrap Yard is an approximately 36-acre storage area located southwest of the main portion of ETTP, outside the security perimeter fence in the Powerhouse Area adjacent to the Clinch River. The K-770 area was used to store radioactively contaminated or suspected contaminated materials during and previous to the K-25 Site cascade upgrading program. The waste storage facility began operation in the 1960s and is estimated to at one time contain in excess of 40,000 tons of low-level, radioactively contaminated scrap metal. Scrap metal was taken to the site when it was found to contain alpha or beta/gamma activity on the surface or if the scrap metal originated from a process building. The segregated metal debris was removed from the site as part of the K-770 Scrap Removal Action (RA) Project that was completed in fiscal year (FY) 2007 by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). An area of approximately 10 acres is located in EUs 29 and 31 where the scrap was originally located in the 100-year floodplain. In the process of moving the materials around and establishing segregated waste piles above the 100-year floodplain, the footprint of the site was expanded by 10-15 acres in EUs 30 and 32. The area in EUs 29 and 31 that was cleared of metallic debris in the floodplain was sown with grass. The areas in EUs 30 and 32 have some scattered

  8. Quality of histone modification antibodies undermines chromatin biology research

    OpenAIRE

    Goran Kungulovski; Albert Jeltsch

    2015-01-01

    Histone post-translational modification (PTM) antibodies are essential research reagents in chromatin biology. However, they suffer from variable properties and insufficient documentation of quality. Antibody manufacturers and vendors should provide detailed lot-specific documentation of quality, rendering further quality checks by end-customers unnecessary. A shift from polyclonal antibodies towards sustainable reagents like monoclonal or recombinant antibodies or histone binding domains wou...

  9. Mesoscopic biology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G V Shivashankar

    2002-02-01

    In this paper we present a qualitative outlook of mesoscopic biology where the typical length scale is of the order of nanometers and the energy scales comparable to thermal energy. Novel biomolecular machines, governed by coded information at the level of DNA and proteins, operate at these length scales in biological systems. In recent years advances in technology have led to the study of some of the design principles of these machines; in particular at the level of an individual molecule. For example, the forces that operate in molecular interactions, the stochasticity involved in these interactions and their spatio-temporal dynamics are beginning to be explored. Understanding such design principles is opening new possibilities in mesoscopic physics with potential applications.

  10. Methodology for the economic evaluation of the application of the eolic energy and lot in the desalinization of sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The methodology that is presented allows the preliminary evaluation of the cost of the water of sea ($/m3) of a non connected system to the net, fed with renewable energy (eolic and photovoltaic lot) or with an electric generator. The production capacities they are limited to the 100 m3/d. The desalinisation plant can be fed by a single energy source or for but of one of them, what will constitute in this last case a system with feeding hybrid. In all the cases it was considered the necessity of energy storage to inclination of batteries to exception of when the feeding was by means of a generator electric. In the annex a chart is presented with the result of the application of the methodology

  11. Determination of late-time Gamma-Ray (60Co) sensitivity of single diffusion Lot 2N2222A transistors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DePriest, Kendall Russell; Kajder, Karen C.; Peters, Curtis D. (American Staff Augmentation Providers, LLC, Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has embarked on a program to develop a methodology to use damage relations techniques (alternative experimental facilities, modeling, and simulation) to understand the time-dependent effects in transistors (and integrated circuits) caused by neutron irradiations in the Sandia Pulse Reactor-III (SPR-III) facility. The development of these damage equivalence techniques is necessary since SPR-III was shutdown in late 2006. As part of this effort, the late time {gamma}-ray sensitivity of a single diffusion lot of 2N2222A transistors has been characterized using one of the {sup 60}Co irradiation cells at the SNL Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF). This report summarizes the results of the experiments performed at the GIF.

  12. Biological programming

    OpenAIRE

    Ramsden, Jeremy J.; Bándi, Gergely

    2010-01-01

    Biology offers a tremendous set of concepts that are potentially very powerfully usable for the software engineer, but they have been barely exploited hitherto. In this position paper we propose a fresh attempt to create the building blocks of a programming technology that could be as successful as life. A key guiding principle is to develop and make use of unambiguous definitions of the essential features of life.

  13. Biological radioprotector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the patent description, the biological radioprotector is deuterium depleted water, DDW, produced by vacuum distillation with an isotopic content lower than natural value. It appears as such or in a mixture with natural water and carbon dioxide. It can be used for preventing and reducing the ionizing radiation effects upon humans or animal organisms, exposed therapeutically, professionally or accidentally to radiation. The most significant advantage of using DDW as biological radioprotector results from its way of administration. Indeed no one of the radioprotectors currently used today can be orally administrated, what reduces the patients' compliance to prophylactic administrations. The biological radioprotector is an unnoxious product obtained from natural water, which can be administrated as food additive instead of drinking water. Dose modification factor is according to initial estimates around 1.9, what is a remarkable feature when one takes into account that the product is toxicity-free and side effect-free and can be administrated prophylactically as a food additive. A net radioprotective action of the deuterium depletion was evidenced experimentally in laboratory animals (rats) hydrated with DDW of 30 ppm D/(D+H) concentration as compared with normally hydrated control animals. Knowing the effects of irradiation and mechanisms of the acute radiation disease as well as the effects of administration of radiomimetic chemicals upon cellular lines of fast cell division, it appears that the effects of administrating DDW result from stimulation of the immunity system. In conclusion, the biological radioprotector DDW presents the following advantages: - it is obtained from natural products without toxicity; - it is easy to be administrated as a food additive, replacing the drinking water; - besides radioprotective effects, the product has also immunostimulative and antitumoral effects

  14. Marine biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book discusses both taxonomic and ecological topics on marine biology. Full coverage of marine organisms of all five kingdoms is provided, along with interesting and thorough discussion of all major marine habitats. Organization into six major parts allows flexibility. It also provides insight into important topics such as disposal of nuclear waste at sea, the idea that life began on the ocean floor, and how whales, krill, and people interact. A full-color photo chapter reviews questions, and exercises. The contents are: an overview marine biology: fundamental concepts/investigating life in the ocean; the physical ocean, the ocean floor, the nature of water, the nature and motion of ocean water; general ecology, conditions for life in the sea, biological productivity and energy transfer; marine organisms; monera, protista, mycota and metaphyta; the smaller marine animals, the large animals marine habitats, the intertidal zone/benthos of the continental shelf, the photic zone, the deep ocean, the ocean under stress, marine pollution, appendix a: the metric system and conversion factors/ appendix b: prefixes and suffixes/ appendix c: taxonomic classification of common marine organisms, and glossary, and index

  15. Marine biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurman, H.V.; Webber, H.H.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses both taxonomic and ecological topics on marine biology. Full coverage of marine organisms of all five kingdoms is provided, along with interesting and thorough discussion of all major marine habitats. Organization into six major parts allows flexibility. It also provides insight into important topics such as disposal of nuclear waste at sea, the idea that life began on the ocean floor, and how whales, krill, and people interact. A full-color photo chapter reviews questions, and exercises. The contents are: an overview marine biology: fundamental concepts/investigating life in the ocean; the physical ocean, the ocean floor, the nature of water, the nature and motion of ocean water; general ecology, conditions for life in the sea, biological productivity and energy transfer; marine organisms; monera, protista, mycota and metaphyta; the smaller marine animals, the large animals marine habitats, the intertidal zone/benthos of the continental shelf, the photic zone, the deep ocean, the ocean under stress, marine pollution, appendix a: the metric system and conversion factors/ appendix b: prefixes and suffixes/ appendix c: taxonomic classification of common marine organisms, and glossary, and index.

  16. Classifying Measures of Biological Variation

    OpenAIRE

    Gregorius, Hans-Rolf; Gillet, Elizabeth M

    2015-01-01

    Biological variation is commonly measured at two basic levels: variation within individual communities, and the distribution of variation over communities or within a metacommunity. We develop a classification for the measurement of biological variation on both levels: Within communities into the categories of dispersion and diversity, and within metacommunities into the categories of compositional differentiation and partitioning of variation. There are essentially two approaches to characte...

  17. Long term test of buffer material at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, LOT project. Final report on the A2 test parcel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnland, Ola; Olsson, Siv; Dueck, Ann; Birgersson, Martin; Nilsson, Ulf; Hernan-Haakansson, Tania (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)); Pedersen, Karsten (Microbial Analytics Sweden AB (Sweden); Goeteborg Univ., Dept. of Cell and Molecular Biology, Goeteborg (Sweden)); Nilsson, Sara; Eriksen, Trygve E. (School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Nuclear chemistry, Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden)); Rosborg, Bo (Rosborg Consulting, Nykoeping (Sweden))

    2009-11-15

    In the Swedish repository concept for nuclear waste (KBS-3 concept), the spent nuclear fuel will be stored in copper canisters surrounded by compacted bentonite. The decaying power of the fuel will increase the temperature in the repository which, in combination with the uptake of ground-water, are expected to result in minor mineralogical changes in the bentonite. The ongoing LOT test series at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) are focused on identifying and quantifying such mineralogical alterations in the bentonite exposed to typical repository-like conditions. Further, buffer-related processes concerning copper corrosion, cation transport, and bacterial survival/activity are studied. In total, the LOT project includes seven test parcels, which contain a central Cu-tube surrounded by cylindrical bentonite blocks with a diameter of 30 cm, and gauges for temperature, total pressure, water pressure and humidity. Electrical heaters placed inside the copper tube are used to simulate the power from the decaying spent fuel. Three parcels are exposed to standard KBS-3 conditions (maximum temperature below 100 deg C) and four parcels to adverse conditions (maximum temperature below approx140 deg C). Both the standard and the adverse test series include short term tests (1 to 2 years), medium term tests (>5 years) and long term tests (>10 years). The present report concerns the A2 test parcel, which was a medium term test exposed to adverse conditions. Cu-coupons, 60Co tracers, bacteria and specific chemical substances were placed in the bentonite at defined positions. After field exposure, the entire test parcel was released from the rock by overlapping percussion drilling and wire sawing. The parcel was lifted and divided at test site and the bentonite material was sampled for specified analyses performed by nine different laboratories in five countries. The main aspects of the various tests and analyses may be summarized in the following items: - physical

  18. Long term test of buffer material at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, LOT project. Final report on the A2 test parcel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Swedish repository concept for nuclear waste (KBS-3 concept), the spent nuclear fuel will be stored in copper canisters surrounded by compacted bentonite. The decaying power of the fuel will increase the temperature in the repository which, in combination with the uptake of ground-water, are expected to result in minor mineralogical changes in the bentonite. The ongoing LOT test series at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) are focused on identifying and quantifying such mineralogical alterations in the bentonite exposed to typical repository-like conditions. Further, buffer-related processes concerning copper corrosion, cation transport, and bacterial survival/activity are studied. In total, the LOT project includes seven test parcels, which contain a central Cu-tube surrounded by cylindrical bentonite blocks with a diameter of 30 cm, and gauges for temperature, total pressure, water pressure and humidity. Electrical heaters placed inside the copper tube are used to simulate the power from the decaying spent fuel. Three parcels are exposed to standard KBS-3 conditions (maximum temperature below 100 deg C) and four parcels to adverse conditions (maximum temperature below ∼140 deg C). Both the standard and the adverse test series include short term tests (1 to 2 years), medium term tests (>5 years) and long term tests (>10 years). The present report concerns the A2 test parcel, which was a medium term test exposed to adverse conditions. Cu-coupons, 60Co tracers, bacteria and specific chemical substances were placed in the bentonite at defined positions. After field exposure, the entire test parcel was released from the rock by overlapping percussion drilling and wire sawing. The parcel was lifted and divided at test site and the bentonite material was sampled for specified analyses performed by nine different laboratories in five countries. The main aspects of the various tests and analyses may be summarized in the following items: - physical properties

  19. Preparation of 99mTc-Carnosine and 99mTcO-(V-DMSA Complexes,Biological Distribution, and Estimation of Their Gene Anti- PolymorphismsInduced by -Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. EL-Ghany, F. Marzouk, Samy A. Abd El-Azim1, M.H. Awwad2

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Two chelating agents (Carnosine and DMSA were used to study their labeling conditions with technetium-99m followed by biological distribution investigation. Molecular studies were done via PCR/RFLP analysis of angiotensin II subtype II receptor gene for monitoring their antioxidant activity through free iron chelation leading to inhibition of Fenton reaction. Material and methods: Carnosine was labeled by mixing 4 mg with 30 mg glucose and 25 g SnCl2.2H2O, followed by pertechnetate and stand at room temperature for 60 minutes. Minor modification was done to prepare 99mTc(V-DMSA tracer in one step, by adding pertechnetate solution to the lyophilized kit contains 1mg DMSA, 0.1 mg SnCl2.2H2O, and 30 mg glucose at pH 9. The biodistribution of the two tracers in normal and tumor-induced mice. The molecular investigation of the anti-oxidant activity of both carnosine and DMSA in 6 Gy -irradiated rats using the anti-inflammatory angiotensin II subtype II receptor gene (AT2RG as indicator. Results: Carnosine and DMSA were labeled with Technetium-99m yielding 85% and 97%, respectively the ability of both tracers to localize in tumor sites but the priority to the 99mTc (V-DMSA. Molecular studies showed strong antioxidant activity of carnosine but not enough to block radiation induced oxidative stress and Moderate antioxidant activity of DMSA was achieved by chelating free iron and iron released through oxidative stress. Maximum protection was achieved through the dual action of both DMSA and carnosine. Conclusion: moderate and high labeling yield were achieved for both 99mTc(VDMSA and 99mTc-canosine respectively with higher selectivity of the former to tumor sites and maximum protection were achieved by the dual action of both chelating agents

  20. Recent advances in hepatitis C virus research and understanding the biology of the virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Francoise Lunel-Fabiani

    2007-01-01

    @@ Since the identification of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome in 1989[1], a lot of progresses have been done about the understanding of HCV biology, natural history and therapeutic options. HCV is a member of the Flaviviridae viral family. Its genome is a positive simple strand RNA molecule which shows significant genetic variability.

  1. India's Computational Biology Growth and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra; Agoramoorthy, Govindasamy

    2016-09-01

    India's computational science is growing swiftly due to the outburst of internet and information technology services. The bioinformatics sector of India has been transforming rapidly by creating a competitive position in global bioinformatics market. Bioinformatics is widely used across India to address a wide range of biological issues. Recently, computational researchers and biologists are collaborating in projects such as database development, sequence analysis, genomic prospects and algorithm generations. In this paper, we have presented the Indian computational biology scenario highlighting bioinformatics-related educational activities, manpower development, internet boom, service industry, research activities, conferences and trainings undertaken by the corporate and government sectors. Nonetheless, this new field of science faces lots of challenges. PMID:27465042

  2. Art Means a Lot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almanzar, Victor B.

    2013-01-01

    The author, Victor B. Almanzar, reports on his introduction to the arts while growing up in New York as a young teenager. He felt like an outcast from society due to his language barrier and numerous ethnic groups different from his. He became involved with other students who, like himself, were harassed and suffered from bullying due to their…

  3. Rapid small lot manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrigan, R.W.

    1998-05-09

    The direct connection of information, captured in forms such as CAD databases, to the factory floor is enabling a revolution in manufacturing. Rapid response to very dynamic market conditions is becoming the norm rather than the exception. In order to provide economical rapid fabrication of small numbers of variable products, one must design with manufacturing constraints in mind. In addition, flexible manufacturing systems must be programmed automatically to reduce the time for product change over in the factory and eliminate human errors. Sensor based machine control is needed to adapt idealized, model based machine programs to uncontrolled variables such as the condition of raw materials and fabrication tolerances.

  4. Lot Sizing Heuristics Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Baciarello

    2013-02-01

    tested on several different scenarios, benchmarking versus Wagner and Whitin’s optimal solution. As distinct from the contributions in the literature, the operational behaviour has been evaluated in order to determine which one is more suitable to the characteristics of each scenario.

  5. Biological biomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge-Herrero, E. [Servicio de Cirugia Experimental. Clinica Puerta de Hierro, Madrid (Spain)

    1997-05-01

    There are a number of situations in which substances of biological origin are employed as biomaterials. Most of them are macromolecules derived from isolated connective tissue or the connective tissue itself in membrane form, in both cases, the tissue can be used in its natural form or be chemically treated. In other cases, certain blood vessels can be chemically pretreated and used as vascular prostheses. Proteins such as albumin, collagen and fibrinogen are employed to coat vascular prostheses. Certain polysaccharides have also been tested for use in controlled drug release systems. Likewise, a number of tissues, such as dura mater, bovine pericardium, procine valves and human valves, are used in the preparation of cardiac prostheses. We also use veins from animals or humans in arterial replacement. In none of these cases are the tissues employed dissimilar to the native tissues as they have been chemically modified, becoming a new bio material with different physical and biochemical properties. In short, we find that natural products are being utilized as biomaterials and must be considered as such; thus, it is necessary to study both their chemicobiological and physicomechanical properties. In the present report, we review the current applications, problems and future prospects of some of these biological biomaterials. (Author) 84 refs.

  6. Effects of ground surface decontamination on the air radiation dose rate. Results of a decontamination trial at a playground lot in a Fukushima residential area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency decontaminated schools, playgrounds, swimming pools, and houses in nonevacuated, less-contaminated areas in Fukushima for environmental restoration. A small, 150 m2 playground lot in the residential area was chosen for decontamination demonstration, which used routinely available tools and commodities to carry out the work. The surfaces of playground lot equipment, such as swings, slides, and horizontal iron bars, were completely decontaminated by brushing with water and/or detergent. Side gutters around the playground lot were cleaned by removing the mud and then brushed and washed with a high-pressure water jet (7 MPa). The air dose rate at the playground lot was dominated by radiation from the ground surface and adjacent surroundings, such as apartments and rice fields. Two or three centimeters of the surface soil contaminated with cesium was removed manually with shovels, hoes, and other gardening tools. This significantly reduced the average air dose rate of the entire playground lot from 1.5 μSv/h before decontamination to 0.6 μSv/h. These results showed that ground surface decontamination can contribute measurably to the reduction in air dose rate in relatively small areas in residential areas. (author)

  7. NASA Biological Specimen Repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMonigal, K. A.; Pietrzyk, R. A.; Sams, C. F.; Johnson, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Biological Specimen Repository (NBSR) was established in 2006 to collect, process, preserve and distribute spaceflight-related biological specimens from long duration ISS astronauts. This repository provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning may missions. The NBSR collects blood and urine samples from all participating ISS crewmembers who have provided informed consent. These biological samples are collected once before flight, during flight scheduled on flight days 15, 30, 60, 120 and within 2 weeks of landing. Postflight sessions are conducted 3 and 30 days after landing. The number of in-flight sessions is dependent on the duration of the mission. Specimens are maintained under optimal storage conditions in a manner that will maximize their integrity and viability for future research The repository operates under the authority of the NASA/JSC Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects to support scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment. The NBSR will institute guidelines for the solicitation, review and sample distribution process through establishment of the NBSR Advisory Board. The Advisory Board will be composed of representatives of all participating space agencies to evaluate each request from investigators for use of the samples. This process will be consistent with ethical principles, protection of crewmember confidentiality, prevailing laws and regulations, intellectual property policies, and consent form language. Operations supporting the NBSR are scheduled to continue until the end of U.S. presence on the ISS. Sample distribution is proposed to begin with selections on investigations beginning in 2017. The availability of the NBSR will contribute to the body of knowledge about the diverse factors of spaceflight on human physiology.

  8. WHO Expert Committee on Biological Standardization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This report presents the recommendations of a WHO expert committee commissioned to coordinate activities leading to the adoption of international recommendations for the production and control of vaccines and other biologicals and the establishment of international biological reference materials. The report starts with a discussion of general issues brought to the attention of the Committee and provides information on the status and development of reference materials for various antibodies, antigens, blood products and related substances, cytokines, growth factors, endocrinological substances and in vitro diagnostic devices. The second part of the report, of particular relevance to manufacturers and national regulatory authorities, contains revised WHO Recommendations for evaluation of animal cell cultures as substrates for the manufacture of biological medicinal products, for production and control of hepatitis B vaccines and for production and control of yellow fever vaccines. New WHO Guidelines on the independent lot release of vaccines are also included. Finally, there is an update to the procedure for the prequalification of vaccines. Also included are lists of Recommendations, Guidelines and other documents related to the manufacture and control of biological substances used in medicine, and of International Standards and Reference Reagents for biological substances. PMID:24340794

  9. Enabling distributed petascale science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petascale science is an end-to-end endeavour, involving not only the creation of massive datasets at supercomputers or experimental facilities, but the subsequent analysis of that data by a user community that may be distributed across many laboratories and universities. The new SciDAC Center for Enabling Distributed Petascale Science (CEDPS) is developing tools to support this end-to-end process. These tools include data placement services for the reliable, high-performance, secure, and policy-driven placement of data within a distributed science environment; tools and techniques for the construction, operation, and provisioning of scalable science services; and tools for the detection and diagnosis of failures in end-to-end data placement and distributed application hosting configurations. In each area, we build on a strong base of existing technology and have made useful progress in the first year of the project. For example, we have recently achieved order-of-magnitude improvements in transfer times (for lots of small files) and implemented asynchronous data staging capabilities; demonstrated dynamic deployment of complex application stacks for the STAR experiment; and designed and deployed end-to-end troubleshooting services. We look forward to working with SciDAC application and technology projects to realize the promise of petascale science

  10. Biological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following an introduction into the field of cellular radiation effect considering the most important experimental results, the biological significance of the colony formation ability is brought out. The inactivation concept of stem cells does not only prove to be good, according to the present results, in the interpretation of the pathogenesis of acute radiation effects on moult tissue, it also enables chronicle radiation injuries to be interpreted through changes in the fibrous part of the organs. Radiation therapy of tumours can also be explained to a large extent by the radiation effect on the unlimited reproductiveness of tumour cells. The more or less similar dose effect curves for healthy and tumour tissue in practice lead to intermittent irradiation. The dependence of the intermittent doses and intervals on factors such as Elkind recovery, synchronisation, redistribution, reoxygenation, repopulation and regeneration are reviewed. (ORU/LH)

  11. Study on Risk Management of the Parking Lot Liability Insurance%停车场责任保险的风险管理模式研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    车辉; 丁伟鹏

    2015-01-01

    依据系统安全管理的思想,以停车场责任保险为研究对象,通过对停车场进行有效的风险评价及对停车场责任保险全寿命周期内的风险进行科学有效管理,提出合理的管控对策,为保险人经营该险种提供参考。%Based on the ideas of system safety management,this paper discusses the parking lot liability insurance.Through risk assessment of the parking lot and effective management of the risk during the life cy-cle of the parking lot liability insurance,rational control measures are proposed for insurers′references.

  12. Multi-period fuzzy mean-semi variance portfolio selection problem with transaction cost and minimum transaction lots using genetic algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Barati

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Multi-period models of portfolio selection have been developed in the literature with respect to certain assumptions. In this study, for the first time, the portfolio selection problem has been modeled based on mean-semi variance with transaction cost and minimum transaction lots considering functional constraints and fuzzy parameters. Functional constraints such as transaction cost and minimum transaction lots were included. In addition, the returns on assets parameters were considered as trapezoidal fuzzy numbers. An efficient genetic algorithm (GA was designed, results were analyzed using numerical instances and sensitivity analysis were executed. In the numerical study, the problem was solved based on the presence or absence of each mode of constraints including transaction costs and minimum transaction lots. In addition, with the use of sensitivity analysis, the results of the model were presented with the variations of minimum expected rate of programming periods.

  13. Levels, profiles and gas-particle distribution of atmospheric PCDD/Fs in vehicle parking lots of a South China metropolitan area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huiru; Zhou, Lin; Ren, Man; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo; Peng, Ping'an

    2014-01-01

    Vehicle exhaust is one important PCDD/F source in urban areas. In this study, occurrence and inhalation of atmospheric PCDD/Fs in three enclosed/semi-enclosed large-scale vehicle parks were investigated. The park for heavy-duty diesel-trucks exhibited the highest atmospheric 2,3,7,8-PCDD/F concentrations (17.7 ± 4.3 pg m(-3), 0.818 ± 0.264 pg I-TEQm(-3)), followed sequentially by those for liquefied petroleum gas-buses and for unleaded gasoline-cars. High-chlorinated congeners/homologues dominated 2,3,7,8-PCDD/F profiles. Principal component analysis indicated their similarities with tailpipe studies. More than 70% of PCDD/Fs were particle-bound and their congener/homologue patterns differed from those of gaseous PCDD/Fs. In all studied parks logarithms of the gas/particle partitioning coefficients (Kps) of PCDD/F homologues were linearly correlated with those of their sub-cooled vapor pressures (pLs). Daily PCDD/F doses inhaled by park-workers were estimated to be between 0.099-0.227 pg I-TEQ kg(-1)d(-1). Their probabilistic incremental lifetime cancer risks were 1.08 × 10(-5)-2.07 × 10(-5), which were in the acceptable range (1.0 × 10(-4)-1.0 × 10(-6)). However, all data from the diesel-truck park significantly exceeded the upper limit for PCDD/Fs in ambient air of Japan (0.6 pg TEQm(-3)). Hence, air pollution and adequate ventilation should be considered during the design and construction of such enclosed/semi-enclosed parks. PMID:24176655

  14. Creating biological nanomaterials using synthetic biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synthetic biology is a new discipline that combines science and engineering approaches to precisely control biological networks. These signaling networks are especially important in fields such as biomedicine and biochemical engineering. Additionally, biological networks can also be critical to the production of naturally occurring biological nanomaterials, and as a result, synthetic biology holds tremendous potential in creating new materials. This review introduces the field of synthetic biology, discusses how biological systems naturally produce materials, and then presents examples and strategies for incorporating synthetic biology approaches in the development of new materials. In particular, strategies for using synthetic biology to produce both organic and inorganic nanomaterials are discussed. Ultimately, synthetic biology holds the potential to dramatically impact biological materials science with significant potential applications in medical systems. (review)

  15. Creating biological nanomaterials using synthetic biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MaryJoe K Rice

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic biology is a new discipline that combines science and engineering approaches to precisely control biological networks. These signaling networks are especially important in fields such as biomedicine and biochemical engineering. Additionally, biological networks can also be critical to the production of naturally occurring biological nanomaterials, and as a result, synthetic biology holds tremendous potential in creating new materials. This review introduces the field of synthetic biology, discusses how biological systems naturally produce materials, and then presents examples and strategies for incorporating synthetic biology approaches in the development of new materials. In particular, strategies for using synthetic biology to produce both organic and inorganic nanomaterials are discussed. Ultimately, synthetic biology holds the potential to dramatically impact biological materials science with significant potential applications in medical systems.

  16. AN OPTIMIZATION-BASED HEURISTIC FOR A CAPACITATED LOT-SIZING MODEL IN AN AUTOMATED TELLER MACHINES NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supatchaya Chotayakul

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This research studies a cash inventory problem in an ATM Network to satisfy customer’s cash needs over multiple periods with deterministic demand. The objective is to determine the amount of money to place in Automated Teller Machines (ATMs and cash centers for each period over a given time horizon. The algorithms are designed as a multi-echelon inventory problem with single-item capacitated lot-sizing to minimize total costs of running ATM network. In this study, we formulate the problem as a Mixed Integer Program (MIP and develop an approach based on reformulating the model as a shortest path formulation for finding a near-optimal solution of the problem. This reformulation is the same as the traditional model, except the capacity constraints, inventory balance constraints and setup constraints related to the management of the money in ATMs are relaxed. This new formulation gives more variables and constraints, but has a much tighter linear relaxation than the original and is faster to solve for short term planning. Computational results show its effectiveness, especially for large sized problems.

  17. Assessing Local Risk of Rifampicin-Resistant Tuberculosis in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa Using Lot Quality Assurance Sampling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine L Heidebrecht

    Full Text Available KwaZulu-Natal (KZN has the highest burden of notified multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB and extensively drug-resistant (XDR TB cases in South Africa. A better understanding of spatial heterogeneity in the risk of drug-resistance may help to prioritize local responses.Between July 2012 and June 2013, we conducted a two-way Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS study to classify the burden of rifampicin (RIF-resistant TB among incident TB cases notified within the catchment areas of seven laboratories in two northern and one southern district of KZN. Decision rules for classification of areas as having either a high- or low-risk of RIF resistant TB (based on proportion of RIF resistance among all TB cases were based on consultation with local policy makers.We classified five areas as high-risk and two as low-risk. High-risk areas were identified in both Southern and Northern districts, with the greatest proportion of RIF resistance observed in the northernmost area, the Manguzi community situated on the Mozambique border.Our study revealed heterogeneity in the risk of RIF resistant disease among incident TB cases in KZN. This study demonstrates the potential for LQAS to detect geographic heterogeneity in areas where access to drug susceptibility testing is limited.

  18. Assessing Local Risk of Rifampicin-Resistant Tuberculosis in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa Using Lot Quality Assurance Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidebrecht, Christine L.; Podewils, Laura J.; Pym, Alexander; Mthiyane, Thuli; Cohen, Ted

    2016-01-01

    Background KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) has the highest burden of notified multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) TB cases in South Africa. A better understanding of spatial heterogeneity in the risk of drug-resistance may help to prioritize local responses. Methods Between July 2012 and June 2013, we conducted a two-way Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS) study to classify the burden of rifampicin (RIF)-resistant TB among incident TB cases notified within the catchment areas of seven laboratories in two northern and one southern district of KZN. Decision rules for classification of areas as having either a high- or low-risk of RIF resistant TB (based on proportion of RIF resistance among all TB cases) were based on consultation with local policy makers. Results We classified five areas as high-risk and two as low-risk. High-risk areas were identified in both Southern and Northern districts, with the greatest proportion of RIF resistance observed in the northernmost area, the Manguzi community situated on the Mozambique border. Conclusion Our study revealed heterogeneity in the risk of RIF resistant disease among incident TB cases in KZN. This study demonstrates the potential for LQAS to detect geographic heterogeneity in areas where access to drug susceptibility testing is limited. PMID:27050561

  19. Structural Biology Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Science Education > Structural Biology Fact Sheet Structural Biology Fact Sheet Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area What is structural biology? Structural biology is a field of science focused ...

  20. Factors Affecting Biological Stability of Drinking Water Distribution Systems%超滤工艺出水管网生物稳定性影响因素研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李春敏; 李星; 杨艳玲; 相坤; 赵乐乐; 郭栋

    2013-01-01

    Annular biofilm reactor was used to simulate water distribution system carrying effluent from biological activated carbon/ultrafiltration process. The effects of shear force, pipe materials and AOC on biofilm biomass on coupons as well as the relationship of the effluent turbidity and biofilm to suspended bacteria were investigated. The results showed that the effluent concentration of AOC decreased with the increase in biomass on coupons. The maximum biomasses on coupons with 100 r/min and 50 r/min in stainless steel pipe and copper pipe were of the same order of magnitude. In stainless steel pipe, the amount of suspended bacteria was the major factor affecting the effluent turbidity level. In addition, the biomass on biofilm had the positive correlation with the amount of suspended bacteria.%以活性炭/超滤出水为试验水样,采用生物膜培养反应器(BAR)模拟实际给水管网,研究了剪切力、管材以及水中可同化有机碳(AOC)对挂片生物膜上生物量的影响,以及反应器出水浊度、生物膜与悬浮菌的关系.结果表明,反应器出水AOC浓度随着挂片上生物量的增加而减少;在不锈钢管和铜管中,转速分别为100、50 r/min下挂片上最大生物量在同一数量级上;在不锈钢给水管中,悬浮菌是影响浊度的主要因素,悬浮菌量的多少影响反应器出水浊度的高低;生物膜上生物量与悬浮菌量有相同的变化趋势.

  1. Simulating Biological and Non-Biological Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzzo, Angela; Gesierich, Benno; Wohlschlager, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the brain processes biological and non-biological movements in distinct neural circuits. Biological motion, in contrast to non-biological motion, refers to active movements of living beings. Aim of our experiment was to investigate the mechanisms underlying mental simulation of these two movement types. Subjects had to…

  2. A Brief Introduction to Chinese Biological Biological

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Chinese Biological Abstracts sponsored by the Library, the Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, the Biological Documentation and Information Network, all of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, commenced publication in 1987 and was initiated to provide access to the Chinese information in the field of biology.

  3. MADE: Masked Autoencoder for Distribution Estimation

    OpenAIRE

    Germain, Mathieu; Gregor, Karol; Murray, Iain; Larochelle, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a lot of recent interest in designing neural network models to estimate a distribution from a set of examples. We introduce a simple modification for autoencoder neural networks that yields powerful generative models. Our method masks the autoencoder’s parameters to respect autoregressive constraints: each input is reconstructed only from previous inputs in a given ordering. Constrained this way, the autoencoder outputs can be interpreted as a set of conditional probabilities, ...

  4. MADE: Masked Autoencoder for Distribution Estimation

    OpenAIRE

    Germain, Mathieu; Gregor, Karol; Murray, Iain; Larochelle, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a lot of recent interest in designing neural network models to estimate a distribution from a set of examples. We introduce a simple modification for autoencoder neural networks that yields powerful generative models. Our method masks the autoencoder's parameters to respect autoregressive constraints: each input is reconstructed only from previous inputs in a given ordering. Constrained this way, the autoencoder outputs can be interpreted as a set of conditional probabilities, ...

  5. Creating biological nanomaterials using synthetic biology

    OpenAIRE

    MaryJoe K Rice; Ruder, Warren C.

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic biology is a new discipline that combines science and engineering approaches to precisely control biological networks. These signaling networks are especially important in fields such as biomedicine and biochemical engineering. Additionally, biological networks can also be critical to the production of naturally occurring biological nanomaterials, and as a result, synthetic biology holds tremendous potential in creating new materials. This review introduces the field of synthetic bi...

  6. LOT A2 Test, THC-modelling of bentonite buffer in a final repository of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The Finnish spent nuclear fuel disposal is planned to be based on the KBS-3V repository concept. Within this concept, the role of the bentonite buffer is considered to be central. The aim of this study was to model the evolution of the buffer during the thermal phase (heat-generating period of spent fuel), when the bentonite is only partially saturated initially, and the surrounding rock matrix is assumed to be fully saturated. It is essential to study how temperature will affect saturation and also how both of these affect the chemistry of bentonite. In order to make the modeling more concrete, an example experimental case was considered: Long Term Test of Buffer Materials (LOT) A2-parcel test at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) in Sweden. In the A2-parcel the MX-80 bentonite was exposed to adverse (120-150 deg. C) temperature conditions and high temperature gradients. The test parcel diameter was smaller than in the actual KBS-3V deposition hole to speed up the saturation. The chemical behaviour of minerals causes their redistribution inside the bentonite. For example, according to the laboratory tests, gypsum dissolves and anhydrite precipitates near the heater-bentonite interface. Also, incoming groundwater affects the bentonite pore water and its properties. These changes may, in turn, influence the mechanical properties of the bentonite. A coupled Thermo-Hydro-Chemical (THC) model was applied, which means that all mechanical effects were ignored. The purpose of the model was first to achieve a satisfactory match between the model and experimental results, and, therefore, the time frame was limited to ten years (LOT A-2 parcel test lasted approximately 6 years). The system was simplified to 1-D in order to reduce the computational work, which can be very significant due to complex chemical calculations. The 1-D model results are reported in Itaelae (2009). The aim is to extend the calculations to 2-D

  7. Improving data quality and supervision of antiretroviral therapy sites in Malawi: an application of Lot Quality Assurance Sampling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedt-Gauthier Bethany L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High quality program data is critical for managing, monitoring, and evaluating national HIV treatment programs. By 2009, the Malawi Ministry of Health had initiated more than 270,000 patients on HIV treatment at 377 sites. Quarterly supervision of these antiretroviral therapy (ART sites ensures high quality care, but the time currently dedicated to exhaustive record review and data cleaning detracts from other critical components. The exhaustive record review is unlikely to be sustainable long term because of the resources required and increasing number of patients on ART. This study quantifies the current levels of data quality and evaluates Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS as a tool to prioritize sites with low data quality, thus lowering costs while maintaining sufficient quality for program monitoring and patient care. Methods In January 2010, a study team joined supervision teams at 19 sites purposely selected to reflect the variety of ART sites. During the exhaustive data review, the time allocated to data cleaning and data discrepancies were documented. The team then randomly sampled 76 records from each site, recording secondary outcomes and the time required for sampling. Results At the 19 sites, only 1.2% of records had discrepancies in patient outcomes and 0.4% in treatment regimen. However, data cleaning took 28.5 hours in total, suggesting that data cleaning for all 377 ART sites would require over 350 supervision-hours quarterly. The LQAS tool accurately identified the sites with the low data quality, reduced the time for data cleaning by 70%, and allowed for reporting on secondary outcomes. Conclusions Most sites maintained high quality records. In spite of this, data cleaning required significant amounts of time with little effect on program estimates of patient outcomes. LQAS conserves resources while maintaining sufficient data quality for program assessment and management to allow for quality patient

  8. Monitoring maternal, newborn, and child health interventions using lot quality assurance sampling in Sokoto State of northern Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abegunde, Dele; Orobaton, Nosa; Shoretire, Kamil; Ibrahim, Mohammed; Mohammed, Zainab; Abdulazeez, Jumare; Gwamzhi, Ringpon; Ganiyu, Akeem

    2015-01-01

    Background Maternal mortality ratio and infant mortality rate are as high as 1,576 per 100,000 live births and 78 per 1,000 live births, respectively, in Nigeria's northwestern region, where Sokoto State is located. Using applicable monitoring indicators for tracking progress in the UN/WHO framework on continuum of maternal, newborn, and child health care, this study evaluated the progress of Sokoto toward achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) 4 and 5 by December 2015. The changes in outcomes in 2012–2013 associated with maternal and child health interventions were assessed. Design We used baseline and follow-up lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS) data obtained in 2012 and 2013, respectively. In each of the surveys, data were obtained from 437 households sampled from 19 LQAS locations in each of the 23 local government areas (LGAs). The composite state-level coverage estimates of the respective indicators were aggregated from estimated LGA coverage estimates. Results None of the nine indicators associated with the continuum of maternal, neonatal, and child care satisfied the recommended 90% coverage target for achieving MDGs 4 and 5. Similarly, the average state coverage estimates were lower than national coverage estimates. Marginal improvements in coverage were obtained in the demand for family planning satisfied, antenatal care visits, postnatal care for mothers, and exclusive breast-feeding. Antibiotic treatment for acute pneumonia increased significantly by 12.8 percentage points. The majority of the LGAs were classifiable as low-performing, high-priority areas for intensified program intervention. Conclusions Despite the limited time left in the countdown to December 2015, Sokoto State, Nigeria, is not on track to achieving the MDG 90% coverage of indicators tied to the continuum of maternal and child care, to reduce maternal and childhood mortality by a third by 2015. Targeted health system investments at the primary care level remain a

  9. Dynamique des matières en suspension dans un bief de la rivière lot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MASSIO J. C.

    1976-01-01

    Full Text Available Des bilans amont-aval ont été réalisés sur le bief de Cajarc : réservoir artificiel de 3 km de long et 1 269 000 m3 sur la rivière Lot. Les paramètres suivants ont été étudiés sur des cycles de 24 heures pour différents débits : matières minérales et organiques en suspension, turbidité de l'eau, teneurs en pigments chlorophylliens, en nitrates, nitrites et phosphates. Pour des débits inférieurs à 80 m3/s, on observe une tendance à la décantation des matières minérales en suspension, et pour des débits supérieurs à 100 m3 /s une tendance à l'arrachement des sédiments. Ces mécanismes varient selon la saison. La majorité des matières organiques en suspension est constituée en hiver de détritus issus du bassin versant et du lit de la rivière. En été, la part des algues devient importante mais demeure faible relativement aux teneurs observées plus en aval dans la rivière. Dans les bilans amont-aval, l'évolution des teneurs en matières organiques et pigments chlorophylliens d'une part et des teneurs en nitrates, phosphates et nitrites d'autre part rend compte des phénomènes de biosynthèse et de biodégradation au sein de la masse d'eau.

  10. Density Distributions of Cyclotrimethylenetrinitramines (RDX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, D M

    2002-03-19

    As part of the US Army Foreign Comparative Testing (FCT) program the density distributions of six samples of class 1 RDX were measured using the density gradient technique. This technique was used in an attempt to distinguish between RDX crystallized by a French manufacturer (designated insensitive or IRDX) from RDX manufactured at Holston Army Ammunition Plant (HAAP), the current source of RDX for Department of Defense (DoD). Two samples from different lots of French IRDX had an average density of 1.7958 {+-} 0.0008 g/cc. The theoretical density of a perfect RDX crystal is 1.806 g/cc. This yields 99.43% of the theoretical maximum density (TMD). For two HAAP RDX lots the average density was 1.786 {+-} 0.002 g/cc, only 98.89% TMD. Several other techniques were used for preliminary characterization of one lot of French IRDX and two lot of HAAP RDX. Light scattering, SEM and polarized optical microscopy (POM) showed that SNPE and Holston RDX had the appropriate particle size distribution for Class 1 RDX. High performance liquid chromatography showed quantities of HMX in HAAP RDX. French IRDX also showed a 1.1 C higher melting point compared to HAAP RDX in the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) consistent with no melting point depression due to the HMX contaminant. A second part of the program involved characterization of Holston RDX recrystallized using the French process. After reprocessing the average density of the Holston RDX was increased to 1.7907 g/cc. Apparently HMX in RDX can act as a nucleating agent in the French RDX recrystallization process. The French IRDX contained no HMX, which is assumed to account for its higher density and narrower density distribution. Reprocessing of RDX from Holston improved the average density compared to the original Holston RDX, but the resulting HIRDX was not as dense as the original French IRDX. Recrystallized Holston IRDX crystals were much larger (3-500 {micro}m or more) then either the original class 1 HAAP RDX or

  11. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Parking Lot Lighting at T.J.Maxx in Manchester, NH Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myer, Michael; Goettel, Russell T.

    2010-06-29

    A report describing the process and results of replacing existing parking lot lighting, looking at a LED option with occupancy sensors, and conventional alternates. Criteria include payback, light levels, occupant satisfaction. This report is Phase I of II. Phase I deals with initial installation.

  12. From biologically-inspired physics to physics-inspired biology From biologically-inspired physics to physics-inspired biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornyshev, Alexei A.

    2010-10-01

    the talk of Sergey Leikin [11]. No matter which aspect of DNA research was discussed at the conference, the physical chemistry of solution, particularly the role of counterions, was found to be extraordinarily important. Loren Williams (Georgia Tech) presented decisive synchrotron x-ray 3d-maps of distribution of the most important class of adsorbed counterions between the major and minor grooves of DNA or phosphates. Purely physical methods were used to obtain them with the results crucial for understanding the resulting charge patterns of DNA (including the adsorbed counterions) that determine DNA physical behaviour and DNA-DNA helix specific forces. The conference has shown substantial progress in the characterization, understanding of physics, geometry and topology of DNA-supercoiling, as well as its biological implementations, and a set of lectures was devoted to its modeling and experimental characterization. New techniques were also the center of attention, such as DNA transport through solid-state pores. In particular, Serge Lemay (Kavli Institute, TU Delft, now at Twente) has shown a number of new developments related to a combination of magnetic tweezers techniques and transport, allowing him to precisely characterize the trapping of DNA in the pores and revealing what can be learned from it. Amit Meller (BU) reported an intriguing result showing that DNA capture rate increases with its length for medium long DNA whereas there is no length dependence for longer molecules. Statistical physics of polymers was needed to explain this, revealing also a crucial role of electrostatics. Creation of salt gradients across the pore is providing a tool that increases the sensitivity of this popular new method by an order of magnitude. A unique single molecule technique to study the effect of RNA polymeraze backtracking, using a dual trap optical tweezers assay, was reported by Stephan Grill (Max-Plank Institute, Dresden). Many theoretical models reported at the

  13. Subsurface evaluation of the west parking lot and landfill 3 areas of Air Force Plant 4, Fort Worth, Texas, using two-dimensional direct-current resistivity profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Christopher L.; Jones, Sonya A.

    2002-01-01

    During September 1999, the U.S. Geological Survey made 10 two-dimensional direct-current resistivity profile surveys in the west parking lot and landfill 3 areas of Air Force Plant 4, Fort Worth, Texas, to identify subsurface areas of anomalously high or low resistivity that could indicate potential contamination, contaminant pathways, or anthropogenic structures. Six of the 10 surveys (transects) were in the west parking lot. Each of the inverted sections of these transects had anomalously high resistivities in the terrace alluvium/fill (the surficial subsurface layer) that probably were caused by highly resistive fill material. In addition, each of these transects had anomalously low resistivities in the Walnut Formation (a bedrock layer immediately beneath the alluvium/fill) that could have been caused by saturation of fractures within the Walnut Formation. A high-resistivity anomaly in the central part of the study area probably is associated with pea gravel fill used in construction of a French drain. Another high resistivity anomaly in the west parking lot, slightly southeast of the French drain, could be caused by dense nonaqueous-phase liquid in the Walnut Formation. The inverted sections of the four transects in the landfill 3 area tended to have slightly higher resistivities in both the alluvium/fill and the Walnut Formation than the transects in the west parking lot. The higher resistivities in the alluvium/fill could have been caused by drier conditions in grassy areas relative to conditions in the west parking lot. Higher resistivities in parts of the Walnut Formation also could be a function of drier conditions or variations in the lithology of the Walnut Formation. In addition to the 10 vertical sections, four horizontal sections at 2-meteraltitude intervals show generally increasing resistivity with decreasing altitude that most likely results from the increased influence of the Walnut Formation, which has a higher resistivity than the terrace

  14. Mapping biological systems to network systems

    CERN Document Server

    Rathore, Heena

    2016-01-01

    The book presents the challenges inherent in the paradigm shift of network systems from static to highly dynamic distributed systems – it proposes solutions that the symbiotic nature of biological systems can provide into altering networking systems to adapt to these changes. The author discuss how biological systems – which have the inherent capabilities of evolving, self-organizing, self-repairing and flourishing with time – are inspiring researchers to take opportunities from the biology domain and map them with the problems faced in network domain. The book revolves around the central idea of bio-inspired systems -- it begins by exploring why biology and computer network research are such a natural match. This is followed by presenting a broad overview of biologically inspired research in network systems -- it is classified by the biological field that inspired each topic and by the area of networking in which that topic lies. Each case elucidates how biological concepts have been most successfully ...

  15. Countdown to 2015: Tracking Maternal and Child Health Intervention Targets Using Lot Quality Assurance Sampling in Bauchi State Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dele Abegunde

    Full Text Available Improving maternal and child health remains a top priority in Nigeria's Bauchi State in the northeastern region where the maternal mortality ratio (MMR and infant mortality rate (IMR are as high as 1540 per 100,000 live births and 78 per 1,000 live births respectively. In this study, we used the framework of the continuum of maternal and child care to evaluate the impact of interventions in Bauchi State focused on improved maternal and child health, and to ascertain progress towards the achievement of Millennium Development Goals (MDGs 4 and 5.At baseline (2012 and then at follow-up (2013, we randomly sampled 340 households from 19 random locations in each of the 20 Local Government Areas (LGA of Bauchi State in Northern Nigeria, using the Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS technique. Women residents in the households were interviewed about their own health and that of their children. Estimated LGA coverage of maternal and child health indicators were aggregated across the State. These values were then compared to the national figures, and the differences from 2012 to 2014 were calculated.For several of the indicators, a modest improvement from baseline was found. However, the indicators in the continuum of care neither reached the national average nor attained the 90% globally recommended coverage level. The majority of the LGA surveyed were classifiable as high priority, thus requiring intensified efforts and programmatic scale up.Intensive scale-up of programs and interventions is needed in Bauchi State, Northern Nigeria, to accelerate, consolidate and sustain the modest but significant achievements in the continuum of care, if MDGs 4 and 5 are to be achieved by the end of 2015. The intentional focus of LGAs as the unit of intervention ought to be considered a condition precedent for future investments. Priority should be given to the re-allocating resources to program areas and regions where coverage has been low. Finally, systematic

  16. Countdown to 2015: Tracking Maternal and Child Health Intervention Targets Using Lot Quality Assurance Sampling in Bauchi State Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abegunde, Dele; Orobaton, Nosa

    2015-01-01

    Background Improving maternal and child health remains a top priority in Nigeria’s Bauchi State in the northeastern region where the maternal mortality ratio (MMR) and infant mortality rate (IMR) are as high as 1540 per 100,000 live births and 78 per 1,000 live births respectively. In this study, we used the framework of the continuum of maternal and child care to evaluate the impact of interventions in Bauchi State focused on improved maternal and child health, and to ascertain progress towards the achievement of Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) 4 and 5. Methods At baseline (2012) and then at follow-up (2013), we randomly sampled 340 households from 19 random locations in each of the 20 Local Government Areas (LGA) of Bauchi State in Northern Nigeria, using the Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS) technique. Women residents in the households were interviewed about their own health and that of their children. Estimated LGA coverage of maternal and child health indicators were aggregated across the State. These values were then compared to the national figures, and the differences from 2012 to 2014 were calculated. Results For several of the indicators, a modest improvement from baseline was found. However, the indicators in the continuum of care neither reached the national average nor attained the 90% globally recommended coverage level. The majority of the LGA surveyed were classifiable as high priority, thus requiring intensified efforts and programmatic scale up. Conclusions Intensive scale-up of programs and interventions is needed in Bauchi State, Northern Nigeria, to accelerate, consolidate and sustain the modest but significant achievements in the continuum of care, if MDGs 4 and 5 are to be achieved by the end of 2015. The intentional focus of LGAs as the unit of intervention ought to be considered a condition precedent for future investments. Priority should be given to the re-allocating resources to program areas and regions where coverage has been

  17. Characterization and durability testing of plasma-sprayed zirconia-yttria and hafnia-yttria thermal barrier coatings. Part 1: Effect of spray parameters on the performance of several lots of partially stabilized zirconia-yttria powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert A.; Leissler, George W.; Jobe, J. Marcus

    1993-01-01

    Initial experiments conducted on thermal barrier coatings prepared in the newly upgraded research plasma spray facility and the burner rig test facilities are discussed. Part 1 discusses experiments which establish the spray parameters for three baseline zirconia-yttria coatings. The quality of five similar coating lots was judged primarily by their response to burner rig exposure supplemented by data from other sources such as specimen characterizations and thermal diffusivity measurements. After allowing for burner rig variability, although there appears to be an optimum density (i.e., optimum microstructure) for maximum burner rig life, the distribution tends to be rather broad about the maximum. In Part 2, new hafnia-yttria-based coatings were evaluated against both baseline and alternate zirconia-yttria coatings. The hafnia-yttria coatings and the zirconia-yttria coatings that were prepared by an alternate powder vendor were very sensitive to plasma spray parameters, in that high-quality coatings were only obtained when certain parameters were employed. The reasons for this important observation are not understood. Also not understood is that the first of two replicate specimens sprayed for Part 1 consistently performed better than the second specimen. Subsequent experiments did not display this spray order affect, possibly because a chiller was installed in the torch cooling water circuit. Also, large changes in coating density were observed after switching to a new lot of electrodes. Analyses of these findings were made possible, in part, because of the development of a sensitive density measurement technique described herein in detail. The measured thermal diffusivities did not display the expected strong relationship with porosity. This surprising result was believed to have been caused by increased microcracking of the denser coatings on the stainless steel substrates.

  18. Biological effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This fourth chapter presents: cell structure and metabolism; radiation interaction with biological tissues; steps of the production of biological effect of radiation; radiosensitivity of tissues; classification of biological effects; reversibility, transmissivity and influence factors; pre-natal biological effects; biological effects in therapy and syndrome of acute irradiation

  19. DISTRIBUTION OF PERCHLORATE IN SAMPLES OF SODIUM NITRATE (CHILE SALTPETER) FERTILIZER DERIVED FROM NATURAL CALICHE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two lots of sodium nitrate fertilizer derived from Chilean caliche were analyzed to determine the distribution of perchlorate throughout the material. Although our samples represent a limited amount, we found that distribution was essentially homogeneous in any 100-g portion. Whe...

  20. Multi-User Quantum Key Distribution Using Wavelength Division Multiplexing

    OpenAIRE

    P.Lokesh Kumar Reddy; B.Rama Bhupal Reddy; S. Rama Krishna

    2012-01-01

    Quantum cryptography, exclusively known as Quantum key distribution (QKD), has attracted a lot of attention in the recent years with the discovery that it can provide absolute secrecy for communications. We report a new architecture for constructing a fiber-based network of quantum key distribution using optical wavelength division multiplexing in the fiber, and also using some wavelength protocols. The advantages are discussed in detail for demonstrating the experimental report in the way of...

  1. Sustainable Distribution in Emerging Markets – African Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Subrat Sarangi; Sanjay Patro; Ravi Shekhar Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The paper focuses on studying the impediments for new entrants into emerging markets from a perspective of the African economies and proposes a conceptual framework for a sustainable distribution system. While there is a lot of research on emerging economies, African markets have remained relatively untouched, more so from the distribution perspective. Further, the speed at which business transformations are happening in these markets, academic research needs to keep pace with such changes. T...

  2. Particle Swarm Optimization Model of Distributed Network Planning

    OpenAIRE

    Lu-ping Zhou; Bing-rong Li; Fu-cai Wang

    2013-01-01

    With the continuous improvement of computer hardware, major factors affecting the efficiency of computer network have been the pros and cons of the network structure. So it can ensure the operational efficiency, stability and security of the network and save a lot of hardware resources to reasonably plan the distributed computer network. At present, planning levels of many distributed computer networks are not very high, which results in the lower computer network efficiency. For this reason,...

  3. Department of Radiation and Environmental Biology - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text:The year 1999 we devoted mainly to the activities concerning our basic research, and requirements and expectations of three research projects. The environmental project from the European Community was supporting our research in the issues of human monitoring of occupational exposure to pesticides. The two other radiobiology projects from the State Committee of Research were supporting our search on the biological efficiency and its enhancement of radio-therapeutic sources of various LET radiation. We succeeded fruitful co-operation with colleagues from Academy of Mining and Metallurgy that let us go faster with modernization of our laboratory by automation of our methods for screening cytogenetic damages. A lot of efforts were paid to modify our work by automatic reports of the coordinates of aberrant metaphases, and to make a smooth work of our new and own metaphase finder. We are sure that our new and unique research tool will not only enhance the accuracy and speed of measurements, but will also be useful for the purpose of the retrospective biological dosimetry of absorbed doses. We have applied fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) for cytogenetic studies of biological effects induced by neutrons. Now, we are looking forward to apply this technique in a combination with the DNA damage measures done by SCGE assay, to our research on mechanisms of the induction and repair, or interaction of the lesions induced by genotoxic agents. Understanding of the regulation of these processes could be a good goal for the new century to come. (author)

  4. Tracking the Quality of Care for Sick Children Using Lot Quality Assurance Sampling: Targeting Improvements of Health Services in Jigawa, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Oladele, Edward Adekola; Ormond, Louise; Adeyemi, Olusegun; Patrick, David; Okoh, Festus; Oresanya, Olusola Bukola; Valadez, Joseph J

    2012-01-01

    Background In Nigeria, 30% of child deaths are due to malaria. The National Malaria Control Program of Nigeria (NMCP) during 2009 initiated a program to improve the quality of paediatric malaria services delivered in health facilities (HF). This study reports a rapid approach used to assess the existing quality of services in Jigawa state at decentralised levels of the health system. Methods NMCP selected Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS) to identify the variation in HF service quality am...

  5. Are Patent Medicine Vendors Effective Agents in Malaria Control? Using Lot Quality Assurance Sampling to Assess Quality of Practice in Jigawa, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Sima Berendes; Olusegun Adeyemi; Edward Adekola Oladele; Olusola Bukola Oresanya; Festus Okoh; Joseph J Valadez

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patent medicine vendors (PMV) provide antimalarial treatment and care throughout Sub-Saharan Africa, and can play an important role in the fight against malaria. Their close-to-client infrastructure could enable lifesaving artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) to reach patients in time. However, systematic assessments of drug sellers' performance quality are crucial if their role is to be managed within the health system. Lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS) could be an eff...

  6. Optimal production lot size and reorder point of a two-stage supply chain while random demand is sensitive with sales teams' initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar Sana, Shib

    2016-01-01

    The paper develops a production-inventory model of a two-stage supply chain consisting of one manufacturer and one retailer to study production lot size/order quantity, reorder point sales teams' initiatives where demand of the end customers is dependent on random variable and sales teams' initiatives simultaneously. The manufacturer produces the order quantity of the retailer at one lot in which the procurement cost per unit quantity follows a realistic convex function of production lot size. In the chain, the cost of sales team's initiatives/promotion efforts and wholesale price of the manufacturer are negotiated at the points such that their optimum profits reached nearer to their target profits. This study suggests to the management of firms to determine the optimal order quantity/production quantity, reorder point and sales teams' initiatives/promotional effort in order to achieve their maximum profits. An analytical method is applied to determine the optimal values of the decision variables. Finally, numerical examples with its graphical presentation and sensitivity analysis of the key parameters are presented to illustrate more insights of the model.

  7. In-situ infiltration performance of different permeable pavements in a employee used parking lot--A four-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kuldip; Kozak, Joseph; Hundal, Lakhwinder; Cox, Albert; Zhang, Heng; Granato, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Permeable pavements are being adopted as a green solution in many parts of the world to manage urban stormwater quantity and quality. This paper reports on the measured in-situ infiltration performance over a four-year period since construction and use of three permeable parking sections (permeable pavers, permeable concrete and permeable asphalt) of an employee car parking lot. There was only a marginal decline in infiltration rates of all three pavements after one year of use. However, between years two to four, the infiltration rates declined significantly due to clogging of pores either by dry deposition of particles and/or shear stress of vehicles driving and degrading the permeable surfaces; during the last two years, a greater decline was also observed in driving areas of the parking lots compared to parking slots, where minimal wear and tear are expected. Maintenance strategies were employed to reclaim some of the lost infiltration rate of the permeable pavements to limited success. Despite this decline, the infiltration rates were still four to five times higher than average rainstorm intensity in the region. Thus, these permeable pavement parking lots may have significant ecological importance due to their ability to infiltrate rainwater quickly, reduce the runoff in the catchment area, and also dampen runoff peak flows that could otherwise enter the collection system for treatment in a combined sewer area. PMID:26606196

  8. Consistency Principle in Biological Dynamical Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Kaneko, Kunihiko; Furusawa, Chikara

    2008-01-01

    We propose a principle of consistency between different hierarchical levels of biological systems. Given a consistency between molecule replication and cell reproduction, universal statistical laws on cellular chemical abundances are derived and confirmed experimentally. They include a power law distribution of gene expressions, a lognormal distribution of cellular chemical abundances over cells, and embedding of the power law into the network connectivity distribution. Second, given a consis...

  9. Biological conversion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, C.D.

    A system for bioconversion of organic material comprises a primary bioreactor column wherein a biological active agent (zymomonas mobilis) converts the organic material (sugar) to a product (alcohol), a rejuvenator column wherein the biological activity of said biological active agent is enhanced, and means for circulating said biological active agent between said primary bioreactor column and said rejuvenator column.

  10. Synthetic biology: insights into biological computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoni, Romilde; Urrios, Arturo; Velazquez-Garcia, Silvia; de Nadal, Eulàlia; Posas, Francesc

    2016-04-18

    Organisms have evolved a broad array of complex signaling mechanisms that allow them to survive in a wide range of environmental conditions. They are able to sense external inputs and produce an output response by computing the information. Synthetic biology attempts to rationally engineer biological systems in order to perform desired functions. Our increasing understanding of biological systems guides this rational design, while the huge background in electronics for building circuits defines the methodology. In this context, biocomputation is the branch of synthetic biology aimed at implementing artificial computational devices using engineered biological motifs as building blocks. Biocomputational devices are defined as biological systems that are able to integrate inputs and return outputs following pre-determined rules. Over the last decade the number of available synthetic engineered devices has increased exponentially; simple and complex circuits have been built in bacteria, yeast and mammalian cells. These devices can manage and store information, take decisions based on past and present inputs, and even convert a transient signal into a sustained response. The field is experiencing a fast growth and every day it is easier to implement more complex biological functions. This is mainly due to advances in in vitro DNA synthesis, new genome editing tools, novel molecular cloning techniques, continuously growing part libraries as well as other technological advances. This allows that digital computation can now be engineered and implemented in biological systems. Simple logic gates can be implemented and connected to perform novel desired functions or to better understand and redesign biological processes. Synthetic biological digital circuits could lead to new therapeutic approaches, as well as new and efficient ways to produce complex molecules such as antibiotics, bioplastics or biofuels. Biological computation not only provides possible biomedical and

  11. Biological in-vivo measurement of dose distribution in patients' lymphocytes by gamma-H2AX immunofluorescence staining: 3D conformal- vs. step-and-shoot IMRT of the prostate gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huber Peter E

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Different radiation-techniques in treating local staged prostate cancer differ in their dose- distribution. Physical phantom measurements indicate that for 3D, less healthy tissue is exposed to a relatively higher dose compared to SSIMRT. The purpose is to substantiate a dose distribution in lymphocytes in-vivo and to discuss the possibility of comparing it to the physical model of total body dose distribution. Methods For each technique (3D and SSIMRT, blood was taken from 20 patients before and 10 min after their first fraction of radiotherapy. The isolated leukocytes were fixed 2 hours after radiation. DNA double-strand breaks (DSB in lymphocytes' nuclei were stained immunocytochemically using the gamma-H2AX protein. Gamma-H2AX foci inside each nucleus were counted in 300 irradiated as well as 50 non-irradiated lymphocytes per patient. In addition, lymphocytes of 5 volunteer subjects were irradiated externally at different doses and processed under same conditions as the patients' lymphocytes in order to generate a calibration-line. This calibration-line assigns dose-value to mean number of gamma-H2AX foci/ nucleus. So the dose distributions in patients' lymphocytes were determined regarding to the gamma-H2AX foci distribution. With this information a cumulative dose-lymphocyte-histogram (DLH was generated. Visualized distribution of gamma-H2AX foci, correspondingly dose per nucleus, was compared to the technical dose-volume-histogram (DVH, related to the whole body-volume. Results Measured in-vivo (DLH and according to the physical treatment-planning (DVH, more lymphocytes resulted with low-dose exposure ( 80% was equal in both radiation techniques. The mean number of gamma-H2AX foci per lymphocyte was 0.49 (3D and 0.47 (SSIMRT without significant difference. Conclusions In-vivo measurement of the dose distribution within patients' lymphocytes can be performed by detecting gamma-H2AX foci. In case of 3D and SSIMRT, the

  12. Biological in-vivo measurement of dose distribution in patients' lymphocytes by gamma-H2AX immunofluorescence staining: 3D conformal- vs. step-and-shoot IMRT of the prostate gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different radiation-techniques in treating local staged prostate cancer differ in their dose- distribution. Physical phantom measurements indicate that for 3D, less healthy tissue is exposed to a relatively higher dose compared to SSIMRT. The purpose is to substantiate a dose distribution in lymphocytes in-vivo and to discuss the possibility of comparing it to the physical model of total body dose distribution. For each technique (3D and SSIMRT), blood was taken from 20 patients before and 10 min after their first fraction of radiotherapy. The isolated leukocytes were fixed 2 hours after radiation. DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in lymphocytes' nuclei were stained immunocytochemically using the gamma-H2AX protein. Gamma-H2AX foci inside each nucleus were counted in 300 irradiated as well as 50 non-irradiated lymphocytes per patient. In addition, lymphocytes of 5 volunteer subjects were irradiated externally at different doses and processed under same conditions as the patients' lymphocytes in order to generate a calibration-line. This calibration-line assigns dose-value to mean number of gamma-H2AX foci/ nucleus. So the dose distributions in patients' lymphocytes were determined regarding to the gamma-H2AX foci distribution. With this information a cumulative dose-lymphocyte-histogram (DLH) was generated. Visualized distribution of gamma-H2AX foci, correspondingly dose per nucleus, was compared to the technical dose-volume-histogram (DVH), related to the whole body-volume. Measured in-vivo (DLH) and according to the physical treatment-planning (DVH), more lymphocytes resulted with low-dose exposure (< 20% of the applied dose) and significantly fewer lymphocytes with middle-dose exposure (30%-60%) during Step-and-Shoot-IMRT, compared to conventional 3D conformal radiotherapy. The high-dose exposure (> 80%) was equal in both radiation techniques. The mean number of gamma-H2AX foci per lymphocyte was 0.49 (3D) and 0.47 (SSIMRT) without significant

  13. Ecological Studies on Formica yessensis Forel, with Special Reference to Its Effectiveness as a Biological Control Agent of the Pine Caterpillar Moth in Korea : III. Nest Distribution and Environmental Conditions of Nest Sites

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Chang Hyo; Murakami, Yozo

    1981-01-01

    Seasonal change of the nest distribution of Formicayessensis in the hill and biotic and abiotic environmental conditions of nest sites were investigated in red pine stands in Gyeongsang-Nam-Do, Korea in 1973-77. The nests scarcely occurred in the upper zone of slopes and concentrated in the lower and middle zones. The distribution of nests changes seasonally but the density per unit area is relatively constant (0.014-o. 022 per m^2). The active nests increase in number from spring to summer b...

  14. Computational Systems Chemical Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Oprea, Tudor I.; May, Elebeoba E.; Leitão, Andrei; Tropsha, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    There is a critical need for improving the level of chemistry awareness in systems biology. The data and information related to modulation of genes and proteins by small molecules continue to accumulate at the same time as simulation tools in systems biology and whole body physiologically-based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) continue to evolve. We called this emerging area at the interface between chemical biology and systems biology systems chemical biology, SCB (Oprea et al., 2007).

  15. Pictures of Synthetic Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Cserer, Amelie; Seiringer, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    This article is concerned with the representation of Synthetic Biology in the media and by biotechnology experts. An analysis was made of German-language media articles published between 2004 and 2008, and interviews with biotechnology-experts at the Synthetic Biology conference SB 3.0 in Zurich 2007. The results have been reflected in terms of the definition of Synthetic Biology, applications of Synthetic Biology and the perspectives of opportunities and risks. In the media, Synthetic Biolog...

  16. Modeling the biological effectiveness of radiations of different qualities: Lethal damage induced by low-energy protons in V79 cells and correlations with energy deposition, radical distribution, and specific DNA damage

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kundrát, Pavel; Davídková, Marie; Štěpán, Václav; Palajová, Zdenka; Judas, Libor

    Heidelberg : IRPA, 2007, s. 51-51. ISBN 978-3-8249-1071-7. ISSN 1013-4506. [Workshop of Heavy CHarged Particles in Biology and Medicine /11./. Heidelberg (DE), 26.09.2007-29.09.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/05/2728; GA ČR(CZ) GD202/05/H031 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505; CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : biophysical modeling * V79 cells * lethal radiation damage Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders

  17. Why there was need of Asian Journal of Agriculture and Biology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahid Iqbal

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge is exploding with every moment and science is discovering new horizons with every passing day. To encompass this knowledge and, particularly disseminate it to the scientific community free of cost, was the major inspiring force behind the launch of Asian Journal of Agriculture and Biology (AJAB. Another factor that motivated us was the narrow spectrum of the most of existing journals which cover only one or two specific fields and do not focus on interdisciplinary approach. The need was deeply felt by our team members and we decided to start a journal which would focus on all interrelated disciplines of agricultural and other biological sciences. From here we perceived the idea of the name of our new journal “Asian Journal of Agriculture and Biology”. We also decided that this would be online only to save the wastage of paper as most of the scientific literature is accessed through internet and people are least interested in printed copies of the articles. We deliberated a lot over free access of the journal and concluded in its favor, keeping in view the basic right of every human being to have free access to the knowledge of scientific discoveries and literature. It was also decided that AJAB will publish original research manuscripts, short communications and review articles on environmental, plant, animal and human sciences. Environmental sciences will cover areas of soil related research, residues and food quality. Plant sciences will focus on plant diversity, distribution, genetics, bioinformatics and biotechnology related issues. Animal sciences will deal with the health and diseases of vertebrate and invertebrate animals and their treatment related research. Human sciences will relate to different aspects of health and diseases of humans and various issues arising in medical sciences. The first issue of AJAB is before you and we hope your constructive feedback to improve its matter and quality.

  18. Application of fish biology in management of the fisheries

    OpenAIRE

    Mbabazi, D.; Namulemo, G.

    2001-01-01

    All biological aspects of the stock are of scientific interest. Specific biological parameters are used either in estimating; yield, or providing a basis for suggesting fisheries management strategies, growth, mortality and stock size are the main determinants of yield, and aspects such as the timing of spawning and recruitment are important in considering management measures. In fisheries science, fish biology contributes in two broad areas; a) Basic biology and distribution of resourc...

  19. Distribution and biology of epipelagic animals in the northern North Pacific Ocean and adjacent seas-I. Fishes and squids in the southern Okhotsk Sea and western North Pacific Ocean off the Kuril Islands in the autumn of 1993

    OpenAIRE

    Nagasawa, Kazuya; Ueno, Yasuhiro; Azuma, Teruo; OGURA, Miki(College of National Rehabilitation Center for the Disabled); Startsev, Alexander V.; Ivanova, Irena M.; Morris, John F. T.

    1996-01-01

    A surface-trawl survey was conducted by the R/V Kaiyo mare in the southern Okhotsk Sea and western North Pacific Ocean off the Kuril Islands in October and November 1993. The distributions and abundances of the species caught are described and discussed. Twenty-four fish species (1 lamprey, 1 shark, and 22 teleosts) and one squid species were identified. Juvenile Pacific salmon (6 species of the genus Oncorhynchus) were the most abundant, followed by myctophids, juvenile arabesque greenling (...

  20. CLSP问题的周期调度方法及其PSO求解%Cyclfc approach for capacltnted lot scheduling problem and its PSO-based algorithm.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施灿涛; 王文鹏; 李铁克

    2011-01-01

    采用分解思想考虑多阶段CLSP问题,从多阶段生产系统抽象出单阶段生产环节,提出以周期方式对该生产环节进行生产批量调度.在对CLSP周期调度问题进行描述和界定的基础上,建立了相应的数学模型,讨论了周期调度方法中的周期上界以及周期长度与物料批量大小之间的关系等性质,采用基于三层编码的粒子群优化算法进行问题求解.源于冷轧生产实际的计算实例表明周期方法能够大大降低问题的规模且所得设备调整费用比人工方法减少约16%.%By considering multi-stage capacitated lot scheduling problem with a thought of decomposition and abstracting several single stages from a multi-stage manufacture system,this paper proposes a cyclic approach for the capacitated lot-scheduling problem on each abstracted stage.The corresponding mathematical model is built based on the problem description and statement, and some properties of the cyclic approach, such ns upper bound for each cycle and the relationship between cycle length and lot sizes, are discovered. A PSO-based algorithm is employed with three-dimensional solution presentation. By computational tests with a real case from a cool rolling plant,it can be proved that the cyclic approach lends to a dramatic reduction of problem space and makes the setup costs degrade 16%.

  1. Performance of sampling plans to determine aflatoxin in farmers' stock peanut lots by measuring aflatoxin in high-risk-grade components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, T B; Hagler, W M; Giesbrecht, F G

    1999-01-01

    Five 2 kg test samples were taken from each of 120 farmers' stock peanut lots contaminated with aflatoxin. Kernels from each 2 kg sample were divided into the following U.S. Department of Agriculture grade components: sound mature kernels plus sound splits (SMKSS), other kernels (OK), loose shelled kernels (LSK), and damaged kernels (DAM). The kernel mass (g), aflatoxin mass (ng), and aflatoxin concentration (ng of aflatoxin/g of peanuts) were measured for each of the 2400 component samples. The variabilities associated with measuring aflatoxin mass (ng) in OK + LSK + DAM, or A(OLD)ng, and in LSK + DAM, or A(LD)ng, and aflatoxin concentration (ng/g) in OK + LSK + DAM, or A(OLD)ng/g, and in LSK + DAM, or A(LD)ng/g, were determined. The variance associated with measuring aflatoxin in each of the 4 combinations of components increased with aflatoxin, and functional relationships were developed from regression analysis. The variability associated with estimating the lot concentration from each of the 4 combinations of components was also determined. The coefficients of variation (CV) associated with estimating the aflatoxin for a lot with aflatoxin at 100 ng/g were 90, 86, 94 and 96% for aflatoxin masses A(OLD)ng and A(LD)ng and aflatoxin concentrations A(OLD)ng/g and A(LD)ng/g, respectively. The performance of aflatoxin sampling plans using the combination of aflatoxin masses in OK + LD + DAM and LD + DAM components was evaluated with a 2 kg test sample and a 50 ng/g accept/reject limit. PMID:10191533

  2. Refocusing NATO's intelligence outlook towards biological warfare

    OpenAIRE

    Villareal, Claro William.

    1996-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Today, we are attempting to manage chaos. With the end of the Cold War, a number of troubling developments in the world have been unleashed, especially the proliferation of WMD. Biological weapons are an increasing threat to world security. Nations and non-state actors are willing to sell or buy the necessary technologies for the production of biological weapons which can have disastrous effects on a military, an economy, and the envir...

  3. RDFScape: Semantic Web meets Systems Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Splendiani Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The recent availability of high-throughput data in molecular biology has increased the need for a formal representation of this knowledge domain. New ontologies are being developed to formalize knowledge, e.g. about the functions of proteins. As the Semantic Web is being introduced into the Life Sciences, the basis for a distributed knowledge-base that can foster biological data analysis is laid. However, there still is a dichotomy, in tools and methodologies, between the ...

  4. Impact of Distributed Generation on Relay Protections of Distribution Grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Bin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Distributed Generation (DG generates electricity from many small distributed energy sources or even customer’s small power plants. It always comes up with the terminal customer power quality management and the technology of energy cascade utilization. DG has lots of characteristics such as one single point of access, being power and being load, two operating mode in a grid or as an island, a great deal of application of power electronic devices, easily influenced by natural environmental factors etc. DG has impacts to the original grid in terms of the grid structure, the direction of power flow, the fault current level when a fault happens, etc and subsequently the relay protection mechanism must be looked into. This paper analyses the impact of accessing the DG on the distributed grid in three cases which are the DG accessing to the end of the distributed feeders, to the middle, and the DG accessing to lines, on relay protections. At the end of the paper it also comes up with improvements in detail.

  5. Cultural resource survey report for construction of office building, driveway, and parking lot at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Environmental Assessment and associated documentation is reported for the construction of an office building and parking lot in support of environmental management personnel activities. As part of the documentation process, the DOE determined that the proposed project constituted an undertaking as defined in Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act. In accordance with the regulations implementing Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, a records and literature search and historic resource identification effort were carried out on behalf of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). This report summarizes cultural resource literature and record searches and a historic resource identification effort

  6. Advances in Biological Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheimer, Steven B.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Reviews major developments in areas that are at the cutting edge of biological research. Areas include: human anti-cancer gene, recombinant DNA techniques for the detection of Huntington disease carriers, and marine biology. (CW)

  7. Biology of Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mail Facebook TwitterTitle Google+ LinkedIn Home Blood Disorders Biology of Blood Overview of Blood Medical Dictionary Also ... Version. DOCTORS: Click here for the Professional Version Biology of Blood Overview of Blood Components of Blood ...

  8. Biological imaging in radiation oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosu, A.L.; Wiedenmann, N.; Molls, M. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical Univ. of Munich (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    The goal of this study was to discuss the value of integrating biological imaging (PET, SPECT, MRS etc.) in radiation treatment planning and monitoring. Studies in patients with brain tumors have shown that, compared to CT and MRI alone, the image fusion of CT/MRI and amino acid SPECT or PET allows a more correct delineation of gross tumor volume (GTV) and planning target volume (PTV). For FDG-PET, comparable results with different techniques are reported in the literature also for bronchial carcinoma, ear-nose-and-throat tumors, and cervical carcinoma, or, in the case of MRS, for prostate cancer. Imaging of hypoxia, cell proliferation, apoptosis, tumor angiogenesis, and gene expression leads to the identification of differently aggressive areas of a biologically inhomogeneous tumor mass that can be individually and more appropriately targeted using innovative IMRT. Thus, a biological, inhomogeneous dose distribution can be generated, the so-called dose painting. In addition, the biological imaging can play a significant role in the evaluation of the therapy response after radiochemotherapy. Clinical studies in ear-nose-and-throat tumors, bronchial carcinoma, esophagus carcinoma, and cervical carcinoma suggest that the sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET for the therapy response are higher compared to anatomical imaging (CT and MRI). Clinical and experimental studies are required to define the real impact of these investigations in radiation treatment planning, and especially in the evaluation of therapy response. (orig.)

  9. Engineering scalable biological systems

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Timothy K.

    2010-01-01

    Synthetic biology is focused on engineering biological organisms to study natural systems and to provide new solutions for pressing medical, industrial, and environmental problems. At the core of engineered organisms are synthetic biological circuits that execute the tasks of sensing inputs, processing logic, and performing output functions. In the last decade, significant progress has been made in developing basic designs for a wide range of biological circuits in bacteria, yeast, and mammal...

  10. Systems interface biology

    OpenAIRE

    Francis J Doyle; Stelling, Jörg

    2006-01-01

    The field of systems biology has attracted the attention of biologists, engineers, mathematicians, physicists, chemists and others in an endeavour to create systems-level understanding of complex biological networks. In particular, systems engineering methods are finding unique opportunities in characterizing the rich behaviour exhibited by biological systems. In the same manner, these new classes of biological problems are motivating novel developments in theoretical systems approaches. Henc...

  11. Biological Races in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Templeton, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    Races may exist in humans in a cultural sense, but biological concepts of race are needed to access their reality in a non-species-specific manner and to see if cultural categories correspond to biological categories within humans. Modern biological concepts of race can be implemented objectively with molecular genetic data through hypothesis-testing. Genetic data sets are used to see if biological races exist in humans and in our closest evolutionary relative, the chimpanzee. Using the two m...

  12. Distributed Knight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus Marius; Damm, Christian Heide

    2005-01-01

    An extension of Knight (2005) that support distributed synchronous collaboration implemented using type-based publish/subscribe......An extension of Knight (2005) that support distributed synchronous collaboration implemented using type-based publish/subscribe...

  13. Ecological Studies on Formica yessensis Forel, with Special Reference to Its Effectiveness as a Biological Control Agent of the Pine Caterpillar Moth in Korea : I. Geographical and Ecological Distributions of Formica yessensis Forel (Hymenoptera : Formicidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Chang Hyo; Murakami, Yozo

    1980-01-01

    Formica yessensis occurs in southwestern Hokkaido, Honshu north of Hakone-Fuji Mountains, Korea (except Jeju-Do unsurveyed), Ussuri and northeastern China. In Hokkaido and Tohoku Province of Honshu it occurs from sea shore areas to mountains as high as 700 m, while in central Honshu at 700-1800 m in altitude. A record from northern Kyushu is very doubtful. The southern limit of its distribution is nearly 350N both in Korea and Japan. However, the ant inhabits lower lands even at the southern ...

  14. AGENT-BASED DISTRIBUTION GRID OPERATION BASED ON A TRAFFIC LIGHT CONCEPT

    OpenAIRE

    Drayer, Elisabeth; Hegemann, Jan; Lazarus, Marc; Caire, Raphael; Braun, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Compared to a centralised grid operation management for the distribution grid, a distributed and decentralised agent-based operation has a lot of advantages, like scalability, modularity and robustness. We propose the concept for an agent-based distribution grid operation management based on a traffic light concept. Depending on the situation in the grid, the operation management can be in different modes, which define the way how the grid is operated.

  15. Upgrading Undergraduate Biology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musante, Susan

    2011-01-01

    On many campuses throughout the country, undergraduate biology education is in serious need of an upgrade. During the past few decades, the body of biological knowledge has grown exponentially, and as a research endeavor, the practice of biology has evolved. Education research has also made great strides, revealing many new insights into how…

  16. Biology Myth-Killers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampert, Evan

    2014-01-01

    "Biology Myth-Killers" is an activity designed to identify and correct common misconceptions for high school and college introductory biology courses. Students identify common myths, which double as biology misconceptions, and use appropriate sources to share the "truth" about the myths. This learner-centered activity is a fun…

  17. Designing synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapakis, Christina M

    2014-03-21

    Synthetic biology is frequently defined as the application of engineering design principles to biology. Such principles are intended to streamline the practice of biological engineering, to shorten the time required to design, build, and test synthetic gene networks. This streamlining of iterative design cycles can facilitate the future construction of biological systems for a range of applications in the production of fuels, foods, materials, and medicines. The promise of these potential applications as well as the emphasis on design has prompted critical reflection on synthetic biology from design theorists and practicing designers from many fields, who can bring valuable perspectives to the discipline. While interdisciplinary connections between biologists and engineers have built synthetic biology via the science and the technology of biology, interdisciplinary collaboration with artists, designers, and social theorists can provide insight on the connections between technology and society. Such collaborations can open up new avenues and new principles for research and design, as well as shed new light on the challenging context-dependence-both biological and social-that face living technologies at many scales. This review is inspired by the session titled "Design and Synthetic Biology: Connecting People and Technology" at Synthetic Biology 6.0 and covers a range of literature on design practice in synthetic biology and beyond. Critical engagement with how design is used to shape the discipline opens up new possibilities for how we might design the future of synthetic biology. PMID:24156739

  18. The role of epigenetics in the biology of multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimopoulos, K; Gimsing, P; Grønbæk, K

    2014-01-01

    Several recent studies have highlighted the biological complexity of multiple myeloma (MM) that arises as a result of several disrupted cancer pathways. Apart from the central role of genetic abnormalities, epigenetic aberrations have also been shown to be important players in the development of MM......, and a lot of research during the past decades has focused on the ways DNA methylation, histone modifications and noncoding RNAs contribute to the pathobiology of MM. This has led to, apart from better understanding of the disease biology, the development of epigenetic drugs, such as histone deacetylase...... inhibitors that are already used in clinical trials in MM with promising results. This review will present the role of epigenetic abnormalities in MM and how these can affect specific pathways, and focus on the potential of novel 'epidrugs' as future treatment modalities for MM....

  19. Cerenkov Radiation: A Multi-functional Approach for Biological Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei eMa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cerenkov radiation (CR has been used in various biological research fields, which has aroused lots of attention in recent years. Combining optical imaging instruments and most of nuclear medicine imaging or radiotherapy probes, the CR was developed as a new imaging modality for biology studies, called Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI. On the other hand, it was novelly used as an internal excitation source to activate some fluorophores for energy transfer imaging. However, it also has some shortages such as relatively weak luminescence intensity and low penetration in tissue. Thus some scientific groups demonstrated to optimize the CLI and demonstrated it to three-dimension tomography. In this article, we elaborate on its principle, history, and applications and discuss a number of directions for technical improvements. Then concluded some advantages and shortages of CR and discuss some prospects of it.

  20. Polysaccharides of higher fungi: Biological role, structure, and antioxidative activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozarski Maja S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal polysaccharides attract a lot of attention due to their multiple challenging biological properties, such as: anti-tumor, anti-viral, anticomplementary, anticoagulant, hypolipidemic and immunomodulatory and immune-stimulatory activities, which all together make them suitable for application in many quite distinctive areas, such as food industry, biomedicine, cosmetology, agriculture, environmental protection and waste water management. This article presents results with respect to biological properties, structure and procedures related to the isolation and activation of polysaccharides of higher fungi. It is considered and presented along with a review of the critical antioxidative activity and possible influence of the structural composition of polysaccharide extracts (isolated from these higher fungi upon their antioxidative properties.