WorldWideScience

Sample records for biological liquid crystal

  1. Invited review liquid crystal models of biological materials and silk spinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Alejandro D; Herrera-Valencia, Edtson E

    2012-06-01

    A review of thermodynamic, materials science, and rheological liquid crystal models is presented and applied to a wide range of biological liquid crystals, including helicoidal plywoods, biopolymer solutions, and in vivo liquid crystals. The distinguishing characteristics of liquid crystals (self-assembly, packing, defects, functionalities, processability) are discussed in relation to biological materials and the strong correspondence between different synthetic and biological materials is established. Biological polymer processing based on liquid crystalline precursors includes viscoelastic flow to form and shape fibers. Viscoelastic models for nematic and chiral nematics are reviewed and discussed in terms of key parameters that facilitate understanding and quantitative information from optical textures and rheometers. It is shown that viscoelastic modeling the silk spinning process using liquid crystal theories sheds light on textural transitions in the duct of spiders and silk worms as well as on tactoidal drops and interfacial structures. The range and consistency of the predictions demonstrates that the use of mesoscopic liquid crystal models is another tool to develop the science and biomimetic applications of mesogenic biological soft matter. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Liquid Crystal Colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2018-03-01

    Colloids are abundant in nature, science, and technology, with examples ranging from milk to quantum dots and the colloidal atom paradigm. Similarly, liquid crystal ordering is important in contexts ranging from biological membranes to laboratory models of cosmic strings and liquid crystal displays in consumer devices. Some of the most exciting recent developments in both of these soft matter fields emerge at their interface, in the fast-growing research arena of liquid crystal colloids. Mesoscale self-assembly in such systems may lead to artificial materials and to structures with emergent physical behavior arising from patterning of molecular order and nano- or microparticles into precisely controlled configurations. Liquid crystal colloids show exceptional promise for new discovery that may impinge on composite material fabrication, low-dimensional topology, photonics, and so on. Starting from physical underpinnings, I review the state of the art in this fast-growing field, with a focus on its scientific and technological potential.

  3. Experimental and Computational Characterization of Biological Liquid Crystals: A Review of Single-Molecule Bioassays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungsoo Na

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative understanding of the mechanical behavior of biological liquid crystals such as proteins is essential for gaining insight into their biological functions, since some proteins perform notable mechanical functions. Recently, single-molecule experiments have allowed not only the quantitative characterization of the mechanical behavior of proteins such as protein unfolding mechanics, but also the exploration of the free energy landscape for protein folding. In this work, we have reviewed the current state-of-art in single-molecule bioassays that enable quantitative studies on protein unfolding mechanics and/or various molecular interactions. Specifically, single-molecule pulling experiments based on atomic force microscopy (AFM have been overviewed. In addition, the computational simulations on single-molecule pulling experiments have been reviewed. We have also reviewed the AFM cantilever-based bioassay that provides insight into various molecular interactions. Our review highlights the AFM-based single-molecule bioassay for quantitative characterization of biological liquid crystals such as proteins.

  4. Thermotropic Ionic Liquid Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axenov, Kirill V.; Laschat, Sabine

    2011-01-01

    The last five years’ achievements in the synthesis and investigation of thermotropic ionic liquid crystals are reviewed. The present review describes the mesomorphic properties displayed by organic, as well as metal-containing ionic mesogens. In addition, a short overview on the ionic polymer and self-assembled liquid crystals is given. Potential and actual applications of ionic mesogens are also discussed. PMID:28879986

  5. Thermotropic Ionic Liquid Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axenov, Kirill V; Laschat, Sabine

    2011-01-14

    The last five years' achievements in the synthesis and investigation of thermotropic ionic liquid crystals are reviewed. The present review describes the mesomorphic properties displayed by organic, as well as metal-containing ionic mesogens. In addition, a short overview on the ionic polymer and self-assembled liquid crystals is given. Potential and actual applications of ionic mesogens are also discussed.

  6. Thermotropic Ionic Liquid Crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Axenov, Kirill V.; Laschat, Sabine

    2011-01-01

    The last five years’ achievements in the synthesis and investigation of thermotropic ionic liquid crystals are reviewed. The present review describes the mesomorphic properties displayed by organic, as well as metal-containing ionic mesogens. In addition, a short overview on the ionic polymer and self-assembled liquid crystals is given. Potential and actual applications of ionic mesogens are also discussed.

  7. Thermotropic Ionic Liquid Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Laschat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The last five years’ achievements in the synthesis and investigation of thermotropic ionic liquid crystals are reviewed. The present review describes the mesomorphic properties displayed by organic, as well as metal-containing ionic mesogens. In addition, a short overview on the ionic polymer and self-assembled liquid crystals is given. Potential and actual applications of ionic mesogens are also discussed.

  8. Liquid crystalline biopolymers: A new arena for liquid crystal research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizvi, Tasneem Zahra

    2001-07-01

    This paper gives a brief introduction to liquid crystals on the basis of biopolymers and reviews literature on liquid crystalline behaviour of biopolymers both in vitro and in vivo in relation to their implications in the fields of biology, medicine and material science. Knowledge in the field of biological liquid crystals is crucial for understanding complex phenomena at supramolecular level which will give information about processes involved in biological organization and function. The understanding of the interaction of theses crystals with electric, magnetic, optical and thermal fields will uncover mechanisms of near quantum-energy detection capabilities of biosystems

  9. Liquid crystal display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takami, K.

    1981-01-01

    An improved liquid crystal display device is described which can display letters, numerals and other necessary patterns in the night time using a minimized amount of radioactive material. To achieve this a self-luminous light source is placed in a limited region corresponding to a specific display area. (U.K.)

  10. Thermoelectricity in liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Said, Suhana; Nordin, Abdul Rahman; Abdullah, Norbani; Balamurugan, S.

    2015-09-01

    The thermoelectric effect, also known as the Seebeck effect, describes the conversion of a temperature gradient into electricity. A Figure of Merit (ZT) is used to describe the thermoelectric ability of a material. It is directly dependent on its Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity, and inversely dependent on its thermal conductivity. There is usually a compromise between these parameters, which limit the performance of thermoelectric materials. The current achievement for ZT~2.2 falls short of the expected threshold of ZT=3 to allow its viability in commercial applications. In recent times, advances in organic thermoelectrics been significant, improving by over 3 orders of magnitude over a period of about 10 years. Liquid crystals are newly investigated as candidate thermoelectric materials, given their low thermal conductivity, inherent ordering, and in some cases, reasonable electrical conductivity. In this work the thermoelectric behaviour of a discotic liquid crystal, is discussed. The DLC was filled into cells coated with a charge injector, and an alignment of the columnar axis perpendicular to the substrate was allowed to form. This thermoelectric behavior can be correlated to the order-disorder transition. A reasonable thermoelectric power in the liquid crystal temperature regime was noted. In summary, thermoelectric liquid crystals may have the potential to be utilised in flexible devices, as a standalone power source.

  11. Liquid crystals in tribology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrión, Francisco-José; Martínez-Nicolás, Ginés; Iglesias, Patricia; Sanes, José; Bermúdez, María-Dolores

    2009-09-18

    Two decades ago, the literature dealing with the possible applications of low molar mass liquid crystals, also called monomer liquid crystals (MLCs), only included about 50 references. Today, thousands of papers, conference reports, books or book chapters and patents refer to the study and applications of MLCs as lubricants and lubricant additives and efforts are made to develop new commercial applications. The development of more efficient lubricants is of paramount technological and economic relevance as it is estimated that half the energy consumption is dissipated as friction. MLCs have shown their ability to form ordered boundary layers with good load-carrying capacity and to lower the friction coefficients, wear rates and contact temperature of sliding surfaces, thus contributing to increase the components service life and to save energy. This review includes the use of MLCs in lubrication, and dispersions of MLCs in conventional polymers (PDMLCs). Finally, new lubricating system composed of MLC blends with surfactants, ionic liquids or nanophases are considered.

  12. Liquid crystal dimers

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar Pal, Santanu

    2017-01-01

    This book covers in-depth discussion of design principles, synthesis and thermal behavior of all types of liquid crystal (LC) dimers. The text presents recent advances in the field of LC dimers consisting of different mesogenic units such as calamitic, discotic and bent-core molecules. It starts with a chapter on the introduction of liquid crystal dimers, including their odd-even behavior, basic classification of dimers and common mesophases in dimers. The text shows how the molecular architectures are being used to develop new materials to study a range of interesting phenomena such as the biaxial nematic phase containing rod-like and disc-like mesogenic units. Finally, the text presents perspectives related to technological relevance of these dimers such as dopants in LC display mixtures exhibiting faster relaxation time, strong flexoelectric coupling and others to effect control over the properties of these materials.

  13. Liquid crystal colloids

    CERN Document Server

    Muševič, Igor

    2017-01-01

    This book brings together the many concepts and discoveries in liquid crystal colloids contributed over the last twenty years and scattered across numerous articles and book chapters. It provides both a historical overview of the development of the field and a clear perspective on the future applications in photonics. The book covers all phenomena observed in liquid crystal colloids with an emphasis on experimental tools and applications of topology in condensed matter, as well as practical micro-photonics applications. It includes a number of spectacular manifestations of new topological phenomena not found or difficult to observe in other systems. Starting from the early works on nematic colloids, it explains the basics of topological defects in ordered media, charge and winding, and the elastic forces between colloidal particles in nematics. Following a detailed description of experimental methods, such as optical tweezing and particle tracking, the book eases the reader into the theoretical part, which de...

  14. Liquid Crystals in Tribology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María-Dolores Bermúdez

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Two decades ago, the literature dealing with the possible applications of low molar mass liquid crystals, also called monomer liquid crystals (MLCs, only included about 50 references. Today, thousands of papers, conference reports, books or book chapters and patents refer to the study and applications of MLCs as lubricants and lubricant additives and efforts are made to develop new commercial applications. The development of more efficient lubricants is of paramount technological and economic relevance as it is estimated that half the energy consumption is dissipated as friction. MLCs have shown their ability to form ordered boundary layers with good load-carrying capacity and to lower the friction coefficients, wear rates and contact temperature of sliding surfaces, thus contributing to increase the components service life and to save energy. This review includes the use of MLCs in lubrication, and dispersions of MLCs in conventional polymers (PDMLCs. Finally, new lubricating system composed of MLC blends with surfactants, ionic liquids or nanophases are considered.

  15. Liquid Crystal Airborne Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-08-01

    Cum.nings, J. P., et al., Properties and Limitations oe Liquid Crystals for Aircraft Displays, Honeywell Corporate Researc ."I Center, Final Report HR-72...basic module could be used to build displays for both the commercial and military! 157- marhecs, and so would establi sh a broad and sizable market ... market for the display becomes a reality; therein lies, f TABLE 16 THE COURSE OF FUTURE DISPLAY DEVELOPMENT Today 1976-77 1980 1985 Display Size 2" 1 3.2

  16. Physical Properties of Liquid Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Gray, George W; Spiess, Hans W

    1999-01-01

    This handbook is a unique compendium of knowledge on all aspects of the physics of liquid crystals. In over 500 pages it provides detailed information on the physical properties of liquid crystals as well as the recent theories and results on phase transitions, defects and textures of different types of liquid crystals. An in-depth understanding of the physical fundamentals is a prerequisite for everyone working in the field of liquid crystal research. With this book the experts as well as graduate students entering the field get all the information they need.

  17. Wetting of cholesteric liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Nuno M; Figueirinhas Pereira, Maria Carolina; Bernardino, Nelson R; Telo da Gama, Margarida M

    2016-02-01

    We investigate theoretically the wetting properties of cholesteric liquid crystals at a planar substrate. If the properties of substrate and of the interface are such that the cholesteric layers are not distorted, the wetting properties are similar to those of a nematic liquid crystal. If, on the other hand, the anchoring conditions force the distortion of the liquid crystal layers the wetting properties are altered, the free cholesteric-isotropic interface is non-planar and there is a layer of topological defects close to the substrate. These deformations can either promote or hinder the wetting of the substrate by a cholesteric, depending on the properties of the cholesteric liquid crystal.

  18. Modeling liquid crystal polymeric devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez Pinto, Vianney Karina

    The main focus of this work is the theoretical and numerical study of materials that combine liquid crystal and polymer. Liquid crystal elastomers are polymeric materials that exhibit both the ordered properties of the liquid crystals and the elastic properties of rubbers. Changing the order of the liquid crystal molecules within the polymer network can induce shape change. These materials are very valuable for applications such as actuators, sensors, artificial muscles, haptic displays, etc. In this work we apply finite element elastodynamics simulations to study the temperature induced shape deformation in nematic elastomers with complex director microstructure. In another topic, we propose a novel numerical method to model the director dynamics and microstructural evolution of three dimensional nematic and cholesteric liquid crystals. Numerical studies presented in this work are in agreement with experimental observations and provide insight into the design of application devices.

  19. Dichroic Liquid Crystal Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadur, Birendra

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * DICHROIC DYES * Chemical Structure * Chemical and Photochemical Stability * THEORETICAL MODELLING * DEFECTS CAUSED BY PROLONGED LIGHT IRRADIATION * CHEMICAL STRUCTURE AND PHOTOSTABILITY * OTHER PARAMETERS AFFECTING PHOTOSTABILITY * CELL PREPARATION * DICHROIC PARAMETERS AND THEIR MEASUREMENTS * Order Parameter and Dichroic Ratio Of Dyes * Absorbance, Order Parameter and Dichroic Ratio Measurements * IMPACT OF DYE STRUCTURE AND LIQUID CRYSTAL HOST ON PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF A DICHROIC MIXTURE * Order Parameter and Dichroic Ratio * EFFECT OF LENGTH OF DICHROIC DYES ON THE ORDER PARAMETER * EFFECT OF THE BREADTH OF DYE ON THE ORDER PARAMETER * EFFECT OF THE HOST ON THE ORDER PARAMETER * TEMPERATURE VARIATION OF THE ORDER PARAMETER OF DYES IN A LIQUID CRYSTAL HOST * IMPACT OF DYE CONCENTRATION ON THE ORDER PARAMETER * Temperature Range * Viscosity * Dielectric Constant and Anisotropy * Refractive Indices and Birefringence * solubility43,153-156 * Absorption Wavelength and Auxochromic Groups * Molecular Engineering of Dichroic Dyes * OPTICAL, ELECTRO-OPTICAL AND LIFE PARAMETERS * Colour And CIE Colour space120,160-166 * CIE 1931 COLOUR SPACE * CIE 1976 CHROMATICITY DIAGRAM * CIE UNIFORM COLOUR SPACES & COLOUR DIFFERENCE FORMULAE120,160-166 * Electro-Optical Parameters120 * LUMINANCE * CONTRAST AND CONTRAST RATIO * SWITCHING SPEED * Life Parameters and Failure Modes * DICHROIC MIXTURE FORMULATION * Monochrome Mixture * Black Mixture * ACHROMATIC BLACK MIXTURE FOR HEILMEIER DISPLAYS * Effect of Illuminant on Display Colour * Colour of the Field-On State * Effect of Dye Linewidth * Optimum Centroid Wavelengths * Effect of Dye Concentration * Mixture Formulation Using More Than Three Dyes * ACHROMATIC MIXTURE FOR WHITE-TAYLOR TYPE DISPLAYS * HEILMEIER DISPLAYS * Theoretical Modelling * Threshold Characteristic * Effects of Dye Concentration on Electro-optical Parameters * Effect of Cholesteric Doping * Effect of Alignment

  20. Nanoparticles in liquid crystals, and liquid crystals in nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pablo, Juan

    2015-03-01

    Liquid crystals are remarkably sensitive to interfacial interactions. Small perturbations at a liquid crystal interface, for example, can be propagated over relatively long length scales, thereby providing the basis for a wide range of applications that rely on amplification of molecular events into macroscopic observables. Our recent research efforts have focused on the reverse phenomenon; that is, we have sought to manipulate the interfacial assembly of nanoparticles or the organization of surface active molecules by controlling the structure of a liquid crystal. This presentation will consist of a review of the basic principles that are responsible for liquid crystal-mediated interactions, followed by demonstrations of those principles in the context of two types of systems. In the first, a liquid crystal is used to direct the assembly of nanoparticles; through a combination of molecular and continuum models, it is found that minute changes in interfacial energy and particle size lead to liquid-crystal induced attractions that can span multiple orders of magnitude. Theoretical predictions are confirmed by experimental observations, which also suggest that LC-mediated assembly provides an effective means for fabrication of plasmonic devices. In the second type of system, the structure of a liquid crystal is controlled by confinement in submicron droplets. The morphology of the liquid crystal in a drop depends on a delicate balance between bulk and interfacial contributions to the free energy; that balance can be easily perturbed by adsorption of analytes or nanoparticles at the interface, thereby providing the basis for development of hierarchical assembly of responsive, anisotropic materials. Theoretical predictions also indicate that the three-dimensional order of a liquid crystal can be projected onto a two-dimensional interface, and give rise to novel nanostructures that are not found in simple isotropic fluids.

  1. Pressure sensor using liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Devendra S. (Inventor); Holmes, Harlan K. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A pressure sensor includes a liquid crystal positioned between transparent, electrically conductive films (18 and 20), that are biased by a voltage (V) which induces an electric field (E) that causes the liquid crystal to assume a first state of orientation. Application of pressure (P) to a flexible, transparent film (24) causes the conductive film (20) to move closer to or farther from the conductive film (18), thereby causing a change in the electric field (E'(P)) which causes the liquid crystal to assume a second state of orientation. Polarized light (P.sub.1) is directed into the liquid crystal and transmitted or reflected to an analyzer (A or 30). Changes in the state of orientation of the liquid crystal induced by applied pressure (P) result in a different light intensity being detected at the analyzer (A or 30) as a function of the applied pressure (P). In particular embodiments, the liquid crystal is present as droplets (10) in a polymer matrix (12) or in cells (14) in a polymeric or dielectric grid (16) material in the form of a layer (13) between the electrically conductive films (18 and 20). The liquid crystal fills the open wells in the polymer matrix (12) or grid (16) only partially.

  2. Liquid crystal interfaces: Experiments, simulations and biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Piotr

    Interfacial phenomena are ubiquitous and extremely important in various aspects of biological and industrial processes. For example, many liquid crystal applications start by alignment with a surface. The underlying mechanisms of the molecular organization of liquid crystals at an interface are still under intensive study and continue to be important to the display industry in order to develop better and/or new display technology. My dissertation research has been devoted to studying how complex liquid crystals can be guided to organize at an interface, and to using my findings to develop practical applications. Specifically, I have been working on developing biosensors using liquid-crystal/surfactant/lipid/protein interactions as well as the alignment of low-symmetry liquid crystals for potential new display and optomechanical applications. The biotechnology industry needs better ways of sensing biomaterials and identifying various nanoscale events at biological interfaces and in aqueous solutions. Sensors in which the recognition material is a liquid crystal naturally connects the existing knowledge and experience of the display and biotechnology industries together with surface and soft matter sciences. This dissertation thus mainly focuses on the delicate phenomena that happen at liquid interfaces. In the introduction, I start by defining the interface and discuss its structure and the relevant interfacial forces. I then introduce the general characteristics of biosensors and, in particular, describe the design of biosensors that employ liquid crystal/aqueous solution interfaces. I further describe the basic properties of liquid crystal materials that are relevant for liquid crystal-based biosensing applications. In CHAPTER 2, I describe the simulation methods and experimental techniques used in this dissertation. In CHAPTER 3 and CHAPTER 4, I present my computer simulation work. CHAPTER 3 presents insight of how liquid crystal molecules are aligned by

  3. Liquid nitrogen dewar for protein crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Gaseous Nitrogen Dewar apparatus developed by Dr. Alex McPherson of the University of California, Irvine for use aboard Mir and the International Space Station allows large quantities of protein samples to be crystallized in orbit. The specimens are contained either in plastic tubing (heat-sealed at each end). Biological samples are prepared with a precipitating agent in either a batch or liquid-liquid diffusion configuration. The samples are then flash-frozen in liquid nitrogen before crystallization can start. On orbit, the Dewar is placed in a quiet area of the station and the nitrogen slowly boils off (it is taken up by the environmental control system), allowing the proteins to thaw to begin crystallization. The Dewar is returned to Earth after one to four months on orbit, depending on Shuttle flight opportunities. The tubes then are analyzed for crystal presence and quality

  4. Nonlinear dynamical phenomena in liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, X.Y.; Sun, Z.M.

    1988-09-01

    Because of the existence of the orientational order and anisotropy in liquid crystals, strong nonlinear phenomena and singular behaviors, such as solitary wave, transient periodic structure, chaos, fractal and viscous fingering, can be excited by a very small disturbance. These phenomena and behaviors are in connection with physics, biology and mathematics. 12 refs, 6 figs

  5. Nanoparticles Doped, Photorefractive Liquid Crystals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kaczmarek, Malgosia

    2005-01-01

    ...: The main objectives of this exploratory, short project will concern the study of the quality of liquid crystal cells with diluted suspensions of ferroelectric nanoparticles and their photorefractive properties...

  6. Adaptive Liquid Crystal Windows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taheri, Bahman; Bodnar, Volodymyr

    2011-12-31

    Energy consumption by private and commercial sectors in the U.S. has steadily grown over the last decade. The uncertainty in future availability of imported oil, on which the energy consumption relies strongly, resulted in a dramatic increase in the cost of energy. About 20% of this consumption are used to heat and cool houses and commercial buildings. To reduce dependence on the foreign oil and cut down emission of greenhouse gases, it is necessary to eliminate losses and reduce total energy consumption by buildings. To achieve this goal it is necessary to redefine the role of the conventional windows. At a minimum, windows should stop being a source for energy loss. Ideally, windows should become a source of energy, providing net gain to reduce energy used to heat and cool homes. It is possible to have a net energy gain from a window if its light transmission can be dynamically altered, ideally electronically without the need of operator assistance, providing optimal control of the solar gain that varies with season and climate in the U.S. In addition, the window must not require power from the building for operation. Resolution of this problem is a societal challenge and of national interest and will have a broad global impact. For this purpose, the year-round, allclimate window solution to provide an electronically variable solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) with a wide dynamic range is needed. AlphaMicron, Inc. (AMI) developed and manufactured 1ft × 1ft prototype panels for the world’s first auto-adjusting Adaptive Liquid Crystal Windows (ALCWs) that can operate from sunlight without the need for external power source and demonstrate an electronically adjustable SHGC. This novel windows are based on AlphaMicron’s patented e-Tint® technology, a guesthost liquid crystal system implemented on flexible, optically clear plastic films. This technology is suitable both for OEM and aftermarket (retro-fitting) lamination to new and existing windows. Low level of

  7. Liquid Crystals in Decorative and Visual Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makow, David

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * PIGMENT AND STRUCTURAL COLOURS AND THEIR RELEVANCE TO LIQUID CRYSTALS * LIQUID CRYSTAL MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES FOR DECORATIVE AND VISUAL ARTS * Free cholesteric liquid crystals (FCLC's) * Encapsulated liquid crystals (ECLC's) * Nonsteroid Chiral nematics * Polymers with liquid crystalline properties (PLCs) * COLOUR PROPERTIES OF CHOLESTERIC LIQUID CRYSTALS (CLC's) * Molecular structure and the mechanism of colour production * Dependence of perceived colours on the angle of illumination and viewing * Dependence of perceived colours on temperature * Additive colour properties * Methods of doubling the peak reflectance of cholesteric liquid crystals * Colour gamut * Colours of superimposed and pigmented coatings * Colours in transmission * ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS * REFERENCES

  8. Automation in biological crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Patrick Shaw; Mueller-Dieckmann, Jochen

    2014-06-01

    Crystallization remains the bottleneck in the crystallographic process leading from a gene to a three-dimensional model of the encoded protein or RNA. Automation of the individual steps of a crystallization experiment, from the preparation of crystallization cocktails for initial or optimization screens to the imaging of the experiments, has been the response to address this issue. Today, large high-throughput crystallization facilities, many of them open to the general user community, are capable of setting up thousands of crystallization trials per day. It is thus possible to test multiple constructs of each target for their ability to form crystals on a production-line basis. This has improved success rates and made crystallization much more convenient. High-throughput crystallization, however, cannot relieve users of the task of producing samples of high quality. Moreover, the time gained from eliminating manual preparations must now be invested in the careful evaluation of the increased number of experiments. The latter requires a sophisticated data and laboratory information-management system. A review of the current state of automation at the individual steps of crystallization with specific attention to the automation of optimization is given.

  9. Fundamentals of liquid crystal devices

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Deng-Ke

    2014-01-01

    Revised throughout to cover the latest developments in the fast moving area of display technology, this 2nd edition of Fundamentals of Liquid Crystal Devices, will continue to be a valuable resource for those wishing to understand the operation of liquid crystal displays. Significant updates include new material on display components, 3D LCDs and blue-phase displays which is one of the most promising new technologies within the field of displays and it is expected that this new LC-technology will reduce the response time and the number of optical components of LC-modules. Prof. Yang is a pion

  10. Liquid Crystals for Nondestructive Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-09-01

    polarizers (e.g., where p is the distance of alignment or pitch, X is the Nicol, Rochon, and Wollaston prisms ) are based upon peak wavelength of scattered...RANGE OF so 45" 45 - EVENT SEVENT T(°C) TEMPERATUJRE TC)4"TEMPERATURE 40RANGE OF T(°) 0-RANGE OF 40LIQUID ’ ൫" CRYSTAL S 36 3S. 30 0 IS 90 180 - I...Temperatures TI > T2 > - > TS defects was possible using the liquid crystal. are the Average TemperatursI Thes Resptivegi. Kapfer , Burns, Salvo, and Doyle

  11. Ionic Liquid Crystals: Versatile Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, Karel; Lava, Kathleen; Bielawski, Christopher W; Binnemans, Koen

    2016-04-27

    This Review covers the recent developments (2005-2015) in the design, synthesis, characterization, and application of thermotropic ionic liquid crystals. It was designed to give a comprehensive overview of the "state-of-the-art" in the field. The discussion is focused on low molar mass and dendrimeric thermotropic ionic mesogens, as well as selected metal-containing compounds (metallomesogens), but some references to polymeric and/or lyotropic ionic liquid crystals and particularly to ionic liquids will also be provided. Although zwitterionic and mesoionic mesogens are also treated to some extent, emphasis will be directed toward liquid-crystalline materials consisting of organic cations and organic/inorganic anions that are not covalently bound but interact via electrostatic and other noncovalent interactions.

  12. Bicontinuous liquid crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Lynch, Mathew L

    2005-01-01

    PrefaceIntroduction AcknowledgmentsBicontinuous Cubic Liquid Crystalline Materials: A Historical Perspective and Modern Assessment; Kr̄e LarssonIntermediate Phases; Michael C. Holmes and Marc S. LeaverCubic Phases and Human Skin: Theory and Practice; Steven Hoath and Lars NorlňThe Relationship between Bicontinuous Inverted Cubic Phases and Membrane Fusion; D.P. SiegelAspects of the Differential Geometry and Topology of Bicontinuous Liquid-Crystalline Phases; Robert W. CorkeryNovel L3 Phases and Their Macroscopic Properties; R. Beck and H. HoffmannBicontinuous Cubic Phases of Lipids with Entra

  13. Computer modeling of liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Barwani, M.S.

    1999-01-01

    In this thesis, we investigate several aspects of the behaviour of liquid crystal molecules near interfaces using computer simulation. We briefly discuss experiment, theoretical and computer simulation studies of some of the liquid crystal interfaces. We then describe three essentially independent research topics. The first of these concerns extensive simulations of a liquid crystal formed by long flexible molecules. We examined the bulk behaviour of the model and its structure. Studies of a film of smectic liquid crystal surrounded by vapour were also carried out. Extensive simulations were also done for a long-molecule/short-molecule mixture, studies were then carried out to investigate the liquid-vapour interface of the mixture. Next, we report the results of large scale simulations of soft-spherocylinders of two different lengths. We examined the bulk coexistence of the nematic and isotropic phases of the model. Once the bulk coexistence behaviour was known, properties of the nematic-isotropic interface were investigated. This was done by fitting order parameter and density profiles to appropriate mathematical functions and calculating the biaxial order parameter. We briefly discuss the ordering at the interfaces and make attempts to calculate the surface tension. Finally, in our third project, we study the effects of different surface topographies on creating bistable nematic liquid crystal devices. This was carried out using a model based on the discretisation of the free energy on a lattice. We use simulation to find the lowest energy states and investigate if they are degenerate in energy. We also test our model by studying the Frederiks transition and comparing with analytical and other simulation results. (author)

  14. Thermotropic liquid crystals recent advances

    CERN Document Server

    Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2007-01-01

    This book covers developments in the field of thermotropic liquid crystals and their functional importance. It also presents advances related to different sub-areas pertinent to this interdisciplinary area of research. This text brings together research from synthetic scientists and spectroscopists and attempts to bridge the gaps between these areas. New physical techniques that are powerful in characterizing these materials are discussed.

  15. Controlling chirality with helix inversion in cholesteric liquid crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katsonis, Nathalie Hélène; Lacaze, E.; Ferrarini, A.

    2012-01-01

    The helical organization of cholesteric liquid crystals is omnipresent in living matter. Achieving control over the structure of the cholesteric helix consequently holds great potential for developing stimuli-responsive materials matching the level of sophistication of biological systems. In

  16. Molecular dynamics of liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarman, Sten

    1997-02-01

    We derive Green-Kubo relations for the viscosities of a nematic liquid crystal. The derivation is based on the application of a Gaussian constraint algorithm that makes the director angular velocity of a liquid crystal a constant of motion. Setting this velocity equal to zero means that a director-based coordinate system becomes an inertial frame and that the constraint torques do not do any work on the system. The system consequently remains in equilibrium. However, one generates a different equilibrium ensemble. The great advantage of this ensemble is that the Green-Kubo relations for the viscosities become linear combinations of time correlation function integrals, whereas they are complicated rational functions in the conventional canonical ensemble. This facilitates the numerical evaluation of the viscosities by molecular dynamics simulations.

  17. Insertion of liquid crystal molecules into hydrocarbon monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popov, Piotr, E-mail: ppopov@kent.edu; Mann, Elizabeth K. [Department of Physics, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio 44242 (United States); Lacks, Daniel J. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Jákli, Antal [Liquid Crystal Institute, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio 44242-0001 (United States)

    2014-08-07

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to investigate the molecular mechanisms of vertical surface alignment of liquid crystals. We study the insertion of nCB (4-Cyano-4{sup ′}-n-biphenyl) molecules with n = 0,…,6 into a bent-core liquid crystal monolayer that was recently found to provide good vertical alignment for liquid crystals. The results suggest a complex-free energy landscape for the liquid crystal within the layer. The preferred insertion direction of the nCB molecules (core or tail first) varies with n, which can be explained by entropic considerations. The role of the dipole moments was found to be negligible. As vertical alignment is the leading form of present day liquid crystal displays (LCD), these results will help guide improvement of the LCD technology, as well as lend insight into the more general problem of insertion of biological and other molecules into lipid and surfactant layers.

  18. Liquid crystals in biotribology synovial joint treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Ermakov, Sergey; Eismont, Oleg; Nikolaev, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    This book summarizes the theoretical and experimental studies confirming the concept of the liquid-crystalline nature of boundary lubrication in synovial joints. It is shown that cholesteric liquid crystals in the synovial liquid play a significant role in the mechanism of intra-articular friction reduction. The results of structural, rheological and tribological research of the creation of artificial synovial liquids - containing cholesteric liquid crystals in natural synovial liquids - are described. These liquid crystals reproduce the lubrication properties of natural synovia and provide a high chondroprotective efficiency. They were tested in osteoarthritis models and in clinical practice.

  19. Electrically controlled liquid crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corella-Madueño, A.; Reyes, J. Adrián

    2006-08-01

    We consider a cylindrical fiber whose core is a liquid crystal (LC) subject to the action of a low frequency field applied parallel to the axis of the cylinder and having initially the escaped configuration. We find the distorted textures of the nematic inside the cylinder by assuming arbitrary anchoring boundary conditions. In the optical limit we calculate the ray trajectories followed by a low intensity beam along the fiber parametrized by a low frequency electric field. Finally, we calculate exactly the spatial dependence of the transverse magnetic modes distribution in the guide, on the electric field, by using a numerical scheme. We summarize our paper and discuss our results.

  20. Nanoscopic Manipulation and Imaging of Liquid Crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenblatt, Charles S. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2014-02-04

    This is the final project report. The project’s goals centered on nanoscopic imaging and control of liquid crystals and surfaces. We developed and refined techniques to control liquid crystal orientation at surfaces with resolution as small as 25 nm, we developed an optical imaging technique that we call Optical Nanotomography that allows us to obtain images inside liquid crystal films with resolution of 60 x 60 x 1 nm, and we opened new thrust areas related to chirality and to liquid crystal/colloid composites.

  1. Biaxiality of chiral liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longa, L.; Trebin, H.R.; Fink, W.

    1993-10-01

    Using extended deGennes-Ginzburg-Landau free energy expansion in terms of the anisotropic part of the dielectric tensor field Q αβ (χ) a connection between the phase biaxiality and the stability of various chiral liquid crystalline phases is studied. In particular the cholesteric phase, the cubic Blue Phases and the phases characterized by an icosahedral space group symmetry are analysed in detail. Also a general question concerning the applicability of the mean-field approximation in describing the chiral phases is addressed. By an extensive study of the model over a wide range of the parameters a new class of phenomena, not present in the original deGennes-Ginzburg-Landau model, has been found. These include: a) re-entrant phase transitions between the cholesteric and the cubic blue phases and b) the existence of distinct phases of the same symmetry but of different biaxialities. The phase biaxiality serves here as an extra scalar order parameter. Furthermore, it has been shown that due to the presence of the competing bulk terms in the free energy, the stable phases may acquire a large degree of biaxiality, also in liquid crystalline materials composed of effectively uniaxial molecules. A study of icosahedral space group symmetries gives a partial answer to the question as to whether an icosahedral quasicrystalline liquid could be stabilized in liquid crystals. Although, in general, the stability of icosahedral structures could be enhanced by the extra terms in the free energy no absolutely stable icosahedral phase has been found. (author). 16 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab

  2. Nonlinear and quantum optics with liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukishova, Svetlana G

    2014-01-01

    Thermotropic liquid crystals' usual application is display technology. This paper describes experiments on light interaction with pure and doped liquid crystals under for these materials unconventional incident light powers: (1) under high-power laser irradiation, and (2) at the single-photon level. In (1), I will outline several nonlinear optical effects under high-power, nanosecond laser irradiation which should be taken into account in the design of lasers with liquid crystal components and in fabrication of optical power limiters based on liquid crystals: (1.1) athermal helical pitch dilation and unwinding of cholesteric mirrors (both in free space and inside laser resonators); (1.2) some pitfalls in measurements of refractive nonlinearity using z-scan technique under two-photon or linear absorption of liquids; (1.3) the first observation of thermal lens effects in liquid crystals under several-nanosecond, low-pulse-repetition rate (2-10 Hz) laser irradiation in the presence of two-photon absorption; (1.4) feedback-free kaleidoscope of patterns (hexagons, stripes, etc.) in dye-doped liquid crystals. In (2), at the single-photon level, it will be shown that with a proper selection of liquid crystals and a single-emitter dopant spectral range, liquid crystal structures can be used to control emitted single photons (both polarization and count rate). The application of the latter research is absolutely secure quantum communication with polarization coding of information. In particular, in (2.1), definite handedness, circular polarized cholesteric microcavity resonance in quantum dot fluorescence is reported. In (2.2), definite linear polarization of single (antibunched) photons from single-dye-molecules in planar-aligned nematic host is discussed. In (2.3), some results on photon antibunching from NV-color center in nanodiamond in liquid crystal host and circularly polarized fluorescence of definite handedness from nanocrystals doped with trivalent ions of

  3. Demonstrations with a Liquid Crystal Shutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2012-01-01

    The experiments presented show the response of a liquid crystal shutter to applied electric voltages and the delay of the operations. Both properties are important for liquid crystal displays of computers and television sets. Two characteristics of the shutter are determined: (i) the optical transmittance versus applied voltage of various…

  4. Key Developments in Ionic Liquid Crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez, A.A.; Kouwer, P.H.J.

    2016-01-01

    Ionic liquid crystals are materials that combine the classes of liquid crystals and ionic liquids. The first one is based on the multi-billion-dollar flat panel display industry, whilst the latter quickly developed in the past decades into a family of highly-tunable non-volatile solvents. The combination yields materials with a unique set of properties, but also with many challenges ahead. In this review, we provide an overview of the key concepts in ionic liquid crystals, particularly from a...

  5. Liquid crystals for organic transistors (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Jun-ichi; Iino, Hiroaki

    2016-09-01

    Liquid crystals are a new type of organic semiconductors exhibiting molecular orientation in self-organizing manner, and have high potential for device applications. In fact, various device applications have been proposed so far, including photosensors, solar cells, light emitting diodes, field effect transistors, and so on.. However, device performance in those fabricated with liquid crystals is less than those of devices fabricated with conventional materials in spite of unique features of liquid crystals. Here we discuss how we can utilize the liquid crystallinity in organic transistors and how we can overcome conventional non-liquid crystalline organic transistor materials. Then, we demonstrate high performance organic transistors fabricated with a smectic E liquid crystal of Ph-BTBT-10, which show high mobility of over 10cm2/Vs and high thermal durability of over 200oC in OFETs fabricated with its spin-coated polycrystalline thin films.

  6. Small-angle neutron scattering technique in liquid crystal studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahidan Radiman

    2005-01-01

    The following topics discussed: general principles of SAS (Small-angle Neutron Scattering), liquid crystals, nanoparticle templating on liquid crystals, examples of SAS results, prospects of this studies

  7. Lyotropic Liquid Crystal Phases from Anisotropic Nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingo Dierking

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Liquid crystals are an integral part of a mature display technology, also establishing themselves in other applications, such as spatial light modulators, telecommunication technology, photonics, or sensors, just to name a few of the non-display applications. In recent years, there has been an increasing trend to add various nanomaterials to liquid crystals, which is motivated by several aspects of materials development. (i addition of nanomaterials can change and thus tune the properties of the liquid crystal; (ii novel functionalities can be added to the liquid crystal; and (iii the self-organization of the liquid crystalline state can be exploited to template ordered structures or to transfer order onto dispersed nanomaterials. Much of the research effort has been concentrated on thermotropic systems, which change order as a function of temperature. Here we review the other side of the medal, the formation and properties of ordered, anisotropic fluid phases, liquid crystals, by addition of shape-anisotropic nanomaterials to isotropic liquids. Several classes of materials will be discussed, inorganic and mineral liquid crystals, viruses, nanotubes and nanorods, as well as graphene oxide.

  8. Computer simulation of liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McBride, C.

    1999-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation performed on modern computer workstations provides a powerful tool for the investigation of the static and dynamic characteristics of liquid crystal phases. In this thesis molecular dynamics computer simulations have been performed for two model systems. Simulations of 4,4'-di-n-pentyl-bibicyclo[2.2.2]octane demonstrate the growth of a structurally ordered phase directly from an isotropic fluid. This is the first time that this has been achieved for an atomistic model. The results demonstrate a strong coupling between orientational ordering and molecular shape, but indicate that the coupling between molecular conformational changes and molecular reorientation is relatively weak. Simulations have also been performed for a hybrid Gay-Berne/Lennard-Jones model resulting in thermodynamically stable nematic and smectic phases. Frank elastic constants have been calculated for the nematic phase formed by the hybrid model through analysis of the fluctuations of the nematic director, giving results comparable with those found experimentally. Work presented in this thesis also describes the parameterization of the torsional potential of a fragment of a dimethyl siloxane polymer chain, disiloxane diol (HOMe 2 Si) 2 O, using ab initio quantum mechanical calculations. (author)

  9. Nanoparticles in discotic liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep

    The self-assembly of disc-shaped molecules creates discotic liquid crystals (DLCs). These nanomaterials of the sizes ranging from 2-6 nm are emerging as a new class of organic semiconducting materials. The unique geometry of columnar mesophases formed by discotic molecules is of great importance to study the one-dimensional charge and energy migration in organized systems. A number of applications of DLCs, such as, one-dimensional conductor, photoconductor, photovoltaic solar cells, light emitting diodes and gas sensors have been reported. The conductivity along the columns in columnar mesophases has been observed to be several orders of magnitude greater than in perpendicular direction and, therefore, DLCs are described as molecular wires. On the other hand, the fields of nanostructured materials, such as gold nanoparticles, quantum dots, carbon nanotubes and graphene, have received tremendous development in the past decade due to their technological and fundamental interest. Recently the hybridization of DLCs with various metallic and semiconducting nanoparticles has been realized to alter and improve their properties. These nanocomposites are not only of basic science interest but also lead to novel materials for many device applications. This article provides an overview on the development in the field of newly immersed discotic nanoscience. After a brief introduction of DLCs, the article will cover the inclusion of various zero-, one- and two-dimensional nanoparticles in DLCs. Finally, an outlook into the future of this newly emerging intriguing field of discotic nanoscience research will be provided.

  10. NMR spectroscopy using liquid crystal solvents

    CERN Document Server

    Emsley, JW

    2013-01-01

    NMR Spectroscopy using Liquid Crystal Solvents covers the importance of using a liquid crystal solvent in NMR to derive nuclear dipolar spin-spin coupling constants. This book is composed of ten chapters, and begins with a brief description of the features and benefits of liquid crystal in NMR spectroscopic analysis. The succeeding chapters deal with the mode of operation of nuclear spin Hamiltonian for partially oriented molecules and the analysis of NMR spectra of partially oriented molecules, as well as the determination of rigid molecule structure. These topics are followed by discussions

  11. Characterising laser beams with liquid crystal displays

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available the intensity, phase, wavefront, Poynting vector, and orbital angular momentum density of unknown optical fields. This measurement technique makes use of a single spatial light modulator (liquid crystal display), a Fourier transforming lens and detector (CCD...

  12. Liquid crystal television spatial light modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang; Chao, Tien-Hsin

    1989-01-01

    The spatial light modulation characteristics and capabilities of the liquid crystal television (LCTV) spatial light modulators (SLMs) are discussed. A comparison of Radio Shack, Epson, and Citizen LCTV SLMs is made.

  13. Thermal Conductivity and Liquid Crystal Thermometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edge, R. D., Ed.

    1993-01-01

    Describes using stock liquid crystal postcards as inexpensive classroom thermometers. Also suggests using these postcards as a good visual temperature indicator for classroom demonstrations such as temperature gradients. One such activity is provided. (MVL)

  14. Optical Power Limiting Liquid Crystal Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-11-10

    materials. In addition to the nonlinear studies, a separate subproject involving linear properties 0 of polymer dispersed liquid crystals in the infrared ...The horizontal axis represents on-axis laser intensity Io, defined as Io = 2P/( ww2 ), where P is the power and u0 is the beam waist. As can be seen in...I * 9 IR Shutter 1 Included in our original contract was a separate project to evaluate the use of liquid crystal composites in infrared shattering

  15. Liquid crystal boojum-colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasinkevych, M; Silvestre, N M; Telo da Gama, M M

    2012-01-01

    Colloidal particles dispersed in a liquid crystal (LC) lead to distortions of the director field. The distortions are responsible for long-range effective colloidal interactions whose asymptotic behaviour is well understood. The short-distance behaviour depends on the structure and dynamics of the topological defects nucleated near the colloidal particles and a full nonlinear theory is required to describe it. Spherical colloidal particles with strong planar degenerate anchoring nucleate a pair of antipodal surface topological defects, known as boojums. We use the Landau-de Gennes theory to resolve the mesoscopic structure of the boojum cores and to determine the pairwise colloidal interactions. We compare the results in three (3D) and two (2D) spatial dimensions for spherical and disc-like colloidal particles, respectively. The corresponding free energy functionals are minimized numerically using finite elements with adaptive meshes. Boojums are always point-like in 2D, but acquire a rather complex structure in 3D, which depends on the combination of the anchoring potential, the radius of the colloid, the temperature and the LC elastic anisotropy. We identify three types of defect cores in 3D that we call single, double and split-core boojums, and investigate the associated structural transitions. The split-core structure is favoured by low temperatures, strong anchoring and small twist to splay or bend ratios. For sufficiently strong anchoring potentials characterized by a well-defined uniaxial minimum, the split-core boojums are the only stable configuration. In the presence of two colloidal particles, we observe substantial re-arrangements of the inner defects in both 3D and 2D. These re-arrangements lead to qualitative changes in the force-distance profile when compared to the asymptotic quadrupole-quadrupole interaction. In line with the experimental results, the presence of the defects prevents coalescence of the colloidal particles in 2D, but not in 3D

  16. Strong dielectric liquid crystal polymer (Part 3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurata, Hideaki; Shibasaki, Akira

    1988-11-01

    Influence of change of molecular parameters on liquid crystal condition is studied to get the correlation between molecular structure of liquid crystal and phase structure or visco-elastic properties. Eight kinds of biphenyl type liquid crystals with polyacrilate main chain and triphenyl type liquid crystals were used as samples. Followings were found by a ploarizing microscope and X-ray diffraction: Phases are transferred from isotropic phase S/sub A/ phase S/sup *//sub C/ phase S/sub 1/ phase to solid on temperature desending sequence. Degree of polymerization changes only these transfer point but spacer length affects not only transfer points and layer distance but also liquid crystal structure itself. Visco-elasticity of isotropic phase shows Newtonian viscosity and is affected by the main chain length. Macroscopic and microscopic structures influence on viscoelasticity in S/sub A/ phase and S/sup *//sub C/ phase. Two rapid rises of viscoelasticity are found in low molecular weight liquid crystal when S/sub A/ transfer and S/sub A/ to S/sup *//sub C/ transfer occur by temperature desending from the isotropic phase. Viscoelastic behavior is contributed by the properties of domain itself and interaction between domains, and the interaction is changed by polymerization. 6 references, 13 figures, 1 table.

  17. Liquid crystals of carbon nanotubes and graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakri, Cécile; Blanc, Christophe; Grelet, Eric; Zamora-Ledezma, Camilo; Puech, Nicolas; Anglaret, Eric; Poulin, Philippe

    2013-04-13

    Liquid crystal ordering is an opportunity to develop novel materials and applications with spontaneously aligned nanotubes or graphene particles. Nevertheless, achieving high orientational order parameter and large monodomains remains a challenge. In addition, our restricted knowledge of the structure of the currently available materials is a limitation for fundamental studies and future applications. This paper presents recent methodologies that have been developed to achieve large monodomains of nematic liquid crystals. These allow quantification and increase of their order parameters. Nematic ordering provides an efficient way to prepare conductive films that exhibit anisotropic properties. In particular, it is shown how the electrical conductivity anisotropy increases with the order parameter of the nematic liquid crystal. The order parameter can be tuned by controlling the length and entanglement of the nanotubes. In the second part of the paper, recent results on graphene liquid crystals are reported. The possibility to obtain water-based liquid crystals stabilized by surfactant molecules is demonstrated. Structural and thermodynamic characterizations provide indirect but statistical information on the dimensions of the graphene flakes. From a general point of view, this work presents experimental approaches to optimize the use of nanocarbons as liquid crystals and provides new methodologies for the still challenging characterization of such materials.

  18. Key Developments in Ionic Liquid Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez Fernandez, Alexandra; Kouwer, Paul H J

    2016-05-16

    Ionic liquid crystals are materials that combine the classes of liquid crystals and ionic liquids. The first one is based on the multi-billion-dollar flat panel display industry, whilst the latter quickly developed in the past decades into a family of highly-tunable non-volatile solvents. The combination yields materials with a unique set of properties, but also with many challenges ahead. In this review, we provide an overview of the key concepts in ionic liquid crystals, particularly from a molecular perspective. What are the important molecular parameters that determine the phase behavior? How should they be introduced into the molecules? Finally, which other tools does one have to realize specific properties in the material?

  19. Key Developments in Ionic Liquid Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Alvarez Fernandez

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Ionic liquid crystals are materials that combine the classes of liquid crystals and ionic liquids. The first one is based on the multi-billion-dollar flat panel display industry, whilst the latter quickly developed in the past decades into a family of highly-tunable non-volatile solvents. The combination yields materials with a unique set of properties, but also with many challenges ahead. In this review, we provide an overview of the key concepts in ionic liquid crystals, particularly from a molecular perspective. What are the important molecular parameters that determine the phase behavior? How should they be introduced into the molecules? Finally, which other tools does one have to realize specific properties in the material?

  20. Characterising laser beams with liquid crystal displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Angela; Naidoo, Darryl; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-02-01

    We show how one can determine the various properties of light, from the modal content of laser beams to decoding the information stored in optical fields carrying orbital angular momentum, by performing a modal decomposition. Although the modal decomposition of light has been known for a long time, applied mostly to pattern recognition, we illustrate how this technique can be implemented with the use of liquid-crystal displays. We show experimentally how liquid crystal displays can be used to infer the intensity, phase, wavefront, Poynting vector, and orbital angular momentum density of unknown optical fields. This measurement technique makes use of a single spatial light modulator (liquid crystal display), a Fourier transforming lens and detector (CCD or photo-diode). Such a diagnostic tool is extremely relevant to the real-time analysis of solid-state and fibre laser systems as well as mode division multiplexing as an emerging technology in optical communication.

  1. High Resolution Displays Using NCAP Liquid Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macknick, A. Brian; Jones, Phil; White, Larry

    1989-07-01

    Nematic curvilinear aligned phase (NCAP) liquid crystals have been found useful for high information content video displays. NCAP materials are liquid crystals which have been encapsulated in a polymer matrix and which have a light transmission which is variable with applied electric fields. Because NCAP materials do not require polarizers, their on-state transmission is substantially better than twisted nematic cells. All dimensional tolerances are locked in during the encapsulation process and hence there are no critical sealing or spacing issues. By controlling the polymer/liquid crystal morphology, switching speeds of NCAP materials have been significantly improved over twisted nematic systems. Recent work has combined active matrix addressing with NCAP materials. Active matrices, such as thin film transistors, have given displays of high resolution. The paper will discuss the advantages of NCAP materials specifically designed for operation at video rates on transistor arrays; applications for both backlit and projection displays will be discussed.

  2. Liquid Crystal photonic Bandgap Fiber Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Lei

    In this Ph.D. thesis, an experimental investigation of liquid crystal photonic bandgap (LCPBG) fiber devices and applications is presented. Photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) consist of a cladding microstructure with periodic index variations and a core defined by a defect of the structure. The prese......In this Ph.D. thesis, an experimental investigation of liquid crystal photonic bandgap (LCPBG) fiber devices and applications is presented. Photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) consist of a cladding microstructure with periodic index variations and a core defined by a defect of the structure...... of each LCPBG fiber. Finally, the applications for LCPBG fiber devices based on the on-chip platform design have been demonstrated in realizing microwave true-time delay and creating an electrically tunable fiber laser. Referatet mailes...

  3. Liquid crystal parameter analysis for tunable photonic bandgap fiber devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weirich, Johannes; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Wei, Lei

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the tunability of splay-aligned liquid crystals for the use in solid core photonic crystal fibers. Finite element simulations are used to obtain the alignment of the liquid crystals subject to an external electric field. By means of the liquid crystal director field the optical...

  4. Alignment structures in ferroelectric liquid crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, N.U

    1998-07-01

    Although for many years liquid crystals were of purely scientific interest, they have now become ubiquitous in everyday life. The use of the nematic liquid crystal phase in flat panel display applications has been the main factor in this popularity. However, with the advent of the SuperTwist Nematic (STN) device, the limits to which this phase could be exploited for display applications was perhaps reached. With the discovery by Clark et al. of the Surface Stabilised Ferroelectric Liquid Crystal (SSFLC) configuration, the possibility arose of using chiral smectic liquid crystals to create large area, passively addressed, fast switching, flat panel displays. Unfortunately, the structures that form within smectic liquid crystals, and the dynamics of the switching within these, are still not fully understood. In this thesis we address the former of these, making a detailed the study of the structures that form within tilted smectic liquid crystal devices. We present here the first complete theoretical and experimental study of various different ferroelectric liquid crystal materials, where we employed theoretical models based on a simple set of assumptions to understand the behaviour of a set of increasingly complex experimental systems. We started with the simplest of these, Freely Suspended Smectic Films (FSSFs) and then worked with progressively more realistic systems in the form of homeotropically, and later, homogeneously aligned liquid crystal cells. The equilibrium structures that form get particularly complex in the last case, taking the form of tilted and chevron layering structures. In each of these cases, the predictions of the modelling are compared with our experimental results. Further, we present here the first model of the chevron cusp that seeks to include the effects of biaxiality in the S{sub C} phase. We also present a model that seeks to analyse the stability of the chevron layering structure and its relationship with tilted layers. This includes

  5. Alignment structures in ferroelectric liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, N.U.

    1998-01-01

    Although for many years liquid crystals were of purely scientific interest, they have now become ubiquitous in everyday life. The use of the nematic liquid crystal phase in flat panel display applications has been the main factor in this popularity. However, with the advent of the SuperTwist Nematic (STN) device, the limits to which this phase could be exploited for display applications was perhaps reached. With the discovery by Clark et al. of the Surface Stabilised Ferroelectric Liquid Crystal (SSFLC) configuration, the possibility arose of using chiral smectic liquid crystals to create large area, passively addressed, fast switching, flat panel displays. Unfortunately, the structures that form within smectic liquid crystals, and the dynamics of the switching within these, are still not fully understood. In this thesis we address the former of these, making a detailed the study of the structures that form within tilted smectic liquid crystal devices. We present here the first complete theoretical and experimental study of various different ferroelectric liquid crystal materials, where we employed theoretical models based on a simple set of assumptions to understand the behaviour of a set of increasingly complex experimental systems. We started with the simplest of these, Freely Suspended Smectic Films (FSSFs) and then worked with progressively more realistic systems in the form of homeotropically, and later, homogeneously aligned liquid crystal cells. The equilibrium structures that form get particularly complex in the last case, taking the form of tilted and chevron layering structures. In each of these cases, the predictions of the modelling are compared with our experimental results. Further, we present here the first model of the chevron cusp that seeks to include the effects of biaxiality in the S C phase. We also present a model that seeks to analyse the stability of the chevron layering structure and its relationship with tilted layers. This includes an

  6. A theory of the nematic liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazoume, R.P.

    1980-09-01

    A theory of the nematic phase of liquid crystals is presented, taking explicit account of the geometry of the molecule. The three broad peaks of the neutron scattering structure factor are explained. Expressions of the order parameters (average value of Psub(2L)) are given and they can be extracted by comparison with scattering experiments. (author)

  7. Viscoelastic modes in chiral liquid crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    amit@fs.rri.local.net (Amit Kumar Agarwal)

    our studies on the viscoelastic modes of some chiral liquid crystals using dynamic light scattering. We discuss viscoelastic ... In the vicinity of the direct beam for a sample aligned in the Bragg mode and. 297 ... experimental investigations on these modes. Duke and Du ..... scattering volume is not true in practice. In an actual ...

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance of liquid crystals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dong, Ronald Y

    1997-01-01

    ... operator in the small-step rotational diffusion model, while appendix D contains a list of liquid crystal abbreviations used in the book. A portion of this revision is carried out while the author is on leave at the University of Pisa. The author wishes to thank Professor C.A. Veracini for his kind hospitality and many authors for their preprints....

  9. Characteristics of bulk liquid undercooling and crystallization ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Characteristics of bulk liquid undercooling and crystallization behaviors ... cooling rate is fixed, the change of undercooling depends on the melt processing tem- ... solidification and a deep knowledge of undercooling of ... evolution, to obtain the information for the nucleation and ..... When cooling rate is fixed, the change.

  10. Supramolecular Liquid Crystal Displays Construction and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Hoogboom, J.T.V.

    2004-01-01

    This thesis describes chemical methodologies, which can be ued to construct alignment layers for liquid crystal display purposes in a non-clean room environment, by making use of supramolecular chemistry. These techniques are subsequently used to attain control over LCD-properties, both pre- and post-LCD construction. In addition, the thesis describes the application of LCD technology in biosensors.

  11. Lasing in liquid crystal thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palto, S. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)], E-mail: palto@online.ru

    2006-09-15

    A lasing condition is formulated in matrix form for optically anisotropic thin films. Lasing behavior of liquid-crystal slabs is analyzed. In particular, it is shown that if the spatial extent of a liquid crystal slab is much larger than its thickness, then laser emission is feasible not only along the normal to the slab, but also in the entire angular sector. The generated laser light can be observed experimentally as a spot or as concentric rings on a screen. The lowest lasing threshold corresponds to in-plane sliding modes leaking into the substrate. The feedback required for lasing is provided by reflection from the interfaces, rather than edges, of the liquid-crystal slab operating as a planar Fabry-Perot cavity. For cholesteric liquid crystals, it is shown that energy loss to the sliding modes leaking into the substrates and escaping through their edges is a key factor that limits the efficiency of band-edge emission along the normal to the slab.

  12. An Overview of Biological Macromolecule Crystallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Russo Krauss

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The elucidation of the three dimensional structure of biological macromolecules has provided an important contribution to our current understanding of many basic mechanisms involved in life processes. This enormous impact largely results from the ability of X-ray crystallography to provide accurate structural details at atomic resolution that are a prerequisite for a deeper insight on the way in which bio-macromolecules interact with each other to build up supramolecular nano-machines capable of performing specialized biological functions. With the advent of high-energy synchrotron sources and the development of sophisticated software to solve X-ray and neutron crystal structures of large molecules, the crystallization step has become even more the bottleneck of a successful structure determination. This review introduces the general aspects of protein crystallization, summarizes conventional and innovative crystallization methods and focuses on the new strategies utilized to improve the success rate of experiments and increase crystal diffraction quality.

  13. Chem I Supplement: Liquid Crystals--The Chameleon Chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Glenn H.

    1983-01-01

    Presents information relevant to everyday life so as to stimulate student interest in the properties of the two basic types of liquid crystals: thermotropic and lyotropic. Describes the applications of liquid crystals to electronics, biomedicine, and polymer science and appraises the future of liquid crystal research. (JM)

  14. Application of liquid crystals in thermal nondestructive evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panakal, J.P.; Mukherjee, S.; Ghosh, J.K.

    1983-01-01

    In recent years, thermal nondestructive evaluation using Cholestric liquid crystals have found wide applications in industry. Thermography using Cholesteric liquid crystals can be used for detection of nonbonds in metallic composites, hot spots in electronic circuits and preliminary examination of welded pressure vessels. This paper presents the results of experiments on thermography of components using encapsulated liquid crystals. (author)

  15. The sweet world of liquid crystals : The synthesis of non-amphiphilic carbohydrate-derived liquid crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, E

    1998-01-01

    The research in carbohydrate-derived liquid crystals was initiated by a review article by Jeffrey in 1986. This is rather late if one considers that the research on liquid crystals underwent a revival already in the 1960s after the discovery of the liquid crystal display (LCD). Carbohydrates were

  16. Smart lighting using a liquid crystal modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baril, Alexandre; Thibault, Simon; Galstian, Tigran

    2017-08-01

    Now that LEDs have massively invaded the illumination market, a clear trend has emerged for more efficient and targeted lighting. The project described here is at the leading edge of the trend and aims at developing an evaluation board to test smart lighting applications. This is made possible thanks to a new liquid crystal light modulator recently developed for broadening LED light beams. The modulator is controlled by electrical signals and is characterized by a linear working zone. This feature allows the implementation of a closed loop control with a sensor feedback. This project shows that the use of computer vision is a promising opportunity for cheap closed loop control. The developed evaluation board integrates the liquid crystal modulator, a webcam, a LED light source and all the required electronics to implement a closed loop control with a computer vision algorithm.

  17. Thermal diode made by nematic liquid crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, Djair, E-mail: djfmelo@gmail.com [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, Av. Lourival Melo Mota, s/n, 57072-900 Maceió, AL (Brazil); Fernandes, Ivna [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, Av. Lourival Melo Mota, s/n, 57072-900 Maceió, AL (Brazil); Moraes, Fernando [Departamento de Física, CCEN, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Caixa Postal 5008, 58051-900, João Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco, 52171-900 Recife, PE (Brazil); Fumeron, Sébastien [Institut Jean Lamour, Université de Lorraine, BP 239, Boulevard des Aiguillettes, 54506 Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France); Pereira, Erms [Escola Politécnica de Pernambuco, Universidade de Pernambuco, Rua Benfíca, 455, Madalena, 50720-001 Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2016-09-07

    This work investigates how a thermal diode can be designed from a nematic liquid crystal confined inside a cylindrical capillary. In the case of homeotropic anchoring, a defect structure called escaped radial disclination arises. The asymmetry of such structure causes thermal rectification rates up to 3.5% at room temperature, comparable to thermal diodes made from carbon nanotubes. Sensitivity of the system with respect to the heat power supply, the geometry of the capillary tube and the molecular anchoring angle is also discussed. - Highlights: • An escaped radial disclination as a thermal diode made by a nematic liquid crystal. • Rectifying effects comparable to those caused by carbon and boron nitride nanotubes. • Thermal rectification increasing with radius and decreasing with height of the tube. • Asymmetric BCs cause rectification from the spatial asymmetry produced by the escape. • Symmetric BCs provide rectifications smaller than those yields by asymmetric BCs.

  18. Calculation of Optical Parameters of Liquid Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, A.

    2007-12-01

    Validation of a modified four-parameter model describing temperature effect on liquid crystal refractive indices is being reported in the present article. This model is based upon the Vuks equation. Experimental data of ordinary and extraordinary refractive indices for two liquid crystal samples MLC-9200-000 and MLC-6608 are used to validate the above-mentioned theoretical model. Using these experimental data, birefringence, order parameter, normalized polarizabilities, and the temperature gradient of refractive indices are determined. Two methods: directly using birefringence measurements and using Haller's extrapolation procedure are adopted for the determination of order parameter. Both approches of order parameter calculation are compared. The temperature dependences of all these parameters are discussed. A close agreement between theory and experiment is obtained.

  19. Biaxial nematic liquid crystals theory, simulation and experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Luckhurst, Geoffrey R

    2015-01-01

    Liquid Crystals are a state of matter that have properties between those of conventional liquid and those of a solid crystal. Thermotropic liquid crystals react to changes in temperature or, in some cases, pressure. The reaction of lyotropic liquid crystals, which are used in the manufacture of soaps and detergents, depends on the type of solvent they are mixed with. Since the accidental discovery of the chiral nematic (ordered) phase in 1888 many liquid crystal phases have been found, sometimes by chance and sometimes by design. The existence of one such phase was predicted by Freiser in 197

  20. Ultrabroadband terahertz spectroscopy of a liquid crystal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vieweg, N.; Fischer, B. M.; Reuter, M.

    2012-01-01

    Liquid crystals (LCs) are becoming increasingly important for applications in the terahertz frequency range. A detailed understanding of the spectroscopic parameters of these materials over a broad frequency range is crucial in order to design customized LC mixtures for improved performance. We p...... show that the spectra are dominated by multiple strong spectral features mainly at frequencies above 4 THz, originating from intramolecular vibrational modes of the weakly LC molecules....

  1. Nanoparticle guests in lyotropic liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dölle, Sarah; Park, Ji Hyun; Schymura, Stefan; Jo, Hyeran; Scalia, Giusy; Lagerwall, Jan P. F.

    In this chapter we discuss the benefits, peculiarities and main challenges related to nanoparticle templating in lyotropic liquid crystals. We first give a brief bird's-eye view of the field, discussing different nanoparticles as well as different lyotropic hosts that have been explored, but then quickly focus on the dispersion of carbon nanotubes in surfactant-based lyotropic nematic phases. We discuss in some detail how the transfer of orientational order from liquid crystal host to nanoparticle guest can be verified and which degree of ordering can be expected, as well as the importance of choosing the right surfactant and its concentration for the stability of the nanoparticle suspension. We introduce a method for dispersing nanoparticles with an absolute minimum of stabilizing surfactant, based on dispersion below the Krafft temperature, and we discuss the peculiar phenomenon of filament formation in lyotropic nematic phases with a sufficient concentration of well-dispersed carbon nanotubes. Finally, we describe how the total surfactant concentration in micellar nematics can be greatly reduced by combining cat- and anionic surfactants, and we discuss how nanotubes can help in inducing the liquid crystal phase close to the isotropic-nematic boundary.

  2. Liquid Crystal Microlenses for Autostereoscopic Displays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Francisco Algorri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional vision has acquired great importance in the audiovisual industry in the past ten years. Despite this, the first generation of autostereoscopic displays failed to generate enough consumer excitement. Some reasons are little 3D content and performance issues. For this reason, an exponential increase in three-dimensional vision research has occurred in the last few years. In this review, a study of the historical impact of the most important technologies has been performed. This study is carried out in terms of research manuscripts per year. The results reveal that research on spatial multiplexing technique is increasing considerably and today is the most studied. For this reason, the state of the art of this technique is presented. The use of microlenses seems to be the most successful method to obtain autostereoscopic vision. When they are fabricated with liquid crystal materials, extended capabilities are produced. Among the numerous techniques for manufacturing liquid crystal microlenses, this review covers the most viable designs for its use in autostereoscopic displays. For this reason, some of the most important topologies and their relation with autostereoscopic displays are presented. Finally, the challenges in some recent applications, such as portable devices, and the future of three-dimensional displays based on liquid crystal microlenses are outlined.

  3. Adsorption phenomena and anchoring energy in nematic liquid crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Barbero, Giovanni

    2005-01-01

    Despite the large quantity of phenomenological information concerning the bulk properties of nematic phase liquid crystals, little is understood about the origin of the surface energy, particularly the surface, interfacial, and anchoring properties of liquid crystals that affect the performance of liquid crystal devices. Self-contained and unique, Adsorption Phenomena and Anchoring Energy in Nematic Liquid Crystals provides an account of new and established results spanning three decades of research into the problems of anchoring energy and adsorption phenomena in liquid crystals.The book contains a detailed discussion of the origin and possible sources of anchoring energy in nematic liquid crystals, emphasizing the dielectric contribution to the anchoring energy in particular. Beginning with fundamental surface and anchoring properties of liquid crystals and the definition of the nematic phase, the authors explain how selective ion adsorption, dielectric energy density, thickness dependence, and bias voltage...

  4. Guided mode studies of smectic liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodder, B.

    2000-03-01

    Recently there has been considerable interest in the use of ferroelectric liquid crystals in low power, fast switching display devices. At present the voltage switching process in surface stabilised ferroelectric liquid crystal (SSFLC) devices is not fully understood and a convenient theory for such cells has yet to be found. It is the primary aim of this work to characterise the optic tensor configuration (director profile) in thin cells (∼ 3.5 μm) containing ferroelectric liquid crystal (FLC) material. These results form a benchmark by which continuum theories may be tested. Polarised microscopy is, perhaps, the most common optical probe of liquid crystal cells. It should be appreciated that this technique is fundamentally limited, as the results are deduced from an integrated optical response of any given cell, and cannot be used to spatially resolve details of the director profile through the cell. The guided mode techniques used in this study are the primary non-integral probe and enable detailed spatial resolution of the director profile within liquid crystal cells. Analysis of guided mode data from cells containing homeotropically aligned FLC reveals the temperature dependence of the optical biaxiality and cone angle for a 40% chiral mixture of the commercially available FLC SCE8*. From these optical biaxiality measurements the temperature dependence of the biaxial order parameter C is determined. Guided mode studies of cells containing homogeneously aligned SCE8* (the conventional alignment for SSFLC devices) reveal the 0V equilibrium director profile from which a cone and chevron model is constructed. Subsequent studies of voltage induced elastic deformations of the director profile are presented and compared with a single elastic constant continuum theory which is shown to be inadequate. Optical guided mode techniques are not directly sensitive to the smectic layer configuration but X-ray scattering is. Here, for the first time, results are presented

  5. Electrically tunable liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Scolari, Lara; Wei, Lei

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate electrical tunability of a fiber laser by using a liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber. Tuning of the laser is achieved by combining the wavelength filtering effect of a liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber device with an ytterbium-doped photonic crystal fiber. We fabricate an al...

  6. Liquid crystal-based hydrophone arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodzeli, Zourab; Silvestri, Leonardo; Michie, Andrew; Chigrinov, Vladimir G.; Guo, Qi; Pozhidaev, Eugene P.; Kiselev, Alexei D.; Ladouceur, Francois

    2012-09-01

    We describe a fiber optic hydrophone array system that could be used for underwater acoustic surveillance applications (e.g. military, counter terrorist, and customs authorities in protecting ports and harbors), offshore production facilities or coastal approaches as well as various marine applications. In this paper, we propose a new approach to underwater sonar systems using the voltage-controlled liquid crystals and simple multiplexing method. The proposed method permits measurement of sound under water at multiple points along an optical fiber using the low cost components and standard single mode fiber, without complex interferometric measurement techniques, electronics or demodulation software.

  7. Liquid Photonic Crystals for Mesopore Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Biting; Fu, Qianqian; Chen, Ke; Ge, Jianping

    2018-01-02

    Nitrogen adsorption-desorption for mesopore characterization requires the using of expensive instrumentation, time-consuming processes, and the consumption of liquid nitrogen. Herein, a new method is developed to measure the pore parameters through mixing a mesoporous substance with a supersaturated SiO 2 colloidal solution at different temperatures, and subsequent rapid measurement of reflection changes of the precipitated liquid photonic crystals. The pore volumes and diameters of mesoporous silica were measured according to the positive correlation between unit mass reflection change (Δλ/m) and pore volume (V), and the negative correlation between average absorption temperature (T) and pore diameter (D). This new approach may provide an alternative method for fast, convenient and economical characterization of mesoporous materials. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Control of liquid crystal molecular orientation using ultrasound vibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taniguchi, Satoki [Faculty of Life and Medical Sciences, Doshisha University, 1-3 Tataramiyakodani, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan); Wave Electronics Research Center, Doshisha University, 1-3 Tataramiyakodani, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan); Koyama, Daisuke; Matsukawa, Mami [Wave Electronics Research Center, Doshisha University, 1-3 Tataramiyakodani, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan); Faculty of Science and Engineering, Doshisha University, 1-3 Tataramiyakodani, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan); Shimizu, Yuki; Emoto, Akira [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Doshisha University, 1-3 Tataramiyakodani, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan); Nakamura, Kentaro [Precision and Intelligence Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259-R2-26, Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)

    2016-03-07

    We propose a technique to control the orientation of nematic liquid crystals using ultrasound and investigate the optical characteristics of the oriented samples. An ultrasonic liquid crystal cell with a thickness of 5–25 μm and two ultrasonic lead zirconate titanate transducers was fabricated. By exciting the ultrasonic transducers, the flexural vibration modes were generated on the cell. An acoustic radiation force to the liquid crystal layer was generated, changing the molecular orientation and thus the light transmission. By modulating the ultrasonic driving frequency and voltage, the spatial distribution of the molecular orientation of the liquid crystals could be controlled. The distribution of the transmitted light intensity depends on the thickness of the liquid crystal layer because the acoustic field in the liquid crystal layer is changed by the orientational film.

  9. Modified dynamical equation for dye doped nematic liquid crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manohar, Rajiv, E-mail: rajlu1@rediffmail.co [Liquid Crystal Research Lab, Physics Department, University of Lucknow, Lucknow 226007 (India); Misra, Abhishek Kumar; Srivastava, Abhishek Kumar [Liquid Crystal Research Lab, Physics Department, University of Lucknow, Lucknow 226007 (India)

    2010-04-15

    Dye doped liquid crystals show changed dielectric properties in comparison to pure liquid crystals. These changes are strongly dependent on the concentration of dye. In the present work we have measured dielectric properties of standard nematic liquid crystals E-24 and its two guest host mixtures of different concentrations with Anthraquinone dye D5. The experimental results are fitted using linear response and in the light of this we have proposed some modifications in the dynamical equation for the nematic liquid crystals by introducing two new variables as dye concentration coefficients. The limitations of the proposed equation in high temperature range have also been discussed. With the help of the proposed dynamical equation for the guest-host liquid crystals (GHLCs) it is possible to predict the various parameters like rotational viscosity, dielectric anisotropy and relaxation time for GHLCs at other concentrations of dye in liquid crystals theoretically.

  10. In Situ Adsorption Studies at the Solid/Liquid Interface: Characterization of Biological Surfaces and Interfaces Using Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, and Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, D.C.

    2006-01-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) have been used to study the molecular surface structure, surface topography and mechanical properties, and quantitative adsorbed amount of biological molecules at the solid-liquid interface. The molecular-level behavior of designed peptides adsorbed on hydrophobic polystyrene and hydrophilic silica substrates has been examined as a model of protein adsorption on polymeric biomaterial surfaces. Proteins are such large and complex molecules that it is difficult to identify the features in their structure that lead to adsorption and interaction with solid surfaces. Designed peptides which possess secondary structure provide simple model systems for understanding protein adsorption. Depending on the amino acid sequence of a peptide, different secondary structures (α-helix and β-sheet) can be induced at apolar (air/liquid or air/solid) interfaces. Having a well-defined secondary structure allows experiments to be carried out under controlled conditions, where it is possible to investigate the affects of peptide amino acid sequence and chain length, concentration, buffering effects, etc. on adsorbed peptide structure. The experiments presented in this dissertation demonstrate that SFG vibrational spectroscopy can be used to directly probe the interaction of adsorbing biomolecules with a surface or interface. The use of well designed model systems aided in isolation of the SFG signal of the adsorbing species, and showed that surface functional groups of the substrate are sensitive to surface adsorbates. The complementary techniques of AFM and QCM allowed for deconvolution of the effects of surface topography and coverage from the observed SFG spectra. Initial studies of biologically relevant surfaces are also presented: SFG spectroscopy was used to study the surface composition of common soil bacteria for use in bioremediation of nuclear waste

  11. In Situ Adsorption Studies at the Solid/Liquid Interface:Characterization of Biological Surfaces and Interfaces Using SumFrequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy,and Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Diana Christine [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) have been used to study the molecular surface structure, surface topography and mechanical properties, and quantitative adsorbed amount of biological molecules at the solid-liquid interface. The molecular-level behavior of designed peptides adsorbed on hydrophobic polystyrene and hydrophilic silica substrates has been examined as a model of protein adsorption on polymeric biomaterial surfaces. Proteins are such large and complex molecules that it is difficult to identify the features in their structure that lead to adsorption and interaction with solid surfaces. Designed peptides which possess secondary structure provide simple model systems for understanding protein adsorption. Depending on the amino acid sequence of a peptide, different secondary structures (α-helix and β-sheet) can be induced at apolar (air/liquid or air/solid) interfaces. Having a well-defined secondary structure allows experiments to be carried out under controlled conditions, where it is possible to investigate the affects of peptide amino acid sequence and chain length, concentration, buffering effects, etc. on adsorbed peptide structure. The experiments presented in this dissertation demonstrate that SFG vibrational spectroscopy can be used to directly probe the interaction of adsorbing biomolecules with a surface or interface. The use of well designed model systems aided in isolation of the SFG signal of the adsorbing species, and showed that surface functional groups of the substrate are sensitive to surface adsorbates. The complementary techniques of AFM and QCM allowed for deconvolution of the effects of surface topography and coverage from the observed SFG spectra. Initial studies of biologically relevant surfaces are also presented: SFG spectroscopy was used to study the surface composition of common soil bacteria for use in bioremediation of nuclear waste.

  12. Multistability in planar liquid crystal wells

    KAUST Repository

    Luo, Chong; Majumdar, Apala; Erban, Radek

    2012-01-01

    A planar bistable liquid crystal device, reported in Tsakonas, is modeled within the Landau-de Gennes theory for nematic liquid crystals. This planar device consists of an array of square micrometer-sized wells. We obtain six different classes of equilibrium profiles and these profiles are classified as diagonal or rotated solutions. In the strong anchoring case, we propose a Dirichlet boundary condition that mimics the experimentally imposed tangent boundary conditions. In the weak anchoring case, we present a suitable surface energy and study the multiplicity of solutions as a function of the anchoring strength. We find that diagonal solutions exist for all values of the anchoring strength W≥0, while rotated solutions only exist for W≥W c>0, where W c is a critical anchoring strength that has been computed numerically. We propose a dynamic model for the switching mechanisms based on only dielectric effects. For sufficiently strong external electric fields, we numerically demonstrate diagonal-to-rotated and rotated-to-diagonal switching by allowing for variable anchoring strength across the domain boundary. © 2012 American Physical Society.

  13. Multistability in planar liquid crystal wells

    KAUST Repository

    Luo, Chong

    2012-06-08

    A planar bistable liquid crystal device, reported in Tsakonas, is modeled within the Landau-de Gennes theory for nematic liquid crystals. This planar device consists of an array of square micrometer-sized wells. We obtain six different classes of equilibrium profiles and these profiles are classified as diagonal or rotated solutions. In the strong anchoring case, we propose a Dirichlet boundary condition that mimics the experimentally imposed tangent boundary conditions. In the weak anchoring case, we present a suitable surface energy and study the multiplicity of solutions as a function of the anchoring strength. We find that diagonal solutions exist for all values of the anchoring strength W≥0, while rotated solutions only exist for W≥W c>0, where W c is a critical anchoring strength that has been computed numerically. We propose a dynamic model for the switching mechanisms based on only dielectric effects. For sufficiently strong external electric fields, we numerically demonstrate diagonal-to-rotated and rotated-to-diagonal switching by allowing for variable anchoring strength across the domain boundary. © 2012 American Physical Society.

  14. Electrically Tuned Microwave Devices Using Liquid Crystal Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouria Yaghmaee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An overview of liquid crystal technology for microwave and millimeter-wave frequencies is presented. The potential of liquid crystals as reconfigurable materials arises from their ability for continuous tuning with low power consumption, transparency, and possible integration with printed and flexible circuit technologies. This paper describes physical theory and fundamental electrical properties arising from the anisotropy of liquid crystals and overviews selected realized liquid crystal devices, throughout four main categories: resonators and filters, phase shifters and delay lines, antennas, and, finally, frequency-selective surfaces and metamaterials.

  15. Chromatic dispersion of liquid crystal infiltrated capillary tubes and photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Per Dalgaard; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Bang, Ole

    2006-01-01

    We consider chromatic dispersion of capillary tubes and photonic crystal fibers infiltrated with liquid crystals. A perturbative scheme for inclusion of material dispersion of both liquid crystal and the surrounding waveguide material is derived. The method is used to calculate the chromatic...

  16. Dynamics of Active Nematic Liquid Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCamp, Stephen J.

    liquid crystal by assembling microtubule bundles into a quasi-2D film confined to a large, flat oil-water interface. Internal stresses generated by kinesin motors drive the system far from equilibrium which precludes a uniformly aligned nematic ground state through the continuous creation and annihilation of +/-1/2 motile defects. First, we demonstrate that the nematic is extensile by observing the deformation of a photobleached spot which undergoes extension along the nematic director and contraction perpendicular to the director. We map the experimentally tunable parameter, ATP concentration, to the intrinsic activity of the sample measured by the characteristic time of the contractile dynamics. Then, we characterize the flow of individual microtubules by measuring their relative velocity within the nematic and find a flow field consistent with a force dipole but where the magnitude of the extension and contraction velocity are proportional to the separation between the filaments. The extensile and contractile flow velocities can be tuned by the ATP concentration and can be as large as 6 mum/s. Then we spatially map microtubule concentration, alignment, and flow near topological defect cores. We test a theory which predicts that flows are directly proportional to the local alignment of the nematic and find our results inconsistent with that theory. Finally, we measure large scale velocity and vorticity distributions as well as vortex area distributions and find agreement with other recent theoretical predictions. Next, we turn our attention to the complex behavior of defects in the active nematic. Using defect tracking algorithms developed by Gabriel S. Redner, we measure the +/-1/2 defect velocity and lifetime distributions as well as MSD and average defect density. We find that average velocities, lifetimes, and densities are tunable by varying the ATP concentration. The MSDs reveal that motile +1/2 defects stream ballistically through the sample (up to 15 mum

  17. Chirality transfer technique between liquid crystal microdroplets using microfluidic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jin-kun; Lee, Doyeon; Song, Jang-kun

    2018-02-01

    Cholesteric liquid crystal (LC) microdroplet is applied in many areas, such as tunable laser, biosensor, information display and security identification, due to its unique optical properties. The topological structure, defects, and photonic crystallinity in the cholesteric liquid crystal (LC) microdroplet can be controlled through the chirality. Here we report an interesting phenomenon that chirality information can be shared among dispersed LC microdroplets in surfactant aqueous solution, which is driven by the transferring of chiral dopant molecules. As a result, we developed an artificial molecule transfer technology which could in situ vary the material composition within the isolated dispersed microdroplets. The molecular transfer is switchable and the transfer speed is controllable by tuning the molecular solubility in continuous phase. Based on this technique, we manipulated, forward and backward, the topological evolution and the photonic crystal band-gap of the dispersed LC droplet. This technique is an easy and powerful experimental tool, and it may be applicable to other fields in optical application, biology, chemistry and material science.

  18. Alignment technology and applications of liquid crystal devices

    CERN Document Server

    Takatoh, Kohki; Hasegawa, Ray; Koden, Mitsushiro; Itoh, Nobuyuki; Hasegawa, Masaki

    2005-01-01

    Alignment phenomena are characteristic of liquid crystalline materials, and understanding them is critically important in understanding the essential features and behavior of liquid crystals and the performance of Liquid Crystal Devices (LCDs). Furthermore, in LCD production lines, the alignment process is of practical importance. Alignment Technologies and Applications of Liquid Crystal Devices demonstrates both the fundamental and practical aspects of alignment phenomena in liquid crystals. The physical basis of alignment phenomena is first introduced in order to aid the understanding of the various physical phenomena observed in the interface between liquid crystalline materials and alignment layer surfaces. Methods for the characterization of surfaces, which induce the alignment phenomena, and of the alignment layer itself are introduced. These methods are useful for the research of liquid crystalline materials and devices in academic research as well as in industry. In the practical sections, the alignme...

  19. Unconventional phase transitions in liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kats, E. I.

    2017-12-01

    According to classical textbooks on thermodynamics or statistical physics, there are only two types of phase transitions: continuous, or second-order, in which the latent heat L is zero, and first-order, in which L ≠ 0. Present-day textbooks and monographs also mention another, stand-alone type—the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition, which exists only in two dimensions and shares some features with first- and second-order phase transitions. We discuss examples of non-conventional thermodynamic behavior (i.e., which is inconsistent with the theoretical phase transition paradigm now universally accepted). For phase transitions in smectic liquid crystals, mechanisms for nonconventional behavior are proposed and the predictions they imply are examined.

  20. Liquid crystal templating as an approach to spatially and temporally organise soft matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Asdonk, Pim; Kouwer, Paul H J

    2017-10-02

    Chemistry quickly moves from a molecular science to a systems science. This requires spatial and temporal control over the organisation of molecules and molecular assemblies. Whilst Nature almost by default (transiently) organises her components at multiple different length scales, scientists struggle to realise even relatively straightforward patterns. In the past decades, supramolecular chemistry has taught us the rules to precisely engineer molecular assembly at the nanometre scale. At higher length scales, however, we are bound to top-down nanotechnology techniques to realise order. For soft, biological matter, many of these top-down techniques come with serious limitations since the molecules generally show low susceptibilities to the applied stimuli. A new method is based on liquid crystal templating. In this hierarchical approach, a liquid crystalline host serves as the scaffold to order polymers or assemblies. Being a liquid crystal, the host material can be ordered at many different length scales and on top of that, is highly susceptible to many external stimuli, which can even be used to manipulate the liquid crystal organisation in time. As a result, we anticipate large control over the organisation of the materials inside the liquid crystalline host. Recently, liquid crystal templating was also realised in water. This suddenly makes this tool highly applicable to start organising more delicate biological materials or even small organisms. We review the scope and limitations of liquid crystal templating and look out to where the technique may lead us.

  1. Microwave modulation characteristics of twisted liquid crystals with chiral dopant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Adding a chiral dopant in twisted nematic (TN liquid crystal cell can stabilize the orientation of liquid crystal molecules, particularly in high TN (HTN or super TN (STN liquid crystal cells. The difference in pitches in liquid crystal is induced by the chiral dopant, and these different pitches affect the orientation of liquid crystal director under an external applied voltage and influence the characteristics of microwave modulation. To illustrate this point, the microwave phase shift per unit length (MPSL versus voltage is calculated on the basis of the elastic theory of liquid crystal and the finite-difference iterative method. Enhancing the pitch induced by the chiral dopant in liquid crystal increases the MPSLs, but the stability of the twisted structures is decreased. Thus, appropriate pitches of 100d, 4d, and 2d can be applied in TN, HTN, and STN cells with cell gap d to enhance the characteristics of microwave modulation and stabilize the structures in twisted cell. This method can improve the characteristics of liquid crystal microwave modulators such that the operating voltage and the size of such phase shifters can be decreased.

  2. Electrically modulated transparent liquid crystal-optical grating projection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buss, Thomas; Smith, Cameron; Kristensen, Anders

    2013-01-01

    A transparent, fully integrated electrically modulated projection technique is presented based on light guiding through a thin liquid crystal layer covering sub-wavelength gratings. The reported device operates at 10 V with response times of 4.5 ms. Analysis of the liquid crystal alignment shows...

  3. A helical naphthopyran dopant for photoresponsive cholesteric liquid crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yuna; Frigoli, Michel; Vanthuyne, Nicolas; Tamaoki, Nobuyuki

    2017-01-01

    The first photoresponsive cholesteric liquid crystal comprising a photoisomerizable helical naphthopyran derivative dopant and a nematic liquid crystal is reported. An unprecedented helical twisting power switching ratio of over 90% allowed us to demonstrate multi-cycle rotational motion of micro-objects by UV light irradiation.

  4. Liquid-crystal intraocular adaptive lens with wireless control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simonov, A.N.; Vdovine, G.V.; Loktev, M.

    2007-01-01

    We present a prototype of an adaptive intraocular lens based on a modal liquid-crystal spatial phase modulator with wireless control. The modal corrector consists of a nematic liquid-crystal layer sandwiched between two glass substrates with transparent low- and high-ohmic electrodes, respectively.

  5. Polarization-independent nematic liquid crystal waveguides for optofluidic applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    d'Alessandro, A.; Martini, L.; Gilardi, G.; Beccherelli, R.; Asquini, R.

    2015-01-01

    We present the fabrication and the characterization of waveguides made of a nematic liquid crystal infiltrated in poly(dimethylsiloxane) channels. They are made by means of cast and molding technique and patterned using soft photolithography. The orientation of the nematic liquid crystal molecules

  6. Tunable bandpass filter based on photonic crystal fiber filled with multiple liquid crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scolari, Lara; Tartarini, G.; Borelli, E.

    2007-01-01

    A tunable bandpass filter based on a photonic crystal fiber filled with two different liquid crystals is demonstrated. 130 nm bandwidth tunability is achieved by tuning the temperature from 30degC to 90degC.......A tunable bandpass filter based on a photonic crystal fiber filled with two different liquid crystals is demonstrated. 130 nm bandwidth tunability is achieved by tuning the temperature from 30degC to 90degC....

  7. UV response on dielectric properties of nano nematic liquid crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Kumar Pandey

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we investigate the effect of UV light irradiation on the dielectric parameters of nematic liquid crystal (5CB and ZnO nanoparticles dispersed liquid crystal. With addition of nanoparticles in nematic LC are promising new materials for a variety of application in energy harvesting, displays and photonics including the liquid crystal laser. To realize many applications, however we optimize the properties of liquid crystal and understand how the UV light irradiation interact the nanoparticles and LC molecules in dispersed/doped LC. The dielectric permittivity and loss factor have discussed the pure nematic LC and dispersed/doped system after, during and before UV light exposure. The dielectric relaxation spectroscopy was carried out in the frequency range 100 Hz–10 MHz in the nematic mesophase range. Keywords: Dielectric permittivity, Relaxation frequency, Nematic liquid crystal, UV light irradiation

  8. Liquid filling of photonic crystal fibres for grating writing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Henrik Rokkjær; Canning, John; Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    liquid filling of photonic crystal fibres reduces the scattering from air–glass interfaces during Bragg grating writing in many layered photonic crystal fibres. Within experimental uncertainty, the grating index modulation of a grating written in germanium-doped photonic crystal fibre with 10 rings...

  9. Magnetic, electric and optic properties of liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florea, St.C.

    1980-01-01

    We study the nematic liquid crystals of thermotrop type. We also studied the crystals whose mesomorphism occured both at temperature increasing and decreasing and during the supercooling phase (monotrope). Investigation results performed by us have had in view the following: clearing up and experimental support of a new mechanism of nuclear relaxation in liquid crystals, proposed by author; usage of experimental techniques and methods for to characterize and test some mesomorph media used in very important applications, such as color TV. (author)

  10. Liquid Crystal Gel Reduces Age Spots by Promoting Skin Turnover

    OpenAIRE

    Mina Musashi; Ariella Coler-Reilly; Teruaki Nagasawa; Yoshiki Kubota; Satomi Kato; Yoko Yamaguchi

    2014-01-01

    Studies have shown that liquid crystals structurally resembling the intercellular lipids in the stratum corneum can beneficially affect the skin when applied topically by stimulating the skin’s natural regenerative functions and accelerating epidermal turnover. In the present study, the effects of applying low concentrations of a liquid crystal gel of our own creation were evaluated using epidermal thickening in mouse skin as an assay for effective stimulation of epidermal turnover. A liquid ...

  11. H-Bond stabilized columnar discotic liquid crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paraschiv, I.

    2007-01-01

    Since 1977, more than 2300 publications on discotic (disk-like) liquid crystalline materials have appeared. Discotic liquid crystals, which usually consist of polyaromatic molecules surrounded by long peripheral alkyl tails, can form liquid crystalline mesophases in a wide temperature range. Within

  12. Crystal-liquid-gas phase transitions and thermodynamic similarity

    CERN Document Server

    Skripov, Vladimir P; Schmelzer, Jurn W P

    2006-01-01

    Professor Skripov obtained worldwide recognition with his monograph ""Metastable liquids"", published in English by Wiley & Sons. Based upon this work and another monograph published only in Russia, this book investigates the behavior of melting line and the properties of the coexisting crystal and liquid phase of simple substances across a wide range of pressures, including metastable states of the coexisting phases. The authors derive new relations for the thermodynamic similarity for liquid-vapour phase transition, as well as describing solid-liquid, liquid-vapor and liquid-liquid phase tra

  13. New scintillating media based on liquid crystals for particle detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnik, M.I.; Yudin, S.G.; Vasil'chenko, V.G.; Golovkin, S.V.; Medvedkov, A.M.; Solovjev, A.S.

    2000-01-01

    The study results of optical, photoluminiscent and scintillation properties of a liquid crystal 4-pentyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl are presented. The scintillation light output of this liquid crystal is about 35% of crystal anthracene, its main decay time constants are 4 and 14 ns, and the maximum of light emission spectrum is about 400 nm. The light output of a dissolution of green emitting light scintillation dopant R6 in the liquid crystal is about 120% of crystal anthracene. The light output of the frozen dissolution measured at -112 deg. C is about 2.5 times higher as observed at +20 deg. C. In the uniaxially oriented liquid crystal, the predominant intensity direction of emitted light is pointed perpendicular to the liquid crystal director and an appreciable part of the emitted light is elliptically polarized. The possibility to use scintillation properties of liquid crystals is considered both for the improvement of existing particle detector characteristics and for the creation of new gated particle detectors

  14. New scintillating media based on liquid crystals for particle detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Barnik, M I; Vasilchenko, V G; Golovkin, S V; Medvedkov, A M; Soloviev, A S

    2000-01-01

    The study results of optical, photoluminiscent and scintillation properties of a liquid crystal 4-pentyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl are presented. The scintillation light output of this liquid crystal is about 35% of crystal anthracene, its main decay time constants are 4 and 14 ns, and the maximum of light emission spectrum is about 400 nm. The light output of a dissolution of green emitting light scintillation dopant R6 in the liquid crystal is about 120% of crystal anthracene. The light output of the frozen dissolution measured at -112 deg. C is about 2.5 times higher as observed at +20 deg. C. In the uniaxially oriented liquid crystal, the predominant intensity direction of emitted light is pointed perpendicular to the liquid crystal director and an appreciable part of the emitted light is elliptically polarized. The possibility to use scintillation properties of liquid crystals is considered both for the improvement of existing particle detector characteristics and for the creation of new gated particle detectors.

  15. Computer simulation of confined liquid crystal dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webster, R.E.

    2001-11-01

    Results are presented from a series of simulations undertaken to determine whether dynamic processes observed in device-scale liquid crystal cells confined between aligning substrates can be simulated in a molecular system using parallel molecular dynamics of the Gay-Berne model. In a nematic cell, on removal of an aligning field, initial near-surface director relaxation can induce flow, termed 'backflow' in the liquid. This, in turn, can cause director rotation, termed 'orientational kickback', in the centre of the cell. Simulations are performed of the relaxation in nematic systems confined between substrates with a common alignment on removal of an aligning field. Results show /that relaxation timescales of medium sized systems are accessible. Following this, simulations are performed of relaxation in hybrid aligned nematic systems, where each surface induces a different alignment. Flow patterns associated with director reorientation are observed. The damped oscillatory nature of the relaxation process suggests that the behaviour of these systems is dominated by orientational elastic forces and that the observed director motion and flow do not correspond to the macroscopic processes of backflow and kickback. Chevron structures can occur in confined smectic cells which develop two domains of equal and opposite layer tilt on cooling. Layer lilting is thought to be caused by a need to reconcile a mismatch between bulk and surface smectic layer spacing. Here, simulations are performed of the formation of structures in confined smectic systems where layer tilt is induced by an imposed surface pretilt. Results show that bookshelf, chevron and tilled layer structures are observable in a confined Gay-Berne system. The formation and stability of the chevron structure are shown to be influenced by surface slip. (author)

  16. Computer simulation of confined liquid crystal dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webster, R.E

    2001-11-01

    Results are presented from a series of simulations undertaken to determine whether dynamic processes observed in device-scale liquid crystal cells confined between aligning substrates can be simulated in a molecular system using parallel molecular dynamics of the Gay-Berne model. In a nematic cell, on removal of an aligning field, initial near-surface director relaxation can induce flow, termed 'backflow' in the liquid. This, in turn, can cause director rotation, termed 'orientational kickback', in the centre of the cell. Simulations are performed of the relaxation in nematic systems confined between substrates with a common alignment on removal of an aligning field. Results show /that relaxation timescales of medium sized systems are accessible. Following this, simulations are performed of relaxation in hybrid aligned nematic systems, where each surface induces a different alignment. Flow patterns associated with director reorientation are observed. The damped oscillatory nature of the relaxation process suggests that the behaviour of these systems is dominated by orientational elastic forces and that the observed director motion and flow do not correspond to the macroscopic processes of backflow and kickback. Chevron structures can occur in confined smectic cells which develop two domains of equal and opposite layer tilt on cooling. Layer lilting is thought to be caused by a need to reconcile a mismatch between bulk and surface smectic layer spacing. Here, simulations are performed of the formation of structures in confined smectic systems where layer tilt is induced by an imposed surface pretilt. Results show that bookshelf, chevron and tilled layer structures are observable in a confined Gay-Berne system. The formation and stability of the chevron structure are shown to be influenced by surface slip. (author)

  17. Functional Smart Dispersed Liquid Crystals for Nano- and Biophotonic Applications: Nanoparticles-Assisted Optical Bioimaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Kamanina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional nematic liquid crystal structures doped with nano- and bioobjects have been investigated. The self-assembling features and the photorefractive parameters of the structured liquid crystals have been comparatively studied via microscopy and laser techniques. Fullerene, quantum dots, carbon nanotubes, DNA, and erythrocytes have been considered as the effective nano- and biosensitizers of the LC mesophase. The holographic recording technique based on four-wave mixing of the laser beams has been used to investigate the laser-induced change of the refractive index in the nano- and bioobjects-doped liquid crystal cells. The special accent has been given to novel nanostructured relief with vertically aligned carbon nanotubes at the interface: solid substrate-liquid crystal mesophase. It has been shown that this nanostructured relief influences the orienting ability of the liquid crystal molecules with good advantage. As a result, it provokes the orientation of the DNA. The modified functional liquid crystal materials have been proposed as the perspective systems for both the photonics and biology as well as the medical applications.

  18. Liquid crystals in micron-scale droplets, shells and fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanski, Martin; Reyes, Catherine G.; Noh, JungHyun; Sharma, Anshul; Geng, Yong; Subba Rao Jampani, Venkata; Lagerwall, Jan P. F.

    2017-04-01

    The extraordinary responsiveness and large diversity of self-assembled structures of liquid crystals are well documented and they have been extensively used in devices like displays. For long, this application route strongly influenced academic research, which frequently focused on the performance of liquid crystals in display-like geometries, typically between flat, rigid substrates of glass or similar solids. Today a new trend is clearly visible, where liquid crystals confined within curved, often soft and flexible, interfaces are in focus. Innovation in microfluidic technology has opened for high-throughput production of liquid crystal droplets or shells with exquisite monodispersity, and modern characterization methods allow detailed analysis of complex director arrangements. The introduction of electrospinning in liquid crystal research has enabled encapsulation in optically transparent polymeric cylinders with very small radius, allowing studies of confinement effects that were not easily accessible before. It also opened the prospect of functionalizing textile fibers with liquid crystals in the core, triggering activities that target wearable devices with true textile form factor for seamless integration in clothing. Together, these developments have brought issues center stage that might previously have been considered esoteric, like the interaction of topological defects on spherical surfaces, saddle-splay curvature-induced spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking, or the non-trivial shape changes of curved liquid crystal elastomers with non-uniform director fields that undergo a phase transition to an isotropic state. The new research thrusts are motivated equally by the intriguing soft matter physics showcased by liquid crystals in these unconventional geometries, and by the many novel application opportunities that arise when we can reproducibly manufacture these systems on a commercial scale. This review attempts to summarize the current understanding of

  19. Liquid crystals in micron-scale droplets, shells and fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbanski, Martin; Reyes, Catherine G; Noh, JungHyun; Sharma, Anshul; Geng, Yong; Subba Rao Jampani, Venkata; Lagerwall, Jan P F

    2017-01-01

    The extraordinary responsiveness and large diversity of self-assembled structures of liquid crystals are well documented and they have been extensively used in devices like displays. For long, this application route strongly influenced academic research, which frequently focused on the performance of liquid crystals in display-like geometries, typically between flat, rigid substrates of glass or similar solids. Today a new trend is clearly visible, where liquid crystals confined within curved, often soft and flexible, interfaces are in focus. Innovation in microfluidic technology has opened for high-throughput production of liquid crystal droplets or shells with exquisite monodispersity, and modern characterization methods allow detailed analysis of complex director arrangements. The introduction of electrospinning in liquid crystal research has enabled encapsulation in optically transparent polymeric cylinders with very small radius, allowing studies of confinement effects that were not easily accessible before. It also opened the prospect of functionalizing textile fibers with liquid crystals in the core, triggering activities that target wearable devices with true textile form factor for seamless integration in clothing. Together, these developments have brought issues center stage that might previously have been considered esoteric, like the interaction of topological defects on spherical surfaces, saddle-splay curvature-induced spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking, or the non-trivial shape changes of curved liquid crystal elastomers with non-uniform director fields that undergo a phase transition to an isotropic state. The new research thrusts are motivated equally by the intriguing soft matter physics showcased by liquid crystals in these unconventional geometries, and by the many novel application opportunities that arise when we can reproducibly manufacture these systems on a commercial scale. This review attempts to summarize the current understanding of

  20. Artificial muscles based on liquid crystal elastomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min-Hui; Keller, Patrick

    2006-10-15

    This paper presents our results on liquid crystal (LC) elastomers as artificial muscle, based on the ideas proposed by de Gennes. In the theoretical model, the material consists of a repeated series of main-chain nematic LC polymer blocks, N, and conventional rubber blocks, R, based on the lamellar phase of a triblock copolymer RNR. The motor for the contraction is the reversible macromolecular shape change of the chain, from stretched to spherical, that occurs at the nematic-to-isotropic phase transition in the main-chain nematic LC polymers. We first developed a new kind of muscle-like material based on a network of side-on nematic LC homopolymers. Side-on LC polymers were used instead of main-chain LC polymers for synthetic reasons. The first example of these materials was thermo-responsive, with a typical contraction of around 35-45% and a generated force of around 210 kPa. Subsequently, a photo-responsive material was developed, with a fast photochemically induced contraction of around 20%, triggered by UV light. We then succeeded in preparing a thermo-responsive artificial muscle, RNR, with lamellar structure, using a side-on nematic LC polymer as N block.Micrometre-sized artificial muscles were also prepared. This paper illustrates the bottom-up design of stimuli-responsive materials, in which the overall material response reflects the individual macromolecular response, using LC polymer as building block.

  1. Stability of Disclinations in Nematic Liquid Crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yusheng; Yang Guohong; Tian Lijun; Duan Yishi

    2006-01-01

    In the light of φ-mapping method and topological current theory, the stability of disclinations around a spherical particle in nematic liquid crystals is studied. We consider two different defect structures around a spherical particle: disclination ring and point defect at the north or south pole of the particle. We calculate the free energy of these different defects in the elastic theory. It is pointed out that the total Frank free energy density can be divided into two parts. One is the distorted energy density of director field around the disclinations. The other is the free energy density of disclinations themselves, which is shown to be concentrated at the defect and to be topologically quantized in the unit of (k-k 24 )π/2. It is shown that in the presence of saddle-splay elasticity a dipole (radial and hyperbolic hedgehog) configuration that accompanies a particle with strong homeotropic anchoring takes the structure of a small disclination ring, not a point defect.

  2. Optical defect modes in chiral liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyakov, V. A.; Semenov, S. V.

    2011-01-01

    An analytic approach to the theory of optical defect modes in chiral liquid crystals (CLCs) is developed. The analytic study is facilitated by the choice of the problem parameters. Specifically, an isotropic layer (with the dielectric susceptibility equal to the average CLC dielectric susceptibility) sandwiched between two CLC layers is studied. The chosen model allows eliminating the polarization mixing and reducing the corresponding equations to the equations for light of diffracting polarization only. The dispersion equation relating the defect mode (DM) frequency to the isotropic layer thickness and an analytic expression for the field distribution in the DM structure are obtained and the corresponding dependences are plotted for some values of the DM structure parameters. Analytic expressions for the transmission and reflection coefficients of the DM structure (CLC-defect layer-CLC) are presented and analyzed for nonabsorbing, absorbing, and amplifying CLCs. The anomalously strong light absorption effect at the DM frequency is revealed. The limit case of infinitely thick CLC layers is considered in detail. It is shown that for distributed feedback lasing in a defect structure, adjusting the lasing frequency to the DM frequency results in a significant decrease in the lasing threshold. The DM dispersion equations are solved numerically for typical values of the relevant parameters. Our approach helps clarify the physics of the optical DMs in CLCs and completely agrees with the corresponding results of the previous numerical investigations.

  3. Structural Transitions in Cholesteric Liquid Crystal Droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Ye; Bukusoglu, Emre; Martínez-González, José A.; Rahimi, Mohammad; Roberts, Tyler F.; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Xiaoguang; Abbott, Nicholas L.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2016-07-26

    Confinement of cholesteric liquid crystals (ChLC) into droplets leads to a delicate interplay between elasticity, chirality, and surface energy. In this work, we rely on a combination of theory and experiments to understand the rich morphological behavior that arises from that balance. More specifically, a systematic study of micrometer-sized ChLC droplets is presented as a function of chirality and surface energy (or anchoring). With increasing chirality, a continuous transition is observed from a twisted bipolar structure to a radial spherical structure, all within a narrow range of chirality. During such a transition, a bent structure is predicted by simulations and confirmed by experimental observations. Simulations are also able to capture the dynamics of the quenching process observed in experiments. Consistent with published work, it is found that nanoparticles are attracted to defect regions on the surface of the droplets. For weak anchoring conditions at the nanoparticle surface, ChLC droplets adopt a morphology similar to that of the equilibrium helical phase observed for ChLCs in the bulk. As the anchoring strength increases, a planar bipolar structure arises, followed by a morphological transition to a bent structure. The influence of chirality and surface interactions are discussed in the context of the potential use of ChLC droplets as stimuli-responsive materials for reporting molecular adsorbates.

  4. Liquid crystal polyester-carbon fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, T. S.

    1984-01-01

    Liquid crystal polymers (LCP) have been developed as a thermoplastic matrix for high performance composites. A successful melt impregnation method has been developed which results in the production of continuous carbon fiber (CF) reinforced LCP prepreg tape. Subsequent layup and molding of prepreg into laminates has yielded composites of good quality. Tensile and flexural properties of LCP/CF composites are comparable to those of epoxy/CF composites. The LCP/CF composites have better impact resistance than the latter, although epoxy/CF composites possess superior compression and shear strength. The LCP/CF composites have good property retention until 200 F (67 % of room temperature value). Above 200 F, mechanical properties decrease significantly. Experimental results indicate that the poor compression and shear strength may be due to the poor interfacial adhesion between the matrix and carbon fiber as adequate toughness of the LCP matrix. Low mechanical property retention at high temperatures may be attributable to the low beta-transition temperature (around 80 C) of the LCP matrix material.

  5. Shear flow in smectic A liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, I W; Stewart, F

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers the onset of a shear-induced instability in a sample of smectic A liquid crystal. Unlike many previous models, the usual director n need not necessarily coincide with the local smectic layer normal a; the traditional Oseen constraint (∇xa=0) is not imposed when flow is present. A recent dynamic theory for smectic A (Stewart 2007 Contin. Mech. Thermodyn. 18 343-60) will be used to examine a stationary instability in a simple model when the director reorientation and smectic layer distortions are, firstly, assumed not to be coupled to the velocity and, secondly, are supposed coupled to the velocity. A critical shear rate at which the onset of the instability occurs will be identified, together with an accompanying critical director tilt angle and critical wavenumber for the associated smectic layer undulations. Despite some critical phenomena being largely unaffected by any coupling to the flow, it will be shown that the influence of some material parameters, especially the smectic layer compression constant B 0 and the coupling constant B 1 , upon the critical shear rate and critical tilt angle can be greatly affected by flow.

  6. Convolving optically addressed VLSI liquid crystal SLM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jared, David A.; Stirk, Charles W.

    1994-03-01

    We designed, fabricated, and tested an optically addressed spatial light modulator (SLM) that performs a 3 X 3 kernel image convolution using ferroelectric liquid crystal on VLSI technology. The chip contains a 16 X 16 array of current-mirror-based convolvers with a fixed kernel for finding edges. The pixels are located on 75 micron centers, and the modulators are 20 microns on a side. The array successfully enhanced edges in illumination patterns. We developed a high-level simulation tool (CON) for analyzing the performance of convolving SLM designs. CON has a graphical interface and simulates SLM functions using SPICE-like device models. The user specifies the pixel function along with the device parameters and nonuniformities. We discovered through analysis, simulation and experiment that the operation of current-mirror-based convolver pixels is degraded at low light levels by the variation of transistor threshold voltages inherent to CMOS chips. To function acceptable, the test SLM required the input image to have an minimum irradiance of 10 (mu) W/cm2. The minimum required irradiance can be further reduced by adding a photodarlington near the photodetector or by increasing the size of the transistors used to calculate the convolution.

  7. 2D director calculation for liquid crystal optical phased array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, L; Zhang, J; Wu, L Y

    2005-01-01

    A practical numerical model for a liquid crystal cell is set up based on the geometrical structure of liquid crystal optical phased arrays. Model parameters include width and space of electrodes, thickness of liquid crystal layer, alignment layers and glass substrates, pre-tilted angles, dielectric constants, elastic constants and so on. According to electrostatic field theory and Frank-Oseen elastic continuum theory, 2D electric potential distribution and 2D director distribution are calculated by means of the finite difference method on non-uniform grids. The influence of cell sizes on director distribution is analyzed. The fringe field effect between electrodes is also discussed

  8. Passive Temperature Stabilization of Silicon Photonic Devices Using Liquid Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Ptasinski

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we explore the negative thermo-optic properties of liquid crystal claddings for passive temperature stabilization of silicon photonic integrated circuits. Photonic circuits are playing an increasing role in communications and computing, but they suffer from temperature dependent performance variation. Most existing techniques aimed at compensation of thermal effects rely on power hungry Joule heating. We show that integrating a liquid crystal cladding helps to minimize the effects of a temperature dependent drift. The advantage of liquid crystals lies in their high negative thermo-optic coefficients in addition to low absorption at the infrared wavelengths.

  9. Liquid crystals beyond displays chemistry, physics, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Quan

    2012-01-01

    The chemistry, physics, and applications of liquid crystals beyond LCDs Liquid Crystals (LCs) combine order and mobility on a molecular and supramolecular level. But while these remarkable states of matter are most commonly associated with visual display technologies, they have important applications for a variety of other fields as well. Liquid Crystals Beyond Displays: Chemistry, Physics, and Applications considers these, bringing together cutting-edge research from some of the most promising areas of LC science. Featuring contributions from respected researchers from around the globe, th

  10. Mirror Symmetry Breaking by Chirality Synchronisation in Liquids and Liquid Crystals of Achiral Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschierske, Carsten; Ungar, Goran

    2016-01-04

    Spontaneous mirror symmetry breaking is an efficient way to obtain homogeneously chiral agents, pharmaceutical ingredients and materials. It is also in the focus of the discussion around the emergence of uniform chirality in biological systems. Tremendous progress has been made by symmetry breaking during crystallisation from supercooled melts or supersaturates solutions and by self-assembly on solid surfaces and in other highly ordered structures. However, recent observations of spontaneous mirror symmetry breaking in liquids and liquid crystals indicate that it is not limited to the well-ordered solid state. Herein, progress in the understanding of a new dynamic mode of symmetry breaking, based on chirality synchronisation of transiently chiral molecules in isotropic liquids and in bicontinuous cubic, columnar, smectic and nematic liquid crystalline phases is discussed. This process leads to spontaneous deracemisation in the liquid state under thermodynamic control, giving rise to long-term stable symmetry-broken fluids, even at high temperatures. These fluids form conglomerates that are capable of extraordinary strong chirality amplification, eventually leading to homochirality and providing a new view on the discussion of emergence of uniform chirality in prebiotic systems. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Incommensurate Crystals, Liquid Crystals, and Quasi-Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, N

    1988-01-01

    In this NATO-sponsored Advanced Research Workshop we succeeded in bringing together approximately forty scientists working in the three main areas of structurally incommensurate materials: incommensurate crystals (primarily ferroelectric insulators), incommensurate liquid crystals, and metallic quasi-crystals. Although these three classes of materials are quite distinct, the commonality of the physics of the origin and descrip­ tion of these incommensurate structures is striking and evident in these proceedings. A measure of the success of this conference was the degree to which interaction among the three subgroups occurred; this was facili­ tated by approximately equal amounts of theory and experiment in the papers presented. We thank the University of Colorado for providing pleasant housing and conference facilities at a modest cost, and we are especially grate­ ful to Ann Underwood, who retyped all the manuscripts into camera-ready form. J. F. Scott Boulder, Colorado N. A. Clark v CONTENTS PART I: INCO...

  12. Simulating human photoreceptor optics using a liquid-filled photonic crystal fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rativa, Diego; Vohnsen, Brian

    2011-02-11

    We introduce a liquid-filled photonic crystal fiber to simulate a retinal cone photoreceptor mosaic and the directionality selective mechanism broadly known as the Stiles-Crawford effect. Experimental measurements are realized across the visible spectrum to study waveguide coupling and directionality at different managed waveguide parameters. The crystal fiber method is a hybrid tool between theory and a real biological sample and a valuable addition as a retina model for real eye simulations.

  13. Magnetic, electrical and optical properties of liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florea, S.C.

    1980-01-01

    This thesis lays stress on the study of thermotrop nematic liquid crystals. But the crystals whose mesomorphism is achieved by an increase and decrease in temperature and the crystal category exhibiting a mesomorphism in a deep freezing phase are also studied. The results of the research carried out in the laboratory of ''active media, lasers and matter-radiation interactions'' of the Institute for Physics and Technology of Radiation Apparata as well as in the laboratories of liquid crystals and nuclear magnetic resonance of the Polytechnical Institute of Bucharest during seven years have had in view two main objectives: to elucidate and prove experimentally a new mechanism of nuclear relaxation in liquid crystals, proposed by the author; to use the current experimental techniques and methods applied in the above-mentioned laboratories to characterize and test some foreign mesomorphic media which are synthesized locally, providing a wide range of applications, such as colour television. (author)

  14. Static and dynamic continuum theory liquid crystals a mathematical introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Stewart, Iain W

    2004-01-01

    Providing a rigorous, clear and accessible text for graduate students regardless of scientific background, this text introduces the basic continuum theory for nematic liquid crystals in equilibria, and details its various simple applications.

  15. Heat and electrical conductivity of thermotropic liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saidov, N.S.; Majidov, H.; Saburov, B.S.; Safarov, M.M.

    1989-01-01

    A results of thermal conduction and electrical conduction of chemo tropic liquid crystals are brought in this article. An installation dependence formula of thermal conduction investigating things from the electrical conduction and temperatures is constructed

  16. Variational Approach in the Theory of Liquid-Crystal State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevorkyan, E. V.

    2018-03-01

    The variational calculus by Leonhard Euler is the basis for modern mathematics and theoretical physics. The efficiency of variational approach in statistical theory of liquid-crystal state and in general case in condensed state theory is shown. The developed approach in particular allows us to introduce correctly effective pair interactions and optimize the simple models of liquid crystals with help of realistic intermolecular potentials.

  17. New developments in flexible cholesteric liquid crystal displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Tod; Davis, Donald J.; Franklin, Sean; Venkataraman, Nithya; McDaniel, Diaz; Nicholson, Forrest; Montbach, Erica; Khan, Asad; Doane, J. William

    2007-02-01

    Flexible Cholesteric liquid crystal displays have been rapidly maturing into a strong contender in the flexible display market. Encapsulation of the Cholesteric liquid crystal permits the use of flexible plastic substrates and roll-to-roll production. Recent advances include ultra-thin displays, laser-cut segmented displays of variable geometry, and smart card applications. Exciting technologies such as simultaneous laser-edge sealing and singulation enable high volume production, excellent quality control and non-traditional display geometries and formats.

  18. Liquid Crystals of Lithium Dodecylbenzenesulfonate for Electric Double Layer Capacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzmin, Andrey Vasil’evich; Yurtov, Evgeny V.

    2016-01-01

    Ionic lyotropic liquid crystals based on lithium dodecylbenzenesulfonate were used as electrolytes for electric double layer capacitors with carbon fibrous electrodes. The capacitors were tasted by cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge and discharge, and impedance spectroscopy. The highest specific capacitance was achieved for electrical double layer capacitor equipped with ionic lyotropic liquid crystal of lithium dodecylbenzenesulfonate 35 wt% in water. The specific capacitance of capacitor was calculated from galvanostatic discharge curves – 15 F/g of carbon fibrous material

  19. All-optical image processing with nonlinear liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Kuan-Lun

    Liquid crystals are fascinating materials because of several advantages such as large optical birefringence, dielectric anisotropic, and easily compatible to most kinds of materials. Compared to the electro-optical properties of liquid crystals widely applied in displays and switching application, transparency through most parts of wavelengths also makes liquid crystals a better candidate for all-optical processing. The fast response time of liquid crystals resulting from multiple nonlinear effects, such as thermal and density effect can even make real-time processing realized. In addition, blue phase liquid crystals with spontaneously self-assembled three dimensional cubic structures attracted academic attention. In my dissertation, I will divide the whole contents into six parts. In Chapter 1, a brief introduction of liquid crystals is presented, including the current progress and the classification of liquid crystals. Anisotropy and laser induced director axis reorientation is presented in Chapter 2. In Chapter 3, I will solve the electrostrictive coupled equation and analyze the laser induced thermal and density effect in both static and dynamic ways. Furthermore, a dynamic simulation of laser induced density fluctuation is proposed by applying finite element method. In Chapter 4, two image processing setups are presented. One is the intensity inversion experiment in which intensity dependent phase modulation is the mechanism. The other is the wavelength conversion experiment in which I can read the invisible image with a visible probe beam. Both experiments are accompanied with simulations to realize the matching between the theories and practical experiment results. In Chapter 5, optical properties of blue phase liquid crystals will be introduced and discussed. The results of grating diffractions and thermal refractive index gradient are presented in this chapter. In addition, fiber arrays imaging and switching with BPLCs will be included in this chapter

  20. Order parameters in smectic liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beldon, Stephen M.

    2001-01-01

    This thesis explores some of the important mechanisms for switching in smectic liquid crystals. It is mainly concerned with the interaction of the electric field and various order parameters in smectic phases. Distortion of these order parameters and also the layer structures associated with smectics are discussed in depth. Initial work is concentrated on the electroclinic effect of commercially available FLC mixtures, where experimental results suggest the presence of non-uniformity in the molecular director profile. Two possible models are suggested assuming a variation of the order parameter θ through the cell. The first model assumes that the smectic layers remain bookshelf-like, and the second that the layers tilt in a vertical chevron structure when a cone angle is induced electroclinically or otherwise. The latter model is the first 'order parameter' model of an electric field induced vertical chevron. The presence of non-uniformity in the director profile is sensed by a method similar to wavelength extinction spectroscopy. Investigations are undertaken on racemic smectic materials with high dielectric biaxiality. Modelling of such a material reveals a new electroclinic effect which shows a discrete second order phase transition on application of a field. It is suggested that a bistable electroclinic effect stabilised with a high frequency ac field may be realised if a residual polarisation is present in the high biaxiality material, and that this might be useful in the displays industry. Experimental investigations of such a material confirm the above effects close to the smectic A-C transition. Finally a higher order smectic phase, the smectic I* phase, is considered. The distortion of the hexagonal bond orientational order is investigated experimentally during application of an electric field. The first dynamic model of the switching process is presented, showing good agreement with the experimental results. It is suggested that the bond orientational

  1. Liquid crystals: a new topic in physics for undergraduates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlin, Jerneja; Čepič, Mojca; Vaupotič, Nataša

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a teaching module about liquid crystals. Since liquid crystals are linked to everyday student experiences and are also a topic of current scientific research, they are an excellent candidate for a modern topic to be introduced into education. We show that liquid crystals can provide a pathway through several fields of physics such as thermodynamics, optics and electromagnetism. We discuss what students should learn about liquid crystals and what physical concepts they should know before considering them. In the presentation of the teaching module, which consists of a lecture and experimental work in a chemistry and physics laboratory, we focus on experiments on phase transitions, polarization of light, double refraction and colours. A pilot evaluation of the module was performed among pre-service primary school teachers who have no special preference for natural sciences. The evaluation shows that the module is very efficient in transferring knowledge. A prior study showed that the informally obtained pre-knowledge on liquid crystals of the first-year students from several different fields of study was negligible. Since social science students are the least interested in natural sciences, it can be expected that students in any study programme will on average achieve at least as good qualitative knowledge of phenomena related to liquid crystals as the group involved in the pilot study. (paper)

  2. Tunable photoluminescence of porous silicon by liquid crystal infiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Qinglan; Xiong Rui; Huang Yuanming

    2011-01-01

    The photoluminescence (PL) of porous silicon films has been investigated as a function of the amount of liquid crystal molecules that are infiltrated into the constricted geometry of the porous silicon films. A typical nematic liquid crystal 4-pentyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl was employed in our experiment as the filler to modify the PL of porous silicon. It is found that the originally red PL of porous silicon films can be tuned to blue by simply adjusting the amount of liquid crystal molecules in the microchannels of the porous films. The chromaticity coordinates are calculated for the recorded PL spectra. The mechanism of the tunable PL is discussed. Our results have demonstrated that the luminescent properties of porous silicon films can be efficiently tuned by liquid crystal infiltration. - Highlights: → Liquid crystal infiltration can tune the photoluminescence of porous silicon. → Red emission of porous silicon can be switched to blue by the infiltration. → Chromaticity coordinates are calculated for the tuned emissions. → White emission is realized for porous silicon by liquid crystal infiltration.

  3. Simulation of liquid crystals. Disclinations and surface modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downton, M.

    2001-01-01

    In this thesis we investigate the behaviour of molecular models liquid crystals in several different situations. Basic introductory material on liquid crystals and computer simulations is discussed in the first two chapters, we then discuss the research. The third chapter investigates the interaction between a liquid crystal and a modified surface. A confined system of hard spherocylinders in a slab geometry is examined. The surface consists of planar hard walls with elongated molecules grafted perpendicularly onto them. The concentration of grafted molecules is varied to give different surfaces. Several different behaviours are found including planar, homeotropic and tilted anchorings of the liquid crystal. Molecular dynamics simulations of a nematic liquid crystal in slab geometry with twisted boundary conditions are performed. By arranging the initial configuration suitably it is possible to create a simulation cell with two regions of opposite twist separated by a strength half disclination line. The properties of the line are examined both with and without an applied external field. Finally, we again examine the system of grafted molecules on a flat substrate using an atomistic model of both the liquid crystal and the surface molecules. Again the effect of varying the density of grafted molecules is found to change the anchoring characteristics of the surface; both homeotropic and planar anchorings are observed. (author)

  4. Lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals: From viscoelastic properties to living liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shuang

    Lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal (LCLC) represents a broad range of molecules, from organic dyes and drugs to DNA, that self-assemble into linear aggregates in water through face-to-face stacking. These linear aggregates of high aspect ratio are capable of orientational order, forming, for example nematic phase. Since the microscopic properties (such as length) of the chromonic aggregates are results of subtle balance between energy and entropy, the macroscopic viscoelastic properties of the nematic media are sensitive to change of external factors. In the first part of this thesis, by using dynamic light scattering and magnetic Frederiks transition techniques, we study the Frank elastic moduli and viscosity coefficients of LCLC disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) and sunset yellow (SSY) as functions of concentration c , temperature T and ionic contents. The elastic moduli of splay (K1) and bend (K3) are in the order of 10pN, about 10 times larger than the twist modulus (K2). The splay modulus K1 and the ratio K1/K3 both increase substantially as T decreases or c increases, which we attribute to the elongation of linear aggregates at lower T or higher c . The bend viscosity is comparable to that of thermotropic liquid crystals, while the splay and twist viscosities are several orders of magnitude larger, changing exponentially with T . Additional ionic additives into the system influence the viscoelastic properties of these systems in a dramatic and versatile way. For example, monovalent salt NaCl decreases bend modulus K3 and increases twist viscosity, while an elevated pH decreases all the parameters. We attribute these features to the ion-induced changes in length and flexibility of building units of LCLC, the chromonic aggregates, a property not found in conventional thermotropic and lyotropic liquid crystals form by covalently bound units of fixed length. The second part of the thesis studies a new active bio-mechanical hybrid system called living liquid crystal

  5. Cholesteric colloidal liquid crystals from phytosterol rod-like particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossi, L.; Sacanna, S.; Velikov, K.P.

    2011-01-01

    We report the first observation of chiral colloidal liquid crystals of rod-like particles from a low molecular weight organic compound— phytosterols. Based on the particles shape and crystal structure, we attribute this phenomenon to chiral distribution of surface charge on the surface of

  6. NMR studies of liquid crystals and molecules dissolved in liquid crystal solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drobny, Gary Peter [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1982-11-01

    This thesis describes several studies in which nuclear magnetic resonance (nmr) spectroscopy has been used to probe the structure, orientation and dynamics of liquid crystal mesogens and molecules dissolved in liquid crystalline phases. In addition, a modern high field nmr spectrometer is described which has been used to perform such nmr studies. Chapter 1 introduces the quantum mechanical formalisms used throughout this thesis and briefly reviews the fundamentals of nuclear spin physics and pulsed nmr spectroscopy. First the density operator is described and a specific form for the canonical ensemble is derived. Then Clebsch-Gordon coefficients, Wigner rotation matrices, and irreducible tensor operators are reviewed. An expression for the equilibrium (Curie) magnetization is obtained and the linear response of a spin system to a strong pulsed r.f. irradiation is described. Finally, the spin interaction Hamiltonians relevant to this work are reviewed together with their truncated forms. Chapter 2 is a deuterium magnetic resonance study of two 'nom' liquid crystals which possess several low temperature mesomorphic phases. Specifically, deuterium quadrupolar echo spectroscopy is used to determine the orientation of the liquid crystal molecules in smectic phases, the changes in molecular orientation and motion that occur at smectic-smectic phase transitions, and the order of the phase transitions. For both compounds, the phase sequence is determined to be isotropic, nematic, smectic A, smectic C, smectic BA, smectic BC, and crystalline. The structure of the smectic A phase is found to be consistent with the well-known model of a two dimensional liquid in which molecules are rapidly rotating about their long axes and oriented at right angles to the plane of the layers. Molecules in the smectic C phase are found to have their long axes tilted with respect to the layer normal, and the tilt angle is temperature dependent, increasing from

  7. Liquid-Crystal Thermosets, a New Generation of High-Performance Liquid-Crystal Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingemans, Theo; Weiser, Erik; Hou, Tan; Jensen, Brian; St. Clair, Terry

    2004-01-01

    One of the major challenges for NASA's next-generation reusable-launch-vehicle (RLV) program is the design of a cryogenic lightweight composite fuel tank. Potential matrix resin systems need to exhibit a low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), good mechanical strength, and excellent barrier properties at cryogenic temperatures under load. In addition, the resin system needs to be processable by a variety of non-autoclavable techniques, such as vacuum-bag curing, resin-transfer molding (RTM), vacuum-assisted resin-transfer molding (VaRTM), resin-film infusion (RFI), pultrusion, and advanced tow placement (ATP). To meet these requirements, the Advanced Materials and Processing Branch (AMPB) at NASA Langley Research Center developed a new family of wholly aromatic liquid-crystal oligomers that can be processed and thermally cross-linked while maintaining their liquid-crystal order. All the monomers were polymerized in the presence of a cross-linkable unit by use of an environmentally benign melt-condensation technique. This method does not require hazardous solvents, and the only side product is acetic acid. The final product can be obtained as a powder or granulate and has an infinite shelf life. The obtained oligomers melt into a nematic phase and do not exhibit isotropization temperatures greater than the temperatures of decomposition (Ti > T(sub dec)). Three aromatic formulations were designed and tested and included esters, ester-amides, and ester-imides. One of the major advantages of this invention, named LaRC-LCR or Langley Research Center-Liquid Crystal Resin, is the ability to control a variety of resin characteristics, such as melting temperature, viscosity, and the cross-link density of the final part. Depending on the formulation, oligomers can be prepared with melt viscosities in the range of 10-10,000 poise (100 rad/s), which can easily be melt-processed using a variety of composite-processing techniques. This capability provides NASA with custom

  8. Reflective and transflective liquid crystal displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fushan

    Recently transflective liquid crystal displays (LCD) received a lot of attention. A transflective display has a transmissive mode and a reflective mode. It combines the high contrast, high brightness of the transmissive mode with energy-saving of reflective mode and has good performance in various illumination conditions. However, state-of-the-art transflective displays have problems such as different electro-optical properties, difficulty in compatibility and optimization of both modes, low efficiency of light utilization, and complexity in structure. This dissertation focuses on finding new designs of transflective displays that address those problems. One way to do this is to study film compensation of LCD. We first studied film compensation of bistable twisted nematic (BTN) LCD. Starting form the reduced (3x3) Mueller matrices, we derived and simplified the conditions that film compensated BTN can be optimized. Based on these relations, electro-optical properties of some particular configurations, and designs of transflective BTN with high brightness and contrast were given. To confirm and get a better understanding of the results, we use the Poincare sphere to analyze film compensated BTN. The key to this approach is the existence of "fixed points". Compared with the matrix approach, this approach is more simple, elegant, and efficient. We then generalized the Poincare sphere approach to a universal approach of LCD. We applied the universal approach to film compensation of ECB and IPS, and the design of achromatic birefringent filters. We also give two more new designs of transflective displays. In the first design, a dichroic mirror is used to split the visible spectrum into two parts used in transmissive and reflective modes, respectively. Both modes can be optimized. It has a simple structure and good light utilization. A design for a full-color transflective display with good performance is also given. In the second design, each pixel is divided into two

  9. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Advances in the Computer Simulations of Liquid Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Zannoni, Claudio

    2000-01-01

    Computer simulations provide an essential set of tools for understanding the macroscopic properties of liquid crystals and of their phase transitions in terms of molecular models. While simulations of liquid crystals are based on the same general Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics techniques as are used for other fluids, they present a number of specific problems and peculiarities connected to the intrinsic properties of these mesophases. The field of computer simulations of anisotropic fluids is interdisciplinary and is evolving very rapidly. The present volume covers a variety of techniques and model systems, from lattices to hard particle and Gay-Berne to atomistic, for thermotropics, lyotropics, and some biologically interesting liquid crystals. Contributions are written by an excellent panel of international lecturers and provides a timely account of the techniques and problems in the field.

  10. Recent Advances in Discotic Liquid Crystal-Assisted Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwathanarayana Gowda

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This article primarily summarizes recent advancement in the field of discotic liquid crystal (DLC nanocomposites. Discotic liquid crystals are nanostructured materials, usually 2 to 6 nm size and have been recognized as organic semiconducting materials. Recently, it has been observed that the dispersion of small concentration of various functionalized zero-, one- and two-dimensional nanomaterials in the supramolecular order of mesophases of DLCs imparts negligible impact on liquid crystalline properties but enhances their thermal, supramolecular and electronic properties. Synthesis, characterization and dispersion of various nanoparticles in different discotics are presented.

  11. Quantum Dot/Liquid Crystal Nanocomposites in Photonic Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea L. Rodarte

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Quantum dot/liquid crystal nano-composites are promising new materials for a variety of applications in energy harvesting, displays and photonics including the liquid crystal laser. To realize many applications, however, we need to control and stabilize nano-particle dispersion in different liquid crystal host phases and understand how the particles behave in an anisotropic fluid. An ideal system will allow for the controlled assembly of either well-defined nano-particle clusters or a uniform particle distribution. In this paper, we investigate mesogen-functionalized quantum dots for dispersion in cholesteric liquid crystal. These nanoparticles are known to assemble into dense stable packings in the nematic phase, and such structures, when localized in the liquid crystal defects, can potentially enhance the coupling between particles and a cholesteric cavity. Controlling the dispersion and assembly of quantum dots using mesogenic surface ligands, we demonstrate how resonant fluid photonic cavities can result from the co-assembly of luminescent nanoparticles in the presence of cholesteric liquid crystalline ordering.

  12. Do protein crystals nucleate within dense liquid clusters?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maes, Dominique; Vorontsova, Maria A.; Potenza, Marco A. C.; Sanvito, Tiziano; Sleutel, Mike; Giglio, Marzio; Vekilov, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of protein-rich clusters and nucleating crystals were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS), confocal depolarized dynamic light scattering (cDDLS) and depolarized oblique illumination dark-field microscopy. Newly nucleated crystals within protein-rich clusters were detected directly. These observations indicate that the protein-rich clusters are locations for crystal nucleation. Protein-dense liquid clusters are regions of high protein concentration that have been observed in solutions of several proteins. The typical cluster size varies from several tens to several hundreds of nanometres and their volume fraction remains below 10 −3 of the solution. According to the two-step mechanism of nucleation, the protein-rich clusters serve as locations for and precursors to the nucleation of protein crystals. While the two-step mechanism explained several unusual features of protein crystal nucleation kinetics, a direct observation of its validity for protein crystals has been lacking. Here, two independent observations of crystal nucleation with the proteins lysozyme and glucose isomerase are discussed. Firstly, the evolutions of the protein-rich clusters and nucleating crystals were characterized simultaneously by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and confocal depolarized dynamic light scattering (cDDLS), respectively. It is demonstrated that protein crystals appear following a significant delay after cluster formation. The cDDLS correlation functions follow a Gaussian decay, indicative of nondiffusive motion. A possible explanation is that the crystals are contained inside large clusters and are driven by the elasticity of the cluster surface. Secondly, depolarized oblique illumination dark-field microscopy reveals the evolution from liquid clusters without crystals to newly nucleated crystals contained in the clusters to grown crystals freely diffusing in the solution. Collectively, the observations indicate that the protein-rich clusters in

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations of liquid crystals at interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shield, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of an atomistic model of 4-n-octyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) were performed for thin films of 8CB on solid substrates (a pseudopotential representation of the molecular topography of the (100) crystal surface of polyethylene (PE), a highly ordered atomistic model of a pseudo-crystalline PE surface and an atomistic model of a partially orientated film of PE), free standing thin films of 8CB and 8CB droplets in a hexagonal pit. The systems showed strong homeotropic anchoring at the free volume interface and planar anchoring at the solid interface whose strength was dependent upon the surface present. The free volume interface also demonstrated weak signs of smectic wetting of the bulk. Simulations of thin free standing films of liquid crystals showed the ordered nature of the liquid crystals at the two free volume interfaces can be adopted by the region of liquid crystal molecules between the homeotropic layer at each interface only if there is a certain number of liquid crystal molecules present. The perpendicular anchoring imposed by the free volume interface and the solid interface for the thin films on the solid substrates resulted in some evidence for the liquid crystal director undergoing a continual rotation at low temperatures and a definite discontinuous change at higher temperatures. The liquid crystal alignment imparted by these substrates was found to depend upon the topography of the surface and not the direction of the polymer chains in the substrate. The liquid crystal was found to order via an epitaxy-like mechanism. The perpendicular anchoring results in a drop in the order - disorder transition temperature for the molecules in the region between the homeotropic layer at the free volume interface and the planar layers at the solid interface. An increase in the size of this region does not alter the transition temperature. The shape of the liquid crystal molecules is dependent upon the degree of order and thus the nematic

  14. Liquid crystals with novel terminal chains as ferroelectric liquid crystal hosts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosquer, G.Y.

    2000-02-01

    Changes to the molecular structure of liquid crystals can have a significant effect upon their mesomorphism and ferroelectric properties. Most of the research in liquid crystal for display applications concentrates on the design and synthesis of novel mesogenic cores to which straight terminal alkyl or alkoxy chains are attached. However, little is known about the effects upon the mesomorphism and ferroelectric properties of varying the terminal chains. The compounds prepared in this work have a common core - a 2,3-difluoroterphenyl unit with a nine-atom alkyl (nonyl) or alkoxy (octyloxy) chain at the 4-position, but with an unusual chain at the 4''-position. In some cases the terminal chain contains hetero atoms such as silicon, oxygen, chlorine and bromine or has a bulky end group. In total 46 final materials were synthesised in an attempt to understand the effect of an unusual terminal chains on mesomorphism and for some of these compounds the effect upon the switching times when added to a standard ferroelectric mixture were investigated. It was found that most compounds containing a bulky end group only displayed a smectic C phase, compounds with a halogen substituent as an end unit displayed a smectic A phase and that increasing the chain flexibility by introducing an oxygen atom in the chain reduces the melting and clearing points. The electro-optical measurements carried out on ferroelectric mixtures containing a bulky end group compound showed that shorter switching times were produced than for the ferroelectric mixture containing a straight chain compound. It is suggested that a bulky end group diminishes te extent of interlayer mixing in the chiral smectic C phase and therefore the molecules move more easily with ferroelectric switching. (author)

  15. Nanoscience with liquid crystals from self-organized nanostructures to applications

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Quan

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on the exciting topic of nanoscience with liquid crystals: from self-organized nanostructures to applications. The elegant self-organized liquid crystalline nanostructures, the synergetic characteristics of liquid crystals and nanoparticles, liquid crystalline nanomaterials, synthesis of nanomaterials using liquid crystals as templates, nanoconfinement and nanoparticles of liquid crystals are covered and discussed, and the prospect of fabricating functional materials is highlighted. Contributions, collecting the scattered literature of the field from leading and active player

  16. Light scattering from crystals, glasses and liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subbaswamy, K.R.

    1984-09-01

    The theory of inelastic light scattering from a model system in the crystalline, disordered and liquid phases is analyzed. The roles of disorder induced first order scattering and second order scattering are clarified in the context of the classical liquid. The correlation functions appropriate for the various contributions are identified and useful ways of processing experimental data are pointed out. (author)

  17. Manipulating lipid membrane architecture by liquid crystal-analog curvature elasticity (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sin-Doo

    2015-10-01

    Soft matters such as liquid crystals and biological molecules exhibit a variety of interesting physical phenomena as well as new applications. Recently, in mimicking biological systems that have the ability to sense, regulate, grow, react, and regenerate in a highly responsive and self-adaptive manner, the significance of the liquid crystal order in living organisms, for example, a biological membrane possessing the lamellar order, is widely recognized from the viewpoints of physics and chemistry of interfaces and membrane biophysics. Lipid bilayers, resembling cell membranes, provide primary functions for the transport of biological components of ions and molecules in various cellular activities, including vesicle budding and membrane fusion, through lateral organization of the membrane components such as proteins. In this lecture, I will describe how the liquid crystal-analog curvature elasticity of a lipid bilayer plays a critical role in developing a new platform for understanding diverse biological functions at a cellular level. The key concept is to manipulate the local curvature at an interface between a solid substrate and a model membrane. Two representative examples will be demonstrated: one of them is the topographic control of lipid rafts in a combinatorial array where the ligand-receptor binding event occurs and the other concerns the reconstitution of a ring-type lipid raft in bud-mimicking architecture within the framework of the curvature elasticity.

  18. Liquid crystals: high technology materials for potential applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeed, M.A.; Badaruddin; Rizvi, T.Z.

    1993-01-01

    Liquid crystals have very rapidly emerged as a basis of many high technology fields within the last few decades. These materials because of their intriguing physical properties are regarded as the fourth state of matter. At present the applications of liquid crystals are established in digital display devices, electro-optical switches, optical computing, acousto-optics, thermo-indicators, laser thermo-recording, photo-chemical image recording and optical communication networks. More recently due to the concept of molecularly based electronics (MBE): the logical extreme for miniaturization of electronic device, liquid crystals are foreseen to play a vital role in the future optics based technologies. This paper gives a brief introduction to liquid crystals, the types of meso phases found in these materials together with their applications in research and industry. Some technical details of the construction liquid crystal cells for some typical applications in digital displays and other electro optical devices have also been discussed with special emphasis on relevant physical processes occurring at molecular level. (author)

  19. Photonics of liquid-crystal structures: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palto, S. P., E-mail: palto@online.ru; Blinov, L M; Barnik, M I; Lazarev, V V; Umanskii, B A; Shtykov, N M [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-15

    The original results of studies of the electro-optical and laser effects which have been performed at the Laboratory of Liquid Crystals of the Institute of Crystallography, Russian Academy of Sciences, over the last few years are reviewed. Cholesteric liquid crystals as vivid representatives of photonic structures and their behavior in an electric field are considered in detail. The formation of higher harmonics in the periodic distribution of the director field in a helical liquid crystal structure and, correspondingly, the new (anharmonic) mode of electro-optical effects are discussed. Another group of studies is devoted to bistable light switching by an electric field in chiral nematics. Polarization diffraction gratings controlled by an electric field are also considered. The results of studies devoted to microlasers on various photonic structures with cholesteric and nematic liquid crystals are considered in detail. Particular attention is given to the new regime: leaky-mode lasing. Designs of liquid crystal light amplifiers and their polarization, field, and spectral characteristics are considered in the last section.

  20. Optical Study of Liquid Crystal Doped with Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharde, Rita A.; Thakare, Sangeeta Y.

    2014-11-01

    Liquid crystalline materials have been useful for display devices i.e watches, calculators, automobile dashboards, televisions, multi media projectors etc. as well as in electro tunable lasers, optical fibers and lenses. Carbon nanotube is chosen as the main experimental factor in this study as it has been observed that Carbon Nano Tube influence the existing properties of liquid crystal host and with the doping of CNT can enhance1 the properties of LC. The combination of carbon nanotube (CNT) and liquid crystal (LC) materials show considerable interest in the scientific community due to unique physical properties of CNT in liquid crystal. Dispersion of CNTs in LCs can provide us a cheap, simple, versatile and effective means of controlling nanotube orientation on macroscopic scale with no restrictions on nanotube type. LCs have the long range orientational order rendering them to be anisotropic phases. If CNTs can be well dispersed in LC matrix, they will align with their long axes along the LC director to minimize distortions of the LC director field and the free energy. In this paper, we doped liquid crystal (Cholesteryl Nonanoate) by a small amount of multiwall carbon nanotube 0.05% and 0.1% wt. We found that by adding carbon nanotube to liquid crystals the melting point of the mixture is decreased but TNI is increased. It has been also observed that with incereas in concentration of carbon nanotube into liquid crystal shows conciderable effect on LC. The prepared samples were characterized using various techniques to study structural, thermal and optical properties i.e PMS, FPSS, UV-Vis spectroscopy, FT-IR measurements, and DTA.

  1. Modeling Textural Processes during Self-Assembly of Plant-Based Chiral-Nematic Liquid Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh K. Murugesan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Biological liquid crystalline polymers are found in cellulosic, chitin, and DNA based natural materials. Chiral nematic liquid crystalline orientational order is observed frozen-in in the solid state in plant cell walls and is known as a liquid crystal analogue characterized by a helicoidal plywood architecture. The emergence of the plywood architecture by directed chiral nematic liquid crystalline self assembly has been postulated as the mechanism that leads to optimal cellulose fibril organization. In natural systems, tissue growth and development takes place in the presence of inclusions and secondary phases leaving behind characteristic defects and textures, which provide a unique testing ground for the validity of the liquid crystal self-assembly postulate. In this work, a mathematical model, based on the Landau-de Gennes theory of liquid crystals, is used to simulate defect textures arising in the domain of self assembly, due to presence of secondary phases representing plant cells, lumens and pit canals. It is shown that the obtained defect patterns observed in some plant cell walls are those expected from a truly liquid crystalline phase. The analysis reveals the nature and magnitude of the viscoelastic material parameters that lead to observed patterns in plant-based helicoids through directed self-assembly. In addition, the results provide new guidance to develop biomimetic plywoods for structural and functional applications.

  2. Old and new ideas in ferroelectric liquid crystal technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagerwall, Sven T.; Matuszczyk, M.; Matuszczyk, T.

    1998-02-01

    Ferroelectric liquid crystals (FLC) are to conventional liquid crystal what Gallium Arsenide is to Silicon in the semiconductor area. The first generation of FLC displays in now present on the market and has some outstanding features based on the symmetric bistability which may be achieved in these materials. One of the greatest challenges for the next generation is to achieve an analog grey scale out of an essentially digital principle. We will analyze in some detail which major problems had to be solved to reach the present state and show how the final steps could be taken toward a new state-of-the-art level in liquid crystal devices. In the last decade university research and industrial R and D have almost equally contributed to treat the very serious complications caused by the so-called chevron structures We will review this important topic in particular detail.

  3. Thin aligned organic polymer films for liquid crystal devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, Kathryn Ellen

    1997-01-01

    This project was designed to investigate the possibility of producing alignment layers for liquid crystal devices by cross-linking thin films containing anisotropic polymer bound chromophores via irradiation with polarised ultraviolet light. Photocross-linkable polymers find use in microelectronics, liquid crystal displays, printing and UV curable lacquers and inks; so there is an increasing incentive for the development of new varieties of photopolymers in general. The synthesis and characterisation of two new photopolymers that are suitable as potential alignment layers for liquid crystal devices are reported in this thesis. The first polymer contains the anthracene chromophore attached via a spacer unit to a methacrylate backbone and the second used a similarly attached aryl azide group. Copolymers of the new monomers with methyl methacrylate were investigated to establish reactivity ratios in order to understand composition drift during polymerisation. (author)

  4. Young-Laplace equation for liquid crystal interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Alejandro D.

    2000-12-01

    This letter uses the classical theories of liquid crystal physics to derive the Young-Laplace equation of capillary hydrostatics for interfaces between viscous isotropic (I) fluids and nematic liquid crystals (NLC's), and establishes the existence of four energy contributions to pressure jumps across these unusual anisotropic interfaces. It is shown that in addition to the usual curvature contribution, bulk and surface gradient elasticity, elastic stress, and anchoring energy contribute to pressure differentials across the interface. The magnitude of the effect is proportional to the elastic moduli of the NLC, and to the bulk and surface orientation gradients that may be present in the nematic phase. In contrast to the planar interface between isotropic fluids, flat liquid crystal interfaces support pressure jumps if elastic stresses, bulk and surface gradient energy, and/or anchoring energies are finite.

  5. Vitrification and Crystallization of Phase-Separated Metallic Liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Cheng

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The liquid–liquid phase separation (LLPS behavior of Fe50Cu50 melt from 3500 K to 300 K with different rapid quenching is investigated by molecular dynamics (MD simulation based on the embedded atom method (EAM. The liquid undergoes metastable phase separation by spinodal decomposition in the undercooled regime and subsequently solidifies into three different Fe-rich microstructures: the interconnected-type structure is kept in the glass and crystal at a higher cooling rate, while the Fe-rich droplets are found to crystalize at a lower cooling rate. During the crystallization process, only Fe-rich clusters can act as the solid nuclei. The twinning planes can be observed in the crystal and only the homogeneous atomic stacking shows mirror symmetry along the twinning boundary. Our present work provides atomic-scale understanding of LLPS melt during the cooling process.

  6. Shrink, twist, ripple and melt: Studies of frustrated liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernsler, Jonathan G.

    Complex structures can arise out of a simple system with more than one competing influence on its behavior. The protypical example of this is the two-dimensional triangular lattice Ising model. The ferromagnetic model has two simple degenerate ground states of all spins up or down, but the antiferromagnetic model is a frustrated system. Its geometry does not allow satisfaction of the antiferro condition everywhere, which produces complex ordered structures with dimerization of the spins [1]. Without frustration, the complex structures and phase behavior are lost. All of the topics discussed in this thesis concern smectic liquid crystals. Liquid crystals are perhaps uniquely adept at manifesting frustrated phases. Their combination of periodicity in one or more dimensions allows ordered structures, yet their fluid nature in remaining dimensions allows creation of defects and extraordinarily complex structures in ways that a normal crystal could not tolerate. Liquid crystals contain a huge menagerie of frustrated phases and effects including the polarization modulated [2], vortex lattice [3], twist grain boundary [4], and blue [5] phases, as well as frustrated structures such as cholesteric or SmC* helix unwinding [6], defect lattices in thin films [7], and bend melted grain boundary defects [8], arising from boundary conditions and field effects. In this thesis, we study four liquid crystal systems that show unusual phase behavior or complex structures, deriving from the effects of frustration. Frustration, despite some human prejudices against the word, leaves nature all the more interesting and beautiful.

  7. NMR and molecular dynamics of small solutes in liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luyten, P.R.

    1984-01-01

    NMR relaxation measurements, using a wide variety of modern pulse techniques, can yield valuable information about molecular motions. In this thesis the applicability of theories developed to describe spin relaxation phenomena in partially ordered media is studied for small solutes in liquid crystals. 1 H, 2 H, 13 C and 14 N relaxation measurements are interpreted by means of a model, in which fast anisotropic re-orientational motion in an orienting potential combined with contributions from cooperative fluctuations in the surrounding liquid crystal molecules, induce the observed frequency dependent relaxation behavior. (orig.)

  8. Chemistry of Discotic Liquid Crystals From Monomers to Polymers

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Sandeep

    2010-01-01

    Compiling the scattered literature into a single seminal work, this book describes the basic design principles, synthesis, and mesomorphic properties of discotic liquid crystals. Of fundamental importance as models for the study of energy and charge migration in self-organized systems, discotic liquid crystals find functional application as one-dimensional conductors, photoconductors, light emitting diodes, photovoltaic solar cells, field-effect transistors, and gas sensors. This book highlights the scientific concepts behind the hierarchical self-assembly of these disc-shaped molecules alongs

  9. A Microwave Tunable Bandpass Filter for Liquid Crystal Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Weiping; Jiang, Di; Liu, Yupeng; Yang, Yuanwang; Gan, Baichuan

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, a novel microwave continuously tunable band-pass filter, based on nematic liquid crystals (LCs), is proposed. It uses liquid crystal (LC) as the electro-optic material to mainly realize frequency shift at microwave band by changing the dielectric anisotropy, when applying the bias voltage. According to simulation results, it achieves 840 MHz offset. Comparing to the existing tunable filter, it has many advantages, such as continuously tunable, miniaturization, low processing costs, low tuning voltage, etc. Thus, it has shown great potentials in frequency domain and practical applications in modern communication.

  10. Flexoelectricity in an oxadiazole bent-core nematic liquid crystal

    OpenAIRE

    Kaur, Sarabjot; Panov, V. P.; Greco, C.; Ferrarini, A.; Görtz, Verena; Goodby, John W.; Gleeson, Helen F.

    2014-01-01

    We have determined experimentally the magnitude of the difference in the splay and bend flexoelectric coefficients, |e 1 − e 3|, of an oxadiazole bent-core liquid crystal by measuring the critical voltage for the formation of flexodomains together with their wave number. The coefficient |e 1 − e 3| is found to be a factor of 2–3 times higher than in most conventional calamitic nematic liquid crystals, varying from 8 pCm−1 to 20 pCm−1 across the ∼60 K—wide nematic regime. We have also calculat...

  11. A flexible optically re-writable color liquid crystal display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yihong; Sun, Jiatong; Liu, Yang; Shang, Jianhua; Liu, Hao; Liu, Huashan; Gong, Xiaohui; Chigrinov, Vladimir; Kowk, Hoi Sing

    2018-03-01

    It is very difficult to make a liquid crystal display (LCD) that is flexible. However, for an optically re-writable LCD (ORWLCD), only the spacers and the substrates need to be flexible because the driving unit and the display unit are separate and there are no electronics in the display part of ORWLCD. In this paper, three flexible-spacer methods are proposed to achieve this goal. A cholesteric liquid crystal colored mirror with a polarizer behind it is used as the colored reflective backboard of an ORWLCD. Polyethersulfone substrates and flexible spacers are used to make the optically re-writable cell insensitive to mechanical force.

  12. Synthesis of carbonated hydroxyapatite nanorods in liquid crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniella Dias Palombino de Campos

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Syntheses of calcium phosphate nanoparticles, carried out in systems formed from surfactant, oil and water, have resulted in materials with promising possibilities for application. The calcium phosphate particles were synthesized using two different liquid crystals, formed from RenexTM, cyclohexane and a salts solution. The morphology of the nanoparticles synthesized in the liquid crystals is similar to that of hydroxyapatite particles that form bone mineral, where collagen fibers connect these particles so as to form a composite. Therefore, the synthesis of calcium phosphate nanoparticles in the systems used in this work can advance current understanding of mineralization processes that result in the formation of bone mineral.

  13. Compact electrically controlled broadband liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber polarizer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Lei; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2009-01-01

    An electrically controlled liquid crystal photonic-bandgap fiber polarizer is experimentally demonstrated. A maximum 21.3dB electrically tunable polarization extinction ratio is achieved with 45° rotatable transmission axis as well as switched on and off in 1300nm–1600nm.......An electrically controlled liquid crystal photonic-bandgap fiber polarizer is experimentally demonstrated. A maximum 21.3dB electrically tunable polarization extinction ratio is achieved with 45° rotatable transmission axis as well as switched on and off in 1300nm–1600nm....

  14. Bistable switching in dual-frequency liquid crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palto, S. P., E-mail: palto@online.ru; Barnik, M I [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2006-06-15

    Various bistable switching modes in nematic liquid crystals with frequency inversion of the sign of dielectric anisotropy are revealed and investigated. Switching between states with different helicoidal distributions of the director field of a liquid crystal, as well as between uniform and helicoidal states, is realized by dual-frequency waveforms of a driving voltage. A distinctive feature of the dual-frequency switching is that the uniform planar distribution of the director field may correspond to a thermodynamically equilibrium state, and the chirality of an LC is not a necessary condition for switching to a helicoidal state.

  15. Hydrothermal decomposition of liquid crystal in subcritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang, Xuning; He, Wenzhi; Li, Guangming; Huang, Juwen; Lu, Shangming; Hou, Lianjiao

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Hydrothermal technology can effectively decompose the liquid crystal of 4-octoxy-4'-cyanobiphenyl. • The decomposition rate reached 97.6% under the optimized condition. • Octoxy-4'-cyanobiphenyl was mainly decomposed into simple and innocuous products. • The mechanism analysis reveals the decomposition reaction process. - Abstract: Treatment of liquid crystal has important significance for the environment protection and human health. This study proposed a hydrothermal process to decompose the liquid crystal of 4-octoxy-4′-cyanobiphenyl. Experiments were conducted with a 5.7 mL stainless tube reactor and heated by a salt-bath. Factors affecting the decomposition rate of 4-octoxy-4′-cyanobiphenyl were evaluated with HPLC. The decomposed liquid products were characterized by GC-MS. Under optimized conditions i.e., 0.2 mL H 2 O 2 supply, pH value 6, temperature 275 °C and reaction time 5 min, 97.6% of 4-octoxy-4′-cyanobiphenyl was decomposed into simple and environment-friendly products. Based on the mechanism analysis and products characterization, a possible hydrothermal decomposition pathway was proposed. The results indicate that hydrothermal technology is a promising choice for liquid crystal treatment

  16. Large three-dimensional photonic crystals based on monocrystalline liquid crystal blue phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Wei; Hou, Chien-Tsung; Li, Cheng-Chang; Jau, Hung-Chang; Wang, Chun-Ta; Hong, Ching-Lang; Guo, Duan-Yi; Wang, Cheng-Yu; Chiang, Sheng-Ping; Bunning, Timothy J; Khoo, Iam-Choon; Lin, Tsung-Hsien

    2017-09-28

    Although there have been intense efforts to fabricate large three-dimensional photonic crystals in order to realize their full potential, the technologies developed so far are still beset with various material processing and cost issues. Conventional top-down fabrications are costly and time-consuming, whereas natural self-assembly and bottom-up fabrications often result in high defect density and limited dimensions. Here we report the fabrication of extraordinarily large monocrystalline photonic crystals by controlling the self-assembly processes which occur in unique phases of liquid crystals that exhibit three-dimensional photonic-crystalline properties called liquid-crystal blue phases. In particular, we have developed a gradient-temperature technique that enables three-dimensional photonic crystals to grow to lateral dimensions of ~1 cm (~30,000 of unit cells) and thickness of ~100 μm (~ 300 unit cells). These giant single crystals exhibit extraordinarily sharp photonic bandgaps with high reflectivity, long-range periodicity in all dimensions and well-defined lattice orientation.Conventional fabrication approaches for large-size three-dimensional photonic crystals are problematic. By properly controlling the self-assembly processes, the authors report the fabrication of monocrystalline blue phase liquid crystals that exhibit three-dimensional photonic-crystalline properties.

  17. Using Quartz Crystal Microbalance for Field Measurement of Liquid Viscosities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingsong Bai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The field measurement of liquid viscosities, especially the high viscous liquids, is challenging and often requires expensive equipment, long processing time, and lots of reagent. We use quartz crystal microbalances (QCMs operating in solution which are also sensitive to the viscosity and density of the contacting solution. QCMs are typically investigated for sensor applications in which one surface of QCM completely immersed in Newtonian liquid, but the viscous damping in liquids would cause not only large frequency shifts but also large losses in the quality factor Q leading to instability and even cessation of oscillation. A novel mass-sensitivity-based method for field measurement of liquid viscosities using a QCM is demonstrated in this paper and a model describing the influence of the liquid properties on the oscillation frequency is established as well. Two groups of verified experiments were performed and the experimental results show that the presented method is effective and possesses potential applications.

  18. Magneto-optic dynamics in a ferromagnetic nematic liquid crystal

    OpenAIRE

    Potisk, Tilen; Mertelj, Alenka; Sebastian, Nerea; Osterman, Natan; Lisjak, Darja; Brand, Helmut R.; Pleiner, Harald; Svenšek, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    We investigate dynamic magneto-optic effects in a ferromagnetic nematic liquid crystal experimentally and theoretically. Experimentally we measure the magnetization and the phase difference of the transmitted light when an external magnetic field is applied. As a model we study the coupled dynamics of the magnetization, M, and the director field, n, associated with the liquid crystalline orientational order. We demonstrate that the experimentally studied macroscopic dynamic behavior reveals t...

  19. Liquid Crystals - The 'Fourth' Phase of Matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    possibilities of novel technological applications. Liquid crystalline materials ... advanced instrumentation, including laptops and futuristic flat panel displays. .... The twist grain-boundary phase is formed when the layers of a smectic A phase are .... the optic axis) is uniformly oriented parallel to the glass plate. (see Figure IIa).

  20. Simulation of nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of liquid crystals, polymers liquid crystals and conventional polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerard, H.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study is the simulation and the exploitation of NMR spectra of nematic liquid crystals and of polymers. The NMR forms of lines are analysed owing to two complementary models. The first (single conformation model) describes the purely molecular contribution (geometry and internal movements in the molecule), the second the contribution of collective movements (visco elastic modes). Recallings on the NMR method and the orientational order notion within the nematic phase, are given in the first part, where these two models are also described. In a second part these models are applied to data relative to nematic molecules of weak molecular mass and to nematic polymers. This application allows to obtain informations on the structure and the internal movements of the molecule, the orientational order prevailing within the phase and the visco-elastic properties of the studied material. At last it is demonstrated that extension of these models to NMR data of polymers which don't present nematic phase in pure phase allows to obtain similar informations if we consider that their amorphous phase presents locally a nematic order. 136 refs., 46 figs., 4 tabs

  1. Ultra-fast solid state electro-optical modulator based on liquid crystal polymer and liquid crystal composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouskova, Elena; Sio, Luciano De, E-mail: luciano@beamco.com; Vergara, Rafael; Tabiryan, Nelson [Beam Engineering for Advanced Measurements Company, Winter Park, Florida 32789 (United States); White, Timothy J.; Bunning, Timothy J. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433-7707 (United States)

    2014-12-08

    A different generation of polymer-dispersed liquid crystals (PDLCs) based on a liquid crystalline polymer host is reported wherein the fluid behavior of the reactive mesogenic monomer is an enabler to concentration windows (liquid crystal polymer/liquid crystal) (and subsequent morphologies) not previously explored. These liquid crystal (LC) polymer/LC composites, LCPDLCs, exhibit excellent optical and electro-optical properties with negligible scattering losses in both the ON and OFF states. These systems thus have application in systems where fast phase modulation of optical signal instead of amplitude control is needed. Polarized optical microscopy and high resolution scanning electron microscopy confirm a bicontinuous morphology composed of aligned LC polymer coexisting with a phase separated LC fluid. Operating voltages, switching times, and spectra of LCPDLCs compare favourably to conventional PDLC films. The LCPDLCs exhibit a low switching voltage (4–5 V/μm), symmetric and submillisecond (200 μs) on/off response times, and high transmission in both the as formed and switched state in a phase modulation geometry.

  2. Penetration of RBD palm olein in a lyotropic liquid crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamdan bin Suhaimi; Anuar bin Kasim

    1993-01-01

    The inner structure of lamellar liquid crystal before and after addition of RDB palm olein was characterised employing small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) technique and optical microscopy. Results show that the addition of RDB palm olein to both layered structure indicate a temporary disturbance resulting in penetration of RDB palm olein into the layered structure

  3. Surface dynamics and mechanics in liquid crystal polymer coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, D.; Broer, D.J.; Chien, L.-C.; Coles, H.J.; Kikuchi, H.; Smalyukh, I.I.

    2015-01-01

    Based on liquid crystal networks we developed 'smart' coatings with responsive surface topographies. Either by prepatterning or by the formation of self-organized structures they can be switched on and off in a pre-designed manner. Here we provide an overview of our methods to generate coatings that

  4. Liquid Crystal Gel Reduces Age Spots by Promoting Skin Turnover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Musashi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that liquid crystals structurally resembling the intercellular lipids in the stratum corneum can beneficially affect the skin when applied topically by stimulating the skin’s natural regenerative functions and accelerating epidermal turnover. In the present study, the effects of applying low concentrations of a liquid crystal gel of our own creation were evaluated using epidermal thickening in mouse skin as an assay for effective stimulation of epidermal turnover. A liquid crystal gel was also applied topically to human facial skin, and analysis was conducted using before-and-after photographs of age spots, measurements of L* values that reflect degree of skin pigmentation, single-layer samples of the stratum corneum obtained via tape-stripping, and measurements of trans-epidermal water loss that reflect the status of the skin’s barrier function. The results suggested that cost-effective creams containing as low as 5% liquid crystal gel might be effective and safely sold as skin care products targeting age spots and other problems relating to uneven skin pigmentation.

  5. On asymptotic isotropy for a hydrodynamic model of liquid crystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dai, M.; Feireisl, Eduard; Rocca, E.; Schimperna, G.; Schonbek, M.E.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 97, 3-4 (2016), s. 189-210 ISSN 0921-7134 Grant - others:European Research Council(XE) MATHEF(320078) Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : liquid crystal * Q-tensor description * long-time behavior Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.933, year: 2016 http://content.iospress.com/articles/asymptotic-analysis/asy1348

  6. On a hyperbolic system arising in liquid crystals modeling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feireisl, Eduard; Rocca, E.; Schimperna, G.; Zarnescu, A.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 1 (2018), s. 15-35 ISSN 0219-8916 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 320078 - MATHEF Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : dissipative solution * liquid crystal * weak-strong uniqueness Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 0.940, year: 2016 https://www.worldscientific.com/doi/abs/10.1142/S0219891618500029

  7. Liquid crystal elastomer coatings with programmed response of surface profile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babakhanova, G.; Turiv, T.; Guo, Y.; Hendrikx, M.; Wei, Q.H.; Schenning, A.P.H.J.; Broer, D.J.; Lavrentovich, O.D.

    2018-01-01

    Stimuli-responsive liquid crystal elastomers with molecular orientation coupled to rubber-like elasticity show a great potential as elements in soft robotics, sensing, and transport systems. The orientational order defines their mechanical response to external stimuli, such as thermally activated

  8. Ultraviolet-pumped liquid-crystal dye-laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolotti, M.; Sbrolli, L.; Scudieri, F.; Papa, T.

    1981-01-01

    The possibility offered by the orientation properties of liquid crystals as a matrix for dye lasers is shown. In particular, the linear polarization of emitted light can be changed by acting with an external magnetic field on the molecular nematic director. (author)

  9. Advances in chemical physics advances in liquid crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Prigogine, Ilya; Vij, Jagdish K

    2009-01-01

    Prigogine and Rice's highly acclaimed series, Advances in Chemical Physics, provides a forum for critical, authoritative reviews of current topics in every area of chemical physics. Edited by J.K. Vij, this volume focuses on recent advances in liquid crystals with significant, up-to-date chapters authored by internationally recognized researchers in the field.

  10. Optical monitoring of gases with cholesteric liquid crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, Y.; Pacheco Morillo, K.B.; Bastiaansen, C.W.M.; Broer, D.J.; Sijbesma, R.P.

    2010-01-01

    A new approach to optical monitors for gases is introduced using cholesteric liquid crystals doped with reactive chiral compounds. The approach is based on cholesteric pitch length changes caused by a change in helical twisting power (HTP) of the chiral dopants upon reaction with the analyte. The

  11. Alignment of carbon nanotubes in nematic liquid crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoot, van der P.P.A.M.; Popa-Nita, V.; Kralj, S.

    2008-01-01

    The self-organizing properties of nematic liquid crystals can be used to align carbon nanotubes dispersed in them. Because the nanotubes are so much thinner than the elastic penetration length, the alignment is caused by the coupling of the unperturbed director field to the anisotropic interfacial

  12. Chiral HPLC and physical characterisation of orthoconic antiferroelectric liquid crystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vojtylová, Terézia; Żurowska, M.; Milewska, K.; Hamplová, Věra; Sýkora, D.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 9 (2016), s. 1244-1250 ISSN 0267-8292 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD14007; GA ČR GA15-02843S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : liquid crystals * chiral HPLC * orthoconic antiferroelectric LC Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.661, year: 2016

  13. The finite-size effect in thin liquid crystal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śliwa, I.

    2018-05-01

    Effects of surface ordering in liquid crystal systems confined between cell plates are of great theoretical and experimental interest. Liquid crystals introduced in thin cells are known to be strongly stabilized and ordered by cell plates. We introduce a new theoretical method for analyzing the effect of surfaces on local molecular ordering in thin liquid crystal systems with planar geometry of the smectic layers. Our results show that, due to the interplay between pair long-range intermolecular forces and nonlocal, relatively short-range, surface interactions, both orientational and translational orders of liquid crystal molecules across confining cells are very complex. In particular, it is demonstrated that the SmA, nematic, and isotropic phases can coexist. The phase transitions from SmA to nematic, as well as from nematic to isotropic phases, occur not simultaneously in the whole volume of the system but begin to appear locally in some regions of the LC sample. Phase transition temperatures are demonstrated to be strongly affected by the thickness of the LC system. The dependence of the corresponding shifts of phase transition temperatures on the layer number is shown to exhibit a power law character. This new type of scaling behavior is concerned with the coexistence of local phases in finite systems. The influence of a specific character of interactions of molecules with surfaces and other molecules on values of the resulting critical exponents is also analyzed.

  14. On asymptotic isotropy for a hydrodynamic model of liquid crystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dai, M.; Feireisl, Eduard; Rocca, E.; Schimperna, G.; Schonbek, M.E.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 97, 3-4 (2016), s. 189-210 ISSN 0921-7134 Grant - others:European Research Council(XE) MATHEF(320078) Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : liquid crystal * Q-tensor description * long-time behavior Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.933, year: 2016 http://content.iospress.com/articles/asymptotic- analysis /asy1348

  15. Metric approach for sound propagation in nematic liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, E.; Fumeron, S.; Moraes, F.

    2013-02-01

    In the eikonal approach, we describe sound propagation near topological defects of nematic liquid crystals as geodesics of a non-Euclidian manifold endowed with an effective metric tensor. The relation between the acoustics of the medium and this geometrical description is given by Fermat's principle. We calculate the ray trajectories and propose a diffraction experiment to retrieve information about the elastic constants.

  16. NMR studies of macroscopic and microscopic properties of liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, J.R.

    1998-03-01

    The work presented is concerned with studies of orientational order in liquid crystals and the behaviour of certain mesophases. The experimental technique used in common with all the work is deuterium NMR spectroscopy. Much of the work involves studies of the orientational order of deuteriated solute molecules dissolved in liquid crystal solvents. Chapter 1 gives an introduction to liquid crystals followed by a quantitative description of orientational order. Deuterium NMR in liquid crystals is described and an outline of the molecular field theory behind the orientational order of a rigid, biaxial solute in a uniaxial mesophase is given. In Chapter 2 a novel type of mesophase induction is studied using NMR, where a solute induces up to two extra phases in a discotic mesogen depending on its concentration. The purpose of this work is to try to gain an understanding into the mechanism of the phase induction involved. Chapter 3 is concerned primarily with the macroscopic behaviour of the nematic phase formed by a semi-rigid main-chain polymer in solution. Of particular interest is the study of the reorientation of the monodomain, once the director has been rotated with respect to the magnetic field of the NMR spectrometer. A mesogen which has been claimed to exhibit a biaxial nematic phase is studied in Chapter 4, in order to determine the symmetry of the phase using NMR. Finally, Chapter 5 deals with the differing behaviour of a liquid crystal monomer and its dimer dissolved in common nematic solvents in order to determine whether this agrees with molecular field theory. (author)

  17. Frequency tunability of solid-core photonic crystal fibers filled with nanoparticle-doped liquid crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Scolari, Lara; Gauza, Sebastian; Xianyu, Haiqing; Zhai, Lei; Eskildsen, Lars; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Wu, Shin-Tson; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2009-01-01

    We infiltrate liquid crystals doped with BaTiO3 nanoparticles in a photonic crystal fiber and compare the measured transmission spectrum with the one achieved without dopant. New interesting features, such as frequency modulation response of the device and a transmission spectrum with tunable attenuation on the short wavelength side of the widest bandgap, suggest a potential application of this device as a tunable all-in-fiber gain equalization filter with an adjustable slope. The tunability ...

  18. Time-resolved crystallization of deeply cooled liquid hydrogen isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehnel, Matthias

    2014-02-15

    This thesis serves two main purposes: 1. The introduction of a novel experimental method to investigate phase change dynamics of supercooled liquids 2. First-time measurements for the crystallization behaviour for hydrogen isotopes under various conditions (1) The new method is established by the synergy of a liquid microjet of ∼ 5 μm diameter and a scattering technique with high spatial resolution, here linear Raman spectroscopy. Due to the high directional stability and the known velocity of the liquid filament, its traveling axis corresponds to a time axis static in space. Utilizing evaporative cooling in a vacuum environment, the propagating liquid cools down rapidly and eventually experiences a phase transition to the crystalline state. This temporal evolution is probed along the filament axis, ultimately resulting in a time resolution of 10 ns. The feasibility of this approach is proven successfully within the following experiments. (2) A main object of study are para-hydrogen liquid filaments. Raman spectra reveal a temperature gradient of the liquid across the filament. This behaviour can quantitatively be reconstructed by numerical simulations using a layered model and is rooted in the effectiveness of evaporative cooling on the surface and a finite thermal conductivity. The deepest supercoolings achieved are ∼ 30% below the melting point, at which the filament starts to solidify from the surface towards the core. With a crystal growth velocity extracted from the data the appropriate growth mechanism is identified. The crystal structure that initially forms is metastable and probably the result of Ostwald's rule of stages. Indications for a transition within the solid towards the stable equilibrium phase support this interpretation. The analog isotope ortho-deuterium is evidenced to behave qualitatively similar with quantitative differences being mass related. In further measurements, isotopic mixtures of para-hydrogen and ortho-deuterium are

  19. Time-resolved crystallization of deeply cooled liquid hydrogen isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehnel, Matthias

    2014-02-01

    This thesis serves two main purposes: 1. The introduction of a novel experimental method to investigate phase change dynamics of supercooled liquids 2. First-time measurements for the crystallization behaviour for hydrogen isotopes under various conditions (1) The new method is established by the synergy of a liquid microjet of ∼ 5 μm diameter and a scattering technique with high spatial resolution, here linear Raman spectroscopy. Due to the high directional stability and the known velocity of the liquid filament, its traveling axis corresponds to a time axis static in space. Utilizing evaporative cooling in a vacuum environment, the propagating liquid cools down rapidly and eventually experiences a phase transition to the crystalline state. This temporal evolution is probed along the filament axis, ultimately resulting in a time resolution of 10 ns. The feasibility of this approach is proven successfully within the following experiments. (2) A main object of study are para-hydrogen liquid filaments. Raman spectra reveal a temperature gradient of the liquid across the filament. This behaviour can quantitatively be reconstructed by numerical simulations using a layered model and is rooted in the effectiveness of evaporative cooling on the surface and a finite thermal conductivity. The deepest supercoolings achieved are ∼ 30% below the melting point, at which the filament starts to solidify from the surface towards the core. With a crystal growth velocity extracted from the data the appropriate growth mechanism is identified. The crystal structure that initially forms is metastable and probably the result of Ostwald's rule of stages. Indications for a transition within the solid towards the stable equilibrium phase support this interpretation. The analog isotope ortho-deuterium is evidenced to behave qualitatively similar with quantitative differences being mass related. In further measurements, isotopic mixtures of para-hydrogen and ortho-deuterium are

  20. Time-resolved crystallization of deeply cooled liquid hydrogen isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehnel, Matthias

    2014-02-15

    This thesis serves two main purposes: 1. The introduction of a novel experimental method to investigate phase change dynamics of supercooled liquids 2. First-time measurements for the crystallization behaviour for hydrogen isotopes under various conditions (1) The new method is established by the synergy of a liquid microjet of ∼ 5 μm diameter and a scattering technique with high spatial resolution, here linear Raman spectroscopy. Due to the high directional stability and the known velocity of the liquid filament, its traveling axis corresponds to a time axis static in space. Utilizing evaporative cooling in a vacuum environment, the propagating liquid cools down rapidly and eventually experiences a phase transition to the crystalline state. This temporal evolution is probed along the filament axis, ultimately resulting in a time resolution of 10 ns. The feasibility of this approach is proven successfully within the following experiments. (2) A main object of study are para-hydrogen liquid filaments. Raman spectra reveal a temperature gradient of the liquid across the filament. This behaviour can quantitatively be reconstructed by numerical simulations using a layered model and is rooted in the effectiveness of evaporative cooling on the surface and a finite thermal conductivity. The deepest supercoolings achieved are ∼ 30% below the melting point, at which the filament starts to solidify from the surface towards the core. With a crystal growth velocity extracted from the data the appropriate growth mechanism is identified. The crystal structure that initially forms is metastable and probably the result of Ostwald's rule of stages. Indications for a transition within the solid towards the stable equilibrium phase support this interpretation. The analog isotope ortho-deuterium is evidenced to behave qualitatively similar with quantitative differences being mass related. In further measurements, isotopic mixtures of para-hydrogen and ortho-deuterium are

  1. Liquid crystals for organic thin-film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iino, Hiroaki; Usui, Takayuki; Hanna, Jun-Ichi

    2015-04-01

    Crystalline thin films of organic semiconductors are a good candidate for field effect transistor (FET) materials in printed electronics. However, there are currently two main problems, which are associated with inhomogeneity and poor thermal durability of these films. Here we report that liquid crystalline materials exhibiting a highly ordered liquid crystal phase of smectic E (SmE) can solve both these problems. We design a SmE liquid crystalline material, 2-decyl-7-phenyl-[1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothiophene (Ph-BTBT-10), for FETs and synthesize it. This material provides uniform and molecularly flat polycrystalline thin films reproducibly when SmE precursor thin films are crystallized, and also exhibits high durability of films up to 200 °C. In addition, the mobility of FETs is dramatically enhanced by about one order of magnitude (over 10 cm2 V-1 s-1) after thermal annealing at 120 °C in bottom-gate-bottom-contact FETs. We anticipate the use of SmE liquid crystals in solution-processed FETs may help overcome upcoming difficulties with novel technologies for printed electronics.

  2. Magneto-optic dynamics in a ferromagnetic nematic liquid crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potisk, Tilen; Mertelj, Alenka; Sebastián, Nerea; Osterman, Natan; Lisjak, Darja; Brand, Helmut R.; Pleiner, Harald; Svenšek, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    We investigate dynamic magneto-optic effects in a ferromagnetic nematic liquid crystal experimentally and theoretically. Experimentally we measure the magnetization and the phase difference of the transmitted light when an external magnetic field is applied. As a model we study the coupled dynamics of the magnetization, M , and the director field, n , associated with the liquid crystalline orientational order. We demonstrate that the experimentally studied macroscopic dynamic behavior reveals the importance of a dynamic cross-coupling between M and n . The experimental data are used to extract the value of the dissipative cross-coupling coefficient. We also make concrete predictions about how reversible cross-coupling terms between the magnetization and the director could be detected experimentally by measurements of the transmitted light intensity as well as by analyzing the azimuthal angle of the magnetization and the director out of the plane spanned by the anchoring axis and the external magnetic field. We derive the eigenmodes of the coupled system and study their relaxation rates. We show that in the usual experimental setup used for measuring the relaxation rates of the splay-bend or twist-bend eigenmodes of a nematic liquid crystal one expects for a ferromagnetic nematic liquid crystal a mixture of at least two eigenmodes.

  3. Mixing effects in the crystallization of supercooled quantum binary liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kühnel, M.; Kalinin, A.; Fernández, J. M.; Tejeda, G.; Moreno, E.; Montero, S.; Tramonto, F.; Galli, D. E.; Nava, M.; Grisenti, R. E.

    2015-01-01

    By means of Raman spectroscopy of liquid microjets, we have investigated the crystallization process of supercooled quantum liquid mixtures composed of parahydrogen (pH 2 ) or orthodeuterium (oD 2 ) diluted with small amounts of neon. We show that the introduction of the Ne impurities affects the crystallization kinetics in terms of a significant reduction of the measured pH 2 and oD 2 crystal growth rates, similarly to what found in our previous work on supercooled pH 2 -oD 2 liquid mixtures [Kühnel et al., Phys. Rev. B 89, 180201(R) (2014)]. Our experimental results, in combination with path-integral simulations of the supercooled liquid mixtures, suggest in particular a correlation between the measured growth rates and the ratio of the effective particle sizes originating from quantum delocalization effects. We further show that the crystalline structure of the mixtures is also affected to a large extent by the presence of the Ne impurities, which likely initiate the freezing process through the formation of Ne-rich crystallites

  4. Mixing effects in the crystallization of supercooled quantum binary liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kühnel, M.; Kalinin, A. [Institut für Kernphysik, J. W. Goethe-Universität, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Fernández, J. M.; Tejeda, G.; Moreno, E.; Montero, S. [Laboratory of Molecular Fluid Dynamics, Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Tramonto, F.; Galli, D. E. [Laboratorio di Calcolo Parallelo e di Simulazioni di Materia Condensata, Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Nava, M. [Laboratorio di Calcolo Parallelo e di Simulazioni di Materia Condensata, Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Computational Science, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, ETH Zurich, USI Campus, Via Giuseppe Buffi 13, CH-6900 Lugano (Switzerland); Grisenti, R. E. [Institut für Kernphysik, J. W. Goethe-Universität, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); GSI - Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2015-08-14

    By means of Raman spectroscopy of liquid microjets, we have investigated the crystallization process of supercooled quantum liquid mixtures composed of parahydrogen (pH{sub 2}) or orthodeuterium (oD{sub 2}) diluted with small amounts of neon. We show that the introduction of the Ne impurities affects the crystallization kinetics in terms of a significant reduction of the measured pH{sub 2} and oD{sub 2} crystal growth rates, similarly to what found in our previous work on supercooled pH{sub 2}-oD{sub 2} liquid mixtures [Kühnel et al., Phys. Rev. B 89, 180201(R) (2014)]. Our experimental results, in combination with path-integral simulations of the supercooled liquid mixtures, suggest in particular a correlation between the measured growth rates and the ratio of the effective particle sizes originating from quantum delocalization effects. We further show that the crystalline structure of the mixtures is also affected to a large extent by the presence of the Ne impurities, which likely initiate the freezing process through the formation of Ne-rich crystallites.

  5. Optimized Wavelength-Tuned Nonlinear Frequency Conversion Using a Liquid Crystal Clad Waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Mark A. (Inventor)

    2018-01-01

    An optimized wavelength-tuned nonlinear frequency conversion process using a liquid crystal clad waveguide. The process includes implanting ions on a top surface of a lithium niobate crystal to form an ion implanted lithium niobate layer. The process also includes utilizing a tunable refractive index of a liquid crystal to rapidly change an effective index of the lithium niobate crystal.

  6. Electrically tunable zero dispersion wavelengths in photonic crystal fibers filled with a dual frequency addressable liquid crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahle, Markus; Kitzerow, Heinz-Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    We present a liquid crystal (LC) infiltrated photonic crystal fiber, which enables the electrical tuning of the position of zero dispersion wavelengths (ZDWs). A dual frequency addressable liquid crystal is aligned perpendicular on the inclusion walls of a photonic crystal fiber, which results in an escaped radial director field. The orientation of the LC is controlled by applying an external electric field. Due to the high index of the liquid crystal the fiber guides light by the photonic band gap effect. Multiple ZDWs exist in the visible and near infrared. The positions of the ZDWs can be either blue or red shifted depending on the frequency of the applied voltage

  7. Discrimination between biological interfaces and crystal-packing contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Tsuchiya

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Yuko Tsuchiya1, Haruki Nakamura2, Kengo Kinoshita1,31Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minatoku, Tokyo, 108-8639, Japan; 2Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, 3-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871, Japan; 3Bioinformatics Research and Development, JST, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama, 332-0012, JapanAbstract: A discrimination method between biologically relevant interfaces and artificial crystal-packing contacts in crystal structures was constructed. The method evaluates protein-protein interfaces in terms of complementarities for hydrophobicity, electrostatic potential and shape on the protein surfaces, and chooses the most probable biological interfaces among all possible contacts in the crystal. The method uses a discriminator named as “COMP”, which is a linear combination of the complementarities for the above three surface features and does not correlate with the contact area. The discrimination of homo-dimer interfaces from symmetry-related crystal-packing contacts based on the COMP value achieved the modest success rate. Subsequent detailed review of the discrimination results raised the success rate to about 88.8%. In addition, our discrimination method yielded some clues for understanding the interaction patterns in several examples in the PDB. Thus, the COMP discriminator can also be used as an indicator of the “biological-ness” of protein-protein interfaces.Keywords: protein-protein interaction, complementarity analysis, homo-dimer interface, crystal-packing contact, biological interfaces

  8. Variation along liquid isomorphs of the driving force for crystallization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ulf Rørbæk; Adrjanowicz, Karolina; Niss, Kristine

    2017-01-01

    at a reference temperature. More general analysis allows interpretation of experimental data for molecular liquids such as dimethyl phthalate and indomethacin, and suggests that the isomorph scaling exponent γ in these cases is an increasing function of density, although this cannot be seen in measurements......We investigate the variation of the driving force for crystallization of a supercooled liquid along isomorphs, curves along which structure and dynamics are invariant. The variation is weak, and can be predicted accurately for the Lennard-Jones fluid using a recently developed formalism and data...

  9. Alkyltributylphosphonium chloride ionic liquids: synthesis, physicochemical properties and crystal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamová, Gabriela; Gardas, Ramesh L; Nieuwenhuyzen, Mark; Puga, Alberto V; Rebelo, Luís Paulo N; Robertson, Allan J; Seddon, Kenneth R

    2012-07-21

    A series of alkyltributylphosphonium chloride ionic liquids, prepared from tributylphosphine and the respective 1-chloroalkane, C(n)H(2n+1)Cl (where n = 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12 or 14), is reported. This work is a continuation of an extended series of tetraalkylphosphonium ionic liquids, where the focus is on the variability of n and its impact on the physical properties, such as melting points/glass transitions, thermal stability, density and viscosity. Experimental density and viscosity data were interpreted using QPSR and group contribution methods and the crystal structure of propyl(tributyl)phosphonium chloride is detailed.

  10. Large Electro-Optic Kerr-Effect in Ionic Liquid Crystals: Connecting Features of Liquid Crystals and Polyelectrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlick, Michael Christian; Kapernaum, Nadia; Neidhardt, Manuel; Wöhrle, Tobias; Stöckl, Yannick; Laschat, Sabine; Gießelmann, Frank

    2018-06-06

    The electro-optic Kerr effect in the isotropic phase of two ionic liquid crystals (ILCs) is investigated and compared to the Kerr effect in non-ionic liquid crystals (LCs) with same phase sequences, namely direct isotropic to hexagonal columnar transitions and direct isotropic to smectic-A transitions. Up to electric field amplitudes of some 106 V m-1, the optical birefringence induced in the isotropic phases follows Kerr's law and strongly increases when the temperature approaches the transition temperature into the particular liquid crystalline phase. Close to the transition, maximum Kerr constants in the order of 10-11 m V-2 are found, which are more than ten times higher than the Kerr constant of nitrobenzene, a strongly dipolar fluid with a huge Kerr effect applied in optical shutters and phase modulators. In comparison to their non-ionic LC counterparts the Kerr effect in ILCs is found to be enhanced in magnitude, but slowed-down in speed, showing rise times in the order of ten milliseconds. These remarkable differences are attributed to the presence of counterion polarization well-known from complex ionic fluids such as polyelectrolytes or ionic micellar solutions. ILCs thus combine the Kerr effect features of liquid crystals and complex ionic fluids. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Crystallization of glass-forming liquids: Specific surface energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmelzer, Jürn W. P.; Abyzov, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    A generalization of the Stefan-Skapski-Turnbull relation for the melt-crystal specific interfacial energy is developed in terms of the generalized Gibbs approach extending its standard formulation to thermodynamic non-equilibrium states. With respect to crystal nucleation, this relation is required in order to determine the parameters of the critical crystal clusters being a prerequisite for the computation of the work of critical cluster formation. As one of its consequences, a relation for the dependence of the specific surface energy of critical clusters on temperature and pressure is derived applicable for small and moderate deviations from liquid-crystal macroscopic equilibrium states. Employing the Stefan-Skapski-Turnbull relation, general expressions for the size and the work of formation of critical crystal clusters are formulated. The resulting expressions are much more complex as compared to the respective relations obtained via the classical Gibbs theory. Latter relations are retained as limiting cases of these more general expressions for moderate undercoolings. By this reason, the formulated, here, general relations for the specification of the critical cluster size and the work of critical cluster formation give a key for an appropriate interpretation of a variety of crystallization phenomena occurring at large undercoolings which cannot be understood in terms of the Gibbs’ classical treatment.

  12. High-speed imaging polarimetry using liquid crystal modulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambs P.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with dynamic polarimetric imaging techniques. The basics of modern polarimetry have been known for one and a half century, but no practical high-speed implementation providing the full polarization information is currently available. Various methods are reviewed which prove to be a trade-off between the complexity of the optical set-up and the amount of polarimetric information they provide (ie the number of components of the Stokes vector. Techniques using liquid crystal devices, incepted in the late 1990's, are emphasized. Optical set-ups we implemented are presented. We particularly focus on high-speed techniques (i.e. faster than 200 Hz using ferroelectric liquid crystal devices.

  13. Electrically tuned photoluminescence in large pitch cholesteric liquid crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middha, Manju; Kumar, Rishi; Raina, K. K.

    2014-01-01

    Cholesteric liquid crystals are known as 1-D photonic band gap materials due to their periodic helical supramolecular structure and larger birefringence. Depending upon the helical twisted pitch length, they give the characteristic contrast due to selective Bragg reflections when viewed through the polarizing optical microscope and hence affect the electro-optic properties. So the optimization of chiral dopant concentration in nematic liquid crystal leads to control the transmission of polarized light through the microscope. Hence transmission based polarizing optical microscope is used for the characterization of helical pitch length in the optical texture. The unwinding of helical pitch was observed with the application of electric field which affects the intensity of photoluminescence

  14. Modeling texture transitions in cholesteric liquid crystal droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selinger, Robin; Gimenez-Pinto, Vianney; Lu, Shin-Ying; Selinger, Jonathan; Konya, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    Cholesteric liquid crystals can be switched reversibly between planar and focal-conic textures, a property enabling their application in bistable displays, liquid crystal writing tablets, e-books, and color switching ``e-skins.'' To explore voltage-pulse induced switching in cholesteric droplets, we perform simulation studies of director dynamics in three dimensions. Electrostatics calculations are solved at each time step using an iterative relaxation method. We demonstrate that as expected, a low amplitude pulse drives the transition from planar to focal conic, while a high amplitude pulse drives the transition from focal conic back to the planar state. We use the model to explore the effects of droplet shape, aspect ratio, and anchoring conditions, with the goal of minimizing both response time and energy consumption.

  15. Neutron scattering studies of molecular conformations in liquid crystal polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noirez, L.; Moussa, F.; Cotton, J. P.; Keller, P.; Pépy, G.

    1991-03-01

    A comblike liquid crystal polymer (LPC) is a polymer on which mesogenic molecules have been grafted. It exhibits a succession of liquid crystal phases. Usually the equilibrium conformation of an ordinary polymeric chain corresponds to a maximum entropy, i.e., to an isotropic spherical coil. How does the backbone of a LCP behave in the nematic and smectic field? Small-angle neutron scattering may answer this question. Such measurements are presented here on four different polymers as a function of temperature. An anisotropy of the backbone conformation is found in all these studied compounds, much more pronounced in the smectic phase than in the nematic phase: the backbone spreads more or less perpendicularly to its hanging cores. A comparison with existing theories and a discussion of these results is outlined.

  16. Phase-Shifting Liquid Crystal Interferometers for Microgravity Fluid Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, DeVon W.; Marshall, Keneth L.

    2002-01-01

    The initial focus of this project was to eliminate both of these problems in the Liquid Crystal Point-Diffraction Interferometer (LCPDI). Progress toward that goal will be described, along with the demonstration of a phase shifting Liquid Crystal Shearing Interferometer (LCSI) that was developed as part of this work. The latest LCPDI, other than a lens to focus the light from a test section onto a diffracting microsphere within the interferometer and a collimated laser for illumination, the pink region contained within the glass plates on the rod-mounted platform is the complete interferometer. The total width is approximately 1.5 inches with 0.25 inches on each side for bonding the electrical leads. It is 1 inch high and there are only four diffracting microspheres within the interferometer. As a result, it is very easy to align, achieving the first goal. The liquid crystal electro-optical response time is a function of layer thickness, with thinner devices switching faster due to a reduction in long-range viscoelastic forces between the LC molecules. The LCPDI has a liquid crystal layer thickness of 10 microns, which is controlled by plastic or glass microspheres embedded in epoxy 'pads' at the corners of the device. The diffracting spheres are composed of polystyrene/divinyl benzene polymer with an initial diameter of 15 microns. The spheres deform slightly when the interferometer is assembled to conform to the spacing produced by the microsphere-filled epoxy spacer pads. While the speed of this interferometer has not yet been tested, previous LCPDIs fabricated at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics switched at a rate of approximately 3.3 Hz, a factor of 10 slower than desired. We anticipate better performance when the speed of these interferometers is tested since they are approximately three times thinner. Phase shifting in these devices is a function of the AC voltage level applied to the liquid crystal. As the voltage increases, the dye in the liquid crystal

  17. Macroscopic chirality of a liquid crystal from nonchiral molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakli, A.; Nair, G. G.; Lee, C. K.; Sun, R.; Chien, L. C.

    2001-01-01

    The transfer of chirality from nonchiral polymer networks to the racemic B2 phase of nonchiral banana-shaped molecules is demonstrated. This corresponds to the transfer of chirality from an achiral material to another achiral material. There are two levels of chirality transfers. (a) On a microscopic level the presence of a polymer network (chiral or nonchiral) favors a chiral state over a thermodynamically stable racemic state due to the inversion symmetry breaking at the polymer-liquid crystal interfaces. (b) A macroscopically chiral (enantimerically enriched) sample can be produced if the polymer network has a helical structure, and/or contains chemically chiral groups. The chirality transfer can be locally suppressed by exposing the liquid crystal to a strong electric field treatment

  18. Dynamics of cylindrical domain walls in smectic C liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, I W; Wigham, E J

    2009-01-01

    An analysis of the dynamics of cylindrical domain walls in planar aligned samples of smectic C liquid crystals is presented. A circular magnetic field, induced by an electric current, drives a time-dependent reorientation of the corresponding radially dependent director field. Nonlinear approximations to the relevant nonlinear dynamic equation, derived from smectic continuum theory, are solved in a comoving coordinated frame: exact solutions are found for a π-wall and numerical solutions are calculated for π/2-walls. Each calculation begins with an assumed initial state for the director that is a prescribed cylindrical domain wall. Such an initial wall will proceed to expand or contract as its central core propagates radially inwards or outwards, depending on the boundary conditions for the director, the elastic constants, the magnitude of the field and the sign of the magnetic anisotropy of the liquid crystal

  19. Thermodynamic properties of a liquid crystal carbosilane dendrimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samosudova, Ya. S.; Markin, A. V.; Smirnova, N. N.; Ogurtsov, T. G.; Boiko, N. I.; Shibaev, V. P.

    2016-11-01

    The temperature dependence of the heat capacity of a first-generation liquid crystal carbosilane dendrimer with methoxyphenyl benzoate end groups is studied for the first time in the region of 6-370 K by means of precision adiabatic vacuum calorimetry. Physical transformations are observed in this interval of temperatures, and their standard thermodynamic characteristics are determined and discussed. Standard thermodynamic functions C p ° ( T), H°( T) - H°(0), S°( T) - S°(0), and G°( T) - H°(0) are calculated from the obtained experimental data for the region of T → 0 to 370 K. The standard entropy of formation of the dendrimer in the partially crystalline state at T = 298.15 K is calculated, and the standard entropy of the hypothetic reaction of its synthesis at this temperature is estimated. The thermodynamic properties of the studied dendrimer are compared to those of second- and fourth-generation liquid crystal carbosilane dendrimers with the same end groups studied earlier.

  20. Proton irradiation of liquid crystal based adaptive optical devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buis, E.J.; Berkhout, G.C.G.; Love, G.D.; Kirby, A.K.; Taylor, J.M.; Hannemann, S.; Collon, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    To assess its radiation hardness, a liquid crystal based adaptive optical element has been irradiated using a 60 MeV proton beam. The device with the functionality of an optical beam steerer was characterised before, during and after the irradiation. A systematic set of measurements on the transmission and beam deflection angles was carried out. The measurements showed that the transmission decreased only marginally and that its optical performance degraded only after a very high proton fluence (10 10 p/cm 2 ). The device showed complete annealing in the functionality as a beam steerer, which leads to the conclusion that the liquid crystal technology for optical devices is not vulnerable to proton irradiation as expected in space.

  1. Proton irradiation of liquid crystal based adaptive optical devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buis, E.J., E-mail: ernst-jan.buis@tno.nl [cosine Science and Computing BV, Niels Bohrweg 11, 2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands); Berkhout, G.C.G. [cosine Science and Computing BV, Niels Bohrweg 11, 2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands); Huygens Laboratory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9504, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Love, G.D.; Kirby, A.K.; Taylor, J.M. [Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Hannemann, S.; Collon, M.J. [cosine Research BV, Niels Bohrweg 11, 2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2012-01-01

    To assess its radiation hardness, a liquid crystal based adaptive optical element has been irradiated using a 60 MeV proton beam. The device with the functionality of an optical beam steerer was characterised before, during and after the irradiation. A systematic set of measurements on the transmission and beam deflection angles was carried out. The measurements showed that the transmission decreased only marginally and that its optical performance degraded only after a very high proton fluence (10{sup 10}p/cm{sup 2}). The device showed complete annealing in the functionality as a beam steerer, which leads to the conclusion that the liquid crystal technology for optical devices is not vulnerable to proton irradiation as expected in space.

  2. Color Gamut of a Nematic Liquid Crystal Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimomura, Teruo; Mada, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Shunsuke

    1980-05-01

    The theoretical color gamut of a nematic liquid crystal display is described. The color gamut of a tunable birefringence mode and a guest host mode are revealed with the CIE chromaticity diagram and color solid. In order to account for the quantitative color gamut, color matching between the given chromaticity coordinates and those calculated is investigated. Color matching is performed by a combination of three liquid crystal subcells (A, B, C), where each subcell receives the voltage VA, VB, VC or contains the dye amount a, b, c. Calculation of the value of voltage or dye amount was executed by the matrix representation method. The calculated data are in good agreement with the given data within 0.50 CIE-UNIT color difference in the 1964 CIE (U*, V*, W*) color scale.

  3. Thermal expansion accompanying the glass-liquid transition and crystallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Q. Jiang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the linear thermal expansion behaviors of a Zr-based (Vitreloy 1 bulk metallic glass in its as-cast, annealed and crystallized states. Accompanying the glass-liquid transition, the as-cast Vitreloy 1 shows a continuous decrease in the thermal expansivity, whereas the annealed glass shows a sudden increase. The crystallized Vitreloy 1 exhibits an almost unchanged thermal expansivity prior to its melting. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the nucleation of crystalline phases can induce a significant thermal shrinkage of the supercooled liquid, but with the growth of these nuclei, the thermal expansion again dominates. These results are explained in the framework of the potential energy landscape, advocating that the configurational and vibrational contributions to the thermal expansion of the glass depend on both, structure and temperature.

  4. Electrically Tunable Reflective Terahertz Phase Shifter Based on Liquid Crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Xia, Tianyu; Jing, Shuaicheng; Deng, Guangsheng; Lu, Hongbo; Fang, Yong; Yin, Zhiping

    2018-02-01

    We present a reflective spatial phase shifter which operates at terahertz regime above 325 GHz. The controllable permittivity of the nematic liquid crystals was utilized to realize a tunable terahertz (THz) reflective phase shifter. The reflective characteristics of the terahertz electromagnetic waves and the liquid crystal parameters were calculated and analyzed. We provide the simulation results for the effect of the incident angle of the plane wave on the reflection. The experiment was carried out considering an array consisting of 30 × 30 patch elements, printed on a 20 × 20 mm quartz substrate with 1-mm thickness. The phase shifter provides a tunable phase range of 300° over the frequency range of 325 to 337.6 GHz. The maximum phase shift of 331° is achieved at 330 GHz. The proposed phase shifter is a potential candidate for THz applications, particularly for reconfigurable reflectarrays.

  5. Domain Structures in Nematic Liquid Crystals on a Polycarbonate Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasily F. Shabanov

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Alignment of nematic liquid crystals on polycarbonate films obtained with the use of solvents with different solvations is studied. Domain structures occurring during the growth on the polymer surface against the background of the initial thread-like or schlieren texture are demonstrated. It is established by optical methods that the domains are stable formations visualizing the polymer surface structures. In nematic droplets, the temperature-induced transition from the domain structure with two extinction bands to the structure with four bands is observed. This transition is shown to be caused by reorientation of the nematic director in the liquid crystal volume from the planar alignment to the homeotropic state with the pronounced radial configuration of nematic molecules on the surface. The observed textures are compared with different combinations of the volume LC orientations and the radial distribution of the director field and the disclination lines at the polycarbonate surface.

  6. Soft Elasticity in Main Chain Liquid Crystal Elastomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anselm C. Griffin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Main chain liquid crystal elastomers exhibit several interesting phenomena, such as three different regimes of elastic response, unconventional stress-strain relationship in one of these regimes, and the shape memory effect. Investigations are beginning to reveal relationships between their macroscopic behavior and the nature of domain structure, microscopic smectic phase structure, relaxation mechanism, and sample history. These aspects of liquid crystal elastomers are briefly reviewed followed by a summary of the results of recent elastic and high-resolution X-ray diffraction studies of the shape memory effect and the dynamics of the formation of the smectic-C chevron-like layer structure. A possible route to realizing auxetic effect at molecular level is also discussed.

  7. A numerical method for eigenvalue problems in modeling liquid crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baglama, J.; Farrell, P.A.; Reichel, L.; Ruttan, A. [Kent State Univ., OH (United States); Calvetti, D. [Stevens Inst. of Technology, Hoboken, NJ (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Equilibrium configurations of liquid crystals in finite containments are minimizers of the thermodynamic free energy of the system. It is important to be able to track the equilibrium configurations as the temperature of the liquid crystals decreases. The path of the minimal energy configuration at bifurcation points can be computed from the null space of a large sparse symmetric matrix. We describe a new variant of the implicitly restarted Lanczos method that is well suited for the computation of extreme eigenvalues of a large sparse symmetric matrix, and we use this method to determine the desired null space. Our implicitly restarted Lanczos method determines adoptively a polynomial filter by using Leja shifts, and does not require factorization of the matrix. The storage requirement of the method is small, and this makes it attractive to use for the present application.

  8. Liquid crystal blue phases: stability, field effects and alignment

    OpenAIRE

    Gleeson, HF; Miller, RJ; Tian, L; Görtz, V; Goodby, JW

    2015-01-01

    The blue phases are fascinating structures in liquid crystals, fluids that exhibit cubic structures that have true crystalline order. The blue phases were discovered in the 1970s and were the subject of extensive research in the 1980s, when a deep understanding of many of their properties was established. The discovery that the blue phases could be stabilised to exist over wide temperature ranges meant that they became more than scientific curiosities and led to a recent resurgence in researc...

  9. Two-Dimensional Spatial Solitons in Nematic Liquid Crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Weiping; Xie Ruihua; Goong Chen; Belic, Milivoj; Yang Zhengping

    2009-01-01

    We study the propagation of spatial solitons in nematic liquid crystals, using the self-similar method. Analytical solutions in the form of self-similar solitons are obtained exactly. We confirm the stability of these solutions by direct numerical simulation, and find that the stable spatial solitons can exist in various forms, such as Gaussian solitons, radially symmetric solitons, multipole solitons, and soliton vortices.

  10. Smectic liquid crystal cell with heat pulse and laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mash, D.H.

    1984-01-01

    A method of operating a homeotropically aligned smectic liquid crystal cell in which the cell is turned from a clear to a scattering state by illumination with an intense flash of light after which a focused laser beam is scanned across the layer to leave clear tracks where homeotropic alignment has been restored thereby producing a display providing, in projection, bright lines on a dark background

  11. Liquid crystal foil for the detection of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biernat, Michał; Trzyna, Marcin; Byszek, Agnieszka; Jaremek, Henryk

    2016-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignant tumor in females around the world, representing 25.2% of all cancers in women. About 1.7 million women were diagnosed with breast cancer worldwide in 2012 with a death rate of about 522,0001,2. The most frequently used methods in breast cancer screening are imaging methods, i.e. ultrasonography and mammography. A common feature of these methods is that they inherently involve the use of expensive and advanced equipment. The development of advanced computer systems allowed for the continuation of research started already in the 1980s3 and the use of contact thermography in breast cancer screening. The physiological basis for the application of thermography in medical imaging diagnostics is the so-called dermothermal effect related to higher metabolism rate around focal neoplastic lesion. This phenomenon can occur on breast surface as localized temperature anomalies4. The device developed by Braster is composed of a detector that works on the basis of thermotropic liquid crystals, image acquisition device and a computer system for image data processing and analysis. Production of the liquid crystal detector was based on a proprietary CLCF technology (Continuous Liquid Crystal Film). In 2014 Braster started feasibility study to prove that there is a potential for artificial intelligence in early breast cancer detection using Braster's proprietary technology. The aim of this study was to develop a computer system, using a client-server architecture, to an automatic interpretation of thermographic pictures created by the Braster devices.

  12. Directional Scattering of Semiconductor Nanoparticles Embedded in a Liquid Crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braulio García-Cámara

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Light scattering by semiconductor nanoparticles has been shown to be more complex than was believed until now. Both electric and magnetic responses emerge in the visible range. In addition, directional effects on light scattering of these nanoparticles were recently obtained. In particular, zero backward and minimum-forward scattering are observed. These phenomena are very interesting for several applications such as, for instance, optical switches or modulators. The strong dependence of these phenomena on the properties of both the particle and the surrounding medium can be used to tune them. The electrical control on the optical properties of liquid crystals could be used to control the directional effects of embedded semiconductor nanoparticles. In this work, we theoretically analyze the effects on the directional distribution of light scattering by these particles when the refractive index of a surrounded liquid crystal changes from the ordinary to the extraordinary configuration. Several semiconductor materials and liquid crystals are studied in order to optimize the contrast between the two states.

  13. Evidence for several dipolar quasi-invariants in liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, C. J.; González, C. E.; Segnorile, H. H.; Zamar, R. C.

    2013-10-01

    The quasi-equilibrium states of an observed quantum system involve as many constants of motion as the dimension of the operator basis which spans the blocks of all the degenerate eigenvalues of the Hamiltonian that drives the system dynamics, however, the possibility of observing such quasi-invariants in solid-like spin systems in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is not a strictly exact prediction. The aim of this work is to provide experimental evidence of several quasi-invariants, in the proton NMR of small spin clusters, like nematic liquid crystal molecules, in which the use of thermodynamic arguments is not justified. We explore the spin states prepared with the Jeener-Broekaert pulse sequence by analyzing the time-domain signals yielded by this sequence as a function of the preparation times, in a variety of dipolar networks, solids, and liquid crystals. We observe that the signals can be explained with two dipolar quasi-invariants only within a range of short preparation times, however at longer times liquid crystal signals show an echo-like behaviour whose description requires assuming more quasi-invariants. We study the multiple quantum coherence content of such signals on a basis orthogonal to the z-basis and see that such states involve a significant number of correlated spins. Therefore, we show that the NMR signals within the whole preparation time-scale can only be reconstructed by assuming the occurrence of multiple quasi-invariants which we experimentally isolate.

  14. Recent advances in IR liquid crystal spatial light modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Fenglin; Twieg, Robert J.; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2015-09-01

    Liquid crystal (LC) is an amazing class of electro-optic media; its applications span from visible to infrared, millimeter wave, and terahertz regions. In the visible and short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) regions, most LCs are highly transparent. However, to extend the electro-optic application of LCs into MWIR and LWIR, several key technical challenges have to be overcome: (1) low absorption loss, (2) high birefringence, (3) low operation voltage, and (4) fast response time. In the MWIR and LWIR regions, several fundamental molecular vibration bands and overtones exist, which contribute to high absorption loss. The absorbed light turns to heat and then alters the birefringence locally, which in turns causes spatially non-uniform phase modulation. To suppress the optical loss, several approaches have been investigated: (1) Employing thin cell gap by choosing a high birefringence LC mixture; (2) Shifting the absorption bands outside the spectral region of interest by deuteration, fluorination, or chlorination; (3) Reducing the overtone absorption by using a short alkyl chain. In this paper, we report some recently developed chlorinated LC compounds and mixtures with low absorption loss in the SWIR and MWIR regions. To achieve fast response time, we demonstrated a polymer network liquid crystal with 2π phase change at MWIR and response time less than 5 ms. Approaches to extend such a liquid crystal spatial light modulator to long-wavelength infrared will be discussed.

  15. Smectic liquid crystals in anisotropic colloidal silica gels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Dennis [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Borthwick, Matthew A [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Leheny, Robert L [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2004-05-19

    We report x-ray scattering studies of the smectic liquid crystal octylcyano-biphenol (8CB) confined by strained colloidal silica gels. The gels, comprised of aerosil particles, possess an anisotropic structure that stabilizes long-range nematic order in the liquid crystal while introducing random field effects that disrupt the smectic transition. The short-range smectic correlations that form within this environment are inconsistent with the presence of a topologically ordered state predicted for 3D random field XY systems and are quantitatively like the correlations of smectics confined by isotropic gels. Detailed analysis reveals that the quenched disorder suppresses the anisotropic scaling of the smectic correlation lengths observed in the pure liquid crystal. These results and additional measurements of the smectic-A to smectic-C transition in 4-n-pentylphenylthiol-4'-n-octyloxybenzoate (8barS5) indicate that the observed smectic behaviour is dictated by random fields coupling directly to the smectic order while fields coupling to the nematic director play a subordinate role.

  16. The opto-thermal effect on encapsulated cholesteric liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Sung; Lin, Hui-Chi; Yang, Kin-Min

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we implemented a micro-encapsulated CLC electronic paper that is optically addressed and electrically erasable. The mechanism that forms spot diameters on the CLC films is discussed and verified through various experimental parameters, including the thickness of CLCs and Poly(2,3-dihydrothieno-1,4-dioxin)-poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), pump intensity, and pumping time. The opto-thermal effect, brought on by the PEDOT:PSS absorbing layer, causes the spot diameters on the cholesteric liquid crystal thin films to vary. According to our results, the spot diameter is larger for a sample with a thinner cholesteric liquid crystal layer with the same excitation conditions and same thickness of the PEDOT layer. The spot diameter is also larger for a sample with a thicker PEDOT under the same excitation conditions and same thickness of the cholesteric liquid crystal layer. We proposed a simple heat-conducting model to explain the experimental results, which qualitatively agree with this theoretical model.

  17. IR Sensor Synchronizing Active Shutter Glasses for 3D HDTV with Flexible Liquid Crystal Lenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong In Han

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available IR sensor synchronizing active shutter glasses for three-dimensional high definition television (3D HDTV were developed using a flexible liquid crystal (FLC lens. The FLC lens was made on a polycarbonate (PC substrate using conventional liquid crystal display (LCD processes. The flexible liquid crystal lens displayed a maximum transmission of 32% and total response time of 2.56 ms. The transmittance, the contrast ratio and the response time of the flexible liquid crystal lens were superior to those of glass liquid crystal lenses. Microcontroller unit and drivers were developed as part of a reception module with power supply for the IR sensor synchronizing active shutter glasses with the flexible liquid crystal lens prototypes. IR sensor synchronizing active shutter glasses for 3D HDTV with flexible liquid crystal lenses produced excellent 3D images viewing characteristics.

  18. Liquid crystal designs for high-contrast field sequential color liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS) microdisplays (Invited Paper)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James; Chen, Cheng; Bos, Philip J.

    2005-04-01

    Single or dual panel microdisplay systems are becoming more popular in the marketplace. Consequently, Liquid Crystal on Silicon (LCoS) microdisplays are constantly being pushed to achieve faster switching times as well as higher contrast, while becoming simpler and allowing simpler optics engine design. Currently, most products use a Twisted Nematic (TN) mode with a retardation film. The most promising solution in research now is the Vertically Aligned Nematic (VAN) mode, which does not require a retarder.

  19. Bioscorodite: biological crystallization of scorodite for arsenic removal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez-Contreras, P.A.

    2012-01-01

    The use of arsenic is banned for most applications, leading to its accumulation as arsenic trioxide and ferric arsenate sludge. The aim of this thesis was to develop a controlled process for biological crystallization of scorodite from metallurgical streams. In this thesis, the proof of

  20. Liquid crystal alignment in electro-responsive nanostructured thermosetting materials based on block copolymer dispersed liquid crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tercjak, A; Garcia, I; Mondragon, I [Materials-Technologies Group, Departamento IngenierIa Quimica y M Ambiente, Escuela Politecnica, Universidad PaIs Vasco/Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Plaza Europa 1, E-20018 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain)], E-mail: scptesza@sc.ehu.es, E-mail: inaki.mondragon@ehu.es

    2008-07-09

    Novel well-defined nanostructured thermosetting systems were prepared by modification of a diglicydylether of bisphenol-A epoxy resin (DGEBA) with 10 or 15 wt% amphiphilic poly(styrene-b-ethylene oxide) block copolymer (PSEO) and 30 or 40 wt% low molecular weight liquid crystal 4'-(hexyl)-4-biphenyl-carbonitrile (HBC) using m-xylylenediamine (MXDA) as a curing agent. The competition between well-defined nanostructured materials and the ability for alignment of the liquid crystal phase in the materials obtained has been studied by atomic and electrostatic force microscopy, AFM and EFM, respectively. Based on our knowledge, this is the first time that addition of an adequate amount (10 wt%) of a block copolymer to 40 wt% HBC-(DGEBA/MXDA) leads to a well-organized nanostructured thermosetting system (between a hexagonal and worm-like ordered structure), which is also electro-responsive with high rate contrast. This behavior was confirmed using electrostatic force microscopy (EFM), by means of the response of the HBC liquid crystal phase to the voltage applied to the EFM tip. In contrast, though materials containing 15 wt% PSEO and 30 wt% HBC also form a well-defined nanostructured thermosetting system, they do not show such a high contrast between the uncharged and charged surface.

  1. Liquid crystal alignment in electro-responsive nanostructured thermosetting materials based on block copolymer dispersed liquid crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tercjak, A; Garcia, I; Mondragon, I

    2008-07-09

    Novel well-defined nanostructured thermosetting systems were prepared by modification of a diglicydylether of bisphenol-A epoxy resin (DGEBA) with 10 or 15 wt% amphiphilic poly(styrene-b-ethylene oxide) block copolymer (PSEO) and 30 or 40 wt% low molecular weight liquid crystal 4'-(hexyl)-4-biphenyl-carbonitrile (HBC) using m-xylylenediamine (MXDA) as a curing agent. The competition between well-defined nanostructured materials and the ability for alignment of the liquid crystal phase in the materials obtained has been studied by atomic and electrostatic force microscopy, AFM and EFM, respectively. Based on our knowledge, this is the first time that addition of an adequate amount (10 wt%) of a block copolymer to 40 wt% HBC-(DGEBA/MXDA) leads to a well-organized nanostructured thermosetting system (between a hexagonal and worm-like ordered structure), which is also electro-responsive with high rate contrast. This behavior was confirmed using electrostatic force microscopy (EFM), by means of the response of the HBC liquid crystal phase to the voltage applied to the EFM tip. In contrast, though materials containing 15 wt% PSEO and 30 wt% HBC also form a well-defined nanostructured thermosetting system, they do not show such a high contrast between the uncharged and charged surface.

  2. Liquid crystal alignment in electro-responsive nanostructured thermosetting materials based on block copolymer dispersed liquid crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tercjak, A; Garcia, I; Mondragon, I

    2008-01-01

    Novel well-defined nanostructured thermosetting systems were prepared by modification of a diglicydylether of bisphenol-A epoxy resin (DGEBA) with 10 or 15 wt% amphiphilic poly(styrene-b-ethylene oxide) block copolymer (PSEO) and 30 or 40 wt% low molecular weight liquid crystal 4'-(hexyl)-4-biphenyl-carbonitrile (HBC) using m-xylylenediamine (MXDA) as a curing agent. The competition between well-defined nanostructured materials and the ability for alignment of the liquid crystal phase in the materials obtained has been studied by atomic and electrostatic force microscopy, AFM and EFM, respectively. Based on our knowledge, this is the first time that addition of an adequate amount (10 wt%) of a block copolymer to 40 wt% HBC-(DGEBA/MXDA) leads to a well-organized nanostructured thermosetting system (between a hexagonal and worm-like ordered structure), which is also electro-responsive with high rate contrast. This behavior was confirmed using electrostatic force microscopy (EFM), by means of the response of the HBC liquid crystal phase to the voltage applied to the EFM tip. In contrast, though materials containing 15 wt% PSEO and 30 wt% HBC also form a well-defined nanostructured thermosetting system, they do not show such a high contrast between the uncharged and charged surface

  3. Effect of temperature on the morphology and electro-optical properties of liquid crystal physical gel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaw, W.L.; Mamat, C.R.; Triwahyono, S.; Jalil, A.A.; Bidin, N.

    2016-01-01

    Liquid crystal physical gels were (thermally) prepared with cholesteryl stearate as a gelator in nematic liquid crystal, 4-cyano-4′-pentylbiphenyl. The electro-optical performance of liquid crystal physical gels is almost entirely dependent on the gels' inherent morphology. This study involved an empirical investigation of the relationships among all of the gelation temperature, morphology, and electro-optical properties. Besides continuous cooling at room temperature, isothermal cooling was also performed at both 18 and 0 °C, corresponding to near-solid and solid phases of 4-cyano-4′-pentylbiphenyl respectively. Nevertheless, the liquid crystal physical gel was also isothermally rapidly cooled using liquid nitrogen. Polarizing optical microscopy showed that the gel structure became thinner when isothermal cooling was carried out. These thinner gel aggregates then interconnected to form larger liquid crystal domains. Moreover, it was also revealed that the gel networks were randomized. Electron spin resonance results showed that the liquid crystal director orientation was severely randomized in the presence of gel networks. Conversely, isothermal cooling using liquid nitrogen generated a higher liquid crystal director orientation order. The 6.0 wt% cholesteryl stearate/4-cyano-4′-pentylbiphenyl physical gel that was isothermally cooled using liquid nitrogen showed the lowest response time in a twisted nematic mode optical cell. - Graphical abstract: Liquid crystal physical gel was prepared using nematic liquid crystal, 4-cyano-4′-pentylbiphenyl and cholesteryl stearate as gelator. Isothermal cooling at lower temperature produced thinner gel network and larger liquid crystal domain. - Highlights: • 5CB nematic liquid crystal was successfully gelled by cholesteryl stearate gelator. • The morphology of gel network was controlled by different cooling conditions. • Thinner gel network was formed by the rapid cooling using liquid nitrogen. • Enhanced

  4. Effect of temperature on the morphology and electro-optical properties of liquid crystal physical gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leaw, W.L. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310, UTM Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Mamat, C.R., E-mail: che@kimia.fs.utm.my [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310, UTM Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Triwahyono, S. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310, UTM Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Jalil, A.A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Chemical and Energy Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310, UTM Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Centre of Hydrogen Energy, Institute of Future Energy, Univerisiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310, UTM Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Bidin, N. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310, UTM Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia)

    2016-12-01

    Liquid crystal physical gels were (thermally) prepared with cholesteryl stearate as a gelator in nematic liquid crystal, 4-cyano-4′-pentylbiphenyl. The electro-optical performance of liquid crystal physical gels is almost entirely dependent on the gels' inherent morphology. This study involved an empirical investigation of the relationships among all of the gelation temperature, morphology, and electro-optical properties. Besides continuous cooling at room temperature, isothermal cooling was also performed at both 18 and 0 °C, corresponding to near-solid and solid phases of 4-cyano-4′-pentylbiphenyl respectively. Nevertheless, the liquid crystal physical gel was also isothermally rapidly cooled using liquid nitrogen. Polarizing optical microscopy showed that the gel structure became thinner when isothermal cooling was carried out. These thinner gel aggregates then interconnected to form larger liquid crystal domains. Moreover, it was also revealed that the gel networks were randomized. Electron spin resonance results showed that the liquid crystal director orientation was severely randomized in the presence of gel networks. Conversely, isothermal cooling using liquid nitrogen generated a higher liquid crystal director orientation order. The 6.0 wt% cholesteryl stearate/4-cyano-4′-pentylbiphenyl physical gel that was isothermally cooled using liquid nitrogen showed the lowest response time in a twisted nematic mode optical cell. - Graphical abstract: Liquid crystal physical gel was prepared using nematic liquid crystal, 4-cyano-4′-pentylbiphenyl and cholesteryl stearate as gelator. Isothermal cooling at lower temperature produced thinner gel network and larger liquid crystal domain. - Highlights: • 5CB nematic liquid crystal was successfully gelled by cholesteryl stearate gelator. • The morphology of gel network was controlled by different cooling conditions. • Thinner gel network was formed by the rapid cooling using liquid nitrogen.

  5. Thermo-, photo-, and mechano-responsive liquid crystal networks enable tunable photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamatsu, N; Hisano, K; Tatsumi, R; Aizawa, M; Barrett, C J; Shishido, A

    2017-10-25

    Tunable photonic crystals exhibiting optical properties that respond reversibly to external stimuli have been developed using liquid crystal networks (LCNs) and liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs). These tunable photonic crystals possess an inverse opal structure and are photo-responsive, but circumvent the usual requirement to contain dye molecules in the structure that often limit their applicability and cause optical degradation. Herein, we report tunable photonic crystal films that reversibly tune the reflection peak wavelength under thermo-, photo- and mechano-stimuli, through bilayering a stimuli-responsive LCN including azobenzene units with a colourless inverse opal film composed of non-responsive, flexible durable polymers. By mechanically deforming the azobenzene containing LCN via various stimuli, the reflection peak wavelength from the bilayered film assembly could be shifted on demand. We confirm that the reflection peak shift occurs due to the deformation of the stimuli-responsive layer propagating towards and into the inverse opal layer to change its shape in response, and this shift behaviour is repeatable without optical degradation.

  6. Optical tuning of photonic bandgaps in dye-doped nematic liquid crystal photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Hermann, David Sparre

    2005-01-01

    An all-optical modulator is demonstrated, which utilizes a pulsed 532 nm laser to modulate the spectral position of the bandgaps in a photonic crystal fiber infiltrated with a dye-doped nematic liquid crystal. In order to investigate the time response of the LCPBG fiber device, a low-power CW probe...... laser was coupled into the fiber together with the pulsed pump laser of 2.3 mW and we have demonstrated a modulation frequency of up to 2 kHz....

  7. Electrically Rotatable Polarizer Using One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal with a Nematic Liquid Crystal Defect Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryotaro Ozaki

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Polarization characteristics of defect mode peaks in a one-dimensional (1D photonic crystal (PC with a nematic liquid crystal (NLC defect layer have been investigated. Two different polarized defect modes are observed in a stop band. One group of defect modes is polarized along the long molecular axis of the NLC, whereas another group is polarized along its short axis. Polarizations of the defect modes can be tuned by field-induced in-plane reorientation of the NLC in the defect layer. The polarization properties of the 1D PC with the NLC defect layer is also investigated by the finite difference time domain (FDTD simulation.

  8. Liquid Crystal Mediated Nano-assembled Gold Micro-shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quint, Makiko; Sarang, Som; Quint, David; Huang, Kerwyn; Gopinathan, Ajay; Hirst, Linda; Ghosh, Sayantani

    We have created 3D nano-assenbled micro-shell by using thermotropic liquid crystal (LC), 4-Cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl (5CB), doped with mesogen-functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The assembly process is driven by the isotropic-nematic phase transition dynamics. We uniformly disperse the functionalized AuNPs into isotropic liquid crystal matrix and the mixture is cooled from the isotropic to the nematic phase. During the phase transition, the separation of LC-AuNP rich isotropic and ordered 5CB rich domains cause the functionalized AuNPs to move into the shrinking isotropic regions. The mesogenic ligands are locally crystalized during this process, which leads to the formation of a spherical shell with a densely packed wall of AuNPs. These micro-shells are capable of encapsulating fluorescence dye without visible leakages for several months. Additionally, they demonstrate strong localized surface plasmon resonance, which leads to localized heating on optical excitation. This photothermal effect disrupts the structure, releasing contents within seconds. Our results exhibiting the capture and optically regulated release of encapsulated substances is a novel platform that combines drug-delivery and photothermal therapy in one versatile and multifunctional unit. This work is supported by the NSF Grants No. DMR-1056860, ECC-1227034, and a University of California Merced Faculty Mentor Fellowship.

  9. Soap, science, and flat-screen TVs a history of liquid crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Dunmur, David

    2011-01-01

    The terms 'liquid crystal' or 'liquid crystal display' (LCD) are well-known in the context of flat-screen televisions, but the properties and history of liquid crystals are little understood. This book tells the story of liquid crystals, from their controversial discovery at the end of the nineteenth century, to their eventual acceptance as another state of matter to rank alongside gases, liquids and solids. As their story unfolds, the scientists involved and their works are put into illuminating broader socio-political contexts. In recent years, liquid crystals have had a major impact on the display industry, culminating in the now widely available flat-screen televisions; this development is described in detail over three chapters, and the basic science behind it is explained in simple terms accessible to a general reader. New applications of liquid crystals in materials, bio-systems, medicine and technology are also explained.

  10. Synthesis of novel liquid crystal compounds and their blood compatibility as anticoagulative materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu Mei; Cha Zhenhang; Feng Bohua; Zhou Changren

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to synthesize new types of cholesteric liquid crystal compounds and study the anticoagulative properties of their composite membranes. Three kinds of cholesteric liquid crystal compounds were synthesized and characterized by infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and optical polarizing microscope. The polysiloxane, as a substrate, was blended with three liquid crystal compounds and was then used as membranes. The anticoagulative property of different polysiloxane liquid crystal composite membranes was identified by the blood compatibility tests. Three cholesteryl liquid crystals synthesized in this work contained hydrophilic soft chains and presented iridescent texture owned by cholesteric liquid crystals in the range of their liquid crystal state temperature, but only cholesteryl acryloyl oxytetraethylene glycol carbonate was in the liquid crystal state at body temperature. When liquid crystals were blended with polysiloxane to form polysiloxane/liquid crystal composite membranes, the haemocompatibility of these membranes could be improved to some extent. The blood compatibility of composite membranes whose hydrophilic property was the best was more excellent than that of other composite membranes, fewer platelets adhered and spread, and showed little distortion on the surface of materials

  11. A roadmap to uranium ionic liquids: Anti-crystal engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaprak, Damla; Spielberg, Eike T.; Baecker, Tobias; Richter, Mark; Mallick, Bert; Klein, Axel; Mudring, Anja-Verena

    2014-01-01

    In the search for uranium-based ionic liquids, tris(N,N-dialkyldithiocarbamato)uranylates have been synthesized as salts of the 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium (C_4mim) cation. As dithiocarbamate ligands binding to the UO_2"2"+ unit, tetra-, penta-, hexa-, and heptamethylenedithiocarbamates, N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate, N-methyl-N-propyldithiocarbamate, N-ethyl-N-propyldithiocarbamate, and N-methyl-N-butyldithiocarbamate have been explored. X-ray single-crystal diffraction allowed unambiguous structural characterization of all compounds except N-methyl-N-butyldithiocarbamate, which is obtained as a glassy material only. In addition, powder X-ray diffraction as well as vibrational and UV/Vis spectroscopy, supported by computational methods, were used to characterize the products. Differential scanning calorimetry was employed to investigate the phase-transition behavior depending on the N,N-dialkyldithiocarbamato ligand with the aim to establish structure-property relationships regarding the ionic liquid formation capability. Compounds with the least symmetric N,N-dialkyldithiocarbamato ligand and hence the least symmetric anions, tris(N-methyl-N-propyldithiocarbamato)uranylate, tris(N-ethyl-N-propyldithiocarbamato)uranylate, and tris(N-methyl-N-butyldithiocarbamato)uranylate, lead to the formation of (room-temperature) ionic liquids, which confirms that low-symmetry ions are indeed suitable to suppress crystallization. These materials combine low melting points, stable complex formation, and hydrophobicity and are therefore excellent candidates for nuclear fuel purification and recovery. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. A roadmap to uranium ionic liquids: anti-crystal engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaprak, Damla; Spielberg, Eike T; Bäcker, Tobias; Richter, Mark; Mallick, Bert; Klein, Axel; Mudring, Anja-Verena

    2014-05-19

    In the search for uranium-based ionic liquids, tris(N,N-dialkyldithiocarbamato)uranylates have been synthesized as salts of the 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium (C4mim) cation. As dithiocarbamate ligands binding to the UO2(2+) unit, tetra-, penta-, hexa-, and heptamethylenedithiocarbamates, N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate, N-methyl-N-propyldithiocarbamate, N-ethyl-N-propyldithiocarbamate, and N-methyl-N-butyldithiocarbamate have been explored. X-ray single-crystal diffraction allowed unambiguous structural characterization of all compounds except N-methyl-N-butyldithiocarbamate, which is obtained as a glassy material only. In addition, powder X-ray diffraction as well as vibrational and UV/Vis spectroscopy, supported by computational methods, were used to characterize the products. Differential scanning calorimetry was employed to investigate the phase-transition behavior depending on the N,N-dialkyldithiocarbamato ligand with the aim to establish structure-property relationships regarding the ionic liquid formation capability. Compounds with the least symmetric N,N-dialkyldithiocarbamato ligand and hence the least symmetric anions, tris(N-methyl-N-propyldithiocarbamato)uranylate, tris(N-ethyl-N-propyldithiocarbamato)uranylate, and tris(N-methyl-N-butyldithiocarbamato)uranylate, lead to the formation of (room-temperature) ionic liquids, which confirms that low-symmetry ions are indeed suitable to suppress crystallization. These materials combine low melting points, stable complex formation, and hydrophobicity and are therefore excellent candidates for nuclear fuel purification and recovery. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Transmitted spectral modulation of double-ring resonator using liquid crystals in terahertz range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huijuan; Zhou, Qingli; Wang, Xiumin; Li, Chenyu; Wu, Ani; Zhang, Cunlin

    2013-12-01

    Metamaterials with subwavelength structural features show unique electromagnetic responses that are unattainable with natural materials. Recent research on these artificial materials has been pushed forward to the terahertz region because of potential applications in biological fingerprinting, security imaging, remote sensing, and high frequency magnetic and electric resonant devices. Active control of their properties could further facilitate and open up new applications in terms of modulation and switching. Liquid crystals, which have been the subject of research for more than a century, have the unique properties for the development of many other optical components such as light valves, tunable filters and tunable lenses. In this paper, we investigated the transmitted spectral modulation in terahertz range by using liquid crystals (5CB and TEB300) covering on the fabricated double-ring resonators to realize the shift of the resonance frequency. Our obtained results indicate the low frequency resonance shows the obvious blue-shift, while the location of high frequency resonance is nearly unchanged. We believe this phenomenon is related to not only the refractive index of the covering liquid crystals but also the resonant mechanism of both resonances.

  14. Synthesis, crystal structure and biological activity of novel diester cyclophanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Yang, Bingqin; Fang, Xianwen; Cheng, Zhao; Yang, Meipan

    2012-01-01

    A series of novel diester cyclophanes was synthesized by esterification of 1,2-benzenedicarbonyl chloride with eight different diols under high dilution conditions. The structures of the compounds were verified by elemental analysis, 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), IR spectroscopy and high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). The crystal structures of two compounds were characterized by single crystal X-ray diffractometry (XRD). All the new cyclophanes were evaluated for biological activities and the results showed that some of these compounds have low antibacterial or antifungal activities (author)

  15. Synthesis, crystal structure and biological activity of novel diester cyclophanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Yang, Bingqin; Fang, Xianwen; Cheng, Zhao; Yang, Meipan, E-mail: yangbq@nwu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Natural Functional Molecule Chemistry, Northwest University, Shaanxi (China)

    2012-10-15

    A series of novel diester cyclophanes was synthesized by esterification of 1,2-benzenedicarbonyl chloride with eight different diols under high dilution conditions. The structures of the compounds were verified by elemental analysis, {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), IR spectroscopy and high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). The crystal structures of two compounds were characterized by single crystal X-ray diffractometry (XRD). All the new cyclophanes were evaluated for biological activities and the results showed that some of these compounds have low antibacterial or antifungal activities (author)

  16. Large Three-Dimensional Photonic Crystals Based on Monocrystalline Liquid Crystal Blue Phases (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-28

    a pair of glass slides with plastic spacers to determine the cell gap: 100 and 300 μm for the polymer-free BPLCs and 12 μm for the polymer-stabilized...Nissan) and rubbed with cloth to induce uniform planar alignment. Measurements. Reflection and transmission spectra were taken using a spectro- meter...thermal recycles . Opt. Mater. Express 2, 1149–1155 (2012). 34. Onusseit, H. & Stegemeyer, H. Liquid single crystals of cholesteric blue phases. Z

  17. Piezoelectricity of a ferroelectric liquid crystal with a glass transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jákli, A; Tóth-Katona, T; Scharf, T; Schadt, M; Saupe, A

    2002-07-01

    Pressure-electric (hydrostatic piezoelectric) measurements are reported on bookshelf textures of a ferroelectric smectic-C (Sm C*) liquid crystal with a glass transition. The continuous variation of a partially fluid state to the solid glass enables one to trace how the piezoelectric effect depends on the consistency of the material. It was observed that in the Sm C* samples with poled glass the piezoelectric constants are comparable to conventional piezoelectric crystals and poled piezoelectric polymers. This implies their application possibilities. The magnitude of the piezoelectric constant in the glassy state depends very much on the poling conditions. The studies indicate that there are two counteracting effects, which cancel each other out in the Sm C* phase near the glass transition. Our analysis indicates that the pressure-induced director tilt change has a dominating effect both in the fluid and the glassy Sm C* states.

  18. Liquid-crystal laser optics: design, fabrication, and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, S.D.; Cerqua, K.A.; Marshall, K.L.; Schmid, A.; Guardalben, M.J.; Skerrett, K.J.

    1988-01-01

    We describe the development of laser optics utilizing liquid crystals. Devices discussed constitute passive optical elements for both low-power and high-power laser systems, operating in either the pulsed or cw mode. Designs and fabrication methods are given in detail for wave plates, circular polarizers, optical isolators, laser-blocking notch filters, and soft apertures. Performance data in the visible to near infrared show these devices to be useful alternatives to other technologies based on conventional glasses, crystals, or thin films. The issue of laser damage is examined on the basis of off-line threshold testing and daily use in OMEGA, the 24-beam Nd:glass laser system at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics. Results demonstrate that long-term survivability has been achieved

  19. Asymmetric flavone-based liquid crystals: synthesis and properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timmons, Daren J. [Department of Chemistry, Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, VA, USA; Jordan, Abraham J. [Department of Chemistry, Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, VA, USA; Kirchon, Angelo A. [Department of Chemistry, Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, VA, USA; Murthy, N. Sanjeeva [New Jersey Center for Biomaterials, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ, USA; Siemers, Troy J. [Department of Applied Mathematics, Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, VA, USA; Harrison, Daniel P. [Department of Chemistry, Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, VA, USA; Slebodnick, Carla [Department of Chemistry, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA, USA

    2017-02-01

    A series of flavones (n-F) substituted at the 4', and 6 positions was prepared, characterised by NMR (1H,13C), HRMS, and studied for liquid crystal properties. The 4'-alkoxy,6-methoxyflavones (4-F–16-F) exhibit varying ranges of nematic and smectic A phases as evidenced by polarised optical microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). As the tail length is increased, the smectic phase becomes more prevalent. Smectic phases for (8-F–16-F) were further analysed by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and the rate of structural transformations was explored by combined DSC/XRD studies. Flavonol 6-F–OH was also prepared but no mesogenic behaviour was observed. The molecular structures of 6-F and 6-F–OH were determined by single-crystal XRD and help to explain the differences in material properties. Additionally, fluorescence and electrochemical studies were conducted on solutions of n-F.

  20. Asymmetric electrooptic response in a nematic liquid crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dascalu, Constanta [Politechnica University of Bucharest, Bucharest (Romania)

    2001-06-01

    An asymmetric electrooptic response in nematic liquid crystal (LC) has been obtained. The liquid crystal hybrid cell was made by using a standard configuration. One of the ITO (Indium Tin Oxide) electrodes was covered with a surfactant, which induces a homeotropic alignment. The second of the indium tin oxide electrodes was covered by a thin layer of photopolymer, which was previously mixed with an acid, which favours a process of release of protons. Such cations are responsible of electrochemical process in the LC leading to an asymmetric electrooptic response, which depend on the polarity of the applied electric field. This fact is due to an internal field, which change the effective voltage thresholds for the reorientation of the liquid crystal. During the anodic polarization, the optical switching is inhibited because the effective field decreases below the threshold value. On contrary for the opposite polarization the effective field is enough to determine a homeotropic alignment. [Spanish] Se ha obtenido una respuesta electro-optica asimetrica en cristales liquidos neumaticos. La celula hibrida de cristal liquido fue construida utilizando una configuracion estandar. Uno de los electrodos ITO fue cubierto con una pelicula delgada de material organico para inducir una alineacion homeotropa. El otro electrodo ITO fue cubierto con una pelicula delgada de fotopolimero anteriormente mezclada con un acido para favorecer la emision de protones. Estos cationes son responsables del proceso electroquimico en LC, conduciendo a una respuesta electro-optica asimetrica que depende de la polaridad del campo electrico aplicado. Este efecto es originado por un campo interno que cambia el umbral efectivo del voltaje para la reorientacion del cristal liquido. Durante la polarizacion anodica, la conmutacion optica se inhibe debido a que el campo efectivo disminuye abajo del valor del umbral. Por el contrario, para la polarizacion opuesta el campo efectivo es suficiente para

  1. Nematic liquid crystals on sinusoidal channels: the zigzag instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Nuno M; Romero-Enrique, Jose M; Telo da Gama, Margarida M

    2017-01-11

    Substrates which are chemically or topographically patterned induce a variety of liquid crystal textures. The response of the liquid crystal to competing surface orientations, typical of patterned substrates, is determined by the anisotropy of the elastic constants and the interplay of the relevant lengths scales, such as the correlation length and the surface geometrical parameters. Transitions between different textures, usually with different symmetries, may occur under a wide range of conditions. We use the Landau-de Gennes free energy to investigate the texture of nematics in sinusoidal channels with parallel anchoring bounded by nematic-air interfaces that favour perpendicular (hometropic) anchoring. In micron size channels 5CB was observed to exhibit a non-trivial texture characterized by a disclination line, within the channel, which is broken into a zigzag pattern. Our calculations reveal that when the elastic anisotropy of the nematic does not favour twist distortions the defect is a straight disclination line that runs along the channel, which breaks into a zigzag pattern with a characteristic period, when the twist elastic constant becomes sufficiently small when compared to the splay and bend constants. The transition occurs through a twist instability that drives the defect line to rotate from its original position. The interplay between the energetically favourable twist distortions that induce the defect rotation and the liquid crystal anchoring at the surfaces leads to the zigzag pattern. We investigate in detail the dependence of the periodicity of the zigzag pattern on the geometrical parameters of the sinusoidal channels, which in line with the experimental results is found to be non-linear.

  2. Local structural ordering in surface-confined liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śliwa, I.; Jeżewski, W.; Zakharov, A. V.

    2017-06-01

    The effect of the interplay between attractive nonlocal surface interactions and attractive pair long-range intermolecular couplings on molecular structures of liquid crystals confined in thin cells with flat solid surfaces has been studied. Extending the McMillan mean field theory to include finite systems, it has been shown that confining surfaces can induce complex orientational and translational ordering of molecules. Typically, local smectic A, nematic, and isotropic phases have been shown to coexist in certain temperature ranges, provided that confining cells are sufficiently thick, albeit finite. Due to the nonlocality of surface interactions, the spatial arrangement of these local phases can display, in general, an unexpected complexity along the surface normal direction. In particular, molecules located in the vicinity of surfaces can still be organized in smectic layers, even though nematic and/or isotropic order can simultaneously appear in the interior of cells. The resulting surface freezing of smectic layers has been confirmed to occur even for rather weak surface interactions. The surface interactions cannot, however, prevent smectic layers from melting relatively close to system boundaries, even when molecules are still arranged in layers within the central region of the system. The internal interfaces, separating individual liquid-crystal phases, are demonstrated here to form fronts of local finite-size transitions that move across cells under temperature changes. Although the complex molecular ordering in surface confined liquid-crystal systems can essentially be controlled by temperature variations, specific thermal properties of these systems, especially the nature of the local transitions, are argued to be strongly conditioned to the degree of molecular packing.

  3. Electrothermally Driven Fluorescence Switching by Liquid Crystal Elastomers Based On Dimensional Photonic Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Changxu; Jiang, Yin; Tao, Cheng-An; Yin, Xianpeng; Lan, Yue; Wang, Chen; Wang, Shiqiang; Liu, Xiangyang; Li, Guangtao

    2017-04-05

    In this article, the fabrication of an active organic-inorganic one-dimensional photonic crystal structure to offer electrothermal fluorescence switching is described. The film is obtained by spin-coating of liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs) and TiO 2 nanoparticles alternatively. By utilizing the property of LCEs that can change their size and shape reversibly under external thermal stimulations, the λ max of the photonic band gap of these films is tuned by voltage through electrothermal conversion. The shifted photonic band gap further changes the matching degree between the photonic band gap of the film and the emission spectrum of organic dye mounting on the film. With rhodamine B as an example, the enhancement factor of its fluorescence emission is controlled by varying the matching degree. Thus, the fluorescence intensity is actively switched by voltage applied on the system, in a fast, adjustable, and reversible manner. The control chain of using the electrothermal stimulus to adjust fluorescence intensity via controlling the photonic band gap is proved by a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and UV-vis reflectance. This mechanism also corresponded to the results from the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation. The comprehensive usage of photonic crystals and liquid crystal elastomers opened a new possibility for active optical devices.

  4. A novel composite alignment layer for transflective liquid crystal display

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Shuangyao; Li Xuan [State Key Laboratory of Applied Optics, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China); Tao Du; Chigrinov, Vladimir; Kwok, Hoi Sing, E-mail: eechigr@ust.h [Center for Display Research, Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2010-10-20

    A novel composite photoalignment layer for transflective liquid crystal displays is explored. The key technique is to introduce a functional photo-crosslinkage into a rewritable azodye material with proper mixing. Bearing good alignment quality derived from the azodye material, the composite layer provides strong azimuthal and polar anchoring energy comparable to that of rubbed polyimide layers. The capability of dual modes fabrication in one cell exhibited by azodyes could be well retained and the new alignment film exhibits a display resolution of up to 2 {mu}m. Furthermore, after exposure to strong LED unpolarized light the composite layer shows much better stability than that with a pure azodye material.

  5. Optical devices based on liquid crystal photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard

    2005-01-01

    the waveguiding mechanism of LC filled PCFs. The principle of tunable fibers based on LCs is thereafter discussed and an alignment and coating study of LC in capillaries is presented. Next, the Liquid Crystal Photonic BandGap (LCPBG) fiber is presented and the waveguiding mechanism is analyzed through plane...... hole. The presence of a LC in the holes of the PCF transforms the fiber from a Total Internal Reflection (TIR) guiding type into a Photonic BandGap (PBG) guiding type, where light is confined to the silica core by coherent scattering from the LC-billed holes. The high dielectric and optical anisotropy...

  6. The mathematics of instabilities in smectic C liquid crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, D.A

    2001-07-01

    The theoretical effects of applying a magnetic or electric field to samples of smectic A and smectic C{sup *} liquid crystals are studied in this thesis. In Chapter 2 general background material on liquid crystals is introduced as well as the continuum theory which we shall use in subsequent chapters. We consider a planar sample of ferroelectric smectic C{sup *} liquid crystal in Chapter 3, where an electric field is applied perpendicular to the smectic layers. In particular, we obtain an exact solution to a dynamic equation which governs director reorientation (within a sample which is bounded in the z direction) which appears in the literature. We then consider the linear stability of this solution by applying a perturbation, in both space and time, and examine its growth. In Chapter 4 we again consider the stability of a planar sample of ferroelectric smectic C{sup *} when an electric field is applied perpendicular to the smectic planes. However, unlike in Chapter 3, we derive the relevant governing equation. After having introduced the relevant theory, the linear and nonlinear stability of a constant equilibrium state in both finite and infinite domains is examined. We then obtain information upon the relaxation times for each of these cases. The relaxation time gives an indication of how quickly the director relaxes back to equilibrium. The dynamic equation which is derived in Chapter 4 is extended in Chapter 5 to include the effects of lilting the applied electric field. The equilibrium equation which we then obtain is not tractable explicitly due to the form of the sinusoidal nonlinearity which appears in it. We therefore solve a simplified approximating dynamic equation as well as the full sinusoidal nonlinearity case numerically. In both cases the linear stability of the equilibrium solution is examined. Finally, in Chapter 6 we consider the layer deformations in a cylindrical sample of smectic A liquid crystal when a magnetic field is applied across the

  7. Liquid crystal nanoparticles for delivery of photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Okhil K.; Naciri, Jawad; Delehanty, James B.

    2018-02-01

    The main principle of photodynamic therapy (PDT) is to kill malignant cells by generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). PDT appeared highly effective when ROS can be produced in subcellular location such as plasma membrane. The plasma membrane maintains the structural integrity of the cell and regulates multiple important cellular processes, such as endocytosis, trafficking, and apoptotic pathways, could be one of the best points to kill the cancer cells. Previously, we have developed a plasma membrane-targeted liquid crystal nanoparticle (LCNP) formulation that can be loaded with dyes or drugs. Here we highlight the utility of this LCNP for membrane targeted delivery and imaging for a photosensitizer (PS) for PDT applications.

  8. Diffraction and signal processing experiments with a liquid crystal microdisplay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MartInez, Jose Luis; Moreno, Ignacio; Ahouzi, Esmail

    2006-01-01

    In this work, we show some diffraction experiments performed with a liquid crystal display (LCD) that shows how useful this device can be to teach and experience diffraction optics and signal processing experiments. The LCD acts as a programmable pixelated diffractive mask. The Fourier spectrum of the image displayed in the LCD is visualized through a simple free propagation diffraction experiment. This optical system allows easy testing of different diffractive elements. As a demonstration we include experimental results with well-known diffractive elements like diffraction gratings or Fresnel lenses, and with more complicated elements like computer-generated holograms

  9. Diffraction and signal processing experiments with a liquid crystal microdisplay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MartInez, Jose Luis [Departamento de Ciencia y TecnologIa de Materiales, Universidad Miguel Hernandez de Elche, Alicante (Spain); Moreno, Ignacio [Departamento de Ciencia y TecnologIa de Materiales, Universidad Miguel Hernandez de Elche, Alicante (Spain); Ahouzi, Esmail [Institut National des Postes et Telecomunications (INTP), Madinat Al Irfane, Rabat (Morocco)

    2006-09-01

    In this work, we show some diffraction experiments performed with a liquid crystal display (LCD) that shows how useful this device can be to teach and experience diffraction optics and signal processing experiments. The LCD acts as a programmable pixelated diffractive mask. The Fourier spectrum of the image displayed in the LCD is visualized through a simple free propagation diffraction experiment. This optical system allows easy testing of different diffractive elements. As a demonstration we include experimental results with well-known diffractive elements like diffraction gratings or Fresnel lenses, and with more complicated elements like computer-generated holograms.

  10. Experimental investigations on weakly polar liquid crystal-aerosil composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobo, Chethan V; Prasad, S Krishna; Yelamaggad, C V [Centre for Liquid Crystal Research, Jalahalli, Bangalore 560013 (India)

    2006-01-25

    We have carried out differential scanning calorimetric and dielectric studies on composites of hydrophilic aerosil with a liquid crystal that does not possess a terminal polar group. While the shift in the nematic-isotropic transition temperature is in agreement with the general behaviour observed for such composites, the dielectric studies show, contrary to the commonly observed feature, that there is a systematic increase in the relaxation frequency associated with the rotation of the molecules around their short axis, as the aerosil concentration in the composite is increased.

  11. The mathematics of instabilities in smectic C liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.A.

    2001-01-01

    The theoretical effects of applying a magnetic or electric field to samples of smectic A and smectic C * liquid crystals are studied in this thesis. In Chapter 2 general background material on liquid crystals is introduced as well as the continuum theory which we shall use in subsequent chapters. We consider a planar sample of ferroelectric smectic C * liquid crystal in Chapter 3, where an electric field is applied perpendicular to the smectic layers. In particular, we obtain an exact solution to a dynamic equation which governs director reorientation (within a sample which is bounded in the z direction) which appears in the literature. We then consider the linear stability of this solution by applying a perturbation, in both space and time, and examine its growth. In Chapter 4 we again consider the stability of a planar sample of ferroelectric smectic C * when an electric field is applied perpendicular to the smectic planes. However, unlike in Chapter 3, we derive the relevant governing equation. After having introduced the relevant theory, the linear and nonlinear stability of a constant equilibrium state in both finite and infinite domains is examined. We then obtain information upon the relaxation times for each of these cases. The relaxation time gives an indication of how quickly the director relaxes back to equilibrium. The dynamic equation which is derived in Chapter 4 is extended in Chapter 5 to include the effects of lilting the applied electric field. The equilibrium equation which we then obtain is not tractable explicitly due to the form of the sinusoidal nonlinearity which appears in it. We therefore solve a simplified approximating dynamic equation as well as the full sinusoidal nonlinearity case numerically. In both cases the linear stability of the equilibrium solution is examined. Finally, in Chapter 6 we consider the layer deformations in a cylindrical sample of smectic A liquid crystal when a magnetic field is applied across the circular cross

  12. Controlling Active Liquid Crystal Droplets with Temperature and Surfactant Concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shechter, Jake; Milas, Peker; Ross, Jennifer

    Active matter is the study of driven many-body systems that span length scales from flocking birds to molecular motors. A previously described self-propelled particle system was made from liquid crystal (LC) droplets in water with high surfactant concentration to move particles via asymmetric surface instabilities. Using a similar system, we investigate the driving activity as a function of SDS surfactant concentration and temperature. We then use an optical tweezer to trap and locally heat the droplets to cause hydrodynamic flow and coupling between multiple droplets. This system will be the basis for a triggerable assembly system to build and couple LC droplets. DOD AROMURI 67455-CH-MUR.

  13. Infiltration liquid crystal in microstructured polymer optical fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Scott Wu; Wei, Lei; Bang, Ole

    2009-01-01

    7 is then infiltrated into about 6 cm of the length of mPOF by using capillary forces with the duration of 45 minutes. The transmission spectrum is measured by an optical spectrum analyzer with 1 nm resolution, and normalized to that of the unfilled fiber as shown by the solid line. The difference......POF is butt-coupled to a conventional single mode fiber (SMF) with the broadband light from a supercontinuum source. It is clear to see the colour of the guided modes is red, since some wavelengths are attenuated by the material loss of PMMA in visible region. A positive dielectric anisotropy liquid crystal E...

  14. Self-Assembled Supramolecular Architectures Lyotropic Liquid Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Garti, Nissim

    2012-01-01

    This book will describe fundamentals and recent developments in the area of Self-Assembled Supramolecular Architecture and their relevance to the  understanding of the functionality of  membranes  as delivery systems for active ingredients. As the heirarchial architectures determine their performance capabilities, attention will be paid to theoretical and design aspects related to the construction of lyotropic liquid crystals: mesophases such as lamellar, hexagonal, cubic, sponge phase micellosomes. The book will bring to the reader mechanistic aspects, compositional c

  15. Distributed hydrophone array based on liquid crystal cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodzeli, Zourab; Ladouceur, Francois; Silvestri, Leonardo; Michie, Andrew; Chigrinov, Vladimir; Guo, Grace Qi; Pozhidaev, Eugene P.; Kiselev, Alexei D.

    2012-02-01

    We describe a fibre optic hydrophone array system that could be used for underwater acoustic surveillance applications e.g. military, counter terrorist and customs authorities in protecting ports and harbors, offshore production facilities or coastal approaches as well as various marine applications. In this paper we propose a new approach to underwater sonar systems using voltage-controlled Liquid Crystals (LC) and simple multiplexing method. The proposed method permits measurements of sound under water at multiple points along an optical fibre using low cost components (LC cells), standard single mode fibre, without complex interferometric measurement techniques, electronics or demodulation software.

  16. Adaptive Holography in Liquid Crystal Light-Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Huignard

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available By performing two-wave mixing experiments in a liquid crystal light-valve, optical beam amplification is obtained as a strongly resonant process to which a narrow frequency bandwidth is associated. This property is exploited to realize adaptive holographic interferometric systems able to efficiently detect displacements as small as fraction of picometers. Pressure radiation induced deformations of a reflecting membrane are measured with the same type of system. Then, when used with complex wavefronts, like speckle fields, the LCLV-based interferometer allows to detect extremely small phase modulations. The examples shown demonstrate the potentialities of the light-valve for dynamic holography applications.

  17. Imaging spectrometer using a liquid crystal tunable filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrien, Thomas G.; Chovit, Christopher; Miller, Peter J.

    1993-09-01

    A demonstration imaging spectrometer using a liquid crystal tunable filter (LCTF) was built and tested on a hot air balloon platform. The LCTF is a tunable polarization interference or Lyot filter. The LCTF enables a small, light weight, low power, band sequential imaging spectrometer design. An overview of the prototype system is given along with a description of balloon experiment results. System model performance predictions are given for a future LCTF based imaging spectrometer design. System design considerations of LCTF imaging spectrometers are discussed.

  18. A novel composite alignment layer for transflective liquid crystal display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shuangyao; Li Xuan; Tao Du; Chigrinov, Vladimir; Kwok, Hoi Sing

    2010-01-01

    A novel composite photoalignment layer for transflective liquid crystal displays is explored. The key technique is to introduce a functional photo-crosslinkage into a rewritable azodye material with proper mixing. Bearing good alignment quality derived from the azodye material, the composite layer provides strong azimuthal and polar anchoring energy comparable to that of rubbed polyimide layers. The capability of dual modes fabrication in one cell exhibited by azodyes could be well retained and the new alignment film exhibits a display resolution of up to 2 μm. Furthermore, after exposure to strong LED unpolarized light the composite layer shows much better stability than that with a pure azodye material.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of liquid crystals and their thermoset films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Yong-Ho; Jung, Myung-Sup; Chang, Jin-Hae

    2010-01-01

    We prepared a series of aromatic liquid crystals (LCs) based on aromatic ester units with the reactive end groups methyl-maleimide and nadimide, and the resulting LCs were thermally cross-linked to produce liquid crystalline thermoset (LCT) films by means of solution-casting and heat treatment. The synthesized LCs and LCTs were characterized with Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermomechanical analysis (TMA), and polarizing optical microscopy with a hot stage. We found that all these LCs form nematic phases. The coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) of the LCT films are strongly affected by the reactive end group and the mesogen units in their main-chain structures. The methyl-maleimide-terminated biphenyl LCT was found to have the lowest CTE.

  20. Biaxiality in Nematic and Smectic Liquid Crystals. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Satyendra [Kent State Univ., Kent, OH (United States); Li, Quan [Kent State Univ., Kent, OH (United States); Srinivasarao, Mohan [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Agra-Kooijman, Dena M. [Kent State Univ., Kent, OH (United States); Rey, Alejandro [McGill Univ., Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2017-01-24

    During the award period, the project team explored several phenomena in a diverse group of soft condensed matter systems. These include understanding of the structure of the newly discovered twist-bend nematic phase, solving the mystery of de Vries smectic phases, probing of interesting associations and defect structures in chromonic liquid crystalline systems, dispersions of ferroelectric nanoparticles in smectic liquid crystals, investigations of newly synthesized light sensitive and energy harvesting materials with highly desirable transport properties. Our findings are summarized in the following report followed by a list of 36 publications and 37 conference presentations. We achieved this with the support of Basic Sciences Division of the US DOE for which we are thankful.

  1. Tunable Channel Drop Filter in a Two-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Modulated by a Nematic Liquid Crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Photonic crystals (PCs have many potential applications because of their ability to control light-wave propagation and because PC-based waveguides may be integrated into optical circuits. We propose a novel tunable PC channel drop filter based on nematic liquid crystals and investigate its properties numerically by using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD method. The refractive indices of liquid crystals can be actively modulated after infiltrating nematic liquid crystals into the microcavity in PC waveguides with square lattices. Then we can control light propagation in a PC waveguide. We analyze the Q -factors and resonance frequencies of a tunable PC channel drop filter by considering various indices modulation of liquid crystals. The novel component can be used as wavelength division multiplexing in photonic integrated circuits.

  2. Localized soft elasticity in liquid crystal elastomers (POSTPRINT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-23

    liquid crystalline acrylate terminated macromers. The macromers are then crosslinked by exposure to 100mWcm 2 ultraviolet light (365 nm) at room...with a micrometre. All films were clamped on both ends. Images of the buckled films were taken with a digital camera and analysed in ImageJ. Curvature...distribution of heat was then monitored using an infrared camera (FLIR). References 1. Studart, A. R. Biological and bioinspired composites with spatially

  3. Dye-Induced Enhancement of Optical Nonlinearity in Liquids and Liquid Crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muenster, R.; Jarasch, M.; Zhuang, X.; Shen, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Optical nonlinearity of liquid crystals (LC) in the isotropic phase can be enhanced by 1 order of magnitude by dissolving 0.1% of anthraquinone dye in the LC. The enhancement decreases by ∼30% when the LC transforms into the nematic phase. The same guest-host effect also exists in non-LC liquids. It can be explained by a model based on the change of guest-host interaction induced by optical excitations of the dye. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  4. Viewing angle switching of patterned vertical alignment liquid crystal display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Young Jin; Jeong, Eun; Chin, Mi Hyung; Lee, Seung Hee; Ji, Seunghoon; Lee, Gi-Dong

    2008-01-01

    Viewing angle control of a patterned vertical alignment (PVA) liquid crystal display using only one panel is investigated. In conventional PVA modes, a vertically aligned liquid crystal (LC) director tilts down in four directions making 45 deg. with respect to crossed polarizers to exhibit a wide viewing angle. In the viewing angle control device, one pixel was divided into two sub-pixels such that the LC director in the main pixel is controlled to be tilted down in multiple directions making an angle with the polarizer, playing the role of main display with the wide viewing angle, while the LC director in the sub-pixel is controlled to be tilted down to the polarizer axis, playing the role of sub-pixel to the viewing angle control for the narrow viewing angle. Using sub-pixel control, light leakage or any type of information such as characters and image can be generated in oblique viewing directions without distorting the image quality in the normal direction, which will prevent others from peeping at the displayed image by overlapping the displayed image with the made image

  5. Optics of Confined Liquid Crystals for Gas Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, William; Carrozzi, Daniel; Vigilia, Lee Anne; Wang, Xiaoyurui; Guzman, Violet; Shibayev, Petr; Fordham University Students of Undergraduate Physics Team

    Cholesteric liquid crystals (CLCs) of a wide range of viscosities were studied experimentally in relation to their use as gas sensors and sensors of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), specifically ethanol, cyclohexane, toluene, acetic acid, and pyridine. CLCs were obtained by mixing low molar mass liquid crystals (MBBA and cholesterol derivatives with siloxane based oligomers). The droplets of CLCs were placed in containers with controlled atmospheres. The shift of the selective reflection band, predominantly from shorter to longer wavelengths, and the color changes were observed in the CLC illuminated by light coming from the various directions. Visible optical changes were observed in droplets with viscosities of CLCs ranging from c.a. 4 Pa*s to 105 Pa*s. The most responsive droplets in which the shift of the selective reflection band occurs at lower concentrations of VOCs were prepared from CLC mixtures with the lowest viscosities. Higher viscosities of CLCs lead to a slower response to VOCs, but the rate of response is different for each pair of VOC and CLC with a certain viscosity. This finding opens a possibility for selective detection of VOCs by CLCs with different viscosities. The mechanism of VOCs diffusion, interaction with CLC matrix and optical changes is discusse

  6. Switchable Liquid Crystal Contact Lenses for the Correction of Presbyopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Bailey

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Presbyopia is an age-related disorder where the lens of the eye hardens so that focusing on near objects becomes increasingly difficult. This complaint affects everyone over the age of 50. It is becoming progressively more relevant, as the average age of the global population continues to rise. Bifocal or varifocal spectacles are currently the best solution for those that require near and far vision correction. However, many people prefer not to wear spectacles and while multifocal contact lenses are available, they are not widely prescribed and can require significant adaptation by wearers. One possible solution is to use liquid crystal contact lenses that can change focal power by applying a small electric field across the device. However, the design of these contact lenses must be carefully considered as they must be comfortable for the user to wear and able to provide the required change in focal power (usually about +2D. Progress towards different lens designs, which includes lens geometry, liquid crystal choices and suitable alignment modes, are reviewed. Furthermore, we also discuss suitable electrode materials, possible power sources and suggest some methods for switching the lenses between near and far vision correction.

  7. Intrinsic frame transport for a model of nematic liquid crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzini, S.; Rull, L. F.; Ciccotti, G.; Paolini, G. V.

    1997-02-01

    We present a computer simulation study of the dynamical properties of a nematic liquid crystal model. The diffusional motion of the nematic director is taken into account in our calculations in order to give a proper estimate of the transport coefficients. Differently from other groups we do not attempt to stabilize the director through rigid constraints or applied external fields. We instead define an intrinsic frame which moves along with the director at each step of the simulation. The transport coefficients computed in the intrinsic frame are then compared against the ones calculated in the fixed laboratory frame, to show the inadequacy of the latter for systems with less than 500 molecules. Using this general scheme on the Gay-Berne liquid crystal model, we evidence the natural motion of the director and attempt to quantify its intrinsic time scale and size dependence. Through extended simulations of systems of different size we calculate the diffusion and viscosity coefficients of this model and compare our results with values previously obtained with fixed director.

  8. Surface dynamics and mechanics in liquid crystal polymer coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Danqing; Broer, Dirk J.

    2015-03-01

    Based on liquid crystal networks we developed `smart' coatings with responsive surface topographies. Either by prepatterning or by the formation of self-organized structures they can be switched on and off in a pre-designed manner. Here we provide an overview of our methods to generate coatings that form surface structures upon the actuation by light. The coating oscillates between a flat surface and a surface with pre-designed 3D micro-patterns by modulating a light source. With recent developments in solid state lighting, light is an attractive trigger medium as it can be integrated in a device for local control or can be used remotely for flood or localized exposure. The basic principle of formation of surface topographies is based on the change of molecular organization in ordered liquid crystal polymer networks. The change in order leads to anisotropic dimensional changes with contraction along the director and expansion to the two perpendicular directions and an increase in volume by the formation of free volume. These two effects work in concert to provide local expansion and contraction in the coating steered by the local direction of molecular orientation. The surface deformation, expressed as the height difference between the activated regions and the non-activated regions divided by the initial film thickness, is of the order of 20%. Switching occurs immediately when the light is switched `on' and `off' and takes several tens of seconds.

  9. Investigation of the liquid crystal alignment layer: effect on electrical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abderrahmen, Asma; Romdhane, Fayda Fekih; Gharbi, Abdelhafidh [Laboratoire de la matiere molle, Faculte des sciences, Tunis (Tunisia); Ouada, Hafedh Ben [Laboratoire de physique et chimie des interfaces, Faculte des sciences, 5000 Monastir (Tunisia)], E-mail: asma_abderrahmen@yahoo.fr

    2008-04-01

    We investigate the electrical behavior of a symmetric liquid crystal (LC) cell: elecrode-silane-LC-silane-electrode. The silane (chlorodimethyloctadecyl-silane) layer induces a homeotropic orientation of the nematic liquid crystal (NLC) molecules. The wettability technique is used to detect the change of the surface energy of the electrode upon cleaning and silane layer deposition. We report on the dynamic impedance measurements of the nematic liquid crystal cell. It is found that the silane alignment layer has a blocking effect on the liquid crystal (LC) cell. We also study the relaxation behavior of the cell which is later assimilated as an electrical equivalent circuit.

  10. Investigation of the liquid crystal alignment layer: effect on electrical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abderrahmen, Asma; Romdhane, Fayda Fekih; Gharbi, Abdelhafidh; Ouada, Hafedh Ben

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the electrical behavior of a symmetric liquid crystal (LC) cell: elecrode-silane-LC-silane-electrode. The silane (chlorodimethyloctadecyl-silane) layer induces a homeotropic orientation of the nematic liquid crystal (NLC) molecules. The wettability technique is used to detect the change of the surface energy of the electrode upon cleaning and silane layer deposition. We report on the dynamic impedance measurements of the nematic liquid crystal cell. It is found that the silane alignment layer has a blocking effect on the liquid crystal (LC) cell. We also study the relaxation behavior of the cell which is later assimilated as an electrical equivalent circuit

  11. Application of Thin Films of Conjugated Polymers in Novel LED's and Liquid Crystal 'Light Valves'

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    MacDiarmid, A

    1997-01-01

    .... Flexible, completely organic polymer dispersed liquid crystal light valves have been fabricated from transparent plastic substrates on which a conducting film of polypyrrole has been deposited...

  12. muSR-Investigation of a Liquid Crystal Containing Iron Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Mamedov, T N; Galyametdinov, Yu G; Gritsaj, K I; Herlach, D; Kormann, O; Major, J V; Rochev, V Ya; Stoikov, A V; Zimmermann, U

    2000-01-01

    The work is devoted to the investigation of properties of a liquid crystal whose molecule contains iron atom. The compounds of this type are of interest from the point of view of obtaining liquid crystals with magnetic properties. The temperature dependence of the polarization and relaxation rate of positive muon spin in the liquid crystal was measured in the temperature range 4-300 K. The results obtained do not contradict the suggestion that the iron ions from an antiferromagnetically-ordered structure in this liquid crystal at the temperatures below 80 K.

  13. A roadmap to uranium ionic liquids: Anti-crystal engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaprak, Damla; Spielberg, Eike T.; Baecker, Tobias; Richter, Mark; Mallick, Bert [Inorganic Chemistry III, Ruhr-University Bochum (Germany); Klein, Axel [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Koeln Univ. (Germany); Mudring, Anja-Verena [Inorganic Chemistry III, Ruhr-University Bochum (Germany); Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University and Critical Materials Institute, Ames Laboratory, Ames, IA (United States)

    2014-05-19

    In the search for uranium-based ionic liquids, tris(N,N-dialkyldithiocarbamato)uranylates have been synthesized as salts of the 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium (C{sub 4}mim) cation. As dithiocarbamate ligands binding to the UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} unit, tetra-, penta-, hexa-, and heptamethylenedithiocarbamates, N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate, N-methyl-N-propyldithiocarbamate, N-ethyl-N-propyldithiocarbamate, and N-methyl-N-butyldithiocarbamate have been explored. X-ray single-crystal diffraction allowed unambiguous structural characterization of all compounds except N-methyl-N-butyldithiocarbamate, which is obtained as a glassy material only. In addition, powder X-ray diffraction as well as vibrational and UV/Vis spectroscopy, supported by computational methods, were used to characterize the products. Differential scanning calorimetry was employed to investigate the phase-transition behavior depending on the N,N-dialkyldithiocarbamato ligand with the aim to establish structure-property relationships regarding the ionic liquid formation capability. Compounds with the least symmetric N,N-dialkyldithiocarbamato ligand and hence the least symmetric anions, tris(N-methyl-N-propyldithiocarbamato)uranylate, tris(N-ethyl-N-propyldithiocarbamato)uranylate, and tris(N-methyl-N-butyldithiocarbamato)uranylate, lead to the formation of (room-temperature) ionic liquids, which confirms that low-symmetry ions are indeed suitable to suppress crystallization. These materials combine low melting points, stable complex formation, and hydrophobicity and are therefore excellent candidates for nuclear fuel purification and recovery. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Effects of thermo-order-mechanical coupling on band structures in liquid crystal nematic elastomer porous phononic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuai; Liu, Ying

    2018-08-01

    Liquid crystal nematic elastomers are one kind of smart anisotropic and viscoelastic solids simultaneously combing the properties of rubber and liquid crystals, which is thermal sensitivity. In this paper, the wave dispersion in a liquid crystal nematic elastomer porous phononic crystal subjected to an external thermal stimulus is theoretically investigated. Firstly, an energy function is proposed to determine thermo-induced deformation in NE periodic structures. Based on this function, thermo-induced band variation in liquid crystal nematic elastomer porous phononic crystals is investigated in detail. The results show that when liquid crystal elastomer changes from nematic state to isotropic state due to the variation of the temperature, the absolute band gaps at different bands are opened or closed. There exists a threshold temperature above which the absolute band gaps are opened or closed. Larger porosity benefits the opening of the absolute band gaps. The deviation of director from the structural symmetry axis is advantageous for the absolute band gap opening in nematic state whist constrains the absolute band gap opening in isotropic state. The combination effect of temperature and director orientation provides an added degree of freedom in the intelligent tuning of the absolute band gaps in phononic crystals. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Charge Transport and Phase Behavior of Imidazolium-Based Ionic Liquid Crystals from Fully Atomistic Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevillon, Michael J; Whitmer, Jonathan K

    2018-01-02

    Ionic liquid crystals occupy an intriguing middle ground between room-temperature ionic liquids and mesostructured liquid crystals. Here, we examine a non-polarizable, fully atomistic model of the 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium nitrate family using molecular dynamics in the constant pressure-constant temperature ensemble. These materials exhibit a distinct "smectic" liquid phase, characterized by layers formed by the molecules, which separate the ionic and aliphatic moieties. In particular, we discuss the implications this layering may have for electrolyte applications.

  16. Biologically inspired hairy surfaces for liquid repellency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shu-Hau

    Owing to remarkable features, such as self-cleaning, anti-biofouling and drag reduction, interest on rendering surfaces water-repellent has significantly grown within this decade. Attempts on making surfaces "superhydrophobic", where high water contact angle (θc >150°) accompanied with only few degrees of roll-off angle, have been extensively demonstrated through the mimicking of the surface chemistry and morphology of lotus leaves. This appealing phenomenon also exists on another structure from nature: surfaces comprising soft hairs. Although the role of this piliferous integument has long been recognized for providing life, arthropods in particular, waterrepellency, the synthetic superhydrophobic surfaces based on this structure are still very limited. In this study, the goal was to develop a novel liquid-repellent surface by mimicking the hairy exterior of species. The artificial hairy surfaces were prepared by means of pressurized membrane casting, in which thermoplastic sheets were forced to flow into porous membranes at elevated temperature. The G-shaped pillars on the membrane cast polypropylene substrate are particularly similar to the conformation of natural hairs. The principle of this fabrication technique is relatively accessible and is expected to be compatible with large-area fabrication of superhydrophobic interfaces. The artificial hairy surface features perfectly hydrophobic response where no contact angle hysteresis was observed from video assessment. Thus the artificial hairy surface of the current work appears to be the first report to have such extreme hydrophobicity with only structural modification from the original substrate. This ultralow adhesion to water droplet is believed to be attributed to the hydrophobic methyl groups and the mechanical response of the artificial hairs. Liquid repellency of the hairy surfaces was further enhanced by coating with fluorocarbon (CF) layers via deep reactive ion etching (DRIE). The contact angle of

  17. Pulsed zero field NMR of solids and liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thayer, A.M.

    1987-02-01

    This work describes the development and applications to solids and liquid crystals of zero field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with pulsed dc magnetic fields. Zero field NMR experiments are one approach for obtaining high resolution spectra of amorphous and polycrystalline materials which normally (in high field) display broad featureless spectra. The behavior of the spin system can be coherently manipulated and probed in zero field with dc magnetic field pulses which are employed in a similar manner to radiofrequency pulses in high field NMR experiments. Nematic phases of liquid crystalline systems are studied in order to observe the effects of the removal of an applied magnetic field on sample alignment and molecular order parameters. In nematic phases with positive and negative magnetic susceptibility anisotropies, a comparison between the forms of the spin interactions in high and low fields is made. High resolution zero field NMR spectra of unaligned smectic samples are also obtained and reflect the symmetry of the liquid crystalline environment. These experiments are a sensitive measure of the motionally induced asymmetry in biaxial phases. Homonuclear and heteronuclear solute spin systems are compared in the nematic and smectic phases. Nonaxially symmetric dipolar couplings are reported for several systems. The effects of residual fields in the presence of a non-zero asymmetry parameter are discussed theoretically and presented experimentally. Computer programs for simulations of these and other experimental results are also reported. 179 refs., 75 figs

  18. Biological treatment of sludge digester liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loosdrecht, M C M; Salem, S

    2006-01-01

    Nitrogen removal in side stream processes offers a good potential for upgrading wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) that need to meet stricter effluent standards. Removing nutrients from these internal process flows significantly reduces the N-load to the main treatment plant. These internal flows mainly result from the sludge processing and have a high temperature and a high concentration of ammonia. Therefore, the required reactor volumes as well as the required aerobic SRT are small. Generally, biological treatment processes are more economical and preferred over physical-chemical processes. Recently, several biological treatment processes have been introduced for sludge water treatment. These processes are available now on the activated sludge market (e.g. SHARON, ANAMMOX and BABE processes). The technologies differ in concept and in the limitations guiding the application of these processes for upgrading WWTPs. This paper reviews and compares different biological alternatives for nitrogen removal in side streams. The limitations for selecting a technology from the available ones in the activated sludge market are noted and analysed. It is stressed that the choice for a certain process is based on more aspects than pure process engineering arguments.

  19. Creation of tunable absolute bandgaps in a two-dimensional anisotropic photonic crystal modulated by a nematic liquid crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chenyang

    2008-01-01

    Photonic crystals (PCs) have many potential applications because of their ability to control light-wave propagation. We have investigated the tunable absolute bandgap in a two-dimensional anisotropic photonic crystal structures modulated by a nematic liquid crystal. The PC structure composed of an anisotropic-dielectric cylinder in the liquid crystal medium is studied by solving Maxwell's equations using the plane wave expansion method. The photonic band structures are found to exhibit absolute bandgaps for the square and triangular lattices. Numerical simulations show that the absolute bandgaps can be continuously tuned in the square and triangular lattices consisting of anisotropic-dielectric cylinders by infiltrating nematic liquid crystals. Such a mechanism of bandgap adjustment should open up a new application for designing components in photonic integrated circuits

  20. Thermal conductivity of Glycerol's liquid, glass, and crystal states, glass-liquid-glass transition, and crystallization at high pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Ove; Johari, G P

    2016-02-14

    To investigate the effects of local density fluctuations on phonon propagation in a hydrogen bonded structure, we studied the thermal conductivity κ of the crystal, liquid, and glassy states of pure glycerol as a function of the temperature, T, and the pressure, p. We find that the following: (i) κcrystal is 3.6-times the κliquid value at 140 K at 0.1 MPa and 2.2-times at 290 K, and it varies with T according to 138 × T(-0.95); (ii) the ratio κliquid (p)/κliquid (0.1 MPa) is 1.45 GPa(-1) at 280 K, which, unexpectedly, is about the same as κcrystal (p)/κcrystal (0.1 MPa) of 1.42 GPa(-1) at 298 K; (iii) κglass is relatively insensitive to T but sensitive to the applied p (1.38 GPa(-1) at 150 K); (iv) κglass-T plots show an enhanced, pressure-dependent peak-like feature, which is due to the glass to liquid transition on heating; (v) continuous heating cold-crystallizes ultraviscous glycerol under pressure, at a higher T when p is high; and (vi) glycerol formed by cooling at a high p and then measured at a low p has a significantly higher κ than the glass formed by cooling at a low p. On heating at a fixed low p, its κ decreases before its glass-liquid transition range at that p is reached. We attribute this effect to thermally assisted loss of the configurational and vibrational instabilities of a glass formed at high p and recovered at low p, which is different from the usual glass-aging effect. While the heat capacity, entropy, and volume of glycerol crystal are less than those for its glass and liquid, κcrystal of glycerol, like its elastic modulus and refractive index, is higher. We discuss these findings in terms of the role of fluctuations in local density and structure, and the relations between κ and the thermodynamic quantities.

  1. Thermal optical nonlinearity in photonic crystal fibers filled with nematic liquid crystals doped with gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesiak, Piotr; Budaszewski, Daniel; Bednarska, Karolina; Wójcik, Michał; Sobotka, Piotr; Chychłowski, Miłosz; Woliński, Tomasz R.

    2017-05-01

    In this work we studied a newly reported class of nonlinear effects observed in 5CB liquid crystals doped with gold nanoparticles (GNPs). The size of the GNP was determined by direct TEM imaging and by X-ray scattering of the diluted NP solution. GNPs was coated by thiols with the ratio of mesogenic to n-alkyl thiols varying from 1:2 to 1:1. The research involved comparing properties of both undoped and doped 5CB (nematic LC) by infiltrating LC cell and microholes of the photonic crystal fiber (PCF) separately. In our experiment the PCF fiber type LMA-10 made by NKT Photonics as host material has been used.

  2. Polymer Stabilization of Liquid-Crystal Blue Phase II toward Photonic Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Seong-Yong; Jeon, Sung-Wook; Kim, Byeong-Cheon; Bae, Jae-Hyun; Araoka, Fumito; Choi, Suk-Won

    2017-03-15

    The temperature ranges where a pure simple-cubic blue phase (BPII) emerges are quite narrow compared to the body-centered-cubic BP (BPI) such that the polymer stabilization of BPII is much more difficult. Hence, a polymer-stabilized BPII possessing a wide temperature range has been scarcely reported. Here, we fabricate a polymer-stabilized BPII over a temperature range of 50 °C including room temperature. The fabricated polymer-stabilized BPII is confirmed via polarized optical microscopy, Bragg reflection, and Kossel diagram observations. Furthermore, we demonstrate reflective BP liquid-crystal devices utilizing the reflectance-voltage performance as a potential application of the polymer-stabilized BPII. Our work demonstrates the possibility of practical application of the polymer-stabilized BPII to photonic crystals.

  3. Switchable Photonic Crystals Using One-Dimensional Confined Liquid Crystals for Photonic Device Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Seong Ho; Gim, Min-Jun; Lee, Wonsuk; Choi, Suk-Won; Yoon, Dong Ki

    2017-01-25

    Photonic crystals (PCs) have recently attracted considerable attention, with much effort devoted to photonic bandgap (PBG) control for varying the reflected color. Here, fabrication of a modulated one-dimensional (1D) anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) PC with a periodic porous structure is reported. The PBG of the fabricated PC can be reversibly changed by switching the ultraviolet (UV) light on/off. The AAO nanopores contain a mixture of photoresponsive liquid crystals (LCs) with irradiation-activated cis/trans photoisomerizable azobenzene. The resultant mixture of LCs in the porous AAO film exhibits a reversible PBG, depending on the cis/trans configuration of azobenzene molecules. The PBG switching is reliable over many cycles, suggesting that the fabricated device can be used in optical and photonic applications such as light modulators, smart windows, and sensors.

  4. Flat liquid crystal diffractive lenses with variable focus and magnification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valley, Pouria

    Non-mechanical variable lenses are important for creating compact imaging devices. Various methods employing dielectrically actuated lenses, membrane lenses, and liquid crystal lenses were previously proposed [1-4]. In This dissertation the design, fabrication, and characterization of innovative flat tunable-focus liquid crystal diffractive lenses (LCDL) are presented. LCDL employ binary Fresnel zone electrodes fabricated on Indium-Tin-Oxide using conventional micro-photolithography. The light phase can be adjusted by varying the effective refractive index of a nematic liquid crystal sandwiched between the electrodes and a reference substrate. Using a proper voltage distribution across various electrodes the focal length can be changed between several discrete values. Electrodes are shunted such that the correct phase retardation step sequence is achieved. If the number of 2pi zone boundaries is increased by a factor of m the focal length is changed from f to f/m based on the digitized Fresnel zone equation: f = rm2/2mlambda, where r m is mth zone radius, and lambda is the wavelength. The chromatic aberration of the diffractive lens is addressed and corrected by adding a variable fluidic lens. These LCDL operate at very low voltage levels (+/-2.5V ac input), exhibit fast switching times (20-150 ms), can have large apertures (>10 mm), and small form factor, and are robust and insensitive to vibrations, gravity, and capillary effects that limit membrane and dielectrically actuated lenses. Several tests were performed on the LCDL including diffraction efficiency measurement, switching dynamics, and hybrid imaging with a refractive lens. Negative focal lengths are achieved by adjusting the voltages across electrodes. Using these lenses in combination, magnification can be changed and zoom lenses can be formed. These characteristics make LCDL a good candidate for a variety of applications including auto-focus and zoom lenses in compact imaging devices such as camera

  5. The Effect of Thermal Cycling on Crystal-Liquid Separation During Lunar Magma Ocean Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Ryan D.

    2013-01-01

    Differentiation of magma oceans likely involves a mixture of fractional and equilibrium crystallization [1]. The existence of: 1) large volumes of anorthosite in the lunar highlands and 2) the incompatible- rich (KREEP) reservoir suggests that fractional crystallization may have dominated during differentiation of the Moon. For this to have occurred, crystal fractionation must have been remarkably efficient. Several authors [e.g. 2, 3] have hypothesized that equilibrium crystallization would have dominated early in differentiation of magma oceans because of crystal entrainment during turbulent convection. However, recent numerical modeling [4] suggests that crystal settling could have occurred throughout the entire solidification history of the lunar magma ocean if crystals were large and crystal fraction was low. These results indicate that the crystal size distribution could have played an important role in differentiation of the lunar magma ocean. Here, I suggest that thermal cycling from tidal heating during lunar magma ocean crystallization caused crystals to coarsen, leading to efficient crystal-liquid separation.

  6. Biological production of liquid fuels from biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-01-01

    A scheme for the production of liquid fuels from renewable resources such as poplar wood and lignocellulosic wastes from a refuse hydropulper was investigated. The particular scheme being studied involves the conversion of a cellulosic residue, resulting from a solvent delignified lignocellulosic feed, into either high concentration sugar syrups or into ethyl and/or butyl alcohol. The construction of a pilot apparatus for solvent delignifying 150 g samples of lignocellulosic feeds was completed. Also, an analysis method for characterizing the delignified product has been selected and tested. This is a method recommended in the Forage Fiber Handbook. Delignified samples are now being prepared and tested for their extent of delignification and susceptibility to enzyme hydrolysis. Work is continuing on characterizing the cellulase and cellobiase enzyme systems derived from the YX strain of Thermomonospora.

  7. Precipitation of thin-film organic single crystals by a novel crystal growth method using electrospray and ionic liquid film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Keita; Kikuchi, Akihiko

    2018-04-01

    We report an organic single crystal growth technique, which uses a nonvolatile liquid thin film as a crystal growth field and supplies fine droplets containing solute from the surface of the liquid thin film uniformly and continuously by electrospray deposition. Here, we investigated the relationships between the solute concentration of the supplied solution and the morphology and size of precipitated crystals for four types of fluorescent organic low molecule material [tris(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum (Alq3), 2-(4-biphenylyl)-5-(4-tert-butylphenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole (PBD), N,N‧-bis(3-methylphenyl)-N,N‧-diphenylbenzidine (TPD), and N,N-bis(naphthalene-1-yl)-N,N-diphenyl-benzidine (NPB)] using an ionic liquid as the nonvolatile liquid. As the concentration of the supplied solution decreased, the morphology of precipitated crystals changed from dendritic or leaf shape to platelike one. At the solution concentration of 0.1 mg/ml, relatively large platelike single crystals with a diagonal length of over 100 µm were obtained for all types of material. In the experiment using ionic liquid and dioctyl sebacate as nonvolatile liquids, it was confirmed that there is a clear positive correlation between the maximum volume of the precipitated single crystal and the solubility of solute under the same solution supply conditions.

  8. Transitions through critical temperatures in nematic liquid crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Majumdar, Apala; Ockendon, John; Howell, Peter; Surovyatkina, Elena

    2013-01-01

    We obtain estimates for critical nematic liquid crystal (LC) temperatures under the action of a slowly varying temperature-dependent control variable. We show that biaxiality has a negligible effect within our model and that these delay estimates are well described by a purely uniaxial model. The static theory predicts two critical temperatures: the supercooling temperature below which the isotropic phase loses stability and the superheating temperature above which the ordered nematic states do not exist. In contrast to the static problem, the isotropic phase exhibits a memory effect below the supercooling temperature in the dynamic framework. This delayed loss of stability is independent of the rate of change of temperature and depends purely on the initial value of the temperature. We also show how our results can be used to improve estimates for LC material constants. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  9. Four-dimensional Printing of Liquid Crystal Elastomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambulo, Cedric P; Burroughs, Julia J; Boothby, Jennifer M; Kim, Hyun; Shankar, M Ravi; Ware, Taylor H

    2017-10-25

    Three-dimensional structures capable of reversible changes in shape, i.e., four-dimensional-printed structures, may enable new generations of soft robotics, implantable medical devices, and consumer products. Here, thermally responsive liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs) are direct-write printed into 3D structures with a controlled molecular order. Molecular order is locally programmed by controlling the print path used to build the 3D object, and this order controls the stimulus response. Each aligned LCE filament undergoes 40% reversible contraction along the print direction on heating. By printing objects with controlled geometry and stimulus response, magnified shape transformations, for example, volumetric contractions or rapid, repetitive snap-through transitions, are realized.

  10. Polymer dispersed liquid crystals. Pt.1 Concept, Preparation and Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakemi, H. A.; Santangelo, M.

    1998-01-01

    It is more than a decade since Polymer Dispersed Liquid Crystal (PDLC) film technology became the subject of a world-wide scientific and industrial research and development for commercial applications as large-area reflective displays and electrooptical windows, for privacy, security and light transmission control. In view of current interest and intensive fundamental and industrial research on PDLC, the authors attempt to provide a review of the state-of-art of this technology, from concept to its industrial production, in a series of articles. In the present introductory part, the authors discuss the basic concept, the principle of operation, the materials and the preparation techniques of a PDLC device by phase separation method [it

  11. Study of memory effects in polymer dispersed liquid crystal films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Jinwoo

    2006-01-01

    In this work, we have studied the memory effects in polymer dispersed liquid crystal films. We found that optical responses, such as the memory effects, of the films depended strongly on the morphology. For example, memory effects were observed for films with polymer ball morphologies; however, only weak hysteresis effects were observed for films with droplet morphologies. In particular, a stronger memory effect was observed for films with more complicated polymer ball structures. Coincidentally, T TE , the temperature at which the memory state is thermally erased, was generally higher for the films exhibiting a stronger memory effect. In addition, studies of the temporal evolution of the films show that the memory effects become stronger after films have been kept on the shelf for a period of time. This change is likely to be associated with a modification of surface anchoring properties at the LC-polymer interface.

  12. Elastic energy of liquid crystals in convex polyhedra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, A; Robbins, J M; Zyskin, M

    2004-01-01

    We consider nematic liquid crystals in a bounded, convex polyhedron described by a director field n(r) subject to tangent boundary conditions. We derive lower bounds for the one-constant elastic energy in terms of topological invariants. For a right rectangular prism and a large class of topologies, we derive upper bounds by introducing test configurations constructed from local conformal solutions of the Euler-Lagrange equation. The ratio of the upper and lower bounds depends only on the aspect ratios of the prism. As the aspect ratios are varied, the minimum-energy conformal state undergoes a sharp transition from being smooth to having singularities on the edges. (letter to the editor)

  13. Stabilization of liquid crystal dispersions with acrylamide copolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S.J.; Kim, M.H.; Lee, J.R. [Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-01

    The effects of hydrophobic moieties(styrene and methyl methacrylate) on the stability of a liquid crystal(LC, E-7)-in-water dispersion stabilized by copolymers of hydrophilic acrylamide with hydrophobic monomers have been studied in terms of nematic curvilinear aligned phase(NCAP) system. It was observed that the preferential adsorption hydrophobic moieties onto LC droplet surface resulted in steric stabilization of the dispersion, due to increasing the interfacial tension of LC and reducing the LC droplet size. According to the interfacial tension, coalescence time, and sedimented layer thickness measurements, it was proposed that the presence of hydrophobic moieties allows to form the apolar microenvironment in the round of LC droplet and finally reduces the anchoring effect between LC and the polymeric wall. 16 refs., 10 figs.

  14. Emerging Applications of Liquid Crystals Based on Nanotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Inn Sohn

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Diverse functionalities of liquid crystals (LCs offer enormous opportunities for their potential use in advanced mobile and smart displays, as well as novel non-display applications. Here, we present snapshots of the research carried out on emerging applications of LCs ranging from electronics to holography and self-powered systems. In addition, we will show our recent results focused on the development of new LC applications, such as programmable transistors, a transparent and active-type two-dimensional optical array and self-powered display systems based on LCs, and will briefly discuss their novel concepts and basic operating principles. Our research will give insights not only into comprehensively understanding technical and scientific applications of LCs, but also developing new discoveries of other LC-based devices.

  15. Molecular engineering of chiral colloidal liquid crystals using DNA origami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siavashpouri, Mahsa; Wachauf, Christian H.; Zakhary, Mark J.; Praetorius, Florian; Dietz, Hendrik; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2017-08-01

    Establishing precise control over the shape and the interactions of the microscopic building blocks is essential for design of macroscopic soft materials with novel structural, optical and mechanical properties. Here, we demonstrate robust assembly of DNA origami filaments into cholesteric liquid crystals, one-dimensional supramolecular twisted ribbons and two-dimensional colloidal membranes. The exquisite control afforded by the DNA origami technology establishes a quantitative relationship between the microscopic filament structure and the macroscopic cholesteric pitch. Furthermore, it also enables robust assembly of one-dimensional twisted ribbons, which behave as effective supramolecular polymers whose structure and elastic properties can be precisely tuned by controlling the geometry of the elemental building blocks. Our results demonstrate the potential synergy between DNA origami technology and colloidal science, in which the former allows for rapid and robust synthesis of complex particles, and the latter can be used to assemble such particles into bulk materials.

  16. Anisotropic ultrasound propagation in a smectic-C liquid crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, S.; Umrigar, C.J.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1976-01-01

    The results of longitudinal ultrasound propagation in a magnetically aligned smectic-C liquid crystal (p-p' Heptyloxyazoxy benzene) are reported. In the smectic-C phase the plane normals can lie anywhere on a cone with the axis along the magnetic field direction in which the sample was cooled. The effects of the layer normal direction and the molecular orientation within the planes on the velocity anisotropy were separated by cooling the sample into the smectic-C phase at particular orientations of the magnetic field and subsequently rotating the magnetic field. The results were analyzed on the basis of a multidomain model where the azimuthal angle of the plane normal around the field direction was averaged over

  17. Poly-Phenylene-Quinonediimine as a possible conducting liquid crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, H. K.

    1986-06-01

    The synthesis of stable electrically conducting, fabricable polymers of known structure represents an important goal of current polymer science. It seems to us that conductive, processable, and stable materials of defined structure should not be beyond the reach of the modern synthetic polymer chemist. Our approach has been to utilize a wide variety of polycondensation reactions to see whether they are useful for the synthesis of potentially conducting, stable, processable polymers. Polycondensation routes are preferred because they will lead to polymers of rational, known structure. Standard techniques of polymer chemistry such as copolymerization, use of unsymmetrical monomers, and introduction of softening substituents can be used to enhance processability. Further, the extended para structures preferred for conductivity may also lead to liquid crystal behavior, another potential tool for fabrication.

  18. In Silico Measurement of Elastic Moduli of Nematic Liquid Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidky, Hythem; de Pablo, Juan J.; Whitmer, Jonathan K.

    2018-03-01

    Experiments on confined droplets of the nematic liquid crystal 5CB have questioned long-established bounds imposed on the elastic free energy of nematic systems. This elasticity, which derives from molecular alignment within nematic systems, is quantified through a set of moduli which can be difficult to measure experimentally and, in some cases, can only be probed indirectly. This is particularly true of the surfacelike saddle-splay elastic term, for which the available experimental data indicate values on the cusp of stability, often with large uncertainties. Here, we demonstrate that all nematic elastic moduli, including the saddle-splay elastic constant k24, may be calculated directly from atomistic molecular simulations. Importantly, results obtained through in silico measurements of the 5CB elastic properties demonstrate unambiguously that saddle-splay elasticity alone is unable to describe the observed confined morphologies.

  19. Morphological studies of polymer dispersed liquid crystal materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Jin-Woo

    2006-01-01

    In this work, we have studied the morphologies of polymer dispersed liquid crystals (PDLCs) based on E7/NOA61. Scanning electron microscope studies show that the PDLC morphology is strongly affected by the LC concentration and the cure temperature. A typical PDLC morphology with isolated LC droplets dispersed in a polymer matrix is only observed at low LC compositions and at low cure temperatures. Increasing either the LC composition or the cure temperature results in a polymer ball morphology, in which LCs exist in irregularly shaped voids in the polymer network structure. It is shown that the transition between these two morphologies can be qualitatively explained using a pseudo-binary phase diagram.

  20. Amplified Photon Upconversion by Photonic Shell of Cholesteric Liquid Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ji-Hwan; Kim, Shin-Hyun; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto; Reichmanis, Elsa

    2017-04-26

    As an effective platform to exploit triplet-triplet-annihilation-based photon upconversion (TTA-UC), microcapsules composed of a fluidic UC core and photonic shell are microfluidically prepared using a triple emulsion as the template. The photonic shell consists of cholesteric liquid crystals (CLCs) with a periodic helical structure, exhibiting a photonic band gap. Combined with planar anchoring at the boundaries, the shell serves as a resonance cavity for TTA-UC emission and enables spectral tuning of the UC under low-power-density excitation. The CLC shell can be stabilized by introducing a polymerizable mesogen in the LC host. Because of the microcapsule spherical symmetry, spontaneous emission of the delayed fluorescence is omnidirectionally amplified at the edge of the stop band. These results demonstrate the range of opportunities provided by TTA-UC systems for the future design of low-threshold photonic devices.

  1. Introduction to optical methods for characterizing liquid crystals at interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Daniel S; Carlton, Rebecca J; Mushenheim, Peter C; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2013-03-12

    This Instructional Review describes methods and underlying principles that can be used to characterize both the orientations assumed spontaneously by liquid crystals (LCs) at interfaces and the strength with which the LCs are held in those orientations (so-called anchoring energies). The application of these methods to several different classes of LC interfaces is described, including solid and aqueous interfaces as well as planar and nonplanar interfaces (such as those that define a LC-in-water emulsion droplet). These methods, which enable fundamental studies of the ordering of LCs at polymeric, chemically functionalized, and biomolecular interfaces, are described in this Instructional Review on a level that can be easily understood by a nonexpert reader such as an undergraduate or graduate student. We focus on optical methods because they are based on instrumentation that is found widely in research and teaching laboratories.

  2. Bistable cholesteric liquid crystal light shutter with multielectrode driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng-Chang; Tseng, Heng-Yi; Pai, Tsung-Wei; Wu, Yu-Ching; Hsu, Wen-Hao; Jau, Hung-Chang; Chen, Chun-Wei; Lin, Tsung-Hsien

    2014-08-01

    An electrically activated bistable light shutter that exploits polymer-stabilized cholesteric liquid crystal film was developed. Under double-sided three-terminal electrode driving, the device can be bistable and switched between focal conic and homeotropic textures with a uniform in-plane and vertical electrical field. The transparent state with a transmittance of 80% and the opaque/scattering state with a transmittance of 13% can be realized without any optical compensation film, and each can be simply switched to the other by applying a pulse voltage. Also, gray-scale selection can be performed by varying the applied voltage. The designed energy-saving bistable light shutter can be utilized to preserve privacy and control illumination and the flow of energy.

  3. Liquid Crystal Microlens Using Nanoparticle-Induced Vertical Alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shug-June Hwang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The nanoparticle-induced vertical alignment (NIVA of the nematic liquid crystals (LC is applied to achieve an adaptive flat LC microlens with hybrid-aligned nematic (HAN mode by dropping polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS nanoparticle solution on a homogeneous alignment layer. The vertical alignment induced by the POSS nanoparticles resulted in the formation of a hybrid-aligned LC layer with concentric nonuniform distribution of the refractive index in the planar LC cell, which subsequently played the role of the lens, even in the absence of any applied voltages. The dimensions of the concentric HAN structure significantly depend on the volume of the microdroplet and the POSS concentration. The focus effect of this flat microlens was observed while electrically controlling its focal length using the applied voltages from −50 mm to −90 mm.

  4. Optical solitons in nematic liquid crystals: model with saturation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgna, Juan Pablo; Panayotaros, Panayotis; Rial, Diego; de la Vega, Constanza Sánchez F.

    2018-04-01

    We study a 2D system that couples a Schrödinger evolution equation to a nonlinear elliptic equation and models the propagation of a laser beam in a nematic liquid crystal. The nonlinear elliptic equation describes the response of the director angle to the laser beam electric field. We obtain results on well-posedness and solitary wave solutions of this system, generalizing results for a well-studied simpler system with a linear elliptic equation for the director field. The analysis of the nonlinear elliptic problem shows the existence of an isolated global branch of solutions with director angles that remain bounded for arbitrary electric field. The results on the director equation are also used to show local and global existence, as well as decay for initial conditions with sufficiently small L 2-norm. For sufficiently large L 2-norm we show the existence of energy minimizing optical solitons with radial, positive and monotone profiles.

  5. Shape Changing Nonlocal Molecular Deformations in a Nematic Liquid Crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavitha, L.; Venkatesh, M.; Gopi, D.

    2010-07-01

    The nature of nonlinear molecular deformations in a homeotropically aligned nematic liquid crystal (NLC) is presented. We start from the basic dynamical equation for the director axis of a NLC with elastic deformation mapped onto an integro-differential perturbed Nonlinear Schroedinger equation which includes the nonlocal term. By invoking the modified extended tangent hyperbolic function method aided with symbolic computation, we obtain a series of solitary wave solutions. Under the influence of the nonlocality induced by the reorientation nonlinearity due to fluctuations in the molecular orientation, the solitary wave exhibits shape changing property for different choices of parameters. This intriguing property, as a result of the relation between the coherence of the solitary deformation and the nonlocality, reveals a strong need for deeper understanding in the theory of self-localization in NLC systems. (author)

  6. Transitions through critical temperatures in nematic liquid crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Majumdar, Apala

    2013-08-06

    We obtain estimates for critical nematic liquid crystal (LC) temperatures under the action of a slowly varying temperature-dependent control variable. We show that biaxiality has a negligible effect within our model and that these delay estimates are well described by a purely uniaxial model. The static theory predicts two critical temperatures: the supercooling temperature below which the isotropic phase loses stability and the superheating temperature above which the ordered nematic states do not exist. In contrast to the static problem, the isotropic phase exhibits a memory effect below the supercooling temperature in the dynamic framework. This delayed loss of stability is independent of the rate of change of temperature and depends purely on the initial value of the temperature. We also show how our results can be used to improve estimates for LC material constants. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  7. Electro-optical switching of liquid crystals of graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jang-Kun

    Electric field effects on aqueous graphene-oxide (GO) dispersions are reviewed in this chapter. In isotropic and biphasic regimes of GO dispersions, in which the inter-particle friction is low, GO particles sensitively respond to the application of electric field, producing field-induced optical birefringence. The electro-optical sensitivity dramatically decreases as the phase transits to the nematic phase; the increasing inter-particle friction hinders the rotational switching of GO particles. The corresponding Kerr coefficient reaches the maximum near the isotropic to biphasic transition concentration, at which the Kerr coefficient is found be c.a. 1:8 · 10-5 mV-2, the highest value ever reported in all Kerr materials. The exceptionally large Kerr effect arises from the Maxwell- Wagner polarization of GO particles with an extremely large aspect ratio and a thick electrical double layer (EDL). The polarization sensitively depends on the ratio of surface and bulk conductivities in dispersions. As a result, low ion concentration in bulk solvent is highly required to achieve a quality electro-optical switching in GO dispersions. Spontaneous vinylogous carboxylic reaction in GO particles produces H+ ions, resulting in spontaneous degradation of electro-optical response with time, hence the removal of residual ions by using a centrifuge cleaning process significantly improves the electro-optical sensitivity. GO particle size is another important parameter for the Kerr coefficient and the response time. The best performance is observed in a GO dispersion with c.a. 0.5 μm mean size. Dielectrophoretic migration of GO particles can be also used to manipulate GO particles in solution. Using these unique features of GO dispersions, one can fabricate GO liquid crystal devices similar to conventional liquid crystal displays; the large Kerr effect allows fabricating a low power device working at extremely low electric fields.

  8. Active liquid-crystal deflector and lens with Fresnel structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuya, Giichi; Yamano, Shohei; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Masanori

    2017-02-01

    A new type of tunable Fresnel deflector and lens composed of liquid crystal was developed. Combined structure of multiple interdigitated electrodes and the high-resistivity (HR) layer implements the saw-tooth distribution of electrical potential with only the planar surfaces of the transparent substrates. According to the numerical calculation and design, experimental devices were manufactured with the liquid crystal (LC) material sealed into the sandwiched flat glass plates of 0.7 mm thickness with rubbed alignment layers set to an anti-parallel configuration. Fabricated beam deflector with no moving parts shows the maximum tilt angle of +/-1.3 deg which can apply for optical image stabilizer (OIS) of micro camera. We also discussed and verified their lens characteristics to be extended more advanced applications. Transparent interdigitated electrodes were concentrically aligned on the lens aperture with the insulator gaps under their boundary area. The diameter of the lens aperture was 30 mm and the total number of Fresnel zone was 100. Phase retardation of the beam wavefront irradiated from the LC lens device can be evaluated by polarizing microscope images with a monochromatic filter. Radial positions of each observed fringe are plotted and fitted with 2nd degree polynomial approximation. The number of appeared fringes is over 600 in whole lens aperture area and the correlation coefficients of all approximations are over 0.993 that seems enough ideal optical wavefront. The obtained maximum lens powers from the approximations are about +/-4 m-1 which was satisfied both convex and concave lens characteristics; and their practical use for the tunable lens grade eyeglasses became more prospective.

  9. Cholesteric Liquid Crystal Based Reflex Color Reflective Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Asad

    2012-02-01

    Bistable color cholesteric liquid crystal displays are unique LCDs that exhibit high reflectivity, good contrast, extremely low power operation, and are amenable to versatile roll-to-roll manufacturing. The display technology, now branded as Reflex has been in commercialized products since 1996. It has been the subject of extensive research and development globally by a variety of parties in both academic and industrial settings. Today, the display technology is in volume production for applications such as dedicated eWriters (Boogie Board), full color electronic skins (eSkin), and displays for smart cards. The flexibility comes from polymerization induced phase separation using unique materials unparalleled in any other display technology. The blend of monomers, polymers, cross linkers, and other components along with nematic liquid crystals and chiral dopants is created and processed in such ways so as to enable highly efficient manufactrable displays using ultra thin plastic substrates -- often as thin as 50μm. Other significant aspects include full color by stacking or spatial separation, night vision capability, ultra high resolution, as well as active matrix capabilities. Of particular note is the stacking approach of Reflex based displays to show full color. This approach for reflective color displays is unique to this technology. Owing to high transparency in wavelength bands outside the selective reflection band, three primarily color layers can be stacked on top of each other and reflect without interfering with other layers. This highly surprising architecture enables the highest reflectivity of any other reflective electronic color display technology. The optics, architecture, electro-topics, and process techniques will be discussed. This presentation will focus on the physics of the core technology and color, it's evolution from rigid glass based displays to flexible displays, development of products from the paradigm shifting concepts to consumer

  10. Some topics in continuum theory of liquid crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Claire

    2000-07-01

    Since advancements by Ericksen and Leslie in the 1960's, interest in the continuum theory for liquid crystals has escalated. In this thesis, we present the well established continuum theory for nematics, and apply it to the simple Tsvetkov experiment. This analysis is further extended by studying a similar geometric setup which allows additional degrees of freedom. Steady state solutions are studied, and stable/unstable solutions discussed. The bulk of this thesis however, is concerned with the smectic continuum theory. The theory presented allows variable layer spacing, and hence goes beyond the scope of that proposed by Leslie, Stewart and Nakagawa in 1991. With this theory, we initially study a sample of SmA liquid crystal in the bookshelf geometry between two parallel plates, and subject to a strongly anchored pretilt at the boundaries. Weakly anchored solutions are also briefly discussed at the end of this chapter. This work is extended by considering the same problem with a SmC sample, and the distinct differences between the SmA and SmC solutions are highlighted. Symmetric chevron solutions of C1 and C2 type are discussed fully, and energy considerations are made to find the physically realistic configurations. Again, the last part of this chapter is dedicated to solutions subject to weak anchoring. Finally, we take a brief look at Freedericksz transitions when a magnetic field is applied across a cell containing a SmA sample in the bookshelf geometry. The Freedericksz thresholds for two possible deformations are obtained by linearising the appropriate equation, and solving the resulting eigenvalue problem. Numerical calculations finally show where the transitions occur, and confirm the accuracy of the threshold values obtained analytically. (author)

  11. Some topics in continuum theory of liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Claire

    2000-01-01

    Since advancements by Ericksen and Leslie in the 1960's, interest in the continuum theory for liquid crystals has escalated. In this thesis, we present the well established continuum theory for nematics, and apply it to the simple Tsvetkov experiment. This analysis is further extended by studying a similar geometric setup which allows additional degrees of freedom. Steady state solutions are studied, and stable/unstable solutions discussed. The bulk of this thesis however, is concerned with the smectic continuum theory. The theory presented allows variable layer spacing, and hence goes beyond the scope of that proposed by Leslie, Stewart and Nakagawa in 1991. With this theory, we initially study a sample of SmA liquid crystal in the bookshelf geometry between two parallel plates, and subject to a strongly anchored pretilt at the boundaries. Weakly anchored solutions are also briefly discussed at the end of this chapter. This work is extended by considering the same problem with a SmC sample, and the distinct differences between the SmA and SmC solutions are highlighted. Symmetric chevron solutions of C1 and C2 type are discussed fully, and energy considerations are made to find the physically realistic configurations. Again, the last part of this chapter is dedicated to solutions subject to weak anchoring. Finally, we take a brief look at Freedericksz transitions when a magnetic field is applied across a cell containing a SmA sample in the bookshelf geometry. The Freedericksz thresholds for two possible deformations are obtained by linearising the appropriate equation, and solving the resulting eigenvalue problem. Numerical calculations finally show where the transitions occur, and confirm the accuracy of the threshold values obtained analytically. (author)

  12. Liquid crystal true 3D displays for augmented reality applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Liu, Shuxin; Zhou, Pengcheng; Chen, Quanming; Su, Yikai

    2018-02-01

    Augmented reality (AR) technology, which integrates virtual computer-generated information into the real world scene, is believed to be the next-generation human-machine interface. However, most AR products adopt stereoscopic 3D display technique, which causes the accommodation-vergence conflict. To solve this problem, we have proposed two approaches. The first is a multi-planar volumetric display using fast switching polymer-stabilized liquid crystal (PSLC) films. By rapidly switching the films between scattering and transparent states while synchronizing with a high-speed projector, the 2D slices of a 3D volume could be displayed in time sequence. We delved into the research on developing high-performance PSLC films in both normal mode and reverse mode; moreover, we also realized the demonstration of four-depth AR images with correct accommodation cues. For the second approach, we realized a holographic AR display using digital blazed gratings and a 4f system to eliminate zero-order and higher-order noise. With a 4k liquid crystal on silicon device, we achieved a field of view (FOV) of 32 deg. Moreover, we designed a compact waveguidebased holographic 3D display. In the design, there are two holographic optical elements (HOEs), each of which functions as a diffractive grating and a Fresnel lens. Because of the grating effect, holographic 3D image light is coupled into and decoupled out of the waveguide by modifying incident angles. Because of the lens effect, the collimated zero order light is focused at a point, and got filtered out. The optical power of the second HOE also helps enlarge FOV.

  13. Regularity of solutions to the liquid crystals systems in R2 and R3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Mimi; Qing, Jie; Schonbek, Maria

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we establish regularity and uniqueness for solutions to density dependent nematic liquid crystals systems. The results presented extend the regularity and uniqueness for constant density liquid crystals systems, obtained by Lin and Liu (1995 Commun. Pure Appl. Math. XLVIII 501–37)

  14. Dielectric relaxation studies in 5CB nematic liquid crystal at 9 GHz ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Resonance width, shift in resonance frequency, relaxation time and activation energy of 5CB nematic liquid crystal are measured using microwave cavity technique under the influence of an external magnetic field at 9 GHz and at different temperatures. The dielectric response in liquid crystal at different temperatures and ...

  15. Measuring of nonlinearity of dye doped liquid crystals using of self phase modulation effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abedi, M.; Jafari, A.; Tajalli, H.

    2007-01-01

    Self phase modulation in dye doped liquid crystals has investigated and the nonlinearity of dye doped liquid crystals is measured by this effect. The Self phase modulation effect can be used for producing optical micro rings that have many applications in photonics and laser industries.

  16. Photosensitive bent-core liquid crystals based on methyl substituted 3-hydroxybenzoic acid.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kohout, M.; Alaasar, M.; Poryvai, A.; Novotná, Vladimíra; Poppe, S.; Tschierske, C.; Svoboda, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 57 (2017), s. 35805-35813 ISSN 2046-2069 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-12150S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : liquid crystals * photosensitivity * bent-core liquid crystals * 3-hydroxybenzoic acid Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials OBOR OECD: Nano-materials (production and properties) Impact factor: 3.108, year: 2016

  17. Chiral-nematic liquid crystals as one dimensional photonic materials in optical sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, D.J.; Schenning, A.P.H.J.; Bastiaansen, C.W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Current developments in the field of thermotropic chiral-nematic liquid crystals as sensors are discussed. These one dimensional photonic materials are based on low molecular weight liquid crystals and chiral-nematic polymeric networks. For both low molecular weight LCs and polymer networks,

  18. Liquid Crystal Phases of Colloidal Platelets and their Use as Nanocomposite Templates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourad, M.C.D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837563

    2009-01-01

    This thesis explores the gelation and liquid crystal phase behavior of colloidal dispersions of platelike particles as well as the use of such dispersions for the generation of nanocomposites. We report on the sol-gel, sol-glass and liquid crystal phase transitions of positively charged colloidal

  19. Spectroscopic investigation of the far-infrared properties of liquid crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reuter, M.; Vieweg, N.; Fischer, B. M.

    2013-01-01

    Liquid crystals are one of the most promising base materials for switchable devices at THz frequencies. Therefore, a precise understanding of the optical parameters is crucial. Here, we present the refractive indices and absorption coefficients for 5 CB and an isothiocyanate terminated liquid...... crystal over a broad frequency range from 0.3 THz to 15 THz....

  20. Nematic quantum liquid crystals of bosons in frustrated lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guanyu; Koch, Jens; Martin, Ivar

    2016-04-01

    The problem of interacting bosons in frustrated lattices is an intricate one due to the absence of a unique minimum in the single-particle dispersion where macroscopic number of bosons can condense. Here, we consider a family of tight-binding models with macroscopically degenerate lowest energy bands, separated from other bands by a gap. We predict the formation of exotic states that spontaneously break rotational symmetry at relatively low filling. These states belong to three nematic phases: Wigner crystal, supersolid, and superfluid. The Wigner crystal phase is established exactly at low filling. Supersolid and superfluid phases, at larger filling, are obtained by making use of a projection onto the flat band, construction of an appropriate Wannier basis, and subsequent mean-field treatment. The nematic superfluid that we predict is uniform in real space but has an anisotropic momentum distribution, providing a novel scenario for Bose condensation with an additional nematic order. Our findings open up a promising direction of studying microscopic quantum liquid crystalline phases of bosons.

  1. Reorientation of single-wall carbon nanotubes in negative anisotropy liquid crystals by an electric field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda García-García

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT are anisotropic nanoparticles that can cause modifications in the electrical and electro-optical properties of liquid crystals. The control of the SWCNT concentration, distribution and reorientation in such self-organized fluids allows for the possibility of tuning the liquid crystal properties. The alignment and reorientation of CNTs are studied in a system where the liquid crystal orientation effect has been isolated. Complementary studies including Raman spectroscopy, microscopic inspection and impedance studies were carried out. The results reveal an ordered reorientation of the CNTs induced by an electric field, which does not alter the orientation of the liquid crystal molecules. Moreover, impedance spectroscopy suggests a nonnegligible anchoring force between the CNTs and the liquid crystal molecules.

  2. Local layer structure of smectic liquid crystals by X-ray micro-diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Takanishi, Y

    2003-01-01

    The local layer structure of smectic liquid crystal has been measured using time-resolved synchrotron X-ray micro-diffraction. Typical layer disorders observed in surface stabilized (anti-) ferroelectric liquid crystals, i.e. a stripe texture, a needed-like defect and a zigzag defect, are directly analyzed. The detailed analysis slows that the surface anchoring force due to the interaction between the liquid crystal molecule and the alignment thin film plays an important role to realize both the static and dynamic local layer structures. The layer structure of the circular domain observed in the liquid crystal of bent-shaped molecules found to depend on the applied electric field though the optical micrograph shows little difference. The frustrated, double and single layer structures of the bent-shaped molecule liquid crystal are determined depending on the terminal alkyl chain length. (author)

  3. Induced Magnetic Anisotropy in Liquid Crystals Doped with Resonant Semiconductor Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Marzal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there are many efforts to improve the electrooptical properties of liquid crystals by means of doping them with different types of nanoparticles. In addition, liquid crystals may be used as active media to dynamically control other interesting phenomena, such as light scattering resonances. In this sense, mixtures of resonant nanoparticles hosted in a liquid crystal could be a potential metamaterial with interesting properties. In this work, the artificial magnetism induced in a mixture of semiconductor nanoparticles surrounded by a liquid crystal is analyzed. Effective magnetic permeability of mixtures has been obtained using the Maxwell-Garnett effective medium theory. Furthermore, permeability variations with nanoparticles size and their concentration in the liquid crystal, as well as the magnetic anisotropy, have been studied.

  4. Liquid Crystal Formation from Sunflower Oil: Long Term Stability Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha-Filho, Pedro Alves; Maruno, Mônica; Ferrari, Márcio; Topan, José Fernando

    2016-06-09

    The Brazilian biodiversity offers a multiplicity of raw materials with great potential in cosmetics industry applications. Some vegetable oils and fatty esters increase skin hydration by occlusivity, keeping the skin hydrated and with a shiny appearance. Sunflower (Helianthus annus L.) oil is widely employed in cosmetic emulsions in the form of soaps, creams, moisturizers and skin cleansers due to the presence of polyphenols and its high vitamin E content. Liquid crystals are systems with many applications in both pharmaceutical and cosmetic formulations and are easily detected by microscopy under polarized light due to their birefringence properties. The aim of this research was to develop emulsions from natural sunflower oil for topical uses. Sunflower oil (75.0% w/w) was combined with liquid vaseline (25.0% w/w) employing a natural self-emulsifying base (SEB) derivative. The high temperature of the emulsification process did not influence the antioxidant properties of sunflower oil. Fatty esters were added to cosmetic formulations and extended stability tests were performed to characterize the emulsions. Fatty esters like cetyl palmitate and cetyl ester increase the formation of anisotropic structures. O/W emulsions showed acidic pH values and pseudoplastic behavior. The presence of a lamellar phase was observed after a period of 90 days under different storage conditions.

  5. Crystal Structure and Properties of Imidazo-Pyridine Ionic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farren-Dai, Marco; Cameron, Stanley; Johnson, Michel B; Ghandi, Khashayar

    2018-07-05

    Computational studies were performed on novel protic ionic liquids imidazolium-[1,2-a]-pyridine trifluoroacetate [ImPr][TFA] synthesized by the reaction of imidazo-[1,2a]-pyridine (ImPr) with trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), and on fused salt imidazolium-[1,2-a]-pyridine maleamic carbonate [ImPr][Mal] synthesized by reaction of ImPr with maleamic acid (Mal). Synthesis was performed as one-pot reactions, which applies green chemistry tenets. Both these compounds begin to decompose at 180°C. Our computational studies suggest another thermal reaction channel, in which [ImPr][Mal] can also thermally polymerizes to polyacrylamide which then cyclizes. This is thermal product remains stable up to 700 degrees, consistent with our thermogravimetric studies. [ImPr][TFA] exhibited good conductivity and ideal ionic behavior, as evaluated by a Walden plot. X-ray crystallography of [ImPr][TFA] revealed a tightly packed system for the crystals as a result of strong ionic interaction, pi-stacking, and fluorine-CH interactions. Both synthesized compounds exhibited some CO 2 absorptivity, with [ImPr][Mal] outperforming [ImPr][TFA] in this regard. The quantum chemistry based computational methods can shed light on many properties of these ionic liquids, but they are challenged in fully describing their ionic nature. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Optical monitoring of gases with cholesteric liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yang; Pacheco, Katherine; Bastiaansen, Cees W M; Broer, Dirk J; Sijbesma, Rint P

    2010-03-10

    A new approach to optical monitors for gases is introduced using cholesteric liquid crystals doped with reactive chiral compounds. The approach is based on cholesteric pitch length changes caused by a change in helical twisting power (HTP) of the chiral dopants upon reaction with the analyte. The concept is demonstrated for monitoring carbon dioxide via reversible carbamate formation and for oxygen using the irreversible oxidation of a chiral dithiol to a disulfide. Monitoring of CO(2) was achieved by doping a commercial cholesteric liquid crystalline mixture (E7) with 1.6% mol of the 1:1 complex of an optically pure diamine with a TADDOL derivative. Upon exposure to carbon dioxide, the reflection band of a thin film of the mixture shifted from 637 to 495 nm as a consequence of dissociation of the complex after carbamate formation of the diamine. An O(2) monitor was obtained by doping E7 with a chiral binaphthyl dithiol derivative and a nonresponsive codopant. The reflection band of the oxygen monitor film changed from 542 to 600 nm, due to the conformational change accompanying oxidation of the dithiol to disulfide. These monitoring mechanisms hold promise for application in smart packaging, where carbon dioxide and oxygen are of special interest because of their roles in food preservation.

  7. Blue Shifting Tuning of the Selective Reflection of Polymer Stabilized Cholesteric Liquid Crystals (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-08

    crystal (MLC-2079, Merck). The polymer stabi- lizing network was formed within the samples by photoinitiated polymerization with 50–700 mW cm2 of 365...AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2017-0347 BLUE-SHIFTING TUNING OF THE SELECTIVE REFLECTION OF POLYMER STABILIZED CHOLESTERIC LIQUID CRYSTALS (POSTPRINT...BLUE-SHIFTING TUNING OF THE SELECTIVE REFLECTION OF POLYMER STABILIZED CHOLESTERIC LIQUID CRYSTALS (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-16-F

  8. Nonlinear Raman spectroscopy of liquid crystals: orientational alignment and switching behaviour in a ferroelectric liquid crystal mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grofcsik, Andras

    Picosecond inverse Raman spectroscopy has been employed to probe the alignment behaviour and switching characteristics of a 6 mum thick ferroelectric liquid crystal based on a host mixture of fluorinated phenyl biphenylcarboxylates and a chiral dopant. Optical bistability is observed in the Raman signal on application of dc electric fields of opposite polarity. For particular polarities of the applied field, the Raman signals display a cos4theta dependence on the angle of rotation around the beam direction. Reorientational rate constants of 300 mus and 590 mus are observed for the aromatic core at the high-voltage limit for the rise and decay of the 1600 cm-1 Raman signal on application of a switching ac electric field.

  9. Evidence of nanodiamond-self-assembly in a liquid crystal, and the consequent impacts on the liquid crystal properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajratan Basu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A small quantity of nanodiamonds (NDs was dispersed in a nematic liquid crystal (LC, and the NDs were found to exhibit an anisotropic self-assembly along the nematic director. The anisotropic assembly of the NDs in the LC matrix was probed by measuring the dielectric anisotropy, Δε, of the LC+ND system, which showed a significant increase in Δε. Additional studies revealed that the presence of NDs reduced the rotational viscosity and the pretilt angle of the LC. The studies were carried out with several ND concentrations in the LC and the experimental results coherently suggest that there exists an optimal concentration of ND. Above this optimal ND concentration, the anisotropic assembly of the NDs was found to be not effective anymore. The rotational viscosity and the pretilt angle of the LC were found to increase above the optimal concentration of ND.

  10. Evidence of nanodiamond-self-assembly in a liquid crystal, and the consequent impacts on the liquid crystal properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Rajratan; Skaggs, Nicole; Shalov, Samuel; Brereton, Peter

    2017-07-01

    A small quantity of nanodiamonds (NDs) was dispersed in a nematic liquid crystal (LC), and the NDs were found to exhibit an anisotropic self-assembly along the nematic director. The anisotropic assembly of the NDs in the LC matrix was probed by measuring the dielectric anisotropy, Δɛ, of the LC+ND system, which showed a significant increase in Δɛ. Additional studies revealed that the presence of NDs reduced the rotational viscosity and the pretilt angle of the LC. The studies were carried out with several ND concentrations in the LC and the experimental results coherently suggest that there exists an optimal concentration of ND. Above this optimal ND concentration, the anisotropic assembly of the NDs was found to be not effective anymore. The rotational viscosity and the pretilt angle of the LC were found to increase above the optimal concentration of ND.

  11. Realization of hydrodynamic experiments on quasi-2D liquid crystal films in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Noel A.; Eremin, Alexey; Glaser, Matthew A.; Hall, Nancy; Harth, Kirsten; Klopp, Christoph; Maclennan, Joseph E.; Park, Cheol S.; Stannarius, Ralf; Tin, Padetha; Thurmes, William N.; Trittel, Torsten

    2017-08-01

    Freely suspended films of smectic liquid crystals are unique examples of quasi two-dimensional fluids. Mechanically stable and with quantized thickness of the order of only a few molecular layers, smectic films are ideal systems for studying fundamental fluid physics, such as collective molecular ordering, defect and fluctuation phenomena, hydrodynamics, and nonequilibrium behavior in two dimensions (2D), including serving as models of complex biological membranes. Smectic films can be drawn across openings in planar supports resulting in thin, meniscus-bounded membranes, and can also be prepared as bubbles, either supported on an inflation tube or floating freely. The quantized layering renders smectic films uniquely useful in 2D fluid physics. The OASIS team has pursued a variety of ground-based and microgravity applications of thin liquid crystal films to fluid structure and hydrodynamic problems in 2D and quasi-2D systems. Parabolic flights and sounding rocket experiments were carried out in order to explore the shape evolution of free floating smectic bubbles, and to probe Marangoni effects in flat films. The dynamics of emulsions of smectic islands (thicker regions on thin background films) and of microdroplet inclusions in spherical films, as well as thermocapillary effects, were studied over extended periods within the OASIS (Observation and Analysis of Smectic Islands in Space) project on the International Space Station. We summarize the technical details of the OASIS hardware and give preliminary examples of key observations.

  12. INERA Workshop 2016: Membrane and Liquid Crystal Nanostructures (MELINA 2016)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    We are pleased to introduce the Proceedings of the INERA Workshop “Membrane and Liquid Crystal Nanostructures” (MELINA 2016). This meeting was held from 3 th to 6 th of September 2016 in Varna (Bulgaria) and was organized by the Institute of Solid State Physics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (ISSP-BAS) in the frames of the Project INERA “Research and Innovation Capacity Strengthening of ISSP-BAS in Multifunctional Nanostructures” REGPOT-2012-2013-1 NMP (http://www.inera.org). The workshop venue was the “Saints Constantine and Helena” Resort - a beautiful complex on the Bulgarian Black Sea coast within a landscaped park 10 km north of downtown Varna, close to the Euxinograd royal summer palace, park and winery. The aim of this workshop was to bring together researchers with interests in interdisciplinary areas in order to report the recent results of their scientific work, to discuss the state-of-the-art and perspectives and communicate new ideas. Several experimental and theoretical streams in the field of nanostructured liquid crystal systems and nanocomposites; soft and living matter physics; membrane biophysics; nanostructures in polymer and lipid membranes; characterization of soft nanomaterials were merged and directed towards a constructive discussion and solutions of a wide variety of actual problems in these important scientific areas. Participants from 9 countries presented 20 oral and 15 poster presentations in 5 topical areas. INERA Workshop MELINA 2016 provided very good opportunities for direct contacts, interesting discussions and interactive exchange of ideas between the participants. It also became a meeting point where INERA partners could plan and organize their future efficient collaborations and joint research projects of common interest. The editors would like to thank all authors for their high-quality contributions. The papers submitted for publication in the Proceedings were refereed according to the publishing standards of the

  13. Design and Synthesis of Novel Discotic Liquid Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayal, Himadri Sekhar

    Columnar mesophases of discotic liquid crystals (DLCs) have attracted much attention as organic semiconductors and have been tested as active materials in light-emitting diodes, photovoltaic solar cells, and field-effect transistors. However, devices based on DLCs have shown lower performance than devices based on polymeric and small molecule glass semiconductors, despite their superior charge conducting and advantages self-organizing properties. Most DLCs also require relatively complex processing conditions for the preparation of electronic devices, which is another significant disadvantage. Consequently, new types of DLCs are sought-after to overcome these limitations and described in this thesis are new types of discotic materials and their synthesis. Chapters 2 and 3 describe star-shaped discotic molecules for donor-acceptor columnar structures and as novel flexible core discotic molecules. Presented are the first examples of star-shaped heptamers of donor and acceptor discotic molecules which have six hexaalkoxy triphenylene ligands and a hexaazatriphenylene hexacarboxylate core or a hexaazatriphenylene hexaamide core. The hexaazatriphenylene cores were chosen because of their electron deficient character while the hexaalkoxy triphenylenes are known to be electron rich. Envisioned is the formation of super-columns in which the heptamers stack on top of each other and generate a material with electron acceptor and electron donor channels separated by aliphatic chains. This is an important difference to previously reported donor-acceptor star-shaped structures that were connected via conjugated linkers and do not form separate columnar stacks. Star-shaped DLCs based on small aromatic groups linked together by short flexible spacers may represent a novel type of discotic core structure that does not require peripheral flexible chains. Softening of the core by the spacer group is expected to sufficiently lower melting points and not interfere with the columnar

  14. A dark hollow beam from a selectively liquid-filled photonic crystal fibre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei-Yan, Zhang; Shu-Guang, Li; Yan-Yan, Yao; Bo, Fu; Lei, Zhang

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports that, based on the electromagnetic scattering theory of the multipole method, a high-quality hollow beam is produced through a selectively liquid-filled photonic crystal fibre. Instead of a doughnut shape, a typical hollow beam is produced by other methods; the mode-field images of the hollow-beam photonic crystal fibre satisfy sixth-order rotation symmetry, according to the symmetry of the photonic crystal fibre (PCF) structure. A dark spot size of the liquid-filled photonic crystal fibre-generated hollow beam can be tuned by inserting liquid into the cladding region and varying the photonic crystal fibre structure parameters. The liquid-filled PCF makes a convenient and flexible tool for the guiding and trapping of atoms and the creation of all-fibre optical tweezers. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  15. Influence of rubbing-alignment on microwave modulation induced by liquid crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjiang Ye

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The microwave modulation induced by liquid crystal is decided by the liquid crystal director distribution under an external applied voltage. The rubbing-alignment of substrate has an effect on the liquid crystal director, which must result in the change of microwave phase-shift. To illustrate the influence of rubbing-alignment on the microwave phase-shift, the microwave modulation property of twisted nematic liquid crystal is researched adopting the elastic theory of liquid crystal and the finite-difference iterative method. The variations of microwave phase-shift per unit-length for different pre-tilt and pre-twist angles of liquid crystal on the substrate surface and anchoring energy strengths with the applied voltage are numerically simulated. The result indicates that with the increase of pre-tilt angle and with the decrease of anchoring energy strength the weak anchoring twisted cell with pre-twisted angle 90° relative to the strong anchoring non-twisted cell can increase the microwave phase-shift per unit-length. As a result, for achieving the maximum microwave modulation, the weak anchoring twisted cell with pre-tilt angle 5° and anchoring energy strength 1×10−5J/m2 should be selected, which provides a reliably theoretical foundation for the design of liquid crystal microwave modulator.

  16. Thermally Driven Photonic Actuator Based on Silica Opal Photonic Crystal with Liquid Crystal Elastomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Huihui; Li, Jun; Shi, Yang; Guo, Jinbao; Wei, Jie

    2016-04-13

    We have developed a novel thermoresponsive photonic actuator based on three-dimensional SiO2 opal photonic crystals (PCs) together with liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs). In the process of fabrication of such a photonic actuator, the LCE precursor is infiltrated into the SiO2 opal PC followed by UV light-induced photopolymerization, thereby forming the SiO2 opal PC/LCE composite film with a bilayer structure. We find that this bilayer composite film simultaneously exhibits actuation behavior as well as the photonic band gap (PBG) response to external temperature variation. When the SiO2 opal PC/LCE composite film is heated, it exhibits a considerable bending deformation, and its PBG shifts to a shorter wavelength at the same time. In addition, this actuation is quite fast, reversible, and highly repeatable. The thermoresponsive behavior of the SiO2 opal PC/LCE composite films mainly derives from the thermal-driven change of nematic order of the LCE layer which leads to the asymmetric shrinkage/expansion of the bilayer structure. These results will be of interest in designing optical actuator systems for environment-temperature detection.

  17. Ultra-high tunable liquid crystal-plasmonic photonic crystal fiber polarization filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Mohamed Farhat O; Heikal, A M; Younis, B M; Abdelrazzak, Maher; Obayya, S S A

    2015-03-23

    A novel ultra-high tunable photonic crystal fiber (PCF) polarization filter is proposed and analyzed using finite element method. The suggested design has a central hole infiltrated with a nematic liquid crystal (NLC) that offers high tunability with temperature and external electric field. Moreover, the PCF is selectively filled with metal wires into cladding air holes. Results show that the resonance losses and wavelengths are different in x and y polarized directions depending on the rotation angle φ of the NLC. The reported filter of compact device length 0.5 mm can achieve 600 dB / cm resonance losses at φ = 90° for x-polarized mode at communication wavelength of 1300 mm with low losses of 0.00751 dB / cm for y-polarized mode. However, resonance losses of 157.71 dB / cm at φ = 0° can be achieved for y-polarized mode at the same wavelength with low losses of 0.092 dB / cm for x-polarized mode.

  18. Large scale structures in liquid crystal/clay colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duijneveldt, Jeroen S.; Klein, Susanne; Leach, Edward; Pizzey, Claire; Richardson, Robert M.

    2005-04-01

    Suspensions of three different clays in K15, a thermotropic liquid crystal, have been studied by optical microscopy and small angle x-ray scattering. The three clays were claytone AF, a surface treated natural montmorillonite, laponite RD, a synthetic hectorite, and mined sepiolite. The claytone and laponite were sterically stabilized whereas sepiolite formed a relatively stable suspension in K15 without any surface treatment. Micrographs of the different suspensions revealed that all three suspensions contained large scale structures. The nature of these aggregates was investigated using small angle x-ray scattering. For the clays with sheet-like particles, claytone and laponite, the flocs contain a mixture of stacked and single platelets. The basal spacing in the stacks was independent of particle concentration in the suspension and the phase of the solvent. The number of platelets in the stack and their percentage in the suspension varied with concentration and the aspect ratio of the platelets. The lath shaped sepiolite did not show any tendency to organize into ordered structures. Here the aggregates are networks of randomly oriented single rods.

  19. Large scale structures in liquid crystal/clay colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duijneveldt, Jeroen S van; Klein, Susanne; Leach, Edward; Pizzey, Claire; Richardson, Robert M

    2005-01-01

    Suspensions of three different clays in K15, a thermotropic liquid crystal, have been studied by optical microscopy and small angle x-ray scattering. The three clays were claytone AF, a surface treated natural montmorillonite, laponite RD, a synthetic hectorite, and mined sepiolite. The claytone and laponite were sterically stabilized whereas sepiolite formed a relatively stable suspension in K15 without any surface treatment. Micrographs of the different suspensions revealed that all three suspensions contained large scale structures. The nature of these aggregates was investigated using small angle x-ray scattering. For the clays with sheet-like particles, claytone and laponite, the flocs contain a mixture of stacked and single platelets. The basal spacing in the stacks was independent of particle concentration in the suspension and the phase of the solvent. The number of platelets in the stack and their percentage in the suspension varied with concentration and the aspect ratio of the platelets. The lath shaped sepiolite did not show any tendency to organize into ordered structures. Here the aggregates are networks of randomly oriented single rods

  20. Shear flow simulations of biaxial nematic liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarman, Sten

    1997-08-01

    We have calculated the viscosities of a biaxial nematic liquid crystal phase of a variant of the Gay-Berne fluid [J. G. Gay and B. J. Berne, J. Chem. Phys. 74, 3316 (1981)] by performing molecular dynamics simulations. The equations of motion have been augmented by a director constraint torque that fixes the orientation of the directors. This makes it possible to fix them at different angles relative to the stream lines in shear flow simulations. In equilibrium simulations the constraints generate a new ensemble. One finds that the Green-Kubo relations for the viscosities become linear combinations of time correlation function integrals in this ensemble whereas they are complicated rational functions in the conventional canonical ensemble. We have evaluated these Green-Kubo relations for all the shear viscosities and all the twist viscosities. We have also calculated the alignment angles, which are functions of the viscosity coefficients. We find that there are three real alignment angles but a linear stability analysis shows that only one of them corresponds to a stable director orientation. The Green-Kubo results have been cross checked by nonequilibrium shear flow simulations. The results from the different methods agree very well. Finally, we have evaluated the Miesowicz viscosities [D. Baalss, Z. Naturforsch. Teil A 45, 7 (1990)]. They vary by more than 2 orders of magnitude. The viscosity is consequently highly orientation dependent.

  1. Optical bistability and limiting in polymer dispersed liquid crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yshino, K.; Tagawa, A.; Sadohara, Y.; Ozaki, M. (Osaka University, Osaka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering); Munezawa, T. (Ajinomoto Co. Inc., Tokyo (Japan)); Nomura, Y. (Takiron Co. Ltd., Osaka (Japan))

    1991-04-15

    The linear electro-optical effect of polymer dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC) and the nonlinear optical response of electrically feedbacked PDLC were studied. Electro-optical limiting and bistability were observed in PDLCs with negative and positive feedback, respectively. In the PDLC film with positive feedback gain, an optical hysteresis loop shifted toward a high intensity region with decreasing magnitude of the feedback gain. The switching between high and low transmission states in an optical bistable region was realized by controlling incident light, and the on-off switching by superimposing light pulse on incident light for an extremely short period (several hundreds {mu}s). As the light pulse was strong, the minimum pulse width required for switching was as short as 500 {mu}s or less. The on-off switching was also realized by shutting out the incident light for a period equivalent to the pulse width. Slower response times of the PDLC film required longer minimum pulse widths. 12 refs., 11 figs.

  2. Structural Transformations in Nematic Liquid Crystals with a Hybrid Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delev, V. A.; Krekhov, A. P.

    2017-12-01

    The structural transformations in a nematic liquid crystal (NLC) layer with a hybrid orientation (planar director orientation is created on one substrate and homeotropic director orientation is created on the other) are studied. In the case of a dc voltage applied to the NLC layer, the primary instability is flexoelectric. It causes the appearance of flexoelectric domains oriented along the director on the substrate with a planar orientation. When the voltage increases further, an electroconvective instability in the form of rolls moving almost normal to flexoelectric domains develops along with these domains. Thus, the following spatially periodic structures of different natures coexist in one system: equilibrium static flexoelectric deformation of a director and dissipative moving oblique electroconvection rolls. The primary instability in the case of an ac voltage is represented by electroconvection, which leads to moving oblique or normal rolls depending on the electric field frequency. Above the electroconvection threshold, a transition to moving "abnormal" rolls is detected. The wavevector of the rolls coincides with the initial director orientation on the substrate with a planar orientation, and the projection of the director at the midplane of the NLC layer on the layer plane makes a certain angle with the wavevector. The results of numerical calculations of the threshold characteristics of the primary instabilities agree well with the obtained experimental data.

  3. Reconfigurable dual-band metamaterial antenna based on liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Bang-Jun; Meng, Fan-Yi; Lyu, Yue-Long; Wu, Qun

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, a novel reconfigurable dual-band metamaterial antenna with a continuous beam that is electrically steered in backward to forward directions is first proposed by employing a liquid crystal (LC)-loaded tunable extended composite right-/left-handed (E-CRLH) transmission line (TL). The frequency-dependent property of the E-CRLH TL is analyzed and a compact unit cell based on the nematic LC is proposed to realize the tunable dual band characteristics. The phase constant of the proposed unit cell can be dynamically continuously tuned from negative to positive values in two operating bands by changing the bias voltage of the loaded LC material. A resulting dual band fixed-frequency beam steering property has been predicted by numerical simulations and experimentally verified. The measured results show that the fabricated reconfigurable antenna features an electrically controlled continuous beam steering from backward  ‑16° to forward  +13° at 7.2 GHz and backward  ‑9° to forward  +17° at 9.4 GHz, respectively. This electrically controlled beam steering range turns out to be competitive with the previously reported single band reconfigurable antennas. Besides, the measured and simulated results of the proposed reconfigurable dual-band metamaterial antenna are in good agreement.

  4. Key-lock colloids in a nematic liquid crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Nuno M; Tasinkevych, M

    2017-01-01

    The Landau-de Gennes free energy is used to study theoretically the effective interaction of spherical "key" and anisotropic "lock" colloidal particles. We assume identical anchoring properties of the surfaces of the key and of the lock particles, and we consider planar degenerate and perpendicular anchoring conditions separately. The lock particle is modeled as a spherical particle with a spherical dimple. When such a particle is introduced into a nematic liquid crystal, it orients its dimple at an oblique angle θ_{eq} with respect to the far field director n_{∞}. This angle depends on the depth of the dimple. Minimization results show that the free energy of a pair of key and lock particles exhibits a global minimum for the configuration when the key particle is facing the dimple of the lock colloidal particle. The preferred orientation ϕ_{eq} of the key-lock composite doublet relative to n_{∞} is robust against thermal fluctuations. The preferred orientation θ_{eq}^{(2)} of the dimple particle in the doublet is different from the isolated situation. This is related to the "direct" interaction of defects accompanying the key particle with the edge of the dimple. We propose that this nematic-amplified key-lock interaction can play an important role in self-organization and clustering of mixtures of colloidal particles with dimple colloids present.

  5. Photo-Induced Deformations of Liquid Crystal Elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Nathan; Kuzyk, Mark; Neal, Jeremy; Luchette, Paul; Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

    2010-10-01

    Over a century ago, Alexander Graham Bell transmitted mechanical information on a beam of light using the ``photophone.'' We report on the use of a Fabry-Perot interferometer to encode and detect mechanical information of an illuminated liquid crystal elastomer (LCE) that is placed at a critical point between the reflectors. Furthermore, we show that cascading of macroscopic LCE-interferometer devices is possible. These are the first steps in the creation of ultra smart materials. Such applications require materials with a large photomechanical response. Thus, understanding the underlying mechanisms is critical. Only limited studies of the mechanisms of photomechanical effects have been studied in azo-dye-doped LCEs. The focus of our present work is to use the Fabry-Perot transducer geometry to study the underlying mechanisms and to determine the relevant material parameters that are used to develop theoretical models of the response. We use various intensity-modulated optical wave forms to determine the frequency response of the material, which are used to predict the material response in the time domain.

  6. Mechanisms of Photo-Induced Deformations of Liquid Crystal Elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Nathan; Kuzyk, Mark; Neal, Jeremy; Luchette, Paul; Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

    2010-03-01

    Over a century ago, Alexander Graham Bell invented the photophone, which he used to transmit mechanical information on a beam of light. We report on the use of an active Fabry-Perot interferometer to encode and detect mechanical information using the photomechanical effect of a liquid crystal elastomer (LCE) that is placed at a critical point between the reflectors. These are the first steps in the creation of ultra smart materials which require a large photomechanical response. Thus, understanding the underlying mechanisms is critical. Only limited studies of the mechanisms of the photomechanical effect, such as photo-isomerization, photo-reorientation and thermal effects have been studied in azo-dye-doped LCEs and in azo-dye-doped polymer fibers have been reported. The focus of our present work is to use the Fabry-Perot transducer geometry to study the underlying mechanisms and to determine the relevant material parameters that are used to develop theoretical models of the response. We use various intensity-modulated optical wave forms to determine the frequency response of the material, which are used to predict the material response.

  7. Electrically modulated capillary filling imbibition of nematic liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Jayabrata; Chakraborty, Suman

    2018-04-01

    The flow of nematic liquid crystals (NLCs) in the presence of an electric field is typically characterized by the variation in its rheological properties due to transition in its molecular arrangements. Here, we bring out a nontrivial interplay of a consequent alteration in the resistive viscous effects and driving electrocapillary interactions, toward maneuvering the capillary filling dynamics over miniaturized scales. Considering a dynamic interplay of the relevant bulk and interfacial forces acting in tandem, our results converge nicely to previously reported experimental data. Finally, we attempt a scaling analysis to bring forth further insight to the reported observations. Our analysis paves the way for the development of microfluidic strategies with previously unexplored paradigms of interaction between electrical and fluidic phenomenon, providing with an augmented controllability on capillary filling as compared to tthose reported to be achievable by the existing strategies. This, in turn, holds utilitarian scopes in improved designs of functional capillarities in electro-optical systems, electrorheological utilities, electrokinetic flow control, as well as in interfacing and imaging systems for biomedical microdevices.

  8. Smart windows based on cholesteric liquid crystals (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Hitesh; Debije, Michael G.; Schenning, Albert P. H. J.

    2017-02-01

    With increase in global warming, use of active cooling and heating devices are continuously increasing to maintain interior temperature of built environment, greenhouses and cars. To reduce the consumption of tremendous amount of energy on cooling and heating devices we need an improved control of transparent features (i.e. windows). In this respect, smart window which is capable for reflecting solar infrared energy without interfering with the visible light would be very attractive. Most of the technologies developed so far are to control the visible light. These technologies block visual contact to the outside world which cause negative effects on human health. An appealing method to selectively control infrared transmission is via utilizing the reflection properties of cholesteric liquid crystals. In our research, we have fabricated a smart window which is capable of reflecting different amount of solar infrared energy depending on the specific climate conditions. The reflection bandwidth can be tuned from 120 nm to 1100 nm in the infrared region without interfering with the visible solar radiations. Calculations reveal that between 8% and 45% of incident solar infrared light can be reflected with a single cell. Simulation studies predicted that more than 12% of the energy spent on heating, cooling and lighting in the built environment can be saved by using the fabricated smart window compared to standard double glazing window.

  9. Cosmetic Potential of a Liotropic Liquid Crystal Emulsion Containing Resveratrol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Bonato Alves Oliveira

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol is a natural substance that has been the target of many researchers over the years since it presents a variety of potential applications in the areas of cosmetics and medicine as a treatment for some diseases. Due to its high antioxidant capacity but low bioavailability, we evaluated the antiaging potential of resveratrol as a liotropic liquid crystal emulsion. Initially, we performed in vitro assays to quantify both the organoleptic characteristics and stability of the emulsion. Next, an in vivo trial was performed on the faces of 30 volunteers to determine the cream’s cosmetic potential and to measure porphyrins, skin barrier function, skin pigmentation, expression lines, and porosity. The emulsion maintained its characteristics during the in vitro assays and, in the in vivo trial, it had some effect only on pore size in forehead, without any significant effects on the other parameters. We had 6 dropouts throughout the study, then the final number of volunteers was 24. Most volunteers did not show any changes in skin pigmentation throughout the study. Similarly, there was not any noticeable improvement on any other parameters evaluated. However, volunteers related a high level of satisfaction with the product.

  10. Topological transitions in unidirectional flow of nematic liquid crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Linda; Anderson, Thomas; Mema, Ensela; Kondic, Lou

    2015-11-01

    Recent experiments by Sengupta et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 2013) revealed interesting transitions that can occur in flow of nematic liquid crystal under carefully controlled conditions within a long microfluidic channel of rectangular cross-section, with homeotropic anchoring at the walls. At low flow rates the director field of the nematic adopts a configuration that is dominated by the surface anchoring, being nearly parallel to the channel height direction over most of the cross-section; but at high flow rates there is a transition to a flow-dominated state, where the director configuration at the channel centerline is aligned with the flow (perpendicular to the channel height direction). We analyze simple channel-flow solutions to the Leslie-Ericksen model for nematics. We demonstrate that two solutions exist, at all flow rates, but that there is a transition between the elastic free energies of these solutions: the anchoring-dominated solution has the lowest energy at low flow rates, and the flow-dominated solution has lowest energy at high flow rates. NSF DMS 1211713.

  11. Theory of liquid crystal elastomers and polymer networks : Connection between neoclassical theory and differential geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh-Son; Selinger, Jonathan V

    2017-09-01

    In liquid crystal elastomers and polymer networks, the orientational order of liquid crystals is coupled with elastic distortions of crosslinked polymers. Previous theoretical research has described these materials through two different approaches: a neoclassical theory based on the liquid crystal director and the deformation gradient tensor, and a geometric elasticity theory based on the difference between the actual metric tensor and a reference metric. Here, we connect those two approaches using a formalism based on differential geometry. Through this connection, we determine how both the director and the geometry respond to a change of temperature.

  12. Slow-light enhanced optical detection in liquid-infiltrated photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Martin Erland Vestergaard; Rishøj, Lars Søgaard; Steffensen, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    Slow-light enhanced optical detection in liquid-infiltrated photonic crystals is theoretically studied. Using a scattering-matrix approach and the Wigner–Smith delay time concept, we show that optical absorbance benefits both from slow-light phenomena as well as a high filling factor of the energy...... residing in the liquid. Utilizing strongly dispersive photonic crystal structures, we numerically demonstrate how liquid-infiltrated photonic crystals facilitate enhanced light–matter interactions, by potentially up to an order of magnitude. The proposed concept provides strong opportunities for improving...

  13. Angular dependences of the luminescence and density of photon states in a chiral liquid crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umanskii, B A; Blinov, L M; Palto, S P [A.V. Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russian Federaion (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-30

    Luminescence spectra of a laser dye-doped chiral liquid crystal have been studied in a wide range of angles (up to 60°) to the axis of its helical structure using a semicylindrical quartz prism, which made it possible to observe the shift and evolution of the photonic band gap in response to changes in angle. Using measured spectra and numerical simulation, we calculated the spectral distributions of the density of photon states in such a cholesteric crystal for polarised and unpolarised light, which characterise its structure as that of a chiral one-dimensional photonic crystal. (optics of liquid crystals)

  14. Study of β-NMR for Liquid Biological Samples

    CERN Document Server

    Beattie, Caitlin

    2017-01-01

    β-NMR is an exotic form of NMR spectroscopy that allows for the characterization of matter based on the anisotropic β-decay of radioactive probe nuclei. This has been shown to be an effective spectroscopic technique for many different compounds, but its use for liquid biological samples is relatively unexplored. The work at the VITO line of ISOLDE seeks to employ this technique to study such samples. Currently, preparations are being made for an experiment to characterize DNA G-quadruplexes and their interactions with stabilizing cations. More specifically, the work in which I engaged as a summer student focused on the experiment’s liquid handling system and the stability of the relevant biological samples under vacuum.

  15. Miniature Compressive Ultra-spectral Imaging System Utilizing a Single Liquid Crystal Phase Retarder

    Science.gov (United States)

    August, Isaac; Oiknine, Yaniv; Abuleil, Marwan; Abdulhalim, Ibrahim; Stern, Adrian

    2016-03-01

    Spectroscopic imaging has been proved to be an effective tool for many applications in a variety of fields, such as biology, medicine, agriculture, remote sensing and industrial process inspection. However, due to the demand for high spectral and spatial resolution it became extremely challenging to design and implement such systems in a miniaturized and cost effective manner. Using a Compressive Sensing (CS) setup based on a single variable Liquid Crystal (LC) retarder and a sensor array, we present an innovative Miniature Ultra-Spectral Imaging (MUSI) system. The LC retarder acts as a compact wide band spectral modulator. Within the framework of CS, a sequence of spectrally modulated images is used to recover ultra-spectral image cubes. Using the presented compressive MUSI system, we demonstrate the reconstruction of gigapixel spatio-spectral image cubes from spectral scanning shots numbering an order of magnitude less than would be required using conventional systems.

  16. (Liquid + liquid), (solid + liquid), and (solid + liquid + liquid) equilibria of systems containing cyclic ether (tetrahydrofuran or 1,3-dioxolane), water, and a biological buffer MOPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altway, Saidah; Taha, Mohamed; Lee, Ming-Jer

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • MOPS buffer induced liquid phase splitting for mixtures of water with THF or 1,3-dioxolane. • Phase boundaries of LLE, SLE, and SLLE were determined experimentally. • Tie-lines at LLE and at SLLE were also measured. • Phase diagrams of MOPS + water + THF or 1,3-dioxolane are prepared. • LLE tie-line data are correlated satisfactorily with the NRTL model. - Abstract: Two liquid phases were formed as the addition of a certain amount of biological buffer 3-(N-morpholino)propane sulfonic acid (MOPS) in the aqueous solutions of tetrahydrofuran (THF) or 1,3-dioxolane. To evaluate the feasibility of recovering the cyclic ethers from their aqueous solutions with the aid of MOPS, we determined experimentally the phase diagrams of the ternary systems of {cyclic ether (THF or 1,3-dioxolane) + water + MOPS} at T = 298.15 K under atmospheric pressure. In this study, the solubility data of MOPS in water and in the mixed solvents of water/cyclic ethers were obtained from the results of a series of density measurements, while the (liquid + liquid) and the (solid + liquid + liquid) phase boundaries were determined by visually inspection. Additionally, the tie-line results for (liquid + liquid) equilibrium (LLE) and for (solid + liquid + liquid) equilibrium (SLLE) were measured using an analytical method. The reliability of the experimental LLE tie-line results data was validated by using the Othmer–Tobias correlation. These LLE tie-line values were correlated well with the NRTL model. The phase diagrams obtained from this study reveal that MOPS is a feasible green auxiliary agent to recover the cyclic ethers from their aqueous solutions, especially for 1,3-dioxolane

  17. Oral and transdermal drug delivery systems: role of lipid-based lyotropic liquid crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajabalaya R

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Rajan Rajabalaya, Muhammad Nuh Musa, Nurolaini Kifli, Sheba R David PAPRSB Institute of Health Sciences, Universiti Brunei Darussalam, Brunei Darussalam Abstract: Liquid crystal (LC dosage forms, particularly those using lipid-based lyotropic LCs (LLCs, have generated considerable interest as potential drug delivery systems. LCs have the physical properties of liquids but retain some of the structural characteristics of crystalline solids. They are compatible with hydrophobic and hydrophilic compounds of many different classes and can protect even biologicals and nucleic acids from degradation. This review, focused on research conducted over the past 5 years, discusses the structural evaluation of LCs and their effects in drug formulations. The structural classification of LLCs into lamellar, hexagonal and micellar cubic phases is described. The structures of these phases are influenced by the addition of surfactants, which include a variety of nontoxic, biodegradable lipids; these also enhance drug solubility. LLC structure influences drug localization, particle size and viscosity, which, in turn, determine drug delivery properties. Through several specific examples, we describe the applications of LLCs in oral and topical drug formulations, the latter including transdermal and ocular delivery. In oral LLC formulations, micelle compositions and the resulting LLC structures can determine drug solubilization and stability as well as intestinal transport and absorption. Similarly, in topical LLC formulations, composition can influence whether the drug is retained in the skin or delivered transdermally. Owing to their enhancement of drug stability and promotion of controlled drug delivery, LLCs are becoming increasingly popular in pharmaceutical formulations. Keywords: liquid crystal, drug delivery, controlled release, lyotropic, surfactants, drug localization

  18. Some problems of the statistical theory of polymeric lyotropic liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosberg, A.Yu.; Khokhlov, A.R.

    1980-06-01

    In this article we consider some topics of the statistical physics of liquid-crystalline phase in the solutions of stiff chain macromolecules. Among these topics are: the problem of the phase diagram for the liquid-crystalline transition in the solutions of completely stiff macromolecules (rigid rods); conditions of formation of the liquid-crystalline phase in the solutions of semiflexible macromolecules; possibility of the intramolecular liquid-crystalline ordering in semiflexible macromolecules; structure of intramolecular liquid crystals and dependence of the properties of the liquid-crystalline phase on the microstructure of the polymer chain. (author)

  19. Spectroscopic and morphological investigation of conjugated photopolymerisable quinquethiophene liquid crystals

    KAUST Repository

    McGlashon, Andrew J.

    2012-09-01

    3′-methyl-(5,5′′-bis[3-ethyl-3-(6-phenyl-hexyloxymethyl) -oxetane])-2,2′:5′,2′′-terthiophene (5T(Me)Ox) is a solution processable small molecule semiconductor displaying smectic-C and nematic liquid crystal phases. The pendant oxetane group can be polymerized in situ in the presence of a suitable photoacid at concentrations ≥1% by weight. Spin-coated films of pure 5T(Me)Ox and 5T(Me)Ox doped with the soluble photoacid were characterized by absorption and photoluminescent spectroscopy. Thick pristine films showed absorption and emission from a crystalline phase. Thin monolayer (<5 nm) films, as well as thicker photoacid doped films, instead showed absorption from an H-aggregate phase and emission from an excimer. Optical microscopy showed a significant change in film structure upon addition of the photoacid; large and well-orientated crystals being replaced by much smaller domains which appear to vary in thickness. Grazing Incidence Wide Angle X-Ray Scattering (GIWAXS) was used to characterize the packing and orientation of molecules in the crystalline and doped samples. The results are consistent with the photoacid doped samples forming layers of H-aggregate phase monolayer sheets parallel to the substrate where the photoacid inhibits the transition into the three-dimensionally ordered crystalline phase. Field-effect transistors and light emitting diodes were constructed incorporating 5T(Me)Ox as the active layer. Pure 5T(Me)Ox field-effect transistors showed good, p-type device characteristics, but the morphological changes upon doping result in a loss of transistor action. In the diodes, curing through melting and exposure to UV light followed by photoacid removal resulted in an increase in current density but a decrease in light emission. These results indicate that the presence of the photoacid (≥1% by weight) can have a dramatic effect on the structure, morphology and device performance of ordered, photopatternable materials for organic

  20. Spectroscopic and morphological investigation of conjugated photopolymerisable quinquethiophene liquid crystals

    KAUST Repository

    McGlashon, Andrew J.; Zhang, Weimin; Smilgies, Detlef Matthias; Shkunov, Maxim N.; Genevičius, Kristijonas; Whitehead, Katherine S.; Amassian, Aram; Malliaras, George G.; Bradley, Donal D C; Heeney, Martin J.; Campbell, Alasdair J.

    2012-01-01

    3′-methyl-(5,5′′-bis[3-ethyl-3-(6-phenyl-hexyloxymethyl) -oxetane])-2,2′:5′,2′′-terthiophene (5T(Me)Ox) is a solution processable small molecule semiconductor displaying smectic-C and nematic liquid crystal phases. The pendant oxetane group can be polymerized in situ in the presence of a suitable photoacid at concentrations ≥1% by weight. Spin-coated films of pure 5T(Me)Ox and 5T(Me)Ox doped with the soluble photoacid were characterized by absorption and photoluminescent spectroscopy. Thick pristine films showed absorption and emission from a crystalline phase. Thin monolayer (<5 nm) films, as well as thicker photoacid doped films, instead showed absorption from an H-aggregate phase and emission from an excimer. Optical microscopy showed a significant change in film structure upon addition of the photoacid; large and well-orientated crystals being replaced by much smaller domains which appear to vary in thickness. Grazing Incidence Wide Angle X-Ray Scattering (GIWAXS) was used to characterize the packing and orientation of molecules in the crystalline and doped samples. The results are consistent with the photoacid doped samples forming layers of H-aggregate phase monolayer sheets parallel to the substrate where the photoacid inhibits the transition into the three-dimensionally ordered crystalline phase. Field-effect transistors and light emitting diodes were constructed incorporating 5T(Me)Ox as the active layer. Pure 5T(Me)Ox field-effect transistors showed good, p-type device characteristics, but the morphological changes upon doping result in a loss of transistor action. In the diodes, curing through melting and exposure to UV light followed by photoacid removal resulted in an increase in current density but a decrease in light emission. These results indicate that the presence of the photoacid (≥1% by weight) can have a dramatic effect on the structure, morphology and device performance of ordered, photopatternable materials for organic

  1. Thermal Analysis, Mechanical and Rheological Behaviour of Melt Manufactured Polyethylene/Liquid Crystal Polymer Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilze ELKSNITE

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Modification of properties of conventional thermoplastics with thermotropic liquid crystal polymers, from one hand, allows decrease their viscosities, substantially facilitating processing conditions, and, from another hand, allows increase their exploitation properties. Orientation of the labile structure of liquid crystal polymer in extrusion or injection moulding causes specific reinforcement (so-called self-reinforcement to occur in the blends containing liquid crystal polymer. Up to now the effect of self-reinforcement is mostly investigated in the blends, containing considerable amount of liquid crystal polymer. In this research the effect of minor amounts of liquid crystalline co-polyester modifier on the properties of polyethylene is investigated. Various compositions of laboratory synthesized hydroxybenzoic acid /polyethylene terephtalate copolymer containing polyethylene composites have been manufactured by thermoplastic blending. It has been observed that 1 modulus of elasticity, yield strength and ultimate strength increase with raising the content of liquid crystalline modifier; 2 void content in the investigated polyethylene/liquid crystal copolymer composites is not greater that 1 %; 3 addition of liquid crystalline co-polyester modifier improves arrangement of PE crystalline phase.http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.17.2.483

  2. The ion capturing effect of 5° SiOx alignment films in liquid crystal devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi; Bos, Philip J.; Bhowmik, Achintya

    2010-09-01

    We show that SiOx, deposited at 5° to the interior surface of a liquid crystal cell allows for a surprisingly substantial reduction in the ion concentration of liquid crystal devices. We have investigated this effect and found that this type of film, due to its surface morphology, captures ions from the liquid crystal material. Ion adsorption on 5° SiOx film obeys the Langmuir isotherm. Experimental results shown allow estimation of the ion capturing capacity of these films to be more than an order of 10 000/μm2. These types of materials are useful for new types of very low power liquid crystal devices such as e-books.

  3. PEG-nanotube liquid crystals as templates for construction of surfactant-free gold nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameta, Naohiro; Shiroishi, Hidenobu

    2018-04-23

    Lyotropic liquid crystals, in which nanotubes coated with polyethylene glycol were aligned side-by-side in aqueous dispersions, acted as templates for the construction of surfactant-free gold nanorods with controllable diameters, functionalizable surfaces, and tunable optical properties.

  4. Thermal tunability of photonic bandgaps in liquid crystal infiltrated microstructured polymer optical fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Scott Wu; Wei, Lei; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate the photonic bandgap effect and the thermal tunability of bandgaps in microstructured polymer optical fibers infiltrated with liquid crystal. Two liquid crystals with opposite sign of the temperature gradient of the ordinary refractive index (E7 and MDA-00- 1444) are used to demons......We demonstrate the photonic bandgap effect and the thermal tunability of bandgaps in microstructured polymer optical fibers infiltrated with liquid crystal. Two liquid crystals with opposite sign of the temperature gradient of the ordinary refractive index (E7 and MDA-00- 1444) are used...... to demonstrate that both signs of the thermal tunability of the bandgaps are possible. The useful bandgaps are ultimately bounded to the visible range by the transparency window of the polymer....

  5. On Regularity Criteria for the Two-Dimensional Generalized Liquid Crystal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We establish the regularity criteria for the two-dimensional generalized liquid crystal model. It turns out that the global existence results satisfy our regularity criteria naturally.

  6. Dichroic dye-dependent studies in guest-host polymer-dispersed liquid crystal films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malik, Praveen, E-mail: pmalik100@yahoo.co [Department of Physics, Dr. B.R. Ambedkar National Institute of Technology, Jalandhar 144011, Punjab (India); Raina, K.K. [Liquid Crystal Group, Materials Research Laboratory, School of Physics and Materials Science, Thapar University, Patiala 147004, Punjab (India)

    2010-01-01

    Guest-host polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (GHPDLC) films were prepared using a nematic liquid crystal, photo-curable polymer and dichroic dye (anthraquinone blue) by polymerization-induced phase separation (PIPS) technique. Non-ionic dichroic dye (1%, 2% and 4% wt./wt. ratio) was taken as guest in PDLC host. Polarizing microscopy shows that in the absence of electric field, liquid crystal (LC) droplets in polymer matrix mainly exhibit bipolar configuration, however, relatively at higher field, maltese-type crosses were observed. Our results show that approx1% dye-doped PDLC film shows better transmission and faster response times over pure polymer-dispersed nematic liquid crystal (PDNLC) and higher concentrated (2% and 4%) GHPDLC films.

  7. Infra-Red Gas Analysers of Liquid Crystal Type for Environmental Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Nazarov

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reveals an opportunity to use infra-red gas analysers on the basis of the developed dichroic liquid crystal cells for investigation of absorption bands of various gases in the near infrared spectral region.

  8. Carbon/Liquid Crystal Polymer Prepreg for Cryogenic and High-Temp Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — KaZaK Composites proposes to develop a pultrusion process to produce carbon fiber / liquid crystal polymer (LCP) prepreg, a first for this category of materials and...

  9. Dichroic dye-dependent studies in guest-host polymer-dispersed liquid crystal films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, Praveen; Raina, K.K.

    2010-01-01

    Guest-host polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (GHPDLC) films were prepared using a nematic liquid crystal, photo-curable polymer and dichroic dye (anthraquinone blue) by polymerization-induced phase separation (PIPS) technique. Non-ionic dichroic dye (1%, 2% and 4% wt./wt. ratio) was taken as guest in PDLC host. Polarizing microscopy shows that in the absence of electric field, liquid crystal (LC) droplets in polymer matrix mainly exhibit bipolar configuration, however, relatively at higher field, maltese-type crosses were observed. Our results show that ∼1% dye-doped PDLC film shows better transmission and faster response times over pure polymer-dispersed nematic liquid crystal (PDNLC) and higher concentrated (2% and 4%) GHPDLC films.

  10. Controlling the volatility of the written optical state in electrochromic DNA liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai; Varghese, Justin; Gerasimov, Jennifer Y.; Polyakov, Alexey O.; Shuai, Min; Su, Juanjuan; Chen, Dong; Zajaczkowski, Wojciech; Marcozzi, Alessio; Pisula, Wojciech; Noheda, Beatriz; Palstra, Thomas T. M.; Clark, Noel A.; Herrmann, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    Liquid crystals are widely used in displays for portable electronic information display. To broaden their scope for other applications like smart windows and tags, new material properties such as polarizer-free operation and tunable memory of a written state become important. Here, we describe an anhydrous nanoDNA-surfactant thermotropic liquid crystal system, which exhibits distinctive electrically controlled optical absorption, and temperature-dependent memory. In the liquid crystal isotropic phase, electric field-induced colouration and bleaching have a switching time of seconds. Upon transition to the smectic liquid crystal phase, optical memory of the written state is observed for many hours without applied voltage. The reorientation of the DNA-surfactant lamellar layers plays an important role in preventing colour decay. Thereby, the volatility of optoelectronic state can be controlled simply by changing the phase of the material. This research may pave the way for developing a new generation of DNA-based, phase-modulated, photoelectronic devices.

  11. Physical properties of smectic C liquid crystal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, P.E.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate some of the fundamental physical properties of surface stabilised ferroelectric liquid crystal devices (SSFLCDs) using optical, electrical and x-ray diffraction techniques. The measured physical parameters are then related to the performance of display devices. Refractometry measurements on homeotropically aligned FLC samples are used to accurately determine the smectic cone angle and information is also gained on FLC biaxial order. Propagation of optically excited guided modes along liquid crystalline layers is then used to obtain detailed director configuration information. Wavelength dependent extinction angle spectroscopy is also used to extract smectic C director profiles, albeit with a slightly lower accuracy than the guided mode method. A triangular director profile model is found to describe the wavelength dependent extinction angle properties of achiral samples, and examination of the cell spacing dependence of the director profile enables a ratio of bulk elasticity to surface anchoring energy to be determined. Information is obtained on the behaviour of smectic C materials under high frequency electric fields using a continuum director profile model, providing a novel measurement of bend and splay elastic constants. Additionally an extension of the wavelength dependent extinction angle technique allows half splayed states to be characterised. A variety of simple electro-optic techniques are used to characterise several key material parameters. Polarisation reversal current is used to measure both the spontaneous polarisation and an effective FLC switching viscosity. Monochromatic extinction angle measurements under applied d.c. fields are used to determine the cone and layer tilt angles, whilst a comparison of d.c. and a.c. extinction angle characteristics provides an estimate of the dielectric biaxiality. An automated measurement technique is used to determine FLC response time characteristics, which are described

  12. Physical properties of smectic C liquid crystal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, P E

    1998-07-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate some of the fundamental physical properties of surface stabilised ferroelectric liquid crystal devices (SSFLCDs) using optical, electrical and x-ray diffraction techniques. The measured physical parameters are then related to the performance of display devices. Refractometry measurements on homeotropically aligned FLC samples are used to accurately determine the smectic cone angle and information is also gained on FLC biaxial order. Propagation of optically excited guided modes along liquid crystalline layers is then used to obtain detailed director configuration information. Wavelength dependent extinction angle spectroscopy is also used to extract smectic C director profiles, albeit with a slightly lower accuracy than the guided mode method. A triangular director profile model is found to describe the wavelength dependent extinction angle properties of achiral samples, and examination of the cell spacing dependence of the director profile enables a ratio of bulk elasticity to surface anchoring energy to be determined. Information is obtained on the behaviour of smectic C materials under high frequency electric fields using a continuum director profile model, providing a novel measurement of bend and splay elastic constants. Additionally an extension of the wavelength dependent extinction angle technique allows half splayed states to be characterised. A variety of simple electro-optic techniques are used to characterise several key material parameters. Polarisation reversal current is used to measure both the spontaneous polarisation and an effective FLC switching viscosity. Monochromatic extinction angle measurements under applied d.c. fields are used to determine the cone and layer tilt angles, whilst a comparison of d.c. and a.c. extinction angle characteristics provides an estimate of the dielectric biaxiality. An automated measurement technique is used to determine FLC response time characteristics, which are described

  13. Hydrodynamics of defects in nematic liquid crystal films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurz, G.

    1999-01-01

    In this thesis I propose a new theory to deal with the presence of a macroscopic density of defects or disclinations in two-dimensional systems of uniaxial nematic liquid crystal. The static part of the Abelian-Higgs model is the basis for a gauge covariant form of the Frank free energy for distortions in nematics, where the gauge field models the screening due to the presence of the defects. Certain results for vortices in the Abelian-Higgs model are reformulated for use in my theory. The model suggests disclinations with an isotropic core region. The covariant Frank free energy is used to derive a new form of the Ericksen-Leslie equations describing the hydrodynamics off nematics. These equations are set up according to the concept of thermodynamic fluxes and forces. Detailed analytic results are derived for the case where the dynamics is due to director reorientations, but no liquid flow. The hydrodynamic equations are reduced to dynamic equations for disclination points assuming a quasi-static motion in moduli space. The static form of the disclinations is based on solutions in the Bogomol'nyi limit, their quasi-static motion is induced through a deviation from this limit. The resulting equations are valid for a configuration containing disclinations with winding numbers of the same sign. These general equations require a, specific ansatz to yield further results. I consider two regimes, for defects close together and far apart from one another. A set of disclinations with winding numbers of the same sign which are close to one another, i.e. with overlapping cores, can result from disintegration of a larger disclination, and they repel one another. The results for this case predict how the disintegration could occur. The interaction of disclinations, with winding numbers of the same sign, which are far apart from one another is repulsive and decreases exponentially with the distances between them. Two such disclinations move on a straight line where their

  14. Angular selectivity asymmetry of holograms recorded in near infrared sensitive liquid crystal photopolymerizable materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbour, Steven; Galstian, Tigran; Akopyan, Rafik; Galstyan, Artur

    2004-08-01

    We have experimentally observed and theoretically explained the angular selectivity asymmetry in polymer dispersed liquid crystal holograms. Experiments are conducted in compounds with near infrared sensitivity. The coupled-wave theory is used to describe the diffraction properties of obtained anisotropic holographic gratings. Furthermore, the comparison of theory and experiments provides information about the optical axis direction that is defined by the average molecular orientation of the liquid crystal in the polymer matrix.

  15. Magnetic Nanoparticle-Assisted Tunable Optical Patterns from Spherical Cholesteric Liquid Crystal Bragg Reflectors

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Yali; Yang, Yujie; Shan, Yuwei; Gong, Lingli; Chen, Jingzhi; Li, Sensen; Chen, Lujian

    2017-01-01

    Cholesteric liquid crystals (CLCs) exhibit selective Bragg reflections of circularly polarized (CP) light owing to their spontaneous self-assembly abilities into periodic helical structures. Photonic cross-communication patterns could be generated toward potential security applications by spherical cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC) structures. To endow these optical patterns with tunability, we fabricated spherical CLC Bragg reflectors in the shape of microshells by glass-capillary microfluidi...

  16. Progress in linear optics, non-linear optics and surface alignment of liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, H. L.; Meyer, R. B.; Hurd, A. J.; Karn, A. J.; Arakelian, S. M.; Shen, Y. R.; Sanda, P. N.; Dove, D. B.; Jansen, S. A.; Hoffmann, R.

    We first discuss the progress in linear optics, in particular, the formulation and application of geometrical-optics approximation and its generalization. We then discuss the progress in non-linear optics, in particular, the enhancement of a first-order Freedericksz transition and intrinsic optical bistability in homeotropic and parallel oriented nematic liquid crystal cells. Finally, we discuss the liquid crystal alignment and surface effects on field-induced Freedericksz transition.

  17. Electric-field responsive contrast agent based on liquid crystals and magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, Lamar O.; Martinez-Miranda, Luz J.; Kurihara, Lynn K.; Nacev, Aleksandar; Hilaman, Ryan; Chowdhury, Sagar; Jafari, Sahar; Ijanaten, Said; da Silva, Claudian; Baker-McKee, James; Stepanov, Pavel Y.; Weinberg, Irving N.

    2018-05-01

    The properties of liquid crystal-magnetic nanoparticle composites have potential for sensing in the body. We study the response of a liquid crystal-magnetic nanoparticle (LC-MNP) composite to applied potentials of hundreds of volts per meter. Measuring samples using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and imaging composites using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we demonstrate that electric potentials applied across centimeter scale LC-MNP composite samples can be detected using XRD and MRI techniques.

  18. A Polarization Maintaining Filter based on a Liquid-Crystal-Photonic-Bandgap-Fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scolari, Lara; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Turchinovich, Dmitry

    2008-01-01

    A polarization maintaining filter based on a liquid-crystal-photonic-bandgap-fiber is demonstrated. Its polarization extinction ratio is 14 dB at 1550 nm. Its tunability is 150 nm.......A polarization maintaining filter based on a liquid-crystal-photonic-bandgap-fiber is demonstrated. Its polarization extinction ratio is 14 dB at 1550 nm. Its tunability is 150 nm....

  19. Deuteron NMR resolved mesogen vs. crosslinker molecular order and reorientational exchange in liquid single crystal elastomers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Milavec, J.; Domenici, V.; Zupančič, B.; Rešetič, A.; Bubnov, Alexej; Zalar, B.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 5 (2016), s. 4071-4077 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-02843S; GA MŠk(CZ) LD14007 Grant - others:EU - ICT(XE) COST Action IC1208 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : liquid single crystal elastomer * NMR * liquid crystal * molecular order * monomers Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials Impact factor: 4.123, year: 2016

  20. Biaxial potential of surface-stabilized ferroelectric liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaznacheev, Anatoly; Pozhidaev, Evgeny; Rudyak, Vladimir; Emelyanenko, Alexander V.; Khokhlov, Alexei

    2018-04-01

    A biaxial surface potential Φs of smectic-C* surface-stabilized ferroelectric liquid crystals (SSFLCs) is introduced in this paper to explain the experimentally observed electric-field dependence of polarization P˜cell(E ) , in particular the shape of the static hysteresis loops. Our potential consists of three independent parts. The first nonpolar part Φn describes the deviation of the prime director n (which is the most probable orientation of the long molecular axes) from the easy alignment axis R , which is located in the boundary surface plane. It is introduced in the same manner as the uniaxial Rapini potential. The second part Φp of the potential is a polar term associated with the presence of the polar axis in a FLC. The third part Φm relates to the inherent FLC biaxiality, which has not been taken into consideration previously. The Φm part takes into account the deviations of the secondary director m (which is the most probable orientation of the short molecular axes) from the normal to the boundary surface. The overall surface potential Φs, which is a sum of Φn,Φp , and Φm, allows one to model the conditions when either one, two, or three minima of the SSFLC cell free energy are realized depending on the biaxiality extent. A monodomain or polydomain structure, as well as the bistability or monostability of SSFLC cells, depends on the number of free-energy minima, as confirmed experimentally. In this paper, we analyze the biaxiality impact on the FLC alignment. We also answer the question of whether the bistable or monostable structure can be formed in an SSFLC cell. Our approach is essentially based on a consideration of the biaxial surface potential, while the uniaxial surface potential cannot adequately describe the experimental observations in the FLC.

  1. NMR polarization echoes in a nematic liquid crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levstein, Patricia R.; Chattah, Ana K.; Pastawski, Horacio M.; Raya, Jésus; Hirschinger, Jérôme

    2004-10-01

    We have modified the polarization echo (PE) sequence through the incorporation of Lee-Goldburg cross polarization steps to quench the 1H-1H dipolar dynamics. In this way, the 13C becomes an ideal local probe to inject and detect polarization in the proton system. This improvement made possible the observation of the local polarization P00(t) and polarization echoes in the interphenyl proton of the liquid crystal N-(4-methoxybenzylidene)-4-butylaniline. The decay of P00(t) was well fitted to an exponential law with a characteristic time τC≈310 μs. The hierarchy of the intramolecular dipolar couplings determines a dynamical bottleneck that justifies the use of the Fermi Golden Rule to obtain a spectral density consistent with the structural parameters. The time evolution of P00(t) was reversed by the PE sequence generating echoes at the time expected by the scaling of the dipolar Hamiltonian. This indicates that the reversible 1H-1H dipolar interaction is the main contribution to the local polarization decrease and that the exponential decay for P00(t) does not imply irreversibility. The attenuation of the echoes follows a Gaussian law with a characteristic time τφ≈527 μs. The shape and magnitude of the characteristic time of the PE decay suggest that it is dominated by the unperturbed homonuclear dipolar Hamiltonian. This means that τφ is an intrinsic property of the dipolar coupled network and not of other degrees of freedom. In this case, one cannot unambiguously identify the mechanism that produces the decoherence of the dipolar order. This is because even weak interactions are able to break the fragile multiple coherences originated on the dipolar evolution, hindering its reversal. Other schemes to investigate these underlying mechanisms are proposed.

  2. Order parameters in smectic liquid crystals[Smectics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beldon, Stephen M

    2001-07-01

    This thesis explores some of the important mechanisms for switching in smectic liquid crystals. It is mainly concerned with the interaction of the electric field and various order parameters in smectic phases. Distortion of these order parameters and also the layer structures associated with smectics are discussed in depth. Initial work is concentrated on the electroclinic effect of commercially available FLC mixtures, where experimental results suggest the presence of non-uniformity in the molecular director profile. Two possible models are suggested assuming a variation of the order parameter {theta} through the cell. The first model assumes that the smectic layers remain bookshelf-like, and the second that the layers tilt in a vertical chevron structure when a cone angle is induced electroclinically or otherwise. The latter model is the first 'order parameter' model of an electric field induced vertical chevron. The presence of non-uniformity in the director profile is sensed by a method similar to wavelength extinction spectroscopy. Investigations are undertaken on racemic smectic materials with high dielectric biaxiality. Modelling of such a material reveals a new electroclinic effect which shows a discrete second order phase transition on application of a field. It is suggested that a bistable electroclinic effect stabilised with a high frequency ac field may be realised if a residual polarisation is present in the high biaxiality material, and that this might be useful in the displays industry. Experimental investigations of such a material confirm the above effects close to the smectic A-C transition. Finally a higher order smectic phase, the smectic I* phase, is considered. The distortion of the hexagonal bond orientational order is investigated experimentally during application of an electric field. The first dynamic model of the switching process is presented, showing good agreement with the experimental results. It is suggested that the bond

  3. Current progress and technical challenges of flexible liquid crystal displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikake, Hideo; Sato, Hiroto

    2009-02-01

    We focused on several technical approaches to flexible liquid crystal (LC) display in this report. We have been developing flexible displays using plastic film substrates based on polymer-dispersed LC technology with molecular alignment control. In our representative devices, molecular-aligned polymer walls keep plastic-substrate gap constant without LC alignment disorder, and aligned polymer networks create monostable switching of fast-response ferroelectric LC (FLC) for grayscale capability. In the fabrication process, a high-viscosity FLC/monomer solution was printed, sandwiched and pressed between plastic substrates. Then the polymer walls and networks were sequentially formed based on photo-polymerization-induced phase separation in the nematic phase by two exposure processes of patterned and uniform ultraviolet light. The two flexible backlight films of direct illumination and light-guide methods using small three-primary-color light-emitting diodes were fabricated to obtain high-visibility display images. The fabricated flexible FLC panels were driven by external transistor arrays, internal organic thin film transistor (TFT) arrays, and poly-Si TFT arrays. We achieved full-color moving-image displays using the flexible FLC panel and the flexible backlight film based on field-sequential-color driving technique. Otherwise, for backlight-free flexible LC displays, flexible reflective devices of twisted guest-host nematic LC and cholesteric LC were discussed with molecular-aligned polymer walls. Singlesubstrate device structure and fabrication method using self-standing polymer-stabilized nematic LC film and polymer ceiling layer were also proposed for obtaining LC devices with excellent flexibility.

  4. Computer simulations of liquid crystals: Defects, deformations and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billeter, Jeffrey Lee

    1999-11-01

    Computer simulations play an increasingly important role in investigating fundamental issues in the physics of liquid crystals. Presented here are the results of three projects which utilize the unique power of simulations to probe questions which neither theory nor experiment can adequately answer. Throughout, we use the (generalized) Gay-Berne model, a widely-used phenomenological potential which captures the essential features of the anisotropic mesogen shapes and interactions. First, we used a Molecular Dynamics simulation with 65536 Gay-Berne particles to study the behaviors of topological defects in a quench from the isotropic to the nematic phase. Twist disclination loops were the dominant defects, and we saw evidence for dynamical scaling. We observed the loops separating, combining and collapsing, and we also observed numerous non-singular type-1 lines which appeared to be intimately involved with many of the loop processes. Second, we used a Molecular Dynamics simulation of a sphere embedded in a system of 2048 Gay-Berne particles to study the effects of radial anchoring of the molecules at the sphere's surface. A saturn ring defect configuration was observed, and the ring caused a driven sphere (modelling the falling ball experiment) to experience an increased resistance as it moved through the nematic. Deviations from a linear relationship between the driving force and the terminal speed are attributed to distortions of the saturn ring which we observed. The existence of the saturn ring confirms theoretical predictions for small spheres. Finally, we constructed a model for wedge-shaped molecules and used a linear response approach in a Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the flexoelectric behavior of a system of 256 such wedges. Novel potential models as well as novel analytical and visualization techniques were developed for these projects. Once again, the emphasis throughout was to investigate questions which simulations alone can adequately answer.

  5. Mechanism of calcium phosphates precipitation in liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prelot, B.; Zemb, T.

    2004-04-01

    The possibility of using as a precursor an easily wet meso-porous powder would be a breakthrough in the preparation of nuclear waste storage ceramics. A concentrated solution containing ions to be stored would wet a dry powder and then, subjected to mild compression, lead to a micro-crystalline matrix of calcium phosphate at acceptable temperatures. Since no porous calcium phosphate different from calcined bone (patented) is described as porous precursor, we have compared the different synthesis routes towards meso-porous ceramics. First, we considered homogeneous precipitation of slats in water: using initially off-stoichiometry in reaction, micron-sized hydroxyapatite particles are produced with a specific surface up to 100 m 2 /g. Then, we consider the classical route of precipitation of an hybrid material in the miscibility gap of a phase diagram, when an hexagonal liquid crystal is used a matrix for precipitation. The surfactant family consists in single chain surfactants containing phosphates as head-group to poison the growing surface of calcium phosphate nano-domains. Since the reaction is still too brutal, we considered using a cat-anionic precursor material of controllable surface charge. For certain concentrations and molar ratios, a new structure not yet described in surfactant precipitation literature is observed: since the periodicity is lower than twice the chain length, a disordered constant curvature monolayer (instead of the classical cylinder of twice chain length diameter) of surfactant is implied. Finally, we have investigated synthesis routes implying slow dissolution of pre-formed calcium phosphate in an already existing hexagonal matrix. For all these routes of synthesis, micro-structural determinations using SAXS, WARS and BET are performed, with a special attention to comparison of the precipitation material, the matrix obtained with all elements present, and also the material obtained after calcinations. (authors)

  6. Evanescent Field Enhancement in Liquid Crystal Optical Fibers: A Field Characteristics Based Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Choudhury

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the analysis of the electromagnetic wave propagation through liquid crystal optical fibers (LCOFs of two different types—conventional guides loaded with liquid crystals (addressed as LCOFs and those with additional twists due to conducting helical windings (addressed as HCLCOFs. More precisely, the three-layer optical waveguide structures are considered along with its outermost region being loaded with radially anisotropic liquid crystal material and the inner regions being made of usual silica, as used in conventional optical fibers. In addition to that, LCOF with twists introduced in the form of conducting helical windings at the interface of the silica core and the liquid crystal clad is also taken into account. Emphasis has been put on the power confinements by the lower-order TE modes sustained in the different sections of the LCOF structure. The results demonstrate useful applications of these guides in integrated optics as the power sustained in the liquid crystal section by the excited TE modes remains very high. In the case of twisted clad liquid crystal guides, descriptions are limited to the nature of dispersion relation only under the TE mode excitation, and corresponding to the cases of helix orientations being parallel and perpendicular to the optical axis.

  7. Crystallization of an organic compound from an ionic liquid using carbon dioxide as anti-solvent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, M.C.; Toussaint, V.A.; Shariati - Sarabi, A.; Florusse, L.J.; Spronsen, van J.; Witkamp, G.J.; Peters, C.J.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the anti-solvency behavior of supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) as a way to recover an organic compound from an ionic liquid by crystallization is explored. As an example, the conditions for crystallization of the organic compound methyl-(Z)-a-acetamido cinnamate (MAAC) from the ionic

  8. Studies of switching structures in ferroelectric liquid crystal devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pabla, D.S.

    1998-01-01

    The fast, bistable electro-optic response of ferroelectric liquid crystal (FLC) devices has made them prime candidates for use in display applications. However, before these applications can become widely commercially viable a number of key issues relating to the switching within these devices need to be addressed. One of these is related to the fact that while there has been much work done on modelling the switching process in FLC devices, with some moderate success, in the main these models have not accurately accounted for the physical processes taking place. In order to rectify this situation we present a simple, multi-variable approach which includes important physical phenomenon such as stressed states, partial and domain switching. Through using this model we learn more about the dynamic molecular profiles which may exist in devices, and use this as a springboard to undertake a comprehensive theoretical and experimental study of the molecular profiles of chevron structures under different types of addressing pulses and voltages. This entails modelling the dynamic profiles using a simple non flow reorientation theory and comparing these simulations directly with experimental data obtained through the use of two different optical characterisation techniques. Our findings show quite conclusively that for monopolar addressing within low and high voltage regimes and for low voltage bipolar pulses during the early stages of switching, the dynamic reorientation near the surfaces and central regions of the device lags the reorientation within the bulk. The reverse however being true for the high voltage bipolar addressing case. These results for chevron structures differ from previous theoretical predictions made by others using equations derived from the flow coupled chiral smectic C continuum theory. These flow coupled simulations however, refer to reorientation in bookshelf structures rather than the chevron type structures thought to exist in FLC devices. As

  9. Studies of switching structures in ferroelectric liquid crystal devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pabla, D.S

    1998-07-01

    The fast, bistable electro-optic response of ferroelectric liquid crystal (FLC) devices has made them prime candidates for use in display applications. However, before these applications can become widely commercially viable a number of key issues relating to the switching within these devices need to be addressed. One of these is related to the fact that while there has been much work done on modelling the switching process in FLC devices, with some moderate success, in the main these models have not accurately accounted for the physical processes taking place. In order to rectify this situation we present a simple, multi-variable approach which includes important physical phenomenon such as stressed states, partial and domain switching. Through using this model we learn more about the dynamic molecular profiles which may exist in devices, and use this as a springboard to undertake a comprehensive theoretical and experimental study of the molecular profiles of chevron structures under different types of addressing pulses and voltages. This entails modelling the dynamic profiles using a simple non flow reorientation theory and comparing these simulations directly with experimental data obtained through the use of two different optical characterisation techniques. Our findings show quite conclusively that for monopolar addressing within low and high voltage regimes and for low voltage bipolar pulses during the early stages of switching, the dynamic reorientation near the surfaces and central regions of the device lags the reorientation within the bulk. The reverse however being true for the high voltage bipolar addressing case. These results for chevron structures differ from previous theoretical predictions made by others using equations derived from the flow coupled chiral smectic C continuum theory. These flow coupled simulations however, refer to reorientation in bookshelf structures rather than the chevron type structures thought to exist in FLC devices. As

  10. Oral and transdermal drug delivery systems: role of lipid-based lyotropic liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabalaya, Rajan; Musa, Muhammad Nuh; Kifli, Nurolaini; David, Sheba R

    2017-01-01

    Liquid crystal (LC) dosage forms, particularly those using lipid-based lyotropic LCs (LLCs), have generated considerable interest as potential drug delivery systems. LCs have the physical properties of liquids but retain some of the structural characteristics of crystalline solids. They are compatible with hydrophobic and hydrophilic compounds of many different classes and can protect even biologicals and nucleic acids from degradation. This review, focused on research conducted over the past 5 years, discusses the structural evaluation of LCs and their effects in drug formulations. The structural classification of LLCs into lamellar, hexagonal and micellar cubic phases is described. The structures of these phases are influenced by the addition of surfactants, which include a variety of nontoxic, biodegradable lipids; these also enhance drug solubility. LLC structure influences drug localization, particle size and viscosity, which, in turn, determine drug delivery properties. Through several specific examples, we describe the applications of LLCs in oral and topical drug formulations, the latter including transdermal and ocular delivery. In oral LLC formulations, micelle compositions and the resulting LLC structures can determine drug solubilization and stability as well as intestinal transport and absorption. Similarly, in topical LLC formulations, composition can influence whether the drug is retained in the skin or delivered transdermally. Owing to their enhancement of drug stability and promotion of controlled drug delivery, LLCs are becoming increasingly popular in pharmaceutical formulations.

  11. Advances in nonlinear polymers and inorganic crystals, liquid crystals, and laser media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musikant, S.

    1987-01-01

    These proceedings collect papers on laser materials. Topics include: solid state lasers, fracture mechanics in laser materials, optical second harmonic generation, nonlinear optics, molecular crystals, crystal-phase transformation, and materials for laser fusion reactors

  12. The study of the elasticity of spider dragline silk with liquid crystal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Linying; Liu Fei; Ouyang Zhongcan

    2009-01-01

    Spider dragline silk is an optimal biomaterial with a combination of high tensile strength and high elasticity, and it has long been suggested to belong to liquid crystalline materials. However, a satisfactory liquid crystal description for the mechanical properties of the dragline is still missing. To solve the long existing problem, we generalized the Maier-Saupe theory of nematics to construct a liquid crystal model of the deformation mechanism of the dragline silk. We show that the remarkable elasticity of the dragline can be understood as the isotropic-nematic phase transition of the chain network with the beginning of the transition corresponding to the yield point. The calculated curve fits well with the measurements and the yield point is obtained self-consistently within our framework. The present theory can also qualitatively account for the drop of stress in supercontracted spider silk. All these comprehensive agreements between theory and experiments strongly indicate the dragline to belong to liquid crystal materials.

  13. The liquid protein phase in crystallization: a case study—intact immunoglobulins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, Yurii G.; Malkin, Alexander J.; McPherson, Alexander

    2001-11-01

    A common observation by protein chemists has been the appearance, for many proteins in aqueous solutions, of oil like droplets, or in more extreme cases the formation of a second oil like phase. These may accompany the formation of precipitate in "salting out" or "salting in' procedures, but more commonly appear in place of any precipitate. Such phase separations also occur, with even greater frequency, in the presence of polymeric precipitants such as polyethyleneglycol (PEG). In general the appearance of a second liquid phase has been taken as indicative of protein aggregation, though an aggregate state distinctly different from that characteristic of amorphous precipitate. While the latter is thought to be composed of linear and branched assemblies, polymers of a sort, the oil phase suggests a more compact, three-dimensional, but fluid state. An important property of an alternate, fluid phase is that it can mediate transitions between other states, for example, between protein molecules free in solution and protein molecules immobilized in amorphous precipitate or crystals. The "liquid protein" phase can be readily observed in many crystallization experiments either prior to the appearance of visible crystals, or directly participating in the crystal growth process. In some cases the relationship between the liquid phase and developing crystals is intimate. Crystals grow directly from the liquid phase, or appear only after the visible formation of the liquid phase. We describe here our experience with a class of macromolecules, immunoglobulins, and particularly IDEC-151, an IgG specific for CD4 on human lymphocytes. This protein has been crystallized from a Jeffamine-LiSO 4 mother liquor and, its crystallization illustrates many of the features associated with the liquid protein, or protein rich phase.

  14. Sharp Morphological Transitions from Nanoscale Mixed-Anchoring Patterns in Confined Nematic Liquid Crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armas-Pérez, Julio C. [Institute; División; Li, Xiao [Institute; Martínez-González, José A. [Institute; Smith, Coleman [Institute; Hernández-Ortiz, J. P. [Departamento; Nealey, Paul F. [Institute; Materials; de Pablo, Juan J. [Institute; Materials

    2017-08-17

    Liquid crystals are known to be particularly sensitive to orientational cues provided at surfaces or interfaces. In this work, we explore theoretically, computationally, and experimentally the behavior of liquid crystals on isolated nanoscale patterns with controlled anchoring characteristics at small length scales. The orientation of the liquid crystal is controlled through the use of chemically patterned polymer brushes that are tethered to a surface. This system can be engineered with remarkable precision, and the central question addressed here is whether a characteristic length scale exists at which information encoded on a surface is no longer registered by a liquid crystal. To do so, we adopt a tensorial description of the free energy of the hybrid liquidcrystal surface system, and we investigate its morphology in a systematic manner. For long and narrow surface stripes, it is found that the liquid crystal follows the instructions provided by the pattern down to 100 nm widths. This is accomplished through the creation of line defects that travel along the sides of the stripes. We show that a "sharp" morphological transition occurs from a uniform undistorted alignment to a dual uniform/splay-bend morphology. The theoretical and numerical predictions advanced here are confirmed by experimental observations. Our combined analysis suggests that nanoscale patterns can be used to manipulate the orientation of liquid crystals at a fraction of the energetic cost that is involved in traditional liquid crystal-based devices. The insights presented in this work have the potential to provide a new fabrication platform to assemble low power bistable devices, which could be reconfigured upon application of small external fields.

  15. Fluorinated tolane and dioxane liquid crystals for ferroelectric display applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu Chuan Dong

    1994-05-01

    The aim of this thesis was to make low viscosity, low birefringence, large negative dielectric anisotropy liquid-crystalline materials for use in ferroelectric liquid crystal mixtures to be used in high speed display devices. Saturated heterocyclic rings, dioxane and dioxaborinane, were chosen separately to be linked with a difluorophenyl system as the main component of the mesogenic core. In order to optimise the physical properties and to reduce the cost of the chiral materials, the strategy of making dopant-host mixtures was used. In addition to the difluorobiphenyl dioxaborinanes, three types of compounds were prepared possessing difluorophenyl rings and a dioxane ring: (i) difluorophenyl dioxanes and difluorobiphenyl dioxanes with the fluorinated ring in the middle of or at the end of the core; (ii) a number of compounds with linking groups, dimethylene (CH 2 CH 2 ), ester (COO), ethenylene (CH=CH) and ethynylene (C≡C) between adjacent benzene rings or between a dioxane ring and a benzene ring; (iii) difluorobiphenyl dioxanes possessing a chiral aliphatic chain were chosen as chiral dopants whose structure matched those of the host materials. Other compounds which have been synthesised are the difluorotolanes and difluorophenyl-ethynyl compounds, which were targeted because of the low viscosity of the tolane compounds and the negative dielectric anisotropy of the difluorophenyl ring. Fifty-six 2-(2,3-difluorobiphenyl-4'-yl)-1,3-dioxanes (n = 5-9, m = 5-10 or O5-O9; or n = 9, R' = OCH 2 CH(CH 3 )C 4 H 9 ) were prepared. Smectic C and nematic phases were observed for most of the alkyl-alkoxy homologues. Conversely, most of the dialkyl compounds exhibited smectic C, smectic A and nematic phases. The birefringences (Δn) and the dielectric anisotropies (Δε) of a number of materials have been determined. Three 2-(2,3-difluorobiphenyl-4-yl)-5-alkyl-1,3-dioxanes (n = 7, m = O7-O9) were prepared and only exhibit nematic phases. Two difluorophenyl dioxanes were

  16. Liquid Crystal Enabled Early Stage Detection of Beta Amyloid Formation on Lipid Monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadati, Monirosadat [Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Chicago IL 60637 USA; Apik, Aslin Izmitli [Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison WI 53706 USA; Armas-Perez, Julio C. [Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Chicago IL 60637 USA; Martinez-Gonzalez, Jose [Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Chicago IL 60637 USA; Hernandez-Ortiz, Juan P. [Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Chicago IL 60637 USA; Departamento de Materiales y Minerales, Facultad de Minas, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Medellín, Calle 75 # 79A-51, Bloque M17 Medellín Colombia; Abbott, Nicholas L. [Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison WI 53706 USA; de Pablo, Juan J. [Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Chicago IL 60637 USA; Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA

    2015-09-09

    Liquid crystals (LCs) can serve as sensitive reporters of interfacial events, and this property has been used for sensing of synthetic or biological toxins. Here it is demonstrated that LCs can distinguish distinct molecular motifs and exhibit a specific response to beta-sheet structures. That property is used to detect the formation of highly toxic protofibrils involved in neurodegenerative diseases, where it is crucial to develop methods that probe the early-stage aggregation of amyloidogenic peptides in the vicinity of biological membranes. In the proposed method, the amyloid fibrils formed at the lipid-decorated LC interface can change the orientation of LCs and form elongated and branched structures that are amplified by the mesogenic medium; however, nonamyloidogenic peptides form ellipsoidal domains of tilted LCs. Moreover, a theoretical and computational analysis is used to reveal the underlying structure of the LC, thereby providing a detailed molecular-level view of the interactions and mechanisms responsible for such motifs. The corresponding signatures can be detected at nanomolar concentrations of peptide by polarized light microscopy and much earlier than the ones that can be identified by fluorescence-based techniques. As such, it offers the potential for early diagnoses of neurodegenerative diseases and for facile testing of inhibitors of amyloid formation.

  17. Density-viscosity product of small-volume ionic liquid samples using quartz crystal impedance analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHale, Glen; Hardacre, Chris; Ge, Rile; Doy, Nicola; Allen, Ray W K; MacInnes, Jordan M; Bown, Mark R; Newton, Michael I

    2008-08-01

    Quartz crystal impedance analysis has been developed as a technique to assess whether room-temperature ionic liquids are Newtonian fluids and as a small-volume method for determining the values of their viscosity-density product, rho eta. Changes in the impedance spectrum of a 5-MHz fundamental frequency quartz crystal induced by a water-miscible room-temperature ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimiclazolium trifluoromethylsulfonate ([C4mim][OTf]), were measured. From coupled frequency shift and bandwidth changes as the concentration was varied from 0 to 100% ionic liquid, it was determined that this liquid provided a Newtonian response. A second water-immiscible ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide [C4mim][NTf2], with concentration varied using methanol, was tested and also found to provide a Newtonian response. In both cases, the values of the square root of the viscosity-density product deduced from the small-volume quartz crystal technique were consistent with those measured using a viscometer and density meter. The third harmonic of the crystal was found to provide the closest agreement between the two measurement methods; the pure ionic liquids had the largest difference of approximately 10%. In addition, 18 pure ionic liquids were tested, and for 11 of these, good-quality frequency shift and bandwidth data were obtained; these 12 all had a Newtonian response. The frequency shift of the third harmonic was found to vary linearly with square root of viscosity-density product of the pure ionic liquids up to a value of square root(rho eta) approximately 18 kg m(-2) s(-1/2), but with a slope 10% smaller than that predicted by the Kanazawa and Gordon equation. It is envisaged that the quartz crystal technique could be used in a high-throughput microfluidic system for characterizing ionic liquids.

  18. Bond orientational ordering in a metastable supercooled liquid: a shadow of crystallization and liquid–liquid transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hajime

    2010-01-01

    It is widely believed that a liquid state can be characterized by a single order parameter, density, and that a transition from a liquid to solid can be described by density ordering (translational ordering). For example, this type of theory has had great success in describing the phase behaviour of hard spheres. However, there are some features that cannot be captured by such theories. For example, hard spheres crystallize into either hcp or fcc structures, without a tendency of bcc ordering which is expected by the Alexander–McTague theory based on the Landau-type free energy of the density order parameter. We also found hcp-like bond orientational ordering in a metastable supercooled liquid, which promotes nucleation of hcp crystals. Furthermore, theories based on the single order parameter cannot explain water-like thermodynamic and kinetic anomalies of a liquid and liquid–liquid transition in a single-component liquid. Based on these facts, we argue that we need an additional order parameter to describe a liquid state. It is bond orientational order, which is induced by dense packing in hard spheres or by directional bonding in molecular and atomic liquids. Bond orientational order is intrinsically of local nature, unlike translational order which is of global nature. This feature plays a unique role in crystallization and quasicrystal formation. We also reveal that bond orientational ordering is a cause of dynamic heterogeneity near a glass transition and is linked to slow dynamics. In relation to this, we note that, for describing the structuring of a highly disordered liquid, we need a structural signature of low configurational entropy, which is more general than bond orientational order. Finally, the water-like anomaly and liquid–liquid transition can be explained by bond orientational ordering due to hydrogen or covalent bonding and its cooperativity, respectively. So we argue that bond orientational ordering is a key to the physical understanding

  19. Silicon crystal growth using a liquid-feeding Czochralski method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Yutaka; Kurosaka, Shoei; Imai, Masato

    1996-09-01

    Silicon single crystals with uniformity along the growth direction were grown using a new continuous Czochralski (CCZ) method. Polycrystalline silicon rods used as charge materials are melted by carbon heaters over a crucible without contact between the raw material and other substances. Using this method, silicon crystals with diameters as large as 6 or 8 inch and good uniformity along the growth direction were grown.

  20. New structural studies of liquid crystal by reflectivity and resonant X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, P.

    2007-04-01

    This memory presents three structural studies of smectic Liquid Crystals by reflectivity and resonant diffraction of X-rays. It is divided in five chapters. In the first a short introduction to Liquid Crystals is given. In particular, the smectic phases that are the object of this study are presented. The second chapter is consecrated to the X-ray experimental techniques that were used in this work. The three last chapters present the works on which this thesis can be divided. Chapter three demonstrates on free-standing films of MHPOBC (historic liquid crystal that possesses the antiferroelectric sub-phases) the possibility to extend the technique of resonant X-ray diffraction to liquid crystals without resonant element. In the fourth chapter the structure of the B 2 liquid crystal phase of bent-core molecules (or banana molecules) is elucidated by using resonant X-ray diffraction combined with polarization analysis of the diffracted beam. A model of the polarization of the resonant beam diffracted by four different structures proposed for the B 2 phase is developed in this chapter. In the fifth chapter a smectic binary mixture presenting a very original critical point of phase separation is studied by X-ray reflectivity and optical microscopy. A concentration gradient in the direction perpendicular to the plane of the film seems to be induced by the free-standing film geometry. The results of a simplified model of the system are compatible with this interpretation

  1. Ionic diffusion and salt dissociation conditions of lithium liquid crystal electrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yuria; Hirai, Kenichi; Murata, Shuuhei; Kishii, Yutaka; Kii, Keisuke; Yoshio, Masafumi; Kato, Takashi

    2005-06-16

    Salt dissociation conditions and dynamic properties of ionic species in liquid crystal electrolytes of lithium were investigated by a combination of NMR spectra and diffusion coefficient estimations using the pulsed gradient spin-echo NMR techniques. Activation energies of diffusion (Ea) of ionic species changed with the phase transition of the electrolyte. That is, Ea of the nematic phase was lower than that of the isotropic phase. This indicates that the aligned liquid crystal molecules prepared efficient conduction pathways for migration of ionic species. The dissociation degree of the salt was lower compared with those of the conventional electrolyte solutions and polymer gel electrolytes. This is attributed to the low concentration of polar sites, which attract the dissolved salt and promote salt dissociation, on the liquid crystal molecules. Furthermore, motional restriction of the molecules due to high viscosity and molecular oriented configuration in the nematic phase caused inefficient attraction of the sites for the salt. With a decreased dissolved salt concentration of the liquid crystal electrolyte, salt dissociation proceeded, and two diffusion components attributed to the ion and ion pair were detected independently. This means that the exchange rate between the ion and the ion pair is fairly slow once the salt is dissociated in the liquid crystal electrolytes due to the low motility of the medium molecules that initiate salt dissociation.

  2. A liquid-crystal-on-silicon color sequential display using frame buffer pixel circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangrok

    Next generation liquid-crystal-on-silicon (LCOS) high definition (HD) televisions and image projection displays will need to be low-cost and high quality to compete with existing systems based on digital micromirror devices (DMDs), plasma displays, and direct view liquid crystal displays. In this thesis, a novel frame buffer pixel architecture that buffers data for the next image frame while displaying the current frame, offers such a competitive solution is presented. The primary goal of the thesis is to demonstrate the LCOS microdisplay architecture for high quality image projection displays and at potentially low cost. The thesis covers four main research areas: new frame buffer pixel circuits to improve the LCOS performance, backplane architecture design and testing, liquid crystal modes for the LCOS microdisplay, and system integration and demonstration. The design requirements for the LCOS backplane with a 64 x 32 pixel array are addressed and measured electrical characteristics matches to computer simulation results. Various liquid crystal (LC) modes applicable for LCOS microdisplays and their physical properties are discussed. One- and two-dimensional director simulations are performed for the selected LC modes. Test liquid crystal cells with the selected LC modes are made and their electro-optic effects are characterized. The 64 x 32 LCOS microdisplays fabricated with the best LC mode are optically tested with interface circuitry. The characteristics of the LCOS microdisplays are summarized with the successful demonstration.

  3. Biological treatment of the liquid effluents of a paper industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mejia, Juan Felipe; Ramirez, Gladys Eugenia; Arias Zabala, Mario

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to determine the effect of the microorganisms Candida utilis and Candida tropicalis in the reduction of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) of the liquid effluents of a producing factory of paper kraft type, by means of fermentations made to pH of 5 and a 30 centigrade degrees during 6 days. The biological processing is preceded by a physicochemical process of directed acidulation to reduce pH of the effluent (liquor black) from its initial value, of approximately 13, to 5, in order to it is adapted for the growth of yeast. In this process, which forms precipitated, that is necessary to eliminate by centrifugation and filtration to facilitate the growth of the microorganisms, with is obtained one first removal of the COD of the order of 70 %. With the biological processing obtains for both yeasts a percentage of removal of 45 -50% of the COD surplus. The total removal of the COD, that is to say, obtained with the pre-cure and the fermentation it is of the order of 84% for the yeast. Additionally the possibility studied of implementing some complementary procedures to the biological processing, with a view to obtaining greater growth of yeast in the black liquor and thus obtaining additional reductions in the OCD of the same one

  4. Single-Photon Source for Quantum Information Based on Single Dye Molecule Fluorescence in Liquid Crystal Host

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukishova, S.G.; Knox, R.P.; Freivald, P.; McNamara, A.; Boyd, R.W.; Stroud, Jr. C.R.; Schmid, A.W.; Marshall, K.L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a new application for liquid crystals: quantum information technology. A deterministically polarized single-photon source that efficiently produces photons exhibiting antibunching is a pivotal hardware element in absolutely secure quantum communication. Planar-aligned nematic liquid crystal hosts deterministically align the single dye molecules which produce deterministically polarized single (antibunched) photons. In addition, 1-D photonic bandgap cholesteric liquid crystals will increase single-photon source efficiency. The experiments and challenges in the observation of deterministically polarized fluorescence from single dye molecules in planar-aligned glassy nematic-liquid-crystal oligomer as well as photon antibunching in glassy cholesteric oligomer are described for the first time

  5. Multi-functional photonic crystal sensors enabled by biological silica (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Alan X.

    2017-02-01

    Diatoms are microalgae found in every habitat where water is present. They produce 40% of the ocean's yearly production of organic carbon and 20% of the oxygen that we breathe. Their abundance and wide distribution make them ideal materials for a wide range of applications as living organisms. In our previous work, we have demonstrated that diatom biosilica with self-assembled silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) can be used as ultra-sensitive, low-cost substrates for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensing. The enhancement comes from the photonic crystal enhancement of diatom frustules that could improve the hot-spots of Ag NPs. In this work, we report the unique micro-fluidic flow, analyte concentration effect, and thin layer chromatography (TLC) on diatom biosilica, which enables selection, separation, detection, and analysis of complex chemical and biological samples. Particularly, we show that the microscopic fluidic flow induced by the evaporation of liquid droplet can concentrate the analyte and achieve label-free sensing of single molecule detection of R6G and label-free sensing of 4.5×10-17g trinitrotoluene (TNT) from only 200 nano-liter solution. We also demonstrated a facile method for instant on-site separation and detection of analytes by TLC in tandem with SERS spectroscopy using high density diatom thin film. This lab-on-chip technology has been successfully applied for label-free detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from human plasma and histamine from salmon fish. Our research suggests that such cost-effective, multi-functional photonic crystal sensors enabled by diatom biosilica opens a new route for lab-on-chip systems and possess significant engineering potentials for chemical and biological sensing.

  6. Polarization and switching properties of holographic polymer-dispersed liquid-crystal gratings. I. Theoretical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Richard L.

    2002-12-01

    Polarization properties and electro-optical switching behavior of holographic polymer-dispersed liquid-crystal (HPDLC) reflection and transmission gratings are studied. A theoretical model is developed that combines anisotropic coupled-wave theory with an elongated liquid-crystal-droplet switching model and includes the effects of a statistical orientational distribution of droplet-symmetry axes. Angle- and polarization-dependent switching behaviors of HPDLC gratings are elucidated, and the effects on dynamic range are described. A new type of electro-optical switching not seen in ordinary polymer-dispersed liquid crystals, to the best of the author's knowledge, is presented and given a physical interpretation. The model provides valuable insight to the physics of these gratings and can be applied to the design of HPDLC holographic optical elements.

  7. Electrically switchable photonic liquid crystal devices for routing of a polarized light wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushnova, Irina I.; Melnikova, Elena A.; Tolstik, Alexei L.; Muravsky, Alexander A.

    2018-04-01

    The new mode of LC alignment based on photoalignment AtA-2 azo dye where the refractive interface between orthogonal orientations of the LC director exists without voltage and disappeared or changed with critical voltage has been proposed. The technology to fabricate electrically controlled liquid crystal elements for spatial separation and switching of linearly polarized light beams on the basis of the total internal reflection effect has been significantly improved. Its distinctive feature is the application of a composite alignment material comprising two sublayers of Nylon-6 and AtA-2 photoalignment azo dye offering patterned liquid crystal director orientation with high alignment quality value q = 0 . 998. The fabricated electrically controlled spatially structured liquid crystal devices enable implementation of propagation directions separation for orthogonally polarized light beams and their switching with minimal crosstalk.

  8. Dual gauge field theory of quantum liquid crystals in three dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beekman, Aron J.; Nissinen, Jaakko; Wu, Kai; Zaanen, Jan

    2017-01-01

    The dislocation-mediated quantum melting of solids into quantum liquid crystals is extended from two to three spatial dimensions, using a generalization of boson-vortex or Abelian-Higgs duality. Dislocations are now Burgers-vector-valued strings that trace out worldsheets in space-time while the phonons of the solid dualize into two-form (Kalb-Ramond) gauge fields. We propose an effective dual Higgs potential that allows for restoring translational symmetry in either one, two, or three directions, leading to the quantum analogues of columnar, smectic, or nematic liquid crystals. In these phases, transverse phonons turn into gapped, propagating modes, while compressional stress remains massless. Rotational Goldstone modes emerge whenever translational symmetry is restored. Lastly, we also consider the effective electromagnetic response of electrically charged quantum liquid crystals, and find among other things that as a hard principle only two out of the possible three rotational Goldstone modes are observable using propagating electromagnetic fields.

  9. Dual gauge field theory of quantum liquid crystals in three dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beekman, Aron J.; Nissinen, Jaakko; Wu, Kai; Zaanen, Jan

    2017-10-01

    The dislocation-mediated quantum melting of solids into quantum liquid crystals is extended from two to three spatial dimensions, using a generalization of boson-vortex or Abelian-Higgs duality. Dislocations are now Burgers-vector-valued strings that trace out worldsheets in space-time while the phonons of the solid dualize into two-form (Kalb-Ramond) gauge fields. We propose an effective dual Higgs potential that allows for restoring translational symmetry in either one, two, or three directions, leading to the quantum analogues of columnar, smectic, or nematic liquid crystals. In these phases, transverse phonons turn into gapped, propagating modes, while compressional stress remains massless. Rotational Goldstone modes emerge whenever translational symmetry is restored. We also consider the effective electromagnetic response of electrically charged quantum liquid crystals, and find among other things that as a hard principle only two out of the possible three rotational Goldstone modes are observable using propagating electromagnetic fields.

  10. The Monte Carlo simulations of liquid crystal cell with bend distortions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xuan; Zhang Zhidong

    2010-01-01

    Strong anchoring nematic liquid crystal cell with bend distortions is studied, This liquid crystal cell has fast response in application prospects. The continuum theory has given that the surface elastic energy k 13 term causes surface discontinuities of the liquid crystal director. Study based on molecular theory, the pair potential parameters link directly to the surface elastic energy coefficient k 13 . The effect of finite temperature is studied by Monte Carlo simulation. The second rank ordering tensor is calculated, the largest eigenvalue gives the order parameter, and its corresponding eigenvector identifies the director in the continuum theory. It is shown that it doesn't present the surface discontinuities based on the molecular theory and the k 13 term in pair potential will increase the fluctuation in the middle of the cell. By inference, the boundary discontinuity caused by k 13 item in continuum theory is resulted from the neglecting of the higher items than the second rank of the elastic energy. (authors)

  11. Dynamics of topological solitons, knotted streamlines, and transport of cargo in liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Hayley R. O.; Ackerman, Paul J.; Boyle, Timothy J.; Sheetah, Ghadah H.; Fornberg, Bengt; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2018-05-01

    Active colloids and liquid crystals are capable of locally converting the macroscopically supplied energy into directional motion and promise a host of new applications, ranging from drug delivery to cargo transport at the mesoscale. Here we uncover how topological solitons in liquid crystals can locally transform electric energy to translational motion and allow for the transport of cargo along directions dependent on frequency of the applied electric field. By combining polarized optical video microscopy and numerical modeling that reproduces both the equilibrium structures of solitons and their temporal evolution in applied fields, we uncover the physical underpinnings behind this reconfigurable motion and study how it depends on the structure and topology of solitons. We show that, unexpectedly, the directional motion of solitons with and without the cargo arises mainly from the asymmetry in rotational dynamics of molecular ordering in liquid crystal rather than from the asymmetry of fluid flows, as in conventional active soft matter systems.

  12. Ion Density Analysis of Single-Stranded DNA in Liquid Crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwabata, Kazuki; Seki, Yasutaka; Toizumi, Ryota; Shimada, Yuki; Furue, Hirokazu; Sakaguchi, Kengo

    2013-09-01

    With the widespread use of liquid crystals (LCs) in liquid crystal displays, we have looked into the application of liquid crystals in biotechnology. The purpose of the study described here is to investigate the physical properties of DNA using LCs. Synthetic oligonucleotide molecules were dispersed in MLC6884, the sample injected into antiparallel cells, and the amount of mobile ions was measured. The LC cell doped with oligonucleotide molecules showed a sequence-dependent, specific correlation between oligonucleotide concentration and the amount of mobile ions in the LC cells. In the framework of the Stokes model and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) analysis, we speculate that this result arises from the difference in ion mobility, which is caused by the shape of the oligonucleotide molecule in the LC.

  13. Geometrical optics approach in liquid crystal films with three-dimensional director variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panasyuk, G; Kelly, J; Gartland, E C; Allender, D W

    2003-04-01

    A formal geometrical optics approach (GOA) to the optics of nematic liquid crystals whose optic axis (director) varies in more than one dimension is described. The GOA is applied to the propagation of light through liquid crystal films whose director varies in three spatial dimensions. As an example, the GOA is applied to the calculation of light transmittance for the case of a liquid crystal cell which exhibits the homeotropic to multidomainlike transition (HMD cell). Properties of the GOA solution are explored, and comparison with the Jones calculus solution is also made. For variations on a smaller scale, where the Jones calculus breaks down, the GOA provides a fast, accurate method for calculating light transmittance. The results of light transmittance calculations for the HMD cell based on the director patterns provided by two methods, direct computer calculation and a previously developed simplified model, are in good agreement.

  14. Increasing the rewriting speed of optical rewritable e-paper by selecting proper liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng Yu; Sun Jiatong; Kwok Hoi Sing; Murauski Anatoli; Chigrinov Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    The effect of interaction between liquid crystal (LC) and photoalignment material on the speed of optical rewriting process is investigated. The theoretical analysis shows that a smaller frank elastic constant K 22 of liquid crystal corresponds to a larger twist angle, which gives rise to a larger rewriting speed. Six different LC cells with the same boundary conditions (one substrate is covered with rubbed polyimide (PI) and the other with photo sensitive rewritable sulfuric dye 1(SD1)) are tested experimentally under the same illumination intensity (450 nm, 80 mW/cm 2 ). The results demonstrate that with a suitable liquid crystal, the LC optical rewriting speed for e-paper application can be obviously improved. For two well known LC materials E7 (K 22 is larger) and 5CB (K 22 is smaller), they require 11 s and 6 s corresponding to change alignment direction for generating image information. (general)

  15. Correlation Between Superheated Liquid Fragility And Onset Temperature Of Crystallization For Al-Based Amorphous Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo J.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Amorphous alloys or metallic glasses have attracted significant interest in the materials science and engineering communities due to their unique physical, mechanical, and chemical properties. The viscous flow of amorphous alloys exhibiting high strain rate sensitivity and homogeneous deformation is considered to be an important characteristic in thermoplastic forming processes performed within the supercooled liquid region because it allows superplastic-like deformation behavior. Here, the correlation between the superheated liquid fragility, and the onset temperature of crystallization for Al-based alloys, is investigated. The activation energy for viscous flow of the liquid is also investigated. There is a negative correlation between the parameter of superheated liquid fragility and the onset temperature of crystallization in the same Al-based alloy system. The activation energy decreases as the onset temperature of crystallization increases. This indicates that the stability of a superheated liquid can affect the thermal stability of the amorphous alloy. It also means that a liquid with a large superheated liquid fragility, when rapidly solidified, forms an amorphous alloy with a low thermal stability.

  16. Influence of RF power on performance of sputtered a-IGZO based liquid crystal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, G.M., E-mail: wu@mail.cgu.edu.tw; Sahoo, A.K.; Liu, C.Y.

    2015-12-01

    The influence of radio-frequency (RF) power on sputter-deposited amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) films and the corresponding liquid crystal cell performances have been investigated. The inorganic films were used as alternative alignment layers for liquid crystal display cells. The columnar growth of film was achieved by non-contact, fixed oblique deposition using RF sputtering at the power of 50 W, 60 W and 70 W. The experiments have been carried out to compare the physical characteristics with those of the traditional polyimide (PI) alignment layers used for liquid crystal cells. The cell performances in voltage-transmittance, contrast ratio, and response time were all evaluated. The liquid crystal pretilt angle has been determined to be about 13° using 70 W power deposited a-IGZO film. It was 6° for the 60 W deposited film and only 1.5° for the PI alignment film. The experimental cell rise time and fall time was 1.25 ms and 2.96 ms, respectively. Thus, a very quick response time of 4.21 ms has been achieved. It was about 6.62 ms for the PI alignment control cell. - Highlights: • Radio-frequency power of indium gallium zinc oxide film deposition was studied. • The oblique deposition technique was used to prepare the alignment layers. • The liquid crystal pretilt angle was about 13° using 70 W. • The corresponding liquid crystal cells exhibited fast response time at 4.21 ms. • The cells showed low threshold voltage of 1.78 V and excellent contrast ratio.

  17. Tunable diffraction and self-defocusing in liquid-filled photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosberg, Christian Romer; Bennet, Francis H.; Neshev, Dragomir N.

    2007-01-01

    We suggest and demonstrate a novel platform for the study of tunable nonlinear light propagation in two-dimensional discrete systems, based on photonic crystal fibers filled with high index nonlinear liquids. Using the infiltrated cladding region of a photonic crystal fiber as a nonlinear waveguide...... array, we experimentally demonstrate highly tunable beam diffraction and thermal self-defocusing, and realize a compact all-optical power limiter based on a tunable nonlinear response....

  18. Longitudinal and transverse pyroelectric effects in a chiral ferroelectric liquid crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yablonskii, S. V., E-mail: yablonskii2005@yandex.ru; Bondarchuk, V. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Soto-Bustamante, E. A.; Romero-Hasler, P. N. [Universidad de Chile (Chile); Ozaki, M. [Osaka University, Department of Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Engineering (Japan); Yoshino, K. [Shimane Institute for Industrial Technology (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    In this study, we compare the results of experimental investigations of longitudinal and transverse pyroelectric effects in a chiral ferroelectric crystal. In a transverse geometry, we studied freely suspended liquid-crystal films. In both geometries, samples exhibited bistability, demonstrating stable pyroelectric signals of different polarities at zero voltage. It is shown that a bistable cell based on a freely suspended film requires 40 times less energy expenditures as compared to the conventional sandwich-type cell.

  19. Hydrogen bonded columnar liquid crystals for nanostructured functional materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fitié, C.F.C.

    2010-01-01

    Many functional materials rely on a well-organized internal structure for their functional properties. The length scale of this organization can vary from the atomic level (e.g., piezoelectric crystals) to a macroscopic length scale exceeding the dimensions of individual molecules (e.g., porous

  20. How ionic species structure influences phase structure and transitions from protic ionic liquids to liquid crystals to crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaves, Tamar L; Broomhall, Hayden; Weerawardena, Asoka; Osborne, Dale A; Canonge, Bastien A; Drummond, Calum J

    2017-12-14

    The phase behaviour of n-alkylammonium (C6 to C16) nitrates and formates has been characterised using synchrotron small angle and wide angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), cross polarised optical microscopy (CPOM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The protic salts may exist as crystalline, liquid crystalline or ionic liquid materials depending on the alkyl chain length and temperature. n-Alkylammonium nitrates with n ≥ 6 form thermotropic liquid crystalline (LC) lamellar phases, whereas n ≥ 8 was required for the formate series to form this LC phase. The protic ionic liquid phase showed an intermediate length scale nanostructure resulting from the segregation of the polar and nonpolar components of the ionic liquid. This segregation was enhanced for longer n-alkyl chains, with a corresponding increase in the correlation length scale. The crystalline and liquid crystalline phases were both lamellar. Phase transition temperatures, lamellar d-spacings, and liquid correlation lengths for the n-alkylammonium nitrates and formates were compared with those for n-alkylammonium chlorides and n-alkylamines. Plateau regions in the liquid crystalline to liquid phase transition temperatures as a function of n for the n-alkylammonium nitrates and formates are consistent with hydrogen-bonding and cation-anion interactions between the ionic species dominating alkyl chain-chain van der Waals interactions, with the exception of the mid chained hexyl- and heptylammonium formates. The d-spacings of the lamellar phases for both the n-alkylammonium nitrates and formates were consistent with an increase in chain-chain layer interdigitation within the bilayer-based lamellae with increasing alkyl chain length, and they were comparable to the n-alkylammonium chlorides.

  1. Thermalization calorimetry: A simple method for investigating glass transition and crystallization of supercooled liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Bo; Sanz, Alejandro; Niss, Kristine

    2016-01-01

    and their crystallization, e.g., for locating the glass transition and melting point(s), as well as for investigating the stability against crystallization and estimating the relative change in specific heat between the solid and liquid phases at the glass transition......We present a simple method for fast and cheap thermal analysis on supercooled glass-forming liquids. This “Thermalization Calorimetry” technique is based on monitoring the temperature and its rate of change during heating or cooling of a sample for which the thermal power input comes from heat...

  2. Stability of equilibrium states in finite samples of smectic C* liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, I W

    2005-01-01

    Equilibrium solutions for a sample of ferroelectric smectic C (SmC*) liquid crystal in the 'bookshelf' geometry under the influence of a tilted electric field will be presented. A linear stability criterion is identified and used to confirm stability for typical materials possessing either positive or negative dielectric anisotropy. The theoretical response times for perturbations to the equilibrium solutions are calculated numerically and found to be consistent with estimates for response times in ferroelectric smectic C liquid crystals reported elsewhere in the literature for non-tilted fields

  3. Stability of equilibrium states in finite samples of smectic C* liquid crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, I W [Department of Mathematics, University of Strathclyde, Livingstone Tower, 26 Richmond Street, Glasgow G1 1XH (United Kingdom)

    2005-03-04

    Equilibrium solutions for a sample of ferroelectric smectic C (SmC*) liquid crystal in the 'bookshelf' geometry under the influence of a tilted electric field will be presented. A linear stability criterion is identified and used to confirm stability for typical materials possessing either positive or negative dielectric anisotropy. The theoretical response times for perturbations to the equilibrium solutions are calculated numerically and found to be consistent with estimates for response times in ferroelectric smectic C liquid crystals reported elsewhere in the literature for non-tilted fields.

  4. Geometric methods in the elastic theory of membranes in liquid crystal phases

    CERN Document Server

    Ji Xing Liu; Yu Zhang Xie

    1999-01-01

    This book contains a comprehensive description of the mechanical equilibrium and deformation of membranes as a surface problem in differential geometry. Following the pioneering work by W Helfrich, the fluid membrane is seen as a nematic or smectic - A liquid crystal film and its elastic energy form is deduced exactly from the curvature elastic theory of the liquid crystals. With surface variation the minimization of the energy at fixed osmotical pressure and surface tension gives a completely new surface equation in geometry that involves potential interest in mathematics. The investigations

  5. Optical security devices using nonuniform schlieren texture of UV-curable nematic liquid crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Keizo; Ohtsubo, Junji

    2016-02-10

    We proposed and quantitatively evaluated an optical security device that provides nonuniform or random patterns of schlieren texture in nematic liquid crystal as unique identification information with a design by employing computer image processing and normalized cross correlation. Using the same photomask as the first author's university logo, the written patterns, which were composed of polymerized isotropic areas and polymerized nematic areas, were stable among different cells. Judging from the maximum correlation coefficient of 0.09, the patterns of the schlieren texture were unique in different cells. These results indicate that photocurable nematic liquid crystal materials have the potential to be applied to security devices for anticounterfeiting measures.

  6. Smart window using a thermally and optically switchable liquid crystal cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seung-Won; Kim, Sang-Hyeok; Baek, Jong-Min; Yoon, Tae-Hoon

    2018-02-01

    Light shutter technologies that can control optical transparency have been studied extensively for developing curtain-free smart windows. We introduce thermally and optically switchable light shutters using LCs doped with push-pull azobenzene, which is known to speed up thermal relaxation. The liquid crystal light shutter can be switched between translucent and transparent states or transparent and opaque states by phase transition through changing temperature or photo-isomerization of doped azobenzene. The liquid crystal light shutter can be used for privacy windows with an initial translucent state or energy-saving windows with an initial transparent state.

  7. Theoretical study of the slow neutron coherent scattering by nemanic liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugakov, V.I.; Shiyanovskij, S.V.

    1982-01-01

    An exact expression is obtained for neutron coherent quasielastic scattering cross section in nematic liquid crystals. Expressions are analyzed or big and small values of scattering wave vector. In the first case scattering is occured on the separate molecules and the account of the molecule form noncylindricity is to be essential. In the second case an intermolecular correlations contribute greatly to cross sections. A connection is found for pair correlation function with fluctuation for density, dipole moment and order parameters. The performed cross section analysis allow to determine the significant microscopic parameters of the nematic liquid crystal from the experimental data of slow neutron scattering

  8. Global solution to the 3D inhomogeneous nematic liquid crystal flows with variable density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xianpeng; Liu, Qiao

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the global existence and uniqueness of solution to the 3D inhomogeneous incompressible nematic liquid crystal flows with variable density in the framework of Besov spaces. It is proved that there exists a global and unique solution to the nematic liquid crystal flows if the initial data (ρ0 - 1 ,u0 ,n0 -e3) ∈ M (B˙p,1 3/p - 1 (R3)) × B˙p,1 3/p - 1 (R3) × B˙p,1 3/p (R3) with 1 ≤ p < 6, and satisfies

  9. HOLOGRAPHIC GRATING RECORDING IN “LYOTROPIC LIQUID CRYSTAL – VIOLOGEN” SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Bordyuh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the results of nonlinear optical experiment run on the samples of lyotropic liquid crystal (LLC with viologen admixtures. During the experiment we obtained dynamic grating recording on bilayered LLC-viologen samples and determined main characteristics of recoded gratings. It was found out that the recording takes place in a thin near-cathode coloured viologen layer. The analysis of kinetics of thermal gratings erasing showed that contribution of a thermal nonlinearity into general diffraction efficiency is negligible small. The last fact is connected with a separation of LLC-viologen samples under the action of an electric field and heat sink into the liquid crystal layer

  10. Electrically tunable Fabry-Péerot resonator based on microstructured Si containing liquid crystal

    KAUST Repository

    Tolmachev, Vladimir A.; Melnikov, Vasily; Baldycheva, Anna V.; Berwick, Kevin; Perova, Tatiana S.

    2012-01-01

    We have built Fabry-Perot resonators based on microstructured silicon and a liquid crystal. The devices exhibit tuning of the resonance peaks over a wide range, with relative spectral shifts of up to Delta lambda/lambda = 10%. In order to achieve this substantial spectral shift, cavity peaks of high order were used. Under applied voltages of up to 15 V, a variation in the refractive index of the nematic liquid crystal E7 from Delta n(LC) = 0.12 to Delta n(LC) = 0.17 was observed. These results may have practical applications in the near-, mid and far-infrared range.

  11. A finite element beam propagation method for simulation of liquid crystal devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanbrabant, Pieter J M; Beeckman, Jeroen; Neyts, Kristiaan; James, Richard; Fernandez, F Anibal

    2009-06-22

    An efficient full-vectorial finite element beam propagation method is presented that uses higher order vector elements to calculate the wide angle propagation of an optical field through inhomogeneous, anisotropic optical materials such as liquid crystals. The full dielectric permittivity tensor is considered in solving Maxwell's equations. The wide applicability of the method is illustrated with different examples: the propagation of a laser beam in a uniaxial medium, the tunability of a directional coupler based on liquid crystals and the near-field diffraction of a plane wave in a structure containing micrometer scale variations in the transverse refractive index, similar to the pixels of a spatial light modulator.

  12. A new method of liquid crystal thermometry excluding human color sensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunugi, Tomoaki; Akino, Norio; Ueda, Masaharu.

    1987-01-01

    Some choresteric liquid crystals can be used as a thermometer because of their color changes with varying temperatures. However, it is impossible to employ human color sensation for precise quantitative evaluation of temperature from their color. Therefore, a new method of liquid crystal thermometry is developed using narrow band optical filters and an image processor to exclude the employment of human color sensation. Relations between filter wavelength and temperature were determined by calibration tests. Two dimensional temperature distributions on a heated plate were successfully measured by the present method. (author)

  13. Memory effect of polymer dispersed liquid crystal by hybridization with nanoclay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The electro-optical performances of polymer dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC were investigated in the presence of organically modified clays. With the addition and increasing amount of modified clay, driving voltage and memory effect, viz. transparent state of the film after the electricity is off simultaneously increased due most likely to the increased viscosity. Among the two types of modifier, 4-(4-aminophenyl benzonitrile having greater chemical affinity with LC than hexylamine, gave finer dispersion of clay in liquid crystal, greater viscosity, larger driving voltage and response time, and greater memory effect.

  14. Optical Manipulation of Shape-Morphing Elastomeric Liquid Crystal Microparticles Doped with Gold Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Y. R.; Evans, J. S.; Lee, T.; Senyuk, B.; Keller, P.; He, S. L.; Smalyukh, I. I.

    2012-06-11

    We demonstrate facile optical manipulation of shape of birefringent colloidal microparticles made from liquid crystal elastomers. Using soft lithography and polymerization, we fabricate elastomeric microcylinders with weakly undulating director oriented on average along their long axes. These particles are infiltrated with gold nanospheres acting as heat transducers that allow for an efficient localized transfer of heat from a focused infrared laser beam to a submicrometer region within a microparticle. Photothermal control of ordering in the liquid crystal elastomer using scanned beams allows for a robust control of colloidal particles, enabling both reversible and irreversible changes of shape. Possible applications include optomechanics, microfluidics, and reconfigurable colloidal composites with shape-dependent self-assembly.

  15. Scanning conoscopy measurement of the optical properties of chiral smectic liquid crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitri, N. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Molle Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, 2092 El Manar TUNIS (Tunisia); Centre de Recherches Paul Pascal, 115, Av. Albert-Schweitzer, 33600 Pessac (France)], E-mail: bitri@crpp-bordeaux.cnrs.fr; Gharbi, A. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Molle Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, 2092 El Manar TUNIS (Tunisia); Marcerou, J.P. [Centre de Recherches Paul Pascal, 115, Av. Albert-Schweitzer, 33600 Pessac (France)

    2008-11-30

    We report on a new scanning conoscopic method which, by rotating the sample and analyzing the ellipticity of transmitted light, provides an accurate tool to measure the temperature dependence of the two indices n{sub e}, n{sub o} and of the optical activity for uniaxial liquid crystals. Their determination is useful to give informations about the tilt angle {theta} and the macroscopic helicity in the different phases and then on the structures of the liquid crystal phases. We tested the method with the reference compound (99% S, 1% R)MHPOBC.

  16. Indium-tin oxide surface treatments: Effects on the performance of liquid crystal devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abderrahmen, A.; Romdhane, F.F.; Ben Ouada, H.; Gharbi, A.

    2006-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the effect of indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate cleaning on the surface properties. Wettability technique was used to measure the contact angle and the surface energy of the different treated ITO substrates. It is found that treatment with the methanol without dehydration gives the lowest water contact angle (most hydrophilic surface) and the highest surface energy compared to other solvents. This result was confirmed by impedance measurements performed on nematic liquid crystal cells with ITO electrodes. Indeed, we check the decrease of ionic entities in the interface ITO/liquid crystal. The polarity and dielectric parameters of the used solvents explain the obtained results

  17. Indium-tin oxide surface treatments: Effects on the performance of liquid crystal devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abderrahmen, A. [Laboratoire de physique et chimie des interfaces, Faculte des sciences, 5000, Monastir (Tunisia)]. E-mail: asma_abderrahmen@yahoo.fr; Romdhane, F.F. [Laboratoire de la matiere molle, Faculte des sciences, Tunis (Tunisia); Ben Ouada, H. [Laboratoire de physique et chimie des interfaces, Faculte des sciences, 5000, Monastir (Tunisia); Gharbi, A. [Laboratoire de la matiere molle, Faculte des sciences, Tunis (Tunisia)

    2006-03-15

    In this work, we investigate the effect of indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate cleaning on the surface properties. Wettability technique was used to measure the contact angle and the surface energy of the different treated ITO substrates. It is found that treatment with the methanol without dehydration gives the lowest water contact angle (most hydrophilic surface) and the highest surface energy compared to other solvents. This result was confirmed by impedance measurements performed on nematic liquid crystal cells with ITO electrodes. Indeed, we check the decrease of ionic entities in the interface ITO/liquid crystal. The polarity and dielectric parameters of the used solvents explain the obtained results.

  18. Lyotropic liquid crystal preconcentrates for the treatment of periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehér, A; Urbán, E; Eros, I; Szabó-Révész, P; Csányi, E

    2008-06-24

    The aim of our study was to develop water-free lyotropic liquid crystalline preconcentrates, which consist of oils and surfactants with good physiological tolerance and spontaneously form lyotropic liquid crystalline phase in aqueous environment. In this way these preconcentrates having low viscosity can be injected into the periodontal pocket, where they are transformed into highly viscous liquid crystalline phase, so that the preparation is prevented from flowing out of the pocket due to its great viscosity, while drug release is controlled by the liquid crystalline texture. In order to follow the structure alteration upon water absorption polarization microscopical and rheological examinations were performed. The water absorption mechanism of the samples was examined by the Enslin-method. Metronidazole-benzoate was used as active agent the release of which was characterized via in vitro investigations performed by means of modified Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. On the grounds of the results it can be stated that the 4:1 mixture of the investigated surfactants (Cremophor EL, Cremophor RH40) and oil (Miglyol 810) formed lyotopic liquid crystalline phases upon water addition. Polarization microscopic examinations showed that samples with 10-40% water content possessed anisotropic properties. On the basis of water absorption, rheological and drug release studies it can be concluded that the amount of absorbed water and stiffness of lyotropic structure influenced by the chemical entity of the surfactant exerted major effect on the drug release.

  19. Liquid gallium cooling of silicon crystals in high intensity photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smither, R.K.; Forster, G.A.; Bilderback, D.H.; Bedzyk, M.; Finkelstein, K.; Henderson, C.; White, J.; Berman, L.E.; Stefan, P.; Oversluizen, T.

    1989-01-01

    The high-brilliance, insertion-device-based photon beams of the next generation of synchrotron sources (Argonne's APS and Grenoble's ESRF) will deliver large thermal loads (1--10 kW) to the first optical elements. Considering the problems that present synchrotron users are experiencing with beams from recently installed insertion devices, new and improved methods of cooling these first optical elements, particularly when they are diffraction crystals, are clearly needed. A series of finite element calculations were performed to test the efficiency of new cooling geometries and various cooling fluids. The best results were obtained with liquid Ga metal flowing in channels just below the surface of the crystal. Ga was selected because of its good thermal conductivity and thermal capacity, low melting point, high boiling point, low kinetic viscosity, and very low vapor pressure. Its very low vapor pressure, even at elevated temperatures, makes it especially attractive in UHV conditions. A series of experiments were conducted at CHESS in February of 1988 that compared liquid gallium-cooled silicon diffraction crystals with water-cooled crystals. A six-pole wiggler beam was used to perform these tests on three different Si crystals, two with new cooling geometries and the one presently in use. A special high-pressure electromagnetic induction pump, recently developed at Argonne, was used to circulate the liquid gallium through the silicon crystals. In all experiments, the specially cooled crystal was used as the first crystal in a two crystal monochromator. An infrared camera was used to monitor the thermal profiles and correlated them with rocking curve measurements. A second set of cooling experiments were conducted in June of 1988 that used the intense, highly collimated beam from the newly installed ANL/CHESS undulator

  20. Aligned silane-treated MWCNT/liquid crystal polymer films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervini, Raoul; Simon, George P; Ginic-Markovic, Milena; Matisons, Janis G; Huynh, Chi; Hawkins, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    We report on a method to preferentially align multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in a liquid crystalline matrix to form stable composite thin films. The liquid crystalline monomeric chains can be crosslinked to form acrylate bridges, thereby retaining the nanotube alignment. Further post-treatment by ozone etching of the composite films leads to an increase in bulk conductivity, leading to higher emission currents when examined under conducting scanning probe microscopy. The described methodology may facilitate device manufacture where electron emission from nanosized tips is important in the creation of new display devices

  1. Alkyltributylphosphonium chloride ionic liquids: synthesis, physicochemical properties and crystal structure

    OpenAIRE

    Adamova, Gabriela; Gardas, Ramesh L.; Nieuwenhuyzen, Mark; Vaca Puga, Alberto; Rebelo, Luis Paulo N.; Robertson, Allan J.; Seddon, Kenneth R.

    2012-01-01

    A series of alkyltributylphosphonium chloride ionic liquids, prepared from tributylphosphine and the respective 1-chloroalkane, CnH2n+1Cl (where n = 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12 or 14), is reported. This work is a continuation of an extended series of tetraalkylphosphonium ionic liquids, where the focus is on the variability of n and its impact on the physical properties, such as melting points/glass transitions, thermal stability, density and viscosity. Experimental density and viscosit...

  2. Liquid crystal droplet formation and anchoring dynamics in a microfluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhaus, Ben; Shen, Amy; Feng, James; Link, Darren

    2004-11-01

    Liquid crystal drops dispersed in a continuous phase of silicon oil are generated with a narrow distribution in droplet size in microfluidic devices both above and below the nematic to isotropic transition temperature. For these two cases, we observe not only the different LC droplet generation and coalescence dynamics, but also distinct droplet morphology. Our experiments show that the nematic liquid crystalline order is important for the LC droplet formation and anchoring dynamics.

  3. High-Q silicon-on-insulator slot photonic crystal cavity infiltrated by a liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caër, Charles; Le Roux, Xavier; Cassan, Eric

    2013-01-01

    We report the experimental realization of a high-Q slot photonic crystal cavity in Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) configuration infiltrated by a liquid. Loaded Q-factor of 23 000 is measured at telecom wavelength. The intrinsic quality factor inferred from the transmission spectrum is higher than 200 000, which represents a record value for slot photonic crystal cavities on SOI, whereas the maximum of intensity of the cavity is roughly equal to 20% of the light transmitted in the waveguide. This result makes filled slot photonic crystal cavities very promising for silicon-based light emission and ultrafast nonlinear optics

  4. Conductive Hybrid Crystal Composed from Polyoxomolybdate and Deprotonatable Ionic-Liquid Surfactant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Kobayashi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A polyoxomolybdate inorganic-organic hybrid crystal was synthesized with deprotonatable ionic-liquid surfactant. 1-dodecylimidazolium cation was employed for its synthesis. The hybrid crystal contained δ-type octamolybdate (Mo8 isomer, and possessed alternate stacking of Mo8 monolayers and interdigitated surfactant bilayers. The crystal structure was compared with polyoxomolybdate hybrid crystals comprising 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium surfactant, which preferred β-type Mo8 isomer. The less bulky hydrophilic moiety of the 1-dodecylimidazolium interacted with the δ-Mo8 anion by N–H···O hydrogen bonds, which presumably induced the formation of the δ-Mo8 anion. Anhydrous conductivity of the hybrid crystal was estimated to be 5.5 × 10−6 S·cm−1 at 443 K by alternating current (AC impedance spectroscopy.

  5. Fractional Wigner Crystal in the Helical Luttinger Liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso Ziani, N; Crépin, F; Trauzettel, B

    2015-11-13

    The properties of the strongly interacting edge states of two dimensional topological insulators in the presence of two-particle backscattering are investigated. We find an anomalous behavior of the density-density correlation functions, which show oscillations that are neither of Friedel nor of Wigner type: they, instead, represent a Wigner crystal of fermions of fractional charge e/2, with e the electron charge. By studying the Fermi operator, we demonstrate that the state characterized by such fractional oscillations still bears the signatures of spin-momentum locking. Finally, we compare the spin-spin correlation functions and the density-density correlation functions to argue that the fractional Wigner crystal is characterized by a nontrivial spin texture.

  6. Bidimensional distortion in ferroelectric liquid crystals with strong ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    characterized by bistability and optical memory in the surface-stabilized bookshelf [2,3] ... tic layers, which lies in a plane parallel to the cell walls (see figure 1). Up to now ... Theory. We consider a liquid crystalline material exhibiting ferroelectric phase organized in book- ... By applying an external electric field Eext along.

  7. Lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals as materials for optical and biosensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortora, L.; Park, H.-S.; Antion, K.; Finotello, D.; Lavrentovich, O. D.

    2007-02-01

    Lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals (LCLCs) are formed by molecules with rigid polyaromatic cores and ionic groups at the periphery that form aggregates while in water. Most of the LCLCs are not toxic to the biological cells and can be used as an amplifying medium in real-time biosensors. The detector is based on the principle that the immune aggregates growing in the LCLC bulk trigger the director distortions. Self-assembly of LCLC molecules into oriented structures allows one to use them in various structured films. For example, layer-by-layer electrostatic deposition produces monomolecular layers and stacks of layers of LCLC with long-range in-plane orientational order which sets them apart from the standard Langmuir-Blodgett films. We demonstrate that divalent and multivalent salts as well as acidic and basic materials that alter pH of the LCLC water solutions, are drastically modifying the phase diagrams of LCLC, from shifting the phase transition temperatures by tens of degrees, to causing condensation of the LCLC aggregates into more compact structures, such as birefringent bundles or formation of a columnar hexagonal phase from the nematic phase.

  8. Can pharmaceutical co-crystals provide an opportunity to modify the biological properties of drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalpiaz, Alessandro; Pavan, Barbara; Ferretti, Valeria

    2017-08-01

    Poorly soluble and/or permeable molecules jeopardize the discovery and development of innovative medicines. Pharmaceutical co-crystals, formed by an active pharmaceutical substance (API) and a co-crystal former, can show enhanced dissolution and permeation values compared with those of the parent crystalline pure phases. It is currently assumed that co-crystallization with pharmaceutical excipients does not affect the pharmacological activity of an API or, indeed, might even improve physical properties such as solubility and permeability. However, as we highlight here, the biological behavior of co-crystals can differ drastically with respect to that of their parent physical mixtures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Relation between anchorings of liquid crystals and conformation changes in aligning agents by the Langmuir-Blodgett film technique investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Y.; Lu, Z.; Wei, Y.

    1995-01-01

    The anchoring direction of liquid crystals on a solid substrate surface depends upon many parameters characterizing the liquid-crystal--substrate interface, a variation of which may change this anchoring direction leading to the so-called anchoring transition. Here, based on the Langmuir-Blodgett film technique, we present two model systems to study the relation between anchoring directions and the conformation changes in aligning agents. A double-armed crown ether liquid crystal and a side chain polymer liquid crystal at an air-water interface both show phase transitions, accompanied by conformation changes. However, when the monolayers in different phases were transferred onto solid substrates to orient liquid crystals, we found that for the crown ether material the conformation change can alter the anchoring of liquid crystals between homeotropic and homogeneous alignments, while for the polymer liquid crystal, despite the conformation changes, the liquid crystals can only be aligned homeotropically. The involved mechanisms were briefly discussed in terms of the Landau-type phenomenological theory

  10. Crystal Nucleation and Polymorph Control : Self-­association, Template Nucleation, Liquid?Liquid, phase Separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulkarni, S.

    2014-01-01

    Crystallization is an essential step in many processes in chemical industries, ranging from bulk chemicals to special products. It is a separation and purification technique that results in a solid particulate product, which is generally preferred in the pharmaceutical industry. The crystal product

  11. Alignment control of columnar liquid crystals with wavelength tunable CO2 laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monobe, Hirosato; Awazu, Kunio; Shimizu, Yo

    2008-01-01

    Infrared-induced alignment change with wavelength tunable CO 2 laser irradiation for columnar liquid crystal domains was investigated for a liquid crystalline triphenylene derivative. A uniformly aligned alignment change of domains was observed when a chopped linearly polarized infrared laser light corresponding to the wavelength of the aromatic C-O-C stretching vibration band (9.65 μm) was irradiated. The results strongly imply that the infrared irradiation is a possible technique for device fabrication by use of columnar mesophase as a liquid crystalline semiconductor

  12. Theoretically informed Monte Carlo simulation of liquid crystals by sampling of alignment-tensor fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armas-Pérez, Julio C.; Londono-Hurtado, Alejandro [Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Guzmán, Orlando [Departamento de Física, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, Iztapalapa, DF 09340, México (Mexico); Hernández-Ortiz, Juan P. [Departamento de Materiales y Minerales, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Medellín, Medellín (Colombia); Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Pablo, Juan J. de, E-mail: depablo@uchicago.edu [Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2015-07-28

    A theoretically informed coarse-grained Monte Carlo method is proposed for studying liquid crystals. The free energy functional of the system is described in the framework of the Landau-de Gennes formalism. The alignment field and its gradients are approximated by finite differences, and the free energy is minimized through a stochastic sampling technique. The validity of the proposed method is established by comparing the results of the proposed approach to those of traditional free energy minimization techniques. Its usefulness is illustrated in the context of three systems, namely, a nematic liquid crystal confined in a slit channel, a nematic liquid crystal droplet, and a chiral liquid crystal in the bulk. It is found that for systems that exhibit multiple metastable morphologies, the proposed Monte Carlo method is generally able to identify lower free energy states that are often missed by traditional approaches. Importantly, the Monte Carlo method identifies such states from random initial configurations, thereby obviating the need for educated initial guesses that can be difficult to formulate.

  13. Theoretically informed Monte Carlo simulation of liquid crystals by sampling of alignment-tensor fields.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armas-Perez, Julio C.; Londono-Hurtado, Alejandro; Guzman, Orlando; Hernandez-Ortiz, Juan P.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-07-27

    A theoretically informed coarse-grained Monte Carlo method is proposed for studying liquid crystals. The free energy functional of the system is described in the framework of the Landau-de Gennes formalism. The alignment field and its gradients are approximated by finite differences, and the free energy is minimized through a stochastic sampling technique. The validity of the proposed method is established by comparing the results of the proposed approach to those of traditional free energy minimization techniques. Its usefulness is illustrated in the context of three systems, namely, a nematic liquid crystal confined in a slit channel, a nematic liquid crystal droplet, and a chiral liquid crystal in the bulk. It is found that for systems that exhibit multiple metastable morphologies, the proposed Monte Carlo method is generally able to identify lower free energy states that are often missed by traditional approaches. Importantly, the Monte Carlo method identifies such states from random initial configurations, thereby obviating the need for educated initial guesses that can be difficult to formulate.

  14. H-1 NMR relaxometric study of molecular dynamics in a "de Vries" liquid crystal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gradišek, A.; Domenici, V.; Apih, T.; Novotná, Vladimíra; Sebastiao, P.J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 20 (2016), s. 4706-4714 ISSN 1520-6106 Grant - others:AVČR(CZ) M100101204 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : liquid crystals Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials Impact factor: 3.177, year: 2016

  15. Xenon NMR of liquid crystals confined to cylindrical nanocavities: a simulation study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Karjalainen, J.; Vaara, J.; Straka, Michal; Lantto, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 11 (2015), s. 7158-7171 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-03564S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : 129Xe NMR * liquid crystals * cylindrical cavities * phase transition s * Monte-Carlo simulations Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.449, year: 2015

  16. Photolithography of thick photoresist coating for electrically controlled liquid crystal photonic bandgap fibre devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Lei; Khomtchenko, Elena; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard

    2009-01-01

    Thick photoresist coating for electrode patterning in an anisotropically etched V-groove is investigated for electrically controlled liquid crystal photonic bandgap fibre devices. The photoresist step coverage at the convex corners is compared with and without soft baking after photoresist spin...

  17. A Cost-Effective Optical Device for the Characterization of Liquid Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millier, Brian; Aleman Milán, Gianna

    2014-01-01

    The design and construction of an apparatus to measure the optical birefringence of a liquid crystal is described. The instrument also includes temperature control and monitoring circuitry to allow for the measurement of the nematic-to-isotropic phase transition temperature. An important feature of this design is that the students are able to…

  18. New banana-type liquid crystal with a methoxy group substituted near the central ring

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kašpar, Miroslav; Hamplová, Věra; Novotná, Vladimíra; Glogarová, Milada; Vaněk, Přemysl

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 12, - (2002), s. 2221-2224 ISSN 0959-9428 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : bent-shaped liquid crystal * nm-chiral * B 2 phase Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.683, year: 2002

  19. Conductive properties of switchable photoluminescence thermosetting systems based on liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tercjak, Agnieszka; Gutierrez, Junkal; Ocando, Connie; Mondragon, Iñaki

    2010-03-16

    Conductive properties of different thermosetting materials modified with nematic 4'-(hexyl)-4-biphenyl-carbonitrile (HBC) liquid crystal and rutile TiO(2) nanoparticles were successfully studied by means of tunneling atomic force miscroscopy (TUNA). Taking into account the liquid crystal state of the HBC at room temperature, depending on both the HBC content and the presence of TiO(2) nanoparticles, designed materials showed different TUNA currents passed through the sample. The addition of TiO(2) nanoparticles into the systems multiply the detected current if compared to the thermosetting systems without TiO(2) nanoparticles and simultaneously stabilized the current passed through the sample, making the process reversible since the absolute current values were almost the same applying both negative and positive voltage. Moreover, thermosetting systems modified with liquid crystals with and without TiO(2) nanoparticles are photoluminescence switchable materials as a function of temperature gradient during repeatable heating/cooling cycle. Conductive properties of switchable photoluminescence thermosetting systems based on liquid crystals can allow them to find potential application in the field of photoresponsive devices, with a high contrast ratio between transparent and opaque states.

  20. Broadband reflection of polymer-stabilized chiral nematic liquid crystals induced by a chiral azobenzene compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xingwu; Wang, Ling; Chen, Yinjie; Li, Chenyue; Hou, Guoyan; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Xiaoguang; He, Wanli; Yang, Huai

    2014-01-21

    A chiral nematic liquid crystal-photopolymerizable monomer-chiral azobenzene compound composite was prepared and then polymerized under UV irradiation. The reflection wavelength of the composite can be extended to cover the 1000-2400 nm range and also be adjusted to the visible light region by controlling the concentration of chiral compounds.

  1. Functional organic materials based on polymerized liquid-crystal monomers: supramolecular hydrogen-bonded systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broer, D.J.; Bastiaansen, C.W.M.; Debije, M.G.; Schenning, A.P.H.J.

    2012-01-01

    Functional organic materials are of great interest for a variety of applications. To obtain precise functional properties, well-defined hierarchically ordered supramolecular materials are crucial. The self-assembly of liquid crystals has proven to be an extremely useful tool in the development of

  2. A new polymer electrolyte based on a discotic liquid crystal triblock copolymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoeva, Zlatka; Lu, Zhibao; Ingram, Malcolm D.; Imrie, Corrie T.

    2013-01-01

    A discotic liquid crystal triblock copolymer consisting of a central main chain triphenylene-based liquid crystal block capped at both ends by blocks of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) (M W = 2000 g mol −1 ) has been doped with lithium perchlorate in an EO:Li 6:1 ratio. The polymer electrolyte exhibits a phase separated morphology consisting of a columnar hexagonal liquid crystal phase and PEO-rich regions. The polymer electrolyte forms self-supporting, solid-like films. The ionic conductivity on initial heating of the sample is very low below ca. 60 °C but increases rapidly above this temperature. This is attributed to the melting of crystalline PEO-rich regions. Crystallisation is suppressed on cooling, and subsequent heating cycles exhibit higher conductivities but still less than those measured for the corresponding lithium perchlorate complex in poly(ethylene glycol) (M W = 2000 g mol −1 ). Instead the triblock copolymer mimics the behaviour of high molecular weight poly(ethylene oxide) (M W = 300,000 g mol −1 ). This is attributed, in part, to the anchoring of the short PEG chains to the liquid crystal block which prevents their diffusion through the sample. Temperature and pressure variations in ion mobility indicate that the ion transport mechanism in the new material is closely related to that in the conventional PEO-based electrolyte, opening up the possibility of engineering enhanced conductivities in future

  3. The cone phase of liquid crystals: Triangular lattice of double-tilt ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (figure 3) and analyse the mechanism which stabilizes it. Liquid crystals are soft ... There is no change in the smectic layer spacing along .... with the case of blue phases of cubic symmetry where the pitch of the helix provides a natural length ...

  4. Visualizing Molecular Chirality in the Organic Chemistry Laboratory Using Cholesteric Liquid Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, Maia; Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Hartley, C. Scott

    2016-01-01

    Although stereochemistry is an important topic in second-year undergraduate organic chemistry, there are limited options for laboratory activities that allow direct visualization of macroscopic chiral phenomena. A novel, guided-inquiry experiment was developed that allows students to explore chirality in the context of cholesteric liquid crystals.…

  5. Microchannel-flowed-plasma modification of octadecyltrichlorosilane self-assembled-monolayers for liquid crystal alignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, W.; Chiang, C.-Y.; Underwood, I.

    2013-01-01

    We report that a chemical patterning technique based on local plasma modification of self-assembled monolayers has been utilized to fabricate surfaces for domain liquid crystal alignment. Highly hydrophobic octadecyltrichlorosilane monolayers deposited on glass substrates coated with Indium-Tin-Oxide were brought into contact with elastomeric stamps comprising trenches on a micro scale, and then exposed to an oxygen plasma. In the regions exposed to the plasma the monolayer was etched away leaving a patterned surface that exhibited surface energy differences between surface domains. The surfaces that bear the micropatterns have been shown to be capable of producing patterned alignment of nematic liquid crystal. - Highlights: • Chemical surface-patterning is used to fabricate liquid crystal alignment surface. • Highly hydrophobic octadecyltrichlorosilane monolayer is deposited on substrate. • O 2 plasma flow is used to etch the monolayer to form patterned surface. • The patterned surface exhibits surface energy differences between surface domains. • The surface borne the micropatterns is capable of domain liquid crystal alignment

  6. Nonlinear absorption of fullerene- and nanotubes-doped liquid crystal systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kamanina, N.; Reshak, Ali H; Vasiliev, P.Y.; Vangonen, A. I.; Studeonov, V. I.; Usanov, Y. E.; Ebothe, J.; Gondek, E.; Wojcik, W.; Danel, A.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 3 (2009), s. 391-394 ISSN 1386-9477 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : nonlinear absorption properties * organic electrooptical systems * liquid crystal * fullerene s * nanotubes * PVK-derivatives Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.177, year: 2009

  7. Electro-optical effect of a magnetically biased ferronematic liquid crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S H; Liang, B J

    1988-09-01

    The electro-optical effect of a magnetically biased ferronematic liquid-crystal film is investigated by using birefringence measurements. When a magnetic field is applied, the threshold voltage of the Freedericksz transition no longer exists. The dependence of the birefringence on the magnetic field strength in the low field regime is presented. A theory that accounts for the results is given.

  8. Synthesis of guanidinium–sulfonimide ion pairs: towards novel ionic liquid crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Butschies

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The recently introduced concept of ionic liquid crystals (ILCs with complementary ion pairs, consisting of both, mesogenic cation and anion, was extended from guanidinium sulfonates to guanidinium sulfonimides. In this preliminary study, the synthesis and mesomorphic properties of selected derivatives were described, which provide the first example of an ILC with the sulfonimide anion directly attached to the mesogenic unit.

  9. Photoaligning and Photopatterning — A New Challenge in Liquid Crystal Photonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir G. Chigrinov

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Photoalignment possesses obvious advantages in comparison with the usually “rubbing” treatment of the substrates of liquid crystal display (LCD cells. The application of the photoalignment and photopatterning nanotechnology for the new generation of photonic and display devices will be reviewed.

  10. Interfacial ordering of thermotropic liquid crystals triggered by the secondary structures of oligopeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Yang, Pei; Mondiot, Frederic; Li, Yaoxin; Miller, Daniel S; Chen, Zhan; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2015-12-07

    We report that assemblies formed by eight oligopeptides at phospholipid-decorated interfaces of thermotropic liquid crystals (LCs) trigger changes in ordering of the LCs that are dependent on the secondary structures of the oligopeptides (as characterized in situ using infrared-visible sum-frequency spectroscopy).

  11. Formation of tilted smectic-C liquid crystal phase in polar Gay-Berne molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, J.; Bose, T.R.; Ghosh, D.; Saha, M.

    2005-01-01

    We perform molecular dynamics simulation for a system of Gay-Berne molecules having two terminal dipole moments to generate tilted smectic-C liquid crystal phase. We investigate the effect of dipolar orientation with respect to the long molecular axis on phase behaviour. The study indicates that larger dipolar angle can give rise to greater tilt in molecular organization within a layer

  12. Blazed vector gratings fabricated using photosensitive polymer liquid crystals and control of polarization diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Hiroshi; Kuzuwata, Mitsuru; Sasaki, Tomoyuki; Noda, Kohei; Kawatsuki, Nobuhiro

    2014-03-01

    The blazed vector grating possessing antisymmetric distributions of the birefringence were fabricated by exposing the line-focused linearly polarized ultraviolet light on the photosensitive polymer liquid crystals. The polarization states of the diffraction beams can be highly and widely controlled by designing the blazed structures, and the diffraction properties were well-explained by Jones calculus.

  13. Drag of a Cottrell atmosphere by an edge dislocation in a smectic-A liquid crystal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Oswald, P.; Lejček, Lubor

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 10 (2017), s. 84-93 ISSN 1292-8941 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : soft matter * liquid crystal Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics OBOR OECD: Atomic, molecular and chemical physics (physics of atoms and molecules including collision, interaction with radiation, magnetic resonances, Mössbauer effect) Impact factor: 1.464, year: 2016

  14. Numerical study of liquid crystal elastomers by a mixed finite element method

    KAUST Repository

    LUO, C.; CALDERER, M. C.

    2011-01-01

    Liquid crystal elastomers present features not found in ordinary elastic materials, such as semi-soft elasticity and the related stripe domain phenomenon. In this paper, the two-dimensional Bladon-Terentjev-Warner model and the one-constant Oseen

  15. Simultaneous alignment and dispersion of carbon nanotubes with lyotropic liquid crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagerwall, J.P.F.; Scalia, G.; Haluska, M.; Dettlaff-Weglikowska, U.; Giesselmann, F.; Roth, S.

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate that single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) can be macroscopically aligned by means of templating in a lyotropic nematic liquid crystal (LC), a self-assembling anisotropic fluid with orientational but no translational order. The CNTs spontaneously adopt the alignment of the host, as we

  16. Alloy hardening of a smectic A liquid crystal doped with gold nanoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Oswald, P.; Milette, J.; Relaix, S.; Reven, L.; Dequidt, A.; Lejček, Lubor

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 103, AUG (2013), "46004-p1"-"46004-p6" ISSN 0295-5075 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : smectic A liquid crystals * gold nanoparticles * edge dislocation * precipitation hardening Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 2.269, year: 2013

  17. Alcohol-responsive, hydrogen-bonded, cholesteric liquid-crystal networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, C.; Bastiaansen, C.W.M.; Broer, D.J.; Kuo, H.-L.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen-bridged, cholesteric liquid-crystal (CLC) polymer networks are adopted as an optical sensor material to distinguish between ethanol and methanol. Fast uptake of the alcohols is facilitated by an incorporated porosity created by breaking the hydrogen bridges and by a previously removed

  18. Monotonicity of a Key Function Arised in Studies of Nematic Liquid Crystal Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyun Wang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We revisit a key function arised in studies of nematic liquid crystal polymers. Previously, it was conjectured that the function is strictly decreasing and the conjecture was numerically confirmed. Here we prove the conjecture analytically. More specifically, we write the derivative of the function into two parts and prove that each part is strictly negative.

  19. Tunable polarisation-maintaining filter based on liquid crystal photonic bandgap fibre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scolari, Lara; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Weirich, Johannes

    2008-01-01

    A tunable and polarisation-maintaining all-in-fibre filter based on a liquid crystal photonic bandgap fibre is demonstrated. Its polarisation extinction ratio reaches 14 dB at 1550 nm wavelength. Its spectral tunability range spans over 250 nm in the temperature range 30–70°C. The measured...

  20. Charge carrier transport in layers of discotic liquid crystals as studied by transient photocurrents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rybak, A.; Pfleger, Jiří; Jung, J. Y.; Pavlík, Martin; Glowacki, I.; Ulanski, J.; Tomovic, Z.; Müllen, K.; Geerts, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 156, 2-4 (2006), s. 302-309 ISSN 0379-6779 Grant - others:NANOFUN-POLY(PL) 5709/R04/R05 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : organic semiconductors * discotic liquid crystals * photoconductivity Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.685, year: 2006