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Sample records for biological labs frederick

  1. Frederick National Lab's Contribution to ATOM | FNLCR Staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    As a founding member organization of ATOM, the Frederick National Labwill contribute scientific expertise in precision oncology, computational chemistry and cancer biology, as well as support for open sharing of data sets and predictive modelin

  2. Frederick National Lab Supports Clinical Trials for Vaccine Against Mosquito-borne Chikungunya | FNLCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    An experimental vaccine for mosquito-borne chikungunya is being tested at sites in the Caribbean as part of a phase II clinical trial being managed by the Frederick National Lab. No vaccine or treatment currently exists for the viral disease, which c

  3. Frederick National Lab Rallies to Meet Demand for Zika Vaccine | FNLCR Staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research’s Vaccine Pilot Plant, part of the Vaccine Clinical Materials Program (VCMP), is helping researchers produce investigational Zika vaccines for a new round of clinical trials. The plant has been

  4. Frederick National Lab Encourages Healthy Living at the Annual In The Street Festival | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    While it was the pleasant weather, live music, and scores of vendors that drew thousands to Frederick’s 2017 In The Street festival, it was the eye-catching activities and prizes that drew attendees to the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research tent.

  5. Frederick National Lab Aids Liberian Hospitals Through Project C.U.R.E. | FNLCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    When Project C.U.R.E.'s much-needed medical supplies and equipment arrive in Liberia, the Frederick National Lab’s Kathryn Kynvin is there to receive and distribute the donations to hospitals who continue to treat survivors of the most recent Ebola

  6. Labs not in a lab: A case study of instructor and student perceptions of an online biology lab class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiron, Jessica Boyce

    Distance learning is not a new phenomenon but with the advancement in technology, the different ways of delivering an education have increased. Today, many universities and colleges offer their students the option of taking courses online instead of sitting in a classroom on campus. In general students like online classes because they allow for flexibility, the comfort of sitting at home, and the potential to save money. Even though there are advantages to taking online classes, many students and instructors still debate the effectiveness and quality of education in a distant learning environment. Many universities and colleges are receiving pressure from students to offer more and more classes online. Research argues for both the advantages and disadvantages of online classes and stresses the importance of colleges and universities weighing both sides before deciding to adopt an online class. Certain classes may not be suitable for online instruction and not all instructors are suitable to teach online classes. The literature also reveals that there is a need for more research on online biology lab classes. With the lack of information on online biology labs needed by science educators who face the increasing demand for online biology labs, this case study hopes to provide insight into the use of online biology lab classes and the how students and an instructor at a community college in Virginia perceive their online biology lab experience as well as the effectiveness of the online labs.

  7. Frederick National Laboratory's Contribution to ATOM | FNLCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    As a founding member organization of ATOM, the Frederick National Laboratory will contribute scientific expertise in precision oncology, computational chemistry and cancer biology, as well as support for open sharing of data sets and predictive model

  8. Rescuing Dogs in the Frederick Community | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many Frederick National Lab employees have a favorite cause to which they volunteer a significant amount of time. For Dianna Kelly, IT program manager/scientific program analyst, Office of Scientific Operations, and Courtney Kennedy, associate technical project manager, Business Enterprise Systems, that cause is dog rescue.

  9. Frederick Yi-Tung Cho (1939-2011) : His PhD days in Biophysics, the Photosynthesis Lab, and his patents in engineering physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindjee; Munday, John C; Papageorgiou, George C

    2017-06-01

    We present here a Tribute to Frederick Yi-Tung Cho (1939-2011), an innovative and ingenious biophysicist and an entrepreneur. He was one of the 4 earliest PhD students [see: Cederstrand (1965)-Carl Nelson Cederstrand; coadvisor: Eugene Rabinowitch; Papageorgiou (1968)-George C. Papageorgiou (coauthor of this paper); and Munday (1968)-John C. Munday Jr. (also a coauthor of this paper)] of one of us (Govindjee) in Biophysics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) during the late 1960s (1963-1968). Fred was best known, in the photosynthesis circle for his pioneering work on low temperature (down to liquid helium temperature, 4 K) absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy of photosynthetic systems; he showed temperature independence of excitation energy transfer from (i) chlorophyll (Chl) b to Chl a and (ii) from Chl a 670 to Chl a 678; and temperature dependence of energy transfer from the phycobilins to Chl a and from Chl a 678 to its suggested trap. After doing research in biophysics of photosynthesis, Fred shifted to do research in solid-state physics/engineering in the Government Electronics Division (Group) of the Motorola Company, Scottsdale, Arizona, from where he published research papers in that area and had several patents granted. We focus mainly on his days at the UIUC in context of the laboratory in which he worked. We also list some of his papers and most of his patents in engineering physics. His friends and colleagues have correctly described him as an innovator and an ingenious scientist of the highest order. On the personal side, he was a very easy-going and amiable individual.

  10. Bawden, Prof. Frederick Charles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1972 Honorary. Bawden, Prof. Frederick Charles. Date of birth: 18 August 1908. Date of death: 8 February 1972. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the Three Science Academies of ...

  11. Frederick M. Rener

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janez Stanonik

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available The editors of Acta Neophilologica announce deeply grieved the demise of one of their major coworkers, Professor Frederick M. Rener. He was one of those intellectuals who after the Second World War emigrated from  Slovenia to America where they made distinguished scholarly careers at the universities of Canada and United States.

  12. Hopkins, Prof. Frederick Gowland

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1935 Honorary. Hopkins, Prof. Frederick Gowland Nobel Laureate (Medicine) - 1929. Date of birth: 20 June 1861. Date of death: 16 May 1947. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th Mid-year ...

  13. Hopkins, Prof. Frederick Gowland

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1935 Honorary. Hopkins, Prof. Frederick Gowland Nobel Laureate (Medicine) - 1929. Date of birth: 20 June 1861. Date of death: 16 May 1947. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the ...

  14. Frederick National Laboratory Advisory Committee Welcomes New FNL, NCI Leaders | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Frederick National Laboratory Advisory Committee recently met to discuss the future of several high-profile Frederick National Lab initiatives in a meeting that included a chance to meet the new NCI and FNLCR leaders. Here is a look at a few of the highlights from the last of the 2017 FNLAC meetings.

  15. Frederick National Laboratory Celebrates 40 Years | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer Forty years ago, what we now call the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research was born. Here are some highlights in the facility’s history. October 19, 1971 – President Richard Nixon announced that Fort Detrick would be converted from a biological warfare facility to a cancer research center (Covert, Norman M., Cutting Edge: A History of Fort Detrick, Maryland, 1943–1993, pp. 85–87).

  16. A Study of the Literature on Lab-Based Instruction in Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puttick, Gillian; Drayton, Brian; Cohen, Eliza

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed the practitioner literature on lab-based instruction in biology in "The American Biology Teacher" between 2007 and 2012. We investigated what laboratory learning looks like in biology classrooms, what topics are addressed, what instructional methods and activities are described, and what is being learned about student…

  17. Genome Annotation in a Community College Cell Biology Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beagley, C. Timothy

    2013-01-01

    The Biology Department at Salt Lake Community College has used the IMG-ACT toolbox to introduce a genome mapping and annotation exercise into the laboratory portion of its Cell Biology course. This project provides students with an authentic inquiry-based learning experience while introducing them to computational biology and contemporary learning…

  18. Introductory Biology Labs... They Just Aren't Sexy Enough!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotner, Sehoya; Gallup, Gordon G., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The typical introductory biology curriculum includes the nature of science, evolution and genetics. Laboratory activities are designed to engage students in typical subject areas ranging from cell biology and physiology, to ecology and evolution. There are few, if any, laboratory classes exploring the biology and evolution of human sexual…

  19. Perceptions of Prospective Biology Teachers on Scientific Argumentation in Microbiology Inquiry Lab Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roviati, E.; Widodo, A.; Purwianingsih, W.; Riandi, R.

    2017-09-01

    Inquiry laboratory activity and scientific argumentation in science education should be promoted and explicitly experienced by prospective biology teacher students in classes, including in microbiology courses. The goal of this study is to get information about perceptions of prospective biology teachers on scientific argumentation in microbiology inquiry lab activities. This study reported the result of a survey research to prospective biology teachers about how their perception about microbiology lab classes and their perception about inquiry and argumentation in microbiology lab activities should be. The participants of this study were 100 students of biology education department from an institute in Cirebon, West Java taking microbiology lecture during the fifth semester. The data were collected using questionnaire to explore the perceptions and knowledge of prospective biology teachers about microbiology, inquiry lab activities and argumentation. The result showed that students thought that the difficulties of microbiology as a subject were the lack of references and the way lecturer teaching. The students’ perception was that argumentation and inquiry should be implemented in microbiology courses and lab activities. Based on the data from questionnaire, It showed that prospective biology teacher students had very little knowledge about scientific argumentation and its implementation in science education. When the participants made arguments based on the problems given, they showed low quality of arguments.

  20. Lab-on-a-chip for label free biological semiconductor analysis of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Minghui; Sun, Steven; Bruck, Hugh Alan; Kostov, Yordan; Rasooly, Avraham

    2010-01-01

    We describe a new lab-on-a-chip (LOC) which utilizes a biological semiconductor (BSC) transducer for label free analysis of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B (SEB) (or other biological interactions) directly and electronically. BSCs are new transducers based on electrical percolation through a

  1. Genome annotation in a community college cell biology lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beagley, C Timothy

    2013-01-01

    The Biology Department at Salt Lake Community College has used the IMG-ACT toolbox to introduce a genome mapping and annotation exercise into the laboratory portion of its Cell Biology course. This project provides students with an authentic inquiry-based learning experience while introducing them to computational biology and contemporary learning skills. Additionally, the project strengthens student understanding of the scientific method and contributes to student learning gains in curricular objectives centered around basic molecular biology, specifically, the Central Dogma. Importantly, inclusion of this project in the laboratory course provides students with a positive learning environment and allows for the use of cooperative learning strategies to increase overall student success. Copyright © 2012 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. GeneLab: A Systems Biology Platform for Spaceflight Omics Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinsch, Sigrid S.; Lai, San-Huei; Chen, Rick; Thompson, Terri; Berrios, Daniel; Fogle, Homer; Marcu, Oana; Timucin, Linda; Chakravarty, Kaushik; Coughlan, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    NASA's mission includes expanding our understanding of biological systems to improve life on Earth and to enable long-duration human exploration of space. Resources to support large numbers of spaceflight investigations are limited. NASA's GeneLab project is maximizing the science output from these experiments by: (1) developing a unique public bioinformatics database that includes space bioscience relevant "omics" data (genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics) and experimental metadata; (2) partnering with NASA-funded flight experiments through bio-sample sharing or sample augmentation to expedite omics data input to the GeneLab database; and (3) developing community-driven reference flight experiments. The first database, GeneLab Data System Version 1.0, went online in April 2015. V1.0 contains numerous flight datasets and has search and download capabilities. Version 2.0 will be released in 2016 and will link to analytic tools. In 2015 Genelab partnered with two Biological Research in Canisters experiments (BBRIC-19 and BRIC-20) which examine responses of Arabidopsis thaliana to spaceflight. GeneLab also partnered with Rodent Research-1 (RR1), the maiden flight to test the newly developed rodent habitat. GeneLab developed protocols for maxiumum yield of RNA, DNA and protein from precious RR-1 tissues harvested and preserved during the SpaceX-4 mission, as well as from tissues from mice that were frozen intact during spaceflight and later dissected. GeneLab is establishing partnerships with at least three planned flights for 2016. Organism-specific nationwide Science Definition Teams (SDTs) will define future GeneLab dedicated missions and ensure the broader scientific impact of the GeneLab missions. GeneLab ensures prompt release and open access to all high-throughput omics data from spaceflight and ground-based simulations of microgravity and radiation. Overall, GeneLab will facilitate the generation and query of parallel multi-omics data, and

  3. An Introductory Biology Lab that Uses Enzyme Histochemistry to Teach Students about Skeletal Muscle Fiber Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Lauren J.; Brodfuehrer, Peter D.; Raughley, Beth L.

    2004-01-01

    One important goal of introductory biology laboratory experiences is to engage students directly in all steps in the process of scientific discovery. Even when laboratory experiences are built on principles discussed in the classroom, students often do not adequately apply this background to interpretation of results they obtain in lab. This…

  4. Literature Lab: a method of automated literature interrogation to infer biology from microarray analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stegmaier Kimberly

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The biomedical literature is a rich source of associative information but too vast for complete manual review. We have developed an automated method of literature interrogation called "Literature Lab" that identifies and ranks associations existing in the literature between gene sets, such as those derived from microarray experiments, and curated sets of key terms (i.e. pathway names, medical subject heading (MeSH terms, etc. Results Literature Lab was developed using differentially expressed gene sets from three previously published cancer experiments and tested on a fourth, novel gene set. When applied to the genesets from the published data including an in vitro experiment, an in vivo mouse experiment, and an experiment with human tumor samples, Literature Lab correctly identified known biological processes occurring within each experiment. When applied to a novel set of genes differentially expressed between locally invasive and metastatic prostate cancer, Literature Lab identified a strong association between the pathway term "FOSB" and genes with increased expression in metastatic prostate cancer. Immunohistochemistry subsequently confirmed increased nuclear FOSB staining in metastatic compared to locally invasive prostate cancers. Conclusion This work demonstrates that Literature Lab can discover key biological processes by identifying meritorious associations between experimentally derived gene sets and key terms within the biomedical literature.

  5. GeneLab: NASA's Open Access, Collaborative Platform for Systems Biology and Space Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrios, Daniel C.; Thompson, Terri G.; Fogle, Homer W.; Rask, Jon C.; Coughlan, Joseph C.

    2015-01-01

    NASA is investing in GeneLab1 (http:genelab.nasa.gov), a multi-year effort to maximize utilization of the limited resources to conduct biological and medical research in space, principally aboard the International Space Station (ISS). High-throughput genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic or other omics analyses from experiments conducted on the ISS will be stored in the GeneLab Data Systems (GLDS), an open-science information system that will also include a biocomputation platform with collaborative science capabilities, to enable the discovery and validation of molecular networks.

  6. Enhancing Scientific Inquiry Literacy of Prospective Biology Teachers through Inquiry Lab Project in Microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusnadi, K.; Rustaman, N. Y.; Redjeki, S.; Aryantha, I. N. P.

    2017-09-01

    The implementation of the inquiry laboratory based project to enhance scientific inquiry literacy of prospective biology teachers in Microbiology course has been done. The inquiry lab based project was designed by three stages were debriefing of basic microbiology lab skills, guided inquiry and free inquiry respectively. The Study was quasi experimental with control group pretest-posttest design. The subjects were prospective biology teachers consists of 80 students. The scientific inquiry literacy instrument refers to ScInqLiT by Wenning. The results showed that there was significant difference of scientific inquiry literacy posttest scores between experiment and control (α 0,05) and was obtained N-gain score was 0.49 (medium) to experiment and 0.24 (low) to control. Based on formative assessment showed that development of student’s scientific attitude, research and microbiology lab skills during conducting project were increased. Student’s research skills especially in identification of variables, constructing a hypothesis, communicating and concluding were increased. During implementation of inquiry project also showed that they carried out mind and hands-on and so collaborative group investigation lab activities. Our findings may aid in reforming higher-education, particularly in microbiology laboratory activities to better promote scientific inquiry literacy, scientific attitude, research and laboratory skills.

  7. GeneLab Phase 2: Integrated Search Data Federation of Space Biology Experimental Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, P. B.; Berrios, D. C.; Gurram, M. M.; Hashim, J. C. M.; Raghunandan, S.; Lin, S. Y.; Le, T. Q.; Heher, D. M.; Thai, H. T.; Welch, J. D.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The GeneLab project is a science initiative to maximize the scientific return of omics data collected from spaceflight and from ground simulations of microgravity and radiation experiments, supported by a data system for a public bioinformatics repository and collaborative analysis tools for these data. The mission of GeneLab is to maximize the utilization of the valuable biological research resources aboard the ISS by collecting genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic (so-called omics) data to enable the exploration of the molecular network responses of terrestrial biology to space environments using a systems biology approach. All GeneLab data are made available to a worldwide network of researchers through its open-access data system. GeneLab is currently being developed by NASA to support Open Science biomedical research in order to enable the human exploration of space and improve life on earth. Open access to Phase 1 of the GeneLab Data Systems (GLDS) was implemented in April 2015. Download volumes have grown steadily, mirroring the growth in curated space biology research data sets (61 as of June 2016), now exceeding 10 TB/month, with over 10,000 file downloads since the start of Phase 1. For the period April 2015 to May 2016, most frequently downloaded were data from studies of Mus musculus (39) followed closely by Arabidopsis thaliana (30), with the remaining downloads roughly equally split across 12 other organisms (each 10 of total downloads). GLDS Phase 2 is focusing on interoperability, supporting data federation, including integrated search capabilities, of GLDS-housed data sets with external data sources, such as gene expression data from NIHNCBIs Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), proteomic data from EBIs PRIDE system, and metagenomic data from Argonne National Laboratory's MG-RAST. GEO and MG-RAST employ specifications for investigation metadata that are different from those used by the GLDS and PRIDE (e.g., ISA-Tab). The GLDS Phase 2 system

  8. WHK Interns Sweep Entire Category at Frederick County Science Fair | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer The competitors in the cellular and molecular biology category of the Frederick County Science and Engineering Fair on March 22–23 didn’t stand a chance against the Werner H. Kirsten student interns at the National Cancer Institute at Frederick. These interns swept the entire category, with Madelyne Xiao, a rising intern, winning first place; Maria Hamscher, second place; Ashley Babyak and Dahlia Kronfli tying for third place; and Maham Ahmed receiving an honorable mention.

  9. Graduate student training and creating new physics labs for biology students, killing two birds with one stone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Barbara

    2001-03-01

    At UCSD biology majors are required to take 3 quarters of a calculus based physics course. This is taught in a standard format large lecture class partly by faculty and partly by freeway flyers. We are working with physics graduate students who are also participating in our PFPF (Preparing Future Physics Faculty) program to write, review, and teach new weekly labs for these biology students. This provides an experience for the grad student that is both rewarding to them and useful to the department. The grad students participate in curriculum development, they observe the students behaviour in the labs, and assess the effectiveness of different lab formats. The labs are intended to provide an interactive, hands on experience with a wide variety of equipment which is mostly both simple and inexpensive. Both students and grads find the labs to be engaging and fun. Based on group discussions the labs are modified to try to try to create the best teaching environment. The biology students benefit from the improvements both in the quality of the labs they do, and from the enthusiasm of the TAs who take an active interest in their learning. The ability to make significant changes to the material taught maintains the interest of the grad students and helps to make the labs a stable and robust environment.

  10. International Fellows of NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Each year, the Employee Diversity Team (EDT) acknowledges members of the NCI at Frederick Community for their achievements and contributions towards the mission of facility.  Historically, the team has profiled the “Women of NCI at Frederick,” but this year, the team decided to instead shed light on the diverse and successful individuals who make up the international fellows community.

  11. Lurking in the Lab: Analysis of Data from Molecular Biology Laboratory Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen Ferguson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This project examined primary research data files found on instruments in a molecular biology teaching laboratory. Experimental data files were analyzed in order to learn more about the types of data generated by these instruments (e.g. file formats, and to evaluate current laboratory data management practices.SETTING: This project examined experimental data files from instruments in a teaching laboratory at Brandeis University.METHODOLOGY: Experimental data files and associated metadata on instrument hard drives were captured and analyzed using Xplorer2 software. Formats were categorized as proprietary or open, and characteristics such as file naming conventions were noted. Discussions with the faculty member and lab staff guided the project scope and informed the findings.RESULTS: Files in both proprietary and open formats were found on the instrument hard drives. 62% of the experimental data files were in proprietary formats. Image files in various formats accounted for the most prevalent types of data found. Instrument users varied widely in their approaches to data management tasks such as file naming conventions.CONCLUSIONS: This study found inconsistent approaches to managing data on laboratory instruments. Prevalence of proprietary file formats is a concern with this type of data. Students express frustration in working with these data, and files in these proprietary formats could pose curation and preservation challenges in the future. Teaching labs afford an opportunity for librarians interested in learning more about primary research data and data management practices.

  12. Obituary: Gerald Frederick Tape, 1915-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Robert E.

    2007-12-01

    design and fabrication problems that developed in the 140-foot telescope project. These had to be renegotiated with the NSF, honing skills that Jerry had already developed. In the course of this, he also made an effort to reach out and understand the astronomical community and to mend some of the rifts that accompanied the NSF's first venture into "big science." This all changed in 1963 when President Kennedy asked Leland Haworth to become the Director of the National Science Foundation and also asked Gerald Tape to take on Haworth's role as an Atomic Energy Commissioner working under the Chairmanship of Glenn Seaborg. All five Commissioners participated in all official actions of the body, but each one had special areas of concentration of effort. With some overlap, this assured fuller and deeper coverage of the broad spectrum of issues they faced. Jerry's special interests were nuclear weapons development; research in the physical, biological, and life sciences; and international cooperation. This menu was a broad one, and for six years of full-time effort it required endless travel to laboratories, conferences, and government-to-government meetings. International delegations involved civil as well as defense programs. Formal civil exchange programs were negotiated with many nations including the USSR. Negotiations on arms control issues involved contacts with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Atoms for Peace conferences. In the national research program area, Jerry became the lead Commissioner for the establishment of what became the Fermi Laboratory and its management organization, Universities Research Association (URA). Fermi Lab soon became, and still is, the primary United States high-energy particle physics institution. In 1969, Jerry Tape returned to AUI as president where he was welcomed enthusiastically. Both BNL and NRAO had grown and were thriving. Plans were being formulated for major new facilities, a proton collider with superconducting

  13. NCI at Frederick Ebola Response Team | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Editor’s note: This article was adapted from the Employee Diversity Team’s display case exhibit “Recognizing the NCI at Frederick Ebola Response Team,” in the lobby of Building 549. The Poster staff recognizes that this article does not include everyone who was involved in the response to the Ebola crisis, both at NCI at Frederick and in Africa. When the Ebola crisis broke out in 2014 in West Africa, staff members from the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research responded quickly. Members of the Clinical Monitoring Research Program (CMRP) were instrumental not only in setting up the clinical trials of the vaccine in Liberia, but also in providing training, community outreach, and recruitment strategies for the trials.

  14. Using Mouse Mammary Tumor Cells to Teach Core Biology Concepts: A Simple Lab Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlrath, Victoria; Trye, Alice; Aguanno, Ann

    2015-06-18

    Undergraduate biology students are required to learn, understand and apply a variety of cellular and molecular biology concepts and techniques in preparation for biomedical, graduate and professional programs or careers in science. To address this, a simple laboratory module was devised to teach the concepts of cell division, cellular communication and cancer through the application of animal cell culture techniques. Here the mouse mammary tumor (MMT) cell line is used to model for breast cancer. Students learn to grow and characterize these animal cells in culture and test the effects of traditional and non-traditional chemotherapy agents on cell proliferation. Specifically, students determine the optimal cell concentration for plating and growing cells, learn how to prepare and dilute drug solutions, identify the best dosage and treatment time course of the antiproliferative agents, and ascertain the rate of cell death in response to various treatments. The module employs both a standard cell counting technique using a hemocytometer and a novel cell counting method using microscopy software. The experimental procedure lends to open-ended inquiry as students can modify critical steps of the protocol, including testing homeopathic agents and over-the-counter drugs. In short, this lab module requires students to use the scientific process to apply their knowledge of the cell cycle, cellular signaling pathways, cancer and modes of treatment, all while developing an array of laboratory skills including cell culture and analysis of experimental data not routinely taught in the undergraduate classroom.

  15. NCI at Frederick Employees Receive Awards at the Spring Research Festival | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI and Frederick National Laboratory staff members were among those honored at the Spring Research Festival Awards Ceremony on May 28. The ceremony was the culmination of the festival, which was sponsored by the National Interagency Confederation for Biological Research (NICBR), May 4–7. Maj. Gen. Brian Lein, commanding general, U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (USAMRMC), presented the awards.

  16. ANALISIS KEMUNCULAN KETERAMPILAN SPESIFIK LAB MIKROBIOLOGI MELALUI PEMBELAJARAN MIKROBIOLOGI BERBASIS PROYEK INKUIRI “MINI-RISET” MAHASISWA BIOLOGI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr Kusnadi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Telah dilakukan penelitian untuk menganalisis kemunculan keterampilan laboratorium mikrobiologi melalui program pembelajaran mikrobiologi berbasis proyek inkuiri (P2MBPI mini-riset. Penelitian melibatkan sejumlah mahasiswa semester IV Program Studi Biologi di salah satu LPTK Negeri di kota Bandung (n=33, yang mengikuti perkuliahan mikrobiologi. Program pembelajaran dirancang dalam setting laboratorium berbasis proyek inkuiri kelompok (free inquiry labs. Data penelitian dijaring melalui laporan mini-riset, presentasi oral dan poster serta wawancara.  Hasil penelitian  menunjukkan bahwa P2MBPI mini-riset setiap kelompok memberikan kontribusi terhadap kemunculan keterampilan laboratorium mikrobiologi yang cukup beragam. Hal ini selaras dengan tahapan proyek mulai dari pemilihan masalah dan topik mini-riset, sampai pengambilan keputusan proyek yang dilaksanakan oleh kelompok. Secara umum ruang lingkup topik proyek mini-riset mencakup empat bidang, yaitu mikrobiologi pertanian (tanah, mikrobiologi lingkungan (air, mikrobiologi kesehatan, dan mikrobiologi pangan. Hasil analisis kemunculan jenis keterampilan spesifik lab mikrobiologi dari laporan, presentasi oral, dan poster, serta wawancara menunjukkan bahwa sebagian besar kelompok menunjukkan persentase kemunculan jenis keterampilan yang tinggi (100%, yaitu pada keterampilan bekerja aseptik, keterampilan mengisolasi mikroba, sterilisasi, dan menggunakan mikroskop.  Kemunculan jenis keterampilan dengan persentase sedang (75% pada keterampilan identifikasi dan kultivasi mikroorganisme. Selanjutnya berdasarkan hasil wawancara mendalam pada 7 orang mahasiswa, menyatakan bahwa program pembelajaran mikrobiologi berbasis proyek inkuiri mini-riset ini juga sangat berarti, disamping mendapatkan keterampilan lab mikrobiologi, juga dapat membekali keterampilan meneliti (research skill mahasiswa biologi.  Dengan demikian P2MBPI mini-riset ini, perlu terus dikembangkan karena memberikan konstribusi yang

  17. The Flute Music of Frederick II

    OpenAIRE

    Macken, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Frederick II ‘the Great’ of Prussia (1712-1786) is regarded as one of the greatest aristocratic dilettante musicians and composers of the 18th century. This Master of Arts in Music (Performance) minor dissertation explores his flute music with particular reference to the compositional style of his flute sonatas and concertos. It commences with an overview of Frederick’s musical background, focusing on relevant biographical details that relate both to the formative influences on...

  18. Giant Ants and Walking Plants: Using Science Fiction to Teach a Writing-Intensive, Lab-Based Biology Class for Nonmajors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firooznia, Fardad

    2006-01-01

    This writing-intensive, lab-based, nonmajor biology course explores scientific inquiry and biological concepts through specific topics illustrated or inaccurately depicted in works of science fiction. The laboratory emphasizes the scientific method and introduces several techniques used in biological research related to the works we study.…

  19. Microbes in Mascara: Hypothesis-Driven Research in a Nonmajor Biology Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burleson, Kathryn M.; Martinez-Vaz, Betsy M.

    2011-01-01

    In this laboratory exercise, students were taught concepts of microbiology and scientific process through an everyday activity — cosmetic use. The students’ goals for the lab were to develop a hypothesis regarding microbial contamination in cosmetics, learn techniques to culture and differentiate microorganisms from cosmetics, and propose best practices in cosmetics use based on their findings. Prior to the lab, students took a pretest to assess their knowledge of scientific hypotheses, microbiology, and cosmetic safety. In the first week, students were introduced to microbiological concepts and methodologies, and cosmetic terminology and safety. Students completed a hypothesis-writing exercise before formulating and testing their own hypotheses regarding cosmetic contamination. Students provided a cosmetic of their own and, in consultation with their lab group, chose one product for testing. Samples were serially diluted and plated on a variety of selective media. In the second week, students analyzed their plates to determine the presence and diversity of microbes and if their hypotheses were supported. Students completed a worksheet of their results and were given a posttest to assess their knowledge. Average test scores improved from 5.2 (pretest) to 7.8 (posttest), with p-values < 0.0001. Seventy-nine percent (79%) of students correctly identified hypotheses that were not falsifiable or lacked variables, and 89% of students improved their scores on questions concerning safe cosmetic use. Ninety-one percent (91%) of students demonstrated increased knowledge of microbial concepts and methods. Based on our results, this lab is an easy, yet effective, way to enhance knowledge of scientific concepts for nonmajors, while maintaining relevance to everyday life. PMID:23653761

  20. A LabVIEW-based electrical bioimpedance spectroscopic data interpreter (LEBISDI) for biological tissue impedance analysis and equivalent circuit modelling

    KAUST Repository

    Bera, Tushar Kanti

    2016-12-05

    Under an alternating electrical signal, biological tissues produce a complex electrical bioimpedance that is a function of tissue composition and applied signal frequencies. By studying the bioimpedance spectra of biological tissues over a wide range of frequencies, we can noninvasively probe the physiological properties of these tissues to detect possible pathological conditions. Electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) can provide the spectra that are needed to calculate impedance parameters within a wide range of frequencies. Before impedance parameters can be calculated and tissue information extracted, impedance spectra should be processed and analyzed by a dedicated software program. National Instruments (NI) Inc. offers LabVIEW, a fast, portable, robust, user-friendly platform for designing dataanalyzing software. We developed a LabVIEW-based electrical bioimpedance spectroscopic data interpreter (LEBISDI) to analyze the electrical impedance spectra for tissue characterization in medical, biomedical and biological applications. Here, we test, calibrate and evaluate the performance of LEBISDI on the impedance data obtained from simulation studies as well as the practical EIS experimentations conducted on electronic circuit element combinations and the biological tissue samples. We analyze the Nyquist plots obtained from the EIS measurements and compare the equivalent circuit parameters calculated by LEBISDI with the corresponding original circuit parameters to assess the accuracy of the program developed. Calibration studies show that LEBISDI not only interpreted the simulated and circuitelement data accurately, but also successfully interpreted tissues impedance data and estimated the capacitive and resistive components produced by the compositions biological cells. Finally, LEBISDI efficiently calculated and analyzed variation in bioimpedance parameters of different tissue compositions, health and temperatures. LEBISDI can also be used for human tissue

  1. Frederick Carl Frieseke: The Evolution of an American Impressionist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mark M.

    2002-01-01

    Provides background information on the life and career of Frederick Carl Frieseke, an artist who painted in the style of impressionism. Explains that this artist is the focus of a retrospective exhibition entitled, "Frederick Carl Frieseke: The Evolution of an American Impressionist" at the Telfair Museum of Art (Savannah, Georgia). (CMK)

  2. Investigating the Role of an Inquiry-Based Biology Lab Course on Student Attitudes and Views toward Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Erica; Nomme, Kathy; Deane, Thomas; Pollock, Carol; Birol, Gülnur

    2016-01-01

    Students’ academic experiences can influence their conceptualization of science. In contrast experts hold particular beliefs, perceptions, opinions, and attitudes about science that are often absent in first-year undergraduate students. Shifts toward more expert-like attitudes and views have been linked to improved student engagement, critical-thinking ability, conceptual understanding, and academic performance. In this study, we investigate shifts in attitudes and views toward science by students in four biology classes with differences in student enrollment, academic support, and instruction. We observe significant, positive effects of enrollment in a guided-inquiry lab course and academic performance on the percentage of expert-like student attitudes and views at the end of term. We also identify variation in two aspects of student attitudes and views: 1) confidence and interest and 2) understanding and acceptance. In particular, enrollment in the lab course boosts student confidence and interest in scientific inquiry in the short term, even for students with low academic performance or little English-language experience. Our results suggest that low-performing students in particular may require additional opportunities for experiential learning or greater academic support to develop expert-like perceptions of biology as a science. PMID:27856549

  3. Investigating the Role of an Inquiry-Based Biology Lab Course on Student Attitudes and Views toward Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Erica; Nomme, Kathy; Deane, Thomas; Pollock, Carol; Birol, Gülnur

    2016-01-01

    Students' academic experiences can influence their conceptualization of science. In contrast experts hold particular beliefs, perceptions, opinions, and attitudes about science that are often absent in first-year undergraduate students. Shifts toward more expert-like attitudes and views have been linked to improved student engagement, critical-thinking ability, conceptual understanding, and academic performance. In this study, we investigate shifts in attitudes and views toward science by students in four biology classes with differences in student enrollment, academic support, and instruction. We observe significant, positive effects of enrollment in a guided-inquiry lab course and academic performance on the percentage of expert-like student attitudes and views at the end of term. We also identify variation in two aspects of student attitudes and views: 1) confidence and interest and 2) understanding and acceptance. In particular, enrollment in the lab course boosts student confidence and interest in scientific inquiry in the short term, even for students with low academic performance or little English-language experience. Our results suggest that low-performing students in particular may require additional opportunities for experiential learning or greater academic support to develop expert-like perceptions of biology as a science. © 2016 E. Jeffery et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2016 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  4. Frederick Soddy: Early pioneer in radiochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauffman, G.B.

    1985-01-01

    It is only by careful study of the lives, works and writings of some of the principal figures in the early period of research into radioactivity that historians can reconstruct the actual events leading up to our modern-day understanding of complex phenomena. One such leading figure was Frederick Soddy (1877-1956), whose life and work are examined here by internationally recognized authorities in the history of science. The reception of Soddy's ideas in Japan and the U.S.S.R. is also considered, providing insight into the international commerce of ideas in the inter-war period. The articles collected in this book, complemented by Soddy's own keynote papers, form a rounded picture of Soddy the man, his life, his work and the impact he had on the society of his time

  5. Athelstan Frederick Spilhaus (1911-1998)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauss, John

    Athelstan Frederick Spilhaus, who died on March 30 at the age of 86, lived a full and varied life. His obituary in the New York Times gave prominence to his world famous collection of some 3000 antique children's toys. The Economist referred to him as the “inventor of aliens,” noting that it was the remains of one of his instrumented balloons found scattered in the sands of Roswell, New Mexico, in June 1947 that triggered the cult of believers in visitors from outer space. Robert Abel noted in a funeral eulogy that as a meteorological observer in China's Yenan Province during World War II, Spilhaus came to know and respect Mao Zedong many years before Chairman Mao came to power.

  6. Using Restriction Mapping to Teach Basic Skills in the Molecular Biology Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Lauren; Shaker, Elizabeth; De Stasio, Elizabeth A.

    2007-01-01

    Digestion of DNA with restriction enzymes, calculation of volumes and concentrations of reagents for reactions, and the separation of DNA fragments by agarose gel electrophoresis are common molecular biology techniques that are best taught through repetition. The following open-ended, investigative laboratory exercise in plasmid restriction…

  7. Incorporating Biological Mass Spectrometry into Undergraduate Teaching Labs, Part 2: Peptide Identification via Molecular Mass Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnquist, Isaac J.; Beussman, Douglas J.

    2009-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has become a routine analytical tool in the undergraduate curriculum in the form of GC-MS. While relatively few undergraduate programs have incorporated biological mass spectrometry into their programs, the importance of these techniques, as demonstrated by their recognition with the 2002 Nobel Prize, will hopefully lead to…

  8. Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site : transportation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    This study provide concepts and ideas for a complementary transportation plan in support of the revised General Management Plan (GMP) for the Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site. The GMP sets forth a preferred plan of action for how Olmsted ...

  9. Global transcriptomic analysis suggests carbon dioxide as an environmental stressor in spaceflight: A systems biology GeneLab case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheshti, Afshin; Cekanaviciute, Egle; Smith, David J; Costes, Sylvain V

    2018-03-08

    Spaceflight introduces a combination of environmental stressors, including microgravity, ionizing radiation, changes in diet and altered atmospheric gas composition. In order to understand the impact of each environmental component on astronauts it is important to investigate potential influences in isolation. Rodent spaceflight experiments involve both standard vivarium cages and animal enclosure modules (AEMs), which are cages used to house rodents in spaceflight. Ground control AEMs are engineered to match the spaceflight environment. There are limited studies examining the biological response invariably due to the configuration of AEM and vivarium housing. To investigate the innate global transcriptomic patterns of rodents housed in spaceflight-matched AEM compared to standard vivarium cages we utilized publicly available data from the NASA GeneLab repository. Using a systems biology approach, we observed that AEM housing was associated with significant transcriptomic differences, including reduced metabolism, altered immune responses, and activation of possible tumorigenic pathways. Although we did not perform any functional studies, our findings revealed a mild hypoxic phenotype in AEM, possibly due to atmospheric carbon dioxide that was increased to match conditions in spaceflight. Our investigation illustrates the process of generating new hypotheses and informing future experimental research by repurposing multiple space-flown datasets.

  10. A lab-on-a-chip device for analysis of amlodipine in biological fluids using peroxyoxalate chemiluminescence system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Lawati, Haider A J; Al-Nadabi, Mira M; Varma, Gouri B; Suliman, Fakhr Eldin O; Al-Abri, Hasnaa

    2014-12-01

    A highly sensitive, rapid and economical method for the determination of amlodipine (AM) in biological fluids was developed using a peroxyoxalate chemiluminescence (CL) system in a lab-on-a-chip device. Peroxyoxalate-CL is an indirect type of CL that allows the detection of native fluorophores or compounds derivatized with fluorescent labels. Here, fluorescamine was reacted with AM, and the derivatization product was used in a bis-(2,4,6-trichlorophenyl)oxalate-CL system. Fluorescamine reacts selectively with aliphatic primary amine at neutral or basic pH. As most of the calcium channel blocker and many cardiovascular drugs do not contain primary amine, the developed method is highly selective. The parameters that influenced the CL signal intensity were studied carefully. These included the chip geometry, pH, concentration of reagents used and flow rates. Moreover, we confirmed our previous observation about the effects of imidazole, which is commonly used in the bis-(2,4,6-trichlorophenyl)oxalate-CL system as a catalyst, and found that the signal was significantly improved when imidazole was absent. Under optimized conditions, a calibration curve was obtained with a linear range (10-100 µg/L). The limit of detection was 3 µg/L, while the limit of quantification was 10 µg/L. Finally the method was applied for the determination of AM in biological fluids successfully. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Bilingual (German-English) Molecular Biology Courses in an Out-of-School Lab on a University Campus: Cognitive and Affective Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenhauser, Annika; Preisfeld, Angelika

    2015-01-01

    Taking into account (German) students' deficiencies in scientific literacy as well as reading competence and the "mother tongue + 2" objective of the European commission, a bilingual course on molecular biology was developed. It combines CLIL fundamentals and practical experimentation in an out-of-school lab. Cognitive and affective…

  12. An Advanced Organometallic Lab Experiment with Biological Implications: Synthesis and Characterization of Fe[subscript 2](µ-S[subscript 2])(C0)[subscript 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Jacob; Spentzos, Ariana; Works, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    The organometallic complex Fe[subscript 2](µ-S[subscript 2])(CO)[subscript 6] has interesting biological implications. The concepts of bio-organometallic chemistry are rarely discussed at the undergraduate level, but this experiment can start such a conversation and, in addition, teach valuable synthetic techniques. The lab experiment takes a…

  13. Using LabView for real-time monitoring and tracking of multiple biological objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolskyy, Aleksandr I.; Krasilenko, Vladimir G.; Bilynsky, Yosyp Y.; Starovier, Anzhelika

    2017-04-01

    Today real-time studying and tracking of movement dynamics of various biological objects is important and widely researched. Features of objects, conditions of their visualization and model parameters strongly influence the choice of optimal methods and algorithms for a specific task. Therefore, to automate the processes of adaptation of recognition tracking algorithms, several Labview project trackers are considered in the article. Projects allow changing templates for training and retraining the system quickly. They adapt to the speed of objects and statistical characteristics of noise in images. New functions of comparison of images or their features, descriptors and pre-processing methods will be discussed. The experiments carried out to test the trackers on real video files will be presented and analyzed.

  14. Estimating a structured covariance matrix from multi-lab measurements in high-throughput biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks, Alexander M; Csárdi, Gábor; Drummond, D Allan; Airoldi, Edoardo M

    2015-03-01

    We consider the problem of quantifying the degree of coordination between transcription and translation, in yeast. Several studies have reported a surprising lack of coordination over the years, in organisms as different as yeast and human, using diverse technologies. However, a close look at this literature suggests that the lack of reported correlation may not reflect the biology of regulation. These reports do not control for between-study biases and structure in the measurement errors, ignore key aspects of how the data connect to the estimand, and systematically underestimate the correlation as a consequence. Here, we design a careful meta-analysis of 27 yeast data sets, supported by a multilevel model, full uncertainty quantification, a suite of sensitivity analyses and novel theory, to produce a more accurate estimate of the correlation between mRNA and protein levels-a proxy for coordination. From a statistical perspective, this problem motivates new theory on the impact of noise, model mis-specifications and non-ignorable missing data on estimates of the correlation between high dimensional responses. We find that the correlation between mRNA and protein levels is quite high under the studied conditions, in yeast, suggesting that post-transcriptional regulation plays a less prominent role than previously thought.

  15. Biological implications of lab-on-a-chip devices fabricated using multi-jet modelling and stereolithography processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Feng; Macdonald, Niall; Skommer, Joanna; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2015-06-01

    Current microfabrication methods are often restricted to two-dimensional (2D) or two and a half dimensional (2.5D) structures. Those fabrication issues can be potentially addressed by emerging additive manufacturing technologies. Despite rapid growth of additive manufacturing technologies in tissue engineering, microfluidics has seen relatively little developments with regards to adopting 3D printing for rapid fabrication of complex chip-based devices. This has been due to two major factors: lack of sufficient resolution of current rapid-prototyping methods (usually >100 μm ) and optical transparency of polymers to allow in vitro imaging of specimens. We postulate that adopting innovative fabrication processes can provide effective solutions for prototyping and manufacturing of chip-based devices with high-aspect ratios (i.e. above ration of 20:1). This work provides a comprehensive investigation of commercially available additive manufacturing technologies as an alternative for rapid prototyping of complex monolithic Lab-on-a-Chip devices for biological applications. We explored both multi-jet modelling (MJM) and several stereolithography (SLA) processes with five different 3D printing resins. Compared with other rapid prototyping technologies such as PDMS soft lithography and infrared laser micromachining, we demonstrated that selected SLA technologies had superior resolution and feature quality. We also for the first time optimised the post-processing protocols and demonstrated polymer features under scanning electronic microscope (SEM). Finally we demonstrate that selected SLA polymers have optical properties enabling high-resolution biological imaging. A caution should be, however, exercised as more work is needed to develop fully bio-compatible and non-toxic polymer chemistries.

  16. Vision Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Vision Lab personnel perform research, development, testing and evaluation of eye protection and vision performance. The lab maintains and continues to develop...

  17. Constructing Joseph Fredericks: competing narratives of a child sex murderer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrunik, Michael; Weisman, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Joseph Fredericks--one of Canada's most notorious sex offenders--was defined through the institutions that dealt with him from his infancy to his death to the inquest held after his death. In this paper, we locate in historical context and compare the different narratives that were constructed of his life in each of these institutional settings from unwanted child to 'mental defective' to psychiatric offender to criminal recidivist to victim to iconic sexual predator. We show that each of these narratives claimed to capture the essence of Fredericks in terms of what were his core characteristics and what remedies were necessary for the problems he posed only to be superseded by new narratives based on different assumptions. Finally, we show how one of these conceptions of Frederick's essence influenced a shift in Canadian public policy for sex offenders toward the greater emphasis on community protection characteristic of public policy in the United States.

  18. Context matters: volunteer bias, small sample size, and the value of comparison groups in the assessment of research-based undergraduate introductory biology lab courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownell, Sara E; Kloser, Matthew J; Fukami, Tadashi; Shavelson, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    The shift from cookbook to authentic research-based lab courses in undergraduate biology necessitates the need for evaluation and assessment of these novel courses. Although the biology education community has made progress in this area, it is important that we interpret the effectiveness of these courses with caution and remain mindful of inherent limitations to our study designs that may impact internal and external validity. The specific context of a research study can have a dramatic impact on the conclusions. We present a case study of our own three-year investigation of the impact of a research-based introductory lab course, highlighting how volunteer students, a lack of a comparison group, and small sample sizes can be limitations of a study design that can affect the interpretation of the effectiveness of a course.

  19. Frederick National Laboratory and Georgetown University Launch Research and Education Collaboration | FNLCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    FREDERICK, Md. -- A new collaboration established between Georgetown University and the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research aims to expand both institutions’ research and training missions in the biomedical sciences. Representatives f

  20. WHK Interns Win Big at Frederick County Science Fair | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three Werner H. Kirsten student interns claimed awards at the 35th Annual Frederick County Science and Engineering Fair—and got a shot at the national competition—for imaginative projects that reached out to the rings of Saturn and down to the details of advanced cancer diagnostics.

  1. Help NCI at Frederick “Knock Out Hunger” | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI at Frederick is once again participating in the Feds Feed Families initiative, an annual food drive that addresses severe shortages of non-perishable items in food banks across D.C., Maryland, and Virginia during the summer months, when giving is at its lowest.

  2. Hundreds of Area Residents Visit the National Lab Booth at the Annual In The Street Festival | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light-up yo-yos, brightly colored portion plates, and a fast spinner game lured hundreds of area residents to the Frederick National Lab booth at this year’s In The Street festival, where they also heard a message from the lab: Stay healthy through healthy habits.

  3. Using Affinity Chromatography to Investigate Novel Protein-Protein Interactions in an Undergraduate Cell and Molecular Biology Lab Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, Kenneth D.

    2009-01-01

    Inquiry-driven lab exercises require students to think carefully about a question, carry out an investigation of that question, and critically analyze the results of their investigation. Here, we describe the implementation and assessment of an inquiry-based laboratory exercise in which students obtain and analyze novel data that contribute to our…

  4. Nanotechnology Characterization Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory (NCL) at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research performs preclinical characterization of nanomaterials...

  5. Like a Good Neighbor, NCI-Frederick Is There | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    The main campus of the National Cancer Institute at Frederick is an island of sorts: 68 acres of land that was once part of Fort Detrick. Accessing NCI property means passing through the Fort Detrick gates and crossing the post. While the campus is surrounded by the military installation, is protected by NIH police, and doesn’t allow the use of tobacco products, it is not a part of the military.

  6. Quando o documentário pensa, Frederick Wiseman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Melo Ferreira

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In the cinema in general and particularly in documentary it is very difficult to separate the social concern of one film from its political nature. In his fundamental work in contemporary documentary, Frederick Wiseman shooted some of themost relevant institutions of American society with a declared social concern but alsowith an ethical look and an expression of political thought.Keywords:

  7. R&W Club Frederick Sews for Kids | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer Sewing enthusiasts of all skill levels are invited to attend a sewing party hosted by the R&W Club Frederick on Feb. 18. Stop by the Building 549 Café Room between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. to sew for a cause: help the club make pillowcases for ConKerr Cancer, a nonprofit organization that supports children in hospitals across the country.

  8. An RNA Phage Lab: MS2 in Walter Fiers' laboratory of molecular biology in Ghent, from genetic code to gene and genome, 1963-1976.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierrel, Jérôme

    2012-01-01

    The importance of viruses as model organisms is well-established in molecular biology and Max Delbrück's phage group set standards in the DNA phage field. In this paper, I argue that RNA phages, discovered in the 1960s, were also instrumental in the making of molecular biology. As part of experimental systems, RNA phages stood for messenger RNA (mRNA), genes and genome. RNA was thought to mediate information transfers between DNA and proteins. Furthermore, RNA was more manageable at the bench than DNA due to the availability of specific RNases, enzymes used as chemical tools to analyse RNA. Finally, RNA phages provided scientists with a pure source of mRNA to investigate the genetic code, genes and even a genome sequence. This paper focuses on Walter Fiers' laboratory at Ghent University (Belgium) and their work on the RNA phage MS2. When setting up his Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Fiers planned a comprehensive study of the virus with a strong emphasis on the issue of structure. In his lab, RNA sequencing, now a little-known technique, evolved gradually from a means to solve the genetic code, to a tool for completing the first genome sequence. Thus, I follow the research pathway of Fiers and his 'RNA phage lab' with their evolving experimental system from 1960 to the late 1970s. This study illuminates two decisive shifts in post-war biology: the emergence of molecular biology as a discipline in the 1960s in Europe and of genomics in the 1990s.

  9. New Phone System Coming to NCI Campus at Frederick | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Travis Fouche and Trent McKee, Guest Writers Beginning in September, phones at the NCI Campus at Frederick will begin to be replaced, as the project to upgrade the current phone system ramps up. Over the next 16 months, the Information Systems Program (ISP) will be working with Facilities Maintenance and Engineering and Computer & Statistical Services to replace the current Avaya phone system with a Cisco Unified Communications phone system. The Cisco system is already in use at the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF).

  10. Advanced LabVIEW Labs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Eric D.

    1999-01-01

    In the world of computer-based data acquisition and control, the graphical interface program LabVIEW from National Instruments is so ubiquitous that in many ways it has almost become the laboratory standard. To date, there have been approximately fifteen books concerning LabVIEW, but Professor Essick's treatise takes on a completely different tack than all of the previous discussions. In the more standard treatments of the ways and wherefores of LabVIEW such as LabVIEW Graphical Programming: Practical Applications in Instrumentation and Control by Gary W. Johnson (McGraw Hill, NY 1997), the emphasis has been instructing the reader how to program LabVIEW to create a Virtual Instrument (VI) on the computer for interfacing to a particular instruments. LabVIEW is written in ''G'' a graphical programming language developed by National Instruments. In the past the emphasis has been on training the experimenter to learn ''G''. Without going into details here, ''G'' incorporates the usual loops, arithmetic expressions, etc., found in many programming languages, but in an icon (graphical) environment. The net result being that LabVIEW contains all of the standard methods needed for interfacing to instruments, data acquisition, data analysis, graphics, and also methodology to incorporate programs written in other languages into LabVIEW. Historically, according to Professor Essick, he developed a series of experiments for an upper division laboratory course for computer-based instrumentation. His observation was that while many students had the necessary background in computer programming languages, there were students who had virtually no concept about writing a computer program let alone a computer- based interfacing program. Thus the beginnings of a concept for not only teaching computer- based instrumentation techniques, but aiso a method for the beginner to experience writing a com- puter program. Professor Essick saw LabVIEW as the ''perfect environment in which to

  11. H.E. Mr Richard J. Fredericks, Ambassador of the United States of America to Switzerland

    CERN Document Server

    Patrice Loïez

    2001-01-01

    Photo 01 : Prof. L. Maiani, CERN Director-General, gives a piece of LHC super conducting wire to H.E. Mr. Richard J. Fredericks; Photo 02 : Prof. L. Maiani, CERN Director-General, Mr. Jan van der Boon, CERN Director of Administration and H.E. Mr. J. Richard Fredericks

  12. VIG Seminar March 1, 2018 Alex Compton NCI-Frederick | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Please join us for the Virology Interest Group Seminar on Thursday, March 1st, from 2:30 until 3:30 in Bethesda, Building 50, Room 2328. The seminar will also be broadcasted to Frederick, Building 549, Conference Room A. This seminar will be presented by Alex Compton, NCI-Frederick.

  13. Two Methods of Determining Total Phenolic Content of Foods and Juices in a General, Organic, and Biological (GOB) Chemistry Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, Lee Alan; Leung, Sam H.; Puderbaugh, Amy; Angel, Stephen A.

    2011-01-01

    The determination of total phenolics in foods and fruit juices was used successfully as a laboratory experiment in our undergraduate general, organic, and biological (GOB) chemistry course. Two different colorimetric methods were used over three years and comparative student results indicate that a ferrous ammonium sulfate (FAS) indicator…

  14. O salário na obra de Frederick Winslow Taylor Frederick Winslow Taylor's oeuvre: an analysis of wages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Paulo Gomes da Silva

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo analisa e explica a perspectiva de Frederick Winslow Taylor sobre o salário, tal como enunciada em suas duas grandes obras: Shop management (1903 e Principles of scientific management (1911. A primeira parte consubstancia-se na apresentação de aspectos econômicos relevantes que caracterizaram o tempo em que ele viveu e o quanto influenciaram suas obras. Na segunda parte, é efetuada uma análise da forma como o salário é apresentado nas duas obras de F. W. Taylor. O artigo termina com um comentário sobre as obras supracitadas no que se refere à perspectiva taylorista do salário.This paper analyses and explains Frederick Winslow Taylor's perspective on wages, as it is presented in his main literary works: Shop management (1903 and Principles of scientific management (1911. The first part presents the main economic aspects that characterized his lifetime, which undoubtedly influenced his literary works. The second part analyses F. W. Taylor's two main books in which the author's perspective about wages is discussed. The paper concludes with a critical view of F. W. Taylor's view on wages.

  15. Design and development of electrochemical polymer-based lab-on-a-disc devices for biological applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanger, Kuldeep

    detection based centrifugal microfluidic platforms towards applications in bioprocess monitoring, medical diagnostics, food and environmental analysis, etc. Stencil based electrode fabrication approach was developed and optimized to pattern reliable and reproducible electrodes on a polymeric substrate. Also......, enrichment). The applicability of the developed microfluidic systems was demonstrated by monitoring a biological process, namely quantifying the amount of the bacterial metabolite p-Coumaric acid (pHCA) produced by genetically modified E. coli cells. The first generation LoD device (with integrated...

  16. Mathematical Formalization Of Theories Of Motivation Proposed By Abraham Maslow And Frederick Herzberg

    OpenAIRE

    Ivan Kotliarov

    2008-01-01

    the present article gives an outline of a mathematical model of theories of motivation proposed by Abraham Maslow and Frederick Herzberg. This model is built on a basis of special non-continuous functions.

  17. AFSC/ABL: Frederick Sound Echo-integrated Trawl Survey, 2001 to 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The acoustic trawl database for Frederick Sounds echo-trawl survey was conducted from 2001 to 2004. The surveys were conducted throughout most of the southern part...

  18. Business Case Analysis: Reconfiguration of the Frederick Memorial Healthcare System Courier Service

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rauch, Nathan C

    2008-01-01

    This business case projects the likely benefits and costs to Frederick Memorial Hospital that would result from a decision to reconfigure its courier service by way of vehicle diversification and route realignment...

  19. Realities of Graphic Novels: An Interview with Frederick Aldama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruzbeh Babaee

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The trend about producing and reading graphic novels has grown since the late twentieth century. These books with comic backgrounds seem to have a miraculous energy. They have been even appealing to unenthusiastic readers. They tempt people of different age groups, races and genders. They are also used for teaching ESL courses, e-learning activities, designing reality games, and teaching creative writing. If you talk to its followers, you may get the feedback that graphic novels can fulfil your demands and dreams from writing your assignments to taking you to the moon. Although many researchers have investigated the benefits of graphic novels, many faculties and librarians are still reluctant to include graphic novels in their curricula. Perhaps it is simply the attitude of many teachers and librarians that graphic novels look like a comic book, and simply are not “real” books. They have too few words, too many pictures, and lack quality to be seriously considered as literature. In the following, I, Ruzbeh Babaee, did an interview with Distinguished Professor Frederick Luis Aldama on realities of graphic novels. Aldama is a distinguished scholar and Professor of English at The Ohio State University, United States. In the departments of English and Spanish & Portuguese he is involved in teaching courses on US Latino and Latin American cultural phenomena, literature, film, music, video games, and comic books.  He has founded and directed the White House Hispanic Bright Spot awarded LASER/Latino and Latin American Space for Enrichment Research. Professor Aldama won the Ohio Education Summit Award for Founding & Directing LASER in 2016. In April 2017, Aldama was awarded OSU’s Alumni Award for Distinguished Teaching and inducted into the Academy of Teaching. He is the author, co-author, and editor of 30 books, including his first book of fiction/graphic fiction, Long Stories Cut Short: Fictions from the Borderlands.

  20. Virtual Labs and Virtual Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehler, Ted

    2006-12-01

    Virtual Labs and Virtual Worlds Coastline Community College has under development several virtual lab simulations and activities that range from biology, to language labs, to virtual discussion environments. Imagine a virtual world that students enter online, by logging onto their computer from home or anywhere they have web access. Upon entering this world they select a personalized identity represented by a digitized character (avatar) that can freely move about, interact with the environment, and communicate with other characters. In these virtual worlds, buildings, gathering places, conference rooms, labs, science rooms, and a variety of other “real world” elements are evident. When characters move about and encounter other people (players) they may freely communicate. They can examine things, manipulate objects, read signs, watch video clips, hear sounds, and jump to other locations. Goals of critical thinking, social interaction, peer collaboration, group support, and enhanced learning can be achieved in surprising new ways with this innovative approach to peer-to-peer communication in a virtual discussion world. In this presentation, short demos will be given of several online learning environments including a virtual biology lab, a marine science module, a Spanish lab, and a virtual discussion world. Coastline College has been a leader in the development of distance learning and media-based education for nearly 30 years and currently offers courses through PDA, Internet, DVD, CD-ROM, TV, and Videoconferencing technologies. Its distance learning program serves over 20,000 students every year. sponsor Jerry Meisner

  1. Detergent-Based Isolation of Yeast Membrane Rafts: An Inquiry-Based Laboratory Series for the Undergraduate Cell Biology or Biochemistry Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willhite, D. Grant; Wright, Stephen E.

    2009-01-01

    Lipid rafts have been implicated in numerous cellular processes including cell signaling, endocytosis, and even viral infection. Isolation of these lipid rafts often involves detergent treatment of the membrane to dissolve nonraft components followed by separation of raft regions in a density gradient. We present here an inquiry-based lab series…

  2. Crown Prince Frederick of Prussia: Suez and syphilis. Un canard dévoilé.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurenson, R D

    1995-06-01

    Frederick III (Crown Prince of Prussia, and Emperor of Germany) died of cancer of the larynx in 1888. In Drame Imperial (1888) journalist Jean de Bonnefon asserted that the disease was not cancer but syphilis which the Crown Prince acquired in 1869 in Suez. What de Bonnefon wrote about the prince does not coincide with the prince's itinerary published in the London Times. This discrepancy is examined and the reason for de Bonefon's claim is considered. The report that Crown Prince Frederick of Prussia caught syphilis in Suez is a canard.

  3. The argumentative relevance of visual and multimodal antithesis in Frederick Wiseman’s documentaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tseronis, A.; Forceville, C.; Tseronis, A.; Forceville, C.

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter we argue that certain salient contrasts that Frederick Wiseman presents non-verbally and multimodally in his Direct Cinema documentaries can be understood as antitheses that play an argumentative role. In this type of documentary, which renounces the use of voice-over narration and

  4. Was the Constitution Pro-Slavery? The Changing View of Frederick Douglass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Robert

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author reflects on Frederick Douglass's different interpretations of the Constitution. One explanation of the shift in Douglass's thinking on the Constitution had to do with his growing intellectual independence. Douglass had the intellectual space to reflect on the fact that there was more than one way to think about…

  5. Frederick National Laboratory Rallies to Meet Demand for Zika Vaccine | FNLCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research is producing another round of Zika vaccine for ongoing studies to determine the best delivery method and dosage. This will lay the groundwork for additional tests to see if the vaccine prevents i

  6. Annual Running Festival a Chance for the Frederick Community to Stretch Its Legs | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    May will soon be here, ushering in the season of cookouts, sunny days—and the annual Frederick Running Festival. Organized by Corrigan Sports Enterprises, the two-day event gives athletes of all backgrounds chances for exercise and friendly competition against their fellow community members.

  7. Frederick Banting and Insulin Discovery (75th Anniversary of Tragic Death)

    OpenAIRE

    A.G. Reznikov

    2016-01-01

    The article has been written in order to commemorate Canadian scientist Frederick Banting, the discoverer of insulin. There are briefly enlightened biography of the scientist and a history of insulin discovery. There is mentioned the role of scientist’s predecessors in decoding pathogenesis of diabetes and resolving the problem of development of therapeutic preparation of insulin.

  8. Frederick Banting and Insulin Discovery (75th Anniversary of Tragic Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.G. Reznikov

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The article has been written in order to commemorate Canadian scientist Frederick Banting, the discoverer of insulin. There are briefly enlightened biography of the scientist and a history of insulin discovery. There is mentioned the role of scientist’s predecessors in decoding pathogenesis of diabetes and resolving the problem of development of therapeutic preparation of insulin.

  9. A Helping Hand in the Frederick Community—Ross Smith | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By day, Ross Smith is the compliance and security officer for Data Management Services, Inc., assigned to the National Cancer Institute (NCI) at Frederick. His role is to ensure the secure operation of in-house computer systems, servers, and network connections. But in his spare time, Smith is also a volunteer firefighter and emergency medical technician (EMT).

  10. Joint Service Chemical and Biological Defense Program FY 08-09 Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-01

    Biological Defense (MEDBIO) CONTRACTORS dynPort vaccine company FREDERICK, MD emergent Biosolutions LANSING, MI cangene corporation WINNIPEG, MANITOBA...army medical research institute of infectious diseases Consolidated Program Locator Map MASSACHUSETTS nctrf wolf coach MICHIGAN emergent Biosolutions

  11. Lab on a chip systems for biochemical analysis, biology and synthesis: towarda simple, scalable microfabrication technolgies based on COC and LTCC

    OpenAIRE

    Berenguel Alonso, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    La tecnologia Lab on a Chip (LOC) ha experimentat un extraordinari creixement en les dues últimes dècades, gràcies al desenvolupament de noves tecnologies de microfabricació i al coneixement més profund dels fenòmens físics dominants a la microescala. Els sistemes LOC presenten diversos avantatges sobre els sistemes macroscòpics anàlegs: transport d'energia i matèria més eficients, miniaturització, automatització, integració, alta densitat d'informació, entre d'altres. Aquests avantatges han ...

  12. A mosaic of diverse ideas: The ecological legacy of J. Frederick Grassle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snelgrove, Paul V.R; Petrecca, Rose; Stocks, Karen I.; Van Dover, Cindy L.; Zimmer, Cheryl A.

    2009-01-01

    During the 40 years (and counting) of his scientific career, J. Frederick Grassle has made fundamental contributions to our understanding of marine ecosystems from coral reefs to deep-sea sediments. His advocacy and passion for marine biodiversity in the form of myriad groundbreaking studies and influential reviews, his generosity of ideas and capacity to catalyze and inspire those working with him as well as the science community in general, his breakthroughs in improved ocean observation, his marine science infrastructure initiatives, together with his tireless persistence, have helped lead to major shifts in approaches to marine science and the shape of modern ocean studies to one that favours multidisciplinary research, teamwork, continuous, long-term observation, in situ experimentation, recognition of the importance of marine biodiversity, and global cooperation on research and data sharing. In shallow-water ecology, he co-discovered sibling species of Capitella spp., important not only because it is a key pollution indicator but also because the work helped to pave the way for the discovery of numerous sibling species in other taxa with major ramifications for ecological understanding. He was also a key player in the West Falmouth oil spill study which, along with complementary mesocosm experiments, remains one of the most important and detailed studies of its kind. He was also a lead player in the first biological expedition to hydrothermal vents and wrote the seminal articles that helped to inspire the flurry of vent research that followed. He is perhaps best known for his deep-sea work, where he brought submersibles to the forefront as a sampling tool, brought experimental manipulative studies to the primarily descriptive discipline of deep-sea benthic ecology, and generated tremendous excitement, debate, and rekindled interest in marine biodiversity with the first quantitative estimate of global deep-sea diversity. His efforts to document marine

  13. A mosaic of diverse ideas: The ecological legacy of J. Frederick Grassle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snelgrove, Paul V. R.; Petrecca, Rose; Stocks, Karen I.; Van Dover, Cindy; Ann Zimmer, Cheryl

    2009-09-01

    During the 40 years (and counting) of his scientific career, J. Frederick Grassle has made fundamental contributions to our understanding of marine ecosystems from coral reefs to deep-sea sediments. His advocacy and passion for marine biodiversity in the form of myriad groundbreaking studies and influential reviews, his generosity of ideas and capacity to catalyze and inspire those working with him as well as the science community in general, his breakthroughs in improved ocean observation, his marine science infrastructure initiatives, together with his tireless persistence, have helped lead to major shifts in approaches to marine science and the shape of modern ocean studies to one that favours multidisciplinary research, teamwork, continuous, long-term observation, in situ experimentation, recognition of the importance of marine biodiversity, and global cooperation on research and data sharing. In shallow-water ecology, he co-discovered sibling species of Capitella spp., important not only because it is a key pollution indicator but also because the work helped to pave the way for the discovery of numerous sibling species in other taxa with major ramifications for ecological understanding. He was also a key player in the West Falmouth oil spill study which, along with complementary mesocosm experiments, remains one of the most important and detailed studies of its kind. He was also a lead player in the first biological expedition to hydrothermal vents and wrote the seminal articles that helped to inspire the flurry of vent research that followed. He is perhaps best known for his deep-sea work, where he brought submersibles to the forefront as a sampling tool, brought experimental manipulative studies to the primarily descriptive discipline of deep-sea benthic ecology, and generated tremendous excitement, debate, and rekindled interest in marine biodiversity with the first quantitative estimate of global deep-sea diversity. His efforts to document marine

  14. Virtual Reality Lab Assistant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Hrishikesh; Palmer, Timothy A.

    1996-01-01

    Virtual Reality Lab Assistant (VRLA) demonstration model is aligned for engineering and material science experiments to be performed by undergraduate and graduate students in the course as a pre-lab simulation experience. This will help students to get a preview of how to use the lab equipment and run experiments without using the lab hardware/software equipment. The quality of the time available for laboratory experiments can be significantly improved through the use of virtual reality technology.

  15. NCI at Frederick Team Receives 2014 HHS Green Champions Award | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    A team of NCI and Leidos Biomedical Research employees at NCI at Frederick received the Energy and Fleet Management Award, one of the 2014 Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Green Champions Awards, for comparing the costs and energy usage of two -80°C freezer technologies. This was the first scientific study to be jointly conducted by Leidos Biomedical Research’s Applied and Developmental Research Directorate (ADRD) and Facilities Maintenance and Engineering Directorate (FME).  

  16. An Integral Part of the Frederick Community—Michael Dean | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    For more than 30 years, Michael Dean, Ph.D., has been an integral part of the NCI at Frederick community. In addition to studying several different aspects of genomics and cancer research, he has worked with the Werner H. Kirsten Student Intern Program and also volunteered his time with Mission of Mercy, a community-based organization providing free healthcare and free prescription medications to the uninsured and under-insured.

  17. Geologic and anthropogenic factors influencing karst development in the Frederick region of Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brezinski, D.K.

    2007-01-01

    Karst features pervade the outcrop belts of Triassic, Ordovician, and Cambrian rocks in the Frederick Valley region of Maryland's western Piedmont. Detailed stratigraphic analysis and geologic and karst mapping demonstrate that individual stratigraphic units have differing susceptibilities of karst feature creation. Although the Triassic Leesburg Member of the Bull Run Formation and Rocky Springs Station Member of the Cambrian Frederick Formation have many surface depressions within their outcrop belts, the Lime Kiln Member of the Frederick Formation and the Ceresville, Fountain Rock, and Woodsboro members of the Ordovician Grove Formation have the greatest potential for development of catastrophic collapse sinkholes. Although these four members have the highest relative susceptibility, human activity can increase the potential for sinkhole activation in all units. Rerouting of surface drainage patterns, unlined drainage, and storm-water management areas and removal of significant overburden deposits significantly increase sinkhole development, but mainly, these units are inherently more susceptible to begin with. Copyright ?? 2007. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists/Division of Environmental Geosciences. All rights reserved.

  18. Cyclic loading of thick vessels based on the Prager and Armstrong-Frederick kinematic hardening models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahbadi, H.; Eslami, M.R.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to relate the type of stress category in cyclic loading to ratcheting or shakedown behaviour of the structure. The kinematic hardening theory of plasticity based on the Prager and Armstrong-Frederick models is used to evaluate the cyclic loading behaviour of thick spherical and cylindrical vessels under load and deformation controlled stresses. It is concluded that kinematic hardening based on the Prager model under load and deformation controlled conditions, excluding creep, results in shakedown or reversed plasticity for spherical and cylindrical vessels with the isotropy assumption of the tension/compression curve. Under an anisotropy assumption of the tension/compression curve, this model predicts ratcheting. On the other hand, the Armstrong-Frederick model predicts ratcheting under load controlled cyclic loading and reversed plasticity for deformation controlled stress. The interesting conclusion is that the Armstrong-Frederick model is well capable to predict the experimental data under the assumed type of stresses, wherever experimental data are available

  19. Awakening interest in the natural sciences - BASF's Kids' Labs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Cinthia

    2012-01-01

    At BASF's Ludwigshafen headquarters, kids and young adults in grades 1-13 can learn about chemistry in the Kids' Labs. Different programs exist for different levels of knowledge. In the two 'Hands-on Lab H(2)O & Co.' Kids' Labs, students from grades 1-6 explore the secrets of chemistry. BASF Kids' Labs have now been set up in over 30 countries. In Switzerland alone, almost 2,000 students have taken part in the 'Water Loves Chemistry' Kids' Lab since it was started in 2011. In Alsace, 600 students have participated to date. In the Teens' Lab 'Xplore Middle School', middle school students explore five different programs with the themes 'substance labyrinth', 'nutrition', 'coffee, caffeine & co.', 'cosmetics' and 'energy'. Biotechnological methods are the focus of the Teens' Lab 'Xplore Biotech' for students taking basic and advanced biology courses. In the 'Xplore High School' Teens' Lab, chemistry teachers present their own experimental lab instruction for students in basic and advanced chemistry courses. The Virtual Lab has been expanding the offerings of the BASF Kids' Labs since 2011. The online lab was developed by the company for the International Year Of Chemistry and gives kids and young adults the opportunity to do interactive experiments outside of the lab.

  20. Crystallization Formulation Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Crystallization Formulation Lab fills a critical need in the process development and optimization of current and new explosives and energetic formulations. The...

  1. USNA DIGITAL FORENSICS LAB

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — To enable Digital Forensics and Computer Security research and educational opportunities across majors and departments. Lab MissionEstablish and maintain a Digital...

  2. Fabrication and Prototyping Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The Fabrication and Prototyping Lab for composite structures provides a wide variety of fabrication capabilities critical to enabling hands-on research and...

  3. Magnetic Media Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This lab specializes in tape certification and performance characterization of high density digital tape and isprepared to support the certification of standard size...

  4. The fed-batch principle for the molecular biology lab: controlled nutrient diets in ready-made media improve production of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Mirja; Neubauer, Antje; Neubauer, Peter

    2016-06-17

    While the nutrient limited fed-batch technology is the standard of the cultivation of microorganisms and production of heterologous proteins in industry, despite its advantages in view of metabolic control and high cell density growth, shaken batch cultures are still the standard for protein production and expression screening in molecular biology and biochemistry laboratories. This is due to the difficulty and expenses to apply a controlled continuous glucose feed to shaken cultures. New ready-made growth media, e.g. by biocatalytic release of glucose from a polymer, offer a simple solution for the application of the fed-batch principle in shaken plate and flask cultures. Their wider use has shown that the controlled diet not only provides a solution to obtain significantly higher cell yields, but also in many cases folding of the target protein is improved by the applied lower growth rates; i.e. final volumetric yields for the active protein can be a multiple of what is obtained in complex medium cultures. The combination of the conventional optimization approaches with new and easy applicable growth systems has revolutionized recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli in view of product yield, culture robustness as well as significantly increased cell densities. This technical development establishes the basis for successful miniaturization and parallelization which is now an important tool for synthetic biology and protein engineering approaches. This review provides an overview of the recent developments, results and applications of advanced growth systems which use a controlled glucose release as substrate supply.

  5. Comprehensive Performance Study of Magneto Cantilevers as a Candidate Model for Biological Sensors used in Lab-on-a-Chip Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberkari, Hamidreza; Ghavifekr, Habib Badri; Shamsi, Mousa

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, demand for biological sensors which are capable of fast and accurate detection of minor amounts of pathogens in real-time form has been intensified. Acoustic wave (AW) devices whose performance is determined by mass sensitivity parameters and quality factor are used in biological sensors as platforms with high quality. Yet, current AW devices are facing many challenges such as the low value of their quality factor in practical applications and also their difficulty to use in liquids. The main focus of this article is to study on the magnetostrictive sensors which include milli/microcantilever (MSMC) type. In comparison with AW devices, MSMC has a lot of advantages; (1) its actuation and sensing unit is wirelessly controlled. (2) Its fabrication process is easy. (3) It works well in liquids. (4) It has a high-quality factor (in the air > 500). Simulation results demonstrate that the amount of quality factor depends on environment properties (density and viscosity), MSMC geometry, and its resonant behavior of harmonic modes.

  6. Guidelines for Urban Labs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholl, Christian; Agger Eriksen, Mette; Baerten, Nik

    2017-01-01

    urban lab initiatives from five different European cities: Antwerp (B), Graz and Leoben (A), Maastricht (NL) and Malmö (S). We do not pretend that these guidelines touch upon all possible challenges an urban lab may be confronted with, but we have incorporated all those we encountered in our...

  7. Microsoft Office 365 Deployment Continues through June at NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    The latest Microsoft suite, Office 365 (O365), is being deployed to all NCI at Frederick computers during the months of May and June to comply with federal mandates. The suite includes the latest versions of Word, Excel, Outlook, PowerPoint, and Skype for Business, along with cloud-based capabilities. These cloud-based capabilities will help meet the federal mandates that require all Health and Human Services operating divisions to migrate e-mail to the cloud by the end of 2016.

  8. OpenLabNotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, Markus; Franz, Michael; Tan, Qihua

    2015-01-01

    be advantageous if an ELN was Integrated with a laboratory information management system to allow for a comprehensive documentation of experimental work including the location of samples that were used in a particular experiment. Here, we present OpenLabNotes, which adds state-of-the-art ELN capabilities to Open......LabFramework, a powerful and flexible laboratory information management system. In contrast to comparable solutions, it allows to protect the intellectual property of its users by offering data protection with digital signatures. OpenLabNotes effectively Closes the gap between research documentation and sample management...

  9. Research on the enhancement of biological nitrogen removal at low temperatures from ammonium-rich wastewater by the bio-electrocoagulation technology in lab-scale systems, pilot-scale systems and a full-scale industrial wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Qian, Guangsheng; Ye, Linlin; Hu, Xiaomin; Yu, Xin; Lyu, Weijian

    2018-04-17

    In cold areas, nitrogen removal performance of wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) declines greatly in winter. This paper systematically describes the enhancement effect of a periodic reverse electrocoagulation technology on biological nitrogen removal at low temperatures. The study showed that in the lab-scale systems, the electrocoagulation technology improved the biomass amount, enzyme activity and the amount of nitrogen removal bacteria (Nitrosomonas, Nitrobacter, Paracoccus, Thauera and Enterobacter). This enhanced nitrification and denitrification of activated sludge at low temperatures. In the pilot-scale systems, the electrocoagulation technology increased the relative abundance of cold-adapted microorganisms (Luteimonas and Trueperaceae) at low temperatures. In a full-scale industrial WWTP, comparison of data from winter 2015 and winter 2016 showed that effluent chemical oxygen demand (COD), NH 4 + -N, and NO 3 - -N reduced by 10.37, 3.84, and 136.43 t, respectively, throughout the winter, after installation of electrocoagulation devices. These results suggest that the electrocoagulation technology is able to improve the performance of activated sludge under low-temperature conditions. This technology provides a new way for upgrading of the performance of WWTPs in cold areas. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Udall Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Udall lab is interested in genome evolution and cotton genomics.The cotton genus ( Gossypium) is an extraordinarily diverse group with approximately 50 species...

  11. LIDAR Research & Development Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The LIDAR Research and Development labs are used to investigate and improve LIDAR components such as laser sources, optical signal detectors and optical filters. The...

  12. Clothing Systems Design Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Clothing Systems Design Lab houses facilities for the design and rapid prototyping of military protective apparel.Other focuses include: creation of patterns and...

  13. Secure Processing Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Secure Processing Lab is the center of excellence for new and novel processing techniques for the formation, calibration and analysis of radar. In addition, this...

  14. Guidelines for Urban Labs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholl, Christian; Agger Eriksen, Mette; Baerten, Nik

    2017-01-01

    These guidelines are intended for team members and managers of urban labs and, more generally, for civil servants and facilitators in cities working with experimental processes to tackle complex challenges. They aim to support the everyday practice of collaboratively experimenting and learning ho...... the result is inspiring and instructive for all those who want to wrap their minds around experimental co-creative approaches to urban governance and city development.......These guidelines are intended for team members and managers of urban labs and, more generally, for civil servants and facilitators in cities working with experimental processes to tackle complex challenges. They aim to support the everyday practice of collaboratively experimenting and learning how...... to create more sustainable and inclusive cities. Policy-makers and urban development stakeholders may struggle to implement urban labs, and seek guidance for further development. Evidence-based guidelines and design principles are needed to decide for which types of challeng- es urban labs are most suited...

  15. Laser Research Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Laser Research lab is thecenter for the development of new laser sources, nonlinear optical materials, frequency conversion processes and laser-based sensors for...

  16. Next Practise Labs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    Klaus Thestrup explains what Next Practise Labs are and how that involves both participants, the researcher and teachers. He also talks about how the term builds upon the open laboratory and experimenting communities - and cultures of creativity.......Klaus Thestrup explains what Next Practise Labs are and how that involves both participants, the researcher and teachers. He also talks about how the term builds upon the open laboratory and experimenting communities - and cultures of creativity....

  17. Macromolecules Inquiry: Transformation of a Standard Biochemistry Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsworth, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Identification of macromolecules in food is a standard introductory high school biology lab. The intent of this article is to describe the conversion of this standard cookbook lab into an inquiry investigation. Instead of verifying the macromolecules found in food, students use their knowledge of the macromolecules in food to determine the…

  18. Watershed Boundaries, Frederick County, Maryland, watershed management areas that extend to the topographic watershed divide. Watersheds were developed from catchment delineations (2008) by dissolving catchments within larger drainage areas that were previously defined by Fre, Published in 2008, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, Frederick County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Watershed Boundaries dataset current as of 2008. Frederick County, Maryland, watershed management areas that extend to the topographic watershed divide. Watersheds...

  19. National Dam Safety Program. Lake Frederick Dam (Inventory Number NY 769), Orange County, New York. Phase 1 Inspection Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-11

    COMPUTATIONSF F . OTHER DATA LAL M- PHASE I REPORT - NATIONAL DAM SAFETY PROGRAMA _ Name of Dam: LAKE FREDERICK DAM (I.D. NO. 769) V - State Located: NEW YORK... abc -ut 230 feet to the right of the spiliway. The conduit runs = underground and outfalls about 75 feet downstream frm the toe of the dar; the

  20. Biology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I am particularly happy that the Academy is bringing out this document by Professor M S. Valiathan on Ayurvedic Biology. It is an effort to place before the scientific community, especially that of India, the unique scientific opportunities that arise out of viewing Ayurveda from the perspective of contemporary science, its tools ...

  1. VirexLab a Virtual Reality Educational System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The VirexLab, the centerpiece of this Tietronix proposal offers significant innovation to NASA and to the Marshall Space Flight Center, implementing the Biological...

  2. VirexLab a Virtual Reality Educational System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The VirexLab, the centerpiece of this Tietronix proposal offers significant innovation to NASA and to the Marshall Space Flight Center, implementing the Biological...

  3. Film, Parable, Reciprocity. Frederick Wiseman’s “Reality Fictions” and Social Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyda Faber

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This essay argues that social criticism may be an effect of Frederick Wiseman’s “re¬ality fiction” films only if that effect is understood as analogous to that of parable, an awakened responsiveness to the unknown and the unresolved. The irresolution witnessed repeatedly in his films is the reality of “radical inequality” within institu¬tions in democracy, with domination ranging from explicit exploitative relations to subtle aural and bodily cues. Within those relations, Wiseman opens up the space of parable as a vision and practice of reciprocity and more-than-reciprocity through, among others, filmic strategies of “lyric portraiture” and expressive “democratic noise”. Furthermore, Wiseman’s camera extends more-than-reciprocity to animals in a filmic style that shows human and animal relations as visceral markers of what otherwise might remain unseen in human-to-human relations.

  4. The African-American grandmother in autobiographical works by Frederick Douglass, Langston Hughes, and Maya Angelou.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill-Lubin, M A

    1991-01-01

    Using the autobiographies of Frederick Douglass, Langston Hughes, and Maya Angelou, this article demonstrates that the portrait of the African-American grandmother is one of action, involvement, hope, and dignity. In examining the works, we observe her functioning in three areas: as the preserver and most tenacious survivor of the African extended family; second, as repository and distributor of the family history, wisdom, and black lore; this role places her at the foundation of the Black, oral and written, literary and creative traditions; and third, as the retainer and transmitter of values and ideals that support and enhance her humanity, her family, and her community. This function emphasizes her spirituality. It is suggested that the grandmother, having played an important role in the growth, development, and artistic flowering of the autobiographer, can become a model and source of empowerment for future generations.

  5. Lab Attendance and Academic Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Adair, Kirk; Swinton, Omari H.

    2012-01-01

    The benefits from attendance of lectures have been established in the literature. This paper focuses on attendance not of the lecture, but of smaller labs. These labs are 50 minutes one-day-a-week sessions to emphasis material covered during lecture. Using a 200-student Principles of Economics class that covers microeconomics with six different labs, we investigate the effect of lab attendance on exam performance by taking into account individual characteristics. We find that lab attendance b...

  6. The NOAO Data Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, M.; Olsen, K.; Stobie, E. B.; Mighell, K. J.; Norris, P.

    2015-09-01

    We describe the NOAO Data Lab to help community users take advantage of current large surveys and prepare them even larger surveys in the era of LSST. The Data Lab will allow users to efficiently utilize catalogs of billions of objects, combine traditional telescope image and spectral data with external archives, share custom results with collaborators, publish data products to other users, and experiment with analysis toolkits. Specific science cases will be used to develop a prototype framework and tools, allowing us to work directly with scientists from survey teams to ensure development remains focused on scientifically productive tasks.

  7. SenseLab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crasto, Chiquito J.; Marenco, Luis N.; Liu, Nian; Morse, Thomas M.; Cheung, Kei-Hoi; Lai, Peter C.; Bahl, Gautam; Masiar, Peter; Lam, Hugo Y.K.; Lim, Ernest; Chen, Huajin; Nadkarni, Prakash; Migliore, Michele; Miller, Perry L.; Shepherd, Gordon M.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the latest developments in neuroscience information dissemination through the SenseLab suite of databases: NeuronDB, CellPropDB, ORDB, OdorDB, OdorMapDB, ModelDB and BrainPharm. These databases include information related to: (i) neuronal membrane properties and neuronal models, and (ii) genetics, genomics, proteomics and imaging studies of the olfactory system. We describe here: the new features for each database, the evolution of SenseLab’s unifying database architecture and instances of SenseLab database interoperation with other neuroscience online resources. PMID:17510162

  8. CDC Lab Values

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-02-02

    More than fifteen hundred scientists fill the lab benches at CDC, logging more than four million hours each year. CDC’s laboratories play a critical role in the agency’s ability to find, stop, and prevent disease outbreaks. This podcast provides a brief overview of what goes on inside CDC’s labs, and why this work makes a difference in American’s health.  Created: 2/2/2015 by Office of the Associate Director for Communication (OADC).   Date Released: 2/2/2015.

  9. The Crime Lab Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Annamae J.

    2003-01-01

    Describes the Crime Lab Project, which takes an economical, hands-on, interdisciplinary approach to studying the career of forensics in the middle or high school classroom. Includes step-by-step student requirements for the investigative procedure, a sample evidence request form, and an assessment rubric. (KHR)

  10. Physics lab in spin

    CERN Multimedia

    Hawkes, N

    1999-01-01

    RAL is fostering commerical exploitation of its research and facilities in two main ways : spin-out companies exploit work done at the lab, spin-in companies work on site taking advantage of the facilities and the expertise available (1/2 page).

  11. A Big Bang Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheider, Walter

    2005-01-01

    The February 2005 issue of The Science Teacher (TST) reminded everyone that by learning how scientists study stars, students gain an understanding of how science measures things that can not be set up in lab, either because they are too big, too far away, or happened in a very distant past. The authors of "How Far are the Stars?" show how the…

  12. Lab on paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Weian; van den Berg, Albert

    2008-01-01

    Lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices, which are suited to portable point-of-care (POC) diagnostics and on-site detection, hold great promise for improving global health, and other applications.1–8 While their importance and utility are widely acknowledged and extensive research has been conducted in the

  13. Digital Social Science Lab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Michael; Lauersen, Christian Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    at the Faculty of Social Sciences. DSSL will host and facilitate an 80 m2 large mobile and intelligent study- and learning environment with a focus on academic events, teaching and collaboration. Besides the physical settings DSSL has two primary functions: 1. To implement relevant social scientific software......At the Faculty Library of Social Sciences (part of Copenhagen University Library) we are currently working intensely towards the establishment of a Digital Social Science Lab (DSSL). The purpose of the lab is to connect research, education and learning processes with the use of digital tools...... and hardware at the disposal for students and staff at The Faculty of Social Sciences along with instruction and teaching in the different types of software, e.g. Stata, Nvivo, Atlas.ti, R Studio, Zotero and GIS-software. 2. To facilitate academic events focusing on use of digital tools and analytic software...

  14. Nordic Study Labs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørnø, Rasmus Leth Vergmann; Hestbech, Astrid Margrethe; Gynther, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Denne rapport dokumenterer projektet Nordplus projektet The Nordic Study Lab. Projektet har haft til formål at udveksle eksisterende viden blandt projektdeltagerne om etablering og drift af distribueret uddannelse med særlig fokus på læringscentre. I løbet af en serie af studiebesøg har partnere...... med at skabe kvalificeret uddannelse på distancen. Nordic Study Labs projektet har afsløret et rigt reservoir af eksisterende erfaringer, med et stort transferpotentiale og både unikke og eksemplariske løsninger på uddannelses­ problematikker. Mange af de nordiske lande har mange års succesrige...

  15. Berkeley Lab Computing Sciences: Accelerating Scientific Discovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hules, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Scientists today rely on advances in computer science, mathematics, and computational science, as well as large-scale computing and networking facilities, to increase our understanding of ourselves, our planet, and our universe. Berkeley Lab's Computing Sciences organization researches, develops, and deploys new tools and technologies to meet these needs and to advance research in such areas as global climate change, combustion, fusion energy, nanotechnology, biology, and astrophysics

  16. Frederick Delius: controversies regarding his neurological disorder and its impact on his compositional output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Frederick Delius was born in Yorkshire, England, on June 29, 1862, the son of German immigrants. He showed early musical talent but his father, a wealthy wool merchant, insisted he pursue a business career. After several failures, including an assignment managing an orange grove near Jacksonville, Florida, his father agreed to support his musical studies in Leipzig, assuming he would then become self-sufficient. Delius spent most of his adult life in France, living with and ultimately marrying Jelka Rosen, a painter of independent means, composing prolifically, and being sexually promiscuous both before and after starting life with Jelka. He contracted syphilis in 1895 and manifestations of neurosyphilis appeared in 1910. Despite periods of relative good health over the ensuing 10 years, he became progressively disabled from 1920 on, ultimately quadriparetic and blind but with preserved cognition and musical inspiration. In his final years, he completed several compositions aided by a young British musician, Eric Fenby, who served as his amanuensis and caregiver, along with Jelka, to his death on June 10, 1934. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Systems kinomics for characterizing host responses to high-consequence pathogens at the NIH/NIAID Integrated Research Facility-Frederick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindrachuk, Jason; Falcinelli, Shane; Wada, Jiro; Kuhn, Jens H; Hensley, Lisa E; Jahrling, Peter B

    2014-07-01

    Currently, there is a paucity of information regarding the molecular pathogenesis for many high-consequence pathogens (HCPs) that pose threats to both national and international public health. In spite of this, investigations of the molecular pathogenesis for many HCPs have been limited to gross pathological changes in animal models or global analysis of gene expression. Further, questions remain regarding the ability of animal models of disease to recapitulate human molecular pathogenesis or act as predictors of therapeutic efficacy. Thus, it is likely that medical countermeasure development for HCPs will rely on identifying therapeutic targets that are uniquely modulated during HCP infection. It is also appreciated that many cellular processes can be regulated independently of changes in transcription or translation through phosphorylation events. Cellular kinases, individually or collectively (the kinome), play critical roles in regulating complex biology, underlie various malignancies, and represent high-priority drug targets. The growing interest in kinases in both basic and translational research has driven efforts to develop technologies that enable characterization of phosphorylation-mediated signal transduction. To this end, enhanced technical capabilities at the IRF-Frederick provide the unique capability for characterizing host responses to HCP insult during the course of infection and identify novel targets for therapeutic intervention. Published 2014. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  18. Archimedes Remote Lab for Secondary Schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia Zubia, J.; Angulo Martinez, I.; Martinez Pieper, G.; Lopez de Ipina Gonzalez de Artaza, D.; Hernandez Jayo, U.; Orduna Fernandez, P.; Dziabenko, O.; Rodriguez Gil, L.; van Riesen, Siswa; Anjewierden, Anjo Allert; Kamp, Ellen; de Jong, Anthonius J.M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a remote lab designed for teaching the Archimedes’ principle to secondary school students, as well as an online virtual lab on the general domain of buoyancy. The Archimedes remote lab is integrated into WebLab-Deusto. Both labs are promoted for usage in frame of the Go-Lab

  19. DESY NanoLab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Stierle

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The DESY NanoLab is a facility providing access to nano-characterization, nano-structuring and nano-synthesis techniques which are complementary to the advanced X-ray techniques available at DESY’s light sources. It comprises state-of-the art scanning probe microscopy and focused ion beam manufacturing, as well as surface sensitive spectroscopy techniques for chemical analysis. Specialized laboratory x-ray diffraction setups are available for a successful sample pre-characterization before the precious synchrotron beamtimes. Future upgrades will include as well characterization of magnetic properties.

  20. e-Learning - Physics Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohottala, Hashini

    2014-03-01

    The general student population enrolled in any college level class is highly diverse. An increasing number of ``nontraditional'' students return to college and most of these students follow distance learning degree programs while engaging in their other commitments, work and family. However, those students tend to avoid taking science courses with labs, mostly because of the incapability of remotely completing the lab components in such courses. In order to address this issue, we have come across a method where introductory level physics labs can be taught remotely. In this process a lab kit with the critical lab components that can be easily accessible are conveniently packed into a box and distributed among students at the beginning of the semester. Once the students are given the apparatus they perform the experiments at home and gather data All communications with reference to the lab was done through an interactive user-friendly webpage - Wikispaces (WikiS). Students who create pages on WikiS can submit their lab write-ups, embed videos of the experiments they perform, post pictures and direct questions to the lab instructor. The students who are enrolled in the same lab can interact with each other through WikiS to discuss labs and even get assistance.

  1. Urban Living Labs: A living lab way of working

    OpenAIRE

    van Bueren, E.M.

    2017-01-01

    Urban living labs have become a popular phenomenon in today’s cities. The Living Lab approach would provide real life research with its multiple stakeholders in a co-innovating inclusive setting, crucial in creating metropolitan solutions with impact, that will be adopted smoothly and swiftly by all involved, and thus help achieve prosperous living environments that are more liveable, sustainable, resilient and just. With these ambitions, urban living labs are important links in the achieveme...

  2. 5 Pre-Lab and Lab Activities for Newtonian Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangold, James

    2010-03-01

    Key to success of a lab activity is the student's prerequisite skills. This workshop focuses on 5 pre-lab white board activities with the corresponding lab activities in Newtonian mechanics utilizing the GMLAD. The activities will cover projectile motion; kinematics, Newton's 2nd Law, Determination of Friction and its Coefficient, Conservation of Energy, Determination of the Spring Constant, and Conservation of Momentum in 2 Dimensions. Limited to 24 participants - 2 hours - Cost 5.00

  3. Tritium at Jefferson Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bane, Jason; Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Jefferson Lab's recently upgraded accelerator will provide the perfect opportunity to increase the quality and quantity of the electron scattering world data on tritium. Tritium, the radioactive isotope of hydrogen with a half-life of 12 years, was last used in a large scale electron scattering experiment a few decades ago. This Fall Jefferson Lab will play host to a set of very exciting electron scattering experiments involving tritium. A 25 cm aluminum cell will be filled with 1 kCi of tritium with an internal pressure of approximately 200 psi at 295 kelvin. The tritium target will first see a 10.6 GeV beam to probe the deep inelastic scattering region to study the down to up quark ratio and the EMC effect. Then the beam will be set to 4.3 GeV to investigate SRCs and momentum distributions in the quasi-elastic scattering regime. If time permits, elastic scattering will be used to extract the ratio of the charge radius of tritium and helium3.

  4. UCLA Astronomer Frederick Charles Leonard (1896-1960): From Childhood Prodigy to Mature Obsession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, R. S.; Plotkin, H.

    2002-12-01

    The precocious 13-year-old Frederick Leonard burst onto the astronomical scene in 1909, when he audaciously attended the 10th anniversary meeting of the American Astronomical Society (AAS) at Yerkes Observatory. He was soon contributing frequent notes to ``Popular Astronomy" on double stars and a variety of other topics, and in 1911 founded the amateur Society for Practical Astronomy. Although he presided over its rapid growth, edited its ``Monthly Register," and dominated its administrrative structure with youthful mastery, the Society peaked early and faded into oblivion by 1917. Astronomers like F.R. Moulton and E.C. Pickering recognized his talents and provided encouragement, but he was denied membership to the AAS due to his youth. As well, his lack of rigor in observations, verbose editorializing, and hunger for the limelight gave his elders pause. After two degrees from Chicago, he moved in 1919 to the University of California, Berkeley, completing a solid Berkeley/Lick PhD in December, 1921, with a dissertation on the spectra of visual double stars. He moved within weeks to the Southern Branch of the University (later UCLA), where he introduced an undergraduate astronomy program which successfully attracted many first-rate students (Fred Whipple being perhaps the most illustrious). Although he continued various research projects at Mt. Wilson and later Lick, they were purely observational, with little interpretive analysis. Perhaps sensing that the science of astronomy was beginning to pass him by, Leonard's career path veered suddenly to meteoritics by 1930. He and meteorite collector-dealer Harvey H. Nininger founded the Society for Research on Meteorites in 1933 (later, the Meteoritical Society), and Leonard became its first president and edited its journal over the next 25 years. The Meteoritical Society provided the perfect vehicle for Leonard's adolescent preoccupation with scientific society administration and journal editing to blossom into an adult

  5. Urban Living Labs : A living lab way of working

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bueren, E.M.

    2017-01-01

    Urban living labs have become a popular phenomenon in today’s cities. The Living Lab approach would provide real life research with its multiple stakeholders in a co-innovating inclusive setting, crucial in creating metropolitan solutions with impact, that will be adopted smoothly and swiftly by all

  6. The Jefferson Lab Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kW-class infrared (IR) free electron laser (FEL) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) had the capability of producing intra-cavity Thomson scattering of the IR off the electron beam thus producing high average flux, sub-picosecond x-rays. We have measured these x-rays and demonstrated the energy tunability range from 3.5 keV to 18 keV. The corresponding flux and brightness have been estimated and will be discussed. In 2002, the FEL was disassembled and has been reconfigured to produce 10 kW average power IR. We present the estimated x-ray capabilities for the new FEL and discuss potential applications

  7. The lab of fame

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2014-01-01

    For a third time, CERN is organising the Swiss heat of Famelab, the world’s leading science communication competition that has already gathered over 5,000 young and talented scientists and engineers from all across the planet.   Besides their degrees, the scientists who participate in Famelab have another thing in common: their passion for communicating science. Coming from a variety of scientific fields, from medicine to particle physics and microbiology, the contestants have three minutes to present a science, technology, mathematics or engineering-based talk using only the props he or she can carry onto the stage; PowerPoint presentations are not permitted. The contestants are then judged by a panel of three judges who evaluate the content, clarity and charisma of their talks. What's unique about FameLab is the fact that content is an important aspect of the performance. At the end of their presentation, contestants are often questioned about the scientific relevance of...

  8. Lab-on-a-Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Labs on chips are manufactured in many shapes and sizes and can be used for numerous applications, from medical tests to water quality monitoring to detecting the signatures of life on other planets. The eight holes on this chip are actually ports that can be filled with fluids or chemicals. Tiny valves control the chemical processes by mixing fluids that move in the tiny channels that look like lines, connecting the ports. Scientists at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama designed this chip to grow biological crystals on the International Space Station. Through this research, they discovered that this technology is ideally suited for solving the challenges of the Vision for Space Exploration. For example, thousands of chips the size of dimes could be loaded on a Martian rover looking for biosignatures of past or present life. Other types of chips could be placed in handheld devices used to monitor microbes in water or to quickly conduct medical tests on astronauts. (NASA/MSFC/D.Stoffer)

  9. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Research Cancer Genomics Research ... Centers Frederick National Lab Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes ...

  10. GitLab repository management

    CERN Document Server

    Hethey, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    A simple, easy to understand tutorial guide on how to build teams and efficiently use version control, using GitLab.If you are a system administrator in a company that writes software or are in charge of an infrastructure, this book will show you the most important features of GitLab, including how to speed up the overall process

  11. Thinking Outside the Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colter, Tabitha

    2017-01-01

    As an undergraduate physics major who spent 2015 deep in a quantum optics lab at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, I knew my 2016 experience with the House of Representatives Energy and Commerce Committee would be a completely new challenge. I have long had a passion for the bridge of communication between the technical and non-technical worlds but it was only through my AIP Mather internship this summer that I was able to see that passion come to life in the realm of science policy. Suddenly, I went from squeezing political philosophy classes into my packed schedule to witnessing the political process first-hand. I was thrilled to find that the skills of critical thinking and communicating complex issues I have developed throughout my training as a physicist were directly applicable to my work in Congress. Overall, my experience this summer has given me insight into the inner workings of the federal policy process, deepened my appreciation for the work of government employees to keep Congressional members informed on the pressing current issues, and exposed me to a whole range of alternative careers within science. AIP and SPS

  12. Technical and didactic problems of virtual lab exercises in biochemistry and biotechnology education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, Michael; Skriver, Karen; Dandanell, Gert

    from a lack of conceptual analysis of what actually constitutes virtual labs. A clarification of these conceptual issues is suggested as part of a Danish research and development project on virtual lab exercises in biochemistry, molecular biology and biotechnology education. The main outcome...... of this clarification is that specific didactic problems of biochemistry education can now be addressed through the design of exercises in the virtual lab environment....

  13. Advanced Active Acoustics Lab (AAAL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Active Acoustics Lab (AAAL) is a state-of-the-art Undersea Warfare (USW) acoustic data analysis facility capable of both active and passive underwater...

  14. An Annotated Math Lab Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schussheim, Joan Yares

    1980-01-01

    A listing of mathematics laboratory material is organized as follows: learning kits, tape programs, manipulative learning materials, publications, math games, math lab library, and an alphabetized listing of publishers and/or companies offering materials. (MP)

  15. Pollution hazard closes neutrino lab

    CERN Multimedia

    Jones, Nicola

    2003-01-01

    "A leading astrophysics laboratory in Italy has closed down all but one of its experiments over concerns that toxic polluants could leak form the underground lab into the local water supply" (0.5 page)

  16. Common Systems Integration Lab (CSIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Common Systems Integration Lab (CSIL)supports the PMA-209 Air Combat Electronics Program Office. CSIL also supports development, test, integration and life cycle...

  17. Field Botanist for a Day: A Group Exercise for the Introductory Botany Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbatt, Natalie M.

    2004-01-01

    A group exercise, suggested to be most effective when used near the semester-end, enables entry-level students to appreciate the application of plant biology and makes botany labs experimental. It is believed that this series of labs helps students to appreciate their own learning when they teach and explain things to others.

  18. Installation and use of LabKey Server for proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckels, Joshua; Hussey, Peter; Nelson, Elizabeth K; Myers, Tamra; Rauch, Adam; Bellew, Matthew; Connolly, Brian; Law, Wendy; Eng, Jimmy K; Katz, Jonathan; McIntosh, Martin; Mallick, Parag; Igra, Mark

    2011-12-01

    LabKey Server (formerly CPAS, the Computational Proteomics Analysis System) provides a Web-based platform for mining data from liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) proteomic experiments. This open source platform supports systematic proteomic analyses and secure data management, integration, and sharing. LabKey Server incorporates several tools currently used in proteomic analysis, including the X! Tandem search engine, the ProteoWizard toolkit, and the PeptideProphet and ProteinProphet data mining tools. These tools and others are integrated into LabKey Server, which provides an extensible architecture for developing high-throughput biological applications. The LabKey Server analysis pipeline acts on data in standardized file formats, so that researchers may use LabKey Server with other search engines, including Mascot or SEQUEST, that follow a standardized format for reporting search engine results. Supported builds of LabKey Server are freely available at http://www.labkey.com/. Documentation and source code are available under the Apache License 2.0 at http://www.labkey.org. © 2011 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  19. Koanga de Frederick Delius : cherche premier opéra afro-américain désespérément Frederick Delius’s Koanga: desperately seeking first african-american opera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Depardieu

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Although Gershwin’s Porgy & Bess (1935 is still regarded by most critics as the first African-American opera, Louis Gruenberg’s The Emperor Jones (1933 and Scott Joplin’s Treemonisha (1910 have recently challenged this sacrosanct position. Today, according to some researchers, Frederick Delius’s Koanga, based upon the central episode of the story of “Bras coupé” in George Cable’s The Grandissimes, composed in 1897 but whose première took place in 1904, could claim to be “actually the first”. This statement obviously raises the question of the definition of an “African–American” and the attendant criteria. Through an analysis of the libretto as well as the reviews of the various performances from the late 1890’s to the early 1970’s, this article aims to assess the African-American criteria of Koanga.

  20. An improved Armstrong-Frederick-Type Plasticity Model for Stable Cyclic Stress-Strain Responses Considering Nonproportional Hardening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Zhang, Zhong-ping; Li, Chun-wang

    2018-03-01

    This paper modified an Armstrong-Frederick-type plasticity model for investigating the stable cyclic deformation behavior of metallic materials with different sensitivity to nonproportional loadings. In the modified model, the nonproportionality factor and nonproportional cyclic hardening coefficient coupled with the Jiang-Sehitoglu incremental plasticity model were used to estimate the stable stress-strain responses of the two materials (1045HR steel and 304 stainless steel) under various tension-torsion strain paths. A new equation was proposed to calculate the nonproportionality factor on the basis of the minimum normal strain range. Procedures to determine the minimum normal strain range were presented for general multiaxial loadings. Then, the modified model requires only the cyclic strain hardening exponent and cyclic strength coefficient to determine the material constants. It is convenient for predicting the stable stress-strain responses of materials in engineering application. Comparisons showed that the modified model can reflect the effect of nonproportional cyclic hardening well.

  1. Ethnoastronomy in Brazil: the contribution of Charles Frederick Hartt and José Vieira Couto de Magalhães

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Pedroza Lima

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available After a brief bibliographical review of Archaeoastronomy and Ethnoastronomy, the paper discusses some works of the late 19th century that contain information on the Ethnoastronomy of Brazilian Indians. These accounts were written by the Canadian naturalist Charles Frederick Hartt (1840-1878 and by the Brazilian polymath José Vieira Couto de Magalhães (1837-1898. Although shaped by the worldviews of their authors and the scientific ethnological theories of that time, they record a small fraction of the indigenous knowledge systems about nature, celestial myths, constellations and calendars. The authors were contemporaries, and corresponded to each other; nevertheless they independently recorded some common knowledge from peoples who spoke a tupi language.

  2. Status of chemistry lab safety in Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Krishna Prasad; Neupane, Bhanu Bhakta

    2017-01-01

    Chemistry labs can become a dangerous environment for students as the lab exercises involve hazardous chemicals, glassware, and equipment. Approximately one hundred thousand students take chemistry laboratory classes annually in Nepal. We conducted a survey on chemical lab safety issues across Nepal. In this paper, we assess the safety policy and equipment, protocols and procedures followed, and waste disposal in chemistry teaching labs. Significant population of the respondents believed that there is no monitoring of the lab safety in their lab (p<0.001). Even though many labs do not allow food and beverages inside lab and have first aid kits, they lack some basic safety equipment. There is no institutional mechanism to dispose lab waste and chemical waste is disposed haphazardly. Majority of the respondents believed that the safety training should be a part of educational training (p = 0.001) and they would benefit from short course and/or workshop on lab safety (p<0.001). PMID:28644869

  3. Experimenting with Mathematical Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanft, Rebecca; Walter, Anne

    2016-01-01

    St. Olaf College recently added a Mathematical Biology concentration to its curriculum. The core course, Mathematics of Biology, was redesigned to include a wet laboratory. The lab classes required students to collect data and implement the essential modeling techniques of formulation, implementation, validation, and analysis. The four labs…

  4. Technical and didactic problems of virtual lab exercises in biochemistry and biotechnology education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, Michael; Skriver, Karen; Dandanell, Gert

    methods. With web technologies we can now design exercises for remote or virtual labs, but we should not expect to improve student learning simply by recreating old didactic problems in new media. Unfortunately studies of the efficiency of different lab types (hands-on, virtual, and remote labs) suffer...... from a lack of conceptual analysis of what actually constitutes virtual labs. A clarification of these conceptual issues is suggested as part of a Danish research and development project on virtual lab exercises in biochemistry, molecular biology and biotechnology education. The main outcome...... of this clarification is that specific didactic problems of biochemistry education can now be addressed through the design of exercises in the virtual lab environment....

  5. Advanced Physics Lab at TCU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarles, C. A.

    2009-04-01

    The one semester, one credit hour Modern Physics Lab is viewed as a transition between the structured Physics 1 and 2 labs and junior/senior research. The labs focus on a variety of experiments built around a multichannel analyzer, various alpha, beta and gamma ray detectors and weak radioactive sources. Experiments include radiation safety and detection with a Geiger counter and NaI detector, gamma ray spectroscopy with a germanium detector, beta spectrum, alpha energy loss, gamma ray absorption, Compton effect, nuclear and positron annihilation lifetime, speed of gamma rays. Other experiments include using the analog oscilloscope, x-ray diffraction of diamond and using an SEM/EDX. Error analysis is emphasized throughout. The semester ends with an individual project, often an extension of one of the earlier experiments, and students present their results as a paper and an APS style presentation to the department.

  6. Beyond Classroom, Lab, Studio and Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, J. L.; Brey, J. A.; DeMuynck, E.; Weglarz, T. C.

    2017-12-01

    When the arts work in tandem with the sciences, the insights of these disciplines can be easily shared and teaching and learning are enriched. Our shared experiences in classroom/lab/studio instruction and in art and science based exhibitions reward all involved. Our individual disciplines cover a wide range of content- Art, Biology, Geography, Geology- yet we connect on aspects that link to the others'. We easily move from lab to studio and back again as we teach—as do our students as they learn! Art and science education can take place outside labs and studios through study abroad, international workshops, museum or gallery spaces, and in forums like the National Academies' programs. We can reach our neighbors at local public gatherings, nature centers and libraries. Our reach is extended in printed publications and in conferences. We will describe some of our activities listed above, with special focus on exhibitions: "Layers: Places in Peril"; "small problems, BIG TROUBLE" and the in-progress "River Bookends: Headwaters, Delta and the Volume of Stories In Between". Through these, learning and edification take place between the show and gallery visitors and is extended via class visits and related assignments, field trips for child and adult learners, interviews, films and panel presentations. These exhibitions offer the important opportunities for exhibit- participating scientists to find common ground with each other about their varied work. We will highlight a recent collaborative show opening a new university-based environmental research center and the rewarding activities there with art and science students and professors. We will talk about the learning enhancement added through a project that brought together a physical geography and a painting class. We will explore how students shared the form and content of their research projects with each other and then, became the educators through paintings and text of their geoscience topics on gallery walls.

  7. Lab-on-fiber technology

    CERN Document Server

    Cusano, Andrea; Crescitelli, Alessio; Ricciardi, Armando

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on a research field that is rapidly emerging as one of the most promising ones for the global optics and photonics community: the "lab-on-fiber" technology. Inspired by the well-established 'lab on-a-chip' concept, this new technology essentially envisages novel and highly functionalized devices completely integrated into a single optical fiber for both communication and sensing applications.Based on the R&D experience of some of the world's leading authorities in the fields of optics, photonics, nanotechnology, and material science, this book provides a broad and accurate de

  8. Lab-on-a-chip technologies for stem cell analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, Peter; Sticker, Drago; Charwat, Verena; Kasper, Cornelia; Lepperdinger, Günter

    2014-05-01

    The combination of microfabrication-based technologies with cell biology has laid the foundation for the development of advanced in vitro diagnostic systems capable of analyzing cell cultures under physiologically relevant conditions. In the present review, we address recent lab-on-a-chip developments for stem cell analysis. We highlight in particular the tangible advantages of microfluidic devices to overcome most of the challenges associated with stem cell identification, expansion and differentiation, with the greatest advantage being that lab-on-a-chip technology allows for the precise regulation of culturing conditions, while simultaneously monitoring relevant parameters using embedded sensory systems. State-of-the-art lab-on-a-chip platforms for in vitro assessment of stem cell cultures are presented and their potential future applications discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Exclusive processes at Jefferson Lab

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Exclusive processes such as proton–proton elastic scattering, meson photoproduction, and deuteron photodisintegration have been pursued extensively at many laboratories over the years in the search for such a transition, particularly at Jefferson Lab in recent years, taking the advantage of the high luminosity capability of ...

  10. The Telecom Lab is moving

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2009-01-01

    As of 2nd March 2009, the Telecom Lab will move to Building 58 R-017. The Telecom Lab is the central point for all support questions regarding CERN mobile phone services (provision of SIM cards, requests for modifications of subscriptions, diagnostics for mobile phone problems, etc.). The opening hours as well as the contact details for the Telecom Lab remain unchanged: New location: Building 58 R-017 Opening hours: Every week day, from 11 a.m. to 12 a.m. Phone number: 72480 Email address: labo.telecom@cern.ch This change has no impact on support requests for mobile services. Users can still submit their requests concerning mobile phone subscriptions using the usual EDH form (https://edh.cern.ch/Document/GSM). The automatic message sent to inform users of their SIM card availability will be updated to indicate the new Telecom Lab location. You can find all information related to CERN mobile phone services at the following link: http://cern.ch/gsm CS Section - IT/CS group

  11. A Simple, Successful Capacitor Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, William

    2011-01-01

    Capacitors are a fundamental component of modern electronics. They appear in myriad devices and in an enormous range of sizes. Although our students are taught the function and analysis of capacitors, few have the opportunity to use them in our labs.

  12. Virtual Simulations as Preparation for Lab Exercises: Assessing Learning of Key Laboratory Skills in Microbiology and Improvement of Essential Non-Cognitive Skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makransky, Guido; Warming Thisgaard, Malene; Gadegaard, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate if a virtual laboratory simulation (vLAB) could be used to replace a face to face tutorial (demonstration) to prepare students for a laboratory exercise in microbiology. Methods A total of 189 students who were participating in an undergraduate biology course were randomly...... selected into a vLAB or demonstration condition. In the vLAB condition students could use a vLAB at home to 'practice' streaking out bacteria on agar plates in a virtual environment. In the demonstration condition students were given a live demonstration from a lab tutor showing them how to streak out......-efficacy in the field of microbiology. Conclusion Our data show that vLABs function just as well as face to face tutorials in preparing students for a physical lab activity in microbiology. The results imply that vLABs could be used instead of face to face tutorials, and a combination of virtual and physical lab...

  13. SuperFormLab: showing SuperFormLab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    3D-printing in clay and ceramic objects shaped by your own sounds and movements! Digital form transferred via CNC-milling to ornamental ceramic wall-cladding. Brave New World… Students and their teacher at SuperFormLab, the new ceramic workshop of the School of Design at the Royal Danish Academy...... of Fine Arts in Copenhagen, will be showing results of their investigations into the potential of combining digital technologies with ceramic materials. It is now possible to shape the most complex mathematical, virtual 3D objects through the use of advanced software-programs. And more than that – you can...... now get these objects out of the computer and be able to hold and experience them with your hands. Even made in clay. At SuperFormLab, workshop for the new education in Ceramic Design at the School of Design, the integration of digital technologies in relation to the ceramic materials and techniques...

  14. Novartis School Lab: bringing young people closer to the world of research and discovering the excitement of science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Christiane Röckl; Standke, Gesche; Naef, Reto

    2012-01-01

    The Novartis School Lab (http://www.novartis.ch/schullabor) is an institution with an old tradition. The School Lab reaches about 5000 students through internal courses and an additional 5000 children at public science events where they can enjoy hands-on science in disciplines of biomedical research. The subjects range from chemistry, physics, molecular biology and genetics to toxicology and medical topics. The Novartis School Lab offers a variety of activities for youngsters aged 10-20 ranging from lab courses for school classes, continuing education for teachers and development of teaching kits, support for individual research projects to outreach for public science events. Innovation and adaptation to changes of current needs are essential aspects for the Novartis School Lab. Ongoing activities to shape the Novartis Biomedical Learning Lab include design of new teaching experiments, exploration into additional disciplines of biomedical science and the creation of a fascinating School Lab of the future.

  15. An Approach for WebLabs Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier García Zubia

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The Faculty of Engineering of University of Deusto has a WebLab oriented to Microelectronics available since 2001. The first part of this paper shows several requirements that a WebLab should meet and the following sections present the WebLab-Deusto.

  16. Recent results from Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.

    2000-01-01

    Precision measurements of the structure of nucleons and nuclei in the regime of strong interaction QCD are now possible with the availability of high current polarized electron beams, polarized targets, and recoil polarimeters, in conjunction with modern spectrometers and detector instrumentation. The authors present some recent results from the Jefferson Lab on the charge and current distributions of nucleons and nuclei. They also review measurements which relate physics at small distances to the regime where strong interaction QCD is the relevant theory

  17. Frederick W. Alt received the 2015 Szent-Györgi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Peter; Zhao, Jie; Ba, Sujuan

    2016-02-03

    The Szent-Györgyi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research is a prestigious scientific award established by the National Foundation for Cancer Research (NFCR)--a leading cancer research charitable organization in the United States that is committed to supporting scientific research and public education relating to the prevention, early diagnosis, better treatments, and ultimately, a cure for cancer. Each year, the Szent-Györgyi Prize honors an outstanding researcher, nominated by colleagues or peers, who has contributed outstanding, significant research to the fight against cancer, and whose accomplishments have helped improve treatment options for cancer patients. The Prize also promotes public awareness of the importance of basic cancer research and encourages the sustained investment needed to accelerate the translation of these research discoveries into new cancer treatments. This report highlights the pioneering work led by the 2015 Prize winner, Dr. Frederick Alt. Dr. Alt's work in the area of cancer genetics over four decades has helped to shape the very roots of modern cancer research. His work continues to profoundly impact the approaches that doctors around the globe use to diagnose and treat cancer. In particular, his seminal discoveries of gene amplification and his pioneering work on molecular mechanisms of DNA damage repair have helped to usher in the era of genetically targeted therapy and personalized medicine.

  18. Designing inquiry learning spaces for online labs in the Go-Lab platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Ton; Gillet, Dennis; Sotiriou, Sofoklis; Agogi, Ellinogermaniki; Zacharia, Zacharias

    2015-01-01

    The Go-Lab project (http://www.go-lab-project.eu/) aims to enable the integration of online labs through inquiry-based learning approaches into science classrooms. Through the use of an advanced plug and play technological solution the Go-Lab project opens up remote science laboratories, data

  19. LabVIEW 8 student edition

    CERN Document Server

    Bishop, Robert H

    2007-01-01

    For courses in Measurement and Instrumentation, Electrical Engineering lab, and Physics and Chemistry lab. This revised printing has been updated to include new LabVIEW 8.2 Student Edition. National Instruments' LabVIEW is the defacto industry standard for test, measurement, and automation software solutions. With the Student Edition of LabVIEW, students can design graphical programming solutions to their classroom problems and laboratory experiments with software that delivers the graphical programming capabilites of the LabVIEW professional version. . The Student Edition is also compatible with all National Instruments data acquisition and instrument control hardware. Note: The LabVIEW Student Edition is available to students, faculty, and staff for personal educational use only. It is not intended for research, institutional, or commercial use. For more information about these licensing options, please visit the National Instruments website at (http:www.ni.com/academic/)

  20. Lab-on a-Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Labs on chips are manufactured in many shapes and sizes and can be used for numerous applications, from medical tests to water quality monitoring to detecting the signatures of life on other planets. The eight holes on this chip are actually ports that can be filled with fluids or chemicals. Tiny valves control the chemical processes by mixing fluids that move in the tiny channels that look like lines, connecting the ports. Scientists at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama designed this chip to grow biological crystals on the International Space Station (ISS). Through this research, they discovered that this technology is ideally suited for solving the challenges of the Vision for Space Exploration. For example, thousands of chips the size of dimes could be loaded on a Martian rover looking for biosignatures of past or present life. Other types of chips could be placed in handheld devices used to monitor microbes in water or to quickly conduct medical tests on astronauts. The portable, handheld Lab-on-a Chip Application Development Portable Test System (LOCAD-PTS) made its debut flight aboard Discovery during the STS-116 mission launched December 9, 2006. The system allowed crew members to monitor their environment for problematic contaminants such as yeast, mold, and even E.coli, and salmonella. Once LOCAD-PTS reached the ISS, the Marshall team continued to manage the experiment, monitoring the study from a console in the Payload Operations Center at MSFC. The results of these studies will help NASA researchers refine the technology for future Moon and Mars missions. (NASA/MSFC/D.Stoffer)

  1. The First Three Years of a Community Lab: Lessons Learned and Ways Forward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Z. Scheifele

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The highly specialized nature of scientific research has erected substantial barriers between professional scientists and the laity, who have become distanced from the process of discovery. The Do-It-Yourself Biology movement seeks to remove these impediments, with community laboratories serving as vehicles for public engagement and participation in scientific inquiry. We describe our experience establishing and maintaining the BUGSS community lab in Baltimore. While each community lab is distinct in its structure, culture, and programming, we hope that this review of our experience will serve as a resource to inform those who seek to understand this growing movement and those who plan to establish their own community labs.

  2. Double success for neutrino lab

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    "The Gran Sasso National Laboratory in Italy is celebrating two key developments in the field of neutrino physics. Number one is the first ever detection, by the OPERA experiement, of possible tau neutrino that has switched its identity from a muon neutrino as it travelled form its origins at CERN in Switzerland to the Italian lab. Number two is the successful start-up of the ICARUS detector, which, like OPERA, is designed to study neutrinos that "oscillate" between types" (0.5 pages)

  3. Remote Lab for Robotics Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinson Jiménez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the development of a remote lab environment used to test and training sessions for robotics tasks. This environment is made up of the components and devices based on two robotic arms, a network link, Arduino card and Arduino shield for Ethernet, as well as an IP camera. The remote laboratory is implemented to perform remote control of the robotic arms with visual feedback by camera, of the robots actions, where, with a group of test users, it was possible to obtain performance ranges in tasks of telecontrol of up to 92%.

  4. Laser safety in the lab

    CERN Document Server

    Barat, Ken L

    2012-01-01

    There is no more challenging setting for laser use than a research environment. In almost every other setting the laser controls count on engineering controls, and human exposure is kept to a minimum. In research, however, the user often manipulates the optical layout and thereby places him or herself in peril, but this does not mean that accidents and injury are unavoidable. On the contrary, laser accidents can be avoided by following a number of simple approaches. [i]Laser Safety in the Lab[/i] provides the laser user and laser safety officer with practical guidelines from housekeeping to ey

  5. Digital media labs in libraries

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Amanda L

    2014-01-01

    Families share stories with each other and veterans reconnect with their comrades, while teens edit music videos and then upload them to the web: all this and more can happen in the digital media lab (DML), a gathering of equipment with which people create digital content or convert content that is in analog formats. Enabling community members to create digital content was identified by The Edge Initiative, a national coalition of leading library and local government organizations, as a library technology benchmark. Surveying academic and public libraries in a variety of settings and sharing a

  6. Recent results from Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volker D. Burkert

    1999-01-01

    Recent results on studies of the structure of nucleons and nuclei in the regime of strong interaction QCD are discussed. Use of high current polarized electron beams, polarized targets, and recoil polarimeters, in conjunction with modern spectrometers and detector instrumentation allow much more detailed studies of nucleon and nuclear structure than has been possible in the past. The CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab was build to study the internal structure of hadrons in a regime where confinement is important and strong interaction QCD is the relevant theory. They author discusses how the first experiments already make significant contributions towards an improved understanding of hadronic structure

  7. Recent Results from Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volker Burkert

    2000-03-01

    Recent results on studies of the structure of nucleons and nuclei in the regime of strong interaction QCD are discussed. Use of high current polarized electron beams, polarized targets, and recoil polarimeters, in conjunction with modern spectrometers and detector instrumentation allow much more detailed studies of nucleon and nuclear structure than has been possible in the past. The CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab was built to study the internal structure of hadrons in a regime where confinement is important and strong interaction QCD is the relevant theory. I discuss how the first experiments already make significant contributions towards an improved understanding of hadronic structure

  8. A green chemistry lab course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rank, J.; Lenoir, D.; Bahadir, M.; Koning, B.

    2006-01-01

    The traditional course content of chemistry classes must change to achieve better awareness of the important issues of sustainability in chemistry within the next generation of professional chemists. To provide the necessary material for the organic chemistry teaching lab course, which is part of almost all study programs in chemistry, material was developed and collected (http://www.oc-praktikum.de/en) that allows students and teachers to assess reactions beyond the experimental set up, reaction mechanism and chemical yield. Additional parameters like atom economy of chemical transformations, energy efficiency, and questions of waste, renewable feed stocks, toxicity and ecotoxicity, as well as the safety measures for the chemicals used are discussed. (author)

  9. Jefferson Lab, a status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab; formerly known as CEBAF), operates a 4 GeV, 200 microA continuous wave (CW) electron accelerator that re-circulates the beam five times through two superconducting 400 MeV linacs. Electrons can be extracted from any of the five recirculation passes and beam can be simultaneously delivered to the three experimental halls. As the commissioning stage nears completion, the accelerator is becoming a fully operational machine. Experiments in Hall C have been underway since November 1995 with beam powers of over 300 kW at various energies. Hall A has received beam for spectrometer commissioning, while Hall B is expected to receive its first beam in the fall of 1996. Accelerator availability of greater than 70% during physics runs and excellent beam quality have contributed to making Jefferson Lab a world class laboratory for accelerator-based electromagnetic nuclear physics. With the high performance of the superconducting RF cavities, machine upgrades to 6 GeV, and eventually 8 to 10 GeV are now in the planning stages. Operational and commissioning details concerning all aspects of the machine will be discussed

  10. Jefferson Lab, a status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunham, B.M.

    1996-01-01

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab; formerly known as CEBAF), operates a 4 GeV, 200 μA continuous wave (CW) electron accelerator that re-circulates the beam five times through two superconducting 400 MeV linacs. Electrons can be extracted from any of the five recirculation passes and beam can be simultaneously delivered to the three experimental halls. As the commissioning stage nears completion, the accelerator is becoming a fully operational machine. Experiments in Hall C have been underway since November 1995 with beam powers of over 300 kW at various energies. Hall A has received beam for spectrometer commissioning, while Hall B is expected to receive its first beam in the fall of 1996. Accelerator availability of greater than 70% during physics runs and excellent beam quality have contributed to making Jefferson Lab a world class laboratory for accelerator-based electromagnetic nuclear physics. With the high performance of the superconducting RF cavities, machine upgrades to 6 GeV, and eventually 8 to 10 GeV are now in the planning stages. Operational and commissioning details concerning all aspects of the machine will be discussed. (author)

  11. Jefferson Lab, a status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunham, B.M.

    1996-01-01

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab; formerly known as CEBAF), operates a 4 GeV, 200 microA continuous wave (CW) electron accelerator that re-circulates the beam five times through two superconducting 400 MeV linacs. Electrons can be extracted from any of the five recirculation passes and beam can be simultaneously delivered to the three experimental halls. As the commissioning stage nears completion, the accelerator is becoming a fully operational machine. Experiments in Hall C have been underway since November 1995 with beam powers of over 300 kW at various energies. Hall A has received beam for spectrometer commissioning, while Hall B is expected to receive its first beam in the fall of 1996. Accelerator availability of greater than 70% during physics runs and excellent beam quality have contributed to making Jefferson Lab a world class laboratory for accelerator-based electromagnetic nuclear physics. With the high performance of the superconducting RF cavities, machine upgrades to 6 GeV, and eventually 8 to 10 GeV are now in the planning stages. Operational and commissioning details concerning all aspects of the machine will be discussed

  12. MatLab Script and Functional Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaykhian, Gholam Ali

    2007-01-01

    MatLab Script and Functional Programming: MatLab is one of the most widely used very high level programming languages for scientific and engineering computations. It is very user-friendly and needs practically no formal programming knowledge. Presented here are MatLab programming aspects and not just the MatLab commands for scientists and engineers who do not have formal programming training and also have no significant time to spare for learning programming to solve their real world problems. Specifically provided are programs for visualization. The MatLab seminar covers the functional and script programming aspect of MatLab language. Specific expectations are: a) Recognize MatLab commands, script and function. b) Create, and run a MatLab function. c) Read, recognize, and describe MatLab syntax. d) Recognize decisions, loops and matrix operators. e) Evaluate scope among multiple files, and multiple functions within a file. f) Declare, define and use scalar variables, vectors and matrices.

  13. Famed lab seeks big grid

    CERN Document Server

    Lillington, K

    2001-01-01

    DUBLIN, Ireland -- CERN, the famed Swiss high-energy particle physics lab, has a problem. It's about to start generating more data than any computer or network anywhere in the world is able to analyze. That prospect has led CERN to drive a major European project to create a vast "grid" research network of computers across Europe. When completed, the 10 million euro, Linux-based endeavor called DataGRID, will become a principal European computing resource for researchers of many disciplines. "I believe grid computing will revolutionize the way we compute, in much the same way as the World Wide Web and Internet changed the way we communicate," said John Ellis, a theoretical physicist and adviser to the director general of CERN.

  14. Innovations in STEM education: the Go-Lab federation of online labs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Anthonius J.M.; Sotiriou, Sofoklis; Gillet, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    The Go-Lab federation of online labs opens up virtual laboratories (simulation), remote laboratories (real equipment accessible at distance) and data sets from physical laboratory experiments (together called “online labs”) for large-scale use in education. In this way, Go-Lab enables inquiry-based

  15. System Integration - A Major Step toward Lab on a Chip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liao Joseph C

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Microfluidics holds great promise to revolutionize various areas of biological engineering, such as single cell analysis, environmental monitoring, regenerative medicine, and point-of-care diagnostics. Despite the fact that intensive efforts have been devoted into the field in the past decades, microfluidics has not yet been adopted widely. It is increasingly realized that an effective system integration strategy that is low cost and broadly applicable to various biological engineering situations is required to fully realize the potential of microfluidics. In this article, we review several promising system integration approaches for microfluidics and discuss their advantages, limitations, and applications. Future advancements of these microfluidic strategies will lead toward translational lab-on-a-chip systems for a wide spectrum of biological engineering applications.

  16. Innovation - A view from the Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    The USDA Ag Lab in Peoria helps bridge the gap between agricultural producers and commercial manufacturers. In 2015, the Ag Lab, officially known as the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research (NCAUR), is celebrating 75 years of research in Peoria. T...

  17. Latest results from FROST at Jefferson Lab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritchie B.G.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of broad and overlapping nucleon excitations can be greatly clarified by use of a polarized photon beam incident on a polarized target in meson photoproduction experiments. At Jefferson Lab, a program of such measurements has made use of the Jefferson Lab FROzen Spin Target (FROST. An overview of preliminary results are presented.

  18. Latest results from FROST at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritchie, Barry G. [Arizona State University

    2014-06-01

    The spectrum of broad and overlapping nucleon excitations can be greatly clarified by use of a polarized photon beam incident on a polarized target in meson photoproduction experiments. At Jefferson Lab, a program of such measurements has made use of the Jefferson Lab FROzen Spin Target (FROST). An overview of preliminary results are presented.

  19. Programming Arduino with LabVIEW

    CERN Document Server

    Schwartz, Marco

    2015-01-01

    If you already have some experience with LabVIEW and want to apply your skills to control physical objects and make measurements using the Arduino sensor, this book is for you. Prior knowledge of Arduino and LabVIEW is essential to fully understand the projects detailed in this book.

  20. Supercharging Lessons with a Virtual Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Jefferson; Vincent, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The authors describes their experiences incorporating the virtual lab into a simple circuit lesson during an energy unit in a sixth-grade class. The lesson included a hands-on group experiment using wire, batteries, and light bulbs to make a circuit and an online simulation, using a virtual lab. Class discussions, student inquiries, and the study…

  1. Frank, Prof. (Frederick) Charles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2018-03-13

    . 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th Mid-year meeting of the Academy will be held from 29–30 June 2018 in Infosys, Mysuru. 84th Annual meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 84th Annual meeting of the ...

  2. Exploring linear algebra labs and projects with Mathematica

    CERN Document Server

    Arangala, Crista

    2014-01-01

    Matrix Operations Lab 0: An Introduction to Mathematica Lab 1: Matrix Basics and Operations Lab 2: A Matrix Representation of Linear Systems Lab 3: Powers, Inverses, and Special Matrices Lab 4: Graph Theory and Adjacency Matrices Lab 5: Permutations and Determinants Lab 6: 4 x 4 Determinants and Beyond Project Set 1 Invertibility Lab 7: Singular or Nonsingular? Why Singularity Matters Lab 8: Mod It Out, Matrices with Entries in ZpLab 9: It's a Complex World Lab 10: Declaring Independence: Is It Linear? Project Set 2 Vector Spaces Lab 11: Vector Spaces and SubspacesLab 12: Basing It All on Just a Few Vectors Lab 13: Linear Transformations Lab 14: Eigenvalues and Eigenspaces Lab 15: Markov Chains, An Application of Eigenvalues Project Set 3 Orthogonality Lab 16: Inner Product Spaces Lab 17: The Geometry of Vector and Inner Product SpacesLab 18: Orthogonal Matrices, QR Decomposition, and Least Squares Regression Lab 19: Symmetric Matrices and Quadratic Forms Project Set 4 Matrix Decomposition with Applications L...

  3. NASA GeneLab Project: Bridging Space Radiation Omics with Ground Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheshti, Afshin; Miller, Jack; Kidane, Yared; Berrios, Daniel; Gebre, Samrawit G; Costes, Sylvain V

    2018-04-13

    Accurate assessment of risks of long-term space missions is critical for human space exploration. It is essential to have a detailed understanding of the biological effects on humans living and working in deep space. Ionizing radiation from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) is a major health risk factor for astronauts on extended missions outside the protective effects of the Earth's magnetic field. Currently, there are gaps in our knowledge of the health risks associated with chronic low-dose, low-dose-rate ionizing radiation, specifically ions associated with high (H) atomic number (Z) and energy (E). The NASA GeneLab project ( https://genelab.nasa.gov/ ) aims to provide a detailed library of omics datasets associated with biological samples exposed to HZE. The GeneLab Data System (GLDS) includes datasets from both spaceflight and ground-based studies, a majority of which involve exposure to ionizing radiation. In addition to detailed information on radiation exposure for ground-based studies, GeneLab is adding detailed, curated dosimetry information for spaceflight experiments. GeneLab is the first comprehensive omics database for space-related research from which an investigator can generate hypotheses to direct future experiments, utilizing both ground and space biological radiation data. The GLDS is continually expanding as omics-related data are generated by the space life sciences community. Here we provide a brief summary of the space radiation-related data available at GeneLab.

  4. Dr. Monaco Examines Lab-on a-Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Dr. Lisa Monaco, Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) project scientist for the Lab-on-a-Chip Applications Development (LOCAD) program, examines a lab on a chip. The small dots are actually ports where fluids and chemicals can be mixed or samples can be collected for testing. Tiny channels, only clearly visible under a microscope, form pathways between the ports. Many chemical and biological processes, previously conducted on large pieces of laboratory equipment, can now be performed on these small glass or plastic plates. Monaco and other researchers at MSFC in Huntsville, Alabama, are customizing the chips to be used for many space applications, such as monitoring microbes inside spacecraft and detecting life on other planets. The portable, handheld Lab-on-a Chip Application Development Portable Test System (LOCAD-PTS) made its debut flight aboard Discovery during the STS-116 mission launched December 9, 2006. The system allowed crew members to monitor their environment for problematic contaminants such as yeast, mold, and even E.coli, and salmonella. Once LOCAD-PTS reached the International Space Station (ISS), the Marshall team continued to manage the experiment, monitoring the study from a console in the Payload Operations Center at MSFC. The results of these studies will help NASA researchers refine the technology for future Moon and Mars missions. (NASA/MSFC/D.Stoffer)

  5. Designing Viable Business Models for Living Labs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard R. Katzy

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Over 300 regions have integrated the concept of living labs into their economic development strategy since 2006, when the former Finnish Prime Minister Esko Aho launched the living lab innovation policy initiative during his term of European presidency. Despite motivating initial results, however, success cases of turning research into usable new products and services remain few and uncertainty remains on what living labs actually do and contribute. This practitioner-oriented article presents a business excellence model that shows processes of idea creation and team mobilization, new product development, user involvement, and entrepreneurship through which living labs deliver high-potential investment opportunities. Customers of living labs are identified as investors such as venture capitalists or industrial firms because living labs can generate revenue from them to create their own sustainable business model. The article concludes that living labs provide extensive support “lab” infrastructure and that it remains a formidable challenge to finance it, which calls for a more intensive debate.

  6. Baseball Physics: A New Mechanics Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagoner, Kasey; Flanagan, Daniel

    2018-05-01

    The game of baseball provides an interesting laboratory for experimenting with mechanical phenomena (there are many good examples in The Physics Teacher, available on Professor Alan Nathan's website, and discussed in Physics of Baseball & Softball). We have developed a lab, for an introductory-level physics course, that investigates many of these phenomena. The lab uses inexpensive, readily available equipment such as wooden baseball bats, baseballs, and actual Major League Baseball data. By the end of the lab, students have revisited many concepts they learned earlier in the semester and come away with an understanding of how to put seemingly disparate ideas together to analyze a fun sport.

  7. [Book review] The Eastern Screech Owl: Life History, Ecology and Behavior in the Suburbs and Countryside, by Frederick Gehlback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, D.C.

    1995-01-01

    Review of: Eastern Screech Owl: Life History, Ecology, and Behavior in the Suburbs and Countryside. Frederick R. Gehlbach. Issue 16; Issue 2008 of W. L. Moody Jr. Natural History Series. Texas A&M University Press; 1st edition (November 1994). ISBN: 0890966095. For ornithologists and ecologists alike, Fred Gehlbach's book promises to hold both interest and information value as a comprehensive study of the eastern screech owl (Otus asio hasbroucki). Gehlbach was intrigued with screech owls as a boy and encouraged as an undergraduate by William Hamilton, who underscored that in-depth studies of familiar backyard species can be as fascinating as those in exotic sites. Correspondence with another owl-aficionado, the late H. N. Southern, inspired the author's long-term study of screech owls in a woodland landscape in central Texas and led him to provide nest boxes to enhance his access and sample size. This book is based on observations over a 25-year period-beginning in 1967, with intensive study during an 11-year period (1976-1987) in Texas south of Waco, where Gehlbach teaches at Baylor University. The study represents observations on 659 screech owls, covering several generations of birds and entire lives of many individuals. Gehlbach compares screech owl nesting behavior in a rural versus suburban setting and includes chapters on food supplies and predation tactics; egg-laying, incubation, and parental behavior; vocalizations; and population structure and flux. He discusses why screech owls are widespread across the eastern half of North America and why they succeed among people in suburban environments, where they adapt as easily to mailboxes and porch columns as to natural tree cavities. The book mixes two approaches: on the one hand the dense style of a technical book in which the professional biologist can find information on many aspects of screech owl behavior, life history, and population, including tables, figures, summary statistics, results of statistical

  8. Teachers' Perspectives on Online Virtual Labs vs. Hands-On Labs in High School Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohr, Teresa M.

    This study of online science teachers' opinions addressed the use of virtual labs in online courses. A growing number of schools use virtual labs that must meet mandated laboratory standards to ensure they provide learning experiences comparable to hands-on labs, which are an integral part of science curricula. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine teachers' perceptions of the quality and effectiveness of high school virtual labs. The theoretical foundation was constructivism, as labs provide student-centered activities for problem solving, inquiry, and exploration of phenomena. The research questions focused on experienced teachers' perceptions of the quality of virtual vs. hands-on labs. Data were collected through survey questions derived from the lab objectives of The Next Generation Science Standards . Eighteen teachers rated the degree of importance of each objective and also rated how they felt virtual labs met these objectives; these ratings were reported using descriptive statistics. Responses to open-ended questions were few and served to illustrate the numerical results. Many teachers stated that virtual labs are valuable supplements but could not completely replace hands-on experiences. Studies on the quality and effectiveness of high school virtual labs are limited despite widespread use. Comprehensive studies will ensure that online students have equal access to quality labs. School districts need to define lab requirements, and colleges need to specify the lab experience they require. This study has potential to inspire positive social change by assisting science educators, including those in the local school district, in evaluating and selecting courseware designed to promote higher order thinking skills, real-world problem solving, and development of strong inquiry skills, thereby improving science instruction for all high school students.

  9. The Design:Lab as platform in participatory design research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binder, Thomas; Brandt, Eva

    2008-01-01

    The notion of laboratory or simply 'lab' has become popular in recent years in areas outside science and technology development. Learning Labs, Innovation Labs, Usability Labs, Media and Communication Labs and even Art Labs designate institutions or fora dedicated to change and experimentation...... as others have frequently used other metaphors like workshop, studio or atelier in design research. In this article we will argue that the laboratory metaphor is particularly suitable and useful for the design:lab, and we will give examples of how we have worked with the design:lab as a platform...

  10. Virtual labs in Leonardo da Vinci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislaw Nagy

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the problem of virtual lab capabilities in the e-learning. Using combination of web conferencing and "virtual labs" capabilities, a new quality distance learning teaching is now in preparation and will be included in the course teaching to produce interactive, online simulations for the natural gas engineering studies. The activities are designed to enhance the existing curriculum and to include online assessments. A special care is devoted to the security problem between a server and a client computer. Several examples of the virtual labs related to the PVT thermodynamics, fluid flow, the natural gas well-testing, and thev gas network flow are prepared and tested. A major challenge for the 'CELGAS' system is in managing the delicate balance between the student collaboration and the isolation. Students may be encouraged to collaborate and work with each other, simulating their exploration of the lab material.

  11. LAB building a home for scientists

    CERN Document Server

    Fishman, Mark C

    2017-01-01

    Laboratories are both monasteries and space stations, redolent of the great ideas of generations past and of technologies to propel the future. Yet standard lab design has changed only little over recent years. Here Mark Fishman describes how to build labs as homes for scientists, to accommodate not just their fancy tools, but also their personalities. This richly illustrated book explores the roles of labs through history, from the alchemists of the Middle Ages to the chemists of the 19th and 20th centuries, and to the geneticists and structural biologists of today, and then turns to the special features of the laboratories Fishman helped to design in Cambridge, Shanghai, and Basel. Anyone who works in, or plans to build a lab, will enjoy this book, which will encourage them to think about how this special environment drives or impedes their important work.

  12. Jefferson Lab physics overview: Recent results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I review highlights of the Jefferson Lab nucleon structure program. I shall emphasize recent results from experiments exploring the spin structure of the nucleon and from dedicated experiments aimed at accessing the generalized parton distributions (GPDs).

  13. Online labs and the MARVEL experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter Mueller

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available MARVEL is a Leonardo da Vinci project that provides a framework to analyse the pedagogic effectiveness of online labs in various heterogeneous areas that include solar energy, robotics, electronics and electro-pneumatics. It is also used as a test bench to compare the implementation of purely remote labs, where all devices are real, versus mixed-reality environments, where real devices work together with simulation models. This paper describes the basic concepts underlying the implementation of such online labs and presents two case studies (which are openly available to the public. A final section discusses the main pedagogical implications of online labs and presents the research directions that are being considered as a follow-up from this project.

  14. Cockle Temperature Exposure Lab Experiment (2016)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — We carried out a lab experiment in which we exposed cockles to a range of air temperatures to simulate the physiological rigors of exposure to sunlight and air at...

  15. GeoLab Sample Handling System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This work builds upon the successes in developing and field testing GeoLab as part of the 2010 and 2011 Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) and Desert RATS activities....

  16. Photonics and Fiber Optics Processor Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Photonics and Fiber Optics Processor Lab develops, tests and evaluates high speed fiber optic network components as well as network protocols. In addition, this...

  17. Airborne Low-Frequency Sonar (ALFS) Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The ALFS lab is dedicated to support acoustic data analysis and processing software support to the AN/AQS-22 dipping sonar system. It includes stand-alone Software...

  18. Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) facility (formerly LOASIS) develops advanced accelerators and radiation sources. High gradient (1-100 GV/m) laser-plasma...

  19. European labs fight back against cuts

    CERN Multimedia

    König, R

    1997-01-01

    Germany's 1997 budget contains cuts amounting to 3.7% in funding of domestic research programs and in contributions to international labs. Contributions will be cut to the European Space Agency, the European Synchrotron facility and CERN.

  20. Generator Inspection Report: Bio - Lab, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contains report from Georgia Department of Natural Resources of July 21, 1999 inspection of the Bio - Lab Incorporated Plant 4 in Conyers, Rockdale County, Georgia, reporting that no violations were observed.

  1. Thanatology for Everyone: Developmental Labs and Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Walter E.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    In an effort to "treat" the growing death concerns of many medical staffs, an experiential death and dying lab was created. Its evolution to meet changing needs is discussed, as well as future potential for work in this area. (Author)

  2. The Art-Science Connection: Students Create Art Inspired by Extracurricular Lab Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegedus, Tess; Segarra, Verónica A.; Allen, Tawannah G.; Wilson, Hillary; Garr, Casey; Budzinski, Christina

    2016-01-01

    The authors developed an integrated science-and-art program to engage science students from a performing arts high school in hands-on, inquiry based lab experiences. The students participated in eight biology-focused investigations at a local university with undergraduate mentors. After the laboratory phase of the project, the high school students…

  3. PLC Support Software at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Chevtsov; S. Higgins; S. Schaffner; D. Seidman

    2002-10-01

    Several Automation Direct (DirectNet) Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) have been integrated into the accelerator control system at Jefferson Lab. The integration is based on new software that consists of three main parts: a PLC driver with a state machine control block, a device support module, and a common serial driver. The components of new software and experience gained with the use of this software for beam dump systems at Jefferson Lab are presented.

  4. German lab wins linear collider contest

    CERN Multimedia

    Cartlidge, Edwin

    2004-01-01

    Particle physicists have chosen to base the proposed International Linear Collider on superconducting technology developed by an international collaboration centred on the DESY lab in Germany. The superconducting approach was chosen by an internatinal panel ahead of a rival technology developed at Stanford in the US and the KEK lab in Japan. The eagerly-awaited decision was announced at the International Conference on High Energy Physics in Beijing today (½ page)

  5. Evaluation of oral microbiology lab curriculum reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Min; Gao, Zhen Y; Wu, Xin Y; Jiang, Chen X; Du, Jia H

    2015-12-07

    According to the updated concept of oral microbiology, the School of Stomatology, Wuhan University, has carried out oral microbiology teaching reforms during the last 5 years. There was no lab curriculum before 2009 except for a theory course of oral microbiology. The school has implemented an innovative curriculum with oral medicine characteristics to strengthen understanding of knowledge, cultivate students' scientific interest and develop their potential, to cultivate the comprehensive ability of students. This study was designed to evaluate the oral microbiology lab curriculum by analyzing student performance and perceptions regarding the curriculum from 2009 to 2013. The lab curriculum adopted modalities for cooperative learning. Students collected dental plaque from each other and isolated the cariogenic bacteria with selective medium plates. Then they purified the enrichment culture medium and identified the cariogenic strains by Gram stain and biochemical tests. Both quantitative and qualitative data for 5 years were analysed in this study. Part One of the current study assessed student performance in the lab from 2009 to 2013. Part Two used qualitative means to assess students' perceptions by an open questionnaire. The 271 study students' grades on oral microbiology improved during the lab curriculum: "A" grades rose from 60.5 to 81.2 %, and "C" grades fell from 28.4 to 6.3 %. All students considered the lab curriculum to be interesting and helpful. Quantitative and qualitative data converge to suggest that the lab curriculum has strengthened students' grasp of important microbiology-related theory, cultivated their scientific interest, and developed their potential and comprehensive abilities. Our student performance and perception data support the continued use of the innovative teaching system. As an extension and complement of the theory course, the oral microbiology lab curriculum appears to improve the quality of oral medicine education and help to

  6. S'Cool LAB Summer CAMP 2017

    CERN Multimedia

    Woithe, Julia

    2017-01-01

    The S’Cool LAB Summer CAMP is an opportunity for high-school students (aged 16-19) from all around the world to spend 2 weeks exploring the fascinating world of particle physics. The 24 selected participants spend their summer at S’Cool LAB, CERN’s hands-on particle physics learning laboratory, for an epic programme of lectures and tutorials, team research projects, visits of CERN’s research installations, and social activities.

  7. Technology Roadmap: Lab-on-a-Chip

    OpenAIRE

    Pattharaporn Suntharasaj; Tugrul U Daim

    2010-01-01

    With the integration of microfluidic and MEMS technologies, biochips such as the lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices are at the brink of revolutionizing the medical disease diagnostics industries. Remarkable advancements in the biochips industry are making products resembling Star Trek.s "tricorder" and handheld medical scanners a reality. Soon, doctors can screen for cancer at the molecular level without costly and cumbersome equipments, and discuss treatment plans based on immediate lab results. Th...

  8. Using OpenTarget to Generate Potential Countermeasures for Long-Term Space Exposure from Data Available on GeneLab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheshti, Afshin

    2018-01-01

    GeneLab as a general tool for the scientific community; Utilizing GeneLab datasets to generate hypothesis and determining potential biological targets against health risks due to long-term space missions; How can OpenTarget be used to discover novel drugs to test as countermeasures that can be utilized by astronauts.

  9. LabVIEW Support at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    Since the beginning of 2009, due to the CERN restructuring, LabVIEW support moved from the IT to the EN department, joining the Industrial Controls and Electronics Group (ICE). LabVIEW support has been merged with the Measurement, Test and Analysis (MTA) section which, using LabVIEW, has developed most of the measurement systems to qualify the LHC magnets and components over the past 10 years. The post mortem analysis for the LHC hardware commissioning has also been fully implemented using LabVIEW, customised into a framework, called RADE, for CERN needs. The MTA section has started with a proactive approach sharing its tools and experience with the CERN LabVIEW community. Its framework (RADE) for CERN integrated application development has been made available to the users. Courses on RADE have been integrated into the standard National Instruments training program at CERN. RADE and LabVIEW support were merged together in 2010 on a single email address:labview.support@cern.ch For more information please...

  10. AMERICAN ENSLAVEMENT AS SEEN IN NARRATIVE OF THE LIFE OF FREDERICK DOUGLAS & IN THE INTERESTING NARRATIVE OF THE LIFE OF OLAUDAH EQUIAO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suparman Suparman

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Mimetic approach is used in this study to reveal the practice of slavery depicted in two novels "narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglas" and "The Interesting Narrative of the life of Olaudah Equiao". The findings show that novels have common ground that is the practice of the slavery of blacks Africans by the whites in America. In some aspects, the slaveholders treated their slave inhumanly, savagely, and brutally. The slaves were really treated like animals in the ways of providing them food, shelter. clothes, and dispensation of rest. They were forbiden to learn of how to write and read. They were forced to work hard without having enough rest. However, when they got wage, they had to give it to their masters. Female slaves were whipped and tortured savagely, and their children were tortured to death. These are the examples of the brutality of the slaveholders. Key words: slavery, slaveholders, slaves, inhumanity, discrimination, and oppression

  11. Instrumentation and Equipment for Three Independent Research Labs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darlene Roth

    2012-03-29

    Completed in 2011, Albright's new Science Center includes three independent student and faculty research labs in Biology, Chemistry/Biochemistry, and Physics (separate from teaching labs). Providing independent research facilities, they eliminate disruptions in classrooms and teaching labs, encourage and accommodate increased student interest, and stimulate advanced research. The DOE grant of $369,943 enabled Albright to equip these advanced labs for 21st century science research, with much instrumentation shared among departments. The specialty labs will enable Albright to expand its student-faculty research program to meet growing interest, help attract superior science students, maximize faculty expertise, and continue exceeding its already high rates of acceptance for students applying for postgraduate education or pharmaceutical research positions. Biology instrumentation/equipment supports coursework and independent and collaborative research by students and faculty. The digital shaker, CO{sub 2} and water bath incubators (for controlled cell growth), balance, and micropipettes support cellular biology research in the advanced cell biology course and student-faculty research into heavy metal induction of heat shock proteins in cultured mammalian cells and the development of PCR markers from different populations of the native tree, Franklinia. The gravity convection oven and lyophilizer support research into physical and chemical analysis of floodplain sediments used in assessment of riparian restoration efforts. The Bio-Rad thermocycler permits fast and accurate DNA amplification as part of research into genetic diversity in small mammal populations and how those populations are affected by land-use practices and environmental management. The Millipore water deionizing system and glassware washer provide general support of the independent research lab and ensure quality control of coursework and interdisciplinary research at the intersection of biology

  12. Assessing Usage and Maximizing Finance Lab Impact: A Case Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguera, Magdy; Budden, Michael Craig; Silva, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey conducted to assess students' usage and perceptions of a finance lab. Finance labs differ from simple computer labs as they typically contain data boards, streaming market quotes, terminals and software that allow for real-time financial analyses. Despite the fact that such labs represent significant and…

  13. The Design:Lab as platform in participatory design research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binder, Thomas; Brandt, Eva

    2008-01-01

    The notion of laboratory or simply 'lab' has become popular in recent years in areas outside science and technology development. Learning Labs, Innovation Labs, Usability Labs, Media and Communication Labs and even Art Labs designate institutions or fora dedicated to change and experimentation....... Influenced by these currents we use the expression 'Design:Lab' as a shorthand description of open collaborations between many stakeholders sharing a mutual interest in design research in a particular field. Many have reacted to the term 'laboratory' or 'lab' as foreign and awkward to design, and we as well...... as others have frequently used other metaphors like workshop, studio or atelier in design research. In this article we will argue that the laboratory metaphor is particularly suitable and useful for the design:lab, and we will give examples of how we have worked with the design:lab as a platform...

  14. eLabEL: Technology-supported living labs in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, Joan; Huygens, Martine; de Witte, Luc P.; Oude Nijeweme-d'Hollosy, Wendeline; Swinkels, Ilse; van Velsen, Lex Stefan; Jansen, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    Telecare technologies and eHealth applications can support patients and care professionals. However, these technologies are currently not being implemented in primary care. The eLabEL project aims to contribute to a solution for this problem by establishing Living Labs in which patients, healthcare

  15. NASA GeneLab Project: Bridging Space Radiation Omics with Ground Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheshti, Afshin; Miller, Jack; Kidane, Yared H.; Berrios, Daniel; Gebre, Samrawit G.; Costes, Sylvain V.

    2018-01-01

    Accurate assessment of risk factors for long-term space missions is critical for human space exploration: therefore it is essential to have a detailed understanding of the biological effects on humans living and working in deep space. Ionizing radiation from Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) is one of the major risk factors factor that will impact health of astronauts on extended missions outside the protective effects of the Earth's magnetic field. Currently there are gaps in our knowledge of the health risks associated with chronic low dose, low dose rate ionizing radiation, specifically ions associated with high (H) atomic number (Z) and energy (E). The GeneLab project (genelab.nasa.gov) aims to provide a detailed library of Omics datasets associated with biological samples exposed to HZE. The GeneLab Data System (GLDS) currently includes datasets from both spaceflight and ground-based studies, a majority of which involve exposure to ionizing radiation. In addition to detailed information for ground-based studies, we are in the process of adding detailed, curated dosimetry information for spaceflight missions. GeneLab is the first comprehensive Omics database for space related research from which an investigator can generate hypotheses to direct future experiments utilizing both ground and space biological radiation data. In addition to previously acquired data, the GLDS is continually expanding as Omics related data are generated by the space life sciences community. Here we provide a brief summary of space radiation related data available at GeneLab.

  16. Are Virtual Labs as Effective as Hands-on Labs for Undergraduate Physics? A Comparative Study at Two Major Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrah, Marjorie; Humbert, Roxann; Finstein, Jeanne; Simon, Marllin; Hopkins, John

    2014-01-01

    Most physics professors would agree that the lab experiences students have in introductory physics are central to the learning of the concepts in the course. It is also true that these physics labs require time and money for upkeep, not to mention the hours spent setting up and taking down labs. Virtual physics lab experiences can provide an…

  17. Are Remote Labs Worth the Cost? Insights From a Study of Student Perceptions of Remote Labs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Uttal

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Remote online laboratories enable students to conduct scientific investigations using real experimental equipment. However, scaling up remote labs may require significant costs in purchasing and maintaining expensive equipment compared to scaling simulated labs. While these costs are a consequence of using physical equipment, we argue that there are unique educational advantages to remote labs. This paper presents the results of a preliminary study of student perceptions of a remote lab in comparison to an identical lab experience with simulated data. The findings reveal several intriguing themes that highlight the pedagogical value of remote laboratories. In addition, we provide recommendations for the design and pedagogy of online laboratory experiences based on our findings.

  18. Biological and medical sensor technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Iniewski, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    Biological and Medical Sensor Technologies presents contributions from top experts who explore the development and implementation of sensors for various applications used in medicine and biology. Edited by a pioneer in the area of advanced semiconductor materials, the book is divided into two sections. The first part covers sensors for biological applications. Topics include: Advanced sensing and communication in the biological world DNA-derivative architectures for long-wavelength bio-sensing Label-free silicon photonics Quartz crystal microbalance-based biosensors Lab-on-chip technologies fo

  19. Environment monitoring using LabVIEW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawtree, J.

    1995-01-01

    A system has been developed for electronically recording and monitoring temperature, humidity, and other environmental variables at the Silicon Detector Facility located in Lab D. The data is collected by LabVIEW software, which runs in the background on an Apple Macintosh. The software is completely portable between Macintosh, MS Windows, and Sun platforms. The hardware includes a Macintosh with 8 MB of RAM; an external ADC-1 analog-to-digital converter that uses a serial port; LabVIEW software; temperature sensors; humidity sensors; and other voltage/current sensing devices. ADC values are converted to ASCII strings and entered into files which are read over Ethernet. Advantages include automatic logging, automatic recovery after power interruptions, and the availability of stand-alone applications for other locations with inexpensive software and hardware

  20. A Moodle extension to book online labs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio C. Cardoso

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The social constructivist philosophy of Moodle makes it an excellent choice to deliver e-learning contents that require collaborative activities, such as those that are associated with online labs. In the case of online labs that enable web access to real devices (remote workbenches, access time should be reserved beforehand. A booking tool will avoid access conflicts and at the same time will help the students to organise their time and activities. This paper presents a Moodle extension that was developed within the Leonardo da Vinci MARVEL project, with the objective of meeting this requirement. The booking tool presented enables resource sharing in general and may be used to organise access to any type of scarce resources, such as to online labs and to the videoconferencing rooms that are needed to support collaborative activities.

  1. Collaborative Creation of a Lab Rubric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie Miller-DeBoer

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available While there are a number of tested rubrics in circulation, our task was to intervene in a particular situation: the lead professor was concerned because her graduate teaching assistants held negative views about student performance on the lab reports. GTAs found poor products frustrating, and admitted that their grading was thus superficial and provided no feedback to students. Specifically, GTAs did not feel equipped to evaluate writing and, as a result, simply graded on steps completed in the lab process.We have a rubric now for an Introduction to Zoology lab that could be submitted here as a pretty darn good rubric for other instructors to use. But the intent of our “Tips and Tools” is to describe the actual creation of the rubric. We believe the active “real time” development of the rubric carried as much or more value than the finished product.

  2. LabVIEW Real-Time

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Flockhart, Ronald Bruce; Seppey, P

    2003-01-01

    With LabVIEW Real-Time, you can choose from a variety of RT Series hardware. Add a real-time data acquisition component into a larger measurement and automation system or create a single stand-alone real-time solution with data acquisition, signal conditioning, motion control, RS-232, GPIB instrumentation, and Ethernet connectivity. With the various hardware options, you can create a system to meet your precise needs today, while the modularity of the system means you can add to the solution as your system requirements grow. If you are interested in Reliable and Deterministic systems for Measurement and Automation, you will profit from this seminar. Agenda: Real-Time Overview LabVIEW RT Hardware Platforms - Linux on PXI Programming with LabVIEW RT Real-Time Operating Systems concepts Timing Applications Data Transfer

  3. Digital Design with KP-Lab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Ponta

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available KP-Lab is an EU Integrated Project envisioning a learning system that facilitates innovative practices of sharing, creating and working with knowledge in education and workplaces. The project exploits a novel pedagogical view, the knowledge-creation metaphor of learning. According to such “trialogical” approach, cognition arises through collaborative work in systematically developing shared “knowledge artefacts”, such as concepts, plans, material products, or social practices. The paper presents the plan of a pilot course to test the KP-Lab methodologies and tools in the field of Digital Design.

  4. [Semiotic Studies Lab for Patient Care Interactions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Dulce Maria; Portella, Jean Cristtus; Bianchi e Silva, Laura

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this experience report is to present the Semiotic Studies Lab for Patient Care Interactions (Laboratório de Estudos Semióticos nas Interações de Cuidado - LESIC). The lab was set up at the Nursing School of the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Brazil in 2010. It has the purpose of providing didactic and pedagogical updates, based on the Theory developed by the Paris School of Semiotics, that enable the increase of knowledge and interactive/observational skills regarding the nature and mastery of human care.

  5. Exploiting the bead-injection approach in the integrated sequential injection Lab-on-Valve format using hydrophobic packing materials for on-line matrix removal and preconcentration of trace levels of cadmium in environmental and biological samples via formation of non-charged chelates prior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miró, Manuel; Jonczyk, Sylwia; Wang, Jianhua

    2003-01-01

    The concept of renewable microcolumns within the conduits of an automated single injection lab-on-valve system was exploited in a sorption/elution fashion using sorbents of hydrophobic nature. The scheme's practical applicability was demonstrated for the electrothermal atomic absorption spectrome...... spectrometry determination of trace level concentrations of cadmium in complex matrices. Statistical comparisons between the proposed procedure and certified values revealed no significant differences at the 95% confidence level....

  6. Lab-on-a-Chip Based Protein Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanderWoerd, Mark J.; Brasseur, Michael M.; Spearing, Scott F.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We are developing a novel technique with which we will grow protein crystals in very small volumes, utilizing chip-based, microfluidic ("LabChip") technology. This development, which is a collaborative effort between NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and Caliper Technologies Corporation, promises a breakthrough in the field of protein crystal growth. Our initial results obtained from two model proteins, Lysozyme and Thaumatin, show that it is feasible to dispense and adequately mix protein and precipitant solutions on a nano-liter scale. The mixtures have shown crystal growth in volumes in the range of 10 nanoliters to 5 microliters. In addition, large diffraction quality crystals were obtained by this method. X-ray data from these crystals were shown to be of excellent quality. Our future efforts will include the further development of protein crystal growth with LabChip(trademark) technology for more complex systems. We will initially address the batch growth method, followed by the vapor diffusion method and the liquid-liquid diffusion method. The culmination of these chip developments is to lead to an on orbit protein crystallization facility on the International Space Station. Structural biologists will be invited to utilize the on orbit Iterative Biological Crystallization facility to grow high quality macromolecular crystals in microgravity.

  7. Lab-on-a-chip systems for photodynamic therapy investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudy, Michał; Tokarska, Katarzyna; Jastrzębska, Elżbieta; Bułka, Magdalena; Drozdek, Sławomir; Lamch, Łukasz; Wilk, Kazimiera A; Brzózka, Zbigniew

    2018-03-15

    In recent years photodynamic therapy (PDT) has received widespread attention in cancer treatment due to its smaller surgical trauma, better selectivity towards tumor cells, reduced side effects and possibility of repeatable treatment. Since cancer is the second cause of death worldwide, scientists constantly seek for new potential therapeutic agents including nanotechnology-based photosensitizers used in PDT. The new-designed nanostructures must be carefully studied and well characterized what require analytically useful and powerful tools that enable real progress in nanoscience development. This review describes the current status of PDT investigations using microfluidic Lab-on-a-Chip systems, including recent developments of nanoparticle-based PDT agents, their combinations with different drugs, designs and examples of in vitro applications. This review mainly lays emphasis on biological evaluation of FDA approved photosensitizing agents as well as newly designed nanophotosensitizers. It also highlights the analytical performances of various microfluidic Lab-on-a-chip systems for PDT efficacy analysis on 3D culture and discusses microsystems designs in detail. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Lab-on-chip systems for integrated bioanalyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde, João Pedro; Madaboosi, Narayanan; Soares, Ruben R G; Fernandes, João Tiago S; Novo, Pedro; Moulas, Geraud; Chu, Virginia

    2016-06-30

    Biomolecular detection systems based on microfluidics are often called lab-on-chip systems. To fully benefit from the miniaturization resulting from microfluidics, one aims to develop 'from sample-to-answer' analytical systems, in which the input is a raw or minimally processed biological, food/feed or environmental sample and the output is a quantitative or qualitative assessment of one or more analytes of interest. In general, such systems will require the integration of several steps or operations to perform their function. This review will discuss these stages of operation, including fluidic handling, which assures that the desired fluid arrives at a specific location at the right time and under the appropriate flow conditions; molecular recognition, which allows the capture of specific analytes at precise locations on the chip; transduction of the molecular recognition event into a measurable signal; sample preparation upstream from analyte capture; and signal amplification procedures to increase sensitivity. Seamless integration of the different stages is required to achieve a point-of-care/point-of-use lab-on-chip device that allows analyte detection at the relevant sensitivity ranges, with a competitive analysis time and cost. © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  9. The Portuguese Contribution for lab2go - pt.lab2go

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Restivo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Online experimentation provides innovative and valuable tools for use in academy, in high schools, in industry and in medical areas. It has also become a precious tool for educational and training purposes in any of those areas. Looking at online experimentation as a pure distance learning tool it represents a very efficient way of sharing hands-on capabilities, for example with developing countries. In Portugal a new consortium of online experimentation was created for fostering the national potential, using the Portuguese version of lab2go web platform, pt.lab2go. The authors pretend to demonstrate some of capabilities of the consortium in sharing online labs.

  10. Electronics Lab Instructors' Approaches to Troubleshooting Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dounas-Frazer, Dimitri R.; Lewandowski, H. J.

    2017-01-01

    In this exploratory qualitative study, we describe instructors' self-reported practices for teaching and assessing students' ability to troubleshoot in electronics lab courses. We collected audio data from interviews with 20 electronics instructors from 18 institutions that varied by size, selectivity, and other factors. In addition to describing…

  11. Encouraging Creativity in the Science Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyster, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Although science is a creative endeavor (NRC 1996, p. 46), many students think they are not encouraged--or even allowed--to be creative in the laboratory. When students think there is only one correct way to do a lab, their creativity is inhibited. Park and Seung (2008) argue for the importance of creativity in science classrooms and for the…

  12. FameLab - Swiss Semi Finals

    CERN Multimedia

    Corinne Pralavorio

    2012-01-01

    Twenty-two young scientists participated in the FameLab semi-final at CERN's Globe of Science and Innovation on 4 February, supported by a large audience and by more than 100 fans following via webcast. A panel of judges chose Lemmer and four other candidates to join five other semi-finalists at the national finals in Zurich on 30 March.

  13. mQoL smart lab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Masi, Alexandre; Ciman, Matteo; Gustarini, Mattia

    2016-01-01

    As a base for hypothesis formulation and testing, accurate, timely and reproducible data collection is a challenge for all researchers. Data collection is especially challenging in uncontrolled environments, outside of the lab and when it involves many collaborating disciplines, where the data mu...

  14. Information at a Cost: A Lab Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Robalo (Pedro); R.S. Sayag (Rei)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe supposed irrelevance of historical costs for rational decision making has been the subject of much interest in the economic literature. In this paper we explore whether individual decision making under risk is affected by the cost of the supplied information. Outside of the lab, it

  15. Nonverbal Communication and Writing Lab Tutorials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claywell, Gina

    Writing labs should utilize the knowledge gained from a variety of fields to enhance further their programs, particularly with regard to the study of nonverbal communication. Regardless of the sincerity and importance of the tutor's suggestions, nonverbal messages often are sent to the student which undermine the session. Various channels of…

  16. Design Lab 2005 : pilk steriilsesse elektrotulevikku

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Design Lab kutsub disainereid ja üliõpilasi üle terve maailma tegelema kaugemale tulevikku suunatud visioonidega. 2005. a. konkurss otsis nutikaid ja säästlikke lahendusi, mis võiksid 2020. a. kodudes olla juba juurdunud, keskenduti kodutehnikale

  17. Carleton to oversee $40 million lab grant

    CERN Multimedia

    Singer, Zev

    2003-01-01

    "Carleton University got a major gift yesterday, as the federal government announced the university will oversee a $40-million grant to run the world's deepest underground lab at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. Five other universities are partners in the project" (1/2 page).

  18. Displacing Media: LCD LAB Artistic Residency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Pais

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This review refers to an artistic residency which took place at LCD LAB -  CAAA at Guimarães, in March, exploring a strategy for media art called Media Displacement. The text introduces the strategy very briefly and describes the residency's organization, structure, processses and the results produced.

  19. Surfactant Adsorption: A Revised Physical Chemistry Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresler, Marc R.; Hagen, John P.

    2008-01-01

    Many physical chemistry lab courses include an experiment in which students measure surface tension as a function of surfactant concentration. In the traditional experiment, the data are fit to the Gibbs isotherm to determine the molar area for the surfactant, and the critical micelle concentration is used to calculate the Gibbs energy of micelle…

  20. A Hardware Lab Anywhere At Any Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Schubert

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Scientific technical courses are an important component in any student's education. These courses are usually characterised by the fact that the students execute experiments in special laboratories. This leads to extremely high costs and a reduction in the maximum number of possible participants. From this traditional point of view, it doesn't seem possible to realise the concepts of a Virtual University in the context of sophisticated technical courses since the students must be "on the spot". In this paper we introduce the so-called Mobile Hardware Lab which makes student participation possible at any time and from any place. This lab nevertheless transfers a feeling of being present in a laboratory. This is accomplished with a special Learning Management System in combination with hardware components which correspond to a fully equipped laboratory workstation that are lent out to the students for the duration of the lab. The experiments are performed and solved at home, then handed in electronically. Judging and marking are also both performed electronically. Since 2003 the Mobile Hardware Lab is now offered in a completely web based form.

  1. Lab-on a-Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Helen Cole, the project manager for the Lab-on-a-Chip Applications Development program, and Lisa Monaco, the project scientist for the program, insert a lab on a chip into the Caliper 42 which is specialized equipment that controls processes on commercial chips to support development of lab-on-a-chip applications. The system has special microscopes and imaging systems, so scientists can process and study different types of fluid, chemical, and medical tests conducted on chips. For example, researchers have examined fluorescent bacteria as it flows through the chips' fluid channels or microfluidic capillaries. Researchers at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, have been studying how the lab-on-a-chip technology can be used for microbial detection, water quality monitoring, and detecting biosignatures of past or present life on Mars. The Marshall Center team is also collaborating with scientists at other NASA centers and at universities to develop custom chip designs for not only space applications, but for many Earth applications, such as for detecting deadly microbes in heating and air systems. (NASA/MSFC/D.Stoffer)

  2. LabVIEW A Developer's Guide to Real World Integration

    CERN Document Server

    Fairweather, Ian

    2011-01-01

    LabVIEW(t) has become one of the preeminent platforms for the development of data acquisition and data analysis programs. LabVIEW(t): A Developer's Guide to Real World Integration explains how to integrate LabVIEW into real-life applications. Written by experienced LabVIEW developers and engineers, the book describes how LabVIEW has been pivotal in solving real-world challenges. Each chapter is self-contained and demonstrates the power and simplicity of LabVIEW in various applications, from image processing to solar tracking systems. Many of the chapters explore how exciting new technologies c

  3. Boosting Big National Lab Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleese van Dam, Kerstin [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-02-21

    Introduction: Big data. Love it or hate it, solving the world’s most intractable problems requires the ability to make sense of huge and complex sets of data and do it quickly. Speeding up the process – from hours to minutes or from weeks to days – is key to our success. One major source of such big data are physical experiments. As many will know, these physical experiments are commonly used to solve challenges in fields such as energy security, manufacturing, medicine, pharmacology, environmental protection and national security. Experiments use different instruments and sensor types to research for example the validity of new drugs, the base cause for diseases, more efficient energy sources, new materials for every day goods, effective methods for environmental cleanup, the optimal ingredients composition for chocolate or determine how to preserve valuable antics. This is done by experimentally determining the structure, properties and processes that govern biological systems, chemical processes and materials. The speed and quality at which we can acquire new insights from experiments directly influences the rate of scientific progress, industrial innovation and competitiveness. And gaining new groundbreaking insights, faster, is key to the economic success of our nations. Recent years have seen incredible advances in sensor technologies, from house size detector systems in large experiments such as the Large Hadron Collider and the ‘Eye of Gaia’ billion pixel camera detector to high throughput genome sequencing. These developments have led to an exponential increase in data volumes, rates and variety produced by instruments used for experimental work. This increase is coinciding with a need to analyze the experimental results at the time they are collected. This speed is required to optimize the data taking and quality, and also to enable new adaptive experiments, where the sample is manipulated as it is observed, e.g. a substance is injected into a

  4. GeneLab Analysis Working Group Kick-Off Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costes, Sylvain V.

    2018-01-01

    Goals to achieve for GeneLab AWG - GL vision - Review of GeneLab AWG charter Timeline and milestones for 2018 Logistics - Monthly Meeting - Workshop - Internship - ASGSR Introduction of team leads and goals of each group Introduction of all members Q/A Three-tier Client Strategy to Democratize Data Physiological changes, pathway enrichment, differential expression, normalization, processing metadata, reproducibility, Data federation/integration with heterogeneous bioinformatics external databases The GLDS currently serves over 100 omics investigations to the biomedical community via open access. In order to expand the scope of metadata record searches via the GLDS, we designed a metadata warehouse that collects and updates metadata records from external systems housing similar data. To demonstrate the capabilities of federated search and retrieval of these data, we imported metadata records from three open-access data systems into the GLDS metadata warehouse: NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), EBI's PRoteomics IDEntifications (PRIDE) repository, and the Metagenomics Analysis server (MG-RAST). Each of these systems defines metadata for omics data sets differently. One solution to bridge such differences is to employ a common object model (COM) to which each systems' representation of metadata can be mapped. Warehoused metadata records are then transformed at ETL to this single, common representation. Queries generated via the GLDS are then executed against the warehouse, and matching records are shown in the COM representation (Fig. 1). While this approach is relatively straightforward to implement, the volume of the data in the omics domain presents challenges in dealing with latency and currency of records. Furthermore, the lack of a coordinated has been federated data search for and retrieval of these kinds of data across other open-access systems, so that users are able to conduct biological meta-investigations using data from a variety of sources. Such meta

  5. Ultrafiltration Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB in mung Beans Broth by Mixed LAB Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aspiyanto Aspiyanto

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Increasing Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB concentration in fermented broth of mung beans by mixed culture of Lactobacillus sp. and Streptococcus thermophillus through ultrafiltration (UF (20,000 MWCO at flow rate of ~8.87 L/min, room temperature and pressure 5 and 7 bars for 0, 30, 60, 90 and 120 minutes was performed. The results showed that pressure and time affected on UF performance, total solids, total protein and total number of LAB. Optimal time at pressure 5 bar was reached 60 minutes with flux 11.94 L/m2.hour, total solids 13.9423%, total protein 8.95%, total LAB 6.18 log CFU/mL, Robs of total solids 3.45%, total protein  58.67%, LAB 100% and DC 1.38 folds. The best time at 7 bar was reached 30 minutes with flux 16.16 L/m2.hour, total solids 12.2879%, total protein 4.41%, total LAB 6.04 Log CFU/mL, Robs of total solids 11.98%, total protein 45.76%, LAB 99.5 and DC 1.16 folds.

  6. CELSTEC Learning Labs: Mobile App Development for Education and Training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Specht, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Specht, M. (2011). CELSTEC Learning Labs: Mobile App Development for Education and Training. Presentation given in Workshop at CELSTEC Learning Lab for Bluetea. February, 21, 2011, Heerlen, The Netherlands.

  7. Measure, Then Show: Grasping Human Evolution Through an Inquiry-Based, Data-driven Hominin Skulls Lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Chris N; Luberda, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Incomprehension and denial of the theory of evolution among high school students has been observed to also occur when teachers are not equipped to deliver a compelling case also for human evolution based on fossil evidence. This paper assesses the outcomes of a novel inquiry-based paleoanthropology lab teaching human evolution to high-school students. The inquiry-based Be a Paleoanthropologist for a Day lab placed a dozen hominin skulls into the hands of high-school students. Upon measuring three variables of human evolution, students explain what they have observed and discuss findings. In the 2013/14 school year, 11 biology classes in 7 schools in the Greater New Orleans area participated in this lab. The interviewed teacher cohort unanimously agreed that the lab featuring hominin skull replicas and stimulating student inquiry was a pedagogically excellent method of delivering the subject of human evolution. First, the lab's learning path of transforming facts to data, information to knowledge, and knowledge to acceptance empowered students to themselves execute part of the science that underpins our understanding of deep time hominin evolution. Second, although challenging, the hands-on format of the lab was accessible to high-school students, most of whom were readily able to engage the lab's scientific process. Third, the lab's exciting and compelling pedagogy unlocked higher order thinking skills, effectively activating the cognitive, psychomotor and affected learning domains as defined in Bloom's taxonomy. Lastly, the lab afforded students a formative experience with a high degree of retention and epistemic depth. Further study is warranted to gauge the degree of these effects.

  8. Measure, Then Show: Grasping Human Evolution Through an Inquiry-Based, Data-driven Hominin Skulls Lab.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris N Bayer

    Full Text Available Incomprehension and denial of the theory of evolution among high school students has been observed to also occur when teachers are not equipped to deliver a compelling case also for human evolution based on fossil evidence. This paper assesses the outcomes of a novel inquiry-based paleoanthropology lab teaching human evolution to high-school students. The inquiry-based Be a Paleoanthropologist for a Day lab placed a dozen hominin skulls into the hands of high-school students. Upon measuring three variables of human evolution, students explain what they have observed and discuss findings. In the 2013/14 school year, 11 biology classes in 7 schools in the Greater New Orleans area participated in this lab. The interviewed teacher cohort unanimously agreed that the lab featuring hominin skull replicas and stimulating student inquiry was a pedagogically excellent method of delivering the subject of human evolution. First, the lab's learning path of transforming facts to data, information to knowledge, and knowledge to acceptance empowered students to themselves execute part of the science that underpins our understanding of deep time hominin evolution. Second, although challenging, the hands-on format of the lab was accessible to high-school students, most of whom were readily able to engage the lab's scientific process. Third, the lab's exciting and compelling pedagogy unlocked higher order thinking skills, effectively activating the cognitive, psychomotor and affected learning domains as defined in Bloom's taxonomy. Lastly, the lab afforded students a formative experience with a high degree of retention and epistemic depth. Further study is warranted to gauge the degree of these effects.

  9. Etnoastronomia no Brasil: a contribuição de Charles Frederick Hartt e José Vieira Couto de Magalhães

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Pedroza Lima

    Full Text Available Após uma breve revisão bibliográfica sobre arqueoastronomia e etnoastronomia, o artigo analisa algumas obras do final do século XIX que trazem informações sobre a etnoastronomia de índios brasileiros. Estes relatos são de autoria do naturalista canadense Charles Frederick Hartt (1840-1878 e do polimata brasileiro José Vieira Couto de Magalhães (1837-1898. Embora moldados pelas cosmovisões dos seus autores e pelas teorias científicas da etnologia da época, registram uma pequena fração dos sistemas de conhecimento indígenas sobre a natureza, seus mitos celestes, constelações e calendários. Os autores são contemporâneos e se corresponderam, mas registraram de forma independente alguns conhecimentos comuns aos povos que falavam uma língua tupi.

  10. NASA's GeneLab Phase II: Federated Search and Data Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrios, Daniel C.; Costes, Sylvain V.; Tran, Peter B.

    2017-01-01

    GeneLab is currently being developed by NASA to accelerate 'open science' biomedical research in support of the human exploration of space and the improvement of life on earth. Phase I of the four-phase GeneLab Data Systems (GLDS) project emphasized capabilities for submission, curation, search, and retrieval of genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics ('omics') data from biomedical research of space environments. The focus of development of the GLDS for Phase II has been federated data search for and retrieval of these kinds of data across other open-access systems, so that users are able to conduct biological meta-investigations using data from a variety of sources. Such meta-investigations are key to corroborating findings from many kinds of assays and translating them into systems biology knowledge and, eventually, therapeutics.

  11. NASAs GeneLab Phase II: Federated Search and Data Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrios, Daniel C.; Costes, Sylvain; Tran, Peter

    2017-01-01

    GeneLab is currently being developed by NASA to accelerate open science biomedical research in support of the human exploration of space and the improvement of life on earth. Phase I of the four-phase GeneLab Data Systems (GLDS) project emphasized capabilities for submission, curation, search, and retrieval of genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics (omics) data from biomedical research of space environments. The focus of development of the GLDS for Phase II has been federated data search for and retrieval of these kinds of data across other open-access systems, so that users are able to conduct biological meta-investigations using data from a variety of sources. Such meta-investigations are key to corroborating findings from many kinds of assays and translating them into systems biology knowledge and, eventually, therapeutics.

  12. Needsfinding in living labs : A structured research approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savelkoul, L.E.M.; Peutz, M.

    Living labs enable innovations to be facilitated and implemented quickly and efficiently. A key element of the living lab approach is the active involvement of users. In this article, we examine a structured needsfinding phase of a living lab infrastructure project within the context of bicycle

  13. Experiential Learning of Digital Communication Using LabVIEW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Wei; Porter, Jay R.; Morgan, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the design and implementation of laboratories and course projects using LabVIEW in an instrumentation course. The pedagogical challenge is to enhance students' learning of digital communication using LabVIEW. LabVIEW was extensively used in the laboratory sessions, which better prepared students for the course projects. Two…

  14. Introduction to Computing: Lab Manual. Faculty Guide [and] Student Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasca, Joseph W.

    This lab manual is designed to accompany a college course introducing students to computing. The exercises are designed to be completed by the average student in a supervised 2-hour block of time at a computer lab over 15 weeks. The intent of each lab session is to introduce a topic and have the student feel comfortable with the use of the machine…

  15. Cassandra - WP400 - final report of living lab 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engler, M.; Klievink, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    This CASSANDRA LL2 final deliverable contains all information regarding the CASSANDRA Living Lab Europe – USA via Bremerhaven including information from two intermediate reports (CASSANDRA D4.21 and D4.22) about the very same Living Lab handed in during runtime of the Living Lab. CASSANDRA Living

  16. The NOAO Data Lab PHAT Photometry Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Knut; Williams, Ben; Fitzpatrick, Michael; PHAT Team

    2018-01-01

    We present a database containing both the combined photometric object catalog and the single epoch measurements from the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT). This database is hosted by the NOAO Data Lab (http://datalab.noao.edu), and as such exposes a number of data services to the PHAT photometry, including access through a Table Access Protocol (TAP) service, direct PostgreSQL queries, web-based and programmatic query interfaces, remote storage space for personal database tables and files, and a JupyterHub-based Notebook analysis environment, as well as image access through a Simple Image Access (SIA) service. We show how the Data Lab database and Jupyter Notebook environment allow for straightforward and efficient analyses of PHAT catalog data, including maps of object density, depth, and color, extraction of light curves of variable objects, and proper motion exploration.

  17. New mission for the national labs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisman, J.

    1995-01-01

    As a testing moratorium takes hold, the future of the weapons laboratories may lie in a $3 billion package of science projects meant to keep the arsenal reliable-and weapons-designing talents sharp. When President Clinton declared an end to all nuclear testing a month ago, he offered the nation's three weapons laboratories an enormous, expensive pacifier-a $3 billion package of scientific projects to replace testing. The labs swallowed hard, choked back their conviction that explosive testing is the best and cheapest means of ensuring the reliability of the nation's nuclear stockpile, and took the bait. The lab directors duly issued statements embracing the test ban-providing the new program materializes

  18. New mission for the national labs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisman, J.

    1995-10-06

    As a testing moratorium takes hold, the future of the weapons laboratories may lie in a $3 billion package of science projects meant to keep the arsenal reliable-and weapons-designing talents sharp. When President Clinton declared an end to all nuclear testing a month ago, he offered the nation`s three weapons laboratories an enormous, expensive pacifier-a $3 billion package of scientific projects to replace testing. The labs swallowed hard, choked back their conviction that explosive testing is the best and cheapest means of ensuring the reliability of the nation`s nuclear stockpile, and took the bait. The lab directors duly issued statements embracing the test ban-providing the new program materializes.

  19. Implementation of a Mobile Accessible Remote Lab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Garbi Zutin

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the proposed research is to designand implement a LabVIEW-based remote lab client to runon a TCP/IP enabled PDA (Personal Digital Assistantdevice, thus teaching using this wireless m-learning systemwill not be limited by time and location. In addition,resources and equipments can be integrated and shared tothe extent that critically events can be monitored andhandled in time. An environment will be created to trainstudents to handle factory automation, data acquisition,data management, and manufacturing processes usingmobile devices. Furthermore, the integration and sharing oflab equipments via the Internet is a kind of teachingenvironment which promotes learning interests andefficiency using mobile devices.

  20. Technology Roadmap: Lab-on-a-Chip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pattharaporn Suntharasaj

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available With the integration of microfluidic and MEMS technologies, biochips such as the lab-on-a-chip (LOC devices are at the brink of revolutionizing the medical disease diagnostics industries. Remarkable advancements in the biochips industry are making products resembling Star Trek.s "tricorder" and handheld medical scanners a reality. Soon, doctors can screen for cancer at the molecular level without costly and cumbersome equipments, and discuss treatment plans based on immediate lab results. This paper develops a roadmap for a hypothetical company (XI which is seeking to be successful in this market. The roadmapping process starts with gathering data through literature research and expert opinions, and progress through defining the market/product/technology layers, linking and integrating these layers, and finally creating a labon-a-chip for disease diagnostics technology roadmap.

  1. Lab-on-a-Chip Multiplex Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Harald; Wienke, Julia; Bier, Frank F

    2017-01-01

    Lab-on-a-chip multiplex assays allow a rapid identification of multiple parameters in an automated manner. Here we describe a lab-based preparation followed by a rapid and fully automated DNA microarray hybridization and readout in less than 10 min using the Fraunhofer in vitro diagnostics (ivD) platform to enable rapid identification of bacterial species and detection of antibiotic resistance. The use of DNA microarrays allows a fast adaptation of new biomarkers enabling the identification of different genes as well as single-nucleotide-polymorphisms (SNPs) within these genes. In this protocol we describe a DNA microarray developed for identification of Staphylococcus aureus and the mecA resistance gene.

  2. Biocompatibility of a lab-on-a-pill sensor in artificial gastrointestinal environments

    OpenAIRE

    Johannessen, E.A.; Wang, L.; Wyse, C.; Cumming, D.R.S.; Cooper, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    n this paper, we present a radiotelemetry sensor, designed as a lab-in-a-pill, which incorporates a two-channel microfabricated sensor platform for real-time measurements of temperature and pH. These two parameters have potential application for use in remote biological sensing (for example they may be used as markers that reflect the physiological environment or as indicators for disease, within the gastrointestinal tract). We have investigated the effects of biofouling on these sensors, by ...

  3. Negative regulation of mast cell signaling and function by the adaptor LAB/NTAL

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lusková, Petra; Lebduška, Pavel; Dráberová, Lubica; Šímová, Šárka; Heneberg, Petr; Boubelík, Michael; Bugajev, V.; Mallisen, B.; Wilson, B. S.; Hořejší, Václav; Mallisen, M.; Dráber, Petr

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 200, č. 8 (2004), s. 1001-1013 ISSN 0022-1007 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A026; GA ČR GA204/03/0594; GA ČR GA301/03/0596; GA AV ČR IAA5052310 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : mast cell * LAB/NTAL * cell signaling Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 14.588, year: 2004

  4. Stability of a lab-scale biofilm for simultaneous removal of phosphorus and nitrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkentoft, Christina Maria; Harremoës, Poul; Mosbæk, Hans

    2001-01-01

    A lab-scale biofilm reactor for simultaneous removal of phosphorus and nitrate was operated for one and a half years. Despite using only well defined synthetic wastewater and well defined operation, the activity varied significantly over the months. It was speculated that microbial population...... to the importance of the history of the bacteria when considering biological P removal, on-line measurements are strongly recommended for research on this subject. Microbial characterisation methods are recommended as an assisting tool in further research....

  5. co_LAB @ Web We Want

    OpenAIRE

    Thayne, Martyn; Cooper, Graham; Field, James; McCarthy, Clive; Vickers, Richard; Lawlor, Louise; West, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    co_LAB projects typically involve working with interdisciplinary groups of students, using discovery-based learning methods to explore questions, concerns and issues within digital culture and the incorporation of digital media into aspects of everyday life. Most recently the group participated in the 'Web We Want Festival' at the Southbank Arts Centre in London, which was part of Sir Tim Berners-Lee's campaign to develop a 'Magna Carta for the digital age'. In the week leading up to the fest...

  6. LAB bacteriocin applications in the last decade

    OpenAIRE

    Ma. del Rocío López-Cuellar; Adriana-Inés Rodríguez-Hernández; Norberto Chavarría-Hernández

    2016-01-01

    In the early 2000s, the expectations about bacteriocins produced by lactic acid bacteria (LABs) were aimed at food applications. However, the effectiveness of bacteriocins against undesirable micro-organisms opened endless possibilities for innovative research. In the present review, we collected a database including 429 published papers and 245 granted patents (from 2004 to 2015). Based on bibliometric analysis, the progress of bacteriocin research in the last 11 years was discussed in detai...

  7. Report to Lincoln Labs on TWPAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubois, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Carosi, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Woollett, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Holland, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Horsley, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Qu, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Materise, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Drury, O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chapline, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Friedrich, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-26

    This past spring LLNL’s Quantum Sensor’s team received two TWPA amplifiers from Lincoln Labs along with a data-sheet explaining handling, operations and expected performance. Here we will outline some of the initial tests performed on this amplifiers as part of LLNL’s Quantum Sensors Strategic Initiative (QSSI). Initial testing confirmed that both amplifiers worked and provided gain and SNR improvement similar to that called out in the data-sheets provided.

  8. Berkeley's Advanced Labs for Undergraduate Astronomy Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiles, C.

    1998-12-01

    We currently offer three advanced laboratory courses for undergraduate majors: optical, IR, and radio. These courses contain both intellectual and practical content; in this talk we focus on the radio lab as a representative example. The first half of the semester concentrates on fundamentals of microwave electronics and radio astronomy techniques in four formal laboratory exercises which emphasize hands-on use of microwave devices, laboratory instruments, and computer-controlled data taking. The second half of the course emphasizes astronomy, using a horn with ~ 1 m(2) aperture to map the HI in the Galaxy and a two-element interferometer composed of ~ 1 m diameter dishes on a ~ 10 m baseline to measure accurate positions of radio sources and accurate diameters for the Sun and Moon. These experiments and observations offer ideal opportunities for teaching coordinates, time, rotation matrices, data reduction techniques, least squares, signal processing, image processing, Fourier transforms, and laboratory and astronomical instrumentation. The students can't get along without using computers as actually used by astronomers. We stay away from packaged software such as IRAF, which are ``black boxes''; rather, students learn far more by writing their own software, usually for the first time. They use the IDL language to take and reduce data and prepare them for the lab reports. We insist on quality reports---including tables, postscript graphs and images, correct grammar, spelling, and all the rest---and we strongly urge (successfully!) the students to use LATEX. The other two lab courses have the same emphasis: the guiding spirit is to place the students in a real-life research-like situation. There is too much to do, so students perform the work in small groups of 3 or 4 and groups are encouraged to share their knowledge. Lab reports are written individually. These courses are very demanding, requiring an average of 20 hours per week from the students (and probably

  9. MotifLab: a tools and data integration workbench for motif discovery and regulatory sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepper, Kjetil; Drabløs, Finn

    2013-01-16

    Traditional methods for computational motif discovery often suffer from poor performance. In particular, methods that search for sequence matches to known binding motifs tend to predict many non-functional binding sites because they fail to take into consideration the biological state of the cell. In recent years, genome-wide studies have generated a lot of data that has the potential to improve our ability to identify functional motifs and binding sites, such as information about chromatin accessibility and epigenetic states in different cell types. However, it is not always trivial to make use of this data in combination with existing motif discovery tools, especially for researchers who are not skilled in bioinformatics programming. Here we present MotifLab, a general workbench for analysing regulatory sequence regions and discovering transcription factor binding sites and cis-regulatory modules. MotifLab supports comprehensive motif discovery and analysis by allowing users to integrate several popular motif discovery tools as well as different kinds of additional information, including phylogenetic conservation, epigenetic marks, DNase hypersensitive sites, ChIP-Seq data, positional binding preferences of transcription factors, transcription factor interactions and gene expression. MotifLab offers several data-processing operations that can be used to create, manipulate and analyse data objects, and complete analysis workflows can be constructed and automatically executed within MotifLab, including graphical presentation of the results. We have developed MotifLab as a flexible workbench for motif analysis in a genomic context. The flexibility and effectiveness of this workbench has been demonstrated on selected test cases, in particular two previously published benchmark data sets for single motifs and modules, and a realistic example of genes responding to treatment with forskolin. MotifLab is freely available at http://www.motiflab.org.

  10. Tele-Lab IT-Security: an Architecture for an online virtual IT Security Lab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Meinel

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently, Awareness Creation in terms of IT security has become a big thing – not only for enterprises. Campaigns for pupils try to highlight the importance of IT security even in the user’s early years. Common practices in security education – as seen in computer science courses at universities – mainly consist of literature and lecturing. In the best case, the teaching facility offers practical courses in a dedicated isolated computer lab. Additionally, there are some more or less interactive e-learning applications around. Most existing offers can do nothing more than impart theoretical knowledge or basic information. They all lack of possibilities to provide practical experience with security software or even hacker tools in a realistic environment. The only exceptions are the expensive and hard-to-maintain dedicated computer security labs. Those can only be provided by very few organizations. Tele-Lab IT-Security was designed to offer hands-on experience exercises in IT security without the need of additional hardware or maintenance expenses. The existing implementation of Tele-Lab even provides access to the learning environment over the Internet – and thus can be used anytime and anywhere. The present paper describes the extended architecture on which the current version of the Tele-Lab server is built.

  11. The Dynamics and Facilitation of a Living Lab Construct

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønnum, Louise; Nielsen, Louise Møller

    2013-01-01

    During the last decade Living Labs have established itself as an attractive innovation approach. Living Labs are an interesting construction because it offers a collaboration platform for dynamic interaction with users in all the project phases. Living Labs frame knowledge about actors in their own...... settings, in which new opportunities for innovation can be discovered. However, the practical management of a Living Lab is often a great challenge. It involves managing several actors, who are working with different agendas and within very different development traditions. The managing of a Living Lab...... and the different actors, processes and methods are therefore interesting to put into perspective as it contains opportunities for staging a well‐functioning Living Lab. This paper contributes to unfolding and discussing some of the main challenges in managing a Living Lab while keeping the different actors engaged...

  12. Recent lab-on-chip developments for novel drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Nauman; Kobayashi, Isao; Nakajima, Mitsutoshi

    2017-07-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and micro total analysis systems (μTAS) revolutionized the biochemical and electronic industries, and this miniaturization process became a key driver for many markets. Now, it is a driving force for innovations in life sciences, diagnostics, analytical sciences, and chemistry, which are called 'lab-on-a-chip, (LOC)' devices. The use of these devices allows the development of fast, portable, and easy-to-use systems with a high level of functional integration for applications such as point-of-care diagnostics, forensics, the analysis of biomolecules, environmental or food analysis, and drug development. In this review, we report on the latest developments in fabrication methods and production methodologies to tailor LOC devices. A brief overview of scale-up strategies is also presented together with their potential applications in drug delivery and discovery. The impact of LOC devices on drug development and discovery has been extensively reviewed in the past. The current research focuses on fast and accurate detection of genomics, cell mutations and analysis, drug delivery, and discovery. The current research also differentiates the LOC devices into new terminology of microengineering, like organ-on-a-chip, stem cells-on-a-chip, human-on-a-chip, and body-on-a-chip. Key challenges will be the transfer of fabricated LOC devices from lab-scale to industrial large-scale production. Moreover, extensive toxicological studies are needed to justify the use of microfabricated drug delivery vehicles in biological systems. It will also be challenging to transfer the in vitro findings to suitable and promising in vivo models. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2017, 9:e1381. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1381 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Virtual Simulations as Preparation for Lab Exercises: Assessing Learning of Key Laboratory Skills in Microbiology and Improvement of Essential Non-Cognitive Skills.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Makransky

    Full Text Available To investigate if a virtual laboratory simulation (vLAB could be used to replace a face to face tutorial (demonstration to prepare students for a laboratory exercise in microbiology.A total of 189 students who were participating in an undergraduate biology course were randomly selected into a vLAB or demonstration condition. In the vLAB condition students could use a vLAB at home to 'practice' streaking out bacteria on agar plates in a virtual environment. In the demonstration condition students were given a live demonstration from a lab tutor showing them how to streak out bacteria on agar plates. All students were blindly assessed on their ability to perform the streaking technique in the physical lab, and were administered a pre and post-test to determine their knowledge of microbiology, intrinsic motivation to study microbiology, and self-efficacy in the field of microbiology prior to, and after the experiment.The results showed that there were no significant differences between the two groups on their lab scores, and both groups had similar increases in knowledge of microbiology, intrinsic motivation to study microbiology, as well as self-efficacy in the field of microbiology.Our data show that vLABs function just as well as face to face tutorials in preparing students for a physical lab activity in microbiology. The results imply that vLABs could be used instead of face to face tutorials, and a combination of virtual and physical lab exercises could be the future of science education.

  14. Virtual Simulations as Preparation for Lab Exercises: Assessing Learning of Key Laboratory Skills in Microbiology and Improvement of Essential Non-Cognitive Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makransky, Guido; Thisgaard, Malene Warming; Gadegaard, Helen

    2016-01-01

    To investigate if a virtual laboratory simulation (vLAB) could be used to replace a face to face tutorial (demonstration) to prepare students for a laboratory exercise in microbiology. A total of 189 students who were participating in an undergraduate biology course were randomly selected into a vLAB or demonstration condition. In the vLAB condition students could use a vLAB at home to 'practice' streaking out bacteria on agar plates in a virtual environment. In the demonstration condition students were given a live demonstration from a lab tutor showing them how to streak out bacteria on agar plates. All students were blindly assessed on their ability to perform the streaking technique in the physical lab, and were administered a pre and post-test to determine their knowledge of microbiology, intrinsic motivation to study microbiology, and self-efficacy in the field of microbiology prior to, and after the experiment. The results showed that there were no significant differences between the two groups on their lab scores, and both groups had similar increases in knowledge of microbiology, intrinsic motivation to study microbiology, as well as self-efficacy in the field of microbiology. Our data show that vLABs function just as well as face to face tutorials in preparing students for a physical lab activity in microbiology. The results imply that vLABs could be used instead of face to face tutorials, and a combination of virtual and physical lab exercises could be the future of science education.

  15. E-Labs - Learning with Authentic Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardeen, Marjorie G. [Fermilab; Wayne, Mitchell [Notre Dame U.

    2016-01-01

    the success teachers have had providing an opportunity for students to: • Organize and conduct authentic research. • Experience the environment of scientific collaborations. • Possibly make real contributions to a burgeoning scientific field. We've created projects that are problem-based, student driven and technology dependent. Students reach beyond classroom walls to explore data with other students and experts and share results, publishing original work to a worldwide audience. Students can discover and extend the research of other students, modeling the processes of modern, large-scale research projects. From start to finish e-Labs are student-led, teacher-guided projects. Students need only a Web browser to access computing techniques employed by professional researchers. A Project Map with milestones allows students to set the research plan rather than follow a step-by-step process common in other online projects. Most importantly, e-Labs build the learning experience around the students' own questions and let them use the very tools that scientists use. Students contribute to and access shared data, most derived from professional research databases. They use common analysis tools, store their work and use metadata to discover, replicate and confirm the research of others. This is where real scientific collaboration begins. Using online tools, students correspond with other research groups, post comments and questions, prepare summary reports, and in general participate in the part of scientific research that is often left out of classroom experiments. Teaching tools such as student and teacher logbooks, pre- and post-tests and an assessment rubric aligned with learner outcomes help teachers guide student work. Constraints on interface designs and administrative tools such as registration databases give teachers the "one-stop-shopping" they seek for multiple e-Labs. Teaching and administrative tools also allow us to track usage and assess the

  16. Charpy V, an application in Mat lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo M, J.A.; Torres V, M.

    2003-01-01

    The obtained results with the system Charpy V V 1 designed in Mat lab for the estimate of parameters of three mathematical models are shown. The adjustment of data is used to determine the fracture energy, the lateral expansion and the percentage of ductility of steels coming from the reactor vessels of Laguna Verde, Veracruz. The data come from test tubes type Charpy V of irradiated material and not irradiated. To verify our results they were compared with those obtained by General Electric of data coming from the Laguna Verde nuclear power plant. (Author)

  17. CompTIA Network+ Lab Manual

    CERN Document Server

    Skandier, Toby

    2012-01-01

    Gain street-smart skills in network administration Think of the most common and challenging tasks that network administrators face, then read this book and find out how to perform those tasks, step by step. CompTIA Network + Lab Manual provides an inside look into the field of network administration as though you were actually on the job. You'll find a variety of scenarios and potential roadblocks, as well as clearly mapped sections to help you prepare for the CompTIA Network+ Exam N10-005. Learn how to design, implement, configure, maintain, secure, and troubleshoot a network with this street

  18. DOSAR/CalLab Operations Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogard, J.S.

    2000-03-01

    The Life Sciences Division (LSD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a long record of radiation dosimetry research, primarily using the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) and the Dosimetry Applications Research (DOSAR) Program Calibration Laboratory (CalLab), referred to formerly as the Radiation Calibration Laboratory. These facilities have been used by a broad segment of the research community to perform a variety of experiments in areas including, but not limited to, radiobiology, radiation dosimeter and instrumentation development and calibration, and the testing of materials in a variety of radiation environments.

  19. Comparative genomics of Lactobacillus and other LAB

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wassenaar, Trudy M.; Lukjancenko, Oksana

    2014-01-01

    The genomes of 66 LABs, belonging to five different genera, were compared for genome size and gene content. The analyzed genomes included 37 Lactobacillus genomes of 17 species, six Lactococcus lactis genomes, four Leuconostoc genomes of three species, six Streptococcus genomes of two species...... that of the others, with the two Streptococcus species having the shortest genomes. The widest distribution in genome content was observed for Lactobacillus. The number of tRNA and rRNA gene copies varied considerably, with exceptional high numbers observed for Lb. delbrueckii, while these numbers were relatively...

  20. Quark Hadron Duality - Recent Jefferson Lab Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niculescu, Maria Ioana [James Madison Univ., Harrisonburg, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-08-01

    The duality between the partonic and hadronic descriptions of electron--nucleon scattering is a remarkable feature of nuclear interactions. When averaged over appropriate energy intervals the cross section at low energy which is dominated by nucleon resonances resembles the smooth behavior expected from perturbative QCD. Recent Jefferson Lab results indicate that quark-hadron duality is present in a variety of observables, not just the proton F2 structure function. An overview of recent results, especially local quark-hadron duality on the neutron, are presented here.

  1. Where Synthetic Biology Meets ET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic biology - the design and construction of new biological parts and systems and the redesign of existing ones for useful purposes - has the potential to transform fields from pharmaceuticals to fuels. Our lab has focused on the potential of synthetic biology to revolutionize all three major parts of astrobiology: Where do we come from? Where are we going? and Are we alone? For the first and third, synthetic biology is allowing us to answer whether the evolutionary narrative that has played out on planet earth is likely to have been unique or universal. For example, in our lab we are re-evolving the biosynthetic pathways of amino acids in order to understand potential capabilities of an early organism with a limited repertoire of amino acids and developing techniques for the recovery of metals from spent electronics on other planetary bodies. And what about the limits for life? Can we create organisms that expand the envelope for life? In the future synthetic biology will play an increasing role in human activities both on earth, in fields as diverse as human health and the industrial production of novel bio-composites. Beyond earth, we will rely increasingly on biologically-provided life support, as we have throughout our evolutionary history. In order to do this, the field will build on two of the great contributions of astrobiology: studies of the origin of life and life in extreme environments.

  2. The Design of NetSecLab: A Small Competition-Based Network Security Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C. P.; Uluagac, A. S.; Fairbanks, K. D.; Copeland, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a competition-style of exercise to teach system and network security and to reinforce themes taught in class. The exercise, called NetSecLab, is conducted on a closed network with student-formed teams, each with their own Linux system to defend and from which to launch attacks. Students are expected to learn how to: 1) install…

  3. OpenLabNotes – An Electronic Laboratory Notebook Extension for OpenLabFramework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    List Markus

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Electronic laboratory notebooks (ELNs are more accessible and reliable than their paper based alternatives and thus find widespread adoption. While a large number of commercial products is available, small- to mid-sized laboratories can often not afford the costs or are concerned about the longevity of the providers. Turning towards free alternatives, however, raises questions about data protection, which are not sufficiently addressed by available solutions. To serve as legal documents, ELNs must prevent scientific fraud through technical means such as digital signatures. It would also be advantageous if an ELN was integrated with a laboratory information management system to allow for a comprehensive documentation of experimental work including the location of samples that were used in a particular experiment. Here, we present OpenLabNotes, which adds state-of-the-art ELN capabilities to OpenLabFramework, a powerful and flexible laboratory information management system. In contrast to comparable solutions, it allows to protect the intellectual property of its users by offering data protection with digital signatures. OpenLabNotes effectively closes the gap between research documentation and sample management, thus making Open- LabFramework more attractive for laboratories that seek to increase productivity through electronic data management.

  4. Tools for application management at Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Software Controls Group at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) is responsible for slow controls for many Jefferson Lab facilities. The Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) is used as the basis of these control systems. The Controls Group developed and maintains over 150 control applications running on over 100 I/O controllers (IOCs). With so many applications, it becomes increasingly difficult to maintain and upgrade older applications and still produce new applications. The difficulties became especially apparent this year as a major effort was undertaken to upgrade all control system applications to the newest versions of EPICS and VxWorks. Over the past few years, the Controls Group has worked on constructing a framework within which to develop and maintain applications more efficiently. As the framework has matured and applications have been structured to fit the framework, a number of tools have been developed to help with software maintenance and upgrades. This paper will describe some of these tools and how they are used to enhance the maintainability and reliability of the control system

  5. Control system reliability at Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab), the availability of the control system is crucial to the operation of the accelerator for experimental programs. Jefferson Lab's control system, uses 68040 based microprocessors running VxWorks, Unix workstations, and a variety of VME, CAMAC. GPIB, and serial devices. The software consists of control system toolkit software, commercial packages, and over 200 custom and generic applications, some of which are highly complex. The challenge is to keep this highly diverse and still growing system, with over 162,000 control points, operating reliably, while managing changes and upgrades to both the hardware and software. Downtime attributable to the control system includes the time to troubleshoot and repair problems and the time to restore the machine to operation of the scheduled program. This paper describes the availability of the control system during the last year, the heaviest contributors to downtime and the response to problems. Strategies for improving the robustness of the control system am detailed and include changes in hardware, software, procedures and processes. The improvements range from the routine preventive hardware maintenance, to improving their ability to detect, predict and prevent problems. This paper also describes the software tools used to assist in control system troubleshooting, maintenance and failure recovery processes

  6. The evolution of Jefferson Lab's control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K. S. White; M. Bickley; W. Watson

    1999-01-01

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility's (Jefferson Lab) accelerator controls were initially implemented as a proprietary in-house system. During machine commissioning, problems were encountered leading to a decision to migrate to the Experimental Physics and Industrial Controls System (EPICS). Since then, the accelerator and all other laboratory controls have been successfully converted. In addition to implementing Jefferson Lab's controls using EPICS, new data visualization tools have been developed and existing programs have been enhanced with new capabilities. In order to provide a more generic interface for high level applications development, a device abstraction layer, called Common DEVice (CDEV), was implemented. These additions have been made available to other laboratories and are in use at many sites, including some that do not use EPICS. Control System development is not limited to computer scientists; operators, engineers and physicists frequently add capabilities using EPICS, CDEV, Tel/tk, and other tools. These contributions have tailored the control system for many different types of customers. For the future, the authors envision more intelligent processing and more capable tools for data storage, retrieval and visualization

  7. Quality of Lab Appliances in Orthodontic Offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruzansky, D P; Park, J H

    Lab appliances are an integral part of orthodontics, from active treatment to retention. The quality and fit of an appliance can affect the treatment result and stability. This study aims to determine common points of failure in orthodontic appliances, and suggest methods to reduce this rate. A survey consisting of 23 questions was distributed to active members of the American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) via Survey Monkey. The most common appliance to need an adjustment was the wrap-around retainer, with the Hawley retainer as a close second. The least common appliance needing adjustment was the Essix/clear retainer. Respondents were asked which component of each appliance was most commonly responsible for an ill-fit. For Hawley and wrap-around retainers, clasps were the most common problem at 50%, whereas spring aligners had two components - clasps and labial bows, both at 38%. Ill-fitting Essix/clear retainers had gingival impingement (52%) closely followed by poor posterior seating (43%). Communication between the orthodontist and lab technician can be improved by establishing a quality assurance protocol for outgoing and incoming cases. The labial bow of Hawley's, wrap-arounds and spring aligners should be clearly demarcated on the casts. Impressions should be free of distortion and casts should be inspected for accuracy. Clear retainers and positioner should be trimmed to avoid gingival impingement. The type of clasp should be selected based on the anatomy of the teeth, and bands should be checked for accuracy of fit.

  8. Temperature quenching in LAB based liquid scintillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sörensen, A.; Hans, S.; Junghans, A. R.; Krosigk, B. v.; Kögler, T.; Lozza, V.; Wagner, A.; Yeh, M.; Zuber, K.

    2018-01-01

    The effect of temperature changes on the light output of LAB based liquid scintillator is investigated in a range from -5 to 30°C with α -particles and electrons in a small scale setup. Two PMTs observe the scintillator liquid inside a cylindrically shaped aluminum cuvette that is heated or cooled and the temperature dependent PMT sensitivity is monitored and corrected. The α -emitting isotopes in dissolved radon gas and in natural Samarium (bound to a LAB solution) excite the liquid scintillator mixtures and changes in light output with temperature variation are observed by fitting light output spectra. Furthermore, also changes in light output by compton electrons, which are generated from external calibration γ -ray sources, is analysed with varying temperature. Assuming a linear behaviour, a combined negative temperature coefficient of {(-0.29 ± 0.01)}{ %/°}C is found. Considering hints for a particle type dependency, electrons show {(-0.17 ± 0.02)}{ %/°}C, whereas the temperature dependency seems stronger for α -particles, with {(-0.35 ± 0.03)}{ %/°}C. Due to a high sampling rate, a pulse shape analysis can be performed and shows an enhanced slow decay component at lower temperatures, pointing to reduced non-radiative triplet state de-excitations.

  9. PC/104 Embedded IOCs at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jianxun Yan, Trent Allison, Sue Witherspoon, Anthony Cuffe

    2009-10-01

    Jefferson Lab has developed embedded IOCs based on PC/104 single board computers (SBC) for low level control systems. The PC/104 IOCs run EPICS on top of the RTEMS operating system. Two types of control system configurations are used in different applications, PC/104 SBC with commercial PC/104 I/O cards and PC/104 SBC with custom designed FPGA-based boards. RTEMS was built with CEXP shell to run on the PC/104 SBC. CEXP shell provides the function of dynamic object loading, which is similar to the widely used VxWorks operating system. Standard software configurations were setup for PC/104 IOC application development to provide a familiar format for new projects as well as ease the conversion of applications from VME based IOCs to PC/104 IOCs. Many new projects at Jefferson Lab are going to employ PC/104 SBCs as IOCs and some applications have already been running them for accelerator operations. The PC/104 - RTEMS IOC provides a free open source Real-Time Operating System (RTOS), low cost/maintenance, easily installed/ configured, flexible, and reliable solution for accelerator control and 12GeV Upgrade projects.

  10. Control system reliability at Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, K.S.; Areti, H.; Garza, O.

    1997-01-01

    At Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab), the availability of the control system is crucial to the operation of the accelerator for experimental programs. Jefferson Lab's control system, uses 68040 based microprocessors running VxWorks, Unix workstations, and a variety of VME, CAMAC. GPIB, and serial devices. The software consists of control system toolkit software, commercial packages, and over 200 custom and generic applications, some of which are highly complex. The challenge is to keep this highly diverse and still growing system, with over 162,000 control points, operating reliably, while managing changes and upgrades to both the hardware and software. Downtime attributable to the control system includes the time to troubleshoot and repair problems and the time to restore the machine to operation of the scheduled program. This paper describes the availability of the control system during the last year, the heaviest contributors to downtime and the response to problems. Strategies for improving the robustness of the control system am detailed and include changes in hardware, software, procedures and processes. The improvements range from the routine preventive hardware maintenance, to improving their ability to detect, predict and prevent problems. This paper also describes the software tools used to assist in control system troubleshooting, maintenance and failure recovery processes

  11. A review of digital microfluidics as portable platforms for lab-on a-chip applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samiei, Ehsan; Tabrizian, Maryam; Hoorfar, Mina

    2016-07-07

    Following the development of microfluidic systems, there has been a high tendency towards developing lab-on-a-chip devices for biochemical applications. A great deal of effort has been devoted to improve and advance these devices with the goal of performing complete sets of biochemical assays on the device and possibly developing portable platforms for point of care applications. Among the different microfluidic systems used for such a purpose, digital microfluidics (DMF) shows high flexibility and capability of performing multiplex and parallel biochemical operations, and hence, has been considered as a suitable candidate for lab-on-a-chip applications. In this review, we discuss the most recent advances in the DMF platforms, and evaluate the feasibility of developing multifunctional packages for performing complete sets of processes of biochemical assays, particularly for point-of-care applications. The progress in the development of DMF systems is reviewed from eight different aspects, including device fabrication, basic fluidic operations, automation, manipulation of biological samples, advanced operations, detection, biological applications, and finally, packaging and portability of the DMF devices. Success in developing the lab-on-a-chip DMF devices will be concluded based on the advances achieved in each of these aspects.

  12. Leidos Biomed Teams with NCI, DOE, and Argonne National Lab to Support National X-Ray Resource | FNLCR Staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists are making progress in understanding a bleeding disorder caused by prescription drug interactions, thanks to a high-tech research facility involving two federal national laboratories, Argonne and Frederick. Miroslawa Dauter is a Senior Res

  13. Leidos Biomed Teams with NCI, DOE, and Argonne National Lab to Support National X-Ray Resource | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists are making progress in understanding a bleeding disorder caused by prescription drug interactions, thanks to a high-tech research facility involving two federal national laboratories, Argonne and Frederick.

  14. WetLab-2: Providing Quantitative PCR Capabilities on ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Macarena; Jung, Jimmy Kar Chuen; Almeida, Eduardo; Boone, Travis David; Schonfeld, Julie; Tran, Luan Hoang

    2015-01-01

    The objective of NASA Ames Research Centers WetLab-2 Project is to place on the ISS a system capable of conducting gene expression analysis via quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) of biological specimens sampled or cultured on orbit. The WetLab-2 system is capable of processing sample types ranging from microbial cultures to animal tissues dissected on-orbit. The project has developed a RNA preparation module that can lyse cells and extract RNA of sufficient quality and quantity for use as templates in qRT-PCR reactions. Our protocol has the advantage that it uses non-toxic chemicals, alcohols or other organics. The resulting RNA is transferred into a pipette and then dispensed into reaction tubes that contain all lyophilized reagents needed to perform qRT-PCR reactions. These reaction tubes are mounted on rotors to centrifuge the liquid to the reaction window of the tube using a cordless drill. System operations require simple and limited crew actions including syringe pushes, valve turns and pipette dispenses. The resulting process takes less than 30 min to have tubes ready for loading into the qRT-PCR unit.The project has selected a Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) qRT-PCR unit, the Cepheid SmartCycler, that will fly in its COTS configuration. The SmartCycler has a number of advantages including modular design (16 independent PCR modules), low power consumption, rapid thermal ramp times and four-color detection. The ability to detect up to four fluorescent channels will enable multiplex assays that can be used to normalize for RNA concentration and integrity, and to study multiple genes of interest in each module. The WetLab-2 system will have the capability to downlink data from the ISS to the ground after a completed run and to uplink new programs. The ability to conduct qRT-PCR on-orbit eliminates the confounding effects on gene expression of reentry stresses and shock acting on live cells and organisms or the concern of RNA degradation of fixed samples. The

  15. Innovative Educational Practice: Using Virtual Labs in the Secondary Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Satsky Kerr, PhD

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Two studies investigated the effectiveness of teaching science labs online to secondary students. Study 1 compared achievement among students instructed using hands-on Chemistry labs versus those instructed using virtual Chemistry labs (eLabs. Study 2 compared the same groups of students again while both teachers instructed using hands-on Chemistry labs to determine whether teacher or student characteristics may have affected Study 1’s findings. Participants were high school Chemistry students from a Central Texas Independent School District. Results indicated that: students learn science effectively online, schools may experience cost savings from delivering labs online, and students gain valuable technology skills needed later in college and in the workplace.

  16. JAVA Implementation of the Batched iLab Shared Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenard Payne

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The MIT iLab Shared Architecture is limited currently to running on the Microsoft Windows platform. A JAVA implementation of the Batched iLab Shared Architecture has been developed that can be used on other operating systems and still interoperate with the existing Microsoft .NET web services of MIT’s iLab ServiceBroker. The Batched iLab Shared Architecture has been revised and separates the Labserver into a LabServer that handles experiment management and a LabEquipment that handles experiment execution. The JAVA implementation provides a 3-tier code development model that allows code to be reused and to develop only the code that is specific to each experiment.

  17. Respecifying lab ethnography an ethnomethodological study of experimental physics

    CERN Document Server

    Sormani, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Respecifying Lab Ethnography delivers the first ethnomethodological study of current experimental physics in action, describing the disciplinary orientation of lab work and exploring the discipline in its social order, formal stringency and skilful performance - in situ and in vivo. In bringing together two major strands of ethnomethodological inquiry, reflexive ethnography and video analysis, which have hitherto existed in parallel, Respecifying Lab Ethnography introduces a practice-based video analysis. In doing so, the book recasts conventional distinctions to shed fresh light on methodolog

  18. Lab-on-a-chip technologies for genodermatoses: Recent progress and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongzhou, Cui; Shuping, Guo; Wenju, Wang; Li, Li; Lulu, Wei; Linjun, Deng; Jingmin, Li; Xiaoli, Ren; Li, Bai

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, molecular biology has proven to be a great asset in our understanding of mechanisms in genodermatoses. However, bench to bedside translation research lags far behind. Advances in lab-on-a-chip technologies enabled programmable, reconfigurable, and scalable manipulation of a variety of laboratory procedures. Sample preparation, microfluidic reactions, and continuous monitoring systems can be integrated on a small chip. These advantages have attracted attention in various fields of clinical application including diagnosis of inherited skin diseases. This review lists an overview of the underlying genes and mutations and describes prospective application of lab-on-a-chip technologies as solutions to challenges for point-of-care genodematoses diagnosis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Stream piracy in the Black Hills: A geomorphology lab exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaprowski, B.J.; Evenson, E.B.; Epstein, J.B.

    2002-01-01

    The Black Hills of South Dakota exhibits many fine examples of stream piracy that are very suitable for teaching geomorphology lab exercises. This lab goes beyond standard topographic map interpretation by using geologic maps, well logs, gravel provenance and other types of data to teach students about stream piracy. Using a step-by-step method in which the lab exercises ramp up in difficulty, students hone their skills in deductive reasoning and data assimilation. The first exercises deal with the identification of stream piracy at a variety of spatial scales and the lab culminates with an exercise on landscape evolution and drainage rearrangement.

  20. The History of Science and Technology at Bell Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, David

    2008-03-01

    Over the last 80 years, Bell Labs has been one of the most scientifically and technologically productive research labs in the world. Inventions such as the transistor, laser, cell phone, solar cell, negative feedback amplifier, communications satellite and many others were made there. Scientific breakthroughs such as discovery of the Big Bang, the wave nature of the electron, electron localization and the fractional quantum hall effect were also made there making Bell Labs almost unique in terms of large impacts in both science and technology. In my talk, I will discuss the history of the lab, talk about the present and give some suggestions for how I see it evolving into the future.

  1. EarthLabs Meet Sister Corita Kent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quartini, E.; Ellins, K. K.; Cavitte, M. G.; Thirumalai, K.; Ledley, T. S.; Haddad, N.; Lynds, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    The EarthLabs project provides a framework to enhance high school students' climate literacy and awareness of climate change. The project provides climate science curriculum and teacher professional development, followed by research on students' learning as teachers implement EarthLabs climate modules in the classroom. The professional development targets high school teachers whose professional growth is structured around exposure to current climate science research, data observation collection and analysis. During summer workshops in Texas and Mississippi, teachers work through the laboratories, experiments, and hand-on activities developed for their students. In summer 2013, three graduate students from the University of Texas at Austin Institute for Geophysics with expertise in climate science participated in two weeklong workshops. The graduate students partnered with exemplary teacher leaders to provide scientific content and lead the EarthLabs learning activities. As an experiment, we integrated a visit to the Blanton Museum and an associated activity in order to motivate participants to think creatively, as well as analytically, about science. This exercise was inspired by the work and educational philosophy of Sister Corita Kent. During the visit to the Blanton Museum, we steered participants towards specific works of art pre-selected to emphasize aspects of the climate of Texas and to draw participants' attention to ways in which artists convey different concepts. For example, artists use of color, lines, and symbols conjure emotional responses to imagery in the viewer. The second part of the exercise asked participants to choose a climate message and to convey this through a collage. We encouraged participants to combine their experience at the museum with examples of Sister Corita Kent's artwork. We gave them simple guidelines for the project based on techniques and teaching of Sister Corita Kent. Evaluation results reveal that participants enjoyed the

  2. Jefferson Lab's Journey into the Nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas Higinbotham

    2004-01-01

    The year 1969 saw the publication of the first results indicating that hard scattering centres exist deep inside protons. A collaboration between the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology was using SLAC's new high-energy electron LINAC to pioneer a rich new field in the study of the nucleus--deep inelastic scattering. Their measurements revealed that nucleons are made up of point-like particles, which Richard Feynman dubbed ''partons''. Thirty-five years on, studies of the parton-nature of the nucleus continue, not only at the traditional high-energy centres, but also at lower-energy laboratories, and in particular at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) in Virginia. Jefferson Lab is home to the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). Its main mission is to explore the atomic nucleus and the fundamental building-blocks of matter. As part of this mission, researchers there study the transition from the picture of the nucleus as a bound state of neutrons and protons to its deeper structure in terms of quarks and gluons--in other words, the transition from the hadronic degrees of freedom of nuclear physics to the quark-gluon degrees of freedom of high-energy physics. In exploring this transition, a wide range of experiments has been performed, from measurements of elastic form factors at large momentum transfers to studies of deep inelastic scattering. An array of spectrometers together with electron-beam energies of up to 5.7 GeV has allowed the laboratory to make significant contributions to this field. This article describes three experiments, each aimed at improving our understanding of a different aspect of the partonic nature of matter. The first, a classic deep inelastic scattering experiment, seeks to further our understanding of the composition of nucleon spin. The second experiment studies the concept of quark-hadron duality--a link between the deep inelastic

  3. A new approach to standardize multicenter studies: mobile lab technology for the German Environmental Specimen Bank.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Lermen

    Full Text Available Technical progress has simplified tasks in lab diagnosis and improved quality of test results. Errors occurring during the pre-analytical phase have more negative impact on the quality of test results than errors encountered during the total analytical process. Different infrastructures of sampling sites can highly influence the quality of samples and therewith of analytical results. Annually the German Environmental Specimen Bank (ESB collects, characterizes, and stores blood, plasma, and urine samples of 120-150 volunteers each on four different sampling sites in Germany. Overarching goal is to investigate the exposure to environmental pollutants of non-occupational exposed young adults combining human biomonitoring with questionnaire data. We investigated the requirements of the study and the possibility to realize a highly standardized sampling procedure on a mobile platform in order to increase the required quality of the pre-analytical phase. The results lead to the development of a mobile epidemiologic laboratory (epiLab in the project "Labor der Zukunft" (future's lab technology. This laboratory includes a 14.7 m(2 reception area to record medical history and exposure-relevant behavior, a 21.1 m(2 examination room to record dental fillings and for blood withdrawal, a 15.5 m(2 biological safety level 2 laboratory to process and analyze samples on site including a 2.8 m(2 personnel lock and a 3.6 m2 cryofacility to immediately freeze samples. Frozen samples can be transferred to their final destination within the vehicle without breaking the cold chain. To our knowledge, we herewith describe for the first time the implementation of a biological safety laboratory (BSL 2 lab and an epidemiologic unit on a single mobile platform. Since 2013 we have been collecting up to 15.000 individual human samples annually under highly standardized conditions using the mobile laboratory. Characterized and free of alterations they are kept ready for

  4. RASPBERRY PI TIEDONKERUULAITTEENA : Case: Nab Labs Oy

    OpenAIRE

    Aho, Henri

    2016-01-01

    Opinnäytetyön aiheena oli Raspberry Pi-alustalle suunnitellun etäluettavan ja -hallittavan mittausjärjes-telmän toteuttaminen Nab Labs Oy:n ilmatutkimusyksikölle. Työn tavoitteena oli automatisoida mit-taustulosten keräämistä ja käsittelyä. Rinnakkain kulkeva teorian ja käytännön kuvaus jakaantuu kolmeen eri osa-alueeseen: Raspberry Pi ja siihen liitetyt laitteet, järjestelmän toiminta ja sen ohjelmointi sekä internet-käyttöliityntä ja www-ohjelmointi. Työn tuloksena syntyi mittalaitt...

  5. Innovation Incubator: Whisker Labs Technical Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sparn, Bethany F. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Frank, Stephen M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Earle, Lieko [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Scheib, Jennifer G. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The Wells Fargo Innovation Incubator (IN2) is a program to foster and accelerate startup companies with commercial building energy-efficiency and demand management technologies. The program is funded by the Wells Fargo Foundation and co-administered by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Whisker Labs, an Oakland, California-based company, was one of four awardees in the first IN2 cohort and was invited to participate in the program because of its novel electrical power sensing technology for circuit breakers. The stick-on Whisker meters install directly on the front face of the circuit breakers in an electrical panel using adhesive, eliminating the need to open the panel and install current transducers (CTs) on the circuit wiring.

  6. Making the Case for Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter is a personal account of the initial planning and competition for a new laboratory, which eventually became known as the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, with the official nickname 'Jefferson Lab'. The period covered starts as far back as 1964, with the introduction of quarks, and extends up to the late 1980s after the initial team was assembled, the superconducting design was in place, and construction was well underway. I describe some of the major experiments that were proposed to justify the laboratory, reflect on the present status of those initially proposed experiments, and very briefly outline some of the new ideas that emerged after the laboratory was constructed. The science is presented in a simple manner intended for a lay audience, with some of the ideas illustrated by cartoons that were often used in popular lectures given during this period.

  7. The SPARC-LAB Thomson source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaccarezza, C., E-mail: cristina.vaccarezza@lnf.infn.it [INFN-LNF, Via Enrico Fermi, 40 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Alesini, D.; Anania, M.P. [INFN-LNF, Via Enrico Fermi, 40 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Bacci, A. [INFN-MI, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Biagioni, A.; Bisesto, F.; Bellaveglia, M. [INFN-LNF, Via Enrico Fermi, 40 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Cardarelli, P. [University of Ferrara and INFN-FE, via Saragat 1, 44122 Ferrara (Italy); Cardelli, F. [University La Sapienza and INFN-Roma1, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 2 00161 Rome (Italy); Cianchi, A. [University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Chiadroni, E.; Croia, M.; Curcio, A. [INFN-LNF, Via Enrico Fermi, 40 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Delogu, P. [University of Pisa and INFN-PI, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Giovenale, D. Di [INFN-LNF, Via Enrico Fermi, 40 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Domenico, G. Di [University of Ferrara and INFN-FE, via Saragat 1, 44122 Ferrara (Italy); Pirro, G. Di [INFN-LNF, Via Enrico Fermi, 40 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Drebot, I. [INFN-MI, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Ferrario, M. [INFN-LNF, Via Enrico Fermi, 40 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Filippi, F. [University La Sapienza and INFN-Roma1, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 2 00161 Rome (Italy); and others

    2016-09-01

    The SPARC-LAB Thomson source is a compact X-ray source based on the Thomson backscattering process presently under its second phase of commissioning at the LNF. The electron beam energy ranges between 30 and 150 MeV, the electrons collide head-on with the Ti:Sapphire FLAME laser pulse the energy of which ranges between 1 and 5 J with pulse lengths in the 25 fs–10 ps range, this provides an X-ray energy tunability in the range of 20–500 keV, with the further capability to generate strongly non-linear phenomena and to drive diffusion processes due to multiple and plural scattering effects. The experimental results of the obtained X-ray radiation are presented.

  8. Replacing textbook problems with lab experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Register, Trevor

    2017-10-01

    End-of-the-chapter textbook problems are often the bread and butter of any traditional physics classroom. However, research strongly suggests that students be given the opportunity to apply their knowledge in multiple contexts as well as be provided with opportunities to do the process of science through laboratory experiences. Little correlation has been shown linking the number of textbook problems solved with conceptual understanding of topics in mechanics. Furthermore, textbook problems as the primary source of practice for students robs them of the joy and productive struggle of learning how to think like an experimental physicist. Methods such as Modeling Instruction tackle this problem head-on by starting each instructional unit with an inquiry-based lab aimed at establishing the important concepts and equations for the unit, and this article will discuss ideas and experiences for how to carry that philosophy throughout a unit.

  9. Making the Case for Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, Franz

    2011-06-01

    This chapter is a personal account of the initial planning and competition for a new laboratory, which eventually became known as the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, with the official nickname "Jefferson Lab." The period covered starts as far back as 1964, with the introduction of quarks, and extends up to the late 1980s after the initial team was assembled, the superconducting design was in place, and construction was well underway. I describe some of the major experiments that were proposed to justify the laboratory, reflect on the present status of those initially proposed experiments, and very briefly outline some of the new ideas that emerged after the laboratory was constructed. The science is presented in a simple manner intended for a lay audience, with some of the ideas illustrated by cartoons that were often used in popular lectures given during this period.

  10. The Jefferson Lab Frozen Spin Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher Keith, James Brock, Christopher Carlin, Sara Comer, David Kashy, Josephine McAndrew, David Meekins, Eugene Pasyuk, Joshua Pierce, Mikell Seely

    2012-08-01

    A frozen spin polarized target, constructed at Jefferson Lab for use inside a large acceptance spectrometer, is described. The target has been utilized for photoproduction measurements with polarized tagged photons of both longitudinal and circular polarization. Protons in TEMPO-doped butanol were dynamically polarized to approximately 90% outside the spectrometer at 5 T and 200-300 mK. Photoproduction data were acquired with the target inside the spectrometer at a frozen-spin temperature of approximately 30 mK with the polarization maintained by a thin, superconducting coil installed inside the target cryostat. A 0.56 T solenoid was used for longitudinal target polarization and a 0.50 T dipole for transverse polarization. Spin relaxation times as high as 4000 hours were observed. We also report polarization results for deuterated propanediol doped with the trityl radical OX063.

  11. VPPD Lab - The Chemical Product Simulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalakul, Sawitree; Hussain, Rehan; Elbashir, Nimir

    2015-01-01

    of product performance models and product-chemical property models are used to evaluate different classes of product. The product classes are single molecular structure chemicals (lipids, solvents, aroma, etc.), blended products (gasoline, jet-fuels, lubricants, etc.), and emulsified product (hand wash......In this paper, the development of a systematic model-based framework for product design, implemented in the new product design software called VPPD-Lab is presented. This framework employs its in-house knowledge-based system to design and evaluate chemical products. The built-in libraries......, detergent, etc.). It has interface to identify workflow/data-flow for the inter-related activities between knowledge-based system and model-based calculation procedures to systematically, efficiently and robustly solve various types of product design-analysis problems. The application of the software...

  12. Tough Times Ahead for Government Labs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, Stephen; Buchanan, Michelle V.; Cheeks, Nona; Funsten, Herbert; Hawsey, Robert; Lane, Monya; Whitlow, Woodrow Jr.; Studt, Tim

    2008-01-01

    Many government R and D laboratory executives face a tough couple of months ahead. These anxieties are fueled by (1) possible management, technical direction, and budgetary changes in their agencies due to changes in the federal administration; (2) frozen operating budgets until March 2009 due to the Continuing Resolution (CR) attachment to the recent banking bailout bill; and (3) the financial fallout from the economic downturn. These and other pertinent questions regarding their R and D operations were addressed in R and D Magazine's 9th Annual Government R and D Executive Roundtable held on Oct. 16, 2008, in conjunction with the 46th Annual R and D 100 Awards at Chicago's Navy Pier. Most members of this year's government executive panel were hesitant to speculate on the changes that might occur in their labs as a result of the new administration. The exception to this stand was the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) Robert Hawsey. ''No matter who wins (the Roundtable was held before the Nov. 4th Presidential election), we expect to see continued support,'' says Hawsey. ''All of our cooperative research facilities are over-subscribed and we're looking at how we can expand them.'' Obviously, renewable energy is a hot button in the administration and likely to get increased financial backing to help meet our country's energy independence goals. When pressed, the panel was mostly optimistic about their future support, stating that external threats to the U.S. have not changed, and research work associated with homeland security and national defense is unlikely to see drastic change. ''We have a strong portfolio in life science and don't expect any changes,'' says Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Michelle Buchanan. Ongoing federally funded work at the national labs that was started before the Oct. 1st start of the FY2009 fiscal year will continue without any changes - those funds are unaffected by the CR action. This applies as well to any

  13. Characterization of Tri-lab Tantalum Plate.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchheit, Thomas E.; Cerreta, Ellen K.; Deibler, Lisa Anne; Chen, Shu-Rong; Michael, Joseph R.

    2014-09-01

    This report provides a detailed characterization Tri-lab Tantalum (Ta) plate jointly purchased from HCStark Inc. by Sandia, Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. Data in this report was compiled from series of material and properties characterization experiments carried out at Sandia (SNL) and Los Alamos (LANL) Laboratories through a leveraged effort funded by the C2 campaign. Results include microstructure characterization detailing the crystallographic texture of the material and an increase in grain size near the end of the rolled plate. Mechanical properties evaluations include, compression cylinder, sub-scale tension specimen, micohardness and instrumented indentation testing. The plate was found to have vastly superior uniformity when compare with previously characterized wrought Ta material. Small but measurable variations in microstructure and properties were noted at the end, and at the top and bottom edges of the plate.

  14. ECG based biometrics verification system using LabVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Singla

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Biometric based authentication systems provide solutions to the problems in high security which remain with conventionalsecurity systems. In a biometric verification system, human’s biological parameters (such as voice, finger print,palm print or hand geometry, face, iris etc. are used to verify the authenticity of a person. These parameters are good to beused as biometric parameters but do not provide the guarantee that the person is present and alive. As voice can be copied,finger print can be picked from glass on synthetic skin and in face recognition system due to genetic factors identical twinsor father-son may have the same facial appearance. ECG does not have these problems. It can not be recorded without theknowledge of the person and ECG of every person is unique even identical twins have different ECG. In this paper an ECGbasedbiometrics verification system which was developed using Laboratory Virtual Instruments Engineering Workbench(LabVIEW version 7.1 is discussed. Experiments were conducted on the database stored in the laboratory of 20 individualshaving 10 samples each and the results revealed a false rejection rate (FRR of 3% and false acceptance rate (FAR of 3.21%.

  15. The Jefferson Lab High Power Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jefferson Lab has designed, built and operated two high average power free-electron lasers (FEL) using superconducting RF (SRF) technology and energy recovery techniques. Between 1999-2001 Jefferson Lab operated the IR Demo FEL. This device produced over 2 kW in the mid-infrared, in addition to producing world record average powers in the visible (50 W), ultraviolet (10 W) and terahertz range (50 W) for tunable, short-pulse (< ps) light. This FEL was the first high power demonstration of an accelerator configuration that is being exploited for a number of new accelerator-driven light source facilities that are currently under design or construction. The driver accelerator for the IR Demo FEL uses an Energy Recovered Linac (ERL) configuration that improves the energy efficiency and lowers both the capital and operating cost of such devices by recovering most of the power in the spent electron beam after optical power is extracted from the beam. The IR Demo FEL was de-commissioned in late 2001 for an upgraded FEL for extending the IR power to over 10 kW and the ultraviolet power to over 1 kW. The FEL Upgrade achieved 10 kW of average power in the mid-IR (6 microns) in July of 2004, and its IR operation currently is being extended down to 1 micron. In addition, we have demonstrated the capability of on/off cycling and recovering over a megawatt of electron beam power without diminishing machine performance. A complementary UV FEL will come on-line within the next year. This paper presents a summary of the FEL characteristics, user community accomplishments with the IR Demo, and planned user experiments

  16. The Jefferson Lab High Power Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James R. Boyce

    2006-01-01

    Jefferson Lab has designed, built and operated two high average power free-electron lasers (FEL) using superconducting RF (SRF) technology and energy recovery techniques. Between 1999-2001 Jefferson Lab operated the IR Demo FEL. This device produced over 2 kW in the mid-infrared, in addition to producing world record average powers in the visible (50 W), ultraviolet (10 W) and terahertz range (50 W) for tunable, short-pulse (< ps) light. This FEL was the first high power demonstration of an accelerator configuration that is being exploited for a number of new accelerator-driven light source facilities that are currently under design or construction. The driver accelerator for the IR Demo FEL uses an Energy Recovered Linac (ERL) configuration that improves the energy efficiency and lowers both the capital and operating cost of such devices by recovering most of the power in the spent electron beam after optical power is extracted from the beam. The IR Demo FEL was de-commissioned in late 2001 for an upgraded FEL for extending the IR power to over 10 kW and the ultraviolet power to over 1 kW. The FEL Upgrade achieved 10 kW of average power in the mid-IR (6 microns) in July of 2004, and its IR operation currently is being extended down to 1 micron. In addition, we have demonstrated the capability of on/off cycling and recovering over a megawatt of electron beam power without diminishing machine performance. A complementary UV FEL will come on-line within the next year. This paper presents a summary of the FEL characteristics, user community accomplishments with the IR Demo, and planned user experiments.

  17. LAB bacteriocin applications in the last decade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma. del Rocío López-Cuellar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In the early 2000s, the expectations about bacteriocins produced by lactic acid bacteria (LABs were aimed at food applications. However, the effectiveness of bacteriocins against undesirable micro-organisms opened endless possibilities for innovative research. In the present review, we collected a database including 429 published papers and 245 granted patents (from 2004 to 2015. Based on bibliometric analysis, the progress of bacteriocin research in the last 11 years was discussed in detail. It was found that 164 patents were granted in 2010–2015, which is equivalent to 60% in comparison with previous years (i.e. only 81 patents were granted in 2004–2009. Currently, the research on bacteriocins is still gaining importance. In the realm of therapeutic strategies, about a 37% of the published research was focused on biomedical applications in the last decade. This vein of research is currently seeking for alternative solutions to problems such as cancer, systemic infections, oral-care, vaginal infections, contraception and skincare. On the other hand, food preservation, bio-nanomaterial and veterinary applications represent 29%, 25% and 9%, respectively. All this technology is being applied and will surely grow in the future, since about 31% of the patents granted since 2004 are focused on the biomedical area, 29% on food preservation, 5% on veterinary use; whereas 13% and 16% correspond to patents granted on production–purification systems and recombinant proteins or molecular modifications in the producer strains. This review contributes to the analysis of recent LAB bacteriocin applications and their role in safety, quality and improvement of human health.

  18. Reducing unnecessary lab testing in the ICU with artificial intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cismondi, F; Celi, L A; Fialho, A S; Vieira, S M; Reti, S R; Sousa, J M C; Finkelstein, S N

    2013-05-01

    To reduce unnecessary lab testing by predicting when a proposed future lab test is likely to contribute information gain and thereby influence clinical management in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding. Recent studies have demonstrated that frequent laboratory testing does not necessarily relate to better outcomes. Data preprocessing, feature selection, and classification were performed and an artificial intelligence tool, fuzzy modeling, was used to identify lab tests that do not contribute an information gain. There were 11 input variables in total. Ten of these were derived from bedside monitor trends heart rate, oxygen saturation, respiratory rate, temperature, blood pressure, and urine collections, as well as infusion products and transfusions. The final input variable was a previous value from one of the eight lab tests being predicted: calcium, PTT, hematocrit, fibrinogen, lactate, platelets, INR and hemoglobin. The outcome for each test was a binary framework defining whether a test result contributed information gain or not. Predictive modeling was applied to recognize unnecessary lab tests in a real world ICU database extract comprising 746 patients with gastrointestinal bleeding. Classification accuracy of necessary and unnecessary lab tests of greater than 80% was achieved for all eight lab tests. Sensitivity and specificity were satisfactory for all the outcomes. An average reduction of 50% of the lab tests was obtained. This is an improvement from previously reported similar studies with average performance 37% by [1-3]. Reducing frequent lab testing and the potential clinical and financial implications are an important issue in intensive care. In this work we present an artificial intelligence method to predict the benefit of proposed future laboratory tests. Using ICU data from 746 patients with gastrointestinal bleeding, and eleven measurements, we demonstrate high accuracy in predicting the likely information to be gained from proposed future

  19. Reducing unnecessary lab testing in the ICU with artificial intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cismondi, F.; Celi, L.A.; Fialho, A.S.; Vieira, S.M.; Reti, S.R.; Sousa, J.M.C.; Finkelstein, S.N.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To reduce unnecessary lab testing by predicting when a proposed future lab test is likely to contribute information gain and thereby influence clinical management in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding. Recent studies have demonstrated that frequent laboratory testing does not necessarily relate to better outcomes. Design Data preprocessing, feature selection, and classification were performed and an artificial intelligence tool, fuzzy modeling, was used to identify lab tests that do not contribute an information gain. There were 11 input variables in total. Ten of these were derived from bedside monitor trends heart rate, oxygen saturation, respiratory rate, temperature, blood pressure, and urine collections, as well as infusion products and transfusions. The final input variable was a previous value from one of the eight lab tests being predicted: calcium, PTT, hematocrit, fibrinogen, lactate, platelets, INR and hemoglobin. The outcome for each test was a binary framework defining whether a test result contributed information gain or not. Patients Predictive modeling was applied to recognize unnecessary lab tests in a real world ICU database extract comprising 746 patients with gastrointestinal bleeding. Main results Classification accuracy of necessary and unnecessary lab tests of greater than 80% was achieved for all eight lab tests. Sensitivity and specificity were satisfactory for all the outcomes. An average reduction of 50% of the lab tests was obtained. This is an improvement from previously reported similar studies with average performance 37% by [1–3]. Conclusions Reducing frequent lab testing and the potential clinical and financial implications are an important issue in intensive care. In this work we present an artificial intelligence method to predict the benefit of proposed future laboratory tests. Using ICU data from 746 patients with gastrointestinal bleeding, and eleven measurements, we demonstrate high accuracy in predicting the

  20. Drama Drives a DNA Fingerprinting Lab Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenstein, Elaine C.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Presents a laboratory exercise for an intermediate cell and molecular biology course that uses a murder-mystery play. Provokes students to think critically about important issues in scientific methodology in general and DNA analysis in particular. (JRH)

  1. Exploring Contemporary Issues in Genetics & Society: Karyotyping, Biological Sex, & Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Julie C.

    2013-01-01

    In this two-part activity, high school biology students examine human karyotyping, sex-chromosome-linked disorders, and the relationship between biological sex and gender. Through interactive simulations and a structured discussion lab, students create a human karyotype and diagnose chromosomal disorders in hypothetical patients, as well as…

  2. News from the Biological Stain Commission no. 13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyon, H O

    2013-01-01

    In the 13(th) issue of News from the Biological Stain Commission (BSC) under the heading of Regulatory affairs, the Biological Stain Commission's International Affairs Committee presents information from the first plenary meeting of the International Standards Organization ISO/TC 212 Clinical lab...... laboratory testing and in vitro diagnostic test systems held on 17-19 October 2011 in Las Vegas, Nevada....

  3. Ontology: A Support Structure for a V-Labs Network: Euronet-Lab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Cordeiro Correia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Our propose is to build a network of virtual laboratories, based in a Virtual Closet that will contain all the elements and parts that are needed to build the various experiences available in a v-labs network (that we call Euronet-Lab. To build this complex network we need to find a system that supports effectively this structure. This probably will be a enormous database of v-labs and independent elements, where will be possible sometimes to “recycle” some of the elements. This means “re-use” the same element several times in many experiences. To do this is necessary to have a structure that allows us to have several instances of the same element. It’s important that in our structure and virtual environment we can create several “images” of the same reality and this images can be used simultaneously in different circuits/experiments. This means that we can create several instances of the same element, to be used in different experiences and exercises.

  4. Living Labs als een Vehikel voor (Onderwijs)innovatie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellen Sjoer

    2014-01-01

    Wereldwijd schieten ze als paddenstoelen uit de grond: living labs. Deze ‘levende laboratoria’ zijn er in alle soorten en maten. Meestal wordt het lab gezien als een onderzoeks- en ontwikkelomgeving om een probleem met verschillende partijen op een innovatieve manier op te lossen. De thema’s van de

  5. Incorporating a Career Planning Lab into a Managerial Communications Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Gary L.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes how a small business school, as part of a strategic planning initiative to improve career services, added a self-directed career planning lab to an existing managerial communication course. The lab concept and the learning design are innovative because they met a student need without creating additional time demands on the…

  6. The Living Labs: Innovation in Real-Life Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Nathan; Bartle, Gamin; Romine, Martha

    2012-01-01

    The living lab (LL) is an open innovation ecosystem serving to provide opportunities for local stakeholders to practice research and to experiment with meaningful improvements for cities and other organizations. Living labs aim at involving the user as a cocreator. In this article the relationship between the LLs and a variety of stakeholders is…

  7. Aerial view of the water reservoirs for Lab II

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    Two large reservoirs (5000 m3 each) were built on the Swiss part of the site (Lab I is on the left). The water was drawn from the pumping station at Le Vengeron on Lac Léman, through a 10 km long pipe to be distributed over all Lab II.

  8. The Global MRIO Lab - charting the world economy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenzen, Manfred; Geschke, Arne; Rahman, Muhammad Daaniyall Abd; Xiao, Yanyan; Fry, Jacob; Reyes, Rachel; Dietzenbacher, Hendrikus; Inomata, Satoshi; Kanemoto, Keiichiro; Los, Bart; Moran, Daniel; Schulte in den Bäumen, Hagen; Tukker, Arnold; Walmsley, Terrie; Wiedmann, Thomas; Wood, Richard; Yamano, Norihiko

    2017-01-01

    We describe the creation of the Global Multi-Region Input-Output (MRIO) Lab, which is a cloud-computing platform offering a collaborative research environment through which participants can use each other's resources to assemble their own individual MRIO versions. The Global MRIO Lab's main purpose

  9. European labs brace for German cuts: international collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    Clery, D

    1996-01-01

    Germany, the largest contributor to international European research labs, announced plans to reduce its contributions an average of 8% in the nation's latest budget. CERN and other labs are worried that the cuts will endanger ongoing projects and that other countries may follow Germany's lead.

  10. Genomics Education in Practice: Evaluation of a Mobile Lab Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Mil, Marc H. W.; Boerwinkel, Dirk Jan; Buizer-Voskamp, Jacobine E.; Speksnijder, Annelies; Waarlo, Arend Jan

    2010-01-01

    Dutch genomics research centers have developed the "DNA labs on the road" to bridge the gap between modern genomics research practice and secondary-school curriculum in the Netherlands. These mobile DNA labs offer upper-secondary students the opportunity to experience genomics research through experiments with laboratory equipment that…

  11. The Multisensory Sound Lab: Sounds You Can See and Feel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman, Norman; Hendricks, Paula

    1994-01-01

    A multisensory sound lab has been developed at the Model Secondary School for the Deaf (District of Columbia). A special floor allows vibrations to be felt, and a spectrum analyzer displays frequencies and harmonics visually. The lab is used for science education, auditory training, speech therapy, music and dance instruction, and relaxation…

  12. Living Labs as boundary-spanners between Triple Helix actors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geenhuizen, M.S.

    2016-01-01

    Living labs are an increasingly popular methodology to enhance innovation. Living labs aim to span boundaries between different organizations, among others Triple helix actors, by acting as a network organization typically in a real-life environment to foster co-creation by user-groups. This paper

  13. Engineering Students' Experiences from Physics Group Work in Learning Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellingsaeter, Magnus Strøm

    2014-01-01

    Background: This paper presents a case study from a physics course at a Norwegian university college, investigating key aspects of a group-work project, so-called learning labs, from the participating students' perspective. Purpose: In order to develop these learning labs further, the students' perspective is important. Which aspects are essential…

  14. Using Mini-Reports to Teach Scientific Writing to Biology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Alexandria D.; Larios-Sanz, Maia; Amin, Shivas; Rosell, Rosemarie C.

    2014-01-01

    Anyone who has taught an introductory biology lab has sat at their desk in front of a towering stack of lengthy lab reports and wondered if there was a better way to teach scientific writing. We propose the use of a one-page format that we have called a "mini-report," which we believe better allows students to understand the structure…

  15. The Work Smart Standards process at Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) has developed a set of Work Smart Standards for the Lab. The effort incorporated the Lab's performance-based contract into the Necessary and Sufficient (N and S) Standards identification process of the DOE. A rigorous protocol identified hazards in the workplace and standards that provide adequate protection of workers, public, and the environment at reasonable cost. The intensive process was a joint effort between the Lab and DOE and it required trained teams of knowledgeable experts in three fields: (1) actual required work conditions at Jefferson Lab; (2) laws, regulations, DOE directives and performance-based contracts; and (3) Environmental Health and Safety (EH and S), Rad Con, and QA. The criteria for selection of the teams, the database designed and used for the process, and lessons learned are discussed

  16. Use of tablets for instruction and learning in microbiology labs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Karen Louise; Jelsbak, Vibe Alopaeus; Georgsen, Marianne

    ? The empirical part of the project has been documented through field observations in the lab (in writing and with photos). We have found the following to be characteristic of the work of the students: the students use the tablets collaboratively, take more photos than requested, use the video based instructions......In the Bachelor Programme of Biomedical Laboratory Analysis at University College VIA, the students work in a classified microbiology laboratory. This means that they are not allowed to bring their personal computers into the lab. Until now the students have used paper based lab instructions...... and taken notes by hand. Use of tablets in the lab offers new opportunities. In September 2012, nine tablets were introduced into one of the labs of the college. Groups of students use the tablets to access documents, watch video instructions, and to document results and procedures digitally. The objectives...

  17. GeneLab for High Schools: Data Mining for the Next Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaber, Elizabeth A.; Ly, Diana; Sato, Kevin Y.; Taylor, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Modern biological sciences have become increasingly based on molecular biology and high-throughput molecular techniques, such as genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics. NASA Scientists and the NASA Space Biology Program have aimed to examine the fundamental building blocks of life (RNA, DNA and protein) in order to understand the response of living organisms to space and aid in fundamental research discoveries on Earth. In an effort to enable NASA funded science to be available to everyone, NASA has collected the data from omics studies and curated them in a data system called GeneLab. Whilst most college-level interns, academics and other scientists have had some interaction with omics data sets and analysis tools, high school students often have not. Therefore, the Space Biology Program is implementing a new Summer Program for high-school students that aims to inspire the next generation of scientists to learn about and get involved in space research using GeneLabs Data System. The program consists of three main components core learning modules, focused on developing students knowledge on the Space Biology Program and Space Biology research, Genelab and the data system, and previous research conducted on model organisms in space; networking and team work, enabling students to interact with guest lecturers from local universities and their fellow peers, and also enabling them to visit local universities and genomics centers around the Bay area; and finally an independent learning project, whereby students will be required to form small groups, analyze a dataset on the Genelab platform, generate a hypothesis and develop a research plan to test their hypothesis. This program will not only help inspire high-school students to become involved in space-based research but will also help them develop key critical thinking and bioinformatics skills required for most college degrees and furthermore, will enable them to establish networks with their peers and connections

  18. A computer lab exploring evolutionary aspects of chromatin structure and dynamics for an undergraduate chromatin course*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eirín-López, José M

    2013-01-01

    The study of chromatin constitutes one of the most active research fields in life sciences, being subject to constant revisions that continuously redefine the state of the art in its knowledge. As every other rapidly changing field, chromatin biology requires clear and straightforward educational strategies able to efficiently translate such a vast body of knowledge to the classroom. With this aim, the present work describes a multidisciplinary computer lab designed to introduce undergraduate students to the dynamic nature of chromatin, within the context of the one semester course "Chromatin: Structure, Function and Evolution." This exercise is organized in three parts including (a) molecular evolutionary biology of histone families (using the H1 family as example), (b) histone structure and variation across different animal groups, and (c) effect of histone diversity on nucleosome structure and chromatin dynamics. By using freely available bioinformatic tools that can be run on common computers, the concept of chromatin dynamics is interactively illustrated from a comparative/evolutionary perspective. At the end of this computer lab, students are able to translate the bioinformatic information into a biochemical context in which the relevance of histone primary structure on chromatin dynamics is exposed. During the last 8 years this exercise has proven to be a powerful approach for teaching chromatin structure and dynamics, allowing students a higher degree of independence during the processes of learning and self-assessment. Copyright © 2013 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Learning by Viewing - Nobel Labs 360

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2013-01-01

    First of all, my thanks to the Nobel Lindau Foundation for their inspiration and leadership in sharing the excitement of scientific discovery with the public and with future scientists! I have had the pleasure of participating twice in the Lindau meetings, and recently worked with the Nobel Labs 360 project to show how we are building the world's greatest telescope yet, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). For the future, I see the greatest challenges for all the sciences in continued public outreach and inspiration. Outreach, so the public knows why we are doing what we are doing, and what difference it makes for them today and in the long-term future. Who knows what our destiny may be? It could be glorious, or not, depending on how we all behave. Inspiration, so that the most creative and inquisitive minds can pursue the scientific and engineering discoveries that are at the heart of so much of human prosperity, health, and progress. And, of course, national and local security depend on those discoveries too; scientists have been working with "the government" throughout recorded history. For the Lindau Nobel experiment, we have a truly abundant supply of knowledge and excitement, through the interactions of young scientists with the Nobelists, and through the lectures and the video recordings we can now share with the whole world across the Internet. But the challenge is always to draw attention! With 7 billion inhabitants on Earth, trying to earn a living and have some fun, there are plenty of competing opportunities and demands on us all. So what will draw attention to our efforts at Lindau? These days, word of mouth has become word of (computer) mouse, and ideas propagate as viruses ( or memes) across the Internet according to the interests of the participants. So our challenge is to find and match those interests, so that the efforts of our scientists, photographers, moviemakers, and writers are rewarded by our public. The world changes every day, so there

  20. Systems Biology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Systems biology seeks to study biological systems as a whole, contrary to the reductionist approach that has dominated biology. Such a view of biological systems emanating from strong foundations of molecular level understanding of the individual components in terms of their form, function and interactions is promising to ...

  1. Stability of a lab-scale biofilm for simultaneous removal of phosphorus and nitrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkentoft, Christina Maria; Harremoës, Poul; Mosbæk, Hans

    2001-01-01

    A lab-scale biofilm reactor for simultaneous removal of phosphorus and nitrate was operated for one and a half years. Despite using only well defined synthetic wastewater and well defined operation, the activity varied significantly over the months. It was speculated that microbial population shi...... to the importance of the history of the bacteria when considering biological P removal, on-line measurements are strongly recommended for research on this subject. Microbial characterisation methods are recommended as an assisting tool in further research....

  2. 13 scientists aced their science communication test at the FameLab final

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    On 8 May, the joint CERN and Swiss FameLab final took place in CERN’s Restaurant 1, which was transformed into a cosy setting for the special occasion. The jury selected Oskari Vinko, a Master’s student in synthetic biology at ETH Zurich, as the winner of the Swiss final while Lillian Smestad, a physicist in the Aegis collaboration, will be the first CERN finalist to go to the international final at the Cheltenham Science Festival. In addition, CMS physicist Christos Lazaridis was awarded the audience prize.   

  3. UniSchooLabs Toolkit: Tools and Methodologies to Support the Adoption of Universities’ Remote and Virtual Labs in Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Chioccariello

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The UniSchooLabs project aims at creating an infrastructure supporting web access to remote/virtual labs and associated educational resources to engage learners with hands-on and minds-on activities in science, technology and math in schools. The UniSchooLabs tool-kit supports the teacher in selecting a remote or virtual lab and developing a lab activity based on an inquiry model template. While working with the toolkit the teacher has access to three main features: a a catalogue of available online laboratories; b an archive of activities created by other users; c a tool for creating new activities or reusing existing ones.

  4. The lab-on-PCB approach: tackling the μTAS commercial upscaling bottleneck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschou, Despina; Tserepi, Angeliki

    2017-04-11

    Commercialization of lab-on-a-chip devices is currently the "holy grail" within the μTAS research community. While a wide variety of highly sophisticated chips which could potentially revolutionize healthcare, biology, chemistry and all related disciplines are increasingly being demonstrated, very few chips are or can be adopted by the market and reach the end-users. The major inhibition factor lies in the lack of an established commercial manufacturing technology. The lab-on-printed circuit board (lab-on-PCB) approach, while suggested many years ago, only recently has re-emerged as a very strong candidate, owing to its inherent upscaling potential: the PCB industry is well established all around the world, with standardized fabrication facilities and processes, but commercially exploited currently only for electronics. Owing to these characteristics, complex μTASs integrating microfluidics, sensors, and electronics on the same PCB platform can easily be upscaled, provided more processes and prototypes adapted to the PCB industry are proposed. In this article, we will be reviewing for the first time the PCB-based prototypes presented in the literature to date, highlighting the upscaling potential of this technology. The authors believe that further evolution of this technology has the potential to become a much sought-after standardized industrial fabrication technology for low-cost μTASs, which could in turn trigger the projected exponential market growth of μTASs, in a fashion analogous to the revolution of Si microchips via the CMOS industry establishment.

  5. Designing virtual science labs for the Islamic Academy of Delaware

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlZahrani, Nada Saeed

    Science education is a basic part of the curriculum in modern day classrooms. Instructional approaches to science education can take many forms but hands-on application of theory via science laboratory activities for the learner is common. Not all schools have the resources to provide the laboratory environment necessary for hands-on application of science theory. Some settings rely on technology to provide a virtual laboratory experience instead. The Islamic Academy of Delaware (IAD), a typical community-based organization, was formed to support and meet the essential needs of the Muslim community of Delaware. IAD provides science education as part of the overall curriculum, but cannot provide laboratory activities as part of the science program. Virtual science labs may be a successful model for students at IAD. This study was conducted to investigate the potential of implementing virtual science labs at IAD and to develop an implementation plan for integrating the virtual labs. The literature has shown us that the lab experience is a valuable part of the science curriculum (NBPTS, 2013, Wolf, 2010, National Research Council, 1997 & 2012). The National Research Council (2012) stressed the inclusion of laboratory investigations in the science curriculum. The literature also supports the use of virtual labs as an effective substitute for classroom labs (Babateen, 2011; National Science Teachers Association, 2008). Pyatt and Simms (2011) found evidence that virtual labs were as good, if not better than physical lab experiences in some respects. Although not identical in experience to a live lab, the virtual lab has been shown to provide the student with an effective laboratory experience in situations where the live lab is not possible. The results of the IAD teacher interviews indicate that the teachers are well-prepared for, and supportive of, the implementation of virtual labs to improve the science education curriculum. The investigator believes that with the

  6. The NOAO Data Lab virtual storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Matthew J.; Fitzpatrick, Michael J.; Norris, Patrick; Mighell, Kenneth J.; Olsen, Knut; Stobie, Elizabeth B.; Ridgway, Stephen T.; Bolton, Adam S.; Saha, Abhijit; Huang, Lijuan W.

    2016-07-01

    Collaborative research/computing environments are essential for working with the next generations of large astronomical data sets. A key component of them is a distributed storage system to enable data hosting, sharing, and publication. VOSpace1 is a lightweight interface providing network access to arbitrary backend storage solutions and endorsed by the International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA). Although similar APIs exist, such as Amazon S3, WebDav, and Dropbox, VOSpace is designed to be protocol agnostic, focusing on data control operations, and supports asynchronous and third-party data transfers, thereby minimizing unnecessary data transfers. It also allows arbitrary computations to be triggered as a result of a transfer operation: for example, a file can be automatically ingested into a database when put into an active directory or a data reduction task, such as Sextractor, can be run on it. In this paper, we shall describe the VOSpace implementations that we have developed for the NOAO Data Lab. These offer both dedicated remote storage, accessible as a local file system via FUSE, and a local VOSpace service to easily enable data synchronization.

  7. Featured Image: Making Dust in the Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-12-01

    This remarkable photograph (which spans only 10 m across; click for a full view) reveals what happens when you form dust grains in a laboratory under conditions similar to those of interstellar space. The cosmic life cycle of dust grains is not well understood we know that in the interstellar medium (ISM), dust is destroyed at a higher rate than it is produced by stellar sources. Since the amount of dust in the ISM stays constant, however, there must be additional sources of dust production besides stars. A team of scientists led by Daniele Fulvio (Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro and the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena) have now studied formation mechanisms of dust grains in the lab by mimicking low-temperature ISM conditions and exploring how, under these conditions, carbonaceous materials condense from gas phase to form dust grains. To read more about their results and see additional images, check out the paper below.CitationDaniele Fulvio et al 2017 ApJS 233 14. doi:10.3847/1538-4365/aa9224

  8. BOREAS TE-1 SSA Soil Lab Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Nerbas, Tim; Anderson, Darwin

    2000-01-01

    This data set was collected by TE-1 to provide a set of soil properties for BOREAS investigators in the SSA. The soil samples were collected at sets of soil pits in 1993 and 1994. Each set of soil pits was in the vicinity of one of the five flux towers in the BOREAS SSA. The collected soil samples were sent to a lab, where the major soil properties were determined. These properties include, but are not limited to, soil horizon; dry soil color; pH; bulk density; total, organic, and inorganic carbon; electric conductivity; cation exchange capacity; exchangeable sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and hydrogen; water content at 0.01, 0.033, and 1.5 MPascals; nitrogen; phosphorus; particle size distribution; texture; pH of the mineral soil and of the organic soil; extractable acid; and sulfur. The data are stored in tabular ASCII text files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  9. Di-hadron production at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anefalos Pereira, Sergio [Lab. Naz. Frascati, Frascati, Italy; et. al.,

    2014-10-01

    Semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) has been used extensively in recent years as an important testing ground for QCD. Studies so far have concentrated on better determination of parton distribution functions, distinguishing between the quark and antiquark contributions, and understanding the fragmentation of quarks into hadrons. Hadron pair (di-hadron) SIDIS provides information on the nucleon structure and hadronization dynamics that complement single hadron SIDIS. Di-hadrons allow the study of low- and high-twist distribution functions and Dihadron Fragmentation Functions (DiFF). Together with the twist-2 PDFs ( f1, g1, h1), the Higher Twist (HT) e and hL functions are very interesting because they offer insights into the physics of the largely unexplored quark-gluon correlations, which provide access into the dynamics inside hadrons. The CLAS spectrometer, installed in Hall-B at Jefferson Lab, has collected data using the CEBAF 6 GeV longitudinally polarized electron beam on longitudinally polarized solid NH3 targets. Preliminary results on di-hadron beam-, target- and double-spin asymmetries will be presented.

  10. BIOLOGY OF POLYPHOSPHATE-ACCUMULATING BACTERIA INVOLVED IN ENHANCED BIOLOGICAL PHOSPHORUS REMOVAL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KORTSTEE, GJJ; APPELDOORN, KJ; BONTING, CFC; VANNIEL, EWJ; VANVEEN, HW

    1994-01-01

    Recent research on the process of biological phosphorus removal in lab-scale treatment systems has indicated that: (i) the development of an actively polyP-accumulating bacterial community after the introduction of an anaerobic period may take at least 4 months; (ii) up to 80% of all aerobic

  11. A new LabVIEW interface for MDSplus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manduchi, G., E-mail: gabriele.manduchi@igi.cnr.it [Consorzio RFX, Euratom-ENEA Association, Padova (Italy); De Marchi, E. [Department of Information Engineering, Padova University (Italy); Mandelli, A. [National Instruments (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Integration object oriented data access layer in LabVIEW. ► A new component of the MDSplus data acquisition package. ► A new approach in the graphical presentation of data acquisition systems. -- Abstract: The paper presents a new interface providing full integration of MDSplus in LabVIEW, based on the recent features of MDSplus, in particular, data streaming, multithreading and Object Oriented interface. Data streaming support fits into the data driven concept of LabVIEW and multithreading is a native concept in LabVIEW. The object oriented interface of MDSplus defines a set of classes which map specific functionality, such as Tree and TreeNode to represent pulse files and data items, respectively, and fits naturally into the LabVIEW Object Oriented programming interface (LVOOP) introduced in version 8.2. MDSplus objects have been mapped onto LabVIEW objects, which act as wrappers to the underlying MDSplus object instance. This approach allows exporting the full MDSplus functionality into LabVIEW retaining the language-independent system view provided by the MDSplus object oriented interface.

  12. A new LabVIEW interface for MDSplus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manduchi, G.; De Marchi, E.; Mandelli, A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Integration object oriented data access layer in LabVIEW. ► A new component of the MDSplus data acquisition package. ► A new approach in the graphical presentation of data acquisition systems. -- Abstract: The paper presents a new interface providing full integration of MDSplus in LabVIEW, based on the recent features of MDSplus, in particular, data streaming, multithreading and Object Oriented interface. Data streaming support fits into the data driven concept of LabVIEW and multithreading is a native concept in LabVIEW. The object oriented interface of MDSplus defines a set of classes which map specific functionality, such as Tree and TreeNode to represent pulse files and data items, respectively, and fits naturally into the LabVIEW Object Oriented programming interface (LVOOP) introduced in version 8.2. MDSplus objects have been mapped onto LabVIEW objects, which act as wrappers to the underlying MDSplus object instance. This approach allows exporting the full MDSplus functionality into LabVIEW retaining the language-independent system view provided by the MDSplus object oriented interface

  13. Can Direct Measurement Videos Inspire Lab-like Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonk, M.; Bohacek, P. H.

    2014-12-01

    Hands-on labs can offer students a rare opportunity to confront the laws of physics first hand and to gain experience using science practices. As such, hands-on labs are an important learning tool which have played a foundational role in science education since the time of Galileo. But labs also have features that make them difficult to implement in practice. They are often time consuming for the instructor to plan and setup, time consuming for students to perform, expensive to implement, and fraught with potential missteps that can send confused students into a spiral of misunderstanding. Our Direct Measurement Video team is working to create several series' of videos with an interface that allows students to interact with them in a way that (we hope) will start to feel lab-like, but with fewer of the impediments that tend to undermine lab-learning in the real world. We hope that lab-like videos will soon provide a needed complement to traditional hands-on labs in science classrooms across the nation. In this talk, I will present our vision of the pedagogical possibilities of video and highlight our progress toward the goal. This work is supported by NSF TUES award #1245268

  14. Biochemical Applications in the Analytical Chemistry Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Cynthia; Ruttencutter, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    An HPLC and a UV-visible spectrophotometer are identified as instruments that helps to incorporate more biologically-relevant experiments into the course, in order to increase the students understanding of selected biochemistry topics and enhances their ability to apply an analytical approach to biochemical problems. The experiment teaches…

  15. Robotic, MEMS-based Multi Utility Sample Preparation Instrument for ISS Biological Workstation, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project will develop a multi-functional, automated sample preparation instrument for biological wet-lab workstations on the ISS. The instrument is based on a...

  16. GeoLab: A Geological Workstation for Future Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Cynthia; Calaway, Michael; Bell, Mary Sue; Li, Zheng; Tong, Shuo; Zhong, Ye; Dahiwala, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    The GeoLab glovebox was, until November 2012, fully integrated into NASA's Deep Space Habitat (DSH) Analog Testbed. The conceptual design for GeoLab came from several sources, including current research instruments (Microgravity Science Glovebox) used on the International Space Station, existing Astromaterials Curation Laboratory hardware and clean room procedures, and mission scenarios developed for earlier programs. GeoLab allowed NASA scientists to test science operations related to contained sample examination during simulated exploration missions. The team demonstrated science operations that enhance theThe GeoLab glovebox was, until November 2012, fully integrated into NASA's Deep Space Habitat (DSH) Analog Testbed. The conceptual design for GeoLab came from several sources, including current research instruments (Microgravity Science Glovebox) used on the International Space Station, existing Astromaterials Curation Laboratory hardware and clean room procedures, and mission scenarios developed for earlier programs. GeoLab allowed NASA scientists to test science operations related to contained sample examination during simulated exploration missions. The team demonstrated science operations that enhance the early scientific returns from future missions and ensure that the best samples are selected for Earth return. The facility was also designed to foster the development of instrument technology. Since 2009, when GeoLab design and construction began, the GeoLab team [a group of scientists from the Astromaterials Acquisition and Curation Office within the Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Directorate at JSC] has progressively developed and reconfigured the GeoLab hardware and software interfaces and developed test objectives, which were to 1) determine requirements and strategies for sample handling and prioritization for geological operations on other planetary surfaces, 2) assess the scientific contribution of selective in-situ sample

  17. A mobile design lab for user-driven innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Ellen; Kanstrup, Anne Marie

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents the history and conceptual foundation for the Mobile Design Lab, ment to support both designers and users in the acts of user-driven innovation. The Mobile Design Lab is based on Vygotsky's theory of tool- and language-mediation, and was created in 2004 to support research...... to get 'into the street'. To support these moves might seem simple, but it is in practice not at all easy. As for today the Mobile Design Lab comprises tools and techniques for categorization, articulation and concretizatoin in design projects involving lead users as well as ordinary users, and invisible...

  18. Living lab: Format for rehearsing a new (service) practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yndigegn, Signe; Aakjær, Marie Kirstejn

    service platforms takes place in the format of living labs. We characterize living labs as the design of experiential spaces where ‘what is’ and ‘what could be’ are explored over a longer period of engagement. The labs are staged to integrate multiple stakeholders’ issues and resources and to create new......Citizen engagement and the citizens as a resource are key concepts in rethinking the Danish welfare system to meet the challenges of delivering better services for the elderly, while simultaneously reducing the cost of healthcare. In this method paper, we address how the co-design of new digital...

  19. Biological computation

    CERN Document Server

    Lamm, Ehud

    2011-01-01

    Introduction and Biological BackgroundBiological ComputationThe Influence of Biology on Mathematics-Historical ExamplesBiological IntroductionModels and Simulations Cellular Automata Biological BackgroundThe Game of Life General Definition of Cellular Automata One-Dimensional AutomataExamples of Cellular AutomataComparison with a Continuous Mathematical Model Computational UniversalitySelf-Replication Pseudo Code Evolutionary ComputationEvolutionary Biology and Evolutionary ComputationGenetic AlgorithmsExample ApplicationsAnalysis of the Behavior of Genetic AlgorithmsLamarckian Evolution Genet

  20. Measure, Then Show: Grasping Human Evolution Through an Inquiry-Based, Data-driven Hominin Skulls Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luberda, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Incomprehension and denial of the theory of evolution among high school students has been observed to also occur when teachers are not equipped to deliver a compelling case also for human evolution based on fossil evidence. This paper assesses the outcomes of a novel inquiry-based paleoanthropology lab teaching human evolution to high-school students. The inquiry-based Be a Paleoanthropologist for a Day lab placed a dozen hominin skulls into the hands of high-school students. Upon measuring three variables of human evolution, students explain what they have observed and discuss findings. In the 2013/14 school year, 11 biology classes in 7 schools in the Greater New Orleans area participated in this lab. The interviewed teacher cohort unanimously agreed that the lab featuring hominin skull replicas and stimulating student inquiry was a pedagogically excellent method of delivering the subject of human evolution. First, the lab’s learning path of transforming facts to data, information to knowledge, and knowledge to acceptance empowered students to themselves execute part of the science that underpins our understanding of deep time hominin evolution. Second, although challenging, the hands-on format of the lab was accessible to high-school students, most of whom were readily able to engage the lab’s scientific process. Third, the lab’s exciting and compelling pedagogy unlocked higher order thinking skills, effectively activating the cognitive, psychomotor and affected learning domains as defined in Bloom’s taxonomy. Lastly, the lab afforded students a formative experience with a high degree of retention and epistemic depth. Further study is warranted to gauge the degree of these effects. PMID:27513927

  1. [Probiotics: from the lab to the consumer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, J M

    2015-02-07

    In the last years, the field of probiotics has grown notably. However, out of the thousands of strains isolated each year in the labs around the world, very few enter in a phase of industrial development and even a lower number go to the market. In this article, the main aspects that have to be taken into account in the, usually, long and winding road that a strain must follow from isolation to the market are reviewed Results and conclusions: A probiotic microorganism has to be correctly identified at the species and strain levels. The genome sequence is the gold identification standard and provides valuable information on the safety, functionality and technological properties of a strain. The cases in which a link between a probiotic and an adverse effect has been established are scarce and have involved people with underlying pathologies. There is a wide variety of in vitro, ex vivo and animal model assays for the screening of probiotics, which provide useful information throughout the selection process; however, correctly designed clinical trials are the only way to obtain direct results on the safety and efficacy of a probiotic to the target population. Probiotic companies have the need to obtain a very high bacterial biomass in an economically viable manner while preserving the concentration of live bacteria required for exerting the expected beneficial effect until the end of the probiotic's shelf life. Finally, commercial aspects play a key role in the decision of starting an industrial development and, eventually, to place a probiotic in the market. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  2. Link Analysis in the Mission Planning Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Jessica A.; Cervantes, Benjamin W.; Daugherty, Sarah C.; Arroyo, Felipe; Mago, Divyang

    2011-01-01

    The legacy communications link analysis software currently used at Wallops Flight Facility involves processes that are different for command destruct, radar, and telemetry. There is a clear advantage to developing an easy-to-use tool that combines all the processes in one application. Link Analysis in the Mission Planning Lab (MPL) uses custom software and algorithms integrated with Analytical Graphics Inc. Satellite Toolkit (AGI STK). The MPL link analysis tool uses pre/post-mission data to conduct a dynamic link analysis between ground assets and the launch vehicle. Just as the legacy methods do, the MPL link analysis tool calculates signal strength and signal- to-noise according to the accepted processes for command destruct, radar, and telemetry assets. Graphs and other custom data are generated rapidly in formats for reports and presentations. STK is used for analysis as well as to depict plume angles and antenna gain patterns in 3D. The MPL has developed two interfaces with the STK software (see figure). The first interface is an HTML utility, which was developed in Visual Basic to enhance analysis for plume modeling and to offer a more user friendly, flexible tool. A graphical user interface (GUI) written in MATLAB (see figure upper right-hand corner) is also used to quickly depict link budget information for multiple ground assets. This new method yields a dramatic decrease in the time it takes to provide launch managers with the required link budgets to make critical pre-mission decisions. The software code used for these two custom utilities is a product of NASA's MPL.

  3. Digital 'faces' of synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Kathrin

    2013-06-01

    In silicio design plays a fundamental role in the endeavour to synthesise biological systems. In particular, computer-aided design software enables users to manage the complexity of biological entities that is connected to their construction and reconfiguration. The software's graphical user interface bridges the gap between the machine-readable data on the algorithmic subface of the computer and its human-amenable surface represented by standardised diagrammatic elements. Notations like the Systems Biology Graphical Notation (SBGN), together with interactive operations such as drag & drop, allow the user to visually design and simulate synthetic systems as 'bio-algorithmic signs'. Finally, the digital programming process should be extended to the wet lab to manufacture the designed synthetic biological systems. By exploring the different 'faces' of synthetic biology, I argue that in particular computer-aided design (CAD) is pushing the idea to automatically produce de novo objects. Multifaceted software processes serve mutually aesthetic, epistemic and performative purposes by simultaneously black-boxing and bridging different data sources, experimental operations and community-wide standards. So far, synthetic biology is mainly a product of digital media technologies that structurally mimic the epistemological challenge to take both qualitative as well as quantitative aspects of biological systems into account in order to understand and produce new and functional entities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Quantitative analysis of lab-to-lab variability in Caco-2 permeability assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Bong; Zgair, Atheer; Taha, Dhiaa A; Zang, Xiaowei; Kagan, Leonid; Kim, Tae Hwan; Kim, Min Gi; Yun, Hwi-Yeol; Fischer, Peter M; Gershkovich, Pavel

    2017-05-01

    In this study, Caco-2 permeability results from different laboratories were compared. Six different sets of apparent permeability coefficient (P app ) values reported in the literature were compared to experimental P app obtained in our laboratory. The differences were assessed by determining the root mean square error (RMSE) values between the datasets, which reached levels as high as 0.581 for the training set compounds, i.e. ten compounds with known effective human permeability (P eff ). The consequences of these differences in P app for prediction of oral drug absorption were demonstrated by introducing the P app into the absorption and pharmacokinetics simulation software application GastroPlus™ for prediction of the fraction absorbed (F a ) in humans using calibrated "user-defined permeability models". The RMSE were calculated to assess the differences between the simulated F a and experimental values reported in the literature. The RMSE for F a simulated with the permeability model calibrated using experimental P app from our laboratory was 0.128. When the calibration was performed using P app from literature datasets, the RMSE values for F a were higher in all cases except one. This study shows quantitative lab-to-lab variability of Caco-2 permeability results and the potential consequences this can have in the use of these results for predicting intestinal absorption of drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Enabling miniaturised personalised diagnostics: from lab-on-a-chip to lab-in-a-drop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Kevin M; Wee, Eugene J H; Wang, Yuling; Trau, Matt

    2017-09-26

    The concept of personalised diagnostics is to direct accurate clinical decisions based on an individual's unique disease molecular profile. Lab-on-a-chip (LOC) systems are prime personalised diagnostics examples which seek to perform an entire sample-to-outcome detection of disease nucleic acid (NA) biomarkers on a single miniaturised platform with minimal user handling. Despite the great potential of LOC devices in providing rapid, portable, and inexpensive personalised diagnosis at the point-of-care (POC), the translation of this technology into widespread use has still been hampered by the need for sophisticated and complex engineering. As an alternative miniaturised diagnostics platform free of precision fabrication, there have been recent developments towards a solution-based lab-in-a-drop (LID) system by which an entire laboratory-based diagnostics workflow could be downscaled and integrated within a singular fluid droplet for POC detection of NA biomarkers. In contrast to existing excellent reviews on miniaturised LOC fabrication and individual steps of NA biomarker sensing, we herein focus on miniaturised solution-based NA biosensing strategies suited for integrated LID personalised diagnostics development. In this review, we first evaluate the three fundamental bioassay steps for miniaturised NA biomarker detection: crude sample preparation, isothermal target amplification, and detection readout of amplicons. Then, we provide insights into research advancements towards a functional LID system which integrates all three of the above-mentioned fundamental steps. Finally, we discuss perspectives and future directions of LID diagnostic platforms in personalised medicine applications.

  6. Process modeling of a HLA research lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Bruna G. C.; Sena, Alexandre C.; Silva, Dilson; Marzulo, Leandro A. J.

    2017-11-01

    Bioinformatics has provided tremendous breakthroughs in the field of molecular biology. All this evolution has generated a large volume of biological data that increasingly require the use of computing for analysis and storage of this information. The identification of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotypes is critical to the success of organ transplants in humans. HLA typing involves not only laboratory tests but also DNA sequencing, with the participation of several professionals responsible for different stages of the process. Thus, the objective of this paper is to map the main steps in HLA typing in a laboratory specialized in performing such procedures, analyzing each process and proposing solutions to speed up the these steps, avoiding mistakes.

  7. Chapel Hill, NC Lab--Office of Research and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    ORD scientists at the state-of-the-art lab in Chapel Hill conduct integrated research to improve our understanding of how social, economic, and health related factors affect an individual’s or com-munity’s health risks.

  8. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Hazards in a Photography Lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houk, Cliff; Hart, Charles

    1987-01-01

    Described are case studies illustrating chemical hazards in a photography lab due to compounds containing cyanide. Suggestions for preventing problems including proper procedures, housekeeping, facilities, and ventilation are considered. (RH)

  9. City Labs as Vehicles for Innovation in Urban Planning Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Scholl

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper assesses the role of urban experiments for local planning processes through a case-based analysis of the city lab of Maastricht. In conjunction with this, the article offers three contributions, as additional elements. Firstly, the paper develops a set of defining characteristics of city labs as an analytical concept which is relevant for discussions about (collaborative planning. Secondly, it refines the literature on collaborative planning by drawing attention to experimentation and innovation. Thirdly, the paper assesses the potential of city labs to contribute to the innovation of urban governance. The work draws from the literature on experimentation and learning as well as the literature on collaborative urban planning. In the conclusions, we discuss the potential of city labs as vehicles for learning about new urban planning approaches and their limitations as spaces for small-scale experimentation. The paper is based on research for the URB@Exp research project funded by JPI Urban Europe.

  10. Lab-scale hydrogen peroxide data from ECBC

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Data from small lab scale tests conducted at ECBC. It contains efficacy data as well as data on env conditions such as temperature, RH, and hydrogen peroxide vapor...

  11. Establishing an intelligent transportation systems (ITS) lab at LTRC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-30

    The primary goal of this research project is to lay the foundation for establishing a state-of-the-art Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) : lab at the Louisiana Transportation Research Center (LTRC), where data will be collected, analyzed, and ...

  12. In silico and wet lab approaches to study transcriptional regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hestand, Matthew Scott

    2010-01-01

    Gene expression is a complicated process with multiple types of regulation, including binding of proteins termed transcription factors. This thesis looks at transcription factors and transcription factor binding site discovery through computational predictions and wet lab work to better elucidate

  13. Chapter 3 – VPPD-Lab: The Chemical Product Simulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalakul, Sawitree; Cignitti, Stefano; Zhang, L.

    2017-01-01

    for computer-aided chemical product design and evaluation, implemented in the software called VPPD-Lab, is presented. In the same way a typical process simulator works, the VPPD-Lab allows users to: (1) analyze chemical-based products by performing virtual experiments (product property and performance...... calculations), (2) predict the properties of products, and (3) create new product property and product performance models when needed. However, unlike process simulators, VPPD-Lab can also be used directly for (1) design of chemicals based products using design templates for various types of products......, such as single molecule products, formulations, blends, emulsions, and devices; and (2) to create new product design templates when the needed template for a desired product is not available. VPPD-Lab employs a suite of algorithms (such as database search, molecular and mixture blend design) and toolboxes (such...

  14. A New Two-Step Approach for Hands-On Teaching of Gene Technology: Effects on Students' Activities during Experimentation in an Outreach Gene Technology Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharfenberg, Franz-Josef; Bogner, Franz X.

    2011-01-01

    Emphasis on improving higher level biology education continues. A new two-step approach to the experimental phases within an outreach gene technology lab, derived from cognitive load theory, is presented. We compared our approach using a quasi-experimental design with the conventional one-step mode. The difference consisted of additional focused…

  15. Gail Harlamoff: Executive Director, Life Lab Science Program

    OpenAIRE

    Rabkin, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    Gail Harlamoff is Executive Director of the Life Lab Science Program, a nationally recognized, award-winning nonprofit science and environmental organization located on the UC Santa Cruz campus. Founded in 1979, Life Lab helps schools develop gardens and implement curricula to enhance students’ learning about science, math, and the natural world. The program has trained tens of thousands of educators in more than 1400 schools across the country. Life Lab’s specialized initiatives inc...

  16. Qualification Lab Testing on M1 Abrams Engine Oil Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    OIL FILTERS FINAL REPORT TFLRF No. 483 by Kristi K. Rutta U.S...the originator. UNCLASSIFIED QUALIFICATION LAB TESTING ON M1 ABRAMS ENGINE OIL FILTERS FINAL REPORT TFLRF No. 483 by Kristi K...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Qualification Lab Testing on M1 Abrams Engine Oil Filter 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W56HZV-15-C-0030 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c.

  17. Implementation of Siemens USS protocol into LabVIEW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosek, P; Diblik, M

    2011-10-01

    This article gives basic overview of the USS protocol as a communication interface to drive Siemens frequency inverters. It presents our implementation of this protocol into LabVIEW, as there was permanent demand from the community of the users to have native LabVIEW implementation of the USS protocol. It also states encountered problems and their solutions. Copyright © 2011 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A Case Study of a High School Fab Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, Jennifer E.

    This dissertation examines making and design-based STEM education in a formal makerspace. It focuses on how the design and implementation of a Fab Lab learning environment and curriculum affect how instructors and students see themselves engaging in science, and how the Fab Lab relates to the social sorting practices that already take place at North High School. While there is research examining design-based STEM education in informal and formal learning environments, we know little about how K-12 teachers define STEM in making activities when no university or museum partnership exists. This study sought to help fill this gap in the research literature. This case study of a formal makerspace followed instructors and students in one introductory Fab Lab course for one semester. Additional observations of an introductory woodworking course helped build the case and set it into the school context, and provided supplementary material to better understand the similarities and differences between the Fab Lab course and a more traditional design-based learning course. Using evidence from observational field notes, participant interviews, course materials, and student work, I found that the North Fab Lab relies on artifacts and rhetoric symbolic of science and STEM to set itself apart from other design-based courses at North High School. Secondly, the North Fab Lab instructors and students were unable to explain how what they were doing in the Fab Lab was science, and instead relied on vague and unsupported claims related to interdisciplinary STEM practices and dated descriptions of science. Lastly, the design and implementation of the Fab Lab learning environment and curriculum and its separation from North High School's low tech, design-based courses effectively reinforced social sorting practices and cultural assumptions about student work and intelligence.

  19. A ten-week biochemistry lab project studying wild-type and mutant bacterial alkaline phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witherow, D Scott

    2016-11-12

    This work describes a 10-week laboratory project studying wild-type and mutant bacterial alkaline phosphatase, in which students purify, quantitate, and perform kinetic assays on wild-type and selected mutants of the enzyme. Students also perform plasmid DNA purification, digestion, and gel analysis. In addition to simply learning important techniques, students acquire novel biochemical data in their kinetic analysis of mutant enzymes. The experiments are designed to build on students' work from week to week in a way that requires them to apply quantitative analysis and reasoning skills, reinforcing traditional textbook biochemical concepts. Students are assessed through lab reports focused on journal style writing, quantitative and conceptual question sheets, and traditional exams. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(6):555-564, 2016. © 2016 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  20. Automatic creation of LabVIEW network shared variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluge, T.; Schroeder, H.

    2012-01-01

    We are in the process of preparing the LabVIEW controlled system components of our Solid State Direct Drive experiments for the integration into a Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA) or distributed control system. The predetermined route to this is the generation of LabVIEW network shared variables that can easily be exported by LabVIEW to the SCADA system using OLE for Process Control (OPC) or other means. Many repetitive tasks are associated with the creation of the shared variables and the required code. We are introducing an efficient and inexpensive procedure that automatically creates shared variable libraries and sets default values for the shared variables. Furthermore, LabVIEW controls are created that are used for managing the connection to the shared variable inside the LabVIEW code operating on the shared variables. The procedure takes as input an XML spread-sheet defining the required input. The procedure utilizes XSLT and LabVIEW scripting. In a later state of the project the code generation can be expanded to also create code and configuration files that will become necessary in order to access the shared variables from the SCADA system of choice. (authors)

  1. Future{at}Labs.Prosperity Game{trademark}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, D.F.; Boyack, K.W.; Berman, M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Innovative Alliances Dept.

    1996-10-01

    Prosperity Games{trademark} are an outgrowth and adaptation of move/countermove and seminar War Games, Prosperity Games{trademark} are simulations that explore complex issues in a variety of areas including economics, politics, sociology, environment, education, and research. These issues can be examined from a variety of perspectives ranging from global, macroeconomic and geopolitical viewpoint down to the details of customer/supplier/market interactions specific industries. All Prosperity Games{trademark} are unique in that both the game format and the player contributions vary from game to game. This report documents the Future{at}Labs.Prosperity Game{trademark} conducted under the sponsorship of the Industry Advisory Boards of the national labs, the national labs, Lockheed Martin Corporation, and the University of California. Players were drawn from all stakeholders involved including government, industry, labs, and academia. The primary objectives of this game were to: (1) explore ways to optimize the role of the multidisciplinary labs in serving national missions and needs; (2) explore ways to increase collaboration and partnerships among government, laboratories, universities, and industry; and (3) create a network of partnership champions to promote findings and policy options. The deliberations and recommendations of these players provided valuable insights as to the views of this diverse group of decision makers concerning the future of the labs.

  2. Hybrid Reality Lab Capabilities - Video 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Francisco J.; Noyes, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Our Hybrid Reality and Advanced Operations Lab is developing incredibly realistic and immersive systems that could be used to provide training, support engineering analysis, and augment data collection for various human performance metrics at NASA. To get a better understanding of what Hybrid Reality is, let's go through the two most commonly known types of immersive realities: Virtual Reality, and Augmented Reality. Virtual Reality creates immersive scenes that are completely made up of digital information. This technology has been used to train astronauts at NASA, used during teleoperation of remote assets (arms, rovers, robots, etc.) and other activities. One challenge with Virtual Reality is that if you are using it for real time-applications (like landing an airplane) then the information used to create the virtual scenes can be old (i.e. visualized long after physical objects moved in the scene) and not accurate enough to land the airplane safely. This is where Augmented Reality comes in. Augmented Reality takes real-time environment information (from a camera, or see through window, and places digitally created information into the scene so that it matches with the video/glass information). Augmented Reality enhances real environment information collected with a live sensor or viewport (e.g. camera, window, etc.) with the information-rich visualization provided by Virtual Reality. Hybrid Reality takes Augmented Reality even further, by creating a higher level of immersion where interactivity can take place. Hybrid Reality takes Virtual Reality objects and a trackable, physical representation of those objects, places them in the same coordinate system, and allows people to interact with both objects' representations (virtual and physical) simultaneously. After a short period of adjustment, the individuals begin to interact with all the objects in the scene as if they were real-life objects. The ability to physically touch and interact with digitally created

  3. MACMA: a Virtual Lab for Plate Tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigne, C.; Combes, M.; Tisseau, C.

    2013-12-01

    MACMA (Multi-Agent Convective MAntle) is a tool developed to simulate evolutive plate tectonics and mantle convection in a 2-D cylindrical geometry (Combes et al., 2012). The model relies mainly on a force balance to compute the velocity of each plate, and on empirical rules to determine how plate boundaries move and evolve. It includes first-order features of plate tectonics: (a) all plates on Earth do not have the same size, (b) subduction zones are asymmetric, (c) plates driven by subducting slabs and upper plates do not exhibit the same velocities, and (d) plate boundaries are mobile, can collide, merge and disappear, and new plate boundaries can be created. The MACMA interface was designed to be user-friendly and a simple use of the simulator can be achieved without any prerequisite knowledge in fluid dynamics, mantle rheology, nor in numerical methods. As a preliminary study, the simulator was used by a few students from bachelor's degree to master's degree levels. An initial configuration for plate tectonics has to be created before starting a simulation: the number and types of plate boundaries (ridge, subduction, passive margins) has to be defined and seafloor ages must be given. A simple but interesting exercise consists in letting students build such an initial configuration: they must analyze a map of tectonic plates, choose a 2-D section and examine carefully a map of seafloor ages. Students mentioned that the exercise made them realize that the 3-D spherical structure of plate tectonics does not translate directly in a simple 2-D section, as opposed to what is usually shown in books. Physical parameters: e.g. mantle viscosity, number of layers to consider in the mantle (upper and lower mantle, possible asthenosphere), initial time and mantle temperature, have to be chosen, and students can use this virtual lab to see how different scenarios emerge when parameters are varied. Very importantly, the direct visualization of the mobility of plate

  4. Development of elastomeric lab-on-a-chip devices through Proton Beam Writing (PBW) based fabrication strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.P.; Shao, P.G.; Kan, J.A. van; Bettiol, A.A.; Watt, F.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, one of the most exciting developments in fluidic device applications is the rapid evolution of miniaturized micro- and nanofluidic systems, the so called 'lab-on-a-chip' devices. These devices integrate laboratory functions into a single chip, and are capable of various biochemical analysis and synthesis, such as sample injection and preparation, single cell/molecule observation, bioparticle sequencing and sorting etc. The evolvement of lab-on-a-chip concept implies the use of novel fabrication techniques for the construction of versatile analytical components in a fast and reproducible manner. Endowed with unique three-dimensional fabrication abilities, Proton Beam Writing (PBW) , which is capable of producing nanometer scaled fluidic structures with smooth and straight side wall features, has a great potential to develop all sorts of polymer fluidic devices. In this paper, we describe the batch fabrication of Poly-dimethysiloxane (PDMS) elastomeric lab-on-a-chip devices utilizing PBW technique. A series of fabrication processes, involving PBW, nickel electroplating, soft lithography, polymer dynamic coating and hydrophilic treating, were modified and adopted in our work. Subsequent characterization of individual categories of channel devices was carried out for specific fluidic studies. Respective experimental procedures are presented and results are explained. The channel devices demonstrated good fluidic performance and functionality, suggesting their further application in more complex biological investigations, and the versatility of PBW in lab-on-a-chip development.

  5. Unified data model for biological data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idrees, M.

    2014-01-01

    A data model empowers us to store, retrieve and manipulate data in a unified way. We consider the biological data consists of DNA (De-Oxyribonucleic Acid), RNA (Ribonucleic Acid) and protein structures. In our Bioinformatics Lab (Bioinformatics Lab, Alkhawarizmi Institute of Computer Science, University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore, Pakistan), we have already proposed two data models for DNA and protein structures individually. In this paper, we propose a unified data model by using the data models of TOS (Temporal Object Oriented System) after making some necessary modifications to this data model and our already proposed the two data models. This proposed unified data model can be used for the modeling and maintaining the biological data (i.e. DNA, RNA and protein structures), in a single unified way. (author)

  6. Engineering students' experiences from physics group work in learning labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strøm Mellingsæter, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Background: This paper presents a case study from a physics course at a Norwegian university college, investigating key aspects of a group-work project, so-called learning labs, from the participating students' perspective. Purpose: In order to develop these learning labs further, the students' perspective is important. Which aspects are essential for how the students experience the learning labs, and how do these aspects relate to the emergence of occurrences termed joint workspace, i.e. the maintenance of content-related dialogues within the group? Programme description: First year mechanical engineering students attended the learning labs as a compulsory part of the physics course. The student groups were instructed to solve physics problems using the interactive whiteboard and then submit their work as whiteboard files. Sample: One group of five male students was followed during their work in these learning labs through one term. Design and methods: Data were collected as video recordings and fieldwork observation. In this paper, a focus group interview with the students was the main source of analysis. The interpretations of the interview data were compared with the video material and the fieldwork observations. Results: The results show that the students' overall experience with the learning labs was positive. They did, however, point to internal aspects of conflicting common and personal goals, which led to a group-work dynamics that seemed to inhibit elaborate discussions and collaboration. The students also pointed to external aspects, such as a close temporal proximity between lectures and exercises, which also seemed to inhibit occurrences termed joint workspace. Conclusions: In order to increase the likelihood of a joint workspace throughout the term in the learning labs, careful considerations have to be made with regard to timing between lectures and exercises, but also with regard to raising the students' awareness about shared and personal goals.

  7. Systems Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiley, H S.

    2006-06-01

    The biology revolution over the last 50 years has been driven by the ascendancy of molecular biology. This was enthusiastically embraced by most biologists because it took us into increasingly familiar territory. It took mysterious processes, such as the replication of genetic material and assigned them parts that could be readily understood by the human mind. When we think of ''molecular machines'' as being the underlying basis of life, we are using a paradigm derived from everyday experience. However, the price that we paid was a relentless drive towards reductionism and the attendant balkanization of biology. Now along comes ''systems biology'' that promises us a solution to the problem of ''knowing more and more about less and less''. Unlike molecular biology, systems biology appears to be taking us into unfamiliar intellectual territory, such as statistics, mathematics and computer modeling. Not surprisingly, systems biology has met with widespread skepticism and resistance. Why do we need systems biology anyway and how does this new area of research promise to change the face of biology in the next couple of decades?

  8. Biological therapeutics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Greenstein, Ben; Brook, Daniel A

    2011-01-01

    This introductory textbook covers all the main categories of biological medicines, including vaccines, hormonal preparations, drugs for rheumatoid arthritis and other connective tissue diseases, drugs...

  9. Goober: A fully integrated and user-friendly microarray data management and analysis solution for core labs and bench biologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo Wen

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the large number of software tools developed to address different areas of microarray data analysis, very few offer an all-in-one solution with little learning curve. For microarray core labs, there are even fewer software packages available to help with their routine but critical tasks, such as data quality control (QC and inventory management. We have developed a simple-to-use web portal to allow bench biologists to analyze and query complicated microarray data and related biological pathways without prior training. Both experiment-based and gene-based analysis can be easily performed, even for the first-time user, through the intuitive multi-layer design and interactive graphic links. While being friendly to inexperienced users, most parameters in Goober can be easily adjusted via drop-down menus to allow advanced users to tailor their needs and perform more complicated analysis. Moreover, we have integrated graphic pathway analysis into the website to help users examine microarray data within the relevant biological content. Goober also contains features that cover most of the common tasks in microarray core labs, such as real time array QC, data loading, array usage and inventory tracking. Overall, Goober is a complete microarray solution to help biologists instantly discover valuable information from a microarray experiment and enhance the quality and productivity of microarray core labs. The whole package is freely available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/goober. A demo web server is available at http://www.goober-array.org.

  10. A Conceptual Review of Lab-Based Aggression Paradigms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randy J. McCarthy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aggression is often defined as a behavior that is done with the intent to harm an individual who is believed to want avoid being harmed (e.g., Baron & Richardson, 1994. Accordingly, social scientists have developed several tasks to study aggression in laboratory settings; tasks that we refer to as “lab-based aggression paradigms.” However, because of the legal, ethical, and practical issues inherent in provoking aggression within the confines of a laboratory setting, it is feasible to study only very mildly harmful aggression. The current conceptual review examines the criteria that are necessary to study aggression in a laboratory setting, discusses the strengths and weaknesses of several new and/or commonly-used lab-based aggression paradigms, and offers recommendations for the future of lab-based aggression research. Collectively, we hope the current discussion helps researchers to describe the contributions and limitations of lab-based aggression research and, ultimately, helps to improve the informativeness of lab-based aggression research.

  11. Lab-on-a-chip pathogen sensors for food safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jeong-Yeol; Kim, Bumsang

    2012-01-01

    There have been a number of cases of foodborne illness among humans that are caused by pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella typhimurium, etc. The current practices to detect such pathogenic agents are cell culturing, immunoassays, or polymerase chain reactions (PCRs). These methods are essentially laboratory-based methods that are not at all real-time and thus unavailable for early-monitoring of such pathogens. They are also very difficult to implement in the field. Lab-on-a-chip biosensors, however, have a strong potential to be used in the field since they can be miniaturized and automated; they are also potentially fast and very sensitive. These lab-on-a-chip biosensors can detect pathogens in farms, packaging/processing facilities, delivery/distribution systems, and at the consumer level. There are still several issues to be resolved before applying these lab-on-a-chip sensors to field applications, including the pre-treatment of a sample, proper storage of reagents, full integration into a battery-powered system, and demonstration of very high sensitivity, which are addressed in this review article. Several different types of lab-on-a-chip biosensors, including immunoassay- and PCR-based, have been developed and tested for detecting foodborne pathogens. Their assay performance, including detection limit and assay time, are also summarized. Finally, the use of optical fibers or optical waveguide is discussed as a means to improve the portability and sensitivity of lab-on-a-chip pathogen sensors.

  12. Systemic Microgravity Response: Utilizing GeneLab to Develop Hypotheses for Spaceflight Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheshti, Afshin; Fogle, Homer; Galazka, Jonathan; Kidane, Yared; Chakravarty, Kaushik; Berrios, Daniel C.; Costes, Sylvain V.

    2017-01-01

    Biological risks associated with microgravity is a major concern for space travel. Although determination of risk has been a focus for NASA research, data examining systemic (i.e., multi- or pan-tissue) responses to space flight are sparse. The overall goal of our work is to identify potential master regulators responsible for such responses to microgravity conditions. To do this we utilized the NASA GeneLab database which contains a wide array of omics experiments, including data from: 1) different flight conditions (space shuttle (STS) missions vs. International Space Station (ISS); 2) different tissues; and 3) different types of assays that measure epigenetic, transcriptional, and protein expression changes. We have performed meta-analysis identifying potential master regulators involved with systemic responses to microgravity. The analysis used 7 different murine and rat data sets, examining the following tissues: liver, kidney, adrenal gland, thymus, mammary gland, skin, and skeletal muscle (soleus, extensor digitorum longus, tibialis anterior, quadriceps, and gastrocnemius). Using a systems biology approach, we were able to determine that p53 and immune related pathways appear central to pan-tissue microgravity responses. Evidence for a universal response in the form of consistency of change across tissues in regulatory pathways was observed in both STS and ISS experiments with varying durations; while degree of change in expression of these master regulators varied across species and strain, some change in these master regulators was universally observed. Interestingly, certain skeletal muscle (gastrocnemius and soleus) show an overall down-regulation in these genes, while in other types (extensor digitorum longus, tibialis anterior and quadriceps) they are up-regulated, suggesting certain muscle tissues may be compensating for atrophy responses caused by microgravity. Studying these organtissue-specific perturbations in molecular signaling networks, we

  13. Is synthetic biology mechanical biology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Sune

    2015-12-01

    A widespread and influential characterization of synthetic biology emphasizes that synthetic biology is the application of engineering principles to living systems. Furthermore, there is a strong tendency to express the engineering approach to organisms in terms of what seems to be an ontological claim: organisms are machines. In the paper I investigate the ontological and heuristic significance of the machine analogy in synthetic biology. I argue that the use of the machine analogy and the aim of producing rationally designed organisms does not necessarily imply a commitment to mechanical biology. The ideal of applying engineering principles to biology is best understood as expressing recognition of the machine-unlikeness of natural organisms and the limits of human cognition. The paper suggests an interpretation of the identification of organisms with machines in synthetic biology according to which it expresses a strategy for representing, understanding, and constructing living systems that are more machine-like than natural organisms.

  14. RiskLab - a joint Teaching Lab on Hazard and Risk Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruffini, Mi.; Baruffini, Mo.; Thuering, M.

    2009-04-01

    In the future natural disasters are expected to increase due to climatic changes that strongly affect environmental, social and economical systems. For this reason and because of the limited resources, governments require analytical risk analysis for a better mitigation planning. Risk analysis is a process to determine the nature and extent of risk by estimating potential hazards and evaluating existing conditions of vulnerability that could pose a potential threat or harm to people, property, livelihoods and environment. This process has become a generally accepted approach for the assessment of cost-benefit scenarios; originating from technical risks it is being applied to natural hazards for several years now in Switzerland. Starting from these premises "Risk Lab", a joint collaboration between the Institute of Earth Sciences of the University of Applied Sciences of Southern Switzerland and the Institute for Economic Research of the University of Lugano, has been started in 2006, aiming to become a competence centre about Risk Analysis and Evaluation. The main issue studied by the lab concerns the topic "What security at what price?" and the activities follow the philosophy of the integral risk management as proposed by PLANAT, that defines the process as a cycle that contains different and interrelated phases. The final aim is to change the population and technician idea about risk from "defending against danger" to "being aware of risks" through a proper academic course specially addressed to young people. In fact the most important activity of the laboratory consists in a degree course, offered both to Engineering and Architecture students of the University of Applied Sciences of Southern Switzerland and Economy Students of the University of Lugano. The course is structured in two main parts: an introductive, theoretical part, composed by class lessons, where the main aspects of natural hazards, risk perception and evaluation and risk management are presented

  15. Mesoscopic biology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper we present a qualitative outlook of mesoscopic biology where the typical length scale is of the order of nanometers and the energy scales comparable to thermal energy. ... National Center for Biological Sciences, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, UAS-GKVK Campus, Bangalore 560 065, India ...

  16. Computational biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Lars Røeboe; Jones, Neil; Simonsen, Jakob Grue

    2011-01-01

    Computation via biological devices has been the subject of close scrutiny since von Neumann’s early work some 60 years ago. In spite of the many relevant works in this field, the notion of programming biological devices seems to be, at best, ill-defined. While many devices are claimed or proved t...

  17. Mesoscopic biology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper we present a qualitative outlook of mesoscopic biology where the typical length scale is of the order of nanometers and the energy scales comparable to thermal energy. Novel biomolecular machines, governed by coded information at the level of DNA and proteins, operate at these length scales in biological ...

  18. Lab-scale Technology for Biogas Production from Lignocellulose Wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukáš Krátký

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently-operating biogas plants are based on the treatment of lignocellulose biomass, which is included in materials such as agriculture and forestry wastes, municipal solid wastes, waste paper, wood and herbaceous energy crops. Lab-scale biogas technology was specially developed for evaluating the anaerobic biodegrability and the specific methane yields of solid organic substrates. This technology falls into two main categories – pretreatment equipments, and fermentation equipments. Pretreatment units use physical principles based on mechanical comminution (ball mills, macerator orhydrothermal treatment (liquid hot water pretreatment technology. The biochemical methane potential test is used to evaluate the specific methane yields of treated or non-treated organic substrates. This test can be performed both by lab testing units and by lab fermenter.

  19. Integration of remote lab exercises into standard course packages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Zimmer

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available We propose to integrate remote lab exercises into standard course packages. A standard course package consists in classroom sessions, exercise sessions and lab sessions, the whole completed by homework for following up and preparing the different sessions. Homework is crucial in the learning process and we have developed a dedicated platform integrating four levels of activities accompanying each lesson. The first level recalls the learning objectives and learning contents of each lesson. The corresponding exercises are proposed in a second level. An auto-evaluation can be done in a third level. Finally, lab exercises are proposed for each topic in the forth level. The whole is organised in a hierarchical tree structure for easy navigation and a good overview.

  20. Living labs design and assessment of sustainable living

    CERN Document Server

    Guerra-Santin, Olivia; Lockton, Dan

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the results of a multi-annual project with sustainable Living Labs in the United Kingdom, Sweden, Germany and the Netherlands. Living Labs – as initiated by the authors – have proved to be very promising research, design, co-creation and communication facilities for the development and implementation of sustainable innovations in the home. The book provides an inspiring introduction to both the methodology and business modelling for the Living Lab facilities. Understanding daily living at home is key to designing products and services that support households in their transition to more sustainable lifestyles. This book not only explores new ways of gaining insights into daily practices, but also discusses developing and testing design methods to create sustainable solutions for households. These new methods and tools are needed because those available are either ineffective or cause rebound-effects. Intended for researchers and designers with an interest in the transition to sustainable...

  1. EUSO@TurLab: An experimental replica of ISS orbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertaina M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The EUSO@TurLab project is an on-going activity aimed to reproduce atmospheric and luminous conditions that JEM-EUSO will encounter on its orbits around the Earth. The use of the TurLab facility, part of the Department of Physics of the University of Torino, allows the simulation of different surface conditions in a very dark and rotating environment in order to test the response of JEM-EUSO's sensors and sensitivity. The experimental setup currently in operation has been used to check the potential of the TurLab facility for the above purposes, and the acquired data will be used to test the concept of JEM-EUSO's trigger system.

  2. Promoting Metacognition in Introductory Calculus-based Physics Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grennell, Drew; Boudreaux, Andrew

    2010-10-01

    In the Western Washington University physics department, a project is underway to develop research-based laboratory curriculum for the introductory calculus-based course. Instructional goals not only include supporting students' conceptual understanding and reasoning ability, but also providing students with opportunities to engage in metacognition. For the latter, our approach has been to scaffold reflective thinking with guided questions. Specific instructional strategies include analysis of alternate reasoning presented in fictitious dialogues and comparison of students' initial ideas with their lab group's final, consensus understanding. Assessment of student metacognition includes pre- and post- course data from selected questions on the CLASS survey, analysis of written lab worksheets, and student opinion surveys. CLASS results are similar to a traditional physics course and analysis of lab sheets show that students struggle to engage in a metacognitive process. Future directions include video studies, as well as use of additional written assessments adapted from educational psychology.

  3. Lab on a chip technologies for algae detection: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaap, Allison; Rohrlack, Thomas; Bellouard, Yves

    2012-08-01

    Over the last few decades, lab on a chip technologies have emerged as powerful tools for high-accuracy diagnosis with minute quantities of liquid and as tools for exploring cell properties in general. In this paper, we present a review of the current status of this technology in the context of algae detection and monitoring. We start with an overview of the detection methods currently used for algae monitoring, followed by a review of lab on a chip devices for algae detection and classification, and then discuss a case study based on our own research activities. We conclude with a discussion on future challenges and motivations for algae-oriented lab on a chip technologies. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Examination of mobile phones in a university forensic lab environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttenberger, Silas; Kröger, Knut; Creutzburg, Reiner

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this article is to show forensic investigation methods for mobile phones to students in a university forensic lab environment. Students have to learn the usefulness of forensic procedures to ensure evidence collection, evidence preservation, forensic analysis, and reporting. Open source tools as well as commercial forensic tools for forensic investigation of modern mobile (smart) phones are used. It is demonstrated how important data stored in the mobile device are investigated. Different scenarios of investigations are presented that are well-suited for forensics lab work in university.

  5. Remembering the early days of the Met Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, J.J.

    1990-01-01

    The Met Lab was set up by the war-time Manhattan District, US Corp of Engineers to (i) find a system using normal uranium in which a chain reaction would occur; (ii) to show that if such a chain reaction did occur, it would be possible to separate plutonium chemically from the uranium matrix and the fission products formed in the chain reactions; and (iii) to prepare plans for the large-scale production of plutonium. Chemistry Section C-1 of the Met Lab was assigned the responsibility for developing separation methods for plutonium production on the industrial scale. This report describes some aspects of daily life in Section C-1

  6. Touch-enabled Programming for the Lab of Things

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Zheng; Samuel, Arjmand

    2013-01-01

    Lab of Things (LoT, lab-of-things.com) is a research platform for interconnection, programming, and large scale deployment of devices and sensors. These devices and sensors can then be used for deployment of field studies in a variety of research areas including elderly care, energy management, and the like. LoT is built on top of HomeOS, a middle-ware component, making interconnection of a wide range of devices possible. LoT also provides cloud storage and remote monitoring capabilities. Tra...

  7. An Overview of Dark Matter Experiments at Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyce, James R

    2012-01-01

    Dark Matter research at Jefferson Lab started in 2006 with the LIght Pseudoscalar and Scalar Search (LIPSS) collaboration to check the validity of results reported by the PVLAS collaboration. In the intervening years interest in dark matter laboratory experiments has grown at Jefferson Lab. Current research underway or in planning stages probe various mass regions covering 14 orders of magnitude: from 10 −6 eV to 100 MeV. This presentation will be an overview of our dark matter searches, three of which focus on the hypothesized A' gauge boson.

  8. NASA Dryden: Flight Loads Lab Capabilities and Mass Properties Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, David Michael; Bakalyar, John A.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation covers the basic capabilities of the Dryden Flight Loads Lab. It also covers in detail the mass properties capabilities of the loads lab, focusing on the recent mass properties testing of the X-48B, and the recent tests of the Dynamic Inertia Measurement method (DIMM). Presentation focuses on the test methods and issues discovered during the mass properties testing of the X-48B leading to the requirement of new instrumentation on all conventional mass properties testing. Presentation also focuses on development of DIMM for replacement of conventional mass properties tests.

  9. Design and Evaluation of an Instructional Solar Energy Technologies Lab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina B. Class

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a design for a solar energy lab that allows students to plan, install and evaluate different system architectures and gain relevant practical experiences. The addressed learning outcomes are analyzed based on the 13 learning outcomes defined by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET as well as based on the taxonomy levels of the cognitive domain after Bloom. In this paper we present a sample lab assignment and map its tasks to the learning outcomes and cognitive domains. First results of qualitative student feedback are equally presented.

  10. Innovative Use of a Classroom Response System During Physics Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walgren, Jay

    2011-01-01

    More and more physics instructors are making use of personal/classroom response systems or "clickers." The use of clickers to engage students with multiple-choice questions during lecture and available instructor resources for clickers have been well documented in this journal.1-4 Newer-generation clickers, which I refer to as classroom response systems (CRS), have evolved to accept numeric answers (such as 9.81) instead of just single "multiple-choice" entries (Fig. 1). This advancement is available from most major clicker companies and allows for a greater variety of engaging questions during lecture. In addition, these new "numeric ready" clickers are marketed to be used for student assessments. During a test or quiz, students' answers are entered into their clicker instead of on paper or Scantron® and immediately absorbed by wireless connection into a computer for grading and analysis. I recognize the usefulness and benefit these new-generation CRSs provide for many instructors. However, I do not use my CRS in either of the aforementioned activities. Instead, I use it in an unconventional way. I use the CRS to electronically capture students' lab data as they are performing a physics lab (Fig. 2). I set up the clickers as if I were going to use them for a test, but instead of entering answers to a test, my students enter lab data as they collect it. In this paper I discuss my use of a classroom response system during physics laboratory and three benefits that result: 1) Students are encouraged to "take ownership of" and "have integrity with" their physics lab data. 2) Students' measuring and unit conversion deficiencies are identified immediately during the lab. 3) The process of grading students' labs is simplified because the results of each student's lab calculations can be pre-calculated for the instructor using a spreadsheet. My use of clickers during lab can be implemented with most clicker systems available to instructors today. The CRS I use is the e

  11. Integrated lasers for polymer Lab-on-a-Chip systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mappes, Timo; Vannahme, Christoph; Grosmann, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    We develop optical Lab-on-a-Chips on different platforms for marker-based and label-free biophotonic sensor applications. Our chips are based on polymers and fabricated by mass production technologies to integrate microfluidic channels, optical waveguides and miniaturized lasers.......We develop optical Lab-on-a-Chips on different platforms for marker-based and label-free biophotonic sensor applications. Our chips are based on polymers and fabricated by mass production technologies to integrate microfluidic channels, optical waveguides and miniaturized lasers....

  12. Professional penetration testing creating and operating a formal hacking lab

    CERN Document Server

    Wilhelm, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    PART I - Setting Up. Chapter 1: Introduction. Chapter 2: Ethics and Hacking. Chapter 3: Hacking as a Career. Chapter 4: Setting up Your Lab. Chapter 5: Creating and Using PenTest Targets in Your Lab. Chapter 6: Methodologies. Chapter 7: PenTest Metrics. Chapter 8: Management of a PenTest. PART II - Running a PenTest. Chapter 9: Information Gathering. Chapter 10: Vulnerability Identification. Chapter 11: Vulnerability Verification. Chapter 12: Compromising a System and Privilege Escalation. Chapter 13: Maintaining Access. Chapter 14: Covering Your Tracks. PART III - Wrapping Everything Up. Chap

  13. Quantum Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Sergi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A critical assessment of the recent developmentsof molecular biology is presented.The thesis that they do not lead to a conceptualunderstanding of life and biological systems is defended.Maturana and Varela's concept of autopoiesis is briefly sketchedand its logical circularity avoided by postulatingthe existence of underlying living processes,entailing amplification from the microscopic to the macroscopic scale,with increasing complexity in the passage from one scale to the other.Following such a line of thought, the currently accepted model of condensed matter, which is based on electrostatics and short-ranged forces,is criticized. It is suggested that the correct interpretationof quantum dispersion forces (van der Waals, hydrogen bonding, and so onas quantum coherence effects hints at the necessity of includinglong-ranged forces (or mechanisms for them incondensed matter theories of biological processes.Some quantum effects in biology are reviewedand quantum mechanics is acknowledged as conceptually important to biology since withoutit most (if not all of the biological structuresand signalling processes would not even exist. Moreover, it is suggested that long-rangequantum coherent dynamics, including electron polarization,may be invoked to explain signal amplificationprocess in biological systems in general.

  14. Biological Oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyhrman, Sonya

    2004-10-01

    The ocean is arguably the largest habitat on the planet, and it houses an astounding array of life, from microbes to whales. As a testament to this diversity and its importance, the discipline of biological oceanography spans studies of all levels of biological organization, from that of single genes, to organisms, to their population dynamics. Biological oceanography also includes studies on how organisms interact with, and contribute to, essential global processes. Students of biological oceanography are often as comfortable looking at satellite images as they are electron micrographs. This diversity of perspective begins the textbook Biological Oceanography, with cover graphics including a Coastal Zone Color Scanner image representing chlorophyll concentration, an electron micrograph of a dinoflagellate, and a photograph of a copepod. These images instantly capture the reader's attention and illustrate some of the different scales on which budding oceanographers are required to think. Having taught a core graduate course in biological oceanography for many years, Charlie Miller has used his lecture notes as the genesis for this book. The text covers the subject of biological oceanography in a manner that is targeted to introductory graduate students, but it would also be appropriate for advanced undergraduates.

  15. Lab-on-Skin: A Review of Flexible and Stretchable Electronics for Wearable Health Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuhao; Pharr, Matt; Salvatore, Giovanni Antonio

    2017-10-24

    Skin is the largest organ of the human body, and it offers a diagnostic interface rich with vital biological signals from the inner organs, blood vessels, muscles, and dermis/epidermis. Soft, flexible, and stretchable electronic devices provide a novel platform to interface with soft tissues for robotic feedback and control, regenerative medicine, and continuous health monitoring. Here, we introduce the term "lab-on-skin" to describe a set of electronic devices that have physical properties, such as thickness, thermal mass, elastic modulus, and water-vapor permeability, which resemble those of the skin. These devices can conformally laminate on the epidermis to mitigate motion artifacts and mismatches in mechanical properties created by conventional, rigid electronics while simultaneously providing accurate, non-invasive, long-term, and continuous health monitoring. Recent progress in the design and fabrication of soft sensors with more advanced capabilities and enhanced reliability suggest an impending translation of these devices from the research lab to clinical environments. Regarding these advances, the first part of this manuscript reviews materials, design strategies, and powering systems used in soft electronics. Next, the paper provides an overview of applications of these devices in cardiology, dermatology, electrophysiology, and sweat diagnostics, with an emphasis on how these systems may replace conventional clinical tools. The review concludes with an outlook on current challenges and opportunities for future research directions in wearable health monitoring.

  16. Moving-part-free microfluidic systems for lab-on-a-chip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, J K; Fu, Y Q; Du, X Y; Flewitt, A J; Milne, W I; Li, Y; Walton, A J

    2009-01-01

    Microfluidic systems are part of an emerging technology which deals with minute amounts of liquids (biological samples and reagents) on a small scale. They are fast, compact and can be made into a highly integrated system to deliver sample purification, separation, reaction, immobilization, labelling, as well as detection, thus are promising for applications such as lab-on-a-chip and handheld healthcare devices. Miniaturized micropumps typically consist of a moving-part component, such as a membrane structure, to deliver liquids, and are often unreliable, complicated in structure and difficult to be integrated with other control electronics circuits. The trend of new-generation micropumps is moving-part-free micropumps operated by advanced techniques, such as electrokinetic force, surface tension/energy, acoustic waves. This paper reviews the development and advances of relevant technologies, and introduces electrowetting-on-dielectrics and acoustic wave-based microfluidics. The programmable electrowetting micropump has been realized to dispense and manipulate droplets in 2D with up to 1000 addressable electrodes and electronics built underneath. The acoustic wave-based microfluidics can be used not only for pumping, mixing and droplet generation but also for biosensors, suitable for single-mechanism-based lab-on-a-chip applications

  17. LabVIEW control software for scanning micro-beam X-ray fluorescence spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrobel, Pawel; Czyzycki, Mateusz; Furman, Leszek; Kolasinski, Krzysztof; Lankosz, Marek; Mrenca, Alina; Samek, Lucyna; Wegrzynek, Dariusz

    2012-05-15

    Confocal micro-beam X-ray fluorescence microscope was constructed. The system was assembled from commercially available components - a low power X-ray tube source, polycapillary X-ray optics and silicon drift detector - controlled by an in-house developed LabVIEW software. A video camera coupled to optical microscope was utilized to display the area excited by X-ray beam. The camera image calibration and scan area definition software were also based entirely on LabVIEW code. Presently, the main area of application of the newly constructed spectrometer is 2-dimensional mapping of element distribution in environmental, biological and geological samples with micrometer spatial resolution. The hardware and the developed software can already handle volumetric 3-D confocal scans. In this work, a front panel graphical user interface as well as communication protocols between hardware components were described. Two applications of the spectrometer, to homogeneity testing of titanium layers and to imaging of various types of grains in air particulate matter collected on membrane filters, were presented. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Systems Biology of lactic acid bacteria: a critical review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teusink, B.; Bachmann, H.; Molenaar, D.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the properties of a system as emerging from the interaction of well described parts is the most important goal of Systems Biology. Although in the practice of Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) physiology we most often think of the parts as the proteins and metabolites, a wider interpretation

  19. Video and HTML: Testing Online Tutorial Formats with Biology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Cindy L.; Friehs, Curt G.

    2013-01-01

    This study compared two common types of online information literacy tutorials: a streaming media tutorial using animation and narration and a text-based tutorial with static images. Nine sections of an undergraduate biology lab class (234 students total) were instructed by a librarian on how to use the BIOSIS Previews database. Three sections…

  20. A Comprehensive Experiment for Molecular Biology: Determination of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism in Human REV3 Gene Using PCR-RFLP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Shao, Meng; Gao, Lu; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Sun, Zixuan; Zhou, Liping; Yan, Yongmin; Shao, Qixiang; Xu, Wenrong; Qian, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Laboratory exercise is helpful for medical students to understand the basic principles of molecular biology and to learn about the practical applications of molecular biology. We have designed a lab course on molecular biology about the determination of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in human REV3 gene, the product of which is a subunit of…

  1. To Build an Ecosystem: An Introductory Lab for Environmental Science & Biology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudon, Daniel; Finnerty, John R.

    2013-01-01

    A hypothesis-driven laboratory is described that introduces students to the complexities of ecosystem function. Students work with live algae, brine shrimp, and sea anemones to test hypotheses regarding the trophic interactions among species, the exchange of nutrients and gases, and the optimal ratio of producers to consumers and predators in…

  2. Investigative Labs in Biology: The Importance of Attending to Team Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Martha; Gildensoph, Lynne H.; Myers, Marcella J.; Norton, Cynthia G.; Olson, Andrea M.; Wygal, Deborah D.; Tweeten, Kathleen A.

    2007-01-01

    This article provides some tips for success in facilitating teamwork. Working collaboratively is common in science and the functioning of teams has a large impact on both the implementation of a research project and student satisfaction with the experience. The strategies are divided into what can be done to minimize problems from the start and…

  3. Dyes, Fibers, and Paper: A Botany Lab Exercise for Non-Biology Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Todd P.; Meekins, J. Forrest; Maluso, Diane

    2004-01-01

    This laboratory exercise affords students a hands-on experience learning about traditional dyes, fiber strength, and paper making. It is economical, simple to prepare, provides satisfactory results, and is student friendly. Dyes were extracted from plant leaves, stems, roots, and fruits. Hard-boiled eggs were place in the dyes for 15 minutes to…

  4. Developing a Teacher Identity: TAs' Perspectives about Learning to Teach Inquiry-Based Biology Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormally, Cara

    2016-01-01

    Becoming a teacher involves a continual process of identity development and negotiation. Expectations and norms for particular pedagogies impact and inform this development. In inquiry based classes, instructors are expected to act as learning facilitators rather than information providers. For novice inquiry instructors, developing a teacher…

  5. Biological Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Biological Pathways Fact Sheet Enter Search Term(s): Español Research Funding An Overview Bioinformatics Current Grants Education and Training Funding Extramural Research News Features ...

  6. Enterobacter aerogenes Needle Stick Leads to Improved Biological Management System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johanson, Richard E.

    2004-08-01

    A laboratory worker who received a needle stick from a contaminated needle while working with a culture containing Enterobactor aerogenes developed a laboratory acquired infection. Although this organism has been shown to cause community and nosocomial infections, there have been no documented cases of a laboratory acquired infections. Lessons learned from the event led to corrective actions which included modification of lab procedures, development of a biological inventory tracking and risk identification system and the establishment of an effective biological safety program.

  7. Ionic Liquids and Green Chemistry: A Lab Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Annegret; Ott, Denise; Kralisch, Dana; Kreisel, Guenter; Ondruschka, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    Although ionic liquids have been investigated as solvents for many applications and are starting to be used in industrial processes, only a few lab experiments are available to introduce students to these materials. Ionic liquids have been discussed in the context of green chemistry, but few investigations have actually assessed the degree of…

  8. ThinkSpace: Spatial Thinking in Middle School Astronomy Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udomprasert, Patricia S.; Goodman, Alyssa A.; Plummer, Julia; Sadler, Philip M.; Johnson, Erin; Sunbury, Susan; Zhang, Helen; Dussault, Mary E.

    2016-01-01

    Critical breakthroughs in science (e.g., Einstein's Theory of General Relativity, and Watson & Crick's discovery of the structure of DNA), originated with those scientists' ability to think spatially, and research has shown that spatial ability correlates strongly with likelihood of entering a career in STEM. Mounting evidence also shows that spatial skills are malleable, i.e., they can be improved through training. We report early work from a new project that will build on this research to create a series of middle schools science labs called "Thinking Spatially about the Universe" (ThinkSpace), in which students will use a blend of physical and virtual models (in WorldWide Telescope) to explore complex 3-dimensional phenomena in space science. In the three-year ThinkSpace labs project, astronomers, technologists, and education researchers are collaborating to create and test a suite of three labs designed to improve learners' spatial abilities through studies of: 1) Moon phases and eclipses; 2) planetary systems around stars other than the Sun; and 3.) celestial motions within the broader universe. The research program will determine which elements in the labs will best promote improvement of spatial skills within activities that emphasize disciplinary core ideas; and how best to optimize interactive dynamic visualizations to maximize student understanding.

  9. The Jefferson Lab 12 GeV Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, Hugh [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2017-04-19

    The Jefferson Lab facilities have undergone a substantial upgrade, both of accelerator, CEBAF, and of the experimental installations. We will discuss the progress to completion of these facilities, the status of accelerator commissioning, and the recent first operations for physics. We will then flesh out the anticipated exciting physics program of the next several years.

  10. Head first: Living labs for ad-hoc search evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balog, K.; Kelly, L.; Schuth, A.; Li, J.; Wang, X.S.

    2014-01-01

    The information retrieval (IR) community strives to make evaluation more centered on real users and their needs. The living labs evaluation paradigm, i.e., observing users in their natural task environments, offers great promise in this regard. Yet, progress in an academic setting has been limited.

  11. SHORT REPORT Practical considerations in planning a cath-lab ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This room hosts the C-arm power supply cabinets, as well as X-ray tube heat converters and any other computer hardware necessary for the vascular lab. The control room should be state of the art with huge glass windows that overlook the vascular laboratory so that effective handling of software occurs during a procedure.

  12. Fungal Culture Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Lab Test Information → Fungal Culture Test URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/ ... of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics Authority; c2017. Health Information: Fungal Culture for Athlete's Foot: Exam Overview [updated 2016 Oct ...

  13. Fermentation art and science at the Nordic Food Lab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reade, Benedict; de Valicourt, Justine; Evans, Joshua David

    2015-01-01

    The Nordic Food Lab (NFL) is a self-governed foundation based in Copenhagen, Denmark. The aim of NFL is to investigate food diversity and deliciousness and to share the results in an open-source format. We combine scientific and cultural approaches with culinary techniques from around the world...

  14. Formalising Living Labs to achieve organisational objectives in emerging economies

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smit, D

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available by the identification of four dimensions of living labs which is then used to evaluate three existing LLs to indicate the relevance for choosing a LL as methodology for doing the projects as well as the dimensions of LL within each LL at this research centre. This focus...

  15. A Lab Experience to Illustrate the Physicochemical Principles of Detergency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poce-Fatou, J. A.; Bethencourt-Nunez, M.; Moreno, C.; Pinto-Ganfornina, J. J.; Moreno-Dorado, F. J.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a lab experience to study detergency from a physicochemical point of view intended for undergraduate students. By means of a simple experimental device, we analyze the influence of the surfactant concentration in both distilled water and tap water. Our method is based on the measurement of diffuse reflectances of polyester…

  16. Novel applications of Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) and Recombinant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB), present in intestines of most animals and humans, plays an important role as starters of fermented food products where it acts as a biopreservative, preventing spoilage by pathogenic microorganisms through acidification, competition for essential nutrients, and / or production of inhibitory ...

  17. Do cheaters in the lab also cheat in the field?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potters, Jan; Stoop, J.T.R.

    In this paper, we study the correlation between cheating in the lab and cheating in the field. We conduct a laboratory experiment using a variant of the Mind game (Jiang, 2013). Payoffs above a certain threshold are indicative of cheating behavior. Subjects are paid their earnings by bank transfer.

  18. Towards Third-Generation Living Lab Networks in Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seppo Leminen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Many cities engage in diverse experimentation, innovation, and development activities with a broad variety of environments and stakeholders to the benefit of citizens, companies, municipalities, and other organizations. Hence, this article discusses such engagement in terms of next-generation living lab networks in the city context. In so doing, the study contributes to the discussion on living labs by introducing a framework of collaborative innovation networks in cities and suggesting a typology of third-generation living labs. Our framework is characterized by diverse platforms and participation approaches, resulting in four distinctive modes of collaborative innovation networks where the city is: i a provider, ii a neighbourhood participator, iii a catalyst, or iv a rapid experimenter. The typology is based on an analysis of 118 interviews with participants in six Finnish cities and reveals various ways to organize innovation activities in the city context. In particular, cities can benefit from innovation networks by simultaneously exploiting multiple platforms such as living labs for innovation. We conclude by discussing implications to theory and practice, and suggesting directions for future research.

  19. City Labs as vehicles for innovation in urban planning processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemp, René; Scholl, Christian

    2016-01-01

    This paper assesses the role of urban experiments for local planning processes through a case-based analysis of the city lab of Maastricht. In conjunction with this, the article offers three contributions, as additional elements. Firstly, the paper develops a set of defining characteristics of city

  20. Development Labs: University Knowledge Production and Global Poverty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Christopher S.

    2017-01-01

    In 2012, the United States Agency for International Development allocated $137 million to fund seven universities to create "development labs" to advance social/economic progress and reduce poverty. International economic development has become a booming field and industry but is also highly contested. The function of the university as a…

  1. Reconstructed Living Lab: supporting drug users and families ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-08-08

    Aug 8, 2009 ... the co-operative counselling model in a Living Lab context. Results: The advantages of the DAS technology and what it offers to community-based organisations are discussed. Data on relatives of drug users using the system are included. Conclusion: The use of mobile phone technology has advantages ...

  2. Dancing Around My Technology Classroom Box (My Second RET Lab)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Terry

    2010-01-01

    The laboratory the author had been assigned for his RET (Research Experience for Teachers) at Vanderbilt University is new and different from the one he had previously experienced. This summer he was assigned to the Microfluidics and Lab-on-a-chip laboratory to help research dielectrophoresis. As this is an emerging technology, there was not a lot…

  3. LABS, cells and organs on chip : Technologies and biomedical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Den Berg, Albert

    2017-01-01

    Over the past few decades both micro/ nanofabrication and microfluidics technologies have been crucial for the rapid development of Lab on a Chip systems. Here we present a few examples of this. Firstly, a capillary electrophoresis system on chip for blood analysis will be presented. Secondly, we

  4. Lab-on-a-Chip: Frontier Science in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wietsma, Jan Jaap; van der Veen, Jan T.; Buesink, Wilfred; van den Berg, Albert; Odijk, Mathieu

    2018-01-01

    Lab-on-a-chip technology is brought into the classroom through development of a lesson series with hands-on practicals. Students can discover the principles of microfluidics with different practicals covering laminar flow, micromixing, and droplet generation, as well as trapping and counting beads. A quite affordable novel production technique…

  5. Applying living lab methodology to enhance skills in innovation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Herselman, M

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this paper is to indicate how skills can be enhanced in innovation through the application of the living lab methodology. When users are part of the creation of innovation in real-life contexts it can have a positive effect...

  6. Pair spectrometer hodoscope for Hall D at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, F.; Hutton, C.; Sitnikov, A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Somov, A., E-mail: somov@jlab.org [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Somov, S.; Tolstukhin, I. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-21

    We present the design of the pair spectrometer hodoscope fabricated at Jefferson Lab and installed in the experimental Hall D. The hodoscope consists of thin scintillator tiles; the light from each tile is collected using wave-length shifting fibers and detected using a Hamamatsu silicon photomultiplier. Light collection was measured using relativistic electrons produced in the tagger area of the experimental Hall B.

  7. Active Learning Improves Student Performance in a Respiratory Physiology Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Alex M.; Liachovitzky, Carlos; Abdullahi, Abass S.

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the effectiveness of the introduction of active learning exercises into the anatomy and physiology curriculum in a community college setting. Specifically, the incorporation of a spirometry-based respiratory physiology lab resulted in improved student performance in two concepts (respiratory volumes and the hallmarks of…

  8. Presentation and demonstration at Alt-i-lab 2005

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tattersall, Colin

    2005-01-01

    These documents were used to accompany the Learning Design presentation and demonstration at Alt-i-lab 2005. The slides were shown during a plenary session describing the interoperability demo. The scenario was used to guide the demonstration process, and the UNFOLD handout was used to illustrate

  9. Leadership Development in College Newsroom Labs: It is Transactional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Janice Marie

    2017-01-01

    While men ease their ways into positions of authority, the number of women holding top-level leadership positions in media is declining. This study sought to explore how the professional socialization process found in college newsroom labs contributes to the effectiveness or ineffectiveness of female leadership development. Mixed methodology…

  10. Nano lab-on-chip systems for biomedical and environmental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In recent years, nano lab-on-chip (NLOC) has emerged as a powerful tool for biosensing and an active area of research particularly in DNA genetic and genetic related investigations. Compared with conventional sensing techniques, distinctive advantages of using NLOC for biomedicine and other related area include ...

  11. LabVIEW Library to EPICS Channel Access

    CERN Document Server

    Liyu, Andrei; Thompson, Dave H

    2005-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator systems will deliver a 1.0 GeV, 1.4 MW proton beam to a liquid mercury target for neutron scattering research. The accelerator complex consists of a 1 GeV linear accelerator, an accumulator ring and associated transport lines. The SNS diagnostics platform is PC-based and will run Windows for its OS and LabVIEW as its programming language. Data acquisition hardware will be based on PCI cards. There will be about 300 rack-mounted computers. The Channel Access (CA) protocol of the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) is the SNS control system communication standard. This paper describes the approaches, implementation, and features of LabVIEW library to CA for Windows, Linux, and Mac OS X. We also discuss how the library implements the asynchronous CA monitor routine using LabVIEW's occurrence mechanism instead of a callback function (which is not available in LabVIEW). The library is used to acquire accelerator data and applications have been ...

  12. Modelling the Landing of a Plane in a Calculus Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morante, Antonio; Vallejo, Jose A.

    2012-01-01

    We exhibit a simple model of a plane landing that involves only basic concepts of differential calculus, so it is suitable for a first-year calculus lab. We use the computer algebra system Maxima and the interactive geometry software GeoGebra to do the computations and graphics. (Contains 5 figures and 1 note.)

  13. CLEF 2017 eHealth evaluation lab overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goeuriot, L.; Kelly, L.; Suominen, H.; Névéol, A.; Robert, A.; Kanoulas, E.; Spijker, R.; Palotti, J.; Zuccon, G.; Jones, G.J.F.; Lawless, S.; Gonzalo, J.; Kelly, L.; Goeuriot, L.; Mandl, T.; Cappellato, L.; Ferro, N.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we provide an overview of the fifth edition of the CLEF eHealth evaluation lab. CLEF eHealth 2017 continues our evaluation resource building efforts around the easing and support of patients, their next-of-kins, clinical staff, and health scientists in understanding, accessing, and

  14. Germany plans 60m euro physics and medicine lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, Ned

    2017-09-01

    A new €60m medical-physics research lab is to be built in Erlangen, Germany, by the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light (MPL) together with the Friedrich Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg and the University Hospital Erlangen.

  15. A Simple Inquiry-Based Lab for Teaching Osmosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, John R.

    2014-01-01

    This simple inquiry-based lab was designed to teach the principle of osmosis while also providing an experience for students to use the skills and practices commonly found in science. Students first design their own experiment using very basic equipment and supplies, which generally results in mixed, but mostly poor, outcomes. Classroom "talk…

  16. Scientists of tomorrow - Geophysics School Lab for Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschämmer, Ellen; Bohlen, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Starting in 2012, the Geophysical Institute (GPI) at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) developed several geophysical experiments for secondary school students which are now part of the Geophysics School Lab at the GPI. Usually, the students visit the School Lab as a class together with their teacher (Physics, Geography, Science), but the School Lab can also be used for extracurricular learning of individual students. The experiments carried out deal with the topics Seismology, Geoelectrics, and Fluid Dynamics: A horizontal seismometer is decoupled from its registration unit for the time of the visit of the students. With this setup, the students can measure the natural period of the pendulum, and adjust the seismometer accordingly. At different experimental stations, students can analyse seismic data registered with this unit, locate earthquakes, or get to know and understand an accelerometer. The accelerometer is attached to a registration unit and data can be visualized in real time. In another experimental setup, the students can measure the viscosity of a fluid as a function of temperature in order to get a better understanding of different magma types and their viscosity. Furthermore, a geoelectric experiment is carried out in a sandbox: The students experience with non-destructive testing, and try to reveal the subsurface structure. For our experiments, secondary school teachers can receive free supportive materials for the preparation of the visit. The aim of the Geophysics School Lab is to encourage and acquaint secondary school students to the concepts of Geophysics, and to enthuse them with the applied issues of Geosciences.

  17. An Intelligent Lighting Control System (ILCS) using LabVIEW ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An Intelligent Lighting Control System (ILCS) was proposed and designed by considering ergonomic setting and energy efficiency. The integration of CompactRIO as a main hardware and National Instrument Laboratory Virtual Instrument Engineering Workbench (NI LabVIEW) 2012 as a platform to design an interactive ...

  18. Advanced teaching labs in physics - celebrating progress; challenges ahead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Richard

    A few examples of optical physics experiments may help us first reflect on significant progress on how advanced lab initiatives may now be more effectively developed, discussed, and disseminated - as opposed to only 10 or 15 years back. Many cooperative developments of the last decade are having profound impacts on advanced lab workers and students. Central to these changes are the programs of the Advanced Laboratory Physics Association (ALPhA) (Immersions, BFY conferences), AAPT (advlab-l server, ComPADRE, apparatus competitions, summer workshops/sessions), APS (Reichert Award, FEd activities and sessions), and the Jonathan F. Reichert Foundation (ALPhA support and institution matched equipment grants for Immersion participants). Broad NSF support has helped undergird several of these initiatives. Two of the most significant challenges before this new advanced lab community are (a) to somehow enhance funding opportunities for teaching equipment and apparatus in an era of minimal NSF equipment support, and (b) to help develop a more complementary relationship between research-based advanced lab pedagogies and the development of fresh physics experiments that help enable the mentoring and experimental challenge of our students.

  19. Out of the lab and into the field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahan, Dan M.; Carpenter, Katherine

    2017-04-01

    Decision scientists have identified remedies for various cognitive biases that distort climate-change risk perceptions. Researchers must now use the same empirical methods to identify strategies for reproducing -- in the tumult of the real world -- results forged in the tranquillity of their labs.

  20. A Series of Computational Neuroscience Labs Increases Comfort with MATLAB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, David F

    2015-01-01

    Computational simulations allow for a low-cost, reliable means to demonstrate complex and often times inaccessible concepts to undergraduates. However, students without prior computer programming training may find working with code-based simulations to be intimidating and distracting. A series of computational neuroscience labs involving the Hodgkin-Huxley equations, an Integrate-and-Fire model, and a Hopfield Memory network were used in an undergraduate neuroscience laboratory component of an introductory level course. Using short focused surveys before and after each lab, student comfort levels were shown to increase drastically from a majority of students being uncomfortable or with neutral feelings about working in the MATLAB environment to a vast majority of students being comfortable working in the environment. Though change was reported within each lab, a series of labs was necessary in order to establish a lasting high level of comfort. Comfort working with code is important as a first step in acquiring computational skills that are required to address many questions within neuroscience.

  1. Living Labs as Educational Tool for Ambient Intelligence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robben, Saskia; Kanis, Marije; Kröse, B.J.A.; Veenstra, Mettina

    2012-01-01

    The way that innovation is currently done requires a new research methodology that enables co-creation and frequent, iterative evaluation in realworld settings. This paper describes the employment of the living lab methodology that corresponds to this need. Particularly, this paper presents the way

  2. Integration of MSFC Usability Lab with Usability Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yiwei; Richardson, Sally

    2010-01-01

    As part of the Stage Analysis Branch, human factors engineering plays an important role in relating humans to the systems of hardware and structure designs of the new launch vehicle. While many branches are involved in the technical aspects of creating a launch vehicle, human factors connects humans to the scientific systems with the goal of improving operational performance and safety while reducing operational error and damage to the hardware. Human factors engineers use physical and computerized models to visualize possible areas for improvements to ensure human accessibility to components requiring maintenance and that the necessary maintenance activities can be accomplished with minimal risks to human and hardware. Many methods of testing are used to fulfill this goal, such as physical mockups, computerized visualization, and usability testing. In this analysis, a usability test is conducted to test how usable a website is to users who are and are not familiar with it. The testing is performed using participants and Morae software to record and analyze the results. This analysis will be a preliminary test of the usability lab in preparation for use in new spacecraft programs, NASA Enterprise, or other NASA websites. The usability lab project is divided into two parts: integration of the usability lab and a preliminary test of the usability lab.

  3. A Virtual PV Systems Lab for Engineering Undergraduate Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Ozkop

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Design and utilization of a Virtual Photovoltaic Systems Laboratory for undergraduate curriculum are introduced in this paper. The laboratory introduced in this study is developed to teach students the basics and design steps of photovoltaic solar energy systems in a virtual environment before entering the field. The users of the proposed virtual lab will be able to determine the sizing by selecting related parameters of the photovoltaic system to meet DC and AC loading conditions. Besides, the user will be able to analyze the effect of changing solar irradiation and temperature levels on the operating characteristics of the photovoltaic systems. Common DC bus concept and AC loading conditions are also included in the system by utilizing a permanent magnet DC motor and an RLC load as DC and AC loading examples, respectively. The proposed Virtual Photovoltaic Systems Laboratory is developed in Matlab/Simulink GUI environment. The proposed virtual lab has been used in Power Systems Lab in the Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering at Karadeniz Technical University as a part of undergraduate curriculum. A survey on the students who took the lab has been carried out and responses are included in this paper.

  4. Faraday's Principle and Air Travel in the Introductory Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Razzaq, Wathiq; Thakur, Saikat Chakraborty

    2017-01-01

    We all know that we must improve the quality of teaching in science at all levels. Not only physicists but also many students from other areas of study take the introductory physics courses in college. Physics introductory laboratories (labs) can be one of the best tools to help these students understand applications of scientific principles that…

  5. Exploring the changing learning environment of the gross anatomy lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Robin; Regehr, Glenn; Wilson, Timothy D

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact of virtual models and prosected specimens in the context of the gross anatomy lab. In 2009, student volunteers from an undergraduate anatomy class were randomly assigned to study groups in one of three learning conditions. All groups studied the muscles of mastication and completed identical learning objectives during a 45-minute lab. All groups were provided with two reference atlases. Groups were distinguished by the type of primary tools they were provided: gross prosections, three-dimensional stereoscopic computer model, or both resources. The facilitator kept observational field notes. A prepost multiple-choice knowledge test was administered to evaluate students' learning. No significant effect of the laboratory models was demonstrated between groups on the prepost assessment of knowledge. Recurring observations included students' tendency to revert to individual memorization prior to the posttest, rotation of models to match views in the provided atlas, and dissemination of groups into smaller working units. The use of virtual lab resources seemed to influence the social context and learning environment of the anatomy lab. As computer-based learning methods are implemented and studied, they must be evaluated beyond their impact on knowledge gain to consider the effect technology has on students' social development.

  6. Overview of the Fire Lab at Missoula Experiments (FLAME)

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. M. Kreidenweis; J. L. Collett; H. Moosmuller; W. P. Arnott; WeiMin Hao; W. C. Malm

    2010-01-01

    The Fire Lab at Missoula Experiments (FLAME) used a series of open biomass burns, conducted in 2006 and 2007 at the Forest Service Fire Science Laboratory in Missoula, MT, to characterize the physical, chemical and optical properties of biomass combustion emissions. Fuels were selected primarily based on their projected importance for emissions from prescribed and wild...

  7. Challenges of evaluating a living lab in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Adam, R

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to discuss certain challenges that emerge when evaluating a Living Lab (LL). These challenges are linked to the choice of evaluation methods as well as whether to measure, when, what and how to measure. A LL in itself...

  8. Lab-on-a-Chip : Frontier Science in the Classroom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wietsma, Jan Jaap; Van Der Veen, Jan T.; Buesink, Wilfred; Van Den Berg, Albert; Odijk, Mathieu

    2018-01-01

    Lab-on-a-chip technology is brought into the classroom through development of a lesson series with hands-on practicals. Students can discover the principles of microfluidics with different practicals covering laminar flow, micromixing, and droplet generation, as well as trapping and counting beads.

  9. Design and Simulation of Lab-on-a-Chip Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimaki, Maria; Okkels, Fridolin

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidic channels are an essential part of any lab-on-a-chip system. They usually perform various functions, such as transporting liquids from A to B or mixing or separating liquids. As production costs for such systems are not insignificant, it is essential that the systems are designed...

  10. Integrated lasers for polymer Lab-on-a-Chip systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mappes, Timo; Vannahme, Christoph; Grosmann, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    We develop optical Lab-on-a-Chips on different platforms for marker-based and label-free biophotonic sensor applications. Our chips are based on polymers and fabricated by mass production technologies to integrate microfluidic channels, optical waveguides and miniaturized lasers....

  11. Internships and Fellowships | FNLCR Staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Frederick National Lab hasmany exciting opportunities for scientists and biotechnology professionalsthrough numerous post-doctoral and pre-doctoral fellowship positions sponsored by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) at Frederick. In

  12. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Extramural Research Bioinformatics and Cancer NCI-Designated Cancer Centers Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators ... Extramural Research Bioinformatics and Cancer NCI-Designated Cancer Centers Frederick National Lab Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists ...

  13. StagLab: Post-Processing and Visualisation in Geodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crameri, Fabio

    2017-04-01

    Despite being simplifications of nature, today's Geodynamic numerical models can, often do, and sometimes have to become very complex. Additionally, a steadily-increasing amount of raw model data results from more elaborate numerical codes and the still continuously-increasing computational power available for their execution. The current need for efficient post-processing and sensible visualisation is thus apparent. StagLab (www.fabiocrameri.ch/software) provides such much-needed strongly-automated post-processing in combination with state-of-the-art visualisation. Written in MatLab, StagLab is simple, flexible, efficient and reliable. It produces figures and movies that are both fully-reproducible and publication-ready. StagLab's post-processing capabilities include numerous diagnostics for plate tectonics and mantle dynamics. Featured are accurate plate-boundary identification, slab-polarity recognition, plate-bending derivation, mantle-plume detection, and surface-topography component splitting. These and many other diagnostics are derived conveniently from only a few parameter fields thanks to powerful image processing tools and other capable algorithms. Additionally, StagLab aims to prevent scientific visualisation pitfalls that are, unfortunately, still too common in the Geodynamics community. Misinterpretation of raw data and exclusion of colourblind people introduced with the continuous use of the rainbow (a.k.a. jet) colour scheme is just one, but a dramatic example (e.g., Rogowitz and Treinish, 1998; Light and Bartlein, 2004; Borland and Ii, 2007). StagLab is currently optimised for binary StagYY output (e.g., Tackley 2008), but is adjustable for the potential use with other Geodynamic codes. Additionally, StagLab's post-processing routines are open-source. REFERENCES Borland, D., and R. M. T. Ii (2007), Rainbow color map (still) considered harmful, IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, 27(2), 14-17. Light, A., and P. J. Bartlein (2004), The end of

  14. Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube Array (VANTA Biosensor for MEMS Lab-on-a-Chip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke JOSEPH

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We describe the fabrication, functionalization and characterization of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays (VANTAs for biological sensor applications. This structure is created using a standard MEMS process and chemical vapor deposition (CVD multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT post-processing. The device is well suited for full integration into microfluidic lab-on-a-chip solutions. Included is a spectroscopic characterization of the galvanostatic impedance of the device, as well as scanning electron microscopy (SEM images of the pre- and post- functionalized device. Interferometric 3D profiling and X-ray spectroscopy were also used to check process assumptions. The work presented validates that this approach is an ideal candidate for low-cost, high-throughput manufacturing of biochemical sensors. Unlike previously published work [1, 2] using SWNT, the use of MWNT arrays allows functionalization over the entirety of the nanotubes. This approach maintains low baseline impedance and increases the surface area leveraging inherent benefits of the VANTA.

  15. The PNNL Lab Homes Experimental Plan, FY12-FY15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widder, Sarah H; Parker, Graham B; Baechler, Michael C

    2012-05-01

    The PNNL lab homes (http://labhomes.pnnl.gov/ ) are two manufactured homes recently installed immediately south of the 6th Street Warehouse on the PNNL Richland, WA campus that will serve as a project test bed for DOE, PNNL and its research partners who aim to achieve highly energy efficient and grid-responsive homes. The PNNL Lab Homes project is the first of its kind in the Pacific Northwest region. The Energy & Environment Directorate at PNNL, working with multiple sponsors, will use the identical 1,500 square-foot homes for experiments focused on reducing energy use and peak demand. Research and demonstration primarily will focus on retrofit technologies, and the homes will offer a unique, side-by-side ability to test and compare new ideas and approaches that are applicable to site-built as well as manufactured homes. The test plan has the following objectives: • To define a retrofit solution packages for moderate to cold climates that can be cost effectively deployed in the Pacific NW to save 50% of the energy needs of a typical home while enhancing the comfort and indoor air quality. The retrofit strategies would also lower the peak demands on the grid. • To leverage the unique opportunity in the lab homes to reach out to researchers, industry, and other interested parties in the building science community to collaborate on new smart and efficient solutions for residential retrofits. • To increase PNNL’s visibility in the area of buildings energy efficiency based on the communication strategy and presentation of the unique and impactful data generated in the lab homes. This document describes the proposed test plan for the lab homes to achieve these goals, through FY15. The subsequent sections will provide a brief description of each proposed experiment, summarize the timing of the experiment (including any experiments that may be run in parallel, and propose potential contributors and collaborators. For those experiments with funding information

  16. GeneLab: Multi-Omics Investigation of Rodent Research-1 Bio-Banked Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, San-Huei; Boyko, Valery; Chakravarty, Kaushik; Chen, Rick; Dueck, Sandra; Berrios, Daniel C.; Fogle, Homer; Marcu, Oana; Timucin, Linda; Reinsch, Sigrid; hide

    2016-01-01

    NASAs Rodent Research (RR) project is playing a critical role in advancing biomedical research on the physiological effects of space environments. Due to the limited resources for conducting biological experiments aboard the International Space Station (ISS), it is imperative to use crew time efficiently while maximizing high-quality science return. NASAs GeneLab project has as its primary objectives to 1) further increase the value of these experiments using a multi-omics, systems biology-based approach, and 2) disseminate these data without restrictions to the scientific community. The current investigation assessed viability of RNA, DNA, and protein extracted from archived RR-1 tissue samples for epigenomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic assays. During the first RR spaceflight experiment, a variety of tissue types were harvested from subjects, snap-frozen or RNAlater-preserved, and then stored at least a year at -80OC after return to Earth. They were then prioritized for this investigation based on likelihood of significant scientific value for spaceflight research. All tissues were made available to GeneLab through the bio-specimen sharing program managed by the Ames Life Science Data Archive and included mouse adrenal glands, quadriceps, gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, extensor digitorum longus, soleus, eye, and kidney. We report here protocols for and results of these tissue extractions, and thus, the feasibility and value of these kinds of omics analyses. In addition to providing additional opportunities for investigation of spaceflight effects on the mouse transcriptome and proteome in new kinds of tissues, our results may also be of value to program managers for the prioritization of ISS crew time for rodent research activities. Support from the NASA Space Life and Physical Sciences Division and the International Space Station Program is gratefully acknowledged.

  17. Using a Module-Based Laboratory to Incorporate Inquiry into a Large Cell Biology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, David R.; Miskowski, Jennifer A.

    2005-01-01

    Because cell biology has rapidly increased in breadth and depth, instructors are challenged not only to provide undergraduate science students with a strong, up-to-date foundation of knowledge, but also to engage them in the scientific process. To these ends, revision of the Cell Biology Lab course at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse was…

  18. An Introduction to Biological Modeling Using Coin Flips to Predict the Outcome of a Diffusion Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, Greg Q.; Rodriguez, Juan; Chirhart, Scott; Messina, Troy C.

    2016-01-01

    In order to increase students' awareness for and comfort with mathematical modeling of biological processes, and increase their understanding of diffusion, the following lab was developed for use in 100-level, majors/non-majors biology and neuroscience courses. The activity begins with generation of a data set that uses coin-flips to replicate…

  19. Interactive, Online, Adsorption Lab to Support Discovery of the Scientific Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, K. C.; Ulery, A. L.; Chamberlin, B.; Dettmer, A.

    2014-12-01

    Science students require more than methods practice in lab activities; they must gain an understanding of the application of the scientific process through lab work. Large classes, time constraints, and funding may limit student access to science labs, denying students access to the types of experiential learning needed to motivate and develop new scientists. Interactive, discovery-based computer simulations and virtual labs provide an alternative, low-risk opportunity for learners to engage in lab processes and activities. Students can conduct experiments, collect data, draw conclusions, and even abort a session. We have developed an online virtual lab, through which students can interactively develop as scientists as they learn about scientific concepts, lab equipment, and proper lab techniques. Our first lab topic is adsorption of chemicals to soil, but the methodology is transferrable to other topics. In addition to learning the specific procedures involved in each lab, the online activities will prompt exploration and practice in key scientific and mathematical concepts, such as unit conversion, significant digits, assessing risks, evaluating bias, and assessing quantity and quality of data. These labs are not designed to replace traditional lab instruction, but to supplement instruction on challenging or particularly time-consuming concepts. To complement classroom instruction, students can engage in a lab experience outside the lab and over a shorter time period than often required with real-world adsorption studies. More importantly, students can reflect, discuss, review, and even fail at their lab experience as part of the process to see why natural processes and scientific approaches work the way they do. Our Media Productions team has completed a series of online digital labs available at virtuallabs.nmsu.edu and scienceofsoil.com, and these virtual labs are being integrated into coursework to evaluate changes in student learning.

  20. ASK4Labs: A Web-Based Repository for Supporting Learning Design Driven Remote and Virtual Labs Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zervas, Panagiotis; Fiskilis, Stefanos; Sampson, Demetrios G.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past years, Remote and Virtual Labs (RVLs) have gained increased attention for their potential to support technology-enhanced science education by enabling science teachers to improve their day-to-day science teaching. Therefore, many educational institutions and scientific organizations have invested efforts for providing online access…