WorldWideScience

Sample records for biological exposure indices

  1. Biological indicators of exposure to radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is given of recent investigations into mutagenesis and carcinogenesis due to alpha irradiation by the radon progeny. Studies of the occurrence of chromosomal aberrations after alpha irradiation are given particular attention. In the author's opinion, up to now no useful biological indicator of response to high and low doses of alpha particles has been found, including those of radon on the molecular and cellular level. (A.K.)

  2. Fingernails as biological indices of metal exposure

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rita Mehra; Meenu Juneja

    2005-03-01

    Metal determination in human tissues is the most common application of biological monitoring for screening, diagnosis and assessment of metal exposures and their risks. Various biopsy-materials may be used. This paper deals with the quantitative determination of Cd, Pb, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, and Zn concentrations in nails of male subjects exposed to these metals alongwith their respective controls, while working in locomotive, carriage and roadways workshops, and lead battery factories. The levels of Cd, Pb, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu and Zn in fingernails, assayed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, were compared with their respective controls by student ‘’ test. All the obtained values were correlated to the personal and medical history of the subjects under study. Significantly high levels of Cd, Pb, Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu and Zn were present in smokers, compared to nonsmokers. The concentrations of Cd, Pb, Cr, Mn and Fe were not significantly high in vegetarian subjects. It was also observed that there is no contribution of liquor towards nail-metal concentration. Significant correlations were observed between skin disease and Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu; hypertension and Cd, Mn, Cu; mental stress and Cd, Pb, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn; diabetes and Cr, Mn, Ni; chest pain and Pb; respiratory trouble and Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Zn; tuberculosis and Zn; acidity and Cd; and ophthalmic problems and Mn, Fe, Ni, and Zn.

  3. Biological indicators of radiation exposure - serum amylase increase following irradiation of salivary glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, an isoenzyme test is described which enables the proteins of pancreas to be differentiated from those of the salivary glands. This isoenzyme test, in combination with an antibody lipase test which inturn is sensitive to the pancreatic enzyme triacylglycerinlipase, has been used to examine a total of the 42 patients under radiation therapy. 25 of these patients had been subjected to partial body exposure of the head region and 17 to whole body exposure. The results show that the amount of activity increase depends upon the dose to the salivary glands and that almost exclusively the isoenzymes of these organs are responsible for the radiation-induced activity increase in the serum. The isoenzyme test proved to be a good approach in cases where pathogenic variations in the serum α-amylase activity concerning primarily the pancreatic glands had to be differentiated from radiation-induced variations. (orig./MG)

  4. Biological indicators of radiation exposure - increase of blood serum amylase following irradiation of salivary glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, an isoenzyme test is described which enables the proteins of pancreas to be differentiated from those of the salivary glands. This isoenzyme test, in combination with an antibody lipase test which in turn is sensitive to the pancreatic enzyme triacylglycerinlipase, has been used to examine a total of the 42 patients under radiation therapy. 25 of these patients had been subjected to partial body exposure of the head region and 17 to whole body exposure. The results show that the amount of activity increase depends upon the dose to the salivary glands and that almost exclusively the isoenzymes of these organs are responsible for the radiation-induced activity increase in the serum. The isoenzyme test proved to be a good approach in cases where pathogenic variations in the serum α-amylase activity concerning primarily the pancreatic glands had to be differentiated from radiation-induced variations. (orig./MG)

  5. Sheep lymph-nodes as a biological indicator of environmental exposure to fluoro-edenite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledda, Caterina; Loreto, Carla; Pomara, Cristoforo; Rapisarda, Giuseppe; Fiore, Maria; Ferrante, Margherita; Bracci, Massimo; Santarelli, Lory; Fenga, Concettina; Rapisarda, Venerando

    2016-05-01

    A significantly increased incidence of pleural mesothelioma in Biancavilla (Sicily, Italy) has been attributed to exposure to fluoro-edenite (FE), a fibrous amphibole extracted from a local stone quarry. The lymph-nodes draining the pulmonary lobes of sheep grazing around the town were examined, to gain insights into fibre diffusion. The pasture areas of six sheep flocks lying about 3km from Biancavilla were located using the global positioning system. The cranial tracheobronchial and one middle mediastinal lymph-node as well as four lung tissue samples were collected from 10 animals from each flock and from 10 control sheep for light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination. The lymph-nodes from exposed sheep were enlarged and exhibited signs of anthracosis. Histologically, especially at the paracortical level, they showed lymph-follicle hyperplasia with large reactive cores and several macrophages (coniophages) containing grey-brownish particulate interspersed with elements with a fibril structure, forming aggregates of varying dimensions (coniophage nodules). Similar findings were detected in some peribronchiolar areas of the lung parenchyma. SEM examination showed that FE fibres measured 8-41µm in length and 0.4-1.39µm in diameter in both lymph-nodes and lung tissue. Monitoring of FE fibres in sheep lymph-nodes using appropriate techniques can help set up environmental pollution surveillance. PMID:26855127

  6. Lack of correlation between environmental or biological indicators of benzene exposure at parts per billion levels and micronuclei induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite growing concern for possible carcinogenic effects associated with environmental benzene exposure in the general population, few studies exist at parts per billion (ppb) levels. We investigated the existence of a relationship between airborne/biological measurements of benzene exposure i.e., personal/area sampling and unmodified urinary benzene/trans,trans-muconic acid; t,t-MA) and micronuclei induction cytochalasin B technique) among exposed chemical laboratory workers (n=47) and traffic wardens (n=15). Although urinary t,t-MA (106.9±123.17 μg/Lurine) correlated (R2=0.37) with urinary benzene (0.66±0.99 μg/Lurine), neither biological measurement correlated with environmental benzene exposure (14.04±9.71 μg/m3; 4.39±3.03 ppb), suggesting that, at ppb level (1 ppb=3.2 μg/m3), airborne benzene constitutes a fraction of the total intake. Traffic wardens and laboratory workers had comparable numbers of micronuclei (4.70±2.63 versus .76±3.11; n.s.), similar to levels recorded in the general population. With univariate/multivariate analysis, no association was found between micronuclei induction and air/urinary benzene exposure variables. Notably, among the personal characteristics examined (including age, gender, smoking, drinking, etc.), high body mass index correlated with micronuclei induction while, among females, use of hormonal medication was associated with less micronuclei. Thus the present study provides no evidence that ppb levels of environmental benzene exposure appreciably affect micronuclei incidence against the background of other relevant factors). However, this should not be taken as an argument against efforts aiming to reduce environmental benzene pollution

  7. Lichens as biological indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichens, a symbiotic association of an alga and a fungus, have been used for some years as 'bioindicators', to detect environmental pollution. For this, their property of reacting to certain pollutants with characteristic changes of growth is exploired. With this biological method, continual, sufficiently sensitive measurements over wide areas can often be carried out more simply than with expensive, complicated technical equipment, which requires servicing, as well. This article describes the various possibilities of using lichens as bioindicators, and reviews the methods currently in use for measuring air pollution by means of lichens. (orig.)

  8. Biological indicators of radiation exposure. Experimental study of radiation-induced changes of thymidine level in human serum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study summarizes the results of the search for a reliable quantitative biochemical indicator system for ionizing radiation in man. Thymidine seems to be a promising indicator in the serum. The analysis of thymidine is based on the inhibited incorporation of 125I-UdR into DNA of fibroblast cells in the presence of serum of the irradiated mice. Maximal inhibition of the I-UdR-incorporation occurs 4 hours after irradiation. The data from animal experiments show in the dose range between 0.005 and 1 Gy a dose effect relationship which was multiply reproduced. The main objective of the experiments is to test the transferability of results from mouse to man. What little is known on these effects in humans was learned from investigations in radiotherapy patients. Up to now, 22 radiotherapy patients have been examined and in no case dose dependency for the increase of thymidine concentration in human serum as a function of radiation dose has been observed. Among the tumour patients investigated, three groups were found to be of special interest: one group with a low initial thymidine concentration increasing after irradiation, a second group of patients with a high initial thymidine concentration decreasing after irradiation and a third group with a middle initial thymidine concentration not changing after irradiation. A dependency of the effect from time, as it occurs in the mouse, has not been observed in man until now. Thus the applicability of this biochemical indicator system as evidence of a radiation exposure in man has not been proven. (orig./MG)

  9. Biological indicators and sterilization processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is given of biological indicators, e.g. bacterial spores, used for monitoring the efficiency of sterilization processes. The choice of a suitable biological indicator depending on its resistance to heat sterilization, ionizing radiation and gaseous sterilization is discussed. Factors affecting the reliability of biological indicators are also discussed including genotypically determined resistance, environmental influences during growth and sporulation, the influence of the environment during storage and sterilization and the influence of recovery conditions. (U.K.)

  10. A review of air quality, biological indicators and health effects of second-hand waterpipe smoke exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Sumit R Kumar; Davies, Shelby; Weitzman, Michael; Sherman, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Objective There has been a rapid increase in the use of waterpipe tobacco and non-tobacco based shisha in many countries. Understanding the impact and effects of second-hand smoke (SHS) from cigarette was a crucial factor in reducing cigarette use, leading to clean indoor air laws and smoking bans. This article reviews what is known about the effects of SHS exposure from waterpipes. Data sources We used PubMed and EMBASE to review the literature. Articles were grouped into quantitative measur...

  11. DNA double-strand breaks as potential indicators for the biological effects of ionising radiation exposure from cardiac CT and conventional coronary angiography: a randomised, controlled study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geisel, Dominik; Zimmermann, Elke; Rief, Matthias; Greupner, Johannes; Hamm, Bernd [Charite Medical School, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Laule, Michael; Knebel, Fabian [Charite Medical School, Department of Cardiology, Berlin (Germany); Dewey, Marc [Charite Medical School, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Charite, Institut fuer Radiologie, Berlin (Germany)

    2012-08-15

    To prospectively compare induced DNA double-strand breaks by cardiac computed tomography (CT) and conventional coronary angiography (CCA). 56 patients with suspected coronary artery disease were randomised to undergo either CCA or cardiac CT. DNA double-strand breaks were assessed in fluorescence microscopy of blood lymphocytes as indicators of the biological effects of radiation exposure. Radiation doses were estimated using dose-length product (DLP) and dose-area product (DAP) with conversion factors for CT and CCA, respectively. On average there were 0.12 {+-} 0.06 induced double-strand breaks per lymphocyte for CT and 0.29 {+-} 0.18 for diagnostic CCA (P < 0.001). This relative biological effect of ionising radiation from CCA was 1.9 times higher (P < 0.001) than the effective dose estimated by conversion factors would have suggested. The correlation between the biological effects and the estimated radiation doses was excellent for CT (r = 0.951, P < 0.001) and moderate to good for CCA (r = 0.862, P < 0.001). One day after radiation, a complete repair of double-strand breaks to background levels was found in both groups. Conversion factors may underestimate the relative biological effects of ionising radiation from CCA. DNA double-strand break assessment may provide a strategy for individualised assessments of radiation. (orig.)

  12. DNA double-strand breaks as potential indicators for the biological effects of ionising radiation exposure from cardiac CT and conventional coronary angiography: a randomised, controlled study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To prospectively compare induced DNA double-strand breaks by cardiac computed tomography (CT) and conventional coronary angiography (CCA). 56 patients with suspected coronary artery disease were randomised to undergo either CCA or cardiac CT. DNA double-strand breaks were assessed in fluorescence microscopy of blood lymphocytes as indicators of the biological effects of radiation exposure. Radiation doses were estimated using dose-length product (DLP) and dose-area product (DAP) with conversion factors for CT and CCA, respectively. On average there were 0.12 ± 0.06 induced double-strand breaks per lymphocyte for CT and 0.29 ± 0.18 for diagnostic CCA (P < 0.001). This relative biological effect of ionising radiation from CCA was 1.9 times higher (P < 0.001) than the effective dose estimated by conversion factors would have suggested. The correlation between the biological effects and the estimated radiation doses was excellent for CT (r = 0.951, P < 0.001) and moderate to good for CCA (r = 0.862, P < 0.001). One day after radiation, a complete repair of double-strand breaks to background levels was found in both groups. Conversion factors may underestimate the relative biological effects of ionising radiation from CCA. DNA double-strand break assessment may provide a strategy for individualised assessments of radiation. (orig.)

  13. Gamma radiographic exposure time indicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In industrial radiography, with the proper selection of source and film, the radiographic quality depends very much on the exposure time, which in turn depends upon the source strength and the source to film distance. Conventional methods to arrive at correct exposure time involve time consuming calculations and in these methods the knowledge of the above mentioned parameters is imperative. An instrument to determine the required exposure time has been developed which indicates exposure times in about 30 secs. This covers two commonly used gamma radiography sources, viz., 192Ir and 60Co and six commonly used radiography films of different speeds. Knowledge of source strength and source to film distance is not required with the use of this instrument. With a knowledge of the total exposure required by the film to give the required sensitivity and by the measurement of radiation level at the film location, the correct exposure time is determined. The radiation level is measured by placing a GM counter behind the radiographic specimen at the film location. To match the responses of the film and the GM counter, the counter is incorporated in a suitably designed probe. In this instruments, an integrator to integrate the GM-pulses and a constant current integrator (timer) are started simultaneously. The voltage at the GM-pulse integrator is compared with a preselected voltage, (selected on the basis of film type, source, source strength and order of object thickness) by a comparator. The comparator is so adjusted that when the GM-pulse integrator voltage exceeds the preselected voltage, it switches its state and stops the integration of constant current. The constant current integrator output which is proportional to the time taken for the GM-pulse integrator to reach the preselected voltage, is read on a meter graduated in terms of exposure time. The instrument can measure exposure times from 5 minutes to 10 hours read in two ranges, the range-changing being automatic

  14. Application of translocation, γ-H2AX, and Sam68 as a biological indicators for the assessment of radiation exposure in nuclear power plant workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Kwang Hee; Park, Hyung Sun; Nam, Seon Young [Korea Hydro Nuclear Power Co., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    This study showed that confirmation of the initial dose estimated by dicentric analysis is provided by the subsequent FISH analysis for translocation frequency and provides further evidence for the valid use of FISH as a retrospective biological dosimeter. The IAEA manual on cytogenetic dosimetry recommends a halftime value of 3 y to correct for the decrease of dicentrics in case of delayed sampling based on the patient data of Buckton. Support for this comes from the cytogenetic follow up of an individual exposed to tritium, which also indicated a decline in dicentrics with a half-time of ∼3 y. Naturally, the RBE of tritium, as well as other kinds of ionizing radiation, depends on the dose, exposure conditions, and studied parameters. The information about the RBE of tritium that is most important from an applied standpoint is that associated with the range of low doses. In our study, the dose dependence of tritium RBE was not identified because of very low dose Tritium (< 1mSv). However, The strong smooth relationship between translocation yield and age is shown in Table 2. The translocation yields reported here are only slightly lower than already published. The implication is that the increase of yield with age could be due to environmental factors, to a natural aging process or both. In addition, we confirmed that γ-H2AX and Sam68 associated with DNA damage and apoptosis, can be new biological indicators for radiation exposure. Radiation workers are exposed to ionizing radiation from various sources. Ionizing radiation produces several types of DNA lesion, including DNA base alterations, DNA. DNA cross-links, and single- and double-strand breaks. As a protocol for biological dosimetry recommended by IAEA (2001), the analysis of solid stained dicentric chromosomes has been used since the mid 1960s. The intervening years have seen great improvements bringing the technique to a point where dicentric analysis has become a routine component of the radiological

  15. Application of translocation, γ-H2AX, and Sam68 as a biological indicators for the assessment of radiation exposure in nuclear power plant workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study showed that confirmation of the initial dose estimated by dicentric analysis is provided by the subsequent FISH analysis for translocation frequency and provides further evidence for the valid use of FISH as a retrospective biological dosimeter. The IAEA manual on cytogenetic dosimetry recommends a halftime value of 3 y to correct for the decrease of dicentrics in case of delayed sampling based on the patient data of Buckton. Support for this comes from the cytogenetic follow up of an individual exposed to tritium, which also indicated a decline in dicentrics with a half-time of ∼3 y. Naturally, the RBE of tritium, as well as other kinds of ionizing radiation, depends on the dose, exposure conditions, and studied parameters. The information about the RBE of tritium that is most important from an applied standpoint is that associated with the range of low doses. In our study, the dose dependence of tritium RBE was not identified because of very low dose Tritium (< 1mSv). However, The strong smooth relationship between translocation yield and age is shown in Table 2. The translocation yields reported here are only slightly lower than already published. The implication is that the increase of yield with age could be due to environmental factors, to a natural aging process or both. In addition, we confirmed that γ-H2AX and Sam68 associated with DNA damage and apoptosis, can be new biological indicators for radiation exposure. Radiation workers are exposed to ionizing radiation from various sources. Ionizing radiation produces several types of DNA lesion, including DNA base alterations, DNA. DNA cross-links, and single- and double-strand breaks. As a protocol for biological dosimetry recommended by IAEA (2001), the analysis of solid stained dicentric chromosomes has been used since the mid 1960s. The intervening years have seen great improvements bringing the technique to a point where dicentric analysis has become a routine component of the radiological

  16. Biological indicators for radiation dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After an introductory report on the present level of practical experience in using biological indicator systems to identify and assess doses from radiation exposures, the state of the art in the field of biochemical, cytological and immunological indicators was presented as a basis for discussions in working groups. With reference to the type of radiation - gamma radiation, electrons, neutrons - the question was examined how and to which extent body doses could be evaluated on the basis of results from biological indicator systems. The indicator systems were examined and evaluated in working groups under the aspects of practical use, validity of results and demand of research according to uniform criteria. These were, among others, dose effect relationship, detection limit, reproducibility and specificity, interference factors, stress and reasonable inconvenience of the examined person, earliest possible availability of results and the maximum time needed to identify a biological effect after radiation exposure, as well as the possible maximum number of persons examined from a population group of radiation exposed individuals. The results of the working groups discussions were compiled and summarized in recommendations. (orig./MG)

  17. Evaluation of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a coke production and a graphite electrode manufacturing plant: assessment of urinary excretion of 1-hydroxypyrene as a biological indicator of exposure.

    OpenAIRE

    Buchet, J P; Gennart, J P; Mercado-Calderon, F; Delavignette, J P; Cupers, L; Lauwerys, R

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--Characterisation of the airborne concentration of 13 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at various workplaces in a graphite electrode and a coke production plant. Validation of the urinary excretion of 1-hydroxypyrene (hydroxypyrene) as a biological marker of exposure to PAH. DESIGN--Cross sectional study of workers exposed to PAHs (106 in the graphite electrode producing plant and 16 in the coke works). METHODS--Personal air sampling during at least six hours per workshift u...

  18. Digital radiography exposure indices: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digital radiography (DR) technologies have the advantage of a wide dynamic range compared to their film-screen predecessors, however, this poses a potential for increased patient exposure if left unchecked. Manufacturers have developed the exposure index (EI) to counter this, which provides radiographers with feedback on the exposure reaching the detector. As these EIs were manufacturer-specific, a wide variety of EIs existed. To offset this, the international standardised EI has been developed by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). The purpose of this article is to explore the current literature relating to EIs, beginning with the historical development of the EI, the development of the standardised EI and an exploration of common themes and studies as evidenced in the research literature. It is anticipated that this review will provide radiographers with a useful guide to understanding EIs, their application in clinical practice, limitations and suggestions for further research

  19. Using biological monitoring to assess human exposure to priority toxicants.

    OpenAIRE

    Pirkle, J L; Sampson, E J; Needham, L L; Patterson, D G; Ashley, D L

    1995-01-01

    Scientifically valid exposure assessment is crucial to risk assessment, risk management, and prevention of environmental disease. Scientists have used three tools to assess exposure: exposure history/questionnaire, environmental monitoring (including personal monitoring), and biological monitoring. Combinations of these tools usually provide the exposure information needed to meet objectives of human studies evaluating the exposure-health effect relationship. Biological monitoring is a capabl...

  20. Microwave radiation - Biological effects and exposure standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsay, I.R.

    1980-06-01

    The thermal and nonthermal effects of exposure to microwave radiation are discussed and current standards for microwave exposure are examined in light of the proposed use of microwave power transmission from solar power satellites. Effects considered include cataractogenesis at levels above 100 mW/sq cm, and possible reversible disturbances such as headaches, sleeplessness, irritability, fatigue, memory loss, cardiovascular changes and circadian rhythm disturbances at levels less than 10 mW/sq cm. It is pointed out that while the United States and western Europe have adopted exposure standards of 10 mW/sq cm, those adopted in other countries are up to three orders of magnitude more restrictive, as they are based on different principles applied in determining safe limits. Various aspects of the biological effects of microwave transmissions from space are considered in the areas of the protection of personnel working in the vicinity of the rectenna, interactions of the transmitted radiation with cardiac pacemakers, and effects on birds. It is concluded that thresholds for biological effects from short-term microwave radiation are well above the maximal power density of 1 mW/sq cm projected at or beyond the area of exclusion of a rectenna.

  1. Human biological monitoring of occupational genotoxic exposures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Sorsa, M

    1993-01-01

    Human biological monitoring is a valuable tool for exposure assessment in groups of persons occupationally exposed to genotoxic agents. If the monitoring activity covers genetic material the term genetic monitoring is used. The methods used for genetic monitoring are either substance specific, e.......g. the quantitation of identified DNA-adducts or substance unspecific as is the measurement of DNA-repair. The sample material used for analysis must be well characterized and subject to uniform processing for comparison of the results. Confounding factors of smoking, age and sex must be well controlled...

  2. Gene-environment interaction and biological monitoring of occupational exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological monitoring methods and biological limit values applied in occupational and environmental medicine have been traditionally developed on the assumption that individuals do not differ significantly in their biotransformation capacities. It has become clear, however, that this is not the case, but wide inter-individual differences exist in the metabolism of chemicals. Integration of the data on individual metabolic capacity in biological monitoring studies is therefore anticipated to represent a significant refinement of the currently used methods. We have recently conducted several biological monitoring studies on occupationally exposed subjects, which have included the determination of the workers' genotypes for the metabolic genes of potential importance for a given chemical exposure. The exposure levels have been measured by urine metabolites, adducts in blood macromolecules, and cytogenetic alterations in lymphocytes. Our studies indicate that genetic polymorphisms in metabolic genes may indeed be important modifiers of individual biological monitoring results of, e.g., carbon disulphide and styrene. The information is anticipated to be useful in insuring that the workplace is safe for everyone, including the most sensitive individuals. This knowledge could also be useful to occupational physicians, industrial hygienists, and regulatory bodies in charge of defining acceptable exposure limits for environmental and/or occupational pollutants

  3. Microwave radiation: biological effects and exposure standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsay, I.R.

    1981-01-01

    The thermal effects of microwave radiation are well recognized and are discussed with particular reference to cataractogenesis; the possibility of an association cannot be questioned. Postulated nonthermal effects comprise an asthenic syndrome, and for the most part the disturbances lie within clinical norms and tolerances, and are reversible. World opinion on safe exposure levels for microwave radiation is varied, and this had led to national standards disparate by three to four orders of magnitude. The US and UK exposure standard of 10 mW/cm/sup 2/ was determined over two decades ago; the possibility of a change to a more restrictive level, in line with other countries, in the near future is examined. It is concluded that such a change, without scientific rationale, is not justified. Some biological implications of the microwave radiation from the solar power satellite are considered in terms of precautions to be taken by personnel working in the vicinity of the rectenna, effects on cardiac pacemakers, and any potential effects on birds. 14 references.

  4. Use of biological indicators in TMDL assessment and implementation

    OpenAIRE

    Yagow, G.; Wilson, B.; Srivastava, P; Obropta, C. C.

    2006-01-01

    Most states in the U.S. have a general water quality standard intended to protect water from all potential pollutants not specifically named or identified in other standards. Biological indicators are used, in part, to assess the level of water quality with respect to this general standard. Under EPA's Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) program, impaired waters based on a biological assessment require an additional step compared with non-biological TMDLs. In non-biological TMDLs, the "pollutant"...

  5. Use of biological indicators to evaluate environmental stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report examines the usefulness of biological analyses for evaluating environmental stress. All forms of stress are addressed; particular attention, however, is paid to the use of biological analyses to evaluate the impact on the environment from radioactive releases of the nuclear industry. First, we will review different biological analyses which are grouped into two approaches: the holistic approach (biotic and diversity indices) and the reductionist approach ('biological indicators' per se). Secondly, we will compare the usefulness of plants and animals as indicators based on the established criteria. This report ends with a compilation of letters received from different organizations which outline the present usage in Canada of biological indicators for evaluating environmental stress

  6. Use of biological indicators for evaluating environmental stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report examines the usefulness of biological analyses for evaluating environmental stress. All forms of stress are addressed; particular attention, however, is paid to the use of biological analyses to evaluate the impact on the environment from radioactive releases of the nuclear industry. First, we will review different biological analyses which are grouped into two approaches: the holistic approach (biotic and diversity indices) and the reductionist approach ('biological indicators' per se). Secondly, we will compare the usefulness of plants and animals as indicators based on the established criteria. This report ends with a compilation of letters received from different organizations which outline the present use in Canada of biological indicators for evaluating environmental stress

  7. Mental retardation after prenatal exposure. Re-analysis indicated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current risk assessment for severe mental retardation after prenatal exposure to the A-bomb radiation is based on 21 cases exposed to more than 0.005 Gy, of which 17 were exposed in the most sensitive period 8-15 weeks p.c. The latest analysis, applying the best fitting model, indicates a threshold with a lower 95% bound of 0.06-0.31 Gy, depending on whether 2 cases with Down's syndrome are included or not. The authors have interpreted this as suggesting a threshold in the low-dose region. In the dose group 0.10-0.49 Gy, except one case with Down's syndrome there is only one other case, exposed 8 weeks p.c. to 0.14 Gy. However, in a RERF report (TR 13-91) concerning brain abnormalities detected by MRI in retarded persons, the same case is described. According to this report he was actually exposed to 0.86 Gy. The distance was 1060 m, and his mother exhibited severe epilation. These details indicate that the higher dose is correct and the lower dose is erroneous. In a small material the misclassification of one case has a deep influence on the result of the data analysis. Reclassification of this case will lead to a considerable change in the estimated threshold, notably in the 95% lower bound of the threshold. There will be no indication of severe retardation after less than 0.5 Gy even in the most sensitive period. This does not preclude a milder effect on intelligence from lower doses. The fraction of severe retardation after exposure to 1 Sv in the period 8-15 weeks p.c. has been estimated at 40%. The effect on intelligence score has been estimated at 30 IQ units per Sv in the same period. These estimates have been combined in ICRP 60 to create a model, based on a presumed normal distribution of IQ scores, according to which the final outcome for an individual is determined by his expected IQ without exposure. Thus the dose required to make an otherwise normal individual retarded would be high, while a much lower dose would be enough to bring an individual

  8. Biological indicators for radiation absorbed dose: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological dosimetry has an important role to play in assessing the cumulative radiation exposure of persons working with radiation and also in estimating the true dose received during accidents involving external and internal exposure. Various biodosimetric methods have been tried to estimate radiation dose for the above purposes. Biodosimetric methods include cytogenetic, immunological and mutational assays. Each technique has certain advantages and disadvantages. We present here a review of each technique, the actual method used for detection of dose, the sensitivity of detection and its use in long term studies. (author)

  9. Cytogenetic biological dosimetry. Dose estimative in accidental exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The methodology of cytogenetic biological dosimetry is studied. The application in estimation of dose in five cases of accidental exposure is reported. An hematological study and culture of lymphocytes is presented. (M.A.C.)

  10. Integrity and Biological Activity of DNA after UV Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Delina Y.; Monier, Jean-Michel; Dupraz, Sébastien; Freissinet, Caroline; Simonet, Pascal; Vogel, Timothy M.

    2010-04-01

    The field of astrobiology lacks a universal marker with which to indicate the presence of life. This study supports the proposal to use nucleic acids, specifically DNA, as a signature of life (biosignature). In addition to its specificity to living organisms, DNA is a functional molecule that can confer new activities and characteristics to other organisms, following the molecular biology dogma, that is, DNA is transcribed to RNA, which is translated into proteins. Previous criticisms of the use of DNA as a biosignature have asserted that DNA molecules would be destroyed by UV radiation in space. To address this concern, DNA in plasmid form was deposited onto different surfaces and exposed to UVC radiation. The surviving DNA was quantified via the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Results demonstrate increased survivability of DNA attached to surfaces versus non-adsorbed DNA. The DNA was also tested for biological activity via transformation into the bacterium Acinetobacter sp. and assaying for antibiotic resistance conferred by genes encoded by the plasmid. The success of these methods to detect DNA and its gene products after UV exposure (254 nm, 3.5 J/m2s) not only supports the use of the DNA molecule as a biosignature on mineral surfaces but also demonstrates that the DNA retained biological activity.

  11. Biological effects and hazards of radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation induced carcinogenesis and mutagenesis form the main risk to health from exposure to low levels of radiation. This risk effects can be at least qualitatively understood by considering the effects of radiation on cell DNA. Whilst exposure to high levels of radiation results in a number of identifiable effects, exposure to low levels of radiation may result in effects which only manifest themselves after many years. Risk estimates for low levels of radiation have been derived on the basis of a number of assumptions. In the case of uranium mine workers a major hazard arises from the inhalation of radon daughters. Whilst the correlation between radon daughter exposure and lung cancer incidence is well established, the numerical value of the risk factor is the subject of controversy. ICRP 50 gives a value of 10 cases per 106 person-years at risk per WLM (range 5-15 x 10-6 PYR-1 WLM-1). The effect of smoking on lung cancer incidence rates amongst miners is also controversial. Nevertheless, smoking by miners should be discouraged

  12. Further approaches to biological indicators of radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite of the decades-long investigations, the search for proper biological indicator of radiation injuries did not result in techniques fulfilling all the requirements. So far, the most reliable assay is the dicentric chromosome aberration analysis. New developments have been made recently on a cytogenetic technique, the micronucleus assay, and for local injuries on the application of thermography

  13. What Trends Do Turkish Biology Education Studies Indicate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topsakal, Unsal Umdu; Calik, Muammer; Cavus, Ragip

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine what trends Turkish biology education studies indicate. To achieve this aim, the researchers examined online databases of the Higher Education Council and open access archives of graduate theses in web sites of Turkish universities. Finally, totally 138 graduate theses were elicited to analyze in regard to…

  14. Linking exposure to environmental pollutants with biological effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette; Autrup, Herman; Møller, Peter;

    2003-01-01

    Exposure to ambient air pollution has been associated with cancer. Ambient air contains a complex mixture of toxics, including particulate matter (PM) and benzene. Carcinogenic effects of PM may relate both to the content of PAH and to oxidative DNA damage generated by transition metals, benzene......, metabolism and inflammation. By means of personal monitoring and biomarkers of internal dose, biologically effective dose and susceptibility, it should be possible to characterize individual exposure and identify air pollution sources with relevant biological effects. In a series of studies, individual...... setting, biological effects of air pollutants appear mainly related to oxidative stress via personal exposure and not to urban background levels. Future developments include personal time-resolved monitors for exposure to ultrafine PM and PM(2.5,) use of GPS, as well as genomics and proteomics based...

  15. Biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report on the meeting of the Strahlenschutzkommission 2007 concerning biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure includes the following contributions: Adaptive response. The importance of DNA damage mechanisms for the biological efficiency of low-energy photons. Radiation effects in mammography: the relative biological radiation effects of low-energy photons. Radiation-induced cataracts. Carcinomas following prenatal radiation exposure. Intercellular apoptosis induction and low-dose irradiation: possible consequences for the oncogenesis control. Mechanistic models for the carcinogenesis with radiation-induced cell inactivation: application to all solid tumors in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Microarrays at low radiation doses. Mouse models for the analysis of biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. The bystander effect: observations, mechanisms and implications. Lung carcinoma risk of Majak workers - modeling of carcinogenesis and the bystander effect. Microbeam studies in radiation biology - an overview. Carcinogenesis models with radiation-induced genomic instability. Application to two epidemiological cohorts.

  16. Biological exposure models for oil spill impact analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The oil spill impact analysis (OSIA) software system has been developed to supply a tool for comprehensive, quantitative environmental impact assessments resulting from oil spills. In the system, a biological component evaluates potential effects on exposed organisms based on results from a physico-chemieal fates component, including the extent and characteristics of the surface slick, and dissolved and total concentrations of hydrocarbons in the water column. The component includes a particle-based exposure model for migratory adult fish populations, a particle-based exposure model for spawning planktonic organisms (eggs and larvae), and an exposure model for wildlife species (sea birds or marine mammals). The exposure model for migratory adult fish populations simulates the migration behaviors of fish populations migrating to or staying in their feeding areas, over-wintering areas or spawning areas, and determines the acute effects (mortality) and chronic accumulation (body burdens) from the dissolved contaminant. The exposure model for spawning planktonic organisms simulates the release of eggs and larvae, also as particles, from specific spawning areas during the spawning period, and determines their potential exposure to contaminants in the water or sediment. The exposure model for wild species calculates the exposure to surrace oil of wildlife (bird and marine mammal ) categories inhabiting the contaminated area. Compared with the earlier models in which all kinds of organisms are assumed evenly and randomly distributed, the updated biological exposure models can more realistically estimate potential effects on marine ecological system from oil spill pollution events.

  17. Study on biological monitoring of n-hexane exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwata, M.; Takeuchi, Y.; Hisanaga, N.; Ono, Y.

    1983-03-01

    n-Hexane is one of the solvents widely used in industry well known to be neurotoxic. Recently it was clearly revealed that n-hexane is metabolized in vivo and its metabolites are excreted in the urine. However, the relationship between the exposed dose of n-hexane and the metabolites in the urine has not yet been substantially determined. Therefore, this investigation was intended to clarify the above relationship in order to establish its usefulness for biological monitoring of n-hexane exposure. The exposed dose was measured by means of a personal monitoring badge worn by workers in seven factories manufacturing vinyl sandals. The timeweighted average (TWA) concentration of n-hexane was 0.2-47.4 ppm. The n-hexane metabolites in the urine of 22 workers were measured with modified Perbellini's method (12) in the early morning (6:00-7:00 hrs) and at 17:00 hrs, 2,5-Dimethylfuran, 2,5-hexanedione and ..gamma..-valerolactone were identified by gas chromatography and mass spectrometory. At 17:00 hrs the means +- SD of the metabolites were 0.21+-0.11 mg/l for 2,5-dimethylfuran, 1.13+-0.71 mg/l for 2,5-hexanedione, and 2.04+-2.31 mg/l for ..gamma..-valerolactone. The metabolites were also found in the urine in the early morning. 2-Hexanol was not detected in the urine of any worker examined. A strong correlation between TWA concentration of n-hexane and 2,5-hexanedione in the urine was found at 17:00 hrs (r=0.895, P<0.001). The results suggest that the urinary metabolites of n-hexane, especially 2,5-hexanedione, could be useful indicators for biological monitoring of n-hexane exposure. Furthermore the present study offers the advantage of a better estimate of n-hexane TWA.

  18. Identification of Bacteria and Determination of Biological Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; La Duc, Myron T.; Vaishampayan, Parag A.

    2009-01-01

    The ultimate goal of planetary protection research is to develop superior strategies for inactivating resistance bearing micro-organisms like Rummeli - bacillus stabekisii. By first identifying the particular physiologic pathway and/or structural component of the cell/spore that affords it such elevated tolerance, eradication regimes can then be designed to target these resistance-conferring moieties without jeopardizing the structural integrity of spacecraft hardware. Furthermore, hospitals and government agencies frequently use biological indicators to ensure the efficacy of a wide range of sterilization processes. The spores of Rummelibacillus stabekisii, which are far more resistant to many of such perturbations, could likely serve as a more significant biological indicator for potential survival than those being used currently.

  19. Radioactive indicators in biology and their medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This talk was given at the society of promotion of the national industry on December 1, 1949. The report is a pre-print of an article published in L'Industrie Nationale no.2 (1950). It presents the state-of-the-art of the use of artificial radioisotopes in biology and medicine: 1 - definitions (isotopes, decay, radiation emission); 2 - modalities of the use of radioisotopes in biology: basic instrumentation (Geiger-Mueller counter, counting techniques, photography, auto-histo-radiography); 3 - applications in physiology (digestive absorption, excretion, vascular exchanges, tracer techniques) and biochemistry (metabolism, thyroxine synthesis and fixation indicators, tracer techniques for drugs); 4 - radiotherapy, internal and external irradiation. (J.S.)

  20. Effects of Drilling Fluid Exposure to Oil and Gas Workers Presented with Major Areas of Exposure and Exposure Indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Broni-Bediako

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Drilling fluid is any fluid which is circulated through a well in order to remove cuttings from a wellbore. They are used broadly in the oil and gas industry, on exploration rigs, and are critical to ensuring a safe and productive oil or gas well. During drilling, a large volume of fluids are circulated through the well and into open, partially enclosed or completely enclosed systems at elevated temperatures. When these drilling fluids are agitated during circulating process there is significant potential for chemical exposure to workers and subsequent health effects. This study seeks to identify major areas of drilling fluid exposure and health hazard associated with the use of drilling fluid. The study also presents some challenges in setting drilling fluid exposure standard which has always not been given the same attention or concern as effects and risk management of drilling fluid. Some exposure indicators are also presented.

  1. Cytogenetic techniques as biological indicator and dosimeter of radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The cytogenetic methods are established techniques for bio monitoring and bio dosimetry of professionally and accidentally exposed to ionizing radiation subjects. They are applied to continue the evaluation of the physical dosimetry and to consider the individual radiosensitivity. The results of cytogenetic monitoring and dosimetry of radiation exposed subjects carried out during the last 5 years in laboratory of Radiation Genetics, NCRRP is reported. Laboratory of Radiation genetics performs cytogenetic monitoring of low dose radiation professionally or medically exposed subjects: workers in Kozloduy NPP, radioactive waste repository workers, X-rays diagnostically exposed patients, and radiotherapy exposed as well. Three cytogenetic indicators are applied as the most sensitive indicators for human radiation exposure: analysis of micronuclei (MN), chromosomal aberrations (CA) and stable translocations (FISH). The optimized methodology for application of different cytogenetic techniques for radiation estimation is discussed

  2. Effective biological dose from occupational exposure during nanoparticle synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanomaterial and nanotechnology safety require the characterization of occupational exposure levels for completing a risk assessment. However, equally important is the estimation of the effective internal dose via lung deposition, transport and clearance mechanisms. An integrated source-to-biological dose assessment study is presented using real monitoring data collected during nanoparticle synthesis. Experimental monitoring data of airborne exposure levels during nanoparticle synthesis of CaSO4 and BiPO4 nanoparticles in a research laboratory is coupled with a human lung transport and deposition model, which solves in an Eulerian framework the general dynamic equation for polydisperse aerosols using particle specific physical-chemical properties. Subsequently, the lung deposition model is coupled with a mathematical particle clearance model providing the effective biological dose as well as the time course of the biological dose build-up after exposure. The results for the example of BiPO4 demonstrate that even short exposures throughout the day can lead to particle doses of 1.10·E+08/(kg-bw·8h-shift), with the majority accumulating in the pulmonary region. Clearance of particles is slow and is not completed within a working shift following a 1 hour exposure. It mostly occurs via macrophage activity in the alveolar region, with small amounts transported to the interstitium and less to the lymph nodes.

  3. Effective biological dose from occupational exposure during nanoparticle synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demou, Evangelia; Tran, Lang; Housiadas, Christos

    2009-02-01

    Nanomaterial and nanotechnology safety require the characterization of occupational exposure levels for completing a risk assessment. However, equally important is the estimation of the effective internal dose via lung deposition, transport and clearance mechanisms. An integrated source-to-biological dose assessment study is presented using real monitoring data collected during nanoparticle synthesis. Experimental monitoring data of airborne exposure levels during nanoparticle synthesis of CaSO4 and BiPO4 nanoparticles in a research laboratory is coupled with a human lung transport and deposition model, which solves in an Eulerian framework the general dynamic equation for polydisperse aerosols using particle specific physical-chemical properties. Subsequently, the lung deposition model is coupled with a mathematical particle clearance model providing the effective biological dose as well as the time course of the biological dose build-up after exposure. The results for the example of BiPO4 demonstrate that even short exposures throughout the day can lead to particle doses of 1.10·E+08#/(kg-bw·8h-shift), with the majority accumulating in the pulmonary region. Clearance of particles is slow and is not completed within a working shift following a 1 hour exposure. It mostly occurs via macrophage activity in the alveolar region, with small amounts transported to the interstitium and less to the lymph nodes.

  4. Biological indicators in Cuba. Current trends and forecasting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The introduction and development of biological indicators of radiation damage began in Cuba in 1986 with the creation of the department of Radiobiology at the Centre for Hygiene and Radiation Protection. The first experiences however began in Cuba in the sixties. The initial task of the work started in the 80 was to introduce the cytogenetic dosimetry. This task finalised with the consolidation of a regular cytogenetic service, currently analyses the cases of presumed overexposures in the country. Additionally a group of research projects are carried out using cytogenetic indicators among them a project with children from territories affected by the Chernobyl accident. The biochemical indicators of radiation damage were developed in a parallel way, at the moment a group of them are available.The nucleic acid concentration and oxidative stress indicators in patients selected for bone marrow transplants are in use in research projects. In the near future a comet assay and the p53 expression will be include in the list of laboratory indicators. In the paper are presented the main results obtained until the moment in the regular services, in the ongoing projects and the works planing for the future. (author)

  5. Gene expression in caged fish as a first-tier indicator of contaminant exposure in streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Aaron P; Oris, James T; Burton, G Allen; Clements, William H

    2005-12-01

    The development of sensitive, biologically based indicators of contaminant exposure (i.e., biomarkers) is an ongoing topic of research. These indicators have been proposed as a first-tier method of identifying contaminant exposure. The primary objective of this research was to implement a biomarker-based method of exposure assessment using caged fish and real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (rtRT-PCR) measurements of gene expression. Primers were developed for the CYPIA, metallothionein, and vitellogenin genes in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchyus mykiss), cutbow trout (Oncorhynchyus clarkii x mykiss), and Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). Each of these genes has been shown to respond specifically to planar aromatic compounds, heavy metals, and environmental estrogens, respectively. Juvenile fish were placed in cages and exposed in situ at reference and contaminated sites on the Cache la Poudre River (CO, USA), the Arkansas River (CO, USA), the St. John River (NB, Canada), and two urban creeks near Dayton (OH, USA). Quantitative gene expression was determined using rtRT-PCR. Biomarker expression profiles were obtained that demonstrated differences in CYPIA, metallothionein, and vitellogenin mRNA production unique to each site, indicating that specific types of compounds were bioavailable and present in sufficient concentrations to elicit transcriptional responses in the organism. These findings support the use of a biomarker-based approach to exposure identification and assessment. PMID:16445090

  6. A study on biological monitoring of n-hexane exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwata, M.; Takeuchi, Y.; Hisanaga, N.; Ono, Y.

    1983-01-01

    n-Hexane is one of the solvents widely used in industry and well known to be neurotoxic. Recently it was clearly revealed that n-hexane is metabolized in vivo and its metabolites are excreted in the urine. However, the relationship between the exposed dose of n-hexane and the metabolites in the urine has not yet been substantially determined. Therefore, in this investigation we intended to clarify the above relationship in order to establish its usefulness for biological monitoring of n-hexane exposure. The exposed dose was measured by means of a personal monitoring badge worn by workers in seven factories manufacturing vinyl sandals. The time-weighted average (TWA) concentration of n-hexane was 0.2-47.4 ppm. The n-hexane metabolites in the urine of 22 workers were measured with modified Perbellini's method (12) in the early morning (6:00-7:00 hrs) and at 17:00 hrs. 2,5-Dimethylfuran, 2,5-hexanedione and gamma-valerolactone were identified by gas chromatography and mass spectrometory. At 17:00 hrs the means +/- SD of the metabolites were 0.21 +/- 0.11 mg/l for 2,5-dimethylfuran, 1.13 +/- 0.71 mg/l for 2,5-hexanedione, and 2.04 +/- 2.31 mg/l for gamma-valerolactone. The metabolites were also found in the urine in the early morning. 2-Hexanol was not detected in the urine of any worker examined. A strong correlation between TWA concentration of n-hexane and 2,5-hexanedione in the urine was found at 17:00 hrs (r . 0.895, P less than 0.001). The results suggest that the urinary metabolites of n-hexane, especially 2,5-hexanedione, could be useful indicators for biological monitoring of n-hexane exposure. Furthermore the present study offers the advantage of a better estimate of n-hexane TWA.

  7. Bioinspired Artificial Melanosomes As Colorimetric Indicators of Oxygen Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shillingford, Cicely; Russell, Calvin W; Burgess, Ian B; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-02-01

    Many industries require irreversibly responsive materials for use as sensors or detectors of environmental exposure. We describe the synthesis and fabrication of a nontoxic surface coating that reports oxygen exposure of the substrate material through irreversible formation of colored spots. The coating consists of a selectively permeable rubber film that contains the colorless organic precursors to darkly pigmented synthetic melanin. Melanin synthesis within the film is triggered by exposure to molecular oxygen. The selectively permeable rubber film regulates the rate of oxygen diffusion, enabling independent control of the sensitivity and response time of the artificial melanosome, while preventing leaching of melanin or its precursors. PMID:26854914

  8. Chromosomal analysis and application of biological dosimetry in two cases of apparent over exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gamma radiation calibration curve of 60 Co is used which was generated in the ININ Laboratory of Biology to calculate the exposure dose of two workers whose dosemeters marked values above of the limit allowed. The analysis indicates that in a first case, the aberrations frequency corresponded to the basal value, therefore there is not over exposure. The aberrations frequency of the second case is lightly above to the basal value and therefore the probability favors to what the physical dosimetry indicates. (Author)

  9. Occupational accidents with exposure to biological material: Description of cases in Bahia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Técia Maria Santos Carneiro e Cordeiro

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: This study is included in the field of public health in Brazil, in particular occupational health, by the occupational accidents with exposure to biological material consists of a preventable injury. Thus, the objective was to describe risk factors the of occupational accidents with exposure to biological material and the conduct postexposure adopted notified of cases in Notifiable Diseases Information System (SINAN in the State of Bahia in 2012. Methods: This is a descriptive epidemiological study realized with data from the injuries of notifications SINAN in February 2013, the analysis was realized using descriptive statistics in absolute frequencies and relative. Results: The results indicate a higher occurrence of occupational accidents involving exposure to biological materials in Bahia in the female population (78.1% and aged between 30-49 years (51.5%; the blood was fluid larger contact in accidents 75.2% by percutaneous (71.5%; post-exposure procedures were adopted in accordance recommended by the Ministry of Health; divers information were not fulfilled in the notifications and only 23.8% of Occupational Accidents Comunication (CAT were issued. Conclusion: It is considered necessary to draw up strategies on occupational health and safety, consciousness of workers about the relevance of the measures adopted after occupational accidents with exposure to biological material and the training of professionals for case notification and research to fill all the fields of the notification form and also the issuance of CAT.

  10. Hair as an indicator of multielement exposure of population groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scalp hair is becoming well recognized as an invaluable tissue for monitoring human environmental exposure. Simultaneous determination of a number of metals in hair can be used to evaluate the total body accumulation due to exposure. In this laboratory, a nuclear method for multielement hair analysis has been developed by combining neutron and photon activation analyses to detect part per million concentrations of antimony, arsenic, bromine, cadmium, calcium, cobalt, iron, lead, mercury, nickel, selenium, sodium, zinc, and zirconium in hair. The concentrations of As, Cd and Pb have been observed to be the most elevated among urban residents near two Pb smelters compared with residents in urban control and rural communities. Lead in hair has been studied in detail by analyzing more than 250 samples. The variation of Pb content with respect to color of hair and to age and sex of the donor are reported here. Children residing close to smelters, especially the boys, have been observed to show the most elevated hair Pb levels, some up to ten times normal and some of them have been treated for Pb poisoning. Further, by analyzing the sequential growth sections along the length of hair strands it has been possible to deduce the period of maximum exposure and some history of the exposure. (U.S.)

  11. Biological effects of low level exposures to chemicals and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In May 1990 a group of scientists representing several federal agencies, the International Society of Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology, the private sector, and academia met to develop a strategy to encourage the study of the biological effects of low level exposures (BELLE) to chemical agents and radioactivity. A workshop was held in 1991 with seven invited speakers focusing on the toxicological implications of biological adaptations. The selection of topics and speakers was designed to consider critically the concept of hormesis, not only in a broad, conceptual manner, but also at the molecular and biochemical levels. These presentations offered a complementary perspective on the diverse range of molecular mechanisms that can become activated at low levels of toxicant exposure. In addition to chemical toxicology research, an overview of current research on 'Effects of low-dose radiation on the immune response' was presented as well as 'Cellular adaptation as an important response during chemical carcinogenesis'. The final presentation was devoted to biostatistical considerations when designing studies that address issues associated with the biological responses to low doses of chemicals and radiation, as well as issues in interpretation of the findings from such studies

  12. Pesticide Exposure, Safety Issues, and Risk Assessment Indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos A. Damalas

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Pesticides are widely used in agricultural production to prevent or control pests, diseases, weeds, and other plant pathogens in an effort to reduce or eliminate yield losses and maintain high product quality. Although pesticides are developed through very strict regulation processes to function with reasonable certainty and minimal impact on human health and the environment, serious concerns have been raised about health risks resulting from occupational exposure and from residues in food and drinking water. Occupational exposure to pesticides often occurs in the case of agricultural workers in open fields and greenhouses, workers in the pesticide industry, and exterminators of house pests. Exposure of the general population to pesticides occurs primarily through eating food and drinking water contaminated with pesticide residues, whereas substantial exposure can also occur in or around the home. Regarding the adverse effects on the environment (water, soil and air contamination from leaching, runoff, and spray drift, as well as the detrimental effects on wildlife, fish, plants, and other non-target organisms, many of these effects depend on the toxicity of the pesticide, the measures taken during its application, the dosage applied, the adsorption on soil colloids, the weather conditions prevailing after application, and how long the pesticide persists in the environment. Therefore, the risk assessment of the impact of pesticides either on human health or on the environment is not an easy and particularly accurate process because of differences in the periods and levels of exposure, the types of pesticides used (regarding toxicity and persistence, and the environmental characteristics of the areas where pesticides are usually applied. Also, the number of the criteria used and the method of their implementation to assess the adverse effects of pesticides on human health could affect risk assessment and would possibly affect the characterization

  13. Predictive modeling of nanomaterial exposure effects in biological systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu X

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Xiong Liu,1 Kaizhi Tang,1 Stacey Harper,2 Bryan Harper,2 Jeffery A Steevens,3 Roger Xu1 1Intelligent Automation, Inc., Rockville, MD, USA; 2Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA; 3ERDC Environmental Laboratory, Vicksburg, MS, USA Background: Predictive modeling of the biological effects of nanomaterials is critical for industry and policymakers to assess the potential hazards resulting from the application of engineered nanomaterials. Methods: We generated an experimental dataset on the toxic effects experienced by embryonic zebrafish due to exposure to nanomaterials. Several nanomaterials were studied, such as metal nanoparticles, dendrimer, metal oxide, and polymeric materials. The embryonic zebrafish metric (EZ Metric was used as a screening-level measurement representative of adverse effects. Using the dataset, we developed a data mining approach to model the toxic endpoints and the overall biological impact of nanomaterials. Data mining techniques, such as numerical prediction, can assist analysts in developing risk assessment models for nanomaterials. Results: We found several important attributes that contribute to the 24 hours post-fertilization (hpf mortality, such as dosage concentration, shell composition, and surface charge. These findings concur with previous studies on nanomaterial toxicity using embryonic zebrafish. We conducted case studies on modeling the overall effect/impact of nanomaterials and the specific toxic endpoints such as mortality, delayed development, and morphological malformations. The results show that we can achieve high prediction accuracy for certain biological effects, such as 24 hpf mortality, 120 hpf mortality, and 120 hpf heart malformation. The results also show that the weighting scheme for individual biological effects has a significant influence on modeling the overall impact of

  14. Pesticide Exposure, Safety Issues, and Risk Assessment Indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Damalas, Christos A.; Ilias G. Eleftherohorinos

    2011-01-01

    Pesticides are widely used in agricultural production to prevent or control pests, diseases, weeds, and other plant pathogens in an effort to reduce or eliminate yield losses and maintain high product quality. Although pesticides are developed through very strict regulation processes to function with reasonable certainty and minimal impact on human health and the environment, serious concerns have been raised about health risks resulting from occupational exposure and from residues in food an...

  15. Large scale air monitoring: Biological indicators versus air particulate matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological indicator organisms are widely used for monitoring and banking purposes since many years. Although the complexity of the interactions between bioorganisms and their environment is generally not easily comprehensible, environmental quality assessment using the bioindicator approach offers some convincing advantages compared to direct analysis of soil, water, or air. Direct measurement of air particulates is restricted to experienced laboratories with access to expensive sampling equipment. Additionally, the amount of material collected generally is just enough for one determination per sampling and no multidimensional characterization might be possible. Further, fluctuations in air masses have a pronounced effect on the results from air filter sampling. Combining the integrating property of bioindicators with the world wide availability and uniform matrix characteristics of air particulates as a prerequisite for global monitoring of air pollution will be discussed. A new approach for sampling urban dust using large volume filtering devices installed in air conditioners of large hotel buildings is assessed. A first experiment was initiated to collect air particulates (300 to 500 g each) from a number of hotels during a period of three to four months by successive vacuum cleaning of used inlet filters from high volume air conditioning installations reflecting average concentrations per three months in different large cities. This approach is expected to be upgraded and applied for global monitoring. Highly positive correlated elements were found in lichen such as K/S, Zn/P, the rare earth elements (REE) and a significant negative correlation between Fig and Cu was observed in these samples. The ratio of concentrations of elements in dust and Usnea spp. is highest for Cr, Zn, and Fe (400-200) and lowest for elements such as Ca, Rb, and Sr (20-10). (author)

  16. Biological indicators for monitoring water quality of MTF canals system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, S. L.

    1975-01-01

    Biological models, diversity indexes, were developed to predict environmental effects of NASA's Mississippi test facility (MTF) chemical operations on canal systems in the area. To predict the effects on local streams, a physical model of unpolluted streams was established. The model is fed by artesian well water free of background levels of pollutants. The species diversity and biota composition of unpolluted MTF stream was determined; resulting information will be used to form baseline data for future comparisons. Biological modeling was accomplished by adding controlled quantities or kinds of chemical pollutants and evaluating the effects of these chemicals on the biological life of the stream.

  17. Biologically controlled minerals as potential indicators of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, D. E.; Mancinelli, R. L.; Kaneshiro, E.

    1991-01-01

    Minerals can be produced and deposited either by abiotic or biologic means. Regardless of their origin, mineral crystals reflect the environment conditions (e.g., temperature, pressure, chemical composition, and redox potential) present during crystal formation. Biologically-produced mineral crystals are grown or reworked under the control of their host organism and reflect an environment different from the abiotic environment. In addition, minerals of either biologic or abiotic origin have great longevities. For these reasons, biologically produced minerals have been proposed as biomarkers. Biomarkers are key morphological, chemical, and isotopic signatures of living systems that can be used to determine if life processes have occurred. Studies of biologically controlled minerals produced by the protist, Paramecium tetraurelia, were initiated since techniques have already been developed to culture them and isolate their crystalline material, and methods are already in place to analyze this material. Two direct crystalline phases were identified. One phase, whose chemical composition is high in Mg, was identified as struvite. The second phase, whose chemical composition is high in Ca, has not been previously found occurring naturally and may be considered a newly discovered material. Analyses are underway to determine the characteristics of these minerals in order to compare them with characteristics of these minerals in order to compare them with characteristics of minerals formed abiotically, but with the same chemical composition.

  18. Biological effects of exposure to magnetic resonance imaging: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Formica Domenico

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The literature on biological effects of magnetic and electromagnetic fields commonly utilized in magnetic resonance imaging systems is surveyed here. After an introduction on the basic principles of magnetic resonance imaging and the electric and magnetic properties of biological tissues, the basic phenomena to understand the bio-effects are described in classical terms. Values of field strengths and frequencies commonly utilized in these diagnostic systems are reported in order to allow the integration of the specific literature on the bio-effects produced by magnetic resonance systems with the vast literature concerning the bio-effects produced by electromagnetic fields. This work gives an overview of the findings about the safety concerns of exposure to static magnetic fields, radio-frequency fields, and time varying magnetic field gradients, focusing primarily on the physics of the interactions between these electromagnetic fields and biological matter. The scientific literature is summarized, integrated, and critically analyzed with the help of authoritative reviews by recognized experts, international safety guidelines are also cited.

  19. Hair as an indicator of environmental exposure in Hong Kong

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eleven human hair samples were taken from the Chinese residents of Hong Kong for the study of hair trace elemental level and environmental exposure. Absolute neutron-activation analysis and Ge(Li) gamma-ray spectrometry were applied for the determination of the trace elemental level. After washing, each hair sample was air-dried at room temperature in acetone and water. The hair was weighed and encapsulated into the irradiation container. Typical sample weight was about 150 mg. The samples were irradiated at a neutron flux of 4.4x1013nxcm-2xs-1. Conditions of the irradiations and counting are tabulated. The trace element content of hair from a drug addict was found to be considerably different from other sampled peopie. Comparison of the normal concentrations of the trace elements of the Chinese residents of Hong Kong was made with those from people of various other national, socio-cultural and environmental backgrounds. It was found that together with a few other trace elements, Ni, Sr, Zr, and Hg content of the Chinese residents of Hong Kong show a higher level than those of the other sampled people. Tabulated data are given. (T.G.)

  20. Hair analysis as an indicator of exposure to uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medical examinations performed on four monks of a monastery in the northern Greece revealed heavy metal contamination. Hair analysis, performed by a toxicological laboratory abroad, indicated, among other, the presence of uranium. The uranium concentrations determined in a laboratory of 'Elemental Hair Analysis' indicated a uranium level that was about five times the maximum value of the reference range, which has been adopted by the measuring laboratory. After these diagnostic findings, on request of 10 monks, uranium determination in hair and urine samples was performed by means of alpha spectrometry in GAEC's laboratory. The measured uranium concentrations in hair varied from 0.15 to 2.10 mBq g-1, which correspond to 12.1 and 170 ng g-1, respectively. The uranium concentrations in urine were between 41 and 174 ng d-1. For comparison purposes, urine and non-dyed hair samples from the staff of the laboratory were analysed. Because one of the major sources of uranium intake is through drinking water, water samples were also analysed. The mean value of the uranium concentration in the two drinking water samples collected from the residence area was found to be 2.35 μg l-1. (authors)

  1. Biological Markers May Indicate Poor Breast Cancer Prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    A team of researchers has found an association between breast cancer survival and two proteins that, when present in the blood in high levels, are indicators of inflammation. Using data from the Health, Eating, Activity and Lifestyle (HEAL) study sponsor

  2. Biological consequences of exposure to soluble forms of natural uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depending on dose, route of administration and chemical form of the administered uranium, exposure to uranium compounds can produce effects in a variety of organs. Of these, the kidney is the most sensitive, and is considered to be a critical target organ for hazard assessment. Although dose-effect relationships differ among species, injury and necrosis of the terminal segments of the renal proximal tubule is characteristic in all mammalian species that have been studied. Glomerular injury has also been reported. The critical occupational health issues is thus, ''To what extent can laboratory animal models be useful for predicting human health hazards to uranium?''. While direct quantitative extrapolations of dose-effect relationships in laboratory animals to humans is not a reality at present, it is possible, nevertheless, to explore in laboratory animal models certain specific questions regarding the biological effects of uranium in kidney that are relevant to hazard assessment. Indeed, a complete understanding of the laboratory animal model is critical for establishing valid extrapolations to humans. Issues relating to mechanisms of renal injury, dose-effect relationships and biological monitoring for uranium-induced nephrotoxicity are considered in this review. (author)

  3. Radon exposure of the skin: I. Biological effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles, M W [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-15

    Radon progeny can plate out on skin and give rise to exposure of the superficial epidermis from alpha emitters Po-218 (7.7 MeV, range {approx}66 {mu}m) and Po-214 (6 MeV, range {approx}44 {mu}m). Dose rates from beta/gamma emitters Pb-214 and Bi-214 are low and only predominate at depths in excess of the alpha range. This paper reviews the evidence for a causal link between exposure from radon and its progeny, and deterministic and stochastic biological effects in human skin. Radiation induced skin effects such as ulceration and dermal atrophy, which require irradiation of the dermis, are ruled out for alpha irradiation from radon progeny because the target cells are considerably deeper than the range of alpha particles. They have not been observed in man or animals. Effects such as erythema and acute epidermal necrosis have been observed in a few cases of very high dose alpha particle exposures in man and after acute high dose exposure in animals from low energy beta radiations with similar depth doses to radon progeny. The required skin surface absorbed doses are in excess of 100 Gy. Such effects would require extremely high levels of radon progeny. They would involve quite exceptional circumstances, way outside the normal range of radon exposures in man. There is no definitive identification of the target cells for skin cancer induction in animals or man. The stem cells in the basal layer which maintain the epidermis are the most plausible contenders for target cells. The majority of these cells are near the end of the range of radon progeny alpha particles, even on the thinnest body sites. The nominal depth of these cells, as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), is 70 {mu}m. There is evidence however that some irradiation of the hair follicles and/or the deeper dermis, as well as the inter-follicular epidermis, is also necessary for skin cancer induction. Alpha irradiation of rodent skin that is restricted to the

  4. Radon exposure of the skin: I. Biological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon progeny can plate out on skin and give rise to exposure of the superficial epidermis from alpha emitters Po-218 (7.7 MeV, range ∼66 μm) and Po-214 (6 MeV, range ∼44 μm). Dose rates from beta/gamma emitters Pb-214 and Bi-214 are low and only predominate at depths in excess of the alpha range. This paper reviews the evidence for a causal link between exposure from radon and its progeny, and deterministic and stochastic biological effects in human skin. Radiation induced skin effects such as ulceration and dermal atrophy, which require irradiation of the dermis, are ruled out for alpha irradiation from radon progeny because the target cells are considerably deeper than the range of alpha particles. They have not been observed in man or animals. Effects such as erythema and acute epidermal necrosis have been observed in a few cases of very high dose alpha particle exposures in man and after acute high dose exposure in animals from low energy beta radiations with similar depth doses to radon progeny. The required skin surface absorbed doses are in excess of 100 Gy. Such effects would require extremely high levels of radon progeny. They would involve quite exceptional circumstances, way outside the normal range of radon exposures in man. There is no definitive identification of the target cells for skin cancer induction in animals or man. The stem cells in the basal layer which maintain the epidermis are the most plausible contenders for target cells. The majority of these cells are near the end of the range of radon progeny alpha particles, even on the thinnest body sites. The nominal depth of these cells, as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), is 70 μm. There is evidence however that some irradiation of the hair follicles and/or the deeper dermis, as well as the inter-follicular epidermis, is also necessary for skin cancer induction. Alpha irradiation of rodent skin that is restricted to the epidermis does not

  5. Seagrass epiphytes: useful indicator, potential biological criterion, or forlorn hope?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epiphytes on seagrasses have been studied for more than 50 years, and proposed as an indicator of anthropogenic nutrient enrichment for over 30 years. Epiphytes have been correlated with seagrass declines, causally related to nutrient additions in both field and mesocosm experim...

  6. Wildlife as biological indicators for assessing impacts of climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimates of the impacts of climate change on wildlife are necessarily constrained by knowledge of the effects of climate on wildlife. A review is presented of the better-known impacts of climate on wildlife, examining their utility as ecological indicators. The most obvious feature of any species is its geographic distribution, or range. Climate may affect distribution indirectly through effects on habitat, directly through physiological effects, or most probably, through both. Impacts can include changes in distribution of habitat, changes in distribution of species, and changes in migration routes. Direct effects of climate include timing and success of breeding, timing and success of migration, winter survival, and extreme events. Distribution changes are powerful integrators of ecosystem-level events, but poor indicators of particular changes. Changes in the timing of migration, and the phenology of breeding, are more directly determined by weather events and hence will be better indicators of changing climate. Detailed knowledge of effects of climate on timing and success of breeding is available for only a few species, and has not been carefully synthesized with a view to using such variables as climatic indicators. Temperature maxima and minima, frost-free and degree days, and estimates of precipitation on finer scales, both temporal and geographic, are needed to predict the effects of climate change on wildlife. 48 refs

  7. Changes in the cellularity of the cortex of human hairs as an indicator of radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growing hair follicles with their rapid cell proliferation would be expected to be sensitive organs to cytotoxic agents such as radiation. Various abnormalities in the hair and hair follicles have been reported in the past. Changes in the number of cells in the newly forming hair cortex have been shown in the mouse to be one of the more sensitive assays for radiation effects, and this approach could provide a basis for a biological dosimeter. Here we show for the first time using hair cortex cell counts some preliminary data indicating that the number of cell nuclei in a unit of length (140 μm) of the cortex of human hairs from the chest and scalp of patients undergoing fractionated radiotherapy falls significantly (P = 0.005) by 5%-10% 3 days after the first dose in a fractionated sequence of irradiations. The first dose was delivered on a Friday, and no further exposures were delivered until after the hair sample was taken on the 3rd day (Monday). No significant effect of radiation dose could be detected over the available, limited range of doses studied (5 - 6.5 Gy with one exit dose sample at 2.6 Gy). Also, the width varies from hair to hair. If the width of the hair is taken into account and the cortical nuclei counts are normalised to the width of each hair, the effects seen at day 3 become slightly more significant (P = 0.002), and those at day 5 also become significant (P = 0.012). Samples taken on the 5th day after the first (Friday) exposure were also 2 days after the second exposure and 1 day after the third exposure. However, little expression of damage attributable to the 2nd and 3rd exposures was anticipated since their effects would take some time to be expressed in the cortical region examined, which is some distance from the proliferative region of the follicle. (orig.). With 2 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Health Outcomes of Exposure to Biological and Chemical Components of Inhalable and Respirable Particulate Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morakinyo, Oyewale Mayowa; Mokgobu, Matlou Ingrid; Mukhola, Murembiwa Stanley; Hunter, Raymond Paul

    2016-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) is a key indicator of air pollution and a significant risk factor for adverse health outcomes in humans. PM is not a self-contained pollutant but a mixture of different compounds including chemical and biological fractions. While several reviews have focused on the chemical components of PM and associated health effects, there is a dearth of review studies that holistically examine the role of biological and chemical components of inhalable and respirable PM in disease causation. A literature search using various search engines and (or) keywords was done. Articles selected for review were chosen following predefined criteria, to extract and analyze data. The results show that the biological and chemical components of inhalable and respirable PM play a significant role in the burden of health effects attributed to PM. These health outcomes include low birth weight, emergency room visit, hospital admission, respiratory and pulmonary diseases, cardiovascular disease, cancer, non-communicable diseases, and premature death, among others. This review justifies the importance of each or synergistic effects of the biological and chemical constituents of PM on health. It also provides information that informs policy on the establishment of exposure limits for PM composition metrics rather than the existing exposure limits of the total mass of PM. This will allow for more effective management strategies for improving outdoor air quality. PMID:27314370

  9. Biomarkers in natural fish populations indicate adverse biological effects of offshore oil production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lennart Balk

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite the growing awareness of the necessity of a sustainable development, the global economy continues to depend largely on the consumption of non-renewable energy resources. One such energy resource is fossil oil extracted from the seabed at offshore oil platforms. This type of oil production causes continuous environmental pollution from drilling waste, discharge of large amounts of produced water, and accidental spills. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Samples from natural populations of haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus and Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua in two North Sea areas with extensive oil production were investigated. Exposure to and uptake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs were demonstrated, and biomarker analyses revealed adverse biological effects, including induction of biotransformation enzymes, oxidative stress, altered fatty acid composition, and genotoxicity. Genotoxicity was reflected by a hepatic DNA adduct pattern typical for exposure to a mixture of PAHs. Control material was collected from a North Sea area without oil production and from remote Icelandic waters. The difference between the two control areas indicates significant background pollution in the North Sea. CONCLUSION: It is most remarkable to obtain biomarker responses in natural fish populations in the open sea that are similar to the biomarker responses in fish from highly polluted areas close to a point source. Risk assessment of various threats to the marine fish populations in the North Sea, such as overfishing, global warming, and eutrophication, should also take into account the ecologically relevant impact of offshore oil production.

  10. Late biological effects from internal and external exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    Information on late biological effects of radiation was obtained from the long-term medical followup of a small population of Marshallese accidentally exposed to radioactive fallout from a thermonuclear test in 1954. Endocrine data are compatible with a sequence of nonstochastic radiation effects. The ingestion of radioisotopes of iodine produced clinical thyroid hypofunction in children, biochemical evidence of thyroid dysfunction in some adults, thyroid adenomatous module formation, and, as a possible indirect effect of thyroid damage, at least two cases of pituitary adenoma. In contrast, the only evidence of a stochastic effect has been a real increase in thyroid cancers among the more highly exposed people of Rongelap, none of whom have evidence of residual disease. While three nonthyroidal cancers which are known to be inducible in humans by external irradiation have been documented in the exposed population, three similar cancers have occurred in an unexposed comparison population of Marshallese. Nonstochastic effects of radiation exposure may be common but subtle. In the Marshallese experience the morbidity of delayed nonstochastic effects far exceeds that of the stochastic. 20 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Late biological effects from internal and external exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information on late biological effects of radiation was obtained from the long-term medical followup of a small population of Marshallese accidentally exposed to radioactive fallout from a thermonuclear test in 1954. Endocrine data are compatible with a sequence of nonstochastic radiation effects. The ingestion of radioisotopes of iodine produced clinical thyroid hypofunction in children, biochemical evidence of thyroid dysfunction in some adults, thyroid adenomatous module formation, and, as a possible indirect effect of thyroid damage, at least two cases of pituitary adenoma. In contrast, the only evidence of a stochastic effect has been a real increase in thyroid cancers among the more highly exposed people of Rongelap, none of whom have evidence of residual disease. While three nonthyroidal cancers which are known to be inducible in humans by external irradiation have been documented in the exposed population, three similar cancers have occurred in an unexposed comparison population of Marshallese. Nonstochastic effects of radiation exposure may be common but subtle. In the Marshallese experience the morbidity of delayed nonstochastic effects far exceeds that of the stochastic. 20 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  12. The Role of Molecular Biology in the Biomonitoring of Human Exposure to Chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balam Muñoz

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to different substances in an occupational environment is of utmost concern to global agencies such as the World Health Organization and the International Labour Organization. Interest in improving work health conditions, particularly of those employees exposed to noxious chemicals, has increased considerably and has stimulated the search for new, more specific and selective tests. Recently, the field of molecular biology has been indicated as an alternative technique for monitoring personnel while evaluating work-related pathologies. Originally, occupational exposure to environmental toxicants was assessed using biochemical techniques to determine the presence of higher concentrations of toxic compounds in blood, urine, or other fluids or tissues; results were used to evaluate potential health risk. However, this approach only estimates the presence of a noxious chemical and its effects, but does not prevent or diminish the risk. Molecular biology methods have become very useful in occupational medicine to provide more accurate and opportune diagnostics. In this review, we discuss the role of the following common techniques: (1 Use of cell cultures; (2 evaluation of gene expression; (3 the “omic” sciences (genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics and (4 bioinformatics. We suggest that molecular biology has many applications in occupational health where the data can be applied to general environmental conditions.

  13. Environmental lithium exposure in the north of Chile - Tissue exposure indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo T. Figueroa

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: northern Chile has the highest levels of lithium in surface waters in the world which is reflected in very high lithium levels in the plants and animals that depend on these water systems and consequently in the indigenous population.Methods: the lithium tissue burdens in populations from two valleys in the extreme north of Chile have been studied. The bulk of this report is based on analyses of lithium levels in urine, hair, and breast milk in the population of several villages. Data on serum levels, some of which had been previously published, are included for the sake of completeness. Since this paper reports studies by several groups of workers samples were analysed by a variety of methods. These include atomic emission, atomic absorption, other photospectroscopic techniques and mass spectroscopy.Results: in all samples studied the average lithium level (5.3 ppm was found to be significantly elevated compared to levels reported in the literature and measured in this study for people not exposed to high levels in water and food (0.009-0.228 ppm.Conclusions: the people studied represent a unique longitudinal cohort. The work should provide important insights into the potential neuroprotective effects of lithium also help us set guidelines to assess the risks from high dose environmental exposure.

  14. Evaluation of effects of ozone exposure on influenza infection in mice using several indicators of susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selgrade, M K; Illing, J W; Starnes, D M; Stead, A G; Ménache, M G; Stevens, M A

    1988-07-01

    Mice were exposed to 1 ppm O3, 3 hr/day, for 5 consecutive days. Separate groups of mice were infected with influenza following each of the individual exposures. A twofold increase in the incidence of mortality and a 3-day decrease in mean survival time were observed in mice infected after the second exposure. There were no effects on percentage mortality or mean survival time due to exposure to 1 ppm O3 in mice infected after the first, third, fourth, or fifth exposure. When the exposure concentration was lowered to 0.5 ppm, there were no effects on mortality in mice infected after the second exposure. Five, daily, 3-hr exposures to 1 ppm O3 had no effect on virus titers in the lungs of mice infected after either the second or fifth exposure. In contrast, wet lung weights were significantly enhanced over infected air controls in mice infected after the second O3 exposure at both 1 and 0.5 ppm but not at 0.25 ppm exposure concentrations. This effect on lung wet weight was observed in mice infected with a dose of virus which produced 7-33% mortality in controls as well as in mice infected with a sublethal dose of virus. Histopathologic changes due to sublethal influenza infection, including nonsuppurative pneumonitis and necrosis, squamous metaplasia and hyperplasia of the epithelium lining the bronchi and bronchioles, were more severe in mice infected after the second of five, 1 ppm O3 exposure than in comparable air controls. Sublethal infection caused a loss of lung volume with secondary reduction in diffusing capability and homogenity of ventilation distribution. These latter two effects were also exacerbated in mice infected after the second of five, 1 ppm O3 exposures as compared to air controls. When mice were infected after the fifth, 1 ppm O3 exposure, there was no effect due to ozone on either lung wet weight or histopathology. The data indicate that O3 has little if any effect on antiviral defense mechanisms since virus titers in the lungs were not

  15. Biological indicators for radiation exposure. Thymidine concentration in human serum as 'biological dosemeter'?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The in vivo test of blood from partial and whole-body irradiated patients revealed no strict differences in radiosensitivity in correlation to the dose, only tendencies for radiation-effects. The serum thymidine concentration appeared to be also dependent on non-investigated factors, such as diseases and previous therapies. Therefore, the suitability of thymidine concentration in blood as a 'biochemical dosimeter' could not be demonstrated. (orig.)

  16. A critical review and analysis of the use of exposure- and flux-based ozone indices for predicting vegetation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musselman, Robert C.; Lefohn, Allen S.; Massman, William J.; Heath, Robert L.

    Early studies of plant response to ozone (O 3) utilized concentration-based metrics, primarily by summarizing the commonly monitored hourly average data sets. Research with the O 3 concentration parameter led to the recognition that both peak concentrations and cumulative effects are important when relating plant response to O 3. The US and Canada currently use O 3 concentration-based (exposure-based) parameters for ambient air quality standards for protecting vegetation; the European countries use exposure-based critical levels to relate O 3 to vegetation response. Because plant response is thought to be more closely related to O 3 absorbed into leaf tissue, recent research has been focused on flux-based O 3 parameters. Even though flux-based indices may appear to be more biologically relevant than concentration-based indices, there are limitations associated with their use. The current set of flux-based indices assumes that the plant has no defense mechanism to detoxify O 3. This is a serious limitation. In this paper, we review the literature on exposure- and flux-based indices for predicting plant response. Both exposure- and flux-based metrics may overestimate plant response. At this time, flux-based models that take into consideration detoxification mechanisms (referred to as effective flux) provide the best approach to relate O 3 to plant response. However, because there is considerable uncertainty in quantifying the various defense mechanisms, effective flux at this time is difficult to quantify. Without adequate effective-flux based models, exposure-based O 3 metrics appear to be the only practical measure for use in relating ambient air quality standards to vegetation response.

  17. Evaluation of chromium in red blood cells as an indicator of exposure to hexavalent chromium: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devoy, Jérôme; Géhin, Antoine; Müller, Samuel; Melczer, Mathieu; Remy, Aurélie; Antoine, Guillaume; Sponne, Isabelle

    2016-07-25

    Chromium(VI) compounds are classified as carcinogenic to humans. Whereas chromium measurements in urine and whole blood (i.e., including plasma) are indicative of recent exposure, chromium in red blood cells (RBC) is attributable specifically to Cr(VI) exposure. Before recommending Cr in RBC as a biological indicator of Cr(VI) exposure, in-vitro studies must be undertaken to assess its reliability. The present study examines the relationship between the chromium added to a blood sample and that subsequently found in the RBC. After incubation of total blood with chromium, RBC were isolated, counted and their viability assessed. Direct analysis of chromium in RBC was conducted using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. Hexavalent, but not trivalent Cr, was seen to accumulate in the RBC and we found a strong correlation between the Cr(VI) concentration added to a blood sample and the amount of Cr in RBC. This relationship appears to be independent of the chemical properties of the human blood samples (e.g., different blood donors or different reducing capacities). Even though in-vivo studies are still needed to integrate our understanding of Cr(VI) toxicokinetics, our findings reinforce the idea that a single determination of the chromium concentration in RBC would enable biomonitoring of critical cases of Cr(VI) exposure. PMID:27178267

  18. Biological correlates of child and adolescent responses to disaster exposure: a bio-ecological model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weems, Carl F

    2015-07-01

    Exposure to both human-caused and natural disasters is associated with a number of postevent reactions in youth including the experience of symptoms of several mental disorders. There is wide variability in these responses, with some youth having very intense exposure to the disaster and yet showing resilience or even personal growth, while others with low exposure sometimes show intensely negative reactions. Research findings are reviewed in this article to identify biological correlates of risk and resilience focusing on potential genetic, neurobiological, and physiological factors linked to the reactions of children exposed to disasters. A bio-ecological model is presented to couch this review of biological correlates of disaster exposure. The model predicts susceptibility to negative reactions after disaster exposure, and the biological correlates of disaster reactions can be understood in terms of this susceptibility as it relates to biological markers of the fear system. PMID:25980506

  19. Proposed experiments for assessing the potential use of skin as an indicator of sub-erythemal radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several biological systems have been developed in recent years for radiation dosimetry. They have proved to be useful in accident situations or when the result of personal dosemeter assessment is equivocal. A review of a range of biochemical and biophysical dosimetry techniques indicates that none are ideally suited for dose assessment in the sub-erythemal range (< 2 Gy) when a high non-uniform or partial body exposure is involved. This important practical situation could be met by the development of a biological dosimetry system based upon the response of skin. A programme of study has been agreed upon to investigate this possibility. A resume of a 1 year pilot study supported by the CEGB is presented, the results of which will be described in due course. (author)

  20. Evaluation of Serum, Urine, and Hair Chromium Levels as Indices of Chromium Exposure and the Relationship of these Indices to Serum Lipid and Insulin Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Janis Avril

    Concentrations of chromium (Cr) in hair, serum, and urine, and serum concentrations of insulin and lipids of a selected group of men exposed to trivalent Cr (Cr III) were compared with those of men not exposed to Cr. Seventy -three tannery workers (TW) (mean age 37 +/- 12 years) from four Southern Ontario tanneries and fifty-two control subjects (CS) (mean age 41 +/- 13 years), matched for age, race, and socioeconomic status, from the Guelph and Toronto areas participated. The median hair and serum Cr concentrations for the TW were significantly higher (p leather tanning industry, is absorbed and retained. Absorption of Cr III had no significant effect on serum insulin concentrations or serum lipid profiles. These results also suggest that concentrations of Cr in hair, serum, and urine are valid biological indices of industrial exposure to Cr III.

  1. Exposure data and risk indicators for safety performance assessment in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Eleonora; Yannis, George; Bijleveld, Frits; Cardoso, João L

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this paper is the analysis of the state-of-the-art in risk indicators and exposure data for safety performance assessment in Europe, in terms of data availability, collection methodologies and use. More specifically, the concepts of exposure and risk are explored, as well as the theoretical properties of various exposure measures used in road safety research (e.g. vehicle- and person-kilometres of travel, vehicle fleet, road length, driver population, time spent in traffic, etc.). Moreover, the existing methods for collecting disaggregate exposure data for risk estimates at national level are presented and assessed, including survey methods (e.g. travel surveys, traffic counts) and databases (e.g. national registers). A detailed analysis of the availability and quality of existing risk exposure data is also carried out. More specifically, the results of a questionnaire survey in the European countries are presented, with detailed information on exposure measures available, their possible disaggregations (i.e. variables and values), their conformity to standard definitions and the characteristics of their national collection methods. Finally, the potential of international risk comparisons is investigated, mainly through the International Data Files with exposure data (e.g. Eurostat, IRTAD, ECMT, UNECE, IRF, etc.). The results of this review confirm that comparing risk rates at international level may be a complex task, as the availability and quality of exposure estimates in European countries varies significantly. The lack of a common framework for the collection and exploitation of exposure data limits significantly the comparability of the national data. On the other hand, the International Data Files containing exposure data provide useful statistics and estimates in a systematic way and are currently the only sources allowing international comparisons of road safety performance under certain conditions. PMID:23769621

  2. Biological monitoring of child lead exposure in the Czech Republic.

    OpenAIRE

    Cikrt, M.; Smerhovsky, Z; Blaha, K; Nerudova, J.; Sediva, V; Fornuskova, H; Knotkova, J; Roth, Z; Kodl, M; Fitzgerald, E.

    1997-01-01

    The area around the Pribram lead smelter has been recognized to be heavily contaminated by lead (Pb). In the early 1970s, several episodes of livestock lead intoxication were reported in this area; thereafter, several epidemiological and ecological studies focused on exposure of children. In contrast to earlier studies, the recent investigation (1992-1994) revealed significantly lower exposure to lead. From 1986-1990, recorded average blood lead levels were about 37.2 micrograms lead (Pb)/100...

  3. Predictive modeling of nanomaterial exposure effects in biological systems

    OpenAIRE

    Liu X; Tang K.; Harper S.; Harper B; Steevens JA; Xu R

    2013-01-01

    Xiong Liu,1 Kaizhi Tang,1 Stacey Harper,2 Bryan Harper,2 Jeffery A Steevens,3 Roger Xu1 1Intelligent Automation, Inc., Rockville, MD, USA; 2Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA; 3ERDC Environmental Laboratory, Vicksburg, MS, USA Background: Predictive modeling of the biological effects of nanomaterials is critical for industry and policymakers to assess the potential ha...

  4. Biological effects from electromagnetic fields: Research progress and exposure measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although it is commonly accepted that exposure to high levels of electromagnetic, micro- and radiofrequency waves produces harmful effects to the health of man, the formulation of exposure limits is still an open process and dependent upon the evolving level of knowledge in this field. This paper surveys the current level of knowledge gained through 'in vitro' and 'in vivo' radiological and epidemiological studies on different types of electromagnetic radiation derived effects - chromosomal, mutagenic, carcinogenic. It then reviews efforts by international organizations, e. g., the International Radiation Protection Association, to establish exposure limits for radiofrequency electromagnetic fields. Brief notes are given on the electromagnetic radiation monitoring campaign being performed by public health authorities in the Lazio Region of Italy

  5. Construction of an indicator of exposure to RF fields in urban environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of a specific task of the CTN-AGF (Centro Tematico Nazionale Agenti Fisici) was the construction of an environmental indicator for the exposure to electromagnetic fields produced by Radio Frequency sources (Base Transceiver Station particularly) in urban environment. The proposed indicator is descriptive and, in the DPSIR framework, is placed among the state indicators. The steps necessary to evaluate the indicator are: - theoretical computation of the electromagnetic field strength; - analysis of the spatial distribution of the potentially exposed population; - topological overlay of the geo referred constructed data

  6. Serum-amylase - a semiquantitative indicator of exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earlier works by Kashima et al. and Chen et al. have shown that it might be possible to use the radiation induced activity changes in s-amylase as an indicator of exposure to ionizing radiation. It is the aim of our investigations to check and possibly make more precise the results these authors arrived at. (orig.)

  7. CAN FLU-LIKE ILLNESS BE AN INDICATION OF RECENT ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDE EXPOSURE IN PRESCHOOL CHILDREN?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can flu-like illness be an indication of recent organophosphate pesticide exposure in preschool children? P Mendola*, D Barr, D Walsh, S Hern, S Rhoney, L Needham, E Hilborn, M Gonzales, C Carty, G Robertson, J Creason (US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711)<...

  8. Biological markers in animals can provide information on exposure and bioavailability of environmental contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidemiologic studies of agents present in the environment seek to identify the extent to which they contribute to the causation of a specific toxic, clinical, or pathological endpoint. The multifactorial nature of disease etiology, long latency periods and the complexity of exposure, all contribute to the difficulty of establishing associations and casual relationships between a specific exposure and an adverse outcome. These barriers to studies of exposures and subsequent risk assessment cannot generally be changed. However, the appropriate use of biological markers in animal species living in a contaminated habitat can provide a measure of potential damage from that exposure and, in some instances, act as a surrogate for human environmental exposures. Quantitative predictivity of the effect of exposure to environmental pollutants is being approached by employing an appropriate array of biological end points. 34 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs

  9. Biological markers in animals can provide information on exposure and bioavailability of environmental contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shugart, L.R.; Adams, S.M.; Jimenez, B.D.; Talmage, S.S.; McCarthy, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies of agents present in the environment seek to identify the extent to which they contribute to the causation of a specific toxic, clinical, or pathological endpoint. The multifactorial nature of disease etiology, long latency periods and the complexity of exposure, all contribute to the difficulty of establishing associations and casual relationships between a specific exposure and an adverse outcome. These barriers to studies of exposures and subsequent risk assessment cannot generally be changed. However, the appropriate use of biological markers in animal species living in a contaminated habitat can provide a measure of potential damage from that exposure and, in some instances, act as a surrogate for human environmental exposures. Quantitative predictivity of the effect of exposure to environmental pollutants is being approached by employing an appropriate array of biological end points. 34 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  10. Investigation of Exposure to Formaldehyde from Preserved Biological Specimens. Status Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consumer Product Safety Commission, Washington, DC.

    This investigation of formaldehyde exposure in school laboratories, where its principal source is from preserved biological specimens, was undertaken because of concern over exposure levels reported in the literature. Information was obtained in two ways. A limited survey of schools was conducted to determine extent of students' use of preserved…

  11. Characterisation of exposure to total and hexavalent chromium of welders using biological monitoring.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheepers, P.T.J.; Heussen, G.A.; Peer, P.G.M.; Verbist, K.; Anzion, R.; Willems, J.

    2008-01-01

    Inhalation exposure to total and hexavalent chromium (TCr and HCr) was assessed by personal air sampling and biological monitoring in 53 welders and 20 references. Median inhalation exposure levels of TCr were 1.3, 6.0, and 5.4 microg/m(3) for welders of mild steel (MS, <5% alloys), high alloy st

  12. Biological monitoring of child lead exposure in the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cikrt, M; Smerhovsky, Z; Blaha, K; Nerudova, J; Sediva, V; Fornuskova, H; Knotkova, J; Roth, Z; Kodl, M; Fitzgerald, E

    1997-04-01

    The area around the Pribram lead smelter has been recognized to be heavily contaminated by lead (Pb). In the early 1970s, several episodes of livestock lead intoxication were reported in this area; thereafter, several epidemiological and ecological studies focused on exposure of children. In contrast to earlier studies, the recent investigation (1992-1994) revealed significantly lower exposure to lead. From 1986-1990, recorded average blood lead levels were about 37.2 micrograms lead (Pb)/100 ml in an elementary school population living in a neighborhood close to the smelter (within 3 km of the plant). The present study, however, has found mean blood lead levels of 11.35 micrograms/100 ml (95% CI = 9.32; 13.82) among a comparable group of children. In addition to blood lead, tooth lead was used to assess exposure among children. Statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) were observed between the geometric mean tooth lead level of 6.44 micrograms Pb/g (n = 13; 95% CI = 3.95; 10.50) in the most contaminated zone and 1.43 micrograms Pb/g (n = 35; 95% CI = 1.11; 1.84) in zones farther away from the point source. Both biomarkers, blood and tooth lead levels, reflect a similar pattern of lead exposure in children. This study has attempted a quantitative assessment of risk factors associated with elevated lead exposure in the Czech Republic. Content of lead in soil, residential distance from the smelter, consumption of locally grown vegetables or fruits, drinking water from local wells, the mother's educational level, cigarette consumption among family members, and the number of children in the family were factors positively related (p < 0.05) to blood lead levels. The resulting blood lead level was found to be inversely proportional to the child's age. PMID:9189705

  13. Soil biodiversity assessment, biological indicators and soil ecosystem services - an overview of European approaches

    OpenAIRE

    CREAMER, Rachel; Hamer, Ute; Helder, Johannes; Pelosi, Céline; Pérès, Guénola; Rutgers, Michiel

    2012-01-01

    Soil biota are essential for many soil processes and functions, yet there are increasing pressures on soil biodiversity and soil degradation remains a pertinent issue. The sustainable management of soils requires soil monitoring, including biological indicators, to be able to relate land use and management to soil functioning and ecosystem services. Since the 1990s, biological soil parameters have been assessed in an increasing number of field trials and monitoring programmes across Europe....

  14. Gene Expression Profiling of Biological Pathway Alterations by Radiation Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kuei-Fang; Weng, Julia Tzu-Ya; Hsu, Paul Wei-Che; Chi, Yu-Hsiang; Chen, Ching-Kai; Liu, Ingrid Y.; CHEN, YI-CHENG; Wu, Lawrence Shih-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    Though damage caused by radiation has been the focus of rigorous research, the mechanisms through which radiation exerts harmful effects on cells are complex and not well-understood. In particular, the influence of low dose radiation exposure on the regulation of genes and pathways remains unclear. In an attempt to investigate the molecular alterations induced by varying doses of radiation, a genome-wide expression analysis was conducted. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were collected from...

  15. MDI Biological Laboratory Arsenic Summit: Approaches to Limiting Human Exposure to Arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Bruce A; Caldwell, Kathleen; Congdon, Clare Bates; Disney, Jane; Donahue, Maria; Ferguson, Elizabeth; Flemings, Elsie; Golden, Meredith; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Highman, Jay; James, Karen; Kim, Carol; Lantz, R Clark; Marvinney, Robert G; Mayer, Greg; Miller, David; Navas-Acien, Ana; Nordstrom, D Kirk; Postema, Sonia; Rardin, Laurie; Rosen, Barry; SenGupta, Arup; Shaw, Joseph; Stanton, Elizabeth; Susca, Paul

    2015-09-01

    This report is the outcome of the meeting "Environmental and Human Health Consequences of Arsenic" held at the MDI Biological Laboratory in Salisbury Cove, Maine, August 13-15, 2014. Human exposure to arsenic represents a significant health problem worldwide that requires immediate attention according to the World Health Organization (WHO). One billion people are exposed to arsenic in food, and more than 200 million people ingest arsenic via drinking water at concentrations greater than international standards. Although the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has set a limit of 10 μg/L in public water supplies and the WHO has recommended an upper limit of 10 μg/L, recent studies indicate that these limits are not protective enough. In addition, there are currently few standards for arsenic in food. Those who participated in the Summit support citizens, scientists, policymakers, industry, and educators at the local, state, national, and international levels to (1) establish science-based evidence for setting standards at the local, state, national, and global levels for arsenic in water and food; (2) work with government agencies to set regulations for arsenic in water and food, to establish and strengthen non-regulatory programs, and to strengthen collaboration among government agencies, NGOs, academia, the private sector, industry, and others; (3) develop novel and cost-effective technologies for identification and reduction of exposure to arsenic in water; (4) develop novel and cost-effective approaches to reduce arsenic exposure in juice, rice, and other relevant foods; and (5) develop an Arsenic Education Plan to guide the development of science curricula as well as community outreach and education programs that serve to inform students and consumers about arsenic exposure and engage them in well water testing and development of remediation strategies. PMID:26231509

  16. Assessment tools for urban catchments: developing biological indicators based on benthic macroinvertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, A.H.; Bressler, D.W.; Paul, M.J.; Barbour, M.T.; Rankin, E.T.; Carter, J.L.; Resh, V.H.

    2009-01-01

    Biological indicators, particularly benthic macroinvertebrates, are widely used and effective measures of the impact of urbanization on stream ecosystems. A multimetric biological index of urbanization was developed using a large benthic macroinvertebrate dataset (n = 1,835) from the Baltimore, Maryland, metropolitan area and then validated with datasets from Cleveland, Ohio (n = 79); San Jose, California (n = 85); and a different subset of the Baltimore data (n = 85). The biological metrics used to develop the multimetric index were selected using several criteria and were required to represent ecological attributes of macroinvertebrate assemblages including taxonomic composition and richness (number of taxa in the insect orders of Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera), functional feeding group (number of taxa designated as filterers), and habit (percent of individuals which cling to the substrate). Quantile regression was used to select metrics and characterize the relationship between the final biological index and an urban gradient (composed of population density, road density, and urban land use). Although more complex biological indices exist, this simplified multimetric index showed a consistent relationship between biological indicators and urban conditions (as measured by quantile regression) in three climatic regions of the United States and can serve as an assessment tool for environmental managers to prioritize urban stream sites for restoration and protection.

  17. Qualification of a rapid readout biological indicator with moist heat sterilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Patrick; Finocchario, Catherine; Manchester, Robert; Glasgow, Louis; Costanzo, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    Biological indicators are recognized as an important component in the validation and routine monitoring of moist heat (steam) sterilization processes. Due to the need to allow for the recovery and outgrowth of test organisms that may have been sub-lethally injured, between 2-5 days of incubation are typically required before the outcome of sterilization processing can be reliably interpreted. Rapid readout biological indicators that incorporate the response of a heat resistant enzyme provide a means for assessing the efficacy of moist heat sterilization within hours of processing. This study describes the qualification of the 3M Attest 1292 Rapid Readout Biological Indicator with moist heat sterilization according to the procedures described in the PDA Technical Report No. 33, "Evaluation, Validation and Implementation of New Microbiological Testing Methods". PMID:12643504

  18. Measuring the consequences of wildfires in a Bayesian network with vulnerability and exposure indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papakosta, Panagiota; Botzler, Sebastian; Krug, Kai; Straub, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Mediterranean climate type areas have always been experiencing fire events. However, population growth and expansion of urban centers into wildland areas during the 20th century (expansion of wildland-urban interface) has increased the threat to humans and their activities. Life and property losses, damage on infrastructure and crops, and forest degradation are some of the damages caused by wildfires. Although fires repeatedly occur along the Mediterranean basin, not all areas have experienced severe consequences. The extent of damage by wildfires is influenced by several factors, such as population density, vegetation type, topography, weather conditions and social preparedness [1]. Wildfire consequence estimation by means of vulnerability and exposure indicators is an essential part of wildfire risk analysis. Vulnerability indicators express the conditions that increase the susceptibility of a site to the impact of wildfires and exposure indicators describe the elements at risk [2],[3]. Appropriate indicators to measure wildfire vulnerability and exposure can vary with scale and site. The consequences can be classified into economic, social, environmental and safety, and they can be tangible (human life losses, buildings damaged) or intangible (damage of cultural heritage site). As a consequence, a variety of approaches exist and there is a lack of generalized unified easy-to-implement methodologies. In this study we present a methodology for measuring consequences of wildfires in a Mediterranean area in the mesoscale (1 km² spatial resolution). Vulnerability and exposure indicators covering all consequence levels are identified and their interrelations are stressed. Variables such as building materials, roofing type, and average building values are included in the economic vulnerability level. Safety exposure is expressed by population density, demographic structure, street density and distance to closest fire station. Environmental vulnerability of protected

  19. Distribution of perfluoroalkyl compounds in rats: Indication for using hair as bioindicator of exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bei; He, Xin; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Huanhuan; Saito, Norimitsu; Tsuda, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    Hair analysis is potentially advantageous in exposure assessment of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) as a non-invasive method, combined with the ability to reflect long-term exposure. The present study aims to assess the feasibility of using hair as an indicator of PFAA exposure. Adult male and female rats were subchronically exposed to selected PFAAs, including perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS), for 90 days. Hair, serum, and other tissues, including liver, kidney, spleen, lung, brain and heart, as well as the urine and feces excretions, were analyzed for PFAA levels. PFOA/PFNA/PFOS were detected in rat hair in a dose-dependent manner, in the order of PFOS>PFNA>PFOA. Hair PFAA concentrations were higher in male rats than the female rats, except for PFOS at low dose. Moreover, significant positive correlations as well as similar PFAA profiles were observed between hair, serum, and other tissues. Besides, hair PFAAs were negatively correlated with the urinary excretion rate. Although the influencing factors in humans still need further investigation, the results suggested that hair is capable of reflecting PFAA exposure, and could be employed as an alternative exposure bioindicator of PFAAs. PMID:25118134

  20. Heavy-metal air pollution study using biological indicators and nuclear analytical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of industry and the increase in vehicle road traffic are responsible for the ever-growing environmental pollution by toxic elements. Some biological organisms strongly accumulate certain heavy toxic elements and thus can be considered as indicators of the environmental pollution. In this work different types of biological indicators were collected in almost all main cities and industrial zones of Vietnam. They were subsequently analysed by different modern analytical methods. The concentration of different elements and their correlation matrices may provide valuable information on the nature and sources of pollution (author)

  1. Use of dogs as indicators of metal exposure in rural and urban habitats in NW Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many different species have been used in environmental biomonitoring studies in diverse habitats including forest, farmland, and urban and sub-urban areas. However, there is little information on domestic animals living in rural or urban habitats and exposed to the same pollutants as the human population. In this connection, pets could prove to be good indicators of human metal exposure since they closely share the same environment as their owners, and are therefore exposed, at least in part, to the same pollutants. The present study investigated toxic metal exposure in dogs in NW Spain and compared metal exposures between dogs from rural and urban habitats, considering the influence of diet, sex and age. Samples of liver and kidney from 57 male and female dogs, aged between 6 months and 18 years, were collected after euthanasia at veterinary clinics. Samples were acid-digested and metal concentrations determined by ICP-MS. Geometric mean concentrations of metals in the liver and kidney (μg/kg wet weight) were 12.6 and 15.9 for arsenic, 58.0 and 175 for cadmium, 32.7 and 53.4 for mercury, and 57.7 and 23.1 respectively. Hepatic lead concentrations were significantly higher (p < 0.05) in dogs fed commercial diets than dogs fed home-made feed (32%) or a mixture of commercial and home-made feeds (95%). Mercury concentrations in the kidney were significantly higher (3-fold, p < 0.05) in dogs from urban areas than in dogs from rural areas. Cadmium levels in kidney were significantly higher (p < 0.05) in females (67%) and increased with age (p < 0.001). Although no human samples were obtained in this study and no direct correlations between dogs and human metal exposure have been conducted, given our results pets could be suggested as surrogate indicators of human metal exposure

  2. Use of dogs as indicators of metal exposure in rural and urban habitats in NW Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Alonso, M. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Departamento de Patoloxia Animal, Facultade de Veterinaria, 27002 Lugo (Spain)]. E-mail: mlalonso@usc.es; Miranda, M. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Departamento de Ciencias Clinicas Veterinarias, Facultade de Veterinaria, 27002 Lugo (Spain); Garcia-Partida, P. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Departamento de Patologia Animal II, Facultad de Veterinaria, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Cantero, F. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Departamento de Patoloxia Animal, Facultade de Veterinaria, 27002 Lugo (Spain); Hernandez, J. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Departamento de Patoloxia Animal, Facultade de Veterinaria, 27002 Lugo (Spain); Benedito, J.L. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Departamento de Patoloxia Animal, Facultade de Veterinaria, 27002 Lugo (Spain)

    2007-01-01

    Many different species have been used in environmental biomonitoring studies in diverse habitats including forest, farmland, and urban and sub-urban areas. However, there is little information on domestic animals living in rural or urban habitats and exposed to the same pollutants as the human population. In this connection, pets could prove to be good indicators of human metal exposure since they closely share the same environment as their owners, and are therefore exposed, at least in part, to the same pollutants. The present study investigated toxic metal exposure in dogs in NW Spain and compared metal exposures between dogs from rural and urban habitats, considering the influence of diet, sex and age. Samples of liver and kidney from 57 male and female dogs, aged between 6 months and 18 years, were collected after euthanasia at veterinary clinics. Samples were acid-digested and metal concentrations determined by ICP-MS. Geometric mean concentrations of metals in the liver and kidney ({mu}g/kg wet weight) were 12.6 and 15.9 for arsenic, 58.0 and 175 for cadmium, 32.7 and 53.4 for mercury, and 57.7 and 23.1 respectively. Hepatic lead concentrations were significantly higher (p < 0.05) in dogs fed commercial diets than dogs fed home-made feed (32%) or a mixture of commercial and home-made feeds (95%). Mercury concentrations in the kidney were significantly higher (3-fold, p < 0.05) in dogs from urban areas than in dogs from rural areas. Cadmium levels in kidney were significantly higher (p < 0.05) in females (67%) and increased with age (p < 0.001). Although no human samples were obtained in this study and no direct correlations between dogs and human metal exposure have been conducted, given our results pets could be suggested as surrogate indicators of human metal exposure.

  3. A guide to the biological indicators of the watercourses of the Province of Viterbo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    European legislation recognised to biological indicators a main role among the instruments for the evaluation of the ecological status of fresh running waters (Water Framework Directive 2000/60/EC). The analysis of the communities of different biological components, such as Diatoms, Macrophytes, Macro invertebrates and Fishes, can provide an approach at ecosystem level, essential for a correct interpretation of river conditions. Therefore, it is fundamental to provide useful instruments for the taxonomic identification of the aquatic organisms. The Viterbo Province has a long time activity in this context, through the organisation of several events focused on training courses and dissemination. This work, even if preliminary, provides a scheme of Atlas of Biological Indicators of running waters, available for all stake holders, and that could represent a stepping stone for the future realization of guides at national level

  4. The radioinduced membranes injuries as biological dose indicators: mechanisms of studies and practical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After an accidental overexposure, the assessment of the received dose in biological dosimetry is performed by a method based on the effects of irradiation on the DNA molecule. But this technique shows some limitations; therefore we tried to find new bio-sensors of radiation exposure. We have pointed out that membrane is a critical target of ionising radiation after an in vitro and in vivo overexposure. In vitro, these modifications were involved in the radio-induced apoptotic pathway. The measure of membrane fluidity allowed us to obtain an overall view of cellular membrane. Moreover, in vivo, by changing the lipid nutritional status of animals, our results displayed the important role played by membrane lipid composition in radio-induced membrane alterations. Besides, membrane effects were adjusted by the extracellular physiological control, and in particular by the damages on membrane fatty acid pattern. Finally, we have tested the use of membrane fluidity index as a bio-sensor of radiation exposure on in vivo models and blood samples from medical total body irradiated patients. The results achieved on animal models suggested that the membrane fluidity index was a bio-sensor of radiation exposure. Nevertheless, the observations realised on patients highlight that the effect of the first dose fraction of the radiotherapy treatment had some difficulties to be noticed. Indeed, the combined treatment: chemotherapy and radiotherapy disturbed the membrane fluidity index measures. To conclude, whereas this parameter was not a bio-sensor of irradiation exposure usable in biological dosimetry, it may allow us to assess the radio-induced damages and their cellular but also tissue impacts. (author)

  5. Phytoecological indicators for biological recultivation of soils polluted with oil in the Absheron peninsula

    OpenAIRE

    E. M. Gurbanov; A. A. Akhundova

    2009-01-01

    Phytoecological indicators of polluted soils of Amirov Oil-and-Gas Production Department (Garadag district, Baku) were studied. Phytocenological and biomorphological analysis of flora was done with the aim of further biological rehabilitation of Absheron peninsula. Oil products (black oil, boring waters, etc.) pollution turns the plant cover into a dead mass. Decontamination of soil and rehabilitation of microbial community improve the soil’s fertility. Wild and cultured plant indicators may ...

  6. Radiation exposure and the woman worker: biological and legal parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interpretation of federal and state legislation and regulations concerning the radiation protection of women in the workplace has not been a clear and straightforward procedure. On one hand, the safety of all workers, independent of sex, imposes a specific directive for the enforcement of working standards in general. On the other hand, must allowance be made in setting radiation standards for the particular biological characteristics of workers, some of whom are women. Title VII of the Civil Rights Act provides equal employment opportunity for women and is now being enforced. All legal questions aside, men and women are decidedly different in one aspect; only women can conceive and carry a fetus and studies have shown that, in humans, the most radiosensitive stage of the fetus is during the first trimester of pregnancy. Possible legal and socio-economic aspects of questions posed by the employment of women by the nuclear industry are considered

  7. Associations of dietary indices with biomarkers of dietary exposure and cardiovascular status among adolescents in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Truthmann Julia

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adolescence is an important life stage for the development of dietary preferences and health behaviour. Longitudinal studies indicated that cardiovascular status in adolescence predicts cardiovascular risk marker values in adulthood. Several diet quality indices for adolescents have been developed in the past, but literature concerning associations between indices and biomarkers of dietary exposure and cardiovascular status is rather sparse. Hence, the aim of this study was to analyse associations of dietary indices with biomarkers of dietary exposure and cardiovascular status. Methods For the present analysis, data from the German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents (KiGGS 2003–2006 were used. The analysis included 5,198 adolescents, aged 12 to 17 years. The Healthy Food Diversity Index (HFD, the Healthy Nutrition Score for Kids and Youth (HuSKY, the Indicator Food Index (IFI and a simple fruit/vegetable intake index were derived from food frequency questionnaire information to indicate a healthy diet. Adjusted mean values for homocysteine, uric acid, CRP, total cholesterol, HDL-C, ferritin, HbA1c, folate, vitamin B12 and BMI were calculated using complex-samples general linear models for quintiles of the different indices. Furthermore, the agreement in ranking between the different indices was calculated by weighted kappa. All statistical analyses were conducted for boys and girls separately, and were adjusted for potential confounders. Results Folate was positively associated with the HFD, the HuSKY, and fruit/vegetable intake for both boys and girls and with IFI for boys. Among girls, positive associations were seen between vitamin B12 and the IFI and between diastolic blood pressure and the IFI as well as fruit/vegetable intake. A negative association was found between homocysteine and the HFD, the HuSKY, and the IFI for both boys and girls and with fruit/vegetable intake for boys

  8. Biological risk at work in Italy: results from theNational Register of Occupational Exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarselli, Alberto; Vonesch, Nicoletta; Melis, Paola; Massari, Stefania; Tomao, Paola; Marinaccio, Alessandro; Iavicoli, Sergio

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the information on workers and exposures to biological agents in Italy, collected by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Prevention in the period 1994-2008 on the basis of a regulation. Employers are asked to identify the biological agents and to report data on employees exposed to biological hazards. Biological agents included in the system belong to risk group 3 and 4 of the European Union classification, and are grouped by family and transmission type. Data analyzed in this study regard 90 firms (28% in "Laboratory analysis clinics" economic activity) and 2,194 workers exposed to biological agents in the period 1994-2008. The most frequent biological agent reported is Salmonella typhi, while the one which counted more exposures is Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Nonetheless the incompleteness of Italian legislative framework about "exposure registers" to biological agents in the workplace, the identification of large groups of workers "at risk" can contribute to undertake epidemiological studies aimed at the prevention of occupational infection diseases. PMID:20562513

  9. Delay of hair regrowth in mice as a possible biological dosimeter on the skin in case of over exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The delay of hair regrowth of mice after irradiation was examined to investigate its possibility as a biological dosimeter in the cases of localized over exposure. Hairs on the dorsal skin of mice were shaved and irradiated with a 90Sr/90Y β-ray source in early anagen or midanagen stage of hair cycle. Skin doses were 0.5-10 Gy and 1-4 Gy, respectively. Hair regrowth was observed with a scaling loupe. Hair regrowth delay was dose dependent, fitting the linear-quadratic function and the linear function according to the stages of hair. Histological observations indicated that the hair matrix cells death was the main cause of hair regrowth delay in the midanagen stage. Dose estimation functions, derived from the dose-effect relationship curves, could be applied for the dosimetry of the skin over exposure. It could detect a dose over 1 Gy, and as early as a few days after the exposure. (author)

  10. The relationship between environmental monitoring and biological markers in exposure assessment.

    OpenAIRE

    Rappaport, S. M.; Symanski, E.; Yager, J W; Kupper, L L

    1995-01-01

    The poor quality of traditional assessments of exposure has encouraged epidemiologists to explore biological monitoring in studies of chronic diseases. Yet, despite theoretical advantages, biomarkers have not been widely used in such applications. This article compares the general utility of a biomarker with that of the measurement of exposure per se. Points are illustrated with a longitudinal study of boat workers in which levels of styrene in the breathing zone and in exhaled air were compa...

  11. Biological dosimetry following exposure to neutrons in a criticality accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindholm, C. (Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, STUK (Finland)); Wojcik, A. (Stockholm Univ. (SU), Stockholm (Sweden)); Jaworska, A. (Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA) (Norway))

    2011-01-15

    The aim of the BIONCA project was to implement cytogenetic techniques for biodosimetry purposes in the Nordic countries. The previous NKS-funded biodosimetry activities (BIODOS and BIOPEX) concentrated on experiments using gamma-irradiation and on developing the PCC ring assay for biodosimetry. Experiments conducted during the present BIONCA project has broadened the biodosimetry capacity of the Nordic countries to include dose estimation of exposure to neutrons for both PCC ring and dicentric chromosome techniques. In 2009, experiments were conducted for establishing both PCC ring and dicentric dose calibration curves. Neutron irradiation of human whole blood obtained from two volunteers was conducted in the Netherlands at the Petten reactor. Cell cultures and analysis of whole blood exposed to eight doses between 0 and 10 Gy were performed for both techniques. For the dicentric assay, excellent uniformity in dose calibration for data from both SU and STUK was observed. For PCC rings, the SU and STUK curves were not equally congruent, probably due to the less uniform scoring criteria. However, both curves displayed strong linearity throughout the dose range. In 2010, an exercise was conducted to simulate a criticality accident and to test the validity of the established dose calibration curves. For accident simulation, 16 blood samples were irradiated in Norway at the Kjeller reactor and analysed for dose estimation with both assays. The results showed that, despite a different com-position of the radiation beams in Petten and Kjeller, good dose estimates were obtained. The activity has provided good experience on collaboration required in radiation emergency situations where the biodosimetry capacity and resources of one laboratory may be inadequate. In this respect, the project has strengthened the informal network between the Nordic countries: STUK, the Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, NRPA, the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority and SU

  12. Quercetin Improved Biological Membrane Integrity and Decreased Protein Oxidation as Induced in Rats by Ionizing Radiation Exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After radiation exposure at certain levels, harmful changes in the living cell metabolic activities may occur. These changes include oxidation of lipid and protein as well as membrane permeability disorders. Gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT) is recently believed to be important in protecting against oxidative stress and is considered as good indicator of it. In the present study Spague Dawely rats (140-150 g) were exposed to whole body gamma irradiation (shot dose, 5 Gy), samples of blood and liver were taken 1 and 10 days post exposure. Quercetin (pentahydroxy flavone) presented in most vegetables, was administered orally (1.064 mmol/kg body wt.)up to 10 days before radiation exposure to evaluate its anti oxidative role. he data revealed serious effects of radiation exposure on the membrane integrity as reflected by increased serum potassium associated with decreased sodium levels. Oxidation of lipid and protein with antioxidant disorders were recorded after radiation exposure as reflected by increased contents of malondialdehyde, carbonyl and GGT activity. Quercetin administration before radiation exposure attenuated the harmful effects of irradiation in the most chosen parameters. The beneficial role of quercetin may be related to its ability in quenching free radicals and scavenging reactive oxygen species thus improving regeneration in the biological tissues

  13. Biological effects of in vitro THz radiation exposure in human foetal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Amicis, Andrea; Sanctis, Stefania De; Cristofaro, Sara Di; Franchini, Valeria; Lista, Florigio; Regalbuto, Elisa; Giovenale, Emilio; Gallerano, Gian Piero; Nenzi, Paolo; Bei, Roberto; Fantini, Massimo; Benvenuto, Monica; Masuelli, Laura; Coluzzi, Elisa; Cicia, Cristina; Sgura, Antonella

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, terahertz (THz) radiation has been widely used in a variety of applications: medical, security, telecommunications and military areas. However, few data are available on the biological effects of this type of electromagnetic radiation and the reported results, using different genetic or cellular assays, are quite discordant. This multidisciplinary study focuses on potential genotoxic and cytotoxic effects, evaluated by several end-points, associated with THz radiation. For this purpose, in vitro exposure of human foetal fibroblasts to low frequency THz radiation (0.1-0.15THz) was performed using a Compact Free Electron Laser. We did not observe an induction of DNA damage evaluated by Comet assay, phosphorylation of H2AX histone or telomere length modulation. In addiction, no induction of apoptosis or changes in pro-survival signalling proteins were detected. Moreover, our results indicated an increase in the total number of micronuclei and centromere positive micronuclei induction evaluated by CREST analysis, indicating that THz radiation could induce aneugenic rather than clastogenic effects, probably leading to chromosome loss. Furthermore, an increase of actin polymerization observed by ultrastructural analysis after THz irradiation, supports the hypothesis that an abnormal assembly of spindle proteins could lead to the observed chromosomal malsegregation. PMID:26520385

  14. Evaluation of Bacillus oleronius as a Biological Indicator for Terminal Sterilization of Large-Volume Parenterals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Masamitsu; Fujifuru, Masato; Okada, Aki; Takai, Katsuya; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Udagawa, Takeshi; Miyake, Makoto; Naruyama, Shintaro; Tokuda, Hiroshi; Nishioka, Goro; Yoden, Hikaru; Aoki, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    In the production of large-volume parenterals in Japan, equipment and devices such as tanks, pipework, and filters used in production processes are exhaustively cleaned and sterilized, and the cleanliness of water for injection, drug materials, packaging materials, and manufacturing areas is well controlled. In this environment, the bioburden is relatively low, and less heat resistant compared with microorganisms frequently used as biological indicators such as Geobacillus stearothermophilus (ATCC 7953) and Bacillus subtilis 5230 (ATCC 35021). Consequently, the majority of large-volume parenteral solutions in Japan are manufactured under low-heat sterilization conditions of F0 <2 min, so that loss of clarity of solutions and formation of degradation products of constituents are minimized. Bacillus oleronius (ATCC 700005) is listed as a biological indicator in "Guidance on the Manufacture of Sterile Pharmaceutical Products Produced by Terminal Sterilization" (guidance in Japan, issued in 2012). In this study, we investigated whether B. oleronius is an appropriate biological indicator of the efficacy of low-heat, moist-heat sterilization of large-volume parenterals. Specifically, we investigated the spore-forming ability of this microorganism in various cultivation media and measured the D-values and z-values as parameters of heat resistance. The D-values and z-values changed depending on the constituents of large-volume parenteral products. Also, the spores from B. oleronius showed a moist-heat resistance that was similar to or greater than many of the spore-forming organisms isolated from Japanese parenteral manufacturing processes. Taken together, these results indicate that B. oleronius is suitable as a biological indicator for sterility assurance of large-volume parenteral solutions subjected to low-heat, moist-heat terminal sterilization. PMID:26889054

  15. Determination of platinum in blood and urine as a tool for the biological monitoring of internal exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Karl H.; Angerer, Juergen; Alt, Friedrich; Messerschmidt, Juergen; Weber, Andreas

    1993-03-01

    The increased industrial use of platinum has led to a growing need for the determination of platinum levels in biological materials. Concern about the release of toxic material from catalytic converters in motor vehicles in the environment and about occupational platinum exposure of employees working in the assembly of motor vehicle catalyzers and recycling led us to establish background and internal exposure levels in human body fluids. The development of an analytical procedure, based on adsorptive voltammetry with an extremely high power of detection (2 pg Pt absolute) for the determination in body fluids made population studies reliable and practicable. The methods are described and the reliability criteria are presented. For 13 not occupationally exposed persons the platinum levels ranged in urine from recycling of platinum containing catalysts showed much higher platinum levels ranging from 10 - 2900 ng/l urine, 2 - 180 ng/l blood and 4 - 280 ng/l plasma. This was in agreement with the external exposure levels, which exceeded the German MAK value of 2 (mu) g/m3. Platinum concentrations in human biological materials seem to be suitable as internal exposure indicators.

  16. The use of biological indicators in radiosterilisation: I. Bacillus pumilus E 601

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effective use of biological indicators in radiosterilisation designed by the French Pharmacopeia has been proved in several installations using accelerated electrons or γ-rays. No difference in efficacy has been noted in relation with the delivery of doses applied. The different possibilities opened up by these techniques, as well as the interpretation of the results obtained, are detailed, taking into account a four years experiment by the Hospitals' Central Pharmacy and its recent appointment as National Reference Laboratory

  17. Environmental Assessment of Streams: Linking Land Use, Instream Stressors, and Biological Indices to Infer Likely Causes of Ecological Impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Vander Laan, Jacob J.

    2012-01-01

    To protect and restore the biological integrity of streams, we need to be able to both detect biological degradation and infer likely causes of impairment. Managers often use biological indices to measure biological condition and detect degradation. However, the ability to detect degradation can be limited by the performance of the indices we develop. Index performance varies widely, but the sources of this variation are often unclear. In addition, although bioassessments are useful tools for...

  18. Influence of TACE combined with radioactive seed radiotherapy on primary liver cancer patients’ malignant biological indicators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Liu; Yu Wang; Guang-Yan Lei; Xiao-Hong Yan; Qiao Yang; Hai-Ping Zhu; Yi Geng

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the influence of TACE combined with radioactive seed radiotherapy on primary liver cancer patients’ malignant biological indicators.Methods:A total of 112 cases of primary liver cancer patients who received treatment in our hospital, Xijing Hospital and Tumor Hospital of Shaanxi Province were chosen as research subjects and divided into control group (TACE therapy alone) with 63 cases in it and observation group (TACE combined with radioactive seed radiotherapy) with 49 cases according to different treatment, and then the levels of malignant biological indicators after 2 months of treatment were compared between two groups.Results:Serum VEGF, FGF and MMP levels of observation group after treatment were significantly lower than those of control group; serum AFP-L3, GP73, Sb7-H3, AFU and CatS levels were significantly lower than those of control group; serum ICAM-1, ESM-1 and uPA levels were lower than those of control group.Conclusion: TACE combined with radioactive seed radiotherapy can effectively reduce primary liver cancer patients’ serum malignant biological indicator levels, decrease the degree of malignancy of cancer cells and slow disease progression, and is an ideal treatment.

  19. Biological dose estimation of partial body exposures in cervix cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present, unstable chromosome aberrations analysis in peripheral blood lymphocytes is the most sensitive method to provide a biological estimation of the dose in accidental radiation over exposures. The assessment of the dose is particularly reliable in cases of acute, uniform, whole-body exposures or after irradiation of large parts of the body. However, the scenarios of most radiation accidents result in partial-body exposures or non-uniform dose distribution, leading to a differential exposure of lymphocytes in the body. Inhomogeneity produces a yield of dicentrics, which does not conform to a Poisson distribution, but is generally over dispersed. This arises because those lymphocytes in tissues outside the radiation field will not be damaged. Most of the lymphocytes (80 %) belong to the 'redistributional pool' (lymphatic tissues and other organs) and made recirculate into peripheral blood producing a mixed irradiated and unirradiated population of lymphocytes. So-called over dispersion, with a variance greater than the mean, can be taken as an indication of non-uniform exposure. The main factors operating in vivo partial-body irradiation may be the location and size of the irradiation field and, at high doses, various cellular reactions such as reduced blast transformation, mitotic delay or interphase death may contribute. For partial-body exposures, mathematical-statistical analysis of chromosome aberration data can be performed to derive a dose estimate for the irradiated fraction of the body, been more realistic than to quote a mean equivalent uniform whole body dose. The 'Contaminated Poisson' method of Dolphin or the Qdr method of Sasaki, both based on similar principles, can achieve this. Contaminated Poisson considers the over dispersed distribution of dicentrics among all the cells scored. The observed distribution is considered to be the sum of a Poisson distribution, which represents the irradiated fraction of the body, and the remaining unexposed

  20. Phytoecological indicators for biological recultivation of soils polluted with oil in the Absheron peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Gurbanov

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Phytoecological indicators of polluted soils of Amirov Oil-and-Gas Production Department (Garadag district,Baku were studied. Phytocenological and biomorphological analysis of flora was done with the aim of further biological rehabilitation of Absheron peninsula. Oil products (black oil, boring waters, etc. pollution turns the plant cover into a dead mass. Decontamination of soil and rehabilitation of microbial community improve the soil’s fertility. Wild and cultured plant indicators may be used in biopurification of the soils polluted with oil products. Sowing of the fodder crops followed by the technical remediation forms the clean areas of higher productivity.

  1. Integration of biological monitoring, environmental monitoring and computational modelling into the interpretation of pesticide exposure data: introduction to a proposed approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colosio, Claudio; Rubino, Federico M; Alegakis, Athanasios; Ariano, Eugenio; Brambilla, Gabri; Mandic-Rajcevic, Stefan; Metruccio, Francesca; Minoia, Claudio; Moretto, Angelo; Somaruga, Chiara; Tsatsakis, Aristidis; Turci, Roberta; Vellere, Francesca

    2012-08-13

    Open field, variability of climatic and working conditions, and the use of complex mixtures of pesticides makes biological and environmental monitoring in agriculture, and therefore risk assessment and management, very complicated. A need of pointing out alternative risk assessment approaches, not necessarily based on measures, but simple, user-friendly and reliable, feasible also in the less advanced situations and in particular in small size enterprises, arises. This aim can be reached through a combination of environmental monitoring, biological monitoring and computational modelling. We have used this combination of methods for the creation of "exposure and risk profiles" to be applied in specific exposure scenarios, and we have tested this approach on a sample of Italian rice and maize herbicide applicators. We have given specific "toxicity scores" to the different products used and we have identified, for each of the major working phases, that is mixing and loading, spraying, maintenance and cleaning of equipment, the main variables affecting exposure and inserted them into a simple algorithm, able to produce "exposure indices". Based on the combination of toxicity indices and exposure indices it is possible to obtain semiquantitative estimates of the risk levels experienced by the workers in the exposure scenarios considered. Results of operator exposure data collected under real-life conditions can be used to validate and refine the algorithms; moreover, the AOEL derived from pre-marketing studies can be combined to estimate tentative biological exposure limits for pesticides, useful to perform individual risk assessment based on technical surveys and on simple biological monitoring. A proof of principle example of this approach is the subject of this article. PMID:21903154

  2. State-of-the-art exposure chamber for highly controlled and reproducible THz biological effects studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerna, Cesario Z.; Elam, David P.; Echchgadda, Ibtissam; Sloan, Mark A.; Wilmink, Gerald J.

    2014-03-01

    Terahertz (THz) imaging and sensing technologies are increasingly being used at international airports for security screening purposes and at major medical centers for cancer and burn diagnosis. The emergence of new THz applications has directly resulted in an increased interest regarding the biological effects associated with this frequency range. Knowledge of THz biological effects is also desired for the safe use of THz systems, identification of health hazards, and development of empirically-based safety standards. In this study, we developed a state-of-the-art exposure chamber that allowed for highly controlled and reproducible studies of THz biological effects. This innovative system incorporated an industry grade cell incubator system that permitted a highly controlled exposure environment, where temperatures could be maintained at 37 °C +/- 0.1 °C, carbon dioxide (CO2) levels at 5% +/- 0.1%, and relative humidity (RH) levels at 95% +/- 1%. To maximize the THz power transmitted to the cell culture region inside the humid incubator, a secondary custom micro-chamber was fabricated and incorporated into the system. This micro-chamber shields the THz beam from the incubator environment and could be nitrogen-purged to eliminate water absorption effects. Additionally, a microscope that allowed for real-time visualization of the live cells before, during, and after THz exposure was integrated into the exposure system.

  3. Biological effects of repeated exposure of beagle dogs to relatively insoluble aerosols of 144Ce. IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This experiment is being conducted to study the behavior and long-term biological effects in Beagle dogs of 144Ce inhaled in fused aluminosilicate particles in repeated inhalation exposures for comparison with similar data from dogs that were exposed only once to a similar aerosol. Four groups of nine dogs each were exposed once every eight weeks for two years (13 exposures) to achieve specified exposure goals. The 144Ce-exposed dogs received increasing or relatively constant beta radiation dose rates in contrast to the steadily decreasing dose rate seen after a single inhalation exposure. Exposures in the first and second groups were planned to yield a cumulative absorbed dose to lung of approximately equal to 35,000 rads and those in the third group approximately equal to 17,000 rads within two years after the first exposure. Singly exposed dogs that had died with pulmonary tumors when this experiment was initiated had cumulative doses to death of 29,000 to 61,000 rads. All 13 exposures have been completed. One dog in the 4.5-μCi 144Ce/kg body weight group died at 771 days after first exposure with emaciation, adrenal cortical degeneration and bone marrow aplasia. One control dog died accidentally during anesthesia. During the past year, two additional dogs have died. One dog in the repeated 2.5-μCi 144Ce/kg body weight group died at 1256 days after the first exposure with radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis and a control dog died at 1052 days with autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The remaining 32 dogs appear to be in good physical condition except for a persistent lymphopenia at approximately equal to 4 years after the first exposure. They are being maintained for life span observations

  4. Indicators of Club Management Practices and Biological Measurements of Patrons’ Drug and Alcohol Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Hilary F.; Miller, Brenda A.; Johnson, Mark B.; Voas, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Electronic Music Dance Events in nightclubs attract patrons with heavy alcohol/drug use. Public health concerns are raised from risks related to these behaviors. Practices associated with increased risk in these club settings need to be identified. Objectives The relationship between club management practices and biological measures of patrons’ alcohol/drug use is examined. Methods Observational data from 25 events across 6 urban clubs were integrated with survey data (N=738 patrons, 42.8% female) from patrons exiting these events, 2010–2012. Five indicators of club management practices were examined using mixed model regressions: club security, bar crowding, safety signs, serving intoxicated patrons, and isolation. Results Analyses revealed that serving intoxicated patrons and safety signs were related to less substance use. Specifically, serving intoxicated patrons was related to heavy alcohol and drug use at exit, while safety signs were marginally related to less exit drug use. Conclusions/Importance Findings indicate observable measures in nightclubs provide important indicators for alcohol/drug use, suggesting practices to target. Study strengths include the use of biological measures of substance use on a relatively large scale. Limitations and future directions are discussed. PMID:24832721

  5. Application of Benchmark Dose (BMD) in Estimating Biological Exposure Limit (BEL) to Cadmium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To estimate the biological exposure limit (BEL) using benchmark dose (BMD) based on two sets of data from occupational epidemiology. Methods Cadmium-exposed workers were selected from a cadmium smelting factory and a zinc product factory. Doctors, nurses or shop assistants living in the same area served as a control group. Urinary cadmium (UCd) was used as an exposure biomarker and urinary β2-microgloburin (B2M), N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) and albumin (ALB) as effect biomarkers. All urine parameters were adjusted by urinary creatinine. Software of BMDS (Version 1.3.2, EPA.U.S.A) was used to calculate BMD. Results The cut-off point (abnormal values) was determined based on the upper limit of 95% of effect biomarkers in control group. There was a significant dose response relationship between the effect biomarkers (urinary B2M, NAG, and ALB) and exposure biomarker (UCd). BEL value was 5 μg/g creatinine for UB2M as an effect biomarker, consistent with the recommendation of WHO. BEL could be estimated by using the method of BMD. BEL value was 3 μg/g creatinine for UNAG as an effect biomarker. The more sensitive the used biomarker is, the more occupational population will be protected. Conclusion BMD can be used in estimating the biological exposure limit (BEL). UNAG is a sensitive biomarker for estimating BEL after cadmium exposure.

  6. Effects of temperature and relative humidity on biological indicators used for ethylene oxide sterilization.

    OpenAIRE

    Oxborrow, G. S.; Placencia, A M; Danielson, J W

    1983-01-01

    A study was made to determine the effects of temperature and moisture on the D-value of a common biological indicator. Relative humidity (RH) was varied between 10 and 70% in increments of 10%, and temperature was varied between 30 and 70 degrees C in increments of 10 degrees C. Temperature was found to have a pronounced effect on the D-value. At 60% RH, the D-value varied from 15.0 min at 30 degrees C to 1.1 min at 70 degrees C. When RH was plotted against the average D-value at the various ...

  7. Assessing Ecological Impacts of Shrimp and Sewage Effluent: Biological Indicators with Standard Water Quality Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. B.; O'Donohue, M. J.; Udy, J.; Dennison, W. C.

    2001-01-01

    Despite evidence linking shrimp farming to several cases of environmental degradation, there remains a lack of ecologically meaningful information about the impacts of effluent on receiving waters. The aim of this study was to determine the biological impact of shrimp farm effluent, and to compare and distinguish its impacts from treated sewage effluent. Analyses included standard water quality/sediment parameters, as well as biological indicators including tissue nitrogen (N) content, stable isotope ratio of nitrogen (δ 15N), and amino acid composition of inhabitant seagrasses, mangroves and macroalgae. The study area consisted of two tidal creeks, one receiving effluent from a sewage treatment plant and the other from an intensive shrimp farm. The creeks discharged into the western side of Moreton Bay, a sub-tropical coastal embayment on the east coast of Australia. Characterization of water quality revealed significant differences between the creeks, and with unimpacted eastern Moreton Bay. The sewage creek had higher concentrations of dissolved nutrients (predominantly NO-3/NO-2 and PO3-4, compared to NH+4 in the shrimp creek). In contrast, the shrimp creek was more turbid and had higher phytoplankton productivity. Beyond 750 m from the creek mouths, water quality parameters were indistinguishable from eastern Moreton Bay values. Biological indicators detected significant impacts up to 4 km beyond the creek mouths (reference site). Elevated plant δ 15N values ranged from 10·4-19·6‰ at the site of sewage discharge to 2·9-4·5‰ at the reference site. The free amino acid concentration and composition of seagrass and macroalgae was used to distinguish between the uptake of sewage and shrimp derived N. Proline (seagrass) and serine (macroalgae) were high in sewage impacted plants and glutamine (seagrass) and alanine (macroalgae) were high in plants impacted by shrimp effluent. The δ 15N isotopic signatures and free amino acid composition of inhabitant

  8. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of fission neutrons and gamma rays at occupational exposure levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pathologic consequences of exposure to 60 equal once-weekly doses of fission neutron or 60Co gamma rays have been subjected to dose-response analyses for the purposes of generating relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for the major causes of death of for tumor occurrences. Cumulative probabilities of death or occurrence were generated for 15 categories of neoplastic disease for the time interval of 800--999 days since first exposure. These probabilities were developed for each dose, sex, and radiation quality, and a dose-response analysis was applied to derive linear risk coefficients of death or occurrence. 40 refs., 16 figs., 9 tabs

  9. Assessing isocyanate exposures in polyurethane industry sectors using biological and air monitoring methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creely, K S; Hughson, G W; Cocker, J; Jones, K

    2006-08-01

    Isocyanates, as a chemical group, are considered to be the biggest cause of occupational asthma in the UK. Monitoring of airborne exposures to total isocyanate is costly, requiring considerable expertise, both in terms of sample collection and chemical analysis and cannot be used to assess the effectiveness of protection from wearing respiratory protective equipment (RPE). Biological monitoring by analysis of metabolites in urine can be a relatively simple and inexpensive way to assess exposure to isocyanates. It may also be a useful way to evaluate the effectiveness of control measures in place. In this study biological and inhalation monitoring were undertaken to assess exposure in a variety of workplaces in the non-motor vehicle repair sector. Companies selected to participate in the survey included only those judged to be using good working practices when using isocyanate formulations. This included companies that used isocyanates to produce moulded polyurethane products, insulation material and those involved in industrial painting. Air samples were collected by personal monitoring and were analysed for total isocyanate content. Urine samples were collected soon after exposure and analysed for the metabolites of different isocyanate species, allowing calculation of the total metabolite concentration. Details of the control measures used and observed contamination of exposed skin were also recorded. A total of 21 companies agreed to participate in the study, with exposure measurements being collected from 22 sites. The airborne isocyanate concentrations were generally very low (range 0.0005-0.066 mg m(-3)). A total of 50 of the 70 samples were polyurethane foam insulation (0.023 mg m(-3)). The most commonly detected isocyanate in the urine was hexamethylene diisocyanate, which was detected in 21 instances. The geometric mean total isocyanate metabolite concentration for the dataset was 0.29 micromol mol(-1) creatinine (range 0.05-12.64 micromol mol(-1

  10. Somatic mutation in peripheral blood lymphocytes among Metro Manila residents: indicator of exposure to environmental pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of a four-year study on somatic mutation in peripheral blood lymphocytes among Metro Manila residents as an indicator of exposure to environmental pollution conducted by the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) is presented. The study which involves mutation indexing of 200 blood donors demonstrated very strong correlation between high levels of ambient air pollution and increase incidence of mutation at the specific gene locus in peripheral blood lymphocytes among residents of specific areas in Metro Manila. Using the PNRI adapted protocol to determine incidence of mutation at a specific gene marker, hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT), our database analysis indicated a statistically significant difference between mean mutation index of blood donors residing in an area with lower level of pollution (Las Pinas) compared to those residents living in areas with the highest estimated pollution level (Valenzuela). The results of the statistical analyses should provide regulators the direction in incorporating the data into their pollution abatement program to maximize health impact. Biomarker analysis should play a greater role in the future in the formulation of national environment policies. The temporal variation of these ''aseline data'' as the Philippine moves forward through the next several years in its industrialization program should in itself be a very valuable source of environmental policy instruments. (Author)

  11. Investigation of human exposure to triclocarban after showering, and preliminary evaluation of its biological effects

    OpenAIRE

    Schebb, Nils Helge; Inceoglu, Bora; Ahn, Ki Chang; Morisseau, Christophe; Gee, Shirley; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2011-01-01

    The antibacterial soap additive triclocarban (TCC) is widely used in personal care products. TCC has a high environmental persistence. We developed and validated a sensitive online solid phase extraction-LC-MS/MS method to rapidly analyze TCC and its major metabolites in urine and other biological samples to assess human exposure. We measured human urine concentrations 0–72 h after showering with a commercial bar soap containing 0.6% TCC. The major route of renal elimination was excretion as ...

  12. Variance partitioning of stream diatom, fish, and invertebrate indicators of biological condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuellig, Robert E.; Carlisle, Daren M.; Meador, Michael R.; Potapova, Marina

    2012-01-01

    Stream indicators used to make assessments of biological condition are influenced by many possible sources of variability. To examine this issue, we used multiple-year and multiple-reach diatom, fish, and invertebrate data collected from 20 least-disturbed and 46 developed stream segments between 1993 and 2004 as part of the US Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment Program. We used a variance-component model to summarize the relative and absolute magnitude of 4 variance components (among-site, among-year, site × year interaction, and residual) in indicator values (observed/expected ratio [O/E] and regional multimetric indices [MMI]) among assemblages and between basin types (least-disturbed and developed). We used multiple-reach samples to evaluate discordance in site assessments of biological condition caused by sampling variability. Overall, patterns in variance partitioning were similar among assemblages and basin types with one exception. Among-site variance dominated the relative contribution to the total variance (64–80% of total variance), residual variance (sampling variance) accounted for more variability (8–26%) than interaction variance (5–12%), and among-year variance was always negligible (0–0.2%). The exception to this general pattern was for invertebrates at least-disturbed sites where variability in O/E indicators was partitioned between among-site and residual (sampling) variance (among-site  =  36%, residual  =  64%). This pattern was not observed for fish and diatom indicators (O/E and regional MMI). We suspect that unexplained sampling variability is what largely remained after the invertebrate indicators (O/E predictive models) had accounted for environmental differences among least-disturbed sites. The influence of sampling variability on discordance of within-site assessments was assemblage or basin-type specific. Discordance among assessments was nearly 2× greater in developed basins (29–31%) than in least

  13. [The indices of water-salt metabolism and of the endocrine status in monkeys after flights on the Kosmos biological satellites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korol'kov, V I; Dotsenko, M A; Larina, I M; Shakhmatova, E I; Natochin, Iu V

    1996-01-01

    Findings of studying the indices of water-salt metabolism and endocrine status of monkeys after their exposure in the weightless environment onboard the biological satellites of Earth have revealed a change in the blood serum concentrations of electrolytes which is indicative of instability of the system responsible for maintenance of the fluid-mineral homeostasis during readaptation. Results of studying the endocrine status of monkeys infer alteration in calcium metabolism, i.e. decreased levels of parathyroid hormone, calcitonin and the transport form of vitamin D3. PMID:8963290

  14. HExpoChem: a systems biology resource to explore human exposure to chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taboureau, Olivier; Jacobsen, Ulrik Plesner; Kalhauge, Christian Gram;

    2013-01-01

    of computational biology approaches are needed to assess the health risks of chemical exposure. Here we present HExpoChem, a tool based on environmental chemicals and their bioactivities on human proteins with the objective of aiding the qualitative exploration of human exposure to chemicals. The......Summary: Humans are exposed to diverse hazardous chemicals daily. Although an exposure to these chemicals is suspected to have adverse effects on human health, mechanistic insights into how they interact with the human body are still limited. Therefore, acquisition of curated data and development...... chemical–protein interactions have been enriched with a quality-scored human protein–protein interaction network, a protein–protein association network and a chemical–chemical interaction network, thus allowing the study of environmental chemicals through formation of protein complexes and phenotypic...

  15. Uranium bioaccumulation and biological disorders induced in zebrafish (Danio rerio) after a depleted uranium waterborne exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of its toxicity and its ubiquity within aquatic compartments, uranium (U) represents a significant hazard to aquatic species such as fish. In a previous study, we investigated some biological responses in zebrafish either exposed to depleted or to enriched U (i.e., to different radiological activities). However, results required further experiments to better understand biological responses. Moreover, we failed to clearly demonstrate a significant relationship between biological effects and U radiological activity. We therefore chose to herein examine U bioaccumulation and induced effects in zebrafish according to a chemical dose-response approach. Results showed that U is highly bioconcentrated in fish, according to a time- and concentration-dependent model. Additionally, hepatic antioxidant defenses, red blood cells DNA integrity and brain acetylcholinesterase activity were found to be significantly altered. Generally, the higher the U concentration, the sooner and/or the greater the effect, suggesting a close relationship between accumulation and effect. - Research highlights: → Depleted U bioconcentration factor is of about 1000 in zebrafish exposed to 20 μg/L. → Hepatic antioxidant disorders are noticed as soon as the first hours of exposure. → DNA damage is induced in red blood cells after 20 d of exposure to 500 μg DU/L. → The brain cholinergic system (AChE activity) is impacted. - This study demonstrates that U is highly bioaccumulated in fish, resulting in biological disorders such as hepatic oxidative stress as well as genotoxic and neurotoxic events.

  16. Uranium bioaccumulation and biological disorders induced in zebrafish (Danio rerio) after a depleted uranium waterborne exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barillet, Sabrina, E-mail: sabrina.barillet@free.f [Laboratory of Radioecology and Ecotoxicology, IRSN (Institute for Radiological protection and Nuclear Safety), DEI/SECRE/LRE, Cadarache, Bat 186, BP 3, 13115 St-Paul-Lez-Durance cedex (France); Adam-Guillermin, Christelle, E-mail: christelle.adam-guillermin@irsn.f [Laboratory of Radioecology and Ecotoxicology, IRSN (Institute for Radiological protection and Nuclear Safety), DEI/SECRE/LRE, Cadarache, Bat 186, BP 3, 13115 St-Paul-Lez-Durance cedex (France); Palluel, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.palluel@ineris.f [Ecotoxicological Risk Assessment Unit, INERIS (National Institute for Industrial Environment and Risks), Parc technologique ALATA, 60 550 Verneuil-en-Halatte (France); Porcher, Jean-Marc, E-mail: jean-marc.porcher@ineris.f [Ecotoxicological Risk Assessment Unit, INERIS (National Institute for Industrial Environment and Risks), Parc technologique ALATA, 60 550 Verneuil-en-Halatte (France); Devaux, Alain, E-mail: alain.devaux@entpe.f [Universite de Lyon, INRA, EFPA-SA, Environmental Science Laboratory (LSE), ENTPE, 69518 Vaulx en Velin cedex (France)

    2011-02-15

    Because of its toxicity and its ubiquity within aquatic compartments, uranium (U) represents a significant hazard to aquatic species such as fish. In a previous study, we investigated some biological responses in zebrafish either exposed to depleted or to enriched U (i.e., to different radiological activities). However, results required further experiments to better understand biological responses. Moreover, we failed to clearly demonstrate a significant relationship between biological effects and U radiological activity. We therefore chose to herein examine U bioaccumulation and induced effects in zebrafish according to a chemical dose-response approach. Results showed that U is highly bioconcentrated in fish, according to a time- and concentration-dependent model. Additionally, hepatic antioxidant defenses, red blood cells DNA integrity and brain acetylcholinesterase activity were found to be significantly altered. Generally, the higher the U concentration, the sooner and/or the greater the effect, suggesting a close relationship between accumulation and effect. - Research highlights: Depleted U bioconcentration factor is of about 1000 in zebrafish exposed to 20 {mu}g/L. Hepatic antioxidant disorders are noticed as soon as the first hours of exposure. DNA damage is induced in red blood cells after 20 d of exposure to 500 {mu}g DU/L. The brain cholinergic system (AChE activity) is impacted. - This study demonstrates that U is highly bioaccumulated in fish, resulting in biological disorders such as hepatic oxidative stress as well as genotoxic and neurotoxic events.

  17. Chromosomal analysis and application of biological dosimetry in two cases of apparent over exposure; Analisis cromosomico y aplicacion de la dosimetria biologica en dos casos de aparente sobreexposicion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero C, C.; Brena V, M. [Departamento de Biologia, ININ A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    The gamma radiation calibration curve of {sup 60} Co is used which was generated in the ININ Laboratory of Biology to calculate the exposure dose of two workers whose dosemeters marked values above of the limit allowed. The analysis indicates that in a first case, the aberrations frequency corresponded to the basal value, therefore there is not over exposure. The aberrations frequency of the second case is lightly above to the basal value and therefore the probability favors to what the physical dosimetry indicates. (Author)

  18. Biological dose estimation for accidental supra-high dose gamma-ray exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y., E-mail: yingchen29@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiation Toxicology and Oncology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, 27 Taiping Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100850 (China); Yan, X.K. [Department of Radiation Toxicology and Oncology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, 27 Taiping Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100850 (China); Department of Radiation Safety, Beijing Institute of Nuclear and Chemical Safety, 14 Guan-cun, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100077 (China); Du, J.; Wang, Z.D.; Zhang, X.Q.; Zeng, F.G.; Zhou, P.K. [Department of Radiation Toxicology and Oncology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, 27 Taiping Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100850 (China)

    2011-09-15

    To correctly estimate the biological dose of victims accidentally exposed to a very high dose of {sup 60}Co gamma-ray, a new dose-effect curve of chromosomal dicentrics/multicentrics and rings in the supra-high dose range was established. Peripheral blood from two healthy men was irradiated in vitro with doses of {sup 60}Co gamma-rays ranging from 6 to 22 Gy at a dose rate of 2.0 Gy/min. Lymphocytes were concentrated, cultured and harvested at 52 h, 68 h and 72 h. The numbers of dic + r were counted. The dose-effect curves were established and validated using comparisons with doses from the Tokai-mura accident and were then applied to two victims of supra-high dose exposure accident. The results indicated that there were no significant differences in chromosome aberration frequency among the different culture times from 52 h to 72 h. The 6-22 Gy dose-effect curve was fitted to a linear quadratic model Y = -2.269 + 0.776D - 7.868 x l0{sup -3}D{sup 2}. Using this mathematic model, the dose estimates were similar to data from Tokai-mura which were estimated by PCC ring. Whole body average doses of 9.7 Gy and 18.1 Gy for two victims in the Jining accident were satisfactorily given. We established and successfully applied a new dose-effect curve of chromosomal dicentrics plus ring (dic + r) after 6-22 Gy {gamma}-irradiation from a supra-high dose {sup 60}Co gamma-ray accident.

  19. Sub-chronic exposure to fluoxetine in juvenile oysters (Crassostrea gigas): uptake and biological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Poi, Carole; Evariste, Lauris; Séguin, Alexis; Mottier, Antoine; Pedelucq, Julie; Lebel, Jean-Marc; Serpentini, Antoine; Budzinski, Hélène; Costil, Katherine

    2016-03-01

    The bioconcentration potential of fluoxetine (FLX) and its biological effects were investigated in juvenile Pacific oyster exposed for 28 days to environmentally relevant concentrations of FLX (1 ng L(-1), 100 ng L(-1) and up to 10 μg L(-1)). FLX bioaccumulated in oyster flesh resulting in 28-day bioconcentration factors greater than 2,000 and 10,000 by referring to wet and dry weights, respectively. Nevertheless, FLX did not induce oyster mortality, delayed gametogenesis, or lead to adverse histopathological alterations. At the two highest concentrations, despite non-optimal trophic conditions, FLX stimulated shell growth but only in a transient manner, suggesting a role of serotonin in the regulation of feeding and metabolism in bivalves. Those high concentrations seemed to drive bell-shaped responses of catalase and glutathione S-transferase activities throughout the exposure period, which may indicate the activation of antioxidant enzyme synthesis and then an enhanced catabolic rate or direct inhibition of those enzymes. However, no clear oxidative stress was detected because no strong differences in thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) content (i.e. lipid peroxidation) were observed between oyster groups, suggesting that cellular defence mechanisms were effective. These results demonstrate the importance of considering additional biomarkers of oxidative stress to obtain a comprehensive overview of the FLX-induced changes in marine bivalves exposed under realistic conditions. Considering the battery of biomarkers used, FLX appears to induce little or no effects on oyster physiology even at a concentration of 10 μg L(-1). These results do not confirm the lowest observed effect concentration (LOEC) values reported by some authors in other mollusc species. PMID:25315935

  20. Repeated cue exposure effects on subjective and physiological indices of chocolate craving

    OpenAIRE

    Gucht, Dinska Van; Vansteenwegen, Debora; Beckers, Tom; Hermans, Dirk; Baeyens, Frank; Van den Bergh, Omer

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of repeated unreinforced exposure to chocolate cues in persons reporting chocolate craving. Participants in the experimental group (n=40) received 10 consecutive brief exposures to chocolate cues in each of two sessions, separated by 1-3 days. Control participants (n=18) received two exposures at the start and end of each session. Chocolate craving was measured (alternately) through subjective report and the amount of saliva secretion to cho...

  1. Health Outcomes of Exposure to Biological and Chemical Components of Inhalable and Respirable Particulate Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Oyewale Mayowa Morakinyo; Matlou Ingrid Mokgobu; Murembiwa Stanley Mukhola; Raymond Paul Hunter

    2016-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) is a key indicator of air pollution and a significant risk factor for adverse health outcomes in humans. PM is not a self-contained pollutant but a mixture of different compounds including chemical and biological fractions. While several reviews have focused on the chemical components of PM and associated health effects, there is a dearth of review studies that holistically examine the role of biological and chemical components of inhalable and respirable PM in disease...

  2. Adverse health effects of lead exposure on children and exploration to internal lead indicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our research on adverse effects of lead exposures on physical and neurobehavioral health of children aged 6-12 years in 4 villages, labeled as K, M, L, and X, in rural China, was reported in this article. Lead in blood (PbB), urine (PbU), hairs (PbH), and nails (PbN) were measured by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Abbreviated Symptom Questionnaire of Conner's instruments and Revised Raven's Standard Progressive Matrices were applied to evaluate childhood attention deficit/hyperactivity disorders (ADHD) and intelligences. Geometric means (SD) of PbB, PbU, PbH and PbN concentrations were 71.2 μg/L (1.56), 11.7 μg/g (1.75), 12.5 μg/g (2.82), and 25.3 μg/g (2.79), respectively. 54 (17.0%) children had PbB levels of ≥ 100 μg/L. Boys, the 6-10 years old, and living in village K were 2.11, 2.48, and 9.16 times, respectively, more likely to be poisoned by lead than girls, aged 11-12 years, and residing in X. 18 (5.7%) and 37 (11.7%) subjects had ADHD and mental retardations, respectively. Inverse relationships between intelligences and natural log transformed PbU and PbH levels were observed with respective odds ratios (95%CI) of 1.79 (1.00-3.22) and 1.46 (1.06-2.03) or 1.28 (1.04-1.58) and 1.73 (1.18-2.52) by binary or ordinal logistic regression modeling. ADHD prevalence was different by gender and age of subjects. PbU, PbH, and PbN related to PbB positively with respective correlation coefficients of 0.530, 0.477, and 0.181. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of the three measurements reveled areas under curves (AUCs) being 0.829, 0.758, and 0.687, respectively. In conclusion, children had moderate levels of lead exposures in this rural area. Intelligence declines were associated with internal lead levels among children. ROC analysis suggests PbU an internal lead indicator close to PbB.

  3. Adverse health effects of lead exposure on children and exploration to internal lead indicator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Q.; Zhao, H.H. [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China); Chen, J.W.; Gu, K.D.; Zhang, Y.Z.; Zhu, Y.X.; Zhou, Y.K. [Minitry of Environmental Protection Key Lab of Environment, Wuhan 430030 (China); Ye, L.X., E-mail: yelx2004@163.com [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China)

    2009-11-15

    Our research on adverse effects of lead exposures on physical and neurobehavioral health of children aged 6-12 years in 4 villages, labeled as K, M, L, and X, in rural China, was reported in this article. Lead in blood (PbB), urine (PbU), hairs (PbH), and nails (PbN) were measured by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Abbreviated Symptom Questionnaire of Conner's instruments and Revised Raven's Standard Progressive Matrices were applied to evaluate childhood attention deficit/hyperactivity disorders (ADHD) and intelligences. Geometric means (SD) of PbB, PbU, PbH and PbN concentrations were 71.2 {mu}g/L (1.56), 11.7 {mu}g/g (1.75), 12.5 {mu}g/g (2.82), and 25.3 {mu}g/g (2.79), respectively. 54 (17.0%) children had PbB levels of {>=} 100 {mu}g/L. Boys, the 6-10 years old, and living in village K were 2.11, 2.48, and 9.16 times, respectively, more likely to be poisoned by lead than girls, aged 11-12 years, and residing in X. 18 (5.7%) and 37 (11.7%) subjects had ADHD and mental retardations, respectively. Inverse relationships between intelligences and natural log transformed PbU and PbH levels were observed with respective odds ratios (95%CI) of 1.79 (1.00-3.22) and 1.46 (1.06-2.03) or 1.28 (1.04-1.58) and 1.73 (1.18-2.52) by binary or ordinal logistic regression modeling. ADHD prevalence was different by gender and age of subjects. PbU, PbH, and PbN related to PbB positively with respective correlation coefficients of 0.530, 0.477, and 0.181. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of the three measurements reveled areas under curves (AUCs) being 0.829, 0.758, and 0.687, respectively. In conclusion, children had moderate levels of lead exposures in this rural area. Intelligence declines were associated with internal lead levels among children. ROC analysis suggests PbU an internal lead indicator close to PbB.

  4. Homeostatic balance as an indicator of prolonged technogenic exposure in low dose range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Indication of changes induced by ionizing radiation starting up a wide range of pathologic reactions in the disease developments still poses a significant problem in radiation medicine. It mainly concerns exposure to low dose-rate ionizing radiation, since its effects are still open to question, and today any researcher acknowledges that radiation induced pathological changes can accumulate at both subclinical and prenosological stages and develop not only in exposed persons, but also in their offspring. The subject of this study was workers of reactor and radiochemical productions of Siberian Group of Chemical Enterprises (SGCE) exposed to external and combined (external and internal) radiation respectively. Two comparative groups were formed: reactor and radiochemical production workers. In the reactor production group of workers the cumulative dose of external γ-radiation was up to 300 mSv, in the radiochemical production group - up to 150 mSv. Age ranged from 40 to 50 years. The two groups were compared between each other. Above all, there were formed 'insider control' groups (workers of the same productions with zero doses) to assess the impact of radiation factor on central homeostatic mechanisms. These groups were created using pair technique in order to level somatic disorders influence on the parameters under study. Numbers of full and biochemical blood examinations, energy metabolism between cells, hormones of homeostasis by the adaptive hormone level - insulin and cortisol, lipid peroxidation and antioxidant protection systems, immune and vegetative systems were all analyzed. Analyses of the systems performed, it was found out that in persons having been exposed to long term occupational radiation there were significant changes indicating lipid peroxidation system activation, antioxidant protection system depression, as well as lowered energy metabolism. The higher external γ-doses the bigger these changes are. Results from the two groups of

  5. Repeated cue exposure effects on subjective and physiological indices of chocolate craving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. van Gucht; D. Vansteenwegen; T. Beckers; D. Hermans; F. Baeyens; O. Van den Bergh

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of repeated unreinforced exposure to chocolate cues in persons reporting chocolate craving. Participants in the experimental group (n ¼ 40) received 10 consecutive brief exposures to chocolate cues in each of two sessions, separated by 1-3 days. Co

  6. Comparison of Model Calculations of Biological Damage from Exposure to Heavy Ions with Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    The space environment consists of a varying field of radiation particles including high-energy ions, with spacecraft shielding material providing the major protection to astronauts from harmful exposure. Unlike low-LET gamma or X rays, the presence of shielding does not always reduce the radiation risks for energetic charged-particle exposure. Dose delivered by the charged particle increases sharply at the Bragg peak. However, the Bragg curve does not necessarily represent the biological damage along the particle path since biological effects are influenced by the track structures of both primary and secondary particles. Therefore, the ''biological Bragg curve'' is dependent on the energy and the type of the primary particle and may vary for different biological end points. Measurements of the induction of micronuclei (MN) have made across the Bragg curve in human fibroblasts exposed to energetic silicon and iron ions in vitro at two different energies, 300 MeV/nucleon and 1 GeV/nucleon. Although the data did not reveal an increased yield of MN at the location of the Bragg peak, the increased inhibition of cell progression, which is related to cell death, was found at the Bragg peak location. These results are compared to the calculations of biological damage using a stochastic Monte-Carlo track structure model, Galactic Cosmic Ray Event-based Risk Model (GERM) code (Cucinotta, et al., 2011). The GERM code estimates the basic physical properties along the passage of heavy ions in tissue and shielding materials, by which the experimental set-up can be interpreted. The code can also be used to describe the biophysical events of interest in radiobiology, cancer therapy, and space exploration. The calculation has shown that the severely damaged cells at the Bragg peak are more likely to go through reproductive death, the so called "overkill".

  7. Investigation of human exposure to triclocarban after showering and preliminary evaluation of its biological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schebb, Nils Helge; Inceoglu, Bora; Ahn, Ki Chang; Morisseau, Christophe; Gee, Shirley J; Hammock, Bruce D

    2011-04-01

    The antibacterial soap additive triclocarban (TCC) is widely used in personal care products. TCC has a high environmental persistence. We developed and validated a sensitive online solid-phase extraction-LC-MS/MS method to rapidly analyze TCC and its major metabolites in urine and other biological samples to assess human exposure. We measured human urine concentrations 0-72 h after showering with a commercial bar soap containing 0.6% TCC. The major route of renal elimination was excretion as N-glucuronides. The absorption was estimated at 0.6% of the 70±15 mg of TCC in the soap used. The TCC-N-glucuronide urine concentration varied widely among the subjects, and continuous daily use of the soap led to steady state levels of excretion. In order to assess potential biological effects arising from this exposure, we screened TCC for the inhibition of human enzymes in vitro. We demonstrate that TCC is a potent inhibitor of the enzyme soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), whereas TCC's major metabolites lack strong inhibitory activity. Topical administration of TCC at similar levels to rats in a preliminary in vivo study, however, failed to alter plasma biomarkers of sEH activity. Overall the analytical strategy described here revealed that use of TCC soap causes exposure levels that warrant further evaluation. PMID:21381656

  8. Male cerebral palsy hospitalization as a potential indicator of neurological effects of methylmercury exposure in Great Lakes communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perinatal exposure to methylmercury is known to result in severe neurological effects on the developing fetus and infant, including cerebral palsy, mental retardation, and seizures. Males are more susceptible than females to neurological damage from perinatal methylmercury exposures. Preliminary analyses of data and statistics for the hospitalization rates of males for cerebral palsy in the 17 Canadian Areas of Concern in the Great Lakes basin indicate a possible geographic association with locations with elevated mercury from natural or industrial sources

  9. Radionuclides in human hair as indicators of exposure to uranium series radionuclides - Polonium-210 and lead-210 in human hair as indicators of exposure to uranium series radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polonium-210 and lead-210 were determined in samples of human hair from people living in several regions of Portugal with different radioactivity levels in soils and water. Activity concentration ratios of 210Po/210Pb in the hair were always higher than unity, suggesting that hair is an excretion route for these radionuclides from the human body, especially for 210Po. 210Po activity concentration in the hair increased with the age of people indicating that the source of 210Po body burden is 226Ra deposited in bone, and that this deposit increases with the age of individuals. Furthermore, 210Po activity concentration in the hair was significantly higher in uranium mine workers than in members of the public at large in granite regions, and these ones higher than in people living in low background sedimentary regions, indicating that 210Po concentration in the hair reflected radioactivity levels of the regional environment. 210Pb activity concentrations in the hair seemed more constant throughout life of humans, although reflecting also 210Pb levels in the environment. A relationship is established between 210Po concentration in the hair and 210Po total body burden. (authors)

  10. The space exposure biology assembly (SEBA)-results of the phase a study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, W.; Hofmann, P.; König, H.

    In the past ESA has successfully flown several experiment facilities for research in space biology, such as the `Exobiology Radiation Assembly' on the EURECA free-flyer and the exposure facility `BIOPAN' on Russian retrievable FOTON satellites. A flight opportunity in the mid-term future well suited to experiments in the field of exobiology and radiation research will be the `Space Exposure Biology Assembly' (SEBA). This new multi-user facility will be installed as an external payload on one of the EXPRESS Pallets that are attached to the truss structure of the International Space Station. In its baseline configuration SEBA consists of two multi-user experiment units: ■ EXPOSE, a sun exposed experiment unit, designed for photobiology and photoprocessing experiments; this unit will be mounted on a sun pointing device ■ MATROSHKA, an experiment unit for the simulation of extravehicular activities of man by using a phantom of a human body equipped with sensors for radiation dosimetric measurements. In addition, SEBA will provide resources to accommodate further self-standing biological or dosimetry add-on experiments. All SEBA elements will be installed on a single EXPRESS Pallet Adapter with an exchange interval of one to three years.

  11. Developing terrestrial, multi-taxon indices of biological integrity: An example from coastal sage scrub

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffendorfer, J.E.; Fleming, G.M.; Duggan, J.M.; Chapman, R.E.; Rahn, M.E.; Mitrovich, M.J.; Fisher, R.N.

    2007-01-01

    We screened 351 species or genera for their response to disturbance in coastal sage scrub (CSS) to develop a 15-metric, 5-taxon Index of Biological Integrity (IBI). We collected data on ants, birds, herpetofauna, small mammals, and plants for two years on 46 sites established across a gradient of disturbance in three reserves. The gradient spanned relatively intact CSS with thick stands of shrubs, to former CSS stands type-converted to exotic grasses. ANOVAs and clustering analyses indicated the IBI could distinguish four levels of disturbance in CSS. General measures of community structure, such as richness, did not show changes across the gradient for most taxa, and responses of taxa across the gradient were varied and rarely correlated. However, turnover in species or genera across the gradient was common across all taxa as shrub-obligate life forms were replaced by those favoring grassy or disturbed habitats. Our data indicate index-based approaches based on data collected across disturbance gradients may outperform more traditional community level metrics when responses to anthropogenic influences are complex and vary across species. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Short-term effects of different organic amendments on soil chemical, biochemical and biological indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondelli, Donato; Aly, Adel; Yirga Dagnachew, Ababu; Piscitelli, Lea; Dumontet, Stefano; Miano, Teodoro

    2014-05-01

    The limited availability of animal manure and the high cost of good quality compost lead to difficult soil quality management under organic agriculture. Therefore, it is important to find out alternative organic soil amendments and more flexible strategies that are able to sustain crop productivity and maintain and enhance soil quality. A three years study was carried out in the experimental fields of the Mediterranean Agronomic Institute of Bari located in Valenzano, Italy. The main objective of this research is to investigate the effects of different fertility management strategies on soil quality in order to estimate the role of innovative matrices for their use in organic farming. The experiment consists of seven treatments applied to a common crop rotation. The treatments include alternative organic amendments (1- olive mill wastewater OMW, 2- residues of mushroom cultivation MUS, 3- coffee chaff COF), common soil amendments (4- compost COM, 5- faba bean intercropping LEG, 6- cow manure - MAN) and as a reference treatment (7- mineral fertilizer COV). The soil quality was assessed before and after the application of the treatments, through biological (microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen, soil respiration and metabolic quotient), biochemical (soil enzymatic activities: β-glucosidase, alkaline phospatase, urease, fluorescein diacetate (FDA) hydrolysis), and chemical (pH, soil organic carbon, soil organic matter, total nitrogen, available phosphorous, exchangeable potassium, dissolved organic carbon and total dissolved nitrogen) indicators. Based on the results obtained after the second year, all treatments were able to improve various soil chemical parameters as compared to mineral fertilizer. The incorporation of COF and OMW seemed to be more effective in improving soil total N and exchangeable K, while MAN significantly increased available P. All the amendments enhance dissolved organic C, soil respiration, microbial biomass and metabolic quotient as

  13. Evaluation of urinary arsenic as an indicator of exposure to residents of Tarkwa, Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Ghana, mining plays a significant role in the economic recovery programme. However, the gains are achieved at the cost of environmental and human health. For many years, the extraction of gold involved roasting which released airborne particles and large quantities of arsenic (As). Sampling for this study was conducted in March 2004 to assess the contamination status of trace elements, especially As, in water and mine workers in Tarkwa, which has nearly a century of gold mining history. Water and human urine samples were collected from Tarkwa, in addition to control samples taken from Accra, the capital of Ghana. Arsenic excretion was assessed in the first morning void urine. Concentrations of As and Mn in some water samples from Tarkwa were above the WHO drinking water guidelines. A potential health risk of As and Mn is a concern for the people consuming the contaminated water in this area. Levels of trace elements in water from control site were low compared to levels from Tarkwa. The mean urinary As concentration of 260 μgl-1 from the study area was comparable to those in As-endemic areas of the world. This indicates relatively high degree of human exposure to As in Tarkwa, Ghana. Relatively low levels of As in water and no significant difference of As concentrations in urine between Tarkwa and Accra may suggest the presence of other sources of As contamination in Ghana, possibly food. This is the first study reporting 23 trace elements in human urine samples from a mining town in Ghana. (au)

  14. Exposure Perception as a Key Indicator of Risk Perception and Acceptance of Sources of Radio Frequency Electromagnetic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederik Freudenstein

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The presented survey was conducted in six European countries as an online study. A total of 2454 subjects participated. Two main research questions were investigated: firstly, how does the cognitive, moral, and affective framing of radio frequency electromagnetic field (RF EMF exposure perception influence RF EMF risk perception? Secondly, can the deployment of mobile phone base stations have greater acceptance with RF EMF exposure reduction? The findings with respect to the first question clearly indicated that the cognitive framed exposure perception is the main determinant of RF EMF risk perception. The concomitant sensitivity to exposure strength offers an opportunity to improve the acceptance of base stations by exposure reduction. A linear regression analysis supported this assumption: in a fictional test situation, exposure reduction improved the acceptance of base stations, operationalized as the requested distance of the base station from one’s own home. Furthermore, subjects with high RF EMF risk perception were most sensitive to exposure reduction. On average, a 70% exposure reduction reduced the requested distance from about 2000 meters to 1000 meters. The consequences for risk communication are discussed.

  15. Structural, Chemical and Biological Aspects of Antioxidants for Strategies Against Metal and Metalloid Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swaran J. S. Flora

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress contributes to the pathophysiology of exposure to heavy metals/metalloid. Beneficial renal effects of some medications, such as chelation therapy depend at least partially on the ability to alleviate oxidative stress. The administration of various natural or synthetic antioxidants has been shown to be of benefit in the prevention and attenuation of metal induced biochemical alterations. These include vitamins, N-acetylcysteine, α-lipoic acid, melatonin, dietary flavonoids and many others. Human studies are limited in this regard. Under certain conditions, surprisingly, the antioxidant supplements may exhibit pro-oxidant properties and even worsen metal induced toxic damage. To date, the evidence is insufficient to recommend antioxidant supplements in subject with exposure to metals. Prospective, controlled clinical trials on safety and effectiveness of different therapeutic antioxidant strategies either individually or in combination with chelating agent are indispensable. The present review focuses on structural, chemical and biological aspects of antioxidants particularly related to their chelating properties.

  16. Blood-bound carbon disulfide: an indicator of carbon disulfide exposure, and its accumulation in repeatedly exposed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, C W; DiStefano, V

    1983-09-30

    Carbon disulfide is present in exposed subjects in free and bound or acid-labile forms. Sensitivities of the blood acid-labile CS2 (AL CS2) concentration and the modified iodine-azide test (IAT) were compared as indicators of CS2 exposure. Rats were exposed to 15 (approximately 5 ppm), 30, 60, or 120 mg/m3 of CS2. Exposure to 15 or 30 mg/m3 of CS2 could not be detected by the modified IAT. However, a linear relationship between blood CS2 (free or AL CS2) concentrations and these exposure levels was observed. Free CS2 is eliminated rapidly, while AL CS2 is eliminated very slowly from the exposed subjects. Repetitive daily exposures (8 hr/day) to 120 mg/m3 of CS2 were carried out in rats. Blood AL CS2 concentrations in exposed rats increased with each successive exposure while the free CS2 level remained relatively constant. By the sixth or seventh daily exposure the blood AL CS2 concentration was about 2.5 times that of the first 8-hr exposure and about 3 times the level of free CS2. These results indicated an appreciable accumulation of CS2 in subjects repeatedly exposed to low concentrations of the solvent. Rats were also exposed to CS2 8 hr/day for 5 days. After a 2-day nonexposure period (Days 6 and 7), the animals were reexposed on Day 8. The blood AL CS2 concentration in animals exposed on Day 8 was substantially higher than in those that received a single 8-hr exposure (Day 1), despite the hiatus on Days 6 and 7. These results indicated that blood AL CS2 was not totally eliminated during the 2-day nonexposure period. In in vitro experiments, the binding profile of CS2 to human blood was remarkably similar to that of rats exposed to CS2 by inhalation. PMID:6636170

  17. Association of bisphenol A exposure with dietary quality indices in Spanish schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Ana; Monteagudo, Celia; Heras-Gonzalez, Leticia; Mariscal-Arcas, Miguel; Lorenzo-Tovar, Maria Luisa; Olea-Serrano, Fátima

    2016-08-01

    Young children, whose growth and development are highly dependent on the endocrine system, are particularly vulnerable to endocrine disruptor exposure. The main objectives of this study were to measure BPA migration levels from cans, fruit juice bottles/packs, and microwave containers used for food/drinks consumed by a sample of 6- to 8-year old schoolchildren in Spain and to estimate the relationship between their resulting BPA exposure and diet quality index scores (Mediterranean Diet Score and Breakfast Quality Index). The mean BPA concentration was 11.8 ng/mL for vegetable cans, 22.1 ng/mL for pulse cans, 3.6 ng/mL for juice bottles/packs, and 1.2 ng/mL for microwave containers. Results revealed a significant association between the Mediterranean Diet Score and low BPA exposure of the children. BPA exposure below the median level was significantly associated with a higher score in both the first-grade (P = 0.030) and second-grade (p = 0.0001) groups. However, no association was found between BPA exposure and the Breakfast Quality Index. In conclusion, children with a stronger adherence to a Mediterranean-like diet appear to be less exposed to BPA migrating from food packaging and microwave containers. Further research is warranted on the inadvertent exposure of children to endocrinedisrupting chemicals from these sources. PMID:27208728

  18. Occupational Exposure to Mercury: Air Exposure Assessment and Biological Monitoring based on Dispersive Ionic Liquid-Liquid Microextraction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Shirkhanloo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to mercury (Hg as a heavy metal can cause health effects. The objective of this study was to assess occupational exposure to Hg in a chlor-alkali petrochemical industry in Iran by determining of Hg concentrations in air, blood and urine samples.The study was performed on 50 exposed subjects and 50 unexposed controls. Air samples were collected in the breathing zone of exposed subjects, using hopcalite sorbents. Analysis was performed using a cold vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometer (CV-AAS according to NIOSH analytical method 6009. For all participants, blood and urine samples were collected and then transferred into sterile glass tubes. After micro-extraction with ionic liquid and back extraction with nitric acid, Hg concentrations in blood and urine samples were determined by CV-AAS.The mean concentration of air Hg was 0.042± 0.003 mg/m(3. The mean concentrations of Hg in blood and urine samples of exposed subjects were significantly higher than unexposed controls (22.41± 12.58 versus 1.19± 0.95 μg/l and 30.61± 10.86 versus 1.99± 1.34 μg/g creatinine, respectively. Correlation of air Hg with blood Hg, urine Hg and blood Hg-urine Hg ratio were significant statistically (P< 0.05.The values of Hg in blood and urine samples of chlor-alkali workers were considerably high. Correlation coefficients showed that blood Hg and blood Hg-urine Hg ratio are better indicators than urine Hg for assessing occupationally exposed workers in terms of current exposure assessment.

  19. Neurobehavioral effects during exposures to propionic acid--an indicator of chemosensory distraction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hey, Kathrin; Juran, Stephanie; Schäper, Michael; Kleinbeck, Stefan; Kiesswetter, Ernst; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Golka, Klaus; Brüning, Thomas; van Thriel, Christoph

    2009-11-01

    The chemosensory effects of propionic acid (PA) in humans have not been conclusively studied and there is no established occupational exposure limit (OEL) in Germany. In addition to sensory irritation caused by PA, it was hypothesized that the annoying odor of PA might interfere with the performance results. There were 23 consenting healthy participants (12 female, 11 male) in the group studied. They were exposed for 4 h to PA in concentrations of 0.3, 5 and 10 ppm in a cross-over design. During these exposures, performance was recorded with four cognitive tests measuring response-inhibition, working memory, set-shifting, and divided attention. Odor annoyance, other chemosensory sensations, and acute symptoms were assessed before, during, and after exposure with standardized rating scales. Moderate odor annoyance and weak sensory irritation were reported during 5 and 10 ppm exposure conditions. The different levels of exposure to PA had no impact upon the results of three out of the four behavioral tests. The difficulties of the task were reflected in the results. However in the fourth, which was the response-inhibition task, there was significant increase in the error rates which corresponded to the exposure levels. Results from previous experiments suggested high odor annoyance at the investigated concentrations. Our findings showed that odor annoyance and reported sensory irritations were low. In conclusion, the hypothesis of a distractive effect due to the malodor of PA could not be confirmed. Only in concentrations as high as 10 ppm acute PA exposure affected the response accuracy of one of the four neurobehavioral task. For other more annoying substances, a neurobehavioral effect influenced by an indirect mechanism of resources competition is still conceivable. PMID:19733590

  20. [Ants as biological indicators of human impact in mangroves of the southeastern coast of Bahia, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delabie, Jacques H C; Paim, Valéria R L de M; Do Nascimento, Ivan C; Campiolo, Sofia; Mariano, Cléa dos S F

    2006-01-01

    Mangroves are common in estuaries along the Atlantic coast of Brazil. Although plant diversity is low, this ecosystem supports a range of animals, offering some resources for non-aquatic organisms. Many insects live in mangroves and, between them, many ant species that are exclusively arboreous. Mangroves throughout the world suffer from high levels of human impact, and this is particularly true for southeastern Bahia, where land-uses include traditional crab and fish exploitation, urban development, refuse pollution, recreation, and timber extraction. The ants of 13 mangrove sites, representing a range of levels of human use, have been studied along 250 km of the southern Bahia littoral, between Itacaré and Porto Seguro. Ants were sampled both inside and on the periphery of the tidal zone, using entomological rainbow, baiting, collect of hollow branches and pit-fall. A total of 108 species have been collected, with the richest genera being Camponotus and Pseudomyrmex, and the most frequent belonging to the genera Azteca and Crematogaster. The ant community living on the periphery of mangrove areas is rather homogeneous regardless of the degree of environmental perturbation, but varies markedly with the disturbance inside the mangroves themselves. The evolution of richness of the both communities, mangrove and periphery, is negatively related to the human effects, even limited to the periphery. Ant communities therefore have the potential to be useful as biological indicators of ecological impacts of land-use in these mangrove systems. PMID:17144131

  1. The need for and the importance of biological indicators of radiation effects with special reference to injuries in radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need for further research on the existing and new biological indicators of radiation injury has been expressed. The studies on the radiation-induced alterations of membrane structure and function stimulated investigations aiming to develop an indicator based on membrane-phenomena. The co-ordinated research programme on ''Cell Membrane Probes as Biological Indicators of Radiation Injury in Radiation Accidents'' was initiated in mid 1977 and terminated in 1980. Within this programme many basic observations were made in connection with altered features of various animal and human cell membranes. Molecular, biophysical, biochemical and cell biological approaches were performed. The rapid reaction within minutes or hours of membranes against relatively low doses of various types of irradiations were described and the effects proved to be transitory, i.e. membrane regeneration occurred within hours. These dose- and timedependent alterations suggest the possibility of developing a biological indicator which would give signals at the earliest period after radiation injury when no other biological informations are available. The importance of a system of biological indicators is emphasized. (author)

  2. Cosmogenic radionuclides in metals as indicator for sea level exposure history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laubenstein, M. [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, INFN, S. S. 17/bis km 18-910, I-67010 Assergi (AQ) (Italy); Heusser, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, POB 103980, D-69029 Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: gerd.heusser@mpi-hd.mpg.de

    2009-05-15

    Copper and stainless steel used in neutrino related experiments have been screened for primordial and cosmogenic isotopes with highly sensitive germanium gamma spectroscopy. Aliquots of these materials have been exposed to cosmic rays at the LNGS site. The obtained production rates (saturation activities) are checked against experimental and theoretical literature values. The data is used to evaluate the cosmic ray exposure histories of the originally measured samples. Two stainless steel samples offer the possibility to compare the obtained exposure ages with a time scale based on the disequilibrium in the thorium decay chain.

  3. Biological characterization of radiation exposure and dose estimates for inhaled uranium milling effluents. Annual progress report, April 1981-March 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problems addressed are the protection of uranium will workers from occupational exposure to uranium through routine bioassay programs and the assessment of accidental worker exposures. Comparisons of chemical properties and the biological behavior of refined uranium ore (yellowcake) are made to identify important properties that influence uranium distribution patterns among organs. These studies will facilitate calculations of organ doses for specific exposures and associated health risk estimates and will identify important bioassay procedures to improve evaluations of human exposures. Sampling of airborne yellowcake at four uranium mills showed that aerosols were heterogeneous, changed with time and contained approx. 50% of the airborne uranium in particles greater than 12 μm aerodynamic diameter. Results are related to specific packaging steps and to predictions of appreciable upper respiratory tract deposition rates for the aerosols, if inhaled by a worker without respiratory protection. Previously used in vitro dissolution techniques were evaluated and the uses of the results for interpreting urinary bioassay data are described. Preliminary results from an inhalation experiment using rats indicate that the clearance patterns of inhaled uranium from lung agreed quantitatively with results from in vitro dissolution and infrared analyses of the yellowcake used. Preliminary results from an experiment to simulate contamination of a wound by yellowcake showed that more of the implanted dose of a less soluble form of yellowcake was retained at the wound site than of a more soluble form at 32 days after implantation. The results did not quantitatively agree with in vitro dissolution results. A two-year study of yellowcake from two mills was initiated. Twenty Beagle dogs were exposed by nose-only inhalation to a more soluble form of yellowcake and 20 to a less soluble form

  4. Prenatal androgen exposure alters girls' responses to information indicating gender-appropriate behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Melissa; Pasterski, Vickie; Spencer, Debra; Neufeld, Sharon; Patalay, Praveetha; Hindmarsh, Peter C; Hughes, Ieuan A; Acerini, Carlo L

    2016-02-19

    Individual variability in human gender-related behaviour is influenced by many factors, including androgen exposure prenatally, as well as self-socialization and socialization by others postnatally. Many studies have looked at these types of influences in isolation, but little is known about how they work together. Here, we report that girls exposed to high concentrations of androgens prenatally, because they have the genetic condition congenital adrenal hyperplasia, show changes in processes related to self-socialization of gender-related behaviour. Specifically, they are less responsive than other girls to information that particular objects are for girls and they show reduced imitation of female models choosing particular objects. These findings suggest that prenatal androgen exposure may influence subsequent gender-related behaviours, including object (toy) choices, in part by changing processes involved in the self-socialization of gendered behaviour, rather than only by inducing permanent changes in the brain during early development. In addition, the findings suggest that some of the behavioural effects of prenatal androgen exposure might be subject to alteration by postnatal socialization processes. The findings also suggest a previously unknown influence of early androgen exposure on later processes involved in self-socialization of gender-related behaviour, and thus expand understanding of the developmental systems regulating human gender development. PMID:26833843

  5. ANTS AS INDICATORS OF EXPOSURE TO ENVIRONMENTAL STRESSORS IN NORTH AMERICAN DESERT GRASSLANDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The relative abundance of ant species was measured by pit-fall trapping at 44 sites in southern New Mexico and southeastern Arizona, U.S.A..Sites were selected for study based on documentation of a history of disturbance or protection from disturbance, exposure to varying intens...

  6. From tails to toes: developing nonlethal tissue indicators of mercury exposure in five amphibian species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfleeger, Adam Z.; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Kowalski, Brandon M.; Herring, Garth; Willacker, James J.; Jackson, Allyson K.; Pierce, John

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to environmental contaminants has been implicated as a factor in global amphibian decline. Mercury (Hg) is a particularly widespread contaminant that biomagnifies in amphibians and can cause a suite of deleterious effects. However, monitoring contaminant exposure in amphibian tissues may conflict with conservation goals if lethal take is required. Thus, there is a need to develop non-lethal tissue sampling techniques to quantify contaminant exposure in amphibians. Some minimally invasive sampling techniques, such as toe-clipping, are common in population-genetic research, but it is unclear if these methods can adequately characterize contaminant exposure. We examined the relationships between mercury (Hg) concentrations in non-lethally sampled tissues and paired whole-bodies in five amphibian species. Specifically, we examined the utility of three different tail-clip sections from four salamander species and toe-clips from one anuran species. Both tail and toe-clips accurately predicted whole-body THg concentrations, but the relationships differed among species and the specific tail-clip section or toe that was used. Tail-clips comprised of the distal 0–2 cm segment performed the best across all salamander species, explaining between 82 and 92 % of the variation in paired whole-body THg concentrations. Toe-clips were less effective predictors of frog THg concentrations, but THg concentrations in outer rear toes accounted for up to 79 % of the variability in frog whole-body THg concentrations. These findings suggest non-lethal sampling of tails and toes has potential applications for monitoring contaminant exposure and risk in amphibians, but care must be taken to ensure consistent collection and interpretation of samples.

  7. Biological effects of radiation and health risks from exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The very fact that ionizing radiation produces biological effects is known from many years. The first case of injury reported by Sir Roentgen was reported just after a few months after discovery of X-rays in 1895. As early as 1902, the first case of X-ray induced cancer was reported in the literature. Early human evidence of harmful effects as a result of exposure to radiation in large amounts existed in the 1920s and 1930s, based upon the experience of early radiologists, miners exposed to airborne radioactivity underground, persons working in the radium industry, and other special occupational groups. The long-term biological significance of smaller, repeated doses of radiation, however, was not widely appreciated until relatively recently, and most of our knowledge of the biological effects of radiation has been accumulated since World War II. The mechanisms that lead to adverse health effects after exposure to ionizing radiation are still not fully understood. Ionizing radiation has sufficient energy to change the structure of molecules, including DNA, within the cells of the body. Some of these molecular changes are so complex that it may be difficult for the body's repair mechanisms to mend them correctly. However, the evidence is that only a small fraction of such changes would be expected to result in cancer or other health effects. The most thoroughly studied individuals for the evaluation of health effects of ionizing radiation are the survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombings, a large population that includes all ages and both sexes.The Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) in Japan has conducted followup studies on these survivors for more than 50 years. An important finding from these studies is that the occurrence of solid cancers increases in proportion to radiation dose. More than 60% of exposed survivors received a dose of radiation of less than 100 mSv (the definition of low dose used by the BEIR VII report). (author)

  8. The applied indicators of water quality may underestimate the risk of chemical exposure to human population in reservoirs utilized for human supply-Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Debora Regina; Yamamoto, Flávia Yoshie; Filipak Neto, Francisco; Randi, Marco Antônio Ferreira; Garcia, Juan Esquivel; Costa, Daniele Dietrich Moura; Liebel, Samuel; Campos, Sandro Xavier; Voigt, Carmen Lúcia; de Oliveira Ribeiro, Ciro Alberto

    2016-05-01

    The knowledge concerning associations between chronic chemical exposure and many disorders with complex etiology involving gene-environment interactions is increasing, and new methods must be developed to improve water quality monitoring. The complexity of chemical mixtures in polluted aquatic environments makes the evaluation of toxic potential in those sites difficult, but the use of biomarkers and bioindicators has been recognized as a reliable tool to assess risk of exposure to biota and also the human population. In order to evaluate the use of fish and biomarkers to assess toxic potential and bioavailability of chemicals in human-related hydric resources, an in situ experiment was accomplished in two water reservoirs designated for human supply, which were previously evaluated by the local environmental regulatory agency through a set of physical, chemical, and classical biological parameters. Molecular, biochemical, and morphological biomarkers were performed in caged Oreochromis niloticus kept for 6 months in the studied reservoirs to assess potentially useful biomarkers to evaluate the quality of water for human supply. Chemical analysis of toxic metals in liver and muscle and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in bile was considered to assess the bioavailability of pollutants and highlight human activity impact. The reservoir previously classified by a governmental agency as less impacted presented more risk of exposure to biota. These results were supported by chemical analysis, vitellogenin expression, histopathological findings (gonads, liver, and gills), as well as indicators of neurotoxic effects and oxidative stress in liver. The inclusion of some biomarkers as parameters in regulatory monitoring programs in reservoirs designated for human supply is strongly suggested to evaluate the risks of exposure to the human population. Thus, a revision of the traditional biological and physicochemical analysis utilized to establish the conditions of

  9. A Novel Biological Dosimetry Method for Monitoring Occupational Radiation Exposure in Diagnostic and Therapeutic Wards: From Radiation Dosimetry to Biological Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Heydarheydari, S.; Haghparast, A.; Eivazi, M.T.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Professional radiation workers are occupationally exposed to long-term low levels of ionizing radiation. Occupational health hazards from radiation exposure, in a large occupational segment of the population, are of special concern. Biological dosimetry can be performed in addition to physical dosimetry with the aim of individual dose assessment and biological effects. Methods In this biodosimetry study, some hematological parameters have been examined in 40 exposed a...

  10. Somatic mutation in peripheral blood lymphocytes among Metro Manila residents: indicator of exposure to environmental pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metro Manila is ranked as one of the world's most polluted cities where air quality levels are 2-3 times higher than the levels set by WHO. Development of diseases could be alleviated if early warning signs as occurrence of gene mutations are detected early enough. The adapted hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) mutation assay measures the degree of mutation on the HGPRT gene and allows rapid evaluation of the occurrence of mutation in an individual exposed to radiation or mutagens within six months after exposure. The objective of the project is to (1) assay exposure of Metro Manila residents exposed to environmental pollution, (2) determine population groups significantly affected by pollutants and (3) construct an environmental baseline HGPRT mutation data bank specific to area in Metro Manila. A composite table of personal information of donors against mutation index in two barangays in Venezuela is presented. About 30% of the total samples are shown to have mutation index greater than 0.5. So far, the data show a slightly higher mutation rate among donors who are smokers with more than 5 hours outdoor exposure to pollutants per day than the corresponding class of non-smokers. (author). 5 refs.; 5 tabs

  11. Tooth element levels indicating exposure profiles in diabetic and hypertensive subjects from Mysore, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, G; Sukumar, A; Nandlal, B; Vellaichamy, S; Thanasekaran, K; Ramanathan, A L

    2009-12-01

    Element contents of teeth elucidate exposure nature, but less is known about association of tooth element concentrations of diabetics and hypertensives with exposure profile. Present study aims to estimate copper, chromium, iron, zinc, nickel, and lead concentrations in the permanent teeth of control, diabetic, and hypertensive subjects from Mysore. The results show that lead levels of teeth (Pb-T) are higher in the hypertensives and diabetics, whereas copper levels of teeth (Cu-T) are lower in the hypertensives and users of stainless steel utensils than that of controls and users of mixed utensils. The elevated Cu-T levels found in the users of mixed utensils that being made of several metals are ascribed to leaching effect of sour and spicy food of Indian cuisine. The element levels were influenced by diet (Zn-T), place of living, sex and income (Pb-T) of the subjects, but not by age, drinking water from different sources, and certain habits viz., smoking, alcohol consumption, chewing betel, and nut. Thus, it is evident that high Pb-T and low Cu-T levels may be related with diabetes and hypertension and high Pb-T and Cu-T levels, respectively, in the urbanites, and the users of mixed utensils may show different exposure profiles from environment and utensils. PMID:19352596

  12. Dioxin exposure of human CD34+ hemopoietic cells induces gene expression modulation that recapitulates its in vivo clinical and biological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) has a large number of biological effects, including skin, cardiovascular, neurologic diseases, diabetes, infertility, cancers and immunotoxicity. We analysed the in vitro TCDD effects on human CD34+ cells and tested the gene expression modulation by means of microarray analyses before and after TCDD exposure. We identified 257 differentially modulated probe sets, identifying 221 well characterized genes. A large part of these resulted associated to cell adhesion and/or angiogenesis and to transcription regulation. Synaptic transmission and visual perception functions, with the particular involvement of the GABAergic pathway were also significantly modulated. Numerous transcripts involved in cell cycle or cell proliferation, immune response, signal transduction, ion channel activity or calcium ion binding, tissue development and differentiation, female or male fertility or in several metabolic pathways were also affected after dioxin exposure. The transcriptional profile induced by TCDD treatment on human CD34+ cells strikingly reproduces the clinical and biological effects observed in individuals exposed to dioxin and in biological experimental systems. Our data support a role of dioxin in the neoplastic transformation of hemopoietic stem cells and in immune modulation processes after in vivo exposure, as indicated by the epidemiologic data in dioxin accidentally exposed populations, providing a molecular basis for it. In addition, TCDD alters genes associated to glucidic and lipidic metabolisms, to GABAergic transmission or involved in male and female fertility, thus providing a possible explanation of the diabetogenic, dyslipidemic, neurologic and fertility effects induced by TCDD in vivo exposure.

  13. Biological indicators in relation to coastal pollution along Karnataka coast, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Verlecar, X.N.; Desai, S.R.; Sarkar, A.; Dalal, S.G.

    USA). For current measurement, a self-recording current meter (RCM-7, Aanderaa Instruments Inc., Norway) was used. Water and sediment samples for chemical and biological studies were collected from 9 stations spread over 25 km2 area at each...

  14. Sampling designs matching species biology produce accurate and affordable abundance indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant Harris

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Wildlife biologists often use grid-based designs to sample animals and generate abundance estimates. Although sampling in grids is theoretically sound, in application, the method can be logistically difficult and expensive when sampling elusive species inhabiting extensive areas. These factors make it challenging to sample animals and meet the statistical assumption of all individuals having an equal probability of capture. Violating this assumption biases results. Does an alternative exist? Perhaps by sampling only where resources attract animals (i.e., targeted sampling, it would provide accurate abundance estimates more efficiently and affordably. However, biases from this approach would also arise if individuals have an unequal probability of capture, especially if some failed to visit the sampling area. Since most biological programs are resource limited, and acquiring abundance data drives many conservation and management applications, it becomes imperative to identify economical and informative sampling designs. Therefore, we evaluated abundance estimates generated from grid and targeted sampling designs using simulations based on geographic positioning system (GPS data from 42 Alaskan brown bears (Ursus arctos. Migratory salmon drew brown bears from the wider landscape, concentrating them at anadromous streams. This provided a scenario for testing the targeted approach. Grid and targeted sampling varied by trap amount, location (traps placed randomly, systematically or by expert opinion, and traps stationary or moved between capture sessions. We began by identifying when to sample, and if bears had equal probability of capture. We compared abundance estimates against seven criteria: bias, precision, accuracy, effort, plus encounter rates, and probabilities of capture and recapture. One grid (49 km2 cells and one targeted configuration provided the most accurate results. Both placed traps by expert opinion and moved traps between capture

  15. Sampling designs matching species biology produce accurate and affordable abundance indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Sean; Russell, Gareth J.; Butler, Matthew J.; Selinger, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Wildlife biologists often use grid-based designs to sample animals and generate abundance estimates. Although sampling in grids is theoretically sound, in application, the method can be logistically difficult and expensive when sampling elusive species inhabiting extensive areas. These factors make it challenging to sample animals and meet the statistical assumption of all individuals having an equal probability of capture. Violating this assumption biases results. Does an alternative exist? Perhaps by sampling only where resources attract animals (i.e., targeted sampling), it would provide accurate abundance estimates more efficiently and affordably. However, biases from this approach would also arise if individuals have an unequal probability of capture, especially if some failed to visit the sampling area. Since most biological programs are resource limited, and acquiring abundance data drives many conservation and management applications, it becomes imperative to identify economical and informative sampling designs. Therefore, we evaluated abundance estimates generated from grid and targeted sampling designs using simulations based on geographic positioning system (GPS) data from 42 Alaskan brown bears (Ursus arctos). Migratory salmon drew brown bears from the wider landscape, concentrating them at anadromous streams. This provided a scenario for testing the targeted approach. Grid and targeted sampling varied by trap amount, location (traps placed randomly, systematically or by expert opinion), and traps stationary or moved between capture sessions. We began by identifying when to sample, and if bears had equal probability of capture. We compared abundance estimates against seven criteria: bias, precision, accuracy, effort, plus encounter rates, and probabilities of capture and recapture. One grid (49 km2 cells) and one targeted configuration provided the most accurate results. Both placed traps by expert opinion and moved traps between capture sessions, which

  16. Adult and prenatal exposures to tobacco smoke as risk indicators of fertility among 430 Danish couples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tina Kold; Henriksen, T B; Hjollund, N H;

    1998-01-01

    menstrual cycles or until a clinically recognized pregnancy. At enrollment and each month throughout the follow-up, both partners completed a questionnaire that asked them about their smoking, alcohol consumption, and intake of caffeinated beverages. The effect of current smoking and smoking exposure in...... utero was evaluated by using a logistic regression model with pregnancy outcome of each cycle in a Cox discrete model calculating the fecundability odds ratio. After adjustment for female body mass index and alcohol intake, diseases in female reproductive organs, semen quality, and duration of menstrual...

  17. Exposure factors for marine eutrophication impacts assessment based on a mechanistic biological model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cosme, Nuno Miguel Dias; Koski, Marja; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2015-01-01

    Emissions of nitrogen (N) from anthropogenic sources enrich marine waters and promote planktonic growth. This newly synthesised organic carbon is eventually exported to benthic waters where aerobic respiration by heterotrophic bacteria results in the consumption of dissolved oxygen (DO). This...... pathway is typical of marine eutrophication. A model is proposed to mechanistically estimate the response of coastal marine ecosystems to N inputs. It addresses the biological processes of nutrient-limited primary production (PP), metazoan consumption, and bacterial degradation, in four distinct sinking...... routes from primary (cell aggregates) and secondary producers (faecal pellets, carcasses, and active vertical transport). Carbon export production (PE) and ecosystems eXposure Factors (XF), which represents a nitrogen-to-oxygen 'conversion' potential, were estimated at a spatial resolution of 66 large...

  18. Are Bavarian Forests (southern Germany) at risk from ground-level ozone? Assessment using exposure and flux based ozone indices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure and flux-based indices of O3 risk were compared, at 19 forest locations across Bavaria in southern Germany from 2002 to 2005; leaf symptoms on mature beech trees found at these locations were also examined for O3 injury. O3 flux modelling was performed using continuously recorded O3 concentrations in combination with meteorological and soil moisture data collected from Level II forest sites. O3 measurements at nearby rural open-field sites proved appropriate as surrogates in cases where O3 data were lacking at forest sites (with altitude-dependent average differences of about 10% between O3 concentrations). Operational thresholds of biomass loss for both O3 indices were exceeded at the majority of the forest locations, suggesting similar risk under long-term average climate conditions. However, exposure-based indices estimated higher O3 risk during dry years as compared to the flux-based approach. In comparison, minor O3-like leaf injury symptoms were detected only at a few of the forest sites investigated. Relationships between flux-based risk thresholds and tree response need to be established for mature forest stands for validation of predicted growth reductions under the prevailing O3 regimes. - Exposure- and flux-based ozone indices suggest Bavarian forests to be at risk from ozone; the flux-based index offers a means of incorporating stand-specific and ecological variables that influence risk.

  19. The impact of high commercial fishery load on biological indices of the roach (Rutilus rutilus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. O. Kotovska

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Age composition, length and weight indices of the roach populations (Rutilus rutilus L. were analyzed and compared in water bodies with the different commercial fishery loading levels. Presence of fast-growing and slow-growing forms is inherent to cyprinid fish. In Dnieper reservoirs these forms are mixed and it is difficult to separate any one of them. It is assumed that selective elimination of fast-growing forms by commercial fishing may cause accumulation of slow-growing forms in populations. On that ground, water bodies with different levels of commercial fishery pressure have been chosen to test this hypothesis. For instance, Kremenchuk Reservoir was selected as a water body with high level of commercial fishery load because it forms more than a half of roach commercial catching in Ukraine. On the contrary, “Dniprovsko-Orilskiy” Natural Reserve was taken as a water body where human impact is minimum. Subsequently, comparing of the basic biological features of the roach from water bodies with different commercial fishery load illustrated the value of the study. It is found that the roach age range in Kremenchuk Reservoir is much higher than in subordinate waters of the Natural Reserve fund. Namely, the roach population in Kremenchuk Reservoir consisted of seventeen age groups while in “Dniprovsko-Orilskiy” Natural Reserve it comprised ten age groups only. However, size-weight features of species under study across the age groups 6+ –10+ in water bodies with the intensive commercial fishery were statistically lower than in protected waters of the Nature Reserve. Namely, length of these age groups in Kremenchuk Reservoir was equal to 24.6–33.5 cm, compared with 25.0–37.0 cm in the National Reserve. Naturally, that weight was equal to 334–957 and 340–1320 g, respectively. In general, this result does not fit into the traditional concept that the fast-growing roach should inhabit the lacustrine biocenosis of the Dnieper

  20. MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS OF RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN IODINE BIOLOGICAL EXPOSURE AND SUBCLINICAL THYROID DYSFUNCTIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Chong; Zhong-yan Shan; Wei Sun; Wei-ping Teng

    2005-01-01

    Objective To assess the relationships between iodine biological exposure and subclinical thyroid dysfunctions. Methods The cross-sectional survey was performed to obtain the epidemiologic data of population in three communities with different iodine biological exposure: mild iodine deficiency [median urinary iodine concentration (MUI) of 50 99g/L], more than adequate iodine intake (MUI of 200-299 μg/L), and excessive iodine intake (MUI over 300 μg/L). Univariate and multivariate analysis (logistic regression analysis) were used to analyze the risk factors of subclinical hypothyroidism and subclinical hyperthyroidism. Results Logistic regression analysis with sex and age controlled suggested that more than adequate iodine intake (OR = 3.172, P = 0.0004) and excessive iodine intake (OR = 6.391, P = 0.0001) increased the risk of subclinical hypothyroidism, while excessive iodine intake decreased the risk of subclinical hyperthyroidism (OR = 0.218, P= 0.0001). Logistic regression analysis including interaction of iodine intake and antibodies [tryroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb) and thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb)] suggested that excessive iodine intake was an independent risk factor of subclinical hypothyroidism (OR = 6.360, P = 0.0001), but independent protect factor of subclinical hyperthyroidism (OR = 0.193, P = 0.0001). More than adequate iodine intake and it's interaction with TgAb increased the risk of subclinical hypothyroidism independently, in addition, it decreased the risk of subclinical hyperthyroidism at the present of TPOAb. Conclusion Both excessive iodine intake and more than adequate iodine intake could increase risk of subclinical hypo thyroidism, supplement of iodine should be controlled to ensure MUI within the safe range.

  1. Surveillance indicators for potential reduced exposure products (PREPs: developing survey items to measure awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McNeill Ann

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the past decade, tobacco companies have introduced cigarettes and smokeless tobacco products (known as Potential Reduced Exposure Products, PREPs with purportedly lower levels of some toxins than conventional cigarettes and smokeless products. It is essential that public health agencies monitor awareness, interest, use, and perceptions of these products so that their impact on population health can be detected at the earliest stages. Methods This paper reviews and critiques existing strategies for measuring awareness of PREPs from 16 published and unpublished studies. From these measures, we developed new surveillance items and subjected them to two rounds of cognitive testing, a common and accepted method for evaluating questionnaire wording. Results Our review suggests that high levels of awareness of PREPs reported in some studies are likely to be inaccurate. Two likely sources of inaccuracy in awareness measures were identified: 1 the tendency of respondents to misclassify "no additive" and "natural" cigarettes as PREPs and 2 the tendency of respondents to mistakenly report awareness as a result of confusion between PREPs brands and similarly named familiar products, for example, Eclipse chewing gum and Accord automobiles. Conclusion After evaluating new measures with cognitive interviews, we conclude that as of winter 2006, awareness of reduced exposure products among U.S. smokers was likely to be between 1% and 8%, with the higher estimates for some products occurring in test markets. Recommended measurement strategies for future surveys are presented.

  2. Assessment of routine hematological indices in occupational exposure of the Kozloduy NPP personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The studies aim at determining haematological parameters in occupational exposure of the Kozloduy NPP personnel. The investigation covers the 1974/2000 period during which 1043 persons have been examined. The data obtained and the results are interpreted in terms of cumulative doses, length of service and age. Doses up to 400 mSv do not appear to have caused statistically significant effects on the major hematological parameters of the NPP personnel. The results show a tendency of increasing the leukocyte and lymphocyte count within the referential levels, being the only real effect of radiation on the personnel. The inclusion of other criteria concerning the effect of radiation on the Kozloduy NPP personnel is discussed. Special attention has been paid also to the assessment of cell mediated and humoral immunity of a group of the personnel. The results of assessment show no significant difference in the parameters of humoral immunity. Some alterations are observed in the proportion of lymphocyte subsets (a tendency of decreasing of T and B cells and increasing of NK cells within the referential levels) that could be a defence mechanism against radiation exposure. (author)

  3. Peroxidase activity as an indicator of exposure of wetland seedlings to metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton, H.D.; Klaine, S.J. [Clemson Univ., Pendleton, SC (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The enzyme peroxidase has been found to increase quantitatively in several aquatic plant species in response to increasing exposure to various contaminants. In this study, a number of wetland species are tested for their usefulness as bioindicators of metal exposure using the peroxidase assay. Woody species tested include Liquidambar styraciflua (sweetgum), Fraxinus pennsylvanica (green ash), and Cephalanthus occidentalis (buttonbush), while herbaceous species include Saururus cernuus (lizard`s tail) and Sparganium americanum (bur-reed). The assay has been optimized for all of these species. In all cases the pH optimum has been found to be either 5.5 or 6.0 and the substrate optimum is 2.8 or 1.4mM hydrogen peroxide. There is considerable variation in baseline peroxidase activity among the species when tested under their optimal assay conditions. These species are being dosed with copper, nickel, and cadmium in order to determine whether a response elicited. Seedlings will be dosed using both petri dish culture conditions and test tubes filled with vermiculite and sand combinations. The peroxidase response will be compared to germination and root elongation endpoints. Lettuce (Lactuca saliva) and radish (Raphanus sativus) are being tested alongside the wetland species as reference organisms for which background data is available. The wetland species tested in the present study have rarely if ever been used in toxicological studies.

  4. Exposure assessment to heavy metals in general population in a polluted area through biological monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vimercati L.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In polluted areas, a major issue is the correct assessment of the exposure of general population to industrial pollutants. The objectives were: to evaluate the exposure to heavy metals emitted from the industrial area of Taranto; to correlate biological monitoring data with environmental data, in order to clarify the impact of industrial pollution in terms of internal dose. A cross sectional study has been designed to measure levels of urinary arsenic, lead, cadmium, chromium, manganese in 300 inhabitants of Taranto, Statte and Laterza. Adult subjects have been selected by a two-stage random stratified sampling. Results are based on 272 subjects (131 men and 141 women. The observed concentrations of metals in the whole study population are overall high. The median values for lead (7.4 μg/l and chromium (0.4 μg/l are higher than the 95° percentile of the range of reference values. For manganese and arsenic the 95° percentile of concentration in the whole study population is higher than the 95° percentile of the range of reference values. Concentrations of mercury in the whole study population are comparable to reference.

  5. Cytochrome P4501A biomarker indication of the timeline of chronic exposure of Barrow's goldeneyes to residual Exxon Valdez oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esler, Daniel; Ballachey, B.E.; Trust, K.A.; Iverson, S.A.; Reed, J.A.; Miles, A.K.; Henderson, J.D.; Woodin, Bruce R.; Stegeman, John J.; McAdie, M.; Mulcahy, D.M.; Wilson, B.W.

    2011-01-01

    We examined hepatic EROD activity, as an indicator of CYP1A induction, in Barrow's goldeneyes captured in areas oiled during the 1989 Exxon Valdez spill and those from nearby unoiled areas. We found that average EROD activity differed between areas during 2005, although the magnitude of the difference was reduced relative to a previous study from 1996/1997, and we found that areas did not differ by 2009. Similarly, we found that the proportion of individuals captured from oiled areas with elevated EROD activity (-2 times unoiled average) declined from 41% in winter 1996/1997 to 10% in 2005 and 15% in 2009. This work adds to a body of literature describing the timelines over which vertebrates were exposed to residual Exxon Valdez oil and indicates that, for Barrow's goldeneyes in Prince William Sound, exposure persisted for many years with evidence of substantially reduced exposure by 2 decades after the spill. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Glyphosate accumulation, translocation, and biological effects in Coffea arabica after single and multiple exposures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrübbers, Lars Christoph; Valverde, Bernal E.; Strobel, Bjarne W.;

    2016-01-01

    In perennial crops like coffee, glyphosate drift exposure can occur multiple times during its commercial life span. Due to limited glyphosate degradation in higher plants, a potential accumulation of glyphosate could lead to increased biological effects with increased exposure frequency. In this...... study, we investigated glyphosate translocation over time, and its concentration and biological effects after single and multiple simulated spray-drift exposures. Additionally, shikimic acid/glyphosate ratios were used as biomarkers for glyphosate binding to its target enzyme.Four weeks after the...... exposure, glyphosate was continuously translocated. Shikimic acid levels were lin-ear correlated with glyphosate levels. After two months, however, glyphosate appeared to have reduced activity. In the greenhouse, multiple applications resulted in higher internal glyphosate concentrations.The time of...

  7. 76 FR 30093 - Effectiveness Indications Statements in Veterinary Biologics Labeling; Notice of Public Meeting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-24

    ... Labeling; Notice of Public Meeting and Request for Comments AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection... veterinary biologics labeling. We are also making the concept paper available for review and comment. DATES...-2011-0049, Regulatory Analysis and Development, PPD, APHIS, Station 3A-03.8, 4700 River Road Unit...

  8. Biological and morphological effects on the reproductive organ of rats after exposure to electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biological effect of electromagnetic field (EMF) emitted from mobile phones is a current debate and still a controversial issue. Therefore, little is known on the possible adverse effects on reproduction as mobile phone bio-effects are only a very recent concern. The aim of this experimental study was to determine the biological and morphological effects of 900 MHz radiofrequency (RF) EMF on rat testes. The study was performed in the Physiology and Histology Research Laboratories of Suleyman Demirel University, Faculty of Medicine, Isparta, Turkey in May 2004. Twenty adult male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 270-320 gm were randomized into two groups of 10 animals: Group I (control group) was not exposed to EMF and group II (EMF group) was exposed to 30 minutes per day, 5 days a week for 4 weeks to 900 MHz EMF. Testicular biopsy score count and the percentage of interstitial tissue to the entire testicular tissue were registered. Serum testosterone, plasma luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) levels were assayed biochemically. The weight of testes testicular biopsy score count and the percentage of interstitial tissue to the entire testicular tissue were not significantly different in EMF group compared to the control group. However, the diameter of the seminiferous tubules and the mean height of the germinal epithelium were significantly decreased in EMF group (p0.05). The biological and morphological effects resulting from 900 MHz RF EMF exposure lends no support to suggestions of adverse effect on the spermatogenesis, and on germinal epithelium. Therefore, testicular morphologic alterations may possibly be due to the hormonal changes. (author)

  9. Concept of Biological Progress and Information as Indication and Measure of Ontic Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonci Kokic

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The history of the idea of biological progress shows that it is not a selfexplanatory category, so a clear definition is required. Biological progress exists if: (1 “more progressive” is defined as “more complex” – in that case evolution is synonymous with progress, i.e. development from simple to complex, from homogeneous to heterogeneous; (2 we perceive the expression “more progressive” as more successful in relation to the environment, in these terms some groups in the history of life were more progressive because/so that they survived, while others were retrogressive or less progressive because/so that they died out; on the other hand, within their ecological niches, certain forms of life (species are perfectly adapted to their environment as long as it is stable (along these lines, mammals are no more progressive than bacteria; (3 we take the span or reach of a potential adaptation of populations as a measure (in which case differences exist. However, there is no active, innovative problem solving in relation to the environment either with plants or animals – only the variability mechanism / selection is in place, automatism, instinct. In the light of the above-mentioned biological criteria, man is the most complex living creature by his constitution (central nervous system, he is the least dependent on the environment and can be innovative in relation to the environment. Man is the only living creature capable of establishing an active relationship with the environment through his special tool – culture. Considering the level of organization and quantity of information, the mammal genome is more progressive than the bacterium genome, while the human genome comprises most information which makes man the most progressive living thing. We can talk about biological progress if we define progressiveness as advancement toward complexity of organisation, but sometimes the simplification of structure enables survival. It seems

  10. Technical specifications on harmonised epidemiological indicators for biological hazards to be covered by meat inspection of domestic sheep and goats

    OpenAIRE

    European Food Safety Authority

    2013-01-01

    In this report, harmonised epidemiological indicators are proposed for food-borne biological hazards that are related to domestic sheep and goats and meat thereof and that can be addressed in the context of meat inspection. These hazards include Toxoplasma gondii, pathogenicverocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli and mycobacteria. An epidemiological indicator is defined as the prevalence or concentration of the hazard at a certain stage of the food chain or an indirect measure of the hazard ...

  11. Indication of metal homeostasis disturbance in earthworm Eisenia fetida after exposure to semi-solid depot sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babić, Sanja; Dragun, Zrinka; Sauerborn Klobučar, Roberta; Ivanković, Dušica; Bačić, Niko; Fiket, Željka; Barišić, Josip; Krasnići, Nesrete; Strunjak-Perović, Ivančica; Topić Popović, Natalija; Čož-Rakovac, Rozelindra

    2015-09-01

    Treated sewage sludge is commonly used in agriculture as fertilizer. It is, therefore, necessary to determine possible detrimental influences of sludge application on soil contamination and accumulation of contaminants in tissues of terrestrial animals, which in the long run could also have undesirable effects on humans. With that aim, the study was performed using earthworm Eisenia fetida as test organism and semi-solid depot sludge from a wastewater treatment plant as exposure media. The concentrations of 26 metals/metalloids were determined in depot sludge, and their bioaccumulation was estimated in whole tissue of E. fetida, and for the first time in the soluble tissue fraction, which represents metal fraction available for metabolic requirements and toxic effects. Obtained results have revealed acceptable levels of several elements (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn) in depot sludge, when compared to currently valid regulations, and only moderate accumulation of some elements (e.g. As, Ba, Cd, Co, Fe, Tl, V, and Zn) in earthworms, as a consequence of exposure to depot sludge. However, a concentration increase after exposure to depot sludge was observed in E. fetida for several elements (Cd, Mo, and Zn), which were present in lower concentrations in the exposure mixtures than in soil. Contrary, a concentration decrease was observed for Cs, Mn, and Rb, although they were present in higher concentrations in depot sludge than in soil. It was an indication of disturbance in metal homeostasis in earthworms, possibly caused by exposure to complex mixture of contaminants present in depot sludge. The cumulative effect of exposure to a number of various contaminants (inorganic, organic, microbiological and pharmaceutical), even if each of them was not present in very high concentrations, could have caused distress in earthworms exposed to depot sludge. PMID:25931022

  12. Multi-biological defects caused by lead exposure exhibit transferable properties from exposed parents to their progeny in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Whether the multi-biological toxicity from lead exposure could be transferred to progeny has not been clarified. In the present study, we explored the Caenorhabditis elegans to analyze the multiple toxicities from lead exposure and their possibly transferable properties. The lead exposure could cause series of severe multi-biological defects with a concentration-dependent manner by affecting the endpoints of life span, development, reproduction and locomotion behaviors in nematodes. Moreover, most of these toxicities could be transferred to progeny from lead exposed animals and some of the defects in progeny appeared even more severe than in their parents, such as the body sizes and mean life spans. We summarized the defects caused by lead exposure into three groups according to their transferable properties or rescue patterns. That is, the defects caused by lead exposure could be largely, or partially, or became even more severe in progeny animals. Therefore, our results suggest that lead exposure can cause severely multi-biological defects, and most of these multiple toxicities can be considered as transferable for exposed animals in C. elegans.

  13. Fish biliary metabolites as an indicator of PAH exposure at an ecoregional scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bile metabolites were measured in fish collected from the Eastern Cornbelt Plains (ECBP) Ecoregion to determine the distribution and levels of exposure to combustion by-products and petroleum. Bile was collected from the gall bladder of 1 to 6 white suckers from 118 sites across Ohio (107), Indiana (8) and Michigan (3) using a randomized EMAP statistical sampling design. Diluted bile was measured at 380/430 nm to estimate the exposure to BaP-type compounds and 290/335 nm to estimate naphthalene-type compounds. Fixed fluorescence readings were normalized to the concentration of protein in bile. Mean values for all sites had skewed distributions. For BAP the mean, standard deviation, skewness and kurtosis were 129.3, 137.3, 2.7 and 8.5, respectively. The corresponding values for NAPH were 29.1, 19.2, and 4.9 and 34.3. The range for the lowest 10% of sites was from 0 to 24.1 for BAP, and was from 8.5 to 15.8 for NAPH. The range for the highest 10% was from 276.9 to 757.3 for BAP, and was from 45.7 to 181.9 for NAPH. For first order stream sites, the range for the lower 10% and the upper 10% were from 29.2 to 34.2 and from 436 to 757.3 for BAP. The corresponding numbers for NAPH were from 17 to 18.5 and 45.7 to 84.9. For second order stream sites, the above ranges were from 3.5 to 21.9 and from 282.2 to 723.8 for BAP. The corresponding numbers for NAPH were from 8.5 to 14.3 and from 37.6 to 63.4. For the third order stream sites, the lower and upper 10% ranges were from 0 to 22.6 and from 207.1 to 421.8 for BAP. The respective numbers for NAPH were from 12.1 to 15.5 and from 53.6 to 181.9

  14. Prenatal exposure to a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB congener influences fixation duration on biological motion at 4-months-old: a preliminary study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Doi

    Full Text Available Adverse effects of prenatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB congeners on postnatal brain development have been reported in a number of previous studies. However, few studies have examined the effects of prenatal PCB exposure on early social development. The present study sought to increase understanding of the neurotoxicity of PCBs by examining the relationship between PCB congener concentrations in umbilical cord blood and fixation patterns when observing upright and inverted biological motion (BM at four-months after birth. The development of the ability to recognize BM stimuli is considered a hallmark of socio-cognitive development. The results revealed a link between dioxin-like PCB #118 concentration and fixation pattern. Specifically, four-month-olds with a low-level of prenatal exposure to PCB #118 exhibited a preference for the upright BM over inverted BM, whereas those with a relatively high-level of exposure did not. This finding supports the proposal that prenatal PCB exposure impairs the development of social functioning, and indicates the importance of congener-specific analysis in the risk analysis of the adverse effects of PCB exposure on the brain development.

  15. Gafchromic film as a fast visual indicator of radiation exposure of first responders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three types of Gafchromic films have been studied to investigate their potential for use as a visually readable dosemeter for persons acting as first responders in connection with radiological or nuclear emergencies. The two most sensitive film types show a pronounced variation in sensitivity by photon energy and are therefore not suitable for use in cases of unknown exposures. The third film type tested (RTQA2), which is intended for quality control in radiation therapy has a sensitivity that is independent of the radiation quality, and is therefore considered as the most optimal for visual reading in situ. Tests carried out on a group of 10 human observers showed that absorbed doses down to 40 mGy can be detected by the eye. Read by a portable densitometer, qualitative absorbed dose estimates down to 9 mGy can be achieved. The colour change is obtained instantaneously, giving first responders immediate information about the presence of beta-, gamma- and X-ray radiation. (authors)

  16. Elemental mercury exposure: correlation of urine mercury indices with ulnar nerve conduction studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, S.P.; Cavender, G.D.; Langolf, G.D.; Albers, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    An electrophysiological evaluation was made of the ulnar nerve in 18 men who were exposed to elemental mercury vapor in the course of their jobs at a mercury-cell chlorine plant. The men averaged 31 years of age, ranging from 19 to 56. Urinary mercury levels were available for three years prior to the evaluation of the ulnar nerve. Abnormal nerve conduction studies were obtained in five subjects, with three having prolonged sensory distal latency, one having prolonged motor distal letency and one having both prolonged motor and sensory distal latencies with a low normal SNAP amplitude. Over half of the mercury levels were significantly higher in this abnormal group. The highest correlation obstained was between sensory latency and the number of months urine mercury exceeded 0.50 milligrams/liter. The authors conclude that exposure to elemental mercury can affect both motor and sensory peripheral nerve conduction and that the degree of involvement can be related to time-integrated urine mercury levels.

  17. Effects of organic amendment on soil quality as assessed by biological indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Sultana, Salma

    2011-01-01

    Soil quality decline is one of the most predominant effect deriving from human activities. In particular, intensive agricultural management can affect negatively soils, principally due to rapid depletion of soil organic matter, that affects, in turn, soil physical, chemical and biological properties. The declining trend of soil quality coupled with mismanagement of agricultural production is pose a serious threat to sustainability of intensive agriculture. Sustainable intensive agriculture is...

  18. Application of hair as an indicator for trace element exposure in man. A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report presents a comprehensive summary of what is known from the literature on the use of hair as a bioindicator for trace elements. It is split into two parts: The use of hair as a biopsy tissue for trace elements in the human body and the contribution of studies in animals to the application of hair as an indicator for metals and trace elements in man. A separate abstract is prepared for each part. Refs, figs and tabs

  19. Urban form indicators as proxy on the noise exposure of buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Lígia Torres; Oliveira, Marta Isabela Fernandes; Silva, José F.

    2014-01-01

    The present paper aims to address the problems of the urban environment as an area of interaction between urban forms and urban noise. This interaction is intended to be monitored using urban indica-tors, by comparing the effects of noise propagation using models of urban forms. The model of noise pre-diction allowed developing noise studies in facades, resulting in noise levels in a calculation grid located in the building facades. The study will allow the creation of different scenari...

  20. Biological effects of repeated inhalation exposure of beagle dogs to aerosols of 144Ce in fused clay particles I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This experiment was initiated to study the biological behavior and long-term effects of repeated inhalation exposures to 144Ce in fused clay particles compared with those seen in Beagle dogs that received a single exposure as young adults. The 36 dogs, divided into four equal groups, are exposed every 8 weeks to achieve the following: to maintain lung burdens of 9 and 4.5 μCi 144Ce/kg body weight in the first and second groups, respectively; to increase the lung burden by 2.5 μCi 144Ce/kg body weight in the third group with each exposure and to expose controls (fourth group) to fused clay containing stable cerium. With these exposure sequences, the 144Ce-exposed dogs will receive increasing or maintained β dose rates in contrast to the steadily decreasing dose rate seen after a single inhalation exposure. Exposures to the first and third groups will produce a cumulative absorbed dose to lung of approximately equal to 35,000 rads and those to the second group will yield approximately equal to 17,000 rads within 2 yr after the first exposure. Single exposure dogs that had died with pulmonary neoplasia when this experiment was initiated had cumulative doses to death of 29,000 to 61,000 rads. Six of the planned 13 exposures have been completed to date. All exposed dogs are surviving and will be maintained for lifespan observation. (U.S.)

  1. Benthic macroinvertebrate as biological indicator for water quality in Sungai Penchala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahazar, Akmal; Shuhaimi-Othman, Mohammad; Kutty, Ahmad Abas

    2013-11-01

    Sungai Penchala is one of the main tributaries for Sungai Klang which flows through the urban area of Wilayah Persekutuan Kuala Lumpur before merging with Sungai Klang in the Petaling Jaya district. As urban river, Sungai Penchala is polluted because of anthropogenic activities and this include direct garbage load, untreated drainage system from nearby residential area and also runoff from frequent heavy rain as the country located in tropical area. Currently, there are efforts from government and educational sectors to monitor and rehabilitate the river with vision to return it into its former natural function and not as a sink for urban population. Unlike pristine or recreational river, the water quality of urban river changes drastically over day even hours. Thus there is need for a procedure that can be used for water quality inspection in time of sampling but also provides reliable information that can resemble past event. Therefore, to do that the river monitoring was carried out by employing the traditional physical-chemical parameter by using Hydrolab Quanta® multi parameter reader. The benthic macroinvertebrate was collected using Surber's sampler and preserved in 95% ethanol for identification purposes. The data collected was analyzed for Water Quality Index (WQI) and Biological Monitoring Working Party (BMWP) to determine the river condition. The system used has its own strength and weakness but when employed together, it is expected to give better knowledge in evaluating river condition. Thus, increase the accuracy of evaluation process. In this study, the biological monitoring shows that changes in water quality influence the diversity of benthic macroinvertebrate. This study prove that biological monitoring by utilizing benthic macroinvertebrate can also be used in determining water quality of urban type river. It is also produced result that more readily interprets as it reveal past event disturbance which sometimes missed by physical

  2. Serum amylase as a semiquantitative indicator of an exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantitative aspects of amylase-activity increase in serum after a single irradiation of the salivary glands in man are considered. The threshold is about 0,4 Gy; in the range 0,4 - 5 Gy the dose can be estimated semi-quantitatively after 24 hours if the salivary glands were irradiated completely and homogeneously. To obtain a (pre-irradiation) reference level the 72-hour value is used. Non-complete and inhomogeneous irradiation of the glands and fractionated irradiation invalidate the dose assessment. It is concluded that at present serum amylase measurement is the only available biochemical indicator of irradiation dose in man. 7 refs., 2 figs. (qui)

  3. Biological agents: investigation into leprosy and other infectious diseases before indication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antônio, João Roberto; Soubhia, Rosa Maria Cordeiro; Paschoal, Vania Del Arco; Amarante, Carolina Forte; Travolo, Ana Regina Franchi

    2013-01-01

    Biological agents are widely used for various immune-mediated diseases, with remarkable effectiveness in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and Crohn's disease. However, attention needs to be drawn to the adverse effects of these therapies and the risk of reactivating underlying granulomatous infectious diseases such as tuberculosis, leprosy, syphilis, leishmaniasis, among others. The objective of this paper is to describe a case of leprosy in a patient with RA using anti-TNF alfa, demonstrating the need for systematic investigation of skin lesions suggestive of leprosy in patients who require rheumatoid arthritis therapeutic treatment, especially in endemic regions like Brazil. PMID:24346871

  4. Coral Reef Health Indices versus the Biological, Ecological and Functional Diversity of Fish and Coral Assemblages in the Caribbean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Pérez, Leopoldo; Rodríguez-Zaragoza, Fabián Alejandro; Ortiz, Marco; Cupul-Magaña, Amílcar Leví; Carriquiry, Jose D; Ríos-Jara, Eduardo; Rodríguez-Troncoso, Alma Paola; García-Rivas, María Del Carmen

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the relationship between the indices known as the Reef Health Index (RHI) and two-dimensional Coral Health Index (2D-CHI) and different representative metrics of biological, ecological and functional diversity of fish and corals in 101 reef sites located across seven zones in the western Caribbean Sea. Species richness and average taxonomic distinctness were used to asses biological estimation; while ecological diversity was evaluated with the indices of Shannon diversity and Pielou´s evenness, as well as by taxonomic diversity and distinctness. Functional diversity considered the number of functional groups, the Shannon diversity and the functional Pielou´s evenness. According to the RHI, 57.15% of the zones were classified as presenting a "poor" health grade, while 42.85% were in "critical" grade. Based on the 2D-CHI, 28.5% of the zones were in "degraded" condition and 71.5% were "very degraded". Differences in fish and coral diversity among sites and zones were demonstrated using permutational ANOVAs. Differences between the two health indices (RHI and 2D-CHI) and some indices of biological, ecological and functional diversity of fish and corals were observed; however, only the RHI showed a correlation between the health grades and the species and functional group richness of fish at the scale of sites, and with the species and functional group richness and Shannon diversity of the fish assemblages at the scale of zones. None of the health indices were related to the metrics analyzed for the coral diversity. In general, our study suggests that the estimation of health indices should be complemented with classic community indices, or should at least include diversity indices of fish and corals, in order to improve the accuracy of the estimated health status of coral reefs in the western Caribbean Sea. PMID:27579575

  5. Quality of UVR exposure for different biological systems along a latitudinal gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernet, Maria; Diaz, Susana B; Fuenzalida, Humberto A; Camilion, Carolina; Booth, Charles R; Cabrera, Sergio; Casiccia, Claudio; Deferrari, Guillermo; Lovengreen, Charlotte; Paladini, Alejandro; Pedroni, Jorge; Rosales, Alejandro; Zagarese, Horacio E

    2009-09-01

    The exposure of organisms to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is characterized by the climatology (annual cycle) and the variance (anomalies) of biologically-weighted irradiances at eight geographical locations in austral South America, from 1995-2002. The net effect of UVR on biological systems is a result of the balance of damage and repair which depends on intensity and duration of irradiance and is modulated by its variability. The emphasis in this study is on day-to-day variability, a time scale of importance to adaptive strategies that counteract UVR damage. The irradiances were weighted with DNA- and phytoplankton photosynthesis-action spectra. Low latitude sites show high average UVR. For all sites, the frequency of days with above average irradiances is higher than below average irradiances. Persistence in anomalies is generally low (coefficient), but higher for DNA- than phytoplankton photosynthesis-weighted irradiances due to their higher correspondence to stratospheric ozone. Cloudiness and other factors with small wavelength dependence (e.g. aerosols and albedo) are highly correlated with UVR anomalies at low latitudes (24-33 degrees S); ozone correlates higher at high latitudes (42-54.5 degrees S). Our results show that organisms in this region deal with several days of excess radiation and fewer, shorter and more intense periods of lower than average radiation. Relief from UVR stress (or higher frequency of days below the climatology) is more prevalent at high latitudes (54.5 degrees S). Thus, lower latitudes are more stressful to organisms not only because of higher average UVR irradiance but also for the higher frequency of days above the climatology. PMID:19707621

  6. Uranium bone content as an indicator of chronic environmental exposure from drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium (U) is an ubiquitous radioelement found in drinking water and food. As a consequence of its prevalence, most humans ingest a few micrograms (μg) of this element daily. It is incorporated in various organs and tissues. Several studies have demonstrated that ingested U is deposited mainly in bones. Therefore, U skeletal content could be considered as a prime indicator for low-level chronic intake. In this study, 71 archived vertebrae bone samples collected in seven Canadian cities were subjected to digestion and U analysis by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. These results were correlated with U concentrations in municipal drinking water supplies, with the data originating from historical studies performed by Health Canada. A strong relationship (r2 = 0.97) was observed between the averaged U total skeletal content and averaged drinking water concentration, supporting the hypothesis that bones are indeed a good indicator of U intake. Using a PowerBASIC compiler to process an ICRP systemic model for U (ICRP, 1995a), U total skeletal content was estimated using two gastrointestinal tract absorption factors (f1 = 0.009 and 0.03). Comparisons between observed and modelled skeletal contents as a function of U intake from drinking water tend to demonstrate that neither of the f1 values can adequately estimate observed values. An f1value of 0.009 provides a realistic estimate for intake resulting from food consumption only (6.72 μg) compared to experimental data (7.4 ± 0.8 μg), whereas an f1value of 0.03 tends to better estimate U skeletal content at higher levels of U (1–10 μg L−1) in drinking water

  7. Gene expression in caged fish as indicators of contaminants exposure in tropical karstic water bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Fuentes, Gabriela; Luna-Ramírez, Karen S; Soto, Mélina; Richardson, Kristine L

    2012-04-01

    Karstic areas in Yucatan are very permeable, which allows contaminants to move rapidly into the aquifer. In the present study, we evaluated gene expression of vitellogenin (VTG) and cytochrome P-450 1A (CYP1A) in caged juvenile zebrafish deployed for 15 days in 13 different water bodies, cenotes and aguadas, throughout karstic region of the Yucatan peninsula. Gene expression was evaluated using qRT-PCR. Results indicated induction of VTG in 7 water bodies with respect to reference cage. The highest relative VTG expression, about 3000 times higher than reference cage, was found in an aguada close to a cattle farm. CYP1A induction with respect to reference cage was observed in 3 water bodies, all of them located near villages or used for tourist activities. Pollutants and biomarkers of effect should be monitored in these water bodies in order to have a better understanding of the actual levels of pollutants that are present at Yucatan's aquifer and the potential risk to human and environmental health. PMID:22014761

  8. Studies on the biological effects of internal exposure of alpha emitters. Carcinogenicity test of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Outlines of carcinogenicity tests in animals given with injected or inhaled plutonium (Pu) were described. Insoluble 239PuO2 particles were nasally inhaled in rats maintained for life. The dose response relationship between incidence of their lung tumor and absorbed radiation dose in the lung revealed that>1 Gy dose increased the incidence of malignant lung tumors, which differed from findings in the U.S. probably due to the difference between particle sizes. Further, a carcinogenic mechanism specific for alpha-ray was suggested based on tumor-related gene analysis. After soluble 239Pu (citrate salt) was injected in mice, significant reduction of lifetime and early tumor- or non-tumor-death were observed when the bone dose exceeded 3 Gy. Tumors were mostly osteosarcoma, lymphoma and other soft tissue solid cancers and were different from those induced by gamma-ray, X-ray and neutron irradiation. Studies on the strain difference, on the carcinogenic mechanism and alpha-ray induced mutation and transformation are in progress, which may lead to elucidation of the biological effects of internal exposure of alpha-emitters. (K.H.)

  9. Activation of a distinct subpopulation of pulmonary macrophages following exposure to biological response modifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drath, D B; Do, C; Burd, T; Hong, L L

    1994-03-01

    A distinct subpopulation of tissue-associated pulmonary macrophages (TAPM) displayed tumoricidal activity towards syngeneic and xenogeneic targets following in vitro incubation with N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine (MDP). This subpopulation, as well as, the predominant population of freely lavagable alveolar macrophages destroyed allogeneic targets following a similar incubation with either 6-0-stearoyl MDP (S-MDP) or recombinant interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). IFN-gamma-induced in vivo tumoricidal activation of both populations of pulmonary macrophage was most effective when delivered either intravenously or via osmotic minipump infusion and least effective when administered by direct intratracheal instillation. The separate populations also displayed in vivo activation in response to liposome-encapsulated i.v. administered S-MDP. Under comparable conditions, IFN-alpha was not nearly as effective. Metabolic activation of TAPM, assessed by the release of increased levels of superoxide free radicals during phagocytosis, occurred following 24 hr exposure to S-MDP or lipopolysaccharide. Incorporation of these agents into multilamellar vesicle liposomes further augmented the release of superoxide observed at 24 hrs. Our results collectively demonstrated that a subpopulation of lung macrophage, a tissue-associated pulmonary macrophage, may be activated to a tumoricidal state and to release pronounced levels of oxygen free radicals following either in vitro or in situ treatment with several biological response modifiers. PMID:8194852

  10. Liquid chromatography of urinary porphyrins for the biological monitoring of occupational exposure to porphyrinogenic substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colombi, A.; Maroni, M.; Ferioli, A.; Valla, C.; Coletti, G.; Foa, V.

    1983-01-01

    Very sensitive and precise analytical methods for measuring total porphyrin excretion and the relative amounts of different porphyrins in urine are required in order to monitor the biological effects of porphyrinogenic substances in workers and the general population. Many analytical steps of a HPLC method for measuring porphyrins as methyl esters in urine have been perfected. Sensitivity is 0.1 microgram/1 for each type of porphyrin, and average recovery is 92% in the range of 50-450 micrograms/liter porphyrins. The coefficient of variation is 3.4% within a series and 12.5% between series. Chemical oxidation before analysis and appropriate storing of the samples are the key points in achieving high quality results. The urinary excretion of porphyrins in healthy male workers varies within the range 21 to 161 micrograms/liter (95% limits of a group of 78 subjects). Concomitant factors, like drug use or liver disorders, were found to alter urinary porphyrin excretion. The proposed method permits the detection of extremely small alterations in porphyrin excretion resulting from occupational exposure to industrial chemicals such as, for example, mild coproporphyrinuria or early stages of chemical porphyria induced by polyhalogenated arylhydrocarbons.

  11. Assessment of students’ health condition by indicators of adaptation potential, biological age and bio-energetic reserves of organism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martyniuk O.V.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to assess students’ health condition by indicators of adaptation potential, biological age and express-assessment. Material: in the research 47 first and second year girl students participated, who belonged to main health group. Results: we distributed the girl students into three groups: 14.89% of them were included in group with “safe” health condition; 34.04% - in group of “third state”; 51.06% were related to group with “ dangerous” health condition. We established that dangerous level was characterized by energy potential of below middle and low level. It is accompanied by accelerated processes of organism’s age destructions and tension of regulation mechanisms. Conclusions: the received results permit to further develop and generalize the data of students’ health’s assessment by indicators of adaptation potentials, biological age and physical health’s condition.

  12. Biological effects of repeated inhalation exposure of Beagle dogs to relatively insoluble aerosols of 144Ce. V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behavior and long-term biological effects in Beagle dogs of 144Ce inhaled in fused aluminosilicate particles in repeated inhalation exposures are being studied for comparison with data from dogs that were exposed only once to a similar aerosol. Four groups of nine dogs each were exposed once every 8 weeks for 2 years (13 exposures) to achieve specified exposure goals. These goals were: to increase the lung burden by 2.5 μCi 144Ce/kg body weight with each exposure in the first group; to reestablish lung burdens of 9 or 4.5 μCi 144Ce/kg body weight in the second and third groups, respectively; and to expose controls (fourth group) to fused aluminosilicate particles containing stable cerium. With these exposure sequences, the 144Ce-exposed dogs received increasing or relatively constant beta radiation dose rates in contrast to the steadily decreasing dose rate seen after a single inhalation exposure. Exposures in the first and second groups were planned to yield a cumulative absorbed dose to lung of approx. = 35,000 rads and those in the third group approx. = 17,000 rads within two years after the first exposure. All 13 exposures have been completed. During the past year, one dog in the 9.0 μCi 144Ce/kg body weight group died at 1558 days after the first exposure with autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The remaining 24 144Ce-exposed and seven control dogs generally appear to be in good physical condition with exception of a persistent lymphopenia at approx. = 5 years after the first exposure. They are continuing to be maintained for life span observations

  13. Development of bioprocesses for the production of a biological indicator for sterilization processes from Bacillus atrophaeus spores

    OpenAIRE

    Sella, Sandra Regina Barroso Ruiz

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: The genus Bacillus includes a great diversity of industrially important strains, including Bacillus atrophaeus (formerly Bacillus subtilis var. niger). This spore-forming bacterium has been established as industrial bacteria in the production of biological sterilization indicators, in studies of biodefense and astrobiology methods, and as potential adjuvants or vehicles for vaccines, among other applications. Two novels, cost-effective B. atrophaeus Sterilization Bioindicator System...

  14. Small scale spatial heterogeneity of Normalized Difference Vegetation Indices (NDVIs) and hot spots of photosynthesis in biological soil crusts

    OpenAIRE

    T. Fischer; M. Veste; Andreas Eisele; Oliver Bens; W. Spyra; Reinhard F. J. Hüttl

    2012-01-01

    Normalized Difference Vegetation Indices (NDVIs) are typically determined using satellite or airborne remote sensing, or field portable spectrometers, which give an averaged signal on centimetre to metre scale plots. Biological soil crust (BSC) patches may have smaller sizes, and ecophysiological, hydrological as well as pedological processes may be heterogeneously distributed within this level of resolution. A ground-based NDVI imaging procedure using low-cost equipment (Olympus Camedia 5000...

  15. Chironomidae (Diptera, Chironomidae) as biological indicators of water bodies ecological condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents data confirming that Chironomidae are good to be used as an indicative criterion when classifying lakes. It was found that their quantity and presence of certain species could serve as an index in assessment of water body ecological condition. Results of cytotaxonomic analysis helped to reveal the nature of Chironomini species diversity in STS water bodies. (author)

  16. Soil nematode assemblages indicate the potential for biological regulation of pest species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Hanne; Ferris, Howard

    2016-05-01

    In concept, regulation or suppression of target nematode pest species should be enhanced when an abundance of predator species is supported by ample availability of bacterial- fungal- and non-damaging plant-feeding prey species. We selected soils from natural and managed environments that represented different levels of resource availability and disturbance. In microcosm chambers of each soil, in its natural state or after heat defaunation, we introduced test prey species not already resident in the soils (Meloidogyne incognita and Steinernema feltiae). Survival of the test prey was determined after a 5-day bioassay exposure. Across the soils tested, predator abundance and biomass were greater in undisturbed soils with plentiful resources and lower in soils from agricultural sites. Suppressiveness to the two introduced species increased with both numerical abundance and metabolic footprint of the predator assemblages. The magnitude of the increase in suppressiveness was greater at low numbers of predators then dampened to an asymptotic level at greater predator abundance, possibly determined by temporal and spatial aspects of the bioassay system and/or satiation of the predators. The more resource-limited the predators were and the higher the metabolic predator footprint, the greater the suppressiveness. The applied implications of this study are that soil suppressiveness to pest species may be enhanced by increasing resources to predators, removing chemical and physical constraints to their survival and increase, and altering management practices so that predators and target prey are co-located in time and space.

  17. AVERAGE BIOLOGICAL INDICES OF THE MAJOR FISH SPECIES OF THE ZAPORIZHZHIA RESERVOIR AND OTHER FISHERY WATER BODIES OF DNEPROPETROVSK REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Fedonenko

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate, analyze and summarize the biological indices of commercial fish species in the main fishery water bodies of Dnіpropetrovsk region for the last 10 years. Methodology. Field data were collected in the Zaporizhzhia reservoir during 2003 – 2013 using a standard set of monitoring fishing gears (gill nets with mesh size a=30–120 mm. Juvenile fish were caught in third decade of June - first decade of August using the juvenile fish beach seine with a length of 10 m. Processing of ichthyological materials was conducted according to generally accepted methods. Findings. When comparing the biological indices of fish in the Zaporіzhzhia reservoir with the data for the past decade reflected in the normative documents, we found significant changes in the population of pikeperch (Sander lucioperca and gibel carp (Carassius gibelio, which concern the average fish weight, fertility and the relative proportion of females in the spawning stock. Roach (Rutilus rutilus, perch (Perca fluviatilis, and gibel carp are characterized a reduced number of spawning events. The biological indices of bream (Abramis brama, common carp (Cyprinus, pike (Esox lucius and catfish (Silurus glanis populations remain virtually unchanged during the study period. As for biological indices of Black and Caspian Sea sprat, rudd, gobies and crayfish, the information on these species in the relevant regulatory documents is missing, so it is not possible to assess the dynamics of their changes. Due to an inventory of small fishery water bodies we received the information on the biological indicators of major species, which can also be used for updating the normative database. Originality. For the first time we summarized the characteristic of fish fauna in major fishery water bodies of Dnepropetrovsk region and analyzed main indices, which define the conditions of fish stock development and exploitation of aquatic living aquatic resources in fishery water bodies

  18. Development of a low-cost sterilization biological indicator using Bacillus atrophaeus by solid-state fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sella, Sandra Regina B R; Guizelini, Belquis P; Zanello, Pedro H; Vandenberghe, Luciana P S; Ribeiro, Ciro A O; Minozzo, João Carlos; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    The production of biological indicators involving bacterial sporulation and multi-step downstream processes has been described. The goal of the present work was to use fermented material as the final product in a biological indicator, thereby reducing processing steps and costs. The performance of three different inexpensive supports (vermiculite, sand, and sugarcane bagasse) was assessed by determining Bacillus atrophaeus sporulation during solid-state fermentation and by assessing the direct use of the fermentation products in the subsequent steps of the process. All three supports allowed spore production of between 10(7) and 10(9) CFU g(-1). Sand proved to be the best inert support enabling the direct use of the fermented product due to its easy homogenization, filling properties, and compatibility with recovery medium. Bacterial adhesion to the sand surface was supported by biofilm formation. The resistance to sterilization of the dried fermentation product was evaluated. For dry-heat resistance (160°C), the D value was 6.6 min, and for ethylene oxide resistance (650 mg/L), the D value was 6.5 min. The cost reduction of this process was at least 48%. No previous studies have been published on the application of sand as a support in solid-state fermentation for the production of biological indicators. PMID:21785930

  19. Quantification of deaths attributed to air pollution in Sweden using estimated population exposure to nitrogen dioxide as indicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the previous phase of this project a model was provided for quantifying the general population exposure to air pollution. From that work interpolated yearly mean concentrations of nitrogen dioxide were provided for the Swedish population. To be applied in the health impact assessment we selected an ecological study from Auckland, New Zealand, which reported a 13 % increase in non-accidental mortality (all ages) for 10 μg/m3 increase in NO2. Based on official national data we assumed a baseline rate of 1,010 deaths per 100,000 persons and year at the population weighted mean level of approximately 10 μg NO2/m3. We then calculated the death rate and the yearly number of deaths expected at the population weighted mean exposure in each of four exposure classes above 10 μg/m3. Using the modelled levels of NO2 as an indicator of air pollution levels from transportation and combustion, and calculating effects on mortality only above the yearly mean 10 μg/m3, we estimated excess exposure to result in 2,837 (95% CI 2400-3273) deaths per year. A recent paper presenting similar calculations estimated the local contribution to urban levels of PM in Sweden to result in around 1,800 deaths per year, but the authors questioned the use of risk coefficients for regional PM to assess the effect of local traffic pollutants. The new results obtained, using locally produced nitrogen dioxide as the basis for the risk assessment, resulted in an impact estimate 55 % higher than the published estimate based on PM

  20. Biological diversity values in semi-natural grasslands : indicators, landscape context and restoration

    OpenAIRE

    Öster, Mathias

    2006-01-01

    Semi-natural grasslands, which are a declining and fragmented habitat in Europe, contain a high biodiversity, and are therefore of interest to conservation. This thesis examines how plant diversity is influenced by the landscape context, and how plant and fungal diversity can be targeted by practical conservation using indicator species and congruence between species groups. Reproduction and recruitment of the dioecious herb Antennaria dioica was also investigated, providing a case study on h...

  1. Effect of chronic exposure to cadmium on serum lipid, lipoprotein and oxidative stress indices in male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samarghandian Saeed

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium (Cd is an environmental toxic metal implicated in lipid abnormalities. The present study was designed to elucidate the possible association between chronic exposure to Cd concentration and alterations in plasma lipid, lipoprotein, and oxidative stress indices in rats. Sixteen male rats were assigned to 2 groups of 8 rats each (test and control. The Cd-exposed group obtained drinking water containing cadmium chloride (CdCl2 in the concentration of 2.0 mg Cd/L in drinking water for 3 months. At the end of the experimental period, blood samples were obtained to determine the changes of serum triglycerides (TG, total cholesterol (TC, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, reduced glutathione (GSH, malondialdehyde (MDA and also serum Cd contents. The results of the present study indicated that Cd administration significantly increased the serum levels of TG, TC, LDL-C, MDA and Cd with reduction in the HDL-C and GSH levels. In conclusion, evidence is presented that chronic exposure to low Cd concentration can adversely affect the lipid and lipoprotein profile via lipid peroxidation.

  2. Childhood exposure to violence and lifelong health: clinical intervention science and stress-biology research join forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffitt, Terrie E

    2013-11-01

    Many young people who are mistreated by an adult, victimized by bullies, criminally assaulted, or who witness domestic violence react to this violence exposure by developing behavioral, emotional, or learning problems. What is less well known is that adverse experiences like violence exposure can lead to hidden physical alterations inside a child's body, alterations that may have adverse effects on life-long health. We discuss why this is important for the field of developmental psychopathology and for society, and we recommend that stress-biology research and intervention science join forces to tackle the problem. We examine the evidence base in relation to stress-sensitive measures for the body (inflammatory reactions, telomere erosion, epigenetic methylation, and gene expression) and brain (mental disorders, neuroimaging, and neuropsychological testing). We also review promising interventions for families, couples, and children that have been designed to reduce the effects of childhood violence exposure. We invite intervention scientists and stress-biology researchers to collaborate in adding stress-biology measures to randomized clinical trials of interventions intended to reduce effects of violence exposure and other traumas on young people. PMID:24342859

  3. Clinical indications and biological mechanisms of splenic irradiation in autoimmune diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Splenic irradiation (SI) is a fairly unknown treatment modality in autoimmune disorders like autoimmune thrombocytopenia (AIT) or autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), which may provide an effective, low toxic and cost-effective treatment for selected patients. Patients, Materials and Methods: This article reviews the limited experiences on splenic irradiation in autoimmune thrombocytopenia by analyzing the current studies including 71 patients and some preliminary reports on splenic irradiation in autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Results: In autoimmune thrombocytopenia between 40 and 90% of all patients responded, but most of them relapsed within 4 to 6 months after splenic irradiation. Between 10 and 20% of all patients had a sustained response. The efficacy of splenic irradiation in HIV-associated cases of thrombocytopenia is probably lower than in other forms of autoimmune thrombocytopenia, but especially in this group immunosuppressive drug treatment of autoimmune thrombocytopenia exposes some problems. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia there are some case reports about efficacy of splenic irradiation. Toxicity of splenic irradiation in both diseases was very moderate. Conclusions: For HIV patients, for elderly patients or patients at high risk for complications following splenectomy splenic irradiation might be a treatment option. Splenic irradiation as preoperative treatment in patients not responding to or not suitable for immunosuppressive drugs prior to splenectomy may be a promising new application of splenic irradiation to reduce adverse effects of splenectomy in thrombocytopenic patients. A further analysis of the biological mechanisms underlying splenic irradiation may help to improve patient selection, to optimize dose concepts and treatment schedules and will improve understanding of radiotherapy as an immunomodulatory treatment modality. (orig.)

  4. Characterization of a multiculture in-vitro cell exposure chamber for assessing the biological impact of diesel engine exhaust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to study the various health influencing parameters related to particulate as well as to gas-phase pollutants emitted by Diesel engine exhaust, there is an urgent need for appropriate sampling devices and methods for cell exposure studies and associated biological and toxicological tests. In a previous paper [1], a specific concept for a cell culture exposure chamber was introduced to allow the uniform exposure of cell cultures to diesel aerosols. In the present work, this cell culture exposure chamber is evaluated and characterized with state-of-the-art nanoparticles measurement instrumentation to assess the local deposition of soot aggregates on the cell cultures and any losses due to particle deposition on the cell culture exposure chamber walls, and in addition an upgraded Multiculture Exposure Chamber (MEC) for in vitro continuous flow cell exposure tests is introduced with improved, compared to the previous version, features. Analysis and design of the MEC employs CFD and true to geometry representations of soot particle aggregates.

  5. The impact of high commercial fishery load on biological indices of the roach (Rutilus rutilus)

    OpenAIRE

    G. O. Kotovska; D. S. Khrystenko; R. O. Novitskiy

    2015-01-01

    Age composition, length and weight indices of the roach populations (Rutilus rutilus L.) were analyzed and compared in water bodies with the different commercial fishery loading levels. Presence of fast-growing and slow-growing forms is inherent to cyprinid fish. In Dnieper reservoirs these forms are mixed and it is difficult to separate any one of them. It is assumed that selective elimination of fast-growing forms by commercial fishing may cause accumulation of slow-growing forms in populat...

  6. Biological characterization of radiation exposure and dose estimates for inhaled uranium milling effluents. Annual progress report April 1, 1982-March 31, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eidson, A.F.

    1984-05-01

    The problems addressed are the protection of uranium mill workers from occupational exposure to uranium through routine bioassay programs and the assessment of accidental worker exposures. Comparisons of chemical properties and the biological behavior of refined uranium ore (yellowcake) are made to identify important properties that influence uranium distribution patterns among organs. These studies will facilitate calculations of organ doses for specific exposures and associated health risk estimates and will identify important bioassay procedures to improve evaluations of human exposures. A quantitative analytical method for yellowcake was developed based on the infrared absorption of ammonium diuranate and U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ mixtures in KBr. The method was applied to yellowcake samples obtained from six operating mills. The composition of yellowcake from the six mills ranged from nearly pure ammonium diuranate to nearly pure U/sub 3/O/sub 8/. The composition of yellowcake samples taken from lots from the same mill was only somewhat less variable. Because uranium mill workers might be exposed to yellowcake either by contamination of a wound or by inhalation, a study of retention and translocation of uranium after subcutaneous implantation in rats was done. The results showed that 49% of the implanted yellowcake cleared from the body with a half-time (T sub 1/2) in the body of 0.3 days, and the remainder was cleared with a T sub 1/2 of 11 to 30 days. Exposures of Beagle dogs by nose-only inhalation to aerosols of commercial yellowcake were completed. Biochemical indicators of kidney dysfunction that appeared in blood and urine 4 to 8 days after exposure to the more soluble yellowcake showed significant changes in dogs, but levels returned to normal by 16 days after exposure. No biochemical evidence of kidney dysfunction was observed in dogs exposed to the less soluble yellowcake form. 18 figures, 9 tables.

  7. Biological characterization of radiation exposure and dose estimates for inhaled uranium milling effluents. Annual progress report April 1, 1982-March 31, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problems addressed are the protection of uranium mill workers from occupational exposure to uranium through routine bioassay programs and the assessment of accidental worker exposures. Comparisons of chemical properties and the biological behavior of refined uranium ore (yellowcake) are made to identify important properties that influence uranium distribution patterns among organs. These studies will facilitate calculations of organ doses for specific exposures and associated health risk estimates and will identify important bioassay procedures to improve evaluations of human exposures. A quantitative analytical method for yellowcake was developed based on the infrared absorption of ammonium diuranate and U3O8 mixtures in KBr. The method was applied to yellowcake samples obtained from six operating mills. The composition of yellowcake from the six mills ranged from nearly pure ammonium diuranate to nearly pure U3O8. The composition of yellowcake samples taken from lots from the same mill was only somewhat less variable. Because uranium mill workers might be exposed to yellowcake either by contamination of a wound or by inhalation, a study of retention and translocation of uranium after subcutaneous implantation in rats was done. The results showed that 49% of the implanted yellowcake cleared from the body with a half-time (T sub 1/2) in the body of 0.3 days, and the remainder was cleared with a T sub 1/2 of 11 to 30 days. Exposures of Beagle dogs by nose-only inhalation to aerosols of commercial yellowcake were completed. Biochemical indicators of kidney dysfunction that appeared in blood and urine 4 to 8 days after exposure to the more soluble yellowcake showed significant changes in dogs, but levels returned to normal by 16 days after exposure. No biochemical evidence of kidney dysfunction was observed in dogs exposed to the less soluble yellowcake form. 18 figures, 9 tables

  8. Characterization of biological types of cattle: indicator traits offertility in beef cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A. Cushman

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity among breeds of cattle allows producers to select animals for specific environments or market conditions. Reproductive efficiency is a multi-component trait that is largely influenced by environmental influences such as health and nutritional status; however, there are clearly genetic components to reproductive efficiency, and breed differences in a number of indicator traits associated with fertility and cow productivity have been identified. Historical indicators of fertility include scrotal circumference, age at puberty, and postpartum interval. Both age at puberty and postpartum interval are laborious traits to collect in heifers and cows because they require many days of detection of behavioral estrus. In recent years, the addition of ultrasonography to management practices has allowed for the collection of female traits such as follicle diameter, antral follicle counts, and fetal age that are not as labor intensive. These additional diagnostic traits provide novel phenotypes for the identification of genetic markers of fertility and cow productivity, which would be the ultimate goal. Genetic markers of the number of follicles in the bovine ovary have the potential to identify heifers that will be highly productive cows. Furthermore, identifying and understanding the genes that control various reproductive traits and the response to stressors, such as temperature and nutrient availability, could improve production efficiency by improving management and breeding decisions in a wide range of production environments.

  9. Impact assessment of proposed ski areas: A GIS approach integrating biological, physical and landscape indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ski centres are characterized by significant environmental impacts that occur during both the construction and the operation phase. In Trentino, a well-known ski destination located in northern Italy, new ski areas were identified by planning tools without conducting a formal assessment of their effects on the environment. This paper presents a study to assess and compare the impacts of the proposed ski areas within two valleys strongly linked to winter tourism: the Fiemme and Fassa Valleys. The method is based on the computation of spatial indicators using a Geographical Information System (GIS) to predict and quantify critical impacts, such as ecosystem loss and fragmentation, soil erosion, geomorphologic hazards, interference with flora and fauna, and visibility. Subsequently, multicriteria analysis was applied to generate composite indices, and to rank ski areas according to their overall suitability. Finally, sensitivity analyses allowed to test the stability of the results. The study concluded that two of the proposed ski areas are located in highly unsuitable environment, and the relevant plan provisions should be revised

  10. Prioritizing conservation effort through the use of biological soil crusts as ecosystem function indicators in an arid region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowker, M.A.; Miller, M.E.; Belnap, J.; Sisk, T.D.; Johnson, N.C.

    2008-01-01

    Conservation prioritization usually focuses on conservation of rare species or biodiversity, rather than ecological processes. This is partially due to a lack of informative indicators of ecosystem function. Biological soil crusts (BSCs) trap and retain soil and water resources in arid ecosystems and function as major carbon and nitrogen fixers; thus, they may be informative indicators of ecosystem function. We created spatial models of multiple indicators of the diversity and function of BSCs (species richness, evenness, functional diversity, functional redundancy, number of rare species, number of habitat specialists, nitrogen and carbon fixation indices, soil stabilization, and surface roughening) for the 800,000-ha Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument (Utah, U.S.A.). We then combined the indicators into a single BSC function map and a single BSC biodiversity map (2 alternative types of conservation value) with an unweighted averaging procedure and a weighted procedure derived from validations performance. We also modeled potential degradation with data from a rangeland assessment survey. To determine which areas on the landscape were the highest conservation priorities, we overlaid the function- and diversity-based conservation-value layers on the potential degradation layer. Different methods for ascribing conservation-value and conservation-priority layers all yielded strikingly similar results (r = 0.89-0.99), which suggests that in this case biodiversity and function can be conserved simultaneously. We believe BSCs can be used as indicators of ecosystem function in concert with other indicators (such as plant-community properties) and that such information can be used to prioritize conservation effort in drylands. ?? 2008 Society for Conservation Biology.

  11. Clinical indications and biological mechanisms of splenic irradiation in autoimmune diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinmann, M.; Becker, G. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Strahlenonkologie; Einsele, H.; Bamberg, M. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Innere Medizin 2

    2001-02-01

    Background: Splenic irradiation (SI) is a fairly unknown treatment modality in autoimmune disorders like autoimmune thrombocytopenia (AIT) or autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), which may provide an effective, low toxic and cost-effective treatment for selected patients. Patients, Materials and Methods: This article reviews the limited experiences on splenic irradiation in autoimmune thrombocytopenia by analyzing the current studies including 71 patients and some preliminary reports on splenic irradiation in autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Results: In autoimmune thrombocytopenia between 40 and 90% of all patients responded, but most of them relapsed within 4 to 6 months after splenic irradiation. Between 10 and 20% of all patients had a sustained response. The efficacy of splenic irradiation in HIV-associated cases of thrombocytopenia is probably lower than in other forms of autoimmune thrombocytopenia, but especially in this group immunosuppressive drug treatment of autoimmune thrombocytopenia exposes some problems. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia there are some case reports about efficacy of splenic irradiation. Toxicity of splenic irradiation in both diseases was very moderate. Conclusions: For HIV patients, for elderly patients or patients at high risk for complications following splenectomy splenic irradiation might be a treatment option. Splenic irradiation as preoperative treatment in patients not responding to or not suitable for immunosuppressive drugs prior to splenectomy may be a promising new application of splenic irradiation to reduce adverse effects of splenectomy in thrombocytopenic patients. A further analysis of the biological mechanisms underlying splenic irradiation may help to improve patient selection, to optimize dose concepts and treatment schedules and will improve understanding of radiotherapy as an immunomodulatory treatment modality. (orig.) [German] Hintergrund: Die Bestrahlung der Milz zur Behandlung von haematologischen

  12. Biological effects and oxidative stress responses in Arabidopsis thaliana following exposure to uranium and copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horemans, N.; Saenen, E.; Vandenhove, H.; Vanhoudt, N.; Wannijn, J.; Nauts, R. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN (Belgium); Vangronsveld, J.; Cuypers, A. [Hasselt University (Belgium)

    2014-07-01

    Since organisms are almost always exposed to multiple stressors, it is important to investigate the toxicity effects in plants in a multiple stressor context to provide a more realistic estimate of environmental risks. Therefore, we evaluated the toxicity of U and Cu individually and in combination. Arabidopsis thaliana plants were exposed during 3 days to 25 μM U, 2.5 μM Cu or 12.5 μM U + 1.25 μM Cu at pH 7.5. The concentrations of U and Cu administered to the plants were the derived EC30 values for plant growth reduction based on the single-dose response curves. When plants were exposed to U or Cu, this resulted in an increased metal concentration in both roots and shoots as compared to the control plants. The increased Cu content of the plant, led to a significant decrease in leaf and root growth, while U exposure did not affect plant growth. By exposing plants to both metals, it seems that Cu interferes with the translocation of U from the roots to the leaves. In addition, U interferes with the Cu uptake, since less Cu was found in the roots than expected. This can probably be explained by the fact that U causes a shift in the Cu speciation in our medium. As such, the percentage of the bioavailable fractions of Cu decreased, while the percentage Cu-EDTA (i.e. non-available fraction) increased. No effects on plant growth were observed by exposing plants to U+Cu. Exposing plants to heavy metals can lead to an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). After U or Cu exposure, the transcript levels of different ROS-producing enzymes (NADPH oxidases and lipoxygenases (LOX)) were up-regulated in the roots. Furthermore, exposing plants to U+Cu resulted in a 20-fold increase in the expression of LOX1 as compared to the single stressor conditions. This possibly indicates an enhanced ROS production. In addition, the increased expression of LOX1 can also indicate an increased production of oxylipins, important molecules in inter-organ signalling. In the

  13. Functional traits of selected mangrove species in Brazil as biological indicators of different environmental conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrivabene, Hiulana Pereira [Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Centro de Ciências Humanas e Naturais, Departamento de Ciências Biológicas, 29075-910 Vitória, Espírito Santo (Brazil); Souza, Iara [Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Centro de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde, Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, 13565-905 São Carlos (Brazil); Có, Walter Luiz Oliveira [Associação Educational de Vitória, Departamento de Biologia, 29053-360 Vitória (Brazil); Rodella, Roberto Antônio [Universidade Estadual Paulista Júlio de Mesquita Filho, Campus de Botucatu, Instituto de Biociências, Departamento de Botânica, C. Postal 510, 18618-000 Botucatu, São Paulo (Brazil); Wunderlin, Daniel Alberto, E-mail: dwunder@fcq.unc.edu.ar [Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología de Alimentos Córdoba (ICYTAC), CONICET, Dpto. Qca. Orgánica, Fac. Cs. Químicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000, Córdoba (Argentina); and others

    2014-04-01

    Ecological studies on phenotypic plasticity illustrate the relevance of this phenomenon in nature. Conditions of biota reflect environmental changes, highlighting the adaptability of resident species that can be used as bioindicators of such changes. We report the morpho-anatomical plasticity of leaves of Avicennia schaueriana Stapf and Leechm. ex Moldenke, Laguncularia racemosa (L.) C.F.Gaertn. and Rhizophora mangle L., evaluated in three estuaries (Vitória bay, Santa Cruz and Itaúnas River; state of Espírito Santo, Brazil), considering five areas of mangrove ecosystems with diverse environmental issues. Two sampling sites are part of the Ecological Station Lameirão Island in Vitória bay, close to a harbor. A third sampling site in Cariacica (Vitória bay) is inside the Vitória harbor and also is influenced by domestic sewage. The fourth studied area (Santa Cruz) is part of Piraquê Mangrove Ecological Reservation, while the fifth (Itaúnas River) is a small mangrove, with sandy sediment and greater photosynthetically active radiation, also not strongly influenced by anthropic activity. Results pointed out the morpho-anatomical plasticity in studied species, showing that A. schaueriana and L. racemosa might be considered the most appropriate bioindicators to indicate different settings and environmental conditions. Particularly, the dry mass per leaf area (LMA) of A. schaueriana was the main biomarker measured. In our study, LMA of A. schaueriana was positively correlated with salinity (Spearman 0.71), Mn content (0.81) and pH (0.82) but negatively correlated with phosphorus content (− 0.63). Thus, the evaluation of modification in LMA of A. schaueriana pointed out changes among five studied sites, suggesting its use to reflect changes in the environment, which could be also useful in the future to evaluate the climate change. - Highlights: • We investigated adaptive modifications in plants in response to differences among three estuaries. • We used

  14. Functional traits of selected mangrove species in Brazil as biological indicators of different environmental conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ecological studies on phenotypic plasticity illustrate the relevance of this phenomenon in nature. Conditions of biota reflect environmental changes, highlighting the adaptability of resident species that can be used as bioindicators of such changes. We report the morpho-anatomical plasticity of leaves of Avicennia schaueriana Stapf and Leechm. ex Moldenke, Laguncularia racemosa (L.) C.F.Gaertn. and Rhizophora mangle L., evaluated in three estuaries (Vitória bay, Santa Cruz and Itaúnas River; state of Espírito Santo, Brazil), considering five areas of mangrove ecosystems with diverse environmental issues. Two sampling sites are part of the Ecological Station Lameirão Island in Vitória bay, close to a harbor. A third sampling site in Cariacica (Vitória bay) is inside the Vitória harbor and also is influenced by domestic sewage. The fourth studied area (Santa Cruz) is part of Piraquê Mangrove Ecological Reservation, while the fifth (Itaúnas River) is a small mangrove, with sandy sediment and greater photosynthetically active radiation, also not strongly influenced by anthropic activity. Results pointed out the morpho-anatomical plasticity in studied species, showing that A. schaueriana and L. racemosa might be considered the most appropriate bioindicators to indicate different settings and environmental conditions. Particularly, the dry mass per leaf area (LMA) of A. schaueriana was the main biomarker measured. In our study, LMA of A. schaueriana was positively correlated with salinity (Spearman 0.71), Mn content (0.81) and pH (0.82) but negatively correlated with phosphorus content (− 0.63). Thus, the evaluation of modification in LMA of A. schaueriana pointed out changes among five studied sites, suggesting its use to reflect changes in the environment, which could be also useful in the future to evaluate the climate change. - Highlights: • We investigated adaptive modifications in plants in response to differences among three estuaries. • We used

  15. Flow direction indicators in lithic-rich, basal ground layers in western exposures of the Miocene Peach Spring Tuff, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buesch, D.

    2012-12-01

    Lithic-rich, basal ground layer (BGL) deposits occur in three western exposures of the 18.7 Ma Peach Spring Tuff (PST), and structures indicate directions of transport in the pyroclastic flow. Locations include (1) Kane Wash (Newberry Mountains), (2) "West Gem" (Daggett Ridge), and (3) Alvord Mountain area. These locations are 190-225 km from the PST source in the Silver Creek Caldera, southwest Black Mountain, Arizona (Pearthree and others, 2009); however, ~50 km is from extension across the Lower Colorado River Extensional Corridor. In each location, many lithic clasts were locally derived. Lithic-rich horizons in Kane Wash exposures of the PST were described by Buesch (1991). Total thickness of valley-filling ignimbrite ranges from <1-30 m and was deposited on alluvial fan and axial stream sandstone. Thickness of 8 individual lithic-rich horizons (a type of BGL) range from 4-300 cm with lithic clasts 2-472 cm. Clast size-grading, imbrication, and elongation indicate directions of flow. Each horizon was attributed to (1) incorporation and concentration of local clasts into a boundary layer of the pyroclastic flow as it traversed topography, (2) decoupling of a lithic-rich layer from the over riding flow, (3) independent movement of a lithic-rich flow along local topography (180°±30°) with the ash-rich pyroclastic flow direction probably independent of local topography, but along the main paleovalley (245°±20°), and (4) introduction and westward deflection of lithic-rich flows into the main, valley-filling, pyroclastic flow. Multiple lithic-rich horizons indicate repeated, locally developed boundary layers from the body of the pyroclastic flow throughout the flow history. In the West Gem exposure, the PST is 5.3 m thick and was deposited on alluvial sandstone. The 60-cm thick, lithic-rich, BGL contains lithic clasts <25 cm. Poorly developed clast imbrication and elongation, and a rip-up flap from the BGL folded into the lower part of the ignimbrite, indicate

  16. Flow direction indicators in lithic-rich, basal ground layers in western exposures of the Miocene Peach Spring Tuff, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buesch, D.

    2012-12-01

    Lithic-rich, basal ground layer (BGL) deposits occur in three western exposures of the 18.7 Ma Peach Spring Tuff (PST), and structures indicate directions of transport in the pyroclastic flow. Locations include (1) Kane Wash (Newberry Mountains), (2) "West Gem" (Daggett Ridge), and (3) Alvord Mountain area. These locations are 190-225 km from the PST source in the Silver Creek Caldera, southwest Black Mountain, Arizona (Pearthree and others, 2009); however, ~50 km is from extension across the Lower Colorado River Extensional Corridor. In each location, many lithic clasts were locally derived. Lithic-rich horizons in Kane Wash exposures of the PST were described by Buesch (1991). Total thickness of valley-filling ignimbrite ranges from axial stream sandstone. Thickness of 8 individual lithic-rich horizons (a type of BGL) range from 4-300 cm with lithic clasts 2-472 cm. Clast size-grading, imbrication, and elongation indicate directions of flow. Each horizon was attributed to (1) incorporation and concentration of local clasts into a boundary layer of the pyroclastic flow as it traversed topography, (2) decoupling of a lithic-rich layer from the over riding flow, (3) independent movement of a lithic-rich flow along local topography (180°±30°) with the ash-rich pyroclastic flow direction probably independent of local topography, but along the main paleovalley (245°±20°), and (4) introduction and westward deflection of lithic-rich flows into the main, valley-filling, pyroclastic flow. Multiple lithic-rich horizons indicate repeated, locally developed boundary layers from the body of the pyroclastic flow throughout the flow history. In the West Gem exposure, the PST is 5.3 m thick and was deposited on alluvial sandstone. The 60-cm thick, lithic-rich, BGL contains lithic clasts flap from the BGL folded into the lower part of the ignimbrite, indicate a general flow toward the west-southwest. In the Alvord Mountain area, 13 PST exposures occur for 9 km around the

  17. Functional traits of selected mangrove species in Brazil as biological indicators of different environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrivabene, Hiulana Pereira; Souza, Iara; Có, Walter Luiz Oliveira; Rodella, Roberto Antônio; Wunderlin, Daniel Alberto; Milanez, Camilla Rozindo

    2014-04-01

    Ecological studies on phenotypic plasticity illustrate the relevance of this phenomenon in nature. Conditions of biota reflect environmental changes, highlighting the adaptability of resident species that can be used as bioindicators of such changes. We report the morpho-anatomical plasticity of leaves of Avicennia schaueriana Stapf & Leechm. ex Moldenke, Laguncularia racemosa (L.) C.F.Gaertn. and Rhizophora mangle L., evaluated in three estuaries (Vitória bay, Santa Cruz and Itaúnas River; state of Espírito Santo, Brazil), considering five areas of mangrove ecosystems with diverse environmental issues. Two sampling sites are part of the Ecological Station Lameirão Island in Vitória bay, close to a harbor. A third sampling site in Cariacica (Vitória bay) is inside the Vitória harbor and also is influenced by domestic sewage. The fourth studied area (Santa Cruz) is part of Piraquê Mangrove Ecological Reservation, while the fifth (Itaúnas River) is a small mangrove, with sandy sediment and greater photosynthetically active radiation, also not strongly influenced by anthropic activity. Results pointed out the morpho-anatomical plasticity in studied species, showing that A. schaueriana and L. racemosa might be considered the most appropriate bioindicators to indicate different settings and environmental conditions. Particularly, the dry mass per leaf area (LMA) of A. schaueriana was the main biomarker measured. In our study, LMA of A. schaueriana was positively correlated with salinity (Spearman 0.71), Mn content (0.81) and pH (0.82) but negatively correlated with phosphorus content (-0.63). Thus, the evaluation of modification in LMA of A. schaueriana pointed out changes among five studied sites, suggesting its use to reflect changes in the environment, which could be also useful in the future to evaluate the climate change. PMID:24496023

  18. Use of scalp hair as indicator of human exposure to heavy metals in an electronic waste recycling area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scalp hair samples were collected at an electronic waste (e-waste) recycling area and analyzed for trace elements and heavy metals. Elevated levels were found for Cu and Pb with geometric means (GMs) at 39.8 and 49.5 μg/g, and the levels of all elements were found in the rank order Pb > Cu >> Mn > Ba > Cr > Ni > Cd > As > V. Besides Cu and Pb, Cd (GM: 0.518 μg/g) was also found to be significantly higher compared to that in hair samples from control areas. Differences with age, gender, residence status and villages could be distinguished for most of the elements. The high levels of Cd, Cu and Pb were likely found to be originated from e-waste related activities, and specific sources were discussed. This study shows that human scalp hair could be a useful biomarker to assess the extent of heavy metal exposure to workers and residents in areas with intensive e-waste recycling activities. - Human scalp hair samples can be used to indicate environmental and occupational exposure of heavy metals due to intensive electronic waste recycling activities.

  19. Patterns of database citation in articles and patents indicate long-term scientific and industry value of biological data resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousfield, David; McEntyre, Johanna; Velankar, Sameer; Papadatos, George; Bateman, Alex; Cochrane, Guy; Kim, Jee-Hyub; Graef, Florian; Vartak, Vid; Alako, Blaise; Blomberg, Niklas

    2016-01-01

    Data from open access biomolecular data resources, such as the European Nucleotide Archive and the Protein Data Bank are extensively reused within life science research for comparative studies, method development and to derive new scientific insights. Indicators that estimate the extent and utility of such secondary use of research data need to reflect this complex and highly variable data usage. By linking open access scientific literature, via Europe PubMedCentral, to the metadata in biological data resources we separate data citations associated with a deposition statement from citations that capture the subsequent, long-term, reuse of data in academia and industry.  We extend this analysis to begin to investigate citations of biomolecular resources in patent documents. We find citations in more than 8,000 patents from 2014, demonstrating substantial use and an important role for data resources in defining biological concepts in granted patents to both academic and industrial innovators. Combined together our results indicate that the citation patterns in biomedical literature and patents vary, not only due to citation practice but also according to the data resource cited. The results guard against the use of simple metrics such as citation counts and show that indicators of data use must not only take into account citations within the biomedical literature but also include reuse of data in industry and other parts of society by including patents and other scientific and technical documents such as guidelines, reports and grant applications. PMID:27092246

  20. Hydrogen as an Indicator to Assess Biological Activity During Trace-Metal Bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, P. R.; Komlos, J.; Brown, D. G.; Lovley, D. R.

    2002-05-01

    The design and operation of a trace-metal or radionuclide bioremediation scheme requires that specific redox conditions be achieved at given zones of an aquifer for a predetermined duration. Tools are therefore needed to identify and quantify the terminal electron acceptor processes (TEAPs) that are being achieved during bioremediation in an aquifer, and that this is done at a high spatial resolution. Hydrogen holds the promise of being a key parameter that may be used to identify TEAPs. Theoretical analysis have shown that steady-state hydrogen levels in the subsurface are solely dependent upon the physiological parameters of the hydrogen-consuming microorganisms, and that hydrogen concentrations increase as each successive TEAP yields less energy for bacterial growth. The assumptions for this statement may not hold during a bioremediation scheme in which an organic substrate is injected into the subsurface and where organisms may consume hydrogen and carbon simultaneously. The objective of the research is to gain a basic understanding of the hydrogen dynamics in an aquifer during a trace metal/radionuclide bioremediation scheme. For this purpose, a series of batch studies have been conducted during the first year of this project. In these studies the utilization of acetate and hydrogen by geobacter sulfurreducens were studied. In all cases Fe(III) was the electron acceptor. Microcosms were set up to investigate the utilization of hydrogen and acetate when either of them is the sole electron donor and when both are present and utilized simultaneously as electron donor. These experiments were conducted for varying initial conditions of the hydrogen and acetate concentration, and the disappearance of these compounds plus the evolution of Fe(II) as well as biomass was monitored over time. The results of these studies indicate that the biokinetic coefficients describing the rate of hydrogen utilization are not affected by the simultaneous utilization of acetate. While

  1. Human exposure to radiation following the release of radioactivity from a reactor accident: a quantitative assessment of the biological consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this review is to provide a biological basis upon which to assess the consequences of the exposure of a population to radioactivity released after a reactor accident. Depending upon the radiation dose, both early and late somatic damage could occur in the exposed population and hereditary effects may occur in their descendants. The development of dose-effect relationships has been based upon the limited amount of information available on humans, supplemented by data obtained from experiments on animals. (author)

  2. Accidental exposure to biological material in healthcare workers at a university hospital: Evaluation and follow-up of 404 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Eliana Battaggia; Lopes, Marta Heloísa; Yasuda, Maria Aparecida Shikanai

    2005-01-01

    The care and follow-up provided to healthcare workers (HCWs) from a large teaching hospital who were exposed to biological material between 1 August 1998 and 31 January 2002 is described here. After exposure, the HCW is evaluated by a nurse and doctor in an emergency consultation and receives follow-up counselling. The collection of 10 ml of blood sample from each HCW and its source patient, when known, is made for immunoenzymatic testing for HIV, HBV and HCV. Evaluation and follow-up of 404 cases revealed that the exposures were concentrated in only a few areas of the hospital; 83% of the HCWs exposed were seen by a doctor responsible for the prophylaxis up to 3 h after exposure. Blood was involved in 76.7% (309) of the exposures. The patient source of the biological material was known in 80.7% (326) of the exposed individuals studied; 80 (24.5%) sources had serological evidence of infection with 1 or more agents: 16.2% were anti-HCV positive, 3.8% were HAgBs positive and 10.9% were anti-HIV positive. 67% (273) of the study population completed the proposed follow-up. No confirmed seroconversion occurred. In conclusion, the observed adherence to the follow-up was quite low, and measures to improve it must be taken. Surprisingly, no difference in adherence to the follow-up was observed among those exposed HCW at risk, i.e. those with an infected or unknown source patient. Analysis of post-exposure management revealed excess prescription of antiretroviral drugs, vaccine and immunoglobulin. Infection by HCV is the most important risk of concern, in our hospital, in accidents with biological material. PMID:15804666

  3. AVERAGE BIOLOGICAL INDICES OF THE MAJOR FISH SPECIES OF THE ZAPORIZHZHIA RESERVOIR AND OTHER FISHERY WATER BODIES OF DNEPROPETROVSK REGION

    OpenAIRE

    E. Fedonenko; N. Esipova; Marenkov, O.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate, analyze and summarize the biological indices of commercial fish species in the main fishery water bodies of Dnіpropetrovsk region for the last 10 years. Methodology. Field data were collected in the Zaporizhzhia reservoir during 2003 – 2013 using a standard set of monitoring fishing gears (gill nets with mesh size a=30–120 mm). Juvenile fish were caught in third decade of June - first decade of August using the juvenile fish beach seine with a length of 10 m. Proc...

  4. Biological effects of repeated inhalation exposure of Beagle dogs to relatively insoluble aerosols of 144Ce. VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beagle dogs were exposed repeatedly to a relatively insoluble form of 144Ce (in fused aluminosilicate particles) to study the deposition, retention and long-term biological effects for comparison with data from dogs that were exposed only once to a similar aerosol. Four groups of nine dogs each were exposed once every 8 weeks for 2 years (13 exposures) to achieve specified exposure goals. These goals were: to increase the lung burden by 2.5 μCi 144Ce/kg body weight with each exposure; to reestablish lung burdens of 9 or 4.5 μCi 144Ce/kg body weight and to expose controls to fused aluminosilicate particles containing nonradioactive cerium. With these exposure sequences, the 144Ce-exposed dogs received increasing or relatively constant beta radiation dose rates in contrast to the steadily decreasing dose rate seen after a single inhalation exposure. Following completion of the exposure series, the dogs are being observed for the development of long-term biological effects. To date, 11 dogs have died or were euthanized, nine exposed dogs and two controls. Although pulmonary hemangiosarcomas were a prominent finding in dogs exposed once to the same aerosol at a level that led to cumulative doses to lung similar to these repeatedly exposed dogs, only one has been observed in the repeatedly exposed dogs. Other effects of note to date include three pulmonary carcinomas, two hemangiosarcomas of the tracheobronchial lymph nodes and one splenic hemangiosarcoma. Observations are continuing on the surviving 18 exposed and seven control dogs

  5. Technical specifications on harmonised epidemiological indicators for biological hazards to be covered by meat inspection of domestic sheep and goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    European Food Safety Authority

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this report, harmonised epidemiological indicators are proposed for food-borne biological hazards that are related to domestic sheep and goats and meat thereof and that can be addressed in the context of meat inspection. These hazards include Toxoplasma gondii, pathogenicverocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli and mycobacteria. An epidemiological indicator is defined as the prevalence or concentration of the hazard at a certain stage of the food chain or an indirect measure of the hazard that correlates with the human health risk caused by the hazard. The indicators can be used by the European Commission and the Member States to consider when adaptations to meat inspection methods may be required, and to carry out risk analysis to support such decisions. It is foreseen that the indicators will be used in the integrated sheep and goats meat safety assurance system outlined in the EFSA Scientific Opinion on the public health hazards to be covered by inspection of meat from sheep and goats, particularly to help categorise farms/flock and slaughterhouses according to the risk related to the hazards and process hygiene. Depending on the purpose and the epidemiological situation, risk managers should decide on the most appropriate indicator(s to use, either alone or in combination, at national, regional, slaughterhouse or farm/flock level. It is recommended that risk managers should define the harmonised requirements for controlled housing conditions of farms, and the requirements for food chain information. Member States are invited to report data generated by the implementation of the indicators in accordance with Directive 2003/99/EC. The proposed indicators should be regularly reviewed in light of new information and the data generated by their implementation.

  6. Technical specifications on harmonised epidemiological indicators for biological hazards to be covered by meat inspection of domestic solipeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    European Food Safety Authority

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this report, harmonised epidemiological indicators are proposed for food-borne biological hazards to public health that are related to domestic solipeds and meat thereof and that can be addressed within meat inspection. These hazards include only Trichinella. An epidemiological indicator is defined as the prevalence or concentration of the hazard at a certain stage of the food chain or an indirect measure of the hazard that correlates with the human health risk caused by the hazard. The indicators can be used by the European Commission and the Member States to consider when adaptations to meat inspection methods may be relevant and to carry out risk analysis to support such decisions. It is foreseen that the indicators are used in a risk-based system for domestic soliped meat as proposed in the EFSA Scientific Opinion on the public health hazards to be covered by inspection of meat from domestic solipeds, particularly to help categorise countries/regions and animals according to the risk related to Trichinella. Depending on the purpose and the epidemiological situation, risk managers should decide on the most appropriate indicator(s to use, either alone or in combination, at national, regional or slaughterhouse level. It is recommended that risk managers should define legal requirements for improving traceability of horses, recording information on all animal movements. Member States are invited to report data generated by the implementation of the indicators in accordance with Directive 2003/99/EC. The proposed indicators should be regularly reviewed in the light of new information and the data generated by their implementation.

  7. The use of remote sensors to relate biological and physical indicators to environmental and public health problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    Relationships between biological, ecological and botanical structures, and disease organisms and their vectors which might be detected and measured by remote sensing are determined. In addition to the use of trees as indicators of disease or potential disease, an attempt is made to identify environmental factors such as soil moisture and soil and water temperatures as they relate to disease or health problems and may be detected by remote sensing. The following three diseases and one major health problem are examined: Malaria, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Encephalitis and Red Tide. It is shown that no single species of vascular plant nor any one environmental factor can be used as the indicator of disease or health problems. Entire vegetation types, successional stages and combinations of factors must be used.

  8. Assessment of water quality at selected sites in the White River Basin, Indiana, 1993 and 1995 using biological indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Jeffrey W.; Baker, N.T.; Lydy, M.J.; Stone, W.W.

    1996-01-01

    As part of the National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program, fish communities were sampled at 11 sites in the White River Basin, Indiana, in 1993 and 1995 to help determine water-quality conditions. Ninety-one species of fish with representatives from 18 families were collected in the basin. Total numbers of fish collected at every site increased between collection years. The Index of Biological Integrity (IBI) and Qualitative Habitat Evaluation Index (QHEI) were calculated for all 11 sites in 1995. The QHEI scores indicated six sites had excellent habitat to support fish communities. Only three sites were rated in the “good” to “excellent” IBI water-quality categories, indicating some type of nonhabitat environmental degradation to the fish communities. Eight of the sites were rated in the “fair,” “poor,” or “very poor” IBI water-quality categories.

  9. Antiviral Biologic Produced in DNA Vaccine/Goose Platform Protects Hamsters Against Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome When Administered Post-exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Haese

    Full Text Available Andes virus (ANDV and ANDV-like viruses are responsible for most hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS cases in South America. Recent studies in Chile indicate that passive transfer of convalescent human plasma shows promise as a possible treatment for HPS. Unfortunately, availability of convalescent plasma from survivors of this lethal disease is very limited. We are interested in exploring the concept of using DNA vaccine technology to produce antiviral biologics, including polyclonal neutralizing antibodies for use in humans. Geese produce IgY and an alternatively spliced form, IgYΔFc, that can be purified at high concentrations from egg yolks. IgY lacks the properties of mammalian Fc that make antibodies produced in horses, sheep, and rabbits reactogenic in humans. Geese were vaccinated with an ANDV DNA vaccine encoding the virus envelope glycoproteins. All geese developed high-titer neutralizing antibodies after the second vaccination, and maintained high-levels of neutralizing antibodies as measured by a pseudovirion neutralization assay (PsVNA for over 1 year. A booster vaccination resulted in extraordinarily high levels of neutralizing antibodies (i.e., PsVNA80 titers >100,000. Analysis of IgY and IgYΔFc by epitope mapping show these antibodies to be highly reactive to specific amino acid sequences of ANDV envelope glycoproteins. We examined the protective efficacy of the goose-derived antibody in the hamster model of lethal HPS. α-ANDV immune sera, or IgY/IgYΔFc purified from eggs, were passively transferred to hamsters subcutaneously starting 5 days after an IM challenge with ANDV (25 LD50. Both immune sera, and egg-derived purified IgY/IgYΔFc, protected 8 of 8 and 7 of 8 hamsters, respectively. In contrast, all hamsters receiving IgY/IgYΔFc purified from normal geese (n=8, or no-treatment (n=8, developed lethal HPS. These findings demonstrate that the DNA vaccine/goose platform can be used to produce a candidate antiviral

  10. Use of human nails as bio-indicators of heavy metals environmental exposure among school age children in Kenya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussein Were, Faridah [Department of Chemistry in the School of Pure and Applied Sciences at Kenyatta University, P.O. Box 43844-00100 GPO Nairobi (Kenya); Njue, Wilson [Department of Chemistry in the School of Pure and Applied Sciences at Kenyatta University, P.O. Box 43844-00100 GPO Nairobi (Kenya)], E-mail: wilsonnjue@yahoo.com; Murungi, Jane; Wanjau, Ruth [Department of Chemistry in the School of Pure and Applied Sciences at Kenyatta University, P.O. Box 43844-00100 GPO Nairobi (Kenya)

    2008-04-15

    Metal pollution and its health effects present a challenge currently facing the developing countries. Metal poisoning is usually difficult and expensive to assess or screen in these countries due to limited resources, which means that policies, guidelines, regulations and institutional managements are limited. Hair and nail as biopsy materials were suggested as more attractive biomarkers in assessing heavy metals environmental exposure. This paper deals with quantitative determination of lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), calcium (Ca), zinc (Zn), and iron (Fe) in fingernails of children (n = 200) in urban and rural areas using atomic absorption spectrometry. Factors that were suspected to influence the accumulation of Pb and Cd in children were obtained through a questionnaire. The mean levels of heavy metals in children in urban areas were found to be higher (27.5 {+-} 1.8 {mu}g/g Pb and 0.73 {+-} 0.08 {mu}g/g Cd) than in rural areas (19.7 {+-} 0.9 {mu}g/g Pb and 0.44 {+-} 0.06 {mu}g/g Cd). The difference was significant (P < 0.05; DF = 168, t-test). Other factors that were found to have significant influence were socio-economic background, health conditions, dietary habits and environmental risk exposure. The results also showed that the school location has more influence on the heavy metals level than the area of residence. The children in a school near the highway were found to have a mean of 34.4 {+-} 3.5 {mu}g/g Pb as compared to those who lived near the highway (31.6 {+-} 2.8 {mu}g/g Pb), however the difference was not significant (P > 0.05), suggesting a common source of contaminants in the areas. The correlation results also indicated that a high level of Pb in the nail influenced negatively Zn and Fe but not Ca levels (R = - 0.256 Zn; - 0.188 Fe) while high levels of Cd had a negative relationship with Fe only (R = - 0.241). The association of toxic metals in the nails of children with environmental exposure, and nutritional status implies that policies and actions

  11. Exposure to benzene in urban workers: environmental and biological monitoring of traffic police in Rome

    OpenAIRE

    Crebelli, R; Tomei, F.; Zijno, A; Ghittori, S; M Imbriani; Gamberale, D; Martini, A.; Carere, A

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To evaluate the contribution of traffic fumes to exposure to benzene in urban workers, an investigation on personal exposure to benzene in traffic police from the city of Rome was carried out.
METHODS—The study was performed from December 1998 to June 1999. Diffusive Radiello personal samplers were used to measure external exposures to benzene and alkyl benzenes during the workshift in 139 policemen who controlled medium to high traffic areas and in 63 office police. Moreover, as b...

  12. Childhood exposure to violence and lifelong health: Clinical intervention science and stress biology research join forces

    OpenAIRE

    Moffitt, Terrie E

    2013-01-01

    Many young people who are mistreated by an adult, victimized by bullies, criminally assaulted, or who witness domestic violence react to this violence exposure by developing behavioral, emotional, or learning problems. What is less well known is that adverse experiences like violence exposure can lead to hidden physical alterations inside a child’s body, alterations which may have adverse effects on life-long health. We discuss why this is important for the field of developmental psychopathol...

  13. Sensor structure concepts for the analysis or local radiation exposure of biological samples at terahertz and millimeter wave frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornuf, Fabian; Dörr, Roland; Lämmle, David; Schlaak, Helmut F.; Krozer, Viktor

    2016-03-01

    We have studied several sensor concepts for biomedical applications operating in the millimeter wave and terahertz range. On one hand, rectangular waveguide structure were designed and extended with microfluidic channels. In this way a simple analysis of aqueous solutions at various waveguide bands is possible. In our case, we focused on the frequency range between 75 GHz and 110 GHz. On the other hand, planar sensor structures for aqueous solutions have been developed based on coplanar waveguides. With these planar sensors it is possible to concentrate the interaction volume on small sensor areas, which achieve a local exposure of the radiation to the sample. When equipping the sensor with microfluidic structures the sample volume could be reduced significantly and enabled a localized interaction with the sensor areas. The sensors are designed to exhibit a broadband behavior up to 300 GHz. Narrow-band operation can also be achieved for potentially increased sensitivity by using resonant structures. Several tests with Glucose dissolved in water show promising results for the distinction of different glucose levels at millimeter wave frequencies. The planar structures can also be used for the exposure of biological cells or cell model systems like liposomes with electromagnetic radiation. Several studies are planned to distinguish on one hand the influence of millimeter wave exposure on biological systems and also to have a spectroscopic method which enables the analysis of cell processes, like membrane transport processes, with millimeter wave and terahertz frequencies by focusing the electric field directly on the analyzing sample.

  14. Gene expression analysis of zebrafish melanocytes, iridophores, and retinal pigmented epithelium reveals indicators of biological function and developmental origin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles W Higdon

    Full Text Available In order to facilitate understanding of pigment cell biology, we developed a method to concomitantly purify melanocytes, iridophores, and retinal pigmented epithelium from zebrafish, and analyzed their transcriptomes. Comparing expression data from these cell types and whole embryos allowed us to reveal gene expression co-enrichment in melanocytes and retinal pigmented epithelium, as well as in melanocytes and iridophores. We found 214 genes co-enriched in melanocytes and retinal pigmented epithelium, indicating the shared functions of melanin-producing cells. We found 62 genes significantly co-enriched in melanocytes and iridophores, illustrative of their shared developmental origins from the neural crest. This is also the first analysis of the iridophore transcriptome. Gene expression analysis for iridophores revealed extensive enrichment of specific enzymes to coordinate production of their guanine-based reflective pigment. We speculate the coordinated upregulation of specific enzymes from several metabolic pathways recycles the rate-limiting substrate for purine synthesis, phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate, thus constituting a guanine cycle. The purification procedure and expression analysis described here, along with the accompanying transcriptome-wide expression data, provide the first mRNA sequencing data for multiple purified zebrafish pigment cell types, and will be a useful resource for further studies of pigment cell biology.

  15. In vivo EPR dosimetry of accidental exposures to radiation: experimental results indicating the feasibility of practical use in human subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) provides the potential advantage of making accurate and sensitive measurements of absorbed radiation dose in teeth in situ, i.e. without removing the teeth from the potential victim. The potential limiting factors for making such measurements are: (1) whether low frequency EPR is sufficiently sensitive to detect radiation-induced signal in human teeth; (2) whether sufficient sensitivity can be maintained under in vivo conditions. In this manuscript, we summarize results indicating that this approach is feasible. Using 1.2 GHz EPR spectroscopy, we found that the lower limit for these measurements in isolated human teeth is 0.2 Gy or lower. Measurements of radiation-induced EPR signals in the teeth of living rats were achieved with sufficient sensitivity to indicate that, when taking into consideration the larger mass of human teeth, similar measurements in human teeth in situ would provide sensitivity in the dose range for potential accidental exposures. We estimate that the current lower limit for detecting radiation doses in human teeth in situ (in vivo) is 0.5-1.0 Gy; this would be sufficient for determining if a person has been exposed to potentially life threatening doses of ionizing radiation. The limiting factor for sensitivity appears to be background signals rather than signal/noise, and there are feasible means to overcome this problem and further increase sensitivity. The additional instrumental developments required to make an effective in vivo EPR dosimetric spectrometer for the measurements in teeth in human subjects in situ, seem quite achievable

  16. Activation of stress-related signalling pathway in human cells upon SiO2 nanoparticles exposure as an early indicator of cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Bashir

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nanomaterials such as SiO2 nanoparticles (SiO2NP are finding increasing applications in the biomedical and biotechnological fields such as disease diagnostics, imaging, drug delivery, food, cosmetics and biosensors development. Thus, a mechanistic and systematic evaluation of the potential biological and toxic effects of SiO2NP becomes crucial in order to assess their complete safe applicability limits. Results In this study, human monocytic leukemia cell line THP-1 and human alveolar epithelial cell line A549 were exposed to a range of amorphous SiO2NP of various sizes and concentrations (0.01, 0.1 and 0.5 mg/ml. Key biological indicators of cellular functions including cell population density, cellular morphology, membrane permeability, lysosomal mass/pH and activation of transcription factor-2 (ATF-2 were evaluated utilizing quantitative high content screening (HCS approach and biochemical techniques. Despite the use of extremely high nanoparticle concentrations, our findings showed a low degree of cytotoxicity within the panel of SiO2NP investigated. However, at these concentrations, we observed the onset of stress-related cellular response induced by SiO2NP. Interestingly, cells exposed to alumina-coated SiO2NP showed low level, and in some cases complete absence, of stress response and this was consistent up to the highest dose of 0.5 mg/ml. Conclusions The present study demonstrates and highlights the importance of subtle biological changes downstream of primary membrane and endocytosis-associated phenomena resulting from high dose SiO2NP exposure. Increased activation of transcription factors, such as ATF-2, was quantitatively assessed as a function of i human cell line specific stress-response, ii SiO2NP size and iii concentration. Despite the low level of cytotoxicity detected for the amorphous SiO2NP investigated, these findings prompt an in-depth focus for future SiO2NP-cell/tissue investigations based on the

  17. Activation of stress-related signalling pathway in human cells upon SiO2 nanoparticles exposure as an early indicator of cytotoxicity

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mohamed, Bashir M

    2011-07-29

    Abstract Background Nanomaterials such as SiO2 nanoparticles (SiO2NP) are finding increasing applications in the biomedical and biotechnological fields such as disease diagnostics, imaging, drug delivery, food, cosmetics and biosensors development. Thus, a mechanistic and systematic evaluation of the potential biological and toxic effects of SiO2NP becomes crucial in order to assess their complete safe applicability limits. Results In this study, human monocytic leukemia cell line THP-1 and human alveolar epithelial cell line A549 were exposed to a range of amorphous SiO2NP of various sizes and concentrations (0.01, 0.1 and 0.5 mg\\/ml). Key biological indicators of cellular functions including cell population density, cellular morphology, membrane permeability, lysosomal mass\\/pH and activation of transcription factor-2 (ATF-2) were evaluated utilizing quantitative high content screening (HCS) approach and biochemical techniques. Despite the use of extremely high nanoparticle concentrations, our findings showed a low degree of cytotoxicity within the panel of SiO2NP investigated. However, at these concentrations, we observed the onset of stress-related cellular response induced by SiO2NP. Interestingly, cells exposed to alumina-coated SiO2NP showed low level, and in some cases complete absence, of stress response and this was consistent up to the highest dose of 0.5 mg\\/ml. Conclusions The present study demonstrates and highlights the importance of subtle biological changes downstream of primary membrane and endocytosis-associated phenomena resulting from high dose SiO2NP exposure. Increased activation of transcription factors, such as ATF-2, was quantitatively assessed as a function of i) human cell line specific stress-response, ii) SiO2NP size and iii) concentration. Despite the low level of cytotoxicity detected for the amorphous SiO2NP investigated, these findings prompt an in-depth focus for future SiO2NP-cell\\/tissue investigations based on the combined

  18. Biological effects on human health due to radiofrequency/microwave exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breckenkamp, Jürgen; Berg, Gabriele; Blettner, Maria

    2003-01-01

    person years). As exposures were defined: dielectric heaters in a plastic manufacturing plant, working with radio devices (professional and amateur), production of wireless communication technologies, radar devices of the Canadian police, radar units used by the military as well as artificially produced...... electromagnetic pulses similar to those after a nuclear explosion. In all studies (except one that used a qualitative job-exposure-matrix) either the duration of occupational work as an approximation to actual exposure was determined or a simple yes/no differentiation was used based on a definition of high......-exposed and/or low-exposed (occupational) groups. Either total mortality, cancer mortality, cancer incidence or other outcomes were estimated. In most of the studies, an increased risk for various types of cancer was found in exposed study participants, although in different organs. The overall results were...

  19. Assessment of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in police in Florence, Italy, through personal air sampling and biological monitoring of the urinary metabolite 1-hydroxypyrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perico, A; Gottardi, M; Boddi, V; Bavazzano, P; Lanciotti, E

    2001-01-01

    In this study, the authors evaluated exposure to airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in workers exposed to exhaust gas from cars, and they assessed the efficiency of urinary 1-hydroxypyrene as an indicator of exposure to pyrene and PAHs. The authors selected 2 groups of police who worked in 2 areas in the city of Florence: 1 group was highly exposed to high-density traffic emissions during the winter and summer of 1997, and the 2nd group experienced low exposure to traffic emissions during the same period. Ambient monitoring was achieved with personal sampling of airborne PAHs during each workshift. Eight hydrocarbons were used as indicators of pollution caused by PAHs (e.g., pyrene, benzo[a]pyrene, benzo[a]anthracene, dibenzo[a,h]anthracene). Biological monitoring was performed through dosing of 1-hydroxypyrene (pyrene metabolite) in urine samples taken at the end of each workshift. The ambient monitoring revealed that PAH concentrations were influenced by both season of sampling and varying intensities of traffic in the different areas. The median concentration of benzo[a]pyrene in winter was twice as high in the high-density traffic area as in the low-density traffic area (i.e., 4.1 ng/m3 versus 1.8 ng/m3). In summer, the high-density traffic area experienced benzo[a]pyrene concentrations that were 6 times higher than in the low-density traffic area (i.e., 1.2 ng/m3 versus 0.2 ng/m3). Benzo[a]pyrene was also correlated highly (r(s) = .92, p traffic area and 120.5 ng/gm creatinine in the low-density traffic area). An analysis of the general data revealed that 1-hydroxypyrene was, to some degree, related to pyrene, benzo[a]pyrene, and airborne total PAHs, whereas analysis of separate data for the area and the season revealed an emergence of a closer correlation during the winter in the high-traffic area. Therefore, 1 -hydroxypyrene can be considered a good biological indicator of exposure to airborne PAHs in the urban environment, especially in winter

  20. Biological Monitoring of Occupational Exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons at an Electric Steel Foundry in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Laura; Hanchi, Mariem; Olgiati, Luca; Polledri, Elisa; Consonni, Dario; Zrafi, Ines; Saidane-Mosbahi, Dalila; Fustinoni, Silvia

    2016-07-01

    Occupational exposures during iron and steel founding have been classified as carcinogenic to humans, and the exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in this industrial setting may contribute to cancer risk. The occupational exposure to PAHs was assessed in 93 male workers at an electric steel foundry in Tunisia by biomonitoring, with the aims of characterizing the excretion profile and investigating the influence of job title and personal characteristics on the biomarkers. Sixteen 2-6 ring unmetabolized PAHs (U-PAHs) and eight hydroxylated PAH metabolites (OHPAHs) were analyzed by gas chromatography-triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry, respectively. Among U-PAHs, urinary naphthalene (U-NAP) was the most abundant compound (median level: 643ng l(-1)), followed by phenanthrene (U-PHE, 18.5ng l(-1)). Urinary benzo[a]pyrene (U-BaP) level was model showed that job title was a significant determinant for almost all U-PAHs. In particular, employees in the steel smelter workshop had higher levels of high-boiling U-PAHs and lower levels of low-boiling U-PAHs than those of workers with other job titles. Among OHPAHs, this model was significant only for naphthols and 1-hydroxyphenanthrene (1-OHPHE). Smoking status was a significant predictor for almost all biomarkers. Among all analytes, U-PHE and 1-OHPHE were the less affected by tobacco smoke, and they were significantly correlated with both low- and high-molecular-weight compounds, and their levels were related to job titles, so they could be proposed as suitable biomarkers of PAH exposure at steel foundries. Based on 1-OHPYR levels, our findings show that occupational exposure of these workers was similar to that reported in recent studies of electric steel foundry workers. The multianalytic approach is useful in revealing different exposure levels among job titles. PMID:27206821

  1. Personal air sampling and biological monitoring of occupational exposure to the soil fumigant cis-1,3-dichloropropene

    OpenAIRE

    Brouwer, E.J.; Verplanke, A.J.W.; Boogaard, P J; Bloemen, L.J.; Sittert, van, N.J.; Christian, F.E.; Stokkentreeff, M; Dijksterhuis, A.; Mulder, A.; Wolff, de, F.A.; K¿hler, A.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To assess exposure of commercial application workers to the nematocide cis-1,3-dichloropropene (cis-DCP).
METHODS—The study was conducted during the annual application season, August to 15 November, in the starch potato growing region in The Netherlands. 14 Application workers collected end of shift urine samples on each fumigation day (n=119). The mercapturic acid metabolite N-acetyl-S-(cis-3-chloro-2-propenyl)-L-cysteine (cis-DCP-MA) in urine was used for biological monitoring of...

  2. Substrate-enzyme characteristics after derangements of biological combustion processes. Estimations of organism's long term exposure to uranium ore dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under uranium-mining and processing conditions industrial dust of uranium ore (IDO) is key anthropogenic factor of effect on organism. Industrial dust of uranium ore contains trace of 238uranium oxide making effects of low and ultralow radiation doses along with silicon derivatives, salts of heavy metals and other contaminants. In recent years epidemiological studies showed that along with commonly encountered radiation- induced pathology in zones with radiation problems general somatic morbidity with symptoms of chronic disease with protracted course essentially increased. Above-mentioned facts indicate the exigency of systematized study the nature of systemic effect of ionizing radiation on organism at low doses. Structural and functional irregularities, metabolic imbalances and dyscrasia induced by irradiation can become indicators in this direction. Biological combustion processes performing complex of reductive and oxidative conversions directed to energy-rich compound synthesis occupy a special place among highly sensitive and informative homeostasis systems. In order to reveal the nature of ionizing radiation effect on organism at low doses and search for a relation 'Dose - Effect' we carried out series experiments with different doses of industrial dust of uranium ore from Stepnogorsk mining and chemical complex. Dose load calculation was carried out with a glance for threshold limit value (TLV) of dust control in work zone. Three dose loads satisfied to 5, 10, and 50 times to TLV were studied. Total time on inhalation primer makes up 120 days at doses equal to 5 and 10 times TLV and 60 days at dose 50 times TLV Value of total accumulated dose in the first two series varies within 11 and 22 micro Sv per 120 days of inhalation and is 55 micro Sv per 60 days in the third series. Substrate - enzyme relationships of three energy systems: terminal stages of glycolysis, intermediates and enzymes from Krebs cycle, as well as certain products from lipid

  3. Biological monitoring the exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons of coke oven workers in relation to smoking and genetic polymorphisms for GSTM1 GSTT1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delft, J.H.M. van; Steenwinkel, M.-J.S.T.; Asten, J.G. van; Vogel, N. de; Bruijntjes-Rozier, T.C.D.M.; Schouten, T.; Cramers, P.; Maas, L.; Herwijnen, M.H. van; Schooten, F.-J. van; Hopmans, P.M.J.

    2001-01-01

    Occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) increases the risk of developing lung cancer. Human exposure is often demonstrated by increased internal levels of PAH metabolites and of markers for early biological effects, like DNA adducts and cytogenetic aberrations. Objective: Thi

  4. BIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF CONTINUOUS EXPOSURE TO TRITIUM AND LEAD IN THE RAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    In an attempt to contribute information on the effects of simultaneous exposure to two potentially synergistic environmental pollutants the authors have chronically administered tritiated water (HTO) and lead (Pb) to rats. HTO and Pb were selected because they are ubiquitous in t...

  5. A biologically inspired psychometric function for accuracy of visual identification as a function of exposure duration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anders; Andersen, Tobias

    modelling human performance in whole and partial report tasks in which multiple simultaneously presented letters are to be reported (Shibuya & Bundesen, 1988). Therefore, we investigated visual letter identification as a function of exposure duration. On each trial, a single randomly chosen letter (A-Z) was...

  6. Selective uptake and biological consequences of environmentally relevant antidepressant pharmaceutical exposures on male fathead minnows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, M.M.; Painter, M.M.; Bartell, S.E.; Logue, A.; Furlong, E.T.; Werner, S.L.; Schoenfuss, H.L.

    2011-01-01

    Antidepressant pharmaceuticals have been reported in wastewater effluent at the nanogram to low microgram-per-liter range, and include bupropion (BUP), fluoxetine (FLX), sertraline (SER), and venlafaxine (VEN). To assess the effects of antidepressants on reproductive anatomy, physiology, and behavior, adult male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were exposed for 21 days either to a single concentration of the antidepressants FLX, SER, VEN, or BUP, or to an antidepressant mixture. The data demonstrated that exposure to VEN (305. ng/L and 1104. ng/L) and SER (5.2. ng/L) resulted in mortality. Anatomical alterations were noted within the testes of fish exposed to SER and FLX, both modulators of the neurotransmitter serotonin. Additionally, FLX at 28. ng/L induced vitellogenin in male fish-a common endpoint for estrogenic endocrine disruption. Significant alterations in male secondary sex characteristics were noted with single exposures. Effects of single compound exposures neither carried over, nor became additive in the antidepressant mixtures, and reproductive behavior was not affected. Analysis of brain tissues from the exposed fish suggested increased uptake of FLX, SER and BUP and minimal uptake of VEN when compared to exposure water concentrations. Furthermore, the only metabolite detected consistently in the brain tissues was norfluoxetine. Similar trends of uptake by brain tissue were observed when fish were exposed to antidepressant mixtures. The present study demonstrates that anatomy and physiology, but not reproductive behavior, can be disrupted by exposure to environmental concentrations of some antidepressants. The observation that antidepressant uptake into fish tissues is selective may have consequences on assessing the mode-of-action and effects of these compounds in future studies. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  7. [The evaluation of biological effects of exposure to respirable crystalline silica in building industry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pira, E; Piolatto, P G

    2012-01-01

    The building industry entails the exposure to Respirable Crystalline Silica (RCS), though there is a large variability among different sectors. The environmental values reported for the current conditions seem to be relatively low. For example the mean exposure estimated by IOM for all industrial sectors in the EU is 0.07 mg/m3. There are few studies in the building sector which show similar values. This is obviously not representative of past exposure. Moreover, the problems of sampling and analysis techniques are still at issue. The well known effect of RCS exposure is silicosis. The carcinogenicity of RCS is still under debate, especially regarding the question of whether RCS is carcinogenic "per se" or whether the risk of developing lung cancer is mediated by silicosis. Although the IARC includes RCS in the Group I (human carcinogen), the reference should be the CLP regulation, of which carcinogen definition criteria allow to state that today there are not sufficient data to classify RCS as a carcinogen and that it seems more appropriate to include RCS in different STOT.RE categories. This is valid for building industry as well as for the other industrial sectors. In Italy the recommended exposure limit is the ACGIH value of 0.025 mg/m3. At EU level it is still debated which is the best choice, based on cost/benefits evaluation, among the following limit values: 0.2, 0.1 and 0.05 respectively. The authors obviously believe that the most protective value should be adopted. PMID:23213807

  8. Examining waterborne and dietborne routes of exposure and their contribution to biological response patterns in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozon-Ramilo, Lisa D., E-mail: lisa.ramilo@usask.ca [University of Saskatchewan, Toxicology Centre, 44 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5B3 (Canada); Dube, Monique G., E-mail: moniqe.dube@usask.ca [University of Saskatchewan, School of Environment and Sustainability, 117 Science Place, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 2X8 (Canada); Squires, Allison J., E-mail: allison.squires@usask.ca [University of Saskatchewan, Toxicology Centre, 44 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5B3 (Canada); Niyogi, Som, E-mail: som.niyogi@usask.ca [University of Saskatchewan, Department of Biology, 112 Science Place, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5E2 (Canada)

    2011-10-15

    total egg production and cumulative spawning events were significantly affected by both waterborne and dietborne exposures, with maximum effect found in the multi-trophic streams. These results suggest that under environmentally relevant exposure conditions, trophic transfer of metals may lead to greater reproductive effects and increased metal toxicity in fish. It also indicates that metals are assimilated in tissues differently depending on the quality of the food (live vs. frozen). Overall, it appears that the multi-trophic bioassay provides an important link between the laboratory and field, which may allow for a more realistic assessment of the true impact of MME's in the environment.

  9. Examining waterborne and dietborne routes of exposure and their contribution to biological response patterns in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    total egg production and cumulative spawning events were significantly affected by both waterborne and dietborne exposures, with maximum effect found in the multi-trophic streams. These results suggest that under environmentally relevant exposure conditions, trophic transfer of metals may lead to greater reproductive effects and increased metal toxicity in fish. It also indicates that metals are assimilated in tissues differently depending on the quality of the food (live vs. frozen). Overall, it appears that the multi-trophic bioassay provides an important link between the laboratory and field, which may allow for a more realistic assessment of the true impact of MME's in the environment.

  10. Register indicators of physical endurance of biological objects when running a treadmill and swimming with weights using computer video markerless tracking

    OpenAIRE

    Datsenko A.V.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: to study the use of video tracking to assess physical endurance and indicators of biological objects fatigue when running on a treadmill and swimming with the load. Material and methods. Physical endurance evaluated by test facilities for running on a treadmill and swimming with the load. As the object of the studies used laboratory rats. Results. For indicators of physical endurance biological objects isolated areas running track of treadmill and electrical stimulation site, when sw...

  11. Static magnetic fields: A summary of biological interactions, potential health effects, and exposure guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1992-05-01

    Interest in the mechanisms of interaction and the biological effects of static magnetic fields has increased significantly during the past two decades as a result of the growing number of applications of these fields in research, industry and medicine. A major stimulus for research on the bioeffects of static magnetic fields has been the effort to develop new technologies for energy production and storage that utilize intense magnetic fields (e.g., thermonuclear fusion reactors and superconducting magnet energy storage devices). Interest in the possible biological interactions and health effects of static magnetic fields has also been increased as a result of recent developments in magnetic levitation as a mode of public transportation. In addition, the rapid emergence of magnetic resonance imaging as a new clinical diagnostic procedure has, in recent years, provided a strong rationale for defining the possible biological effects of magnetic fields with high flux densities. In this review, the principal interaction mechanisms of static magnetic fields will be described, and a summary will be given of the present state of knowledge of the biological, environmental, and human health effects of these fields.

  12. Biologic monitoring of exposure to organophosphorus pesticides in 195 Italian children.

    OpenAIRE

    Aprea, C.; Strambi, M; Novelli, M T; Lunghini, L; Bozzi, N

    2000-01-01

    One hundred ninety-five 6- to 7-year-old children who lived in the municipality of Siena (Tuscany, Italy), underwent biologic monitoring to evaluate urinary excretion of several alkylphosphates that are metabolites of organophosphorus pesticides. We evaluated dimethylphosphate (DMP), dimethylthiophosphate (DMTP), dimethyldithiophosphate (DMDTP), diethylphosphate (DEP), diethylthiophosphate (DETP), and diethyldithiophosphate (DEDTP). We obtained urine samples taken in the children's schools, a...

  13. Delay of hair regrowth in mice as a possible biological dosimeter on the skin in cases of over-exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In cases of partial body over-exposure, the dose estimation is often impossible without considerable error. The dose-effect relationship on the delay of hair regrowth and reduction in hair length of mice after irradiation were examined to investigate the possibility of hair growth as a biological dosimeter. Hairs on the dorsum skin of mice were shaved. Shaved areas were irradiated with a Sr-90/Y-90 β-ray source in the early anagen or midanagen stage of the hair cycle. Skin doses were from 0.5 Gy to 10 Gy. The time of hair regrowth and the length of hair was examined with the scaling loupe. The delay of hair regrowth was dose dependent, fitting the L-Q function. Reduction in hair length was less dose dependent. These findings were supported by the histological observations of mitosis and pycnosis in hair matrix cells. Dose estimation functions were derived from the dose-effect relationship curves. Hair regrowth delay is thought to be a sensitive biological dosimeter which can be applied as early as a few days after over-exposure. (4 figs.)

  14. Biological monitoring of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure in a highly polluted area of Poland.

    OpenAIRE

    Ovrebø, S; Fjeldstad, P E; Grzybowska, E; Kure, E H; Chorazy, M; Haugen, A

    1995-01-01

    Air pollution in Poland and particularly in Silesia is among the worst in Europe. Many coal mines and coke oven plants are located in this area, representing a major source of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). We quantitated the PAH exposure level in air samples using personal sampling devices, collected urine samples from the same individuals, and measured 1-hydroxypyrene with high performance liquid chromatography. Samples were collected twice, once in February and once ...

  15. Minimally invasive transcriptome profiling in salmon: Detection of biological response in rainbow trout caudal fin following exposure to environmental chemical contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veldhoen, Nik; Stevenson, Mitchel R. [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055, STN CSC, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada); Skirrow, Rachel C. [Pacific and Yukon Laboratory for Environmental Testing, Pacific Environmental Science Centre, Environment Canada, 2645 Dollarton Highway, North Vancouver, BC V7H 1B1 (Canada); Rieberger, Kevin J. [Environmental Sustainability and Strategic Policy Division, Water Protection and Sustainability Branch, British Columbia Ministry of Environment, P.O. Box 9362 Stn Prov Govt, Victoria, BC V8W 9M2 (Canada); Aggelen, Graham van [Pacific and Yukon Laboratory for Environmental Testing, Pacific Environmental Science Centre, Environment Canada, 2645 Dollarton Highway, North Vancouver, BC V7H 1B1 (Canada); Meays, Cynthia L. [Environmental Sustainability and Strategic Policy Division, Water Protection and Sustainability Branch, British Columbia Ministry of Environment, P.O. Box 9362 Stn Prov Govt, Victoria, BC V8W 9M2 (Canada); Helbing, Caren C., E-mail: chelbing@uvic.ca [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055, STN CSC, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •A minimally-invasive tail fin biopsy assay was developed for use in fish. •Quantitative real time polymerase reaction provided gene expression readout. •Results were comparable to classical liver tissue responses. •The approach was used on two salmonid species and can be coupled with genomic sex determination using an additional biopsy for maximal information. -- Abstract: An increasing number of anthropogenic chemicals have demonstrated potential for disruption of biological processes critical to normal growth and development of wildlife species. Both anadromous and freshwater salmon species are at risk of exposure to environmental chemical contaminants that may affect migratory behavior, environmental fitness, and reproductive success. A sensitive metric in determination of the presence and impact of such environmental chemical contaminants is through detection of changes in the status of gene transcript levels using a targeted quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay. Ideally, the wildlife assessment strategy would incorporate conservation-centered non-lethal practices. Herein, we describe the development of such an assay for rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, following an acute 96 h exposure to increasing concentrations of either 17α-ethinyl estradiol or cadmium. The estrogenic screen included measurement of mRNA encoding estrogen receptor α and β isoforms, vitellogenin, vitelline envelope protein γ, cytochrome p450 family 19 subfamily A, aryl hydrocarbon receptor, and the stress indicator, catalase. The metal exposure screen included evaluation of the latter two mRNA transcripts along with those encoding the metallothionein A and B isoforms. Exposure-dependent transcript abundance profiles were detected in both liver and caudal fin supporting the use of the caudal fin as a non-lethally obtained tissue source. The potential for both transcriptome profiling and genotypic sex determination from fin biopsy was extended, in

  16. Minimally invasive transcriptome profiling in salmon: Detection of biological response in rainbow trout caudal fin following exposure to environmental chemical contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •A minimally-invasive tail fin biopsy assay was developed for use in fish. •Quantitative real time polymerase reaction provided gene expression readout. •Results were comparable to classical liver tissue responses. •The approach was used on two salmonid species and can be coupled with genomic sex determination using an additional biopsy for maximal information. -- Abstract: An increasing number of anthropogenic chemicals have demonstrated potential for disruption of biological processes critical to normal growth and development of wildlife species. Both anadromous and freshwater salmon species are at risk of exposure to environmental chemical contaminants that may affect migratory behavior, environmental fitness, and reproductive success. A sensitive metric in determination of the presence and impact of such environmental chemical contaminants is through detection of changes in the status of gene transcript levels using a targeted quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay. Ideally, the wildlife assessment strategy would incorporate conservation-centered non-lethal practices. Herein, we describe the development of such an assay for rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, following an acute 96 h exposure to increasing concentrations of either 17α-ethinyl estradiol or cadmium. The estrogenic screen included measurement of mRNA encoding estrogen receptor α and β isoforms, vitellogenin, vitelline envelope protein γ, cytochrome p450 family 19 subfamily A, aryl hydrocarbon receptor, and the stress indicator, catalase. The metal exposure screen included evaluation of the latter two mRNA transcripts along with those encoding the metallothionein A and B isoforms. Exposure-dependent transcript abundance profiles were detected in both liver and caudal fin supporting the use of the caudal fin as a non-lethally obtained tissue source. The potential for both transcriptome profiling and genotypic sex determination from fin biopsy was extended, in

  17. Evaluating the response of biological assemblages as potential indicators for restoration measures in an intermittent Mediterranean river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Samantha Jane; Santos, Jose; Ferreira, Teresa; Mendes, Ana

    2010-08-01

    Bioindicators are essential for detecting environmental degradation and for assessing the success of river restoration initiatives. River restoration projects require the identification of environmental and pressure gradients that affect the river system under study and the selection of suitable indicators to assess habitat quality before, during and after restoration. We assessed the response of benthic macroinvertebrates, fish, bird and macrophyte assemblages to environmental and pressure gradients from sites situated upstream and downstream of a cofferdam on the River Odelouca, an intermittent Mediterranean river in southwest Portugal. The Odelouca will be permanently dammed in 2010. Principal Component Analyses (PCA) of environmental and pressure variables revealed that most variance was explained by environmental factors that clearly separated sites upstream and downstream of the partially built cofferdam. The pressure gradient describing physical impacts to the banks and channel as a result of land use change was less distinct. Redundancy Analysis revealed significant levels of explained variance to species distribution patterns in relation to environmental and pressure variables for all 4 biological assemblages. Partial Redundancy analyses revealed high levels of redundancy for pH between groups and that the avifauna was best associated with pressures acting upon the system. Patterns in invertebrates and fish were associated with descriptors of habitat quality, although fish distribution patterns were affected by reduced connectivity. Procrustean and RELATE (Mantel test) analyses gave broadly similar results and supported these findings. We give suggestions on the suitability of key indicator groups such as benthic macroinvertebrates and endemic fish species to assess in stream habitat quality and appropriate restoration measures, such as the release of peak flow patterns that mimic intermittent Mediterranean systems to combat habitat fragmentation and

  18. Evaluating the Response of Biological Assemblages as Potential Indicators for Restoration Measures in an Intermittent Mediterranean River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Samantha Jane; Santos, Jose; Ferreira, Teresa; Mendes, Ana

    2010-08-01

    Bioindicators are essential for detecting environmental degradation and for assessing the success of river restoration initiatives. River restoration projects require the identification of environmental and pressure gradients that affect the river system under study and the selection of suitable indicators to assess habitat quality before, during and after restoration. We assessed the response of benthic macroinvertebrates, fish, bird and macrophyte assemblages to environmental and pressure gradients from sites situated upstream and downstream of a cofferdam on the River Odelouca, an intermittent Mediterranean river in southwest Portugal. The Odelouca will be permanently dammed in 2010. Principal Component Analyses (PCA) of environmental and pressure variables revealed that most variance was explained by environmental factors that clearly separated sites upstream and downstream of the partially built cofferdam. The pressure gradient describing physical impacts to the banks and channel as a result of land use change was less distinct. Redundancy Analysis revealed significant levels of explained variance to species distribution patterns in relation to environmental and pressure variables for all 4 biological assemblages. Partial Redundancy analyses revealed high levels of redundancy for pH between groups and that the avifauna was best associated with pressures acting upon the system. Patterns in invertebrates and fish were associated with descriptors of habitat quality, although fish distribution patterns were affected by reduced connectivity. Procrustean and RELATE (Mantel test) analyses gave broadly similar results and supported these findings. We give suggestions on the suitability of key indicator groups such as benthic macroinvertebrates and endemic fish species to assess in stream habitat quality and appropriate restoration measures, such as the release of peak flow patterns that mimic intermittent Mediterranean systems to combat habitat fragmentation and

  19. Biological Monitoring of human exposure to neonicotinoids using urine samples, and neonicotinoid excretion kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Harada, Kouji H; Tanaka, Keiko; Sakamoto, Hiroko; Imanaka, Mie; Niisoe, Tamon; Hitomi, Toshiaki; Kobayashi, Hatasu; Okuda, Hiroko; Inoue, Sumiko; Kusakawa, Koichi; Oshima, Masayo; Watanabe, Kiyohiko; Yasojima, Makoto; Takasuga, Takumi; Koizumi, Akio

    2016-01-01

    [Background] Neonicotinoids, which are novel pesticides, have entered into usage around the world because they are selectively toxic to arthropods and relatively non-Toxic to vertebrates. It has been suggested that several neonicotinoids cause neurodevelopmental toxicity in mammals. The aim was to establish the relationship between oral intake and urinary excretion of neonicotinoids by humans to facilitate biological monitoring, and to estimate dietary neonicotinoid intakes by Japanese adults...

  20. Biological Monitoring for Depleted Uranium Exposure in U.S. Veterans

    OpenAIRE

    Dorsey, Carrie D.; Engelhardt, Susan M.; Squibb, Katherine S.; McDiarmid, Melissa A.

    2009-01-01

    Background As part of an ongoing medical surveillance program for U.S. veterans exposed to depleted uranium (DU), biological monitoring of urine uranium (U) concentrations is offered to any veteran of the Gulf War and those serving in more recent conflicts (post-Gulf War veterans). Objectives Since a previous report of surveillance findings in 2004, an improved methodology for determination of the isotopic ratio of U in urine (235U:238U) has been developed and allows for more definitive evalu...

  1. Improvement of Biological Indicators by Uniformly Distributing Bacillus subtilis Spores in Monolayers To Evaluate Enhanced Spore Decontamination Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raguse, Marina; Fiebrandt, Marcel; Stapelmann, Katharina; Madela, Kazimierz; Laue, Michael; Lackmann, Jan-Wilm; Thwaite, Joanne E; Setlow, Peter; Awakowicz, Peter; Moeller, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    Novel decontamination technologies, including cold low-pressure plasma and blue light (400 nm), are promising alternatives to conventional surface decontamination methods. However, the standardization of the assessment of such sterilization processes remains to be accomplished. Bacterial endospores of the genera Bacillus and Geobacillus are frequently used as biological indicators (BIs) of sterility. Ensuring standardized and reproducible BIs for reliable testing procedures is a significant problem in industrial settings. In this study, an electrically driven spray deposition device was developed, allowing fast, reproducible, and homogeneous preparation of Bacillus subtilis 168 spore monolayers on glass surfaces. A detailed description of the structural design as well as the operating principle of the spraying device is given. The reproducible formation of spore monolayers of up to 5 × 10(7) spores per sample was verified by scanning electron microscopy. Surface inactivation studies revealed that monolayered spores were inactivated by UV-C (254 nm), low-pressure argon plasma (500 W, 10 Pa, 100 standard cubic cm per min), and blue light (400 nm) significantly faster than multilayered spores were. We have thus succeeded in the uniform preparation of reproducible, highly concentrated spore monolayers with the potential to generate BIs for a variety of nonpenetrating surface decontamination techniques. PMID:26801572

  2. Alteration of cellular and subcellular electrophysiological parameters in mammalian cells by high- and low-LET irradiation at low dose-levels. Part of a coordinated programme on cell membrane probes as biological indicators in radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transmembrane resting potential (MRP) was chosen as a highly sensitive indicator for cellular reactions. The MRP was studied for its suitability as biological indicator of the level of accidental radiation exposure. The development of methodology and installation of a low-cost test chamber, and dose-response studies of MRP-changes of human cells after irradiation with low- and high-LET radiation were considered. Cultured human embryonic lung fibroblasts and human lung biopsy samples were used, with a Co-60 source for low-LET irradiation at dose rates of 2 rad and 20 rad/min, respectively. For high-LET irradiation an Am-241 source was used. The onset of radiation induced effects on cell membranes was prompt but of short duration. In general, full recovery followed within hours of irradiation, at least under the particular experimental conditions. MRP changes in irradiated cells proved a highly sensitive parameter for assessing radiation effects on cell membranes. It appears premature to draw conclusions on the suitability of the method as a biological indicator of radiation damage from accidental exposure, in view of the short duration and prompt reversibility of the effects, and an incomplete understanding of the radiation-induced reactions involved at different LET's and at different doses and dose-rates

  3. Mutagenic potential scale developed for relative evaluation of biological system response to environments presenting different gamma exposure rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The elaboration of a mutagenic potential scale (MPS) will be accomplished through the evaluation of the frequency of induced mutations in a plant biological system in different sites. The selection of these sites will be based on general public perception of risk to health. In this selection, it will include areas such ecological paradises and also neighborhoods of nuclear reactors and uranium mining and milling industry with potential radiological impact. The developed project foresees the contribution of other research groups that will also provide data from different sites. The referred scale will be built based on the response of the genetic system that gives color to the cells of Tradescantia (BNL 4430) stamen hair to mutagenic agents. Methodological improvements has been developed aiming the computerization of mutagenic events evaluation and statistical analysis of data that will significantly increase the efficiency of the system and obtention of results. Other biological systems of environmental quality are being added to the project, for future use. MPS should facilitate the general public and professionals of the nuclear area to understand risks, on a biological basis, of exposure from radiologically impacted environments. (author)

  4. Examining waterborne and dietborne routes of exposure and their contribution to biological response patterns in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozon-Ramilo, Lisa D; Dubé, Monique G; Squires, Allison J; Niyogi, Som

    2011-10-01

    The objectives of the current study were: (i) to gain a better understanding of the relative importance of water and diet as routes of exposure causing toxicity in fathead minnow (FHM) exposed to metal mining effluents (MME) using a full factorial water/food experimental design (Experiment 1), and (ii) to assess differences in the effects of food quality on toxicity by comparing FHM fed both a live and frozen diet of Chironomus dilutus (Experiment 2). The results showed significant increases in general water quality parameters (e.g., hardness, conductivity) and various metals in the effluent treatment waters compared to control waters, with maximum increase seen in the multi-trophic streams. Metals accumulation (Rb, Al, Se, Sr, Tl, Ce, Co, Cu, Pb) effects of both waterborne and multi-trophic exposures were significant in one or more fathead minnow tissue type (muscle, gonads, liver, larvae) relative to those in the control systems. Condition factor and liver somatic index (LSI) of FHM were also significantly affected in both exposures by one or both routes of exposure (water and/or diet). In addition, cumulative total egg production and cumulative spawning events were significantly affected by both waterborne and dietborne exposures, with maximum effect found in the multi-trophic streams. These results suggest that under environmentally relevant exposure conditions, trophic transfer of metals may lead to greater reproductive effects and increased metal toxicity in fish. It also indicates that metals are assimilated in tissues differently depending on the quality of the food (live vs. frozen). Overall, it appears that the multi-trophic bioassay provides an important link between the laboratory and field, which may allow for a more realistic assessment of the true impact of MME's in the environment. PMID:21888872

  5. Biological Monitoring of Blood Naphthalene Levels as a Marker of Occupational Exposure to PAHs among Auto-Mechanics and Spray Painters in Rawalpindi

    OpenAIRE

    Cheema Iqbal U; Qayyum Mazhar; Kamal Atif; Rashid Audil

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Routine exposure to chemical contaminants in workplace is a cause for concern over potential health risks to workers. In Pakistan, reports on occupational exposure and related health risks are almost non-existent, which reflects the scarce availability of survey data and criteria for determining whether an unsafe exposure has occurred. The current study was designed to evaluate blood naphthalene (NAPH) levels as an indicator of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons ...

  6. UV effects on the primary productivity of picophytoplankton: biological weighting functions and exposure response curves of Synechococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, P. J.; Pritchard, A. L.; Ihnacik, R.

    2013-12-01

    A model that predicts UV effects on marine primary productivity using a biological weighting function (BWF) coupled to the photosynthesis-irradiance response (BWF/P-E model) has been implemented for two strains of the picoplanktonic cyanobacteria, Synechococcus, WH7803 and WH8102, which were grown at two irradiances (77 and 174 μmol m-2 s-1 PAR) and two temperatures (20 °C and 26 °C). The model was fit using photosynthesis measured in a polychromatic incubator with 12 long-pass filter configurations with 50% wavelength cutoffs ranging from 291 to 408 nm, giving an effective wavelength range of 280-400 nm. Examination of photosynthetic response vs weighted exposure revealed that repair rate progressively increases at low exposure but reaches a maximum rate above a threshold exposure ("Emax"). Adding Emax as a parameter to the BWF/P-E model provided a significantly better fit to Synechococcus data than the existing "E" or "T" models. Sensitivity to UV inhibition varied with growth conditions for both strains, but this was mediated mainly by variations in Emax for WH8102 while both the BWF and Emax changed for WH7803. Higher growth temperature was associated with a considerable reduction in sensitivity, consistent with an important role of repair in regulating sensitivity to UV. Based on nominal water column conditions (noon, solstice, 23° latitude, "blue" water), the BWFEmax/P-E model estimates that UV + PAR exposure inhibits Synechococcus photosynthesis from 77-91% at 1 m, and integrated productivity to 150 m 15-27% relative to predicted rates in the absence of inhibition.

  7. UV effects on the primary productivity of picophytoplankton: biological weighting functions and exposure response curves of Synechococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, P. J.; Pritchard, A. L.; Ihnacik, R.

    2014-05-01

    A model that predicts UV effects on marine primary productivity using a biological weighting function (BWF) coupled to the photosynthesis-irradiance response (BWF/P-E model) has been implemented for two strains of the picoplanktonic cyanobacteria Synechococcus, WH7803 and WH8102, which were grown at two irradiances (77 and 174 μmol m-2 s-1 photosynthetically available radiation (PAR)) and two temperatures (20 and 26 °C). The model was fit using photosynthesis measured in a polychromatic incubator with 12 long-pass filter configurations with 50% wavelength cutoffs ranging from 291 to 408 nm, giving an effective wavelength range of 280-400 nm. Examination of photosynthetic response vs. weighted exposure revealed that repair rate progressively increases at low exposure but reaches a maximum rate above a threshold exposure ("Emax"). Adding Emax as a parameter to the BWF/P-E model provided a significantly better fit to Synechococcus data than the existing "E" or "T" models. Sensitivity to UV inhibition varied with growth conditions for both strains, but this was mediated mainly by variations in Emax for WH8102 while both the BWF and Emax changed for WH7803. Higher growth temperature was associated with a considerable reduction in sensitivity, consistent with an important role of repair in regulating sensitivity to UV. Based on nominal water column conditions (noon, solstice, 23° latitude, "blue" water), the BWFEmax/P-E model estimates that UV + PAR exposure inhibits Synechococcus photosynthesis from 78 to 91% at 1 m, and integrated productivity to 150 m 17-29% relative to predicted rates in the absence of inhibition.

  8. Use of a biological marker in monitoring exposures among radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the introduction of more modern nuclear technology in nuclear medicine, there is an increased possibility for radiation exposure among workers handling nuclear materials which calls for the autoradiographic assay of Albertini's mutation assay for hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT). An in vivo somatic mutation of HGPRT gene due to radiation exposure could be assessed using this protocol. Favorable growth of lymphocytes in culture requires activated fetal bovine serum (FBS) in RPMI 1640 medium. Phytohemagglutinin (PHA) specifically stimulates maximum proliferation of lymphocytes. Thioguanine, an anti proliferative agent, was used to screen for the presence of mutation at the HGPRT gene in which cells having mutation at the HGPRT gene locus survive the inhibitive condition. Twenty-three samples were analyzed from radiation (14) and non-radiation (9) workers. Mutation index values greater than 0.4 have been found to be higher among radiation workers (21%) than among non-radiation workers (11%). The study will facilitate the screening procedure for radiation workers and thus prevent overexposure to radiation among workers. (author.). 8 refs.; 4 tabs

  9. Biological bases of the maximum permissible exposure levels of the UK laser standard BS 4803: 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of lasers has increased greatly over the past 15 years or so, to the extent that they are now used routinely in many occupational and public situations. There has been an increasing awareness of the potential hazards presented by lasers and substantial efforts have been made to formulate safety standards. In the UK the relevant Safety Standard is the British Standards Institution Standard BS 4803. This Standard was originally published in 1972 and a revision has recently been published (BS 4803: 1983). The revised standard has been developed using the American National Standards Institute Standard, ANSI Z136.1 (1973 onwards), as a model. In other countries, national standards have been similarly formulated, resulting in a large measure of international agreement through participation in the work of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). The bases of laser safety standards are biophysical data on threshold injury effects, particularly on the retina, and the development of theoretical models of damage mechanisms. This report deals in some detail with the mechanisms of injury from over exposure to optical radiations, in particular with the dependency of the type and degree of damage on wavelength, image size and pulse duration. The maximum permissible exposure levels recommended in BS 4803: 1983 are compared with published data for damage thresholds and the adequacy of the standard is discussed. (author)

  10. Ozone pollution and ozone biomonitoring in European cities. Part I: Ozone concentrations and cumulative exposure indices at urban and suburban sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klumpp, A.; Ansel, W.; Klumpp, G.;

    2006-01-01

    In the frame of a European research project on air quality in urban agglomerations, data on ozone concentrations from 23 automated urban and suburban monitoring stations in 11 cities from seven countries were analysed and evaluated. Daily and summer mean and maximum concentrations were computed...... based on hourly mean values, and cumulative ozone exposure indices (Accumulated exposure Over a Threshold of 40 ppb (AOT40), AOT20) were calculated. The diurnal profiles showed a characteristic pattern in most city centres, with minimum values in the early morning hours, a strong rise during the morning...... contrast, maximum values were lower and diurnal variation was much smaller. Based on ozone concentrations as well as on cumulative exposure indices, a clear north-south gradient in ozone pollution, with increasing levels from northern and northwestern sites to central and southern European sites, was...

  11. Seasonal assessment of biological indices, bioaccumulation and bioavailability of heavy metals in mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis from Algerian west coast, applied to environmental monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Rouane-Hacene

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work is to broaden our knowledge on the variability of trace metals in mussel tissues, focusing on seasonal fluctuations in the three different sampling sites of Algerian west coast (Oran Harbor (S1, Ain Defla (S2 and Hadjaj (S3. For this purpose, the bioavailability (metal indices and bioaccumulation (metal concentrations in soft tissues of heavy metals (Zn, Cu, Pb, and Cd, and the physiological characteristics (e.g. biological indices such as condition index (CI of mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis have been assessed and related to seasons and sites. In S1, the highest levels of metal concentrations and indices were obtained in mussels sampled in winter for Zn, Cu and Cd, but in summer for Pb. The biological indices significantly decreased in winter. In S2, the levels of concentrations and indices of all metals varied whatever the seasons, excepting in summer where the values were the lowest. In summer and spring, the biological indices were lower than in autumn and winter. The low growth of organisms in spring and summer might be correlated to the reproductive period and the low trophic level known in S2. S3, considered as a “pristine” area, showed low metal concentrations and indices, and high biological indices, reflecting the favorable physiological conditions for the mussel growth. This approach might be used in the monitoring of the quality of coastal waters and the present work provided a useful data set for Mediterranean monitoring network.

  12. Biologic

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffman, L H

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we explore the boundary between biology and the study of formal systems (logic). In the end, we arrive at a summary formalism, a chapter in "boundary mathematics" where there are not only containers but also extainers ><, entities open to interaction and distinguishing the space that they are not. The boundary algebra of containers and extainers is to biologic what boolean algebra is to classical logic. We show how this formalism encompasses significant parts of the logic of DNA replication, the Dirac formalism for quantum mechanics, formalisms for protein folding and the basic structure of the Temperley Lieb algebra at the foundations of topological invariants of knots and links.

  13. EVALUATION OF EFFECTS OF OZONE EXPOSURE ON INFLUENZA INFECTION IN MICE USING SEVERAL INDICATORS OF SUSCEPTIBILITY (JOURNAL VERSION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mice were exposed to 1 ppm O3, 3hrs/day, for 5 consecutive days. A 2-fold increase in % mortality and a 3 day decrease in survival time were observed in mice infected with influenza virus after the 2nd exposure. These endpoints were not affected in mice infected after the 1st, 3r...

  14. Biological stress responses induced by alpha radiation exposure in Lemna minor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hoeck, A.; Horemans, N.; Van Hees, M.; Nauts, R. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN (Belgium); Knapen, D.; Blust, R. [University of Antwerp (Belgium)

    2014-07-01

    To enhance the robustness of radiation protection criteria for biota, additional information on the biological impact of radionuclides on non-human biota is needed. In particular the effects of alpha emitting isotopes have been poorly studied within a radioecological contextual though they exhibit a high linear energy transfer which can cause significant biological damage when taken up by organisms. Therefore, it is not only essential to measure alpha radiation toxicity, but also try to understand the underlying mechanisms of this stressor. The current study aimed to contribute to a better knowledge of the fundamental processes regulating alpha radiation stress response mechanisms in higher plants. {sup 241}Am was primarily selected as it is an almost pure alpha emitter and, as a daughter nuclide of {sup 241}Pu, it will become one of the dominant pollutants in plutonium affected areas. The aquatic macrophyte Lemna minor has proven its value in eco-toxicological research as representative of higher aquatic plants (OECD guideline nr. 221) and will be used to analyze alpha radiation stress in plant systems. An individual growth inhibition test was set up by means of single dose-response curve in order to identify the Effective Dose Rates (EDR-values) for frond size and biomass. As the mean path length is small for alpha particles, the accumulation of the radionuclide inside species represents almost exclusively the dosimetry. Therefore, quantification of {sup 241}Am uptake and {sup 241}Am distribution were evaluated separately for roots and fronds taking the activity concentrations of growth medium into account. Taken together with the respective dose conversion coefficients from the ERICA tool, this allowed to construct an accurate dosimetric model to determine internal and external dose rates. Different standard media were tested on growth rate and biomass to analyse the amount of {sup 241}Am taken up by the plants exposed from 2.5 to 100 kBq/L. From these

  15. Optical measurement of temperature in biological cells under infrared laser light exposure (λ=800 nm)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, David; Lefort, Claire; Leveque, Philippe; O'Connor, Rod P.

    2015-07-01

    Interest in the interaction between laser light and biological samples has gained momentum in recent years, particularly in neurobiology, where there is significant potential to stimulate neurons with infrared laser light. Despite recent reports showing the application of infrared light for neurostimulation, the underlying mechanism is still unknown. The two main hypotheses are based on thermal or electrostatic mechanisms. Here, a novel optical method is presented to make temperature measurements in human neural cells under infrared laser excitation (λ=800nm) using the dye Rhodamine B (RhB). The measurement of temperature is based on the property of RhB, a fluorescent dye whose fluorescence intensity decreases linearly with increases in temperature. We present and detail the setup and measurement procedure that has temporal resolution of few milliseconds, based around a fluorescent live-cell imaging microscope used for cellular microfluorimetry experiments.

  16. The NIfETy Method for Environmental Assessment of Neighborhood-level Indicators of Violence, Alcohol, and Other Drug Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Furr-Holden, C. D. M.; Smart, M. J.; Pokorni, J. L.; Ialongo, N. S.; Leaf, P. J.; Holder, H D; Anthony, J. C.

    2008-01-01

    There are limited validated quantitative assessment methods to measure features of the built and social environment that might form the basis for environmental preventive interventions. This study describes a model approach for epidemiologic assessment of suspected environmental determinants of violence, alcohol and other drug (VAOD) exposure and fills this gap in current research. The investigation sought to test the feasibility of a systematic and longitudinal assessment of residential bloc...

  17. Changes of pathological and physiological indicators affecting drug metabolism in rats after acute exposure to high altitude

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Wenbin; Wang, Rong; Xie, Hua; ZHANG, JUANHONG; Jia, Zhengping

    2014-01-01

    High altitude environments cause the human body to undergo a series of pathological, physiological and biochemical changes, which have a certain effect on drug pharmacokinetics. The objective of the present study was to observe changes in factors affecting pharmacokinetics in rats following acute exposure to high altitude and return to low altitude. A total of 21 male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to three groups. The rats in group A were maintained at low altitude in Shanghai, 55 m abov...

  18. Mass-spectrometric identification of primary biological particle markers: indication for low abundance of primary biological material in the pristine submicron aerosol of Amazonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Schneider

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The abundance of marker compounds for primary biological particles in submicron aerosol was investigated by means of aerosol mass spectrometry. Mass spectra of amino acids, carbohydrates, small peptides, and proteins, all of which are key building blocks of biological particles, were recorded in laboratory experiments. Several characteristic marker peaks were identified. The identified marker peaks were compared with mass spectra recorded during AMAZE-08, a field campaign conducted in the pristine rainforest of the Central Amazon Basin, Brazil, during the wet season of February and March 2008. The low abundance of identified marker peaks places upper limits of 7.5 % for amino acids and 5.6 % for carbohydrates on the contribution of primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs to the submicron organic aerosol mass concentration during this time period. Upper limits for the absolute submicron concentrations for both compound classes range from 0.01 to 0.1 μg m−3. Carbohydrates and protein amino acids make up for about two thirds of the dry mass of a biological cell. Thus, our findings suggest an upper limit for the PBAPs mass fraction of about 20 % to the submicron organic aerosol.

  19. ON THE ADVISABILITY OF REJECTION OF SUBTRACTION OF BACKGROUND DOSIMETERS INDICATION VALUES FROM THE MEASURED VALUES OF INDIVIDUAL DOSES OF OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE OF A-GROUP PERSONNEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Barkovskiy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An article contains substantiation of advisability of rejection of subtraction of background dosimeters indication values from the measured values of individual doses of occupational exposure of A-group personnel in the process of carrying out of individual dosimetry control of medical organizations stuff which was implemented in the Methodical Guideline 2.6.1.3015-12. It is shown that mentioned procedure is firstly incorrect when we deal with low doses, when the impact of natural exposure could be really considerable and secondary senseless when we deal with dose values close to the dose limit value for A-group personnel when the impact of natural exposure is much lower then the error of measurements. It is suggested to carry out the account of the impact of natural exposure into personnel average doses basing on the analysis of statistical distributions of personnel individual doses and on indications of background dosimeters. It is suggested to add the information about indications of background dosimeters into the Base of Federal Statistical Supervision № 1-DOS as it is prescribed in the Methodical Guideline 2.6.1.3015-12. This article is the respond to the article of A.I. Grigoriev published in the present issue of Journal, in which the author contests the reasonableness of this provision.

  20. Biological Monitoring of Human Exposure to Neonicotinoids Using Urine Samples, and Neonicotinoid Excretion Kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouji H Harada

    Full Text Available Neonicotinoids, which are novel pesticides, have entered into usage around the world because they are selectively toxic to arthropods and relatively non-toxic to vertebrates. It has been suggested that several neonicotinoids cause neurodevelopmental toxicity in mammals. The aim was to establish the relationship between oral intake and urinary excretion of neonicotinoids by humans to facilitate biological monitoring, and to estimate dietary neonicotinoid intakes by Japanese adults.Deuterium-labeled neonicotinoid (acetamiprid, clothianidin, dinotefuran, and imidacloprid microdoses were orally ingested by nine healthy adults, and 24 h pooled urine samples were collected for 4 consecutive days after dosing. The excretion kinetics were modeled using one- and two-compartment models, then validated in a non-deuterium-labeled neonicotinoid microdose study involving 12 healthy adults. Increased urinary concentrations of labeled neonicotinoids were observed after dosing. Clothianidin was recovered unchanged within 3 days, and most dinotefuran was recovered unchanged within 1 day. Around 10% of the imidacloprid dose was excreted unchanged. Most of the acetamiprid was metabolized to desmethyl-acetamiprid. Spot urine samples from 373 Japanese adults were analyzed for neonicotinoids, and daily intakes were estimated. The estimated average daily intake of these neonicotinoids was 0.53-3.66 μg/day. The highest intake of any of the neonicotinoids in the study population was 64.5 μg/day for dinotefuran, and this was <1% of the acceptable daily intake.

  1. Biological impact of high-dose and dose-rate radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maliev, V.; Popov, D. [Russian Academy of Science, Vladicaucas (Russian Federation); Jones, J.; Gonda, S. [NASA -Johnson Space Center, Houston (United States); Prasad, K.; Viliam, C.; Haase, G. [Antioxida nt Research Institute, Premier Micronutrient Corporation, Novato (United States); Kirchin, V. [Moscow State Veterinary and Biotechnology Acade my, Moscow (Russian Federation); Rachael, C. [University Space Research Association, Colorado (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Experimental anti-radiation vaccine is a power tool of immune - prophylaxis of the acute radiation disease. Existing principles of treatment of the acute radiation dis ease are based on a correction of developing patho-physiological and biochemical processes within the first days after irradiation. Protection from radiation is built on the general principles of immunology and has two main forms - active and passive immunization. Active immunization by the essential radiation toxins of specific radiation determinant (S.D.R.) group allows significantly reduce the lethality and increase duration of life among animals that are irradiated by lethal and sub-lethal doses of gamma radiation.The radiation toxins of S.D.R. group have antigenic properties that are specific for different forms of acute radiation disease. Development of the specific and active immune reaction after intramuscular injection of radiation toxins allows optimize a manifestation of a clinical picture and stabilize laboratory parameters of the acute radiation syndromes. Passive immunization by the anti-radiation serum or preparations of immune-globulins gives a manifestation of the radioprotection effects immediately after this kind of preparation are injected into organisms of mammals. Providing passive immunization by preparations of anti-radiations immune-globulins is possible in different periods of time after radiation. Providing active immunization by preparations of S.D.R. group is possible only to achieve a prophylaxis goal and form the protection effects that start to work in 18 - 35 days after an injection of biological active S.D.R. substance has been administrated. However active and passive immunizations by essential anti-radiation toxins and preparations of gamma-globulins extracted from a hyper-immune serum of a horse have significantly different medical prescriptions for application and depend on many factors like a type of radiation, a power of radiation, absorption doses, a time of

  2. Biological impact of high-dose and dose-rate radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental anti-radiation vaccine is a power tool of immune - prophylaxis of the acute radiation disease. Existing principles of treatment of the acute radiation dis ease are based on a correction of developing patho-physiological and biochemical processes within the first days after irradiation. Protection from radiation is built on the general principles of immunology and has two main forms - active and passive immunization. Active immunization by the essential radiation toxins of specific radiation determinant (S.D.R.) group allows significantly reduce the lethality and increase duration of life among animals that are irradiated by lethal and sub-lethal doses of gamma radiation.The radiation toxins of S.D.R. group have antigenic properties that are specific for different forms of acute radiation disease. Development of the specific and active immune reaction after intramuscular injection of radiation toxins allows optimize a manifestation of a clinical picture and stabilize laboratory parameters of the acute radiation syndromes. Passive immunization by the anti-radiation serum or preparations of immune-globulins gives a manifestation of the radioprotection effects immediately after this kind of preparation are injected into organisms of mammals. Providing passive immunization by preparations of anti-radiations immune-globulins is possible in different periods of time after radiation. Providing active immunization by preparations of S.D.R. group is possible only to achieve a prophylaxis goal and form the protection effects that start to work in 18 - 35 days after an injection of biological active S.D.R. substance has been administrated. However active and passive immunizations by essential anti-radiation toxins and preparations of gamma-globulins extracted from a hyper-immune serum of a horse have significantly different medical prescriptions for application and depend on many factors like a type of radiation, a power of radiation, absorption doses, a time of

  3. Using Biologic Markers in Blood to Assess Exposure to Multiple Environmental Chemicals for Inner-City Children 3–6 Years of Age

    OpenAIRE

    Sexton, Ken; Adgate, John L.; Fredrickson, Ann L; Ryan, Andrew D.; Needham, Larry L.; Ashley, David L.

    2005-01-01

    Biomarkers of exposure & early effects: field studiesBiomarker: 50 environmental chemicalsExposure/effect represented:detection of 11 VOCs, 2 heavy metals, 11organochlorine pesticides, 30 PCB congenersStudy design: cross-sectionalStudy size: 43 ethnically diverse childrenAnalytical technique: GC/MSTissue/biological material/sample size: bloodIntra-individual variation: for 6 VOCs (1,4 dichlorobenzene, ethylbenzene, m-l-p-xylene, o-xylene, styrene, tetrachloroethylene) and PCB 66, 105, 110, 18...

  4. Residential and biological exposure assessment of chemicals from a wood treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlgren, James; Takhar, Harpreet; Schecter, Arnold; Schmidt, Reynold; Horsak, Randy; Paepke, Olaf; Warshaw, Raphael; Lee, Alexander; Anderson-Mahoney, Pamela

    2007-04-01

    significantly elevated levels of dioxins, principally octachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (OCDD) and 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-hepta-CDD. Biomonitoring of 29 subjects identified the presence of significantly elevated chlorinated dioxins and furan levels (OCDD=1049 ppt for exposed and 374 ppt for controls and 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-hepta CDD=132 ppt for exposed and 45.1 ppt for controls). These levels are consistent with exposures to pentachlorophenol in this group of subjects. And they confirm the presence of unsafe levels of chlorinated dioxins in these persons. PMID:17234249

  5. Effects of oil sands related aquatic reclamation on yellow perch (Perca flavescens). 2. Chemical and biochemical indicators of exposure to oil sands related waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The impact that oil sands related waters may have on aquatic ecosystems and fish was examined. Regardless of the oil sands tailing reclamation method, the quality of surface waters will be affected by elevated salinity and organic acids as well as by increased concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The study determined that since surface waters will eventually impact on fish, it would be useful to have a suite of biochemical and chemical indicators of exposure to families of compounds associated with oil sands related waters. Two indicators, mixed-function oxygenase (MFO) activity and bile PAH equivalent concentration are frequently used to quantify exposure of fishes to petroleum hydrocarbons. Adult yellow perch were stocked into experimental ponds containing oil sands related waters. After 5 and 11 months, the usefulness of MFO enzymes, conjugation enzymes, bile PAH metabolite concentrations and plasma steroid hormones in yellow perch were examined. The potential of these biochemical and chemical endpoints as predictive indicators of physiological and population-level impacts was examined. It was shown that MFO activity and bile PAH equivalents were good indicators of exposure to oil sands related waters, but they were not predictive of physiological endpoints. This suggests that physiological endpoints were influenced by ecological and not chemical factors. 28 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs

  6. Trends in pneumoconiosis mortality and morbidity for the United States, 1968-2005, and relationship with indicators of extent of exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This surveillance report examines trends in selected pneumoconioses in the U.S. for 1968-2005 and their relationship with past indicators of extent of exposure. Numbers of deaths with asbestosis, silicosis, and coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP) were tabulated by time and age at death. Worker monitoring CWP prevalence data were tabulated by tenure group. Information on indicators of extent and intensity of exposure were obtained from various sources. Asbestosis deaths from 1968--2005 closely followed the historical trend in asbestos consumption, and appear to be declining in most age groups. Given appropriate exposure control, asbestosis could be eliminated by 2050. Silicosis deaths decreased substantially from 1968-2005, but levelled off after 1998 in all age groups, indicating a continuing occupational risk. In the anthracite coal region, CWP mortality has been declining rapidly. If there is no resurgence in the industry, CWP could disappear in that region by 2030. In the much larger bituminous region, deaths have declined over time but may be increasing among younger individuals. In addition, although CWP prevalence in working coal miners declined substantially from 1970 to 1994, it increased from 1995 to 2006. This indicates the need for increased vigilance in dust control in underground coal mining.

  7. Trends in pneumoconiosis mortality and morbidity for the United States, 1968-2005, and relationship with indicators of extent of exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attfield, M D; Bang, K M; Petsonk, E L; Schleiff, P L; Mazurek, J M, E-mail: mda1@cdc.go [Division of Respiratory Disease Studies, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control, 1095 Willowdale Road, Morgantown, WV, 26505 (United States)

    2009-02-01

    This surveillance report examines trends in selected pneumoconioses in the U.S. for 1968-2005 and their relationship with past indicators of extent of exposure. Numbers of deaths with asbestosis, silicosis, and coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP) were tabulated by time and age at death. Worker monitoring CWP prevalence data were tabulated by tenure group. Information on indicators of extent and intensity of exposure were obtained from various sources. Asbestosis deaths from 1968--2005 closely followed the historical trend in asbestos consumption, and appear to be declining in most age groups. Given appropriate exposure control, asbestosis could be eliminated by 2050. Silicosis deaths decreased substantially from 1968-2005, but levelled off after 1998 in all age groups, indicating a continuing occupational risk. In the anthracite coal region, CWP mortality has been declining rapidly. If there is no resurgence in the industry, CWP could disappear in that region by 2030. In the much larger bituminous region, deaths have declined over time but may be increasing among younger individuals. In addition, although CWP prevalence in working coal miners declined substantially from 1970 to 1994, it increased from 1995 to 2006. This indicates the need for increased vigilance in dust control in underground coal mining.

  8. Trends in pneumoconiosis mortality and morbidity for the United States, 1968-2005, and relationship with indicators of extent of exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attfield, M. D.; Bang, K. M.; Petsonk, E. L.; Schleiff, P. L.; Mazurek, J. M.

    2009-02-01

    This surveillance report examines trends in selected pneumoconioses in the U.S. for 1968--2005 and their relationship with past indicators of extent of exposure. Numbers of deaths with asbestosis, silicosis, and coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP) were tabulated by time and age at death. Worker monitoring CWP prevalence data were tabulated by tenure group. Information on indicators of extent and intensity of exposure were obtained from various sources. Asbestosis deaths from 1968--2005 closely followed the historical trend in asbestos consumption, and appear to be declining in most age groups. Given appropriate exposure control, asbestosis could be eliminated by 2050. Silicosis deaths decreased substantially from 1968--2005, but levelled off after 1998 in all age groups, indicating a continuing occupational risk. In the anthracite coal region, CWP mortality has been declining rapidly. If there is no resurgence in the industry, CWP could disappear in that region by 2030. In the much larger bituminous region, deaths have declined over time but may be increasing among younger individuals. In addition, although CWP prevalence in working coal miners declined substantially from 1970 to 1994, it increased from 1995 to 2006. This indicates the need for increased vigilance in dust control in underground coal mining.

  9. Probabilistic modelling of human exposure to intense sweeteners in Italian teenagers: validation and sensitivity analysis of a probabilistic model including indicators of market share and brand loyalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcella, D; Soggiu, M E; Leclercq, C

    2003-10-01

    For the assessment of exposure to food-borne chemicals, the most commonly used methods in the European Union follow a deterministic approach based on conservative assumptions. Over the past few years, to get a more realistic view of exposure to food chemicals, risk managers are getting more interested in the probabilistic approach. Within the EU-funded 'Monte Carlo' project, a stochastic model of exposure to chemical substances from the diet and a computer software program were developed. The aim of this paper was to validate the model with respect to the intake of saccharin from table-top sweeteners and cyclamate from soft drinks by Italian teenagers with the use of the software and to evaluate the impact of the inclusion/exclusion of indicators on market share and brand loyalty through a sensitivity analysis. Data on food consumption and the concentration of sweeteners were collected. A food frequency questionnaire aimed at identifying females who were high consumers of sugar-free soft drinks and/or of table top sweeteners was filled in by 3982 teenagers living in the District of Rome. Moreover, 362 subjects participated in a detailed food survey by recording, at brand level, all foods and beverages ingested over 12 days. Producers were asked to provide the intense sweeteners' concentration of sugar-free products. Results showed that consumer behaviour with respect to brands has an impact on exposure assessments. Only probabilistic models that took into account indicators of market share and brand loyalty met the validation criteria. PMID:14555359

  10. Benthic macroinvertebrates as indicators of biological condition below hydropower dams on west slope Sierra Nevada streams, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over 50 hydropower dams in California will undergo relicensing by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) in the next 15 years. An interpretive framework for biological data collected by relicensing studies is lacking. This study developed a multi-metric index of biotic...

  11. Extraction and analysis of fumonisins and compounds indicative of fumonisin exposure in plant and mammalian tissues and cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitomer, Nicholas C; Riley, Ronald T

    2011-01-01

    Fumonisin mycotoxins are common contaminants in many grains, often at very low levels. Maize is -particularly problematic as one of the organisms that commonly produce fumonisins, the fungus Fusarium verticillioides, often exists as an endophyte of maize. Fumonisin is a potent inhibitor of the enzyme ceramide synthase, and this inhibition results in the accumulation of a variety of upstream compounds, most notably, the sphingoid bases sphingosine, sphinganine, 1-deoxysphinganine and, in plants, phytosphingosine. Fumonisin exposure results in a wide variety of species, sex, and strain-specific responses. This method provides a relatively fast means of extracting fumonisins, sphingoid bases, and sphingoid base 1-phosphates from tissues and cells, as well as the subsequent analyses and quantification of these compounds using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. PMID:21567327

  12. Register indicators of physical endurance of biological objects when running a treadmill and swimming with weights using computer video markerless tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Datsenko A.V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to study the use of video tracking to assess physical endurance and indicators of biological objects fatigue when running on a treadmill and swimming with the load. Material and methods. Physical endurance evaluated by test facilities for running on a treadmill and swimming with the load. As the object of the studies used laboratory rats. Results. For indicators of physical endurance biological objects isolated areas running track of treadmill and electrical stimulation site, when swimming on the total area of the container isolated subarea near the water surface. With video tracking performed computer timing of finding biological object in different zones of the treadmill and containers for swimming. On the basis of data on the time location rats in a given zone apparatus for running and swimming, obtained in the dynamics of the test of physical endurance, build a "fatigue curves", quantified changes in the indices of hard work, depending on the duration of its execution. Conclusion. Video tracking allows to define the execution of physical work to overflowing with loads of aerobic and mixed aerobic-anaerobic power, establish quantitative indicators of changes in the dynamics of biological objects operability testing with the construction of "fatigue curve" and objectively determine the times of occurrence in experimental animals exhaustion when fails to perform physical work.

  13. Evaluation of the Index of Bathing from Biological Indicators of the Soledade Reservoir in Soledade, State of Paraiba, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lucia Antunes de Lima

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available It is known that water is one of the most important natural resources and is indispensable for the survival and various recreational activities. This study aimed to evaluate the water quality of the Reservoir Soledade, in Soledade, the state of Paraiba for the bathing. The study was conducted in the years 2008 and 2009, when they were assessed the biological parameter fecal coliform. The results showed that the waters of the Reservoir of Soledade aren’t in accordance with the pattern of quality set by CONAMA Resolution 274/2000 to water balneabilidade, and allowed this to be classified as inappropriate according to the methodology used by CETESB.

  14. Aqueous exposure to Aroclor 1254 modulates the mitogenic response of Atlantic salmon anterior kidney T-cells: Indications of short- and long-term immunomodulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) exist as persistent organic pollutants in numerous river systems in the United States. Unfortunately, some of these rivers are sites of active Atlantic salmon restoration programs, and polychlorinated biphenyls have been implicated as ancillary factors contributing to failed salmon restoration. Here, we investigate the immediate and chronic effects of intermediate duration aqueous PCB exposure (1 or 10 μg L-1 Aroclor 1254) on the mitogen-stimulated lymphoproliferative response of Atlantic salmon anterior kidney leukocytes (AKLs). A short-term study was designed to examine immunomodulation in Atlantic salmon smolts immediately following 21 days of aqueous exposure, while a long-term study evaluated chronic impacts in the mitogen response in parr 15 months post-exposure as larvae. The proliferative response of AKLs to the mitogens concanavalin A (CON A), phytohemaglutinnin-P (PHA-P), pokeweed mitogen (PWM), and lipopolysaccharide were used as an indice of immunomodulation. The proliferative response to the T-cell mitogens CON A and PHA-P was significantly increased in the 10 μg L-1 group (n = 10; P = 0.043 and 0.002, respectively) immediately following exposure of smolts. Additionally, The PHA-P response was significantly increased in the 1 μg L-1 exposure group (n = 10, P = 0.036). In fish treated as larvae and tested 15 months later, the PHA-P sensitive populations exhibited elevated proliferation in the 1 and 10 μg L-1 groups (n = 12, P -1 treated groups. These results demonstrate an immunomodulatory effect of PCBs on T-cell mitogen sensitive populations of lymphocytes in Atlantic salmon as well as long-term immunomodulation in PHA-P and PWM sensitive populations

  15. Electron spin resonance analysis of tooth enamel does not indicate exposures to large radiation doses in a large proportion of distally-exposed A-bomb survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Yuko; Kodama, Yoshiaki; Cullings, Harry M; Miyazawa, Chuzo; Nakamura, Nori

    2011-01-01

    The atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki led to two different types of radiation exposure; one was direct and brief and the other was indirect and persistent. The latter (so-called exposure to residual radiation) resulted from the presence of neutron activation products in the soil, or from fission products present in the fallout. Compared with the doses from direct exposures, estimations of individual doses from residual radiation have been much more complicated, and estimates vary widely among researchers. The present report bases its conclusions on radiation doses recorded in tooth enamel from survivors in Hiroshima. Those survivors were present at distances of about 3 km or greater from the hypocenter at the time of the explosion, and have DS02 estimated doses (direct exposure doses) of less than 5 mGy (and are regarded as control subjects). Individual doses were estimated by measuring CO(2)(-) radicals in tooth enamel with the electron spin resonance (ESR; or electron paramagnetic resonance, EPR) method. The results from 56 molars donated by 49 survivors provided estimated doses which vary from -200 mGy to 500 mGy, and the median dose was 17 mGy (25% and 75% quartiles are -54 mGy and 137 mGy, respectively) for the buccal parts and 13 mGy (25% and 75% quartiles: -49 mGy and 87 mGy, respectively) for the lingual parts of the molars. Three molars had ESR-estimated doses of 300 to 400 mGy for both the buccal and lingual parts, which indicates possible exposures to excess doses of penetrating radiation, although the origin of such radiation remains to be determined. The results did not support claims that a large fraction of distally-exposed survivors received large doses (e.g. 1 Gy) of external penetrating radiation resulting from residual radiation. PMID:21768749

  16. Manual accidents, biological risk control, and quality indicators at a children's hospital in north-east Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parco S

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sergio Parco, Fulvia Vascotto, Roberto Simeone, Patrizia Visconti Department of Health Technology Assessment, Institute for Maternal and Child Health, Trieste, Italy Background: Working in health care carries the risk of transmission of infected blood to patients by hospital workers and to other health personnel in the form of occupational infections. Conscientious application of the standard precautions is the main method used to avoid needle stick injuries, contamination of skin and mucous membranes, cuts with sharp tools, and inadequate disposal and recapping of needles. The aim of this work was to investigate in Friuli Venezia Giulia, a region in north-east Italy, the enhancement carried out to prevent situations of biologic risk for health care workers, and to verify the related laboratory analyses. Methods: Biological accidents occurring during the years 2012–2013 in the departments of oncology and pediatric-obstetric surgery, and in the intensive care unit at Burlo Garofolo Children's Hospital in Trieste (a large town in Friuli Venezia Giulia were reviewed, and a new panel of tests was introduced for patients and health care workers, to also detect human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, hepatitis C virus (HCV, hepatitis B virus (HBV, and aspartate transaminase and immunoglobulin G. All tests were submitted for external quality assessment. Results: In total, 230 nosocomial events were reported by health care workers in the above-mentioned hospital departments in 2012–2013. There were 158 accidents in 2012, including 55 accidental needle stick injuries (34.81%, 59 blood splashes (37.34%, and 44 cuts with infected instruments (27.84%. The risk of sustaining a cut was related to movement error during surgery when the appropriate procedure was not followed or when devices were being assembled and passed between doctors and nurses. Most accidents happened among physicians compared to nurses; the high percentage of needle stick injuries (34

  17. Radiation induced damage to the cells of pig hairs: a biological indicator of radiation dose and dose distribution in skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation damage to the matrix cells of actively growing pig hairs resulted in a transient reduction in diameter. This was clearly dose dependent for doses in the range 0.5-5 Gy for 250 kV X rays and 3-8 Gy surface dose for 90Sr β rays. While the relationship between the percentage reduction in hair diameter and the X ray dose was linear between 0.5 and 5 Gy, the skin surface dose for β rays and the percentage reduction in hair diameter was found to be best fitted by a quadratic equation. Differences in the effect produced by X and β ray irradiation can be attributed to the absorption of β rays with depth in the dermis and a correction for this has been applied. This system would appear to have considerable potential for use as a biological dosemeter. (author)

  18. Explaining variability in first grazing season heifer growth combining individually measured parasitological and clinical indicators with exposure to gastrointestinal nematode infection based on grazing management practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlin, Aurélie; Chauvin, Alain; Madouasse, Aurélien; Froger, Sébastien; Bareille, Nathalie; Chartier, Christophe

    2016-07-30

    The objective of our study was to explain the variability of average daily weight gain (ADWG) due to gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) infection for 291 non treated first grazing season (FGS) heifers, from 12 independent groups in the western part of France, by combining parasitological and clinical indicators at individual level and grazing management indicators at group level. Parasitological indicators were faecal egg count (FEC), anti Ostertagia ostertagi antibody level (Ostertagia ODR), and pepsinogen level. Clinical indicators were diarrhea score (DISCO) and breech soiling score (BSS). At group level, grazing management practice (GMP), based on three variables (supplementation, month of turnout, grazing season duration), was clustered into three categories reflecting low, medium or high exposure (EXP) to GIN. Depending on the groups, turnout was from mid-March to early July and housing was from mid-October to late November, with a FGS duration ranging from 4 to 8.4 months. At turnout, the mean age of heifers was 8 months (range: 6-16 months) and they weighed between 175 and 268kg. In each GMP category, FEC significantly decreased between the mid-season and the housing, while Ostertagia ODR and pepsinogen level increased gradually throughout the grazing season. In contrast, clinical indicators did not show any seasonal variation. In a multivariate linear model, 22% of the ADWG variability was significantly explained by two individual indicators (Ostertagia ODR: 12.6%, DISCO: 4.8%) and by the group indicator (GMP category: 4.8%). ADWG losses due to GIN exposure (Ostertagia ODR) were estimated up to 39kg per heifer for the overall grazing season. For groups within the low EXP category the difference between animals with low (697g/day) ADWG was explained by the clinical indicator DISCO. In contrast, for groups within the medium and high EXP categories this difference was explained by a parasitological indicator (Ostertagia ODR). This study highlighted the value of

  19. Discourse and Review of Environmental Quality of River Bodies in India: An Appraisal of Physico-chemical and Biological Parameters as Indicators of Water Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar Manoj; Pratap Kumar Padhy

    2015-01-01

    The present manuscript is an account of the studies conducted on some well known surface water bodies in India, with special emphasis on the river systems, to evaluate their quality status. The review covers the water quality estimation and identification of sources contributing to water quality deterioration. Commonly employed physicochemical and biological parameters as indicators of water quality have been thoroughly discussed. Some possible measures to prevent and control pollution of wat...

  20. The RBE of tritium-beta exposure for the induction of the adaptive response and apoptosis; cellular defense mechanisms against the biological effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adaption to radiation is one of a few biological responses that has been demonstrated to occur in mammalian cells exposed to doses of ionizing radiation in the occupational exposure range. The adaptive response has been well characterized in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, although the doses required to induce the response are higher than in mammalian cells. When yeast cells are primed with sublethal doses of gamma-radiation, they subsequently undergo an adaptive response and develop resistance to radiation, heat the chemical mutagens in a time and dose dependent manner. We have used this model system to assess the relative ability of tritium-beta radiation to induce the adaptive response the examined tritium-induced radiation resistance, thermal tolerance and suppression of mutation. The results show that sublethal priming doses of tritium caused yeast cells to develop resistance to radiation, heat, and a chemical mutagen MNNG. The magnitude and kinetics of the response, per unit dose, were the same for tritium and gamma-radiation. Therefore, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of tritium induction of the adaptive response was about 1.0. Apoptosis is a genetically programmed cell death or cell suicide. Cells damaged by radiation can be selectively removed from the population by apoptosis and therefore eliminated as a potential cancer risk to the organism. Since we have previously shown that apoptosis is a sensitive indicator of radiation damage in human lymphocytes exposed to low doses, we have used this endpoint to investigate the potency of tritium-beta radiation. Initially, tritium was compared to X-rays for relative effectiveness at inducing apoptosis. The results showed the lymphocytes irradiated in vitro with X-rays or tritium had similar levels of apoptosis per unit dose. Therefore the relative biology effectiveness of tritium for induction of apoptosis in human lymphocytes was also about 1. In the work presented here, we have demonstrated that

  1. Bifurcation Scenarios of Neural Firing Patterns across Two Separated Chaotic Regions as Indicated by Theoretical and Biological Experimental Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaguang Gu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear dynamics can be used to identify relationships between different firing patterns, which play important roles in the information processing. The present study provides novel biological experimental findings regarding complex bifurcation scenarios from period-1 bursting to period-1 spiking with chaotic firing patterns. These bifurcations were found to be similar to those simulated using the Hindmarsh-Rose model across two separated chaotic regions. One chaotic region lay between period-1 and period-2 burstings. This region has not attracted much attention. The other region is a well-known comb-shaped chaotic region, and it appears after period-2 bursting. After period-2 bursting, the chaotic firings lay in a period-adding bifurcation scenario or in a period-doubling bifurcation cascade. The deterministic dynamics of the chaotic firing patterns were identified using a nonlinear prediction method. These results provided details regarding the processes and dynamics of bifurcation containing the chaotic bursting between period-1 and period-2 burstings and other chaotic firing patterns within the comb-shaped chaotic region. They also provided details regarding the relationships between different firing patterns in parameter space.

  2. Exposure of fish to biologically treated bleached-kraft effluent; 1: Biochemical, physiological and pathological assessment of Rocky Mountain whitefish (Prosopium williamsoni) and longnose sucker (Catostomus catostomus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloepper-Sams, P.J.; Owens, J.W. (Procter Gamble Co., Cincinnati, OH (United States)); Swanson, S.M. (SENTAR Consultants Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)); Marchant, T. (Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada). Dept. of Biology); Schryer, R. (SENTAR Consultants Ltd., Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada))

    1994-09-01

    A suite of biochemical, physiological, and pathological measures was used to assess possible effects of exposure to bleached-kraft mill effluent (BKME) on wild longnose sucker (Catostomus catostomus=LS) and mountain whitefish (Prosopium williamsoni=MW) in the Wapiti/Smoke River system, as compared to similar populations in a reference river system without BKME inputs. Individual fish body burden data were examined for correlations between chemical exposure and biological response. General incidence of gross pathology and histopathology showed no relationship with exposure to BKME, and no neoplastic or preneoplastic lesions were observed in either exposed or reference fish. The few significant differences observed in LS blood parameters were not correlated with exposure to BKME and appeared to reflect habitat gradients. Liver somatic indexes were higher for female BKME-exposed LS, but were not significantly different in male LS nor in MW. Some differences in circulating sex steroid levels were observed in LS exposed to BKME (but not in MW, the species with higher contaminant body burdens). Steroid profile differences may have been related to natural differences in duration of spawning periods in the two fish populations. Other measures of reproductive capacity (relative gonad size, fecundity, young-of-the-year) showed no reductions in exposed fish. The detoxification enzyme cytochrome P4501A was induced in both species, with greater induction in MW than in LS. MW P4501A induction correlated well with some BKME exposure measures, but not with liver or gonad weights, pathology, reproductive capacity, or population-level parameters. Increased liver size and apparent differences in sex steroid profiles in LS did not translate to other health effects or population-level effects. Thus, exposure to this biologically treated BKME produced one consistent biochemical marker of exposure in the two fish species that was not associated with any adverse effects on fish health.

  3. The effects on populations of exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation. Report of the Advisory Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the summer of 1970, the Federal Radiation Council (whose activities have since been transferred to the Radiation Office of the EPA) asked the National Academy of Sciences for information relevant to an evaluation of present radiation protection guides. This report is in response to that request. It presents a summary and analysis, by members of the Advisory Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations and its subcommittees, of current knowledge relating to risks from exposure to ionizing radiation. In many respects, the report is a sequel to the reports of the Committee on the Biological Effects of Atomic Radiation, published by the NAS-NRC from 1956 to 1961

  4. C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A as early-phase and prognostic indicators of acute radiation exposure in nonhuman primate total-body irradiation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terrorist radiological attacks or nuclear accidents could expose large numbers of people to ionizing radiation. In mass-casualty radiological incidents early medical-management requires triage tools for first-responders to quantitatively identify individuals exposed to life-threatening radiation doses and for early initiation (i.e., within one day after radiation exposure) of cytokine therapy for treatment of bone marrow acute radiation syndrome. Herein, we present results from 30 rhesus macaques total-body irradiated (TBI) to a broad dose range of 1-8.5 Gy with 60Co γ-rays (0.55 Gy min-1) and demonstrate dose- and time-dependent changes in blood of C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), and interleukin 6 (IL-6) measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). CRP and SAA dose-response results are consistent with ∼1 Gy and ∼0.2 Gy thresholds for photon-exposure at 24 h after TBI, respectively. Highly significant elevations of CRP and SAA (p = 0.00017 and p = 0.0024, respectively) were found in animal plasma at 6 h after all TBI doses suggesting their potential use as early-phase biodosimeters. Results also show that the dynamics and content of CRP and SAA levels reflect the course and severity of the acute radiation sickness (ARS) and may function as prognostic indicators of ARS outcome. These results demonstrate proof-of-concept that these radiation-responsive proteins show promise as a complementary approach to conventional biodosimetry for early assessment of radiation exposures and may also contribute as diagnostic indices in the medical management of radiation accidents.

  5. C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A as early-phase and prognostic indicators of acute radiation exposure in nonhuman primate total-body irradiation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ossetrova, N.I., E-mail: ossetrova@afrri.usuhs.mil [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bldg. 42, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States); Sandgren, D.J.; Blakely, W.F. [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bldg. 42, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States)

    2011-09-15

    Terrorist radiological attacks or nuclear accidents could expose large numbers of people to ionizing radiation. In mass-casualty radiological incidents early medical-management requires triage tools for first-responders to quantitatively identify individuals exposed to life-threatening radiation doses and for early initiation (i.e., within one day after radiation exposure) of cytokine therapy for treatment of bone marrow acute radiation syndrome. Herein, we present results from 30 rhesus macaques total-body irradiated (TBI) to a broad dose range of 1-8.5 Gy with {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays (0.55 Gy min{sup -1}) and demonstrate dose- and time-dependent changes in blood of C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), and interleukin 6 (IL-6) measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). CRP and SAA dose-response results are consistent with {approx}1 Gy and {approx}0.2 Gy thresholds for photon-exposure at 24 h after TBI, respectively. Highly significant elevations of CRP and SAA (p = 0.00017 and p = 0.0024, respectively) were found in animal plasma at 6 h after all TBI doses suggesting their potential use as early-phase biodosimeters. Results also show that the dynamics and content of CRP and SAA levels reflect the course and severity of the acute radiation sickness (ARS) and may function as prognostic indicators of ARS outcome. These results demonstrate proof-of-concept that these radiation-responsive proteins show promise as a complementary approach to conventional biodosimetry for early assessment of radiation exposures and may also contribute as diagnostic indices in the medical management of radiation accidents.

  6. An ecologically-based method for selecting ecological indicators for assessing risks to biological diversity from genetically-engineered plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andow, D. A.; Lövei, Gabor L; Arpaia, Salvatore;

    2013-01-01

    be species or ecological processes. MCDA focuses on those species and processes that are critical for the identified ecological functions and are likely to be highly exposed to the GE organism. The highest ranked indicator entities are selected for the next step. (5) Relevant risk hypotheses are...... identified. Knowledge about the specific transgene and its possible environmental effects in other countries can be used to assist development of risk hypotheses. (6) The risk hypotheses are ranked using MCDA with criteria related to the severity of the potential risk. The model emphasizes transparent...

  7. Biological monitoring of occupational exposure to toluene diisocyanate: measurement of toluenediamine in hydrolysed urine and plasma by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    OpenAIRE

    Persson, P.; Dalene, M; Skarping, G; Adamsson, M.; Hagmar, L

    1993-01-01

    Exposure to toluene diisocyanate (TDI) was studied during 48 hours and biological samples from nine subjects were taken in a factory producing flexible polyurethane (PUR) foam. Five PUR workers, two white collar workers, and two volunteers were studied. The concentrations of TDI in air were determined by high performance liquid chromatography with the 9-(N-methylaminomethyl)-anthracene reagent. Urine and plasma samples were collected and the TDI related amines, 2,4-toluenediamine (2,4-TDA) an...

  8. Is the expression of γ-glutamyl transpeptidase messenger RNA an indicator of biological behavior in recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    I-Shyan Sheen; Kuo-Shyang Jeng; Yi-Chun Tsai

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the correlation between gammaglutamyl transpeptidase (γ-GTP) expression in the primary HCC and post-resection recurrence and its biological behaviors.METHODS: Forty consecutive patients having curative resection for HCC were included in this study. The primers for reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RTPCR) were corresponding to the 5'-noncoding human γ-GTP mRNA of fetal liver (type A), HepG2 cells (type B),and placenta (type C). Both the cancer and non-cancerous tissues of the resected liver were analyzed. The correlations between the expression of γ-GTP and the clinicopathological variables and outcomes (recurrence and survival) were studied.RESULTS: Those with type B γ-GTP mRNA in cancer had significant higher recurrence rate than those without it (63.6 % vs 14.3 %). Both those with type B in cancer and in non-cancer died significantly more than those without it (45.5 % vs 0 % and 53.6 % vs 0 %, respectively). By multivariate analysis, the significant predictors of recurrence included high serum AFP (P=0.0108), vascular permeation (P=0.0084), and type B γ-GTP mRNA in non-cancerous liver (P=0.0107). The significant predictors of postrecurrence death included high serum AFP (P=0.0141),vascular permeation (P=0.0130), and daughter nodules (P=0.0053). As to the manifestations (recurrent number ≥2, recurrent extent≥2 segments, extra-hepatic metastasis, and death) in recurrent patients, there were no statistical significant differences between those with type B in the primary tumor and those without it. The difference between those with type B in non-cancerous liver and those without it also was not significant.CONCLUSION: Patients of HCC with type B γ-GTP mRNA both in cancer and in non-cancerous tissue had a worse outcome, earlier recurrence, and more post-recurrence death.

  9. Environmental noise exposure, early biological risk and mental health in nine to ten year old children: a cross-sectional field study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stansfeld Stephen A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous research suggests that children born prematurely or with a low birth weight are more vulnerable to the mental health effects of ambient neighbourhood noise; predominantly road and rail noise, at home. This study used data from the Road Traffic and Aircraft Noise Exposure and Children's Cognition and Health (RANCH study to see if this finding extends to aircraft and road traffic noise at school. Methods Children and their parents from schools around three European airports were selected to represent a range of aircraft and road traffic noise exposure levels. Birth weight and gestation period were merged to create a dichotomous variable assessing 'early biological risk'. Mental health was assessed using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ. Complete data were available for 1900 primary school children. Results Children who were 'at risk' (i.e. low birth weight or premature birth were rated as having more conduct problems and emotional symptoms and poorer overall mental health than children not at risk. However, there was no interaction between aircraft or road traffic noise exposure at school and early biological risk. Conclusions Data from the RANCH study suggests that children with early biological risk are not more vulnerable to the effects of aircraft or road traffic noise at school on mental health than children without this risk; however they are more likely to have mental ill-health.

  10. Biological Significance of Acoustic Impacts on Marine Mammals: Examples Using an Acoustic Recording tag to Define Acoustic Exposure of Sperm Whales, Physeter catodon, Exposed to Airgun Sounds in Controlled Exposure Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyack, P. L.; Johnson, M. P.; Madsen, P. T.; Miller, P. J.; Lynch, J.

    2006-05-01

    There has been considerable debate about how to regulate behavioral disruption in marine mammals. The U.S. Marine Mammal Protection Act prohibits "taking" marine mammals, including harassment, which is defined as injury or disruption of behavioral patterns. A 2005 report by the National Academy of Sciences focuses on the need to analyze acoustic impacts on marine mammal behavior in terms of biological significance. The report develops a model for predicting population consequences of acoustic impacts. One of the key data gaps involves methods to estimate the impact of disruption on an animal's ability to complete life functions critical for growth, survival, and reproduction. One of the few areas where theory and data are available involves foraging energetics. Patrick Miller in the next talk and I will discuss an example study designed to evaluate the impact of exposure to seismic survey on the foraging energetics of sperm whales. As petroleum exploration moves offshore to deep water, there is increasing overlap between seismic exploration and deep diving toothed whales such as the sperm whale which is listed by the US as an endangered species. With support from the US Minerals Management Service and the Industry Research Funding Coalition, we tagged sperm whales with tags that can record sound, orientation, acceleration, temperature and depth. Eight whales tagged in the Gulf of Mexico during 2002-2003 were subjects in 5 controlled experiments involving exposure to sounds of an airgun array. One critical component of evaluating effects involves quantifying exposure at the animal. While the on-axis signature of airgun arrays has been well quantified, there are few broadband calibrated measurements in the water column displaced horizontally away from the downward-directed beam. The acoustic recording tags provide direct data on sounds as received at the animals. Due to multipath propagation, multiple sound pulses were recorded on the tagged whales for each firing of

  11. Stability and maturity of biowaste composts derived by small municipalities: Correlation among physical, chemical and biological indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oviedo-Ocaña, E R; Torres-Lozada, P; Marmolejo-Rebellon, L F; Hoyos, L V; Gonzales, S; Barrena, R; Komilis, D; Sanchez, A

    2015-10-01

    Stability and maturity are important criteria to guarantee the quality of a compost that is applied to agriculture or used as amendment in degraded soils. Although different techniques exist to evaluate stability and maturity, the application of laboratory tests in municipalities in developing countries can be limited due to cost and application complexities. In the composting facilities of such places, some classical low cost on-site tests to monitor the composting process are usually implemented; however, such tests do not necessarily clearly identify conditions of stability and maturity. In this article, we have applied and compared results of stability and maturity tests that can be easily employed on site (i.e. temperature, pH, moisture, electrical conductivity [EC], odor and color), and of tests that require more complex laboratory techniques (volatile solids, C/N ratio, self-heating, respirometric index, germination index [GI]). The evaluation of the above was performed in the field scale using 2 piles of biowaste applied compost. The monitoring period was from day 70 to day 190 of the process. Results showed that the low-cost tests traditionally employed to monitor the composting process on-site, such as temperature, color and moisture, do not provide consistent determinations with the more complex laboratory tests used to assess stability (e.g. respiration index, self-heating, volatile solids). In the case of maturity tests (GI, pH, EC), both the on-site tests (pH, EC) and the laboratory test (GI) provided consistent results. Although, stability was indicated for most of the samples, the maturity tests indicated that products were consistently immature. Thus, a stable product is not necessarily mature. Conclusively, the decision on the quality of the compost in the installations located in developing countries requires the simultaneous use of a combination of tests that are performed both in the laboratory and on-site. PMID:26216503

  12. Development, implementation and utilization of 210Pb in vivo measurement techniques as indicator of human being exposure to 222Rn - evaluation of associated parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon and its decay products are present in the atmosphere and are the most important contributors for the internal exposure of humans to natural radiation. The execution of in vivo measurements of 210Pb in the population and in individuals occupationally exposed in underground mines has been studied and recommended as one of the procedures for the estimation of the exposure to 222Rn. The metabolism of 210Pb and its distribution within the human body, mainly deposited in the bone tissue, suggests the regions of skull and knee as the most suitable for the in vivo monitoring of such radionuclide. A radiological survey in non uranium mines in Brazil indicated that an underground coal mine in the State of Parana, in the south of Brazil, had high radon concentration. The aim of this work were: (1) To investigate whether underground coal miners may also have elevated 210Pb in the skeleton as a result of occupational exposure to radon in the coal mine; (2) To estimate the committed equivalent dose and the committed effective dose in different incorporation scenarios using a computer code. The calibration and the in vivo measurements of underground coal miners were performed in the IRD-CNEN Whole Body Counter shielded room using an array of four high resolution germanium detectors. The detection system was positioned at the head and knee geometries. The minimum detectable quantity of 210Pb in the skeleton using this methodology was (50 Bq) and the positive results were verified using a mathematical method that applies a moving median smoothing function to the total spectrum for each measurement. In vivo measurements of 210Pb in 6 out of the 32 underground coal miners ranged between 83 Bq and 164 Bq suggesting that these workers received significant occupational cumulative exposure to 222Rn. The simulation of some exposure patterns of 222Rn progeny and 210Pb incorporation showed that the most important contribution for 210Pb skeleton deposition was the intake of 214Pb and

  13. Sublethal Effects of Some New Textile Dyes On the Freshwater Snail Biomphalaria alexandrina, as a Biological Indicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Eco toxicological effects of three synthetic textile dyes; fast violet (FV), fast orange (FO) and fast yellow (FY) which mainly used in textile industry in Egypt, were tested on the freshwater snail Biomphalaria alexandrina, that used as a bio-indicator. The results demonstrated that only the FV dye is lethal and the 72 hr LC 50 is 500 ppm. The FO and dyes did not show any lethal effect on the snails at the concentrations used throughout the experiment time. The sublethal toxic concentration of non-irradiated FV dye (100 ppm) showed an increase in cellular and humoral defense responses of the snails exposed to the dye for 72 hr. Although the profile of the snail's nucleoproteins revealed minor qualitative differences; were quantitative differences differences reflected in the intensity of the separated bands, as well as, the percentage of the protein content. The protein content significantly decreased in the snails exposed to FV-dye when compared to FO,FY and non-exposed control snails

  14. Brachidontes variabilis and Patella sp. as quantitative biological indicators for cadmium, lead and mercury in the Lebanese coastal waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mussel, Brachidontes variabilis, and the limpet, Patella sp., were used as indicators to monitor cadmium, lead and mercury concentrations along the Lebanese coast. Studies were carried out in order to define the best strategy for assessing and minimizing the effects of size and physiological condition on the metal contents of the molluscs, and corrective models were constructed. Metal concentrations in surface water were measured to estimate bioconcentration factors (BCFs). The BCFs varied from 8.3 x 103 to 3.4 x 104, from 7.5 x 103 to 8.0 x 103 and from 3.0 x 104 to 3.2 x 104, for Cd, Pb and Hg, respectively. For limpets, BCFs varied from 1.7 x 104 to 7.4 x 104 for Cd, from 2.5 x 103 to 6 x 103 for Pb and remained fairly constant at around 104 for Hg. The highest BCFs were associated with lowest contamination levels. The results of the geographical survey exhibited a similar large-scale spatial pattern for the two species and followed the metal concentration distributions measured in the waters. - Two molluscs were effective bioindicators for metal pollution in waters along the Lebanese coast

  15. A systems biology pipeline identifies new immune and disease related molecular signatures and networks in human cells during microgravity exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sayak; Saha, Rohini; Palanisamy, Anbarasi; Ghosh, Madhurima; Biswas, Anupriya; Roy, Saheli; Pal, Arijit; Sarkar, Kathakali; Bagh, Sangram

    2016-05-01

    Microgravity is a prominent health hazard for astronauts, yet we understand little about its effect at the molecular systems level. In this study, we have integrated a set of systems-biology tools and databases and have analysed more than 8000 molecular pathways on published global gene expression datasets of human cells in microgravity. Hundreds of new pathways have been identified with statistical confidence for each dataset and despite the difference in cell types and experiments, around 100 of the new pathways are appeared common across the datasets. They are related to reduced inflammation, autoimmunity, diabetes and asthma. We have identified downregulation of NfκB pathway via Notch1 signalling as new pathway for reduced immunity in microgravity. Induction of few cancer types including liver cancer and leukaemia and increased drug response to cancer in microgravity are also found. Increase in olfactory signal transduction is also identified. Genes, based on their expression pattern, are clustered and mathematically stable clusters are identified. The network mapping of genes within a cluster indicates the plausible functional connections in microgravity. This pipeline gives a new systems level picture of human cells under microgravity, generates testable hypothesis and may help estimating risk and developing medicine for space missions.

  16. Mitochondrial DNA indicates late pleistocene divergence of populations of Heteronympha merope, an emerging model in environmental change biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Norgate

    Full Text Available Knowledge of historical changes in species range distribution provides context for investigating adaptive potential and dispersal ability. This is valuable for predicting the potential impact of environmental change on species of interest. Butterflies are one of the most important taxa for studying such impacts, and Heteronympha merope has the potential to provide a particularly valuable model, in part due to the existence of historical data on morphological traits and glycolytic enzyme variation. This study investigates the population genetic structure and phylogeography of H. merope, comparing the relative resolution achieved through partial DNA sequences of two mitochondrial loci, COI and ND5. These data are used to define the relationship between subspecies, showing that the subspecies are reciprocally monophyletic. On this basis, the Western Australian subspecies H. m. duboulayi is genetically distinct from the two eastern subspecies. Throughout the eastern part of the range, levels of migration and the timing of key population splits of potential relevance to climatic adaptation are estimated and indicate Late Pleistocene divergence both of the Tasmanian subspecies and of an isolated northern population from the eastern mainland subspecies H. m. merope. This information is then used to revisit historical data and provides support for the importance of clinal variation in wing characters, as well as evidence for selective pressure acting on allozyme loci phosphoglucose isomerase and phosphoglucomutase in H. merope. The study has thus confirmed the value of H. merope as a model organism for measuring responses to environmental change, offering the opportunity to focus on isolated populations, as well as a latitudinal gradient, and to use historical changes to test the accuracy of predictions for the future.

  17. In vivo measurements of 210Pb in skull and knee geometries as an indicator of cumulative 222Rn exposure in underground coal mine in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Cumulative exposure to radon can be evaluated by measuring 210Pb in bone, especially for underground uranium miners and for persons who live in areas where the concentration of radon is high. Lead, with its metabolism and distribution within the human body like its congenor calcium, will be accumulated in the skeleton. The bones of the skull and knee are two convenient locations for measuring 210Pb in vivo because these regions of the body present a high concentration of bone, the detectors are easily positioned and the likelihood of cross contribution from other organs or tissue is low. A radiological survey in non-uranium mines in Brazil indicated that an underground coal mine in Parana, the south of Brazil, had high radon concentration. In vivo measurements of 32 underground coal miners were performed in the IRD-CNEN whole body counter shielded room using an array of four high resolution germanium detectors. These detectors were positioned at the head or knee and were calibrated using anthropometric phantoms of the head and knee for converting the count rate due to 210Pb at 46.5 keV to units of activity (Bq). The activity of 210Pb in the head and knee were used to determine activity in the total skeleton as a means of estimating cumulative exposure to 222Rn. In vivo measurements of 210Pb in 8 of the 32 underground coal miners ranged between 50 Bq and 164 Bq suggesting that these workers received significant occupational exposure to 222Rn. (author)

  18. Patterns of database citation in articles and patents indicate long-term scientific and industry value of biological data resources [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Bousfield

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Data from open access biomolecular data resources, such as the European Nucleotide Archive and the Protein Data Bank are extensively reused within life science research for comparative studies, method development and to derive new scientific insights. Indicators that estimate the extent and utility of such secondary use of research data need to reflect this complex and highly variable data usage. By linking open access scientific literature, via Europe PubMedCentral, to the metadata in biological data resources we separate data citations associated with a deposition statement from citations that capture the subsequent, long-term, reuse of data in academia and industry.  We extend this analysis to begin to investigate citations of biomolecular resources in patent documents. We find citations in more than 8,000 patents from 2014, demonstrating substantial use and an important role for data resources in defining biological concepts in granted patents to both academic and industrial innovators. Combined together our results indicate that the citation patterns in biomedical literature and patents vary, not only due to citation practice but also according to the data resource cited. The results guard against the use of simple metrics such as citation counts and show that indicators of data use must not only take into account citations within the biomedical literature but also include reuse of data in industry and other parts of society by including patents and other scientific and technical documents such as guidelines, reports and grant applications.

  19. Humoral response to the Anopheles gambiae salivary protein gSG6: a serological indicator of exposure to Afrotropical malaria vectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinzia Rizzo

    Full Text Available Salivary proteins injected by blood feeding arthropods into their hosts evoke a saliva-specific humoral response which can be useful to evaluate exposure to bites of disease vectors. However, saliva of hematophagous arthropods is a complex cocktail of bioactive factors and its use in immunoassays can be misleading because of potential cross-reactivity to other antigens. Toward the development of a serological marker of exposure to Afrotropical malaria vectors we expressed the Anopheles gambiae gSG6, a small anopheline-specific salivary protein, and we measured the anti-gSG6 IgG response in individuals from a malaria hyperendemic area of Burkina Faso, West Africa. The gSG6 protein was immunogenic and anti-gSG6 IgG levels and/or prevalence increased in exposed individuals during the malaria transmission/rainy season. Moreover, this response dropped during the intervening low transmission/dry season, suggesting it is sensitive enough to detect variation in vector density. Members of the Fulani ethnic group showed higher anti-gSG6 IgG response as compared to Mossi, a result consistent with the stronger immune reactivity reported in this group. Remarkably, anti-gSG6 IgG levels among responders were high in children and gradually declined with age. This unusual pattern, opposite to the one observed with Plasmodium antigens, is compatible with a progressive desensitization to mosquito saliva and may be linked to the continued exposure to bites of anopheline mosquitoes. Overall, the humoral anti-gSG6 IgG response appears a reliable serological indicator of exposure to bites of the main African malaria vectors (An. gambiae, Anopheles arabiensis and, possibly, Anopheles funestus and it may be exploited for malaria epidemiological studies, development of risk maps and evaluation of anti-vector measures. In addition, the gSG6 protein may represent a powerful model system to get a deeper understanding of molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the

  20. Conjugation of 10 kDa Linear PEG onto Trastuzumab Fab' Is Sufficient to Significantly Enhance Lymphatic Exposure while Preserving in Vitro Biological Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Linda J; Ascher, David B; Yadav, Rajbharan; Bulitta, Jürgen B; Williams, Charlotte C; Porter, Christopher J H; Landersdorfer, Cornelia B; Kaminskas, Lisa M

    2016-04-01

    The lymphatic system is a major conduit by which many diseases spread and proliferate. There is therefore increasing interest in promoting better lymphatic drug targeting. Further, antibody fragments such as Fabs have several advantages over full length monoclonal antibodies but are subject to rapid plasma clearance, which can limit the lymphatic exposure and activity of Fabs against lymph-resident diseases. This study therefore explored ideal PEGylation strategies to maximize biological activity and lymphatic exposure using trastuzumab Fab' as a model. Specifically, the Fab' was conjugated with single linear 10 or 40 kDa PEG chains at the hinge region. PEGylation led to a 3-4-fold reduction in binding affinity to HER2, but antiproliferative activity against HER2-expressing BT474 cells was preserved. Lymphatic pharmacokinetics were then examined in thoracic lymph duct cannulated rats after intravenous and subcutaneous dosing at 2 mg/kg, and the data were evaluated via population pharmacokinetic modeling. The Fab' displayed limited lymphatic exposure, but conjugation of 10 kDa PEG improved exposure by approximately 11- and 5-fold after intravenous (15% dose collected in thoracic lymph over 30 h) and subcutaneous (9%) administration, respectively. Increasing the molecular weight of the PEG to 40 kDa, however, had no significant impact on lymphatic exposure after intravenous (14%) administration and only doubled lymphatic exposure after subcutaneous administration (18%) when compared to 10 kDa PEG-Fab'. The data therefore suggests that minimal PEGylation has the potential to enhance the exposure and activity of Fab's against lymph-resident diseases, while no significant benefit is achieved with very large PEGs. PMID:26871003

  1. Water mosses as indicators of acidification. Practice-oriented biological indication techniques using water mosses for acidification monitoring of running waters with a low buffer capacity; Wassermoose als Versauerungsindikatoren. Praxisorientierte Bioindikationsverfahren mit Wassermoosen zur Ueberwachung des Saeurezustandes von pufferschwachen Fliessgewaessern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tremp, H. [Hohenheim Univ., Stuttgart (Germany). Inst. fuer Landschafts- und Pflanzenoekologie; Kohler, A. [Hohenheim Univ., Stuttgart (Germany). Inst. fuer Landschafts- und Pflanzenoekologie

    1993-12-31

    Since the beginning of the eighties, research in the Federal Republic of Germany on the acidification of rivers and lakes has been dominated by water-chemical investigation programmes. The use of biological indicators of water acidification is to complement water-chemical data surveys; therefore, the development of easily and rapidly applicable techniques must be given priority. This work has the aim to point out opportunities for, and limits to, the use of submersed mosses and liverworts for practice-oriented indication of acidification. Its main points of emphasis are the indicator value of mosses in running waters with a low buffer capacity and their use in passive monitoring, with iron and aluminium accumulation being primarily of interest. Investigations that build on these deal with the simple topochemical verification of these metals in moss leaves. (vhe) [Deutsch] Seit Beginn der achtziger Jahre ist die Erforschung der Gewaesserversauerung in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland in erster Linie von wasserchemischen Untersuchungsprogrammen gepraegt. Der Einsatz von Bioindikatoren fuer die Gewaesserversauerung soll die Erhebung der wasserchemischen Kenngroessen ergaenzen, daher muss die Entwicklung von leicht und schnell anwendbaren Verfahren Vorrang haben. Ziel der vorliegenden Untersuchung ist es, die Moeglichkeiten und Grenzen der Verwendung submerser Laub- und Lebermoose fuer eine praxisorientierte Versauerungsindikation aufzuzeigen. Die Untersuchungsschwerpunkte beschraenken sich auf den Zeigerwert von Moosen pufferschwacher Fliessgewaesser und ihren Einsatz im passiven Monitoring. Im Mittelpunkt stehen dabei die Eisen- und Aluminiumakkumulation. Darauf aufbauende Untersuchungen befassen sich mit dem einfachen topochemischen Nachweis dieser Metalle in Moosblaettern. (vhe)

  2. Biophysical and biological characterization of a new line of hyaluronan-based dermal fillers: A scientific rationale to specific clinical indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Gatta, Annalisa; De Rosa, Mario; Frezza, Maria Assunta; Catalano, Claudia; Meloni, Marisa; Schiraldi, Chiara

    2016-11-01

    Chemico-physical and biological characterization of hyaluronan-based dermal fillers is of key importance to differentiate between numerous available products and to optimize their use. These studies on fillers are nowadays perceived as a reliable approach to predict their performance in vivo. The object of this paper is a recent line of hyaluronic acid (HA)-based dermal fillers, Aliaxin®, available in different formulations that claim a complete facial restoration. The aim of the study is to provide biophysical and biological data that may support the clinical indications and allow to predict performance possibly with respect to similar available products. Aliaxin® formulations were tested for their content in soluble HA, water uptake capacity, rheological behavior, stability to enzymatic degradation, and for in vitro capacity to stimulate extracellular matrix components production. The formulations were found to contain a low amount of soluble HA and were equivalent to each other regarding insoluble hydrogel concentration. The different crosslinking degree declared by the producer was consistent with the trend in water uptake capacity, rigidity, viscosity. No significant differences in stability to enzymatic hydrolysis were found. In vitro experiments, using a full thickness skin model, showed an increase in collagen production in the dermoepidermal junction. Results support the claims of different clinical indications, the classification of products regarding hydro-, lift-action and the specifically suggested needle gauge for the delivery. The biological outcomes also support products effectiveness in skin structure restoration. These data predicted a better performance regarding hydro-action, tissue integration, clinical management during delivery, and a high durability of the aesthetic effect when compared to data on marketed similar products. PMID:27524055

  3. Biological Monitoring of Blood Naphthalene Levels as a Marker of Occupational Exposure to PAHs among Auto-Mechanics and Spray Painters in Rawalpindi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheema Iqbal U

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Routine exposure to chemical contaminants in workplace is a cause for concern over potential health risks to workers. In Pakistan, reports on occupational exposure and related health risks are almost non-existent, which reflects the scarce availability of survey data and criteria for determining whether an unsafe exposure has occurred. The current study was designed to evaluate blood naphthalene (NAPH levels as an indicator of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs among automobile workshop mechanics (MCs and car-spray painters (PNs. We further determined the relationship between blood NAPH levels and personal behavioural, job related parameters and various environmental factors that may further be associated with elevated risks of occupational exposures to PAHs. Methods Sixty blood samples (n = 20 for each group i.e. MC, PN and control group were collected to compare their blood NAPH levels among exposed (MCs and PNs and un-exposed (control groups. Samples were analyzed using high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC. Data regarding demographic aspects of the subjects and their socioeconomic features were collected using a questionnaire. Subjects were also asked to report environmental hygiene conditions of their occupational environment. Results We identified automobile work areas as potential sites for PAHs exposure, which was reflected by higher blood NAPH levels among MCs. Blood NAPH levels ranged from 53.7 to 1980.6 μgL-1 and 54.1 to 892.9 μgL-1 among MCs and PNs respectively. Comparison within each group showed that smoking enhanced exposure risks several fold and both active and passive smoking were among personal parameters that were significantly correlated with log-transformed blood NAPH levels. For exposed groups, work hours and work experience were job related parameters that showed strong associations with the increase in blood NAPH levels. Poor workplace hygiene and ventilation were recognized as

  4. Lead exposures and biological responses in military weapons systems: Aerosol characteristics and acute lead effects among US Army artillerymen: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Stebbings, J.H.; Peterson, D.P.; Johnson, S.A.; Kumar, R.; Goun, B.D.; Janssen, I.; Trier, J.E.

    1993-03-01

    This study was to determine the concentration and chemical nature of lead (Pb) aerosols produced during the firing of artillery and to determine the exposures and biological responses of crew members exposed to lead aerosols during such firing. The concentrations of lead-containing aerosols at crew positions depended on wind conditions, with higher concentrations when firing into a head wind. Aerosol concentrations were highest in the muzzle blast zone. Concentrations of lead in the blood of crew members rose during the first 12 days of exposure to elevated airborne lead concentrations and then leveled off. There was no rapid decrease in blood lead concentrations after completion of firing. Small decreases in hematocrit and small increases in free erythrocyte porphyrin were correlated with increasing exposure to airborne lead. These changes were reversed by seven weeks after firing. Changes in nerve conduction velocity had borderline statistical significance to airborne lead exposure. In measuring nerve conduction velocity, differences in skin temperature must be taken into account.

  5. D-Serine exposure resulted in gene expression changes indicative of activation of fibrogenic pathways and down-regulation of energy metabolism and oxidative stress response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renal toxicity can commonly occur after exposure to xenobiotics, pharmaceutical agents or environmental pollutants. Changes in the gene expression in kidney parenchymal cells that precede and/or accompany renal injury may be hallmark critical events in the onset of pathologic changes of renal functions. Over the last several years, transcriptomic analysis has evolved to enable simultaneous analysis of the expression profiles of tens of thousands of genes in response to various endogenous and exogenous stimuli. In this study, we investigated gene expression changes in the kidney after acute exposure to a nephrotoxin, D-serine, which targets the proximal tubule of the kidney. Male F-344 rats injected intraperitoneally with a single dose of D-serine (5, 20, 50, 200 or 500 mg/kg), and gene expression profiles in the kidney were determined using the Affymetrix RAE230A gene arrays at 96 h post-dosing. D-Serine treatment resulted in the up- and down-regulation of 1158 and 749 genes, respectively, over the entire dose range based on the intersection of the results of t-test, p < 0.01 over two consecutive doses, and ANOVA with Bonferonni correction for multiple testing. Interestingly, both the up-and down-regulated genes show a unified dose response pattern as revealed in the self-organized map clustering analysis using the expression profiles of the 1907 differentially expressed genes as input data. There appears to be minimal changes in the expression level of these genes in the dose range of 5-50 mg/kg, while the most prominent changes were observed at the highest doses tested, i.e. 200 and 500 mg/kg. Pathway analysis of the differentially expressed genes showed perturbation of a large number of biological processes/pathways after D-serine exposure. Among the up-regulated pathways are actin cytoskeleton biogenesis and organization, apoptosis, cell cycle regulation, chromatin assembly, excision repair of damaged DNA, DNA replication and packaging, protein biosynthesis

  6. Urinary hydroxyproline to creatinine ratio as a biological effect marker for exposure to NO 2 and tobacco smoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Yukio; Nishimura, Hajime; Matsuki, Hideaki; Osaka, Fumio; Kasuga, Hitoshi

    In order to study the relationship between NO 2 exposure and effects, we monitored personal NO 2 exposures and the hydroxyproline to creatinine ratio in urine of about 800 women in two communities near Tokyo. Monitoring was conducted during two seasons, winter and summer 1982. The hydroxyproline to creatinine ratio (HOP:C) was determined from urine samples collected in the early morning. Daily average personal NO 2 exposures (ENO 2) were measured by using a filter badge. In both seasons, HOP:C was found to have significant correlation with ENO 2 and active and passive smoking. In addition, subjects living near major roads had significantly higher HOP:C levels in the summer compared with those living far from them. We hypothesize that these higher HOP:C levels in the summer were due to higher air exchange rates resulting in infiltration of automobile exhaust into homes. ENO 2, however, did not correlate with either the distance of the subject's house from major roads or with the amount of smoking. Stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed that HOP:C could be predicted by personal NO 2 exposures and smoking variables with a high level of confidence.

  7. (41)Ca in tooth enamel. Part I: a biological signature of neutron exposure in atomic bomb survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallner, A; Rühm, W; Rugel, G; Nakamura, N; Arazi, A; Faestermann, T; Knie, K; Maier, H J; Korschinek, G

    2010-08-01

    The detection of (41)Ca atoms in tooth enamel using accelerator mass spectrometry is suggested as a method capable of reconstructing thermal neutron exposures from atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. In general, (41)Ca atoms are produced via thermal neutron capture by stable (40)Ca. Thus any (41)Ca atoms present in the tooth enamel of the survivors would be due to neutron exposure from both natural sources and radiation from the bomb. Tooth samples from five survivors in a control group with negligible neutron exposure were used to investigate the natural (41)Ca content in tooth enamel, and 16 tooth samples from 13 survivors were used to estimate bomb-related neutron exposure. The results showed that the mean (41)Ca/Ca isotope ratio was (0.17 +/- 0.05) x 10(-14) in the control samples and increased to 2 x 10(-14) for survivors who were proximally exposed to the bomb. The (41)Ca/Ca ratios showed an inverse correlation with distance from the hypocenter at the time of the bombing, similar to values that have been derived from theoretical free-in-air thermal-neutron transport calculations. Given that gamma-ray doses were determined earlier for the same tooth samples by means of electron spin resonance (ESR, or electron paramagnetic resonance, EPR), these results can serve to validate neutron exposures that were calculated individually for the survivors but that had to incorporate a number of assumptions (e.g. shielding conditions for the survivors). PMID:20681780

  8. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of fission neutrons and gamma rays at occupational exposure levels: Volume 1, Studies on the genetic effects in mice of 60 equal once-weekly exposures to fission neutrons and gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for low doses of fission neutrons compared to 60Co gamma rays were determined with four separate assessments of genetic damage induced in young hybrid male mice. Both radiations were delivered at low dose levels over about one-half the adult lifetime as 60 once-weekly exposures. Genetic damage assessed included both transient and residual injury. The latter is more critical, as residual genetic injury can be transmitted to subsequent generations long after the radiation exposures have ceased. Assays were performed periodically during the 60-week exposure period and at 10 or more weeks after the irradiations had terminated. RBE values, with few exceptions, ranged between 5 and 15 for transient injury and between 25 and 50 for different types of residual genetic injury. The most important form of residual genetic damage in this study was the balanced reciprocal chromosome translocation. These translocations continue to be transmitted throughout reproductive life and can lead to reduced fertility and increased prenatal mortality. The best estimate of the RBE value for translocations was 45 +- 10. Implications and recommendations with regard to the neutron quality factor will be presented conjointly with the findings from the data obtained in this same project on life shortening and on the risks of incidence or death from neoplastic disease. 64 refs., 23 tabs

  9. Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) of fission neutrons and gamma rays at occupational exposure levels: Volume 2, Studies on the effects of 60 equal once-weekly exposures to fission neutrons and gamma rays on survival of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A total of 6316 mice were exposed to 60 once-weekly doses of 0.85 MeV fission neutrons or 60Co gamma rays and observed until they died. An additional 1404 mice were entered into the experiment and followed for part of their lifetimes; a few of these mice were lost accidentally, but most were removed for genetic testing. The mean aftersurvival (MAS) times showed dose-response curves for both neutron and gamma-ray exposures to be linear over all doses except the highest neutron dose. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) value for neutrons, calculated as the ratio of the linear slopes of the dose-response curves for MAS times, was about 20 for both males and females. Essentially the same value was obtained by other analyses of the data. This RBE value of 20 is specific for deaths from all causes after 60 once-weekly exposures to 0.85 MeV fission neutrons, with once-weekly 60Co gamma-ray exposures as the reference radiation. The value for the RBE will probably be different for some, but not all, of the other end points (i.e., specific causes of death, especially tumors). 21 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs

  10. Interaction between the biological effects of high- and low-LET radiation dose components in a mixed field exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mason, Anna J.; Giusti, Valerio; Green, Stuart;

    2011-01-01

    The relative biological effectiveness of two epithermal neutron sources, a reactor based source at Studsvik, Sweden, and a proton accelerator-based source in Birmingham, UK, was studied in relation to the proportional absorbed dose distribution as a function of neutron energy. Evidence for any...

  11. Conjuring a New Category of Disability from Prenatal Cocaine Exposure: Are the Infants Unique Biological or Caretaking Casualties?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutter, Linda S.; Brinker, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    A review of the literature on biological and environmental effects of cocaine use suggests that the classification of infants and young children as prenatally cocaine exposed is neither descriptive nor predictive of behavior. The classification of behavior rather than labeling of the child is encouraged, as are partnerships with families of…

  12. Late biological effects of ionizing radiation as influenced by dose, dose rate, age at exposure and genetic sensitivity to neoplastic transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A most comprehensive investigation is in progress at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory to study the late biological effects of whole-body exposure to gamma irradiation as they may be influenced by total dose, dose rate, age at exposure and genetic background. Strain C57B1/6J mice of four age groups (newborn, 2, 6 and l5 months) were given five doses (20, 60, 180, 540, and 1620 rads) of gamma rays, with each dose being delivered at six dose rates (0.7, 2.1, 6.3, 18.9, 56.7 rads/day and 25 rads/min). Forty to sixty mice were used in each of the approximately 119 dose/dose-rate and age combinations. The study was done in two replications with an equal number of mice per replicaton. Strain RF/J mice were used in a companion study to investigate the influence of genetic background on the type and magnitude of effect. Results of the first and second replications of the l5-month-old age group and data on the influence of genetic background on biological response have been completed, and the results show no significant life shortening within the dose and dose-rate range used. It was also concluded that radiaton-induced neoplastic transformaton was significantly greater in mice with a known genetic sensitivity to neoplastic disease than in mammals which do not normally have a significant incidence of tumours. (author)

  13. Measuring exposure to organochlorinated pesticides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulnar Azevedo e Silva Mendonça

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental epidemiological investigations in cancer remain, with rare exceptions, inconclusive. The difficulties of establishing patterns of measurements of exposure in the human body is one of the limitations of these studies. The findings of six recent epidemiological studies that analyzed the association between organochlorinated compounds and breast cancer are reviewed in considering the problems of measuring environmental exposure through biological markers. The epidemiological evidence based on these studies do not indicate a risk of breast cancer related to organochlorines. Some aspects that may partially explain this absence of risk are discussed regarding the investigation of environmental carcinogenic agents in populations with low but homogeneously sprayed levels of exposure.

  14. Study of the biological effects of uranium exposure on zebra fish (D. rerio). Impact on life stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is part of an ongoing project (ENVIRHOM) started at IRSN in 2000, which consists in studying the environmental effects of radioactive substances at chronic low level of exposure. In this general frame, our aim was two fold: (i) to identify sensitivity of different critical life stages of zebra fish (fish of fresh water frequently used for tests standards in ecotoxicology) to uranium exposure and (ii) to evaluate underlying mechanisms. Experiments were conducted with eggs, larvae and genitors exposed to uranium at environmentally relevant concentrations (from 20 to 500 μg/L) in order to study survival, hatching of eggs, growth of larvae and reproduction of genitors. Bio-markers of exposure (i.e. U bioaccumulation) and bio-markers of effects at molecular level (i.e. genotoxic effects, reproductive-toxicity) were also measured. Sensitivity of fish to uranium was dependent of the life stage of development with the early life stage being the most sensitive to U either directly or maternally exposed. It underlines the relevance of including pro-larval stages for toxicity assessments in fish. Moreover drastic effects of uranium on reproductive success and DNA damages in the germ cells foretell a strong impact on the population for low concentration of exposure (20 μg/L). As it is increasingly recognized that population-level effects of toxic substances are more relevant in terms of ecological risk assessment, this study points out the need to include different life stages of organisms in eco-toxicological studies, especially the sensitive early stages. Moreover, it appears, through the comparative study of the radiological effects or by another isotope of the uranium of stronger radioactivity (233U or by an irradiation with 137Cs), that the effects of the uranium are due to its chemo-toxicity. (author)

  15. Pathway focused protein profiling indicates differential function for IL-1B, -18 and VEGF during initiation and resolution of lung inflammation evoked by carbon nanoparticle exposure in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamelmann Eckard

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carbonaceous nanoparticles possess an emerging source of human exposure due to the massive release of combustion products and the ongoing revolution in nanotechnology. Pulmonary inflammation caused by deposited nanoparticles is central for their adverse health effects. Epidemiological studies suggest that individuals with favourable lung physiology are at lower risk for particulate matter associated respiratory diseases probably due to efficient control of inflammation and repair process. Therefore we selected a mouse strain C3H/HeJ (C3 with robust lung physiology and exposed it to moderately toxic carbon nanoparticles (CNP to study the elicited pulmonary inflammation and its resolution. Methods 5 μg, 20 μg and 50 μg CNP were intratracheally (i.t. instilled in C3 mice to identify the optimal dose for subsequent time course studies. Pulmonary inflammation was assessed using histology, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL analysis and by a panel of 62 protein markers. Results 1 day after instillation of CNP, C3 mice exhibited a typical dose response, with the lowest dose (5 μg representing the 'no effect level' as reflected by polymorphonuclear leucocyte (PMN, and BAL/lung concentrations of pro-inflammatory proteins. Histological analysis and BAL-protein concentration did not reveal any evidence of tissue injury in 20 μg CNP instilled animals. Accordingly time course assessment of the inflammatory response was performed after 3 and 7 days with this dose (20 μg. Compared to day 1, BAL PMN counts were significantly decreased at day 3 and completely returned to normal by day 7. We have identified protein markers related to the acute response and also to the time dependent response in lung and BAL. After complete resolution of PMN influx on day 7, we detected elevated concentrations of 20 markers that included IL1B, IL18, FGF2, EDN1, and VEGF in lung and/or BAL. Biological pathway analysis revealed these factors to be involved in a

  16. Exposure Assessment of Breast-Fed Infants in the Czech Republic to Indicator Pcbs and Selected Chlorinated Pesticides: Area-Related Differences

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Černá, M.; Bencko, V.; Brabec, Marek; Šmíd, J.; Krsková, A.; Jech, L.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 78, č. 2 (2010), s. 160-168. ISSN 0045-6535 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : human milk * Czech Republic * PCBs and OCPs * breast-fed infant exposure * statistical modeling of exposure * Bayesian modeling Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 3.155, year: 2010

  17. Chronic radionuclide low dose exposure for non-human biota: challenges in establishing links between speciation in the exposure sources, bioaccumulation and biological effects. Uranium in aquatic ecosystems: A case-study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the field of environmental radioprotection, the knowledge gaps concern situations leading to chronic exposure at the lower doses typical of the living conditions of organisms influenced by radioactive releases. For any radionuclide and ecosystem, the specificities of these situations are as followed: (i) various chemical forms occur in the environment as a function of the physico-chemical conditions of the medium; (ii) each transfer from one component to another can lead to a modification of these forms with a 'chemical form-specific' mobility and bioavailability; (iii) different categories of non-radioactive toxicants are simultaneously present. In this multipollution context, the biological effects of ionising radiation may be exacerbated or reduced with the potential for action or interaction of all the pollutants present simultaneously. These situations of chronic exposure at low levels are likely to cause toxic responses distinct from those observed after acute exposure at high doses since long-term accumulation mechanisms in cells and tissues may lead to microlocalised accumulation in some target cells or subcellular components. The assessment of these mechanisms is primordial with regard to internal exposure to radionuclides since they increase locally both the radionuclide concentration and the delivered dose, coupling radiological and chemical toxicity. This is the main purpose of the ENVIRHOM research programme, recently launched at IRSN. After a global overview of the experimental strategy and of the first results obtained for phytoplankton and uranium, this paper scans the state of art for uranium within freshwaters and underlines inconsistency encountered when one wants to carry out an Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) on the chemical or on the radiological standpoint. This example argues for future research needs in order to establish well-defined relationship between chemo-toxicity and radiotoxicity for internal contamination. The operational aim

  18. Traffic-related heavy metals uptake by wild plants grow along two main highways in Hunan Province, China: effects of soil factors, accumulation ability, and biological indication potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Yunbo; Dai, Qingyun; Jiang, Kang; Zhu, Yun; Xu, Bibo; Peng, Chuan; Wang, Tengfei; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-07-01

    This study was performed to investigate pollution of traffic-related heavy metals (HMs-Zn, Pb, Cu, Cr, and Cd) in roadside soils and their uptake by wild plants growing along highways in Hunan Province, China. For this, we analyzed the concentration and chemical fractionation of HMs in soils and plants. Soil samples were collected with different depths in the profile and different distances from highway edge. And leaves and barks of six high-frequency plants were collected. Results of the modified European Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) showed that the mobile fraction of these HMs was in the order of Cd > Pb > Zn > Cu > Cr. A high percentage of the mobile fraction indicates Cd, Pb, and Zn were labile and available for uptake by wild plants. The total concentration and values of risk assessment code (RAC) showed that Cd was the main risk factor, which were in the range high to very high risk. The accumulation ability of HMs in plants was evaluated by the biological accumulation factor (BAF) and the metal accumulation index (MAI), and the results showed that all those plant species have good phyto-extraction ability, while accumulation capacity for most HMs plants tissues was bark > leaf. The highest MAI value (5.99) in Cinnamomum camphora (L) Presl indicates the potential for bio-monitoring and a good choice for planting along highways where there is contamination with HMs. PMID:27026539

  19. The endocrine effects of dietary brominated diphenyl ether-47 exposure, measured across multiple levels of biological organization, in breeding fathead minnows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Leah M; Path, Elise M; Venables, Barney J; Sellin Jeffries, Marlo K

    2016-08-01

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate the reproductive function of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to brominated diphenyl ether-47 (BDE-47) at doses lower than those used in previous studies. This was accomplished by evaluating the impacts of BDE-47 exposures across multiple levels of biological organization. Breeding pairs were exposed to BDE-47 via diet for 21 d, during which reproductive success was monitored. At the conclusion of the exposure, fish were euthanized to assess the effects of BDE-47 on sex steroid-related and thyroid-related transcripts, plasma androgen levels, gonadosomatic index (GSI), and secondary sexual characteristics. Several alterations in gene expression were noted including a >2.1-fold decrease in hepatic estrogen receptor α (erα) and a 2.9-fold decrease in ovarian aromatase (arom). In addition, BDE-47-exposed males experienced increases in deiodinase 2 (dio2) expression in brain tissue (∼1.5-fold) and decreases in hepatic transthyretin (ttr) expression (∼1.4-fold). Together, these gene expression alterations suggest the potential for BDE-47 to disrupt endocrine signaling. There were no significant differences in plasma hormone levels, GSI, secondary sexual characteristics, or reproductive success. Overall, the present study demonstrates that exposure to BDE-47 is capable of altering both sex steroid-related and thyroid-related transcripts but that these observed alterations do not necessarily manifest themselves at higher levels of biological organization for the endpoints selected. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2048-2057. © 2016 SETAC. PMID:26749031

  20. Simultaneous estimation of relative biological effectiveness of alpha particles and protons in thermal neutron exposure of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of alpha particles and protons emitted during exposure of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) seeds to thermal neutrons were estimated. sup(10)B-enriched re-dried seeds were irradiated with thermal neutrons or gamma-rays. Two assumptions so far believed that boron distribution was uniform throughout either natural dormant seeds or sup(10)B -enriched seeds, and that boron atoms enter the seeds as freely as water molecules do, were found to be invalid. A boron addition effect (BAE) as high as 58.2 was obtained after thermal neutron exposure of seeds presoaked in 4800 microg/g of sup(10)B-enriched boric acid solution. Estimates of RBE of alpha particles were nearly constant and independent of the contents of absorbed sup(10)B. RBE averaged 55.0 and 55.1 for the seed and spike presoaking methods of boron absorption, respectively. We could also obtain RBE of protons as high as 48.7 and 43.9 for the seed and spike methods, respectively. Boron addition converted the principal capture element during thermal neutron exposure from protons in dormant seeds to boron in sup(10)B enriched-seeds

  1. Biological dosimetry - a Bayesian approach in the presentation of the uncertainty of the estimated dose in cases of exposure to low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biodosimetry laboratory experience has shown that there are limitations in the existing statistical methodology. Statistical difficulties generally occur due to the low number of aberrations leading to large uncertainties for dose estimation. Some problems derived from limitations of the classical statistical methodology, which requires that chromosome aberration yields be considered as something fixed and consequently provides a deterministic dose estimation and associated confidence limits. On the other hand, recipients of biological dosimetry reports, including medical doctors, regulators and the patients themselves may have a limited comprehension of statistics and of informed reports. Thus, the objective of the present paper is to use a Bayesian approach to present the uncertainty on the estimated dose to which a person could be exposed, in the case of low dose (occupational doses) radiation exposure. Such methodology will allow the biodosimetrists to adopt a probabilistic approach for the cytogenetic data analysis. At present, classical statistics allows to produce a confidence interval to report such dose, with a lower limit that could not detach from zero. In this situation it becomes difficult to make decisions as they could impact on the labor activities of the worker if an exposure exceeding the occupational dose limits is inferred. The proposed Bayesian approach is applied to occupational exposure scenario to contribute to take the appropriate radiation protection measures. (authors)

  2. UV effects on the primary productivity of picophytoplankton: biological weighting functions and exposure response curves of Synechococcus

    OpenAIRE

    Neale, P.J.; A. L. Pritchard; R. Ihnacik

    2014-01-01

    A model that predicts UV effects on marine primary productivity using a biological weighting function (BWF) coupled to the photosynthesis–irradiance response (BWF/P-E model) has been implemented for two strains of the picoplanktonic cyanobacteria Synechococcus, WH7803 and WH8102, which were grown at two irradiances (77 and 174 μmol m−2 s−1 photosynthetically available radiation (PAR)) and two temperatures (20 and 26 °C). The model was fit using photosynthesis measured in a ...

  3. Exposure to 3G mobile phone signals does not affect the biological features of brain tumor cells

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yu-Xiao; Li, Guo-Qing; Fu, Xiang-ping; Xue, Jing-hui; Ji, Shou-ping; Zhang, Zhi-Wen; Zhang, Yi; Li, An-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background The increase in mobile phone use has generated concerns about possible risks to human health, especially the development of brain tumors. Whether tumor patients should continue to use mobile telephones has remained unclear because of a paucity of information. Herein, we investigated whether electromagnetic fields from mobile phones could alter the biological features of human tumor cells and act as a tumor-promoting agent. Methods Human glioblastoma cell lines, U251-MG and U87-MG, ...

  4. Treatment plan comparison of linac step and shoot, tomotherapy, rapidarc, and proton therapy for prostate cancer by using the dosimetrical and the biological indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Suk; Cao, Yuan Jie; Chang, Kyung Hwan; Shim, Jang Bo; Kim, Kwang Hyeon; Lee, Nam Kwon; Park, Young Je; Kim, Chul Yong; Cho, Sam Ju; Lee, Sang Hoon; Min, Chul Kee; Kim, Woo Chul; Cho, Kwang Hwan; Huh, Hyun Do; Lim, Sangwook; Shin, Dongho

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to use various dosimetrical indices to determine the best intensitymodulated radiation therapy (IMRT) modality - for treating patients with prostate cancer. Ten patients with prostate cancer were included in this study. IMRT plans were designed to include different modalities, including the linac step and shoot, tomotherapy, RapidArc, and proton systems. Various dosimetrical indices, like the prescription isodose to target volume (PITV) ratio, conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), target coverage index (TCI), modified dose homogeneity index (MHI), conformation number (CN), critical organ scoring index (COSI), and quality factor (QF), were determined to compare the different treatment plans. Biological indices, such as the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) based the tumor control probability (TCP), and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), were also calculated and used to compare the treatment plans. The RapidArc plan attained better PTV coverage, as evidenced by its superior PITV, CI, TCI, MHI, and CN values. Regarding organ at risks (OARs), proton therapy exhibited superior dose sparing for the rectum and the bowel in low dose volumes, whereas the tomotherapy and RapidArc plans achieved better dose sparing in high dose volumes. The QF scores showed no significant difference among these plans (p = 0.701). The average TCPs for prostate tumors in the RapidArc, linac and proton plans were higher than the average TCP for Tomotherapy (98.79%, 98.76%, and 98.75% vs. 98.70%, respectively). Regarding the rectum NTCP, RapidArc showed the most favorable result (0.09%) whereas linac resulted in the best bladder NTCP (0.08%).

  5. Subjective effects of traffic noise exposure, II: Comparisons of noise indices, response scales, and the effects of changes in noise levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdon, F. J.; Griffiths, I. D.

    1982-07-01

    Traffic noise and social surveys were carried out at eight London suburban sites. Dwellings at the selected sites were exposed to noise from freely flowing traffic at levels which ranged from 57 to 82 dB(A), measured as 18 hour L10. The study was designed to obtain noise measurements and subjective responses from residents on four repeated occasions throughout the year. A total of 1363 interviews was conducted, 222 respondents each completing four interviews. Traffic noise was measured as L10, L50 and Leq in both linear and A-weighted form. The eight noise indices were found to be very highly intercorrelated. The correlations between each of these and the subjective responses were all equally high. It was therefore not possible to select a "best" index of noise in terms of nuisance experienced by residents, even when the most highly reliable data, derived from averaging responses for the four repeated interviews, were employed. Subjective responses were measured by means of a 7-point scale of "dissatisfaction" and a 4-point verbal scale of "bother" and the former was found to be a significantly better correlate of noise exposure. The data from these eight sites, which underwent no change in noise levels during the survey, were compared with data obtained in "before and after" studies conducted over a roughly similar period. "Dissatisfaction" and "bother" scores for the "after" condition were found to differ from those which would have been predicted from stable and unchanging conditions. A number of possible reasons for this finding are discussed and it is suggested that prediction of the effects resulting from noise reduction procedures requires further study.

  6. Contribution of an exposure indicator to better anticipate damages with the AIGA flood warning method: a case study in the South of France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Martin, Clotilde; Fouchier, Catherine; Douvinet, Johnny; Javelle, Pierre; Vinet, Freddy

    2016-04-01

    On the 3rd October 2015, heavy localized precipitations have occurred in South Eastern France leading to major flash floods on the Mediterranean coast. The severity of those floods has caused 20 fatalities and important damage in almost 50 municipalities in the French administrative area of Alpes-Maritimes. The local recording rain gauges have shown how fast the event has happened: 156 mm of rain were recorded in Mandelieu-la-Napoule and 145 mm in Cannes within 2 hours. As the affected rivers are not monitored, no anticipation was possible from the authorities in charge of risk management. In this case, forecasting floods is indeed complex because of the small size of the watersheds which implies a reduced catchment response time. In order to cope with the need of issuing flood warnings on un-monitored small catchments, Irstea and Météo-France have developed an alternative warning system for ungauged basins called the AIGA method. AIGA is a flood warning system based on a simple distributed hydrological model run at a 1 km² resolution using real time radar rainfall information (Javelle, Demargne, Defrance, Pansu, & Arnaud, 2014). The flood warnings, produced every 15 minutes, result of the comparison of the real time runoff data produced by the model with statistical runoff values. AIGA is running in real time in the South of France, within the RHYTMME project (https://rhytmme.irstea.fr/). Work is on-going in order to offer a similar service for the whole French territory. More than 200 impacts of the 3rd October floods have been located using media, social networks and fieldwork. The first comparisons between these impacts and the AIGA warning levels computed for this event show several discrepancies. However, these latter discrepancies appear to be explained by the land-use. An indicator of the exposure of territories to flooding has thus been created to weight the levels of the AIGA hydrological warnings with the land-use of the area surrounding the streams

  7. Assessment of occupational exposure and individual radiosensitivity in people exposed to radiation using methods of physical and biological dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examined people professionally in contact with sources of ionizing radiation.The incidence of chromosomal aberrations, the radionuclide content in the urine of the radiochemical method and calculation of internal doses based on the results of direct measurement of the concentration of incorporated radionuclides 137Cs and 241Am using human radiation spectrometer (HRS). According to the results of physical and biological dosimetry identified individual cumulative doses and the ratio defined cohort surveyed by radiosensitivity Key words: chromosomal aberrations, physical methods of dosimetry, radiation sensitivity, ionizing radiation, biodosimetry

  8. Fatores de risco cardiovasculares em adolescentes: indicadores biológicos e comportamentais Cardiovascular risk factors in adolescents: biological and behavioral indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dartagnan Pinto Guedes

    2006-06-01

    between 15 and 18 years of age selected in a high school in the city of Londrina, Paraná. Risk factors of a behavioral nature were analyzed as regards insufficient physical activity, excessive intake of fat and cholesterol and smoking. As biological risk factor indicators we used overweight, high arterial pressure levels, and adverse concentration of serum lipids and lipoproteins. RESULTS: Approximately 20% of the girls and 16% of the boys presented at least one biological risk factor for development of cardiovascular diseases. Overweight was significantly associated with excessive intake of fats, while elevated arterial pressure was related to sedentary lifestyle and smoking. Excessive intake of fat and cholesterol indicated increased risk of undesirable concentrations of serum lipids and lipoproteins. The risk associated with altered blood pressure and serum lipids and lipoprotein was increased two-fold in smokers when compared with nonsmokers. CONCLUSION: The results reinforce the need for interventions targeted at the adoption of a healthy lifestyle, including the regular practice of physical exercise, appropriate dietary patterns, and abstention from smoking as of an early age.

  9. Use of in situ biological indicators of pollution stress by the Venezuelan Petroleum Corporation (PDVSA): Bases for their industrial applications in Latin America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because Industry requires answers in a time-effective manner, PDVSA is promoting the use of biological indicators in an ecotoxicological context, replacing the classical view of species inventory or whole community structure analyses, widely used for ecological assessment studies. When the classical approach is followed, tropical ecosystem complexity consumes a great deal of effort just describing or identifying species, not to mention establishing trophic-structure relationships. If, on the contrary, key species or even communities of reduced species, not to mention establishing trophic-structure relationships. If, on the contrary, key species or even communities of reduced complexity belonging to a given ecological assessment could be simplified, allowing for an efficient response to the clients needs. Throughout this paper, in situ methods developed for these purposes will be discussed, showing the successful application of a large scale assessment through tissue level analyses of a ''sentinel'' mussel (Polymesoda arctata). In addition, when environmental assessment areas are of smaller scale, so that temporal and spatial variations are minimized, the application of community changes by the use of fouling communities will be shown as a novel means for reducing structural complexity. Methods herein proposed, are highly comprehensive, and could serve as basis for future environmental industrial monitoring throughout Latin America and many other regions of the world

  10. Radio-adaptive Response: An Implication for the Biological Consequences of Low Dose-rate Exposure to X-Ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation induced adaptive response is described as the reduced damaging effect of a challenging radiation dose when induced by a previous low priming dose. To verify the radio-adaptive response that can be induced by occupationally (in vivo) received chronic low dose of X-ray, chromosomal aberration (CA) analysis, micronucleus test (MN), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and nitric oxide (NO) concentrations were investigated for both the occupationally exposed and control groups before and after exposure to 2 Gy γ-rays as a challenge dose. The results showed that an elevated frequency of CA, MN and nucleoplasmic bridge (NPB) was recorded in radiation workers (exposed group) compared to control group. However, after 2Gy in vitro irradiation of lymphocytes of exposed and control groups, the exposed group was found to be lower than that of control group. On the other hand, IL-1β and NO concentrations in plasma were elevated in exposed group more than in control group. While, after 2Gy irradiation for both groups, there are higher increment in the concentrations of IL-1β and NO in exposed group than the increment difference observed for control group after in vitro irradiation as compared to the same group before irradiation. The present results suggested the existence of an in vivo cytogenetic adaptive response in individuals occupationally exposed to low dose of X-ray. In addition, the results showed that NO radicals and IL-1β have a role in the induction of radio-resistance due to in vivo exposure that may intermediate this radiation.

  11. Evaluation of biological endpoints in crop plants after exposure to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs): implications for phytotoxicological assessment of novel contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Wiebke; Redshaw, Clare H

    2015-02-01

    Human pharmaceuticals have been detected in the terrestrial environment at µg to mg kg(-1) concentrations. Repeated application of sewage sludge (biosolids) and increasing reclaimed wastewater use for irrigation could lead to accumulation of these novel contaminants in soil systems. Despite this, potential phytotoxicological effects on higher plants have rarely been evaluated. These studies aimed to test effects upon germination, development, growth and physiology of two crop plants, namely radish (Raphanus sativus Spakler 3) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa All Year Around), after exposure to different, but structurally related non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) at environmentally relevant concentrations. A range of biological endpoints comprising biomass, length, water content, specific root and shoot length, root to shoot ratio, daily progress of stages of cell elongation and organ emergence (primary root, hypocotyl elongation, cotyledon emergence, cotyledon opening, and no change), as well as photosynthetic measurements were evaluated. Compounds from the fenamic acid class were found to affect R. sativus root endpoints (root length and water content), while ibuprofen affected early root development of L. sativa. In general, phytotoxicological effects on root endpoints demonstrated that impacts upon higher plants are not only compound specific, but also differ between plant species. It was found that the usage of a wide range of biological endpoints (all simple, cost-effective and ecologically relevant) were beneficial in detecting differences in plant responses to NSAID exposure. Due to paucity and discrepancy within the few previously available phytotoxicological studies with pharmaceuticals, it is now essential to allocate time and resources to consider development of suitable chronic toxicity tests, and some suggestions regarding this are presented. PMID:25463873

  12. The Influence of No-Till, Conventional Tillage and Nitrogen Fertilization on Physico-Chemical and Biological Indicators After Three Years of Monoculture Barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Menta

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available An experimental trial was carried out over three years at Cavacurta (Po valley, Italy on continuous barley. The soil was a coarse-loamy over sandy, mixed, mesic Fluventic Ustochrept. The experimental design was a split-plot with four replicates; the main factor was the soil management system (conventional tillage, CT, and no-tillage, NT, while the secondary factor was the nitrogen fertilization (N0 = 0, N1 = 50 and N2 = 90 kg N ha-1 year-1. At the end of the third year soil samples were taken in all plots at four depths (0-5, 5-10, 10-15 and 15-20 cm. For these samples, pH, organic matter, total N, available P and cation exchange capacity were determined. On the contrary, water aggregate stability was determined for a single layer (0-20 cm depth, excluding the N1 level of fertilization. The biological indicator, QBS-ar index, was studied only in the layer 0-10 cm. Statistical analysis shows that no-till positively influenced all the indices except for CEC and QBS-ar. N fertilization had significant effects on CEC only; in the upper layer, the value in N2 subplots was of approx. 1 cmol+ kg-1 higher than in N0 and N1 subplots. There was no significant interaction for any of the indices. As regards only the 0-20 cm layer, the most important results are as follows. The organic matter content in NT plots was significantly higher than in CT plots (32.6 vs 29.8 g kg-1, as was the total N (2.11 vs 1.97 g kg-1. No-till also had a very clear effect on the Olsen-P (12.3 vs 9.3 mg kg-1. The most remarkable result was found for the water aggregate stability: for NT plots the value was 246% higher than for CT plots (34.3 vs 9.9%. As regards the microarthropod community, the value of the QBS-ar index was between 90 and 126, a typical range for soil under barley.

  13. Biologic markers in risk assessment for environmental carcinogens

    OpenAIRE

    Perera, F.; Mayer, J.; Santella, R. M.; Brenner, D; Jeffrey, A.; Latriano, L; Smith, S.; Warburton, D; Young, T. L.; Tsai, W. Y.; Hemminki, K; Brandt-Rauf, P

    1991-01-01

    The potential of biologic markers to provide more timely and precise risk assessments for environmental carcinogens is viewed against the current state-of-the-art in biological monitoring/molecular epidemiology. Biologic markers such as carcinogen-DNA adducts and oncogene activation are currently considered valid qualitative indicators of potential risk, but for most chemical exposures research is needed to establish their validity as quantitative predictors of cancer risk. Biologic markers h...

  14. Low-dose neutron dose response of zebrafish embryos obtained from the Neutron exposure Accelerator System for Biological Effect Experiments (NASBEE) facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dose response of embryos of the zebrafish, Danio rerio, irradiated at 5 h post fertilization (hpf) by 2-MeV neutrons with ≤100 mGy was determined. The neutron irradiations were made at the Neutron exposure Accelerator System for Biological Effect Experiments (NASBEE) facility in the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. A total of 10 neutron doses ranging from 0.6 to 100 mGy were employed (with a gamma-ray contribution of 14% to the total dose), and the biological effects were studied through quantification of apoptosis at 25 hpf. The responses for neutron doses of 10, 20, 25, and 50 mGy approximately fitted on a straight line, while those for neutron doses of 0.6, 1 and 2.5 mGy exhibited neutron hormetic effects. As such, hormetic responses were generically developed by different kinds of ionizing radiations with different linear energy transfer (LET) values. The responses for neutron doses of 70 and 100 mGy were significantly below the lower 95% confidence band of the best-fit line, which strongly suggested the presence of gamma-ray hormesis. - Highlights: • Neutron dose response was determined for embryos of the zebrafish, Danio rerio. • Neutron doses of 0.6, 1 and 2.5 mGy led to neutron hormetic effects. • Neutron doses of 70 and 100 mGy accompanied by gamma rays led to gamma-ray hormesis

  15. The Biological Effectiveness of Accelerated Particles for the Induction of Chromosome Damage: Track Structure Effects and Cytogenetic Signatures of High-LET Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, K.; Hada, M.; Chappell, L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2012-01-01

    Track structure models predict that at a fixed value of LET, particles with lower charge number, Z will have a higher biological effectiveness compared to particles with a higher Z. In this report we investigated how track structure effects induction of chromosomal aberration in human cells. Human lymphocytes were irradiated in vitro with various energies of accelerated iron, silicon, neon, or titanium ions and chromosome damage was assessed in using three color FISH chromosome painting in chemically induced PCC samples collected a first cell division post irradiation. The LET values for these ions ranged from 30 to 195 keV/micrometers. Of the particles studied, Neon ions have the highest biological effectiveness for induction of total chromosome damage, which is consistent with track structure model predictions. For complex-type exchanges 64 MeV/ u Neon and 450 MeV/u Iron were equally effective and induced the most complex damage. In addition we present data on chromosomes exchanges induced by six different energies of protons (5 MeV/u to 2.5 GeV/u). The linear dose response term was similar for all energies of protons suggesting that the effect of the higher LET at low proton energies is balanced by the production of nuclear secondaries from the high energy protons. All energies of protons have a much higher percentage of complex-type chromosome exchanges than gamma rays, signifying a cytogenetic signature for proton exposures.

  16. Moisture content of seeds affects relative biological effectiveness of alpha particles but not protons in thermal neutron exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influences of moisture content of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) seeds which were presoaked for 13 h and re-dried before irradiation on boron addition effect (BAE) and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of alpha particles and protons were evaluated. Seeds of normal (10.21% in embryo), low (2.55%) and high (28.0%) moisture content showed different regression of BAE values on the absorbed amount of sup(10)B. The regression coefficient was highest for normal moisture content, followed by low moisture content, and the lowest for high moisture content. RBE of alpha particles also significantly differed between the moisture contents. Seeds of normal, low and high moisture contents showed 46.4, 37.4 and 17.0 of RBE value, respectively. Contrarily, RBE values of protons did not significantly vary with moisture content. It was found that the ratio of RBE of alpha particles between different moisture contents could be expressed by the product of the three ratios, i.e. ratio of sensitivity to gamma-rays, ratio of BAE, and ratio of moisture content. It was concluded that adjustment of moisture of the seeds to normal content (about 10%) is important to get a high value of both BAE and RBE of alpha particles

  17. Mutagenic potential scale (MPS) for evaluation of biological response in various ambients with different radiation exposure rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mutagenic potential scale is being elaborated through the evaluation of the frequency of mutations induced in an exposed biological system to several atmospheres (study sites). The selection of these sites will be based on the perception of the public in general, of his/her impact to the public individuals' health. There will be included, in that selection, from considered areas 'ecological paradises' until surroundings of reactors, nuclear and radioactive facilities, as well as miners that extract and/or benefit ores with uranium and thorium associated, potentially generators of radiological impact. The developed project foresees the contribution of other research groups with objective of being obtained data in other ranches. Referred its scale will be built with base in the answer of the responsible genetic system for the alteration of coloration of the cells of the hair estaminais of Tradescantia (BNL 4430) to agents inductors of mutations. Methodological innovations are being introduced to the described system, through automation of the counting of mutagenic events, more specifically for image analysis with forecast of a significant increase on the efficiency of the processing of the analysis and counting of mutagenic events. (author)

  18. Effect of cytoreductive surgery-assisted postoperative intraperitoneal hyperthermic perfusion chemotherapy combined with intravenous chemotherapy on serum malignant biological indicators of ovarian cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian-Lian Liu; Lei Yang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of cytoreductive surgery-assisted postoperative intraperitoneal hyperthermic perfusion chemotherapy combined with intravenous chemotherapy on serum malignant biological indicators of ovarian cancer patients.Methods:Advanced ovarian cancer patients who received cytoreductive surgery in our hospital from June 2010 to August 2014 were selected for study. Based on different postoperative chemotherapy schemes, patients undergoing intraperitoneal hyperthermic perfusion chemotherapy combined with intravenous chemotherapy were screened and enrolled in combination chemotherapy group; patients undergoing routine intravenous chemotherapy were screened and enrolled in intravenous chemotherapy group. Then contents of serum markers, proliferative genes and signaling pathway molecules of both groups were detected.Results:(1) Cell cycles: G0/G1 and S phase percentages in ovarian cancer biopsy tissues of combination chemotherapy group were lower than those of intravenous chemotherapy group; G2/M phase percentage was higher than that of intravenous chemotherapy group; (2) Tumor markers: after 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 chemotherapy cycles, compared with intravenous chemotherapy group, serum HE4 and sTWEAK contents of combination chemotherapy group trended to decrease significantly; (3) Proliferative genes: compared with intravenous chemotherapy group, mRNA contents of mortalin, CIP2A, GILZ and Ki-67 in serum of combination chemotherapy group trended to decrease significantly; (4) Signaling pathway molecules: mRNA contents of Crk, Dock180, Rac1 and YAP in serum of combination chemotherapy group showed a decreasing trend; mRNA contents of C3G, Rap1 and Hippo showed an increasing trend.Conclusion:Intraperitoneal hyperthermic perfusion chemotherapy combined with intravenous chemotherapy is helpful to kill ovarian cancer cells, inhibit expressions of proliferative genes and regulate functions of signaling pathways; it is an ideal chemotherapy scheme for ovarian

  19. The Biology of the Triatomine Bugs Native to South Central Texas and Assessment of the Risk They Pose for Autochthonous Chagas Disease Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, Edward J; Lawrence, Gena; Gorchakov, Rodion; Alamgir, Hasanat; Dotson, Ellen; Sissel, Blake; Sarkar, Sahotra; Murray, Kristy O

    2015-10-01

    Triatomine bugs are a group of hematophagous arthropods that can serve as biological vectors for Trypanosoma cruzi , the etiological agent of American trypanosomiasis (Chagas disease). Because of differences in the biology and feeding habits among triatomine species, some are more likely than others to be involved in zoonotic and/or human-to-human transmission cycles of T. cruzi . In an attempt to assess the risk for Chagas disease exposure in south-central Texas, human habitations across Texas Health Service Region 8 (HSR 8) and surrounding counties were surveyed for triatomines to characterize the geographic distribution, species-specific biology, and T. cruzi -infection prevalence better. Between May 2010 and August 2013, a total of 545 triatomines representing all 5 known indigenous species (Triatoma gerstaeckeri, Triatoma indictiva, Triatoma lecticularia, Triatoma sanguisuga, and Triatoma protracta woodi) were collected from 59 sites across the region. Triatoma gerstaeckeri was the species most commonly found in domestic and peridomestic ecotopes across Texas HSR 8, representing over 80% of the triatomines collected. Adult T. gerstaeckeri exhibited a seasonal dispersal pattern that began in late April, peaked in mid-May, and then continued into August. On homes with available crevices in the exterior walls, adult T. gerstaeckeri were observed emerging from or entering these protective microhabitats, suggesting possible opportunistic colonization of some exterior walls compartments. Laboratory testing of triatomine hindgut contents for T. cruzi by PCR demonstrated the adult T. gerstaeckeri-infection prevalence across Texas HSR 8 to be 64%. Monitoring peridomestic adult T. gerstaeckeri over the seasonal dispersal peak demonstrated statistically significant increases in both their T. cruzi -infection prevalence (P synanthropic tendencies. The high prevalence of T. cruzi infection in native triatomines, and the high frequency with which T. gerstaeckeri is

  20. The Relation between Adolescent Self Assessment of Health and Risk Behaviours: Could a Global Measure of Health Provide Indications of Health Risk Exposures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkansah-Amankra, Stephen; Walker, Ashley Dawn

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Self-rated health (SRH) has become a key organizing construct for assessing multiple dimensions of populations' physical and psychosocial health functioning. However, it is unclear how adolescents' subjective self assessment of health reflects health risk exposures, co-occurring health risks (problem behaviours) and other pre-existing…

  1. Longitudinal Associations of Exposure to Perfluoroalkylated Substances in Childhood and Adolescence and Indicators of Adiposity and Glucose Metabolism 6 and 12 Years Later

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domazet, Sidsel L; Grøntved, Anders; Timmermann, Clara Amalie Gade;

    2016-01-01

    fasting blood glucose, triglyceride, and insulin levels, β-cell function, and insulin resistance, have been collected at all study waves. Multiple linear regression was applied in order to model earlier exposure on later outcome while controlling for baseline outcome levels, sex, age, and socioeconomic...

  2. Biological indices of lead exposure in relation to heavy metal residues in sediment and Biota from Prickly Pear Creek and Lake Helena, Montana

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Biotic and sediment samples were collected from Lake Helena and Prickly Pear Creek upstream and downstream of the East Helena Smelter Superfund Site to assess...

  3. Protective Role of Carnitine against the Harmful Biological Effects of Paracetamol and Radiation Exposure in Male Albino Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L-carnitine, a natural component of mammalian tissue, is a necessary factor in the utilization of long-chain fatty acids to produce energy. Furthermore it has been shown to protect cells from per oxidative stress. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of L-carnitine on hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity induced by paracetamol, γ-radiation, and paracetamol + γ-radiation. Male albino rats were divided into 8 groups. 1-Control group: rats not subject to any treatment, 2-Carnitine group: rats received L-carnitine (0.5 ml/Kg body weight) via intraperitoneal injection during 21 days, 3-Paracetamol group: rats received paracetamol (50 mg/kg body) via intraperi-toneal injection during 21 days, 4- Carnitine + Paracetamol group: rats received L-carnitine in parallel to paracetamol treatment, 5- Radiation groups: rats were whole body gamma irradiated with 7 Gy, 6- Carnitine + Radiation group: rats received L-carnitine for 21 days before whole body gamma irradiation with 7Gy, 7- Paracetamol + Radiation group: rats received paracetamol during 21 days before whole body gamma irradiation, 8- Carnitine + Paracetamol + Radiation group: rats received L-carnitine parallel to paracetamol during 21 days before whole body gamma irradiation.The results demonstrated that rats receiving paracetamol, as well as whole body gamma irradiated rats and rats receiving paracetamol and irradiated showed a significant increase of alanine amino transferase (ALT), aspartate amino transferase (AST), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities, and a significant decrease of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) activity indicating liver injury. A significant increase of urea, creatinine and uric acid levels was recorded also indicating kidney damage. Alteration in liver and kidney functions was accompanied by a significant increase in the content of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) associated with a significant decrease in glutathione (GSH) content and superoxide

  4. Unacceptable "occupational" exposure to toxic agents among children in Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harari, R; Forastiere, F; Axelson, O

    1997-09-01

    To document the problem of child labor as a health issue, we report here three case-studies in Ecuador: exposure to mercury among gold washers, exposure to organophosphates and carbamates in the fruit-growing industry, and exposure to solvents among shoe cleaners. We measured the relevant biological indicators of exposure (mercury in urine, urinary levels of phenols, and acetylcholine esterase in erythrocytes) among selected samples of 10 children for each working place. In all the case studies, the values of the biological indicators showed elevated exposure to well-known toxicants, which are now rare in developed countries, even among adult workers. The findings meld with a previously reported case study of intoxication from inorganic lead among children employed in the manufacture of roof tiles in Ecuador. This study highlights the need to properly evaluate and control the potential health effects due to exposure to toxic substances among children employed in different occupations in several parts of the world. PMID:9219645

  5. Daily rhythms of core temperature and locomotor activity indicate different adaptive strategies to cold exposure in adult and aged mouse lemurs acclimated to a summer-like photoperiod.

    OpenAIRE

    Terrien, Jeremy; Zizzari, Philippe; Epelbaum, Jacques; Perret, Martine; Aujard, Fabienne

    2009-01-01

    Daily variations in core temperature (Tc) within the normothermic range imply thermoregulatory processes that are essential for optimal function and survival. Higher susceptibility towards cold exposure in older animals suggests that these processes are disturbed with age. In the mouse lemur, a long-day breeder, we tested whether aging affected circadian rhythmicity of Tc, locomotor activity (LA), and energy balance under long-day conditions when exposed to cold. Adult (N = 7) and aged (N = 5...

  6. Biological indication of production condition influence on the staff of state specialized enterprise for radioactive waste management and desactivation 'Complex' in Chernobyl exclusion zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of comparative cytogenetical examination of two groups are presented. First group is staff from two work-shops (RAW management and RAW deactivation) of SJE 'Complex' in Chernobyl exclusion zone. Second group consists of the persons who had no mutagenic factors influence during their professional activity (conditional control). Classical chromosome analysis method was used. It was found chromosome damages frequency in staff is significantly higher than spontaneous level in conditional control group. Professional experience duration and external exposure integral doses of both workshops staff do not differ. Staff of RAW deactivation workshop, who is additionally influenced by chemical and physical factors, has significantly higher chromosome aberration frequency, particularly due to specific cytogenetical markers of exposure. Correlation between external exposure integral doses and total chromosome aberration frequency, chromosome type aberration frequency, stabile interchromosomal exchanges frequency was found

  7. Biologic markers in risk assessment for environmental carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perera, F.; Mayer, J.; Santella, R.M.; Brenner, D.; Jeffrey, A.; Latriano, L.; Smith, S.; Warburton, D.; Young, T.L.; Tsai, W.Y.; Brandt-Rauf, P. (Columbia Univ. School of Public Health, New York, NY (United States)); Hemminki, K. (Finnish School of Occupational Health, Helsinki (Finland))

    1991-01-01

    The potential of biologic markers to provide more timely and precise risk assessments for environmental carcinogens is viewed against the current state-of-the-art in biological monitoring/molecular epidemiology. Biologic markers such as carcinogen-DNA adducts and oncogene activation are currently considered valid qualitative indicators of potential risk, but for most chemical exposures research is needed to establish their validity as quantitative predictors of cancer risk. Biologic markers have, however, already provided valuable insights into the magnitude of interindividual variation in response to carcinogenic exposures, with major implications for risk assessment.

  8. Biologic markers in risk assessment for environmental carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential of biologic markers to provide more timely and precise risk assessments for environmental carcinogens is viewed against the current state-of-the-art in biological monitoring/molecular epidemiology. Biologic markers such as carcinogen-DNA adducts and oncogene activation are currently considered valid qualitative indicators of potential risk, but for most chemical exposures research is needed to establish their validity as quantitative predictors of cancer risk. Biologic markers have, however, already provided valuable insights into the magnitude of interindividual variation in response to carcinogenic exposures, with major implications for risk assessment

  9. Posttraumatic recovery to distress symptoms ratio: a mediator of the links between gender, exposure to fire, economic condition, and three indices of resilience to fire disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshel, Yohanan; Majdoob, Hadeal; Goroshi, Marina

    2014-11-01

    This study investigated the direct and indirect effects of demographic predictors on level of resilience following a potentially traumatic event. We hypothesized that the direct effects of three variables (exposure to fire hazards, gender, and economic condition) on resilience following a fire disaster would be mediated by the proportion of posttraumatic recovery to post-fire distress symptoms. The sample consisted of 234 Israeli Druze youth whose hometown was endangered and damaged by the Mount Carmel fire disaster in December 2010. Results partially supported the research hypotheses. PMID:24825510

  10. Effects of different inorganic arsenic species in Cyprinus carpio (Cyprinidae) tissues after short-time exposure: Bioaccumulation, biotransformation and biological responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ventura-Lima, Juliane [Instituto de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande - FURG, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil); Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Fisiologicas - Fisiologia Animal Comparada (FURG), Rio Grande, RS (Brazil); Fattorini, Daniele; Regoli, Francesco [Istituto di Biologia e Genetica, Universita Politecnica delle Marche, 60100, Ancona (Italy); Monserrat, Jose M., E-mail: josemmonserrat@pesquisador.cnpq.b [Instituto de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande - FURG, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil); Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Fisiologicas - Fisiologia Animal Comparada (FURG), Rio Grande, RS (Brazil)

    2009-12-15

    Differences in the toxicological and metabolic pathway of inorganic arsenic compounds are largely unknown for aquatic species. In the present study the effects of short-time and acute exposure to As{sup III} and As{sup V} were investigated in gills and liver of the common carp, Cyprinus carpio (Cyprinidae), measuring accumulation and chemical speciation of arsenic, and the activity of glutathione-S-transferase omega (GST OMEGA), the rate limiting enzyme in biotransformation of inorganic arsenic. Oxidative biomarkers included antioxidant defenses (total glutathione-S-transferases, glutathione reductase, glutathione, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase), total scavenging capacity toward peroxyl radicals, reactive oxygen species (ROS) measurement and lipid peroxidation products. A marked accumulation of arsenic was observed only in gills of carps exposed to 1000 ppb As{sup V}. Also in gills, antioxidant responses were mostly modulated through a significant induction of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity which probably contributed to reduce ROS formation; however this increase was not sufficient to prevent lipid peroxidation. No changes in metal content were measured in liver of exposed carps, characterized by lower activity of GST OMEGA compared to gills. On the other hand, glutathione metabolism was more sensitive in liver tissue, where a significant inhibition of glutathione reductase was concomitant with increased levels of glutathione and higher total antioxidant capacity toward peroxyl radicals, thus preventing lipid peroxidation and ROS production. The overall results of this study indicated that exposure of C. carpio to As{sup III} and As{sup V} can induce different responses in gills and liver of this aquatic organism. - Common carp (Cyprinus carpio) presented marked differences between gills and liver after arsenic exposure in terms of antioxidant responses and also in biotransformation.

  11. Effects of different inorganic arsenic species in Cyprinus carpio (Cyprinidae) tissues after short-time exposure: Bioaccumulation, biotransformation and biological responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Differences in the toxicological and metabolic pathway of inorganic arsenic compounds are largely unknown for aquatic species. In the present study the effects of short-time and acute exposure to AsIII and AsV were investigated in gills and liver of the common carp, Cyprinus carpio (Cyprinidae), measuring accumulation and chemical speciation of arsenic, and the activity of glutathione-S-transferase omega (GST Ω), the rate limiting enzyme in biotransformation of inorganic arsenic. Oxidative biomarkers included antioxidant defenses (total glutathione-S-transferases, glutathione reductase, glutathione, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase), total scavenging capacity toward peroxyl radicals, reactive oxygen species (ROS) measurement and lipid peroxidation products. A marked accumulation of arsenic was observed only in gills of carps exposed to 1000 ppb AsV. Also in gills, antioxidant responses were mostly modulated through a significant induction of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity which probably contributed to reduce ROS formation; however this increase was not sufficient to prevent lipid peroxidation. No changes in metal content were measured in liver of exposed carps, characterized by lower activity of GST Ω compared to gills. On the other hand, glutathione metabolism was more sensitive in liver tissue, where a significant inhibition of glutathione reductase was concomitant with increased levels of glutathione and higher total antioxidant capacity toward peroxyl radicals, thus preventing lipid peroxidation and ROS production. The overall results of this study indicated that exposure of C. carpio to AsIII and AsV can induce different responses in gills and liver of this aquatic organism. - Common carp (Cyprinus carpio) presented marked differences between gills and liver after arsenic exposure in terms of antioxidant responses and also in biotransformation.

  12. γ-H2AX foci analysis in human lymphocytes: a biological tool for assessment of early triage during mass exposure of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emergence of nuclear terrorism and increased use of nuclear technology for industry, energy production, and defence purpose has also increased the risk of mass exposure to radiation. During these scenarios of mass exposure to radiation, an efficient system which would measure the dose absorbed by an individual is required for early triage management. The present study aims to establish γ-H2AX as a biomarker for management of early triage. Radiation induced DNA DSB studied in lymphocytes isolated from 10 healthy individuals and challenged with 2 Gy of X-rays in vitro showed a gradual decrease in number of foci signals. As the persistence of foci signals is important for biodosimetry, phosphatase inhibitors like Calyculin A, Fostriecin and Okadiac Acid were used. Calyculin A was found to be the better inhibitor showing a 2 fold increase in retention of foci signals at 6 hours. The dose response curve was performed in lymphocytes isolated from healthy individuals by fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry. Although both the methods indicated a linear increase in foci signals, microscopic analysis was found to be more sensitive. Influence of age and gender on dose response curve was studied and no significant difference was found. The effect of confounding factors like genetic factors and smoking habits on the dose response curve is being investigated. (author)

  13. Lead exposure and biological effects in pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca) before and after the closure of a lead mine in northern Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berglund, A.M.M., E-mail: asa.berglund@emg.umu.s [Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umea University, SE-901 87 Umea (Sweden); Ingvarsson, P.K. [Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umea University, SE-901 87 Umea (Sweden); Danielsson, H. [IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute Ltd., P.O. Box 5302, SE-400 14 Gothenburg (Sweden); Nyholm, N.E.I. [Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umea University, SE-901 87 Umea (Sweden)

    2010-05-15

    Mining activities affect the surrounding environment by increasing exposure to metals. In this study, metal accumulation and its effects on reproduction and health of pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca) nestlings were monitored before and up to five years after a lead mine and enrichment plant closed down. The lead concentration in moss, nestling blood, liver and feces all indicated decreased lead exposure by at least 31% after closure, although only blood lead decreased significantly. Although the birds responded fairly well to the changed atmospheric deposition (based on moss samples), concentrations were still higher compared with birds in a reference area, and breeding was affected at the mine (smaller clutches and higher mortality). Surviving nestlings suffered from lower hemoglobin levels, mean cell hemoglobin concentrations and inhibited delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activity. Lead poisoning contributed to poor health and adverse reproductive effects, but other factors (e.g. increased parasitic load) probably also affected the birds. - Increased mortality and lower blood values in pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca) nestlings near a closed lead mine.

  14. The radioinduced membranes injuries as biological dose indicators: mechanisms of studies and practical applications; Les dommages membranaires radio-induits comme bio-indicateurs de dose: etudes des mecanismes et applications pratiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincent-Genod, Lucie

    2001-10-15

    After an accidental overexposure, the assessment of the received dose in biological dosimetry is performed by a method based on the effects of irradiation on the DNA molecule. But this technique shows some limitations; therefore we tried to find new bio-sensors of radiation exposure. We have pointed out that membrane is a critical target of ionising radiation after an in vitro and in vivo overexposure. In vitro, these modifications were involved in the radio-induced apoptotic pathway. The measure of membrane fluidity allowed us to obtain an overall view of cellular membrane. Moreover, in vivo, by changing the lipid nutritional status of animals, our results displayed the important role played by membrane lipid composition in radio-induced membrane alterations. Besides, membrane effects were adjusted by the extracellular physiological control, and in particular by the damages on membrane fatty acid pattern. Finally, we have tested the use of membrane fluidity index as a bio-sensor of radiation exposure on in vivo models and blood samples from medical total body irradiated patients. The results achieved on animal models suggested that the membrane fluidity index was a bio-sensor of radiation exposure. Nevertheless, the observations realised on patients highlight that the effect of the first dose fraction of the radiotherapy treatment had some difficulties to be noticed. Indeed, the combined treatment: chemotherapy and radiotherapy disturbed the membrane fluidity index measures. To conclude, whereas this parameter was not a bio-sensor of irradiation exposure usable in biological dosimetry, it may allow us to assess the radio-induced damages and their cellular but also tissue impacts. (author)

  15. The study of the mutagenetical effects of low dose level exposure to ionizing radiation using a bio indicator system close to deposits of radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos Leal, T.C. dos; Kelecom, A. [Pos-graduacao em Ciencia Ambiental (PGCA)-UFF-Niteroi (Brazil); Crispim, V.R.; Silva, A.X. da [Programa de Engenharia Nuclear/COPPE/UFRJ-Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Frota, M. [Laboratorio de Radiobiologia e Radiometria (LARARA)-Dept. Biologia Geral UFF-Niteroi (Brazil)].e-mail: teresa@tcleal.eng.br

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the biological mutational effects caused by low doses of ionizing radiation in biological samples placed close to and around deposits of radioactive waste, as a way of monitoring the environment close to these deposits. In order to do this the Tradescantia pallida, was chosen, and through micronuclei tests one could verify the sensitivity of the dose/ Response to bio-monitoring. The plants were exposed for a period of 24 hours in previously chosen sites around Brazil, within the proximity of deposits of nuclear waste. In each location, three points were chosen for bio-monitoring. The results obtained at these locations shows a small increment in the frequency of micronuclei per cell analyzed by the biosensor. From this data, a scale of mutagenesis affects from low dosage radiation was built up. The Tradescantia pallida is a good alternative in environmental bio-monitoring for tropical climates, as it is an excellent alternative tool in the studies of the effects of ionizing radiation on the environment. (Author)

  16. The study of the mutagenetical effects of low dose level exposure to ionizing radiation using a bio indicator system close to deposits of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the biological mutational effects caused by low doses of ionizing radiation in biological samples placed close to and around deposits of radioactive waste, as a way of monitoring the environment close to these deposits. In order to do this the Tradescantia pallida, was chosen, and through micronuclei tests one could verify the sensitivity of the dose/ Response to bio-monitoring. The plants were exposed for a period of 24 hours in previously chosen sites around Brazil, within the proximity of deposits of nuclear waste. In each location, three points were chosen for bio-monitoring. The results obtained at these locations shows a small increment in the frequency of micronuclei per cell analyzed by the biosensor. From this data, a scale of mutagenesis affects from low dosage radiation was built up. The Tradescantia pallida is a good alternative in environmental bio-monitoring for tropical climates, as it is an excellent alternative tool in the studies of the effects of ionizing radiation on the environment. (Author)

  17. Estimation of entrance dose on chest radiographs according to the exposure index on Computerized Radiology System: preliminary results; Estimativa de dose de entrada a partir do indice de exposicao em sistema CR: resultados preliminares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donomai, Luana Kaoru; Jornada, Tiago da Silva; Daros, Kellen Adriana Curci, E-mail: luana.donomai@gmail.com, E-mail: tiagosjornada@gmail.com, E-mail: daros.kellen@unifesp.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Digital radiology has improved image quality in radiographs in comparison to screen/film systems though the visual control of the quantity of radiation involved on these exams became more demanding due to the low perception of over and underexposed images. Therefore, this study aims to analyze the exposure index (EI) from chest examinations and relate them to the entrance skin dose. Indices from 29 patients and kerma entrance dose were correlated. A correlation coefficient equal to 0,6881 was calculated. EI and entrance dose are correlated positive and moderately, indicating the relevance to deepen the subject. (author)

  18. Indicators in hydrogeology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracer methods and their use in hydrogeoloical and hydrological studies are considered. Characteristics of indicators including solid particles, heat, explosion indicators, biological indicators electrolytes, heavy metals, organic matters, stable and radioactive isotopes, noble gases, freons, organic dyes, fluorescents, illuminants, are presented. Attention is paid to injection and registration of indicators. 48 refs.; 74 figs.; 22 tabs

  19. Evaluation of hepatobiliary scintigraphy as an indicator of hepatic function in domestic pigeons (Columba livia) before and after exposure to ethylene glycol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, Tarah L; Daniel, Gregory B; Rotstein, David S; Avenell, James S; Zagaya, Nancy; Jones, Michael P

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the use of quantitative hepatobiliary scintigraphy to assess liver function in 14 white Carneaux pigeons (Columba livia). Liver scintigraphy using 99mTc-mebrofenin was performed and liver function was quantified using deconvolutional analysis and the area under the normalized heart time-activity curve as previously described in the dog and horse. Liver biopsies were performed in all birds before and after toxin-induced liver damage with ethylene glycol. Before the induction of liver disease, all biopsy specimens showed varying degrees of granulomatous inflammation. After ethylene glycol administration, hepatic lesions were scored and compared with scintigraphic findings. Scintigraphic results showed a significant decrease (P = 0.04) in hepatic function using the area under the normalized time-activity curve. There was good correlation between the overall histologic score posttoxin exposure and scintigraphic measures of liver function (P hepatic extraction as a measure of hepatic parenchymal cell function. The results also showed that worsening hepatic cellular function correlated with increased histologic damage to the liver. The use of hepatobiliary scintigraphy using 99mTc-mebrofenin to determine liver function in pigeons has not been previously reported. Additional studies are warranted to evaluate the application of this technique in clinical patients and to establish the sensitivity of this technique. PMID:17385376

  20. Comparative analysis of functional spirometry indicators of the students of the Faculty of Biology and Biotechnology of the Al-Farabi Kazakh National University

    OpenAIRE

    GALYMQYZY G.; BAKTYBAEVA L.

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory indicators of the lung with load and without load at the smokers was low than norm. The functional condition of the respiratory system at the nonsmoking students was performance. But in the respiratory system of smoking students did not indicate bronchial payback.

  1. In situ responses of a biological indicator Mytilus edulis L. to the variations of radionuclide discharges from a fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The introduction of 10 lots of 100kg of mussels in La Hague waters made it possible to investigate the in situ uptake kinetics of 106Ru + 106Rh released by the fuel reprocessing plant of La Hague during 1 year. Equilibrium was reached within 1 - 3 months, whatever the time of introduction and the amounts released. The removal of the mussels labelled at La Hague to a remote aera made it possible to calculate the biological half-life of 106Ru + 106Rh, viz from 16 to 18 days

  2. Particulate Matter from Both Heavy Fuel Oil and Diesel Fuel Shipping Emissions Show Strong Biological Effects on Human Lung Cells at Realistic and Comparable In Vitro Exposure Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilger, Marco; Paur, Hanns-Rudolf; Schlager, Christoph; Mülhopt, Sonja; Diabaté, Silvia; Weiss, Carsten; Stengel, Benjamin; Rabe, Rom; Harndorf, Horst; Torvela, Tiina; Jokiniemi, Jorma K.; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta; Schmidt-Weber, Carsten; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia; BéruBé, Kelly A.; Wlodarczyk, Anna J.; Prytherch, Zoë; Michalke, Bernhard; Krebs, Tobias; Prévôt, André S. H.; Kelbg, Michael; Tiggesbäumker, Josef; Karg, Erwin; Jakobi, Gert; Scholtes, Sorana; Schnelle-Kreis, Jürgen; Lintelmann, Jutta; Matuschek, Georg; Sklorz, Martin; Klingbeil, Sophie; Orasche, Jürgen; Richthammer, Patrick; Müller, Laarnie; Elsasser, Michael; Reda, Ahmed; Gröger, Thomas; Weggler, Benedikt; Schwemer, Theo; Czech, Hendryk; Rüger, Christopher P.; Abbaszade, Gülcin; Radischat, Christian; Hiller, Karsten; Buters, Jeroen T. M.; Dittmar, Gunnar; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Background Ship engine emissions are important with regard to lung and cardiovascular diseases especially in coastal regions worldwide. Known cellular responses to combustion particles include oxidative stress and inflammatory signalling. Objectives To provide a molecular link between the chemical and physical characteristics of ship emission particles and the cellular responses they elicit and to identify potentially harmful fractions in shipping emission aerosols. Methods Through an air-liquid interface exposure system, we exposed human lung cells under realistic in vitro conditions to exhaust fumes from a ship engine running on either common heavy fuel oil (HFO) or cleaner-burning diesel fuel (DF). Advanced chemical analyses of the exhaust aerosols were combined with transcriptional, proteomic and metabolomic profiling including isotope labelling methods to characterise the lung cell responses. Results The HFO emissions contained high concentrations of toxic compounds such as metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, and were higher in particle mass. These compounds were lower in DF emissions, which in turn had higher concentrations of elemental carbon (“soot”). Common cellular reactions included cellular stress responses and endocytosis. Reactions to HFO emissions were dominated by oxidative stress and inflammatory responses, whereas DF emissions induced generally a broader biological response than HFO emissions and affected essential cellular pathways such as energy metabolism, protein synthesis, and chromatin modification. Conclusions Despite a lower content of known toxic compounds, combustion particles from the clean shipping fuel DF influenced several essential pathways of lung cell metabolism more strongly than particles from the unrefined fuel HFO. This might be attributable to a higher soot content in DF. Thus the role of diesel soot, which is a known carcinogen in acute air pollution-induced health effects should be further investigated. For the

  3. Particulate matter from both heavy fuel oil and diesel fuel shipping emissions show strong biological effects on human lung cells at realistic and comparable in vitro exposure conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Oeder

    Full Text Available Ship engine emissions are important with regard to lung and cardiovascular diseases especially in coastal regions worldwide. Known cellular responses to combustion particles include oxidative stress and inflammatory signalling.To provide a molecular link between the chemical and physical characteristics of ship emission particles and the cellular responses they elicit and to identify potentially harmful fractions in shipping emission aerosols.Through an air-liquid interface exposure system, we exposed human lung cells under realistic in vitro conditions to exhaust fumes from a ship engine running on either common heavy fuel oil (HFO or cleaner-burning diesel fuel (DF. Advanced chemical analyses of the exhaust aerosols were combined with transcriptional, proteomic and metabolomic profiling including isotope labelling methods to characterise the lung cell responses.The HFO emissions contained high concentrations of toxic compounds such as metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, and were higher in particle mass. These compounds were lower in DF emissions, which in turn had higher concentrations of elemental carbon ("soot". Common cellular reactions included cellular stress responses and endocytosis. Reactions to HFO emissions were dominated by oxidative stress and inflammatory responses, whereas DF emissions induced generally a broader biological response than HFO emissions and affected essential cellular pathways such as energy metabolism, protein synthesis, and chromatin modification.Despite a lower content of known toxic compounds, combustion particles from the clean shipping fuel DF influenced several essential pathways of lung cell metabolism more strongly than particles from the unrefined fuel HFO. This might be attributable to a higher soot content in DF. Thus the role of diesel soot, which is a known carcinogen in acute air pollution-induced health effects should be further investigated. For the use of HFO and DF we recommend a

  4. Biology Notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents procedures, exercises, demonstrations, and information on a variety of biology topics including labeling systems, biological indicators of stream pollution, growth of lichens, reproductive capacity of bulbous buttercups, a straw balance to measure transpiration, interaction of fungi, osmosis, and nitrogen fixation and crop production. (DC)

  5. Cytochrome P4501A biomarker indication of oil exposure in harlequin ducks up to 20 years after the Exxon Valdez oil spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esler, Daniel; Trust, Kimberly A.; Ballachey, Brenda E.; Iverson, Samuel A.; Lewis, Tyler L.; Rizzolo, Daniel; Mulcahy, Daniel M.; Miles, A. Keith; Woodin, Bruce R.; Stegeman, John J.; Henderson, John D.; Wilson, Barry W.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrocarbon-inducible cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) expression was measured, as ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity, in livers of wintering harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) captured in areas of Prince William Sound, Alaska, USA, oiled by the 1989 Exxon Valdez spill and in birds from nearby unoiled areas, during 2005 to 2009 (up to 20 years following the spill). The present work repeated studies conducted in 1998 that demonstrated that in harlequin ducks using areas that received Exxon Valdez oil, EROD activity was elevated nearly a decade after the spill. The present findings strongly supported the conclusion that average levels of hepatic EROD activity were higher in ducks from oiled areas than those from unoiled areas during 2005 to 2009. This result was consistent across four sampling periods; furthermore, results generated from two independent laboratories using paired liver samples from one of the sampling periods were similar. The EROD activity did not vary in relation to age, sex, or body mass of individuals, nor did it vary strongly by season in birds collected early and late in the winter of 2006 to 2007, indicating that these factors did not confound inferences about observed differences between oiled and unoiled areas. We interpret these results to indicate that harlequin ducks continued to be exposed to residual Exxon Valdez oil up to 20 years after the original spill. This adds to a growing body of literature suggesting that oil spills have the potential to affect wildlife for much longer time frames than previously assumed.

  6. Potential biological indicators of multi-organ damage: Application to radiation accident victims; Bio-indicateurs potentiels d'atteinte multi-organe: application au cas des victimes d'irradiation accidentelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertho, J.M.; Souidi, M.; Gourmelon, P. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Dir. de la Radioprotection de l' Homme 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2009-09-15

    Accidental irradiations induce a complex pathological situation, difficult to assess and to treat. However, recent results describing new biological indicators of radiation-induced damages such as Flt3-ligand, citrulline and oxy-sterol concentration in the plasma, together with results obtained in large animal models of high dose irradiation, allowed a better understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms induced by uncontrolled irradiations. This conducted to leave the classical paradigm of the acute radiation syndrome, described as the association of three individual syndromes, the hematopoietic syndrome, the gastro-intestinal syndrome and the cerebrovascular syndrome, in favour of a multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, with the implication of other organs and systems. Follow-up of victims from two recent radiation accidents brings a confirmation of the usefulness of the newly described biological indicators, and also a partial confirmation of this new concept of a multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. (authors)

  7. Concentration levels of rare-earth elements and thorium on plants from the Morro de Ferro environment as an indicator for the biological availability of transuranium elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plants and soils from a natural thorium and rare-earth element occurrence (Morro do Ferro, Brazil) were analyzed by alpha spectrometry (Th) and ICP-AES (REE), after pre-concentration of the elements by solvent extraction, co-precipitation and ion exchange procedures. Leaching experiments with humic acid solutions and different soils were performed to estimate the fraction of elements biologically available. High concentrations of the light rare-earth elements (LREE) and of Th, reaching some hundreds of μg/g-ash, were measured in plant leaves from the areas of the highest concentration of these elements in soil and in near-surface waters. Chondrite normalized REE plots of plant leaves and corresponding soils are very similar, suggesting that there is no significant fractionation between the REE during uptake from the soil solution and incorporation into the leaves. However, Ce-depletion was observed for some plant species, increasing for Solanum ciliatum in the sequence: leaves-3 to 10-2. Leaching experiments confirmed the importance of humic acid complexation for the bio-uptake of Th and REE and further showed that only a very small fraction of these elements in soil is leachable. The implications of these results on the calculated CR's will be discussed. (author) 26 refs.; 5 figs.; 5 tabs

  8. Health risk assessment of migrant workers' exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls in air and dust in an e-waste recycling area in China: Indication for a new wealth gap in environmental rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yalin; Hu, Jinxing; Lin, Wei; Wang, Ning; Li, Cheng; Luo, Peng; Hashmi, Muhammad Zaffar; Wang, Wenbo; Su, Xiaomei; Chen, Chen; Liu, Yindong; Huang, Ronglang; Shen, Chaofeng

    2016-02-01

    Migrant workers who work and live in polluted environment are a special vulnerable group in the accelerating pace of urbanization and industrialization in China. In the electronic waste (e-waste) recycling area, for example, migrant workers' exposure to pollutants, such as PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls), is the result of an informal e-waste recycling process. A village in an electronic waste recycling area where migrant workers gather was surveyed. The migrant workers' daily routines were simulated according to the three-space transition: work place-on the road-home. Indoor air and dust in the migrant workers' houses and workplaces and the ambient air on the roads were sampled. The PCB levels of the air and dust in the places corresponding to the migrant workers are higher than those for local residents. The migrant workers have health risks from PCBs that are 3.8 times greater than those of local residents. This is not only caused by the exposure at work but also by their activity patterns and the environmental conditions of their dwellings. These results revealed the reason for the health risk difference between the migrant workers and local residents, and it also indicated that lifestyle and economic status are important factors that are often ignored compared to occupational exposure. PMID:26641519

  9. Decreased radioiodine uptake of FRTL-5 cells after 131I incubation in vitro: molecular biological investigations indicate a cell cycle-dependent pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In radioiodine therapy the ''stunning phenomenon'' is defined as a reduction of radioiodine uptake after diagnostic application of 131I. In the current study, we established an in vitro model based on the ''Fisher rat thyrocyte cell line no. 5'' (FRTL-5) to investigate the stunning. TSH-stimulated FRTL-5 cells were incubated with 131I. Time-dependent 131I uptake and the viability of FRTL-5 cells were evaluated at 4-144 h after radioiodine application. All data was corrected for number of viable cells, half life and 131I concentration. Sodium iodide symporter (NIS) and the housekeeping gene (β-actin, GAPDH) levels were quantified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Additionally, immunohistochemical staining (IHC) of NIS on the cell membrane was carried out. FRTL-5 monolayer cell cultures showed a specific maximum uptake of 131I 24-48 h after application. Significantly decreased 131I uptake values were observed after 72-144 h. The decrease in radioiodine uptake was correlated with decreasing mRNA levels of NIS and housekeeping genes. In parallel, unlike in controls, IHC staining of NIS on FRTL-5 cells declined significantly after 131I long-term incubation. It could be demonstrated that during 131I incubation of FRTL-5 cells, radioiodine uptake decreased significantly. Simultaneously decreasing levels of NIS mRNA and protein expression suggest a NIS-associated mechanism. Since mRNA levels of housekeeping genes decreased, too, the reduced NIS expression might be provoked by a cell cycle arrest. Our investigations recommend the FRTL-5 model as a valuable tool for further molecular biological investigations of the stunning phenomenon. (orig.)

  10. PRESENTED AT TRIANGLE CONSORTIUM OF REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY, CHAPEL HILL, NC: GST M1 GENOTYPE INFLUENCES SPERM DNA DAMAGE ASSOCIATED WITH EXPOSURE TO AIR POLLUTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to episodic air pollution in the Czech Republic has been associated with abnormal semen quality and sperm DNA damage (EHP 108:887;2000). A subsequentlongitudinal study evaluated semenfrom 36 men sampled up to 7 times over a period of two years to capture exposures durin...

  11. Monitoring anthropogenic sewage pollution on mangrove creeks in southern Mozambique: A test of Palaemon concinnus Dana, 1852 (Palaemonidae) as a biological indicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tropical coastal ecosystems, such as mangroves, have a great ecological and socioeconomic importance for adjacent systems and local populations, but intensive environmental impact monitoring is still lacking, mainly in East Africa. This study evaluated the potential anthropogenic disturbance on Palaemon concinnus population structure and fitness. Palaemon concinnus populations from one peri-urban (domestic sewage impacted) and two pristine mangrove creeks were studied by sampling nearly 100 shrimps per location every 15 days for 12 months. The shrimps at the peri-urban location were larger, experienced longer reproductive periods, presented higher proportion of ovigerous females and better embryo quality when compared with shrimps inhabiting pristine locations. Physiological indices (RNA/DNA ratio) were similar between shrimps at pristine and peri-urban mangroves. However, a higher level of parasitation by a Bopyridae isopod, Pseudione elongata indicated some degree of stress on the host at the peri-urban mangrove, with potential effects on the host population dynamics. -Research highlights: → Domestic sewage discharges at low concentrations increase fauna mangrove population parameters, due to the nutrient limitations. → Shrimps in the peri-urban mangrove location were larger, had longer reproductive periods, higher ovigerous females proportions and better embryo. → Physiological indice analysis (RNA/DNA ratio) between pristine and peri-urban mangroves. → Within the peri-urban mangrove, high levels of parasitation by Pseudionee longata caused stress and potential effects on the host population dynamics. → The effects of sewage on P. concinnus population increased the choice of possible bioindicators in East African coastal water. - The identification of the effects of the peri-urban conditions on P. concinnus increases the choice of possible bioindicators in East African coastal waters.

  12. Monitoring anthropogenic sewage pollution on mangrove creeks in southern Mozambique: A test of Palaemon concinnus Dana, 1852 (Palaemonidae) as a biological indicator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penha-Lopes, Gil, E-mail: gil.penha-lopes@fc.ul.p [Laboratorio Maritimo da Guia, Centro de Oceanografia, FCUL, Avenida Na Senhora do Cabo, No 939, 2750-374 Cascais (Portugal); Institute of Biology, University of Southern Denmark, DK-5230 Odense M (Denmark); Torres, Paulo, E-mail: biol.paulo@gmail.co [Laboratorio Maritimo da Guia, Centro de Oceanografia, FCUL, Avenida Na Senhora do Cabo, No 939, 2750-374 Cascais (Portugal); Cannicci, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.cannicci@unifi.i [Dipartimento di Biologia Evoluzionistica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, via Romana 17, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Narciso, Luis, E-mail: lfnarciso@fc.ul.p [Laboratorio Maritimo da Guia, Centro de Oceanografia, FCUL, Avenida Na Senhora do Cabo, No 939, 2750-374 Cascais (Portugal); Paula, Jose, E-mail: jppaula@fc.ul.p [Laboratorio Maritimo da Guia, Centro de Oceanografia, FCUL, Avenida Na Senhora do Cabo, No 939, 2750-374 Cascais (Portugal)

    2011-02-15

    Tropical coastal ecosystems, such as mangroves, have a great ecological and socioeconomic importance for adjacent systems and local populations, but intensive environmental impact monitoring is still lacking, mainly in East Africa. This study evaluated the potential anthropogenic disturbance on Palaemon concinnus population structure and fitness. Palaemon concinnus populations from one peri-urban (domestic sewage impacted) and two pristine mangrove creeks were studied by sampling nearly 100 shrimps per location every 15 days for 12 months. The shrimps at the peri-urban location were larger, experienced longer reproductive periods, presented higher proportion of ovigerous females and better embryo quality when compared with shrimps inhabiting pristine locations. Physiological indices (RNA/DNA ratio) were similar between shrimps at pristine and peri-urban mangroves. However, a higher level of parasitation by a Bopyridae isopod, Pseudione elongata indicated some degree of stress on the host at the peri-urban mangrove, with potential effects on the host population dynamics. -Research highlights: Domestic sewage discharges at low concentrations increase fauna mangrove population parameters, due to the nutrient limitations. Shrimps in the peri-urban mangrove location were larger, had longer reproductive periods, higher ovigerous females proportions and better embryo. Physiological indice analysis (RNA/DNA ratio) between pristine and peri-urban mangroves. Within the peri-urban mangrove, high levels of parasitation by Pseudionee longata caused stress and potential effects on the host population dynamics. The effects of sewage on P. concinnus population increased the choice of possible bioindicators in East African coastal water. - The identification of the effects of the peri-urban conditions on P. concinnus increases the choice of possible bioindicators in East African coastal waters.

  13. Small scattered fragments do not a dwarf make: biological and archaeological data indicate that prehistoric inhabitants of Palau were normal sized.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott M Fitzpatrick

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Current archaeological evidence from Palau in western Micronesia indicates that the archipelago was settled around 3000-3300 BP by normal sized populations; contrary to recent claims, they did not succumb to insular dwarfism. BACKGROUND: Previous and ongoing archaeological research of both human burial and occupation sites throughout the Palauan archipelago during the last 50 years has produced a robust data set to test hypotheses regarding initial colonization and subsequent adaptations over the past three millennia. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Close examination of human burials at the early (ca. 3000 BP and stratified site of Chelechol ra Orrak indicates that these were normal sized individuals. This is contrary to the recent claim of contemporaneous "small-bodied" individuals found at two cave sites by Berger et al. (2008. As we argue, their analyses are flawed on a number of different analytical levels. First, their sample size is too small and fragmentary to adequately address the variation inherent in modern humans within and outside of Palau. Second, the size and stature of all other prehistoric (both older and contemporaneous skeletal assemblages found in Palau fall within the normal parameters of modern human variation in the region, indicating this was not a case of insular dwarfism or a separate migratory group. Third, measurements taken on several skeletal elements by Berger et al. may appear to be from smaller-bodied individuals, but the sizes of these people compares well with samples from Chelechol ra Orrak. Last, archaeological, linguistic, and historical evidence demonstrates a great deal of cultural continuity in Palau through time as expected if the same population was inhabiting the archipelago. CONCLUSIONS: Prehistoric Palauan populations were normal sized and exhibit traits that fall within the normal variation for Homo sapiens-they do not support the claims by Berger et al. (2008 that there were smaller

  14. Bio-indicators for radiation dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In nuclear facilities, such as Chalk River Laboratories, dose to the atomic radiation workers (ARWs) is assessed routinely by using physical dosimeters and bioassay procedures in accordance with regulatory recommendations. However, these procedures may be insufficient in some circumstances, e.g., in cases where the reading of the physical dosimeters is questioned, in cases of radiation accidents where the person(s) in question was not wearing a dosimeter, or in the event of a radiation emergency when an exposure above the dose limits is possible. The desirability of being able to assess radiation dose on the basis of radio-biological effects has prompted the Dosimetric Research Branch to investigate the suitability of biological devices and techniques that could be used for this purpose. Current biological dosimetry concepts suggest that there does not appear to be any bio-indicator that could reliably measure the very low doses that are routinely measured by the physical devices presently in use. Nonetheless, bio-indicators may be useful in providing valuable supplementary information in cases of unusual radiation exposures, such as when the estimated body doses are doubtful because of lack of proper physical measurements, or in cases where available results need to be confirmed for medical treatment plannings. This report evaluates the present state of biological dosimetry and, in particular, assesses the efficiency and limits of individual indicators. This has led to the recommendation of a few promising research areas that may result in the development of appropriate biological dosimeters for operational and emergency needs at Chalk River

  15. Effect of ionizing radiations of lymphocyte membranes. Part of a coordinated programme on cell membrane probes as biological indicators in radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the effects of low doses of irradiation on membrane receptors of lymphoid cells indicated that doses as low as 10 rads induced detectable changes in the antigen receptors of cell surfaces. Lymphoid cells from mice or rabbit lymph nodes, or circulating lymphocytes from human volunteers were irradiated and studied for their ability to bind antisera against the IgG membrane receptors. The isolated lymphoid cells were x-irradiated, and tested versus non-irradiated controls. They were incubated at 370C for different times, and IgG-positive cells stained by the direct or indirect immunofluorescence technique. The percentage of IgG-positive cells was reduced by low-dose irradiation, and proved dose -and temperature-dependent. The disappearance phenomenon depends on the microtubular structure, metabolic energy, and levels of C-AMP. Only the reappearance phase is temperature-dependent and not affected by the drugs tested. The phenomenon is dose-rate dependent, showing greater sensitivity at lower dose/rates. Experiments using anti-Fc and anti-Fab portions of the surface molecule, appear to confirm a partial internatlization of the surface molecule as cause (at least in rabbit cells). Similar experiments with human cells did not show a differential effect. Human T-cells and FC receptors of Mast cells did, however, indicate that these surface molecules are also modified by irradiation

  16. Air quality indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report proposes and describes in detail several air quality indicators that may be used to describe population exposure. The suggested indicators account for temporal and spatial patterns of pollution and movements of individuals between different micro-environments. The Air Quality Indicator /AQI) should represent both the spatial and temporal aspects of pollution exposure that may have important effects on health. Two indicators are needed, the Population Air Quality Indicator and the Individual Air Quality Indicator. Mean concentrations, 98th percentile and maximum values are the traditional indicators for estimating exposure. the temporal variability of PM-10 and NO2, however, is here described by means of: 1) The rate of change of pollution as the difference between two consecutive hourly values and of 2) episodes, described in terms of number, duration and winter episode period, maximum concentration in the episode and integrated episode exposure (episode AOT50/100). The spatial variation of AQIs can be described in several ways, e.g.: 1) Concentrations in neighbouring grid squares can be compared as an indication of spatial variation and 2) point estimates can be compared to grid values for a description of variation within a grid. Both methods are presented here. A test of the representativity of static point estimates for pollution exposure is to compare them to an estimate of air pollution exposure accounting for movements between different locations, obtained using diaries. The ultimate aim of AQIs is to describe the population exposure to ambient pollution. This is done by estimating the number of people exposed using different characteristics of AQIs. The data used to describe these indicators originates from dispersion modelling of short-term air pollution concentrations in Oslo. Two series of data are used. One represents hour-for hour concentrations in the 1 km2 grid system covering the city of Oslo, winter 1994/95, calculated by the grid

  17. Monitoring anthropogenic sewage pollution on mangrove creeks in southern Mozambique: A test of Palaemon concinnus Dana, 1852 (Palaemonidae) as a biological indicator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penha-Lopes, G.; Torres, P.; Cannicci, S.; Narciso, L.; Paula, J.

    2011-01-01

    Tropical coastal ecosystems, such as mangroves, have a great ecological and socioeconomic importance for adjacent systems and local populations, but intensive environmental impact monitoring is still lacking, mainly in East Africa. This study evaluated the potential anthropogenic disturbance on...... Palaemon concinnus population structure and fitness. Palaemon concinnus populations from one pen-urban (domestic sewage impacted) and two pristine mangrove creeks were studied by sampling nearly 100 shrimps per location every 15 days for 12 months. The shrimps at the pen-urban location were larger......, experienced longer reproductive periods, presented higher proportion of ovigerous females and better embryo quality when compared with shrimps inhabiting pristine locations. Physiological indices (RNA/DNA ratio) were similar between shrimps at pristine and pen-urban mangroves. However, a higher level of...

  18. Helminth communities of owls (strigiformes indicate strong biological and ecological differences from birds of prey (accipitriformes and falconiformes in southern Italy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Santoro

    Full Text Available We compared the helminth communities of 5 owl species from Calabria (Italy and evaluated the effect of phylogenetic and ecological factors on community structure. Two host taxonomic scales were considered, i.e., owl species, and owls vs. birds of prey. The latter scale was dealt with by comparing the data here obtained with that of birds of prey from the same locality and with those published previously on owls and birds of prey from Galicia (Spain. A total of 19 helminth taxa were found in owls from Calabria. Statistical comparison showed only marginal differences between scops owls (Otus scops and little owls (Athene noctua and tawny owls (Strix aluco. It would indicate that all owl species are exposed to a common pool of 'owl generalist' helminth taxa, with quantitative differences being determined by differences in diet within a range of prey relatively narrow. In contrast, birds of prey from the same region exhibited strong differences because they feed on different and wider spectra of prey. In Calabria, owls can be separated as a whole from birds of prey with regard to the structure of their helminth communities while in Galicia helminths of owls represent a subset of those of birds of prey. This difference is related to the occurrence in Calabria, but not Galicia, of a pool of 'owl specialist' species. The wide geographical occurrence of these taxa suggest that local conditions may determine fundamental differences in the composition of local communities. Finally, in both Calabria and Galicia, helminth communities from owls were species-poor compared to those from sympatric birds of prey. However, birds of prey appear to share a greater pool of specific helmith taxa derived from cospeciation processes, and a greater potential exchange of parasites between them than with owls because of phylogenetic closeness.

  19. Biologic Monitoring of Exposure to Environmental Chemicals throughout the Life Stages: Requirements and Issues for Consideration for the National Children’s Study

    OpenAIRE

    Barr, Dana B.; Wang, Richard Y.; Needham, Larry L.

    2005-01-01

    Biomonitoring of exposure is a useful tool for assessing environmental exposures. The matrices available for analyses include blood, urine, breast milk, adipose tissue, and saliva, among others. The sampling can be staged to represent the particular time period of concern: preconceptionally from both parents, from a pregnant woman during each of the three trimesters, during and immediately after childbirth, from the mother postnatally, and from the child as it develops to 21 years of age. The...

  20. Short–Term Exposure to Electromagnetic Fields Generated by Mobile Phone Jammers Decreases the Fasting Blood Sugar in Adult Male Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Shekoohi Shooli, F.; Mortazavi, S. A. R.; Jarideh, S.; Nematollahii, S.; Yousefi, F.; Haghani, M.; Mortazavi, S. M. J.; Shojaei-fard, M. B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Substantial evidence indicates that exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMF) above certain levels can affect human health through triggering some biological responses. According to WHO, short-term exposure to EMF at the levels present in the home/environment do not cause any apparent detrimental effects in healthy individuals. However, now, there is a debate on whether long-term exposure to low level EMF can evoke detrimental biological responses. Although based on the Communicatio...

  1. Organizational influence on the occurrence of work accidents involving exposure to biological material La influencia de la organización en la ocurrencia de accidentes de trabajo con exposición a material biológico Influência organizacional na ocorrência de acidentes de trabalho com exposição a material biológico

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Helena Palucci Marziale; Fernanda Ludmilla Rossi Rocha; Maria Lúcia do Carmo Cruz Robazzi; Camila Maria Cenzi; Heloisa Ehmke Cardoso dos Santos; Marli Elisa Mendes Trovó

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: to analyze work accidents involving exposure to biological materials which took place among personnel working in nursing and to evaluate the influence of the organizational culture on the occurrence of these accidents. METHOD: a retrospective, analytical study, carried out in two stages in a hospital that was part of the Network for the Prevention of Work Accidents. The first stage involved the analysis of the characteristics of the work accidents involving exposure to biological ...

  2. Biological monitoring and the influence of genetic polymorphism of As3MT and GSTs on distribution of urinary arsenic species in occupational exposure workers

    OpenAIRE

    Janasik, Beata; Reszka, Edyta; Stanislawska, Magdalena; Wieczorek, Edyta; Fendler, Wojciech; Wasowicz, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine the differences in urinary arsenic metabolism patterns in men affected by occupational exposure, we performed a study on 149 participants—workers of a copper mill and 52 healthy controls without occupational exposure. To elucidate the role of genetic factors in arsenic (As) metabolism, we studied the associations of six polymorphisms: As3MT Met287Thr (T>C) in exon 9; As3MT A>G in 5′UTR; As3MT C>G in intron 6; As3MT T>G in intron 1; GSTP1 Ile105Val and GSTO2 T>C. Methods Air...

  3. Biological effects of short-term, high-concentration exposure to methyl isocyanate. III. Influence on gas exchange in the guinea pig lung.

    OpenAIRE

    Fedde, M. R.; Dodd, D E; Troup, C M; Fowler, E. H.

    1987-01-01

    The influence of methyl isocyanate (MIC) inhalation on the gas exchange function of the lungs in guinea pigs was studied by measuring arterial blood gases, pH, and tracheal pressure during constant-volume, artificial ventilation with air or 100% O2 at 40 and 120 min after exposure. A 15 min exposure to MIC at concentrations of 240 to 628 ppm caused a marked reduction in PaO2 and pHa and an elevated tracheal pressure during artificial ventilation. The low PaO2 was only slightly elevated when t...

  4. Biological monitoring of radiation using indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KAERI and INP(Poland) have been carried out parallel study and joint experiments on the major topics according to MOU about their cooperative project. The experimental materials were T-4430 clones. Main results of the cooperative project were made on response of TSH mutation to low LET radiation, response of TSH mutation to neutrons, response of TSH to mixed irradiation with different radiations and synergism between radiation and environmental factors such as photo period and diurnal temperature difference. Both institutes have established wide variety of research techniques applicable to tradescantia study through the cooperation. These result of research can make the role of fundamental basis for the better relationship between Korea and Poland. (author). 46 refs., 11 tabs., 31 figs

  5. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, M.; Mason, W. B.; Whipple, G. H.; Howland, J. W.

    1952-04-07

    This report presents a review of present knowledge and concepts of the biological effects of ionizing radiations. Among the topics discussed are the physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems, morphological and physiological changes observed in biological systems subjected to ionizing radiations, physiological changes in the intact animal, latent changes following exposure of biological systems to ionizing radiations, factors influencing the biological response to ionizing radiation, relative effects of various ionizing radiations, and biological dosimetry.

  6. Biological monitoring of workers exposed to benzene in the coke oven industry.

    OpenAIRE

    Drummond, L; Luck, R; Afacan, A. S.; Wilson, H K

    1988-01-01

    Workers in the coke oven industry are potentially exposed to low concentrations of benzene. There is a need to establish a well validated biological monitoring procedure for low level benzene exposure. The use of breath and blood benzene and urinary phenol has been explored in conjunction with personal monitoring data. At exposures of about 1 ppm benzene, urinary phenol is of no value as an indicator of uptake/exposure. Benzene in blood was measured by head space gas chromatography but the co...

  7. Near-term and late biological effects of acute and low-dose-rate continuous gamma-ray exposure in dogs and monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and dogs (beagle) were given thirteen 100-rad gamma-ray doses at 28-day intervals. The comparative response (inury and recovery) of the hematopoietic system of the two species was observed at 7-day intervals during the exposure regime. At 84 days after the thirteenth gamma-ray dose, the 1300-rad conditioned and control dogs and monkeys were challenged continuously with gamma rays at 35 r/day until death to determine the amount of radiation-induced injry remaining in conditioned animals as a reduction in mean survival time. Dogs (50%) and monkeys (8%) died from injury incurred during conditioning exposures. Thus, the comparative response (in terms of lethality) of dogs and monkeys to dose protraction by acute dose fractionation was similar to what we would expect from a single acute dose. The mean survival times for nonconditioned dogs and monkeys during continuous exposure at 35 R/day were the same (approx. 1400 h). Thus, the hematopoietic response of the two species by this method of dose protraction was not significantly different. Mean survival times of conditioned dogs and monkeys during the continuous 35-R/day gamma-ray challenge exposure were greater (significant in dogs but not in monkeys) than for their control counterparts. Thus, long-term radiation-induced injury was not measurable by this method. Conditioning doses of more than 4 times the acute LD5030 in dogs and approximately 2 times that in monkeys served only to increase both mean survival time and variance in a gamma-ray stress environment with a dose rate of 35 Rat/day

  8. Waste indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Waste Indicator Project focuses on methods to evaluate the efficiency of waste management. The project proposes the use of three indicators for resource consumption, primary energy and landfill requirements, based on the life-cycle principles applied in the EDIP Project. Trial runs are made With the indicators on paper, glass packaging and aluminium, and two models are identified for mapping the Danish waste management, of which the least extensive focuses on real and potential savings. (au)

  9. Waste indicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dall, O.; Lassen, C.; Hansen, E. [Cowi A/S, Lyngby (Denmark)

    2003-07-01

    The Waste Indicator Project focuses on methods to evaluate the efficiency of waste management. The project proposes the use of three indicators for resource consumption, primary energy and landfill requirements, based on the life-cycle principles applied in the EDIP Project. Trial runs are made With the indicators on paper, glass packaging and aluminium, and two models are identified for mapping the Danish waste management, of which the least extensive focuses on real and potential savings. (au)

  10. Quality indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth-Andersen, Christian

    1991-01-01

    In recent literature it has been suggested that consumers need have no knowledge of product quality as a number of quality indicators (or signals) may be used as substitutes. Very little attention has been paid to the empirical verification of these studies. The present paper is devoted...... to the issue of how well these indicators perform, using market data provided by consumer magazines from 3 countries. The results strongly indicate that price is a poor quality indicator. The paper also presents some evidence which suggests that seller reputation and easily observable characteristics are also...

  11. Blood amylase - a biochemical radiation indicator?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study describes the suitability of the biological radiation indicator 'amylase in human blood serum' to identify, if previous irradiation has occurred. After 'in vivo' exposure, of the human body with organ doses > 0,5 Gy, high activities of the enzyme are found in serum. The important results of examinations from different work groups and from own experiments were summarized in tabular form and evaluated from the statistic point of view. The results show that in more than 90% of all cases, the amylase system is suitable to identify exposure beyond 0,5 to 1 Gy, approximately. However, this is only possible if the salivary glands were also exposed and blood samples are taken about 18 hours after exposure. For the differentiation between induced increase of amylase from disease and radiation induced increase, it is recommended to carry out the isoamylase test, which makes it possible to distinguish between the individual enzymes. The assessment of the total amylase is appropriate to detect, with a range of significance of P = 0,05 that radiation exposure has occurred. The increase of activity is dose dependent when the salivary glands lie in the radiation field, however, the variations of activity are very high. Therefore the radiation dose cannot be considered. Only in cases where a very high radiation induced increase of activity is observed, a rough estimation of dose at the parotid glands can be made. (orig./MG)

  12. Characterization of biologically effective UV radiation at mid-latitudes sites: innovative method for the calculation of the human vitamin D exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Modesti, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    The Italian territory has the potential for receiving high solar ultraviolet (UV) doses during most of the year. This may represent a serious hazard for human health as UV radiation is responsible for skin cancer: Italy is in the third place, after Australia and USA, for melanoma occurrences. It ought to be remember that UV radiation has well-established beneficial effects on the skin, most notably the synthesis of vitamin D3. However a climatological characterization of biologically effecti...

  13. Plugging indicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is often difficult to measure a plugging temperature when the impurity concentration in liquid sodium is low. Then, the plugging temperature is considered to be inferior to 1100C. Sometimes, a more precise indication is required. We propose a use for the plugging indicator which satisfies this type of requirement. A partial plugging of the indicator orifice is produced and increases at a constant temperature. A mathematical model describes this growth: it is based mainly on the kinetics of Na2O and NaH crystal growth and links the plugging time to oxygen or hydrogen concentrations. (orig.)

  14. Solar Indices

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  15. In vitro exposure of human osteoarthritic chondrocytes to ELF fields and new therapeutic application of musically modulated electromagnetic fields: biological evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannoni, D; Albanese, A; Battisti, E; Aceto, E; Giglioni, S; Corallo, C; Carta, S; Ferrata, P; Fioravanti, A; Giordano, N

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most frequently occurring rheumatic disease, caused by metabolic changes in chondrocytes, the cells that maintain cartilage. Treatment with electromagnetic fields (MF) produces benefits in patients affected by this pathology. Isolated human osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes were cultured in vitro under standard conditions or stimulated with IL-1beta or IGF-1, to mimic the imbalance between chondroformation and chondroresorption processes observed in OA cartilage in vivo. The cells were exposed for a specific time to extremely low frequency (ELF; 100-Hz) electromagnetic fields and to the Therapeutic Application of Musically Modulated Electromagnetic Fields (TAMMEF), which are characterized by variable frequencies, intensities, and waveforms. Using flow cytometry, we tested the effects of the different types of exposure on chondrocyte metabolism. The exposure of the cells to both systems enhances cell proliferation, does not generate reactive oxygen species, does not cause glutathione depletion or changes in mitochondrial transmembrane potential and does not induce apoptosis. This study presents scientific support to the fact that MF could influence OA chondrocytes from different points of view (viability, ROS production and apoptosis). We can conclude that both ELF and TAMMEF systems could be recommended for OA therapy and represent a valid non-pharmacological approach to the treatment of this pathology. PMID:22475096

  16. 电磁场曝露对生物组织电磁特性的影响%Effects of Electromagnetic Field Exposure on Electromagnetic Properties of Biological Tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李滚; 庞小峰

    2011-01-01

    Electromagnetic radiations affect human health seriously. Bio-effects of electromagnetic fields mechanisms closely depend on the properties of themselves. Moreover, electromagnetic properties of signaling molecules, radicals and magnetic particles within body will be changed in electromagnetic fields, especially the conductivity, dielectric and magnetic properties of biological tissues will be significant difference when biological tissues exposure to various frequency electromagnetic fields. Identifying the evolution of electromagnetic properties of biological tissues is a key issue to explore underlying mechanisms and prevent electromagnetic bio-effects. Effects and applications of biological tissues in electromagnetic fields are summarized, and several future research directions are put forward.%电磁辐射严重影响着人体的健康.电磁场生物效应的发生机制与电磁场本身的特性相关,同时也与生物组织在电磁场作用下电磁特性的改变密切相关.生物体内的信号分子、自由基以及磁颗粒等处于外加电磁场中时其电磁特性会发生变化,尤其是不同频率电磁场曝露作用下生物组织的导电、介电以及磁学等特性会有非常显著的区别.明确不同频率电磁场作用下生物组织电磁特性的变化规律是研究电磁场生物效应发生机制以及预防问题的关键.综述了近年来电磁场对于生物组织电磁特性影响的研究成果,并对未来的研究方向做了展望.

  17. Identification of potential mechanisms of toxicity after di-(2-ethylhexyl)-phthalate (DEHP) adult exposure in the liver using a systems biology approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eveillard, Alexandre; Lasserre, Frédéric; de Tayrac, Marie; Polizzi, Arnaud; Claus, Sandrine; Canlet, Cécile; Mselli-Lakhal, Laïla; Gotardi, Gaëlle; Paris, Alain; Guillou, Hervé; Martin, Pascal G P; Pineau, Thierry

    2009-05-01

    Phthalates are industrial additives widely used as plasticizers. In addition to deleterious effects on male genital development, population studies have documented correlations between phthalates exposure and impacts on reproductive tract development and on the metabolic syndrome in male adults. In this work we investigated potential mechanisms underlying the impact of DEHP on adult mouse liver in vivo. A parallel analysis of hepatic transcript and metabolic profiles from adult mice exposed to varying DEHP doses was performed. Hepatic genes modulated by DEHP are predominantly PPARalpha targets. However, the induction of prototypic cytochrome P450 genes strongly supports the activation of additional NR pathways, including Constitutive Androstane Receptor (CAR). Integration of transcriptomic and metabonomic profiles revealed a correlation between the impacts of DEHP on genes and metabolites related to heme synthesis and to the Rev-erbalpha pathway that senses endogenous heme level. We further confirmed the combined impact of DEHP on the hepatic expression of Alas1, a critical enzyme in heme synthesis and on the expression of Rev-erbalpha target genes involved in the cellular clock and in energy metabolism. This work shows that DEHP interferes with hepatic CAR and Rev-erbalpha pathways which are both involved in the control of metabolism. The identification of these new hepatic pathways targeted by DEHP could contribute to metabolic and endocrine disruption associated with phthalate exposure. Gene expression profiles performed on microdissected testis territories displayed a differential responsiveness to DEHP. Altogether, this suggests that impacts of DEHP on adult organs, including testis, could be documented and deserve further investigations. PMID:19245819

  18. Biological transformation, kinetics and dose-response assessments of bound musk ketone hemoglobin adducts in rainbow trout as biomarkers of environmental exposure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M A Mottaleb; J H Zimmerman; T W Moy

    2008-01-01

    Low levels (ng/g) of musk ketone (MK), used as a fragrance additive in the formulation of personal care products, are frequently detected in the water and other environment. Thus, aquatic organisms can be continuously exposed to MK. In this study, kinetics and dose-response assessments of 2-amino-MK (AMK) metabolite, bound to cysteine-hemoglobin (Hb) in rainbow trout, formed by enzymatic nitro-reduction of MK have been demonstrated. Trout were exposed to a single exposure of 0.010, 0.030, 0.10, and or 0.30 mg MK/g of fish. Twenty-six Hb samples were collected from exposed- and control fish subsequent to exposure intervals of 1 d (24 h), 3 d (72 h), and 7 d (168 h). Basic hydrolysis released bound AMK metabolite was extracted into n-hexane and then concentrated and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) electron capture negative ion chemical ionization (NICI) mass spectrometry (MS) using selected ion monitoring (SIM). The presence of the AMK metabolite in Hb extracts was confirmed by agreement of similar mass spectral features and retention time with a standard. In the dose-response study, maximum adduct formation was obtained at the 0.10 mg/g dose with an average AMK metabolite concentration of 2.2 ng/g. For kinetics, the highest concentration of the AMK metabolite was found to be 32.0 ng/g at 0.03 mg/g dose in 3-d sample. Further elimination of the metabolite showed kinetics with a half-life estimated to be 2 d, assuming first-order kinetics. The metabolite was not detected in the control samples, non-hydrolyzed Hb, and reagent blank extracts. The detection limit for AMK in the Hb was approximately 0.30 (g/L, based on a signal to noise ratio of 3 (S/N = 3).

  19. Special problems of partial-body exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homogeneous whole-body exposure can be accomplished only in small laboratory animals and it must be admitted that the dose is always unevenly distributed when large animals or human beings are submitted to ionizing radiation. In most cases it is not the damage to the haemopoietic system that is critical, but nevertheless it can limit the therapeutic possibilities and it is therefore important to evaluate the degree of impairment of the haematopoietic functions. Our knowledge in this field is unfortunately limited, but this chapter will provide some recent experimental information and report the observations made on some human cases of incidental overexposure. It is, however, necessary to keep in mind that in all types of radiation exposure it is important to distinguish between those biological effects that indicate total dose regardless of what proportion of the body or what anatomical region has been exposed, and those that may be taken as a reflection of the total injurious effect of exposure

  20. Operational indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chapter presents the operational indicators related to budget, travel costs and tickets, the evolution of the annual program for regulatory inspection, the scientific production, requested patents and the numbers related to the production of the services offered by the Institution

  1. Exposure Forecaster

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Exposure Forecaster Database (ExpoCastDB) is EPA's database for aggregating chemical exposure information and can be used to help with chemical exposure...

  2. Establishment of biological limit value of urinary S-phenylmercapturic acid for occupational exposure to benzene%职业接触苯尿中苯巯基尿酸生物限值研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梅勇; 宋世震; 陈斯琦; 叶玉杰; 叶方立

    2009-01-01

    Objective To establish the biological exposure limit values of urinary S-phenylmercap-turic acid (SPMA) for assessing occupational exposure to benzene. Methods Study participants were selected from 55 workers of benzene exposures below 32.5 mg/m~3. The concentration of personal exposure to benzene was measured by gas chromatography and sampled with personal sampler. The urine samples were collected at the end of work shift and individual internal exposure level was evaluated by determination of SPMA in urine by HPLC/MS method. Comparison of external and internal exposure was assessed by the relative internal expo-sure(RIE) index. Results The benzene exposure level ranged from 0.71 to 32.17 mg/m~3 (geometric mean 6.98 mg/m~3, median 7.50 mg/m~3). The urinary SPMA at the end of the work shift were significantly correlated with benzene exposure, Y (μg/g Cr)=-8.625 + 18.367X (mg/m~3), r=0.8035, (P<0.01). According to the occupational exposure limit for benzene in China and calculation of regression equation, the expected value of urinary SPMA was 101.58 μg/g Cr. Mean level of biotransformation of per mg/m~3 benzene to urinary SPMA was 18.23 μg/g Cr and the metabolic efficiencies of benzene transformation to urinary SPMA decreased with benzene exposure in-creased. Conclusion Based on abroad documents and data, biological limit value for occupational exposure to benzene in China is recommended as follows: 100 μg/g Cr (47 μmol/mol Cr) for SPMA in the urine at the end of shift.%目的 研制我国职业接触苯工人尿中苯巯基尿酸(SPMA)的生物限值.方法 在苯作业车间选择空气中苯浓度在32.5 mg/m~3以下接苯工人55人,应用个体采样器采集空气样品,用气相色谱法检测作业者个体苯接触水平,同时采集当日工人班后尿,应用高压液相色谱/质谱法(HPLC/MS)测定尿中SPMA含量以评价苯接触者的内暴露水平,内外暴露水平的比较用相对内暴露指数(RIE)加以评定.结果 接苯工人工作

  3. Measuring corruption indicators and indices

    OpenAIRE

    MALITO, Debora Valentina

    2014-01-01

    This Working Paper is a background paper delivered to frame the workshop ‘Global Governance by Indicators: Measuring corruption and corruption indicators’ convened by the Global Governance Programme of the European University Institute in Florence on 17 and 18 October 2013. Successively it was developed further in EUI RSCAS WP 2014/37 - http://hdl.handle.net/1814/30582

  4. Some Biological studies on the Mediterranean Fruit Fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) After Egg Exposure to Acetone, Diethyl Ether, Ethyl Alcohol and Pupal Gamma Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some biological studies of the Mediterranean fruit fly Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) were carried out to help in controlling this pest. Three laboratory experiments were done to study the effect of acetone, diethyl ether and ethyl alcohol separately or combined with gamma radiation through egg treatment or larval diet treatment. The gamma dose (90 Gy) was applied only on the produced pupae after egg or larval diet treatment. Concentrations of 0, 25, 50 and 100% of each chemical were applied for treating eggs to evaluate egg hatch, pupation, adult emergence and sex ratio. larval diet treatment was done by adding 20 ml of each chemical concentration to 500 gm of larval diet.Treating eggs with ethyl alcohol separately increased pupation significantly at all concentration used while adult emergence was insignificantly increased with the lowest concentration only (25%). Treating larval diet with ethyl alcohol alone increased pupation insignificantly and adult emergence was insignificantly decreased at different concentrations. Moreover, treating eggs or larval diet with diethyl ether alone significantly increased sex ratio at 50% and 2% concentration, respectively,while differed insignificantly by applying different chemicals either on eggs or on larval diet. Treating eggs with the three chemicals before gamma irradiation of the produced pupae fluctuated egg hatch insignificantly compared to gamma irradiation alone. By applying diethyl ether on eggs or acetone in the larval diet decreased egg hatch insignificantly. Competitiveness values were insignificantly increased by applying ethyl alcohol on eggs, acetone or ethyl alcohol on eggs, acetone or ethyl alcohol in larval diet before gamma irradiation of the produced pupae. Survivals of the produced adults, treated as eggs or in the larval diet with different chemicals and irradiated as pupae, fluctuated insignificantly

  5. [Evaluation of the stability of biological specimens used for monitoring of occupational exposure. Studies of the stability of phenol and trichloroacetic acid in urine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antczak, K

    1989-01-01

    The paper presents results of studies on phenol and trichloroacetic acid concentration in urine samples stored for 30 days at + 5 degrees C and + 20 degrees C. It has been checked whether the addition of sulphuric acid as a conservant to urine can affect changes in phenol concentration in the samples stored. The results obtained did not indicate any significant changes in concentrations of phenol or trichloroacetic acid in the urine samples. It has been recommended that due to bacterial processes the material studied should be kept in refrigerator (+ 5 degrees C). PMID:2630884

  6. Long-term exposure of CdTe quantum dots on PC12 cellular activity and the determination of optimum non-toxic concentrations for biological use

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Prasad, Babu R

    2010-03-25

    Abstract Background The unique and tuneable photonic properties of Quantum Dots (QDs) have made them potentially useful tools for imaging biological entities. However, QDs though attractive diagnostic and therapeutic tools, have a major disadvantage due to their inherent cytotoxic nature. The cellular interaction, uptake and resultant toxic influence of CdTe QDs (gelatinised and non-gelatinised Thioglycolic acid (TGA) capped) have been investigated with pheochromocytoma 12 (PC12) cells. In conjunction to their analysis by confocal microscopy, the QD - cell interplay was explored as the QD concentrations were varied over extended (up to 72 hours) co-incubation times. Coupled to this investigation, cell viability, DNA quantification and cell proliferation assays were also performed to compare and contrast the various factors leading to cell stress and ultimately death. Results Thioglycolic acid (TGA) stabilised CdTe QDs (gel and non - gel) were co-incubated with PC12 cells and investigated as to how their presence influenced cell behaviour and function. Cell morphology was analysed as the QD concentrations were varied over co-incubations up to 72 hours. The QDs were found to be excellent fluorophores, illuminating the cytoplasm of the cells and no deleterious effects were witnessed at concentrations of ~10-9 M. Three assays were utilised to probe how individual cell functions (viability, DNA quantification and proliferation) were affected by the presence of the QDs at various concentrations and incubation times. Cell response was found to not only be concentration dependant but also influenced by the surface environment of the QDs. Gelatine capping on the surface acts as a barrier towards the leaking of toxic atoms, thus reducing the negative impact of the QDs. Conclusion This study has shown that under the correct conditions, QDs can be routinely used for the imaging of PC12 cells with minimal adverse effects. We have found that PC12 cells are highly susceptible to

  7. Long-term exposure of CdTe quantum dots on PC12 cellular activity and the determination of optimum non-toxic concentrations for biological use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gérard Valérie A

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The unique and tuneable photonic properties of Quantum Dots (QDs have made them potentially useful tools for imaging biological entities. However, QDs though attractive diagnostic and therapeutic tools, have a major disadvantage due to their inherent cytotoxic nature. The cellular interaction, uptake and resultant toxic influence of CdTe QDs (gelatinised and non-gelatinised Thioglycolic acid (TGA capped have been investigated with pheochromocytoma 12 (PC12 cells. In conjunction to their analysis by confocal microscopy, the QD - cell interplay was explored as the QD concentrations were varied over extended (up to 72 hours co-incubation times. Coupled to this investigation, cell viability, DNA quantification and cell proliferation assays were also performed to compare and contrast the various factors leading to cell stress and ultimately death. Results Thioglycolic acid (TGA stabilised CdTe QDs (gel and non - gel were co-incubated with PC12 cells and investigated as to how their presence influenced cell behaviour and function. Cell morphology was analysed as the QD concentrations were varied over co-incubations up to 72 hours. The QDs were found to be excellent fluorophores, illuminating the cytoplasm of the cells and no deleterious effects were witnessed at concentrations of ~10-9 M. Three assays were utilised to probe how individual cell functions (viability, DNA quantification and proliferation were affected by the presence of the QDs at various concentrations and incubation times. Cell response was found to not only be concentration dependant but also influenced by the surface environment of the QDs. Gelatine capping on the surface acts as a barrier towards the leaking of toxic atoms, thus reducing the negative impact of the QDs. Conclusion This study has shown that under the correct conditions, QDs can be routinely used for the imaging of PC12 cells with minimal adverse effects. We have found that PC12 cells are highly

  8. Biological Threats

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Workplace Plans School Emergency Plans Main Content Biological Threats Biological agents are organisms or toxins that can ... for Disease Control and Prevention . Before a Biological Threat Unlike an explosion, a biological attack may or ...

  9. Divergence Measures as Diversity Indices

    OpenAIRE

    Abou-Moustafa, Karim T.

    2014-01-01

    Entropy measures of probability distributions are widely used measures in ecology, biology, genetics, and in other fields, to quantify species diversity of a community. Unfortunately, entropy-based diversity indices, or diversity indices for short, suffer from three problems. First, when computing the diversity for samples withdrawn from communities with different structures, diversity indices can easily yield non-comparable and hard to interpret results. Second, diversity indices impose weig...

  10. Personal exposure to ultrafine particles and oxidative DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinzents, Peter S; Møller, Peter; Sørensen, Mette;

    2005-01-01

    the morning after exposure measurement. Cumulated outdoor and cumulated indoor exposures to UFPs each were independent significant predictors of the level of purine oxidation in DNA but not of strand breaks. Ambient air concentrations of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of < or = 10...... microm (PM10), nitrous oxide, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, and/or number concentration of UFPs at urban background or busy street monitoring stations was not a significant predictor of DNA damage, although personal UFP exposure was correlated with urban background concentrations of CO and NO2......, particularly during bicycling in traffic. The results indicate that biologic effects of UFPs occur at modest exposure, such as that occurring in traffic, which supports the relationship of UFPs and the adverse health effects of air pollution....

  11. Pesticide exposure in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    This statement presents the position of the American Academy of Pediatrics on pesticides. Pesticides are a collective term for chemicals intended to kill unwanted insects, plants, molds, and rodents. Children encounter pesticides daily and have unique susceptibilities to their potential toxicity. Acute poisoning risks are clear, and understanding of chronic health implications from both acute and chronic exposure are emerging. Epidemiologic evidence demonstrates associations between early life exposure to pesticides and pediatric cancers, decreased cognitive function, and behavioral problems. Related animal toxicology studies provide supportive biological plausibility for these findings. Recognizing and reducing problematic exposures will require attention to current inadequacies in medical training, public health tracking, and regulatory action on pesticides. Ongoing research describing toxicologic vulnerabilities and exposure factors across the life span are needed to inform regulatory needs and appropriate interventions. Policies that promote integrated pest management, comprehensive pesticide labeling, and marketing practices that incorporate child health considerations will enhance safe use. PMID:23184103

  12. Nail and bone surface as indicators of acute exposure to fluoride in rats Unha e superfície óssea como indicadores da exposição aguda em ratos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Afonso Rabelo Buzalaf

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the use of nails and bone surfaces as indicators of acute exposure to fluoride in rats. Six groups (n=10/grp, aged 70 days, received, by gastrogavage, single doses of sodium fluoride containing 10, 35, 45, 60, 75 and 90 mg fluoride/kg body weight. The control group received deionized water. Two hours after fluoride administration, the rats were killed and their plasma, nails (halves near to the growth end and femur were collected. Nail and plasma fluoride concentrations were analyzed with the electrode following HMDS-facilitated diffusion. Femur surface fluoride was removed from a circular area (4.52 mm² by immersion in 0.5M HCl for 15 seconds, buffered with TISAB and analyzed with the electrode. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (pEste estudo avaliou o uso de unhas e superfícies ósseas como indicadores da exposição aguda ao flúor em ratos. Seis grupos (n=10/grp, com idade de 70 dias, receberam, por gastro-gavagem, doses únicas de fluoreto de sódio contendo 10, 35, 45, 60, 75 e 90 mg flúor/kg peso corpóreo. O grupo controle recebeu água deionizada. Duas horas após a administração de flúor, os ratos foram mortos e seu plasma, unhas (metades próximas à porção de crescimento e fêmur foram coletados. As concentrações de flúor na unha e plasma foram analisadas com o eletrodo após difusão facilitada por HMDS. O flúor da superfície do fêmur foi removida de uma área circular (4,52 mm² por imersão em HCl 0,5 M por 15 segundos, tamponado com TISAB (contendo NaOH e analisado com o eletrodo. Os dados foram analisados por ANOVA e teste de Tukey (p<0,05 e por regressão linear (p<0,001. As concentrações médias de flúor variaram de 55,4 a 91,5 mg/g para as unhas; de 0,019 a 6,937 mg/mL para o plasma e de 617 a 2.394 mg/g para a superfície do fêmur. A concentração de flúor nas unhas do grupo experimental não foi diferente do controle. Quanto ao flúor no plasma, todos os grupos

  13. Dermal exposure assessment techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenske, R A

    1993-12-01

    Exposure of the skin to chemical substances can contribute significantly to total dose in many workplace situations, and its relative importance will increase when airborne occupational exposure limits are reduced, unless steps to reduce skin exposure are undertaken simultaneously. Its assessment employs personal sampling techniques to measure skin loading rates, and combines these measurements with models of percutaneous absorption to estimate absorbed dose. Knowledge of dermal exposure pathways is in many cases fundamental to hazard evaluation and control. When the skin is the primary contributor to absorbed dose, dermal exposure measurements and biological monitoring play complementary roles in defining occupational exposures. Exposure normally occurs by one of three pathways: (i) immersion (direct contact with a liquid or solid chemical substance); (ii) deposition of aerosol or uptake of vapour through the skin; or (iii) surface contact (residue transfer from contaminated surfaces). Sampling methods fall into three categories: surrogate skin; chemical removal; and fluorescent tracers. Surface sampling represents a supplementary approach, providing an estimate of dermal exposure potential. Surrogate skin techniques involve placing a chemical collection medium on the skin. Whole-body garment samplers do not require assumptions relating to distribution, an inherent limitation of patch sampling. The validity of these techniques rests on the ability of the sampling medium to capture and retain chemicals in a manner similar to skin. Removal techniques include skin washing and wiping, but these measure only what can be removed from the skin, not exposure: laboratory removal efficiency studies are required for proper interpretation of data. Fluorescent tracer techniques exploit the visual properties of fluorescent compounds, and combined with video imaging make quantification of dermal exposure patterns possible, but the need to introduce a chemical substance (tracer

  14. Investigation of exposure to Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) magnetic and electric fields: Ongoing animal studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, L.E.

    1994-03-01

    There is now convincing evidence from a large number of laboratories, that exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic and electric fields produces biological responses in animals. Many of the observed effects appear to be directly or indirectly associated with the neural or neuroendocrine systems. Such effects include increased neuronal excitability, chemical and hormonal changes in the nervous system, altered behavioral responses, some of which are related to sensing the presence of the field, and changes in endogenous biological rhythms. Additional indices of general physiological status appear relatively unaffected by exposure, although effects have occasionally been described in bone growth and fracture repair, reproduction and development, and immune system function. A major current emphasis in laboratory research is to determine whether or not the reported epidemiological studies that suggest an association between EMF exposure and risk of cancer are supported in studies using animal models. Three major challenges exist for ongoing research: (1) knowledge about the mechanisms underlying observed bioeffects is incomplete, (2) researchers do not as yet understand what physical aspects of exposure produce biological responses, and (3) health consequences resulting from ELF exposure are unknown. Although no animal studies clearly demonstrate deleterious effects of ELF fields, several are suggestive of potential health impacts. From the perspective of laboratory animal studies, this paper will discuss biological responses to ELF magnetic and/or electric field exposures.

  15. Biological monitoring of exposure to nerve agents.

    OpenAIRE

    Bajgar, J

    1992-01-01

    Changes in acetylcholinesterase activity in blood and some organs of rats after intoxication with sarin, soman, VX, and 2-dimethylaminoethyl-(dimethylamido)-phosphonofluoridate (GV), in doses of roughly 2 x LD50 given intramuscularly, were obtained from published data and by experiment. The time course of inhibition of acetylcholinesterase in blood, regions of brain, and diaphragm and the occurrence of signs and symptoms of poisoning (none, salivation, disturbed ventilation and fasciculations...

  16. Dose evaluation for external exposure in radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abnormal exposures including emergency and accidental are categorized into external exposure and internal contamination, although both of these may be associated with external contamination. From a point of view of lifesaving in the abnormal exposures, it is primarily important to evaluate radiation dose of exposed persons as soon as possible. This report reviews the status of early dosimetry in the accidental exposures and discusses the optimum methodology of the early dose determination for external exposures in abnormal exposures. Personal monitors generally give an indication of dose to an exposed person only at a single part of the body. The data obtained from the personal monitors should be interpreted with care and in the light of information about the circumstances of exposure. In most cases, the records of environmental monitors or the survey with area monitors provide valuable information on the radiation fields. In the some cases, the reconstruction of the abnormal exposure is required for the dose evaluation by means of phantom experiments. In the case of neutron exposures, activation products in the body or its components or personnel possession can be useful for the early dosimetry. If the dose received by the whole body is evaluated as being very high, clinical observations and biological investigations may be more important guide to initial medical treatment than the early dosimetry. For the dose evaluation of general public, depending on the size of abnormal exposure, information that could be valuable in the assessment of abnormal exposures will come from the early dose estimates with environmental monitors and radiation survey meters. (author)

  17. Traceability of biologicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vermeer, Niels S; Spierings, Irina; Mantel-Teeuwisse, Aukje K;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Traceability is important in the postmarketing surveillance of biologicals, since changes in the manufacturing process may give rise to product- or batch-specific risks. With the expected expansion of the biosimilar market, there have been concerns about the ability to trace...... individual products within pharmacovigilance databases. AREAS COVERED: The authors discuss the present challenges in the traceability of biologicals in relation to pharmacovigilance, by exploring the processes involved in ensuring traceability. They explore both the existing systems that are in place...... for the recording of exposure information in clinical practice, as well as the critical steps involved in the transfer of exposure data to various pharmacovigilance databases. EXPERT OPINION: The existing systems ensure the traceability of biologicals down to the manufacturer within pharmacy records, but do...

  18. Use of chromosome translocations for measuring prior environment exposures in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, J. D.

    1997-05-01

    Recent advances in cytogenetic methodology are beginning to have a major impact upon our ability to provide assessments of environmental exposure in humans. The advent of fluorescent-based techniques for `painting` whole chromosomes has made the analysis of chromosome translocations rapid, specific, sensitive and routine. Chromosome painting has been used to address a wide variety of scientific questions, resulting in an increased understanding of the biological consequences of adverse environmental exposure. This paper describes the use of chromosome translocations as a biological marker of exposure and effect in humans. The relevance of translocations is discussed, as are the advantages and disadvantages of painting compared to classical cytogenetic methods for translocation evaluation. The factors to consider in the use of translocations as a retrospective indicator of exposure are then described. Several theoretical parameters that are important to the use of translocations are provided, and the paper concludes with a vision for the future of cytogenetic methodology.

  19. USE OF BARLEY OZONIZED GRAIN AND PROBIOTICS FOR INCREASING BIOLOGICAL VALUE OF POULTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Temiraev R. B.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents experimental data indicating that for the optimization of biological and food processing meat value at risk of aflatoxicosis in feeding chicken-broilers with barley-wheat and sunflower type one should include hullless barley grain at exposure of ozone of 3.0 hour complex with Bifidumbacterinum probiotics

  20. Radiation biology of low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present risk assessments and standards in radiation protection are based on the so-called linear no-threshold (LNT) dose - effect hypothesis, i.e., on a linear, proportional relationship between radiation doses and their effects on biological systems. This concept presupposes that any dose, irrespective of its level and time of occurrence, carries the same risk coefficient and, moreover, that no individual biological effects are taken into account. This contribution presents studies of low energy transfer (LET) radiation which deal with the risk of cancer to individual cells. According to the LNT hypothesis, the relationship for the occurrence of these potential effects should be constant over the dose range: successful repair, cell death, mutation with potential carcinogenesis. The results of the studies presented here indicate more differentiated effects as a function of dose application as far as damage to cellular DNA by ionizing radiation is concerned. At the same overall dose level, multiple exposures to low doses sometimes give rise to much smaller effects than those arising from one single exposure to the total dose. These adaptive effects of cells are known from other studies. The results of the study allow the conclusion to be drawn that non-linear relationships must be assumed to exist for the LET radiation considered. Correspondingly, the linear no-threshold hypothesis model should at least be reconsidered with respect to the low dose range in the light of recent biological findings. The inclusion of other topical research findings also could give rise to a new, revised, risk-oriented approach in radiological protection. (orig.)

  1. Oil exposure and effects in subtidal fish following the Exxon Valdez oil spill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The assessment of oil exposure and resulting biological effects in subtidal fish following marine oil spills is a rather challenging task, due to difficulty in sampling and a lack of methodologies that allow direct determination of petroleum exposure. Because fish can rapidly metabolize petroleum hydrocarbons, standard chemical analyses are of little use for assessing exposure of fish to oil. However, methods are now available for measuring the metabolites of petroleum hydrocarbons in fish, as described elsewhere by Krahn and her colleagues. There have also been advances in determining early biochemical effects-such as induction of the cytochrome P450 system-and more severe biological effects-such as histopathological alterations and reproductive disfunction-in fish species following exposure to petroleum hydrocarbons and related compounds. Accordingly, following the Exxon Valdez oil spill, the authors have been using these approaches and methodologies to measure oil exposure in subtidal fish species, together with associated biological effects. These studies have been conducted at sites inside Prince William Sound and along the Kenai and Alaska Peninsulas. Our results show a continuing exposure of several fish species, including benthic species, which indicates petroleum contamination of subtidal areas. The authors have also assessed reproductive function and histopathological alterations in several of these species; and while major effects have not been documented, some suggestion of histopathological alterations of gill exists in one species of benthic fish. Still to be determined are the potential impacts on fishery resources of long-term exposure to petroleum, albeit at moderate to low levels

  2. Indicadores biológicos de qualidade do solo em diferentes sistemas de uso no brejo paraibano Biological indicators of soil quality in different land use systems in paraiban swamp region, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Lima Pôrto

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A avaliação da qualidade do solo é uma ferramenta importante para monitorar a sua degradação, bem como planejar a implantação de práticas sustentáveis de manejo. Neste trabalho, objetivou-se avaliar indicadores biológicos de qualidade do solo em um Latossolo Amarelo distrófico, submetido a diferentes sistemas de uso em Areia-PB. Foram utilizadas amostras de solo coletadas na camada arável (0-20 cm em áreas de mata nativa, fruticultura, cana-de-açúcar, sucessão de cultivos, pastagem e consórcio de culturas. Foram avaliados o carbono orgânico total (COT, carbono da biomassa microbiana (CBM, quociente microbiano (qMic, respiração basal (RB e quociente metabólico (qCO2. Os resultados obtidos indicaram que as áreas sob gramíneas apresentaram uma tendência de manutenção do COT e menores reduções no CBM, entretanto, apresentaram elevados valores de qCO2, indicando a ocorrência de um processo degradativo. A área sob fruticultura apresentou leves reduções no COT e CBM e baixos valores de qCO2, indicando que esse sistema pode estar se ajustando a um novo estado de equilíbrio. As áreas sob sucessão de cultivos e consórcio de culturas apresentaram as maiores reduções no COT e CBM e elevados valores de qCO2, demonstrando um elevado estágio de degradação desses sistemas. Pode-se concluir que todos os sistemas agrícolas estudados promoveram perda de qualidade do solo, sendo esse fato mais pronunciado nas áreas sob manejo mais intensivo. O CBM e qCO2 mostraram-se bastantes sensíveis às alterações decorrentes do uso agrícola do solo, apresentando grande potencial para estudos de sua qualidade.Soil quality evaluation is an important tool for the monitoring of soil degradation as well as for planning the adoption of sustainable agricultural management practices. The objective of this study was to evaluate some biological indicators of the soil quality of a dystrophic Yellow Latosol (Oxisol under different land use

  3. Elaboration of an index of exposure to motor-vehicle related pollution, based on epidemiological studies; Elaboration d`un indice d`exposition a la pollution atmospherique d`origine automobile a l`usage des etudes epidemiologiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacre, Christian; Flori, Jean-Paul [Centre Scientifique et Technique du Batiment, 11 rue Henri Picherit, 44071 Nantes Cedex 03 (France); Chiron, Mireille [Institut National de Recherche sur les Transports et leur Securite, 109 avenue Salvador Allende,6967 Bron Cedex (France)

    1995-06-22

    Air pollution due to motor vehicles is a worrying issue, in particular in the urban environment, all the more as a number of pollutants such as benzene and PAH are known to have carcinogenic effects. Epidemiological studies seem to be required, so a cumulated score of exposure must be developed. A correlation with pathology should be investigated. The calculation of an index of exposure to motor vehicle-related pollution requires a good assessment of pollutant emissions and a precise knowledge of pollutant transfer mechanisms by advection and spreading in built-up areas. In this study, it is proposed to use current theoretical and experimental knowledge to develop a calculation algorithm for this index. The following issues will be addressed in the presentation: an analysis of epidemiological requirements and of constraints of data acquisition using questionnaire surveys; a model for assessing, for each residential area, the average annual concentration of gaseous pollutants from motor vehicles. It will consider the environment geometry, traffic emissions and wind distributions. The model CALINE3 is used for open areas near roads and highways and the Danish model OSPM is introduced for street canyon environments.

  4. Environmental health indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Posada de la Paz

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This presentation gives a general overview of the project titled Environmental Health Indicators, coordinated by WHO and managed by the Research Centre on the Toxic Oil Syndrome and Rare Diseases in Spain. The presentations describes the objectives of the project, the steps taken and the results obtained during the feasibility study. The project aims to develop an environmental health information system that will allow the monitoring of public health and its health determinants and make international comparisons, develop environmental policies and facilitate communication with citizens. WHO developed a methodology for the development of these indicators within the conceptual framework of DPSEEA (Driving Force, Pressure, State, Exposure, Effect, Action and selected a total of 55 indicators (which included 168 variables in 10 environmental health areas. The feasibility study predicted the successful gathering of 89% of the indicators. However, data recollection proved difficult due to the frequent incompatibility of some variables in the Spanish information systems with the WHO defined variables. On a management level, the greatest difficulty arose from the disperse distribution of responsibilities in environmental health matters. In addition to the technical contribution of this project to Environmental Health in Spain, an added value has been to establish a close collaboration with the different Ministries involved.

  5. Indicadores biológicos da qualidade do solo em sistema agrossilvopastoril no noroeste do estado de Minas Gerais Biological indicators of soil quality in agricultural-forestry-pasture system in northwest region of Minas Gerais state, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Milene Nascente Neves

    2009-02-01

    nativo, em função da ação antrópica. Com o progresso do sistema agrossilvopastoril houve uma recuperação do carbono da biomassa microbiana. Não foi observada diferença significativa entre os sistemas de manejo e o cerrado nativo quanto ao quociente metabólico e à respiração basal.Soil quality studies are important for understanding its interaction with the ecosystem as a whole. In this context, the soil microorganisms play a fundamental role for the maintenance and productivity of various agricultural ecosystems. This work had the objective to evaluate the biological attributes (microbial biomass carbon, basal respiration, and microbial quotient, as well as the organic matter content, possible indicators of alterations in soil quality imposed by different management systems, in relation to native cerrado, in agricultural - forestry - pasture system, in northwest of Minas Gerais state, Brazil. Samples were collected at 0-5, 5-20, and 20-40 cm depths, from a typical Dystrophic Red Latosol (Oxisol, between Vazante and Paracatu counties. The systems were selected according to the history of use, as follows: (1 CN - native cerrado (reference; (2 EA - eucalyptus + rice (year zero of agricultural - forestry - pasture system, planted after removal of cerrado native vegetation; (3 EP - eucalyptus + soybeans (year one of system, soybeans sowing substituting rice; (4 - EP - ES - eucalyptus + pasture (year two of system, using Brachiaria Brizantha Stapf. for cattle raising; (5 - EPG - eucalyptus + pasture + cattle (year three of system, with introduction of cattle; (6 PP - pasture cultivated with Brachiaria Brizantha Stapf.; and (7 EC - eucalyptus under conventional system in 2x3m spacing. The organic carbon and the microbial biomass carbon presented higher values in the superficial layer (0 - 5 cm, in relation to the other depths, in all systems. The organic carbon showed substantial alteration in relation to the studied systems and depths assessed, revealing its

  6. Cerium dioxide nanoparticles can interfere with the associated cellular mechanistic response to diesel exhaust exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Sandro; Mueller, Loretta; Popovicheva, Olga B; Raemy, David O; Czerwinski, Jan; Comte, Pierre; Mayer, Andreas; Gehr, Peter; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Clift, Martin J D

    2012-10-17

    The aim of this study was to compare the biological response of a sophisticated in vitro 3D co-culture model of the epithelial airway barrier to a co-exposure of CeO(2) NPs and diesel exhaust using a realistic air-liquid exposure system. Independent of the individual effects of either diesel exhaust or CeO(2) NPs investigation observed that a combined exposure of CeO(2) NPs and diesel exhaust did not cause a significant cytotoxic effect or alter cellular morphology after exposure to diesel exhaust for 2h at 20μg/ml (low dose) or for 6h at 60μg/ml (high dose), and a subsequent 6h exposure to an aerosolized solution of CeO(2) NPs at the same doses. A significant loss in the reduced intracellular glutathione level was recorded, although a significant increase in the oxidative marker HMOX-1 was found after exposure to a low and high dose respectively. Both the gene expression and protein release of tumour necrosis factor-α were significantly elevated after a high dose exposure only. In conclusion, CeO(2) NPs, in combination with diesel exhaust, can significantly interfere with the cell machinery, indicating a specific, potentially adverse role of CeO(2) NPs in regards to the biological response of diesel exhaust exposure. PMID:22960666

  7. Traffic indicator for population living near busy roads, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Environmental Health Tracking Program — This data set contains values for a traffic exposure indicator designated by the State Environmental Health Indicators Collaborative, Council of State and...

  8. Biological dosimetry: biochemical and cellular parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early after the beginning of radiobiology studies, biochemistry has led to research of a biological dosimeter. From an extensive literature review, methods were selected that might be suitable for dose assessment via biochemical indicators. By now, research both in laboratory animals and in therapeutic or accidental human exposures, do not allow to retain a biochemical parameter alone for the purpose of diagnosis or prognosis. Several enzymatic activities have been precociously studied after irradiation: from these studies, it seems that analysis of four enzymatic activities in serum (serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, amylase, lactic dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase) could be the most useful dosimetry system for mass sorting. Detection of DNA damage or methods for measuring somatic mutations are currently advancing and provide important new opportunities for biological dosimetry of low doses

  9. Use of bio markers as indicators of biological precursors of oil, pa leo environmental conditions and maturity of source rocks using gas chromatography-Mass spectrometry (GC-Ms) and (GC-Ms-Ms)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent studies performed on hydrocarbon source rocks of the Early Cambrian from the Officer Basin Australia led to the identification of significant bio markers. Characteristic features of these bio markers from Tallaringa Trough are predominance of 17-hopane over 17-30-nor hopane. This study reveals that transformation of normal sterane s and ho panes respectively to rearranged sterane s and rearranged ho panes in clay-free carbonates was aided by bacterial reworking (methylotrophic bacteria). Maturity of these carbonates using C29 (20 S/20 S +20 R) ratio is suggested to be marginally mature. Another significant bio marker associated with the Tallaringa carbonates is the occurrence of an unusual compound called 24-isopropyl cholestane. This bio marker was originated from marine sponges and it has been reported from Cambrian sediments from other parts of the world. The age-specificity of the aforementioned compound makes it a powerful marker in oil to source and source to source correlations. Dino sterane is another significant molecular fossil identified in this study. Dino sterane is derived from dino flagellates and other algae. This paper is the first report of the dino sterane from Early Cambrian sediments. Identification of the above mentioned biological markers is significant in determining biological precursors, pa leo ecological conditions and geological time

  10. Monitoring of occupational exposure to cytostatic anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorsa, M; Anderson, D

    1996-08-17

    Many anticancer agents have been shown to be carcinogenic, mutagenic and teratogenic in experimental animals and in in vitro test systems. Epidemiological data on the association of second neoplasms with a specific chemotherapy treatment is available on some 30 agents, and in the case of 10 compounds the overall evidence on human carcinogenicity has been evaluated to be conclusive (Group 1: IARC, 1987 and 1990). The primary source of human exposure to anticancer drugs is from their use in therapy of cancer. However, persons employed in the manufacture, preparation and administration of the drugs to patients and in nursing patients may also be exposed. Safe handling of anticancer drugs, since the introduction of various general handling guidelines, is now good practice in hospitals, pharmacies and drug manufacturing companies of most developed countries. Careless handling of cancer chemotherapeutic agents may lead to exposure of the personnel in amounts detectable with chemical or biological methods in the body fluids or cell samples of the subjects. The exposure is typically to mixed compounds over long-term and to low exposure levels with accidental peaks. Therefore, the use of biological exposure markers is appropriate for the monitoring of such exposure patterns. The biological markers/methods for exposure assessment are either non-specific (e.g., cytogenetic damage, point mutations or 32P-post-labelling adducts in peripheral blood lymphocytes, urinary mutagenicity) or specific for a given compound (immunological methods for DNA adducts, specific analytical methods). Studies have revealed minor amounts of cyclophosphamide in the urine of pharmacy technicians and nurses handling the drug even when taking special safety precautions (Sessink et al. (1994a) J. Occup. Med., 36, 79; Sessink et al. (1994b) Arch. Env. Health, 49, 165). Another study showed surface wipe samples with measurable cyclophosphamide even away from the handling site (McDevitt et al. (1993) J

  11. Developments in biological dosimetry for the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this program is to develop methods for providing estimates of radiation exposure based on changes in the cells/tissues of exposed individuals. This work arises from the need for independent measures of exposure of workers when standard dose measurements are unavailable or questionable. The radiation-induced changes that we propose to measure have been correlated with carcinogenesis. It follows that the methods used should also provide indications of the likely biological consequences of radiation exposure for an individual. The consequences of radiation exposure lie in the resolution of the radiation effects at the cellular level. Accordingly, it is at the cellular level that our attention is directed. More precisely, since the consequences of most concern, cancer induction and the induction of inherited diseases, are the result of changes to the genetic material of cells (the DNA), it is the measurement of effects on DNA that are being investigated as possible dose meters. Individuals are unique in terms of their DNA and differ in their cellular capacities to repair the damage from an ionizing radiation dose. Because of these features, not only do biological dosimetry tools offer us a means of measuring a dose at the individual level but may also provide us with a measure of the ultimate risk associated with a given exposure. (author). 7 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs

  12. Surgical Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Hendra Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Surgical exposure is a surgical method to expose mucous or bone which prevent delayed or unerupted permanent crown teeth, in order to provide normal eruption and to prevent malocclusion. Surgical exposure is usually carried out on maxillary caninces as they have higher incidence of delayed eruption. Nevertheless, this procedure can also be performed on other teeth. For patient management, this procedure need cooperation betweent oral surgeon and orthodontist.

  13. Low level radiation: biological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is imperative that physicians and scientists using radiations in health care delivery continue to assess the benefits derived, vs. potential risk, to patients and radiation workers being exposed to radiation in its various forms as part of our health delivery system. Insofar as possible we should assure our patients and ourselves that the benefits outweigh the potential hazards involved. Inferences as to the possible biological effects of low level radiation are generally based on extrapolations from those effects observed and measured following acute exposures to considerably higher doses of radiation. Thus, in order to shed light on the question of the possible biological effects of low level radiation, a wide variety of studies have been carried out using cells in culture and various species of plant and animal life. This manuscript makes reference to some of those studies with indications as to how and why the studies were done and the conclusions that might be drawn there from. In addition reference is made to the handling of this information by scientists, by environmentalists, and by the news media. Unfortunately, in many instances the public has been misled by what has been said and/or written. It is hoped that this presentation will provide an understandable and reasonable perspective on the various appropriate uses of radiation in our lives and how such uses do provide significant improvement in our health and in our quality of life

  14. Biomarkers of environmental benzene exposure.

    OpenAIRE

    Weisel, C; Yu, R; Roy, A; Georgopoulos, P.

    1996-01-01

    Environmental exposures to benzene result in increases in body burden that are reflected in various biomarkers of exposure, including benzene in exhaled breath, benzene in blood and urinary trans-trans-muconic acid and S-phenylmercapturic acid. A review of the literature indicates that these biomarkers can be used to distinguish populations with different levels of exposure (such as smokers from nonsmokers and occupationally exposed from environmentally exposed populations) and to determine d...

  15. Temperature changes across CO2-lased dentin during multiple exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakariasen, Kenneth L.; Barron, Joseph R.; Boran, Thomas L.

    1990-06-01

    The literature increasingly indicates that lasers will have a multitude of applications for dental hard tissue procedures, e.g. preventive therapy, caries removal, laser etching and endodontic therapy. However, it is critical that such laser therapies avoid the production of heat levels which will be damaging to the surrounding vital tissues, such as the dental pulp and periodontal tissues. Our preliminary research on temperature changes across C02 lased dentin indicated that for single preventive therapeutic exposures (1.2 W., 0. 1 sec., 1.0 mm focal spot) the mean temperature rise across 350 j.tm of dentin was 0.57 0C while across 1000 .tm of dentin the mean rise was only 0.18 °C. Further research utilizing multiple preventive therapeutic exposures (1.2 W., 0. 1 sec., 1.0 mm focal spot, 3 x 1.0 sec. intervals) showed mean temperature elevations of 1.56 0C across 350 m of dentin and 0.66 O across 1000 xm of dentin. While these temperature elevations, which would be associated with preventive therapy, are very low and would be biologically acceptable, it must be noted that exposures of higher intensities are required to fuse enamel and porcelain, or remove decay. This current research investigates temperature elevations which occuT during C02 lasing utilizing the following exposure parameters: 8.0 W., 1.0 mm focal spot, 0.1 sec. exposures, 2 or 4 exposures per site pulsed 1.0 sec. apart. Three dentin thicknesses were utilized, i.e. 1000 jim, 1500 p.tm and 2000 .tm. Four sections of each thickness were utilized with four exposure sites per specimen (2 with 2 exposures, 2 with 4 exposures). All dentin sections were prepared from non-carious third molars using a hard tissue microtome. A thermistor was placed on the dentin surface opposite each lased site and temperature changes were recorded for approximately 50 sec. following lasing. Mean temperature elevations ranged from a high of 3.07 C for the 1000 xm section utilizing four exposures to a low of 0.37 0C for the

  16. Autoimmunity and Asbestos Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean C. Pfau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite a body of evidence supporting an association between asbestos exposure and autoantibodies indicative of systemic autoimmunity, such as antinuclear antibodies (ANA, a strong epidemiological link has never been made to specific autoimmune diseases. This is in contrast with another silicate dust, crystalline silica, for which there is considerable evidence linking exposure to diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Instead, the asbestos literature is heavily focused on cancer, including mesothelioma and pulmonary carcinoma. Possible contributing factors to the absence of a stronger epidemiological association between asbestos and autoimmune disease include (a a lack of statistical power due to relatively small or diffuse exposure cohorts, (b exposure misclassification, (c latency of clinical disease, (d mild or subclinical entities that remain undetected or masked by other pathologies, or (e effects that are specific to certain fiber types, so that analyses on mixed exposures do not reach statistical significance. This review summarizes epidemiological, animal model, and in vitro data related to asbestos exposures and autoimmunity. These combined data help build toward a better understanding of the fiber-associated factors contributing to immune dysfunction that may raise the risk of autoimmunity and the possible contribution to asbestos-related pulmonary disease.

  17. Control of radiation exposure (principles and methods)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological risks are directly related to the tissue radiation dose, so it is very important to maintain personnel doses as low as realistically possible. This goal can be achieved by minimizing internal contamination and external exposure to radioactive sources

  18. Exposure, Uptake, and Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza-Squiban, Armelle; Lanone, Sophie

    The nanotechnologies market is booming, e.g., in the food industry (powder additives, etc.) and in medical applications (drug delivery, prosthetics, diagnostic imaging, etc.), but also in other industrial sectors, such as sports, construction, cosmetics, and so on. In this context, with an exponential increase in the number of current and future applications, it is particularly important to evaluate the problem of unintentional (i.e., non-medical) exposure to manufactured nanoparticles (so excluding nanoparticles found naturally in the environment). In this chapter, we begin by discussing the various parameters that must be taken into account in any serious assessment of exposure to man-made nanoparticles. We then list the potential routes by which nanoparticles might enter into the organism, and outline the mechanisms whereby they could get past the different biological barriers. Finally, we describe the biodistribution of nanoparticles in the organism and the way they are eliminated.

  19. Low-exposure tritium radiotoxicity in mammals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobson, R.L.

    1982-02-11

    Studies of tritium radiotoxicity involving chronic /sup 3/H0H exposures in mammals demonstrate in both mice and monkeys that biological effects can be measured following remarkably low levels of exposure - levels in the range of serious practical interest to radiation protection. These studies demonstrate also that deleterious effects of /sup 3/H beta radiation do not differ significantly from those of gamma radiation at high exposures. In contrast, however, at low exposures tritium is significantly more effective than gamma rays, rad for rad, by a factor approaching 3. This is important for hazard evaluation and radiation protection because knowledge concerning biological effects of chronic low-level radiation exposure has come mainly from gamma-ray data; and predictions based on gamma-ray data will underestimate tritium effects - especially at low exposures - unless the RBE is fully taken into account.

  20. Environmental exposure assessment in European birth cohorts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gehring, Ulrike; Casas, Maribel; Brunekreef, Bert;

    2013-01-01

    hand tobacco smoke (SHS), persistent organic pollutants (POPs), noise, radiation, and occupational exposures. The review lists methods and data on environmental exposures in 37 European birth cohort studies. Most data is currently available for smoking and SHS (N=37 cohorts), occupational exposures (N...... of the environmental exposure and health data in these studies was made as part of the ENRIECO (Environmental Health Risks in European Birth Cohorts) project. The focus with regard to exposure was on outdoor air pollution, water contamination, allergens and biological organisms, metals, pesticides, smoking and second......=33), outdoor air pollution, and allergens and microbial agents (N=27). Exposure modeling is increasingly used for long-term air pollution exposure assessment; biomonitoring is used for assessment of exposure to metals, POPs and other chemicals; and environmental monitoring for house dust mite...

  1. Overview of environmental and occupational vanadium exposure and associated health outcomes: an article based on a presentation at the 8th International Symposium on Vanadium Chemistry, Biological Chemistry, and Toxicology, Washington DC, August 15-18, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortoul, T I; Rojas-Lemus, M; Rodriguez-Lara, V; Gonzalez-Villalva, A; Ustarroz-Cano, M; Cano-Gutierrez, G; Gonzalez-Rendon, S E; Montaño, L F; Altamirano-Lozano, M

    2014-01-01

    Vanadium (V) has a variety of applications that make it suitable for use in ceramic production and decoration, production of pigments for a variety of products, an accelerator for drying paint, production of aniline black dye, and as a mordant in coloring textiles. Taking advantage of its hardness, resilience, ability to form alloys, and its resistance to corrosion, V is also used in the production of tools, steel, machinery, and surgical implants. V is employed in producing photographic developers, batteries, and semi-conductors, and in catalyst-based recycling processes. As technologies have evolved, the use of V has increased in jet aircraft and space technology, as well as in manufacture of ultraviolet filter glass to prevent radiation injury. Due to these myriad uses, the potential for occupational exposure to V is ever-evident. Similarly, there is an increased risk for environmental contamination by V agents themselves or as components of by-products released into the environment. For example, the use of V in sulfuric acid production results in the release of soot and/or fly ash rich in vanadium pentoxide. Petroleum refinery, smelting, welding, and cutting of V-rich steel alloy, the cleaning and repair of oil-fired boilers, and catalysis of chemical productions are other sources of increased airborne V-bearing particles in local/distant environments. Exposure of non-workers to V is an increasing health concern. Studies have demonstrated associations between exposure to airborne V-bearing particles (as part of air pollution) and increased risks of a variety of pathologies like hypertension, dysrhythmia, systemic inflammation, hyper-coagulation, cancers, and bronchial hyper-reactivity. This paper will provide a review of the history of V usage in occupational settings, documented exposure levels, environmental levels of V associated with pollution, epidemiologic data relating V exposure(s) to adverse health outcomes, and governmental responses to protect both

  2. Biomonitoring of occupational exposure to chemical carcinogens

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šrám, Radim; Binková, Blanka

    Amsterdam : IOS Press, 2003 - (Cebulska-Wasilewska, A.; Au, W.; Šrám, R.), s. 44-48 - (NATO Sci. Series I.. 351) Grant ostatní: EC(XE) QLK4-CT-2002-02831 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Keywords : polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons * occupational exposure * biomarkers of exposure Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  3. Indicators and signatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The goal of this presentation is to give an idea of the methodology used to deal with proliferation problems. It can be useful for chemical, biological, balistical proliferation. Here, we underline nuclear proliferation scenarios. Nevertheless, the overall approach is also similar to activities related to terrorism. Everyone knows that to strengthen the NPT/IAEA safeguards and similar treaties verification protocols, the organisations in charge need to build strong capabilities to assess known situations and also to prepare themselves to unknown, or undeclared events and activities. To accomplish this, to collect, analyze, build ad hoc knowledge, organisations have to select the information, to manage the enormous amount of available data. Rather recently, the emergence of new crisis has confirmed the central and vital role that information processing plays at each levels of the international or national non-proliferation community. It is why looking for indicators and signatures is so important, to focus on pertinent information, that could mean something from a nuclear proliferation perspective. This allows people dealing with nuclear proliferation not to be overwhelmed by tons of paper or G bites of memory. A strong need for expertise. Identifying, select and following indicators or looking for signatures is not an easy task. It requires strong expertise. From the development and maintenance of its nuclear deterrence, France acquired expertise in the design, production of fissile material, manufacture and testing of nuclear weapons. There is also in France a long history of nuclear achievements, with small or large scale facilities, both in civilian and military fields; each step of the nuclear fuel cycle can be very precisely described. French nuclear technical assessment relies on Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA, i.e. Atomic Energy Commission). Since 1958, CEA laboratories are in charge of nuclear civilian and military applications. Other

  4. Biological assessment of contaminated land using earthworm biomarkers in support of chemical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological indicators can be used to assess polluted sites but their success depends on the availability of suitable assays. The aim of this study was to investigate the performance of two earthworm biomarkers, lysosomal membrane stability measured using the neutral red retention assay (NRR-T) and the total immune activity (TIA) assay, that have previously been established as responsive to chemical exposure. Responses of the two assays were measured following in situ exposure to complexly contaminated field soils at three industrial sites as well as urban and rural controls. The industrial sites were contaminated with a range of metal (cadmium, copper, lead, zinc, nickel and cobalt) and organic (including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) contaminants, but at concentrations below the 'New Dutch List' Intervention concentrations. Exposed earthworms accumulated both metals and organic compounds at the contaminated sites, indicating that there was significant exposure. No effect on earthworm survival was found at any of the sites. Biomarker measurements, however, indicated significant effects, with lower NRR-T and TIA found in the contaminated soils when compared to the two controls. The results demonstrate that a comparison of soil pollutant concentrations with guideline values would not have unequivocally identified chemical exposure and toxic effect for soil organisms living in these soils. However, the earthworm biomarkers successfully identified significant exposure and biological effects caused by the mixture of chemicals present

  5. Lung function, biological monitoring, and biological effect monitoring of gemstone cutters exposed to beryls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, R.; Heinrich-Ramm, R.; Nowak, D.; Olma, K.; Poschadel, B.; Szadkowski, D.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Gemstone cutters are potentially exposed to various carcinogenic and fibrogenic metals such as chromium, nickel, aluminium, and beryllium, as well as to lead. Increased beryllium concentrations had been reported in the air of workplaces of beryl cutters in Idar-Oberstein, Germany. The aim of the survey was to study the excretion of beryllium in cutters and grinders with occupational exposure to beryls—for example, aquamarines and emeralds—to examine the prevalence of beryllium sensitisation with the beryllium lymphocyte transformation test (BeLT), to examine the prevalence of lung disease induced by beryllium, to describe the internal load of the respective metals relative to work process, and to screen for genotoxic effects in this particular profession.
METHODS—In a cross sectional investigation, 57 out of 100 gemstone cutters working in 12 factories in Idar-Oberstein with occupational exposure to beryls underwent medical examinations, a chest radiograph, lung function testing (spirometry, airway resistance with the interrupter technique), and biological monitoring, including measurements of aluminium, chromium, and nickel in urine as well as lead in blood. Beryllium in urine was measured with a newly developed direct electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy technique with a measurement limit of 0.06 µg/l. Also, cytogenetic tests (rates of micronuclei and sister chromatid exchange), and a BeLT were performed. Airborne concentrations of beryllium were measured in three factories. As no adequate local control group was available, the cutters were categorised into those with an exposure to beryls of >4 hours/week (group A) and ⩽4 hours/week (group B).
RESULTS—Clinical, radiological, or spirometric abnormalities indicating pneumoconiosis were detected in none of the gemstone cutters. Metal concentrations in biological material were far below the respective biological limit values, and beryllium in urine was only measurable in

  6. Biomolecular Effects of Cold Plasma Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogul, Rakesh; Bolshakov, Alexander A.; Chan, Suzanne L.; Stevens, Ramsey D.; Khare, Bishun N.; Meyyappan, M.; Trent, Jonathan D.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The effects of cold plasma exposure on Deinococcus radiodurans, plasmid DNA and model proteins were assessed using microbiological, spectrometric and biochemical techniques. Exposure of D. radiodurans, an extremely radiation resistant microbe, to O2 plasma (less than or equal to 25 W, approx. 45 mTorr, 90 min) yielded a approx. 99.999 % sterilization and the sterilization rate was increased approx. 10-fold at 100 W and 500 mTorr. AFM images shows that the exposed cells are significantly deformed and possess 50-70 nm concavities. IR analysis indicates the chemical degradation of lipids, proteins and carotenoids of the cell wall and membrane. Intracellular damage was indicated by major absorbance loss at 1245, 1651 and 1538/cm corresponding to degradation of DNA and proteins, respectively. Biochemical experiments demonstrate that plasmas induce strand scissions and crosslinking of plasmid DNA, and reduction of enzyme activity; the degradation is power dependent with total sample loss occurring in 60 s at 200 W and 500 mTorr. Emission spectroscopy shows that D. radiodurans is volatilized into CO2, CO, N2 and H2O confirming the removal of biological matter from contaminated surfaces. The O2 plasma impacts several cellular components predominantly through chemical degradation by atomic oxygen. A CO2, plasma, however, was not effective at degrading D. radiodurans, revealing the importance of plasma composition, which has implications for planetary protection and the contamination of Mars.

  7. Blood gene expression signatures predict exposure levels

    OpenAIRE

    P.R. Bushel; Heinloth, A. N.; Li, J.; Huang, L.; Chou, J. W.; Boorman, G A; Malarkey, D.E.; Houle, C. D.; S. M. Ward; Wilson, R. E.; Fannin, R. D.; Russo, M W; Watkins, P B; Tennant, R. W.; Paules, R S

    2007-01-01

    To respond to potential adverse exposures properly, health care providers need accurate indicators of exposure levels. The indicators are particularly important in the case of acetaminophen (APAP) intoxication, the leading cause of liver failure in the U.S. We hypothesized that gene expression patterns derived from blood cells would provide useful indicators of acute exposure levels. To test this hypothesis, we used a blood gene expression data set from rats exposed to APAP to train classifie...

  8. What happens at very low levels of radiation exposure ? Are the low dose exposures beneficial ?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Radiation is naturally present in our environment and has been since the birth of this planet. The human population is constantly exposed to low levels of natural background radiation, primarily from environmental sources, and to higher levels from occupational sources, medical therapy, and other human-mediated events. Radiation is one of the best-investigated hazardous agents. The biological effects of ionizing radiation for radiation protection consideration are grouped into two categories: The deterministic and the stochastic ones. Deterministic radiation effects can be clinically diagnosed in the exposed individual and occur when above a certain thresholdan appropriately high dose is absorbed in the tissues and organs to cause the death of a large number of cells and consequently to impair tissue or organ functions early after exposure. A clinically observable biological effect (Acute Radiation Sendromes, ARS) occurs days to months after an acute radiation dose. Stochastic radiation effects are the chronic effects of radiation result from relatively low exposure levels delivered over long periods of time. These are sort of effects that might result from occupational exposure, or to the background exposure levels. Such late effects might be the development of malignant (cancerous) disease and of the hereditary consequences. These effects may be observed many years after the radiation exposure. There is a latent period between the initial radiation exposure and the development of the biological effect. For this reason, a stochastic effect is called a Linear or Zero-Threshold (LNT) Dose-Response Effect. There is a stochastic correlation between the number of cases of cancers or genetic defects developed inside a population and the dose received by the population at relatively large levels of radiation. These changes in gene activation seem to be able to modify the response of cells to subsequent radiation exposure, termed the adaptive response. This

  9. Embryonic exposures of lithium and homocysteine and folate protection affect lipid metabolism during mouse cardiogenesis and placentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Mingda; Evsikov, Alexei V; Zhang, Lifeng; Lastra-Vicente, Rosana; Linask, Kersti K

    2016-06-01

    Embryonic exposures can increase the risk of congenital cardiac birth defects and adult disease. The present study identifies the predominant pathways modulated by an acute embryonic mouse exposure during gastrulation to lithium or homocysteine that induces cardiac defects. High dose periconceptional folate supplementation normalized development. Microarray bioinformatic analysis of gene expression demonstrated that primarily lipid metabolism is altered after the acute exposures. The lipid-related modulation demonstrated a gender bias with male embryos showing greater number of lipid-related Gene Ontology biological processes altered than in female embryos. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated significant change of the fatty acid oxidation gene Acadm with homocysteine exposure primarily in male embryos than in female. The perturbations resulting from the exposures resulted in growth-restricted placentas with disorganized cellular lipid droplet distribution indicating lipids have a critical role in cardiac-placental abnormal development. High folate supplementation protected normal heart-placental function, gene expression and lipid localization. PMID:26993217

  10. Radiolabelled substrates for studying biological effects of trace contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A programme of coordinated isotopic tracer-aided investigations of the biological side-effects of foreign chemical residues in food and agriculture, initiated in 1973, was reviewed. The current status of representative investigations from the point of view of techniques and priorities was assessed. Such investigations involved radioactive substrates for studying DNA injury and its repair; 14C-labelled acetylcholine as substrate for measuring enzyme inhibition due to the presence of, or exposure to, anticholinesteratic contaminants; radioactive substrates as indication of side-effects in non-target organisms and of their comparative susceptibilities; radioactive substrates as indicators of persistence or biodegradability of trace contaminants of soil or water; and labelled pools for studying the biological side-effects of trace contaminants. Priorities were identified

  11. Parámetros químicos y biológicos como indicadores de calidad del suelo en diferentes manejos Chemical and biological parameters as indicators of soil quality under different managements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ferreras

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del trabajo fue evaluar la sensibilidad de una serie de parámetros químicos y bioquímicos en suelos representativos de la Región Pampeana bajo diferentes manejos con la finalidad de: i establecer los parámetros que reflejen de manera más sensible y tempranamente el grado de degradación o recuperación; ii comparar la información generada de las parcelas bajo cultivo con el mismo tipo de suelo no perturbado, considerado como referencia (T. En ensayos con diferentes manejos localizados en las EEA INTA Oliveros, Marcos Juárez y Rafaela se evaluó: Carbono orgánico total (COT, carbono asociado a la fracción fina (COff, carbono asociado a la fracción gruesa (COfg, carbono de la biomasa microbiana (CBM, actividad respiratoria microbiana (ARM y actividad de las enzimas fosfatasa ácida (Pasa, deshidrogenasa (Dasa y ureasa (Uasa. Se calculó el cociente metabólico microbiano (qCO2, a través de la relación entre ARM y el CBM, como así también las relaciones entre actividades de las enzimas y CBM en función del COT. Para cada sitio, el suelo bajo cultivo presentó en la mayoría de las variables analizadas valores inferiores con respecto a T (pThe aim of the work was to assess the sensitivity of chemical and biochemical parameters in representative soils of the Pampa Region under different managements with the purpose of i establishing the soil parameters that may have a role as early and sensitive indicators of soil ecological stress and restoration; and ii comparing the results from cropped plots with the same undisturbed soil type, considered as reference (T. The experiment was carried out on experimental plots under different soil managements at the INTA Experimental Stations at Oliveros, Marcos Juárez and Rafaela. Total organic carbon (COT, organic carbon associated with the fine fraction (COff and organic carbon associated with the coarse fraction (COfg, microbial biomass carbon (CBM, soil microbial respiration (ARM

  12. Quantum Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Sergi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A critical assessment of the recent developmentsof molecular biology is presented.The thesis that they do not lead to a conceptualunderstanding of life and biological systems is defended.Maturana and Varela's concept of autopoiesis is briefly sketchedand its logical circularity avoided by postulatingthe existence of underlying living processes,entailing amplification from the microscopic to the macroscopic scale,with increasing complexity in the passage from one scale to the other.Following such a line of thought, the currently accepted model of condensed matter, which is based on electrostatics and short-ranged forces,is criticized. It is suggested that the correct interpretationof quantum dispersion forces (van der Waals, hydrogen bonding, and so onas quantum coherence effects hints at the necessity of includinglong-ranged forces (or mechanisms for them incondensed matter theories of biological processes.Some quantum effects in biology are reviewedand quantum mechanics is acknowledged as conceptually important to biology since withoutit most (if not all of the biological structuresand signalling processes would not even exist. Moreover, it is suggested that long-rangequantum coherent dynamics, including electron polarization,may be invoked to explain signal amplificationprocess in biological systems in general.

  13. Trichloroethene levels in human blood and exhaled breath from controlled inhalation exposure.

    OpenAIRE

    Pleil, J D; Fisher, J W; Lindstrom, A B

    1998-01-01

    The organic constituents of exhaled human breath are representative of bloodborne concentrations through gas exchange in the blood/breath interface in the lungs. The presence of specific compounds can be an indicator of recent exposure or represent a biological response of the subject. For volatile organic compounds, sampling and analysis of breath is preferred to direct measurement from blood samples because breath collection is noninvasive, potentially infectious waste is avoided, the sampl...