WorldWideScience

Sample records for biological effects dosimetry

  1. Dosimetry and biological effects of fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoetelief, J.

    1981-01-01

    This thesis contains studies on two types of cellular damage: cell reproductive death and chromosome aberrations induced by irradiation with X rays, gamma rays and fast neutrons of different energies. A prerequisite for the performance of radiobiological experiments is the determination of the absorbed dose with a sufficient degree of accuracy and precision. Basic concepts of energy deposition by ionizing radiation and practical aspects of neutron dosimetry for biomedical purposes are discussed. Information on the relative neutron sensitivity of GM counters and on the effective point of measurement of ionization chambers for dosimetry of neutron and photon beams under free-in-air conditions and inside phantoms which are used to simulate the biological objects is presented. Different methods for neutron dosimetry are compared and the experimental techniques used for the investigations of cell reproductive death and chromosome aberrations induced by ionizing radiation of different qualities are presented. Dose-effect relations for induction cell inactivation and chromsome aberrations in three cultured cell lines for different radiation qualities are presented. (Auth.)

  2. Biological dosimetry by the radiation effects on the skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessho, Yuko

    1994-01-01

    In cases of partial body over-exposure, the dose estimation with personal monitors or with reconstruction of exposed conditions is often impossible without considerable error. Clinical signs of irradiated skin, such as epilation or moist desquamation have been used as the indicators of doses in the radiological accidents, because each sign has the threshold dose. As hair growth is known to be sensitive to radiation, the dose-effect relationship of the delay of hair regrowth and the reduction in hair length of mice after irradiation were examined to investigate if they can be used as biological dosimeters. Hairs on the dorsal skin of 290 ICR mice (8 weeks old) were shaved and irradiated with a Sr-90/Y-90 β-ray source in the early anagen and the midanagen stages of the hair cycle. Skin doses were from 0.5 to 10 Gy. The time of hair regrowth and the hair length were examined with the scaling loupe. Dose-effect relationship of the delay of hair regrowth and reduction in hair length were both clearly dose dependent, fitting the L-Q or L function depending on the stage. Dose estimation functions were derived from the dose-effect relationship curves. The histological observations suggested that hair growth retardation caused by irradiation in midanagen might be due to the cell death and the depression of mitosis in the hair matrix cells. This dose estimation method was applied to the case who was over-exposed to X-ray on his hand and fingers. The findings showed that hair regrowth delay was a sensitive biological dosimeter in the case of partial body over-exposure, which could be applied as early as a few days after over-exposure. The method was simple and non-invasive to the exposed patient. (author)

  3. Effect of contrast agent administration on consequences of dosimetry and biology in radiotherapy planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Ching-Jung [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333 Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333 Taiwan (China); Yang, Pei-Ying [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333 Taiwan (China); Chao, Tsi-Chian, E-mail: chaot@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333 Taiwan (China); Tu, Shu-Ju, E-mail: sjtu@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333 Taiwan (China)

    2015-06-01

    In the treatment planning of radiation therapy, patients may be administrated with contrast media in CT scanning to assist physicians for accurate delineation of the target or organs. However, contrast media are not used in patients during the treatment delivery. In particular, contrast media contain materials with high atomic numbers and dosimetric variations may occur between scenarios where contrast media are present in treatment planning and absent in treatment delivery. In this study we evaluate the effect of contrast media on the dosimetry and biological consequence. An analytical phantom based on AAPM TG 119 and five sets of CT images from clinical patients are included. Different techniques of treatment planning are considered, including 1-field AP, 2-field AP+PA, 4-field box, 7-field IMRT, and RapidArc. RapidArc is a recent technique of volumetric modulated arc therapy and is used in our study of contrast media in clinical scenarios. The effect of RapidArc on dosimetry and biological consequence for administration of contrast media in radiotherapy is not discussed previously in literature. It is shown that dose difference is reduced as the number of external beams is increased, suggesting RapidArc may be favored to be used in the treatment planning enhanced by contrast media. Linear trend lines are fitted for assessment of percent dose differences in the planning target volume versus concentrations of contrast media between plans where contrast media are present and absent, respectively.

  4. Development of radiation biological dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Chul Koo; Kim, Tae Hwan; Lee, Yun Sil; Son, Young Sook; Kim, Soo Kwan; Jang, Won Suk; Le, Sun Joo; Jee, Young Heun; Jung, Woo Jung

    1999-04-01

    Up until now, only a few methods have been developed for radiation biological dosimetry such as conventional chromosome aberration and micronucleus in peripheral blood cell. However, because these methods not only can be estimated by the expert, but also have a little limitation due to need high technique and many times in the case of radiation accident, it is very difficult to evaluate the absorbed dose of victims. Therefore, we should develop effective, easy, simple and rapid biodosimetry and its guideline (triage) to be able to be treated the victims as fast as possible. We established the premature chromosome condensation assay and apoptotic fragment assay which was the significant relationship between dose and cell damages to evaluate the irradiation dose as correct and rapid as possible using lymphocytes and crypt cells, and compared with conventional chromosome aberration assay and micronuclei assay.

  5. Analysis of MIR-18 results for physical and biological dosimetry: radiation shielding effectiveness in LEO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Williams, J. R.; Dicello, J. F.

    2000-01-01

    We compare models of radiation transport and biological response to physical and biological dosimetry results from astronauts on the Mir space station. Transport models are shown to be in good agreement with physical measurements and indicate that the ratio of equivalent dose from the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) to protons is about 3/2:1 and that this ratio will increase for exposures to internal organs. Two biological response models are used to compare to the Mir biodosimetry for chromosome aberration in lymphocyte cells; a track-structure model and the linear-quadratic model with linear energy transfer (LET) dependent weighting coefficients. These models are fit to in vitro data for aberration formation in human lymphocytes by photons and charged particles. Both models are found to be in reasonable agreement with data for aberrations in lymphocytes of Mir crew members: however there are differences between the use of LET dependent weighting factors and track structure models for assigning radiation quality factors. The major difference in the models is the increased effectiveness predicted by the track model for low charge and energy ions with LET near 10 keV/micrometers. The results of our calculations indicate that aluminum shielding, although providing important mitigation of the effects of trapped radiation, provides no protective effect from the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) in low-earth orbit (LEO) using either equivalent dose or the number of chromosome aberrations as a measure until about 100 g/cm 2 of material is used.

  6. Radiation effects analysis in a group of interventional radiologists using biological and physical dosimetry methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, M., E-mail: WEMLmirapas@iqn.upv.e [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, Polytechnic University of Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Montoro, A.; Almonacid, M. [Radiation Protection Service, Hospital Universitario La Fe Valencia (Spain); Ferrer, S. [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, Polytechnic University of Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Barquinero, J.F. [Biological Dosimetry Service, Unit of Anthropology, Department of Animal and Vegetable Biology and Ecology, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB) (Spain); Tortosa, R. [Radiation Protection Service, Hospital Universitario La Fe Valencia (Spain); Verdu, G. [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, Polytechnic University of Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Rodriguez, P. [Biological Dosimetry Service, Unit of Anthropology, Department of Animal and Vegetable Biology and Ecology, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB) (Spain); Barrios, L.L. [Department of Physiology and Cellular Biology, Unit of Cellular Biology (UAB) (Spain); Villaescusa, J.I. [Radiation Protection Service, Hospital Universitario La Fe Valencia (Spain)

    2010-08-15

    excess radio-induced risk of leukemia in the group under study. Finally, the maximum radiological detriment in the group, evaluated as the total number of radio-induced cancers using physical dosimetry, has been of 2.18/1000 person-year (skin and leukemia), and using biological dosimetry of 9.20/1000 PY (leukemia). As a conclusion, this study has provided an assessment of the non-deterministic effects (rate of radio-induced cancer incidence) attributable to the group under study due to their professional activity.

  7. [Study on therapeutic dosimetry and biologic effect of high intensity focused ultrasound].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xuemei; Xiong, Xin; Zou, Jianzhong; Li, Faqi; Ma, Ping; Wang, Zhibiao

    2009-02-01

    This study was aimed at exploring the high intensity focused ultrasound(HIFU) therapeutic dosimetry and its biologic effect. In-vitro, bovine liver was immersed into 0.9% NS and degassed for application. The JC Model-focused ultrasound tumor therapeutic system was used in the experiment. The HIFU parameters were: frequency 1.6 MHz, depth 20 mm, acoustic power from 16.44 W to 196.32 W. Under each power, at radiating times from is to 20 s, bioptic specimens were obtained from all samples. The results showed when the acoustic power was equal to or higher than 179.96 W, only is of radiating is adequate to induce coagulative necrosis, and when the acoustic power was lower than 65.44 W, the radiating time to produce coagulative necrosis was about 7 s. In the range of 65.44-179.96 W, at each time when the acoustic power was set up with an increment of 16.36 W, the time to produce coagulative necrosis was 1-2 s shorter. The form of biological focal region (BFR) varied with the acoustic power and HIFU irradiation time. The size of BFR increased with the increase of HIFU irradiation dosage (acoustic power x exposure time). There is positive correlation between the size of BFR and the dosage of HIFU irradiation (y = 0.0164x(1.05591), R5 = 0.9238, P < 0.05).

  8. Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezende, D.A.O. de

    1976-01-01

    The fundamental units of dosimetry are defined, such as exposure rate, absorbed dose and equivalent dose. A table is given of relative biological effectiveness values for the different types of radiation. The relation between the roentgen and rad units is calculated and the concepts of physical half-life, biological half-life and effective half-life are discussed. Referring to internal dosimetry, a mathematical treatment is given to β particle-and γ radiation dosimetry. The absorbed dose is calculated and a practical example is given of the calculation of the exposure and of the dose rate for a gama source [pt

  9. The use of apoptosis in human lymphocytes peripheral as alternative methods in biological dosimetry of radiation effects from cobalt-60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemes, Marisa

    1997-01-01

    Gamma rays affect cells in dose-response manner, resulting in cell death, as in cancer radiotherapy. The ionizing radiation acts by transferring energy, mainly by free radicals from water radiolysis that result in nucleic acid damage and other effects in lipids and proteins, The level of exposure is indirectly estimated by physical dosimetry, but the biological dosimetry can measure the direct radiation effect, mainly in post-dividing cells by classical cytogenetic approach. Recently, it was reported that irradiated cells develop an induced programmed death or apoptosis. With a biological dosimetric technique, we measured apoptotic cell fraction in 60 Co in vitro irradiated blood cells from voluntary healthy donors. The agarose gel electrophoresis showed a low sensitivity, because cell DNA presented the characteristic pattern only when the cells were exposed to 100 c Gy or more. Using a terminal DNA labeling technique we observed that the apoptotic cell fraction proportionally increases with irradiation. Similar sensitivity was observed when compared to classical cytogenetics (3 c Gy minimum detection level). These techniques are easier to perform, do not need cell culture and all cells, including interphase ones, can be analyzed, providing a good tool in biological dosimetry. (author)

  10. Calibration curves for biological dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero C, C.; Brena V, M. . E-mail cgc@nuclear.inin.mx

    2004-01-01

    The generated information by the investigations in different laboratories of the world, included the ININ, in which settles down that certain class of chromosomal leisure it increases in function of the dose and radiation type, has given by result the obtaining of calibrated curves that are applied in the well-known technique as biological dosimetry. In this work is presented a summary of the work made in the laboratory that includes the calibrated curves for gamma radiation of 60 Cobalt and X rays of 250 k Vp, examples of presumed exposure to ionizing radiation, resolved by means of aberration analysis and the corresponding dose estimate through the equations of the respective curves and finally a comparison among the dose calculations in those people affected by the accident of Ciudad Juarez, carried out by the group of Oak Ridge, USA and those obtained in this laboratory. (Author)

  11. Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of ionizing radiation dosimetry is the measurement of the physical and biological consequences of exposure to radiation. As these consequences are proportional to the local absorption of energy, the dosimetry of ionizing radiation is based on the measurement of this quantity. Owing to the size of the effects of ionizing radiation on materials in all of these area, dosimetry plays an essential role in the prevention and the control of radiation exposure. Its use is of great importance in two areas in particular where the employment of ionizing radiation relates to human health: radiation protection, and medical applications. Dosimetry is different for various reasons: owing to the diversity of the physical characteristics produced by different kinds of radiation according to their nature (X- and γ-photons, electrons, neutrons,...), their energy (from several keV to several MeV), the orders of magnitude of the doses being estimated (a factor of about 10 5 between diagnostic and therapeutic applications); and the temporal and spatial variation of the biological parameters entering into the calculations. On the practical level, dosimetry poses two distinct yet closely related problems: the determination of the absorbed dose received by a subject exposed to radiation from a source external to his body (external dosimetry); and the determination of the absorbed dose received by a subject owing to the presence within his body of some radioactive substance (internal dosimetry)

  12. DRDC Ottawa working standard for biological dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segura, T.M.; Prud'homme-Lalonde, L.; Thorleifson, E.; Lachapelle, S.; Mullins, D.; Qutob, S.; Wilkinson, D.

    2005-07-01

    This Standard provides quality assurance, quality control, and evaluation of the performance criteria for the purpose of accreditation of the Radiation Biology laboratory at Defence Research and Development Canada - Ottawa (DRDC Ottawa) using biological dosimetry to predict radiation exposure doses. The International Standard (ISO 19238) and the International Atomic Energy Association (IAEA) Technical Report Series No. 405 are used as guiding documents in preparation of this working document specific to the DRDC Ottawa Radiation Biology Laboratory. This Standard addresses: 1. The confidentiality of personal information, for the customer and the service laboratory; 2. The laboratory safety requirements; 3. The calibration sources and calibration dose ranges useful for establishing the reference dose-effect curves allowing the dose estimation from chromosome aberration frequency, and the minimum detection levels; 4. Transportation criteria for shipping of test samples to the laboratory; 5. Preparation of samples for analysis; 6. The scoring procedure for unstable chromosome aberrations used for biological dosimetry; 7. The criteria for converting a measured aberration frequency into an estimate of absorbed dose; 8. The reporting of results; 9. The quality assurance and quality control plan for the laboratory; and 10. Informative annexes containing examples of a questionnaire, instructions for customers, a data sheet for recording aberrations, a sample report and other supportive documents. (author)

  13. DRDC Ottawa working standard for biological dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segura, T.M.; Prud' homme-Lalonde, L. [Defence Research and Development Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Thorleifson, E. [Health Canada, Gatineau, Quebec (Canada); Lachapelle, S.; Mullins, D. [JERA Consulting (Canada); Qutob, S. [Health Canada, Gatineau, Quebec (Canada); Wilkinson, D.

    2005-07-15

    This Standard provides quality assurance, quality control, and evaluation of the performance criteria for the purpose of accreditation of the Radiation Biology laboratory at Defence Research and Development Canada - Ottawa (DRDC Ottawa) using biological dosimetry to predict radiation exposure doses. The International Standard (ISO 19238) and the International Atomic Energy Association (IAEA) Technical Report Series No. 405 are used as guiding documents in preparation of this working document specific to the DRDC Ottawa Radiation Biology Laboratory. This Standard addresses: 1. The confidentiality of personal information, for the customer and the service laboratory; 2. The laboratory safety requirements; 3. The calibration sources and calibration dose ranges useful for establishing the reference dose-effect curves allowing the dose estimation from chromosome aberration frequency, and the minimum detection levels; 4. Transportation criteria for shipping of test samples to the laboratory; 5. Preparation of samples for analysis; 6. The scoring procedure for unstable chromosome aberrations used for biological dosimetry; 7. The criteria for converting a measured aberration frequency into an estimate of absorbed dose; 8. The reporting of results; 9. The quality assurance and quality control plan for the laboratory; and 10. Informative annexes containing examples of a questionnaire, instructions for customers, a data sheet for recording aberrations, a sample report and other supportive documents. (author)

  14. About the factors distorting biological dosimetry results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosseh, I.B.

    1999-01-01

    The row of chemical substances that have not mutagenic effect can strengthen ionising radiation induced cytogenetic effects. For example nitrite sodium and nitrate sodium reinforce mutagenic action of radiation and cause sensitized effect although they aren't mutagens. Presence of residual amount of herbicides in food products can have influence at level of aberration in human cells. It was investigated the influence of herbicide zencor at mutagenic action of radiation. This substance has weak mutagenic activity. In the case of combined action of zencor with irradiation antagonistic effect was observed. Mutation rate turns out to be lower than expected summary value. At the same time many foods products (tea, coffee, cacao, chocolate etc., which contain melanin) are antimutagens and can also change the frequency of radiation induced mutations. Taking of medicine distort the results of dose estimation. The frequency of chromosomal aberrations in blood lymphocytes after acute irradiation is considered to be adequate method of biological dosimetry. In the case of chronic irradiation this analysis becomes complicated with such processes as adaptation (selection and proliferation of cells with more radioresistant genotype) and the origin of genetic un stability which leads to higher radiosensitivity. The estimation of the level of point mutations is the most precise method of biological dosimetry because their existence is less exposed to modifications

  15. Extension of the biological effective dose to the MIRD schema and possible implications in radionuclide therapy dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baechler, Sébastien; Hobbs, Robert F.; Prideaux, Andrew R.; Wahl, Richard L.; Sgouros, George

    2010-01-01

    In dosimetry-based treatment planning protocols, patients with rapid clearance of the radiopharmaceutical require a larger amount of initial activity than those with slow clearance to match the absorbed dose to the critical organ. As a result, the dose-rate to the critical organ is higher in patients with rapid clearance and may cause unexpected toxicity compared to patients with slow clearance. In order to account for the biological impact of different dose-rates, radiobiological modeling is beginning to be applied to the analysis of radionuclide therapy patient data. To date, the formalism used for these analyses is based on kinetics derived from activity in a single organ, the target. This does not include the influence of other source organs to the dose and dose-rate to the target organ. As a result, only self-dose irradiation in the target organ contributes to the dose-rate. In this work, the biological effective dose (BED) formalism has been extended to include the effect of multiple source organ contributions to the net dose-rate in a target organ. The generalized BED derivation has been based on the Medical Internal Radionuclide Dose Committee (MIRD) schema assuming multiple source organs following exponential effective clearance of the radionuclide. A BED-based approach to determine the largest safe dose to critical organs has also been developed. The extended BED formalism is applied to red marrow dosimetry, as well as kidney dosimetry considering the cortex and the medulla separately, since both those organs are commonly dose limiting in radionuclide therapy. The analysis shows that because the red marrow is an early responding tissue (high α/β), it is less susceptible to unexpected toxicity arising from rapid clearance of high levels of administered activity in the marrow or in the remainder of the body. In kidney dosimetry, the study demonstrates a complex interplay between clearance of activity in the cortex and the medulla, as well as the initial

  16. Extension of the biological effective dose to the MIRD schema and possible implications in radionuclide therapy dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baechler, Sebastien; Hobbs, Robert F.; Prideaux, Andrew R.; Wahl, Richard L.; Sgouros, George

    2008-01-01

    In dosimetry-based treatment planning protocols, patients with rapid clearance of the radiopharmaceutical require a larger amount of initial activity than those with slow clearance to match the absorbed dose to the critical organ. As a result, the dose-rate to the critical organ is higher in patients with rapid clearance and may cause unexpected toxicity compared to patients with slow clearance. In order to account for the biological impact of different dose-rates, radiobiological modeling is beginning to be applied to the analysis of radionuclide therapy patient data. To date, the formalism used for these analyses is based on kinetics derived from activity in a single organ, the target. This does not include the influence of other source organs to the dose and dose-rate to the target organ. As a result, only self-dose irradiation in the target organ contributes to the dose-rate. In this work, the biological effective dose (BED) formalism has been extended to include the effect of multiple source organ contributions to the net dose-rate in a target organ. The generalized BED derivation has been based on the Medical Internal Radionuclide Dose Committee (MIRD) schema assuming multiple source organs following exponential effective clearance of the radionuclide. A BED-based approach to determine the largest safe dose to critical organs has also been developed. The extended BED formalism is applied to red marrow dosimetry, as well as kidney dosimetry considering the cortex and the medulla separately, since both those organs are commonly dose limiting in radionuclide therapy. The analysis shows that because the red marrow is an early responding tissue (high α/β), it is less susceptible to unexpected toxicity arising from rapid clearance of high levels of administered activity in the marrow or in the remainder of the body. In kidney dosimetry, the study demonstrates a complex interplay between clearance of activity in the cortex and the medulla, as well as the initial

  17. Influence of time-dose-relationships in therapeutic nuclear medicine applications on biological effectiveness of irradiation. Consequences for dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oehme, L.; Kotzerke, J.; Doerr, W.; Wust, P.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: The biological effectiveness of irradiation is influenced not only by the total dose but also the rate at which this dose is administered. Tolerance dose estimates from external radiation therapy with a conventional fractionation protocol require adaptation for application in targeted radionuclide therapy. Methods: The linear-quadratic model allows for calculation of the biologically effective dose (BED) and takes into consideration tissue specific factors (recovery capacity) as well as dose rate effects (recovery kinetics). It can be applied in radionuclide therapy as well. For relevant therapeutic radionuclides (e. g. 188 Re, 90 Y, 177 Lu, and 131 I), the effect of different physical decay times and variable biological half-lives on BED was calculated for several organs. Results: BED is markedly increased using 188 Re compared to longer-lived radionuclides. The effect is dose-dependent and tissue-specific, resulting, for example, in higher effects on the kidneys compared to bone marrow. Therefore, in unfavourable conditions (e. g. reduced recovery capacity due to concomitant diseases or previous therapy), the BED may exceed organ dose tolerance. Conclusion: Time-dose-relationships have to be taken into consideration by the calculation of BED for internal radionuclide therapy. The biological effectiveness depends on dose- and tissue-specific factors and is much more pronounced in 188 Re than in 90 Y and other longer living radionuclides. Determination of organ tolerance dose values should take into account these radiobiological differences, since it is currently not considered in dosimetry programs. (orig.)

  18. Establishing working standards of chromosome aberrations analysis for biological dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bui Thi Kim Luyen; Tran Que; Pham Ngoc Duy; Nguyen Thi Kim Anh; Ha Thi Ngoc Lien

    2015-01-01

    Biological dosimetry is an dose assessment method using specify bio markers of radiation. IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) and ISO (International Organization for Standardization) defined that dicentric chromosome is specify for radiation, it is a gold standard for biodosimetry. Along with the documents published by IAEA, WHO, ISO and OECD, our results of study on the chromosome aberrations induced by radiation were organized systematically in nine standards that dealing with chromosome aberration test and micronucleus test in human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro. This standard addresses: the reference dose-effect for dose estimation, the minimum detection levels, cell culture, slide preparation, scoring procedure for chromosome aberrations use for biodosimetry, the criteria for converting aberration frequency into absorbed dose, reporting of results. Following these standards, the automatic analysis devices were calibrated for improving biological dosimetry method. This standard will be used to acquire and maintain accreditation of the Biological Dosimetry laboratory in Nuclear Research Institute. (author)

  19. Biological effects of radiation and dosimetry in X-ray diagnostics of children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milkovic, Durdica; Beck, Natko; Kovac, Kornelija; Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera; Gajski, Goran

    2008-01-01

    The chest radiograms represent the basic radiological examinations of thorax. The basis for radiation protection especially in pediatrics is the exact determination of doses. The risk estimation of genome damages can be received in human peripheral blood lymphocytes using alkaline version of Comet Assay. The aim of this work was assessment and quantification of the level of DNA damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes of children during airways X-ray examinations of chest and to compare data to the dose of exposure. Doses were determined using thermoluminescence (TL) dosimetry and radiophotoluminescent (RPL) glass dosimetry system. Twenty children with pulmonary diseases, ages between 5 and 14 years were assessed. Dose measurements were conducted for poster-anterior (PA) projection on the forehead, thyroid gland, gonads, chest and back. We used a 150 kV Shimadzu CH-200 M X-ray unit. Peripheral blood samples were taken from children after and prior to X-ray exposure and were examined with the alkaline Comet Assay. Comet Assay is one of the standard techniques for assessing genome damage with variety applications in genotoxicity testing as well as fundamental research in DNA damage and repair. As a measure of DNA damage tail length was used, calculated from the centre of the head and presented in micrometers (μm). Mean value of group after irradiation was 14.04 ± 1.74 as opposed to mean value of group before irradiation that was 13.15 ± 1.33. Differences between mean tail lengths were statistically significant (P<0.05, ANOVA). In addition, correlation was found between doses in primary beam (measured on the back) and the ratio of tail length (DNA damage) before and after irradiation. Doses measured with TL and RPL dosimeters showed satisfactory agreement and both dosimetry methods are suitable for dosimetric measurements in X-ray diagnostics. (author)

  20. Biological dosimetry, scopes and limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero C, C.; Brena V, M.

    1999-01-01

    The analysis of the aberrations in chromosomes is an alternative to establish the exposure dose to the radiation, when the information provided by the traditional physical methods is insufficient. There are diverse causes by which it can reached to apply an alternative system, such is the case of exposures of another persons to the management of radiation sources, which not carry physical dosemeter. Contrary case is to the occupational exposure personnel (OEP), what must to utilize some system for determining the exposure dose, even so can be needed the case for more information. In any case, the cells from the affected person are the alternative without the biological system be overlap to the physical, it is complementary. (Author)

  1. OEDIPE, a software for personalized Monte Carlo dosimetry and treatment planning optimization in nuclear medicine: absorbed dose and biologically effective dose considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petitguillaume, A.; Broggio, D.; Franck, D.; Desbree, A.; Bernardini, M.; Labriolle Vaylet, C. de

    2014-01-01

    For targeted radionuclide therapies, treatment planning usually consists of the administration of standard activities without accounting for the patient-specific activity distribution, pharmacokinetics and dosimetry to organs at risk. The OEDIPE software is a user-friendly interface which has an automation level suitable for performing personalized Monte Carlo 3D dosimetry for diagnostic and therapeutic radionuclide administrations. Mean absorbed doses to regions of interest (ROIs), isodose curves superimposed on a personalized anatomical model of the patient and dose-volume histograms can be extracted from the absorbed dose 3D distribution. Moreover, to account for the differences in radiosensitivity between tumoral and healthy tissues, additional functionalities have been implemented to calculate the 3D distribution of the biologically effective dose (BED), mean BEDs to ROIs, isoBED curves and BED-volume histograms along with the Equivalent Uniform Biologically Effective Dose (EUD) to ROIs. Finally, optimization tools are available for treatment planning optimization using either the absorbed dose or BED distributions. These tools enable one to calculate the maximal injectable activity which meets tolerance criteria to organs at risk for a chosen fractionation protocol. This paper describes the functionalities available in the latest version of the OEDIPE software to perform personalized Monte Carlo dosimetry and treatment planning optimization in targeted radionuclide therapies. (authors)

  2. Radio-analysis. Applications: biological dosimetry; Radioanalyse. Applications: dosage biologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourrel, F. [CEA Saclay, INSTN, Institut National des Sciences et Techniques Nucleaires, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Courriere, Ph. [UFR de Pharmacie, 31 - Toulouse (France)

    2003-06-01

    Radioisotopes have revolutionized the medical biology. Radio-immunology remains the reference measurement of the infinitely small in biology. Constant efforts have been performed to improve the simpleness, detectability and fastness of the method thanks to an increasing automation. This paper presents: 1 - the advantages of compounds labelling and the isotopic dilution; 2 - the antigen-antibody system: properties, determination of the affinity constant using the Scatchard method; 3 - radio-immunologic dosimetry: competitive dosimetry (radioimmunoassay), calibration curve and mathematical data processing, application to the free thyroxine dosimetry, immunoradiometric dosimetry (immunoradiometric assay), evaluation of the analytical efficiency of a radioimmunoassay; 4 - detection of the radioactive signal (solid and liquid scintillation). (J.S.)

  3. Radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Hine, Gerald J; Hine, Gerald J

    1956-01-01

    Radiation Dosimetry focuses on the advancements, processes, technologies, techniques, and principles involved in radiation dosimetry, including counters and calibration and standardization techniques. The selection first offers information on radiation units and the theory of ionization dosimetry and interaction of radiation with matter. Topics include quantities derivable from roentgens, determination of dose in roentgens, ionization dosimetry of high-energy photons and corpuscular radiations, and heavy charged particles. The text then examines the biological and medical effects of radiation,

  4. Biological dosimetry of irradiation accidents; La dosimetrie biologique des accidents d`irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durand, V.; Chambrette, V.; Le Roy, A.; Paillole, N.; Sorokine, I.; Voisin, P.

    1994-12-31

    The biological dosimetry in radiation protection allows to evaluate the received dose by a potentially irradiated person from biological markers such chromosomal abnormalities. The technologies of Hybridization In Situ by Fluorescence (F.I.S.H) allow the detection of steady chromosomal aberrations of translocation type.

  5. The method validation step of biological dosimetry accreditation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, L.; Voisin, P.A.; Guillou, A.C.; Busset, A.; Gregoire, E.; Buard, V.; Delbos, M.; Voisin, Ph.

    2006-01-01

    One of the missions of the Laboratory of Biological Dosimetry (L.D.B.) of the Institute for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (I.R.S.N.) is to assess the radiological dose after an accidental overexposure suspicion to ionising radiation, by using radio-induced changes of some biological parameters. The 'gold standard' is the yield of dicentrics observed in patients lymphocytes, and this yield is converted in dose using dose effect relationships. This method is complementary to clinical and physical dosimetry, for medical team in charge of the patients. To obtain a formal recognition of its operational activity, the laboratory decided three years ago, to require an accreditation, by following the recommendations of both 17025 General Requirements for the Competence of Testing and Calibration Laboratories and 19238 Performance criteria for service laboratories performing biological dosimetry by cyto-genetics. Diagnostics, risks analysis were realized to control the whole analysis process leading to documents writing. Purchases, personnel department, vocational training were also included in the quality system. Audits were very helpful to improve the quality system. One specificity of this technique is that it is not normalized therefore apart from quality management aspects, several technical points needed some validations. An inventory of potentially influent factors was carried out. To estimate their real effect on the yield of dicentrics, a Placket-Burman experimental design was conducted. The effect of seven parameters was tested: the BUdr (bromodeoxyuridine), PHA (phytohemagglutinin) and colcemid concentration, the culture duration, the incubator temperature, the blood volume and the medium volume. The chosen values were calculated according to the uncertainties on the way they were measured i.e. pipettes, thermometers, test tubes. None of the factors has a significant impact on the yield of dicentrics. Therefore the uncertainty linked to their use was considered as

  6. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, M.; Mason, W. B.; Whipple, G. H.; Howland, J. W.

    1952-04-07

    This report presents a review of present knowledge and concepts of the biological effects of ionizing radiations. Among the topics discussed are the physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems, morphological and physiological changes observed in biological systems subjected to ionizing radiations, physiological changes in the intact animal, latent changes following exposure of biological systems to ionizing radiations, factors influencing the biological response to ionizing radiation, relative effects of various ionizing radiations, and biological dosimetry.

  7. Application of biological dosimetry in accidental radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nosal, M.; Batora, I.; Kolesar, D.; Stojkovic, J. (Komenskeho Univ., Bratislava (Czechoslovakia). Lekarska Fakulta); Gaal, P.; Sklovsky, A. (Krajska Hygienicka Stanica, Bratislava (Czechoslovakia)); Cizova, O. (Sexuologicka Ambulancia KUNZ, Bratislava (Czechoslovakia))

    1982-03-01

    The case is described of accidental irradiation of a male person with /sup 137/Cs of an activity of 24.71 GBq. The first estimate induced a reasonable suspicion that the absorbed dose could be very high and life-threatening. On the other hand the clinical picture, usual laboratory examinations, findings in the fluorescent blood count, the analysis of chromosomal count of lymphocytes in the peripheral blood, the spermiogram, and the negative post-irradiation porphyrinuria suggested that the absorbed dose could be much lower than the original estimate. The results of dosimetry obtained after the reconstruction of the accident by measuring on a phantom revealed that the actual dose was very close to that presumed from the results of biological dosimetry during the first days of examination of the patient.

  8. Application of biological dosimetry in accident radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosal, M.; Batora, I.; Kolesar, D.; Stojkovic, J.; Cizova, O.

    1982-01-01

    The case is described of accidental irradiation of a male person with 137 Cs of an activity of 24.71 GBq. The first estimate induced a reasonable suspicion that the absorbed dose could be very high and life-threatening. On the other hand the clinical picture, usual laboratory examinations, findings in the fluorescent blood count, the analysis of chromosomal count of lymphocytes in the peripheral blood, the spermiogram, and the negative post-irradiation porphyrinuria suggested that the absorbed dose could be much lower than the original estimate. The results of dosimetry obtained after the reconstruction of the accident by measuring on a phantom revealed that the actual dose was very close to that presumed from the results of biological dosimetry during the first days of examination of the patient. (author)

  9. Role of cytogenetic techniques in biological dosimetry of absorbed radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, B.S.

    2016-01-01

    In most of the radiation accidents, physical dosimetric information is rarely available. Further, most of the accidental exposures are non-uniform involving either partial body or localized exposure to significant doses. In such situations, physical dosimetry does not provide reliable dose estimate. It has now been realized that biological dosimetric techniques can play an important role in the assessment of absorbed dose. In recent years, a number of biological indicators of radiation have been identified. These include the kinetics of onset and persistence of prodromal syndromes (radiation sickness), cytogenetic changes in peripheral blood lymphocytes, hematological changes, biochemical indicators, ESR spectroscopy of biological samples, induction of gene mutations in red blood cells, cytogenetic and physiological changes in skin and neurophysiological changes. In general, dosimetric information is derived by a combination of several different methods, as they have potential to serve as prognostic indicators. The role of cytogenetic techniques in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) as biological indicators of absorbed radiation is reviewed here

  10. Biological dosimetry study in differentiated thyroid carcinoma patients treated with 131Iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallerga, Maria Belen

    2008-11-01

    Biological Dosimetry allows individual dose assessments based on the effect produced by ionizing radiation on a given biological parameter. The current biological endpoint being scored is chromosomal aberrations, relying on a lymphocytes culture from the patient's blood. The measured yield of chromosome aberrations is referred to a calibration curve obtaining the whole body dose. Different scenarios of overexposure can be taken into account by modifying the calculations leading to the dose estimate. Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma patients undergo thyroidectomy followed by internal radiotherapy with 131 I. The treatment's success entails the delivery of a lethal dose to the tumour within the maximum tolerable dose to a critical organ (blood doses over 2 Gy could lead to bone marrow depression). Currently, there is no established agreement for the selection of radioiodine dosage. Historically, the empiric approach, based on clinical and biochemical data, has been recommended. Nevertheless, this method may not be associated with optimal outcomes. On the other hand, the dosimetric approach attempts to determine the maximum allowable activity to be administered, establishing its biokinetics by a diagnostic 131 I study. The methodology may be modified to further individualized treatment, however it requires validation. Biological dosimetry provides an independent measure of radiotherapy effect, as such it might aid in the validation process. Nonetheless, biological dosimetry has traditionally been applied in cases of external and accidental overexposure to ionizing radiation. Accordingly, it is mandatory to assess its value in medical internal incorporations (main objective of the present study). The applied treatment strategy comprises whole body dose assessment by biological and internal dosimetry in order to administer a personalized therapeutic activity. Overall, 20 patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma were included in the study. For biological dosimetry

  11. Chromosome aberration analysis for biological dosimetry: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, S.F.D.; Venkatachalam, P.; Jeevanram, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    Among various biological dosimetry techniques, dicentric chromosome aberration method appears to be the method of choice in analysing accidental radiation exposure in most of the laboratories. The major advantage of this method is its sensitivity as the number of dicentric chromosomes present in control population is too small and more importantly radiation induces mainly dicentric chromosome aberration among unstable aberration. This report brings out the historical development of various cytogenetic methods, the basic structure of DNA, chromosomes and different forms of chromosome aberrations. It also highlights the construction of dose-response curve for dicentric chromosome and its use in the estimation of radiation dose. (author)

  12. Biological dosimetry: chromosomal aberration analysis for dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    In view of the growing importance of chromosomal aberration analysis as a biological dosimeter, the present report provides a concise summary of the scientific background of the subject and a comprehensive source of information at the technical level. After a review of the basic principles of radiation dosimetry and radiation biology basic information on the biology of lymphocytes, the structure of chromosomes and the classification of chromosomal aberrations are presented. This is followed by a presentation of techniques for collecting blood, storing, transporting, culturing, making chromosomal preparations and scaring of aberrations. The physical and statistical parameters involved in dose assessment are discussed and examples of actual dose assessments taken from the scientific literature are given

  13. An improved in vitro micronucleus assay to biological dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocampo, Ivette Z.; Okazaki, Kayo; Vieira, Daniel P.

    2013-01-01

    The biological dosimetry is widely used to estimate the absorbed dose in people occupationally or accidentally exposed to the radiation for a better medical treatment, minimizing the harmful effects. Many techniques and methods have been proposed to detect and quantify the radioinduced lesions in genetic material, among them, the micronucleus (MN) assay. In the present study, we proposed an improved in vitro micronucleus technique that is rapid, sensitive and with minor cell manipulations. Assays were carried out with human tumor cells (MCF-7) seeded (3x10 4 cells) in slides placed into Petri dishes. Adherent cells were maintained with RPMI medium, supplemented with fetal calf serum, 1 % antibiotics, cytochalasin B (2 μg/mL), and incubated at 37 deg C in the presence of 5% CO2 for 72h. Cells were pre-treated for 24h with aminoguanidine, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor. Nitric oxide is an intracellular free-radical, involved in DNA double-strand break repair mechanisms. After incubation, adherent cells on slides were briefly fixed with paraformaldehyde and stained with acridine orange (100 μg/mL) for analysis through fluorescence microscopy. Dye fluorescence permitted accurate discrimination between nuclei and micronuclei (bright green) and cytoplasm (red), and made possible a faster counting of binucleated cells. Aminoguanidine (2 mM) induced significant increase (p< 0.05) in frequencies of binucleated cells with micronuclei and in the number of micronuclei per binucleated cell. Data showed that proposed modifications permit to understand an early aspect of NO inhibition and suggested an improved protocol to MN assays. (author)

  14. Biological dosimetry of ionizing radiation by chromosomal aberration analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Castano, S.; Silva, A.; Navlet, J.

    1990-01-01

    Biological dosimetry consists of estimating absorbed doses for people exposed to radiation by mean biological methods. Several indicators used are based in haematological, biochemical, and cytogenetic data, although nowadays without doubt, the cytogenetic method is considered to be the most reliable. In this case, the study ol chromosomal aberrations, normally dicentric chromosomes, in peripheral lymphocytes can be related to absorbed dose through an experimental calibration curve. An experimental dose-response curve, using dicentric chromosomes analysis, X-rays at 300 kVp, 114 rad/min and temperature 37 degree celsius has been produced. Experimental data is fitted to model Y =α + β 1 D + β 2 D 2 , where Y is the number of dicentrics per cell and D the dose. The curve is compared with those produced elsewhere. (Author) 14 refs

  15. Biological dosimetry of ionizing radiation by chromosomal aberration analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navlet Armenta, J.M.; Gonzalez, S.; Silva, A.

    1990-01-01

    Biological dosimetry consists of estimating absorbed doses for people exposed to radiation by mean biological methods. Several indicators used are based in haemathological, biochemical, and cytogenetic data, although nowadays without doubt, the cytogenetic method is considered to be the most reliable. In this case, the study of chromosomal aberrations, normally dicentric chromosomes, in peripheral lymphocytes can be related to absorbed dose through an experimental calibration curve. An experimental dose-response curve using dicentric chromosomes analysis, X-rays at 300 kVp, 114 rad/min and temperature 37 o C has been produced. Experimental data is fitted to model Y = α+β 1 D+β 2 D 2 , where Y is the number of dicentrics per cell and D the dose. The curve is compared with those produced elsewhere. (Author)

  16. Biological Dosimetry of X-rays by micronuclei study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, E.; Silva, A.; Navlet, J.

    1991-01-01

    Biological dosimetry consists of estimating absorbed doses for people exposed to radiation by mean biological methods. Several indicators used are based in haematological, biochemical an cytogenetics data, although nowadays without doubt, the cytogenetic method is considered to be the most reliable, in this case, the study of micronuclei in peripheral blood lymphocytes citokinetics blocked can be related to absorbed dose through an experimental calibration curve. An experimental dose-response curve, using micronuclei assay for X-rays at 250 kVp, 43,79 rads/min and temperature 37 degree centigree has been produced. Experimental data is fitted to model Y=C+ αD+BD''2 where Y is the number of micronuclei per cell and D the dose. The curve is compared with those produced elsewhere. (Author) 24 refs

  17. Biological dosimetry of X-rays by micronuclei study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, E.; Silva, A.; Navlet, J.

    1991-01-01

    Biological dosimetry consists of estimating absorbed doses for people exposed to radiation by mean biological methods. Several indicators used are based in hematological, biochemical an cytogenetics data, although nowadays without doubt, the cytogenetic method is considered to be the most reliable, in this case, the study of micronuclei in peripheral blood lymphocytes cytokinetic blocked can be related to absorbed dose through an experimental calibration curve. An experimental dose-response curve, using micronuclei assay for X-rays at 250 kVp, 43,79 rads/min and temperature 37 degree celsius has been produced. Experimental data is fitted to model Y=c+ α D+β D 2 where. Y is the number micronuclei per cell and D the dose. the curve is compared with those produced elsewhere

  18. The effect of changes in dosimetry on cancer mortality risk estimates in the atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preston, D.L.; Pierce, D.A.

    1987-08-01

    In the spring of 1986, RERF received a new dosimetry system which was developed by the US-Japan Committee for Reassessment of Atomic Bomb Radiation Dosimetry in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. This report presents the comparisons of leukemia and nonleukemia cancer mortality risk estimates under the old and new dosimetries. In terms of total kerma (essentially whole-body gamma-ray plus neutron exposure), the risk estimates for both types of cancer are 75 %-85 % higher with the new dosimetry. This and other summary comparisons here make some allowance for possible nonlinearity at high estimated doses. It is also important to consider the changes in relation to organ doses and assumptions about the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of neutrons. Without regard to RBE, the risk estimates for total organ dose are essentially unchanged by the dosimetry revision. However, with increasing assumed values of RBE, the estimated low-LET risk decreases much less rapidly under the new dosimetry, due to the smaller neutron component. Thus at an assumed constant RBE of 10, for example, the effect of the dosimetry revision is to increase organ dose risk estimates, relative to those based on the old dosimetry, by 30 % for nonleukemia and 80 % for leukemia. At an RBE of 20 these increases are 72 % and 136 %, respectively. A number of other issues are discussed. The city difference in dose-response is smaller with the new dosimetry, and is no longer statistically significant, even at an RBE of one. Estimation of RBE is even less feasible with the new dosimetry. There is substantial question of the linearity in dose-response, in the sense of a leveling off at higher doses. Finally, some indication is given of how estimated lifetime risks from this dosimetry may compare to widely-used estimates based largely on the RERF data with the previous dosimetry. (author)

  19. New methodologies of biological dosimetry applied to human protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catena, C.; Parasacchi, P.; Conti, D.; Righi, E.

    1995-04-01

    Biological dosimetry is a diagnostic methodology for the measurement of the individual dose absorbed in the case of accidental overexposition to ionizing radiation. It is demonstrated how in vitro radiobiological and chemobiological studies using cytogenetic methods (count of chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei) on human lymphocytes from healthy subjects and individuals undergoing radiotherapy or chemotherapy, as well as on lymphocytes of mammals other than man (comparative cytogenetics), can help to increase the basic radiobiological and chemobiological scientific information. Such information gives a valid contribution to understanding of the action of ionizing radiation or of pharmaceuticals on cells and, in return, can be of value to human radioprotection and chemoprotection. Cytogenetic studies can be summerized as follows: a) biodosimetry (estimate of dose received after accidental events); b) individual radiosensitivity (level of individual response); c) clinical radiobiology and chemobiology (individual response to radiopharmaceuticals, to radiotherapy and to chemopharmaceuticals); d) comparative radiobiology (cytogenetic studies on species other than man); e) animal model in the environmental surveillance

  20. Comparison of cytological image analysis systems in biological dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, L.; Delbos, M.; Paillole, N.; Durand, V.; Voisin, P.

    2003-01-01

    In biological dosimetry the reference technique is based on the scoring of dicentrics and centric rings induced by ionizing radiation. This article tends to present some image analysis systems used in biological dosimetry to help aberration detection. The presented systems are: the CYTOGEN from IMSTAR society, the CYTOSCAN (APPLIED IMAGING) and the METAFER (METASYSTEM). All 3 systems do not present similar functionalities but offer different way of automation. Some functionalities of these systems are compared. The systems can assist operators on 3 major points: (1) an automatic metaphase finder, in this case, the time benefic ranges from 2 to 4 when compared to manual scoring; (2) a specific tool to help manual scoring of aberrations, this provide an easier scoring and a better stability of the results; (3) the automatic detection of dicentrics, very useful in case of population triage. In this case, the dose has to be established very quickly, on a large population. However, the precision on the dose can be reduced compared to individual dose estimation. Some uncertainties on the detection of dicentric are acceptable and dicentric detection can be automated. Time benefic is then very important as 300 cells can be analyzed in half an hour (METAFER) against 25 when the metaphase finder is used alone. However, only 50% of the dicentrics are detected therefore it would be interesting to increase the efficiency of the detection. The use of the FISH technique could allow a better detection of dicentrics, the first results are promising (90% of centromeres correctly detected) but more experiments are required to evaluate the time benefit. (authors)

  1. Development of radiation biological dosimetry and treatment of radiation-induced damaged tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Chul Koo; Kim, Tae Hwan; Lee, Yun Sil [and others

    2000-04-01

    Util now, only a few methods have been developed for radiation biological dosimetry such as conventional chromosome aberration and micronucleus in peripheral blood cell. However, because these methods not only can be estimated by the expert, but also have a little limitation due to need high technique and many times in the case of radiation accident, it is very difficult to evaluate the absorbed dose of victims. Therefore, we should develop effective, easy, simple and rapid biodosimetry and its guideline(triage) to be able to be treated the victims as fast as possible. We established the apoptotic fragment assay, PCC, comet assay, and micronucleus assay which was the significant relationship between dose and cell damages to evaluate the irradiated dose as correct and rapid as possible using lymphocytes and crypt cells, and compared with chromosome dosimetry and micronucleus assay.

  2. Development of radiation biological dosimetry and treatment of radiation-induced damaged tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Chul Koo; Kim, Tae Hwan; Lee, Yun Sil

    2000-04-01

    Util now, only a few methods have been developed for radiation biological dosimetry such as conventional chromosome aberration and micronucleus in peripheral blood cell. However, because these methods not only can be estimated by the expert, but also have a little limitation due to need high technique and many times in the case of radiation accident, it is very difficult to evaluate the absorbed dose of victims. Therefore, we should develop effective, easy, simple and rapid biodosimetry and its guideline(triage) to be able to be treated the victims as fast as possible. We established the apoptotic fragment assay, PCC, comet assay, and micronucleus assay which was the significant relationship between dose and cell damages to evaluate the irradiated dose as correct and rapid as possible using lymphocytes and crypt cells, and compared with chromosome dosimetry and micronucleus assay

  3. MOSFET dosimetry: temperature effects in-vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, P.K.N.; Cheung, T.; Butson, M.J.; Cancer Services, Wollongong, NSW

    2004-01-01

    Full text: This note investigates temperature effects on dosimetry using a Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) for radiotherapy x-ray treatment. This was performed by analysing the dose response and threshold voltage outputs for MOSFET dosimeters as a function of ambient temperature. Results have shown the clinical semiconductor dosimetry system (CSDS) MOSFET provides stable dose measurements with temperatures varying from 15 deg C up to 40 deg C. Thus standard irradiations performed at room temperature can be directly compared to in-vivo dose assessments performed at near body temperature without a temperature correction function. The MOSFET dosimeter threshold voltage varies with temperature and this level is dependant on the dose history of the MOSFET dosimeter. However the variation can be accounted for in the measurement method. For accurate dosimetry the detector should be placed for approximately 60 seconds on a patient to allow thermal equilibrium before measurements are taken with the final reading performed whilst still attached to the patient or conversely left for approximately 120 seconds after removal from the patient if initial readout was measured at room temperature to allow temperature equilibrium to be established. Copyright (2004) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  4. Effects of temperature variation on MOSFET dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung Tsang; Butson, Martin J; Yu, Peter K N

    2004-01-01

    This note investigates temperature effects on dosimetry using a metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) for radiotherapy x-ray treatment. This was performed by analysing the dose response and threshold voltage outputs for MOSFET dosimeters as a function of ambient temperature. Results have shown that the clinical semiconductor dosimetry system (CSDS) MOSFET provides stable dose measurements with temperatures varying from 15 deg. C up to 40 deg. C. Thus standard irradiations performed at room temperature can be directly compared to in vivo dose assessments performed at near body temperature without a temperature correction function. The MOSFET dosimeter threshold voltage varies with temperature and this level is dependent on the dose history of the MOSFET dosimeter. However, the variation can be accounted for in the measurement method. For accurate dosimetry, the detector should be placed for approximately 60 s on a patient to allow thermal equilibrium before measurements are taken with the final reading performed whilst still attached to the patient or conversely left for approximately 120 s after removal from the patient if initial readout was measured at room temperature to allow temperature equilibrium to be established. (note)

  5. Transient impedance changes in venous endothelial monolayers as a biological radiation dosimetry response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Fossum Young

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In March of 2011, a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and subsequent 14 m-high tsunami caused major damage to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan.  While cancer incidence in the radiation-exposed population is a logical concern, the complex effects of radiation on the heart and cardiovascular system are also of interest.  Immediate and early vascular radiation effects could be exploited as a dosimetry modality.  To test whether non-coronary vasculature exhibited transient perturbation in barrier function, video microscopy studies and Electric Cell Substrate Impedance Sensing technology were used to probe very subtle changes in primary human vascular endothelium.  Human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC monolayers exhibit a transient, statistically significant decrease (P = 0.017 in monolayer resistance 3 h after irradiation with 5.0 Gy of g rays.  Radiation induced perturbations in HUVEC monolayer permeability are similar in magnitude and kinetics to those observed in coronary arterial endothelium.  Therefore, at least two types of vasculature respond to radiation on ECIS arrays with an early transient disruption in permeability.  The finding supports the use of early passage HUVECs for use in bioelectric dosimetry studies of vasculature and suggests that permeability of vessels could potentially serve as a biological dosimetry tool.

  6. Environmental dosimetry and radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodhead, D.S.

    1997-01-01

    Specific assessment of the potential effects on wild organisms of increased radiation exposure arising from the authorized disposal of radioactive wastes to the environment requires two interrelated sets of information. First, an estimate is required of the incremental radiation exposure; and second, dose rate-response relationships are necessary to predict the potential impact of the estimated incremental exposure. Each of these aspects will be discussed in detail. (author)

  7. Calibration curves for biological dosimetry by drug-induced prematurely condensed chromosomes in human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, C. M.; Chung, H. C.; Cho, C. K.

    2002-01-01

    To develop the cytogenetic tool to detect chromosome damages after high dose exposure with 60 Coγ- rays, dose-response curves were measured for induction of prematurely condensed chromosomes (PCC) in peripheral lymphocytes. Blood was obtained from 10 different healthy donors, and given okadaic acid (OA) 500nM in cultured lymphocytes 1h after radiation exposure. Cells were analyzed by the frequencies of OA-induced PCC rings because it is difficult to obtain mitotic chromosomes using a conventional chromosome aberration (CA). PCC-rings were scored in cells exposed in the dose range of 0.2-16Gy. The frequency of the cells with PCC and the dose-response relationship for the yield of PCC rings were examined in the irradiated lymphocytes. The yield of PCC-rings increased with dose dependent-manner up to 16Gy. The observed dose-effect relationship for the percentage of cells with PCC-rings was calculated by linear-quadratic model. This technique can be applied to biological dosimetry of radiation exposures involving whole body irradiation to allow damaged chromosomes to be detected with great sensitivity. Detection of okadaic acid-induced PCC rings is a useful method up to 16Gy or more doses in estimating the absorbed doses of victims after high dose exposure. Calibration curves described in this paper will be used in our laboratory for biological dosimetry by PCC-ring after a high dose exposure

  8. Internal sources dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savio, Eduardo

    1994-01-01

    The absorbed dose, need of estimation in risk evaluation in the application of radiopharmaceuticals in Nuclear Medicine practice,internal dosimetry,internal and external sources. Calculation methodology,Marinelli model,MIRD system for absorbed dose calculation based on biological parameters of radiopharmaceutical in human body or individual,energy of emitted radiations by administered radionuclide, fraction of emitted energy that is absorbed by target body.Limitation of the MIRD calculation model. A explanation of Marinelli method of dosimetry calculation,β dosimetry. Y dosimetry, effective dose, calculation in organs and tissues, examples. Bibliography .

  9. Biological dosimetry laboratory of the Hospital General Gregorio Maranon. A review of cases investigated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez-Espi, M.; Herranz, R.; Olivares, P.; Orera, M.

    1992-01-01

    Since 1989, in part because of our initiatory, and due in part to the support of the 'Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear', the biological dosimetry laboratory of the 'Hospital General Gregorio Maranon' is attending the individuals that are sent to the level I and II Radiopathology and Radioprotection Center with a suspicion of ionizing radiation overexposure. We have performed chromosomal aberration analysis in peripheral lymphocytes in 31 cases (June 1991). We present here the first biological dosimetry analysis performed in our Country, to demonstrate the usefulness of a technique that is commonly used outside our Country. (author)

  10. Dosimetry using environmental and biological materials. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haskell, E.; Kenner, G.; Hayes, R.

    1998-02-01

    This report summarizes a five year effort to improve the sensitivity and reliability of retrospective dosimetry methods, to collaborate with laboratories engaged in related research and to share the technology with startup laboratories seeking similar capabilities. This research program has focused on validation of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) as a dosimetry tool and on optimization of the technique by reducing the lower limits of detection, simplifying the process of sample preparation and analysis and speeding analysis to allow greater throughput in routine measurement situations. The authors have investigated the dosimetric signal of hard tissues in enamel, deorganified dentin, synthetic carbonated apatites and synthetic hydroxyapatite. This research has resulted in a total of 27 manuscripts which have been published, are in press, or have been submitted for publication. Of these manuscripts, 14 are included in this report and were indexed separately for inclusion in the data base

  11. Dosimetry using environmental and biological materials. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haskell, E.; Kenner, G.; Hayes, R.

    1998-02-01

    This report summarizes a five year effort to improve the sensitivity and reliability of retrospective dosimetry methods, to collaborate with laboratories engaged in related research and to share the technology with startup laboratories seeking similar capabilities. This research program has focused on validation of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) as a dosimetry tool and on optimization of the technique by reducing the lower limits of detection, simplifying the process of sample preparation and analysis and speeding analysis to allow greater throughput in routine measurement situations. The authors have investigated the dosimetric signal of hard tissues in enamel, deorganified dentin, synthetic carbonated apatites and synthetic hydroxyapatite. This research has resulted in a total of 27 manuscripts which have been published, are in press, or have been submitted for publication. Of these manuscripts, 14 are included in this report and were indexed separately for inclusion in the data base.

  12. Analysis and assessment of the detriment in interventional radiology using biological dosimetry methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoro, A.; Almonacid, M.; Villaescusa, J.I.; Barquinero, J.F.; Rodriguez, P.; Barrios, L.; Verdu, G.; Ramos, M.

    2006-01-01

    Interventional radiologist and staff members usually are exposed to high levels of scattered radiation. As a result, the exposition to radiation procedures can produce detrimental effects that we would have to know. Effective dose is the quantity that better estimates the radiation risk. For this study we have realized an estimation of the radiological detriment to exposed workers of the Hospital la Fe de Valencia. For it, have been used physical doses registered in detectors T.L.D., and doses estimated by biological dosimetry in lymphocytes of peripheral blood. There has been estimated for every case the probability of effect of skin cancer and of non-solid cancers (leukaemia, lymphoma and myeloma), being compared with the baseline probability of natural effect. Biological doses were obtained by extrapolating the yield of dicentrics and translocations to their respective dose -effect curves. The discrepancies observed between physically recorded doses and biological estimated doses indicate that workers did not always wear their dosimeters or the dosimeters were not always in the radiation field. Cytogenetic studies should be extended to more workers to assess the risk derived from their occupational exposure. (authors)

  13. Analysis and assessment of the detriment in interventional radiology using biological dosimetry methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montoro, A.; Almonacid, M.; Villaescusa, J.I. [Hospital Univ. la Fe de Valen cian, Servicio de Proteccion Radiologica, Valencia (Spain); Barquinero, J.F.; Rodriguez, P. [Universitat Autonom a de Barcelona, Servicio de Dosimetria Biologica, Unidad de Antropologia, Departamento de Biologia Animal, Vegetal y Ecologia., Barcelona (Spain); Barrios, L. [Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, Dept. de Biologia Celular y Fisiologia. Unidad de Biologia Celular, Barcelona (Spain); Verdu, G.; Ramos, M. [Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear, Valencia, (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    Interventional radiologist and staff members usually are exposed to high levels of scattered radiation. As a result, the exposition to radiation procedures can produce detrimental effects that we would have to know. Effective dose is the quantity that better estimates the radiation risk. For this study we have realized an estimation of the radiological detriment to exposed workers of the Hospital la Fe de Valencia. For it, have been used physical doses registered in detectors T.L.D., and doses estimated by biological dosimetry in lymphocytes of peripheral blood. There has been estimated for every case the probability of effect of skin cancer and of non-solid cancers (leukaemia, lymphoma and myeloma), being compared with the baseline probability of natural effect. Biological doses were obtained by extrapolating the yield of dicentrics and translocations to their respective dose -effect curves. The discrepancies observed between physically recorded doses and biological estimated doses indicate that workers did not always wear their dosimeters or the dosimeters were not always in the radiation field. Cytogenetic studies should be extended to more workers to assess the risk derived from their occupational exposure. (authors)

  14. Biological dosimetry of patients with differenced carcinoma of thyroid treated with Iodine-131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallerga, M. B.; Rojo, A.M.; Taja, M.R.; Deluca, G.; Di Giorgio, M.; Fadel, A.; Cabrejas, M.; Valdivieso, C.

    2006-01-01

    aberrations it was considered absorbed dose to whole body. The obtained doses were compared by the different biological methods used. The evaluation by internal dosimetry of the data obtained tracer post-activity allowed to personalize the activity of I-131 to administer, starting from physical-mathematical models that consider the particular biokinetics of each patient (MIRD methodology). The doses estimated by the used biological dosemeters were consistent among them. It was discussed its scopes and limitations to be applied in the validation of the dosimetric estimation based on models, in order to administer a therapeutic dose protecting the patient of the adverse effects of the internal radiotherapy in organs that are not target of the same one. The acquired experience is considered of utility to give answer in cases of radioiodine incorporation in occupationally exposed personnel. (Author)

  15. Applications of 'Ultraweak Photon-Emission' from organism in biological radiation-dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rattemeyer, M.

    1984-05-01

    An important question in radiation-dosimetry is the real effect of ionizing radiation on biological systems. This effect is determined here by measurements of the 'Ultraweak Photon-Emission' (PE) from organism after irradiation with gamma-sources. As biological test objects plant seedlings are used, in this case cucumber seeds (cucumis sativus) after 3-4 d germination in darkness. The PE is measured by a photon-counting- system. The irradiations are carried out either in a TLD-calebrated arrangement with 60 Co/ 137 Cs-sources at low dose-rate (409 μGy.s -1 ) in the range 0-45 Gy, or with a 60 Co-source in a therapeutic apparatus at high dose-rate (95mGy.s -1 ) in the range 50-300 Gy. After irradiation PE-measurements show an increased PE from the seeds; an ozone-effect is tested and can be excluded. In the high dose-range this increase occurs in the spectral range 550-650 nm, and a linear correlation to the applied dose can be ascertained. In the low dose-range there is only found a Biostimulation, but with additional treatment (ethidium-bromide) also a PE-increase occurs, linear correlated to the dose (presumable call membrane damages become visible). By the aid of PE a 'cucumber dosimeter' is calebrated. (Author)

  16. Development of radiological emergency preparedness and biological dosimetry technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Moon Hee; Kim, In Gyoo; Kim, Kook Chan; Kim, Eun Han; Suh, Kyung Suk; Hwang, Won Tae; Choi, Young Gil; Shim, Hae Won; Lee, Jeong Ho; Lee, Kang Suk

    1999-04-01

    Large-scale field tracer experiments have been conducted on Ulchin and Wolsung nuclear sites for the purpose of validating FADAS and of analyzing the environmental characteristics around the nuclear site. The most influential factor in atmospheric dispersion is the meteorological condition. During the experiment, meteorological data were measured on the release point and the selected positions among sampling points. Once radioactive materials are released to the atmosphere, members of public may be exposed through the environmental media such as air, soil and foods. Therefore, to protect the public, adequate countermeasures should be taken at due time for those exposure pathways. Both processes of justification and optimization are applied to a countermeasure simultaneously for decision-making. The work scope of biological research for the radiation protection had contained the search of biological microanalytic methods for the assessment of health effect by radiation and toxic agents, the standardization of human t-lymphocyte cell culture and polymerase chain reaction, T-cell clonal assay, and the quantification of mutation frequency in hypoxanthine (guanine) phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) gene locus by single exposure or combined exposure. Especially, the polymerase chain reaction methods by usage of reverse transcriptase had been developed to analyze of gene product by γ - radiation and chemical (pentachlorophenol) agent exposure, and investigate the point mutation in hprt gene locus of T-lymphocytes. (author)

  17. Development of radiological emergency preparedness and biological dosimetry technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Moon Hee; Kim, In Gyoo; Kim, Kook Chan; Kim, Eun Han; Suh, Kyung Suk; Hwang, Won Tae; Choi, Young Gil; Shim, Hae Won; Lee, Jeong Ho; Lee, Kang Suk

    1999-04-01

    Large-scale field tracer experiments have been conducted on Ulchin and Wolsung nuclear sites for the purpose of validating FADAS and of analyzing the environmental characteristics around the nuclear site. The most influential factor in atmospheric dispersion is the meteorological condition. During the experiment, meteorological data were measured on the release point and the selected positions among sampling points. Once radioactive materials are released to the atmosphere, members of public may be exposed through the environmental media such as air, soil and foods. Therefore, to protect the public, adequate countermeasures should be taken at due time for those exposure pathways. Both processes of justification and optimization are applied to a countermeasure simultaneously for decision-making. The work scope of biological research for the radiation protection had contained the search of biological microanalytic methods for the assessment of health effect by radiation and toxic agents, the standardization of human t-lymphocyte cell culture and polymerase chain reaction, T-cell clonal assay, and the quantification of mutation frequency in hypoxanthine (guanine) phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) gene locus by single exposure or combined exposure. Especially, the polymerase chain reaction methods by usage of reverse transcriptase had been developed to analyze of gene product by {gamma} - radiation and chemical (pentachlorophenol) agent exposure, and investigate the point mutation in hprt gene locus of T-lymphocytes. (author)

  18. Activities developed by the biological dosimetry laboratory of the Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear - ARN of Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radl, A.; Sapienza, C.E.; Taja, M.R.; Bubniak, R.; Deminge, M.; Di Giorgio, M.

    2013-01-01

    Biological dosimetry (DB) allows to estimate doses absorbed in individuals exposed to ionizing radiation through the quantification of stable and unstable chromosome aberrations (SCA and UCA). The frequency of these aberrations is referred to a calibration dose response curve (in vitro) to determine the doses of the individual to the whole body. The DB is a necessary support for programs of national radiation protection and response systems in nuclear or radiological emergencies in the event of accidental or incidental, single overexposure or large scale. In this context the Laboratory of Dosimetry Biological (LDB) of the Authority Regulatory Nuclear (ARN) Argentina develops and applies different dosimeters cytogenetic from four decades ago. These dosimeters provide a fact more within the whole of the information necessary for an accidental, complementing the physical and clinical dosimetry exposure assessment. The most widely used in the DB biodosimetric method is the quantification of SCA (dicentrics and rings Central) from a sample of venous blood. The LDB is accredited for the trial, under rules IRAM 301: 2005 (ISO / IEC 17025: 2005) and ISO 19238:2004. Test applies to the immediate dosimetry evaluation of acute exposures, all or a large part of the body in the range 0,1-5 Gy. In this context the LDB is part of the Latin American network of DB (LBDNet), BioDoseNet-who and response system in radiological emergencies and nuclear IAEA-RANET, being enabled to summon the LBDNet if necessary

  19. Physical and biological organ dosimetry analysis for international space station astronauts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A; Kim, Myung-Hee Y; Willingham, Veronica; George, Kerry A

    2008-07-01

    In this study, we analyzed the biological and physical organ dose equivalents for International Space Station (ISS) astronauts. Individual physical dosimetry is difficult in space due to the complexity of the space radiation environment, which consists of protons, heavy ions and secondary neutrons, and the modification of these radiation types in tissue as well as limitations in dosimeter devices that can be worn for several months in outer space. Astronauts returning from missions to the ISS undergo biodosimetry assessment of chromosomal damage in lymphocyte cells using the multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique. Individual-based pre-flight dose responses for lymphocyte exposure in vitro to gamma rays were compared to those exposed to space radiation in vivo to determine an equivalent biological dose. We compared the ISS biodosimetry results, NASA's space radiation transport models of organ dose equivalents, and results from ISS and space shuttle phantom torso experiments. Physical and biological doses for 19 ISS astronauts yielded average effective doses and individual or population-based biological doses for the approximately 6-month missions of 72 mSv and 85 or 81 mGy-Eq, respectively. Analyses showed that 80% or more of organ dose equivalents on the ISS are from galactic cosmic rays and only a small contribution is from trapped protons and that GCR doses were decreased by the high level of solar activity in recent years. Comparisons of models to data showed that space radiation effective doses can be predicted to within about a +/-10% accuracy by space radiation transport models. Finally, effective dose estimates for all previous NASA missions are summarized.

  20. Biological dosimetry by the triage dicentric chromosome assay - Further validation of international networking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkins, Ruth C., E-mail: Ruth.Wilkins@hc-sc.gc.ca [Health Canada, Ottawa, ON K1A 0K9 (Canada); Romm, Horst; Oestreicher, Ursula [Bundesamt fur Strahlenschutz, 38226 Salzgitter (Germany); Marro, Leonora [Health Canada, Ottawa, ON K1A 0K9 (Canada); Yoshida, Mitsuaki A. [Biological Dosimetry Section, Dept. of Dose Assessment, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, NIRS, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Department Radiation Biology, Institute of Radiation Emergency Medicine, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Health Sciences, 66-1 Hon-cho, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8564 (Japan); Suto, Y. [Biological Dosimetry Section, Dept. of Dose Assessment, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, NIRS, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Prasanna, Pataje G.S. [National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis, Radiation Research Program, 6130 Executive Blvd., MSC 7440, Bethesda, MD 20892-7440 (United States)

    2011-09-15

    Biological dosimetry is an essential tool for estimating radiation doses received to personnel when physical dosimetry is not available or inadequate. The current preferred biodosimetry method is based on the measurement of radiation-specific dicentric chromosomes in exposed individuals' peripheral blood lymphocytes. However, this method is labor-, time- and expertise-demanding. Consequently, for mass casualty applications, strategies have been developed to increase its throughput. One such strategy is to develop validated cytogenetic biodosimetry laboratory networks, both national and international. In a previous study, the dicentric chromosome assay (DCA) was validated in our cytogenetic biodosimetry network involving five geographically dispersed laboratories. A complementary strategy to further enhance the throughput of the DCA among inter-laboratory networks is to use a triage DCA where dose assessments are made by truncating the labor-demanding and time-consuming metaphase spread analysis to 20 - 50 metaphase spreads instead of routine 500 - 1000 metaphase spread analysis. Our laboratory network also validated this triage DCA, however, these dose estimates were made using calibration curves generated in each laboratory from the blood samples irradiated in a single laboratory. In an emergency situation, dose estimates made using pre-existing calibration curves which may vary according to radiation type and dose rate and therefore influence the assessed dose. Here, we analyze the effect of using a pre-existing calibration curve on assessed dose among our network laboratories. The dose estimates were made by analyzing 1000 metaphase spreads as well as triage quality scoring and compared to actual physical doses applied to the samples for validation. The dose estimates in the laboratory partners were in good agreement with the applied physical doses and determined to be adequate for guidance in the treatment of acute radiation syndrome.

  1. Biological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trott, K.R.

    1973-01-01

    Following an introduction into the field of cellular radiation effect considering the most important experimental results, the biological significance of the colony formation ability is brought out. The inactivation concept of stem cells does not only prove to be good, according to the present results, in the interpretation of the pathogenesis of acute radiation effects on moult tissue, it also enables chronicle radiation injuries to be interpreted through changes in the fibrous part of the organs. Radiation therapy of tumours can also be explained to a large extent by the radiation effect on the unlimited reproductiveness of tumour cells. The more or less similar dose effect curves for healthy and tumour tissue in practice lead to intermittent irradiation. The dependence of the intermittent doses and intervals on factors such as Elkind recovery, synchronisation, redistribution, reoxygenation, repopulation and regeneration are reviewed. (ORU/LH) [de

  2. Preliminary study on biological dosimetry using alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis of human peripheral lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qingjie; Lu Xue; Feng Jiangbing; Chen Deqing; Chen Xiaosui

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the feasibility of alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) in biological dosimetry of ionizing radiation. Methods: Normal peripheral blood samples from two healthy males were exposed to different doses coblat-60 gamma-rays, ranged from 0 to 5 Gy, and the tail length (TL) and Oliver tail moment (TM) of the lymphocytes were analyzed with SCGE. The dose-effect curves of TL and TM were fitted respectively. The TL and TM of lymphocytes for eight radiation workers were analyzed with SCGE, cumulative doses were estimated using the fitted TL and TM equations, and then compared with the recorded monitoring doses. Results: The TLs or TMs of normal human lymphocytes were increased with the irradiation doses, and its relationship can be fitted with a linear-quadratic equations: Y=13.59 + 20.87X - 2.27 X 2 for TL, and Y = 8.50 + 15.04X - 1.43X 2 for TM, respectively (Y denotes TL or TM value, X is radiation dose). The doses estimated with TM equation were closer to the recorded monitoring doses than that with TL equation. Conclusions: The TM in lymphocytes analyzed with SCGE is a promising radiation biological dosimeter. (authors)

  3. Biological effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marko, A.M.

    1981-05-01

    In this review radiation produced by the nuclear industry is placed into context with other sources of radiation in our world. Human health effects of radiation, derivation of standards and risk estimates are reviewed in this document. The implications of exposing the worker and the general population to radiation generated by nuclear power are assessed. Effects of radiation are also reviewed. Finally, gaps in our knowledge concerning radiation are identified and current research on biological effects, on environmental aspects, and on dosimetry of radiation within AECL and Canada is documented in this report. (author)

  4. The use of the dicentric assay for biological dosimetry for radiation accidents in Bulgaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjidekova, Valeria; Hristova, Rositsa; Ainsbury, Elizabeth A; Atanasova, Petya; Popova, Ljubomira; Staynova, Albena

    2010-02-01

    This paper details the construction of a 137Cs gamma calibration curve that has been established for dicentric assay and the testing and validation of the curve through biological dosimetry in three situations of suspected workplace overexposure that arose accidentally or through negligence or lack of appropriate safety measures. The three situations were: (1) suspected 137Cs contamination in a factory air supply; (2) suspected exposure to an industrial 192Ir source; and (3) accidental exposure of construction workers to radiation from a 60Co radiotherapy source in a hospital medical physics department. From a total of 24 potentially-exposed subjects, only one worker was found to have a statistically significant dose (0.16 Gy, 95% confidence intervals 0.02-0.43 Gy). In all other cases, the main function of the biological dosimetry was to reassure the subjects that any dose received was low.

  5. The Latin American Biological Dosimetry Network (LBDNet): Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Cuba, Mexico, Peru, Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero C, C.; Arceo M, C.; Di Giorgio, M.; Vallerga, M.; Radl, A.; Taja, M.; Seoane, A.; De Luca, J.; Stuck O, M.; Valdivia, P.

    2010-10-01

    Biological dosimetry is a necessary support for national radiation protection programs and emergency response schemes. The Latin American Biological Dosimetry Network (LBDNet) was formally founded in 2007 for mutual assistance in case of radiation emergencies and for providing support to other Latin American countries that do not have bio dosimetry laboratories. In the frame of the IAEA Technical Cooperation Projects RLA/9/54 and RLA/9/61 the following activities have been performed: a) An international intercomparison exercise organized during 2007-2008 included six European countries and LBDNet laboratories. Relevant parameters related with dose assessment were evaluated through triage and conventional scoring criteria. A new approach for statistical data analysis was developed including assessment of inter-laboratory reproducibility and intra-laboratory repeatability. Overall, the laboratory performance was satisfactory for mutual cooperation purposes. b) In 2009, LBDNet and two European countries carried out a digital image intercomparison exercise involving dose assessment from metaphase images distributed electronically through internet. The main objectives were to evaluate scoring feasibility on metaphase images and time response. In addition a re-examination phase was considered in which the most controversial images were discussed jointly, this allowed for the development of a homogeneous scoring criteria within the network. c) A further exercise was performed during 2009 involving the shipment of biological samples for biological dosimetry assessment. The aim of this exercise was to test the timely and properly sending and receiving blood samples under national and international regulations. A total of 14 laboratories participated in this joint IAEA, PAHO and WHO. (Author)

  6. The Latin American Biological Dosimetry Network (LBDNet): Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Cuba, Mexico, Peru, Uruguay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero C, C.; Arceo M, C. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Di Giorgio, M.; Vallerga, M.; Radl, A. [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Av. del Libertador 8250, C1429 BNP CABA (Argentina); Taja, M.; Seoane, A.; De Luca, J. [Universidad Nacionald de La Plata, Av. 7 No. 1776, La Plata 1900, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Stuck O, M. [Instituto de Radioproteccion y Dosimetria, Av. Salvador Allende s/n, Recreio dos Bandeirantes, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Valdivia, P., E-mail: lbdnet@googlegroups.co [Comision Chilena de Energia, Amutanegui 95, Santiago Centro, Santiago (Chile)

    2010-10-15

    Biological dosimetry is a necessary support for national radiation protection programs and emergency response schemes. The Latin American Biological Dosimetry Network (LBDNet) was formally founded in 2007 for mutual assistance in case of radiation emergencies and for providing support to other Latin American countries that do not have bio dosimetry laboratories. In the frame of the IAEA Technical Cooperation Projects RLA/9/54 and RLA/9/61 the following activities have been performed: a) An international intercomparison exercise organized during 2007-2008 included six European countries and LBDNet laboratories. Relevant parameters related with dose assessment were evaluated through triage and conventional scoring criteria. A new approach for statistical data analysis was developed including assessment of inter-laboratory reproducibility and intra-laboratory repeatability. Overall, the laboratory performance was satisfactory for mutual cooperation purposes. b) In 2009, LBDNet and two European countries carried out a digital image intercomparison exercise involving dose assessment from metaphase images distributed electronically through internet. The main objectives were to evaluate scoring feasibility on metaphase images and time response. In addition a re-examination phase was considered in which the most controversial images were discussed jointly, this allowed for the development of a homogeneous scoring criteria within the network. c) A further exercise was performed during 2009 involving the shipment of biological samples for biological dosimetry assessment. The aim of this exercise was to test the timely and properly sending and receiving blood samples under national and international regulations. A total of 14 laboratories participated in this joint IAEA, PAHO and WHO. (Author)

  7. Main activities of the Latin American Network of Biological Dosimetry (LBDNet)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Giorgio, M.; Vallerga, M.B.; Radl, A.; Taja, M.R.; Stuck Oliveira, M.; Valdivia, P.; Garcia Lima, O.; Lamadrid, A.; Gonzalez Mesa, J.E.; Romero Aguilera, I.; Mandina Cardoso, T.; Guerrero Carbajal, C.; Arceo Maldonado, C.; Espinoza, M.; Martinez Lopez, W.; Di Tomasso, M.; Barquinero, F.; Roy, L.

    2010-01-01

    The Latin American Biological Dosimetry Network (LBDNET) was constituted in 2007 for mutual assistance in case of a radiation emergency in the region supported by IAEA Technical Cooperation Projects RLA/9/054 and RLA/9/061. The main objectives are: a) to strengthen the technical capacities of Biological Dosimetry Services belonging to laboratories existing in the region (Argentine, Brazil, Chile, Cuba, Mexico, Peru and Uruguay) integrated in National Radiological Emergency Plans to provide a rapid biodosimetric response in a coordinated manner between countries and with RANET-IAEA/BioDoseNet-WHO, b) to provide support to other countries in the region lacking Biological Dosimetry laboratories, c) to consolidate the organization of the Latin American Biological Dosimetry Network for mutual assistance. The activities developed include technical meetings for protocols and chromosomal aberration scoring criteria unification, blood samples cultures exercises, chromosomal aberrations analysis at microscope, discussion of statistical methods and specialized software for dose calculation, the intercomparison between laboratory data after the analysis of slides with irradiated material and the intercomparison of the analysis of captured images distributed electronically in the WEB. The last exercise was the transportation of an irradiated human blood sample to countries inside and outside of the region. At the moment the exercises are concluded and they are pending to be published in reference journals. Results obtained show the capacity in the region for a biodosimetric response to a radiological accident. In the future the network will integrate techniques for high dose exposure evaluation and will enhance the interaction with other emergency systems in the region. (authors) [es

  8. Towards Establishing Capacity for Biological Dosimetry at Ghana Atomic Energy Commission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achel, Daniel Gyingiri; Achoribo, Elom; Agbenyegah, Sandra; Adaboro, Rudolph M; Donkor, Shadrack; Adu-Bobi, Nana A K; Agyekum, Akwasi A; Akuamoa, Felicia; Tagoe, Samuel N; Kyei, Kofi A; Yarney, Joel; Serafin, Antonio; Akudugu, John M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was not only to obtain basic technical prerequisites for the establishment of capacity of biological dosimetry at the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC) but also to stimulate interest in biological dosimetry research in Ghana and Sub-Saharan Africa. Peripheral blood from four healthy donors was exposed to different doses (0-6 Gy) of gamma rays from a radiotherapy machine and lymphocytes were subsequently stimulated, cultured, and processed according to standard protocols for 48-50 h. Processed cells were analyzed for the frequencies of dicentric and centric ring chromosomes. Radiation dose delivered to the experimental model was verified using GafChromic® EBT films in parallel experiments. Basic technical prerequisites for the establishment of capacity of biological dosimetry in the GAEC have been realized and expertise in the dicentric chromosome assay consolidated. We successfully obtained preliminary cytogenetic data for a dose-response relationship of the irradiated blood lymphocytes. The data strongly indicate the existence of significant linear (α) and quadratic (β) components and are consistent with those published for the production of chromosome aberrations in comparable absorbed dose ranges.

  9. The dosimetry of ionizing radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Bjaerngard, Bengt E; Kase, Kenneth R

    1987-01-01

    The Dosimetry of Ionizing Radiation, Volume II, attempts to fill the need for updated reference material on the field of radiation dosimetry. This book presents some broad topics in dosimetry and a variety of radiation dosimetry instrumentation and its application. The book opens with a chapter that extends and applies the concepts of microdosimetry to biological systems. This is followed by separate chapters on the state- of-the-art equipment and techniques used to determine neutron spectra; studies to determine recombination effects in ionization chambers exposed to high-intensity pulsed ra

  10. Biology versus engineering: the TMI accident as a case study in problems of dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aamodt, N.O.

    2000-01-01

    Contradictions between official results of studying impact on the environment arising from the Three-Mile-Island (TMI) accident in 1979 and scarce information about biological objects irradiation years later are considered. It is shown that some populations (public and animals) underwent radiation exposure by several orders exceeding the previously calculated doses, which is confirmed by cytogenetic and immune tests. The use of meteorological models, which do not consider complicated topography, gives rise to incorrect results. The situation that took shape around TMI provides a unique potentiality for biological dosimetry to demonstrate its efficiency and advantages in technical reconstruction of radiation exposure doses [ru

  11. Biological effects of heavy particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabatier, L.; Martins, B.; Dutrillaux, B.

    1991-01-01

    The usual definitions of biological dose and biological dosimetry do not fit in case of particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). The dose corresponds to an average value which is not representative of the highly localized energy transfer due to heavy ions. Fortunately, up to now, a biological dosimetry following an exposure to high LET particles is necessary only for cosmonauts. In radiotherapy applications, one exactly knows the nature and energy of incident particle beams. The quality requirements for a good biodosimeter include reliable relation between dose and effect, weak sensitivity to individual variations, reliability and stability of acquired informations against the time delay between exposure and measurements. Nothing is better than the human lymphocyte to be used for measurements that fulfil these requirements. In the case of a manned spaceship, the irradiation dose corresponds to a wide range of radiation (protons, neutrons, heavy ions), and making a dosimetry as well as defining it are of current concern. As yet, there exist two possible definitions, which reduce the dose either to a proton or to a neutron equivalent one. However, such an approximation is not a faithful representation of the irradiation effects and in particular, the long-term effects may be quite different. In the future, it is reasonable to expect an evolution towards technics that enable identifying irradiated cells and quantifying precisely their radiation damage in order to reconstruct the spectrum of particles received by a given cosmonaut in a given time. Let us emphasize that the radiation hazards due to a short stay in space are quite minor, but in the case of a travel to Mars, they cannot be neglected [fr

  12. Effect of processor temperature on film dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Shiv P; Das, Indra J

    2012-01-01

    Optical density (OD) of a radiographic film plays an important role in radiation dosimetry, which depends on various parameters, including beam energy, depth, field size, film batch, dose, dose rate, air film interface, postexposure processing time, and temperature of the processor. Most of these parameters have been studied for Kodak XV and extended dose range (EDR) films used in radiation oncology. There is very limited information on processor temperature, which is investigated in this study. Multiple XV and EDR films were exposed in the reference condition (d(max.), 10 × 10 cm(2), 100 cm) to a given dose. An automatic film processor (X-Omat 5000) was used for processing films. The temperature of the processor was adjusted manually with increasing temperature. At each temperature, a set of films was processed to evaluate OD at a given dose. For both films, OD is a linear function of processor temperature in the range of 29.4-40.6°C (85-105°F) for various dose ranges. The changes in processor temperature are directly related to the dose by a quadratic function. A simple linear equation is provided for the changes in OD vs. processor temperature, which could be used for correcting dose in radiation dosimetry when film is used. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of processor temperature on film dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, Shiv P.; Das, Indra J.

    2012-01-01

    Optical density (OD) of a radiographic film plays an important role in radiation dosimetry, which depends on various parameters, including beam energy, depth, field size, film batch, dose, dose rate, air film interface, postexposure processing time, and temperature of the processor. Most of these parameters have been studied for Kodak XV and extended dose range (EDR) films used in radiation oncology. There is very limited information on processor temperature, which is investigated in this study. Multiple XV and EDR films were exposed in the reference condition (d max. , 10 × 10 cm 2 , 100 cm) to a given dose. An automatic film processor (X-Omat 5000) was used for processing films. The temperature of the processor was adjusted manually with increasing temperature. At each temperature, a set of films was processed to evaluate OD at a given dose. For both films, OD is a linear function of processor temperature in the range of 29.4–40.6°C (85–105°F) for various dose ranges. The changes in processor temperature are directly related to the dose by a quadratic function. A simple linear equation is provided for the changes in OD vs. processor temperature, which could be used for correcting dose in radiation dosimetry when film is used.

  14. Biological dosimetry, scopes and limitations; Dosimetria biologica, alcances y limitaciones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero C, C.; Brena V, M. [Departamento de Biologia, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, C.P. 52045 Salazar, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    The analysis of the aberrations in chromosomes is an alternative to establish the exposure dose to the radiation, when the information provided by the traditional physical methods is insufficient. There are diverse causes by which it can reached to apply an alternative system, such is the case of exposures of another persons to the management of radiation sources, which not carry physical dosemeter. Contrary case is to the occupational exposure personnel (OEP), what must to utilize some system for determining the exposure dose, even so can be needed the case for more information. In any case, the cells from the affected person are the alternative without the biological system be overlap to the physical, it is complementary. (Author)

  15. A contribution to the study of the biological dosimetry in clinical radiopathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eston, T.E. de.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of total body irradiation with different radiation doses from a 4MeV linear accelerator on organs and tissues of adult male rabbits were studied. Doses of 0.50, 2.00, 6.00 and 8.00 Gy were applied. Different organic parameters were evaluated before and after various periods of the post-irradiation time. Mortality did not occured for 0.50 or 2.00 Gy, but morbility was greater in comparison with the control; sexual potency was maintained. 'Impotentia colundi' occured with 6 Gy. A small loss of weight occured with 2.00 Gy and a higher loss for 6.00 Gy, with later recovery. Blood parameters varied even for lowest dose. Alterations were evident in the bone marrow activity for 2.00 and 6.00 Gy. Spermatides, spermatocytes and mature spermatozoids were affect even by low doses, the laters loosing motility. Significant difference was observed in the relation DNA/RNA for irradiated-and control animals. The results showed that T3 asssay could serve as 'biological indicator' of irradiation in a period of at least 7 hours and for doses of 4Gy or more. Using the kinetic method, an increase of glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (GOT) seric levels was observed for 6.00 Gy after 7 hours and a decrease for the glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT). Fasting glycemy and catecolamines urinary extraction were not statiscally significants. The study of chromosomal aberrations that occur in lymphocytes after 'in vitro' irradiation showed that this is at the present moment the most efficient method for biological dosimetry. (M.A.) [pt

  16. Conventional radiation-biological dosimetry using frequencies of unstable chromosome aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramalho, Adriana T.; Costa, Maria Lucia P.; Oliveira, Monica S.

    1998-01-01

    Frequency of chromosome aberrations detected by conventional cytogenetics is a very useful parameter in biological radiodosimetry. It can be used for estimating absorbed doses in individuals working with radioactive sources and individuals accidentally exposed to radiation. In the first case subjects wear physical dosimeters as a routine safety habit. The laboratory at the Institute of Radioprotection and Dosimetry (IRD, Brazil) has been using conventional cytogenetic analysis to complement data obtained by physical dosimetry since 1983. Until now, more than one hundred cases were investigated where individual physical dosimeters detected occupational exposure (above the safety limits allowed). In total, only 34% of these cases were confirmed by conventional cytogenetic dosimetry. Also, conventional cytogenetic analysis following the radiation accident of Goiania (Brazil) in 1987 have been used. Peripheral lymphocytes from 129 exposed or potentially exposed individuals were analyzed for the frequencies of unstable chromosomal aberrations (dicentrics, centric rings and acentrics fragments) to estimate absorbed radiation doses. During the emergency period, doses were estimated to help immediate medical treatment using in vitro calibration curves produced before the accident. Later on, doses were assessed once more using new in vitro calibration curves. A drawback of this technique is that unstable aberrations are lost after exposure. To investigate the mean lifespan of lymphocytes containing dicentric and ring aberrations, we have followed 15 victims of the Goiania accident over all these years. Results suggest that the disappearance of unstable aberrations is dose-dependent. This could explain the variation in the results found among studies in this field

  17. Chromosomal analysis and application of biological dosimetry in two cases of apparent over exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero C, C.; Brena V, M.

    2002-01-01

    The gamma radiation calibration curve of 60 Co is used which was generated in the ININ Laboratory of Biology to calculate the exposure dose of two workers whose dosemeters marked values above of the limit allowed. The analysis indicates that in a first case, the aberrations frequency corresponded to the basal value, therefore there is not over exposure. The aberrations frequency of the second case is lightly above to the basal value and therefore the probability favors to what the physical dosimetry indicates. (Author)

  18. Bibliographical database of radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment: Part 1, through June 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straume, T.; Ricker, Y.; Thut, M.

    1988-08-29

    This database was constructed to support research in radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment. Relevant publications were identified through detailed searches of national and international electronic databases and through our personal knowledge of the subject. Publications were numbered and key worded, and referenced in an electronic data-retrieval system that permits quick access through computerized searches on publication number, authors, key words, title, year, and journal name. Photocopies of all publications contained in the database are maintained in a file that is numerically arranged by citation number. This report of the database is provided as a useful reference and overview. It should be emphasized that the database will grow as new citations are added to it. With that in mind, we arranged this report in order of ascending citation number so that follow-up reports will simply extend this document. The database cite 1212 publications. Publications are from 119 different scientific journals, 27 of these journals are cited at least 5 times. It also contains reference to 42 books and published symposia, and 129 reports. Information relevant to radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment is widely distributed among the scientific literature, although a few journals clearly dominate. The four journals publishing the largest number of relevant papers are Health Physics, Mutation Research, Radiation Research, and International Journal of Radiation Biology. Publications in Health Physics make up almost 10% of the current database.

  19. Bibliographical database of radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment: Part 1, through June 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straume, T.; Ricker, Y.; Thut, M.

    1988-01-01

    This database was constructed to support research in radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment. Relevant publications were identified through detailed searches of national and international electronic databases and through our personal knowledge of the subject. Publications were numbered and key worded, and referenced in an electronic data-retrieval system that permits quick access through computerized searches on publication number, authors, key words, title, year, and journal name. Photocopies of all publications contained in the database are maintained in a file that is numerically arranged by citation number. This report of the database is provided as a useful reference and overview. It should be emphasized that the database will grow as new citations are added to it. With that in mind, we arranged this report in order of ascending citation number so that follow-up reports will simply extend this document. The database cite 1212 publications. Publications are from 119 different scientific journals, 27 of these journals are cited at least 5 times. It also contains reference to 42 books and published symposia, and 129 reports. Information relevant to radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment is widely distributed among the scientific literature, although a few journals clearly dominate. The four journals publishing the largest number of relevant papers are Health Physics, Mutation Research, Radiation Research, and International Journal of Radiation Biology. Publications in Health Physics make up almost 10% of the current database

  20. Effects of dose fractionation on the response of alanine dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundahl, Brad; Logar, John; Desrosiers, Marc; Puhl, James

    2014-01-01

    Alanine dosimetry is well established as a transfer standard and is becoming more prevalently used in routine dosimetry systems for radiation processing. Many routine measurement applications in radiation processing involve absorbed dose measurements resulting from fractioned exposures to ionizing radiation. Fractioning of absorbed dose is identified as an influence quantity (ISO/ASTM, 2013). This paper reports on study results of absorbed dose fractioning characteristics of alanine for gamma and high energy electron beam radiation sources. The results of this study indicate a radiation response difference due to absorbed dose fractioning in response can be observed after four fractionations for high-energy electron beams and no difference up to seven fractions for gamma rays using an ANOVA evaluation method. - Highlights: • Fractioning effects signaled in electron beam using an ANOVA at 6 equal increments. • Fractioning effects not signaled in gamma using an ANOVA up to 7 equal increments. • Insensitivity of alanine to dose fractioning indicates nominal impact on calibration

  1. Advances in dosimetry and biological predictors of radiation-induced esophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Y

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Yang Yu,1 Hui Guan,1 Yuanli Dong,1 Ligang Xing,2 Xiaolin Li2 1School of Medicine and Life Sciences, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, University of Jinan, Jinan, 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China Objective: To summarize the research progress about the dosimetry and biological predictors of radiation-induced esophagitis.Methods: We performed a systematic literature review addressing radiation esophagitis in the treatment of lung cancer published between January 2009 and May 2015 in the PubMed full-text database index systems.Results: Twenty-eight eligible documents were included in the final analysis. Many clinical factors were related to the risk of radiation esophagitis, such as elder patients, concurrent chemoradiotherapy, and the intense radiotherapy regimen (hyperfractionated radiotherapy or stereotactic body radiotherapy. The parameters including Dmax, Dmean, V20, V30, V50, and V55 may be valuable in predicting the occurrence of radiation esophagitis in patients receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Genetic variants in inflammation-related genes are also associated with radiation-induced toxicity.Conclusion: Dosimetry and biological factors of radiation-induced esophagitis provide clinical information to decrease its occurrence and grade during radiotherapy. More prospective studies are warranted to confirm their prediction efficacy. Keywords: lung cancer, esophagitis, radiation injuries, predictors

  2. Biological (DB) and internal dosimetry (DI) in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (CaDT) treated with iodine 131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadel, Ana M.; Chebel, G.; Oneto, A.; Di Giorgio, Marina; Vallerga, Maria B.; Taja, Maria R.; Radl, A.; Rojo, Ana M.; Deluca, G.; Levi de Cabrejas, Mariana; Cabrejas, Raul C.

    2009-01-01

    -dose tracers (to assess the contribution of therapeutic doses above) and the second shows, 8 days post-therapeutic dose (in this period most of the energy of 131 I is deposited in the body and it is possible to assess the biological effect that this produces absorbed dose). These samples were applied techniques cytogenetics, MN and FISH. It assumes: 1) uniform distribution of 131 I in the body, because the total thyroidectomy; 2) that in the absence of bone metastases that compromise bone marrow estimated average dose to the whole body can be considered an approximation appropriate dosage bone marrow. The technique FISH estimated equivalent dose active in bone marrow. Results: A comparison of the doses received by 3 cytogenetic tests applied indicates that these methods are consistent with each other. The absorbed dose to the whole body estimated by DB correlate with those estimated by DI, p 131 I to administer in patients with CaDiT. These results support the advantage of applying quantitative methods of DI, who consider the patient's own parameters, in order to customize their therapy, with respect to the empirical method. In this context, the DB provides evidence for the validation of the DI. Also, from a clinical point of view, the DB conducted on samples from patients with previous treatments, before a new therapeutic administration, would assess the status cytogenetic (radiation damage and repair capacity). The dosimetry presented clinical importance in reducing potential complications hematologic. In cases with cumulative doses higher than 1000 mCi, it would be useful to indicate the need to consider other schemes therapeutic alternative to the administration of 131 I, such as chemotherapy or radiotherapy, reducing morbidity. (author)

  3. Biological effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This fourth chapter presents: cell structure and metabolism; radiation interaction with biological tissues; steps of the production of biological effect of radiation; radiosensitivity of tissues; classification of biological effects; reversibility, transmissivity and influence factors; pre-natal biological effects; biological effects in therapy and syndrome of acute irradiation

  4. Bibliographical database of radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment: Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straume, T.; Ricker, Y.; Thut, M.

    1990-09-01

    This is part 11 of a database constructed to support research in radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment. Relevant publications were identified through detailed searches of national and international electronic databases and through our personal knowledge of the subject. Publications were numbered and key worded, and referenced in an electronic data-retrieval system that permits quick access through computerized searches on authors, key words, title, year, journal name, or publication number. Photocopies of the publications contained in the database are maintained in a file that is numerically arranged by our publication acquisition numbers. This volume contains 1048 additional entries, which are listed in alphabetical order by author. The computer software used for the database is a simple but sophisticated relational database program that permits quick information access, high flexibility, and the creation of customized reports. This program is inexpensive and is commercially available for the Macintosh and the IBM PC. Although the database entries were made using a Macintosh computer, we have the capability to convert the files into the IBM PC version. As of this date, the database cites 2260 publications. Citations in the database are from 200 different scientific journals. There are also references to 80 books and published symposia, and 158 reports. Information relevant to radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment is widely distributed within the scientific literature, although a few journals clearly predominate. The journals publishing the largest number of relevant papers are Health Physics, with a total of 242 citations in the database, and Mutation Research, with 185 citations. Other journals with over 100 citations in the database, are Radiation Research, with 136, and International Journal of Radiation Biology, with 132

  5. Biological dosimetry after criticality accidents. Intercomparison exercise in the Silene Reactor - France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Giorgio, Marina; Vallerga, Maria B.; Taja, Maria R.

    2004-01-01

    The Institute of Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Institute (IRSN) organized an international biological dosimetry intercomparison, at the SILENE experimental reactor (Valduc, France), simulating different criticality scenarios: bare source 4 Gy, lead shield source 1 and 2 Gy and gamma pure 60 Co source 2 Gy. Fifteen laboratories were involved in this exercise, including the Argentine Biological Dosimetry Laboratory. The purposes of the intercomparison were: 1) To compare the unstable chromosome aberration (UCA) frequency observed by the different laboratories; and 2) To compare the dose estimation for gamma rays and neutrons. The objects of the present work were: I) To compare the mean frequency of UCA observed by the Argentine laboratory with the mean frequency observed by the participant laboratories as a whole. II) To compare the dose estimates performed by the Argentine lab with those estimated by the other laboratories involved in the second stage of the intercomparison. Overall, the mean frequencies of UCA and the correspondent 95% confidence limits obtained by the Argentine lab were consistent with the results obtained by the laboratories as a whole. For the gamma pure scenario, smaller variations were observed among laboratories in terms of dose (CV=18,2%) than in terms of frequency (CV=30,1%). For the mixed field scenarios, only four laboratories, including the Argentine lab, estimated gamma and neutron components of the total dose and just two (Argentine lab and lab 12) were in agreement with the given physical doses. The 1 Gy experiment presented lesser variations both in terms of frequency and dose than the other two scenarios. For the 4 and 2 Gy experiments, variations in neutron dose were more significant than variations in gamma dose, related to the magnitude of the dose. The results suggest that intercomparison exercises jointly with the accreditation of biological dosimetry by cytogenetic service laboratories, in compliance with ISO

  6. An introduction to radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovell, S.

    1979-01-01

    This book provides an elementary introduction to radiation dosimetry. Dosimetry is treated from first principles dealing with the following aspects:- basic concepts of nuclear physics; ionizing radiations including charged particles, photons, and neutrons and their interaction with matter at the atomic level; the transitory and permanent effects of ionizing radiation on matter in bulk; dosimetric quantities and units; the measurement of exposure by a variety of techniques including thermoluminescent and photographic dosimetry; and finally radiation protection including the biological effects of ionizing radiations, the ethics of radiation protection, dose limitation, protective measures from external and internal irradiation, and monitoring. (U.K.)

  7. Calibration curves for biological dosimetry; Curvas de calibracion para dosimetria biologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero C, C.; Brena V, M. [ININ, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail cgc@nuclear.inin.mx

    2004-07-01

    The generated information by the investigations in different laboratories of the world, included the ININ, in which settles down that certain class of chromosomal leisure it increases in function of the dose and radiation type, has given by result the obtaining of calibrated curves that are applied in the well-known technique as biological dosimetry. In this work is presented a summary of the work made in the laboratory that includes the calibrated curves for gamma radiation of {sup 60} Cobalt and X rays of 250 k Vp, examples of presumed exposure to ionizing radiation, resolved by means of aberration analysis and the corresponding dose estimate through the equations of the respective curves and finally a comparison among the dose calculations in those people affected by the accident of Ciudad Juarez, carried out by the group of Oak Ridge, USA and those obtained in this laboratory. (Author)

  8. Foundations of ionizing radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisenko, O.N.; Pereslegin, I.A.

    1985-01-01

    Foundations of dosimetry in application to radiotherapy are presented. General characteristics of ionizing radiations and main characteristics of ionizing radiation sources, mostly used in radiotherapy, are given. Values and units for measuring ionizing radiation (activity of a radioactive substance, absorbed dose, exposure dose, integral dose and dose equivalent are considered. Different methods and instruments for ionizing radiation dosimetry are discussed. The attention is paid to the foundations of clinical dosimetry (representation of anatomo-topographic information, choice of radiation conditions, realization of radiation methods, corrections for a configuration and inhomogeneity of a patient's body, account of biological factors of radiation effects, instruments of dose field formation, control of irradiation procedure chosen)

  9. Biological dosimetry in radiological protection: dose response curves elaboration for 60Co and 137Cs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Marcia Augusta da

    1997-01-01

    Ionizing radiation sources for pacific uses are being extensively utilized by modern society and the applications of these sources have raised the probability of the occurrence of accidents. The accidental exposition to radiation creates a necessity of the development of methods to evaluate dose quantity. This data could be obtained by the measurement of damage caused by radiation in the exposed person. The radiation dose can be estimated in exposed persons through physical methods (physical dosimetry) but the biological methods can't be dispensed, and among them, the cytogenetic one that makes use of chromosome aberrations (dicentric and centric ring) formed in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) exposed to ionizing radiation. This method correlates the frequency of radioinduced aberrations with the estimated absorbed dose, as in vitro as in vivo, which is called cytogenetic dosimetry. By the introduction of improved new techniques in culture, in the interpretation of aberrations in the different analysers of slides and by the adoption of different statistical programs to analyse the data, significant differences are observed among laboratories in dose-response curves (calibration curves). The estimation of absorbed dose utilizing other laboratory calibration curves may introduce some uncertainties, so the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) advises that each laboratory elaborates your own dose-response curve for cytogenetic dosimetry. The results were obtained from peripheral blood lymphocytes of the healthy and no-smoking donors exposed to 60 Co and 137 Cs radiation, with dose rate of 5 cGy.min. -1 . Six points of dose were determined 20,50,100,200,300,400 cGy and the control not irradiated. The analysed aberrations were of chromosomic type, dicentric and centric ring. The dose response curve for dicentrics were obtained by frequencies weighted in liner-quadratic mathematic model and the equation resulted were for 60 Co: Y = (3 46 +- 2.14)10 -4 cGy -1 + (3

  10. REVIEW: Nuclear medicine dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabin, Michael

    2006-07-01

    A brief overview is provided of the history of the development of internal dose methods for use in nuclear medicine. Basic methods of internal dosimetry and the systems that have been developed for use in nuclear medicine are described. The development of the MIRD system and the International Radiopharmaceutical Dosimetry Symposium series is outlined. The evolution of models and tools for calculating dose estimates is reviewed. Current efforts in developing more patient-specific methods, particularly for use in therapy calculations, development of small scale and microdosimetry techniques, and of relating internal radiation doses to observed biological effects are described and evaluated.

  11. Solid State and Chemical Radiation Dosimetry in Medicine and Biology. Proceedings of a Symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    Proceedings of a Symposium organized by the IAEA and held in Vienna, 3-7 October 1966. The meeting was attended by 104 participants from 21 countries and three international organizations. Contents: Solid state dosimetry (17 papers); Chemical dosimetry (10 papers); Invited lectures (2 papers); General aspects and other methods of dosimetry (6 papers); Panel discussion on research and development needed in dosimetry. Each paper is in its original language (32 English, 2 French and 1 Spanish) and is preceded by an abstract in English and one in the original language, if this is not English. Discussions are in English. (author)

  12. Biological dosimetry in patients with differenced thyroid carcinoma treated with Iodine-131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallerga, M.; Taja, Maria R.; Radl, A.; Rojo, Ana M.; Deluca, G.; Di Giogio, Marina; Fadel, A.; Chebel, G.; Oneto, A.; Cabrejas, Mariana

    2007-01-01

    The differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC), constitutes the 90 % of the thyroid gland cancers. 80% of patients are cured after the initial therapy and 12% remained disease-free after successive treatments. The 24 patients included in this study represent a sample of the aforementioned 12% and 8%, with recurrence in the first decade post-treatment (local disease and/or recurrence at distance). The internal radiotherapy with 131 I in patients with DTC is used within the therapeutic schema as a step post-thyroidectomy. The success of the therapy is to get a lethal dose in the tumor tissue, which depends on the therapeutic activity and the retention of 131 I, without exceeding the dose of tolerance in healthy tissues. The most widespread way of administration is the empirical prescription which considers the clinical and laboratory parameters for its determination. In this work, the treatment protocol applied incorporates assessment by biological (DB) and internal (DI) dosimetry for estimating absorbed dose to the whole body and bone marrow to manage a personalized therapeutic dose for each patient. The biological dose estimation is based on the quantification of chromosomal aberrations, which is often referred to a dose-response curve in which lymphocytes are irradiated in vitro with 131 I, allowing to determine the dose in vivo of circulating lymphocytes patients [es

  13. Biological dosimetry: the potential use of radiation-induced apoptosis in human T-lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menz, R.; Andres, R.; Larsson, B.; Ozsahin, M.; Crompton, N.E.A.; Trott, K.

    1997-01-01

    An assay for biological dosimetry based on the induction of apoptosis in human T-lymphocytes is described. Radiation-induced apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometric identification of cells displaying apoptosis-associated DNA condensation. CD4 and CD8 T-lymphocytes were analysed. They were recognized on the basis of their cell-surface antigens. Four parameters were measured for both cell types: cell size, granularity, antigen immunofluorescence and DNA content. Apoptosis was quantified as the fraction of CD4-, or CD8-positive cells with a characteristic reduction of cell size and DNA content. At doses below 1 Gy, levels of radiation-induced apoptosis increased for up to 5 days after irradiation. Optimal dose discrimination was observed 4 days after irradiation, at which time the dose-response curves were linear, with a slope of 8% ± 0.5% per 0.1 Gy. In controlled, dose-response experiments the lowest dose level at which the radiation-induced apoptosis frequency was still significantly above control was 0.05 Gy. After 5 days post-irradiation incubation, intra- and interdonor variations were measured and found to be similar; thus, apoptotic levels depend more on the dose than on the donor. The results demonstrate the potential of this assay as a biological dosimeter. (orig.)

  14. Radiation dosimetry and radiation biophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    Radiation dosimetry and radiation biophysics are two closely integrated programs whose joint purpose is to explore the connections between the primary physical events produced by radiation and their biological consequences in cellular systems. The radiation dosimetry program includes the theoretical description of primary events and their connection with the observable biological effects. This program also is concerned with the design and measurement of physical parameters used in theory or to support biological experiments. The radiation biophysics program tests and uses the theoretical developments for experimental design, and provides information for further theoretical development through experiments on cellular systems

  15. Radiation dosimetry and radiation biophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Radiation dosimetry and radiation biophysics are two closely integrated programs whose joint purpose is to explore the connections between the primary physical events produced by radiation and their biological consequences in cellular systems. The radiation dosimetry program includes the theoretical description of primary events and their connection with the observable biological effects. This program also is concerned with design and measurement of those physical parameters used in the theory or to support biological experiments. The radiation biophysics program tests and makes use of the theoretical developments for experimental design. Also, this program provides information for further theoretical development through experiments on cellular systems

  16. Standard Practice for Dosimetry of Proton Beams for use in Radiation Effects Testing of Electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahan, Margaret A.; Blackmore, Ewart; Cascio, Ethan W.; Castaneda, Carlos; von Przewoski, Barbara; Eisen, Harvey

    2008-01-01

    Representatives of facilities that routinely deliver protons for radiation effect testing are collaborating to establish a set of standard best practices for proton dosimetry. These best practices will be submitted to the ASTM International for adoption

  17. Standard Practice for Dosimetry of Proton Beams for use in Radiation Effects Testing of Electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahan, Margaret A.; Blackmore, Ewart; Cascio, Ethan W.; Castaneda, Carlos; von Przewoski, Barbara; Eisen, Harvey

    2008-07-25

    Representatives of facilities that routinely deliver protons for radiation effect testing are collaborating to establish a set of standard best practices for proton dosimetry. These best practices will be submitted to the ASTM International for adoption.

  18. Light scattering by irradiated cells as a method of biological dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostashevsky, J.

    1984-01-01

    Light scattering (LS) parameters between 350-500 nm wavelength have been studied for 2 groups of cells: 1) blood (BL) and thymus (TL) lymphocytes of rats and mice, and 2) Ehrlich ascite tumor (EAT) cells. LS measurements of freshly prepared cell suspensions have been made 24 hrs after x-ray irradiation of rodents (250 Kev, HVL = 2 mm Cu) at doses of 50-900 cGy. A steep (30% per Gy) linear (50-800 cGy for TL and 50-400 cGy for BL) dose-dependence was obtained for the increase in 90 0 -angle LS intensity. Increase in absorption (low-angle LS) was also linear (50-800 cGy for TL and BL) but less steep (9% per Gy). Irradiated cells were the same size as unirradiated. Changes in LS for TL and BL appear to follow the appearance of additional vacuoles which may become new internal smaller-size centers of LS. This suggestion is supported by direct observations of cells with dark-field microscopy. For EAT cells, both 90 0 and low angle LS had the same slope. This slope (4% per Gy) is much shallower than that for BL and TL, and quantitatively coincides with enlargement of area of EAT cells, which could explain LS changes. The difference in LS behavior of the two cellular groups reflects a difference in their early response to irradiation: interphase death for TL and BL, vs division delay for EAT cells. The above data suggest the fast and simple method of biological dosimetry

  19. Topics in radiation dosimetry radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    1972-01-01

    Radiation Dosimetry, Supplement 1: Topics in Radiation Dosimetry covers instruments and techniques in dealing with special dosimetry problems. The book discusses thermoluminescence dosimetry in archeological dating; dosimetric applications of track etching; vacuum chambers of radiation measurement. The text also describes wall-less detectors in microdosimetry; dosimetry of low-energy X-rays; and the theory and general applicability of the gamma-ray theory of track effects to various systems. Dose equivalent determinations in neutron fields by means of moderator techniques; as well as developm

  20. Biological effectiveness of fission neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, M.S.; Saigusa, S.; Kimura, I.

    1992-01-01

    Human peripheral blood lymphocytes were exposed to the uranium fission neutrons with different energy spectra, and the effects of changing pattern of energy spectrum on the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) were studied by analyzing dose-response relationship of chromosome aberrations. When the contribution of contaminated gamma-rays was subtracted, the efficiency of chromosomal response to the neutron dose was found to be refractory to the difference in the energy spectrum while the mean energy ranged from 2 MeV to 27 keV. This chromosomal refractoriness to energy spectrum may be explained by the similarity of energy spectrum for kerma contribution; most of the doses being given by neutrons with energy above 50 keV. Small doses given by short tracks may be less efficient. A comparison of these observations with chromosome aberration frequencies in lymphocytes of A-bomb survivors leads to somewhat higher estimate of neutron dose in Hiroshima than the estimate by the recently revised dosimetry system, DS86. (author)

  1. The biological response of plucked human hair to low-dose radiation: a measure of individual radiosensitivity and a technique for biological dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swain, D.

    1997-01-01

    It is often assumed that the effects of radiation are linear with dose and that high dose effects can be extrapolated to low dose levels. However, there are a variety of mechanisms which can alter the response at low doses. The most important of these relate to induced sensitivity or induced repair mechanisms. It is therefore important that this area is studied in more depth by looking at the molecular effects and damage to cells at low doses. It is well known that there are certain rare genetic syndromes which predispose individuals to cancer, e.g. ataxia telangiectasia. It is also probable that there is a large range of sensitivity in the natural variation of individuals to the risk of radiation-induced cancer. It is proposed that radiosensitivity is studied using stimulated lymphocytes from whole blood and the technique extended to look at the effects in cell cultures established from human hair. Radiation treatment of cell cultures established from plucked human hair has been previously advocated as a non-invasive technique for non-uniform biological dosimetry and it is proposed that these techniques are adapted to the use of hair to estimate individual radiosensitivity. The aim is to establish and optimize these techniques for culturing keratinocytes from plucked human hair follicles with a view to study biological markers for the subsequent assessment of radiosensitivity. Preliminary results are promising and suggest that the technique for culturing keratinocytes from hair presents a feasible approach. Results from this primary cell culture technique and results from the comparison of the micronuclei data obtained from the cell cultures and stimulated lymphocytes will be presented. (author)

  2. Dosimetry; La dosimetrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Couteulx, I.; Apretna, D.; Beaugerie, M.F. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France)] [and others

    2003-07-01

    Eight articles treat the dosimetry. Two articles evaluate the radiation doses in specific cases, dosimetry of patients in radiodiagnosis, three articles are devoted to detectors (neutrons and x and gamma radiations) and a computer code to build up the dosimetry of an accident due to an external exposure. (N.C.)

  3. Contribution of new cytogenetic techniques in the estimations of old irradiations in retrospective biological dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouzoulet, F.

    2007-10-01

    The objective of this study was to answer three questions: if the translocations are steady: the results have shown that the translocations even if they are not obligatory steady can be used in retrospective dosimetry. Furthermore, it appeared important to consider the complex translocations in view of their relative stability and complementary information they bring ( quality of radiation, received dose). The second question is what contribution of the M-F.I.S.H. in the translocations analysis in comparison with the F.I.S.H.-3: we have shown that the M-F.I.S.H. would allow to raise the whole of doubt due to a partial genome observation. that has for effect to increase the precision of the analysis and that what ever be the received dose. The third question is if there are differences between the chromosomal aberrations generated by x radiation of 50 keV and by gamma radiation from cobalt-60: yes, the low energy photons generate more translocations than the photons coming from cobalt-60. But they generate less dicentrics. this difference comes from the way the energy is deposited that leads to a more important formation of complex and multiple translocations with the low energy photons. this could constitute a problem in the use of low energy photons in radiotherapy. it would seem that the simple translocations rate is not influenced by the photons energy. (N.C.)

  4. Collaborative Physical and Biological Dosimetry Studies for Neutron Capture Therapy at the RA-1 Research Reactor Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigg, D.W.; Schwint, A.E.; Hartwell, J.K.; Heber, E.M.; Trivillin, V.; Castillo, J.; Wentzeis, L.; Sloan, P.; Wemple, C.A.

    2004-10-04

    Initial physical dosimetry measurements have been completed using activation spectrometry and thermoluminiscent dosimeters to characterize the BNCT irradiation facility developed at the RA-1 research reactor operated by the Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission in Buenos Aires. Some biological scoping irradiations have also been completed using a small-animal (hamster) oral mucosa tumor model. Results indicate that the RA-1 neutron source produces useful dose rates but that some improvements in the initial configuration will be needed to optimize the spectrum for thermal-neutron BNCT research applications.

  5. Collaborative Physical and Biological Dosimetry Studies for Neutron Capture Therapy at the RA-1 Research Reactor Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David W. Nigg; Amanda E. Schwint; John K. Hartwell; Elisa M. Heber; Veronica Trivillin; Jorge Castillo; Luis Wentzeis; Patrick Sloan; Charles A. Wemple

    2004-10-01

    Initial physical dosimetry measurements have been completed using activation spectrometry and thermoluminiscent dosimeters to characterize the BNCT irradiation facility developed at the RA-1 research reactor operated by the Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission in Buenos Aires. Some biological scoping irradiations have also been completed using a small-animal (hamster) oral mucosa tumor model. Results indicate that the RA-1 neutron source produces useful dose rates but that some improvements in the initial configuration will be needed to optimize the spectrum for thermal-neutron BNCT research applications.

  6. Analysis behaviour of free radicals produced by ionizing radiations in human blood by EPR for biological dosimetry in patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza, O. O.; Almanza, A.; Plazas, M. M. C.

    2006-01-01

    In this work is analyzed the biological dosimetry of the free radicals produced by ionizing radiations in human blood obtained by EPR and the biological behaviour of samples In-Vitro, with Rh: O+, in tubes with EDTA (Acid Etilen Diamino Tetracetic) the samples was extracted of the main investigator, these samples were radiated with gammas of ''60Co of a Theratron 780 between plates of PMMA to a depth of Z m ax of 0.5 cm and between doses 1 to 25 Gy. In these results the behaviors of signal the free radicals presented a increasing a their intensity depending on applied dose, of equal way are results of the biologic dosimetry displayed in sanguineous populations like. White Globules, Red. Platelets etc, to being compared with Resonance Paramagnetic Electronic (EPR). The results show changes in sanguineous populations in high doses (D>10 Gy) in the case of lymphocytes, granulocitos, macusanita, plaquetas, hemoglobina, haematocrit with change similarly in medium and low doses (D>10Gy) in linfocites, platelets, granulocytes, monocytes and the haematocrit. A sanguineous sample without radiating analyzes by EPR giving the presence of signals with values of g=2.13 2,41 in blood. For the first certain value of g authors have associated it to free radicals like: globin (Fe(IV)=0) or Cu''+ incorporated to the ceruloplasmin molecule. (Author)

  7. Reproductive function and biological dosimetry prospective study of young thyroid differentiated cancer patients treated with I-131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Giorgio, M.; Vallerga, M.B.; Taja, M.R.; Radl, A.; Chebel, Graciela; Fadel, Ana Maria; Gutierrez, Silvia; Normandi, Eduardo; Levalle, Oscar; Kundt, Miriam

    2011-01-01

    The administration of I-131 in the management of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is a well established practice. As the spermatogonia is highly sensitive to radiation, large doses of internal radiation could result in adverse effects on reproductive function such as oligo/azoospermia and infertility. During spermiogenesis, mammalian chromatin undergoes replacement of nuclear histones by protamines, which yields a DNA sixfold more highly condensed in spermatozoa than in mitotic chromosomes. The structure of this highly packaged chromatin shows a low binding capacity for several fluorochromes and dyes such as chromomycin A3 (CMA3). The aim of this study is to assess the correlation between reproductive function (endocrine and exocrine testicular function, and levels of CMA3 stainability) and biological dosimetry in a prospective study of 4 young DTC patients treated with I-131. In this context, a background level of CMA3 binding in mature human sperm was established. It revealed a variable accessibility of CMA3 to the DNA that is dependant on packaging quality and thus, indicative of protamine deficiency. The identification of altered stainability suggests DNA damage as well as epigenetic effects, which may be indicators of male infertility. Transient impairment of spermatogenesis associated with an increase in FSH, an altered spermiogram and even azoospermia was observed after the administration of cumulative activities. Overall, testosterone levels were preserved, except in one case, which presented a drastically diminished value associated with an increase in LH level. As peripheral blood lymphocytes and spermatogonia have equivalent radiosensitivity (interphase death) we hypothesize that the knowledge of DNA damage recovery in peripheral lymphocytes could correlate with spermatogonia recovery and with FSH evolution. (authors)

  8. Reproductive function and biological dosimetry prospective study of young thyroid differentiated cancer patients treated with I-131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Giorgio, Marina; Vallerga, Maria B.; Taja, Maria R.; Radl, Analia; Chebel, Graciela; Fadel, Ana M.; Gutierrez, Silvia; Normandi, Eduardo; Levalle, Oscar; Kundt, Miriam

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The administration of I-131 in the management of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is a well established practice. As the spermatogonia is highly sensitive to radiation, large doses of internal radiation could result in adverse effects on reproductive function such as oligo/azoospermia and infertility. During spermiogenesis, mammalian chromatin undergoes replacement of nuclear histones by protamines, which yields a DNA sixfold more highly condensed in spermatozoa than in mitotic chromosomes. The structure of this highly packaged chromatin shows a low binding capacity for several fluoro chromes and dyes such as chromo mycin A 3 (CMA 3 ). The aim of this study is to assess the correlation between reproductive function (endocrine and exocrine testicular function, and levels of CMA 3 stainability) and biological dosimetry in a prospective study of 4 young DTC patients treated with I-131. In this context, a background level of CMA 3 binding in mature human sperm was established. It revealed a variable accessibility of CMA 3 to the DNA that is dependant on packaging quality and thus, indicative of protamine deficiency. The identification of altered stainability suggests DNA damage as well as epigenetic effects, which may be indicators of male infertility. Transient impairment of spermatogenesis associated with an increase in FSH, an altered spermiogram and even azoospermia was observed after the administration of cumulative activities. Overall, testosterone levels were preserved, except in one case, which presented a drastically diminished value associated with an increase in LH level. As peripheral blood lymphocytes and spermatogonia have equivalent radiosensitivity (interphase death) we hypothesize that the knowledge of DNA damage recovery in peripheral lymphocytes could correlate with spermatogonia recovery and with FSH evolution. Therefore, a prospective study on the decline of unstable chromosome aberrations is being conducted, considering the damage

  9. Methodological effects in kidney dosimetry in Lu177 radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heikkonen, J.; Maeenpaeae, H.; Tenhunen, M.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. The aim of this study was to calculate the absorbed radiation dose in Lu 177 DOTATATE treatments to the kidneys of patients with metastasized neuroendocrine tumours and compare the radiation doses obtained with small volume and kidney volumetric analysis. Methods: For 40 patients (23 males, 17 females) in 120 treatments absorbed doses to both kidneys were calculated. One patient had 5 cycles, 19 patients four cycles, 8 patients three cycles, 3 patients two cycles and 9 patients one cycle. Each patient received amino acid solution 30 minutes before and 8 hours after treatment to reduce the kidney dose. The injected activity was 7.4 GBq (88 treatments) or 3.7 GBq (32 treatments) and therapy cycles were repeated every eighth week. SPECT/CT studies were made 24 h, 48 h, 72 h (or 120 h) and 168 h after injection with Siemens Symbia T2. The window was set over the 208 keV photopeak. Attenuated and scatter corrected counts from kidney volumes were registered with volumetric analysis both from right and left kidney and also with small volume (4 cm 3 ) technique. Dosimetric calculations were done with OLINDA/EXM software using mono-exponential time activity curve fitting. Results: the mean radiation dose for kidneys (67-208 cm 3 ) in one cycle was 2.9 Gy (0,48 mGy/MBq) range 0.8-7.7 Gy using kidney volumetric analysis and 4.8 Gy (0.80 mGy/MBq) range 1.3-15.4 Gy using small volume analysis. 20 patients received four cycles. In this group radiation dose to the kidneys in the first cycle was 2.8 Gy (range 1.0-5.3 Gy) in second 2.5 Gy (range 0.7-3.9 Gy), in third 3.2 Gy (range 1.3-6.4 Gy) and in fourth cycle 3.2 Gy (range 1.5-7.7 Gy). Small volume technique yielded 1.7 times (range 1.0-2.2) higher radiation doses compared with volumetric analysis. The cumulative administered doses in 4 cycle treatments were 14.0-29.3 GBq. The effective half live for kidneys was 45 h (range 30-110 h). The highest kidney dose was 20,5 Gy and this patient received

  10. Proceedings of the V. international symposium 'Actual problems of dosimetry'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundas, S.P.; Okeanov, A.E.; Shevchuk, V.E.

    2005-10-01

    The main topics of the workshop were: monitoring and reconstruction of radiation doses at radiation accidents, biological dosimetry and markers of radiation effects as well as normative, metrological and technical aspects of dosimetric and radiometric monitoring

  11. Biological Dosimetry of X-rays by micronuclei study; Dosimetria Biologica de rayos-X mediante el estudio de micronucleos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, E.; Silva, A.; Navlet, J.

    1991-07-01

    Biological dosimetry consists of estimating absorbed doses for people exposed to radiation by mean biological methods. Several indicators used are based in haematological, biochemical an cytogenetics data, although nowadays without doubt, the cytogenetic method is considered to be the most reliable, in this case, the study of micronuclei in peripheral blood lymphocytes citokinetics blocked can be related to absorbed dose through an experimental calibration curve. An experimental dose-response curve, using micronuclei assay for X-rays at 250 kVp, 43,79 rads/min and temperature 37 degree centigree has been produced. Experimental data is fitted to model Y=C+ {alpha}D+BD''2 where Y is the number of micronuclei per cell and D the dose. The curve is compared with those produced elsewhere. (Author) 24 refs.

  12. Cytogenetic techniques for biological indications and dosimetry of of radiation damages in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadjidekova, V.

    2003-01-01

    The cytogenetic methods present a proved way for bio-monitoring and bio-dosimetry for persons, submitted to ionising radiation in occupational and emergency conditions. Their application complement and assist the evaluation of the physical dosimetry and takes in account the individual radiosensitivity of the organism. A comparative assessment is made of the cytogenetic markers for radiation damage of humans applied in Bulgaria. It is discussed the sensitivity of the methods and their development in the last years, as well as the basic concept for their application - the causal relationship between the frequency of the observation of cytogenetic markers in peripheral blood lymphocytes and the risk of oncological disease. The conventional analysis of dicentrics is recognised as a 'golden standard' for the quantitative assessment of the radiation damage. The long term persisting translocations reflect properly the cumulative dose burden from chronic exposure. The micronucleus test allows a quick screening of large groups of persons, working in ionising radiation environment. The combined application with centromeric DNA probe improves the sensitivity and presents a modern alternative of the bio-monitoring and bio-dosimetry. It is discussed the advantages of the different cytogenetic techniques and their optimised application for the assessment of the radiation impact on humans

  13. Biological effectiveness of neutrons: Research needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casarett, G.W.; Braby, L.A.; Broerse, J.J.; Elkind, M.M.; Goodhead, D.T.; Oleinick, N.L.

    1994-02-01

    The goal of this report was to provide a conceptual plan for a research program that would provide a basis for determining more precisely the biological effectiveness of neutron radiation with emphasis on endpoints relevant to the protection of human health. This report presents the findings of the experts for seven particular categories of scientific information on neutron biological effectiveness. Chapter 2 examines the radiobiological mechanisms underlying the assumptions used to estimate human risk from neutrons and other radiations. Chapter 3 discusses the qualitative and quantitative models used to organize and evaluate experimental observations and to provide extrapolations where direct observations cannot be made. Chapter 4 discusses the physical principles governing the interaction of radiation with biological systems and the importance of accurate dosimetry in evaluating radiation risk and reducing the uncertainty in the biological data. Chapter 5 deals with the chemical and molecular changes underlying cellular responses and the LET dependence of these changes. Chapter 6, in turn, discusses those cellular and genetic changes which lead to mutation or neoplastic transformation. Chapters 7 and 8 examine deterministic and stochastic effects, respectively, and the data required for the prediction of such effects at different organizational levels and for the extrapolation from experimental results in animals to risks for man. Gaps and uncertainties in this data are examined relative to data required for establishing radiation protection standards for neutrons and procedures for the effective and safe use of neutron and other high-LET radiation therapy.

  14. Biological effectiveness of neutrons: Research needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casarett, G.W.; Braby, L.A.; Broerse, J.J.; Elkind, M.M.; Goodhead, D.T.; Oleinick, N.L.

    1994-02-01

    The goal of this report was to provide a conceptual plan for a research program that would provide a basis for determining more precisely the biological effectiveness of neutron radiation with emphasis on endpoints relevant to the protection of human health. This report presents the findings of the experts for seven particular categories of scientific information on neutron biological effectiveness. Chapter 2 examines the radiobiological mechanisms underlying the assumptions used to estimate human risk from neutrons and other radiations. Chapter 3 discusses the qualitative and quantitative models used to organize and evaluate experimental observations and to provide extrapolations where direct observations cannot be made. Chapter 4 discusses the physical principles governing the interaction of radiation with biological systems and the importance of accurate dosimetry in evaluating radiation risk and reducing the uncertainty in the biological data. Chapter 5 deals with the chemical and molecular changes underlying cellular responses and the LET dependence of these changes. Chapter 6, in turn, discusses those cellular and genetic changes which lead to mutation or neoplastic transformation. Chapters 7 and 8 examine deterministic and stochastic effects, respectively, and the data required for the prediction of such effects at different organizational levels and for the extrapolation from experimental results in animals to risks for man. Gaps and uncertainties in this data are examined relative to data required for establishing radiation protection standards for neutrons and procedures for the effective and safe use of neutron and other high-LET radiation therapy

  15. Biological Effects of Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jatau, B.D.; Garba, N.N.; Yusuf, A.M.; Yamusa, Y. A.; Musa, Y.

    2013-01-01

    In earlier studies, researchers aimed a single particle at the nucleus of the cell where DNA is located. Eighty percent of the cells shot through the nucleus survived. This contradicts the belief that if radiation slams through the nucleus, the cell will die. But the bad news is that the surviving cells contained mutations. Cells have a great capacity to repair DNA, but they cannot do it perfectly. The damage left behind in these studies from a single particle of alpha radiation doubled the damage that is already there. This proved, beyond a shadow of doubt, those there biological effects occur as a result of exposure to radiation, Radiation is harmful to living tissue because of its ionizing power in matter. This ionization can damage living cells directly, by breaking the chemical bonds of important biological molecules (particularly DNA), or indirectly, by creating chemical radicals from water molecules in the cells, which can then attack the biological molecules chemically. At some extent these molecules are repaired by natural biological processes, however, the effectiveness of this repair depends on the extent of the damage. The interaction of ionizing with the human body, arising either from external sources outside the body or from internal contamination of the body by radioactive materials, leads to the biological effects which may later show up as a clinical symptoms. Basically, this formed the baseline of this research to serve as a yardstick for creating awareness about radiation and its resulting effects.

  16. Biological dosimetry of patients with differenced carcinoma of thyroid treated with Iodine-131; Dosimetria biologica de pacientes con carcinoma diferenciado de tiroides tratados con Iodo-131

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallerga, M. B.; Rojo, A.M.; Taja, M.R.; Deluca, G.; Di Giorgio, M. [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear Av. Del Libertador 8250 (C1429BNP). Buenos Aires (Argentina); Fadel, A. [Hospital General de Agudos Dr. Carlos Durand Av. Diaz Velez 5044. Buenos Aires (Argentina); Cabrejas, M.; Valdivieso, C. [Hospital de Clfnicas Jose de San Martin Av. Cordoba 2351 (CP1120). Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. e-mail: mvallerg@cae.arn.gov.ar

    2006-07-01

    aberrations it was considered absorbed dose to whole body. The obtained doses were compared by the different biological methods used. The evaluation by internal dosimetry of the data obtained tracer post-activity allowed to personalize the activity of I-131 to administer, starting from physical-mathematical models that consider the particular biokinetics of each patient (MIRD methodology). The doses estimated by the used biological dosemeters were consistent among them. It was discussed its scopes and limitations to be applied in the validation of the dosimetric estimation based on models, in order to administer a therapeutic dose protecting the patient of the adverse effects of the internal radiotherapy in organs that are not target of the same one. The acquired experience is considered of utility to give answer in cases of radioiodine incorporation in occupationally exposed personnel. (Author)

  17. Biological effects of hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Hiroshi

    1980-01-01

    Biological effects of hyperthermia and application of hyperthermia to cancer therapy were outlined. As to independent effects of hyperthermia, heat sensitivity of cancer cells, targets of hyperthermia, thermal tolerance of cancer cells, effects of pH on hyperthermic cell survival, effects of hyperthermia on normal tissues, and possibility of clinical application of hyperthermia were described. Combined effect of hyperthermia and x-irradiation to enhance radiosensitivity of cancer cells, its mechanism, effects of oxygen on cancer cells treated with hyperthermia and irradiation, and therapeutic ratio of combined hyperthermia and irradiation were also described. Finally, sensitizers were mentioned. (Tsunoda, M.)

  18. Use of unstable chromosome aberrations for biological dosimetry after the first postirradiation mitosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doloy, M.T.; Malarbet, J.L.; Guedeney, G.; Bourguignon, M.; Leroy, A.; Reillaudou, M.; Masse, R.

    1991-01-01

    The loss of unstable chromosome aberrations after the first postirradiation mitosis makes their use difficult in radiation dosimetry. We describe here a method which, in a cell population observed at this stage, allows retrospective estimation of the frequencies of the unstable aberrations induced at the time of irradiation, and their use as a dosimeter. The laws controlling the behavior of unstable aberrations during mitosis were defined from a large-scale experiment on irradiated human lymphocytes. For cells undergoing the first, second, or third mitosis after irradiation, relationships were determined between the frequency, at irradiation time, of acentric fragments not arising from formation of dicentrics or rings, and the ratio of dicentrics and centric rings appearing without acentric fragments to the total number of dicentrics plus rings. On the basis of this ratio, the method described here provides an assessment of the postirradiation mitotic activity in a cell population. This assessment permitted estimation of the cell distribution and frequency of dicentrics plus centric rings, and of the frequency of acentric fragments at the time of irradiation. The use of this method for retrospective dosimetry after whole-body irradiation under various conditions of exposure is illustrated

  19. Dosimetry in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asha, M L; Chatterjee, Ingita; Patil, Preeti; Naveen, S

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to review various dosimeters used in dentistry and the cumulative results of various studies done with various dosimeters. Several relevant PubMed indexed articles from 1999 to 2013 were electronically searched by typing "dosimeters", "dosimeters in dentistry", "properties of dosimeters", "thermoluminescent and optically stimulated dosimeters", "recent advancements in dosimetry in dentistry." The searches were limited to articles in English to prepare a concise review on dental dosimetry. Titles and abstracts were screened, and articles that fulfilled the criteria of use of dosimeters in dental applications were selected for a full-text reading. Article was divided into four groups: (1) Biological effects of radiation, (2) properties of dosimeters, (3) types of dosimeters and (4) results of various studies using different dosimeters. The present review on dosimetry based on various studies done with dosimeters revealed that, with the advent of radiographic technique the effective dose delivered is low. Therefore, selection of radiological technique plays an important role in dental dose delivery.

  20. New tool for biological dosimetry: Reevaluation and automation of the gold standard method following telomere and centromere staining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M’kacher, Radhia; Maalouf, Elie E.L.; Ricoul, Michelle; Heidingsfelder, Leonhard; Laplagne, Eric; Cuceu, Corina; Hempel, William M.; Colicchio, Bruno; Dieterlen, Alain; Sabatier, Laure

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We have applied telomere and centromere (TC) staining to the scoring of dicentrics. • TC staining renders the scoring of dicentrics more rapid and robust. • TC staining allows the scoring of not only dicentrics but all chromosomal anomalies. • TC staining has led to a reevaluation of the radiation dose–response curve. • TC staining allows automation of the scoring of chromosomal aberations. • Automated scoring of dicentrics after TC staining was as efficient as manual scoring. - Abstract: Purpose: The dicentric chromosome (dicentric) assay is the international gold-standard method for biological dosimetry and classification of genotoxic agents. The introduction of telomere and centromere (TC) staining offers the potential to render dicentric scoring more efficient and robust. In this study, we improved the detection of dicentrics and all unstable chromosomal aberrations (CA) leading to a significant reevaluation of the dose–effect curve and developed an automated approach following TC staining. Material and methods: Blood samples from 16 healthy donors were exposed to 137 Cs at 8 doses from 0.1 to 6 Gy. CA were manually and automatically scored following uniform (Giemsa) or TC staining. The detection of centromeric regions and telomeric sequences using PNA probes allowed the detection of all unstable CA: dicentrics, centric and acentric rings, and all acentric fragments (with 2, 4 or no telomeres) leading to the precise quantification of estimated double strand breaks (DSB). Results: Manual scoring following TC staining revealed a significantly higher frequency of dicentrics (p < 10 −3 ) (up to 30%) and estimated DSB (p < 10 −4 ) compared to uniform staining due to improved detection of dicentrics with centromeres juxtaposed with other centromeres or telomeres. This improvement permitted the development of the software, TCScore, that detected 95% of manually scored dicentrics compared to 50% for the best

  1. New tool for biological dosimetry: Reevaluation and automation of the gold standard method following telomere and centromere staining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M’kacher, Radhia [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie (LRO), Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique (CEA), Route du Panorama, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Maalouf, Elie E.L. [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie (LRO), Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique (CEA), Route du Panorama, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Laboratoire MIPS – Groupe TIIM3D, Université de Haute-Alsace, F-68093 Mulhouse (France); Ricoul, Michelle [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie (LRO), Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique (CEA), Route du Panorama, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Heidingsfelder, Leonhard [MetaSystems GmbH, Robert-Bosch-Str. 6, 68804 Altlussheim (Germany); Laplagne, Eric [Pole Concept, 61 Rue Erlanger, 75016 Paris (France); Cuceu, Corina; Hempel, William M. [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie (LRO), Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique (CEA), Route du Panorama, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Colicchio, Bruno; Dieterlen, Alain [Laboratoire MIPS – Groupe TIIM3D, Université de Haute-Alsace, F-68093 Mulhouse (France); Sabatier, Laure, E-mail: laure.sabatier@cea.fr [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie (LRO), Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique (CEA), Route du Panorama, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We have applied telomere and centromere (TC) staining to the scoring of dicentrics. • TC staining renders the scoring of dicentrics more rapid and robust. • TC staining allows the scoring of not only dicentrics but all chromosomal anomalies. • TC staining has led to a reevaluation of the radiation dose–response curve. • TC staining allows automation of the scoring of chromosomal aberations. • Automated scoring of dicentrics after TC staining was as efficient as manual scoring. - Abstract: Purpose: The dicentric chromosome (dicentric) assay is the international gold-standard method for biological dosimetry and classification of genotoxic agents. The introduction of telomere and centromere (TC) staining offers the potential to render dicentric scoring more efficient and robust. In this study, we improved the detection of dicentrics and all unstable chromosomal aberrations (CA) leading to a significant reevaluation of the dose–effect curve and developed an automated approach following TC staining. Material and methods: Blood samples from 16 healthy donors were exposed to {sup 137}Cs at 8 doses from 0.1 to 6 Gy. CA were manually and automatically scored following uniform (Giemsa) or TC staining. The detection of centromeric regions and telomeric sequences using PNA probes allowed the detection of all unstable CA: dicentrics, centric and acentric rings, and all acentric fragments (with 2, 4 or no telomeres) leading to the precise quantification of estimated double strand breaks (DSB). Results: Manual scoring following TC staining revealed a significantly higher frequency of dicentrics (p < 10{sup −3}) (up to 30%) and estimated DSB (p < 10{sup −4}) compared to uniform staining due to improved detection of dicentrics with centromeres juxtaposed with other centromeres or telomeres. This improvement permitted the development of the software, TCScore, that detected 95% of manually scored dicentrics compared to 50% for

  2. Comparison of organ dosimetry methods and effective dose calculation methods for paediatric CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Z; Cain, T M; Johnston, P N

    2012-06-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is the single biggest ionising radiation risk from anthropogenic exposure. Reducing unnecessary carcinogenic risks from this source requires the determination of organ and tissue absorbed doses to estimate detrimental stochastic effects. In addition, effective dose can be used to assess comparative risk between exposure situations and facilitate dose reduction through optimisation. Children are at the highest risk from radiation induced carcinogenesis and therefore dosimetry for paediatric CT recipients is essential in addressing the ionising radiation health risks of CT scanning. However, there is no well-defined method in the clinical environment for routinely and reliably performing paediatric CT organ dosimetry and there are numerous methods utilised for estimating paediatric CT effective dose. Therefore, in this study, eleven computational methods for organ dosimetry and/or effective dose calculation were investigated and compared with absorbed doses measured using thermoluminescent dosemeters placed in a physical anthropomorphic phantom representing a 10 year old child. Three common clinical paediatric CT protocols including brain, chest and abdomen/pelvis examinations were evaluated. Overall, computed absorbed doses to organs and tissues fully and directly irradiated demonstrated better agreement (within approximately 50 %) with the measured absorbed doses than absorbed doses to distributed organs or to those located on the periphery of the scan volume, which showed up to a 15-fold dose variation. The disparities predominantly arose from differences in the phantoms used. While the ability to estimate CT dose is essential for risk assessment and radiation protection, identifying a simple, practical dosimetry method remains challenging.

  3. THz waves: biological effects, industrial and medical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutaz, J.L.; Garet, F.; Le Drean, Y.; Zhadobov, M.; Veyret, B.; Mounaix, P.; Caumes, J.P.; Gallot, G.; Gian Piero, Gallerano; Mouret, G.; Guilpin, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Following the debates about body scanners installed in airports for passengers security control, the non-ionizing radiations (NIR) section of the French radiation protection society (SFR) has organized a conference day to take stock of the present day knowledge about the physical aspects and the biological effects of this frequency range as well as about their medical, and industrial applications (both civil and military). This document gathers the slides of the available presentations: 1 - introduction and general considerations about THz waves, the THz physical phenomenon among NIR (J.L. Coutaz); 2 - interaction of millimeter waves with living material: from dosimetry to biological impacts (Y. Le Drean and M. Zhadobov); 3 - Tera-Hertz: standards and recommendations (B. Veyret); 4 - THz spectro-imaging technique: status and perspectives (P. Mounaix); 5 - THz technology: seeing the invisible? (J.P. Caumes); 6 - Tera-Hertz: biological and medical applications (G. Gallot); 7 - Biological applications of THz radiation: a review of events and a glance to the future (G.P. Gallerano); 8 - Industrial and military applications - liquids and solids detection in the THz domain (F. Garet); 9 - THz radiation and its civil and military applications - gas detection and quantifying (G. Mouret); 10 - Body scanners and civil aviation security (J.C. Guilpin, presentation not available). (J.S.)

  4. Cytogenetic biological dosimetry in radiological protection: chromosome aberration analysis in human lymphocyties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, I.M.A. de.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation on chromosomes have been know for several decades and dose effect relationships are also fairly well established for several doses and dose rates. Apart from its biological significance, the interpretation of chromosome aberration frequency associated with human exposure to radiation plays an important role in dose assessment, particularly in cases where exposure is though to have occurred but no physical dose monitoring system was present. Based on the cytogenetic data obtained from seven cases of exposure to radiation the aberration frequency have been fitted to the quadratic function Y= αD + βD 2 as the dose response curves from literature. The dose equivalent estimate by frequency of chromosomic aberration found here was compared with 60 Co and 192 Ir already published curves obtained at almost similar dose rate together with some hematological data. (author) [pt

  5. Dosimetry for quantitative analysis of low dose ionizing radiation effects on humans in radiation therapy patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, J; Stern, R L; Daly, T P; Schwieter, C W; Jones, G E; Arnold, M L; Hartmann-Siantar, C L; Goldberg, Z

    2004-04-20

    We have successfully developed a practical approach to predicting the location of skin surface dose at potential biopsy sites that receive 1 cGy and 10 cGy, respectively, in support of in vivo biologic dosimetry in humans. This represents a significant technical challenge as the sites lie on the patient surface out side the radiation fields. The PEREGRINE Monte Carlo simulation system was used to model radiation dose delivery and TLDs were used for validation on a phantom and confirmation during patient treatment. In the developmental studies the Monte Carlo simulations consistently underestimated the dose at the biopsy site by approximately 15% for a realistic treatment configuration, most likely due to lack of detail in the simulation of the linear accelerator outside the main beam line. Using a single, thickness-independent correction factor for the clinical calculations, the average of 36 measurements for the predicted 1 cGy point was 0.985 cGy (standard deviation: 0.110 cGy) despite patient breathing motion and other real world challenges. Since the 10 cGy point is situated in the region of high dose gradient at the edge of the field, patient motion had a greater effect and the six measured points averaged 5.90 cGy (standard deviation: 1.01 cGy), a difference that is equivalent to approximately a 6 mm shift on the patient's surface.

  6. Dosimetry of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musilek, L.; Seda, J.; Trousil, J.

    1992-01-01

    The publication deals with a major field of ionizing radiation dosimetry, viz., integrating dosimetric methods, which are the basic means of operative dose determination. It is divided into the following sections: physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation; integrating dosimetric methods for low radiation doses (film dosimetry, nuclear emulsions, thermoluminescence, radiophotoluminescence, solid-state track detectors, integrating ionization dosemeters); dosimetry of high ionizing radiation doses (chemical dosimetric methods, dosemeters based on the coloring effect, activation detectors); additional methods applicable to integrating dosimetry (exoelectron emission, electron spin resonance, lyoluminescence, etc.); and calibration techniques for dosimetric instrumentation. (Z.S.). 422 refs

  7. Biological effects of neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogiu, Toshiaki; Ohmachi, Yasushi; Ishida, Yuka [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (JP)] [and others

    2003-03-01

    Although the occasion to be exposed to neutrons is rare in our life, except for nuclear accidents like in the critical accident at Tokai-mura in 1999, countermeasures against accident should be always prepared. In the Tokai-mura accident, residents received less than 21 mSv of neutrons and gamma rays. The cancer risks and fetal effects of low doses of neutrons were matters of concern among residents. The purpose of this program is to investigate the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for leukemias, and thereby to assess risks of neutrons. Animal experiments are planed to obtain the following RBEs: (1) RBE for the induction of leukemias in mice and (2) RBE for effects on fetuses. Cyclotron fast neutrons (10 MeV) and electrostatic accelerator-derived neutrons (2 MeV) are used for exposure in this program. Furthermore, cytological and cytogenetic analyses will be performed. (author)

  8. Effects of seed migration on post-implant dosimetry of prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, M.; Wang, J. Z.; Nag, S.; Gupta, N.

    2007-01-01

    Brachytherapy using permanent seed implants has been an effective treatment for prostate cancer. However, seeds will migrate after implant, thus making the evaluation of post-implant dosimetry difficult. In this study, we developed a computer program to simulate seed migration and analyzed dosimetric changes due to seed migration at various migration amounts. The study was based on 14 patients treated with Pd-103 at the James Cancer Hospital. Modeling of seed migration, including direction, distance as well as day of migration, was based on clinical observations. Changes of commonly used dosimetric parameters as a function of migration amount (2, 4, 6 mm respectively), prostate size (from 20 to 90 cc), and prostate region (central vs peripheral) were studied. Change of biological outcome (tumor control probability) due to migration was also estimated. Migration reduced prostate D90 to 99±2% of original value in 2 mm migration, and the reduction increased to 94±6% in 6 mm migration. The reduction of prostate dose led to a 14% (40%) drop in the tumor control probability for 2 mm (6 mm) migration, assuming radiosensitive tumors. However, migration has less effect on a prostate implanted with a larger number of seeds. Prostate V100 was less sensitive to migration than D90 since its mean value was still 99% of original value even in 6 mm migration. Migration also showed a different effect in the peripheral region vs the central region of the prostate, where the peripheral mean dose tended to drop more significantly. Therefore, extra activity implanted in the peripheral region during pre-plan can be considered. The detrimental effects of migration were more severe in terms of increasing the dose to normal structures, as rectum V50 may be 70% higher and urethra V100 may be 50% higher in the case of 6 mm migration. Quantitative knowledge of these effects is helpful in treatment planning and post-implant evaluation

  9. UV biological dosimetry and ozone correlations for sites with similar latitudes at North and South Hemispheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrique Rampelotto, Pabulo; Schuch, Nelson Jorge; Zanandrea, Ademilson; Barcellos da Rosa, Marcelo; Makita, Kazuo

    As consequence of the increase interest in the monitoring of the UV radiation due a reduction of ozone, efforts have been made to compare data from different physical instruments to follow the solar radiation at different sites around the Earth's surface. However, the UV monitoring still have a lack of a global standardization. To complement such data from physical dosimeters, various biosensors have been developed. The spore dosimetry, based in the inactivation of spores of Bacillus subtilis TKJ6312 (SID, Spore Inactivation Dose) fulfill the criterions stabilized to its utilization as a biosensor. Furthermore, as it has the most global coverage, being the same method used in all sites, it's an adequate tool for the global monitoring of the UV solar radiation. These values reflect indirectly the ozone levels, because the biosensor translate the activity of UV-levels on life systems, which is the exponential decay of the Bacillus subtilis TKJ6312 as a function of the UV-levels and consequently anti-correlated with atmospheric ozone concentrations. In this work, SID data from four sites: Punta Arenas - Chile (53.2° S), Santa Maria - Brazil (29.5° S), Tokyo - Japan (35.7° N) and Brussels - Belgium (50.9° N), covering middle and high latitudes in both hemispheres, were compared with ozone data from TOMS, for the period 1999-2004. For a best visualization of the correlations between the spores dosimetry data with ozone data, wavelets analysis were used as mathematical tool. Seasonal variations of SID have been observed and present higher values for the summers: 1,031±113 for Punta Arenas - Chile and 4,798±1,723 for São Martinho da Serra - Brazil, as well 1,280±336 and a 2,270±563 for Brussels - Belgium and Tokyo - Japan, respectively. The lower values of SID were observed for the winters: 42.5±13, 401±171, 44±21 and 156±49 for Punta Arenas, Santa Maria, Brussels and Tokyo, respectively. The maximal seasonal ratio between SID(max) and SID(min) was obtained

  10. Activities of Project 'Cooperation and development with Latin America and Iberian in Biological Dosimetry of Iberian Group of Radiation Protection Societies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasazzi, Nora B.; Taja, Maria R.; Giorgio, Marina di; Garcia Lima, Omar; Lamadrid, Ana I.; Olivares, Pilar; Moreno, Mercedes; Prieto, Maria J.; Espinosa, Marco

    2001-01-01

    In 1996 the GRIAPRA Group (Latin American and Iberian Group of Radiation Protection Societies) was established with the participation of Argentina, Brazil, Cuba, Mexico, Peru, Portugal and Spain. In 1998 began the biennial Collaborative Working Project 'Cooperation and Development with Latin America in Biological Dosimetry', partially supported by the Extremadura Government, Spain, initially involving five countries: Argentina, Cuba, Peru, Portugal and Spain. The general aim of the project is to create an Latin American and Iberian Biological Dosimetry Laboratories Coordinated Group in order to: give mutual cooperation and to other countries if required, in the case of radiological accident; contribute to enhance the technical capabilities of the participant laboratories; promote the installment of laboratories on this field in countries that does not have it yet through the training of human resources and providing the necessary equipment and, finally, perform jointly research activities in biological dosimetry. The activities designed in order to accomplish the project specific aims for the 1998-2000 period have been achieved. Description and results are presented. (author)

  11. Synthesis, biological distribution and radiation dosimetry of Te-123m analogues of hexadecenoic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basmadjian, G.P.; Ice, R.D.; Mills, S.L.

    1982-01-01

    The synthesis and biological distribution of four Te-123m analogues of hexadecenoic acid in rats, rabbits and dogs were described for use as possible myocardial imaging agents. The heart-to-blood ratios ranged from 0.13 for 3-telluranonadecenoic acid in rats at 5 mins to 6.25 for 18-methyl-17-tellura-9-nonadecenoic acid in dogs at 24 hrs. The biological half-life of the Te-123m labelled fatty acids ranged from 26 to 583 hrs in the hearts of the test animals. These Te-123m fatty acids were retained in the heart longer than radioiodinated fatty acids and have acceptable absorbed doses to the various target organs. (U.K.)

  12. Biological radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sejourne, Michele.

    1977-01-01

    This work examines ionizing radiations: what they are, where they come from, their actions and consequences, finally the norms and preventive measures necessary to avoid serious contamination, whether the individual or the population in general is involved. Man has always been exposed to natural irradiation, but owing to the growing use of ionizing radiations both in medicine and in industry, not to mention nuclear tests and their use as an argument of dissuasion, the irradiation of human beings is increasing daily. Radioactive contamination does remain latent, apart from acute cases, but this is where the danger lies since the consequences may not appear until long after the irradiation. Of all biological effects due to the action of radioelements the genetic risk is one of the most important, affecting the entire population and especially the generations to come. The risk of cancer and leukemia induction plays a substantial part also since a large number of people may be concerned, depending on the mode of contamination involved. All these long-term dangers do not of course exclude the various general or local effects to which the individual alone may be exposed and which sometimes constitute a threat to life. As a result the use of ionizing radiations must be limited and should only be involved if no other process can serve instead. The regulations governing radioelements must be stringent and their application strictly supervised for the better protection of man. This protection must be not only individual but also collective since pollution exists in air, water and land passes to plants and animals and finally reaches the last link in the food chain, man [fr

  13. Dosimetry for radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, W.L.; Boyd, A.W.; Chadwick, K.H.; McDonald, J.C.; Miller, A.

    1989-01-01

    Radiation processing is a relatively young industry with broad applications and considerable commercial success. Dosimetry provides an independent and effective way of developing and controlling many industrial processes. In the sterilization of medical devices and in food irradiation, where the radiation treatment impacts directly on public health, the measurements of dose provide the official means of regulating and approving its use. In this respect, dosimetry provides the operator with a means of characterizing the facility, of proving that products are treated within acceptable dose limits and of controlling the routine operation. This book presents an up-to-date review of the theory, data and measurement techniques for radiation processing dosimetry in a practical and useful way. It is hoped that this book will lead to improved measurement procedures, more accurate and precise dosimetry and a greater appreciation of the necessity of dosimetry for radiation processing. (author)

  14. Proceedings of the III international workshop 'Actual problems of dosimetry (15 years after the Chernobyl accident)'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milyutin, A.A.; Chudakov, V.A.; Berezhnoj, A.V.

    2001-10-01

    Materials grouped to three main issues: normative, metrological and technical support of dosimetric and radiometric control; biological dosimetry and markers of radiation effects; monitoring and reconstruction of radiation doses at radiation accidents

  15. Dosimetry Service

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Cern Staff and Users can now consult their dose records for an individual or an organizational unit with HRT. Please see more information on our web page: http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry Dosimetry Service is open every morning from 8.30 - 12.00. Closed in the afternoons. We would like to remind you that dosimeters cannot be sent to customers by internal mail. Short-term dosimeters (VCT's) must always be returned to the Service after the use and must not be left on the racks in the experimental areas or in the secretariats. Dosimetry Service Tel. 7 2155 Dosimetry.service@cern.ch http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  16. Assessment of radiation damage - the need for a multi-parametric and integrative approach with the help of both clinical and biological dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meineke, Viktor

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Accidental exposure to ionising radiation leads to a damage on different levels of the biological organization of the organism. Depending on exposure conditions, such as nature of radiation, time and affected organs and organ systems, the clinical endpoint of radiation damage and the resulting acute and chronic radiation syndromes may vary to a great extent. Exposure situations range from pure localised radiation scenarios and partial body exposures up to whole body exposures. Therefore clinical pictures vary from localized radiation injuries up to the extreme situation of a radiation-induced multi-organ involvement and failure requiring immediate, intensive and interdisciplinary medical treatment. These total different and complex clinical situations not only show up most different clinical diagnostic and therapeutic aspects but necessarily due to different levels of the underlying biological damage, biological indicators of effects may vary to a wide extent. This fact means that an exact assessment of the extent of radiation damage within individual patients can only be performed when taking into consideration both clinical signs and symptoms as well as different biological indicators. Among the clinical indicators, routine laboratory parameters such as blood counts and the documentation of clinical signs and symptoms (such as the METREPOL system) are the key parameters, whereas the dicentric assay, the gold standard for biological dosimetry, but also methods under development such as the gamma-H2Ax focus assay or the estimation of variations of gene expression have to be taken into account. Each method provides best results in different situations, or in other words, there are methods that work better in a specific exposure condition or at a given time of examination (e.g. time after exposure) than others. Some methods show up results immediately, others require days to weeks until results are available for clinical decision making. Therefore to

  17. Simulation of Proton Neutralization Effect for Neutron Dosimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Satoru, ENDO; Quantum Energy Applications, Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University:(Present address)International Radiation Information Center, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University

    2004-01-01

    Neutron dose is transferred to biological materials through the recoil protons produced by elastic scattering. When a low-velocity proton collides with the atoms or molecules of a target, it changes to a hydrogen atom by electron capture; this hydrogen atom then changes to a proton by losing the electron. Because the hydrogen atom has a different ionization cross section from that of a proton, the charge exchange processes need to be considered to calculate stopping power for low energy proto...

  18. Biological dosimetry for the reconstruction of doses absorbed during accidents in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojcik, A.; Stephan, G.; Sommer, S.; Urbanik, W.; Kukolowicz, P.; Kuszewski, T.; Gozdz, S.

    2002-01-01

    Medical radiation represents by far the largest man-made source of radiation exposure. The recent accident in a radiotherapy unit in Bialystok, Poland, clearly showed the necessity to develop biological methods allowing a reconstruction of the absorbed dose in case of an accidental exposure. We are currently analysing the frequencies of micronuclei in lymphocytes of patients undergoing radiotherapy of tumors localized in different parts of the body. The aim of the studies in the setting up to appropriate calibration curves with the help of which a dose absorbed during an accident could be estimated. In addition, the applicability of such calibration curves for quality assurance of teleradiotherapy will be considered. In order to calculate the expected frequencies of aberrations and micronuclei in lymphocytes of patients undergoing teleradiotherapy a mathematical model was developed. The modeled dose-response curves agree well with the majority of published experimental results and will serve as a basis for ongoing studies. (author)

  19. Development and performance evaluation of a dynamic phantom for biological dosimetry of moving targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmel, A.; Bert, C.; Saito, N.; von Neubeck, C.; Iancu, G.; K-Weyrather, W.; Durante, M.; Rietzel, E.

    2010-06-01

    A dynamic phantom has been developed to allow for measurement of 3D cell survival distributions and the corresponding distributions of the RBE-weighted dose (RBED) in the presence of motion. The phantom consists of two 96-microwell plates holding Chinese hamster ovary cells inside a container filled with culture medium and is placed on a movable stage. Basic biological properties of the phantom were investigated without irradiation and after irradiation with a carbon ion beam, using both a stationary (reference) exposure and exposure during motion of the phantom perpendicular to the beam with beam tracking. There was no statistically significant difference between plating efficiency measured in the microwells with and without motion (0.75) and values reported in the literature. Mean differences between measured and calculated cell survival for these two irradiation modes were within ±5% of the target dose of 6 Gy (RBE).

  20. Enhancing Cytogenetic Biological Dosimetry Capabilities of the Philippines for Nuclear Incident Preparedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaad, Celia O; Caraos, Gloriamaris L; Robles, Gerardo Jose M; Asa, Anie Day D C; Cobar, Maria Lucia C; Asaad, Al-Ahmadgaid

    2016-01-01

    The utility of a biological dosimeter based on the analysis of dicentrics is invaluable in the event of a radiological emergency wherein the estimated absorbed dose of an exposed individual is crucial in the proper medical management of patients. The technique is also used for routine monitoring of occupationally exposed workers to determine radiation exposure. An in vitro irradiation study of human peripheral blood lymphocytes was conducted to establish a dose-response curve for radiation-induced dicentric aberrations. Blood samples were collected from volunteer donors and together with optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters and were irradiated at 0, 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 2, 4, and 6 Gy using a cobalt-60 radiotherapy unit. Blood samples were cultured for 48 h, and the metaphase chromosomes were prepared following the procedure of the International Atomic Energy Agency's Emergency Preparedness and Response - Biodosimetry 2011 manual. At least 100 metaphases were scored for dicentric aberrations at each dose point. The data were analyzed using R language program. The results indicated that the distribution of dicentric cells followed a Poisson distribution and the dose-response curve was established using the estimated model, Y dic = 0.0003 (±0.0003) +0.0336 (±0.0115) × D + 0.0236 (±0.0054) × D 2 . In this study, the reliability of the dose-response curve in estimating the absorbed dose was also validated for 2 and 4 Gy using OSL dosimeters. The data were fitted into the constructed curve. The result of the validation study showed that the obtained estimate for the absorbed exposure doses was close to the true exposure doses.

  1. Quantum Effects in Biological Systems

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Since the last decade the study of quantum mechanical phenomena in biological systems has become a vibrant field of research. Initially sparked by evidence of quantum effects in energy transport that is instrumental for photosynthesis, quantum biology asks the question of how methods and models from quantum theory can help us to understand fundamental mechanisms in living organisms. This approach entails a paradigm change challenging the related disciplines: The successful framework of quantum theory is taken out of its low-temperature, microscopic regimes and applied to hot and dense macroscopic environments, thereby extending the toolbox of biology and biochemistry at the same time. The Quantum Effects in Biological Systems conference is a platform for researchers from biology, chemistry and physics to present and discuss the latest developments in the field of quantum biology. After meetings in Lisbon (2009), Harvard (2010), Ulm (2011), Berkeley (2012), Vienna (2013), Singapore (2014) and Florence (2015),...

  2. Biology of ionizing radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferradini, C.; Pucheault, J.

    1983-01-01

    The present trends in biology of ionizing radiation are reviewed. The following topics are investigated: interaction of ionizing radiations with matter; the radiolysis of water and aqueous solutions; properties of the free radicals intervening in the couples O 2 /H 2 O and H 2 O/H 2 ; radiation chemistry of biological compounds; biological effects of ionizing radiations; biochemical mechanisms involving free radicals as intermediates; applications (biotechnological applications, origins of life) [fr

  3. Development of the FISH technique for biological dosimetry applications in the Gregorio Maranon General University Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, M.; Jesus Prieto, M.; Olivares, P.; Gomez, M.; Herranz, R.

    1997-01-01

    Since 1989 cytogenetic analysis for dose estimation has been regularly used In the Gregorio Maranon General University Hospital (HGUGM) of Madrid on individuals suspected of having accidentally been exposed to ionizing radiation. The method used is the study of chromosomal aberrations found in lymphocytes of peripheral blood. The technique recommended by the IAEA in 1986 permits to establish a dicentrics/dose ratio through an effective dose calibration curve prepared in-vitro. This methodology of dose estimation presents serious limitations which can partially be eliminated by means of new molecular cytogenetic techniques, such as chromosomal painting through in-situ hybridization with fluorescence (FISH). At HGUGM, research work has been finished for standardization of the above mentioned technique including effective dose calibration curves, the utilization of adequate aberrations and the intercomparision of the results with other centres

  4. Chromosomal analysis and application of biological dosimetry in two cases of apparent over exposure; Analisis cromosomico y aplicacion de la dosimetria biologica en dos casos de aparente sobreexposicion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero C, C.; Brena V, M. [Departamento de Biologia, ININ A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    The gamma radiation calibration curve of {sup 60} Co is used which was generated in the ININ Laboratory of Biology to calculate the exposure dose of two workers whose dosemeters marked values above of the limit allowed. The analysis indicates that in a first case, the aberrations frequency corresponded to the basal value, therefore there is not over exposure. The aberrations frequency of the second case is lightly above to the basal value and therefore the probability favors to what the physical dosimetry indicates. (Author)

  5. Biological Effectiveness of Antiproton Annihilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maggiore, C.; Agazaryan, N.; Bassler, N.

    2004-01-01

    from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in ‘‘biological dose’’ in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct measurement of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation. The background, description, and status...

  6. The single cell gel electrophoresis: a potential tool for biological dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhilwade, H.N.; Chaubey, R.C.; Rajagopalan, Rema

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, observations made on the effect of gamma radiation on DNA strand breaks in human leucocytes using alkaline comet assay are communicated. Human peripheral blood was collected from healthy volunteers and exposed in vitro to different doses of gamma radiation in the medium 0.125, 0.25, 0.50 and 1.0 Gy and high doses range of 2.04.0 and 8 Gy, using a 6 0C o Teletherapy machine at a dose rate of 0.668 Gy/min at 0 deg C in air. Migration of DNA fragments (TL) and tail moment (TM) was taken as the criteria of genetic damage and measured using the application software, SCGE-Pro, developed in our laboratory. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA for statistical significance. A dose dependent increase in the TL (p<0.001 ) and TM (p<0.001 ) was observed for DNA single strand breaks in the medium dose range, from 0.125 to 1.00 Gy dose. Similarly, data on DNA strand breaks from the high dose (e.g. 2 to 8 Gy) experiments also showed a significant increase in TL (p<0.001) and TM (p<0.001) at all the doses tested. The major finding of these experiments was the detection of DNA single strand breaks in human leucocytes, even at the lowest dose of 0.125 Gy. (author)

  7. Radiotherapy Based On α Emitting Radionuclides: Geant4 For Dosimetry And Micro-/Nano-Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guatelli, Susanna

    2013-01-01

    Possible physics approaches to evaluate the efficacy of TAT are dosimetry, microdosimetry and nanodosimetry. Dosimetry is adequate when mean absorbed dose to a macroscopic target volume is important to understand the biological effect of radiation. General purpose Monte Carlo (MC) codes, based on condensed history approach, are a very useful, cost effective tool to solve dosimetric problems. The condensed history approach is based on the use of multiple scattering theories to calculate the energy losses and angular changes in the direction of the particle. The short α particle range and high LET make the microdosimetric approach more suitable than dosimetry to study TAT from first physics principles, as this approach takes into account the stochastic nature of energy deposition at cellular level

  8. Biological and sanitary effects of non ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugere, H.; Hours, M.; Seze, R. de; Bernier, M.; Letertre, Th.; Aurengo, A.; Burais, N.; Bedja, M.; Merckel, O.; Decat, G.; Lagroye, I.; Perrin, A.; Poulletier de Gannes, F.; Aurengo, A.; Souques, M.; Cesarini, J.P.; Lagroye, I.; Aurengo, A.; Cesarini, J.P.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this day was to encourage the collaborations, especially multidisciplinary, on the biological, clinical, epidemiological and dosimetry aspects. The different presentations are as follow: the magneto reception among animals; the health and radio frequencies foundation; expo-metry to radio frequency fields: dosemeters evaluation; the electro-optical probes as tool of hyper frequency dosimetry; characterisation of emissions produced by the low consumption fluo-compact lamps in the perspective of persons exposure; strong and weak points of epidemiology; numerical dosimetry in low frequency magnetic and/or electric field; exposure of the French population to the 50 Hz magnetic field: first results for the Ile-de-france and Rhone alpes areas; characterisation of the exposure to the very low frequency magnetic fields in the town of Champlan; measurement of the residential exposure of children to the extremely low frequency, very low frequency and radiofrequency (E.L.F., V.L.F. and R.F.) fields and modeling of the high voltage magnetic field face to the child leukemia; effects of radiofrequency signals of wireless communications on the young animals; study of combined effects of 2.45 GHz microwaves and a known mutagen on DNA by two different approaches; effects on the oxidizing stress of nervous cells exposure to an (enhanced data rates for GSM evolution) E.D.G.E. signal; is environmental epidemiology still a science; cardiac implants and exposure to 50 Hz electromagnetic fields in occupational environment; the tanning by artificial UV radiation: norms and legislation; mobiles phones, Wi Fi and other wireless communications; effects on health of 50-60 Hz electromagnetic fields; natural and artificial ultraviolet radiations: a proved risk. (N.C.)

  9. Biological radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, R.A.

    1976-01-01

    The stages of processes leading to radiation damage are studied, as well as, the direct and indirect mechanics of its production. The radiation effects on nucleic acid and protein macro moleculas are treated. The physical and chemical factors that modify radiosensibility are analysed, in particular the oxygen effects, the sensibilization by analogues of nitrogen bases, post-effects, chemical protection and inherent cell factors. Consideration is given to restoration processes by excision of injured fragments, the bloching of the excision restoration processes, the restoration of lesions caused by ionizing radiations and to the restoration by genetic recombination. Referring to somatic effects of radiation, the early ones and the acute syndrome of radiation are discussed. The difference of radiosensibility observed in mammalian cells and main observable alterations in tissues and organs are commented. Referring to delayed radiation effects, carcinogeneses, alterations of life span, effects on growth and development, as well as localized effects, are also discussed [pt

  10. Dosimetry and effects of fetal irradiation from incorporated radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, J.D.; Coffigny, H.; Henshaw, D.L.

    1993-01-01

    An important aspect of the assessment of risks from incorporated radionuclides is the possibility of intakes by pregnant women and in utero exposure of the developing fetus. The overall objective of the project is to provide experimental data for the development of dosimetric models and assessment of risk. Studies include measurements of 210 Po and 239/240 Pu in human fetal tissues and placentae, animal studies of the biokinetics of radionuclide transfer and effects. Animal biokinetic studies concentrate on comparing the uptake and distribution of Po-210, Pu-238 and Am-241 in rats and guinea pigs for different exposure conditions. The data are used, together with the human data, to develop dosimetric models. Objectives and results of the three contributions to the project for the reporting period are presented. (R.P.) 4 figs., 1 tab

  11. ESR Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baffa, Oswaldo; Rossi, Bruno; Graeff, Carlos; Kinoshita, Angela; Chen Abrego, Felipe; Santos, Adevailton Bernardo dos

    2004-01-01

    ESR dosimetry is widely used for several applications such as dose assessment in accidents, medical applications and sterilization of food and other materials. In this work the dosimetric properties of natural and synthetic Hydroxyapatite, Alanine, and 2-Methylalanine are presented. Recent results on the use of a K-Band (24 GHz) ESR spectrometer in dosimetry are also presented

  12. Amylase and blood cell-count hematological radiation-injury biomarkers in a rhesus monkey radiation model-use of multiparameter and integrated biological dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blakely, W.F. [Uniformed Services University, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States)], E-mail: blakely@afrri.usuhs.mil; Ossetrova, N.I.; Manglapus, G.L.; Salter, C.A.; Levine, I.H.; Jackson, W.E.; Grace, M.B.; Prasanna, P.G.S.; Sandgren, D.J.; Ledney, G.D. [Uniformed Services University, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States)

    2007-07-15

    Effective medical management of suspected radiation exposure incidents requires the recording of dynamic medical data (clinical signs and symptoms), biological assessments of radiation exposure, and physical dosimetry in order to provide diagnostic information to the treating physician and dose assessment for personnel radiation protection records. The need to rapidly assess radiation dose in mass-casualty and population-monitoring scenarios prompted an evaluation of suitable biomarkers that can provide early diagnostic information after exposure. We investigated the utility of serum amylase and hematological blood-cell count biomarkers to provide early assessment of severe radiation exposures in a non-human primate model (i.e., rhesus macaques; n=8) exposed to whole-body radiation of {sup 60}Co-gamma rays (6.5 Gy, 40cGymin{sup -1}). Serum amylase activity was significantly elevated (12.3{+-}3.27- and 2.6{+-}0.058-fold of day zero samples) at 1 and 2-days, respectively, after radiation. Lymphocyte cell counts decreased ({<=}15% of day zero samples) 1 and 2 days after radiation exposure. Neutrophil cell counts increased at day one by 1.9({+-}0.38)-fold compared with levels before irradiation. The ratios of neutrophil to lymphocyte cell counts increased by 13({+-}2.66)- and 4.23({+-}0.95)-fold at 1 and 2 days, respectively, after irradiation. These results demonstrate that increases in serum amylase activity along with decreases of lymphocyte counts, increases in neutrophil cell counts, and increases in the ratio of neutrophil to lymphocyte counts 1 day after irradiation can provide enhanced early triage discrimination of individuals with severe radiation exposure and injury. Use of the biodosimetry assessment tool (BAT) application is encouraged to permit dynamic recording of medical data in the management of a suspected radiological casualty.

  13. EPR dosimetry - present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regulla, D.F.

    1999-01-01

    In the past, IAEA has played a central role in stipulating research and development in EPR high-dose standardisation as well as co-ordinating and organising international dose intercomparison programs, within the Member States of the United Nations from the mid-seventies till today. The future tasks of EPR dosimetry seem to tend towards different subjects such as biomarkers, biological radiation effects, post-accident dose reconstruction in the environment, and retrospective human dosimetry. The latter may be considered a promising tool for epidemiology on the way to re-define radiation risk of man for chronicle radiation exposures, based on e.g. South Ural civil population and radiation workers. There are on-going international activities in the field of standardising high-level dosimetry by the American Standards on Testing and Materials (ASTM), and the International Organisation of Standards (ISO) as well as those of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) considering the establishment of relevant recommendations concerning industrial radiation processing, but also human dose reconstruction. (author)

  14. EPR Dosimetry - Present and Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regulla, D.F.

    1999-01-01

    In the past, IAEA has played a central role in stipulating research and development in EPR high-dose standardisation as well as in coordinating and organising international dose intercomparison programs, within the Member States of the United Nations from the mid-seventies till today. The future tasks of EPR dosimetry seem to tend towards different subjects such as bio markers, biological radiation effects, post-accident dose reconstruction in the environment, and retrospective human dosimetry. The latter may be considered a promising tool for epidemiology on the way to re-define radiation risk of man for chronicle radiation exposures, based on e.g. South Ural civil population and radiation workers. There are on-going international activities in the field of standardising high-level dosimetry by the American Standards on Testing and Materials (Astm), and by the International Organisation of Standards (ISO). The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) is considering the establishment of relevant recommendations concerning industrial radiation processing, but also human dose reconstruction. (Author)

  15. EPR Dosimetry - Present and Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regulla, D.F. [GSF - National Research Centre for Environment and Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    In the past, IAEA has played a central role in stipulating research and development in EPR high-dose standardisation as well as in coordinating and organising international dose intercomparison programs, within the Member States of the United Nations from the mid-seventies till today. The future tasks of EPR dosimetry seem to tend towards different subjects such as bio markers, biological radiation effects, post-accident dose reconstruction in the environment, and retrospective human dosimetry. The latter may be considered a promising tool for epidemiology on the way to re-define radiation risk of man for chronicle radiation exposures, based on e.g. South Ural civil population and radiation workers. There are on-going international activities in the field of standardising high-level dosimetry by the American Standards on Testing and Materials (Astm), and by the International Organisation of Standards (ISO). The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) is considering the establishment of relevant recommendations concerning industrial radiation processing, but also human dose reconstruction. (Author)

  16. Alanine dosimetry for clinical applications. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anton, M.

    2006-05-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Therapy level alanine dosimetry at the UK Nationational Physical Laboratory, alanine as a precision validation tool for reference dosimetry, composition of alanine pellet dosimeters, the angular dependence of the alanine ESR spectrum, the CIAE alanine dosimeter for radiotherapy level, a correction for temporal evolution effects in alanine dosimetry, next-generation services foe e-traceability to ionization radiation national standards, establishing e-traceability to HIST high-dose measurement standards, alanine dosimetry of dose delivery from clinical accelerators, the e-scan alanine dosimeter reader, alanine dosimetry at ISS, verification of the integral delivered dose for IMRT treatment in the head and neck region with ESR/alanine dosimetry, alanine dosimetry in helical tomotherapy beams, ESR dosimetry research and development at the University of Palermo, lithium formate as a low-dose EPR radiation dosimeter, sensitivity enhancement of alanine/EPR dosimetry. (HSI)

  17. The effect of skin thickness determined using breast CT on mammographic dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Shihying; Boone, John M.; Yang, Kai; Kwan, Alexander L. C.; Packard, Nathan J.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of breast skin thickness on dosimetry in mammography was investigated. Breast computed tomography (CT) acquisition techniques, combined with algorithms designed for determining specific breast metrics, were useful for estimating skin thickness. A radial-geometry edge detection scheme was implemented on coronal reconstructed breast CT (bCT) images to measure the breast skin thickness. Skin thickness of bilateral bCT volume data from 49 women and unilateral bCT volume data from 2 women (10 healthy women and 41 women with BIRADS 4 and 5 diagnoses) was robustly measured with the edge detection scheme. The mean breast skin thickness (±inter-breast standard deviation) was found to be 1.45±0.30 mm. Since most current published normalized glandular dose (D gN ) coefficients are based on the assumption of a 4-mm breast skin thickness, the D gN values computed with Monte Carlo techniques will increase up to 18% due to the thinner skin layers (e.g., 6-cm 50% glandular breast, 28 kVp Mo-Mo spectrum). The thinner skin dimensions found in this study suggest that the current D gN values used for mammographic dosimetry lead to a slight underestimate in glandular dose

  18. Biological dosimetry of ionizing radiation by chromosomal aberration analysis; Dosimetria biologica de las radiaciones ionizantes mediante el analisis de aberraciones cromosomicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Castano, S.; Silva, A.; Navlet, J.

    1990-07-01

    Biological dosimetry consists of estimating absorbed doses for people exposed to radiation by mean biological methods. Several indicators used are based in haematological, biochemical, and cytogenetic data, although nowadays without doubt, the cytogenetic method is considered to be the most reliable. In this case, the study ol chromosomal aberrations, normally dicentric chromosomes, in peripheral lymphocytes can be related to absorbed dose through an experimental calibration curve. An experimental dose-response curve, using dicentric chromosomes analysis, X-rays at 300 kVp, 114 rad/min and temperature 37 degree celsius has been produced. Experimental data is fitted to model Y ={alpha} + {beta}{sub 1}D + {beta}{sub 2}D 2 , where Y is the number of dicentrics per cell and D the dose. The curve is compared with those produced elsewhere. (Author) 14 refs.

  19. Study of the effects of radon in three biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavera, L.; Balcazar, M.; Lopez, A.; Brena, M.; Rosa, M.E. De la; Villalobos P, R.

    2002-01-01

    The radon and its decay products are responsible of the 3/4 parts of the exposure of the persons to the environmental radiation. The discovery at the end of XIX Century of the illnesses, mainly of cancer, which appeared in the presence of radon, lead to an accelerated growing of the radon studies: monitoring, dosimetry, effects on the persons, etc. Several epidemiological studies of radon in miners and population in general have been realized; advancing in the knowledge about the concentration-lung cancer risk relationship, but with discrepancies in the results depending on the concentration levels. Therefor, studies which consuming time, efforts and money go on doing. The research of the radon effects in biological systems different to human, allows to realize studies in less time, in controlled conditions and generally at lower cost, generating information about the alpha radiation effects in the cellular field. Therefor it was decided to study the response of three biological systems exposed to radon: an unicellular bacteria Escherichia Coli which was exposed directly to alpha particles from an electrodeposited source for determining the sensitivity limit of the chose technique. A plant, Tradescantia, for studying the cytogenetic effect of the system exposed to controlled concentrations of radon. An insect, Drosophila Melanogaster, for studying the genetic effects and the accumulated effects in several generations exposed to radon. In this work the experimental settlements are presented for the expositions of the systems and the biological results commenting the importance of these. (Author)

  20. Dosimetry methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, W.L.; Miller, A.; Kovacs, A.

    2003-01-01

    Chemical and physical radiation dosimetry methods, used for the measurement of absorbed dose mainly during the practical use of ionizing radiation, are discussed with respect to their characteristics and fields of application.......Chemical and physical radiation dosimetry methods, used for the measurement of absorbed dose mainly during the practical use of ionizing radiation, are discussed with respect to their characteristics and fields of application....

  1. Effects of temperature and ionization density in medical luminescence dosimetry using Al2O3:C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edmund, Jens Morgenthaler

    2007-01-01

    by the combined efforts of energetic shallow traps and thermal excitation from intermediate states in deeper traps. In the study of ionization density, we investigated protons with energies between 10 and 60 MeV (4.57 to 1.08 keV/ìm in water). Experimentally, we observed that the initial OSL signal provided......) signal can be read out by stimulating the crystal with light. This thesis applies the initial part and the total area of the resulting OSL decay curve for dosimetry measurements and investigates the effects of temperature and proton energy, i.e. ionization density, on the RL and OSL signals from Al2O3:C...

  2. Biological effects of electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, E.

    1993-01-01

    In this generally intelligible article, the author describes at first the physical fundamentals of electromagnetic fields and their basic biological significance and effects for animals and human beings before dealing with the discussion regarding limiting values and dangers. The article treats possible connections with leukaemia as well as ith melatonine production more detailed. (vhe) [de

  3. Biological effectiveness of antiproton annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Bassler, Niels; Beyer, Gerd; De Marco, John J.; Doser, Michael; Ichioka, Toshiyasu; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Knudsen, Helge V.; Landua, Rolf; Maggiore, Carl; McBride, William H.; Møller, Søren Pape; Petersen, Jorgen; Smathers, James B.; Skarsgard, Lloyd D.; Solberg, Timothy D.; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.; Withers, H.Rodney; Vranjes, Sanja; Wong, Michelle; Wouters, Bradly G.

    2004-01-01

    We describe an experiment designed to determine whether or not the densely ionizing particles emanating from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in “biological dose” in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct measurement of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation. The experiment has been approved by the CERN Research Board for running at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD) as AD-4/ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) and has begun data taking in June of 2003. The background, description and the current status of the experiment are given.

  4. Biological effectiveness of antiproton annihilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzscheiter, M.H.; Agazaryan, N.; Bassler, Niels

    2004-01-01

    We describe an experiment designed to determine whether or not the densely ionizing particles emanating from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in ‘‘biological dose’’ in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct...... measurement of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation. The experiment has been approved by the CERN Research Board for running at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD) as AD-4/ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) and has begun data taking in June of 2003. The background, description and the current...

  5. Validation of an immunochemical assay for the detection of DNA damage as a tool for biological dosimetry of human exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schans, G.P. van der; Timmerman, A.J.; Wojewodzka, M.; Zaim, J.

    1997-01-01

    A method for biological dosimetry based on the immunochemical detection of DNA damage in human white blood cells has been validated. To this end the method developed at TNO (Rijswijk, the Netherlands) was also set up at INCT (Warsaw, Poland). Blood samples of 11 individuals were irradiated with 0 or 5 Gy of 170 kV X-rays at INCT and analyzed both at INCT and TNO. It appeared that in both laboratories damage could be detected to the same extent. The average background level of DNA damage amounted to 1.0 Gy-eq with an interindividual standard deviation of 0.25 Gy. The contribution of the sample variance to the total variance is only 14%. The radiosensitivity showed only a variation of about 10% and can, therefore, be neglected in estimating the radiation dose from the amount of DNA damage detected. (author)

  6. Space dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doke, Tadayoshi

    1988-01-01

    Japan will take part in the LML-1 (International Microgravity Laboratory 1) program that is scheduled to be carried out with space shuttles to be launched in 1991. The program will be followed by the LS-J (Space Laboratory-Japan) and IML-2 programs. A reliable dosimetry system is currently required to be established to evaluate the radiations in space. The present article reviews major features of different types of space radiations and requirements of dosimeters for these radiations. The radiations in the space environment consist of: 1) electrons and protons that have been trapped by the terrestrial magnetism, 2) corpuscular, gamma-and X-rays released from the sun, and 3) galactic cosmic rays (corpuscular, gamma-and X-rays). The effects of the trapped radiations will be low if a spacecraft can get through the zone of such radiations in a short period of time. The effects of galactic cosmic rays are much smaller than those of the trapped radiations. A solar flare can give significant contributions to the total radiations received by a spacecraft. An extremely large flare can release a fatal amount of radiations to the crew of a spacecraft. Prediction of such a large flare is of great important for a long trip through the space. Significant improvements should be made on existing dosimeters. (Nogami, K.)

  7. External dosimetry - Applications to radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faussot, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Dosimetry is the essential component of radiation protection. It allows to determine by calculation and measurement the absorbed dose value, i.e. the energy amounts deposited in matter by ionizing radiations. It deals also with the irradiation effects on living organisms and with their biological consequences. This reference book gathers all the necessary information to understand and master the external dosimetry and the metrology of ionizing radiations, from the effects of radiations to the calibration of radiation protection devices. The first part is devoted to physical dosimetry and allows to obtain in a rigorous manner the mathematical formalisms leading to the absorbed dose for different ionizing radiation fields. The second part presents the biological effects of ionizing radiations on living matter and the determination of a set of specific radiation protection concepts and data to express the 'risk' to develop a radio-induced cancer. The third part deals with the metrology of ionizing radiations through the standardized study of the methods used for the calibration of radiation protection equipments. Some practical exercises with their corrections are proposed at the end of each chapter

  8. Techniques for radiation measurements: Micro-dosimetry and dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waker, A. J.

    2006-01-01

    Experimental Micro-dosimetry is concerned with the determination of radiation quality and how this can be specified in terms of the distribution of energy deposition arising from the interaction of a radiation field with a particular target site. This paper discusses various techniques that have been developed to measure radiation energy deposition over the three orders of magnitude of site-size; nano-meter, micrometer and millimetre, which radiation biology suggests is required to fully account for radiation quality. Inevitably, much of the discussion will concern the use of tissue-equivalent proportional counters and variants of this device, but other technologies that have been studied, or are under development, for their potential in experimental Micro-dosimetry are also covered. Through an examination of some of the quantities used in radiation metrology and dosimetry the natural link with Micro-dosimetric techniques will be shown and the particular benefits of using Micro-dosimetric methods for dosimetry illustrated. (authors)

  9. Effects of temperature and ionization density in medical luminescence dosimetry using Al2O3:C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgenthaler Edmund, J.

    2007-11-01

    A new system containing small crystals of aluminum oxide doped with carbon (Al 2 O 3 :C) attached to optical fiber cables has recently been introduced. During irradiation, the system monitors the radioluminescence (RL)from the crystals and after irradiation, an optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) signal can be read out by stimulating the crystal with light. This thesis applies the initial part and the total area of the resulting OSL decay curve for dosimetry measurements and investigates the effects of temperature and proton energy, i.e. ionization density, on the RL and OSL signals from Al 2 O 3 :C. In the temperature study, it was found that the OSL signal depends on both irradiation and stimulation temperature while the RL signal is effected only by the irradiation temperature. The initial OSL signal is increasing with temperature whereas the total OSL area is decreasing. Therefore, if the irradiation temperature is kept constant, one can find an integration time which provides an OSL signal independent of stimulation temperature. Overall, the RL and OSL signals vary between -0.2 to 0.6% per C. Thermal effects were simulated with a band structure model and indicated that the temperature effects are caused by the combined efforts of energetic shallow traps and thermal excitation from intermediate states in deeper traps. In the study of ionization density, we investigated protons with energies between 10 and 60 MeV (4.57 to 1.08 keV/μm in water). Experimentally, we observed that the initial OSL signalprovided a signal independent of linear energy transfer (LET) for allenergies at 0.3 Gy. The total OSL area showed an LET dependent behavior atall doses and energies. We used track structure theory (TST) to give possible explanations for the LET dependence of the OSL signal. From these calculations, we found that the initial OSL signal is, in general, not LET independent which makes Al2O3:C unsuitable for OSL proton dosimetry. The initial OSL signal can, however

  10. The biological effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykes, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    The hazards of radiations to man are briefly covered in this paper. The natural background sources of radiations are stated and their resulting doses are compared to those received voluntarily by man. The basis of how radiations cause biological damage is given and the resulting somatic effects are shown for varying magnitude of dose. Risk estimates are given for cancer induction and genetic effects are briefly discussed. Finally four case studies of radiation damage to humans are examined exemplifying the symptoms of large doses of radiations [af

  11. Dosimetry in life sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The uses of radiation in medicine and biology have grown in scope and diversity to make the Radiological Sciences a significant factor in both research and medical practice. Of critical importance in the applications and development of biomedical and radiological techniques is the precision with which the dose may be determined at all points of interest in the absorbing medium. This has developed as a result of efficacy of investigations in clinical radiation therapy, concern for patient safety and diagnostic accuracy in diagnostic radiology and the advent of clinical trials and research into the use of heavily ionizing radiations in biology and medicine. Since the last IAEA Symposium on Dosimetry Techniques applied to Agriculture, Industry, Biology and Medicine, held in Vienna in 1972, it has become increasingly clear that advances in the techniques and hardware of biomedical dosimetry have been rapid. It is for these reasons that this symposium was organized in a concerted effort to focus on the problems, developments and areas of further research in dosimetry in the Life Sciences. (author)

  12. New radiation-induced effects in optical fibres feasible for dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomashuk, A.L.; Golant, K.M.; Dianov, E.M.; Nikolin, I.V.; Zakharkin, I.I.; Stepanov, V.A.

    1999-01-01

    Three new radiation-induced effects in silica optical fibres suitable for dosimetry are proposed: 1) in fibres with a high-OH cladding and a low-OH core, ionizing radiation disrupts the O-H bonds to let hydrogen diffuse into the core. This results in an increase in the OH-group absorption band amplitude, 2) the polymers used to coat optical fibres consist of hydrogen to the extent of about 50 %. Energetic neutrons produce recoil protons in the fibre coating, which can ''stick'' in the core, turn into hydrogen, and enter the glass network in the form of OH-group, and 3) in N-doped silica fibres irradiated with thermal neutrons, the following reaction 7 N 14 ( 0 n 1 , 1 p 1 ) 6 C 14 occurs and produces protons with energy 620 keV. With this energy, propagation length of protons in silica is 7 μm which means that the escape of protons from a 50 μm core is very weak. In fact all 3 effects lead to the irreversible increase in the OH-group absorption bands, which is proportional to the absorbed dose. With the help of these effects, temperature and dose-rate independent measurements of high doses become possible

  13. Importance of the effective atomic number (Zeff) of TL materials for radiation dosimetry in clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez M, P.R.

    2008-01-01

    The electric power generation, it has been one of the radiation applications of bigger weight, mainly in developed countries. Another sector of more impact is without a doubt that of the medicine. However, for a sure operation with radiations, those international organisms of radiological safety, exist every time more precise detection systems. The thermoluminescent dosimetry is one of the more reliable methods for this purpose, for that several groups of investigators from different parts of the world, they have guided its investigations in the development of new TL materials. However, to avoid underestimate or overestimation of the measured dose with the use of these materials, it should take into account it effective atomic number (Z eff ) it is well known that some TL materials considered as equivalent to the tissue, presents smaller TL intensity when being irradiated with low energy photons, while the TL material known as not equivalent to the tissue, they present the supra sensitivity effect for this radiation type. Nowadays, the estimate of the Z eff has not been clear, in this work the Z eff is determined by means of the traditional methods and an own method is presented for its determination. The results of the TL signal of different materials, when being irradiated with photons of effective energy between 24 keV and 1.25 MeV and their relationship with their calculated Z eff are also presented. (Author)

  14. AN EXACT GOODNESS-OF-FIT TEST BASED ON THE OCCUPANCY PROBLEMS TO STUDY ZERO-INFLATION AND ZERO-DEFLATION IN BIOLOGICAL DOSIMETRY DATA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Fontelo, Amanda; Puig, Pedro; Ainsbury, Elizabeth A; Higueras, Manuel

    2018-01-12

    The goal in biological dosimetry is to estimate the dose of radiation that a suspected irradiated individual has received. For that, the analysis of aberrations (most commonly dicentric chromosome aberrations) in scored cells is performed and dose response calibration curves are built. In whole body irradiation (WBI) with X- and gamma-rays, the number of aberrations in samples is properly described by the Poisson distribution, although in partial body irradiation (PBI) the excess of zeros provided by the non-irradiated cells leads, for instance, to the Zero-Inflated Poisson distribution. Different methods are used to analyse the dosimetry data taking into account the distribution of the sample. In order to test the Poisson distribution against the Zero-Inflated Poisson distribution, several asymptotic and exact methods have been proposed which are focused on the dispersion of the data. In this work, we suggest an exact test for the Poisson distribution focused on the zero-inflation of the data developed by Rao and Chakravarti (Some small sample tests of significance for a Poisson distribution. Biometrics 1956; 12 : 264-82.), derived from the problems of occupancy. An approximation based on the standard Normal distribution is proposed in those cases where the computation of the exact test can be tedious. A Monte Carlo Simulation study was performed in order to estimate empirical confidence levels and powers of the exact test and other tests proposed in the literature. Different examples of applications based on in vitro data and also data recorded in several radiation accidents are presented and discussed. A Shiny application which computes the exact test and other interesting goodness-of-fit tests for the Poisson distribution is presented in order to provide them to all interested researchers. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Radiation dosimetry in radiotherapy with internal emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stabin, Michael G.

    1997-01-01

    Full text. Radiation dosimetry radionuclides are currently being labeled to various biological agents used in internal emitter radiotherapy. This talk will review the various technologies and types of radiolabel in current use, with focus on the characterization of the radiation dose to the various important tissues of the body. Methods for obtaining data, developing kinetic models, and calculating radiation doses will be reviewed. Monoclonal antibodies are currently being labeled with both alpha and beta emitting radionuclides in attempts to find effective agents against cancer. Several radionuclides are also being used as bone pain palliation agents. These agents must be studied in clinical trials to determine the biokinetics and radiation dosimetry prior to approval for general use. In such studies, it is important to ensure the collection of the appropriate kinds of data and to collect the data at appropriate time intervals. The uptake and retention of activity in all significant source organs and in excreta be measured periodically (with at least 2 data points phase of uptake or clearance). Then, correct dosimetry methods must be applied - the best available methods for characterizing the radionuclide kinetic and for estimating the dosimetry in the various organs of the body especially the marrow, should be used. Attempts are also under way to develop methods for estimating true patient-specific dosimetry. Cellular and animal studies are also. Valuable in evaluating the efficacy of the agents in shrinking or eliminating tumors; some results from such studies will also be discussed. The estimation of radiation doses to patients in therapy with internal emitters involves several complex phases of analysis. Careful attention to detail and the use of the best available methods are essential to the protection of the patient and a successful outcome

  16. Biological effectiveness of fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppola, M.; Silini, G.

    1980-01-01

    It has been found experimentally that fast neutron RBE values generally increase with decreasing neutron doses. This finding reflects the existence of a difference in the shape between the functional dependences of the effect on dose produced by neutrons and by the reference radiation. The most common interpretation of this difference assumes a linear dose-effect relationship for neutrons and a linear plus quadratic relationship for X - or gamma-rays. In radiation protection the assumption of linearity is taken to be valid throughout the whole dose region of interest and is essential for the validity of the extrapolation to low doses of the risk estimates obtained at higher dose levels. On the other hand, the same trend of the RBE versus neutron dose would still be observed, if the biological effect induced by neutrons would be less than proportional to the dose. However, in this latter case the risks of neutron irradiation estimated from data at higher doses would no longer be safely utilized at lower dose levels. The results of various experiments with fast neutrons on different biological systems are examined in an attempt to throw some light on this aspect of radiation protection. It appears that in some cases linear non-threshold dose-effect relationships may not fit experimental series obtained with neutrons at relatively low doses. (H.K.)

  17. The effect of different dopant concentration of tailor-made silica fibers in radiotherapy dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Mahfuza; Mizanur Rahman, A. K. M.; Zubair, H. T.; Abdul-Rashid, H. A.; Yusoff, Z.; Begum, Mahbuba; Alkhorayef, M.; Alzimami, K.; Bradley, D. A.

    2017-12-01

    In thermoluminescence (TL) material dopant concentration has an important effect on their characteristics as a ;radiation-sensor;. The study investigates dosimetric properties of four different concentration (4 mol%, 5 mol%, 7 mol% and 25 mol%) tailor-made Ge-doped silica fibers. The intention is to seek development of alternative TL materials that offer exceptional advantages over existing passive systems of dosimetry, including improved spatial resolution, a water impervious nature and low cost. Photon beams (6 MV and 10 MV) from a clinical linear accelerator were used for irradiation of the fiber samples over radiation therapy doses, ranging from 0.5 Gy to 8 Gy. SEM-EDX analysis was also performed to investigate the homogeneity of distribution of Ge dopant concentration from the fiber samples. The results of measurement were also compared with two of the more commonly used standard TLDs, TLD-100 (LiF: Mg,Ti-7.5% 6LiF) and TLD-700 ((7LiF: Mg,Ti-99.9%7LiF) chips respectively. The TL intensity of the fiber samples was found to strongly depend on Ge dopant concentration, with samples showing enhanced TL yields with decreasing Ge dopant concentration. 4 mol% Ge-doped silica fiber provided the greatest response whereas the 25 mol% samples showed the least, indicative of the well-known concentration quenching effects All fiber TLDs provided linear dose response over the delivered radiotherapy dose-range, the fibers also showing a weak dependence on photon beam energies in comparing the TL yields at 6 and 10 MV. The fading behavior of the different concentration Ge doped TLD-materials were also measured over a period of thirty (30) days subsequent to irradiation. The relative sensitivity of the samples with respect to standard TLD-100 were found to be 0.37, 0.26, 0.13 and 0.02 in respect of the 4, 5, 7 and 25 mol% fibers. The primary dosimetry peak, which was by far the most prominent of any other feature covered by the glow curve, was found to be around 244 °C using

  18. Activities developed by the biological dosimetry laboratory of the Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear - ARN of Argentina; Actividades desarrolladas por el laboratorio de dosimetria biologica de la Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear de Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radl, A.; Sapienza, C.E.; Taja, M.R.; Bubniak, R.; Deminge, M.; Di Giorgio, M., E-mail: csapienza@arn.gob.ar [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear (ARN), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2013-07-01

    Biological dosimetry (DB) allows to estimate doses absorbed in individuals exposed to ionizing radiation through the quantification of stable and unstable chromosome aberrations (SCA and UCA). The frequency of these aberrations is referred to a calibration dose response curve (in vitro) to determine the doses of the individual to the whole body. The DB is a necessary support for programs of national radiation protection and response systems in nuclear or radiological emergencies in the event of accidental or incidental, single overexposure or large scale. In this context the Laboratory of Dosimetry Biological (LDB) of the Authority Regulatory Nuclear (ARN) Argentina develops and applies different dosimeters cytogenetic from four decades ago. These dosimeters provide a fact more within the whole of the information necessary for an accidental, complementing the physical and clinical dosimetry exposure assessment. The most widely used in the DB biodosimetric method is the quantification of SCA (dicentrics and rings Central) from a sample of venous blood. The LDB is accredited for the trial, under rules IRAM 301: 2005 (ISO / IEC 17025: 2005) and ISO 19238:2004. Test applies to the immediate dosimetry evaluation of acute exposures, all or a large part of the body in the range 0,1-5 Gy. In this context the LDB is part of the Latin American network of DB (LBDNet), BioDoseNet-who and response system in radiological emergencies and nuclear IAEA-RANET, being enabled to summon the LBDNet if necessary.

  19. Environmental dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.

    1977-01-01

    For more than 60 years, natural radiation has offered broad opportunities for basic research as evidenced by many fundamental discoveries. Within the last decade, however, dramatic changes have occurred in the motivation and direction of this research. The urgent need for economical energy sources entailing acceptably low levels of environmental impact has compelled the applied aspects of our radiation environment to become overriding considerations. It is within this general framework that state-of-the-art environmental dosimetry techniques are reviewed. Although applied motivation and relevance underscores the current milieu for both reactor and environmental dosimetry, a perhaps even more unifying force is the broad similarity of reactor and environmental radiation fields. In this review, a comparison of these two mixed radiation fields is presented stressing the underlying similarities that exist. On this basis, the evolution of a strong inner bond between dosimetry methods for both reactor and environmental radiation fields is described. The existence of this bond will be illustrated using representative examples of observed spectra. Dosimetry methods of particularly high applicability for both of these fields are described. Special emphasis is placed on techniques of high sensitivity and absolute accuracy which are capable of resolving the components of these mixed radiation fields

  20. High frequency electromagnetic dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez-Hernández, David A

    2009-01-01

    Along with the growth of RF and microwave technology applications, there is a mounting concern about the possible adverse effects over human health from electromagnetic radiation. Addressing this issue and putting it into perspective, this groundbreaking resource provides critical details on the latest advances in high frequency electromagnetic dosimetry.

  1. Realising the European network of bio-dosimetry (RENEB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulka, U.; Ainsbury, L.; Atkinson, M.; Barquinero, J. F.; Barrios, L.; Beinke, C.; Bognar, G.; Cucu, A.; Darroudi, F.; Fattibene, P.; Gil, O.; Gregoire, E.; Hadjidekova, V.; Haghdoost, S.; Herranz, R.; Jaworska, A.; Lindholm, C.; Mkacher, R.; Moertl, S.; Montoro, A.; Moquet, J.; Moreno, M.; Ogbazghi, A.; Oestreicher, U.; Palitti, F.; Pantelias, G.; Popescu, I.; Prieto, M. J.; Romm, H.; Rothkamm, K.; Sabatier, L.; Sommer, S.; Terzoudi, G.; Testa, A.; Thierens, H.; Trompier, F.; Turai, I.; Vandersickel, V.; Vaz, P.; Voisin, P.; Vral, A.; Ugletveit, F.; Woda, C.; Wojcik, A.

    2012-01-01

    In Europe, a network for biological dosimetry has been created to strengthen the emergency preparedness and response capabilities in case of a large-scale nuclear accident or radiological emergency. Through the RENEB (Realising the European Network of bio-dosimetry) project, 23 experienced laboratories from 16 European countries will establish a sustainable network for rapid, comprehensive and standardised bio-dosimetry provision that would be urgently required in an emergency situation on European ground. The foundation of the network is formed by five main pillars: (1) the ad hoc operational basis, (2) a basis of future developments, (3) an effective quality-management system, (4) arrangements to guarantee long-term sustainability and (5) awareness of the existence of RENEB. RENEB will thus provide a mechanism for quick, efficient and reliable support within the European radiation emergency management. The scientific basis of RENEB will concurrently contribute to increased safety in the field of radiation protection. (authors)

  2. Biological effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gisone, Pablo; Perez, Maria R.

    2001-01-01

    It has been emphasised the importance of DNA as the main target for ionizing radiation, that can induce damage by its direct action on this molecule or by an indirect effect mediated by free-radicals generated by water radiolysis. Biological effects of ionizing radiation are influenced not only by the dose but also by the dose-rate and the radiation quality. Radiation induced damage, mainly DNA single and double strand breaks, is detected by molecular sensors which in turn trigger signalling cascades leading to cell cycle arrest to allow DNA repair or programmed cell death (apoptosis). Those effects related with cell death, named deterministic, exhibits a dose-threshold below which they are not observed. Acute radiation syndrome and radiological burns are examples of this kind of effects. Other radiation induced effects, called stochastic, are the consequence of cell transformation and do not exhibit a dose-threshold. This is the case of cancer induction and hereditary effects. The aim of this presentation is briefly describe the main aspects of deterministic and stochastic effects from the point of view of radiobiology and radio pathology. (author)

  3. Advancements in accuracy of the alanine dosimetry system. Part 1. The effects of environmental humidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sleptchonok, Olga F.; Nagy, Vitaly; Desrosiers, Marc F.

    2000-01-01

    A one-year study of the EPR signal of γ-irradiated ( 60 Co) L-α-alanine with simultaneous monitoring of the cavity Q-factor was undertaken. The widespread opinion that the EPR signal remains absolutely stable under normal laboratory storage conditions is inaccurate. At 0% humidity, the signal can be regarded as stable within ±1% of its initial value for 6 months for 1 and 10 kGy doses, but for only 3 months for 100 kGy. When stored at the same relative humidity values up to 60%, the fading rates for dosimeters irradiated to 1 and 10 kGy are similar, whereas signals of dosimeters irradiated to 100 kGy fade considerably faster for all humidities. The rates of fading increase with the relative humidity, especially above 60% R. H. Environmental humidity also deteriorates the accuracy of alanine dosimetry by changing the resonant cavity Q-factor. This is particularly important when irradiated alanine dosimeters are used as instrument calibration standards. Short-term changes in alanine EPR signal amplitudes were recorded upon removal of the irradiated dosimeters from their storage environments. The importance of an in situ standard to correct for measurement errors due to environmental effects is demonstrated. (author)

  4. Effect of chemical composition and density of the pelvic structure in intracavitary brachytherapy dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez-Aguilera, N. [Coordinacion de Investigacion y Estudios de Posgrado, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Paseo Tollocan s/n Esquina con Jesus Carranza, 50180 Toluca (Mexico); Departamento de Fisica Medica, Instituto Estatal de Cancerologia ' Dr. Arturo Beltran Ortega' , Acapulco, Guerrero (Mexico); Torres-Garcia, E., E-mail: etorresg@uaemex.m [Coordinacion de Investigacion y Estudios de Posgrado, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Paseo Tollocan s/n Esquina con Jesus Carranza, 50180 Toluca (Mexico); Mitsoura, E. [Coordinacion de Investigacion y Estudios de Posgrado, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Paseo Tollocan s/n Esquina con Jesus Carranza, 50180 Toluca (Mexico)

    2011-03-15

    High dose rate (HDR) and low dose rate (LDR) intracavitary brachytherapies dosimetry in clinical practice are typically performed by commercial treatment planning systems. However, these systems do not fully consider the heterogeneities present in the real structure of the patient. The aim of this work is to obtain isodose curves and surfaces around the usual array of sources used in LDR ({sup 137}Cs) and HDR ({sup 192}Ir) intracavitary brachytherapy by Monte Carlo simulation, considering the real anatomic structure, density and chemical composition of media and tissues from the female pelvic region. The structural information was obtained from computed tomography images in the DICOM format. A voxel phantom (VP) was developed to perform ionizing radiation transport, considering the gamma spectrum of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 192}Ir. The absorbed dose was computed within each voxel of 2x2x3 mm{sup 3}. Four materials were considered in the VP-air, fat, muscle tissue and bone; however, one material per voxel was defined. Results show and quantify the effect of density and chemical composition of the medium on the absorbed dose distribution. According to them, the treatment planning systems underestimate the absorbed dose by 8% approximately for both radionuclides. In a heterogeneous medium, the absorbed dose distribution of {sup 192}Ir is more irregular than that of {sup 137}Cs but spatially better defined.

  5. Contribution of new cytogenetic techniques in the estimations of old irradiations in retrospective biological dosimetry; Apport des nouvelles techniques de cytogenetiques dans l'estimation des irradiations anciennes en dosimetrie biologique retrospective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pouzoulet, F

    2007-10-15

    The objective of this study was to answer three questions: if the translocations are steady: the results have shown that the translocations even if they are not obligatory steady can be used in retrospective dosimetry. Furthermore, it appeared important to consider the complex translocations in view of their relative stability and complementary information they bring ( quality of radiation, received dose). The second question is what contribution of the M-F.I.S.H. in the translocations analysis in comparison with the F.I.S.H.-3: we have shown that the M-F.I.S.H. would allow to raise the whole of doubt due to a partial genome observation. that has for effect to increase the precision of the analysis and that what ever be the received dose. The third question is if there are differences between the chromosomal aberrations generated by x radiation of 50 keV and by gamma radiation from cobalt-60: yes, the low energy photons generate more translocations than the photons coming from cobalt-60. But they generate less dicentrics. this difference comes from the way the energy is deposited that leads to a more important formation of complex and multiple translocations with the low energy photons. this could constitute a problem in the use of low energy photons in radiotherapy. it would seem that the simple translocations rate is not influenced by the photons energy. (N.C.)

  6. Neutron personnel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, R.V.

    1981-01-01

    The current state-of-the-art in neutron personnel dosimetry is reviewed. Topics covered include dosimetry needs and alternatives, current dosimetry approaches, personnel monitoring devices, calibration strategies, and future developments

  7. Biological Effects after Prenatal Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streffer, C.

    2004-01-01

    A Task Group of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has finished a report Biological Effects after Prenatal Irradiation (Embryo and Fetus) which has been approved by the Main Commission and Will be Published. Some new important scientific data shall be discussed in this contribution. During the preimplantation period lethality of the mammalian embryo is the dominating radiation effect. However, in mouse strains with genetic predispositions it has been shown that also malformations can be caused. This effect is genetically determined and its mechanisms is different from the induction of malformations during major organogenesis. Radiation exposures during this prenatal period leads ato an increase of genomic instability of cells in the normal appearing fetuses. These radiation effects can be transmitted to the next generation. A renewed analysis of individuals with severe mental retardation after exposures during the 8th to 15th week post conception in Hiroshima and Nagasaki gives evidence that a threshold dose exists for this effect around 300 mGy. This is supported by a number of experimental animal data which have been obtained from cellular and molecular investigations during the brain development. The data show the high radiosensitivity of the developing brain but also the various compensatory mechanisms and the enormous plasticity of these processes. The radiosensitivity varies strongly during the prenatal development. The highest sensitivity is found during the early and mid fetal period which is coinciding with weeks 8-15 post conception in humans. The lowest doses causing persistent damage are in the range of 100 to 300 mGy. For intelligence quotient scores a linear dose response model provides a satisfactory fit. From the experimental data it can be concluded that the fetal stage is most sensitive to the carcinogenic effect in comparison to the other prenatal stages. Such as clear situation cannot be obtained from the

  8. MISTI Shielding and Dosimetry Experiment, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Reliable on-orbit dosimetry is necessary for understanding effects of space radiation environments on spacecraft microelectronics performance and comparison of...

  9. Biological dosimetry - a Bayesian approach in the presentation of the uncertainty of the estimated dose in cases of exposure to low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Giorgio, Marina; Zaretzky, A.

    2010-01-01

    Biodosimetry laboratory experience has shown that there are limitations in the existing statistical methodology. Statistical difficulties generally occur due to the low number of aberrations leading to large uncertainties for dose estimation. Some problems derived from limitations of the classical statistical methodology, which requires that chromosome aberration yields be considered as something fixed and consequently provides a deterministic dose estimation and associated confidence limits. On the other hand, recipients of biological dosimetry reports, including medical doctors, regulators and the patients themselves may have a limited comprehension of statistics and of informed reports. Thus, the objective of the present paper is to use a Bayesian approach to present the uncertainty on the estimated dose to which a person could be exposed, in the case of low dose (occupational doses) radiation exposure. Such methodology will allow the biodosimetrists to adopt a probabilistic approach for the cytogenetic data analysis. At present, classical statistics allows to produce a confidence interval to report such dose, with a lower limit that could not detach from zero. In this situation it becomes difficult to make decisions as they could impact on the labor activities of the worker if an exposure exceeding the occupational dose limits is inferred. The proposed Bayesian approach is applied to occupational exposure scenario to contribute to take the appropriate radiation protection measures. (authors) [es

  10. Gel dosimetry: The effect of gold nanoparticles on the dose enhancement in the external radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Khosravi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Normoxic type MAGICA gel dosimeters are established for dose quantification in three dimensions for radiotherapy. Objective(s: The ability of MAGICA polymer gel was assessed by experimental measurements method for studying the effect of gold nanoparticles (GNPs in dose enhancement under the external 18MV radiotherapy practices. Methods: The different GNPs concentrations were studied: 0.02mM, 0.05 mM and 0.1 mM. Then, a new formulation of MAGICA gel was synthesized. The fabricated gel was poured in the tubes (with and without the GNPs located at the water phantom. The water phantom was irradiated to 18 MV beam of a Varian linac. After 24 hours, the irradiated gels were read using a Siemens 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. The absolute dose sat the reference points and isodose curves resulted from the experimental measurements of the gels following the external radiotherapy practices were compared. Results: The signal of non-irradiated gel samples containing GNPs showed maximum difference of the 1% compared to gel without nanoparticles. The dose enhancement factors were 1.014±0.07, 1.074±0.11and 1.161±0.15 for 0.02, 0.05 and 0.1 mM concentrations, respectively. The results demonstrate that use of GNPs embedded in polymer gels caused the enhancement of radiation. Conclusions: The results indicated that the polymer gel dosimetry method as developed and used in this study can be recommended as a reliable method for investigating the DEF of GNPs in external radiotherapy practices.

  11. Effect of inhomogeneous activity distributions and airway geometry on cellular doses in radon lung dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szoke, Istvan; Balashazy, Imre; Farkas, Arpad; Hofmann, Werner

    2007-01-01

    The human tracheobronchial system has a very complex structure including cylindrical airway ducts connected by airway bifurcation units. The deposition of the inhaled aerosols within the airways exhibits a very inhomogeneous pattern. The formation of deposition hot spots near the carinal ridge has been confirmed by experimental and computational fluid and particle dynamics (CFPD) methods. In spite of these observations, current radon lung dosimetry models apply infinitely long cylinders as models of the airway system and assume uniform deposition of the inhaled radon progenies along the airway walls. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of airway geometry and non-uniform activity distributions within bronchial bifurcations on cellular dose distributions. In order to answer these questions, the nuclear doses of the bronchial epithelium were calculated in three different irradiation situations. (1) First, CFPD methods were applied to calculate the distribution of the deposited alpha-emitting nuclides in a numerically constructed idealized airway bifurcation. (2) Second, the deposited radionuclides were randomly distributed along the surface of the above-mentioned geometry. (3) Finally, calculations were made in cylindrical geometries corresponding to the parent and daughter branches of the bifurcation geometry assuming random nuclide activity distribution. In all three models, the same 218 Po and 214 Po surface activities per tissue volumes were assumed. Two conclusions can be drawn from this analysis: (i) average nuclear doses are very similar in all three cases (minor differences can be attributed to differences in the linear energy transfer (LET) spectra) and (ii) dose distributions are significantly different in all three cases, with the highest doses at the carinal ridge in case 3. (authors)

  12. Programme Biology - Health protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The scientific results for 1975, of the five-year Biology-Health Protection programme adopted in 1971, are presented in two volumes. In volume one, Research in Radiation Protection are developed exclusively, including the following topics: measurement and interpretation of radiation (dosimetry); transfer of radioactive nuclides in the constituents of the environment; hereditary effects of radiation; short-term effects (acute irradiation syndrome and its treatment); long-term effects and toxicology of radioactive elements. In volume, two Research on applications in Agriculture and Medicine are developed. It includes: mutagenesis; soil-plant relations; radiation analysis; food conservation; cell culture; radioentomology. Research on applications in Medicine include: Nuclear Medicine and Neutron Dosimetry

  13. Quantitative autoradiography of radionuclides in biological tissues by high resolution nuclear analysis: application in radio-toxicology and dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubineau Laniece, I.

    1997-01-01

    In the framework of radiation damage on cells in living organisms an auto-radiograph, based on the STIC method, has been developed for the particles detection. This apparatus associates a thin scintillator with a photosensitive detector (CCD). The design and the performance of this well adapted tool for low activity biological samples study, are described. (A.L.B.)

  14. Health and biological effects of non-ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Seze, R.; Souques, M.; Aurengo, A.; Bach, V.; Burais, N.; Cesarini, J.P.; Cherin, A.; Decobert, V.; Dubois, G.; Hours, M.; Lagroye, I.; Leveque, Ph.; Libert, J.P.; Lombard, J.; Loos, N.; Mir, L.; Perrin, A.; Poulletier De Gannes, F.; Thuroczy, G.; Wiart, J.; Lehericy, St.; Pelletier, A.; Marc-Vergnes, J.P.; Douki, Th.; Guibal, F.; Tordjman, I.; Gaillot de Saintignon, J.; Collard, J.F.; Scoretti, R.; Magne, I.; Veyret, B.; Katrib, J.

    2011-01-01

    This document gathers the slides of the available presentations given during this conference day on the biological and health effects of non-ionizing radiations. Sixteen presentations out of 17 are assembled in the document and deal with: 1 - NMR: biological effects and implications of Directive 2004/40 on electromagnetic fields (S. Lehericy); 2 - impact of RF frequencies from mobile telephone antennas on body homeostasis (A. Pelletier); 3 - expression of stress markers in the brain and blood of rats exposed in-utero to a Wi-Fi signal (I. Lagroye); 4 - people exposure to electromagnetic waves: the challenge of variability and the contribution of statistics to dosimetry (J. Wiart); 5 - status of knowledge about electromagnetic fields hyper-sensitivity (J.P. Marc-Vergnes; 6 - geno-toxicity of UV radiation: respective impact of UVB and UVA (T. Douki); 7 - National day of prevention and screening for skin cancers (F. Guibal); 8 - UV tan devices: status of knowledge about cancer risks (I. Tordjman, and J. Gaillot de Saintignon); 9 - modulation of brain activity during a tapping task after exposure to a 3000 μT magnetic field at 60 Hz (M. Souques and A. Legros); 10 - calculation of ELF electromagnetic fields in the human body by the finite elements method (R. Scoretti); 11 - French population exposure to the 50 Hz magnetic field (I. Magne); 12 - LF and static fields, new ICNIRP recommendations: what has changed, what remains (B. Veyret); 13 - risk assessment of low energy lighting systems - DELs and CFLs (J.P. Cesarini); 14 - biological effects to the rat of a chronic exposure to high power microwaves (R. De Seze); 15 - theoretical and experimental electromagnetic compatibility approaches of active medical implants in the 10-50 Hz frequency range: the case of implantable cardiac defibrillators (J. Katrib); French physicians and electromagnetic fields (M. Souques). (J.S.)

  15. Biological effects of high strength electric fields on small laboratory animals. Interim progress report, March 9, 1976--September 8, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, R.D.; Kaune, W.T.; Decker, J.R.; Hjeresen, D.L.

    1976-09-01

    Progress is reported on a broad and comprehensive series of biological experiments made under strictly controlled laboratory conditions to screen for possible effects of exposure to 60-Hz electric fields on small laboratory animals. Electric field strengths comparable to and exceeding those under existing and anticipated transmission line designs will be used. Dosimetry studies will complement the animal studies to establish the relationship between tissue dose and any observed biological effects. Information derived from this project will provide a better basis for evaluating potential hazards of exposure to 60-Hz electric fields and help define parameters to be studied in clinical evaluations on humans.

  16. Investigation of the effect of ionizing radiation on gene expression variation by the 'DNA chips': feasibility of a biological dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruel, G.

    2005-01-01

    After having described the different biological effects of ionizing radiation and the different approaches to biological dosimetry, and introduced 'DNA chips' or DNA micro-arrays, the author reports the characterization of gene expression variations in the response of cells to a gamma irradiation. Both main aspects of the use DNA chips are investigated: fundamental research and diagnosis. This research thesis thus proposes an analysis of the effect of ionizing radiation using DNA chips, notably by comparing gene expression modifications measured in mouse irradiated lung, heart and kidney. It reports a feasibility study of bio-dosimeter based on expression profiles

  17. Progress report, Biology and Health Physics Division, April 1 to June 30, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress is reported in research on dosimetry and monitoring, environmental effects of thermal effluents, radionuclide migration, hydrology, radiation carcinogenesis, data manipulation of human health records, and biological radiation effects. (E.C.B.)

  18. Progress report, April 1 to June 30, 1976, Biology and Health Physics Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary results are reported on research covering such broad topics as dosimetry, radiation monitors and detectors, aquatic ecology, radionuclide migration, radiation carcinogenesis, the effects of radiation on human populations, and molecular biological radiation effects. (E.C.B.)

  19. Quantification of biologically effective environmental UV irradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horneck, G.

    To determine the impact of environmental UV radiation on human health and ecosystems demands monitoring systems that weight the spectral irradiance according to the biological responses under consideration. In general, there are three different approaches to quantify a biologically effective solar irradiance: (i) weighted spectroradiometry where the biologically weighted radiometric quantities are derived from spectral data by multiplication with an action spectrum of a relevant photobiological reaction, e.g. erythema, DNA damage, skin cancer, reduced productivity of terrestrial plants and aquatic foodweb; (ii) wavelength integrating chemical-based or physical dosimetric systems with spectral sensitivities similar to a biological response curve; and (iii) biological dosimeters that directly weight the incident UV components of sunlight in relation to the effectiveness of the different wavelengths and to interactions between them. Most biological dosimeters, such as bacteria, bacteriophages, or biomolecules, are based on the UV sensitivity of DNA. If precisely characterized, biological dosimeters are applicable as field and personal dosimeters.

  20. The biological effectiveness of antiproton irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Bassler, Niels; Agazaryan, Nzhde

    2006-01-01

    ever measurements of the biological effectiveness of antiprotons. Materials and methods: V79 cells were suspended in a semi-solid matrix and irradiated with 46.7 MeV antiprotons, 48 MeV protons, or 60Co c-rays. Clonogenic survival was determined as a function of depth along the particle beams. Dose...... has a higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Conclusion: We have produced the first measurements of the biological consequences of antiproton irradiation. These data substantiate theoretical predictions of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation within the Bragg peak, and suggest...

  1. Biological effects of high LET radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Masami [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences

    1997-03-01

    Biological effect of radiation is different by a kind of it greatly. Heavy ions were generally more effective in cell inactivation, chromosome aberration induction, mutation induction and neoplastic cell transformation induction than {gamma}-rays in SHE cells. (author)

  2. Dosimetry of internal emitting: principles and perspectives of the MIRD technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferro F, G.

    1999-01-01

    The development of the radiopharmaceutical technology have multiplied the number of radioisotopes with applications in therapeutical nuclear medicine so known as Directed radiotherapy. Assuming the radiation is capable to produce noxious effects in the biological systems, it is important to evaluate appropriately the risks and benefits of the administration of radioactive agents in the patient. The outstanding parameter in this evaluation is the absorbed dose, which is product of the radiation emitted by a radionuclide that is localized or distributed to the interior of the human body in study and whose its estimation helps to predict the efficacy of the treatment. The scheme generalized of MIRD, it was formulated from thirty years ago for evaluating the interior dosimetry at level of organs.The finality of this work is to show the basic principles of the MIRD methodology and its perspectives using innovator tools as the dosimetry for dynamic masses, in particular the personnel dosimetry for the organs of each patient, the dosimetry for the small structures inside the organs (sub organic dosimetry), the distributions of doses in three dimensions (S voxel), the dosimetry at cellular level and the quantitative acquisition of pharmaceutical data. (Author)

  3. Monte Carlo Investigation on the Effect of Heterogeneities on Strut Adjusted Volume Implant (SAVI) Dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Craig

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer for women with more than 225,000 new cases diagnosed in the United States in 2012 (ACS, 2012). With the high prevalence, comes an increased emphasis on researching new techniques to treat this disease. Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) has been used as an alternative to whole breast irradiation (WBI) in order to treat occult disease after lumpectomy. Similar recurrence rates have been found using ABPI after lumpectomy as with mastectomy alone, but with the added benefit of improved cosmetic and psychological results. Intracavitary brachytherapy devices have been used to deliver the APBI prescription. However, inability to produce asymmetric dose distributions in order to avoid overdosing skin and chest wall has been an issue with these devices. Multi-lumen devices were introduced to overcome this problem. Of these, the Strut-Adjusted Volume Implant (SAVI) has demonstrated the greatest ability to produce an asymmetric dose distribution, which would have greater ability to avoid skin and chest wall dose, and thus allow more women to receive this type of treatment. However, SAVI treatments come with inherent heterogeneities including variable backscatter due to the proximity to the tissue-air and tissue-lung interfaces and variable contents within the cavity created by the SAVI. The dose calculation protocol based on TG-43 does not account for heterogeneities and thus will not produce accurate dosimetry; however Acuros, a model-based dose calculation algorithm manufactured by Varian Medical Systems, claims to accurately account for heterogeneities. Monte Carlo simulation can calculate the dosimetry with high accuracy. In this thesis, a model of the SAVI will be created for Monte Carlo, specifically using MCNP code, in order to explore the affects of heterogeneities on the dose distribution. This data will be compared to TG-43 and Acuros calculated dosimetry to explore their accuracy.

  4. Updating the INDAC computer application of internal dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bravo Perez-Tinao, B.; Marchena Gonzalez, P.; Sollet Sanudo, E.; Serrano Calvo, E.

    2013-01-01

    The initial objective of this project is to expand the application INDAC currently used in internal dosimetry services of the Spanish nuclear power plants and Tecnatom for estimating the effective doses of internal dosimetry of workers in direct action. or in-vivo dosimetry. (Author)

  5. Estimation of dose ionizing radiation exposure by biological dosimetry; Estimación de dosis de exposición a radiaciones ionizantes mediante dosimetría biológica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herranz Crespo, R.; Moreno Domene, M.; Prieto Rodríguez, M.J.; Lozano Barriuso, M.A.

    2014-07-01

    the Biological Dosimetry Laboratory of the Radiopathology Centre, at Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, is the only national laboratory accredited by UNE-EN ISO/IEC 17025:2005, and scope to ISO 19238:2004 (Radiation protection – Performance criteria for service laboratories performing biological dosimetry by citogenetics), for dose assessment by the dycentrics assay, has great experience with more than 100 real cases analyzed, and several population studies. This paper describes experience and results from more than 20 years of work under the Reference level II Centre for the attention of irradiated and/or contaminated people. [Spanish] El Laboratorio de Dosimetría Biológica, del Centro de Radiopatología del Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, es el único en España que dispone de acreditación internacional por la norma UNE-EN ISO/IEC 17025:2005 con alcance a la norma ISO 19238:2004 (Radiationprotection – Performance criteria for service laboratories performing biological dosimetry by citogenetics), para la realización de estimaciones dosimétricas mediante la técnica de dicéntricos, dispone de amplia experiencia en su aplicación en los 110 casos reales analizados, y en diferentes estudios de poblaciones españolas. En este trabajo se describe la experiencia del laboratorio y los resultados obtenidos en los más de 20 años de funcionamiento en el Centro de Referencia de nivel II para la atención a irradiados y/o contaminados por radiaciones ionizantes.

  6. Cellular dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humm, J.L.; Chin, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    Radiation dose is a useful predictive parameter for describing radiation toxicity in conventional radiotherapy. Traditionally, in vitro radiation biology dose-effect relations are expressed in the form of cell survival curves, a semilog plot of cell survival versus dose. However, the characteristic linear or linear quadratic survival curve shape, for high- and low-LET radiations respectively, is only strictly valid when the radiation dose is uniform across the entire target population. With an external beam of 60 Co gamma rays or x-rays, a uniform field may be readily achievable. When radionuclides are incorporated into a cell milieu, several new problems emerge which can result in a departure from uniformity in energy deposition throughout a cell population. This nonuniformity can have very important consequences for the shape of the survival curve. Cases in which perturbations of source uniformity may arise include: 1. Elemental sources may equilibrate in the cell medium with partition coefficients between the extracellular, cytosol, and nuclear compartments. The effect of preferential cell internalization or binding to cell membrane of some radionuclides can increase or decrease the slope of the survival curve. 2. Radionuclides bound to antibodies, hormones, metabolite precursors, etc., may result in a source localization pattern characteristic of the carrier agent, i.e., the sources may bind to cell surface receptors or antigens, be internalized, bind to secreted antigen concentrated around a fraction of the cell population, or become directly incorporated into the cell DNA. We propose to relate the distribution of energy deposition in cell nuclei to biological correlates of cellular inactivation. The probability of each cell's survival is weighted by its individual radiation burden, and the summation of these probabilities for the cell population can be used to predict the number or fraction of cell survivors

  7. Analysis behaviour of free radicals produced by ionizing radiations in human blood by EPR for biological dosimetry in patients; Analisis del comportamiento de los radicales libre en la radiolisis de la sangre por EPR para dosimetria biologia en pacientes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza, O. O.; Almanza, A.; Plazas, M. M. C.

    2006-07-01

    In this work is analyzed the biological dosimetry of the free radicals produced by ionizing radiations in human blood obtained by EPR and the biological behaviour of samples In-Vitro, with Rh: O+, in tubes with EDTA (Acid Etilen Diamino Tetracetic) the samples was extracted of the main investigator, these samples were radiated with gammas of ''60Co of a Theratron 780 between plates of PMMA to a depth of Z{sub m}ax of 0.5 cm and between doses 1 to 25 Gy. In these results the behaviors of signal the free radicals presented a increasing a their intensity depending on applied dose, of equal way are results of the biologic dosimetry displayed in sanguineous populations like. White Globules, Red. Platelets etc, to being compared with Resonance Paramagnetic Electronic (EPR). The results show changes in sanguineous populations in high doses (D>10 Gy) in the case of lymphocytes, granulocitos, macusanita, plaquetas, hemoglobina, haematocrit with change similarly in medium and low doses (D>10Gy) in linfocites, platelets, granulocytes, monocytes and the haematocrit. A sanguineous sample without radiating analyzes by EPR giving the presence of signals with values of g=2.13 2,41 in blood. For the first certain value of g authors have associated it to free radicals like: globin (Fe(IV)=0) or Cu''+ incorporated to the ceruloplasmin molecule. (Author)

  8. Progress report, Biology and Health Physics Division, July 1 to September 30, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-11-01

    Interim results are reported for research in health physics, i.e. dosimetry, detectors, and monitoring; environmental research (limnology, radionuclide migration and kinetics; population research (radiation carcinogenesis, radiation effects in human populations); and biology (radiobiology). (E.C.B.)

  9. Progress report, Biology and Health Physics Division, October 1 to December 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research results are reported on such topics as dosimetry, monitoring, biological impact of thermal effluents, radioecology and radiobiology, hydrology, waste management, neutron activation analysis, and data analysis for radiation effects on humans. (E.C.B.)

  10. Personnel neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hankins, D.

    1982-04-01

    This edited transcript of a presentation on personnel neutron discusses the accuracy of present dosimetry practices, requirements, calibration, dosemeter types, quality factors, operational problems, and dosimetry for a criticality accident. 32 figs

  11. Dosimetry for radiation processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne

    1986-01-01

    During the past few years significant advances have taken place in the different areas of dosimetry for radiation processing, mainly stimulated by the increased interest in radiation for food preservation, plastic processing and sterilization of medical products. Reference services both...... and sterilization dosimetry, optichromic dosimeters in the shape of small tubes for food processing, and ESR spectroscopy of alanine for reference dosimetry. In this paper the special features of radiation processing dosimetry are discussed, several commonly used dosimeters are reviewed, and factors leading...

  12. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, J.L.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this work is to verify the existence of the adaptive response phenomenon induced by low doses of ionizing radiation in living cells.A wild-type yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast) was chosen as the biological target.As a parameter to quantify the sensibility of the target to radiation, the Lethal Dose 50 (LD50 ) was observed. In our experimental condition a value of (60 ± 1) Gy was measured for LD50 with Dose Rate of (0.44 ± 0.03) Gy/min. The method employed to show up the adaptive response phenomenon consisted in exposing the sample to low ''conditioning'' doses, which would initiate these mechanisms. Later the samples with and without conditioning were exposed to higher ''challenging'' doses (such as LD50), and the surviving fractions were compared. In order to maximize the differences, the doses and the time between irradiations were varied. The best results were obtained with both a conditioning dose of (0.44 ± 0.03) Gy and a waiting time of 2 hs until the application of the challenging dose. Following this procedures the 80% of the conditioned samples has survived, after receiving the application of the LD50. The adaptive response phenomenon was also verified for a wide range of challenging doses

  13. Biological effects of high strength electric fields. Second interim progress report, September 1976--March 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, R.D.; Kaune, W.T.

    1977-05-01

    This report describes progress made on the Project during the period of September 9, 1976 to March 31, 1977 towards the determination of the biological effects of high strength electric fields on small laboratory animals. The efforts to date can be divided into five categories: (1) the design, construction, and testing of a prototype and special studies exposure system; (2) the design and construction of exposure systems for rats and mice; (3) dosimetry; (4) experiments to determine the maximum field strength which does not produce corona discharge, ozone formation, shocks to the animal, hair stimulation, or a behavioral preference by rats to avoid exposure to the field; and (5) preparations for the biological screening experiments.

  14. Biological effects of nuclear radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotz, G.

    1975-01-01

    After a brief survey about the main radiobiological effects caused by ionizing radiation, human symptoms after irradiation and incorporation are shown. The special radiotoxic effect of radionuclides which are chemically associated with metabolism-specific elements such as calcium and potassium is shown and methods of treatment are indicated. (ORU) [de

  15. Biological effects of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    The paper reports the proceedings of a conference organised jointly by Friends of the Earth (U.K.) and Greenpeace (International). The aim of the conference was to discuss the effects of low level radiation, particularly on man, within the terms of dose/risk relationships. The topics discussed included: sources of radiation, radiation discharges from nuclear establishments, predictive modelling of radiation hazards, radiation effects at Hiroshima, low dose effects and ICRP dose limits, variation in sensitivity to radiation, and the link between childhood cancer and nuclear power. (U.K.)

  16. The effects of variations in the density and composition of eye materials on ophthalmic brachytherapy dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asadi, Somayeh; Masoudi, Seyed Farhad; Shahriari, Majid

    2012-01-01

    In ophthalmic brachytherapy dosimetry, it is common to consider the water phantom as human eye anatomy. However, for better clinical analysis, there is a need for the dose determination in different parts of the eye. In this work, a full human eye is simulated with MCNP-4C code by considering all parts of the eye, i.e., the lens, cornea, retina, choroid, sclera, anterior chamber, optic nerve, and bulk of the eye comprising vitreous body and tumor. The average dose in different parts of this full model of the human eye is determined and the results are compared with the dose calculated in water phantom. The central axes depth dose and the dose in whole of the tumor for these 2 simulated eye models are calculated as well, and the results are compared.

  17. The effects of variations in the density and composition of eye materials on ophthalmic brachytherapy dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asadi, Somayeh [Department of Physics, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Masoudi, Seyed Farhad, E-mail: masoudi@kntu.ac.ir [Department of Physics, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahriari, Majid [Department of Radiation Application, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-04-01

    In ophthalmic brachytherapy dosimetry, it is common to consider the water phantom as human eye anatomy. However, for better clinical analysis, there is a need for the dose determination in different parts of the eye. In this work, a full human eye is simulated with MCNP-4C code by considering all parts of the eye, i.e., the lens, cornea, retina, choroid, sclera, anterior chamber, optic nerve, and bulk of the eye comprising vitreous body and tumor. The average dose in different parts of this full model of the human eye is determined and the results are compared with the dose calculated in water phantom. The central axes depth dose and the dose in whole of the tumor for these 2 simulated eye models are calculated as well, and the results are compared.

  18. The effect of isotope on the dosimetry of inhaled plutonium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilmette, R.A.; Griffith, W.C.

    1991-01-01

    Results of experimental studies in which animals inhaled 238 PuO 2 or 239 PuO 2 aerosols have shown that the biokinetics and associated radiation dose patterns for these two isotopes differ significantly due to differences in in-vivo solubility caused by the 260-fold difference in specific activity between 238 PuO 2 and 239 PuO 2 . We have adapted a biokinetics and dosimetry model derived from results of the ITRI dog studies to humans and have calculated dose commitments and annual limits on intake (ALI) for both Pu isotopes. Our results show that the ALI calculated in this study is one-third that for class Y 238 Pu from ICRP 30, and one-half or equal to that for class Y 239 Pu, depending on how activity in the thoracic lymph nodes is treated dosimetrically

  19. External audit in radiotherapy dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thwaites, D.I.; Western General Hospital, Edinburgh

    1996-01-01

    Quality audit forms an essential part of any comprehensive quality assurance programme. This is true in radiotherapy generally and in specific areas such as radiotherapy dosimetry. Quality audit can independently test the effectiveness of the quality system and in so doing can identify problem areas and minimize their possible consequences. Some general points concerning quality audit applied to radiotherapy are followed by specific discussion of its practical role in radiotherapy dosimetry, following its evolution from dosimetric intercomparison exercises to routine measurement-based on-going audit in the various developing audit networks both in the UK and internationally. Specific examples of methods and results are given from some of these, including the Scottish+ audit group. Quality audit in radiotherapy dosimetry is now well proven and participation by individual centres is strongly recommended. Similar audit approaches are to be encouraged in other areas of the radiotherapy process. (author)

  20. Biological effects of prenatal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streffer, Christian

    1997-01-01

    After large releases of radionuclides, exposure of the embryo or fetus can take place by external irradiation or uptake of radionuclies. The embryo and fetus are radiosensitive throughout prenatal development. The quality and extent of radiation effects depend on the development stage. During the preimplantation period (one to 10 days postconception, p.c.) a radiation exposure of at least 0.2 Gy can cause the death of the embryo. Malformations are only observed in rare cases when genetic predisposition exist. Macroscopic, anatomical malformations are induced only after irradiation during the major organogenesis (two to eight weeks p.c.). A radiation dose of about 0.2 Gy is a doubling dose for the malformation risks as extrapolated from experiments with rodents. The human embryo may be more radioresistant. During early fetogenesis (8-15 weeks p.c.) a high radiosensitivity exists for the developmental of the brain. Radiation doses of 1.0 Gy cause severe mental retardation in about 40% of the exposed fetuses. It must be taken into account that a radiation exposure during the fetal period can also induce cancer. It is generally assumed that the risk exists at about the same level as for children. (Author)

  1. Medical radiation dosimetry theory of charged particle collision energy loss

    CERN Document Server

    McParland, Brian J

    2014-01-01

    Accurate radiation dosimetry is a requirement of radiation oncology, diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine. It is necessary so as to satisfy the needs of patient safety, therapeutic and diagnostic optimisation, and retrospective epidemiological studies of the biological effects resulting from low absorbed doses of ionising radiation. The radiation absorbed dose received by the patient is the ultimate consequence of the transfer of kinetic energy through collisions between energetic charged particles and atoms of the tissue being traversed. Thus, the ability of the medical physicist to both measure and calculate accurately patient dosimetry demands a deep understanding of the physics of charged particle interactions with matter. Interestingly, the physics of charged particle energy loss has an almost exclusively theoretical basis, thus necessitating an advanced theoretical understanding of the subject in order to apply it appropriately to the clinical regime. ​ Each year, about one-third of the worl...

  2. Radiation Protection and Dosimetry An Introduction to Health Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stabin, Michael G

    2007-01-01

    This comprehensive text provides an overview of all relevant topics in the field of radiation protection (health physics). Radiation Protection and Dosimetry serves as an essential handbook for practicing health physics professionals, and is also ideal as a teaching text for courses at the university level. The book is organized to introduce the reader to basic principles of radiation decay and interactions, to review current knowledge and historical aspects of the biological effects of radiation, and to cover important operational topics such as radiation shielding and dosimetry. In addition to presenting the most up to date treatment of the topics and references to the literature, most chapters contain numerical problems with their solutions for use in teaching or self assessment. One chapter is devoted to Environmental Health Physics, which was written in collaboration with leading professionals in the area.

  3. Biological Effects of Low-Dose Exposure

    CERN Document Server

    Komochkov, M M

    2000-01-01

    On the basis of the two-protection reaction model an analysis of stochastic radiobiological effects of low-dose exposure of different biological objects has been carried out. The stochastic effects are the results published in the last decade: epidemiological studies of human cancer mortality, the yield of thymocyte apoptosis of mice and different types of chromosomal aberrations. The results of the analysis show that as dependent upon the nature of biological object, spontanous effect, exposure conditions and radiation type one or another form dose - effect relationship is realized: downwards concave, near to linear and upwards concave with the effect of hormesis included. This result testifies to the incomplete conformity of studied effects of 1990 ICRP recomendations based on the linear no-threshold hypothesis about dose - effect relationship. Because of this the methodology of radiation risk estimation recomended by ICRP needs more precisian and such quantity as collective dose ought to be classified into...

  4. Complete Biological Evaluation of Therapeutical Radiopharmaceuticals in Rodents, Laboratory Beagles and Veterinary Patients - Preclinical Distribution-, Kinetic-, Excretion-, Internal Dosimetry-, Radiotoxicological-, Radiation Safety- and Efficacy Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balogh, L.; Domokos, M.; Polyak, A.; Thuroczy, J.; Janoki, G.

    2009-01-01

    The research and development of various novel therapeutical radiopharmaceuticals is a huge demand in many laboratories world-wide. Beside of multiple bone metastases pain-palliation and radiosynovectomy agents a number of specific radiopharmaceutical applicants mainly for oncological applications are in the pipeline. Numerous in vitro methods are available in the first line to test the radiolabelling efficiency, the possible radioactive and non-labelled impurities, the stability of the label at different conditions and mediums, and some specific characteristics of radiopharmaceutical applicants eg.: receptor binding assays, antigen-antibody assays. But, still before human clinical trials there are several questions to be solved in regards of toxicology, radiotoxicology, radiation safety and maybe most importantly the efficacy tasks. All these issues cannot be answered without animal tests. Several decades back animal tests in radiopharmacy meant only standard bioassays in a large number of healthy rodents. Later on pathological models eg.: human tumor xenografts in immunodeficient animals came-out and through them radiopharmaceutical tumor-uptake by the targets were available to evaluate in vivo as well. Xenografts are still popular and widely used models in the field but instead of wide-scaled bioassays nowadays repeated scintiscans or hybrid images (SPECT/CT, PET/CT) are more and more often used to answer kinetic-, excretion-, tumor uptake, internal dosimetry (Minimum Effective Dose, Maximum Tolerable Dose, critical organ doses, tumor doses) questions. Greater animals like laboratory Beagles are more closely in size, clinical and metabolic parameters to the human objects so playing a more perfect role of human medical doctor and especially veterinary patients. Easy to understand that many of the spontaneously occurring companion animal diseases are a good model of human pathological diseases. The need of a better diagnosis and treatment of that animals meets with

  5. Effectiveness of Biologic Factors in Shoulder Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giotis, Dimitrios; Aryaei, Ashkan; Vasilakakos, Theofanis; Paschos, Nikolaos K

    2017-01-01

    Shoulder pathology can cause significant pain, discomfort, and loss of function that all interfere with activities of daily living and may lead to poor quality of life. Primary osteoarthritis and rotator cuff diseases with its sequalae are the main culprits. Management of shoulder disorders using biological factors gained an increasing interest over the last years. This interest reveals the need of effective treatments for shoulder degenerative disorders, and highlights the importance of a comprehensive and detailed understanding of the rapidly increasing knowledge in the field. This study will describe most of the available biology-based strategies that have been recently developed, focusing on their effectiveness in animal and clinical studies. Data from in vitro work will also be briefly presented; in order to further elucidate newly acquired knowledge regarding mechanisms of tissue degeneration and repair that would probably drive translational work in the next decade. The role of platelet rich-plasma, growth factors, stem cells and other alternative treatments will be described in an evidence-based approach, in an attempt to provide guidelines for their clinical application. Finally, certain challenges that biologic treatments face today will be described as an initiative for future strategies. The application of different growth factors and mesenchymal stem cells appears as promising approaches for enhancing biologic repair. However, data from clinical studies are still limited, and future studies need to improve understanding of the repair process in cellular and molecular level and evaluate the effectiveness of biologic factors in the management of shoulder disorders.

  6. Dosimetry in radiotherapy. V.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    A series of symposia on dosimetry in medicine and biology have been held by the IAEA in co-operation with WHO. The present symposium was the first one focusing on ''Dosimetry in Radiotherapy''. The papers presented reflected the different steps in the calibration chain such as the calibration standards established by the National Standards Laboratories and the conversion of the reading of calibrated instruments to the desired quantity, i.e. absorbed dose to water at a reference point in the user's beam at the radiotherapy clinic. The programme further examined the procedures necessary for optimization of the treatment of the patient, such as treatment planning methods, dose distribution studies, new techniques of dose measurement, improvements in the physical dose distributions/conformation therapy and special problems involved in total body treatments. Results of quality assurance in radiotherapy were presented from local hospitals as well as from national and international studies. Refs, figs and tabs

  7. Dosimetry in radiotherapy. V.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    A series of symposia on dosimetry in medicine and biology have been held by the IAEA in co-operation with WHO. The present symposium was the first one focusing on ''Dosimetry in Radiotherapy''. The papers presented reflected the different steps in the calibration chain such as the calibration standards established by the National Standards Laboratories and the conversion of the reading of calibrated instruments to the desired quantity, i.e. absorbed dose to water at a reference point in the user's beam at the radiotherapy clinic. The programme further examined the procedures necessary for optimization of the treatment of the patient, such as treatment planning methods, dose distribution studies, new techniques of dose measurement, improvements in the physical dose distributions/conformation therapy and special problems involved in total body treatments. Results of quality assurance in radiotherapy were presented from local hospitals as well as from national and international studies. Refs, figs and tabs

  8. Estimation of Biological Effects of Tritium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umata, Toshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear fusion technology is expected to create new energy in the future. However, nuclear fusion requires a large amount of tritium as a fuel, leading to concern about the exposure of radiation workers to tritium beta radiation. Furthermore, countermeasures for tritium-polluted water produced in decommissioning of the reactor at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station may potentially cause health problems in radiation workers. Although, internal exposure to tritium at a low dose/low dose rate can be assumed, biological effect of tritium exposure is not negligible, because tritiated water (HTO) intake to the body via the mouth/inhalation/skin would lead to homogeneous distribution throughout the whole body. Furthermore, organically-bound tritium (OBT) stays in the body as parts of the molecules that comprise living organisms resulting in long-term exposure, and the chemical form of tritium should be considered. To evaluate the biological effect of tritium, the effect should be compared with that of other radiation types. Many studies have examined the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of tritium. Hence, we report the RBE, which was obtained with radiation carcinogenesis classified as a stochastic effect, and serves as a reference for cancer risk. We also introduce the outline of the tritium experiment and the principle of a recently developed animal experimental system using transgenic mouse to detect the biological influence of radiation exposure at a low dose/low dose rate.

  9. Effects of temperature and ionization density in medical luminescence dosimetry using Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgenthaler Edmund, J.

    2007-11-15

    A new system containing small crystals of aluminum oxide doped with carbon (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C) attached to optical fiber cables has recently been introduced. During irradiation, the system monitors the radioluminescence (RL)from the crystals and after irradiation, an optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) signal can be read out by stimulating the crystal with light. This thesis applies the initial part and the total area of the resulting OSL decay curve for dosimetry measurements and investigates the effects of temperature and proton energy, i.e. ionization density, on the RL and OSL signals from Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C. In the temperature study, it was found that the OSL signal depends on both irradiation and stimulation temperature while the RL signal is effected only by the irradiation temperature. The initial OSL signal is increasing with temperature whereas the total OSL area is decreasing. Therefore, if the irradiation temperature is kept constant, one can find an integration time which provides an OSL signal independent of stimulation temperature. Overall, the RL and OSL signals vary between -0.2 to 0.6% per C. Thermal effects were simulated with a band structure model and indicated that the temperature effects are caused by the combined efforts of energetic shallow traps and thermal excitation from intermediate states in deeper traps. In the study of ionization density, we investigated protons with energies between 10 and 60 MeV (4.57 to 1.08 keV/mum in water). Experimentally, we observed that the initial OSL signalprovided a signal independent of linear energy transfer (LET) for allenergies at 0.3 Gy. The total OSL area showed an LET dependent behavior atall doses and energies. We used track structure theory (TST) to give possible explanations for the LET dependence of the OSL signal. From these calculations, we found that the initial OSL signal is, in general, not LET independent which makes Al2O3:C unsuitable for OSL proton dosimetry. The initial OSL

  10. The role of cell hydration in realization of biological effects of non-ionizing radiation (NIR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayrapetyan, Sinerik

    2015-09-01

    The weak knowledge on the nature of cellular and molecular mechanisms of biological effects of NIR such as static magnetic field, infrasound frequency of mechanical vibration, extremely low frequency of electromagnetic fields and microwave serves as a main barrier for adequate dosimetry from the point of Public Health. The difficulty lies in the fact that the biological effects of NIR depend not only on their thermodynamic characteristics but also on their frequency and intensity "windows", chemical and physical composition of the surrounding medium, as well as on the initial metabolic state of the organism. Therefore, only biomarker can be used for adequate estimation of biological effect of NIR on organisms. Because of the absence of such biomarker(s), organizations having the mission to monitor hazardous effects of NIR traditionally base their instruction on thermodynamic characteristics of NIR. Based on the high sensitivity to NIR of both aqua medium structure and cell hydration, it is suggested that cell bathing medium is one of the primary targets and cell hydration is a biomarker for NIR effects on cells and organisms. The purpose of this article is to present a short review of literature and our own experimental data on the effects of NIR on plants' seeds germination, microbe growth and development, snail neurons and heart muscle, rat's brain and heart tissues.

  11. Project resumes: biological effects from electric fields associated with high-voltage transmission lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-01-01

    Abstracts of research projects are presented in the following areas: measurements and special facilities; cellular and subcellular studies; physiology; behavior; environmental effects; modeling, scaling and dosimetry; and high voltage direct current. (ACR)

  12. Radiation dosimetry in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stabin, M.G.; Tagesson, M.; Ljungberg, M.; Strand, S.E.; Thomas, S.R.

    1999-01-01

    Radionuclides are used in nuclear medicine in a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. A knowledge of the radiation dose received by different organs in the body is essential to an evaluation of the risks and benefits of any procedure. In this paper, current methods for internal dosimetry are reviewed, as they are applied in nuclear medicine. Particularly, the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) system for dosimetry is explained, and many of its published resources discussed. Available models representing individuals of different age and gender, including those representing the pregnant woman are described; current trends in establishing models for individual patients are also evaluated. The proper design of kinetic studies for establishing radiation doses for radiopharmaceuticals is discussed. An overview of how to use information obtained in a dosimetry study, including that of the effective dose equivalent (ICRP 30) and effective dose (ICRP 60), is given. Current trends and issues in internal dosimetry, including the calculation of patient-specific doses and in the use of small scale and microdosimetry techniques, are also reviewed

  13. BIOLOGIC AND ECONOMIC EFFECTS OF INCLUDING DIFFERENT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The biologic and economic effects of including three agro-industrial by-products as ingredients in turkey poult diets were investigated using 48 turkey poults in a completely randomised design experiment. Diets were formulated to contain the three by-products – wheat offal, rice husk and palm kernel meal, each at 20% level ...

  14. Biologic effects of electromagnetic radiation and microwave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Hua

    2002-01-01

    Electromagnetic radiation and microwave exist mankind's environment widely. People realize they disserve authors' health when authors make use of them. Electromagnetic radiation is one of the major physic factors which injure people's health. A review of the biologic mechanism about electromagnetic radiation and microwave, their harmful effects to human body, problems in authors' research and the prospect

  15. The relative biological effectiveness of antiprotons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Alsner, Jan; Bassler, Niels

    2016-01-01

    of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of antiprotons near the end of range. We have performed the first-ever direct measurement of the RBE of antiprotons both at rest and in flight. Materials and methods: Experimental data were generated on the RBE of an antiproton beam entering a tissue-like target...

  16. Biological radiation effects and radioprotection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clerc, H.

    1991-03-01

    In this report, after recalling the mode of action of ionizing radiations, the notions of dose, dose equivalents and the values of natural irradiation, the author describes the biological radiation effects. Then he presents the ICRP recommendations and their applications to the french radioprotection system

  17. Thermoluminescence in medical dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, T.

    2011-10-01

    The dosimetry by thermoluminescence (Tl) is applied in the entire world for the dosimetry of ionizing radiations specially to personal and medical dosimetry. This dosimetry method has been very interesting for measures in vivo because the Tl dosimeters have the advantage of being very sensitive in a very small volume and they are also equivalent to tissue and they do not need additional accessories (for example, cable, electrometer, etc.) The main characteristics of the diverse Tl materials to be used in the radiation measures and practical applications are: the Tl curve, the share homogeneity, the signal stability after the irradiation, precision and exactitude, the response in function with the dose and the energy influence. In this work a brief summary of the advances of the radiations dosimetry is presented by means of the thermally stimulated luminescence and its application to the dosimetry in radiotherapy. (Author)

  18. Effect of brachytherapy technique and patient characteristics on cervical cancer implant dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anker, Christopher J., E-mail: chris.anker@hci.utah.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); O' Donnell, Kristen [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Boucher, Kenneth M. [Department of Oncological Sciences, Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Gaffney, David K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate the relationship between brachytherapy technique and patient characteristics on dose to organs-at-risk (OARs) in patients undergoing high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for cervical cancer. From 1998 to 2008, 31 patients with cervical cancer with full dosimetric data were identified who received definitive external-beam radiation and HDR brachytherapy with tandem and ovoid applicators. Doses were recorded at point A, the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU)-38 rectal point, the ICRU-38 bladder point, the vaginal surface, and the pelvic sidewall. Generalized estimating equations were used to determine the significance of changes in OAR to point A dose ratios with differences in brachytherapy technique or patient characteristics. Patients underwent a median of 5 brachytherapy procedures (range, 3 to 5), with a total of 179 procedures for 31 patients. For all brachytherapy treatments, the average ratios between the doses for the rectal, bladder, vaginal surface, and pelvic sidewall reference points to those at point A were 0.49, 0.59, 1.15, and 0.17, respectively. In general, decreased OAR dose was associated with a lower stage, younger age, increased ovoid size, increased tandem length, and earlier implant number. Increased tandem curvature significantly increased bladder dose and decreased rectal dose. Intravenous anesthesia usage was not correlated with improved dosimetry. This study allowed identification of patient and procedure characteristics influencing OAR dosing. Although the advent of 3-dimensional (3D) image-guided brachytherapy will bring new advances in treatment optimization, the actual technique involved at the time of the brachytherapy implant procedure will remain important.

  19. Lunar biological effects and the magnetosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevington, Michael

    2015-12-01

    The debate about how far the Moon causes biological effects has continued for two millennia. Pliny the Elder argued for lunar power "penetrating all things", including plants, fish, animals and humans. He also linked the Moon with tides, confirmed mathematically by Newton. A review of modern studies of biological effects, especially from plants and animals, confirms the pervasive nature of this lunar force. However calculations from physics and other arguments refute the supposed mechanisms of gravity and light. Recent space exploration allows a new approach with evidence of electromagnetic fields associated with the Earth's magnetotail at full moon during the night, and similar, but more limited, effects from the Moon's wake on the magnetosphere at new moon during the day. The disturbance of the magnetotail is perhaps shown by measurements of electric fields of up to 16V/m compared with the usual effects on some sensitive organisms. Similar intensities found in sferics, geomagnetic storms, aurora disturbance, sensations of a 'presence' and pre-seismic electromagnetic radiation are known to affect animals and 10-20% of the human population. There is now evidence for mechanisms such as calcium flux, melatonin disruption, magnetite and cryptochromes. Both environmental and receptor variations explain confounding factors and inconsistencies in the evidence. Electromagnetic effects might also account for some evolutionary changes. Further research on lunar biological effects, such as acute myocardial infarction, could help the development of strategies to reduce adverse effects for people sensitive to geomagnetic disturbance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Neutron personnel dosimetry considerations for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, T.P.; Easterly, C.E.

    1979-07-01

    The increasing development of fusion reactor technology warrants an evaluation of personnel neutron dosimetry systems to aid in the concurrent development of a radiation protection program. For this reason, current state of knowledge neutron dosimeters have been reviewed with emphasis placed on practical utilization and the problems inherent in each type of dosimetry system. Evaluations of salient parameters such as energy response, latent image instability, and minimum detectable dose equivalent are presented for nuclear emulsion films, track etch techniques, albedo and other thermoluminescent dosimetry techniques, electrical conductivity damage effects, lyoluminescence, thermocurrent, and thermally stimulated exoelectron emission. Brief summaries of dosimetry regulatory requirements and intercomparison study results help to establish compliance and recent trends, respectively. Spectrum modeling data generated by the Neutron Physics Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the Princeton Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Facility have been analyzed by both International Commission on Radiological Protection fluence to dose conversion factors and an adjoint technique of radiation dosimetry, in an attempt to determine the applicability of current neutron dosimetry systems to deuterium and tritium fusion reactor leakage spectra. Based on the modeling data, a wide range of neutron energies will probably be present in the leakage spectra of the TFTR facility, and no appreciable risk of somatic injury to occupationally exposed workers is expected. The relative dose contributions due to high energy and thermal neutrons indicate that neutron dosimetry will probably not be a serious limitation in the development of fusion power

  1. Effects of the Metallic Port in Tissue Expanders on Dose Distribution in Postmastectomy Radiotherapy: A Tridimensional Experimental Model of Dosimetry in Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Marcelo Felix; de Oliveira, Harley Francisco; Borges, Leandro Frederich; Carrara, Helio Humberto Angotti; Farina, Jayme Adriano

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop an experimental model of dosimetry using a breast phantom and evaluate the effects of the metallic port in tissue expanders on dose distribution in postmastectomy radiotherapy. Dose distribution was assessed using an experimental acrylic dosimetry simulator in the absence and presence of a metallic disc (MD), which is similar to that used in tissue expanders containing a magnetic port, by collecting coronal and sagittal radiochromic films. Dosimetry film analysis did not show any changes in dose distribution, except for a MD shadow in the sagittal film where the dose distribution rate was on average 14% lower than in other areas. This model very closely resembled actual breast reconstruction with a tissue expander containing a magnetic port. Scattering or attenuation of the irradiation dose due to interference of the MD was not evident in areas that could jeopardize the effectiveness of radiation therapy. Therefore, the presence of the MD inside the tissue expander does not likely have an impact on radiotherapy effectiveness during immediate breast reconstruction.

  2. Internal Dosimetry Monitoring- Detection Limits for a Selected Set of Radionuclides and Their Translation Into Committed Effective Dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandl, A.; Hrnecek, E.; Steger, F.

    2004-01-01

    To harmonize the practice of internal dosimetry monitoring across the country, the Austrian Standards Institute is currently drafting a new set of standards which are concerned with occupational incorporation monitoring of individuals handling non-sealed radioactive material. This set of standards is expected to consist of three parts discussing the general necessity and frequency, the requirements for monitoring institutions, and the determination and rigorous calculation of committed effective dose after incorporation of radioactive material, respectively. Considerations of the requirements for routine monitoring laboratories have led to an evaluation of the detection limits for routine monitoring equipment. For a selected set of radionuclides, these detection limits are investigated in detail. The main emphasis is placed on the decay chains of naturally occurring radionuclides showing some significant potential for being out of equilibrium due to chemical processes in certain mining industries. The radionuclides considered in this paper are 226Ra, 228Ra, 228Th, 232Th, 234U, 235U, and 238U. Given the routine monitoring intervals of the Austrian Standard, these detection limits are translated into information on committed effective dose. This paper investigates whether routine monitoring equipment is sufficient to ensure compliance with EC directive 96/29/Euratom for this selected set of radionuclides. (Author) 9 refs

  3. Effects of neutron irradiation on optical and chemical properties of CR-39: Potential application in neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, G.S.; Paul, S.; Tripathy, S.P.; Sharma, S.C.; Jena, S.; Rout, S.; Joshi, D.S.; Bandyopadhyay, T.

    2014-01-01

    Effects of high-dose neutron irradiation on chemical and optical properties of CR-39 were studied using FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared) and UV–vis (Ultraviolet–Visible) spectroscopy. The primary goal was to find a correlation between the neutron dose and the corresponding changes in the optical and chemical properties of CR-39 resulted from the neutron irradiation. The neutrons were produced by bombarding a thick Be target with 22-MeV protons. In the FTIR spectra, prominent absorbance peaks were observed at 1735 cm −1 (C=O stretching), 1230 cm −1 (C–O–C stretching), and 783 cm −1 (=C–H bending), the intensities of which decreased with increasing neutron dose. The optical absorbance in the visible range increased linearly with the neutron dose. Empirical relations were established to estimate neutron doses from these optical properties. This technique is particularly useful in measuring high doses, where track analysis with an optical microscope is difficult because of track overlapping. - Highlights: • CR-39 optical absorbance measurements can be used for neutron dosimetry instead of track counting. • The technique is particularly useful for measuring high doses. • Effects of neutron irradiations on various properties of CR-39 have been characterized

  4. The Vinca dosimetry experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1962-03-01

    On 15 October 1958 there occurred a very brief uncontrolled run of the zero-power reactor at the Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Science, Vinca, near Belgrade, Yugoslavia. During this run six persons received various doses of radiation. They were subsequently given medical treatment of a novel kind at the Curie Hospital, Paris. In atomic energy operations to date, very few accidents involving excessive radiation exposure to human beings have occurred. In fact, the cases of acute radiation injury are limited to about 30 known high exposures, few of which were in the lethal or near-lethal range. Since direct experiment to determine the effects of ionizing radiation on man is unacceptable, information on these effects has to be based on a consideration of data relating to accidental exposures, viewed in the light of the much more extensive data obtained from experiments on animals. Therefore, any direct information on the effects of radiation on humans is very valuable. The international dosimetry project described in this report was carried out at Vinca, Yugoslavia, under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency to determine the precise amount of radiation to which the persons had been exposed during the accident. These dosimetry data, together with the record of the carefully observed clinical effects, are of importance both for the scientific study of radiation effects on man and for the development of methods of therapy. The experiment and measurements were carried out at the end of April 1960. The project formed part of the Agency's research programme in the field of health and safety. The results of the experiment are made available through this report to all Member States

  5. Advances in electron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harder, D.

    1980-04-01

    Starting from the two most important interactions of electrons with matter, energy loss and scattering, a review is given of a number of effects which are important in electron dosimetry. For determining the absorbed dose in a phantom by means of ionization chambers, imformation is required on the electron spectrum at the location of the measurement, on the stopping powers of different materials and on disturbances such as the displacement of the effective point of measurements from the centre of the chamber. By means of figures and photographs of electron traces in bubble chambers, the origin of the formation of the absorbed dose maximum in a phantom is explained. It is shown, how by multiple scattering, the similarity of dose distributions in different media can be explained and how by Monte-Carlo calculations absorbed dose distributions in the surroundings of inhomogeneities (e.g. cavities) in a phantom can be determined. (orig.) [de

  6. Exposure Setup and Dosimetry for a Study on Effects of Mobile Communication Signals on Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohland, Martina; Baaske, Kai; Gläser, Katharina; Hintzsche, Henning; Stopper, Helga; Kleine-Ostmann, Thomas; Schrader, Thorsten

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we describe the design of an exposure setup used to study possible non-thermal effects due to the exposure of human hematopoietic stem cells to GSM, UMTS and LTE mobile communication signals. The experiments are performed under fully blinded conditions in a TEM waveguide located inside an incubator to achieve defined environmental conditions as required for the living cells. Chamber slides containing the cells in culture medium are placed on the septum of the waveguide. The environmental and exposure parameters such as signal power, temperatures, relative humidity and CO2 content of the surrounding atmosphere are monitored permanently during the exposure experiment. The power of the exposure signals required to achieve specific absorption rates of 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 W kg-1 are determined by numerical calculation of the field distribution inside the cell culture medium at 900 MHz (GSM), 1950 MHz (UMTS) and 2535 MHz (LTE). The dosimetry is verified both with scattering parameter measurements on the waveguide with and without containers filled with cell culture medium and with temperature measurements with non-metallic probes in separate heating experiments.

  7. Exposure Setup and Dosimetry for a Study on Effects of Mobile Communication Signals on Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rohland

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe the design of an exposure setup used to study possible non-thermal effects due to the exposure of human hematopoietic stem cells to GSM, UMTS and LTE mobile communication signals. The experiments are performed under fully blinded conditions in a TEM waveguide located inside an incubator to achieve defined environmental conditions as required for the living cells. Chamber slides containing the cells in culture medium are placed on the septum of the waveguide. The environmental and exposure parameters such as signal power, temperatures, relative humidity and CO2 content of the surrounding atmosphere are monitored permanently during the exposure experiment. The power of the exposure signals required to achieve specific absorption rates of 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 W kg−1 are determined by numerical calculation of the field distribution inside the cell culture medium at 900 MHz (GSM, 1950 MHz (UMTS and 2535 MHz (LTE. The dosimetry is verified both with scattering parameter measurements on the waveguide with and without containers filled with cell culture medium and with temperature measurements with non-metallic probes in separate heating experiments.

  8. Biological Effects of Space Radiation and Development of Effective Countermeasures

    OpenAIRE

    Kennedy, Ann R.

    2014-01-01

    As part of a program to assess the adverse biological effects expected from astronaut exposure to space radiation, numerous different biological effects relating to astronaut health have been evaluated. There has been major focus recently on the assessment of risks related to exposure to solar particle event (SPE) radiation. The effects related to various types of space radiation exposure that have been evaluated are: gene expression changes (primarily associated with programmed cell death an...

  9. Electromagnetic effects - From cell biology to medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Richard H W; Monsees, Thomas; Ozkucur, Nurdan

    2009-01-01

    In this review we compile and discuss the published plethora of cell biological effects which are ascribed to electric fields (EF), magnetic fields (MF) and electromagnetic fields (EMF). In recent years, a change in paradigm took place concerning the endogenously produced static EF of cells and tissues. Here, modern molecular biology could link the action of ion transporters and ion channels to the "electric" action of cells and tissues. Also, sensing of these mainly EF could be demonstrated in studies of cell migration and wound healing. The triggers exerted by ion concentrations and concomitant electric field gradients have been traced along signaling cascades till gene expression changes in the nucleus. Far more enigmatic is the way of action of static MF which come in most cases from outside (e.g. earth magnetic field). All systems in an organism from the molecular to the organ level are more or less in motion. Thus, in living tissue we mostly find alternating fields as well as combination of EF and MF normally in the range of extremely low-frequency EMF. Because a bewildering array of model systems and clinical devices exits in the EMF field we concentrate on cell biological findings and look for basic principles in the EF, MF and EMF action. As an outlook for future research topics, this review tries to link areas of EF, MF and EMF research to thermodynamics and quantum physics, approaches that will produce novel insights into cell biology.

  10. Radiochromic film dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Zhiyong

    2002-01-01

    Radiochromic film dosimetry was developed to measure ionization irradiation dose for industry and medicine. At this time, there are no comprehensive guideline on the medical application, calibration method and densitometer system for medicine. The review gives update on Radiochromic film dosimetry used for medicine, including principles, film model and material, characteristics, calibration method, scanning densitometer system and medical application

  11. Personal dosimetry in Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khvoshnyanskaya, I.R.; Vdovichenko, V.G.; Lozbin, A.Yu.

    2003-01-01

    KATEP-AE Radiation Laboratory is the first organization in Kazakhstan officially licensed by the Kazakhstan Atomic Energy Committee to provide individual dosimetry services. The Laboratory was established according to the international standards. Nowadays it is the largest company providing personal dosimetry services in the Republic of Kazakhstan. (author)

  12. Scientific days on electromagnetic fields: from dosimetry to human health - Conference proceedings; Journees scientifiques - Champs electromagnetiques: de la dosimetrie a la sante humaine - Recueil des resumes et presentations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiart, J.; Ghanmi, A.; Picon, O.; Conil, E.; Varsier, N.; Hadjem, A.; Sudret, B.; Magne, I.; Souques, M.; Gaudaire, F.; De Seze, R.; Jawad, O.; Lautru, D.; Dricot, J.M.; Horlin, F.; De Doncker, P.; Drissaoui, A.; Musy, F.; Nicolas, L.; Perrussel, R.; Scorretti, R.; Voyer, D.; Jala, M.; Moulines, E.; Levy-Leduc, C.; Mahfouz, Z.; Gati, A.; Fouad Hanna, V.; Leveque, P.; Arnaud-Cormos, D.; Zhadobov, M.; Jarrige, P.; Gaborit, G.; Kohler, S.; Ticaud, N.; Duvillaret, L.; Guelilia, Z.; Loison, R.; Gillard, R.; Laisne, A.; Favet, D.; Benadhira, R.; Mir, L.; Nadi, M.; Kourtiche, D.; Gazeau, F.; Wilhelm, C.; Delemotte, L.; Breton, M.; Tarek, M.; Marc-Vergnes, J.P.; Yardin, C.; Perrin, A.; Le Drean, Y.; Sauleau, R.; Lambrozo, J.; Selmaoui, B.; Ghosn, R.; Thuroczy, G.; Villegier, A.S.; Loos, N.; Brenet-Dufour, V.; Liabeuf, S.; Bach, V.; Moretti, D.; Lewis, N.; Garenne, A.; Poulletier De Gannes, F.; Haro, E.; Lagroye, I.; Bornat, Y.; Boutaib, Y.; Saighi, S.; Renaud, S.; Veyre, B.; Schuz, J.; Deltour, I.; Van Deventer, E.; Vecchia, P.; Merckel, O.; Bellaouel, A.; Demaret, P.; Donati, P.; Jovanovic, D.; Chauvin, S.; Desreumaux, J.P.; Fouquet, L.; Picard, D.; Massardier-Pilonchery, A.; Hours, M.; Bergeret, A.; Person, C.; Toutain, Y.; Butet, R.; Berrahma, K.; Balderelli, I.; Stelmaszyk, V.; Cretallaz, C.; Lamproglou, I.; Amourette, C.; Diserbo, M.; Fauquette, W.; Martigne, P.; Collin, A.; Lagroye, I.; Ait Aissa, S.; Hurtier, A.; Taxile, M.; Le Montagner, L.; Athane, A.; Duleu, S.; Percherancier, Y.; Geffard, M.; Ruffie, G.; Billaudel, B.; Veyret, B.; Pelletier, A.; Delanaud, S.; Libert, J.P.; Schunck, T.; Bieth, F.; Soubere Mahamoud, Y.; Le Quement, C.; Ferrand, G.; Le Guevel, R.; Carton, P.H.; Luong, M.; Tanvir, S.; Selmaoui, B.; Silva Pires-Antonietti, V.; Sonnet, P.; Pulvin, S.; Kuster, O.; Tetelin, C.

    2012-04-15

    This document brings together the available presentations (articles and slides) given at the URSI scientific days on electromagnetic fields: dosimetry, peoples' exposure, biological and health risks, risk management, and medical uses. 48 presentations are compiled in this document and deal with: 1 - Stochastic dosimetry: variability challenge; 2 - How to estimate the exposure to 50/60 Hz magnetic field in an epidemiological study?; 3 - Joint analysis of population exposure and radio coverage of GSM and UMTS mobile phone networks; 4 - Study of the specific energy absorption rate (SAR) sensitiveness to phone positions near the head for 2 GSM mobile phones; 5 - Statistical Study of SAR under Wireless Channel - Exposure in Indoor Environment; 6 - Uncertainty propagation in numerical dosimetry: how to reduce calculation costs?; 7 - Use of a simplified pregnant woman model for foetus exposure analysis; 8 - SAR estimation using multi-exposure with a mobile phone; 9 - State-of-the-art in experimental dosimetry (RF and pulses); 10 - Mm-waves dosimetry: issues, stakes and actual solutions; 11 - Use of DG-FDTD for a dosimetry calculation in a strongly multi-scale problem: determination of the eye-SAR near a HF/VHF vehicle-borne source; 12 - Dosimetric measurements with a fiber-type electro-optical sensor; 13 - Partial experimental evaluation of basic restrictions in the HF/VHF range; 14 - Repetitive trans-cranial magnetic stimulation Stimulation (rTMS) in psychiatry: present day situation and perspectives; 15 - Medical applications of electric fields; 16 - Measurements for life: new perspectives? 17 - Nano-particles and magnetic stimuli for medical imaging and therapy; 18 - Molecular Insights into electroporation and siRNA electro-transfer through model cell membranes; 19 - State of knowledge on electromagnetic fields hypersensitivity (HS-CEM); 20 - Experimentation methodology: from results to interpretation; 22 - Mm waves - update on biological effects at 40-60 GHz; 23

  13. Cross sections required for FMIT dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gold, R.; McElroy, W.N.; Lippincott, E.P.; Mann, F.M.; Oberg, D.L.; Roberts, J.H.; Ruddy, F.H.

    1980-05-02

    The Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) facility, currently under construction, is designed to produce a high flux of high energy neutrons for irradiation effects experiments on fusion reactor materials. Characterization of the flux-fluence-spectrum in this rapidly varying neutron field requires adaptation and extension of currently available dosimetry techniques. This characterization will be carried out by a combination of active, passive, and calculational dosimetry. The goal is to provide the experimenter with accurate neutron flux-fluence-spectra at all positions in the test cell. Plans have been completed for a number of experimental dosimetry stations and provision for these facilities has been incorporated into the FMIT design. Overall needs of the FMIT irradiation damage program delineate goal accuracies for dosimetry that, in turn, create new requirements for high energy neutron cross section data. Recommendations based on these needs have been derived for required cross section data and accuracies.

  14. Biological effects of low-dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stieve, F.E.

    1979-01-01

    For a long time, radiation, biological research concentrated on the diagnosis and the effect chains to be taken into consideration in the case of acute and chronic radiation effects due to intensive irradiation. Approximately at the beginning of the Thirties, the research results of the geneticist Mueller and the radiation-biologists Oliver and Timofeef-Ressovsky brought a fundamental change in the way of looking at things in radiation biology. From the results then obtained it can be deduced that even the smallest quantities of radiation can cause effects. Basically, two processes leading to different radiation reactions have to be recognized: 1) A change in the genetical code, especially by direct irradiation of the nucleus. The effects thus arising are called stochastic effects. 2) A change of the cell in total by inactivation of the cell division or by cell death. These are called non-stochastic effects. Here, a threshold dose is existent. In these cases, the degree of the effects depends on the quantity of the dose. Therefore, the stochastic effects are paid special attention when determining radiation effects with low doses. Here, the emphasis of the research was moved from the genetic effects to the generation of somatic effects, especially the generation of malign neoformations and the shortening of the life connected with them. In the generation of malign neoformations by ionising radiation, probably only the transformation of a single cell is necessary, however only then when ionising radiation is absorbed in the nucleus several times (multi-hit theory). This leads to the assumption that the induction of malignant neoformations possesses a linear quadratic function, at least in the region of medium doses. (orig./MG) [de

  15. Biological effects on the source of geoneutrinos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sleep, Norman H.; Bird, Dennis K.; Rosing, Minik Thorleif

    2013-01-01

    its bulk earth value of similar to 4; Pb isotope measurements on mantle-derived rocks yield low Th/U values, effectively averaged over geological time. The physics of the modern biological process is complicated, but the net effect is that much of the U in the mantle comes from subducted marine...... in solid clay-sized material. Overall, geoneutrino data constrain the masses of mantle chemical and isotopic domains recognized by studies of mantle-derived rocks and show the extent of recycling into the mantle over geological time....

  16. Toxicokinetics of Deltamethrin: Dosage Dependency, Vehicle Effects, and Low-Dose Age-Equivalent Dosimetry in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortuza, Tanzir; Chen, Chen; White, Catherine A; Cummings, Brian S; Muralidhara, Srinivasa; Gullick, Darren; Bruckner, James V

    2018-03-01

    There is increasing concern that infants and children may be at increased risk of neurological effects of pyrethroids, the most widely used class of insecticide. The objectives of this investigation were to (1) characterize the dose-dependent toxicokinetics (TK) of deltamethrin (DLM) for exposures ranging from environmentally relevant to acutely toxic; (2) determine the influence of an aqueous versus oil vehicle on oral absorption and bioavailability; and (3) determine whether DLM exhibits low-dose, age-equivalent internal dosimetry. Serial arterial plasma samples were obtained for 72 h from adult, male Sprague Dawley rats given 0.05-5.0 mg DLM/kg as an oral bolus in corn oil (CO). DLM exhibited linear, absorption rate-limited TK. Increases in maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) and AUC∘∞ were directly proportional to the dose. Oral bioavailability was quite limited. The vehicle and its volume had modest effect on the rate and extent of systemic absorption in adult rats. Postnatal day (PND) 15, 21, and 90 (adult) rats received 0.10, 0.25, or 0.50 mg DLM/kg orally in CO and were sacrificed periodically for plasma, brain, and liver collection. Age-dependent differences between PND 15 and 90 plasma Cmax and AUC∘24 values progressively diminished as the dose decreased, but there was a lack of low dose age equivalence in these brain and liver dosimeters. Other maturational factors may account for the lack of the low-dose age equivalence in brain and liver. This investigation provides support for the premise that the relatively low metabolic capacity of immature subjects may be adequate to effectively eliminate trace amounts of DLM and other pyrethroids from the plasma.

  17. Bystander effect: Biological endpoints and microarray analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhry, M. Ahmad [Department of Medical Laboratory and Radiation Sciences, College of Nursing and Health Sciences, University of Vermont, 302 Rowell Building, Burlington, VT 05405 (United States) and DNA Microarray Facility, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405 (United States)]. E-mail: mchaudhr@uvm.edu

    2006-05-11

    In cell populations exposed to ionizing radiation, the biological effects occur in a much larger proportion of cells than are estimated to be traversed by radiation. It has been suggested that irradiated cells are capable of providing signals to the neighboring unirradiated cells resulting in damage to these cells. This phenomenon is termed the bystander effect. The bystander effect induces persistent, long-term, transmissible changes that result in delayed death and neoplastic transformation. Because the bystander effect is relevant to carcinogenesis, it could have significant implications for risk estimation for radiation exposure. The nature of the bystander effect signal and how it impacts the unirradiated cells remains to be elucidated. Examination of the changes in gene expression could provide clues to understanding the bystander effect and could define the signaling pathways involved in sustaining damage to these cells. The microarray technology serves as a tool to gain insight into the molecular pathways leading to bystander effect. Using medium from irradiated normal human diploid lung fibroblasts as a model system we examined gene expression alterations in bystander cells. The microarray data revealed that the radiation-induced gene expression profile in irradiated cells is different from unirradiated bystander cells suggesting that the pathways leading to biological effects in the bystander cells are different from the directly irradiated cells. The genes known to be responsive to ionizing radiation were observed in irradiated cells. Several genes were upregulated in cells receiving media from irradiated cells. Surprisingly no genes were found to be downregulated in these cells. A number of genes belonging to extracellular signaling, growth factors and several receptors were identified in bystander cells. Interestingly 15 genes involved in the cell communication processes were found to be upregulated. The induction of receptors and the cell

  18. Bystander effect: Biological endpoints and microarray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhry, M. Ahmad

    2006-01-01

    In cell populations exposed to ionizing radiation, the biological effects occur in a much larger proportion of cells than are estimated to be traversed by radiation. It has been suggested that irradiated cells are capable of providing signals to the neighboring unirradiated cells resulting in damage to these cells. This phenomenon is termed the bystander effect. The bystander effect induces persistent, long-term, transmissible changes that result in delayed death and neoplastic transformation. Because the bystander effect is relevant to carcinogenesis, it could have significant implications for risk estimation for radiation exposure. The nature of the bystander effect signal and how it impacts the unirradiated cells remains to be elucidated. Examination of the changes in gene expression could provide clues to understanding the bystander effect and could define the signaling pathways involved in sustaining damage to these cells. The microarray technology serves as a tool to gain insight into the molecular pathways leading to bystander effect. Using medium from irradiated normal human diploid lung fibroblasts as a model system we examined gene expression alterations in bystander cells. The microarray data revealed that the radiation-induced gene expression profile in irradiated cells is different from unirradiated bystander cells suggesting that the pathways leading to biological effects in the bystander cells are different from the directly irradiated cells. The genes known to be responsive to ionizing radiation were observed in irradiated cells. Several genes were upregulated in cells receiving media from irradiated cells. Surprisingly no genes were found to be downregulated in these cells. A number of genes belonging to extracellular signaling, growth factors and several receptors were identified in bystander cells. Interestingly 15 genes involved in the cell communication processes were found to be upregulated. The induction of receptors and the cell

  19. Isoflavones: estrogenic activity, biological effect and bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Daniela Cristina; Piazza, Cateno; Melilli, Barbara; Drago, Filippo; Salomone, Salvatore

    2013-03-01

    Isoflavones are phytoestrogens with potent estrogenic activity; genistein, daidzein and glycitein are the most active isoflavones found in soy beans. Phytoestrogens have similarity in structure with the human female hormone 17-β-estradiol, which can bind to both alpha and beta estrogen receptors, and mimic the action of estrogens on target organs, thereby exerting many health benefits when used in some hormone-dependent diseases. Numerous clinical studies claim benefits of genistein and daidzein in chemoprevention of breast and prostate cancer, cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis as well as in relieving postmenopausal symptoms. The ability of isoflavones to prevent cancer and other chronic diseases largely depends on pharmacokinetic properties of these compounds, in particular absorption and distribution to the target tissue. The chemical form in which isoflavones occur is important because it influences their bioavailability and, therefore, their biological activity. Glucose-conjugated isoflavones are highly polar, water-soluble compounds. They are hardly absorbed by the intestinal epithelium and have weaker biological activities than the corresponding aglycone. Different microbial families of colon can transform glycosylated isoflavones into aglycones. Clinical studies show important differences between the aglycone and conjugated forms of genistein and daidzein. The evaluation of isoflavone metabolism and bioavailability is crucial to understanding their biological effects. Lipid-based formulations such as drug incorporation into oils, emulsions and self-microemulsifying formulations have been introduced to increase bioavailability. Complexation with cyclodextrin also represent a valid method to improve the physicochemical characteristics of these substances in order to be absorbed and distributed to target tissues. We review and discuss pharmacokinetic issues that critically influence the biological activity of isoflavones.

  20. Biological effects of electrical and magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thibault de Boesinghe, L. de

    1979-01-01

    A review is made by the author of the literature about the biological effects of electrical and magnetic fields. A distinction is made between the observations made on man and the experience on animals. The results do not allow to reach a uniform conclusion. The used methodology is furthermore often open for discussion. One fundamental question remains: is there or not a threshold value. The question may be asked if objective modifications would not better come out in the light of systematical programs studies. This review of the literature gives results which anyway justify a systematic study of this subject. (author)

  1. Effects of Pesticides on Biological Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ergul Belge Kurutas

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of pesticid both in Turkey and other contries is widespread in order to combat against many pests which cause economical damages. However, pesticides in human pass through skin, respiratory or digestive systems and is metabolized by monooxygenase system dependent upon cytocrome P450 in liver. They also give rise to severe decreases cytochrome P450 and amount of "hem" enzyme activites of glucose-6-phosphatase, pyrophosphatase by stimulating lipid peroxidation on hepatic microsomes. In this study effects of pesticides on biological systems will be presented in genaral terms. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2003; 12(3.000: 215-228

  2. Biological effects data: Fluoride and sulfur dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMechan, K.J. (ed.); Holton, R.L.; Ulbricht, R.J.; Morgan , J.B.

    1975-04-01

    The Alumax Pacific Aluminum Corporation has proposed construction of an aluminum reduction facility near Youngs Bay at Warrenton, Oregon. This report comprises one part of the final report to Alumax on a research project entitled, Physical, Chemical and Biological Studies of Youngs Bay.'' It presents data pertaining to the potential biological effects of fluoride and sulfur dioxide, two potentially hazardous plant-stack emissions, on selected aquatic species of the area. Companion volumes provide a description of the physical characteristics the geochemistry, and the aquatic animals present in Youngs Bay and adjacent ecosystems. An introductory volume provides general information and maps of the area, and summarizes the conclusions of all four studies. The data from the two phases of the experimental program are included in this report: lethal studies on the effects of selected levels of fluoride and sulfur dioxide on the survival rate of eleven Youngs Bay faunal species from four phyla, and sublethal studies on the effects of fluoride and sulfur dioxide on the rate of primary production of phytoplankton. 44 refs., 18 figs., 38 tabs.

  3. Xenon preconditioning: molecular mechanisms and biological effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Wenwu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Xenon is one of noble gases and has been recognized as an anesthetic for more than 50 years. Xenon possesses many of the characteristics of an ideal anesthetic, but it is not widely applied in clinical practice mainly because of its high cost. In recent years, numerous studies have demonstrated that xenon as an anesthetic can exert neuroprotective and cardioprotective effects in different models. Moreover, xenon has been applied in the preconditioning, and the neuroprotective and cardioprotective effects of xenon preconditioning have been investigated in a lot of studies in which some mechanisms related to these protections are proposed. In this review, we summarized these mechanisms and the biological effects of xenon preconditioning.

  4. Introduction of a single chip TLD system for patient dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hranitzky, C.; Halda, M.; Mueller, G.; Stadtmann, H.; Obryk, B.

    2008-01-01

    A thermoluminescence dosimetry system with single detector chips was developed for patient dosimetry applications. LiF:Mg,Cu,P detector chips, dosimetry protocol, calibration, and dose calculation were prepared for measurements inside phantoms for determining organ and effective doses in medical diagnostic examinations. The first step was optimizing the readout time-temperature-profile for reaching a well resolved dosimetric peak and stability of the glow curves. A number of parameters was varied for the optimization process, e.g. preheating and heating rate. Individual chip sensitivities, residual dose and dose linearity were studied for establishing a reliable and accurate TL dosimetry system. (author)

  5. The program of international intercomparison of accident dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-06-01

    The French institute of radioprotection and nuclear safety (IRSN) has carried out in June 2002 an international intercomparison program for the testing of the physical and biological accident dosimetry techniques. The intercomparison is jointly organized by the IRSN and the OECD-NEA with the sustain of the European commission and the collaboration of the CEA centre of Valduc (France). About 30 countries have participated to this program. Each country has supplied its own dosimeters and biological samples which have been irradiated using the Silene reactor of CEA-Valduc or a 60 Co source. These experiments allow to test the new dosimetric techniques that have been developed since the previous intercomparison program (1993) and to confirm or improve the performances of older techniques. Aside from the intercomparison exercise, this report makes a status of the known radiological accidents and of the effects of high doses of ionizing radiations on human health (symptoms, therapeutics). It explains the phenomenology of criticality accidents, the prevention means, and the history of such accidents up to the Tokai-Mura one in 1999. Finally, the dosimetry of criticality is presented with its physical and biological techniques. (J.S.)

  6. Advances on radiation protection dosimetry research, development and services at AEOI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohrabi, M.

    1993-01-01

    Radiation dosimetry is the main counterpart of an effective national radiation protection program to protect radiation workers, public and the environment against harmful effects of radiation. Research and development on radiation dosimetry are of vital needs to support national dosimetry services. The National Radiation Protection Department (NRPD) of the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) being a National Authority on radiation protection is also responsible for radiation dosimetry research, development and services. Some highlights of such activities at NRPD are reviewed and discussed

  7. New solid-state effects used in neutron detection and dosimetry. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerschel, B.; Hahn, G.

    1981-01-01

    Part 2 covers electrical effects on insulators (aluminium oxide, MOS structures, and electrets) in contact with radiators and on semiconductor storage circuits (RAMs and PROMs) including photodiodes. Utilization of magnetic and optical effects is mentioned especially with regard to emergency uses. 45 references are given

  8. Scientific days on electromagnetic fields: from dosimetry to human health - Conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiart, J.; Ghanmi, A.; Picon, O.; Conil, E.; Varsier, N.; Hadjem, A.; Sudret, B.; Magne, I.; Souques, M.; Gaudaire, F.; De Seze, R.; Jawad, O.; Lautru, D.; Dricot, J.M.; Horlin, F.; De Doncker, P.; Drissaoui, A.; Musy, F.; Nicolas, L.; Perrussel, R.; Scorretti, R.; Voyer, D.; Jala, M.; Moulines, E.; Levy-Leduc, C.; Mahfouz, Z.; Gati, A.; Fouad Hanna, V.; Leveque, P.; Arnaud-Cormos, D.; Zhadobov, M.; Jarrige, P.; Gaborit, G.; Kohler, S.; Ticaud, N.; Duvillaret, L.; Guelilia, Z.; Loison, R.; Gillard, R.; Laisne, A.; Favet, D.; Benadhira, R.; Mir, L.; Nadi, M.; Kourtiche, D.; Gazeau, F.; Wilhelm, C.; Delemotte, L.; Breton, M.; Tarek, M.; Marc-Vergnes, J.P.; Yardin, C.; Perrin, A.; Le Drean, Y.; Sauleau, R.; Lambrozo, J.; Selmaoui, B.; Ghosn, R.; Thuroczy, G.; Villegier, A.S.; Loos, N.; Brenet-Dufour, V.; Liabeuf, S.; Bach, V.; Moretti, D.; Lewis, N.; Garenne, A.; Poulletier De Gannes, F.; Haro, E.; Lagroye, I.; Bornat, Y.; Boutaib, Y.; Saighi, S.; Renaud, S.; Veyre, B.; Schuz, J.; Deltour, I.; Van Deventer, E.; Vecchia, P.; Merckel, O.; Bellaouel, A.; Demaret, P.; Donati, P.; Jovanovic, D.; Chauvin, S.; Desreumaux, J.P.; Fouquet, L.; Picard, D.; Massardier-Pilonchery, A.; Hours, M.; Bergeret, A.; Person, C.; Toutain, Y.; Butet, R.; Berrahma, K.; Balderelli, I.; Stelmaszyk, V.; Cretallaz, C.; Lamproglou, I.; Amourette, C.; Diserbo, M.; Fauquette, W.; Martigne, P.; Collin, A.; Lagroye, I.; Ait Aissa, S.; Hurtier, A.; Taxile, M.; Le Montagner, L.; Athane, A.; Duleu, S.; Percherancier, Y.; Geffard, M.; Ruffie, G.; Billaudel, B.; Veyret, B.; Pelletier, A.; Delanaud, S.; Libert, J.P.; Schunck, T.; Bieth, F.; Soubere Mahamoud, Y.; Le Quement, C.; Ferrand, G.; Le Guevel, R.; Carton, P.H.; Luong, M.; Tanvir, S.; Selmaoui, B.; Silva Pires-Antonietti, V.; Sonnet, P.; Pulvin, S.; Kuster, O.; Tetelin, C.

    2012-04-01

    This document brings together the available presentations (articles and slides) given at the URSI scientific days on electromagnetic fields: dosimetry, peoples' exposure, biological and health risks, risk management, and medical uses. 48 presentations are compiled in this document and deal with: 1 - Stochastic dosimetry: variability challenge; 2 - How to estimate the exposure to 50/60 Hz magnetic field in an epidemiological study?; 3 - Joint analysis of population exposure and radio coverage of GSM and UMTS mobile phone networks; 4 - Study of the specific energy absorption rate (SAR) sensitiveness to phone positions near the head for 2 GSM mobile phones; 5 - Statistical Study of SAR under Wireless Channel - Exposure in Indoor Environment; 6 - Uncertainty propagation in numerical dosimetry: how to reduce calculation costs?; 7 - Use of a simplified pregnant woman model for foetus exposure analysis; 8 - SAR estimation using multi-exposure with a mobile phone; 9 - State-of-the-art in experimental dosimetry (RF and pulses); 10 - Mm-waves dosimetry: issues, stakes and actual solutions; 11 - Use of DG-FDTD for a dosimetry calculation in a strongly multi-scale problem: determination of the eye-SAR near a HF/VHF vehicle-borne source; 12 - Dosimetric measurements with a fiber-type electro-optical sensor; 13 - Partial experimental evaluation of basic restrictions in the HF/VHF range; 14 - Repetitive trans-cranial magnetic stimulation Stimulation (rTMS) in psychiatry: present day situation and perspectives; 15 - Medical applications of electric fields; 16 - Measurements for life: new perspectives? 17 - Nano-particles and magnetic stimuli for medical imaging and therapy; 18 - Molecular Insights into electroporation and siRNA electro-transfer through model cell membranes; 19 - State of knowledge on electromagnetic fields hypersensitivity (HS-CEM); 20 - Experimentation methodology: from results to interpretation; 22 - Mm waves - update on biological effects at 40-60 GHz; 23

  9. Health and dosimetry considerations in the ICRP 1990 formulation of effective dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckerman, K.F.

    1991-01-01

    The new recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection contained in Publication 60 supersede those of Publication 26 issued in 1977. The recommendations are intended to assist national authorities in formulation of radiation protection guidance. Sufficient explanatory information is included to clearly note that radiation protection issues cannot be resolved on the basis of scientific considerations alone, but also require value judgements regarding the relative on the basis of scientific considerations alone, but also require value judgements regarding the relative importance of different kinds of risks and the balance between risk and benefit. Ionizing radiation causes both deterministic and stochastic effects in irradiated tissue. It is the aim of radiation protection to avoid deterministic effects by setting dose limits below their thresholds and to control exposures to limit the frequency of stochastic effects, believed to occur (albeit with low frequency) even at the lowest doses. Cancer induction and hereditary effects are the stochastic effects of concern

  10. Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2005-02-25

    The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at Hanford. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with 10 CFR 835, DOELAP, DOE-RL, ORP, PNSO, and Hanford contractor requirements. The dosimetry system is operated by PNNL’s Hanford External Dosimetry Program which provides dosimetry services to all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. Rev. 0 marks the first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture (ERICA) database.

  11. Biological radiation effects of Radon in Drosophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimentel P, A.E.

    1995-01-01

    In order to contribute to the knowledge on the effects of radon and its decay products, the aim of this investigation is to study the biological effects of radon using Drosophila melanogaster throught the somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) and the analysis of some adaptative factors exposing larvaes to controlled radon atmosphers, considering that this insect could be used as biological monitor. Using the somatic mutation test a mutagenic effect was observed proportional to radon concentration, into an interval of 1 ± 0.3 to 111 ± 7.4 KBq/m 3 equivalent to doses under 0.0106 Gy. The correlation analysis gives a linear (r=0.80) relationship with a positive slope of 0.2217. The same happens when gamma rays are used in the interval of 1 to 20 Gy, given a linear dose-dependent effect (r=0.878) is obtained; nevetheless the slop is smaller (m=0.003) than for radon. Analysing the results of adaptative factors of the nine exposed generations, it was found that probably radon exposition induced dominant lethals during gametogenesis or/and a selection of the more component gamets of the treated individuals in larval state. It was reflected in the significant decrease on fecundity of the generation exposed. Nevertheless the laying eggs had an increase in egg-to-adult viability and the develop velocity was higher than in control for 3 KBq/m 3 , this suggest that radon concentrations used were able to induce repair mechanisms. These data agree with the Hormesis hypothesis that says: low doses have positive effects on health. It was not possible to obtain a dose-effect relationship except with the develop velocity where it was found a dose-effect inverse proportion. In conclusion, Drosophila melanogaster could be a good system to obtain in vivo damaged induction concentration dependent of radon and its decay products, as well as to study the effects in an exposed population by the analysis of adaptative factors. (Author)

  12. Dosimetry of internal emitting: principles and perspectives of the MIRD technology; Dosimetria de emisores internos: principios y perspectivas de la metodologia MIRD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferro F, G. [Gerencia de Aplicaciones Nucleares en la Salud, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Salazar, Estado de Mexico C.P. 52045 (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    The development of the radiopharmaceutical technology have multiplied the number of radioisotopes with applications in therapeutical nuclear medicine so known as Directed radiotherapy. Assuming the radiation is capable to produce noxious effects in the biological systems, it is important to evaluate appropriately the risks and benefits of the administration of radioactive agents in the patient. The outstanding parameter in this evaluation is the absorbed dose, which is product of the radiation emitted by a radionuclide that is localized or distributed to the interior of the human body in study and whose its estimation helps to predict the efficacy of the treatment. The scheme generalized of MIRD, it was formulated from thirty years ago for evaluating the interior dosimetry at level of organs.The finality of this work is to show the basic principles of the MIRD methodology and its perspectives using innovator tools as the dosimetry for dynamic masses, in particular the personnel dosimetry for the organs of each patient, the dosimetry for the small structures inside the organs (sub organic dosimetry), the distributions of doses in three dimensions (S voxel), the dosimetry at cellular level and the quantitative acquisition of pharmaceutical data. (Author)

  13. Skin effects and UV dosimetry of climate therapy in patients with psoriasis

    OpenAIRE

    Bartosova, Veronika

    2010-01-01

    Sun exposure and climate therapy is an effective treatment for psoriasis. However, even though this treatment gives the patients relief from their discomforting symptoms, it has some potentially dangerous side effects such as an increased risk of skin cancer and premature skin aging. A prospective field study plans to follow the patients undergoing the climate therapy. During this study the UV dose to each patient will be monitored by personal dosimeters worn by the patients. Furthermore the...

  14. Effects of individualized assignments on biology achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Philip L.

    A pretest-posttest, randomized, two groups, experimental, factorial design compared effects of detailed and nondetailed assignments on biology achievement over seven and a half months. Detailed assignments (favoring field independence and induction) employed block diagrams and stepwise directions. Nondetailed assignments (favoring field dependence and deduction) virtually lacked these. The accessible population was 101 tenth grade preparatory school male students. The 95 students enrolled in first year biology constituted the sample. Two by three ANOVA was done on residualized posttest score means of the students. Totally, the detailed students achieved significantly higher than the nondetailed students. This significantly higher achievement was only true of detailed students in the middle thirds of the deviation intelligence quotient (DIQ) range and of the grade point average (G.P.A.) range after the breakdown into upper, middle, and lower thirds of intellectual capability (ability and achievement). The upper third detailed DIQ grouping indirectly achieved higher than its peers, whereas the lower detailed DIQ third achieved lower than its peers. Thus, high capability students apparently benefit from flow and block diagrams, inductions, field independence, and high structure, whereas low capability students may be hindered by these.

  15. Dosimetry and Calibration Section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, T.

    1999-01-01

    The Dosimetry and Calibration Section fulfils two tasks within CERN's Radiation Protection Group: the Individual Dosimetry Service monitors more than 5000 persons potentially exposed to ionizing radiation on the CERN sites, and the Calibration Laboratory verifies throughout the year, at regular intervals, over 1000 instruments, monitors, and electronic dosimeters used by RP Group. The establishment of a Quality Assurance System for the Individual Dosimetry Service, a requirement of the new Swiss Ordinance for personal dosimetry, put a considerable workload on the section. Together with an external consultant it was decided to identify and then describe the different 'processes' of the routine work performed in the dosimetry service. The resulting Quality Manual was submitted to the Federal Office for Public Health in Bern in autumn. The CERN Individual Dosimetry Service will eventually be officially endorsed after a successful technical test in March 1999. On the technical side, the introduction of an automatic development machine for gamma films was very successful. It processes the dosimetric films without an operator being present, and its built-in regeneration mechanism keeps the concentration of the processing chemicals at a constant level

  16. Fourth international radiopharmaceutical dosimetry symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlafke-Stelson, A.T.; Watson, E.E.

    1986-04-01

    The focus of the Fourth International Radiopharmaceutical Dosimetry Symposium was to explore the impact of current developments in nuclear medicine on absorbed dose calculations. This book contains the proceedings of the meeting including the edited discussion that followed the presentations. Topics that were addressed included the dosimetry associated with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies and blood elements, ultrashort-lived radionuclides, and positron emitters. Some specific areas of discussion were variations in absorbed dose as a result of alterations in the kinetics, the influence of radioactive contaminants on dose, dose in children and in the fetus, available instrumentation and techniques for collecting the kinetic data needed for dose calculation, dosimetry requirements for the review and approval of new radiopharmaceuticals, and a comparison of the effect on the thyroid of internal versus external irradiation. New models for the urinary blader, skeleton including the active marrow, and the blood were presented. Several papers dealt with the validity of traditional ''average-organ'' dose estimates to express the dose from particulate radiation that has a short range in tissue. These problems are particularly important in the use of monoclonal antibodies and agents used to measure intracellular functions. These proceedings have been published to provide a resource volume for anyone interested in the calculation of absorbed radiation dose

  17. Physical and biological dosimetry at the RA-3 facility for small animal irradiation: preliminary BNCT studies in an experimental model of oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozzi, Emiliano; Miller, Marcelo; Thorp, Silvia I.; Heber, Elisa M.; Trivillin, Veronica A.; Zarza, Leandro; Estryk, Guillermo; Schwint, Amanda E.; Nigg, David W.

    2007-01-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a binary treatment modality based on the capture reaction that occurs between thermal neutrons and boron-10 atoms that accumulate selectively in tumor tissue, emitting high linear energy transfer (LET), short range (5-9 microns) particles (alpha y 7 Li). Thus, BNCT would potentially target tumor tissue selectively, sparing normal tissue. Herein we evaluated the feasibility of treating experimental oral mucosa tumors with BNCT at RA-3 (CAE) employing the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model and characterized the irradiation field at the RA-3 facility. We evaluated the therapeutic effect on tumor of BNCT mediated by BPA in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model and the potential radio toxic effects in normal tissue. We evidenced a moderate biological response in tumor, with no radio toxic effects in normal tissue following irradiations with no shielding for the animal body. Given the sub-optimal therapeutic response, we designed and built a 6 Li 2 CO 3 shielding for the body of the animal to increase the irradiation dose to tumor, without exceeding normal tissue radio tolerance. The measured absolute magnitude of thermal neutron flux and the characterization of the beam with and without the shielding in place, suggest that the irradiation facility in the thermal column of RA-3 would afford an excellent platform to perform BNCT studies in vitro and in vivo in small experimental animals. The present findings must be confirmed and extended by performing in vivo BNCT radiobiological studies in small experimental animals, employing the shielding device for the animal body. (author) [es

  18. Development of double dosimetry algorithm for assessment of effective dose to staff in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Young

    2011-02-01

    Medical staff involving interventional radiology(IR) procedures are significantly exposed to the scatter radiation because they stand in close proximity to the patient. Since modern IR techniques are often very complicated and require extended operation time, doses to IR workers tend to increase considerably. In general, the personal dose equivalent at 10 mm depth, H p (10), read from one dosimeter worn on the trunk of a radiation worker is assumed to be a good estimate of the effective dose and compared to the dose limits for regulatory compliance. This assumption is based on the exposure conditions that the radiation field is broad and rather homogeneous. However, IR workers usually wear protective clothing like lead aprons and thyroid shield which allow part of the body being exposed to much higher doses. To solve this problem, i.e. to adequately estimate the effective doses of IR workers, use of double dosimeters, one under the apron and one over the apron where unshielded part of the body exposed, was recommended. Several algorithms on the interpretation of the two dosimeter readings have been proposed. However, the dosimeter weighting factors applied to the algorithm differ significantly, which quests a question on the reliability of the algorithm. Moreover, there are some changes in the process of calculating the effective dose in the 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection(ICRP): changes in the radiation weighting factors, tissue weighting factors and the computational reference phantoms. Therefore, this study attempts to set a new algorithm for interpreting two dosimeter readings to provide a proper estimate of the effective dose for IR workers, incorporating those changes in definition of effective dose. The effective doses were estimated using Monte Carlo simulations for various practical conditions based on the vogel reference phantom and the new tissue weighting factors. A quasi-effective dose, which is

  19. Development of double dosimetry algorithm for assessment of effective dose to staff in interventional radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Young

    2011-02-15

    Medical staff involving interventional radiology(IR) procedures are significantly exposed to the scatter radiation because they stand in close proximity to the patient. Since modern IR techniques are often very complicated and require extended operation time, doses to IR workers tend to increase considerably. In general, the personal dose equivalent at 10 mm depth, H{sub p}(10), read from one dosimeter worn on the trunk of a radiation worker is assumed to be a good estimate of the effective dose and compared to the dose limits for regulatory compliance. This assumption is based on the exposure conditions that the radiation field is broad and rather homogeneous. However, IR workers usually wear protective clothing like lead aprons and thyroid shield which allow part of the body being exposed to much higher doses. To solve this problem, i.e. to adequately estimate the effective doses of IR workers, use of double dosimeters, one under the apron and one over the apron where unshielded part of the body exposed, was recommended. Several algorithms on the interpretation of the two dosimeter readings have been proposed. However, the dosimeter weighting factors applied to the algorithm differ significantly, which quests a question on the reliability of the algorithm. Moreover, there are some changes in the process of calculating the effective dose in the 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection(ICRP): changes in the radiation weighting factors, tissue weighting factors and the computational reference phantoms. Therefore, this study attempts to set a new algorithm for interpreting two dosimeter readings to provide a proper estimate of the effective dose for IR workers, incorporating those changes in definition of effective dose. The effective doses were estimated using Monte Carlo simulations for various practical conditions based on the vogel reference phantom and the new tissue weighting factors. A quasi-effective dose, which is

  20. Dosimetry as a Factor in Assessing the Technical Effects of Irradiation on Food Products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leone, F.A.

    1970-01-01

    The importance and need of universal uniform methods of measuring and reporting absorbed doses as related to the interpretation of irradiation effects on food items are discussed. The need and importance for uniformity of dose in the interpretation of microbiological and organoleptic studies of fishery products are specifically discussed using limited actual data as well as an illustrative example. (author)

  1. Honeydew honey: biological effects on skin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinotti, Simona; Calabrese, Giorgio; Ranzato, Elia

    2017-11-01

    Honey is a natural product well known by humankind and now reconsidered for its use as topical agent for wound and burn treatments. Floral honey is made by honeybees from the nectar of blossoms, while honeydew honey is prepared from secretions of plants or excretions of plant-sucking insects. Chemical composition is different between blossom and honeydew honeys and there is very few information about the biological properties of honeydew honey. So, this study was specifically designed to explore the potential wound healing effects of the honeydew honey. We used in vitro scratch wound healing model consisting of fibroblasts and keratinocytes. Data showed that honeydew honeys is able to increase wound closure by acting both on fibroblasts and keratinocytes. Based on our findings, honeydew honey has the potential to be useful for clinical settings.

  2. Film dosimetry analyses on the effect of gold shielding for Iodine-125 eye plaque therapy for choroidal melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, A. (Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, Joint Radiation Oncology Center and Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA (USA)); Krasin, F. (Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, New England Medical Center, Boston, MA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    One of the methods currently being used to treat choroidal melanoma employs an episcleral plaque containing I-125 radioactive seeds. However, comprehensive dosimetry studies on the plaque are scarce and controversial. For this work, we use film to study the dosimetry outside the lip of the gold shield of the eye plaque. This lip around the gold shield was made to protect the critical structures behind and adjacent to the lesion. Since the changes of energy spectrum of I-125 in tissue are negligible, film dosimetry seems to be a logical choice because of high spatial resolution required around the lip of the gold plaque. For this study, we first established an H and D curve with dose expressed in a unit of specific dose rate constant. This avoids absolute dose measurements. All film density measurements are made with a 1-mm aperture scan, normalized to the density at the prescription point for tumor of 3--5-mm apical height, i.e., 5 mm from the interior surface of sclera, and converted to percentage isodose curves. With a gold shield, it is found that when the plaque is placed against the optical nerve, the optical disk and macula, located at 2 mm outside the lip, on the exterior surface of sclera, may receive 85% of the prescription dose for a 12-mm plaque and 58% for a 16-mm plaque. For tumors of 8-mm apical height, the optical nerve would receive more than the prescription dose.

  3. Film dosimetry analyses on the effect of gold shielding for Iodine-125 eye plaque therapy for choroidal melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, A.; Krasin, F.

    1990-01-01

    One of the methods currently being used to treat choroidal melanoma employs an episcleral plaque containing I-125 radioactive seeds. However, comprehensive dosimetry studies on the plaque are scarce and controversial. For this work, we use film to study the dosimetry outside the lip of the gold shield of the eye plaque. This lip around the gold shield was made to protect the critical structures behind and adjacent to the lesion. Since the changes of energy spectrum of I-125 in tissue are negligible, film dosimetry seems to be a logical choice because of high spatial resolution required around the lip of the gold plaque. For this study, we first established an H and D curve with dose expressed in a unit of specific dose rate constant. This avoids absolute dose measurements. All film density measurements are made with a 1-mm aperture scan, normalized to the density at the prescription point for tumor of 3--5-mm apical height, i.e., 5 mm from the interior surface of sclera, and converted to percentage isodose curves. With a gold shield, it is found that when the plaque is placed against the optical nerve, the optical disk and macula, located at 2 mm outside the lip, on the exterior surface of sclera, may receive 85% of the prescription dose for a 12-mm plaque and 58% for a 16-mm plaque. For tumors of 8-mm apical height, the optical nerve would receive more than the prescription dose

  4. Food irradiation and its biological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Alok; Nanjappa, C.; Chauhan, O.P.

    2014-01-01

    Irradiation of foods drew attention mostly in 1960s for disinfestation of food grains, spices and sprout inhibition in mainly potato and onion. γ-irradiation at 0.25 to 1 kGy dosage levels are usually used for irradiating grains, legumes, spices and sprout-prone vegetables. Irradiation of foods with in permissible dosage levels of 0.25 to 5 kGy is usually considered fairly safe from human consumption point of view not withstanding usual health concerns about its usage in foods. Irradiation of foods, in mostly solid or semi-solid form, at 5 kGy levels of γ-irradiation can achieve radicidation or, radiation equivalent of pasteurization and, if γ-irradiation is used at 10 kGy, it can achieve radappertization or, radiation equivalent of thermal commercial sterilization. However, the food industry uses γ-irradiation at 0.25 to 2 kGy only for mostly disinfestation of food grains/legumes, spices, sprout inhibition in potato and onion and, for surface sanitation of frozen fish, poultry and meat. Exposure to irradiation creates free radicals in foods that are capable of destroying some of the spoilage and pathogenic microflora but the same can also damage vitamins and enzymes besides creating some new harmful new chemical species, called unique radiolytic products (URPs), by combining with certain chemicals that a food may be laced with (like pesticides/fungicides). Exposure to high-energy electron beams are also known to create deleterious biological effects which may even lead to detection of trace amounts of radioactivity in the food. Some possible causes delineated for such harmful biological effects of irradiation include: irradiation induced vitamin deficiencies, the inactivity of enzymes in the foods, DNA damage and toxic radiolytic products in the foods. Irradiation, a non-thermal food preservation technique, has a role in salvaging enormous post harvest losses (25-30%) in developing economies to increase the per capita availability of foods. (author)

  5. The radioiodine problem following the Chernobyl accident: ecology, dosimetry and medical effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zvonova, I.A.

    1991-01-01

    Following the Chernobyl accident radioisotopes of iodine constituted the main dose-forming factor among the people who stayed on in the radioactively contaminated areas, and in a number of places the effective doses to the thyroid gland were up to two orders of magnitude higher than the whole-body dose stemming from uniform internal and external irradiation. We consider the mechanisms involved in the radioiodine contribution to the doses in the human organism, depending on intake path, life style and social and ecological factors. We illustrate, by means of examples, thyroid gland dose distribution for various age groups in the population, and discuss the medical effects and predict the long-term risks for the population of exposure to radioisotopes of iodine. (author)

  6. Biological effects of space radiation and development of effective countermeasures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann R.

    2014-04-01

    As part of a program to assess the adverse biological effects expected from astronauts' exposure to space radiation, numerous different biological effects relating to astronauts' health have been evaluated. There has been major focus recently on the assessment of risks related to exposure to solar particle event (SPE) radiation. The effects related to various types of space radiation exposure that have been evaluated are: gene expression changes (primarily associated with programmed cell death and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling), oxidative stress, gastrointestinal tract bacterial translocation and immune system activation, peripheral hematopoietic cell counts, emesis, blood coagulation, skin, behavior/fatigue (including social exploration, submaximal exercise treadmill and spontaneous locomotor activity), heart functions, alterations in biological endpoints related to astronauts' vision problems (lumbar puncture/intracranial pressure, ocular ultrasound and histopathology studies), and survival, as well as long-term effects such as cancer and cataract development. A number of different countermeasures have been identified that can potentially mitigate or prevent the adverse biological effects resulting from exposure to space radiation.

  7. Effect of gold nanoparticle size on acoustic cavitation using chemical dosimetry method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanei, Ahmad; Shanei, Mohammad Mahdi

    2017-01-01

    When a liquid is irradiated with high intensities of ultrasound irradiation, acoustic cavitation occurs. Acoustic cavitation generates free radicals from the breakdown of water and other molecules. Cavitation can be fatal to cells and is utilized to destroy cancer tumors. The existence of particles in liquid provides nucleation sites for cavitation bubbles and leads to decrease the ultrasonic intensity threshold needed for cavitation onset. In the present investigation, the effect of gold nanoparticles with appropriate amount and size on the acoustic cavitation activity has been shown by determining hydroxyl radicals in terephthalic acid solutions containing 15, 20, 28 and 35nm gold nanoparticles sizes by using 1MHz low level ultrasound. The effect of sonication intensity in hydroxyl radical production was considered. The recorded fluorescence signal in terephthalic acid solutions containing gold nanoparticles was considerably higher than the terephthalic acid solutions without gold nanoparticles at different intensities of ultrasound irradiation. Also, the results showed that the recorded fluorescence signal intensity in terephthalic acid solution containing finer size of gold nanoparticles was lower than the terephthalic acid solutions containing larger size of gold nanoparticles. Acoustic cavitation in the presence of gold nanoparticles can be used as a way for improving therapeutic effects on the tumors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Application of monomer/polymer gel dosimetry to study the effects of tissue inhomogeneities on intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergote, Koen; De Deene, Yves; Claus, Filip; De Gersem, Werner; Van Duyse, Bart; Paelinck, Leen; Achten, Eric; De Neve, Wilfried; De Wagter, Carlos

    2003-04-01

    When planning an intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment in a heterogeneous region (e.g. the thorax), the dose computation algorithm of a treatment planning system may need to account for these inhomogeneities in order to obtain a reliable prediction of the dose distribution. An accurate dose verification technique such as monomer/polymer gel dosimetry is suggested to verify the outcome of the planning system. The effects of low-density structures: (a) on narrow high-energy (18 MV) photon beams; and (b) on a class-solution IMRT treatment delivered to a thorax phantom have been examined using gel dosimetry. The used phantom contained air cavities that could be filled with water to simulate a homogeneous or heterogeneous configuration. The IMRT treatment for centrally located lung tumors was delivered on both cases, and gel derived dose maps were compared with computations by both the GRATIS and Helax-TMS planning system. Dose rebuildup due to electronic disequilibrium in a narrow photon beam is demonstrated. The gel measurements showed good agreement with diamond detector measurements. Agreement between measured IMRT dose maps and dose computations was demonstrated by several quantitative techniques. An underdosage of the planning target volume (PTV) was revealed. The homogeneity of the phantom had only a minor influence on the dose distribution in the PTV. An expansion of low-level isodoses in the lung volume was predicted by collapsed cone computations in the heterogeneous case. For the class-solution described, the dose in centrally located mediastinal tumors can be computed with sufficient accuracy, even when neglecting the lower lung density. Polymer gel dosimetry proved to be a valuable technique to verify dose calculation algorithms for IMRT in 3D in heterogeneous configurations.

  9. Application of monomer/polymer gel dosimetry to study the effects of tissue inhomogeneities on intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergote, Koen; Deene, Yves de; Claus, Filip; Gersem, Werner de; Duyse, Bart van; Paelinck, Leen; Achten, Eric; Neve, Wilfried de; Wagter, Carlos de

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: When planning an intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment in a heterogeneous region (e.g. the thorax), the dose computation algorithm of a treatment planning system may need to account for these inhomogeneities in order to obtain a reliable prediction of the dose distribution. An accurate dose verification technique such as monomer/polymer gel dosimetry is suggested to verify the outcome of the planning system. Materials and methods: The effects of low-density structures: (a) on narrow high-energy (18 MV) photon beams; and (b) on a class-solution IMRT treatment delivered to a thorax phantom have been examined using gel dosimetry. The used phantom contained air cavities that could be filled with water to simulate a homogeneous or heterogeneous configuration. The IMRT treatment for centrally located lung tumors was delivered on both cases, and gel derived dose maps were compared with computations by both the GRATIS and Helax-TMS planning system. Results: Dose rebuildup due to electronic disequilibrium in a narrow photon beam is demonstrated. The gel measurements showed good agreement with diamond detector measurements. Agreement between measured IMRT dose maps and dose computations was demonstrated by several quantitative techniques. An underdosage of the planning target volume (PTV) was revealed. The homogeneity of the phantom had only a minor influence on the dose distribution in the PTV. An expansion of low-level isodoses in the lung volume was predicted by collapsed cone computations in the heterogeneous case. Conclusions: For the class-solution described, the dose in centrally located mediastinal tumors can be computed with sufficient accuracy, even when neglecting the lower lung density. Polymer gel dosimetry proved to be a valuable technique to verify dose calculation algorithms for IMRT in 3D in heterogeneous configurations

  10. Biological effects of radon in Drosophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimentel P, A.E.; Tavera D, L.; Cruces M, M.P.; Arceo M, C.; Rosa D, M.E. de la

    1992-04-01

    The main objective of this investigation, is to study the biological effects of the Radon-222 at low dose in 'Drosophila melanogaster'. It is necessary to mention that these effects will analyze from the genetic point of view for: 1) To evaluate in which form the Radon-222 to low dose it influences in some genetic components of the adaptation in Drosophila, such as: fecundity, viability egg-adult and sex proportion. 2) To evaluate which is the genetic effect that induces the Radon to low dose by means of the SMART technique in Drosophila melanogaster, and this way to try of to identify which is the possible mechanism that causes the genetic damage to somatic level. The carried out investigation was divided in three stages: 1. Tests to the vacuum resistance. 2. Test of somatic mutation, and 3. Determination of the presence of radon daughters on the adult of Drosophila. It is necessary to point out that all the experiments were made by triplicate and in each one of them was placed detectors in preset places. Those obtained results are presented inside the 4 charts included in the present work. (Author)

  11. Radiation therapy: dosimetry study of the effect of the composition of Pb alloys by PENELOPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose McDonnell

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy is a widely used treatment for cancer. Currently applying the technique of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy, in which an important aspect is the modulation of the radiation beam to generate a non-uniform dose distribution in the tumor. One way to achieve the above non-uniform dose distribution is using solid compensators. In the market there are a number of materials used to manufacture compensators. Pb alloys on the market are: Cerromatrix, Rose, Wood, Newton, Darcet, whose compositions vary with respect to the composition of the lipowitz metal. This paper quantifies the dosimetric effects of the composition of commercial alloys, routinely used in radiotherapy. This quantification is important because of its impact on the total uncertainty of treatment accepted in the dosimetric calculations. To investigate the dosimetric effect of the composition of commercial alloys in the market we used the PENELOPE code, code that allows the simulation of radiation transport in different media by Monte Carlo method.The results show that there is a difference dosimetric respect lipowitz material, ranging from 7 % to 9 % for the materials investigated. These values indicate the importance of knowing exactly the dosimetric characteristics of the material used as compensator for their implications in the dose calculation.

  12. Dosimetry and operation of irradiation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal, P.E.

    1985-01-01

    The industrial use of ionizing radiation has required, from the very first, the measurement of delivered and absorbed doses; hence the necessity of providing dosimetric systems. Laboratories, scientists, industries and potential equipment manufacturers have all collaborated in this new field of activity. Dosimetric intercomparisons have been made by each industry at their own facilities and in collaboration with specialists, national organizations and the IAEA. Dosimetry has become a way of ensuring that treatment by irradiation has been carried out in accordance with the rules. It has become in effect assurance of quality. Routine dosimetry should determine a maximum and minimum dose. Numerous factors play a part in dosimetry. Industry is currently in possession of routine dosimetric systems that are sufficiently accurate, fairly easy to handle and reasonable in cost, thereby satisfying all the requirements of industry and the need for control. Dosimetry is important in the process of marketing irradiated products. The operator of an industrial irradiation facility bases his dosimetry on comparison with reference systems. Research aimed at simplifying the practice of routine dosimetry should be continued. New physical and chemical techniques will be incorporated into systems already in use. The introduction of microcomputers into the operation of radiation facilities has increased the value of dosimetry and made the conditions of treatment more widespread. Stress should be placed on research in several areas apart from reference systems, for example: dosimetric systems at temperatures from +8 deg. C to -45 deg. C, over the dose range 100 krad to a little more than 1 Mrad, liquids and fluidized solids carried at high speed through ducts, thin-film liquids circulating at a high flow rate, and various other problems. (author)

  13. Trials to optimize dosimetry for 153Sm-EDTMP therapy to improve therapeutic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riccabona, G.; Moncayo-Naveda, R.; Oberlandstaetter, M.; Donnemiller, E.; Kendler, D.

    2001-01-01

    In a trial to improve results of therapy with 153 Sm-EDTMP for pain control in patients with disseminated bone metastases dosimetric studies were performed. Out of 30 treated patients 8 were selected for the study at random (5 breast Ca., 3 prostate Ca.). Whole body retention (WBR) of 99m Tc-DPD and 99m Tc-EDTMP was compared with WBR of 153 Sm-EDTMP. Volume of metastases and regional 99 m Tc-phosphonate uptake were assessed by SPECT and conjugated whole body scan data after phantom studies. Effective half-life was estimated also. Clinically results of pain control, side effects and changes of in vitro parameters were followed after therapy for up to 8 months. Therapy was performed in these patients with 55,5 MBq/kg body weight. Results showed an identical pattern of radioactivity distribution on 99 Tc-phosphonate and 153 Sm-EDTMP posttherapy scans, WBR of tracers and therapeutic agent was similar. Tumour volumes were 151-652 mL, count ratios metastases/normal bone 1,72-2,41, so that 6-50% of applied 153 Sm-EDTMP were concentrated in bone lesions. This gave dose estimates of 2,8-13,7 Gy in metastases. Evaluation of clinical results showed that the majority of very good results were observed in patients receiving > 10 Gy (n=3) while with lower doses only 1/4 responded very well. 1 patient was lost to follow-up due to death in the first month after therapy. Moderate and transient myelodepression (platelets) was seen in 3/7 patients without relation to Gy applied. As obviously 153 Sm concentration is not homogenous in bone metastases it can be assumed, that in border zones between tumour and bone 30-40 Gy can be delivered when 10 Gy are calculated for the whole lesion, which would explain the satisfactory therapeutic effect in our study. The dosimetric approach to 153 Sm-EDTMP therapy could necessitate the application of higher amounts of 153 Sm-EDTMP to reach adequate radiation doses in lesions without necessarily increasing risk of myelodepression and with even

  14. Effect of Cerebellum Radiation Dosimetry on Cognitive Outcomes in Children With Infratentorial Ependymoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchant, Thomas E.; Sharma, Shelly; Xiong, Xiaoping; Wu, Shengjie; Conklin, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Cognitive decline is a recognized effect of radiation therapy (RT) in children treated for brain tumors. The importance of the cerebellum and its contribution to cognition have been recognized; however, the effect of RT on cerebellum-linked neurocognitive deficits has yet to be explored. Methods and Materials: Seventy-six children (39 males) at a median 3.3 years of age (range, 1-17 years old) were irradiated for infratentorial ependymoma from 1997 to 2008. The total prescribed dose was 54 to 59.4 Gy administered to the postoperative tumor bed with 5- or 10-mm clinical target volume margin. Age-appropriate cognitive and academic testing was performed prior to the start of RT and was then repeated at 6 months and annually throughout 5 years. The anterior and posterior cerebellum and other normal brain volumes were contoured on postcontrast, T1-weighted postoperative magnetic resonance images registered to treatment planning computed tomography images. Mean doses were calculated and used with time after RT and other clinical covariates to model their effect on neurocognitive test scores. Results: Considering only the statistically significant rates in longitudinal changes for test scores and models that included mean dose, there was a correlation between mean infratentorial dose and intelligence quotient (IQ; −0.190 patients/Gy/year; P=.001), math (−0.164 patients/Gy/year; P=.010), reading (−0.137 patients/Gy/year; P=.011), and spelling scores (−0.147 patients/Gy/year; P=.012), where Gy was measured as the difference between the mean dose received by an individual patient and the mean dose received by the patient group. There was a correlation between mean anterior cerebellum dose and IQ scores (−0.116 patients/Gy/year; P=.042) and mean posterior cerebellum dose and IQ (−0.150 patients/Gy/year; P=.002), math (−0.120 patients/Gy/year; P=.023), reading (−0.111 patients/Gy/year; P=.012), and spelling (−0.117 patients/Gy/year; P=.015

  15. Effect of Cerebellum Radiation Dosimetry on Cognitive Outcomes in Children With Infratentorial Ependymoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchant, Thomas E., E-mail: thomas.merchant@stjude.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Sharma, Shelly [Division of Radiation Oncology, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Xiong, Xiaoping; Wu, Shengjie [Department of Biostatistics, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Conklin, Heather [Department of Psychology, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Cognitive decline is a recognized effect of radiation therapy (RT) in children treated for brain tumors. The importance of the cerebellum and its contribution to cognition have been recognized; however, the effect of RT on cerebellum-linked neurocognitive deficits has yet to be explored. Methods and Materials: Seventy-six children (39 males) at a median 3.3 years of age (range, 1-17 years old) were irradiated for infratentorial ependymoma from 1997 to 2008. The total prescribed dose was 54 to 59.4 Gy administered to the postoperative tumor bed with 5- or 10-mm clinical target volume margin. Age-appropriate cognitive and academic testing was performed prior to the start of RT and was then repeated at 6 months and annually throughout 5 years. The anterior and posterior cerebellum and other normal brain volumes were contoured on postcontrast, T1-weighted postoperative magnetic resonance images registered to treatment planning computed tomography images. Mean doses were calculated and used with time after RT and other clinical covariates to model their effect on neurocognitive test scores. Results: Considering only the statistically significant rates in longitudinal changes for test scores and models that included mean dose, there was a correlation between mean infratentorial dose and intelligence quotient (IQ; −0.190 patients/Gy/year; P=.001), math (−0.164 patients/Gy/year; P=.010), reading (−0.137 patients/Gy/year; P=.011), and spelling scores (−0.147 patients/Gy/year; P=.012), where Gy was measured as the difference between the mean dose received by an individual patient and the mean dose received by the patient group. There was a correlation between mean anterior cerebellum dose and IQ scores (−0.116 patients/Gy/year; P=.042) and mean posterior cerebellum dose and IQ (−0.150 patients/Gy/year; P=.002), math (−0.120 patients/Gy/year; P=.023), reading (−0.111 patients/Gy/year; P=.012), and spelling (−0.117 patients/Gy/year; P=.015

  16. Chernobyl Experience in the Field of Retrospective Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chumak, V.; Bakhanova, E.

    2011-01-01

    Chernobyl accident, which occurred on April 26, 1986 at NPP located less than 150 km north of Kiev, is the largest nuclear accident ever. Unprecedented scale of the accident was determined not only by the amount of released activity, but also by a number of population and workers involved and, therefore, exposed to enhanced doses of ionizing radiation. Population of the 30-km exclusion zone numbering about 116,000 persons of all ages and both genders was evacuated within days and weeks after the accident, emergency workers called ''liquidators of the accident'' (males age 20-50) were involved into clean-up and recovery for 5 years and their number is estimated as 600,000, about 300,000 are Ukrainian citizens. Due to unexpected and excessively large scale accident, none of residents had personal dosimeters, personal dosimetry of liquidators was not total, dosimetry techniques and practices were far from the optimum. As a result, an acute need for retrospective dose assessment was dictated by radiation protection and research considerations. This need was responded by implementation of wide scale dose reconstruction efforts, which covered main exposed cohorts and encompassed broad variety of newly developed methods: analytical (time-and-motion), modeling, biological and physical (EPR spectroscopy of teeth, TL of quartz). The presentation summarizes vast experience accumulated by RCRM in the field of retrospective dosimetry of large cohorts of exposed population and professionals. These dose reconstruction projects were implemented, in particular, in the framework of epidemiological studies, designed to follow-up medical consequences of Chernobyl accident and study health effects of ionizing radiation, in particular, Ukrainian-American studies of cataracts and leukemia among liquidators. Over 25 years passed after Chernobyl accident a broad variety of retrospective dosimetry problems was addressed by the team of Research Center for Radiation Medicine AMS Ukraine. In

  17. Study of radiation effects on some glasses and their applications in radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammad, A.El.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis comprises a study of the X-ray diffraction, thermal, electrical, ESR and optical properties of lead lithium tetra borate glass. The objective of this thesis is to prepare glass dosimeter and study the effect of several gamma-irradiation doses on Lead lithium tetra borate glasses doped with Cu O. The two glasses were prepared from chemical reagents; Li 2 B 4 O 7 from ready package, lead and copper oxide were added in fixed Proportions. The glass melting was made in porcelain crucibles, using electrically heated furnace at temperature of 1000 -1100 degree C. The melts rapidly quenched in air by pressing between two stainless-steel plates mould kept at room temperature. The resultant glasses were colorless for LPTB and transparent greenish sheet of LPTB Cu glass about 0.8 mm thick and where polished to meet the requirements for optical and electrical measurements. The obtained results can be summarized as follows:- Density It is observed that, for unirradiated samples, the addition of copper to LPTB leads to the increase of the number of ions in the sample which decreases the inter-ionic distance. As a result, the molar volume of LPTB Cu decreased and consequently its density increased in the range of 10 ± 1 %. Irradiation with gamma rays is assumed to create displacements, electronic defects and /or breaks in the network bonds. Irradiation can cause the compaction of B 2 O 3 by breaking of the bonds between trigonal elements, allowing the formation of different configuration. Irradiating the LPTB glass with growing gamma doses up to 25 kGy decreased its molar volume with in 4.07 % and consequently increased the density with the same percentage. For the glass LPTB Cu, the effect of gamma rays appeared as a decrease in the molar volume and increase in density with the same percentage (12.9%). The addition traces of copper (0.01 weight %) to LPTB enhanced the effect of gamma radiation on it. Crystallization Behavior: - X-ray diffraction The results show

  18. Organ-specific dosimetry in spinal radiography: an analysis of genetic and somatic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fickel, T.E.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation doses absorbed by the uterus, ovary, testicle and active bone marrow are computed for cervical, thoracic, lumbar, full spine and chest series performed under typical office conditions. Assuming a nonthreshold, linear relationship between dose and radiogenic effect, the computed tissue-specific doses are used to estimate the probability that each X-ray series might enhance the statistical probability of occurrence of an adult leukemia fatality of the irradiated patient; a childhood leukemia, mental retardation or cancer fatality as a result of fetal irradiation; or a variety of sex cell chromosomal aberrations in irradiated patients. It is concluded that the greatest hazard to active bone marrow, the uterus and the gonads is posed by lumbar and full spine radiography and that the need to adequately justify such exposure is mandatory; furthermore, in these series, irradiation of the ovary is 10 times as great as that of the testicle. Lumbar radiographic examinations can be made significantly safer by the elimination of the lumbosacral spot view

  19. Organ-specific dosimetry in spinal radiography: an analysis of genetic and somatic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fickel, T.E.

    1988-02-01

    Radiation doses absorbed by the uterus, ovary, testicle and active bone marrow are computed for cervical, thoracic, lumbar, full spine and chest series performed under typical office conditions. Assuming a nonthreshold, linear relationship between dose and radiogenic effect, the computed tissue-specific doses are used to estimate the probability that each X-ray series might enhance the statistical probability of occurrence of an adult leukemia fatality of the irradiated patient; a childhood leukemia, mental retardation or cancer fatality as a result of fetal irradiation; or a variety of sex cell chromosomal aberrations in irradiated patients. It is concluded that the greatest hazard to active bone marrow, the uterus and the gonads is posed by lumbar and full spine radiography and that the need to adequately justify such exposure is mandatory; furthermore, in these series, irradiation of the ovary is 10 times as great as that of the testicle. Lumbar radiographic examinations can be made significantly safer by the elimination of the lumbosacral spot view.

  20. The biologically effective dose in inhalation nanotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Ken; Schinwald, Anja; Murphy, Fiona; Cho, Wan-Seob; Duffin, Rodger; Tran, Lang; Poland, Craig

    2013-03-19

    In all branches of toxicology, the biologically effective dose (BED) is the fraction of the total dose of a toxin that actually drives any toxic effect. Knowledge of the BED has a number of applications including in building structure-activity relationships, the selection of metrics, the design of safe particles, and the determination of when a nanoparticle (NP) can be considered to be "new" for regulatory purposes. In particle toxicology, we define the BED as "the entity within any dose of particles in tissue that drives a critical pathophysiogically relevant form of toxicity (e.g., oxidative stress, inflammation, genotoxicity, or proliferation) or a process that leads to it." In conventional chemical toxicology, researchers generally use the mass as the metric to describe dose (such as mass per unit tissue or cells in culture) because of its convenience. Concentration, calculated from mass, may also figure in any description of dose. In the case of a nanoparticle dose, researchers use either the mass or the surface area. The mass of nanoparticles is not the only driver of their activity: the surfaces of insoluble particles interact with biological systems, and soluble nanoparticles can release factors that interact with these systems. Nanoparticle shape can modify activity. In this Account, we describe the current knowledge of the BED as it pertains to different NP types. Soluble toxins released by NPs represent one potential indicator of BED for wholly or partially soluble NPs composed of copper or zinc. Rapid dissolution of these NPs into their toxic ions in the acidic environment of the macrophage phagolysosome causes those ions to accumulate, which leads to lysosome destabilization and inflammation. In contrast, soluble NPs that release low toxicity ions, such as magnesium oxide NPs, are not inflammogenic. For insoluble NPs, ζ potential can serve as a BED measurement because the exposure of the particle surface to the acidic milieu of the phagolysosome and

  1. European Society for Radiaton Biology - 19th annual meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The proceedings contain 313 abstracts of papers. The topics covered include: biological radiation effects on lipids, hormones, fibroblasts, on bone healing, DNA repair, DNA synthesis, tumor cells, giant cell formation, on the lymphatic system, central nervous system and the hematopoietic system; determination of RBE; radioprotective agents; radiotherapy; dosimetry; radiation induced mutations; oxygen effects; radiosensitivity of tumor cells; hyperthermia and hypoxia effects on radiosensitivity; biological radiation effects on the growth of plants. (J.P.)

  2. The Effect of Pro-Qura Case Volume on Post-Implant Prostate Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrick, Gregory S.; Lief, Jonathan H.; Grimm, Peter; Sylvester, John; Butler, Wayne M.; Allen, Zachariah A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of prostate brachytherapy case volume on postimplant dosimetric quality in Pro-Qura proctored programs. Methods and Materials: From August 1999 to December 2008, the computed tomography datasets for 6,600 prostate implants performed by 129 brachytherapists were submitted to Pro-Qura for dosimetric analysis. Brachytherapists were divided into three roughly equal-sized terciles based on total case volume. Postimplant computed tomography scans were obtained at a median of 30 days. Excellent target coverage was defined by a V100 ≥90% and D90 ≥100% minimum prescribed peripheral dose. To determine if the number of excellent implants improved with increasing case numbers, each brachytherapist’s series of implants was bisected into early and late experience by a moveable critical point. Results: For the entire cohort, the mean V100 and D90 were 89.2% and 102.8%, respectively, with 47.7% of the implants scored as excellent. Brachytherapists in the highest-case tercile had a significantly greater fraction of excellent target coverage (57.9%) than did those in the two lower terciles (39.5% and 45.7%, p = 0.015). Twenty-one (25.6%) of the 82 brachytherapists with sufficient case volume for dosimetric improvement analyses demonstrated quality improvement over time. Although there was no significant difference between prostate volume and seed strength, the number of seeds used was significantly greater in adequate implants. Conclusions: The highest-volume brachytherapists were most likely to obtain excellent target coverage. We are encouraged that in general practice, nearly 48% of all implants were scored excellent. It is conceivable that with greater expert third-party involvement, an even greater percentage of cases with excellent target coverage will become reality.

  3. The Effect of Pro-Qura Case Volume on Post-Implant Prostate Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrick, Gregory S., E-mail: gmerrick@urologicresearchinstitute.org [Schiffler Cancer Center Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Lief, Jonathan H. [Schiffler Cancer Center Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Grimm, Peter [Prostate Cancer Treatment Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Sylvester, John [Lakewood Ranch Oncology, Bradenton, FL (United States); Butler, Wayne M.; Allen, Zachariah A. [Schiffler Cancer Center Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of prostate brachytherapy case volume on postimplant dosimetric quality in Pro-Qura proctored programs. Methods and Materials: From August 1999 to December 2008, the computed tomography datasets for 6,600 prostate implants performed by 129 brachytherapists were submitted to Pro-Qura for dosimetric analysis. Brachytherapists were divided into three roughly equal-sized terciles based on total case volume. Postimplant computed tomography scans were obtained at a median of 30 days. Excellent target coverage was defined by a V100 {>=}90% and D90 {>=}100% minimum prescribed peripheral dose. To determine if the number of excellent implants improved with increasing case numbers, each brachytherapist's series of implants was bisected into early and late experience by a moveable critical point. Results: For the entire cohort, the mean V100 and D90 were 89.2% and 102.8%, respectively, with 47.7% of the implants scored as excellent. Brachytherapists in the highest-case tercile had a significantly greater fraction of excellent target coverage (57.9%) than did those in the two lower terciles (39.5% and 45.7%, p = 0.015). Twenty-one (25.6%) of the 82 brachytherapists with sufficient case volume for dosimetric improvement analyses demonstrated quality improvement over time. Although there was no significant difference between prostate volume and seed strength, the number of seeds used was significantly greater in adequate implants. Conclusions: The highest-volume brachytherapists were most likely to obtain excellent target coverage. We are encouraged that in general practice, nearly 48% of all implants were scored excellent. It is conceivable that with greater expert third-party involvement, an even greater percentage of cases with excellent target coverage will become reality.

  4. Retrospective dosimetry by electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in dental enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubner, D.; Gisone, P.; Perez, M.R.; Davila, F.A.; Boveris, A.; Puntarulo, S.

    1998-01-01

    Biophysical dosimetry based on EPR in biological solid samples (like bone and teeth) or in organic materials (like textile fibres, sugar, etc.) is a complementary technique that could contribute, along with the biological dosimetry, to the retrospective evaluation of the absorbed dose in accidental situations. Dental enamel could be considered as the only tissue with structure and composition essentially constant over time: this characteristic feature allows its use as an index of radiation exposure since tooth retains indefinitely its radiation history. Samples of human molars were exposed to gamma-Rays (Co 60) with doses between 0,5 Gy to 10 Gy. After a chemical treatment of samples, enamel was removed by grinding with a dental drill and reduced to a fine powder. A characteristic EPR signal was detected at g=2.002. The dose effect curves were done using 20 mw of microwave power. Measurements were done both, with flat cells and disposable Pasteur pipettes allowing the use of lower amounts of sample. The intensity of the signal was proportional to the dose and linearity was verified in both cases. We discuss the applicability of this technique in evaluating radiation dose in accidental overexposures. (author) [es

  5. Effect of Akimbo Versus Raised Arm Positioning on Breast and Cardiopulmonary Dosimetry in Pediatric Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Denniston

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: In pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma (HL, radiotherapy (RT-related late toxicities are a prime concern during treatment planning. This is the first study to examine whether arm positioning (raised versus akimbo result in differential cardiopulmonary and breast doses in patients undergoing mediastinal RT. METHODS: Two treatment plans were made for each patient (akimbo/arms-raised; treatment was per Children’s Oncology Group AHOD0031 protocol, including AP/PA fields. The anterior midline T6-T7 disc space was used as an anatomic reference of midline. Heart/lungs were contoured for each setup. For females, breasts were also contoured and nipple positions identified. Volumetric centers of contoured organs were defined and three-dimensional distances from midline were computed. Analyzed dosimetric parameters included V5 (volume receiving ≥5 Gy, V10, V15, V20, and mean dose. Statistics were performed using the Mann-Whitney test.RESULTS: Fifteen (6 female, 9 male pediatric HL patients treated with mediastinal RT were analyzed. The median lateral distance from the breast center/nipple to midline with arms akimbo was larger than that with arms raised (8.6 vs. 7.7cm left breast, p=0.04; 10.7 vs. 9.2cm left nipple, p=0.04; 8.7 vs. 7.0cm right breast, p=0.004; 9.9 vs. 7.9cm, p=0.007 right nipple. Raised arm position was associated with a median 2.8/3.0cm decrease in breast/nipple separation, respectively. There were no significant differences in craniocaudal breast/nipple position based on arm positioning (p>0.05. Increasing breast volume was correlated with larger arm position-related changes in breast/nipple separation (r=0.74, p=0.06 / r=0.85, p=0.02. Akimbo positioning lowered median breast V5, V10, V15, and mean dose (p0.05. Arm position had no significant effect on cardiopulmonary doses.CONCLUSIONS: Akimbo arm positioning may be advantageous to decrease breast doses in female pediatric HL patients undergoing mediastinal RT, especially in the

  6. Fast neutron dosimetry: Progress summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLuca, P.M. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose was to investigate the radiological physics and biology of very low energy photons derived from a 1-GeV electron synchrotron storage ring. An extensive beam line and irradiation apparatus was designed, developed, and constructed. Dosimetry measurements required invention and testing of a miniature absolute calorimeter and a cell irradiation fixture suitable for scanning exposures under computer control. Measurements of the kerma factors of oxygen, aluminum and silicon for 14-20 MeV neutrons. Custom designed miniature proportional counters of cylindrical symmetry were employed in these determinations. The oxygen kerma factor was found significantly lower than values calculated from microscopic cross sections. We also tested Mg and Fe walled conventional spherical counters. The direct neutron-counting gas interaction is significant enough for these counters that a correction is needed. We also investigated the application of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy to radiation dosimetry. Our purpose was to take advantage of recent development of very high-field magnets, complex RF-pulse techniques for solvent suppression, and improved spectral analysis techniques

  7. Dosimetry for radiation processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne

    1986-01-01

    During the past few years significant advances have taken place in the different areas of dosimetry for radiation processing, mainly stimulated by the increased interest in radiation for food preservation, plastic processing and sterilization of medical products. Reference services both by intern......During the past few years significant advances have taken place in the different areas of dosimetry for radiation processing, mainly stimulated by the increased interest in radiation for food preservation, plastic processing and sterilization of medical products. Reference services both...... by international organizations (IAEA) and national laboratories have helped to improve the reliability of dose measurements. Several dosimeter systems like calorimetry, perspex, and radiochromic dye films are being improved and new systems have emerged, e.g. spectrophotometry of dichromate solution for reference...... and sterilization dosimetry, optichromic dosimeters in the shape of small tubes for food processing, and ESR spectroscopy of alanine for reference dosimetry. In this paper the special features of radiation processing dosimetry are discussed, several commonly used dosimeters are reviewed, and factors leading...

  8. E. Biological effects of radiation on man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This report firstly summarises information on the biological hazards of radiation and their relation to radiation dose, and hence estimates the biological risks associated with nuclear power production. Secondly, it describes the basis and present status of radiation protection standards in the nuclear power industry

  9. Dosimetry of ionising radiation in modern radiation oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kron, Tomas; Lehmann, Joerg; Greer, Peter B.

    2016-07-01

    Dosimetry of ionising radiation is a well-established and mature branch of physical sciences with many applications in medicine and biology. In particular radiotherapy relies on dosimetry for optimisation of cancer treatment and avoidance of severe toxicity for patients. Several novel developments in radiotherapy have introduced new challenges for dosimetry with small and dynamically changing radiation fields being central to many of these applications such as stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy. There is also an increasing awareness of low doses given to structures not in the target region and the associated risk of secondary cancer induction. Here accurate dosimetry is important not only for treatment optimisation but also for the generation of data that can inform radiation protection approaches in the future. The article introduces some of the challenges and highlights the interdependence of dosimetric calculations and measurements. Dosimetric concepts are explored in the context of six application fields: reference dosimetry, small fields, low dose out of field, in vivo dosimetry, brachytherapy and auditing of radiotherapy practice. Recent developments of dosimeters that can be used for these purposes are discussed using spatial resolution and number of dimensions for measurement as sorting criteria. While dosimetry is ever evolving to address the needs of advancing applications of radiation in medicine two fundamental issues remain: the accuracy of the measurement from a scientific perspective and the importance to link the measurement to a clinically relevant question. This review aims to provide an update on both of these.

  10. Secondary standard dosimetry laboratory (SSDL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Md Saion bin Salikin.

    1983-01-01

    A secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory has been established in the Tun Ismail Research Centre, Malaysia as a national laboratory for reference and standardization purposes in the field of radiation dosimetry. This article gives brief accounts on the general information, development of the facility, programmes to be carried out as well as other information on the relevant aspects of the secondary standard dosimetry laboratory. (author)

  11. Cost-effective pediatric head and body phantoms for computed tomography dosimetry and its evaluation using pencil ion chamber and CT dose profiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Saravanakumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, a pediatric head and body phantom was fabricated using polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA at a low cost when compared to commercially available phantoms for the purpose of computed tomography (CT dosimetry. The dimensions of head and body phantoms were 10 cm diameter, 15 cm length and 16 cm diameter, 15 cm length, respectively. The dose from a 128-slice CT machine received by the head and body phantom at the center and periphery were measured using a 100 mm pencil ion chamber and 150 mm CT dose profiler (CTDP. Using these values, the weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDIw and in turn the volumetric CTDI (CTDIv were calculated for various combinations of tube voltage and current-time product. A similar study was carried out using standard calibrated phantom and the results have been compared with the fabricated ones to ascertain that the performance of the latter is equivalent to that of the former. Finally, CTDIv measured using fabricated and standard phantoms were compared with respective values displayed on the console. The difference between the values was well within the limits specified by Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB, India. These results indicate that the cost-effective pediatric phantom can be employed for CT dosimetry.

  12. Accounting for biological effectiveness in radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennis, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) presents a practical problem to radiological protection when attempts are made to ensure that the assessed risks from different types of radiation and different modes of exposure to radiation are commensurate with one another. Unfortunately, the theoretical understanding of RBE is still in the stage of competing explanations and hypotheses. Furthermore, the division of the concept of dose equivalent into a set of concepts for risk assessment and another set for measurement and control has introduced conflicting requirements of a practical nature that are difficult to resolve. Many of those working in radiobiology and radiation protection have perceived the need to increase the quality factors for photon and neutron radiations. It may be more reasonable to change the quality factors for neutrons than for other radiations. The advantages and disadvantages of different methods for accommodating such changes within the dose-equivalent concepts are to be examined. The method of accommodating such a change that has the least practical disadvantages is to increase the quality factors for all secondary particles produced in tissue by neutron radiations by a constant factor. The only disadvantage would be the perception that the quality factors for these secondary particles were not treated in a consistent fashion for all types of ionising radiation. (author)

  13. Experience with in vivo diode dosimetry for verifying radiotherapy dose delivery: Practical implementation of cost-effective approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thwaites, D.I.; Blyth, C.; Carruthers, L.; Elliott, P.A.; Kidane, G.; Millwater, C.J.; MacLeod, A.S.; Paolucci, M.; Stacey, C.

    2002-01-01

    A systematic programme of in vivo dosimetry using diodes to verify radiotherapy delivered doses began in Edinburgh in 1992. The aims were to investigate the feasibility of routine systematic use of diodes as part of a comprehensive QA programme, to carry out clinical pilot studies to assess the accuracy of dose delivery on each machine and for each site and technique, to identify and rectify systematic deviations, to assess departmental dosimetric precision and to compare to clinical requirements. A further aim was to carry out a cost-benefit evaluation based on the results from the pilot studies to consider how best to use diodes routinely

  14. Biologically based multistage modeling of radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Hazelton; Suresh Moolgavkar; E. Georg Luebeck

    2005-08-30

    This past year we have made substantial progress in modeling the contribution of homeostatic regulation to low-dose radiation effects and carcinogenesis. We have worked to refine and apply our multistage carcinogenesis models to explicitly incorporate cell cycle states, simple and complex damage, checkpoint delay, slow and fast repair, differentiation, and apoptosis to study the effects of low-dose ionizing radiation in mouse intestinal crypts, as well as in other tissues. We have one paper accepted for publication in ''Advances in Space Research'', and another manuscript in preparation describing this work. I also wrote a chapter describing our combined cell-cycle and multistage carcinogenesis model that will be published in a book on stochastic carcinogenesis models edited by Wei-Yuan Tan. In addition, we organized and held a workshop on ''Biologically Based Modeling of Human Health Effects of Low dose Ionizing Radiation'', July 28-29, 2005 at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington. We had over 20 participants, including Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff as keynote speaker, talks by most of the low-dose modelers in the DOE low-dose program, experimentalists including Les Redpath (and Mary Helen), Noelle Metting from DOE, and Tony Brooks. It appears that homeostatic regulation may be central to understanding low-dose radiation phenomena. The primary effects of ionizing radiation (IR) are cell killing, delayed cell cycling, and induction of mutations. However, homeostatic regulation causes cells that are killed or damaged by IR to eventually be replaced. Cells with an initiating mutation may have a replacement advantage, leading to clonal expansion of these initiated cells. Thus we have focused particularly on modeling effects that disturb homeostatic regulation as early steps in the carcinogenic process. There are two primary considerations that support our focus on homeostatic regulation. First, a number of

  15. Estimating Effective Dose from Phantom Dose Measurements in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Procedures and Comparison of MOSFET and TLD Detectors in a Small Animal Dosimetry Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson-Evans, Colin David

    effective dose was computed by summing the product of each organ dose and the corresponding tissue weighting factor from the ICRP publication 103. Further risk calculations were done according to the BEIR VII Phase 2 report to obtain relative and lifetime attributable risks of cancer for an average AF ablation procedure. The ED was computed separately for the biplane fluoroscopic and angiographic system's 'low' and 'normal fluoro' automated settings, yielding 27.9 mSv and 45.6 mSv respectively for an average procedure time of 88.2 minutes. The corresponding DAP was 48.7 Gy cm2 and 79.1 Gy cm2 for low and normal settings respectively. The independently measured DAP was found to be within 0.1 % of that measured by the fluoroscopy system's onboard flat panel detectors. DCCs were calculated to be 0.573 and 0.577 for the respective low and normal settings. The results proved to be very closely matched, which was to be expected. The calculated cancer risks were fairly low due to the age of most patients (less than 5 incidences of solid tumor per 100,000 exposed for liver colon and stomach; 100-300 incidences per 100,000 exposed for lungs), but concern remains that longer procedures could increase the risk of erythema or other serious skin injuries. The second section of this thesis study involves the quantification and distribution of radiation dose in small animals undergoing irradiation in an orthovoltage x-ray unit. Extensive research is being done with small animals, particularly mice and rats, in fields such as cancer therapy, radiation biology and radiological countermeasures. Results and conclusion are often drawn from research based solely on manufacturer's specifications of the delivered dose rate without independent verification or adequate understanding of the machines' capabilities. Accurate radiation dose information is paramount when conducting research in this arena. Traditional methods of dosimetry, namely thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) are challenging and

  16. Determination of effective dose for workers hemodynamics service using double dosimetry; Determinacion de la dosis efectiva para los trabajadores del servicio de hemodinamica usando doble dosimetria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz Lopez, M. A.; Lobato Munoz, M.; Jodar Lopez, C. A.; Ramirez Ros, J. C.; Jerez Sainz, M. I.; Pamos Urena, M.; Carrasco Rodriguez, J. L.

    2013-07-01

    The use of an additional dosimeter at the level of the neck above the lead apron we can provide an indication of the dose in the head (the Crystal dose). In addition, it is possible to combine the two readings of the dosimeter to provide an improved estimate of the effective dose. In the hemodynamics service of our Hospital we have maintained a worker for 3 years with the double dosimetry read monthly. With the readings from these dosimeters will do following algorithms, several estimates of the effective dose to see if, with working conditions that occur in this service, it would be necessary to extend this practice to the rest of the workers to get a better estimation of effective dose. (Author)

  17. Nuclear medicine radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    McParland, Brian J

    2010-01-01

    Complexities of the requirements for accurate radiation dosimetry evaluation in both diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine (including PET) have grown over the past decade. This is due primarily to four factors: growing consideration of accurate patient-specific treatment planning for radionuclide therapy as a means of improving the therapeutic benefit, development of more realistic anthropomorphic phantoms and their use in estimating radiation transport and dosimetry in patients, design and use of advanced Monte Carlo algorithms in calculating the above-mentioned radiation transport and

  18. INDIVIDUAL DOSIMETRY SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Personnel in the distribution groups Aleph, Delphi, L3, Opal who also work for other experiments than at LEP, should contact their dispatchers to explain their activities for the future, after LEP dismantling in order to be maintained on the regular distribution list at Individual DosimetryWe inform all staff and users under regular dosimetric control that the dosimeters for the monitoring period MAY/JUNE will be available from their usual dispatchers on Tuesday 2 May.Please have your films changed before the 12 May.The colour of the dosimeter valid in is MAY/JUNE is YELLOW.Individual Dosimetry Service will be closed on Friday 28 April.

  19. European Society for Radiation Biology 21. annual meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The volume contains about 100 abstracts of lectures presented to the conference covering a large variety of topics like: Radiobiology as a base for radiotherapy, radiation carcinogenesis and cellular effects, late and secondary effects of radiotherapy, radioprotection and radiosensitization, heavy ions in radiobiology and space research, microdosimetry and biological dosimetry, radiation effects on the mature and the developing central nervous system, DNA damage and repair and cellular mutations, the imact of radiation on the environment, free radicals in radiation biology

  20. Calibration and error analysis of metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor dosimeters for computed tomography radiation dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trattner, Sigal; Prinsen, Peter; Wiegert, Jens; Gerland, Elazar-Lars; Shefer, Efrat; Morton, Tom; Thompson, Carla M; Yagil, Yoad; Cheng, Bin; Jambawalikar, Sachin; Al-Senan, Rani; Amurao, Maxwell; Halliburton, Sandra S; Einstein, Andrew J

    2017-12-01

    Metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) serve as a helpful tool for organ radiation dosimetry and their use has grown in computed tomography (CT). While different approaches have been used for MOSFET calibration, those using the commonly available 100 mm pencil ionization chamber have not incorporated measurements performed throughout its length, and moreover, no previous work has rigorously evaluated the multiple sources of error involved in MOSFET calibration. In this paper, we propose a new MOSFET calibration approach to translate MOSFET voltage measurements into absorbed dose from CT, based on serial measurements performed throughout the length of a 100-mm ionization chamber, and perform an analysis of the errors of MOSFET voltage measurements and four sources of error in calibration. MOSFET calibration was performed at two sites, to determine single calibration factors for tube potentials of 80, 100, and 120 kVp, using a 100-mm-long pencil ion chamber and a cylindrical computed tomography dose index (CTDI) phantom of 32 cm diameter. The dose profile along the 100-mm ion chamber axis was sampled in 5 mm intervals by nine MOSFETs in the nine holes of the CTDI phantom. Variance of the absorbed dose was modeled as a sum of the MOSFET voltage measurement variance and the calibration factor variance, the latter being comprised of three main subcomponents: ionization chamber reading variance, MOSFET-to-MOSFET variation and a contribution related to the fact that the average calibration factor of a few MOSFETs was used as an estimate for the average value of all MOSFETs. MOSFET voltage measurement error was estimated based on sets of repeated measurements. The calibration factor overall voltage measurement error was calculated from the above analysis. Calibration factors determined were close to those reported in the literature and by the manufacturer (~3 mV/mGy), ranging from 2.87 to 3.13 mV/mGy. The error σ V of a MOSFET voltage

  1. Report of the panel on practical problems in actinide biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    Practical problems are classified as the need to make operational decisions, the need for regulatory assessment either of individual facilities or of generic actions, and the overt appearance of radiobiological effects in man or radioactivity in man or the environment. Topics discussed are as follows: simulated reactor accident; long term effects of low doses; effects of repeated exposures to actinides; inhaled uranium mine air contaminants; metabolism and dosimetry; environmental equilibrium models; patterns of alpha dosimetry; internal dose calculations; interfaces between actinide biology and environmental studies; removal of actinides deposited in the body; and research needs related to uranium isotopes

  2. RADON PROGENY AS AN EXPERIMENTAL TOOL FOR DOSIMETRY OF NANOAEROSOLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruzer, Lev; Ruzer, Lev S.; Apte, Michael G.

    2008-02-25

    The study of aerosol exposure and dosimetry measurements and related quantitation of health effects are important to the understanding of the consequences of air pollution, and are discussed widely in the scientific literature. During the last 10 years the need to correlate aerosol exposure and biological effects has become especially important due to rapid development of a new, revolutionary industry ?-- nanotechnology. Nanoproduct commerce is predicted to top $1 trillion by 2015. Quantitative assessment of aerosol particle behavior in air and in lung deposition, and dosimetry in different parts of the lung, particularly for nanoaerosols, remains poor despite several decades of study. Direct measurements on humans are still needed in order to validate the hollow cast, animal studies, and lung deposition modeling. We discuss here the use of nanoscale radon decay products as an experimental tool in the study of local deposition and lung dosimetry for nanoaerosols. The issue of the safe use of radon progeny in such measurements is discussed based on a comparison of measured exposure in 3 settings: general population, miners, and in a human experiment conducted at the Paul Scherer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland. One of the properties of radon progeny is that they consist partly of 1 nm radioactive particles called unattached activity; having extremely small size and high diffusion coefficients, these particles can be potentially useful as radioactive tracers in the study of nanometer-sized aerosols. We present a theoretical and experimental study of the correlation between the unattached activity and aerosol particle surface area, together with a description of its calibration and method for measurement of the unattached fraction.

  3. The RERF dosimetry measurements database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullings, Harry M.; Fujita, Shoichiro; Preston, Dale L.; Grant, Eric J.; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Maruyama, Takashi; Lowder, Wayne M.

    2005-01-01

    The Radiation Effects Research Foundation maintains a database containing detailed information on every known measurement of environmental materials in the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki for gamma-ray thermoluminescence or neutron activation produced by incident radiation from the atomic bomb detonations. The intent was to create a single information resource that would consistently document, as completely as possible in each case, a standard array of data for every known measurement. This database provides a uniquely comprehensive and carefully designed reference for the dosimetry reassessment. (J.P.N.)

  4. Guide for dosimetry in radiation research on food and agricultural products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This guide covers the minimum requirements for dosimetry and absorbed-dose validation needed to conduct research on the irradiation of food and agricultural products. Such research includes establishment of the quantitative relationship between the absorbed dose and the relevant effects in these products. This guide also describes the overall need for dosimetry in such research, and in reporting of the results. This guide is intended for use by research scientists in the food and agricultural communities, and not just scientists conducting irradiation research. It, therefore, includes more tutorial information than most other ASTM and ISO/ASTM dosimetry standards for radiation processing. This guide is in no way intended to limit the flexibility of the experimenter in the experimental design. However, the radiation source and experimental set up should be chosen such that the results of the experiment will be beneficial and understandable to other scientists, regulatory agencies, and the food and agricultural communities. The effects produced by ionizing radiation in biological systems depend on a large number of factors which may be physical, physiological, or chemical. Although not treated in detail in this guide, quantitative data of environmental factors that may affect the absorbed-dose response of dosimeters, such as temperature and moisture content in the food or agricultural products should be reported. The overall uncertainty in the absorbed-dose measurement and the inherent absorbed-dose range within the specimen should be taken into account in the design of an experiment. The guide covers research conducted using the following types of ionizing radiation: gamma rays, bremsstrahlung X-rays, and electron beams. This guide does not include other aspects of radiation processing research, such as planning of the experimental design. Dosimetry must be considered as an integral part of the experimental design. The guide does not include dosimetry for irradiator

  5. Status of radiation processing dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, A.

    1993-01-01

    Several milestones have marked the field of radiation processing dosimetry since IMRP 7. Among them are the IAEA symposium on High Dose Dosimetry for Radiation Processing and the international Workshops on Dosimetry for Radiation Processing organized by the ASTM. Several standards have been...... or are being published by the ASTM in this field, both on dosimetry procedures and on the proper use of specific dosimeter systems. Several individuals are involved in this international cooperation which contribute significantly to the broader understanding of the role of dosimetry in radiation processing....... The importance of dosimetry is emphasized in the standards on radiation sterilization which are currently drafted by the European standards organization CEN and by the international standards organization ISO. In both standards, dosimetry plays key roles in characterization of the facility, in qualification...

  6. SIX2 Effects on Wilms Tumor Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janene Pierce

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Wilms tumor (WT blastema retains gene expression profiles characteristic of the multipotent nephron progenitor pool, or cap mesenchyme (CM, in the developing kidney. As a result, WT blastema and the CM are believed to represent contextual analogues of one another. Sine oculis homeobox 2 (SIX2 is a transcription factor expressed specifically in the CM, provides a critical mechanism for CM self-renewal, and remains persistently active in WT blastema, although its purpose in this childhood malignancy remains unclear. We hypothesized that SIX2, analogous to its function in development, confers a survival pathway to blastema, the putative WT stem cell. To test its functional significance in WT biology, wild-type SIX2 was overexpressed in the human WT cell line, WiT49. After validating this model, SIX2 effects on anchorage-independent growth, proliferation, invasiveness, canonical WNT pathway signaling, and gene expression of specific WNT pathway participants were evaluated. Relative to controls, WiT49 cells overexpressing SIX2 showed significantly enhanced anchorage-independent growth and early-passage proliferation representing surrogates of cell survival. Interestingly, overexpression of SIX2 generally repressed TCF/LEF-dependent canonical WNT signaling, which activates and coordinates both differentiation and stem pathways, but significantly heightened canonical WNT signaling through the survivin promoter, a mechanism that exclusively maintains the stem state. In summary, when overexpressed in a human WT cell line, SIX2 enhances cell survival and appears to shift the balance in WNT/β-catenin signaling away from a differentiation path and toward a stem cell survival path.

  7. Information on biological health effects of ionizing radiation and radionuclides: the rule of a web site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comte, A.; Gaillard-Lecanu, E.; Flury-Herard, A.; Ourly, F.; Hemidy, P.; Lallemand, J.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to provide a source of information on biological and health effects of radionuclides and ionizing radiation in an easy to use format. Reported work is made up of two distinct parts: data sheets for selected radionuclides and a web file. Data sheets: Specific radiation data sheets provide an overview of the properties, the environmental behaviour, the different pathways of human exposure and the biological and health consequences of selected radionuclides. Radionuclides that have been selected are those commonly dealt with in nuclear industry (and in other areas such as medicine) and released to the environment or naturally occurring (plutonium, tritium, carbon 14). Data sheets corresponding to the different radionuclides are based on the main sources of scientific information in dosimetry, epidemiology, radiobiology and radiation protection. These data sheets are intended for radiation protection specialists and physicians. They include: main physical and chemical characteristics, main radiation protection data: dose coefficients (public, workers), dose limits sources, total released estimate (nuclear industry, atmospheric tests, main pathway of human exposure and biological behaviour, biological and health effects, medical supervision, treatment a list of the main references, appendix providing accurate information. Web file: http://www-dsv.cea.fr/doc/carmin_ext/fond.php This web file provides a source of information on biological and health effects of ionizing radiation and biological basic knowledge of radiation protection. Available for consultation via Internet, compiled information provides, in a same file, subjects as varied as biological mechanisms, ionizing radiations action, biological and health effects, risk assessment This file is mainly intended to assist in informing and training of non-specialist readership (students, teaching on radiation protection basic knowledge. This electronic document is divided in three

  8. Interest of numerical dosimetry in radiation protection: mean of substitution or measurements consolidation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahaye, T.; Chau, Q.; Ferragut, A.; Gillot, J.Y.

    2003-01-01

    The use of calculation codes allows to reduce the costs and the time limits. These codes brings to operators elements to reinforce their projected dosimetry. In the cases of accidental overexposure, the numerical dosimetry comes in complement of clinical and biological investigations to give an estimation as precise as possible of the received dose. For particular situations where it does not exist an adapted instrumentation, the numerical dosimetry can substitute to conventional techniques used by regulatory dosimetry (project for aviation personnel). (N.C.)

  9. WE-G-BRA-01: Development of a Web-Based Dosimetry Training Tool for Therapy and Dosimetry Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, E; Hannum, W; Zeman, E; Kostich, M; Tracton, G; Church, J; Dean, R; Adams, R

    2012-06-01

    Training in clinical dosimetry is an important component of radiation therapy, dosimetry, and medical physics training programs. Based on our in-house treatment planning system, PLanUNC, we are developing and assessing a web-based dosimetry teaching tool to augment existing training programs. We surveyed radiation therapy program directors to assess the need for clinical dosimetry training tools. Based on survey results, we are developing a web-based dosimetry-training tool consisting of 10 modules containing didactic content based on the ASRT curriculum, student assessment, and hands-on treatment planning exercises. External content specialists reviewed the self-paced modules for accuracy and content validity. Two external dosimetry students were observed as they completed three sections, and were interviewed in-depth to evaluate the modules. This qualitative analysis combined features of usability testing with formative evaluation of instructional products. We revised the modules based on these data. Our next phase, quantitative evaluation, will assess the effectiveness of the modules, the quality of the interactivity and the degree of student engagement when completing the modules. Sixty-four percent of program directors indicated they had insufficient local resources for dosimetry training, and over 90% indicated interest in web-based training tools as teaching supplements. External evaluators indicated module content was appropriate and accurate. Students indicated the modules were easy to use with clear and understandable content. They were engaged when using the modules and motivated by the interactive components. They placed value on the exercises and the feedback they received. Inter-institutional evaluation improves the quality and generalizability of instructional modules. Carefully designed online learning modules are viewed as effective teaching tools by dosimetry students. The clinical dosimetry teaching tool will be made accessible to therapy and

  10. Glucinium dosimetry in beryl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kremer, M.

    1949-05-01

    The application of the method developed by Kolthoff and Sandell (1928) for the dosimetry of glucinium (beryllium) in beryl gives non-reproducible results with up to 20% discrepancies. This method recommends to separate beryllium and aluminium using 8 hydroxyquinoline and then to directly precipitate glucinium in the filtrate using ammonia. One possible reason of the problems generated by this method should be the formation of a volatile complex between beryllium and the oxine. This work shows that when the oxine is eliminated before the precipitation with ammonia the dosimetry of beryllium becomes accurate. The destruction of the oxine requires the dry evaporation of the filtrate, which is a long process. Thus the search for a reagent allowing the quantitative precipitation of beryllium in its solutions and in presence of oxine has been made. It has been verified also that the quantitative precipitation of the double beryllium and ammonium phosphate is not disturbed by the oxine in acetic buffer. This method, which gives good results, has also the advantage to separate beryllium from the alkaline-earth compounds still present in the filtrate. The report details the operation mode of the method: beryllium dosimetry using ammonium phosphate, aluminium-beryllium separation, application to beryl dosimetry (ore processing, insolubilization of silica, precipitation with ammonia, precipitation with oxine, precipitation of PO 4 NH 4 Gl, preciseness). (J.S.)

  11. Group: radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldas, L.V.E.

    1990-01-01

    The main activities of the radiation dosimetry group is described, including the calibration of instruments, sources and radioactive solutions and the determination of neutron flux; development, production and market dosimetric materials; development radiation sensor make the control of radiation dose received by IPEN workers; development new techniques for monitoring, etc. (C.G.C.)

  12. Solid state radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, P.R.

    1976-01-01

    Important recent developments provide accurate, sensitive, and reliable radiation measurements by using solid state radiation dosimetry methods. A review of the basic phenomena, devices, practical limitations, and categories of solid state methods is presented. The primary focus is upon the general physics underlying radiation measurements with solid state devices

  13. INDIVIDUAL DOSIMETRY SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Deadline...Deadline...Deadline...Deadline...Deadline...Deadline...   Individual dosimetry service We inform all staffs and users under regular dosimetric control that the dosimeters for the monitoring period JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2002 are available from their usual dispatchers. Please have your films changed before the 15th of January. The color of the dosimeter valid in JANUARY/FEBRUARY is WHITE.

  14. Dosimetry of pion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dicello, J.F.

    1975-01-01

    Negative pion beams are probably the most esoteric and most complicated type of radiation which has been suggested for use in clinical radiotherapy. Because of the limited availability of pion beams in the past, even to nuclear physicists, there exist relatively fewer basic data for this modality. Pion dosimetry is discussed

  15. Individual dosimetry service

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    We inform all staff and users under regular dosimetry control that the dosimeters for the monitoring period JULY-AUGUST 2004 are available from their usual dispatchers. Please have your films changed before the 15 JULY 2004. The color of the dosimeter valid in July-August 2004 is PINK.

  16. Dosimetry for electron beam from Microtron accelerator using chemical dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, Praveen; Nairy, Rajesha; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Narayana, Y.

    2014-01-01

    The Microtron is a simple, compact, low cost electron accelerator with excellent beam quality and it can accelerate electrons to relativistic energies. The variable energy Microtron at Mangalore University is used for R and D programmes in basic and applied areas of physics, chemistry, materials science, biological sciences, medical science and industry. While studying the effects of radiation, it is essential to have complete knowledge of absorbed dose. In the present study the absorbed dose and the uniformity of dose distribution at various points due to 8 MeV electron beam from Microtron accelerator has been calculated using different chemical dosimeters. From the dosimetry studies for Microtron accelerator, it is observed that the absorbed doses measured at various dose ranges from 2 Gy to 25 kGy using FBX dosimeters at very low doses, Fricke at intermediate doses and alanine and glutamine at higher doses, varied linearly with increasing electron counts. From the dosimetry studies it is observed that there is a linear relation between dose and electron numbers over a wide range of absorbed doses. It is evaluated that the electron counts of about 1.15 x 10 14 corresponds to an absorbed dose of 100 Gy. Fricke dosimetry was carried out to measure the uniformity in dose distribution at a distance of 30 cm from the beam exit window of the accelerator to ensure the availability of uniform irradiation field size. It is observed that a field size of about 4 x 4 cm is available at 30 cm distance from the beam exit window over which the dose distribution is uniform. The sample size during radiological studies using Microtron was restricted to less than 4 x 4 cm dimension at 30 cm distance from the beam exit window to ensure uniform dose distribution to the sample

  17. Biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinoehl-Kompa, Sabine; Baldauf, Daniela; Heller, Horst

    2009-01-01

    The report on the meeting of the Strahlenschutzkommission 2007 concerning biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure includes the following contributions: Adaptive response. The importance of DNA damage mechanisms for the biological efficiency of low-energy photons. Radiation effects in mammography: the relative biological radiation effects of low-energy photons. Radiation-induced cataracts. Carcinomas following prenatal radiation exposure. Intercellular apoptosis induction and low-dose irradiation: possible consequences for the oncogenesis control. Mechanistic models for the carcinogenesis with radiation-induced cell inactivation: application to all solid tumors in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Microarrays at low radiation doses. Mouse models for the analysis of biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. The bystander effect: observations, mechanisms and implications. Lung carcinoma risk of Majak workers - modeling of carcinogenesis and the bystander effect. Microbeam studies in radiation biology - an overview. Carcinogenesis models with radiation-induced genomic instability. Application to two epidemiological cohorts.

  18. Effect of different breathing patterns in the same patient on stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy dosimetry for primary renal cell carcinoma: A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham, Daniel; Kron, Tomas; Foroudi, Farshad; Siva, Shankar

    2013-01-01

    Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) for primary renal cell carcinoma (RCC) targets requires motion management strategies to verify dose delivery. This case study highlights the effect of a change in patient breathing amplitude on the dosimetry to organs at risk and target structures. A 73-year-old male patient was planned for receiving 26 Gy of radiation in 1 fraction of SABR for a left primary RCC. The patient was simulated with four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and the tumor internal target volume (ITV) was delineated using the 4DCT maximum intensity projection. However, the initially planned treatment was abandoned at the radiation oncologist's discretion after pretreatment cone-beam CT (CBCT) motion verification identified a greater than 50% reduction in superior to inferior diaphragm motion as compared with the planning 4DCT. This patient was resimulated with respiratory coaching instructions. To assess the effect of the change in breathing on the dosimetry to the target, each plan was recalculated on the data set representing the change in breathing condition. A change from smaller to larger breathing showed a 46% loss in planning target volume (PTV) coverage, whereas a change from larger breathing to smaller breathing resulted in an 8% decrease in PTV coverage. ITV coverage was similarly reduced by 8% in both scenarios. This case study highlights the importance of tools to verify breathing motion prior to treatment delivery. 4D image guided radiation therapy verification strategies should focus on not only verifying ITV margin coverage but also the effect on the surrounding organs at risk

  19. Proposal for an experiment at the SIN: contribution on πE3-beam dosimetry. Measurement of particle spectra after pion absorption in biologically interesting nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appel, H.; Boehmer, V.; Bueche, G.; Kluge, W.; Matthay, H.

    It is proposed to measure the energy spectra of light charged particles (protons, deuterons, tritons, 3 He- and 4 He-nuclei) and of neutrons, after the absorption of stopped pions in the biologically interesting hydrogen, oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen nuclei. In addition, the relative particle yield will be examined in tissue-like targets such as polyethylene, plexiglas, and water. Furthermore, it is proposed to measure the coincidence spectra of two particles emitted after absorption, as a function of the angle between their impulses. In the case of a pure three-body decay, these examinations may open the possibility of drawing conclusions about the heavy recoil nuclei arising during pion absorption. Particle energy and type will be determined by a combined time-of-flight/energy measurement with totally absorbent NaI or plastic detectors. The HF signal will serve as a start signal for time-of-flight measurements

  20. Effects of the regulatory inspections on nuclear medicine services executed by the Radioprotection and Dosimetry Services, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, C.E.G.R.; Farias, C.; Azevedo, E.M.; Nanni, G.J.; Vasconcellos, L.; Mendes, L.C.G.; Souza, L.A.C.; Franca, W.F.L.; Goncalves, M.

    2005-01-01

    The advances in the Nuclear Medicine auditing field performed by Nuclear Medicine Group of the Radiotherapy and Nuclear Medicine Division of the Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry are shown. The main aspects observed during the auditing are presented as well as the evolution of the non-conformities. Its is also shown that the occurrence of these non-conformities decreases year by year, primarily as a function of the severity of the auditing and the consciousness of the personal of Nuclear Medicine Services. Results point clearly to the importance of the coercion actions to guarantee a radiation protection level in compliance with the standards established by the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission. (author)

  1. Memory effects and systematic errors in the RL signal from fiber coupled Al2O3:C for medical dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkjær, Sidsel Marie Skov; Andersen, Claus Erik

    2010-01-01

    This review describes 40 years of experience gained at Risø The radioluminescence (RL) signal from fiber coupled Al2O3:C can be used for real-time in vivo dosimetry during radiotherapy. RL generally provides measurements with a reproducibility of 2% (one standard deviation). However, we have...... observed a non-random variability of the RL signal which means that the memory of the system is not fully reset by the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) readout. Here we report an example of how this memory affects the RL signal. Measurements were performed in the range of 0–4 Gy using four Al2O3:C...... crystals, in cycles of irradiation and subsequent readout. We found the memory to be persistent, influencing several successive RL measurements. The induced systematic error was found to be crystal dependent, but proportional to the measurement-to-measurement dose variation (approximately 1.4% per Gy)....

  2. Retrospective Dosimetry: Dose Analysis From Tooth Enamel Using Electron Spin Resonance (ESR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Rodzi Ali; Rahimah Abdul Rahim; Noraisyah Yusof; Syed Asraf Fahlawi Wafa Syed Mohd Ghazi; Juliana Mahamad Napiah; Yahaya Talib; Rehir Dahalan

    2014-01-01

    The radiation dose should be accurately measured in order to relate its effect to the cells. The assessment of dose usually performed using biological dosimetry techniques. However, the reduction of lymphocytes (white blood cells) after the time period results in inaccuracy of dose measurement. An alternative method used is the application of Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) using tooth enamel. In this study, tooth enamels were evaluated and used to measure the individual absorbed dose from the background. The basic tooth features that would affect dose measurement were discussed. The results show this technique is capable and effective for retrospective dose measurement and useful for the study of radiation effect to human. (author)

  3. Reactor Dosimetry State of the Art 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorbraak, Wim; Debarberis, Luigi; D'Hondt, Pierre; Wagemans, Jan

    2009-08-01

    Oral session 1: Retrospective dosimetry. Retrospective dosimetry of VVER 440 reactor pressure vessel at the 3rd unit of Dukovany NPP / M. Marek ... [et al.]. Retrospective dosimetry study at the RPV of NPP Greifswald unit 1 / J. Konheiser ... [et al.]. Test of prototype detector for retrospective neutron dosimetry of reactor internals and vessel / K. Hayashi ... [et al.]. Neutron doses to the concrete vessel and tendons of a magnox reactor using retrospective dosimetry / D. A. Allen ... [et al.]. A retrospective dosimetry feasibility study for Atucha I / J. Wagemans ... [et al.]. Retrospective reactor dosimetry with zirconium alloy samples in a PWR / L. R. Greenwood and J. P. Foster -- Oral session 2: Experimental techniques. Characterizing the Time-dependent components of reactor n/y environments / P. J. Griffin, S. M. Luker and A. J. Suo-Anttila. Measurements of the recoil-ion response of silicon carbide detectors to fast neutrons / F. H. Ruddy, J. G. Seidel and F. Franceschini. Measurement of the neutron spectrum of the HB-4 cold source at the high flux isotope reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory / J. L. Robertson and E. B. Iverson. Feasibility of cavity ring-down laser spectroscopy for dose rate monitoring on nuclear reactor / H. Tomita ... [et al.]. Measuring transistor damage factors in a non-stable defect environment / D. B. King ... [et al.]. Neutron-detection based monitoring of void effects in boiling water reactors / J. Loberg ... [et al.] -- Poster session 1: Power reactor surveillance, retrospective dosimetry, benchmarks and inter-comparisons, adjustment methods, experimental techniques, transport calculations. Improved diagnostics for analysis of a reactor pulse radiation environment / S. M. Luker ... [et al.]. Simulation of the response of silicon carbide fast neutron detectors / F. Franceschini, F. H. Ruddy and B. Petrović. NSV A-3: a computer code for least-squares adjustment of neutron spectra and measured dosimeter responses / J. G

  4. Eleventh DOE workshop on personnel neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Since its formation, the Office of Health (EH-40) has stressed the importance of the exchange of information related to and improvements in neutron dosimetry. This Workshop was the eleventh in the series sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). It provided a forum for operational personnel at DOE facilities to discuss current issues related to neutron dosimetry and for leading investigators in the field to discuss promising approaches for future research. A total of 26 papers were presented including the keynote address by Dr. Warren K. Sinclair, who spoke on, ''The 1990 Recommendations of the ICRP and their Biological Background.'' The first several papers discussed difficulties in measuring neutrons of different energies and ways of compensating or deriving correction factors at individual facilities. Presentations were also given by the US Navy and Air Force. Current research in neutron dosimeter development was the subject of the largest number of papers. These included a number on the development of neutron spectrometers

  5. On the metabolism and the biological effect of transuranics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskalev, Yu.I.; Zalikin, G.A.

    1976-01-01

    The paper deals with the metabolic behaviour and the biological effects of 237 Np, 241 Am, 244 Cm, and 252 Cf in rats and dogs with particular emphasis being placed on the tumour and non-tumour late effects. (author)

  6. Code of practice for clinical proton dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vynckier, S.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this document is to make recommendations for the determination of absorbed dose to tissue for clinical proton beams and to achieve uniformity in proton dosimetry. A Code of Practice (CoP) has been chosen, providing specific guidelines for the choice of the detector and the method of determination of absorbed dose for proton beams only. This CoP is confined specifically to the determination of absorbed dose and is not concerned with the biological effects of proton beams. It is recommended that dosimeters be calibrated by comparison with a calorimeter. If this is not available, a Faraday cup, or alter-natively, an ionization chamber, with a 60 Co calibration factor should be used. Physical parameters for determining the dose from tissue-equivalent ionization chamber measurements are given together with a worksheet. It is recommended that calibrations be carried out in water at the centre of the spread-out-Bragg-peak and that dose distributions be measured in a water phantom. It is estimated that the error in the calibrations will be less than +-5 per cent (1 S.D.) in all cases. Adoption and implementation of this CoP will facilitate the exchange of clinical information. (author). 34 refs.; 5 figs.; 5 tabs

  7. Proton dosimetry intercomparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatnitsky, S.; Siebers, J.; Miller, D.; Moyers, M.; Schaefer, M.; Jones, D.; Vynckier, S.; Hayakawa, Y.; Delacroix, S.; Isacsson, U.; Medin, J.; Kacperek, A.; Lomax, A.; Coray, A.; Kluge, H.; Heese, J.; Verhey, L.; Daftari, I.; Gall, K.; Lam, G.; Beck, T.; Hartmann, G.

    1996-01-01

    Background and purpose: Methods for determining absorbed dose in clinical proton beams are based on dosimetry protocols provided by the AAPM and the ECHED. Both groups recommend the use of air-filled ionization chambers calibrated in terms of exposure or air kerma in a 60 Co beam when a calorimeter or Faraday cup dosimeter is not available. The set of input data used in the AAPM and the ECHED protocols, especially proton stopping powers and w-value is different. In order to verify inter-institutional uniformity of proton beam calibration, the AAPM and the ECHED recommend periodic dosimetry intercomparisons. In this paper we report the results of an international proton dosimetry intercomparison which was held at Loma Linda University Medical Center. The goal of the intercomparison was two-fold: first, to estimate the consistency of absorbed dose delivered to patients among the participating facilities, and second, to evaluate the differences in absorbed dose determination due to differences in 60 Co-based ionization chamber calibration protocols. Materials and methods: Thirteen institutions participated in an international proton dosimetry intercomparison. The measurements were performed in a 15-cm square field at a depth of 10 cm in both an unmodulated beam (nominal accelerator energy of 250 MeV) and a 6-cm modulated beam (nominal accelerator energy of 155 MeV), and also in a circular field of diameter 2.6 cm at a depth of 1.14 cm in a beam with 2.4 cm modulation (nominal accelerator energy of 100 MeV). Results: The results of the intercomparison have shown that using ionization chambers with 60 Co calibration factors traceable to standard laboratories, and institution-specific conversion factors and dose protocols, the absorbed dose specified to the patient would fall within 3% of the mean value. A single measurement using an ionization chamber with a proton chamber factor determined with a Faraday cup calibration differed from the mean by 8%. Conclusion: The

  8. Dosimetry for food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    A Manual of Food Irradiation Dosimetry was published in 1977 under the auspices of the IAEA as Technical Reports Series No. 178. It was the first monograph of its kind and served as a reference in the field of radiation processing and in the development of standards. While the essential information about radiation dosimetry in this publication has not become obsolete, other publications on radiation dosimetry have become available which have provided useful information for incorporation in this updated version. There is already a Codex General Standard for Irradiated Foods and an associated Code of Practice for Operation of Irradiation Facilities used for Treatment of Food, issued in 1984 by the Codex Alimentarius Commission of the FAO/WHO Food Standard Programme. The Codex Standard contains provisions on irradiation facilities and process control which include, among other requirements, that control of the processes within facilities shall include the keeping of adequate records including quantitative dosimetry. Appendix A of the Standard provides an explanation of process control and dosimetric requirements in compliance with the Codex Standard. By 1999, over 40 countries had implemented national regulations or issued specific approval for certain irradiated food items/classes of food based on the principles of the Codex Standard and its Code of Practice. Food irradiation is thus expanding, as over 30 countries are now actually applying this process for the treatment of one or more food products for commercial purposes. Irradiated foods are being marketed at retail level in several countries. With the increasing recognition and application of irradiation as a sanitary and phytosanitary treatment of food based on the provisions of the Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures of the World Trade Organization, international trade in irradiated food is expected to expand during the next decade. It is therefore essential that proper dosimetry

  9. Characterisation of passive detectors for space dosimetry (DOBIES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhavere, F.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of the complex radiation field in space (consisting of neutrons, electrons and high-energy heavy charged particles) on biological samples are of high interest in the fields of radiobiology and exobiology. Radiation doses absorbed by biological samples must be quantified to allow the determination of the relationship between observed biological effects and the radiation dose. Together with the microgravity condition, the cosmic radiation greatly contributes to the different behaviour of biological samples in space compared to earth conditions. Special techniques and correction methods combining luminescence detectors and track etched detectors are required due to the presence of particles with a wide range of LET (Linear Energy Transfer) values. These doses can be different from those to astronauts, due to a different position in the spacecraft, different compositions of the samples, and different shielding. Previous dosimetric studies have always concentrated on doses to astronauts, while dosimetry for the biological samples has seldom been studied. The objective of this project is to develop a standard dosimetric method (as a combination of different techniques) to measure accurately the absorbed doses and equivalent doses in biological samples. A procedure for these measurements and the associated calculations will be developed and a standard measurement kit will be made for different biological and microbiological samples, for different packaging materials and for different positions in a spacecraft. A special case will be the dosimetry of samples located in external modules, like the EXPOSE hardware. Research on the responses of different detectors is needed to allow the correction for the specific radiation field in space. Therefore ground based experiments are necessary as well as space irradiations. Different types of dosimeters are used: (1) thermoluminescent (TL) detectors of different composition (LiF:Mg,Ti, LiF:Mg,Cu,P, CaF 2 :Mn, Al 2 O 3 :C

  10. Modern methods of personnel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraus, W.; Herrmann, D.; Kiesewetter, W.

    The physical properties of radiation detectors for personnel dosimetry are described and compared. The suitability of different types of dosimeters for operational and central monitoring of normal occupational exposure, for accident and catastrophe dosimetry and for background and space-flight dosimetry is discussed. The difficulties in interpreting the dosimeter reading with respect to the dose in individual body organs are discussed briefly. 430 literature citations (up to Spring 1966) are given

  11. The dosimetry of ionizing radiation

    CERN Document Server

    1990-01-01

    A continuation of the treatise The Dosimetry of Ionizing Radiation, Volume III builds upon the foundations of Volumes I and II and the tradition of the preceeding treatise Radiation Dosimetry. Volume III contains three comprehensive chapters on the applications of radiation dosimetry in particular research and medical settings, a chapter on unique and useful detectors, and two chapters on Monte Carlo techniques and their applications.

  12. Interlaboratory niobium dosimetry comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wille, P.

    1980-01-01

    For an interlaboratory comparison of neutron dosimetry using niobium the 93 sup(m)Nb activities of irradiated niobium monitors were measured. This work was performed to compare the applied techniques of dosimetry with Nb in different laboratories. The niobium monitors were irradiated in the fast breeder EBRII, USA and the BR2, Belgium. The monitors were dissolved and several samples were prepared. Their niobium contents were determined by the 94 Nb-count rates. since the original specific count rate was known. The KX radiations of the 93 sup(m)Nb of the samples and of a calibrated Nb-foil were compared. This foil was measured by PTB, Braunschweig and CBNM, Geel, which we additionally compared with the KX radiation of 88 Sr produced by a thin 88 Y source from a 88 Y-standard solution (PTB). (orig.) [de

  13. Neutron beam measurement dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaro, C.R.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes animal dosimetry studies and phantom measurements. During 1994, 12 dogs were irradiated at BMRR as part of a 4 fraction dose tolerance study. The animals were first infused with BSH and irradiated daily for 4 consecutive days. BNL irradiated 2 beagles as part of their dose tolerance study using BPA fructose. In addition, a dog at WSU was irradiated at BMRR after an infusion of BPA fructose. During 1994, the INEL BNCT dosimetry team measured neutron flux and gamma dose profiles in two phantoms exposed to the epithermal neutron beam at the BMRR. These measurements were performed as a preparatory step to the commencement of human clinical trials in progress at the BMRR

  14. Sixth symposium on neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This booklet contains all abstracts of papers presented in 13 sessions. Main topics: Cross sections and Kerma factors; analytical radiobiology; detectors for personnel monitoring; secondary charged particles and microdosimetric basis of q-value for neutrons; personnel dosimetry; concepts for radiation protection; ambient monitoring; TEPC and ion chambers in radiation protection; beam dosimetry; track detectors (CR-39); dosimetry at biomedical irradiation facilities; health physics at therapy facilities; calibration for radiation protection; devices for beam dosimetry (TLD and miscellaneous); therapy and biomedical irradiation facilities; treatment planning. (HP)

  15. Personnel radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The book contains the 21 technical papers presented at the Technical Committee Meeting to Elaborate Procedures and Data for the Intercomparison of Personnel Dosimeters organizaed by the IAEA on 22-26 April 1985. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. A list of areas in which additional research and development work is needed and recommendations for an IAEA-sponsored intercomparison program on personnel dosimetry is also included

  16. Dosimetry for Crystals Irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Lecomte, Pierre

    2005-01-01

    Before shipment to CMS, all PbWO4 crystals produced in China are irradiated there with 60 Co , in order to insure that the induced absorption coefficient is within specifications. Acceptance tests at CERNand at ENEA also include irradiation with gamma rays from 60 Co sources. There were initially discrepancies in quoted doses and doserates as well as in induced absorption coefficients. The present work resolves the discrepancies in irradiation measurements and defines common dosimetry methods for consistency checks between irradiation facilities.

  17. Effectiveness of a biological control agent Palexorista gilvoides in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Effectiveness of a biological control agent Palexorista gilvoides in controlling Gonometa podorcarpi in conifer ... gilvoides as a potential biological control agent for G. podocarpi. Field and laboratory studies further established that P. .... version for windows (SPSS, 2002). Results. Gonometa podocarpi was present in.

  18. Dosimetry in Phototherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huurto, L. [STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland); Snellman, E. [Department of Dermatology, Central Hospital of Paeijaet-Haeme, Lahti (Finland)

    2003-06-01

    Artificial ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is used in phototherapy, the medical treatment of various skin diseases like psoriasis and atopic eczema. Both solar and artificial UVR exposure have also carcinogenic effects. Long term phototherapy with high cumulative UVR doses is shown to be risk for squamous cell carcinoma. Various biological effects are strongly dependent of the wavelength of the UVR. UV-B-radiation with short wavelength (280 - 320 nm) is more effective to cause sunburn of the skin than UV-A - radiation with longer wavelength (320 - 400 nm). The correlation between wavelength of UVR and the tissue sensitivity is described by action spectra. An action spectrum is a mathematical model describing the efficiency of UVR of different wavelength for producing a certain biological phenomena. Specific action spectra have been determined for the most important health effects like erythema and skin cancers as regard squamous cell carcinomas and basal cell carcinomas. (orig.)

  19. Dosimetry: an ARDENT topic

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2012-01-01

    The first annual ARDENT workshop took place in Vienna from 20 to 23 November. The workshop gathered together the Early-Stage Researchers (ESR) and their supervisors, plus other people involved from all the participating institutions.   “The meeting, which was organised with the local support of the Austrian Institute of Technology, was a nice opportunity for the ESRs to get together, meet each other, and present their research plans and some preliminary results of their work,” says Marco Silari, a member of CERN Radiation Protection Group and the scientist in charge of the programme. Two full days were devoted to a training course on radiation dosimetry, delivered by renowned experts. The workshop closed with a half-day visit to the MedAustron facility in Wiener Neustadt. ARDENT (Advanced Radiation Dosimetry European Network Training) is a Marie Curie ITN project funded under EU FP7 with €4 million. The project focuses on radiation dosimetry exploiting se...

  20. Topical Day on Biological Effects of Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baatout, S.; Jacquet, P.

    1997-05-15

    The topical day has been focussed on the potential effects of ionizing radiation on human health. A general overview on molecular and biophysical aspects of radiation, its effects on cells and organisms, and the contribution of radiobiology to radiation protection and risk assessment is given. The genetic effects of radiation and its effects on the developing organism, the effects of radiation on the cell cycle and the mechanisms of radiation induced apoptosis were also discussed.

  1. Topical Day on Biological Effects of Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baatout, S.; Jacquet, P.

    1997-01-01

    The topical day has been focussed on the potential effects of ionizing radiation on human health. A general overview on molecular and biophysical aspects of radiation, its effects on cells and organisms, and the contribution of radiobiology to radiation protection and risk assessment is given. The genetic effects of radiation and its effects on the developing organism, the effects of radiation on the cell cycle and the mechanisms of radiation induced apoptosis were also discussed

  2. Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2009-08-28

    The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at Hanford. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with 10 CFR 835, DOELAP, DOE-RL, ORP, PNSO, and Hanford contractor requirements. The dosimetry system is operated by PNNL’s Hanford External Dosimetry Program (HEDP) which provides dosimetry services to all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee (HPDAC) which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. The first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture (ERICA) database was designated Revision 0. Revision numbers that are whole numbers reflect major revisions typically involving changes to all chapters in the document. Revision numbers that include a decimal fraction reflect minor revisions, usually restricted to selected chapters or selected pages in the document.

  3. Is Reintroduction Biology an Effective Applied Science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Gemma; Canessa, Stefano; Clarke, Rohan H; Ingwersen, Dean; Armstrong, Doug P; Seddon, Philip J; Ewen, John G

    2017-11-01

    Reintroduction biology is a field of scientific research that aims to inform translocations of endangered species. We review two decades of published literature to evaluate whether reintroduction science is evolving in its decision-support role, as called for by advocates of evidence-based conservation. Reintroduction research increasingly addresses a priori hypotheses, but remains largely focused on short-term population establishment. Similarly, studies that directly assist decisions by explicitly comparing alternative management actions remain a minority. A small set of case studies demonstrate full integration of research in the reintroduction decision process. We encourage the use of tools that embed research in decision-making, particularly the explicit consideration of multiple management alternatives because this is the crux of any management decisions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Biological effects in lymphocytes irradiated with 99mTc: determination of the curve dose-response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Romero Marcilio Barros Matias de

    2002-08-01

    Biological dosimetry estimates the absorbed dose taking into account changes in biological parameters. The most used biological indicator of an exposition to ionizing radiation is the quantification of chromosomal aberrations of lymphocytes from irradiated individuals. The curves of dose versus induced biological effects, obtained through bionalyses, are used in used in retrospective evaluations of the dose, mainly in the case of accidents. In this research, a simple model for electrons and photons transports was idealized to simulate the irradiation of lymphocytes with 99m Tc, representing a system used for irradiation of blood cells. The objective of the work was to establish a curve of dose versus frequencies of chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes of human blood. For the irradiation of blood samples micro spheres of human serum of albumin (HSAM) market with 99m Tc were used, allowing the irradiation of blood with different administered activities of 99m Tc, making possible the study the cytogenetical effects as a function of such activities. The conditions of irradiation in vivo using HSAM spheres marked with 99m Tc were simulated with MCNP 4C (Monte Carlo N-Particle) code to obtain the dose-response curve. Soft tissue composition was employed to simulate blood tissue and the analyses of the curve of dose versus biological effect showed a linear quadratic response of the unstable chromosomal aberrations. As a result, the response of dose versus chromosomal aberrations of blood irradiation with 99m Tc was best fitted by the curve Y=(8,99 ±2,06) x 1- -4 + (1,24 ±0,62) x 10 -2 D + (5,67 ± 0,64) x 10 -2 D 2 . (author)

  5. Solar ultraviolet radiation effects on biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffey, B.L.

    1991-01-01

    This extensive review discusses the topic under the following headings: ultraviolet climatology, molecular and cellular ultraviolet photobiology (absorption, photoproducts, repair), effects of solar UVR on aquatic life (phyto and zooplankton), plants and humans. The section on human effects includes tanning, photo-aging, non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancers and the effects of solar UVR on the eye. (UK)

  6. Statistical differences and systematic effect on measurement procedure in thermoluminescent dosimetry of the Iodine-125 brachytherapy seed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeituni, Carlos A.; Moura, Eduardo S.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M.; Manzoli, Jose E.; Moura, Joao Augusto; Feher, Anselmo, E-mail: czeituni@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP) Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Karam, Dib [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP Leste), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola de Artes, Ciencias e Humanidades

    2009-07-01

    In order to provide the dosimetry for Iodine-125 seed production in Brazil, Harshaw thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100) will be used. Even if measurements with TLD-100 of the same batch of fabrication are performed, the response will not be the same. As a consequence, they must be measured one by one. These dosimeters are LiF type with a micro-cube (1 mm x 1 mm x 1 mm) shape. Irradiations were performed using Iodine-125 seeds to guarantee the same absorbed dose of 5 Gy in each dosimeter. It has been used a Solid Water Phantom with three concentrically circle with 20 mm, 50 mm and 70 mm diameters. The angle of positions used was 0 deg, 30 deg, 60 deg and 90 deg. Of course there are 2 positions in 0 deg and 90 deg and 4 positions in 30 deg and 60 deg. These complete procedures were carried out five times in order to compare the data and minimize the systematic error. The iodine-125 seed used in the experiment was take off in each measure and put again turning his position 180 deg to guarantee the systematic error was minimized. This paper presents also a little discussion about the statistical difference in the measurement and the calculation procedure to determine the systematic error in these measurements. (author)

  7. Iron diminishes the in vitro biological effect of vanadium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanistic pathways underlying inflammatory injury following exposures to vanadium-containing compounds are not defined. We tested the postulate that the in vitro biological effect of vanadium results from its impact on iron homeostasis. Human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells ex...

  8. Physical dosimetry and biological indicators of carcinogenic risk in a cohort of persons exposed to unhealthy ecological factors following the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orel, V E; Tereschenki, V M; Czyatkovskaya, N N; Mazepa, M G; Buzunov, V A

    1998-01-01

    The April 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident caused ecological changes in the Ovruch State forests in the Zhytomir oblast in the Ukraine. The highest radioactivity existed in moss, followed by the pine-forest substrate and soil. During 1984-1985, the pine needles were primarily surface contaminated, whereas during 1986-1988, they were contaminated secondarily. Radioactivity in air was highest (1.07+/-0.185 Bq/l) during dry and sunny weather and when trees were felled; the lowest levels (0.196+/-0.044 Bq/l) occurred during periods of stable snow coverage. Between 1987 and 1989 (i.e., after the Chernobyl accident), the caesium levels in forestry employees exceeded by 13.9-fold the average levels found in the Ukrainian Polessje population. Ovruch forest guards and woodcutters had the highest effective equivalent doses of radiation, and they therefore exhibited the highest carcinogenic risk.

  9. The program of international intercomparison of accident dosimetry; Le programme d'intercomparaison internationale de dosimetrie d'accident 10-12 juin 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-06-01

    The French institute of radioprotection and nuclear safety (IRSN) has carried out in June 2002 an international intercomparison program for the testing of the physical and biological accident dosimetry techniques. The intercomparison is jointly organized by the IRSN and the OECD-NEA with the sustain of the European commission and the collaboration of the CEA centre of Valduc (France). About 30 countries have participated to this program. Each country has supplied its own dosimeters and biological samples which have been irradiated using the Silene reactor of CEA-Valduc or a {sup 60}Co source. These experiments allow to test the new dosimetric techniques that have been developed since the previous intercomparison program (1993) and to confirm or improve the performances of older techniques. Aside from the intercomparison exercise, this report makes a status of the known radiological accidents and of the effects of high doses of ionizing radiations on human health (symptoms, therapeutics). It explains the phenomenology of criticality accidents, the prevention means, and the history of such accidents up to the Tokai-Mura one in 1999. Finally, the dosimetry of criticality is presented with its physical and biological techniques. (J.S.)

  10. Placebo Effects: Biological, Clinical and Ethical Advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaptchuk, Ted J; Miller, Franklin; Benedetti, Fabrizio

    2010-01-01

    For many years, placebos have been conceptualised by their inert content and their use as controls in clinical trials and treatments in clinical practice. Recent research demonstrates that placebo effects are genuine psychobiological phenomenon attributable to the overall therapeutic context, and that placebo effects can be robust in both laboratory and clinical settings. Evidence has also emerged that placebo effects can exist in clinical practice, even if no placebo is given. Further promotion and integration of laboratory and clinical research will allow advances in the ethical harnessing of placebo mechanisms that are inherent in routine clinical care and the potential use of treatments to primarily promote placebo effects. PMID:20171404

  11. Estimation of absorbed dose of radiosensitive organs and effective sose in patients underwent abdominopelvic spiral CT scan using impact CT patient dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayoub Amirnia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Due to the presence of radiosensitive organs in the abdominopelvic region and increasing the number of requests for CT scan examinations, concerns about increasing radiation doses in patients has been greatly elevated. Therefore, the goal of this study was to determine the absorbed dose of radiosensitive organs and the effective dose in patients underwent abdominopelvic CT scan using ImPACT CT patient dosimetry Calculator (version 1.0.4, Imaging Performance Assessment on Computed Tomography, www.impactscan.org. Methods: This prospective cross-sectional study was conducted in Imam Reza Hospital from November to February 2015 February 2015 in the Imam Reza Hospital, in Urmia, Iran. The demographic and dosimetric information of 100 patients who underwent abdominopelvic CT scan in a 6-slice CT scanner were obtained through the data collection forms. The demographic data of the patients included age, weight, gender, and BMI. The dosimetric parameters included pitch value, CT dose volume index (CTDIvol, dose-length product (DLP, tube voltage, tube current, exposure time, collimation size, scan length, and scan time. To determine the absorbed dose of radiosensitive organs and also the effective dose in patients, ImPACT CT patient dosimetry calculator was used. Results: The results of this study demonstrated that the mean and standard deviation (SD of patients' effective dose in abdominopelvic CT scan was 4.927±0.164 mSv. The bladder in both genders had the greatest mean organ dose, which was 64.71±17.15 mGy for men and 77.56±18.48 mGy for women (P<0.001. Conclusion: The effective dose values of this examination are in the same range as previous studies, as well as International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP recommendations. However, the radiation dose from CT scan has the largest contribution to the medical imaging. According to the ALARA principle, it is recommended that the scan parameters, especially mAs, should be

  12. The ‘cutting away’ of potential secondary electron tracks explains the effects of beam size and detector wall density in small-field photon dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khee Looe, Hui; Delfs, Björn; Poppinga, Daniela; Jiang, Ping; Harder, Dietrich; Poppe, Björn

    2018-01-01

    The well-known field-size dependent overresponse in small-field photon-beam dosimetry of solid-state detectors equipped with very thin sensitive volumes, such as the PTW microDiamond, cannot be caused by the photon and electron interactions within these sensitive layers because they are only a few micrometers thick. The alternative explanation is that their overresponse is caused by the combination of two effects, the modification of the secondary electron fluence profile (i) by a field size too small to warrant lateral secondary electron equilibrium and (ii) by the density-dependent electron ranges in the structural detector materials placed in front of or backing the sensitive layer. The present study aims at the numerical demonstration and visualization of this combined mechanism. The lateral fluence profiles of the secondary electrons hitting a 1 µm thick scoring layer were Monte-Carlo simulated by modelling their generation and transport in the upstream or downstream adjacent layers of thickness 0.6 mm and densities from 0.0012 to 3 g cm‑3, whose atomic composition was constantly kept water-like. The scoring layer/adjacent layer sandwich was placed in an infinite water phantom irradiated by circular 60Co, 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams with diameters from 3 to 40 mm. The interpretation starts from the ideal case of lateral secondary electron equilibrium, where the Fano theorem excludes any density effect. If the field size is then reduced, electron tracks potentially originating from source points outside the field border will then be numerically ‘cut away’. This geometrical effect reduces the secondary electron fluence at the field center, but the magnitude of this reduction also varies with the density-dependent electron ranges in the adjacent layers. This combined mechanism, which strongly depends on the photon spectrum, explains the field size and material density effect on the response of detectors with very thin sensitive layers used in small

  13. The Importance of Dosimetry Standardization in Radiobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrosiers, Marc; DeWerd, Larry; Deye, James; Lindsay, Patricia; Murphy, Mark K; Mitch, Michael; Macchiarini, Francesca; Stojadinovic, Strahinja; Stone, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Radiation dose is central to much of radiobiological research. Precision and accuracy of dose measurements and reporting of the measurement details should be sufficient to allow the work to be interpreted and repeated and to allow valid comparisons to be made, both in the same laboratory and by other laboratories. Despite this, a careful reading of published manuscripts suggests that measurement and reporting of radiation dosimetry and setup for radiobiology research is frequently inadequate, thus undermining the reliability and reproducibility of the findings. To address these problems and propose a course of action, the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) brought together representatives of the radiobiology and radiation physics communities in a workshop in September, 2011. The workshop participants arrived at a number of specific recommendations as enumerated in this paper and they expressed the desirability of creating dosimetry standard operating procedures (SOPs) for cell culture and for small and large animal experiments. It was also felt that these SOPs would be most useful if they are made widely available through mechanism(s) such as the web, where they can provide guidance to both radiobiologists and radiation physicists, be cited in publications, and be updated as the field and needs evolve. Other broad areas covered were the need for continuing education through tutorials at national conferences, and for journals to establish standards for reporting dosimetry. This workshop did not address issues of dosimetry for studies involving radiation focused at the sub-cellular level, internally-administered radionuclides, biodosimetry based on biological markers of radiation exposure, or dose reconstruction for epidemiological studies.

  14. Biological effects of water reservoir radioactive contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashneva, N.I.

    1983-01-01

    Radiation damage to fresh water fishes at early stages of ontogenesis is revealed only during the spawn incubation in a solution with 10 -5 to 10 -3 Cu/l radioactivity and at relatively high dosages exceeding 500-1000 rad. Damaging effect of a fission product mixture of 9, 30 and 100 day age as well as of several separate radionuclides on embryogenesis of freshwater fishes depends mainly on fish species, concentration, toxicity, chemical form of radionuclides in the residence medium, on peculiarities of metabolism between the aqueous medium and an organism, stage of the embryo development by the moment of radiation effect and duration of this effect

  15. Current research in Canada on biological effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marko, A.M.

    1980-05-01

    A survey of current research in Canada on the biological effects of ionizing radiation has been compiled. The list of projects has been classified according to structure (organizational state of the test system) as well as according to the type of effects. Using several assumptions, ballpark estimates of expenditures on these activities have been made. Agencies funding these research activities have been tabulated and the break-down of research in government laboratories and in academic institutions has been designated. Wherever possible, comparisons have been made outlining differences or similarities that exist between the United States and Canada concerning biological radiation research. It has been concluded that relevant research in this area in Canada is inadequate. Wherever possible, strengths and weaknesses in radiation biology programs have been indicated. The most promising course for Canada to follow is to support adequately fundamental studies of the biological effects of radiation. (auth)

  16. Quality audit service of the IAEA for radiation processing dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, K.; Girzikowsky, R.

    1996-01-01

    The mandate of the International Atomic Energy Agency includes assistance to Member States to establish nuclear technologies safely and effectively. In pursuit of this, a quality audit service for dosimetry relevant to radiation processing was initiated as a key element of the High-Dose Standardization Programme of the IAEA. The standardization of dosimetry for radiation processing provides a justification for the regulatory approval of irradiated products and their unrestricted international trade. In recent times, the Agency's Dosimetry Laboratory has placed concentrated effort towards establishing a quality assurance programme based on the ISO 9000 series documents. The need for reliable and accurate dosimetry for radiation processing is increasing in Member States and we can envisage a definite role for the SSDLs in such a programme. (author). 10 refs, 3 figs

  17. Advanced materials in radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Bruzzi, M; Nava, F; Pini, S; Russo, S

    2002-01-01

    High band-gap semiconductor materials can represent good alternatives to silicon in relative dosimetry. Schottky diodes made with epitaxial n-type 4 H SiC and Chemical Vapor Deposited diamond films with ohmic contacts have been exposed to a sup 6 sup 0 Co gamma-source, 20 MeV electrons and 6 MV X photons from a linear accelerator to test the current response in on-line configuration in the dose range 0.1-10 Gy. The released charge as a function of the dose and the radiation-induced current as a function of the dose-rate are found to be linear. No priming effects have been observed using epitaxial SiC, due to the low density of lattice defects present in this material.

  18. Biological effects and hazards of radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boas, J.F.; Solomon, S.B.

    1990-01-01

    Radiation induced carcinogenesis and mutagenesis form the main risk to health from exposure to low levels of radiation. This risk effects can be at least qualitatively understood by considering the effects of radiation on cell DNA. Whilst exposure to high levels of radiation results in a number of identifiable effects, exposure to low levels of radiation may result in effects which only manifest themselves after many years. Risk estimates for low levels of radiation have been derived on the basis of a number of assumptions. In the case of uranium mine workers a major hazard arises from the inhalation of radon daughters. Whilst the correlation between radon daughter exposure and lung cancer incidence is well established, the numerical value of the risk factor is the subject of controversy. ICRP 50 gives a value of 10 cases per 10 6 person-years at risk per WLM (range 5-15 x 10 -6 PYR -1 WLM -1 ). The effect of smoking on lung cancer incidence rates amongst miners is also controversial. Nevertheless, smoking by miners should be discouraged

  19. The biological effects of childhood trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bellis, Michael D; Zisk, Abigail

    2014-04-01

    Trauma in childhood is a psychosocial, medical, and public policy problem with serious consequences for its victims and for society. Chronic interpersonal violence in children is common worldwide. Developmental traumatology, the systemic investigation of the psychiatric and psychobiological effects of chronic overwhelming stress on the developing child, provides a framework and principles when empirically examining the neurobiological effects of pediatric trauma. This article focuses on peer-reviewed literature on the neurobiological sequelae of childhood trauma in children and in adults with histories of childhood trauma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Biological effects of fruit and vegetables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, L. O.; Krath, B.; Ravn-Haren, Gitte

    2006-01-01

    A strong and persistent effect of plant-derived foods on the prevention of lifestyle diseases has emerged from observational studies. Several groups of constituents in plants have been identified as potentially health promoting in animal studies, including cholesterol-lowering factors, antioxidants...

  1. Canadian space agency discipline working group for space dosimetry and radiation science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waker, Anthony; Waller, Edward; Lewis, Brent; Bennett, Leslie; Conroy, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Full text: One of the great technical challenges in the human and robotic exploration of space is the deleterious effect of radiation on humans and physical systems. The magnitude of this challenge is broadly understood in terms of the sources of radiation, however, a great deal remains to be done in the development of instrumentation, suitable for the space environment, which can provide real-time monitoring of the complex radiation fields encountered in space and a quantitative measure of potential biological risk. In order to meet these research requirements collaboration is needed between experimental nuclear instrumentation scientists, theoretical scientists working on numerical modeling techniques and radiation biologists. Under the auspices of the Canadian Space Agency such a collaborative body has been established as one of a number of Discipline Working Groups. Members of the Space Dosimetry and Radiation Science working group form a collaborative network across Canada including universities, government laboratories and the industrial sector. Three central activities form the core of the Space Dosimetry and Radiation Science DWG. An instrument sub-group is engaged in the development of instruments capable of gamma ray, energetic charged particle and neutron dosimetry including the ability to provide dosimetric information in real-time. A second sub-group is focused on computer modeling of space radiation fields in order to assess the performance of conceptual designs of detectors and dosimeters or the impact of radiation on cellular and sub-cellular biological targets and a third sub-group is engaged in the study of the biological effects of space radiation and the potential of biomarkers as a method of assessing radiation impact on humans. Many working group members are active in more than one sub-group facilitating communication throughout the whole network. A summary progress-report will be given of the activities of the Discipline Working Group and the

  2. Relocation of Dosimetry Service

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    The Dosimetry Service is moving from Building 24 to Building 55 and will therefore be closed on Friday, March 30. From Monday, April 2 onwards you will find us in building 55/1-001. Please note that during that day we might still have some problems with the internet connections and cannot fully guarantee normal service procedures. The service's opening hours and telephone number will not change as a result of the move 8.30 - 12.00, afternoons closed Tel. 72155

  3. Individual dosimetry and calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefert, M.; Nielsen, M.

    1996-01-01

    In 1995 both the Individual Dosimetry and Calibration Sections worked under the condition of a status quo and concentrated fully on the routine part of their work. Nevertheless, the machine for printing the bar code which will be glued onto the film holder and hence identify the people when entering into high radiation areas was put into operation and most of the holders were equipped with the new identification. As far as the Calibration Section is concerned the project of the new source control system that is realized by the Technical Support Section was somewhat accelerated

  4. Heavy-ion dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimmerling, W.

    1980-03-01

    This lecture deals with some of the more important physical characteristics of relativistic heavy ions and their measurement, with beam delivery and beam monitoring, and with conventional radiation dosimetry as used in the operation of the BEVALAC biomedical facility for high energy heavy ions (Lyman and Howard, 1977; BEVALAC, 1977). Even so, many fundamental aspects of the interaction of relativistic heavy ions with matter, including important atomic physics and radiation chemical considerations, are not discussed beyond the reminder that such additional understanding is required before an adequte perspective of the problem can be attained

  5. Fast neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    This progress report concentrates on two major areas of dosimetry research: measurement of fast neutron kerma factors for several elements for monochromatic and white spectrum neutron fields and determination of the response of thermoluminescent phosphors to various ultra-soft X-ray energies and beta-rays. Dr. Zhixin Zhou from the Shanghai Institute of Radiation Medicine, People's Republic of China brought with him special expertise in the fabrication and use of ultra-thin TLD materials. Such materials are not available in the USA. The rather unique properties of these materials were investigated during this grant period

  6. INDIVIDUAL DOSIMETRY SERVICE

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    Personnel in the distribution groups Aleph, Delphi, L3, Opal who also work for other experiments than at LEP, should contact their dispatchers to explain their activities for the future, after LEP dismantling in order to be maintained on the regular distribution list at Individual Dosimetry ServiceWe inform all staffs and users under regular dosimetric control that the dosimeters for the monitoring period JULY/AUGUST are available from their usual dispatchers.Please have your films changed before the 10th of July.The colour of the dosimeter valid in JULY/AUGUST is PINK.

  7. Development of technology for biological dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Gyu; Kim, Kug Chan; Lee, Kang Sik; Kim, Jin Kyu; Chun, Ki Jung; Shim, Hye Won; Park, Seon Young

    1997-07-01

    Adult male rats were treated a single, whole body exposure to a dose of 0.1, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 5, 7 and 9 Gy. The animal were sacrificed 6, 24, 48, 72, 96 and 212 hours following exposure. Enzyme activity changes such as alkaline phosphatase, GOT, creating kinase, MDH and LDH in rat serum as biochemical indicators useful for evaluating radiation exposure were measured. An competitive enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) has been developed to measure acute phase reactants (APRs) in rat serum after gamma-irradiation. Rat alpha-2 macroglobulin, alpha-1 acid glycoprotein, haptoglobin, ceruloplasmin, C-reactive protein and alpha-1 antitrypsin were purified from the plasma of turpentine treated rats. In vitro somatic mutation induced by gamma-irradiation and pentachlorophenol (PCP) which is representative of chemical pollutant was measured at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphorybosyl transferase (HPRT) locus in human T-lymphocytes by a cell cloning assay. Mutant cells were selected by their ability to form a clone in the presence of purine analogue 6-thioguanine. Reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction technique was needed for the mutation spectrum to discriminate combined exposure to radiation and chemicals. (author). 98 refs., 7 tabs., 47 figs.

  8. OSL and TL of Resistors of Mobile Phones for Retrospective Accident Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. I.; Kim, J. L.; Pradhan, A. S.; Chang, I.; Kim, B. H.

    2012-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and thermoluminescence (TL) of ubiquitous materials continue to draw wider attention for individual dosimetry in nuclear and radiation accidents. Use of ubiquitous objects for radiation dosimetry is preferred because the affected persons in such unexpected events are usually not covered by personal dosimetry services and do not carry personal dosimeters. Often accident sites do not have area monitoring system in place. As the main concern of the dosimetry is health effects, a quick distinction of level of exposures of the affected persons for the required medical care becomes important in all accidents involving radiation. Both in large scale nuclear accidents such Fukushima, Chernobyl or Hiroshima and Nagasaki where large population around the accident site get exposed to radiation (evacuation is based on doses) and in smaller but panicky events, such as misuse of radiological exposure device (RED), radiological dispersive device (RDD: 'Dirty Bomb'), improvised nuclear device (IND) and deliberate dispersal of radioactive contaminants, a need for an ubiquitous personal dosimeter is well recognized. As biological dosimetry systems are yet to become viable for measurements of doses with required accuracy and speed, use of physical dosimeters is often explored. Among the various types of physical dosimetry systems, use of TL and OSL by processing common material such as bricks or tiles and measuring the doses cumulated for long periods of time has already become an accepted tool for large scale nuclear accidents such as Hiroshima and Nagasaki or Chernobyl involving higher doses. In the other potential cases of unexpected situations where the doses encountered could be much lower (even to escape the range of remotely installed area monitors), the need to measure even the low doses in shortest possible time becomes important. It is often realized that in such situations, the main problem could become the panic at the work place

  9. Biological effects of fruit and vegetables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, L. O.; Krath, B.; Ravn-Haren, Gitte

    2006-01-01

    , providing 600hairspg fruit and vegetables/d or in the controls a carbohydrate-rich drink to balance energy intake. Surrogate markers of oxidative damage to DNA, protein and lipids, enzymic defence and lipid metabolism were determined in blood and urine. It was found that a high intake of fruit...... and vegetables tends to increase the stability of lipids towards oxidative damage. Markers of oxidative enzymes indicate a steady increase in glutathione peroxidase (GPX1) activity in erythrocytes during intervention with fruit and vegetables but there is no effect on GPX1 transcription levels in leucocytes....... No change occurs in glutathione-conjugating or -reducing enzyme activities in erythrocytes or plasma, and there are no effects on the transcription of genes involved in phase 2 enzyme induction or DNA repair in leucocytes. Fruit and vegetable intake decreases the level of total cholesterol and LDL...

  10. Biological and therapeutical effects of Radon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deetjen, P. [Institute of Physiologie and Balneologie, University of Innsbruck (Austria)

    1998-12-31

    In spas with a somewhat elevated Radon{sup 222} (Rn) activity (between 300 and 3000 Bq/l), the empirical medicine ended - in all parts of the world - with the same list of indications. It mainly includes the more painful rheumatic diseases such as deformation or degeneration of the joints and non bacterial inflammation of muscles, tendons or joints; Morbus Bechterew and other diseases of the vertebral column like spondylosis, spondylarthrosis or osteochondrosis. While informer times these effects were seldom documented in an objective manner, in recent years several prospective randomized double-blind studies proved the pain reducing efficacy of Radon therapy in patients with cervical pain syndromes, with chronic polyarthritis or with Morbus Bechterew. Studies in experimental animal models have accumulated remarkable data in organs, tissue and cultured cells that provide a rationale to explain the observed effects of Radon therapy in patients. (author)

  11. Biological effects of fruit and vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragsted, Lars O; Krath, Britta; Ravn-Haren, Gitte; Vogel, Ulla B; Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Bo Jensen, Per; Loft, Steffen; Rasmussen, Salka E; Sandstrom, The late BrittMarie; Pedersen, Anette

    2006-02-01

    A strong and persistent effect of plant-derived foods on the prevention of lifestyle diseases has emerged from observational studies. Several groups of constituents in plants have been identified as potentially health promoting in animal studies, including cholesterol-lowering factors, antioxidants, enzyme inducers, apoptosis inducers etc. In human intervention studies the dose levels achieved tend to be lower than the levels found to be effective in animals and sampling from target organs is often not possible. A controlled dietary human intervention study was performed with forty-three volunteers, providing 600 g fruit and vegetables/d or in the controls a carbohydrate-rich drink to balance energy intake. Surrogate markers of oxidative damage to DNA, protein and lipids, enzymic defence and lipid metabolism were determined in blood and urine. It was found that a high intake of fruit and vegetables tends to increase the stability of lipids towards oxidative damage. Markers of oxidative enzymes indicate a steady increase in glutathione peroxidase (GPX1) activity in erythrocytes during intervention with fruit and vegetables but there is no effect on GPX1 transcription levels in leucocytes. No change occurs in glutathione-conjugating or -reducing enzyme activities in erythrocytes or plasma, and there are no effects on the transcription of genes involved in phase 2 enzyme induction or DNA repair in leucocytes. Fruit and vegetable intake decreases the level of total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol, but does not affect sex hormones. In conclusion, it has been shown that total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol, markers of peripheral lipid oxidation, and erythrocyte GPX1 activity are affected by high intakes of fruit and vegetables. This finding provides support for a protective role of dietary fruit and vegetables against CVD.

  12. Palytoxin and Analogs: Biological and Ecological Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vítor Ramos

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Palytoxin (PTX is a potent marine toxin that was originally found in soft corals from tropical areas of the Pacific Ocean. Soon after, its occurrence was observed in numerous other marine organisms from the same ecological region. More recently, several analogs of PTX were discovered, remarkably all from species of the dinoflagellate genus Ostreopsis. Since these dinoflagellates are also found in other tropical and even in temperate regions, the formerly unsuspected broad distribution of these toxins was revealed. Toxicological studies with these compounds shows repeatedly low LD50 values in different mammals, revealing an acute toxic effect on several organs, as demonstrated by different routes of exposure. Bioassays tested for some marine invertebrates and evidences from environmental populations exposed to the toxins also give indications of the high impact that these compounds may have on natural food webs. The recognition of its wide distribution coupled with the poisoning effects that these toxins can have on animals and especially on humans have concerned the scientific community. In this paper, we review the current knowledge on the effects of PTX and its analogs on different organisms, exposing the impact that these toxins may have in coastal ecosystems.

  13. Biological Effects of Stellar Collapse Neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collar, J. I.

    1996-02-01

    Massive stars in their final stages of collapse radiate most of their binding energy in the form of MeV neutrinos. The recoil atoms that they produce in elastic scattering off nuclei in organic tissue create radiation damage which is highly effective in the production of irreparable DNA harm, leading to cellular mutation, neoplasia, and oncogenesis. Using a conventional model of the galaxy and of the collapse mechanism, the periodicity of nearby stellar collapses and the radiation dose are calculated. The possible contribution of this process to the paleontological record of mass extinctions is examined.

  14. In vitro to in vivo extrapolation of effective dosimetry in developmental toxicity testing: Application of a generic PBK modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragki, Styliani; Piersma, Aldert H; Rorije, Emiel; Zeilmaker, Marco J

    2017-10-01

    Incorporation of kinetics to quantitative in vitro to in vivo extrapolations (QIVIVE) is a key step for the realization of a non-animal testing paradigm, in the sphere of regulatory toxicology. The use of Physiologically-Based Kinetic (PBK) modelling for determining systemic doses of chemicals at the target site is accepted to be an indispensable element for such purposes. Nonetheless, PBK models are usually designed for a single or a group of compounds and are considered demanding, with respect to experimental data needed for model parameterization. Alternatively, we evaluate here the use of a more generic approach, i.e. the so-called IndusChemFate model, which is based on incorporated QSAR model parametrization. The model was used to simulate the in vivo kinetics of three diverse classes of developmental toxicants: triazoles, glycol ethers' alkoxyacetic acid metabolites and phthalate primary metabolites. The model required specific input per each class of compounds. These compounds were previously tested in three alternative assays: the whole-embryo culture (WEC), the zebrafish embryo test (ZET), and the mouse embryonic stem cell test (EST). Thereafter, the PBK-simulated blood levels at toxic in vivo doses were compared to the respective in vitro effective concentrations. Comparisons pertaining to relative potency and potency ranking with integration of kinetics were similar to previously obtained comparisons. Additionally, all three in vitro systems produced quite comparable results, and hence, a combination of alternative tests is still preferable for predicting the endpoint of developmental toxicity in vivo. This approach is put forward as biologically more plausible since plasma concentrations, rather than external administered doses, constitute the most direct in vivo dose metric. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Monte Carlo and experimental internal radionuclide dosimetry in RANDO head phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghahraman Asl, Ruhollah; Nasseri, Shahrokh; Parach, Ali Asghar; Zakavi, Seyed Rasoul; Momennezhad Mehdi; Davenport, David

    2015-01-01

    Monte Carlo techniques are widely employed in internal dosimetry to obtain better estimates of absorbed dose distributions from irradiation sources in medicine. Accurate 3D absorbed dosimetry would be useful for risk assessment of inducing deterministic and stochastic biological effects for both therapeutic and diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine. The goal of this study was to experimentally evaluate the use of Geant4 application for tomographic emission (GATE) Monte Carlo package for 3D internal dosimetry using the head portion of the RANDO phantom. GATE package (version 6.1) was used to create a voxel model of a human head phantom from computed tomography (CT) images. Matrix dimensions consisted of 319 × 216 × 30 voxels (0.7871 × 0.7871 × 5 mm 3 ). Measurements were made using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100). One rod-shaped source with 94 MBq activity of 99m Tc was positioned in the brain tissue of the posterior part of the human head phantom in slice number 2. The results of the simulation were compared with measured mean absorbed dose per cumulative activity (S value). Absorbed dose was also calculated for each slice of the digital model of the head phantom and dose volume histograms (DVHs) were computed to analyze the absolute and relative doses in each slice from the simulation data. The S-values calculated by GATE and TLD methods showed a significant correlation (correlation coefficient, r 2 ≥ 0.99, p < 0.05) with each other. The maximum relative percentage differences were ≤14 % for most cases. DVHs demonstrated dose decrease along the direction of movement toward the lower slices of the head phantom. Based on the results obtained from GATE Monte Carlopackage it can be deduced that a complete dosimetry simulation study, from imaging to absorbed dose map calculation, is possible to execute in a single framework.

  16. Significant impact of transient deterioration of renal function on dosimetry in PRRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Binnebeek, S.; Baete, K.; Terwinghe, C.

    2013-01-01

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT), with 90 Y-DOTATOC and 177 Lu-DOTATATE as most clinically used radiopeptides, is widely used in the management of metastatic neuroendocrine tumors. With respect to radiation dosimetry, the kidneys are the critical organ for 90 Y-DOTATOC. Renal irradiation is significant because of reabsorption of the radiopeptide from the proximal tubuli and the resulting retention in the interstitium, mainly in the inner cortical zone. The high energy and consequently wide range in tissue of the yttrium-90 beta particle result in high absorbed doses to the kidney cortex and medulla. Accurate renal dosimetry can help minimizing radiation nephropathy. We report a case of a 69-year-old candidate for PRRT with an acceptable kidney function at the time of screening. When performing 111 In-octreotide pretreatment dosimetry 3 weeks later, we observed a drastic deterioration in kidney function, caused by undisclosed non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug intake. The calculated kidney biological effective dose (BED) was 153 Gy after four projected cycles. PRRT was canceled as our full-course BED limit is 37 Gy and the patient was switched to morphine analgesics. Renal function normalized after 3 months and repeated dosimetry yielded an acceptable kidney BED of 28 Gy after four projected cycles (7 Gy/cycle). This case emphasizes that acute kidney insufficiency can yield toxic kidney doses in a single therapy cycle, with an inherent risk of persistent renal insufficiency. All clinical factors which might influence kidney function should be verified at screening and before PRRT administration. (author)

  17. Nanosilver – Harmful effects of biological activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Świdwińska-Gajewska

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanosilver, also identified as colloidal silver, has been known and used for ages to combat diseases or prolong food freshness. It usually occurs in the form of a suspension consisting of particles of size < 100 nm. Due to its specific properties, silver nanoparticles are used in many technologies to produce medical devices, textiles, conductive materials or photovoltaic cells. The growing popularity of nanosilver applications increases the number of people occupationally exposed to this substance. Potential exposure routes for silver nanoparticles are through dermal, oral and inhalation pathways. Silver nanoparticles may be absorbed through the lungs, intestine, and through the skin into circulation and thus may reach such organs as the liver, kidney, spleen, brain, heart and testes. Nanosilver may cause mild eyes and skin irritations. It can also act as a mild skin allergen. Inhalation of silver nanoparticles mainly affects the lungs and liver. It has been demonstrated that silver nanoparticles may be genotoxic to mammalian cells. There are some alarming reports on the adverse effects of silver nanoparticles on reproduction of experimental animals. Exposure to silver nanoparticles may exert a neurotoxic effect and affect cognitive functions, causing the impairment of short-term and working memory. Maximum admissible concentration (MAC for the inhalable fraction of silver of 0.05 mg/m3 is currently binding in Poland. In light of toxicological studies of silver nanoparticles it seems reasonable to update the hygiene standards for silver with nanoparticles as a separate fraction. Med Pr 2014;65(6:831–845

  18. Calibration of SSTR neutron dosimetry for TMI-2 applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.; Ruddy, F.H.; Roberts, J.H.; Preston, C.C.; Ulseth, J.A.; McElroy, W.N.; Leitz, F.J.; Hayward, B.R.; Schmittroth, F.A.

    1982-01-01

    Application of neutron dosimetry for assessment of fuel distribution throughout the Three Mile Island-2 (TMI-2) reactor-core region and the primary-coolant system is advanced. Neutron dosimetry in the reactor cavity, i.e. the cavity between the pressure vessel and the biological shield, could provide data for the assessment of the core fuel distribution. A more immediate task entails locating and quantifying the amount of fuel debris in the ex-core primary coolant system; in the range of 1 to 1000 kg. Solid-state track-recorder (SSTR) neutron dosimetry is considered for such exploratory scoping experiments at TMI-2. The sensitivity of mica- 235 U (asymptotically thick) SSTR has been ascertained for such environments. It has been demonstrated that the SSTR method has adequate sensitivity to properly respond and detect fuel quantities of the order of 1 kg in the ex-core primary coolant system. 21 figures

  19. Electromagnetic field induced biological effects in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaszuba-Zwoińska, Jolanta; Gremba, Jerzy; Gałdzińska-Calik, Barbara; Wójcik-Piotrowicz, Karolina; Thor, Piotr J

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to artificial radio frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) has increased significantly in recent decades. Therefore, there is a growing scientific and social interest in its influence on health, even upon exposure significantly below the applicable standards. The intensity of electromagnetic radiation in human environment is increasing and currently reaches astronomical levels that had never before experienced on our planet. The most influential process of EMF impact on living organisms, is its direct tissue penetration. The current established standards of exposure to EMFs in Poland and in the rest of the world are based on the thermal effect. It is well known that weak EMF could cause all sorts of dramatic non-thermal effects in body cells, tissues and organs. The observed symptoms are hardly to assign to other environmental factors occurring simultaneously in the human environment. Although, there are still ongoing discussions on non-thermal effects of EMF influence, on May 31, 2011--International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC)--Agenda of World Health Organization (WHO) has classified radio electromagnetic fields, to a category 2B as potentially carcinogenic. Electromagnetic fields can be dangerous not only because of the risk of cancer, but also other health problems, including electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS). Electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS) is a phenomenon characterized by the appearance of symptoms after exposure of people to electromagnetic fields, generated by EHS is characterized as a syndrome with a broad spectrum of non-specific multiple organ symptoms including both acute and chronic inflammatory processes located mainly in the skin and nervous systems, as well as in respiratory, cardiovascular systems, and musculoskeletal system. WHO does not consider the EHS as a disease-- defined on the basis of medical diagnosis and symptoms associated with any known syndrome. The symptoms may be associated with a single source of EMF

  20. Biological effect of radiation on human

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yun Sil; Cho, Chul Koo; Lee, Su Jae

    2000-04-01

    1. Adaptive response when 0.01 Gy was preirradiated before high challenging dose is induced in normal cell types such normal lymphocytes, primary keratinocytes, and L929 fibroblast cells but not in neoplastic cells such as L5178Y lymphoma cells, EL-4 lymphoma cells and 308 papilloma cells. 2. Heat shock protein (HSP) 25 and inducible HSP70 is responsible for the induction of adaptive response and radioresistance - cell cycle regulation, antiapoptotic molecule and PKC activation were involved. 3. Apoptosis was induced at most 5. hrs after irradiation in primary keratinocytes, in v-rasHa transformed keratinocytes, the maximum interval was 16 hrs, and in 308 papilloma cells, the maximum was 48 hrs. 4. PKC response by radiation is correlated with induction of apoptosis. 5. Rapid induction PKCdelta in primary keratinocytes and no response of PKC epsilon may involved in radiation induced apoptosis. 6. The rate of resorption was increased when radiation was given at 2.5 days after gestation. Early death including foetal death were highly expressed when radiation was given at 7.5 days after gestation. There are no difference in incidence of late death including embryonic death. 7. 2 Gy is the most effective dose in radiation induced teratogenesis in mouse model. 8. Growth retardation and small head was present when radiation was given at 5.5, 7.5, 11.5 and 15.5 days after gestation and small head showed high incidence at 11.5 days after gestation. 9. External malformation, internal malformation and skeletal malformation was induced when radiation was given at 7.5 days after gestation. 10. OGG1-mutated cells induced radiosensitive by G2/M cell cycle arrest. 11. Radiation induced G2/M phase cell cycle and correlated with radiosensitivity. 12. PKCalpha induced differentiation. 13. Radiation exposed cells showed carcinogenic effect. 14. Organ specific radiosensitivity was shown and protein expression was involved

  1. Biological effect of radiation on human

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yun Sil; Cho, Chul Koo; Lee, Su Jae [and others

    2000-04-01

    1. Adaptive response when 0.01 Gy was preirradiated before high challenging dose is induced in normal cell types such normal lymphocytes, primary keratinocytes, and L929 fibroblast cells but not in neoplastic cells such as L5178Y lymphoma cells, EL-4 lymphoma cells and 308 papilloma cells. 2. Heat shock protein (HSP) 25 and inducible HSP70 is responsible for the induction of adaptive response and radioresistance - cell cycle regulation, antiapoptotic molecule and PKC activation were involved. 3. Apoptosis was induced at most 5. hrs after irradiation in primary keratinocytes, in v-rasHa transformed keratinocytes, the maximum interval was 16 hrs, and in 308 papilloma cells, the maximum was 48 hrs. 4. PKC response by radiation is correlated with induction of apoptosis. 5. Rapid induction PKCdelta in primary keratinocytes and no response of PKC epsilon may involved in radiation induced apoptosis. 6. The rate of resorption was increased when radiation was given at 2.5 days after gestation. Early death including foetal death were highly expressed when radiation was given at 7.5 days after gestation. There are no difference in incidence of late death including embryonic death. 7. 2 Gy is the most effective dose in radiation induced teratogenesis in mouse model. 8. Growth retardation and small head was present when radiation was given at 5.5, 7.5, 11.5 and 15.5 days after gestation and small head showed high incidence at 11.5 days after gestation. 9. External malformation, internal malformation and skeletal malformation was induced when radiation was given at 7.5 days after gestation. 10. OGG1-mutated cells induced radiosensitive by G2/M cell cycle arrest. 11. Radiation induced G2/M phase cell cycle and correlated with radiosensitivity. 12. PKCalpha induced differentiation. 13. Radiation exposed cells showed carcinogenic effect. 14. Organ specific radiosensitivity was shown and protein expression was involved.

  2. Dosimetry of industrial sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega C, H.R.; Rodriguez J, R.; Manzanares A, E.; Hernandez V, R.; Ramirez G, J.; Rivera M, T.

    2007-01-01

    The gamma rays are produced during the disintegration of the atomic nuclei, its high energy allows them to cross thick materials. The capacity to attenuate a photons beam allows to determine the density, in line, of industrial interest materials as the mining. By means of two active dosemeters and a TLDs group (passive dosimetry) the dose rates of two sources of Cs-137 used for determining in line the density of mining materials were determined. With the dosemeters the dose levels in diverse points inside the grave that it harbors the sources and by means of calculations the isodoses curves were determined. In the phase of calculations was supposed that both sources were punctual and the isodose curves were calculated for two situations: naked sources and in their Pb packings. The dosimetry was carried out around two sources of 137 Cs. The measured values allowed to develop a calculation procedure to obtain the isodoses curves in the grave where the sources are installed. (Author)

  3. Cytogenetic Dosimetry: Applications in Preparedness for and Response to Radiation Emergencies (Chinese Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Cytogenetic dosimetry is recognized as a valuable dose assessment method which fills a gap in dosimetric technology, particularly when there are difficulties in interpreting the data, in cases where there is reason to believe that persons not wearing dosimeters have been exposed to radiation, in cases of claims for compensation for radiation injuries that are not supported by unequivocal dosimetric evidence, or in cases of exposure over an individual's working lifetime. The IAEA has maintained a long standing involvement in biological dosimetry commencing in 1978. This association has been through a sequence of coordinated research programmes (CRPs), the running of regional and national training courses, the sponsorship of individual training fellowships, and the provision of equipment to laboratories in Member States, establishing capabilities in biological dosimetry. From this has arisen the provision to Member States of advice regarding the best focus for research and suggestions for the most suitable techniques for future practice in biological dosimetry. One CRP resulted in the publication in 1986 of a manual, entitled Biological Dosimetry: Chromosomal Aberration Analysis for Dose Assessment (Technical Reports Series No. 260). This was superseded in 2001 by a revised second edition, Technical Reports Series No. 405. This present publication constitutes a third edition, with extensive updating to reflect the considerable advances that have been made in cytogenetic biological dosimetry during the past decade

  4. Cytogenetic Dosimetry: Applications in Preparedness for and Response to Radiation Emergencies (Arabic Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Cytogenetic dosimetry is recognized as a valuable dose assessment method which fills a gap in dosimetric technology, particularly when there are difficulties in interpreting the data, in cases where there is reason to believe that persons not wearing dosimeters have been exposed to radiation, in cases of claims for compensation for radiation injuries that are not supported by unequivocal dosimetric evidence, or in cases of exposure over an individual's working lifetime. The IAEA has maintained a long standing involvement in biological dosimetry commencing in 1978. This association has been through a sequence of coordinated research programmes (CRPs), the running of regional and national training courses, the sponsorship of individual training fellowships, and the provision of equipment to laboratories in Member States, establishing capabilities in biological dosimetry. From this has arisen the provision to Member States of advice regarding the best focus for research and suggestions for the most suitable techniques for future practice in biological dosimetry. One CRP resulted in the publication in 1986 of a manual, entitled Biological Dosimetry: Chromosomal Aberration Analysis for Dose Assessment (Technical Reports Series No. 260). This was superseded in 2001 by a revised second edition, Technical Reports Series No. 405. This present publication constitutes a third edition, with extensive updating to reflect the considerable advances that have been made in cytogenetic biological dosimetry during the past decade

  5. Cytogenetic Dosimetry: Applications in Preparedness for and Response to Radiation Emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Cytogenetic dosimetry is recognized as a valuable dose assessment method which fills a gap in dosimetric technology, particularly when there are difficulties in interpreting the data, in cases where there is reason to believe that persons not wearing dosimeters have been exposed to radiation, in cases of claims for compensation for radiation injuries that are not supported by unequivocal dosimetric evidence, or in cases of exposure over an individual's working lifetime. The IAEA has maintained a long standing involvement in biological dosimetry commencing in 1978. This association has been through a sequence of coordinated research programmes (CRPs), the running of regional and national training courses, the sponsorship of individual training fellowships, and the provision of equipment to laboratories in Member States, establishing capabilities in biological dosimetry. From this has arisen the provision to Member States of advice regarding the best focus for research and suggestions for the most suitable techniques for future practice in biological dosimetry. One CRP resulted in the publication in 1986 of a manual, entitled Biological Dosimetry: Chromosomal Aberration Analysis for Dose Assessment (Technical Reports Series No. 260). This was superseded in 2001 by a revised second edition, Technical Reports Series No. 405. This present publication constitutes a third edition, with extensive updating to reflect the considerable advances that have been made in cytogenetic biological dosimetry during the past decade.

  6. Cytogenetic Dosimetry: Applications in Preparedness for and Response to Radiation Emergencies (French Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Cytogenetic dosimetry is recognized as a valuable dose assessment method which fills a gap in dosimetric technology, particularly when there are difficulties in interpreting the data, in cases where there is reason to believe that persons not wearing dosimeters have been exposed to radiation, in cases of claims for compensation for radiation injuries that are not supported by unequivocal dosimetric evidence, or in cases of exposure over an individual's working lifetime. The IAEA has maintained a long standing involvement in biological dosimetry commencing in 1978. This association has been through a sequence of coordinated research programmes (CRPs), the running of regional and national training courses, the sponsorship of individual training fellowships, and the provision of equipment to laboratories in Member States, establishing capabilities in biological dosimetry. From this has arisen the provision to Member States of advice regarding the best focus for research and suggestions for the most suitable techniques for future practice in biological dosimetry. One CRP resulted in the publication in 1986 of a manual, entitled Biological Dosimetry: Chromosomal Aberration Analysis for Dose Assessment (Technical Reports Series No. 260). This was superseded in 2001 by a revised second edition, Technical Reports Series No. 405. This present publication constitutes a third edition, with extensive updating to reflect the considerable advances that have been made in cytogenetic biological dosimetry during the past decade

  7. Cytogenetic Dosimetry: Applications in Preparedness for and Response to Radiation Emergencies (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Cytogenetic dosimetry is recognized as a valuable dose assessment method which fills a gap in dosimetric technology, particularly when there are difficulties in interpreting the data, in cases where there is reason to believe that persons not wearing dosimeters have been exposed to radiation, in cases of claims for compensation for radiation injuries that are not supported by unequivocal dosimetric evidence, or in cases of exposure over an individual’s working lifetime. The IAEA has maintained a long standing involvement in biological dosimetry commencing in 1978. This association has been through a sequence of coordinated research programmes (CRPs), the running of regional and national training courses, the sponsorship of individual training fellowships, and the provision of equipment to laboratories in Member States, establishing capabilities in biological dosimetry. From this has arisen the provision to Member States of advice regarding the best focus for research and suggestions for the most suitable techniques for future practice in biological dosimetry. One CRP resulted in the publication in 1986 of a manual, entitled Biological Dosimetry: Chromosomal Aberration Analysis for Dose Assessment (Technical Reports Series No. 260). This was superseded in 2001 by a revised second edition, Technical Reports Series No. 405. This present publication constitutes a third edition, with extensive updating to reflect the considerable advances that have been made in cytogenetic biological dosimetry during the past decade

  8. Cytogenetic Dosimetry: Applications in Preparedness for and Response to Radiation Emergencies (Russian Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Cytogenetic dosimetry is recognized as a valuable dose assessment method which fills a gap in dosimetric technology, particularly when there are difficulties in interpreting the data, in cases where there is reason to believe that persons not wearing dosimeters have been exposed to radiation, in cases of claims for compensation for radiation injuries that are not supported by unequivocal dosimetric evidence, or in cases of exposure over an individual's working lifetime. The IAEA has maintained a long standing involvement in biological dosimetry commencing in 1978. This association has been through a sequence of coordinated research programmes (CRPs), the running of regional and national training courses, the sponsorship of individual training fellowships, and the provision of equipment to laboratories in Member States, establishing capabilities in biological dosimetry. From this has arisen the provision to Member States of advice regarding the best focus for research and suggestions for the most suitable techniques for future practice in biological dosimetry. One CRP resulted in the publication in 1986 of a manual, entitled Biological Dosimetry: Chromosomal Aberration Analysis for Dose Assessment (Technical Reports Series No. 260). This was superseded in 2001 by a revised second edition, Technical Reports Series No. 405. This present publication constitutes a third edition, with extensive updating to reflect the considerable advances that have been made in cytogenetic biological dosimetry during the past decade

  9. Biological effects of high level natural background radiation on human population residing in Kerala coast, South West India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seshadri, M.

    2010-01-01

    The populations residing in Kerala coast are exposed to elevated natural background radiation since many generations. Extensive studies conducted by Bio-Medical group, Bhabha Atomic Research Center have generated wealth of data from this area dealing with epidemiology, monitoring the newborns for malformations, Health Audit Survey, Dosimetry and biological studies using cytogenetic and molecular biology techniques. Our studies on congenital malformations and chromosomal anomalies in children born to parents residing in High Level Natural Radiation Areas in Kerala have not shown any significant difference from normal radiation areas. Screening of over 1,25,000 consecutively born children showed an incidence rate which is comparable in both areas. Other factors such as consanguinity, maternal age and gravida status are more significant contributors than radiation dose to the risk for having malformation in child. Radiation prevalent in the HLNRA is in the dose range of above 1.5 to about 50 mGy per year which translates to doses in the range of nGy per hour. This clearly indicate the number of cells exposed to radiations will be one in few thousand or ten thousands. This throws up challenges in our capability to investigate the effects of radiation on cells. It has become imperative to develop and exploit techniques which will detect responses in single cells and would be able screen large number of cells at a time. Developments in cell biology and molecular biology are now giving us these capabilities. Use of flowcytometer and next generation sequencing would enable us to address many of these questions and provide meaningful approaches to understand the effects of such low dose radiation

  10. Biologic and physical fractionation effects of random geometric errors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Herk, Marcel; Witte, Marnix; van der Geer, Joris; Schneider, Christoph; Lebesque, Joos V.

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: We are developing a system to model the effect of random and systematic geometric errors on radiotherapy delivery. The purpose of this study was to investigate biologic and physical fractionation effects of random geometric errors and respiration motion and compare the resulting dose

  11. Progress report, Biology and Health Physics Division, January 1 to March 31, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research is described on dosimetry, radiation monitors, aquatic ecosystems as affected by waste heat and radionuclides, hydrology (especially of waste disposal sites), radiation carcinogenesis, medical record linking of human populations, and radiation effects in biochemistry, molecular biology, genetics, and population studies. (E.C.B.)

  12. Effect of co-doping of sodium on the thermoluminescence dosimetry properties of copper-doped zinc lithium borate glass system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saidu, A.; Wagiran, H.; Saeed, M.A.; Alajerami, Y.S.M.; Kadir, A.B.A.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of sodium as a co-dopant on the thermoluminescence (TL) properties of copper-doped zinc lithium borate (ZLB: Cu) subjected to Co-60 gamma radiation is reported in this study. TL intensity is enhanced with the introduction of sodium in ZLB: Cu. The obtained glow curve is simple with a single peak. The annealing procedure and the best heating rate for the proposed thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) are established, and the phosphor is reusable. The TL response within the dose range of 0.5–1000 Gy is investigated. The results show that the thermal fading behaviour is improved significantly. - Highlights: • Dosimetry properties of an improved TL dosimeter. • The dosimeter is made of lithium borate, modified with ZnO, doped with CuO and co-doped with Na 2 O. • With addition of Na to Cu in the ZLB host, TL yield and sensitivity has significantly enhanced. • The fading behaviour has also been minimized significantly. • The new material is also characterized with the linear dose response, and good reproducibility behaviour.

  13. The effect of iodine uptake on radiation dose absorbed by patient tissues in contrast enhanced CT imaging. Implications for CT dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perisinakis, Kostas; Damilakis, John [University of Crete, Department of Medical Physics, Medical School, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); University Hospital of Heraklion, Department of Medical Physics, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Tzedakis, Antonis; Papadakis, Antonios E. [University Hospital of Heraklion, Department of Medical Physics, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Spanakis, Kostas [University Hospital of Heraklion, Department of Radiology, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Hatzidakis, Adam [University Hospital of Heraklion, Department of Radiology, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); University of Crete, Department of Radiology, Medical School, Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2018-01-15

    To investigate the effect of iodine uptake on tissue/organ absorbed doses from CT exposure and its implications in CT dosimetry. The contrast-induced CT number increase of several radiosensitive tissues was retrospectively determined in 120 CT examinations involving both non-enhanced and contrast-enhanced CT imaging. CT images of a phantom containing aqueous solutions of varying iodine concentration were obtained. Plots of the CT number increase against iodine concentration were produced. The clinically occurring iodine tissue uptake was quantified by attributing recorded CT number increase to a certain concentration of aqueous iodine solution. Clinically occurring iodine uptake was represented in mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms. Standard 120 kV CT exposures were simulated using Monte Carlo methods and resulting organ doses were derived for non-enhanced and iodine contrast-enhanced CT imaging. The mean iodine uptake range during contrast-enhanced CT imaging was found to be 0.02-0.46% w/w for the investigated tissues, while the maximum value recorded was 0.82% w/w. For the same CT exposure, iodinated tissues were found to receive higher radiation dose than non-iodinated tissues, with dose increase exceeding 100% for tissues with high iodine uptake. Administration of iodinated contrast medium considerably increases radiation dose to tissues from CT exposure. (orig.)

  14. Retrospective accident dosimetry using trapped charges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. I.; Kim, J. L.; Chang, I.; Kim, B. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Dicentric chromosome aberrations technique scoring of aberrations in metaphases prepared from human lymphocytes is most commonly used. This is considered as a reliable technique because the sample is extracted from the individual human body itself. There are other techniques in biological dosimetry such as Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) using translocations, premature chromosome condensation (PCC) and micronucleus assay. However the minimum detectable doses (MDD) are relatively high and sample preparation time is also relatively longer. Therefore, there is limitation in use of these techniques for the purpose of triage in a short time in case of emergency situation relating large number of persons. Electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique is based on the signal from unpaired electrons such as free radicals in irradiated materials especially tooth enamel, however it has also limitation for the purpose of triage because of difficulty of sample taking and its high MDD. Recently as physical methods, thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) technique have been attracted due to its lower MDD and simplicity of sample preparation. Density of the trapped charges is generally proportional to the radiation dose absorbed and the intensity of emitting light is also proportional to the density of trapped charges, thus it can be applied to measure radiation dose retrospectively. In this presentation, TL and OSL techniques are going to introduced and discussed as physical methods for retrospective accident dosimetry using trapped charges especially in electronic component materials. As a tool for dose reconstruction for emergency situation, thermoluminescece and optically stimulated luminescence techniques which are based on trapped charges during exposure of material are introduced. These techniques have several advantages such as high sensitivity, fast evaluation and ease to sample collection over common biological dosimetry and EPR

  15. Experiences with alanine dosimetry in afterloading brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhardt, H.-J.; Gohs, U.

    1996-01-01

    At the present, the most commonly used dosimetry for radiotherapy applications are ionisation chambers and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). However, there are some undesirable characteristics of these dosimetry systems, such as large detection volume (ionisation chamber) as well as fading of the radiation induced signal with time and destructive readout (TLG). The present study is an investigation into the use of the alanine/ESR dosimetry in fractionated afterloading brachytherapy during the whole radiotherapy course. There are some qualities which make alanine dosimetry attractive. These are the linear energy response, low fading under standard conditions, and the nondestructive readout. Thus the alanine dosimetry makes possible cumulative dose measurements during the radiotherapy course and an archival storage. By ionizing radiation (gamma, e, n, p, charged particles) free radicals (unpaired electrons) are produced in the amino acid alanine. The continuous wave electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is used to determine the number of free radicals, which is proportional to the absorbed dose and the alanine content of the dosimeter. The ESR measurements were made at room temperature using a Bruker EPR analyzer EMS-104. The dosimeters used in the test are alanine pellets (23.72 mg weight, 4.9 mm diameter, 1 mm height) as well as flexible alanine film dosimeters (thickness about 500 μm). The dosimeters consist of a blend of L-alpha-alanine and a binder. The alanine content of the pellets and the film dosimeters is about 88 % and 50 % by weight, respectively. The dosimeters for the calculation of the dose-effect-relationship were irradiated at the Physical-Technical Bundesanstalt in Braunschweig by a standard 60Co source. The maximum deviation from the calculated linear function is about 0.12 Gy in the dose range up to 80 Gy. The goal of medical applications was the superficial dose measurement in afterloading brachytherapy during the radiotherapy course in

  16. Information from the Dosimetry Service

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Please note the following opening hours of the Service: From 31st July onwards: Every morning from 8:30 to 12:00 The Service is closed in the afternoons. We should like to remind you that dosimeters cannot be sent to customers by internal mail. Short-term dosimeters (VCTs) must always be returned to the Service after use and must not be left on the racks in the experimental areas or in the secretariats. Dosimetry Service Tel 72155 Bldg. 24 E 011 Dosimetry.service@cern.ch http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  17. The biologic effects of cigarette smoke on cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobus, Samantha L; Warren, Graham W

    2014-12-01

    Smoking is one of the largest preventable risk factors for developing cancer, and continued smoking by cancer patients is associated with increased toxicity, recurrence, risk of second primary cancer, and mortality. Cigarette smoke (CS) contains thousands of chemicals, including many known carcinogens. The carcinogenic effects of CS are well established, but relatively little work has been done to evaluate the effects of CS on cancer cells. In this review of the literature, the authors demonstrate that CS induces a more malignant tumor phenotype by increasing proliferation, migration, invasion, and angiogenesis and by activating prosurvival cellular pathways. Significant work is needed to understand the biologic effect of CS on cancer biology, including the development of model systems and the identification of critical biologic mediators of CS-induced changes in cancer cell physiology. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  18. Biology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I am particularly happy that the Academy is bringing out this document by Professor M S. Valiathan on Ayurvedic Biology. It is an effort to place before the scientific community, especially that of India, the unique scientific opportunities that arise out of viewing Ayurveda from the perspective of contemporary science, its tools ...

  19. Technical basis document for internal dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Hickman, D P

    1991-01-01

    This document provides the technical basis for the Chem-Nuclear Geotech (Geotech) internal dosimetry program. Geotech policy describes the intentions of the company in complying with radiation protection standards and the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) program. It uses this policy and applicable protection standards to derive acceptable methods and levels of bioassay to assure compliance. The models and computational methods used are described in detail within this document. FR-om these models, dose- conversion factors and derived limits are computed. These computations are then verified using existing documentation and verification information or by demonstration of the calculations used to obtain the dose-conversion factors and derived limits. Recommendations for methods of optimizing the internal dosimetry program to provide effective monitoring and dose assessment for workers are provided in the last section of this document. This document is intended to be used in establishing an accredited dosi...

  20. Results of the Argentinian intercomparison on internal dosimetry – 2014. Interpretation of monitoring data for effective dose assessment due to internal exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojo, A.M.; Puerta, N.; Gossio, S.; Gómez Parada, I.

    2015-01-01

    Internal dosimetry intercomparisons are essential for the verification of the models applied and the results consistency. To that aim, in 2014 the National Intercomparison Exercise was organized and coordinated by the Internal Dosimetry Laboratory of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) of Argentina. Four simulated cases covering intakes of “1”3”1I, “1”3”7Cs and tritium were proposed. The exercise counted with the participation of four internal dosimetry services from the nuclear power plants (NA-SA CNA and NA-SA CNE) and the CNEA Atomic Centres: Bariloche (CAB) and Ezeiza (CAE). This report shows a complete analysis of the participant’s results in this exercise. (authors) [es

  1. Biological effect of penetration controlled irradiation with ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Atsushi; Shimizu, Takashi; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Watanabe, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Yamashita, Takao

    1997-03-01

    To investigate the effect of local irradiation with ion beams on biological systems, technique for penetration controlled irradiation has been established. The range in a target was controlled by changing the distance from beam window in the atmosphere, and could be controlled linearly up to about 31 {mu}m in biological material. In addition, the effects of the penetration controlled irradiations with 1.5 MeV/u C and He ions were examined using tobacco pollen. The increased frequency of leaky pollen produced by ion beams suggests that the efficient pollen envelope damages would be induced at the range-end of ion beams. (author)

  2. Film dosimetry for IMRT: sensitivity corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suchowerska, N.; Hoban, P.; Davison, A.; Metcalfe, P.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The trend towards conformal, dynamic and intensity modulated radiotherapy treatments has furthered the need for true integrating dosimetry. In traditional radiotherapy, film dosimetry is commonly used. The accuracy and reproducibility of film optical density as an indicator of dose, has been associated with several variables. These include the effects of film specific sensitivity, direction of exposure, chemical processing and film scanner sensitivity. In this study, a procedure is developed to account for these variables, with a particular view to film being used as a dosimeter for conformal treatments. An effective sensitometric curve was established by exposing part of a single sheet of film to known doses. All films were processed together and scanned using a DuoscanT1200 transmission scanner, resulting in 12 bit image files. The images were analysed using Osiris software and the results fitted to the modified Williamson equation: P P s (l - 10 αD ) This yields values of α [film sensitivity], and P s [saturation pixel value], allowing individual dosimetry films to be normalised to this sensitometric calibration curve. For validation, a piece of Kodak X Omat-V film was sealed in a head phantom and exposed to a total of 51 IMRT fields, delivered from 6 gantry angles. The rest of the sheet of film was resealed and exposed to four known doses, providing sensitometric data, specific to this exposure. All films were then processed, scanned and analysed as described above. Observed variations in serial films exposed to 50cGy is in the order of 9% [mean 25.0,standard deviation = 3.2]. The automatic gain of the scanner system typically contributed 4% variation and needs to be carefully monitored. Results indicate that by using the sensitometric data from each exposure, the collective errors can be minimised. The IMRT exposure results confirm that the above process is viable for use in dosimetry for conformal radiation therapy. Copyright (2000) Australasian

  3. The relative biological effectiveness of out-of-field dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balderson, Michael; Koger, Brandon; Kirkby, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: using simulations and models derived from existing literature, this work investigates relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for out-of-field radiation and attempts to quantify the relative magnitudes of different contributing phenomena (spectral, bystander, and low dose hypersensitivity effects). Specific attention is paid to external beam radiotherapy treatments for prostate cancer. Materials and methods: using different biological models that account for spectral, bystander, and low dose hypersensitivity effects, the RBE was calculated for different points moving radially out from isocentre for a typical single arc VMAT prostate case. The RBE was found by taking the ratio of the equivalent dose with the physical dose. Equivalent doses were calculated by determining what physical dose would be necessary to produce the same overall biological effect as that predicted using the different biological models. Results: spectral effects changed the RBE out-of-field less than 2%, whereas response models incorporating low dose hypersensitivity and bystander effects resulted in a much more profound change of the RBE for out-of-field doses. The bystander effect had the largest RBE for points located just outside the edge of the primary radiation beam in the cranial caudal (z-direction) compared to low dose hypersensitivity and spectral effects. In the coplanar direction, bystander effect played the largest role in enhancing the RBE for points up to 8.75 cm from isocentre. Conclusions: spectral, bystander, and low dose hypersensitivity effects can all increase the RBE for out-of-field radiation doses. In most cases, bystander effects seem to play the largest role followed by low dose hypersensitivity. Spectral effects were unlikely to be of any clinical significance. Bystander, low dose hypersensitivity, and spectral effect increased the RBE much more in the cranial caudal direction (z-direction) compared with the coplanar directions.

  4. Biological isotopy. Introduction to the isotopic effects and to their applications in biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tcherkez, G.

    2010-01-01

    Since their discovery in the beginning of the 20. century, the study of stable isotopes has considerably developed. This domain, which remained limited in its applications until the 1990's, has become particularly important thereafter thanks to its practical applications and in particular to its economical impacts. Many techniques used in fraud control, in drugs use control, in selection of high-yield plants etc are based on isotopic abundance measurements. This reference book gives a synthesis of our actual knowledge on the use of stable isotopes and of isotope fractionation in biology. It presents the basic notions of isotopic biochemistry and explains the origin of the isotopic effects. The application principles of these effects to metabolism, to organisms physiology, to environmental biology etc are explained and detailed using examples and exercises. The first chapters present the basic knowledge which defines, from a mathematical point-of-view, the isotopic effects of chemical reactions or of physical processes taking place in biology. The measurements principle of natural isotopes abundance is then synthesised. Finally, all these notions are applied at different scales: enzymes, physiology, metabolism, environment, ecosystems and fraud crackdown. (J.S.)

  5. Experimental IMRT breast dosimetry in a thorax phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pimenta, Elsa B.; Campos, Tarcisio P.R.; Nogueira, Luciana B.; Lima, Andre C.S., E-mail: elsabpimenta@gmail.com, E-mail: tprcampos@pq.cnpq.br, E-mail: lucibn19@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: radioterapia.andre@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Centro de Tratamento em Radioterapia, Betim, MG (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is an essential therapeutic method. RT is often used as adjuvant therapy in the treatment of breast cancer. The dose-volume restrictions of the organs at risk limit the prescribed dose to the target volume and biological and clinical effects may influence the final treatment outcome. The breast RT provides large risks to the adjacent organs and consequently the recommended dosimetry to the prescribed dose volume (PTV) is 50 Gy, lower than the most prescribed dose in other treatments (70-85 Gy). Such values implies in less tumor control compared to other sites. The present research proposal aimed to measure absorbed dose in a thorax phantom with synthetic breasts provided by an Intensity-Modulate Radiation Therapy (IMRT) protocol in a RT center. On the methodology, IMRT protocol was selected following recommendations from the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). Radiochromic films and a thorax simulator were prepared by the Ionizing Radiation Research Group (NRI). Dosimeters were calibrated on a selected linear accelerator (LINAC). The comparison of the dosimetry from treatment planning system (TPS), Xio (Elekta) and from experimental data was performed. The spatial distribution of the breast internal dose and in the adjacent organs was depicted by the experimental data. In the film's calibration, the quadratic polynomial fit presented a satisfactory coefficient. Two-dimensional dose profiles were obtained in the breast suggesting that films can supply details and information that TPS does not provide. At the phantom's dosimetry, the internal mean doses taken at the synthetic breast presented usual values above the prescribed dose, besides overall values were within the dosimetric MSKCC criterion. The non full reproduction of the build-up region in the films had occurred due to the asymmetrical positioning of the films in the inner breast, in addition to their non constant distance from the skin. The hot regions were present may

  6. Experimental IMRT breast dosimetry in a thorax phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimenta, Elsa B.; Campos, Tarcisio P.R.; Nogueira, Luciana B.; Lima, Andre C.S.

    2017-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is an essential therapeutic method. RT is often used as adjuvant therapy in the treatment of breast cancer. The dose-volume restrictions of the organs at risk limit the prescribed dose to the target volume and biological and clinical effects may influence the final treatment outcome. The breast RT provides large risks to the adjacent organs and consequently the recommended dosimetry to the prescribed dose volume (PTV) is 50 Gy, lower than the most prescribed dose in other treatments (70-85 Gy). Such values implies in less tumor control compared to other sites. The present research proposal aimed to measure absorbed dose in a thorax phantom with synthetic breasts provided by an Intensity-Modulate Radiation Therapy (IMRT) protocol in a RT center. On the methodology, IMRT protocol was selected following recommendations from the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). Radiochromic films and a thorax simulator were prepared by the Ionizing Radiation Research Group (NRI). Dosimeters were calibrated on a selected linear accelerator (LINAC). The comparison of the dosimetry from treatment planning system (TPS), Xio (Elekta) and from experimental data was performed. The spatial distribution of the breast internal dose and in the adjacent organs was depicted by the experimental data. In the film's calibration, the quadratic polynomial fit presented a satisfactory coefficient. Two-dimensional dose profiles were obtained in the breast suggesting that films can supply details and information that TPS does not provide. At the phantom's dosimetry, the internal mean doses taken at the synthetic breast presented usual values above the prescribed dose, besides overall values were within the dosimetric MSKCC criterion. The non full reproduction of the build-up region in the films had occurred due to the asymmetrical positioning of the films in the inner breast, in addition to their non constant distance from the skin. The hot regions were present may

  7. Internal dosimetry technical basis manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-20

    The internal dosimetry program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) consists of radiation protection programs and activities used to detect and evaluate intakes of radioactive material by radiation workers. Examples of such programs are: air monitoring; surface contamination monitoring; personal contamination surveys; radiobioassay; and dose assessment. The objectives of the internal dosimetry program are to demonstrate that the workplace is under control and that workers are not being exposed to radioactive material, and to detect and assess inadvertent intakes in the workplace. The Savannah River Site Internal Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual (TBM) is intended to provide a technical and philosophical discussion of the radiobioassay and dose assessment aspects of the internal dosimetry program. Detailed information on air, surface, and personal contamination surveillance programs is not given in this manual except for how these programs interface with routine and special bioassay programs.

  8. Internal dosimetry technical basis manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The internal dosimetry program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) consists of radiation protection programs and activities used to detect and evaluate intakes of radioactive material by radiation workers. Examples of such programs are: air monitoring; surface contamination monitoring; personal contamination surveys; radiobioassay; and dose assessment. The objectives of the internal dosimetry program are to demonstrate that the workplace is under control and that workers are not being exposed to radioactive material, and to detect and assess inadvertent intakes in the workplace. The Savannah River Site Internal Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual (TBM) is intended to provide a technical and philosophical discussion of the radiobioassay and dose assessment aspects of the internal dosimetry program. Detailed information on air, surface, and personal contamination surveillance programs is not given in this manual except for how these programs interface with routine and special bioassay programs

  9. Fast neutron spectrometry and dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaize, S.; Ailloud, J.; Mariani, J.; Millot, J.P.

    1958-01-01

    We have studied fast neutron spectrometry and dosimetry through the recoil protons they produce in hydrogenated samples. In spectrometric, we used nuclear emulsions, in dosimetric, we used polyethylene coated with zinc sulphide and placed before a photomultiplier. (author) [fr

  10. Radioiodotherapy: dosimetry planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apyan, A.; Mileshin, O.; Klyopov, A.; Shishkanov, N.; Matusevich, E.; Roziev, A.

    2001-01-01

    The results of treatment of 142 case histories of 125 patients who had been treated with radioactive iodine at the Medical Radiological Research Center of Russian Academy of Medicine Sciences from 1983 to 1999 are given in the presentation. Among the patients, 35 cases of diffuse toxic goiter with signs of thyrotoxicosis of a mild degree, 25 cases of Diffuse toxic goiter with severe thyrotoxicosis, 6 cases of differentiated thyroid cancer with metastases to lymph-nodes of the neck, 30 cases of thyroid cancer with metastases to lymph-nodes of the neck and lung and 1 case of thyroid cancer with metastases to bones were diagnosed. This paper gives recommendations for individual dosimetry planning for radioiodine-therapy. (authors)

  11. Dosimetry in intravascular brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Laelia Pumilla Botelho

    2000-03-01

    Among the cardiovascular diseases responsible for deaths in the adult population in almost all countries of the world, the most common is acute myocardial infarction, which generally occurs because of the occlusion of one or more coronary arteries. Several diagnostic techniques and therapies are being tested for the treatment of coronary artery disease. Balloon angioplasty has been a popular treatment which is less invasive than traditional surgeries involving revascularization of the myocardium, thus promising a better quality of life for patients. Unfortunately, the rate of restenosis (re-closing of the vessel) after balloon angioplasty is high (approximately 30-50% within the first year after treatment).Recently, the idea of delivering high radiation doses to coronary arteries to avoid or delay restenosis has been suggested. Known as intravascular brachytherapy, the technique has been used with several radiation sources, and researchers have obtained success in decreasing the rate of restenosis in some patient populations. In order to study the radiation dosimetry in the patient and radiological protection for the attending staff for this therapy, radiation dose distributions for monoenergetic electrons and photons (at nine discrete energies) were calculated for blood vessels of diameter 0.15, o,30 and 0.45 cm with balloon and wire sources using the radiation transport code MCNP4B. Specific calculations were carried out for several candidate radionuclides as well. Two s tent sources (metallic prosthesis that put inside of patient's artery through angioplasty) employing 32 P are also simulated. Advantages and disadvantages of the various radionuclides and source geometries are discussed. The dosimetry developed here will aid in the realization of the benefits obtained in patients for this promising new technology. (author)

  12. Physical and biological factors determining the effective proton range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grün, Rebecca; Friedrich, Thomas; Krämer, Michael; Scholz, Michael; Zink, Klemens; Durante, Marco; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Proton radiotherapy is rapidly becoming a standard treatment option for cancer. However, even though experimental data show an increase of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) with depth, particularly at the distal end of the treatment field, a generic RBE of 1.1 is currently used in proton radiotherapy. This discrepancy might affect the effective penetration depth of the proton beam and thus the dose to the surrounding tissue and organs at risk. The purpose of this study was thus to analyze the impact of a tissue and dose dependent RBE of protons on the effective range of the proton beam in comparison to the range based on a generic RBE of 1.1.Methods: Factors influencing the biologically effective proton range were systematically analyzed by means of treatment planning studies using the Local Effect Model (LEM IV) and the treatment planning software TRiP98. Special emphasis was put on the comparison of passive and active range modulation techniques.Results: Beam energy, tissue type, and dose level significantly affected the biological extension of the treatment field at the distal edge. Up to 4 mm increased penetration depth as compared to the depth based on a constant RBE of 1.1. The extension of the biologically effective range strongly depends on the initial proton energy used for the most distal layer of the field and correlates with the width of the distal penumbra. Thus, the range extension, in general, was more pronounced for passive as compared to active range modulation systems, whereas the maximum RBE was higher for active systems.Conclusions: The analysis showed that the physical characteristics of the proton beam in terms of the width of the distal penumbra have a great impact on the RBE gradient and thus also the biologically effective penetration depth of the beam

  13. Dosimetry of high energy radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Sahare, P D

    2018-01-01

    High energy radiation is hazardous to living beings and a threat to mankind. The correct estimation of the high energy radiation is a must and a single technique may not be very successful. The process of estimating the dose (the absorbed energy that could cause damages) is called dosimetry. This book covers the basic technical knowledge in the field of radiation dosimetry. It also makes readers aware of the dangers and hazards of high energy radiation.

  14. Hanford internal dosimetry program manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbaugh, E.H.; Sula, M.J.; Bihl, D.E.; Aldridge, T.L.

    1989-10-01

    This document describes the Hanford Internal Dosimetry program. Program Services include administrating the bioassay monitoring program, evaluating and documenting assessments of internal exposure and dose, ensuring that analytical laboratories conform to requirements, selecting and applying appropriate models and procedures for evaluating internal radionuclide deposition and the resulting dose, and technically guiding and supporting Hanford contractors in matters regarding internal dosimetry. 13 refs., 16 figs., 42 tabs.

  15. Fifth international radiopharmaceutical dosimetry symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, E.E.; Schlafke-Stelson, A.T.

    1992-05-01

    This meeting was held to exchange information on how to get better estimates of the radiation absorbed dose. There seems to be a high interest of late in patient dosimetry; discussions were held in the light of revised risk estimates for radiation. Topics included: Strategies of Dose Assessment; Dose Estimation for Radioimmunotherapy; Dose Calculation Techniques and Models; Dose Estimation for Positron Emission Tomography (PET); Kinetics for Dose Estimation; and Small Scale Dosimetry and Microdosimetry. (VC)

  16. Hanford internal dosimetry program manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbaugh, E.H.; Sula, M.J.; Bihl, D.E.; Aldridge, T.L.

    1989-10-01

    This document describes the Hanford Internal Dosimetry program. Program Services include administrating the bioassay monitoring program, evaluating and documenting assessments of internal exposure and dose, ensuring that analytical laboratories conform to requirements, selecting and applying appropriate models and procedures for evaluating internal radionuclide deposition and the resulting dose, and technically guiding and supporting Hanford contractors in matters regarding internal dosimetry. 13 refs., 16 figs., 42 tabs

  17. [Molluscicidal effects of nano-silver biological molluscicide and niclosamide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guang, Xiao-yuan; Wang, Jiang-jie; He, Zong-gui; Chen, Geng-xin; Ding, Lei; Dai, Jian-jun; Yang, Xiao-hong

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the molluscicidal effect of a novel nano-silver biological molluscicide in the field and its toxicity to other aquatic organisms. A marshland of the Qiupu River was selected as the study site. Four 1 m3 pools were excavated. Four groups, including 300 g/m3 and 600 g/m3 nano-silver biological molluscicide groups, a 2 g/m3 50% niclosamide group, and a natural water (control) group were assigned to the four pools which had 100 Oncomelania hupensis snails and 100 crucian seedlings. The molluscicidal effects and toxicity to the aquatic organisms were observed. The snail death rates were 100% and crucian seedling death rates were 6% in the 600 g/m3 nano-silver biological molluscicide group and 300 g/m3 nano-silver biological molluscicide group in 7 days and 14 days. The snail death rate was 100% in the niclosamide group in 7 days, and the crucian seedling death rate was 100% in the niclosamide group in 3 days. The snail death rates were 7% and 14% in the control group in 7 and 14 days respectively, and the crucian seedling death rate was 22% in the control group. The novel nano-silver biological molluscicide possesses an excellent molluscicidal capability and non-toxicity to the other aquatic organisms. Therefore, it may become a new, efficient and environment-friendly bio-molluscicide for extensive application.

  18. Factors influencing EPR dosimetry in fingernails

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubner, D.L.; Spinella, M.R.; Bof, E.

    2010-01-01

    The technique based on the detection of ionizing radiation induced radicals by EPR in tooth enamel is an established method for the dosimetry of exposed persons in radiological emergencies. Dosimetry based on EPR spectral analysis of fingernail clippings, currently under development, has the practical advantage of the easier sample collection. A limiting factor is that overlapping the radiation induced signal (RIS), fingernails have shown the presence of two mechanically induced signals, called MIS1 and MIS2, due to elastic and plastic deformation respectively, at the time of fingernails cutting. With a water treatment, MIS1 is eliminated while MIS2 is considerably reduced. The calibration curves needed for radiation accident dosimetry should have 'universal' characteristics, ie. Represent the variability that can be found in different individuals. Early studies were directed to the analysis of factors affecting the development of such universal calibration curves. The peak to peak amplitude of the signal before and after the water treatment as well as the effect of size and number of clippings were studied. Furthermore, the interpersonal and intrapersonal variability were analyzed. Taking into account these previous studies, the optimal conditions for measurement were determined and EPR spectra of samples irradiated at different doses were used for the developing of dose-response curves. This paper presents the analysis of the results.(authors) [es

  19. Diagnostic radiology dosimetry: status and trends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera M, T., E-mail: trivera@ipn.mx [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Av. Legaria 694, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Medical radiation is by far the largest man-made source of public exposure to ionizing radiation. Since 1970 the expression of protection standards shifted from a dose- to a risk-based approach, with dose limits established to yield risks to radiation workers comparable with those for workers in other safe industries. Another hand, worldwide interest in patient dose measurement was stimulated by the publication of Patient Dose Reduction in Diagnostic Radiology by the UK National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB). In response to heightened awareness of the importance of patient dose contributed by radiology procedures, there has been a general trend to effect control of patient doses by applying the principles of optimization coupled with an increase in regulatory enforcement. In this sense, thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) has been actively proposed in the last 3 decades thanks to their successful applications in diagnostic radiology. At the same time, it is emerged as the best radiation dosimetry method. The present work presents advantages of thermoluminescent dosimetry for X-ray beams measurements and its optimization. (Author)

  20. Dosimetry of internal emitters - quo vadis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, A.R.; Nagaratnam, A.; Jain, S.C.; Gupta, M.M.; Mehta, S.C.

    1999-01-01

    The dosimetry of internally administered radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine procedures using MIRD formalisms and dosimetry in the case of intakes of radionuclides and ICRP methodology for the purpose of radiological protection are well established working practices. It should, however, be remembered that dose or dose coefficients calculated refer to a reference individual, defined in terms of a mathematical phantom established on the basis of certain biokinetic reference parameters. The reference individual represents a typical caucasian adult of West Europe or North American origin. Recently, some attempts have been made to define a Reference Asian and a Reference Indian individual and to assess the effects of anatomical differences and changes in the biokinetics of radiopharmaceuticals and other radionuclides in these different reference individuals on the estimation of dose and dose coefficients in relation to the intake of internal radionuclides. The assessment of doses to the embryo/fetus due to intake of radionuclides by pregnant women, local dose estimates, microdosimetry, radiobiology and radiation protection aspects relating to Auger electron emitters represent other areas of active research in the area of dosimetry of internal emitters. The present review summarises these different aspects of work. (orig.) [de

  1. Diagnostic radiology dosimetry: status and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera M, T.

    2015-10-01

    Full text: Medical radiation is by far the largest man-made source of public exposure to ionizing radiation. Since 1970 the expression of protection standards shifted from a dose- to a risk-based approach, with dose limits established to yield risks to radiation workers comparable with those for workers in other safe industries. Another hand, worldwide interest in patient dose measurement was stimulated by the publication of Patient Dose Reduction in Diagnostic Radiology by the UK National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB). In response to heightened awareness of the importance of patient dose contributed by radiology procedures, there has been a general trend to effect control of patient doses by applying the principles of optimization coupled with an increase in regulatory enforcement. In this sense, thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) has been actively proposed in the last 3 decades thanks to their successful applications in diagnostic radiology. At the same time, it is emerged as the best radiation dosimetry method. The present work presents advantages of thermoluminescent dosimetry for X-ray beams measurements and its optimization. (Author)

  2. Effects of marine reserves on the reproductive biology and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We tested the effects of marine reserve status on the reproductive biology and recruitment rates of two commonly exploited (Helcion concolor, Scutellastra longicosta) and two rarely exploited (Cellana capensis, Scutellastra granularis) limpet species using two reserve and two non-reserve sites on the south coast of South ...

  3. Critical appraisal: dental amalgam update--part II: biological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Michael J; Swift, Edward J

    2013-12-01

    Dental amalgam restorations have been controversial for over 150 years. In Part I of this Critical Appraisal, the clinical efficacy of dental amalgam was updated. Here in Part II, the biological effects of dental amalgam are addressed. © 2013 The Authors.Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Nutrigenetic Effect of Moringa oleifera Seed Meal on the Biological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nutrigenetic Effect of Moringa oleifera Seed Meal on the Biological Growth Programme of Young Broiler Chickens. ... Asked Questions about PDFs. Alternatively, you can download the PDF file directly to your computer, from where it can be opened using a PDF reader. To download the PDF, click the Download link above.

  5. Biological effects in intramuscular 239Pu administration during chelatotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinyakov, E.G.; Nifatov, A.P.; Bazhin, A.G.; Lyubchanskij, Eh.R.

    1988-01-01

    Durable (up to 64 days) application of complexones (Ca and Zn DTPA) in the case of intramuscular administration of 239 Pu large amounts in rats is studied. The results of studying the biological effect proving considerable decrease of the average lifespan of rats are given

  6. Neutron generator (HIRRAC) and dosimetry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, S; Hoshi, M; Takada, J; Tauchi, H; Matsuura, S; Takeoka, S; Kitagawa, K; Suga, S; Komatsu, K

    1999-12-01

    Dosimetry studies have been made for neutrons from a neutron generator at Hiroshima University (HIRRAC) which is designed for radiobiological research. Neutrons in an energy range from 0.07 to 2.7 MeV are available for biological irradiations. The produced neutron energies were measured and evaluated by a 3He-gas proportional counter. Energy spread was made certain to be small enough for radiobiological studies. Dose evaluations were performed by two different methods, namely use of tissue equivalent paired ionization chambers and activation of method with indium foils. Moreover, energy deposition spectra in small targets of tissue equivalent materials, so-called lineal energy spectrum, were also measured and are discussed. Specifications for biological irradiation are presented in terms of monoenergetic beam conditions, dose rates and deposited energy spectra.

  7. Evaluation of two-dimensional bolus effect of immobilization/support devices on skin doses: A radiochromic EBT film dosimetry study in phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu-Tsao, Sou-Tung; Chan, Maria F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors have quantified the two-dimensional (2D) perspective of skin dose increase using EBT film dosimetry in phantom in the presence of patient immobilization devices during conventional and IMRT treatments. Methods: For 6 MV conventional photon field, the authors evaluated and quantified the 2D bolus effect on skin doses for six different common patient immobilization/support devices, including carbon fiber grid with Mylar sheet, Orfit carbon fiber base plate, balsa wood board, Styrofoam, perforated AquaPlast sheet, and alpha-cradle. For 6 and 15 MV IMRT fields, a stack of two film layers positioned above a solid phantom was exposed at the air interface or in the presence of a patient alpha-cradle. All the films were scanned and the pixel values were converted to doses based on an established calibration curve. The authors determined the 2D skin dose distributions, isodose curves, and cross-sectional profiles at the surface layers with or without the immobilization/support device. The authors also generated and compared the dose area histograms (DAHs) and dose area products from the 2D skin dose distributions. Results: In contrast with 20% relative dose [(RD) dose relative to d max on central axis] at 0.0153 cm in the film layer for 6 MV 10x10 cm 2 open field, the average RDs at the same depth in the film layer were 71%, 69%, 55%, and 57% for Orfit, balsa wood, Styrofoam, and alpha-cradle, respectively. At the same depth, the RDs were 54% under a strut and 26% between neighboring struts of a carbon fiber grid with Mylar sheet, and between 34% and 56% for stretched perforated AquaPlast sheet. In the presence of the alpha-cradle for the 6 MV (15 MV) IMRT fields, the hot spot doses at the effective measurement depths of 0.0153 and 0.0459 cm were 140% and 150% (83% and 89%), respectively, of the isocenter dose. The enhancement factor was defined as the ratio of a given DAH parameter (minimum dose received in a given area) with and without

  8. Evaluation of two-dimensional bolus effect of immobilization/support devices on skin doses: a radiochromic EBT film dosimetry study in phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu-Tsao, Sou-Tung; Chan, Maria F

    2010-07-01

    In this study, the authors have quantified the two-dimensional (2D) perspective of skin dose increase using EBT film dosimetry in phantom in the presence of patient immobilization devices during conventional and IMRT treatments. For 6 MV conventional photon field, the authors evaluated and quantified the 2D bolus effect on skin doses for six different common patient immobilization/support devices, including carbon fiber grid with Mylar sheet, Orfit carbon fiber base plate, balsa wood board, Styrofoam, perforated AquaPlast sheet, and alpha-cradle. For 6 and 15 MV IMRT fields, a stack of two film layers positioned above a solid phantom was exposed at the air interface or in the presence of a patient alpha-cradle. All the films were scanned and the pixel values were converted to doses based on an established calibration curve. The authors determined the 2D skin dose distributions, isodose curves, and cross-sectional profiles at the surface layers with or without the immobilization/support device. The authors also generated and compared the dose area histograms (DAHs) and dose area products from the 2D skin dose distributions. In contrast with 20% relative dose [(RD) dose relative to dmax on central axis] at 0.0153 cm in the film layer for 6 MV 10 x 10 cm2 open field, the average RDs at the same depth in the film layer were 71%, 69%, 55%, and 57% for Orfit, balsa wood, Styrofoam, and alpha-cradle, respectively. At the same depth, the RDs were 54% under a strut and 26% between neighboring struts of a carbon fiber grid with Mylar sheet, and between 34% and 56% for stretched perforated AquaPlast sheet. In the presence of the alpha-cradle for the 6 MV (15 MV) IMRT fields, the hot spot doses at the effective measurement depths of 0.0153 and 0.0459 cm were 140% and 150%, (83% and 89%), respectively, of the isocenter dose. The enhancement factor was defined as the ratio of a given DAH parameter (minimum dose received in a given area) with and without the support device. For 6

  9. Edema associated with I-125 or Pd-103 prostate brachytherapy and its effect on post-implant dosimetry: an analysis based on serial CT acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waterman, Frank M.; Yue Ning; Corn, Benjamin W.; Dicker, Adam P.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The dosimetric evaluation of prostate implants is based on analyses of post-implant CT scans. However, if the prostate is edematous as a consequence of needle insertion at the time of imaging, parameters such as dose coverage and the minimum prostatic dose may be underestimated. The purpose of this study is to characterize the magnitude and duration of post-implant edema, and its effect on dosimetry. Materials and Methods: Serial CT scans were obtained at 0, 1, 3, 7, and 15 weeks post-implant on 10 patients who received either I-125 or Pd-103 seed implants. Pre-implant CT scans of each prostate were also obtained. None of the patients received hormone therapy. The magnitude and duration of edema were evaluated by two different methods. In the first, the relative change in the prostate dimensions was determined from the change in the spatial distribution of the implanted seeds, which contract as edema decreases. The radial distance of each seed from the geometric center of the seed cluster was first calculated and then the mean value was computed. The relative change in the mean radial distance in the serial CT scans reflects the relative change in the prostate dimensions. In the second, the prostate in each CT scan was contoured by the same individual, and the prostate volume was computed. A dose-volume histogram of each contoured volume was compiled, from which the minimum prostatic dose and the percentage of the prostate volume which received the prescribed dose were determined. Results: Edema was present in all of the implanted prostates. The magnitude of the edema, expressed as the ratio of the post- to pre-implant volume, ranged from 1.25 to 1.70 (mean 1.47) immediately after implantation. Both methodologies revealed that the edema decreased exponentially with time; however, the edema half-life (time for the edema to decrease by (1(2))) varied considerably, ranging from 3 to 23 days (mean 8.5 days). As edema regressed, the minimum prostatic

  10. Examining the nature of retrocausal effects in biology and psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossbridge, Julia

    2017-05-01

    Multiple laboratories have reported physiological and psychological changes associated with future events that are designed to be unpredictable by normal sensory means. Such phenomena seem to be examples of retrocausality at the macroscopic level. Here I will discuss the characteristics of seemingly retrocausal effects in biology and psychology, specifically examining a biological and a psychological form of precognition, predictive anticipatory activity (PAA) and implicit precognition. The aim of this examination is to offer an analysis of the constraints posed by the characteristics of macroscopic retrocausal effects. Such constraints are critical to assessing any physical theory that purports to explain these effects. Following a brief introduction to recent research on PAA and implicit precognition, I will describe what I believe we have learned so far about the nature of these effects, and conclude with a testable, yet embryonic, model of macroscopic retrocausal phenomena.

  11. Effectiveness and versatility of biological prosthesis in transplanted patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennarecci, Giovanni; Mascianà, Gianluca; De Werra, Edoardo; Sandri, Giovanni Battista Levi; Ferraro, Daniele; Burocchi, Mirco; Tortorelli, Giovanni; Guglielmo, Nicola; Ettorre, Giuseppe Maria

    2017-02-24

    To emphasize the effectiveness and versatility of prosthesis, and good tolerance by patients with incisional hernia (IH). From December 2001 to February 2016, 270 liver transplantations were performed at San Camillo Hospital. IH occurred in 78 patients (28.8%). IH usually appeared early within the first year post-orthotopic liver transplantation. In the first era, fascial defect was repaired by primary closure for defects smaller than 2.5 cm or with synthetic mesh for greater defects. Recently, we started using biological mesh (Permacol™, Covidien). We present a series of five transplanted patients submitted to surgery for abdominal wall defect correction repaired with biological mesh (Permacol™, Covidien). In our cases, the use of biological prosthesis (Permacol™, Covidien) have proven to be effective and versatile in repairing hernia defects of different kinds; patients did not suffer infections of the prosthesis and no recurrence was observed. Furthermore, the prosthesis remains intact even in the years after surgery. The cases that we presented show that the use of biological mesh (Permacol™, Covidien) in transplanted patients may be safe and effective, being careful in the management of perioperative immunosuppression and renal and graft function, although the cost of the product itself has been the main limiting factor and there is need for prospective studies for further evaluations.

  12. Verification of Monte Carlo calculations around a Fletcher Suit Delclos ovoid with normoxic polymer gel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gifford, K; Horton, J; Steger, T; Heard, M; Jackson, E; Ibbott, G

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this work is to calculate the effect of including the anterior and posterior ovoid shields on the dose distribution around a Fletcher Suit Delclos (FSD) ovoid (Nucletron Trading BV, Leersum, Netherlands) and verify these calculations with normoxic polymer gel dosimetry. To date, no Monte Carlo results verified with dosimetry have been published for this ovoid

  13. Radiotherapy gel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldock, C.

    2002-01-01

    shapes and sizes while sparing normal tissue. The situation is further complicated if the normal tissues are critical organs or are particularly sensitive to radiation. Radiotherapy techniques employed to obtain a closer conformation of the dose distribution to the tumour volume are referred to as conformal radiotherapy techniques. The clinical implementation of conformal therapy has been delayed by limitations in the verification of conformal dose distributions calculated by treatment planning systems prior to the irradiation of the patient and the verification of complex treatments during its delivery to the patient. There are several aspects of conformal therapy that complicate dose verification. To achieve the dose distributions conforming to complex 3D volumes, high dose gradients arise in the treatment volume. Further, overdose or underdose regions can exist when separate radiation fields are used to deliver additional radiation. These aspects require that practical dose measurement (dosimetry) techniques be able to integrate dose over time and easily measure dose distributions in 3D with high spatial resolution. Traditional dosimeters, such as ion chambers, thermoluminescent dosimeters and radiographic film do not fulfil these requirements. Novel gel dosimetry techniques are being developed in which dose distributions can potentially be determined in vitro in 3D using anthropomorphic phantoms to simulate a clinically irradiated situation. As long ago as the 1950's, radiation-induced colour change in dyes was used to investigate radiation doses in gels. It was subsequently shown that radiation induced changes in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation properties of gels infused with conventional Fricke dosimetry solutions could be measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In Fricke gels, Fe 2+ ions in ferrous sulphate solutions are usually dispersed throughout a gelatin, agarose or PVA matrix. Radiation-induced changes in the dosimeters are considered to

  14. Effect of Gold Nanoparticles on Prostate Dose Distribution under Ir-192 Internal and 18 MV External Radiotherapy Procedures Using Gel Dosimetry and Monte Carlo Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khosravi H.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gel polymers are considered as new dosimeters for determining radiotherapy dose distribution in three dimensions. Objective: The ability of a new formulation of MAGIC-f polymer gel was assessed by experimental measurement and Monte Carlo (MC method for studying the effect of gold nanoparticles (GNPs in prostate dose distributions under the internal Ir-192 and external 18MV radiotherapy practices. Method: A Plexiglas phantom was made representing human pelvis. The GNP shaving 15 nm in diameter and 0.1 mM concentration were synthesized using chemical reduction method. Then, a new formulation of MAGIC-f gel was synthesized. The fabricated gel was poured in the tubes located at the prostate (with and without the GNPs and bladder locations of the phantom. The phantom was irradiated to an Ir-192 source and 18 MV beam of a Varian linac separately based on common radiotherapy procedures used for prostate cancer. After 24 hours, the irradiated gels were read using a Siemens 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. The absolute doses at the reference points and isodose curves resulted from the experimental measurement of the gels and MC simulations following the internal and external radiotherapy practices were compared. Results: The mean absorbed doses measured with the gel in the presence of the GNPs in prostate were 15% and 8 % higher than the corresponding values without the GNPs under the internal and external radiation therapies, respectively. MC simulations also indicated a dose increase of 14 % and 7 % due to presence of the GNPs, for the same experimental internal and external radiotherapy practices, respectively. Conclusion: There was a good agreement between the dose enhancement factors (DEFs estimated with MC simulations and experiment gel measurements due to the GNPs. The results indicated that the polymer gel dosimetry method as developed and used in this study, can be recommended as a reliable method for investigating the DEF of GNPs in internal

  15. Effective delivery of sonication energy to fast settling and agglomerating nanomaterial suspensions for cellular studies: Implications for stability, particle kinetics, dosimetry and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Joel M; Beltran-Huarac, Juan; Pyrgiotakis, Georgios; Demokritou, Philip

    2018-04-01

    Typical in vitro assays used for high throughput toxicological screening and measuring nano-bio interactions are conducted by pipetting suspensions of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) dispersed in nutrient-rich culture media directly onto cells. In order to achieve fairly monodisperse and stable suspensions of small agglomerates, ultrasonic energy is usually applied to break apart large agglomerates that can form upon suspension in liquid. Lack of standardized protocols and methods for delivering sonication energy can introduce variability in the ENM suspension properties ( e.g . agglomerate size, polydispersity, suspension stability over time), and holds significant implications for in vitro dosimetry, toxicity, and other nano-bio interactions. Careful assessment of particle transformations during dispersion preparation and sonication is therefore critical for accurate interpretation of in vitro toxicity studies. In this short communication, the difficulties of preparing stable suspensions of rapidly settling ENMs are presented. Furthermore, methods to optimize the delivery of the critical sonication energy required to break large agglomerates and prepare stable, fairly monodispersed suspensions of fast settling ENMs are presented. A methodology for the efficient delivery of sonication energy in a discrete manner is presented and validated using various rapidly agglomerating and settling ENMs. The implications of continuous vs. discrete sonication on average hydrodynamic diameter, and polydispersity was also assessed for both fast and slow settling ENMs. For the rapidly agglomerating and settling ENMs (Ag15%/SiO 2 , Ag and CeO 2 ), the proposed discrete sonication achieved a significant reduction in the agglomerate diameter and polydispersity. In contrast, the relatively slow agglomerating and settling Fe 2 O 3 suspension did not exhibit statistically significant differences in average hydrodynamic diameter or polydispersity between the continuous and discrete

  16. Evaluation of radiobiological effects in 3 distinct biological models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemos, J.; Costa, P.; Cunha, L.; Metello, L.F.; Carvalho, A.P.; Vasconcelos, V.; Genesio, P.; Ponte, F.; Costa, P.S.; Crespo, P.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. The present work aims at sharing the process of development of advanced biological models to study radiobiological effects. Recognizing several known limitations and difficulties of the current monolayer cellular models, as well as the increasing difficulties to use advanced biological models, our group has been developing advanced biological alternative models, namely three-dimensional cell cultures and a less explored animal model (the Zebra fish - Danio rerio - which allows the access to inter-generational data, while characterized by a great genetic homology towards the humans). These 3 models (monolayer cellular model, three-dimensional cell cultures and zebra fish) were externally irradiated with 100 mGy, 500 mGy or 1 Gy. The consequences of that irradiation were studied using cellular and molecular tests. Our previous experimental studies with 100 mGy external gamma irradiation of HepG2 monolayer cells showed a slight increase in the proliferation rate 24 h, 48 h and 72 h post irradiation. These results also pointed into the presence of certain bystander effects 72 h post irradiation, constituting the starting point for the need of a more accurate analysis realized with this work. At this stage, we continue focused on the acute biological effects. Obtained results, namely MTT and clonogenic assays for evaluating cellular metabolic activity and proliferation in the in vitro models, as well as proteomics for the evaluation of in vivo effects will be presented, discussed and explained. Several hypotheses will be presented and defended based on the facts previously demonstrated. This work aims at sharing the actual state and the results already available from this medium-term project, building the proof of the added value on applying these advanced models, while demonstrating the strongest and weakest points from all of them (so allowing the comparison between them and to base the subsequent choice for research groups starting

  17. Biological effects of transuranium elements in experimental animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bair, W.J.

    1975-01-01

    Results are reported from life span studies of the biological effects of the transuranium elements ( 238 Pu, 239 Pu, 241 Am, and 242 Cm) on laboratory animals following inhalation, skin absorption, or injection in various chemical forms. The dose levels at which major biological effects have been observed in experimental animals are discussed relative to the maximum permissible lung burden of 0.016 μCi for occupational exposures. Lung cancer has been observed at dose levels equivalent to about 100 times the maximum permissible lung burden. Current experiments directed towards determining whether health effects will occur at lower levels and the mechanisms by which α emitters induce cancer are reviewed. (U.S.)

  18. Radiolabelled substrates for studying biological effects of trace contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A programme of coordinated isotopic tracer-aided investigations of the biological side-effects of foreign chemical residues in food and agriculture, initiated in 1973, was reviewed. The current status of representative investigations from the point of view of techniques and priorities was assessed. Such investigations involved radioactive substrates for studying DNA injury and its repair; 14 C-labelled acetylcholine as substrate for measuring enzyme inhibition due to the presence of, or exposure to, anticholinesteratic contaminants; radioactive substrates as indication of side-effects in non-target organisms and of their comparative susceptibilities; radioactive substrates as indicators of persistence or biodegradability of trace contaminants of soil or water; and labelled pools for studying the biological side-effects of trace contaminants. Priorities were identified

  19. Dosimetry-based treatment planning for molecular radiotherapy: a summary of the 2017 report from the Internal Dosimetry Task Force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Stokke

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The European directive on basic safety standards (Council directive 2013/59 Euratom mandates dosimetry-based treatment planning for radiopharmaceutical therapies. The directive comes into operation February 2018, and the aim of a report produced by the Internal Dosimetry Task Force of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine is to address this aspect of the directive. A summary of the report is presented. Results A brief review of five of the most common therapy procedures is included in the current text, focused on the potential to perform patient-specific dosimetry. In the full report, 11 different therapeutic procedures are included, allowing additional considerations of effectiveness, references to specific literature on quantitative imaging and dosimetry, and existing evidence for absorbed dose-effect correlations for each treatment. Individualized treatment planning with tracer diagnostics and verification of the absorbed doses delivered following therapy is found to be scientifically feasible for almost all procedures investigated, using quantitative imaging and/or external monitoring. Translation of this directive into clinical practice will have significant implications for resource requirements. Conclusions Molecular radiotherapy is undergoing a significant expansion, and the groundwork for dosimetry-based treatment planning is already in place. The mandated individualization is likely to improve the effectiveness of the treatments, although must be adequately resourced.

  20. Light dosimetry in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Star, Willem M.

    1997-05-01

    This paper starts with definitions of radiance, fluence (rate) and other quantities that are important with regard to in vivo light dosimetry. The light distribution in mammalian tissues can be estimated from model calculations using measured optical properties or from direct measurements of fluence rate using a suitable detector. A historical introduction is therefore followed by a brief discussion of tissue optical properties and of calculations using diffusion theory, the -approximation or Monte Carlo simulations. In particular the form of the scattering function is considered in relation to the fluence rate close to the tissue boundary, where light is incident. Non-invasive measurements of optical properties yield the absorption coefficient and , where is the scattering coefficient and g is the mean cosine of the scattering angle. An important question is whether this combination is sufficient, or whether g itself must be known. It appears that for strongly forward scattering, as in mammalian tissues, rather detailed knowledge of the scattering function is needed to reliably calculate the fluence rate close to the surface. Deeper in the tissue is sufficient. The construction, calibration and use of fibre-optic probes for measurements of fluence rate in tissues or optical phantoms is discussed. At present, minimally invasive absolute fluence (rate) measurements seem to be possible with an accuracy of 10 - 20%. Examples are given of in vivo measurements in animal experiments and in humans during clinical treatments. Measurements in mammalian tissues, plant leaves and marine sediments are compared and similarities and differences pointed out. Most in vivo light fluence rate measurements have been concerned with photodynamic therapy (PDT). Optical properties of the same normal tissue may differ between patients. Tumours of the same histological type may even show different optical properties in a single patient. Treatment-induced changes of optical properties may

  1. Cellular- and micro-dosimetry of heterogeneously distributed tritium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Tsi-Chian; Wang, Chun-Ching; Li, Junli; Li, Chunyan; Tung, Chuan-Jong

    2012-01-01

    The assessment of radiotoxicity for heterogeneously distributed tritium should be based on the subcellular dose and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for cell nucleus. In the present work, geometry-dependent absorbed dose and RBE were calculated using Monte Carlo codes for tritium in the cell, cell surface, cytoplasm, or cell nucleus. Penelope (PENetration and Energy LOss of Positrins and Electrons) code was used to calculate the geometry-dependent absorbed dose, lineal energy, and electron fluence spectrum. RBE for the intestinal crypt regeneration was calculated using a lineal energy-dependent biological weighting function. RBE for the induction of DNA double strand breaks was estimated using a nucleotide-level map for clustered DNA lesions of the Monte Carlo damage simulation (MCDS) code. For a typical cell of 10 μm radius and 5 μm nuclear radius, tritium in the cell nucleus resulted in much higher RBE-weighted absorbed dose than tritium distributed uniformly. Conversely, tritium distributed on the cell surface led to trivial RBE-weighted absorbed dose due to irradiation geometry and great attenuation of beta particles in the cytoplasm. For tritium uniformly distributed in the cell, the RBE-weighted absorbed dose was larger compared to tritium uniformly distributed in the tissue. Cellular- and micro-dosimetry models were developed for the assessment of heterogeneously distributed tritium.

  2. [Biological effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorowski, A; Steciwko, A

    1998-01-01

    Since the mid 1970's, when Adey discovered that extremely-low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF EMF) may affect the calcium ions efflux from various cells, bioeffects of non-ionizing radiation (NIR) have become the subject of growing interest and numerous research projects. At present, the fact that NIR exerts both stimulatory and inhibitory effects on different physiological cellular parameters is rather unquestionable. At the same time, some epidemiological studies suggest that exposure to EMF is potentially harmful even if its intensity is very low. It has been proved that thermal factors are not responsible for these effects, therefore nowadays, they are called 'non-thermal effects'. Our paper deals with three different aspects of biological effects of non-ionizing radiation, bioelectromagnetism, electromagnetobiology and electromagnetic bioinformation. Firstly, we describe how EMF and photons can be produced within a living cell, how biological cycles are controlled, and what are the features of endogenous electromagnetic radiation. Secondly, we discuss various facets of external EMF interactions with living matter, focusing on extremely-low-frequencies, radio- and microwaves. Possible mechanisms of these interactions are also mentioned. Finally, we present a short overview of current theories which explain how electromagnetic couplings may control an open and dissipative structure, namely the living organism. The theory of electromagnetic bioinformation seems to explain how different physiological processes are triggered and controlled, as well as how long-range interactions may possibly occur within the complex biological system. The review points out that the presented research data must be assessed very carefully since its evaluation is crucial to set the proper limits of EMF exposure, both occupational and environmental. The study of biological effects of non-ioinizing radiation may also contribute to the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic

  3. Biological effects of exposure to magnetic resonance imaging: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Formica Domenico

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The literature on biological effects of magnetic and electromagnetic fields commonly utilized in magnetic resonance imaging systems is surveyed here. After an introduction on the basic principles of magnetic resonance imaging and the electric and magnetic properties of biological tissues, the basic phenomena to understand the bio-effects are described in classical terms. Values of field strengths and frequencies commonly utilized in these diagnostic systems are reported in order to allow the integration of the specific literature on the bio-effects produced by magnetic resonance systems with the vast literature concerning the bio-effects produced by electromagnetic fields. This work gives an overview of the findings about the safety concerns of exposure to static magnetic fields, radio-frequency fields, and time varying magnetic field gradients, focusing primarily on the physics of the interactions between these electromagnetic fields and biological matter. The scientific literature is summarized, integrated, and critically analyzed with the help of authoritative reviews by recognized experts, international safety guidelines are also cited.

  4. Thermoluminescence Dosimetry Applied to Radiation Protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Poul; Bøtter-Jensen, Lars; Majborn, Benny

    1982-01-01

    , fading, and LET dependence. The applications of thermoluminescence dosimetry in routine personnel monitoring, accident dosimetry, u.v. radiation dosimetry, and environmental monitoring are discussed with particular emphasis on current problems in routine personnel monitoring. Finally, the present state......This is a general review of the present state of the development and application of thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) for radiation protection purposes. A description is given of commonly used thermoluminescent dosimeters and their main dosimetric properties, e.g. energy response, dose range...

  5. Eleventh DOE workshop on personnel neutron dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    Since its formation, the Office of Health (EH-40) has stressed the importance of the exchange of information related to and improvements in neutron dosimetry. This Workshop was the eleventh in the series sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). It provided a forum for operational personnel at DOE facilities to discuss current issues related to neutron dosimetry and for leading investigators in the field to discuss promising approaches for future research. A total of 26 papers were presented including the keynote address by Dr. Warren K. Sinclair, who spoke on, ``The 1990 Recommendations of the ICRP and their Biological Background.`` The first several papers discussed difficulties in measuring neutrons of different energies and ways of compensating or deriving correction factors at individual facilities. Presentations were also given by the US Navy and Air Force. Current research in neutron dosimeter development was the subject of the largest number of papers. These included a number on the development of neutron spectrometers. Selected papers were processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  6. Fast neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.

    1991-01-01

    During 1988--1990 the magnetic resonance dosimetry project was completed, as were the 250 MeV proton shielding measurements. The first cellular experiment using human cells in vitro at the 1 GeV electron storage ring was also accomplished. More detail may be found in DOE Report number-sign DOE/EV/60417-002 and the open literature cited in the individual progress subsections. We report Kinetic Energy Released in Matter (KERMA), factor measurements in several elements of critical importance to neutron radiation therapy and radiation protection for space habitation and exploration for neutron energies below 30 MeV. The results of this effort provide the only direct measurements of the oxygen and magnesium kerma factors above 20 MeV neutron energy, and the only measurements of the iron kerma factor above 15 MeV. They provide data of immediate relevance to neutron radiotherapy and impose strict criteria for normalizing and testing nuclear models used to calculate kerma factors at higher neutron energies

  7. New materials for radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madatov, R.S.; Necefov, A.I.; Qabulov, I.A.; Seferova, S.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The utilization of nuclear energy and beginning the production of radioactive nuclides are the reasons for radiation safety problems actualization. As a result of this, a new specific peculiar properties such as environmental, psychological, biological and etc. that are originated due to radioactive irradiation have been observed. Dosimetric equipment is used with the purpose of environmental protection, radiation detection, radiation safety assessment and distribution of information. The principle of operation of this equipment is based on the ionization effect. However, the equipment is differed one from another by the registration method. The main imperfections of dosimetric equipment are a narrowness of irradiation range as well as small values of energy sensitivity and stability. Taking into account of all above-stated imperfections, the obtaining of a new radiation-resistant materials and production of modern dosimetric detectors on their basis are one of the actual problems in dosimetry. At present the detectors on the basis of semiconductor materials such as Ge, Si, CdTe, CdS and etc. are widespread. Their principle of operation is also based on the ionization process, but the mechanism of its is differ from gas detectors. It is connected with that the carrier mobility for electrons in semiconductors is varied from 1400 up to 4000 cm 2 /(V·sec), and for holes from 400 up to 2000 cm 2 /(V·sec). It provides high level of detection for detectors on the basis of semiconductors. Initial conductivity of semiconductors differs one from another and it restricts the efficiency of detectors. The investigations on two directions have been carried out by this reason. The first direction is the increasing of radiation resistance of existing materials. The second direction is the obtaining of a new materials with high radiation resistance. It is known that the laminated materials on the basis of tellurium, for instance TeInS 2 are high sensitivity to X

  8. Reassessment of the atomic bomb radiation dosimetry for Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Dosimetry system 2002. DS02. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, Robert W.; Kerr, George D.

    2005-01-01

    The extensive efforts to review the dosimetry of the atomic-bomb survivors and formulate the new dosimetry system DS02 have been greatly welcomed by the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF). This accomplishment is a fine tribute to the importance of the epidemiological studies being conducted at RERF. No other study is so informative of the effects of radiation on human health. The gracious participation in the RERF program by the atomic-bomb survivors allows us to contribute to the well being of these individuals, and the high quality of the data obtained allows the RERF results to feature so prominently in the formulation of international guidelines for radiation protection. Such a great effort to improve and substantiate the dosimetry would not otherwise have been justified. RERF greatly appreciates the independent work of the U.S. and Japanese Working Groups on the atomic-bomb dosimetry and the review by the Joint Senior Review Group of this overall effort. We are assured that unbiased development of the new dosimetry system will reflect well in its application in the RERF epidemiology study. The documentation included in this report will serve as reference for the many deliberations concluded. The title publications are divided into 2 volumes. This is the first volume. The 8 of the reports in each chapter are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  9. Reassessment of the atomic bomb radiation dosimetry for Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Dosimetry system 2002. DS02. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, Robert W.; Kerr, George D.

    2005-01-01

    The extensive efforts to review the dosimetry of the atomic-bomb survivors and formulate the new dosimetry system DS02 have been greatly welcomed by the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF). This accomplishment is a fine tribute to the importance of the epidemiological studies being conducted at RERF. No other study is so informative of the effects of radiation on human health. The gracious participation in the RERF program by the atomic-bomb survivors allows us to contribute to the well being of these individuals, and the high quality of the data obtained allows the RERF results to feature so prominently in the formulation of international guidelines for radiation protection. Such a great effort to improve and substantiate the dosimetry would not otherwise have been justified. RERF greatly appreciates the independent work of the U.S. and Japanese Working Groups on the atomic-bomb dosimetry and the review by the Joint Senior Review Group of this overall effort. We are assured that unbiased development of the new dosimetry system will reflect well in its application in the RERF epidemiology study. The documentation included in this report will serve as reference for the many deliberations concluded. The title publications are divided into 2 volumes. This is the second volume. The 29 of the reports in each chapter are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  10. Radiotherapy gel dosimetry: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldock, C.

    2003-01-01

    Radiation therapy or radiotherapy is a common form of cancer treatment. Recent advances in radiotherapy such as intensity modulated radiation therapy indicate that treatment outcomes may be improved. The principle limitation of these more advanced techniques of radiation therapy is the ability to quantify the absorbed radiation dose to the tumour which is related to the 3- dimensional geometry of the tumour. The main advances in 3-dimensional radiation dosimetry are the development of radiation sensitive polymer gel dosimeters. The use of radiation sensitive gels for radiation dosimetry in cancer therapy was first suggested in the 1950s. It was subsequently shown in 1984 that radiation induced changes in nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation properties of gels infused with conventional Fricke dosimetry solutions could be measured. Due to diffusion-related limitations in the use of Fricke gels, alternative polymer gel dosimeters were subsequently suggested in 1992. Since then, both magnetic resonance and optical imaging techniques have been used to evaluate polymer gel dosimeters to produce three-dimensional radiation dose distributions. More recently the uses of x-ray computer tomography and vibrational spectroscopy have also been demonstrated as valuable techniques in the evaluation of these dosimetry gels. Although not yet used routinely clinically, applications of these radiologically soft-tissue equivalent gel dosimeters have been shown to have great potential in the evaluation of complex radiation dose distributions. A review of 3-dimensional radiotherapy gel dosimetry is presented

  11. Oxygen effect in radiation biology: caffeine and serendipity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesavan, P.C.

    2005-01-01

    The 'hit theory' developed in 1920s to explain the actions of ionizing radiation on cells and organisms was purely physical, and its limitation was its inadequacy to address the contemporary findings such as the oxygen enhancement of radiobiological damage, and the increased radio- sensitivity of dividing compared to non-dividing cells. The textbooks written prior to 1970s did not either refer at all to oxygen as a radiosensitizer, or had mentioned it only in a passing manner; yet 'oxygen effect' was emerging as the central dogma in radiation biology. The oxygen effect in radiation biology is highly interdisciplinary encompassing atomic physics (i.e. interaction of photon with matter), radiation chemistry (formation of reactive oxygen species), molecular signalling, gene expression and genetic alterations in cells (mutation, cancer) or the cell death (apoptosis, necrosis, mitotic catastrophe, etc.). Cell death in higher organisms is now recognized as the precursor of possible error-free cell replacement repair. (author)

  12. Effects of UV and microwave radiation on biological material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fielitz, J.; Boegl, W.; Stockhausen, K.; Kossel, F.

    1977-01-01

    For the present study, ten publications on the effect of UV radiation were analyzed. In vitro tests were carried out with one biological substance and seven different human or animal organs and biocytocultures. In vivo, three bacterial strains were irradiated and four irradiation experiments were carried out on mice. As to the effect of microwave radiation, eleven publications were analyzed. In vitro tests were carried out with one biological substance and three animal organs. In vivo, one bacterial strain was irradiated and eight irradiation experiments were carried out on different types of animals. The study's aim was to obtain a survey on biochemical changes of the organisms. Phenomenological changes were given only when the corresponding articles contained further investigation results. Behavioral changes were not taken into account. The results published by the authors of the original papers were compiled in a kind of dictionary. All relevant data are listed in a defined order. (orig.) [de

  13. Biological effect of nitrogen ion implantation on stevia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Cailian; Shen Mei; Chen Qiufang; Shu Shizhen

    1997-10-01

    Dry seed of stevia were implanted by 35∼150 keV nitrogen ions with various doses. The biological effect in M 1 was studied. The results showed that nitrogen ion beam was able to induce variation on chromosome structure in root tip cells. The rate of cells with chromosome aberration was increased with ion beam energy and dose added, but there was on significant linear regression relationship between ion dose and aberration rate. The results indicated the seedling height reduced with the increasing of dose for ion beam. The biological effect of nitrogen ion beam on M 1 stevia was lower than that of γ-rays. (6 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.)

  14. Some experiments upon the biological effects of fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.H.; Mottram, J.C.; Read, J.; Spear, F.G.

    1995-01-01

    This paper: ''Some experiments upon the biological effects of fast neutrons'', was written by four renowned scientists of their time only 8 years after the discovery of neutrons by Chadwick. The paper describes the methods of measurement of neutron dose and a series of radiobiology experiments on chick embryo fibroblasts and the inhibition of mitosis in the bean root. The results are interesting to compare with current thinking on the radiobiology of neutrons. (UK)

  15. Dosimetric characteristics of biological effect of sulfur-35

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisova, V.V.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental materials related to evaluation of dosimetric characteristics of sulfur-35 are presented. Hemogenic organs are subjected to greatest influence especially in the first hours after radionuclide entry into the organism. Comparison is made of absorbed doses in blood with observed blastomogen effect of hemogenic organs. It is noted, that quantitative evaluation of relative biological efficiency of low energy beta-emitters should be performed with account of dosimetric peculiarities of the nuclides mentioned above. 10 refs.; 3 tabs

  16. Biological effects of the ionizing radiation. Press breakfast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flury-Herard, A.; Boiteux, S.; Dutrillaux, B.; Toledano, M.

    2000-06-01

    This document brings together the subjects discussed during the Press breakfast of 29 june 2000 on the biological effects of the ionizing radiations, with scientists of the CEA and the CNRS. It presents the research programs and provides inquiries on the NDA operating to introduce the NDA damages by ionizing radiations, the possible repairs and the repair efficiency facing the carcinogenesis. Those researches allow the scientists to define laws on radiation protection. (A.L.B.)

  17. A Novel Technique for Performing Space Based Radiation Dosimetry Using DNA: Results from GRaDEx-I and the Design of GRaDEx-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Joe; Branly, R.; Theodorakis, C.; Bickham, J.; Swartz, C.; Friedfeld, R.; Ackerman, E.; Carruthers, C.; DiGirolamo, A.; Faranda, J.; hide

    1999-01-01

    Because of the large amounts of cosmic radiation in the space environment relative to that on earth, the effects of radiation on the physiology of astronauts is of major concern. Doses of radiation which can cause acute or chronic biological effects are to be avoided, therefore determination of the amount of radiation exposure encountered during space flight and assessment of its impact on biological systems is critical. Quantifying the radiation dosage and damage to biological systems, especially to humans during repetitive high altitude flight and during long duration space flight is important for several reasons. Radiation can cause altered biosynthesis and long term genotoxicity resulting in cancer and birth defects, etc. Radiation damage to biological systems depends in a complex way on incident radiation species and their energy spectra. Typically non-biological, i.e. film or electronic monitoring systems with narrow energy band sensitivity are used to perform dosimetry and then results are extrapolated to biological models. For this reason it may be desirable to perform radiation dosimetry by using biological molecules e.g. DNA or RNA strands as passive sensors. A lightweight genotoxicology experiment was constructed to determine the degree to which in-vitro naked DNA extracted from tissues of a variety of vertebrate organisms is damaged by exposure to radiation in a space environment. The DNA is assayed by means of agarose gel electrophoresis to determine damage such as strand breakage caused by high momentum particles and photons, and base oxidation caused by free radicals. The length distribution of DNA fragments is directly correlated with the radiation dose. It is hoped that a low mass, low cost, passive biological system to determine dose-response relationship (increase in strand breaks with increase in exposure) can be developed to perform radiation dosimetry in support of long duration space flight, and to predict negative effects on biological

  18. A Novel Technique for Performing Space Based Radiation Dosimetry Using DNA-Results from GRaDEx-I and the Design of GRaDEx-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Joe; Branly, R.; Theodorakis, C.; Bickham, J.; Swartz, C.; Friedfeld, R.; Ackerman, E.; Carruthers, C.; DiGirolamo, A.; Faranda, J.

    1999-01-01

    Because of the large amounts of cosmic radiation in the space environment relative to that on earth, the effects of radiation on the physiology of astronauts is of major concern. Doses of radiation which can cause acute or chronic biological effects are to be avoided, therefore determination of the amount of radiation exposure encountered during space flight and assessment of its impact on biological systems is critical. Quantifying the radiation dosage and damage to biological systems, especially to humans during repetitive high altitude flight and during long duration space flight is important for several reasons. Radiation can cause altered biosynthesis and long term genotoxicity resulting in cancer and birth defects etc. Radiation damage to biological systems depends in a complex way on incident radiation species and their energy spectra. Typically non-biological, i.e. film or electronic monitoring systems with narrow energy band sensitivity are used to perform dosimetry and then results are extrapolated to biological models. For this reason it may be desirable to perform radiation dosimetry by using biological molecules e.g. DNA or RNA strands as passive sensors. A lightweight genotoxicology experiment was constructed to determine the degree to which in vitro naked DNA extracted from tissues of a variety of vertebrate organisms is damaged by exposure to radiation in a space environment. The DNA is assayed by means of agarose gel electrophoresis to determine damage such as strand breakage caused by high momentum particles and photons, and base oxidation caused by free radicals. The length distribution of DNA fragments is directly correlated with the radiation dose. It is hoped that a low mass, low cost, passive biological system to determine dose response relationship (increase in strand breaks with increase in exposure) can be developed to perform radiation dosimetry in support of long duration space flight, and to predict negative effects on biological

  19. Effect of Ceramic Scaffold Architectural Parameters on Biological Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Isabella eGariboldi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have focused on the optimization of ceramic architectures to fulfill a variety of scaffold functional requirements and improve biological response. Conventional fabrication techniques, however, do not allow for the production of geometrically controlled, reproducible structures and often fail to allow the independent variation of individual geometric parameters. Current developments in additive manufacturing technologies suggest that 3D printing will allow a more controlled and systematic exploration of scaffold architectures. This more direct translation of design into structure requires a pipeline for design-driven optimization. A theoretical framework for systematic design and evaluation of architectural parameters on biological response is presented. Four levels of architecture are considered, namely (1 surface topography, (2 pore size and geometry, (3 porous networks and (4 macroscopic pore arrangement, including the potential for spatially varied architectures. Studies exploring the effect of various parameters within these levels are reviewed. This framework will hopefully allow uncovering of new relationships between architecture and biological response in a more systematic way, as well as inform future refinement of fabrication techniques to fulfill architectural necessities with a consideration of biological implications.

  20. The spectroscopy and dosimetry of silver-L radiation for biophysical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modler, H.

    1984-01-01

    In order to carry out biological radiation experiments with low energy electrons, whose limited range as a rule even for single cell layers is not sufficient to pass through the cytoplasm to the nucleus, one must work with low energy X-rays. The electrons which are released directly in the cell by the photo effect are then the biologically active, directly ionized particles, whose starting spectrum can be determined by the selection of the photon spectra. The problem was to build an apparatus for irradiation of thin cell layers with low energy X-rays, which contained a large portion of the silver-L lines at approximately 3 keV, as well as to carry out the necessary spectrometry and dosimetry with the silver anode tubes and to optimize the irradiation parameters. (orig./PW) [de

  1. Biological effective dose studies in carcinoma of uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Poonam; Ramasubramanian, V.

    2008-01-01

    Cancer of cervix is the second most common cancer worldwide among women. Several treatments related protocols of radiotherapy have been followed over few decades in its treatment for evaluating the response. These physical doses varying on the basics of fractionation size, dose rate and total dose needed to be indicated as biological effective dose (BED) to rationalize these treatments. The curative potential of radiation therapy in the management of carcinoma of the cervix is greatly enhanced by the use of intracavitary brachytherapy. Successful brachytherapy requires the high radiation dose to be delivered to the tumor where as minimum radiation dose reach to surrounding normal tissue. Present study is aimed to evaluate biologically effective dose in patients receiving high dose-rate brachytherapy plus external beam radiotherapy based on tumor cell proliferation values in cancer of the cervix patients. The study includes 30 patients' data as a retrospective analysis. In addition determine extent of a dose-response relationship existing between the biological effective dose at Point A and the bladder and rectum and the clinical outcomes

  2. Comparison of ballistic impact effects between biological tissue and gelatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yongxi; Mai, Ruimin; Wu, Cheng; Han, Ruiguo; Li, Bingcang

    2018-02-01

    Gelatin is commonly used in ballistic testing as substitute for biological tissue. Comparison of ballistic impact effects produced in the gelatin and living tissue is lacking. The work in this paper was aimed to compare the typical ballistic impact effects (penetration trajectory, energy transfer, temporary cavity) caused by 4.8mm steel ball penetrating the 60kg porcine hind limbs and 10wt% gelatin. The impact event in the biological tissue was recorded by high speed flash X-ray machine at different delay time, while the event in the gelatin continuously recorded by high speed video was compared to that in the biological tissue. The collected results clearly displayed that the ballistic impact effects in the muscle and gelatin were similar for the steel ball test; as for instance, the projectile trajectory in the two targets was basically similar, the process of energy transfer was highly coincident, and the expansion of temporary cavity followed the same pattern. This study fully demonstrated that choosing gelatin as muscle simulant was reasonable. However, the maximum temporary cavity diameter in the gelatin was a little larger than that in the muscle, and the expansion period of temporary cavity was longer in the gelatin. Additionally, the temporary cavity collapse process in the two targets followed different patterns, and the collapse period in the gelatin was two times as long as that in the muscle. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Concepts of dosimetry; Notions de dosimetrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambini, D.J. [Service Central de Medecine du Travail, Hotel Dieu, 75 - Paris (France)

    2010-11-15

    The effects of exposure to ionizing radiation are determined by the absorbed dose D. The equivalent dose H takes into consideration the variation in probability of a stochastic effect (cancer, leukemia, genetic mutation) based on the quality of the exposure. The effective dose E takes into account the sensitivity of tissues (T) to stochastic effects from radiation exposure. Optimization of radiation exposure to patients in diagnostic radiology in based on diagnostic reference levels (DRL): entrance surface dose or dose-area product for conventional radiology; CT dose index and DLP for CT. (author)

  4. Targeted alpha therapy of mCRPC. Dosimetry estimate of {sup 213}bismuth-PSMA-617

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kratochwil, Clemens; Afshar-Oromieh, Ali; Rathke, Hendrik; Giesel, Frederik L. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Schmidt, Karl [ABX-CRO, Dresden (Germany); Bruchertseifer, Frank; Morgenstern, Alfred [European Commission - Joint Research Centre, Directorate for Nuclear Safety and Security, Karlsruhe (Germany); Haberkorn, Uwe [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2018-01-15

    PSMA-617 is a small molecule targeting the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA). In this work, we estimate the radiation dosimetry for this ligand labeled with the alpha-emitter {sup 213}Bi. Three patients with metastatic prostate cancer underwent PET scans 0.1 h, 1 h, 2 h, 3 h, 4 h and 5 h after injection of {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-617. Source organs were kidneys, liver, spleen, salivary glands, bladder, red marrow and representative tumor lesions. The imaging nuclide {sup 68}Ga was extrapolated to the half-life of {sup 213}Bi. The residence times of {sup 213}Bi were forwarded to the instable daughter nuclides. OLINDA was used for dosimetry calculation. Results are discussed in comparison to literature data for {sup 225}Ac-PSMA-617. Assuming a relative biological effectiveness of 5 for alpha radiation, the dosimetry estimate revealed equivalent doses of mean 8.1 Sv{sub RBE5}/GBq for salivary glands, 8.1 Sv{sub RBE5}/GBq for kidneys and 0.52 Sv{sub RBE5}/GBq for red marrow. Liver (1.2 Sv{sub RBE5}/GBq), spleen (1.4 Sv{sub RBE5}/GBq), bladder (0.28 Sv{sub RBE5}/GBq) and other organs (0.26 Sv{sub RBE5}/GBq) were not dose-limiting. The effective dose is 0.56 Sv{sub RBE5}/GBq. Tumor lesions were in the range 3.2-9.0 Sv{sub RBE5}/GBq (median 7.6 Sv{sub RBE5}/GBq). Kidneys would limit the cumulative treatment activity to 3.7 GBq; red marrow might limit the maximum single fraction to 2 GBq. Despite promising results, the therapeutic index was inferior compared to {sup 225}Ac-PSMA-617. Dosimetry of {sup 213}Bi-PSMA-617 is in a range traditionally considered reasonable for clinical application. Nevertheless, compared to {sup 225}Ac-PSMA-617, it suffers from higher perfusion-dependent off-target radiation and a longer biological half-life of PSMA-617 in dose-limiting organs than the physical half-life of {sup 213}Bi, rendering this nuclide as a second choice radiolabel for targeted alpha therapy of prostate cancer. (orig.)

  5. The effect of biological cohesion on current ripple development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malarkey, Jonathan; Baas, Jaco H.; Hope, Julie

    2014-05-01

    Results are presented from laboratory experiments examining the role of biological cohesion, associated with Extra Polymeric Substances, on the development of current ripples. The results demonstrate the importance of biological cohesion compared to the effect of physical cohesion associated with clays in an otherwise sandy bed. FURTHER INFORMATION In fluvial and marine environments sediment transport is mainly dependent on the nature of the bed surface (rippled or flat) and the nature of cohesion in the bed. Cohesion can be either physical, as a result of the presence of clays, or biological as a result of the presence of organisms. In the case of the latter, biological cohesion occurs as a result of the presence of Extra Polymeric Substances (EPS) secreted by microorganisms. While it is known that EPS can dramatically increase the threshold of motion (Grant and Gust, 1987), comparatively little is known about the effect of EPS on ripple formation and development. The experiments described here seek to fill this gap. They also allow the effect of biological cohesion to be compared with that of physical cohesion from previous experiments (Baas et al., 2013). The experiments, which were conducted in a 10m flume at Bangor University, involved a current over a bed made of fine sand, with a median diameter of 0.148mm, and various amounts of xanthan gum, a proxy for naturally occurring EPS (Vardy et al., 2007). The hydrodynamic experimental conditions were matched very closely to those of Baas et al. (2013). The ripple dimensions were recorded through the glass side wall of the tank using time lapse photography. In the physical cohesion experiments of Baas et al. (2013) for clay contents up to 12%, the clay was very quickly winnowed out of the bed, leaving essentially clay-free ripples that developed at more or less the same rate as clean sand ripples. The resulting equilibrium ripples were essentially the same length as the clean sand ripples but reduced in height. By

  6. Dosimetry for patients with differentiated thyroid cancer in therapy with {sup 131} (Nal) preceded by rec-hTSH and establishment of a correlation between absorbed dose and cytogenetic effects of radiation in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, J.A.; Guimaraes, M.I.C.C.; Buchpiguel, C.A., E-mail: jgonzalez@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (CMN/InRad/HCFM/USP), SP (Brazil). Centro de Medicina Nuclear. Instituto de Radiologia. Hospital das Clinicas; Da Silva, M.A.; Okazaki, K.; Yoriyaz, H.; Bartolini, P., E-mail: masilva@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to calculate the dosimetry for thyroid remnants and other organs of 22 patients with differentiated thyroid cancer and compare the dosimetric results with the genetic effects that may occur due the introduction of ionizing radiation in the human body. The patients were divided in two groups: group A included the patients that went through the interruption of the thyroid hormone reposition and group B included the ones that received the recombinant human Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (rec-hTSH). Blood samples were collected at predetermined intervals and analyzed with the conventional chromosomal aberrations technique. Patients collected their own urine during 24 hours after the administration of the radioiodine. For internal dosimetry calculations it is being used MlRD methodology and software MIRDOSE-3 and MlRDOSE-OLINDA. Preliminary results of the absorbed dose of 12 patients (6 from each group) show the normal pattern of this type of absorption in treatment of thyroid remnants ablation with a mean effective dose of 3 3.2 {+-} 6.4 mSv/MBq (group A) and 15.0 {+-} 4.5 mSv/MBq (group B). In the cytogenetic results for 5 patients (4 from group A and 1 from group B), the microscopic analysis showed the presence of various types of chromosomal aberrations. The dicentric chromosome was the most frequently found and is considered the most sensitive indicator of radiation damage. The correlation between the absorbed dose and the cytogenetic dosimetry appears to be in good agreement so far, since the doses are consistent with the genetic damage found. (author)

  7. Biological Effects of EM Radiations from Mobile Phones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel A. Ali

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Direct health effects could result following exposure to RF by thermal (heating effects. Recent Studies have shown that there are public fears on effects that can be caused mainly by holding mobile phones close to the body, or as a result of possible non-thermal effects from both phones and base stations.  This paper offers an overview on the biological effects of electromagnetic radiation caused by mobile phones. Exposures of individuals to RF radiation from these sources will depend upon their proximity and may be above those from mobile phone base stations, although still well below guidelines. From a review of the scientific literature, it is concluded that there were no established health effects from exposure to the RF fields from mobile phones. However, there are gaps in knowledge requiring further research, but current knowledge suggests that RF exposure to levels below the guidelines were not a risk to health.

  8. Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2007-03-12

    The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at Hanford. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with 10 CFR 835, DOELAP, DOE-RL, ORP, PNSO, and Hanford contractor requirements. The dosimetry system is operated by PNNL’s Hanford External Dosimetry Program (HEDP) which provides dosimetry services to all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee (HPDAC) which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. Rev. 0 marks the first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture (ERICA) database. Revision numbers that are whole numbers reflect major revisions typically involving changes to all chapters in the document. Revision numbers that include a decimal fraction reflect minor revisions, usually restricted to selected chapters or selected pages in the document. Revision Log: Rev. 0 (2/25/2005) Major revision and expansion. Rev. 0.1 (3/12/2007) Minor

  9. Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2010-04-01

    The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with requirements of 10 CFR 835, the DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program, the DOE Richland Operations Office, DOE Office of River Protection, DOE Pacific Northwest Office of Science, and Hanford’s DOE contractors. The dosimetry system is operated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Hanford External Dosimetry Program which provides dosimetry services to PNNL and all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since its inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. The first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture database was designated Revision 0. Revision numbers that are whole numbers reflect major revisions typically involving significant changes to all chapters in the document. Revision

  10. Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2011-04-04

    The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with requirements of 10 CFR 835, the DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program, the DOE Richland Operations Office, DOE Office of River Protection, DOE Pacific Northwest Office of Science, and Hanford’s DOE contractors. The dosimetry system is operated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Hanford External Dosimetry Program which provides dosimetry services to PNNL and all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since its inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. The first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture database was designated Revision 0. Revision numbers that are whole numbers reflect major revisions typically involving significant changes to all chapters in the document. Revision

  11. Revue of some dosimetry and dose assessment European projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolognese-Milsztajn, T.; Frank, D.; Lacoste, V.; Pihet, P.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Within the 5. Framework Programme of the European Commission several project dealing with dosimetry and dose assessment for internal and external exposure have been supported. A revue of the results of some of them is presented in this paper. The EURADOS network which involved 50 dosimetry institutes in EUROPE has coordinated the project DOSIMETRY NETWORK: the main results achieved within this action are the following: - The release on the World Wide Web of the EURADOS Database of Dosimetry Research Facilities; - The realisation of the report 'Harmonization of Individual Monitoring (IM) in Europe'; - The continuation of the intercomparisons programme of environmental radiation monitoring systems; - The realisation of the report Cosmic radiation exposure of aircraft crew. The EVIDOS project aimed at evaluating state of the art dosimetry techniques in representative workplaces of the nuclear industry with complex mixed neutron-photon radiation fields. This paper summarises the main findings from a practical point of view. Conclusions and recommendations will be given concerning characterisation of radiation fields, methods to derive radiation protection quantities and dosimeters results. The IDEA project aimed to improve the assessment of incorporated radionuclides through developments of advanced in-vivo and bioassay monitoring techniques and making use of such enhancements for improvements in routine monitoring. The primary goal was to categorize those new developments regarding their potential and eligib