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Sample records for biological effectiveness rbe

  1. Rapid MCNP simulation of DNA double strand break (DSB) relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for photons, neutrons, and light ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Robert D; Streitmatter, Seth W; Argento, David C; Kirkby, Charles; Goorley, John T; Moffitt, Greg; Jevremovic, Tatjana; Sandison, George A

    2015-11-07

    To account for particle interactions in the extracellular (physical) environment, information from the cell-level Monte Carlo damage simulation (MCDS) for DNA double strand break (DSB) induction has been integrated into the general purpose Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) radiation transport code system. The effort to integrate these models is motivated by the need for a computationally efficient model to accurately predict particle relative biological effectiveness (RBE) in cell cultures and in vivo. To illustrate the approach and highlight the impact of the larger scale physical environment (e.g. establishing charged particle equilibrium), we examined the RBE for DSB induction (RBEDSB) of x-rays, (137)Cs γ-rays, neutrons and light ions relative to γ-rays from (60)Co in monolayer cell cultures at various depths in water. Under normoxic conditions, we found that (137)Cs γ-rays are about 1.7% more effective at creating DSB than γ-rays from (60)Co (RBEDSB  =  1.017) whereas 60-250 kV x-rays are 1.1 to 1.25 times more efficient at creating DSB than (60)Co. Under anoxic conditions, kV x-rays may have an RBEDSB up to 1.51 times as large as (60)Co γ-rays. Fission neutrons passing through monolayer cell cultures have an RBEDSB that ranges from 2.6 to 3.0 in normoxic cells, but may be as large as 9.93 for anoxic cells. For proton pencil beams, Monte Carlo simulations suggest an RBEDSB of about 1.2 at the tip of the Bragg peak and up to 1.6 a few mm beyond the Bragg peak. Bragg peak RBEDSB increases with decreasing oxygen concentration, which may create opportunities to apply proton dose painting to help address tumor hypoxia. Modeling of the particle RBE for DSB induction across multiple physical and biological scales has the potential to aid in the interpretation of laboratory experiments and provide useful information to advance the safety and effectiveness of hadron therapy in the treatment of cancer.

  2. Rapid MCNP simulation of DNA double strand break (DSB) relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for photons, neutrons, and light ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Robert D.; Streitmatter, Seth W.; Argento, David C.; Kirkby, Charles; Goorley, John T.; Moffitt, Greg; Jevremovic, Tatjana; Sandison, George A.

    2015-11-01

    To account for particle interactions in the extracellular (physical) environment, information from the cell-level Monte Carlo damage simulation (MCDS) for DNA double strand break (DSB) induction has been integrated into the general purpose Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) radiation transport code system. The effort to integrate these models is motivated by the need for a computationally efficient model to accurately predict particle relative biological effectiveness (RBE) in cell cultures and in vivo. To illustrate the approach and highlight the impact of the larger scale physical environment (e.g. establishing charged particle equilibrium), we examined the RBE for DSB induction (RBEDSB) of x-rays, 137Cs γ-rays, neutrons and light ions relative to γ-rays from 60Co in monolayer cell cultures at various depths in water. Under normoxic conditions, we found that 137Cs γ-rays are about 1.7% more effective at creating DSB than γ-rays from 60Co (RBEDSB  =  1.017) whereas 60-250 kV x-rays are 1.1 to 1.25 times more efficient at creating DSB than 60Co. Under anoxic conditions, kV x-rays may have an RBEDSB up to 1.51 times as large as 60Co γ-rays. Fission neutrons passing through monolayer cell cultures have an RBEDSB that ranges from 2.6 to 3.0 in normoxic cells, but may be as large as 9.93 for anoxic cells. For proton pencil beams, Monte Carlo simulations suggest an RBEDSB of about 1.2 at the tip of the Bragg peak and up to 1.6 a few mm beyond the Bragg peak. Bragg peak RBEDSB increases with decreasing oxygen concentration, which may create opportunities to apply proton dose painting to help address tumor hypoxia. Modeling of the particle RBE for DSB induction across multiple physical and biological scales has the potential to aid in the interpretation of laboratory experiments and provide useful information to advance the safety and effectiveness of hadron therapy in the treatment of cancer.

  3. TU-EF-304-10: Efficient Multiscale Simulation of the Proton Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) for DNA Double Strand Break (DSB) Induction and Bio-Effective Dose in the FLUKA Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskvin, V; Tsiamas, P; Axente, M; Farr, J [St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Stewart, R [University of Washington, Seattle, WA. (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: One of the more critical initiating events for reproductive cell death is the creation of a DNA double strand break (DSB). In this study, we present a computationally efficient way to determine spatial variations in the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of proton therapy beams within the FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) code. Methods: We used the independently tested Monte Carlo Damage Simulation (MCDS) developed by Stewart and colleagues (Radiat. Res. 176, 587–602 2011) to estimate the RBE for DSB induction of monoenergetic protons, tritium, deuterium, hellium-3, hellium-4 ions and delta-electrons. The dose-weighted (RBE) coefficients were incorporated into FLUKA to determine the equivalent {sup 6}°60Co γ-ray dose for representative proton beams incident on cells in an aerobic and anoxic environment. Results: We found that the proton beam RBE for DSB induction at the tip of the Bragg peak, including primary and secondary particles, is close to 1.2. Furthermore, the RBE increases laterally to the beam axis at the area of Bragg peak. At the distal edge, the RBE is in the range from 1.3–1.4 for cells irradiated under aerobic conditions and may be as large as 1.5–1.8 for cells irradiated under anoxic conditions. Across the plateau region, the recorded RBE for DSB induction is 1.02 for aerobic cells and 1.05 for cells irradiated under anoxic conditions. The contribution to total effective dose from secondary heavy ions decreases with depth and is higher at shallow depths (e.g., at the surface of the skin). Conclusion: Multiscale simulation of the RBE for DSB induction provides useful insights into spatial variations in proton RBE within pristine Bragg peaks. This methodology is potentially useful for the biological optimization of proton therapy for the treatment of cancer. The study highlights the need to incorporate spatial variations in proton RBE into proton therapy treatment plans.

  4. Why more needs to be known about RBE effects in modern radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, R G; Jones, B; Cárabe-Fernández, A

    2009-03-01

    Radiation therapy remains a very effective tool in the clinical management and cure of cancer and new techniques of radiation delivery continue to be developed. Of particular note is the growing world-wide interest in particle beam therapy (PBT) using protons or light ions. Such beams (particularly light ions) are associated with an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE) which, when viewed alongside the more favourable physical distributions of radiation dose available with all forms of particle beams, makes them especially attractive for treating tumours which are associated with disappointing outcomes following conventional X-ray therapy. Although the large body of clinical experience already gained with conventional X-ray therapy will be of paramount importance in guiding the development of treatment programmes using particle beams, understanding and quantification of the RBE effects which are unique to the latter will also be essential. This is because the magnitude of RBE effect is not fixed for any one radiation/tissue combination but is subject to a number of other radiobiological influences. Such relationships may be quantified within the linear-quadratic radiobiological model, within which the associated concept of biologically effective dose (BED) provides a way of inter-comparing the overall biological impact of existing and projected treatments. This paper summarises the main features of RBE and BED, discusses the main quantitative implications for PBT and highlights why clear understanding of RBE effects will be essential to make best use of PBT. It also summarises other clinical applications where knowledge of and allowance for RBE effects is important and suggests that more needs to be done to allow safer practical applications.

  5. RBE, reference RBE and clinical RBE: applications of these concepts in hadron therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wambersie, A

    1999-06-01

    Introduction of heavy particles (hadrons) into radiation therapy aims at improving the physical selectivity of the irradiation (e.g. proton beams), or the radiobiological differential effect (e.g. fast neutrons), or both (e.g. heavy-ion beams). Each of these new therapy modalities requires several types of information before prescribing safely the doses to patients, as well as for recording and reporting the treatments: (i) absorbed dose measured in a homogeneous phantom in reference conditions; (ii) dose distribution computed at the level of the target volume(s) and the normal tissues at risk; (iii) radiation quality from which a RBE evaluation could be predicted and (iv) RBE measured on biological systems or derived from clinical observation. In hadron therapy, the RBE of the different beams raises specific problems. For fast neutrons, the RBE varies within wide limits (about 2 to 5) depending on the neutron energy spectrum, dose, and biological system. For protons, the RBE values range between smaller limits (about 1.0 to 1.2). A clinical benefit can thus not be expected from RBE differences. However, the proton RBE problem cannot be ignored since dose differences of about 5% can be detected clinically in some cases. The situation is most complex with heavy ions since RBE variations are at least as large as for fast neutrons, as a function of particle type and energy, dose and biological system. In addition, RBE varies with depth. Radiation quality thus has to be taken into account when prescribing and reporting a treatment. This can be done in different ways: (a) description of the method of beam production; (b) computed LET spectra and/or measured microdosimetric spectra at the points clinically relevant; (c) RBE determination. The most relevant RBE data are those obtained for late tolerance of normal tissues at 2 Gy per fraction ("reference RBE"). The "clinical RBE" selected by the radiation oncologist when prescribing the treatment will be close to the

  6. Killing effect of Chinese hamster V79 cells exposed to accelerated carbon ions and RBE determination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Survival curves of Chinese hamster V79 cells exposed to accclerated carbon ions with linear energy transfers of 125.5, 200 and 700 keV/μm were measured, respectively. Inactivation cross sections corresponding to the irradiation above were deduced from the V79 cell survival curves. They are 7.86±0.17, 10.44±1.11 and 32.32±3.58 μm2 in turn. With the surviving response of V79 cells to 60Co γ-rays as a reference value, relative biological effectiveness at 10%, 20%, 50% and 80% survival levels were given for the accelerated carbon ions. The results showed that carbon ions with LET of 125.5 keV/μm had a higher value of RBE at all the four survival levels than the carbon ions with other LETs. It was prompted that the maximum value of RBE for the V79 cell surviving as the biological endpoint emerged at the LET below 200 keV/μm for carbon ions.

  7. Killing effect of Chinese hamster V79 cells exposed to accelerated carbon ions and RBE determination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIQiang; ZHOUGuang-Ming; 等

    2002-01-01

    Survival curves of Chinese hamster V79 cells exposed to accelerated carbon ions with linear energy transfers of 125.5,200 and 700keV/um were measured,respectively,Inactivation cross sections corresponding to the irradiation above were deduced from the V79 cell survival curves.They are 7.86±0.17,10.44±1.11 and 32.32±3.59um2 in turn.With the surviving response of V79 cells to 60Co γ-rays as a reference value,relative biological effectiveness at 10%,20%,50%and 80% survival levels were given for the accelerated carbon ions,The results showed that carbon ions with LET of 125.5keV/um had a higher value of RBE at all the four survival levels than the carbon ions with other LETs.It was prompted that the maximum value of RBE for the V79 cell surviving as the biological endpoint emerged at the LET below 200keV/um for carbon ions.

  8. Development and calculation of an energy dependent normal brain tissue neutron RBE for evaluating neutron fields for BNCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woollard, J E; Blue, T E; Gupta, N; Gahbauer, R A

    2001-06-01

    In Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of malignant brain tumors, the energy dependence of a clinically relevant Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) for epithermal neutrons, RBE(En), is important in neutron field design. In the first half of this paper, we present the development of an expression for the energy dependent normal-tissue RBE, RBE(En). We then calculate a reasonable estimate for RBE(En) for adult brain tissue. In the second half of the paper, two separate RBE expressions are developed, one for the RBE of the neutrons that interact in tissue via the 14N(n,p)14C reaction, denoted RBE(N), and one for the RBE of the neutrons which interact in tissue via the 1H(n,n')1H reaction, denoted RBE(H). The absorbed-dose-averaged values of these expressions are calculated for the neutron flux spectrum in phantom for the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) epithermal neutron beam. The calculated values, [RBE(norm)N] = 3.4 and [RBE(norm)H] = 3.2, are within 6% of being equal, and support the use of equal values for RBEN and RBE(H) by researchers at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Finally, values of [RBE(norm)N] and [RBE(norm)H], along with the absorbed-dose-averaged RBE for brain, [RBE(norm)b], were calculated as a function of depth along the centerline of an ellipsoidal head phantom using flux spectra calculated for our Accelerator-Based Neutron Source (ABNS). These values remained essentially constant with depth, supporting the use of constant values for RBE, as is done at BNL.

  9. submitter Data-driven RBE parameterization for helium ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Mairani, A; Dokic, I; Valle, S M; Tessonnier, T; Galm, R; Ciocca, M; Parodi, K; Ferrari, A; Jäkel, O; Haberer, T; Pedroni, P; Böhlen, T T

    2016-01-01

    Helium ion beams are expected to be available again in the near future for clinical use. A suitable formalism to obtain relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for treatment planning (TP) studies is needed. In this work we developed a data-driven RBE parameterization based on published in vitro experimental values. The RBE parameterization has been developed within the framework of the linear-quadratic (LQ) model as a function of the helium linear energy transfer (LET), dose and the tissue specific parameter ${{(\\alpha /\\beta )}_{\\text{ph}}}$ of the LQ model for the reference radiation. Analytic expressions are provided, derived from the collected database, describing the $\\text{RB}{{\\text{E}}_{\\alpha}}={{\\alpha}_{\\text{He}}}/{{\\alpha}_{\\text{ph}}}$ and ${{\\text{R}}_{\\beta}}={{\\beta}_{\\text{He}}}/{{\\beta}_{\\text{ph}}}$ ratios as a function of LET. Calculated RBE values at 2 Gy photon dose and at 10% survival ($\\text{RB}{{\\text{E}}_{10}}$ ) are compared with the experimental ones. Pearson's correlati...

  10. An empirical method for deriving RBE values associated with electrons, photons and radionuclides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellamy, M; Puskin, J; Hertel, N; Eckerman, K

    2015-12-01

    There is substantial evidence to justify using relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values of >1 for low-energy electrons and photons. But, in the field of radiation protection, radiation associated with low linear energy transfer has been assigned a radiation weighting factor wR of 1. This value may be suitable for radiation protection but, for risk considerations, it is important to evaluate the potential elevated biological effectiveness of radiation to improve the quality of risk estimates. RBE values between 2 and 3 for tritium are implied by several experimental measurements. Additionally, elevated RBE values have been found for other similar low-energy radiation sources. In this work, RBE values are derived for electrons based upon the fractional deposition of absorbed dose of energies less than a few kiloelectron volts. Using this empirical method, RBE values were also derived for monoenergetic photons and 1070 radionuclides from ICRP Publication 107 for which photons and electrons are the primary emissions.

  11. Towards Achieving the Full Clinical Potential of Proton Therapy by Inclusion of LET and RBE Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bleddyn Jones

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite increasing use of proton therapy (PBT, several systematic literature reviews show limited gains in clinical outcomes, with publications mostly devoted to recent technical developments. The lack of randomised control studies has also hampered progress in the acceptance of PBT by many oncologists and policy makers. There remain two important uncertainties associated with PBT, namely: (1 accuracy and reproducibility of Bragg peak position (BPP; and (2 imprecise knowledge of the relative biological effect (RBE for different tissues and tumours, and at different doses. Incorrect BPP will change dose, linear energy transfer (LET and RBE, with risks of reduced tumour control and enhanced toxicity. These interrelationships are discussed qualitatively with respect to the ICRU target volume definitions. The internationally accepted proton RBE of 1.1 was based on assays and dose ranges unlikely to reveal the complete range of RBE in the human body. RBE values are not known for human (or animal brain, spine, kidney, liver, intestine, etc. A simple efficiency model for estimating proton RBE values is described, based on data of Belli et al. and other authors, which allows linear increases in α and β with LET, with a gradient estimated using a saturation model from the low LET α and β radiosensitivity parameter input values, and decreasing RBE with increasing dose. To improve outcomes, 3-D dose-LET-RBE and bio-effectiveness maps are required. Validation experiments are indicated in relevant tissues. Randomised clinical studies that test the invariant 1.1 RBE allocation against higher values in late reacting tissues, and lower tumour RBE values in the case of radiosensitive tumours, are also indicated.

  12. Towards Achieving the Full Clinical Potential of Proton Therapy by Inclusion of LET and RBE Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Bleddyn [Gray Laboratory, CRUK/MRC Oxford Oncology Institute, The University of Oxford, ORCRB-Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-17

    Despite increasing use of proton therapy (PBT), several systematic literature reviews show limited gains in clinical outcomes, with publications mostly devoted to recent technical developments. The lack of randomised control studies has also hampered progress in the acceptance of PBT by many oncologists and policy makers. There remain two important uncertainties associated with PBT, namely: (1) accuracy and reproducibility of Bragg peak position (BPP); and (2) imprecise knowledge of the relative biological effect (RBE) for different tissues and tumours, and at different doses. Incorrect BPP will change dose, linear energy transfer (LET) and RBE, with risks of reduced tumour control and enhanced toxicity. These interrelationships are discussed qualitatively with respect to the ICRU target volume definitions. The internationally accepted proton RBE of 1.1 was based on assays and dose ranges unlikely to reveal the complete range of RBE in the human body. RBE values are not known for human (or animal) brain, spine, kidney, liver, intestine, etc. A simple efficiency model for estimating proton RBE values is described, based on data of Belli et al. and other authors, which allows linear increases in α and β with LET, with a gradient estimated using a saturation model from the low LET α and β radiosensitivity parameter input values, and decreasing RBE with increasing dose. To improve outcomes, 3-D dose-LET-RBE and bio-effectiveness maps are required. Validation experiments are indicated in relevant tissues. Randomised clinical studies that test the invariant 1.1 RBE allocation against higher values in late reacting tissues, and lower tumour RBE values in the case of radiosensitive tumours, are also indicated.

  13. Disregarding RBE variation in treatment plan comparison may lead to bias in favor of proton plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedenberg, Minna; Toma-Dasu, Iuliana

    2014-09-01

    Currently in proton radiation therapy, a constant relative biological effectiveness (RBE) equal to 1.1 is assumed. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of disregarding variations in RBE on the comparison of proton and photon treatment plans. Intensity modulated treatment plans using photons and protons were created for three brain tumor cases with the target situated close to organs at risk. The proton plans were optimized assuming a standard RBE equal to 1.1, and the resulting linear energy transfer (LET) distribution for the plans was calculated. In the plan evaluation, the effect of a variable RBE was studied. The RBE model used considers the RBE variation with dose, LET, and the tissue specific parameter α/β of photons. The plan comparison was based on dose distributions, DVHs and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs). Under the assumption of RBE=1.1, higher doses to the tumor and lower doses to the normal tissues were obtained for the proton plans compared to the photon plans. In contrast, when accounting for RBE variations, the comparison showed lower doses to the tumor and hot spots in organs at risk in the proton plans. These hot spots resulted in higher estimated NTCPs in the proton plans compared to the photon plans. Disregarding RBE variations might lead to suboptimal proton plans giving lower effect in the tumor and higher effect in normal tissues than expected. For cases where the target is situated close to structures sensitive to hot spot doses, this trend may lead to bias in favor of proton plans in treatment plan comparisons.

  14. submitter Dose prescription in carbon ion radiotherapy: How to compare two different RBE-weighted dose calculation systems

    CERN Document Server

    Molinelli, Silvia; Mairani, Andrea; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Inaniwa, Taku; Mirandola, Alfredo; Russo, Stefania; Mastella, Edoardo; Hasegawa, Azusa; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Yamada, Shigeru; Vischioni, Barbara; Vitolo, Viviana; Ferrari, Alfredo; Ciocca, Mario; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Orecchia, Roberto; Fossati, Piero

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose: In carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT), the use of different relative biological effectiveness (RBE) models in the RBE-weighted dose $(D_{RBE})$ calculation can lead to deviations in the physical dose $(D_{phy})$ delivered to the patient. Our aim is to reduce target $D_{phy}$ deviations by converting prescription dose values. Material and methods: Planning data of patients treated at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) were collected, with prescribed doses per fraction ranging from 3.6 Gy (RBE) to 4.6 Gy (RBE), according to the Japanese semi-empirical model. The $D_{phy}$ was Monte Carlo (MC) re-calculated simulating the NIRS beamline. The local effect model (LEM)_I was then applied to estimate $D_{RBE}$. Target median $D_{RBE}$ ratios between MC + LEM_I and NIRS plans determined correction factors for the conversion of prescription doses. Plans were re-optimized in a LEM_I-based commercial system, prescribing the NIRS uncorrected and corrected $D_{RBE}$. Results: The MC ...

  15. RBE estimation of proton radiation fields using a DeltaE-E telescope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wroe, Andrew; Schulte, Reinhard; Fazzi, Alberto; Pola, Andrea; Agosteo, Stefano; Rosenfeld, Anatoly

    2009-10-01

    A new monolithic silicon DeltaE-E telescope was evaluated in unmodulated and modulated 100 MeV proton beams used for hadron therapy. Compared to a classical microdosimetry detector, which provides one-dimensional information on lineal energy of charged particles, this detector system provides two-dimensional information on lineal energy and particle energy based on energy depositions, collected in coincidence, within the DeltaE and E stages of the detector. The authors investigated the possibility to use the information obtained with the DeltaE-E telescope to determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) at defined locations within the proton Bragg peak and spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP). An RBE matrix based on the established in vitro V79 cell survival data was developed to link the output of the device directly to RBE(alpha), the RBE in the low-dose limit, at various depths in a homogeneous polystyrene phantom. In the SOBP of a 100 MeV proton beam, the RBE(alpha) increased from 4.04 proximal to the SOBP to a maximum value of 5.4 at the distal edge. The DeltaE-E telescope, with its high spatial resolution, has potential applications to biologically weighted hadron treatment planning as it provides a compact and portable means for estimating the RBE in rapidly changing hadron radiation fields within phantoms.

  16. Neutrons in proton pencil beam scanning: parameterization of energy, quality factors and RBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Uwe; Hälg, Roger A.; Baiocco, Giorgio; Lomax, Tony

    2016-08-01

    The biological effectiveness of neutrons produced during proton therapy in inducing cancer is unknown, but potentially large. In particular, since neutron biological effectiveness is energy dependent, it is necessary to estimate, besides the dose, also the energy spectra, in order to obtain quantities which could be a measure of the biological effectiveness and test current models and new approaches against epidemiological studies on cancer induction after proton therapy. For patients treated with proton pencil beam scanning, this work aims to predict the spatially localized neutron energies, the effective quality factor, the weighting factor according to ICRP, and two RBE values, the first obtained from the saturation corrected dose mean lineal energy and the second from DSB cluster induction. A proton pencil beam was Monte Carlo simulated using GEANT. Based on the simulated neutron spectra for three different proton beam energies a parameterization of energy, quality factors and RBE was calculated. The pencil beam algorithm used for treatment planning at PSI has been extended using the developed parameterizations in order to calculate the spatially localized neutron energy, quality factors and RBE for each treated patient. The parameterization represents the simple quantification of neutron energy in two energy bins and the quality factors and RBE with a satisfying precision up to 85 cm away from the proton pencil beam when compared to the results based on 3D Monte Carlo simulations. The root mean square error of the energy estimate between Monte Carlo simulation based results and the parameterization is 3.9%. For the quality factors and RBE estimates it is smaller than 0.9%. The model was successfully integrated into the PSI treatment planning system. It was found that the parameterizations for neutron energy, quality factors and RBE were independent of proton energy in the investigated energy range of interest for proton therapy. The pencil beam algorithm has

  17. Integration of a model-independent interface for RBE predictions in a treatment planning system for active particle beam scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinsträter, O; Scholz, U; Friedrich, T; Krämer, M; Grün, R; Durante, M; Scholz, M

    2015-09-07

    Especially for heavier ions such as carbon ions, treatment planning systems (TPSs) for ion radiotherapy depend on models predicting the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the particles involved. Such models are subject to intensive research and the choice of the optimal RBE model is a matter of debate. On the other hand TPSs are often strongly coupled to particular RBE models and transition even to extended models of the same family can be difficult. We present here a model-independent interface which allows the unbiased use of any RBE model capable of providing dose-effect curves (even sampled curves) for a TPS. The full decoupling between the RBE model and TPS is based on the beam-mixing model proposed by Lam which is, in contrast to the often-used Zaider-Rossi model, independent of the explicit form of the underlying dose-effect curves. This approach not only supports the refinement of RBE models without adaptations of the TPS--which we demonstrate by means of the local effect model (LEM)--but also allows the comparison of very different model approaches on a common basis. We exemplify this by a comparison between the LEM and a model from the literature for proton RBE prediction.

  18. submitter Variable RBE in proton therapy: comparison of different model predictions and their influence on clinical-like scenarios

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Giulia; Cabal, Gonzalo; Bauer, Julia; Tessonnier, Thomas; Frey, Kathrin; Debus, Jürgen; Mairani, Andrea; Parodi, Katia

    2016-01-01

    Background: In proton radiation therapy a constant relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1 is usually assumed. However, biological experiments have evidenced RBE dependencies on dose level, proton linear energy transfer (LET) and tissue type. This work compares the predictions of three of the main radio-biological models proposed in the literature by Carabe-Fernandez, Wedenberg, Scholz and coworkers. Methods: Using the chosen models, a spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) as well as two exemplary clinical cases (single field and two fields) for cranial proton irradiation, all delivered with state-of-the-art pencil-beam scanning, have been analyzed in terms of absorbed dose, dose-averaged LET $(LET_D)$, RBE-weighted dose $(D_{RBE})$ and biological range shift distributions. Results: In the systematic comparison of RBE predictions by the three models we could show different levels of agreement depending on $(α/β) x$ and LET values. The SOBP study emphasizes the variation of LET D and RBE not only as a functi...

  19. Relative Biological Effectiveness Variation Along Monoenergetic and Modulated Bragg Peaks of a 62-MeV Therapeutic Proton Beam: A Preclinical Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhary, Pankaj; Marshall, Thomas I. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Sciences, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Perozziello, Francesca M.; Manti, Lorenzo [Department of Physics, University of Naples Federico II and INFN Naples Section University of Naples, Naples (Italy); Currell, Frederick J.; Hanton, Fiona [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); McMahon, Stephen J.; Kavanagh, Joy N. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Sciences, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Cirrone, Giuseppe Antonio Pablo; Romano, Francesco [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, LNS, Catania (Italy); Prise, Kevin M., E-mail: k.prise@qub.ac.uk [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Sciences, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Schettino, Giuseppe [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Sciences, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); National Physical Laboratory, Teddington (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: The biological optimization of proton therapy can be achieved only through a detailed evaluation of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) variations along the full range of the Bragg curve. The clinically used RBE value of 1.1 represents a broad average, which disregards the steep rise of linear energy transfer (LET) at the distal end of the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP). With particular attention to the key endpoint of cell survival, our work presents a comparative investigation of cell killing RBE variations along monoenergetic (pristine) and modulated (SOBP) beams using human normal and radioresistant cells with the aim to investigate the RBE dependence on LET and intrinsic radiosensitvity. Methods and Materials: Human fibroblasts (AG01522) and glioma (U87) cells were irradiated at 6 depth positions along pristine and modulated 62-MeV proton beams at the INFN-LNS (Catania, Italy). Cell killing RBE variations were measured using standard clonogenic assays and were further validated using Monte Carlo simulations and the local effect model (LEM). Results: We observed significant cell killing RBE variations along the proton beam path, particularly in the distal region showing strong dose dependence. Experimental RBE values were in excellent agreement with the LEM predicted values, indicating dose-averaged LET as a suitable predictor of proton biological effectiveness. Data were also used to validate a parameterized RBE model. Conclusions: The predicted biological dose delivered to a tumor region, based on the variable RBE inferred from the data, varies significantly with respect to the clinically used constant RBE of 1.1. The significant RBE increase at the distal end suggests also a potential to enhance optimization of treatment modalities such as LET painting of hypoxic tumors. The study highlights the limitation of adoption of a constant RBE for proton therapy and suggests approaches for fast implementation of RBE models in treatment planning.

  20. Sensitivity analysis of the relative biological effectiveness predicted by the local effect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, T; Grün, R; Scholz, U; Elsässer, T; Durante, M; Scholz, M

    2013-10-07

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is a central quantity in particle radiobiology and depends on many physical and biological factors. The local effect model (LEM) allows one to predict the RBE for radiobiologic experiments and particle therapy. In this work the sensitivity of the RBE on its determining factors is elucidated based on monitoring the RBE dependence on the input parameters of the LEM. The relevance and meaning of all parameters are discussed within the formalism of the LEM. While most of the parameters are fixed by experimental constraints, one parameter, the threshold dose Dt, may remain free and is then regarded as a fit parameter to the high LET dose response curve. The influence of each parameter on the RBE is understood in terms of theoretic considerations. The sensitivity analysis has been systematically carried out for fictitious in vitro cell lines or tissues with α/β = 2 Gy and 10 Gy, either irradiated under track segment conditions with a monoenergetic beam or within a spread out Bragg peak. For both irradiation conditions, a change of each of the parameters typically causes an approximately equal or smaller relative change of the predicted RBE values. These results may be used for the assessment of treatment plans and for general uncertainty estimations of the RBE.

  1. TU-A-BRE-01: The Relative Biological Effectiveness of Proton Beams Relative to Photon Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paganetti, H [Massachusetts General Hospital ' Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Stewart, R [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Carabe-Fernandez, A [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Proton therapy patients receive a 10% lower physical dose than the dose administered using photons, i.e. the proton relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is 1.1 in comparison to high-energy photons. The use of a generic, spatially invariant RBE within tumor targets and normal tissue structures disregards a large body of evidence indicating that proton RBE tends to increase with increasing linear energy transfer (LET). Because the doseaveraged proton LET in the distal edge of a spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) is larger than the LET in the plateau region or proximal edge of a SOBP, the use of a spatially invariant RBE is not well justified from a mechanistic point of view. On the other hand, the available clinical data on local tumor control rates and early or late side effects do not provide strong evidence against the continued use of a constant and spatially invariant clinical RBE. The only potential downside to the ongoing use of a constant RBE of 1.1 seems to be that we are missing a potential opportunity to enhance the therapeutic ratio, i.e., design proton therapy treatments in ways that exploit, rather than mitigate, spatial variations in proton RBE. Speakers in this symposium will: 1-review the laboratory and clinical evidence for and against the continued use of a spatially invariant RBE of 1.1, 2-examine some of the putative mechanisms connecting spatial variations in particle LET to estimates of the proton RBE at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels 3-assess the possible clinical significance of incorporating models for spatial variations in proton RBE into treatment planning systems. 4-discuss treatment planning and delivery techniques that will exploit the spatial variations of RBE within proton beams. Learning Objectives: To review laboratory and clinical evidence for and against the continued use of a constant RBE of 1.1 To understand major mechanisms connecting proton LET to RBE at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels. To quantify the

  2. Neutron relative biological effectiveness in Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Masao S; Endo, Satoru; Hoshi, Masaharu; Nomura, Taisei

    2016-11-01

    The calculated risk of cancer in humans due to radiation exposure is based primarily on long-term follow-up studies, e.g. the life-span study (LSS) on atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Since A-bomb radiation consists of a mixture of γ-rays and neutrons, it is essential that the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of neutrons is adequately evaluated if a study is to serve as a reference for cancer risk. However, the relatively small neutron component hampered the direct estimation of RBE in LSS data. To circumvent this problem, several strategies have been attempted, including dose-independent constant RBE, dose-dependent variable RBE, and dependence on the degrees of dominance of intermingled γ-rays. By surveying the available literature, we tested the chromosomal RBE of neutrons as the biological endpoint for its equivalence to the microdosimetric quantities obtained using a tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) in various neutron fields. The radiation weighting factor, or quality factor, Qn, of neutrons as expressed in terms of the energy dependence of the maximum RBE, RBEm, was consistent with that predicted by the TEPC data, indicating that the chromosomally measured RBE was independent of the magnitude of coexisting γ-rays. The obtained neutron RBE, which varied with neutron dose, was confirmed to be the most adequate RBE system in terms of agreement with the cancer incidence in A-bomb survivors, using chromosome aberrations as surrogate markers. With this RBE system, the cancer risk in A-bomb survivors as expressed in unit dose of reference radiation is equally compatible with Hiroshima and Nagasaki cities, and may be potentially applicable in other cases of human radiation exposure. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  3. RBE-LET relationships of high-LET radiations in Drosophila mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, I; Takatsuji, T; Nagano, M; Takada, J; Endo, S; Hoshi, M

    1999-12-01

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 252Cf neutrons and synchrotron-generated high-energy charged particles for mutation induction was evaluated as a function of linear energy transfer (LET), using the loss of heterozygosity for wing-hair mutations and the reversion of the mutant white-ivory eye-color in Drosophila melanogaster. Loss of heterozygosity for wing-hair mutations results predominantly from mitotic crossing over induced in wing anlage cells of larvae, while the reverse mutation of eye-color is due to an intragenic structural change (2.96 kb-DNA excision) in the white locus on the X-chromosome. The measurements were performed in a combined mutation assay system so that induced mutant wing-hair clones as well as revertant eye-color clone can be detected simultaneously in the same individual. Larvae were irradiated at the age of 3 days post oviposition with 252Cf neutrons, carbon beam or neon beam. For the neutron irradiation, the RBE values for wing-hair mutations were larger than that for eye-color mutation by about 7 fold. The RBE of carbon ions for producing the wing-hair mutations increased with increase in LET. The estimated RBE values were found to be in the range 2 to 6.5 for the wing-hair. For neon beam irradiation, the RBE values for wing-hair mutations peak near 150 keV/micron and decrease with further increase in LET. On the other hand, the RBE values for the induction of the eye-color mutation are nearly unity in 252Cf neutrons and both ions throughout the LET range irradiated. We discuss the relationships between the initial DNA damage and LET in considering the mechanism of somatic mutation induction.

  4. A phenomenological relative biological effectiveness approach for proton therapy based on an improved description of the mixed radiation field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairani, A.; Dokic, I.; Magro, G.; Tessonnier, T.; Bauer, J.; Böhlen, T. T.; Ciocca, M.; Ferrari, A.; Sala, P. R.; Jäkel, O.; Debus, J.; Haberer, T.; Abdollahi, A.; Parodi, K.

    2017-02-01

    Proton therapy treatment planning systems (TPSs) are based on the assumption of a constant relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1 without taking into account the found in vitro experimental variations of the RBE as a function of tissue type, linear energy transfer (LET) and dose. The phenomenological RBE models available in literature are based on the dose-averaged LET (LET D ) as an indicator of the physical properties of the proton radiation field. The LET D values are typically calculated taking into account primary and secondary protons, neglecting the biological effect of heavier secondaries. In this work, we have introduced a phenomenological RBE approach which considers the biological effect of primary protons, and of secondary protons, deuterons, tritons (Z  =  1) and He fragments (3He and 4He, Z  =  2). The calculation framework, coupled with a Monte Carlo (MC) code, has been successfully benchmarked against clonogenic in vitro data measured in this work for two cell lines and then applied to determine biological quantities for spread-out Bragg peaks and a prostate and a head case. The introduced RBE formalism, which depends on the mixed radiation field, the dose and the ratio of the linear–quadratic model parameters for the reference radiation {{≤ft(α /β \\right)}\\text{ph}} , predicts, when integrated in an MC code, higher RBE values in comparison to LET D -based parameterizations. This effect is particular enhanced in the entrance channel of the proton field and for low {{≤ft(α /β \\right)}\\text{ph}} tissues. For the prostate and the head case, we found higher RBE-weighted dose values up to about 5% in the entrance channel when including or neglecting the Z  =  2 secondaries in the RBE calculation. TPSs able to proper account for the mixed radiation field in proton therapy are thus recommended for an accurate determination of the RBE in the whole treatment field.

  5. TU-EF-304-12: Proton Radiation Therapy for Left-Sided Breast Cancer: LET and RBE Considerations for Cardiac Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giantsoudi, D; Jee, K; MacDonald, S; Paganetti, H [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Rose, B [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Brigham & Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Increased risk of coronary artery disease has been documented for patients treated with radiation for left-sided breast cancer. Proton therapy (PRT) has been shown to significantly decrease cardiac irradiation, however variations in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) have been ignored so far. In this study we evaluate the impact of accounting for RBE variations on sensitive structures located within high linear energy transfer (LET) areas (distal end) of the proton treatment fields, for this treatment site. Methods: Three patients treated in our institution with PRT for left-sided breast cancer were selected. All patients underwent reconstructive surgery after mastectomy and treated to a total dose of 50.4Gy with beam(s) vertical to the chest wall. Dose and LET distributions were calculated using Monte Carlo (MC-TOPAS - TOol for PArticle Simulation). The LET-based, variable-RBE-weighted dose was compared to the analytical calculation algorithm (ACA) and MC dose distributions for a constant RBE of 1.1, based on volume histograms and mean values for the target, heart and left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). Results: Assuming a constant RBE and compared to the ACA dose, MC predicted lower mean target and heart doses by 0.5% to 2.7% of the prescription dose. For variable RBE, plan evaluation showed increased mean target dose by up to 5%. Mean variable-RBE-weighted doses for the LAD ranged from 2.7 to 5.9Gy(RBE) among patients increased by 41%–64.2% compared to constant RBE ACA calculation (absolute dose: 1.7–3.9Gy(RBE)). Smaller increase in mean heart doses was noticed. Conclusion: ACA overestimates the target mean dose by up to 2.7%. However, disregarding variations in RBE may lead to significant underestimation of the dose to sensitive structures at the distal end of the proton treatment field and could thus impact outcome modeling for cardiac toxicities after proton therapy. These results are subject to RBE model and parameter

  6. Relative Biological Effectiveness of HZE Particles for Chromosomal Exchanges and Other Surrogate Cancer Risk Endpoints.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliedonna Cacao

    Full Text Available The biological effects of high charge and energy (HZE particle exposures are of interest in space radiation protection of astronauts and cosmonauts, and estimating secondary cancer risks for patients undergoing Hadron therapy for primary cancers. The large number of particles types and energies that makeup primary or secondary radiation in HZE particle exposures precludes tumor induction studies in animal models for all but a few particle types and energies, thus leading to the use of surrogate endpoints to investigate the details of the radiation quality dependence of relative biological effectiveness (RBE factors. In this report we make detailed RBE predictions of the charge number and energy dependence of RBE's using a parametric track structure model to represent experimental results for the low dose response for chromosomal exchanges in normal human lymphocyte and fibroblast cells with comparison to published data for neoplastic transformation and gene mutation. RBE's are evaluated against acute doses of γ-rays for doses near 1 Gy. Models that assume linear or non-targeted effects at low dose are considered. Modest values of RBE (10 are predicted at low doses <0.1 Gy. The radiation quality dependence of RBE's against the effects of acute doses γ-rays found for neoplastic transformation and gene mutation studies are similar to those found for simple exchanges if a linear response is assumed at low HZE particle doses. Comparisons of the resulting model parameters to those used in the NASA radiation quality factor function are discussed.

  7. Investigating the robustness of ion beam therapy treatment plans to uncertainties in biological treatment parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Boehlen, T T; Dosanjh, M; Ferrari, A; Fossati, P; Haberer, T; Mairani, A; Patera, V

    2012-01-01

    Uncertainties in determining clinically used relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for ion beam therapy carry the risk of absolute and relative misestimations of RBE-weighted doses for clinical scenarios. This study assesses the consequences of hypothetical misestimations of input parameters to the RBE modelling for carbon ion treatment plans by a variational approach. The impact of the variations on resulting cell survival and RBE values is evaluated as a function of the remaining ion range. In addition, the sensitivity to misestimations in RBE modelling is compared for single fields and two opposed fields using differing optimization criteria. It is demonstrated for single treatment fields that moderate variations (up to +/-50\\%) of representative nominal input parameters for four tumours result mainly in a misestimation of the RBE-weighted dose in the planning target volume (PTV) by a constant factor and only smaller RBE-weighted dose gradients. Ensuring a more uniform radiation quality in the PTV...

  8. Systematics of relative biological effectiveness measurements for proton radiation along the spread out Bragg peak: experimental validation of the local effect model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grün, Rebecca; Friedrich, Thomas; Krämer, Michael; Scholz, Michael

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the predictions of the local effect model (LEM) in an extensive analysis to proton relative biological effectiveness (RBE) experiments found in the literature, and demonstrate the capabilities of the model as well as to discuss potential limitations. 19 publications with in vitro experiments and 10 publications with in vivo experiments focusing on proton RBE along the spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) were considered. In total the RBE values of over 100 depth positions were compared to LEM predictions. The treatment planning software TRiP98 was used to reconstruct the proton depth dose profile, and, together with the physical dose distribution, the RBE prediction was conducted based on the LEM. Only parameters from photon dose response curves are used as input for the LEM, and no free parameters are introduced, thus allowing us to demonstrate the predictive power of the LEM for protons. The LEM describes the RBE adequately well within the SOBP region with a relative deviation of typically less than 10% up to 10 keV µm-1. In accordance with previous publications a clear dependence of RBE on the dose-averaged linear energy transfer (LETD) was observed. The RBE in the experiments tends to increase above 1.1 for LETD values above 2 keV µm-1 and above 1.5 for LETD values higher than 10 keV µm-1 (distal part of the SOBP). The dose dependence is most pronounced for doses lower than 3 Gy (RBE). However, both the LEM predictions and experimental data show only a weak dependence of RBE on the tissue type, as characterized by the α/β ratio, which is considered insignificant with regard to the general uncertainties of RBE. The RBE predicted by the LEM shows overall very good agreement with the experimental data within the SOBP region and is in better agreement with the experimental data than the constant RBE of 1.1 that is currently applied in the clinics. All RBE trends deduced from the experiments were also reflected by the LEM

  9. Estimation of Biological Effects of Tritium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umata, Toshiyuki

    Nuclear fusion technology is expected to create new energy in the future. However, nuclear fusion requires a large amount of tritium as a fuel, leading to concern about the exposure of radiation workers to tritium beta radiation. Furthermore, countermeasures for tritium-polluted water produced in decommissioning of the reactor at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station may potentially cause health problems in radiation workers. Although, internal exposure to tritium at a low dose/low dose rate can be assumed, biological effect of tritium exposure is not negligible, because tritiated water (HTO) intake to the body via the mouth/inhalation/skin would lead to homogeneous distribution throughout the whole body. Furthermore, organically-bound tritium (OBT) stays in the body as parts of the molecules that comprise living organisms resulting in long-term exposure, and the chemical form of tritium should be considered. To evaluate the biological effect of tritium, the effect should be compared with that of other radiation types. Many studies have examined the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of tritium. Hence, we report the RBE, which was obtained with radiation carcinogenesis classified as a stochastic effect, and serves as a reference for cancer risk. We also introduce the outline of the tritium experiment and the principle of a recently developed animal experimental system using transgenic mouse to detect the biological influence of radiation exposure at a low dose/low dose rate.

  10. SU-E-T-547: Modeling Biological Response to Proton Irradiation and Evaluating Its Potential Clinical Consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taleei, R; Peeler, C; Guan, F; Patel, D; Titt, U; Mirkovic, D; Grosshans, D; Mohan, R [Departments of Radiation Physics and Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In addition to physical uncertainties, proton therapy may also be associated with biologic uncertainties. Currently a generic RBE value of 1.1 is used for treatment planning. In this work the effects of variable RBE, in comparison to a fixed RBE, were evaluated by calculating the effective dose for proton treatments. Methods: The repair misrepair fixation (RMF) model was used to calculate variable proton RBEs. The RBE weighted spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) dose in water phantom was calculated using Monte Carlo simulation and compared to 1.1 weighted SOBP dose. A head and neck proton treatment was used to evaluate the potential effects, by comparing the head and neck treatment plan computed with a commercial treatment planning system that incorporates fixed RBE of 1.1 and a Monte Carlo treatment planning system that incorporates variable RBE. Results: RBE calculations along the depth of SOBP showed that the RBE at the entrance is approximately 1 and reaches 1.1 near the center of the SOBP. However, in distal regions the RBE rises to higher values (up to 3.5 depending on the cell type). Comparison of commercial treatment plans using a fixed RBE of 1.1 and Monte Carlo using variable RBE showed noticeable differences in the effective dose distributions. Conclusion: The comparison of the treatment planning with fixed and variable RBE shows that using commercial treatment planning systems that incorporate fixed RBE (1.1) could Result in overestimation of the effective dose to part of head and neck target volumes, while underestimating the effective dose to the normal tissue beyond the tumor. The accurate variable RBE as a function of proton beam energy in patient should be incorporated in treatment planning to improve the accuracy of effective dose calculation.

  11. Impact of tissue specific parameters on the predition of the biological effectiveness for treatment planning in ion beam therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruen, Rebecca Antonia

    2014-06-03

    Treatment planning in ion beam therapy requires a reliable estimation of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the irradiated tissue. For the pilot project at GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH and at other European ion beam therapy centers RBE prediction is based on a biophysical model, the Local Effect Model (LEM). The model version in use, LEM I, is optimized to give a reliable estimation of RBE in the target volume for carbon ion irradiation. However, systematic deviations are observed for the entrance channel of carbon ions and in general for lighter ions. Thus, the LEM has been continuously developed to improve accuracy. The recent version LEM IV has proven to better describe in-vitro cell experiments. Thus, for the clinical application of LEM IV it is of interest to analyze potential differences compared to LEM I under treatment-like conditions. The systematic analysis presented in this work is aiming at the comparison of RBE-weighted doses resulting from different approaches and model versions for protons and carbon ions. This will facilitate the assessment of consequences for clinical application and the interpretation of clinical results from different institutions. In the course of this thesis it has been shown that the RBE-weighted doses predicted on the basis of LEM IV for typical situations representing chordoma treatments differ on average by less than 10 % to those based on LEM I and thus also allow a consistent interpretation of the clinical results. At Japanese ion beam therapy centers the RBE is estimated using their clinical experience from neutron therapy in combination with in-vitro measurements for carbon ions (HIMAC approach). The methods presented in this work allow direct comparison of the HIMAC approach and the LEM and thus of the clinical results obtained at Japanese and European ion beam therapy centers. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the RBE on the model parameters was evaluated. Among all parameters the

  12. RBE: Mechanisms inferred from cytogenetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, E. H.; Cornforth, M. N.

    1994-10-01

    Cyclotron-accelerated heavy ion beams provide a fine degree of control over the physical parameters of radiation. Cytogenetics affords a view into the irradiated cell at the resolution of chromosomes. Combined they form a powerful means to probe the mechanisms of RBE. Cytogenetic studies with high energy heavy ion beams reveal three LET-dependent trends for 1) level of initial damage, 2) distribution of damage among cells, and 3) lesion severity. The number of initial breaks per unit dose increases from a low-LET plateau to a peak at ~180 keV/μm and declines thereafter. Overdispersion of breaks is significant above ~100 keV/μm. Lesion severity, indicated by the level of chromosomal fragments that have not restituted even after long repair times, increases with LET. Similar studies with very low energy 238Pu alpha particles (120 keV/μm) reveal higher levels of initial breakage per unit dose, fewer residual fragments and a higher level of misrepair when compared to high energy heavy ions at the same LET. These observations would suggest that track structure is an important factor in genetic damage in addition to LET.

  13. Relative Biological Effectiveness of Carbon Ions in a Rat Prostate Carcinoma In Vivo: Comparison of 1, 2, and 6 Fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karger, Christian P., E-mail: c.karger@dkfz.de [Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Peschke, Peter [Clinical Cooperation Unit Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Scholz, Michael [Department of Biophysics, Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Huber, Peter E. [Clinical Cooperation Unit Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, Jürgen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and the effective α/β ratio for local tumor control of a radioresistant rat prostate tumor (Dunning subline R3327-AT1) after 6 fractions of carbon ions and photons. Methods and Materials: A total of 82 animals with tumors in the distal thigh were treated with 6 fractions of either photons or carbon ions, by use of increasing dose levels and a 2-cm spread-out Bragg peak. Endpoints of the study were local control (no tumor recurrence within 300 days) and volumetric changes after irradiation. The resulting values for dose at 50% tumor control probability were used to determine RBE values. Including data for 1 and 2 fractions from a previous study, we estimated α/β ratios. Results: For 6 fractions, the values for dose at 50% tumor control probability were 116.6 ± 3.0 Gy for photons and 43.7 ± 2.3 Gy for carbon ions and the resulting RBE was 2.67 ± 0.15. The α/β ratio was 84.7 ± 13.8 Gy for photons and 66.0 ± 21.0 Gy for carbon ions. Using these data together with the linear-quadratic model, we estimated the maximum RBE to be 2.88 ± 0.27. Conclusions: The study confirmed the increased effectiveness of carbon ions relative to photons over the whole dose range for a highly radioresistant tumor. The maximum RBE below 3 is in line with other published in vivo data. The RBE values may be used to benchmark RBE models. Hypoxia seems to have a major impact on the radiation response, although this still has to be confirmed by dedicated experiments.

  14. SU-E-T-581: On the Value of LET as a Radiation Quality Descriptor for RBE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pater, P; Backstrom, G; Enger, S; Seuntjens, J; Naqa, I El [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Villegas, F; Ahnesjo, A [Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between linear energy transfer (LET) and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for protons and light ions, and the corresponding role of LET as a descriptor of radiation quality of hadron therapy. Methods: Monte Carlo (MC) proton and light ion (He, Li, C) tracks with LET < 30 eV nm{sup -1} were generated in an event-by-event mode. They were overlaid on a cell nucleus model containing 6×10{sup 9} nucleotide base pairs using an isotropic irradiation procedure that provides electronic equilibrium. Strand breaks (sbs) were scored in the DNA sugar-phosphate groups and further sub-classified into single or double sbs (ssbs or dsbs). Distributions of ssbs and dsbs for 2 Gy fractions were calculated to estimate RBE for the induction of initial dsbs with reference to {sup 60}Co. Additionally, sbs were classified based on their complexity (i.e. the number of sbs in each cluster). Results: An increase in LET for light ions of the same atomic number or a decrease in atomic number for ions of the same LET resulted in a lower kinetic energy of emitted secondary electrons. The clustering of DNA damage was more pronounced as reflected by the increase in proton RBE from ∼ 1.75 to 4 for LET values of 7 to 28 eV nm{sup -1}. A significant RBE decrease between protons, He, Li and C ions of the same LET was also noticed as function of the atomic number. Significant differences in ssbs and dsbs complexities were also seen for particles with the same LET, potentially supporting a clustering-based radiation quality descriptor. Conclusion: The LET-RBE relationships were simulated for proton and light ions and exhibited expected trends, including different RBEs for particles with the same LET but different atomic numbers. A complexity based radiation quality descriptor may allow better differentiation of RBE between radiation fields of similar LET. We would like to acknowledge support from the Fonds de recherche du Quebec Sante (FRQS), from the

  15. Theory of RBE. Third triennial report, 1 January 1967--31 December 1975. [Model based on tracks of heavy ions in nuclear emulsions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katz, R.

    1975-09-01

    From a single set of themes, the theory of RBE has developed a picture of the response of many biological, physical, and chemical systems to radiations of different quality, that depends on a model of the structure of the tracks of nuclear projectiles in condensed matter. Its characterizations arise from the tracks of heavy ions in nuclear emulsions, as extended to accommodate biological cells. Most recently emulsions have been identified whose radiosensitivity changes with radiation quality parallel those of biological cells. From experimentally determined radiosensitivity parameters, the theory predicts response to a range of radiations, and includes synergistic effects of mixed radiation fields, making it possible to calculate the RBE of a mixed field of neutrons and gamma-rays, and to specify the dosimetric measurements required to make these predictions. (auth)

  16. Recoil proton, alpha particle, and heavy ion impacts on microdosimetry and RBE of fast neutrons: analysis of kerma spectra calculated by Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pignol, J.-P. [Toronto-Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Centre, Radiotherapy Dept., Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Slabbert, J. [National Accelerator Centre, Faure (South Africa)

    2001-02-01

    Fast neutrons (FN) have a higher radio-biological effectiveness (RBE) compared with photons, however the mechanism of this increase remains a controversial issue. RBE variations are seen among various FN facilities and at the same facility when different tissue depths or thicknesses of hardening filters are used. These variations lead to uncertainties in dose reporting as well as in the comparisons of clinical results. Besides radiobiology and microdosimetry, another powerful method for the characterization of FN beams is the calculation of total proton and heavy ion kerma spectra. FLUKA and MCNP Monte Carlo code were used to simulate these kerma spectra following a set of microdosimetry measurements performed at the National Accelerator Centre. The calculated spectra confirmed major classical statements: RBE increase is linked to both slow energy protons and alpha particles yielded by (n,{alpha}) reactions on carbon and oxygen nuclei. The slow energy protons are produced by neutrons having an energy between 10 keV and 10 MeV, while the alpha particles are produced by neutrons having an energy between 10 keV and 15 MeV. Looking at the heavy ion kerma from <15 MeV and the proton kerma from neutrons <10 MeV, it is possible to anticipate y* and RBE trends. (author)

  17. Recoil proton, alpha particle, and heavy ion impacts on microdosimetry and RBE of fast neutrons: analysis of kerma spectra calculated by Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignol, J P; Slabbert, J

    2001-02-01

    Fast neutrons (FN) have a higher radio-biological effectiveness (RBE) compared with photons, however the mechanism of this increase remains a controversial issue. RBE variations are seen among various FN facilities and at the same facility when different tissue depths or thicknesses of hardening filters are used. These variations lead to uncertainties in dose reporting as well as in the comparisons of clinical results. Besides radiobiology and microdosimetry, another powerful method for the characterization of FN beams is the calculation of total proton and heavy ion kerma spectra. FLUKA and MCNP Monte Carlo code were used to simulate these kerma spectra following a set of microdosimetry measurements performed at the National Accelerator Centre. The calculated spectra confirmed major classical statements: RBE increase is linked to both slow energy protons and alpha particles yielded by (n,alpha) reactions on carbon and oxygen nuclei. The slow energy protons are produced by neutrons having an energy between 10 keV and 10 MeV, while the alpha particles are produced by neutrons having an energy between 10 keV and 15 MeV. Looking at the heavy ion kerma from neutrons <10 MeV, it is possible to anticipate y* and RBE trends.

  18. Biological effectiveness of neutron irradiation on animals and man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straume, T.

    1982-11-01

    Neutron experiments on a highly radiosensitive in vivo system - oocytes in mice - provide new insight into the nature of the radiosensitive targets of these important cells. With the radiobiological literature as background, neutron data from animals and humans are integrated, and the controversial question of radiation protection standards for neutrons is addressed. Oocyte killing in juvenile mice by 0.43-MeV, /sup 252/Cf-fission, and 15 MeV neutrons, compared with that by /sup 60/Co gamma rays, yields unusually low neutron RBEs (relative biological effectiveness). At 0.1 rad of 0.43-MeV neutrons the RBE is only 1.8, contrasting greatly with values of 100 or more reported at low-doses for other endpoints. In mice just prior to birth, however, when oocytes are less radiosensitive, the neutron RBE is much higher, similar to values for most other mammalian endpoints. This dramatic change in neutron RBE with mouse age (occurring within 2 to 3 days) can be explained as the result of a shift from a less radiosensitive target (presumably nuclear DNA) to a much more radiosensitive one (probably the oocyte plasma membrane). Using various approaches, a value for the neutron Quality Factor (Q, a radiation protection standard) is estimated as 17 (+-100%), much lower than 100 which has been suggested. With the large uncertainty, 17 is not markedly different from the value of 10 presently in general use.

  19. Comparison of RBE values of high- LET α-particles for the induction of DNA-DSBs, chromosome aberrations and cell reproductive death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aten Jacob

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various types of radiation effects in mammalian cells have been studied with the aim to predict the radiosensitivity of tumours and normal tissues, e.g. DNA double strand breaks (DSB, chromosome aberrations and cell reproductive inactivation. However, variation in correlations with clinical results has reduced general application. An additional type of information is required for the increasing application of high-LET radiation in cancer therapy: the Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE for effects in tumours and normal tissues. Relevant information on RBE values might be derived from studies on cells in culture. Methods To evaluate relationships between DNA-DSB, chromosome aberrations and the clinically most relevant effect of cell reproductive death, for ionizing radiations of different LET, dose-effect relationships were determined for the induction of these effects in cultured SW-1573 cells irradiated with gamma-rays from a Cs-137 source or with α-particles from an Am-241 source. RBE values were derived for these effects. Ionizing radiation induced foci (IRIF of DNA repair related proteins, indicative of DSB, were assessed by counting gamma-H2AX foci. Chromosome aberration frequencies were determined by scoring fragments and translocations using premature chromosome condensation. Cell survival was measured by colony formation assay. Analysis of dose-effect relations was based on the linear-quadratic model. Results Our results show that, although both investigated radiation types induce similar numbers of IRIF per absorbed dose, only a small fraction of the DSB induced by the low-LET gamma-rays result in chromosome rearrangements and cell reproductive death, while this fraction is considerably enhanced for the high-LET alpha-radiation. Calculated RBE values derived for the linear components of dose-effect relations for gamma-H2AX foci, cell reproductive death, chromosome fragments and colour junctions are 1.0 ± 0.3, 14

  20. [Assessment of relative biological effectiveness of tritium using chromosome aberration frequency in human blood lymphocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snigireva, G P; Khaĭmovich, T I; Nagiba, V I

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is to determine Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) of tritium beta-irradiation using chromosome aberration frequency in peripheral blood lymphocytes after radiation exposure in vitro and in vivo. The results of the experimental estimation of tritium beta-irradiation RBE in comparison with 60Co gamma-irradiation using analysis of unstable chromosome aberration frequencies in peripheral blood lymphocytes in reference to concrete conditions of the investigation were presented. It was demonstrated that tritium beta-irradiation is in total more effective than gamma-irradiation up to 1 Gy. RBE of tritium beta-irradiation was determined as 2.2 at minimum doses and decreased at higher doses (1 Gy) up to 1.25. For the first time results of the comparative analysis of frequencies of stable chromosome aberrations in two groups of professional nuclear workers (town Sarov) exposed to chronic tritium beta- and gamma-irradiation in remote period were presented. The grater RBE of tritium beta-irradiation was demonstrated. It has been estimated as 2.5.

  1. RBE of Energetic Iron Ions for the Induction of Early and Late Chromosome Aberrations in Different Cell Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Hada, Megumi; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Numerous published studies have reported the RBE values for chromosome chromosomes induced by charged particles of different LET. The RBE for chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes exposed ex vivo showed a similar relationship as the quality factor for cancer induction. Consequently, increased chromosome aberrations in the astronauts' white blood cells post long-duration missions are used to determine the biological doses from exposures to space radiation. The RBE value is known to be very different for different types of cancer. Previously, we reported that the RBE for initial chromosome damages was high in human lymphocytes exposed to Fe ions. After multiple cell divisions post irradiation, the RBE was significantly smaller. To test the hypothesis that the RBE values for chromosome aberrations are different between early and late damages and also different between different cell types, we exposed human lymphocytes ex vivo, and human fibroblast cells and human mammary epithelial cells in vitro to 600 MeV/u Fe ions. Post irradiation, the cells were collected at first mitosis, or cultured for multiple generations for collections of remaining or late arising chromosome aberrations. The chromosome aberrations were quantified using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole chromosome specific probes. This study attempts to offer an explanation for the varying RBE values for different cancer types.

  2. Relative biological effectiveness of simulated solar particle event proton radiation to induce acute hematological change in the porcine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanzari, Jenine K.; Wan, Steven X.; Diffenderfer, Eric S.; Cengel, Keith A.; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2014-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for simulated solar particle event (SPE) radiation on peripheral blood cells using Yucatan minipigs and electron-simulated SPE as the reference radiation. The results demonstrated a generally downward trend in the RBE values with increasing doses of simulated SPE radiation for leukocytes in the irradiated animals. The fitted RBE values for white blood cells (WBCs), lymphocytes, neutrophils, monocytes and eosinophils were above 1.0 in all three radiation dose groups at all time-points evaluated, and the lower limits of the 95% confidence intervals were > 1.0 in the majority of the dose groups at different time-points, which together suggest that proton-simulated SPE radiation is more effective than electron-simulated SPE radiation in reducing the number of peripheral WBCs, lymphocytes, neutrophils, monocytes and eosinophils, especially at the low end of the 5–10 Gy dose range evaluated. Other than the RBE values, the responses of leukocytes to electron-simulated SPE radiation and proton-simulated SPE radiation exposure are highly similar with respect to the time-course, the most radiosensitive cell type (the lymphocytes), and the shape of the dose–response curves, which is generally log-linear. These findings provide additional evidence that electron-simulated SPE radiation is an appropriate reference radiation for determination of RBE values for the simulated SPE radiations, and the RBE estimations using electron-simulated SPE radiation as the reference radiation are not complicated by other characteristics of the leukocyte response to radiation exposure. PMID:24027300

  3. Relative biological effectiveness of simulated solar particle event proton radiation to induce acute hematological change in the porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanzari, Jenine K; Wan, Steven X; Diffenderfer, Eric S; Cengel, Keith A; Kennedy, Ann R

    2014-03-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for simulated solar particle event (SPE) radiation on peripheral blood cells using Yucatan minipigs and electron-simulated SPE as the reference radiation. The results demonstrated a generally downward trend in the RBE values with increasing doses of simulated SPE radiation for leukocytes in the irradiated animals. The fitted RBE values for white blood cells (WBCs), lymphocytes, neutrophils, monocytes and eosinophils were above 1.0 in all three radiation dose groups at all time-points evaluated, and the lower limits of the 95% confidence intervals were > 1.0 in the majority of the dose groups at different time-points, which together suggest that proton-simulated SPE radiation is more effective than electron-simulated SPE radiation in reducing the number of peripheral WBCs, lymphocytes, neutrophils, monocytes and eosinophils, especially at the low end of the 5-10 Gy dose range evaluated. Other than the RBE values, the responses of leukocytes to electron-simulated SPE radiation and proton-simulated SPE radiation exposure are highly similar with respect to the time-course, the most radiosensitive cell type (the lymphocytes), and the shape of the dose-response curves, which is generally log-linear. These findings provide additional evidence that electron-simulated SPE radiation is an appropriate reference radiation for determination of RBE values for the simulated SPE radiations, and the RBE estimations using electron-simulated SPE radiation as the reference radiation are not complicated by other characteristics of the leukocyte response to radiation exposure.

  4. Relative biological effectiveness for photons: implication of complex DNA double-strand breaks as critical lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ying; Fu, Qibin; Wang, Xudong; Liu, Feng; Yang, Gen; Luo, Chunxiong; Ouyang, Qi; Wang, Yugang

    2017-03-01

    Current knowledge in radiobiology ascribes the adverse biological effects of ionizing radiation primarily to the induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), which is supposed to be potentially lethal and may be converted to lethal damage due to misrepair. Soft and ultrasoft x-rays have been found to bear elevated biological effectiveness for cell killing compared with conventional x-rays or 60Co γ-rays. This phenomenon is qualitatively interpreted as the increased level of DSB induction for low energy photons, however, a thorough quantitative reasoning is lacking. Here, we systematically compared the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) with relative DSB induction for photons from several hundreds of eV up to MeV. Although there is an approximate two-fold increase in the yields of DSB for low energy photons found in our calculation and a large number of experimental measurements, it is far from enough to account for the three- to four-fold increase in RBE. Further theoretical investigations show that DSB complexity (additional single-strand breaks and base damage within 10 base pairs) increases notably for low energy photons, which largely reconciles the discrepancy between RBE and DSB induction. Our theoretical results are in line with accumulating experimental evidence that complex DSBs are refractory to repair machinery and may contribute predominantly to the formation of lethal damage.

  5. The origin of neutron biological effectiveness as a function of energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiocco, G.; Barbieri, S.; Babini, G.; Morini, J.; Alloni, D.; Friedland, W.; Kundrát, P.; Schmitt, E.; Puchalska, M.; Sihver, L.; Ottolenghi, A.

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the impact of radiation quality in early and late responses of biological targets to ionizing radiation exposure necessarily grounds on the results of mechanistic studies starting from physical interactions. This is particularly true when, already at the physical stage, the radiation field is mixed, as it is the case for neutron exposure. Neutron Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) is energy dependent, maximal for energies ~1 MeV, varying significantly among different experiments. The aim of this work is to shed light on neutron biological effectiveness as a function of field characteristics, with a comprehensive modeling approach: this brings together transport calculations of neutrons through matter (with the code PHITS) and the predictive power of the biophysical track structure code PARTRAC in terms of DNA damage evaluation. Two different energy dependent neutron RBE models are proposed: the first is phenomenological and based only on the characterization of linear energy transfer on a microscopic scale; the second is purely ab-initio and based on the induction of complex DNA damage. Results for the two models are compared and found in good qualitative agreement with current standards for radiation protection factors, which are agreed upon on the basis of RBE data. PMID:27654349

  6. Relative Biological Effectiveness of HZE Particles for Chromosomal Exchanges and Other Surrogate Cancer Risk Endpoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacao, Eliedonna; Hada, Megumi; Saganti, Premkumar B.; George, Kerry A.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2016-01-01

    The biological effects of high charge and energy (HZE) particle exposures are of interest in space radiation protection of astronauts and cosmonauts, and estimating secondary cancer risks for patients undergoing Hadron therapy for primary cancers. The large number of particles types and energies that makeup primary or secondary radiation in HZE particle exposures precludes tumor induction studies in animal models for all but a few particle types and energies, thus leading to the use of surrogate endpoints to investigate the details of the radiation quality dependence of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) factors. In this report we make detailed RBE predictions of the charge number and energy dependence of RBE’s using a parametric track structure model to represent experimental results for the low dose response for chromosomal exchanges in normal human lymphocyte and fibroblast cells with comparison to published data for neoplastic transformation and gene mutation. RBE’s are evaluated against acute doses of γ-rays for doses near 1 Gy. Models that assume linear or non-targeted effects at low dose are considered. Modest values of RBE (10) are predicted at low doses <0.1 Gy. The radiation quality dependence of RBE’s against the effects of acute doses γ-rays found for neoplastic transformation and gene mutation studies are similar to those found for simple exchanges if a linear response is assumed at low HZE particle doses. Comparisons of the resulting model parameters to those used in the NASA radiation quality factor function are discussed. PMID:27111667

  7. Temporal Lobe Reactions After Carbon Ion Radiation Therapy: Comparison of Relative Biological Effectiveness–Weighted Tolerance Doses Predicted by Local Effect Models I and IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillmann, Clarissa, E-mail: clarissa.gillmann@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Therapy, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Jäkel, Oliver [Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Therapy, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Schlampp, Ingmar [Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Therapy, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Karger, Christian P. [Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To compare the relative biological effectiveness (RBE)–weighted tolerance doses for temporal lobe reactions after carbon ion radiation therapy using 2 different versions of the local effect model (LEM I vs LEM IV) for the same patient collective under identical conditions. Methods and Materials: In a previous study, 59 patients were investigated, of whom 10 experienced temporal lobe reactions (TLR) after carbon ion radiation therapy for low-grade skull-base chordoma and chondrosarcoma at Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung (GSI) in Darmstadt, Germany in 2002 and 2003. TLR were detected as visible contrast enhancements on T1-weighted MRI images within a median follow-up time of 2.5 years. Although the derived RBE-weighted temporal lobe doses were based on the clinically applied LEM I, we have now recalculated the RBE-weighted dose distributions using LEM IV and derived dose-response curves with Dmax,V-1 cm³ (the RBE-weighted maximum dose in the remaining temporal lobe volume, excluding the volume of 1 cm³ with the highest dose) as an independent dosimetric variable. The resulting RBE-weighted tolerance doses were compared with those of the previous study to assess the clinical impact of LEM IV relative to LEM I. Results: The dose-response curve of LEM IV is shifted toward higher values compared to that of LEM I. The RBE-weighted tolerance dose for a 5% complication probability (TD{sub 5}) increases from 68.8 ± 3.3 to 78.3 ± 4.3 Gy (RBE) for LEM IV as compared to LEM I. Conclusions: LEM IV predicts a clinically significant increase of the RBE-weighted tolerance doses for the temporal lobe as compared to the currently applied LEM I. The limited available photon data do not allow a final conclusion as to whether RBE predictions of LEM I or LEM IV better fit better clinical experience in photon therapy. The decision about a future clinical application of LEM IV therefore requires additional analysis of temporal lobe reactions in a

  8. The FLUKA Monte Carlo code coupled with the local effect model for biological calculations in carbon ion therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Mairani, A; Kraemer, M; Sommerer, F; Parodi, K; Scholz, M; Cerutti, F; Ferrari, A; Fasso, A

    2010-01-01

    Clinical Monte Carlo (MC) calculations for carbon ion therapy have to provide absorbed and RBE-weighted dose. The latter is defined as the product of the dose and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE). At the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung as well as at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT), the RBE values are calculated according to the local effect model (LEM). In this paper, we describe the approach followed for coupling the FLUKA MC code with the LEM and its application to dose and RBE-weighted dose calculations for a superimposition of two opposed C-12 ion fields as applied in therapeutic irradiations. The obtained results are compared with the available experimental data of CHO (Chinese hamster ovary) cell survival and the outcomes of the GSI analytical treatment planning code TRiP98. Some discrepancies have been observed between the analytical and MC calculations of absorbed physical dose profiles, which can be explained by the differences between the laterally integrated depth-d...

  9. Relative biological effectiveness in canine osteosarcoma cells irradiated with accelerated charged particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Junko; Cartwright, Ian M.; Haskins, Jeremy S.; Fujii, Yoshihiro; Fujisawa, Hiroshi; Hirakawa, Hirokazu; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Kitamura, Hisashi; Fujimori, Akira; Thamm, Douglas H.; Kato, Takamitsu A.

    2016-01-01

    Heavy ions, characterized by high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, have advantages compared with low LET protons and photons in their biological effects. The application of heavy ions within veterinary clinics requires additional background information to determine heavy ion efficacy. In the present study, comparison of the cell-killing effects of photons, protons and heavy ions was investigated in canine osteosarcoma (OSA) cells in vitro. A total of four canine OSA cell lines with various radiosensitivities were irradiated with 137Cs gamma-rays, monoenergetic proton beams, 50 keV/µm carbon ion spread out Bragg peak beams and 200 keV/µm iron ion monoenergetic beams. Clonogenic survival was examined using colony-forming as says, and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values were calculated relative to gamma-rays using the D10 value, which is determined as the dose (Gy) resulting in 10% survival. For proton irradiation, the RBE values for all four cell lines were 1.0–1.1. For all four cell lines, exposure to carbon ions yielded a decreased cell survival compared with gamma-rays, with the RBE values ranging from 1.56–2.10. Iron ions yielded the lowest cell survival among tested radiation types, with RBE values ranging from 3.51–3.69 observed in the three radioresistant cell lines. The radiosensitive cell line investigated demonstrated similar cell survival for carbon and iron ion irradiation. The results of the present study suggest that heavy ions are more effective for killing radioresistant canine OSA cells when compared with gamma-rays and protons. This markedly increased efficiency of cell killing is an attractive reason for utilizing heavy ions for radioresistant canine OSA. PMID:27446477

  10. Microdosimetric analysis confirms similar biological effectiveness of external exposure to gamma-rays and internal exposure to 137Cs, 134Cs, and 131I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuhiko Sato

    Full Text Available The risk of internal exposure to 137Cs, 134Cs, and 131I is of great public concern after the accident at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE, defined herein as effectiveness of internal exposure relative to the external exposure to γ-rays is occasionally believed to be much greater than unity due to insufficient discussions on the difference of their microdosimetric profiles. We therefore performed a Monte Carlo particle transport simulation in ideally aligned cell systems to calculate the probability densities of absorbed doses in subcellular and intranuclear scales for internal exposures to electrons emitted from 137Cs, 134Cs, and 131I, as well as the external exposure to 662 keV photons. The RBE due to the inhomogeneous radioactive isotope (RI distribution in subcellular structures and the high ionization density around the particle trajectories was then derived from the calculated microdosimetric probability density. The RBE for the bystander effect was also estimated from the probability density, considering its non-linear dose response. The RBE due to the high ionization density and that for the bystander effect were very close to 1, because the microdosimetric probability densities were nearly identical between the internal exposures and the external exposure from the 662 keV photons. On the other hand, the RBE due to the RI inhomogeneity largely depended on the intranuclear RI concentration and cell size, but their maximum possible RBE was only 1.04 even under conservative assumptions. Thus, it can be concluded from the microdosimetric viewpoint that the risk from internal exposures to 137Cs, 134Cs, and 131I should be nearly equivalent to that of external exposure to γ-rays at the same absorbed dose level, as suggested in the current recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection.

  11. Microdosimetric analysis confirms similar biological effectiveness of external exposure to gamma-rays and internal exposure to 137Cs, 134Cs, and 131I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Manabe, Kentaro; Hamada, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    The risk of internal exposure to 137Cs, 134Cs, and 131I is of great public concern after the accident at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE, defined herein as effectiveness of internal exposure relative to the external exposure to γ-rays) is occasionally believed to be much greater than unity due to insufficient discussions on the difference of their microdosimetric profiles. We therefore performed a Monte Carlo particle transport simulation in ideally aligned cell systems to calculate the probability densities of absorbed doses in subcellular and intranuclear scales for internal exposures to electrons emitted from 137Cs, 134Cs, and 131I, as well as the external exposure to 662 keV photons. The RBE due to the inhomogeneous radioactive isotope (RI) distribution in subcellular structures and the high ionization density around the particle trajectories was then derived from the calculated microdosimetric probability density. The RBE for the bystander effect was also estimated from the probability density, considering its non-linear dose response. The RBE due to the high ionization density and that for the bystander effect were very close to 1, because the microdosimetric probability densities were nearly identical between the internal exposures and the external exposure from the 662 keV photons. On the other hand, the RBE due to the RI inhomogeneity largely depended on the intranuclear RI concentration and cell size, but their maximum possible RBE was only 1.04 even under conservative assumptions. Thus, it can be concluded from the microdosimetric viewpoint that the risk from internal exposures to 137Cs, 134Cs, and 131I should be nearly equivalent to that of external exposure to γ-rays at the same absorbed dose level, as suggested in the current recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection.

  12. Relative biological effectiveness of fast neutrons in a multiorgan assay for apoptosis in mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hae-June; Kim, Joong-Sun; Moon, Changjong; Kim, Jong-Choon; Jo, Sung-Kee; Kim, Sung-Ho

    2008-04-01

    This study compared the effects of high linear energy transfer (LET) fast neutrons on the induction of apoptosis in several tissue types (hair follicle, intestine crypt, testis) of ICR mouse exposed to low LET 60Co gamma-rays. The changes that occurred from 0 to 24 h after exposing the mice to either 2 Gy of gamma-rays (2 Gy/min) or 0.8 Gy of neutrons (94 mGy/min, 35 MeV) were examined. The maximum frequency of apoptosis was observed at 8 or 12 h after irradiation. The mice that had received 0-8 Gy of gamma-rays or 0-1.6 Gy of neutrons were examined 8 h after irradiation. The best-fitting dose-response curves were linear-quadratic, and there was a significant relationship between the number of apoptotic cells and the dose. The stained products in the TUNEL-positive cells or bodies correlated with the typical morphologic characteristics of apoptosis observed by optical microscopy. In the follicles showing an apoptosis frequency between 2 and 14 per hair follicle, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the neutrons in the small and large follicles was 2.09 +/- 0.31 and 2.15 +/- 0.18, respectively. In the intestine crypts showing an apoptosis frequency between 1 and 3 per crypt, the RBE of the neutrons was 4.03 +/- 0.06 and 3.87 +/- 0.04 in the base and total crypts, respectively. The RBE of the neutrons in the seminiferous tubule showing an apoptosis frequency between 0.5 and 2 per tubule was 5.18 +/- 0.06. The results determined the time-response relations and the RBE for fast neutron-induced apoptosis in several organs at the same time. The differences in RBE observed between the high and low LET radiation and it is believed that the difference in the DSB repair capacity in hair follicle, intestine crypt, and seminiferous tubule cells plays a role in determining the RBE of the high-LET radiation for the induced apoptotic cell formation.

  13. In vitro RBE-LET dependence for multiple particle types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Brita Singers; Overgaard, Jens; Bassler, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Background. In vitro RBE values for various high LET radiation types have been determined for many different cell types. Occasionally it is criticized that RBE for a given endpoint cannot be single-value dependent on LET alone, but also on particle species, due to the different dose deposition...... profiles on microscopic scale. Hence LET is not sufficient as a predictor of RBE, and this is one of the motivations for development of radiobiological models which explicitly depend on the detailed particle energy spectrum of the applied radiation field. The aim of the present study is to summarize...... points were collected from 20, four and four publications for V79, CHO and T1, respectively, in total covering 228 RBE values from a broad range of particle species. Results and discussion. All RBE-LET data points demonstrate surprising agreement within the general error band formed by the numerous data...

  14. SU-F-BRD-16: Relative Biological Effectiveness of Double-Strand Break Induction for Modeling Cell Survival in Pristine Proton Beams of Different Dose-Averaged Linear Energy Transfers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeler, C; Bronk, L [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); UT Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Taleei, R; Guan, F; Patel, D; Titt, U; Mirkovic, D; Grosshans, D; Mohan, R [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Stewart, R [University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: High throughput in vitro experiments assessing cell survival following proton radiation indicate that both the alpha and the beta parameters of the linear quadratic model increase with increasing proton linear energy transfer (LET). We investigated the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of double-strand break (DSB) induction as a means of explaining the experimental results. Methods: Experiments were performed with two lung cancer cell lines and a range of proton LET values (0.94 – 19.4 keV/µm) using an experimental apparatus designed to irradiate cells in a 96 well plate such that each column encounters protons of different dose-averaged LET (LETd). Traditional linear quadratic survival curve fitting was performed, and alpha, beta, and RBE values obtained. Survival curves were also fit with a model incorporating RBE of DSB induction as the sole fit parameter. Fitted values of the RBE of DSB induction were then compared to values obtained using Monte Carlo Damage Simulation (MCDS) software and energy spectra calculated with Geant4. Other parameters including alpha, beta, and number of DSBs were compared to those obtained from traditional fitting. Results: Survival curve fitting with RBE of DSB induction yielded alpha and beta parameters that increase with proton LETd, which follows from the standard method of fitting; however, relying on a single fit parameter provided more consistent trends. The fitted values of RBE of DSB induction increased beyond what is predicted from MCDS data above proton LETd of approximately 10 keV/µm. Conclusion: In order to accurately model in vitro proton irradiation experiments performed with high throughput methods, the RBE of DSB induction must increase more rapidly than predicted by MCDS above LETd of 10 keV/µm. This can be explained by considering the increased complexity of DSBs or the nature of intra-track pairwise DSB interactions in this range of LETd values. NIH Grant 2U19CA021239-35.

  15. Lung Cancer Cell Line Screen Links Fanconi Anemia/BRCA Pathway Defects to Increased Relative Biological Effectiveness of Proton Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qi; Ghosh, Priyanjali; Magpayo, Nicole [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Testa, Mauro; Tang, Shikui [Division of Radiation Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Gheorghiu, Liliana [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Biggs, Peter; Paganetti, Harald [Division of Radiation Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Efstathiou, Jason A. [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Lu, Hsiao-Ming [Division of Radiation Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Held, Kathryn D. [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Willers, Henning, E-mail: hwillers@mgh.harvard.edu [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: Growing knowledge of genomic heterogeneity in cancer, especially when it results in altered DNA damage responses, requires re-examination of the generic relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1 of protons. Methods and Materials: For determination of cellular radiosensitivity, we irradiated 17 lung cancer cell lines at the mid-spread-out Bragg peak of a clinical proton beam (linear energy transfer, 2.5 keV/μm). For comparison, 250-kVp X rays and {sup 137}Cs γ-rays were used. To estimate the RBE of protons relative to {sup 60}Co (Co60eq), we assigned an RBE(Co60Eq) of 1.1 to X rays to correct the physical dose measured. Standard DNA repair foci assays were used to monitor damage responses. FANCD2 was depleted using RNA interference. Results: Five lung cancer cell lines (29.4%) exhibited reduced clonogenic survival after proton irradiation compared with X-irradiation with the same physical doses. This was confirmed in a 3-dimensional sphere assay. Corresponding proton RBE(Co60Eq) estimates were statistically significantly different from 1.1 (P≤.05): 1.31 to 1.77 (for a survival fraction of 0.5). In 3 of these lines, increased RBE was correlated with alterations in the Fanconi anemia (FA)/BRCA pathway of DNA repair. In Calu-6 cells, the data pointed toward an FA pathway defect, leading to a previously unreported persistence of proton-induced RAD51 foci. The FA/BRCA-defective cells displayed a 25% increase in the size of subnuclear 53BP1 foci 18 hours after proton irradiation. Conclusions: Our cell line screen has revealed variations in proton RBE that are partly due to FA/BRCA pathway defects, suggesting that the use of a generic RBE for cancers should be revisited. We propose that functional biomarkers, such as size of residual 53BP1 foci, may be used to identify cancers with increased sensitivity to proton radiation.

  16. Relative biological effectiveness of tritium for induction of myeloid leukemia in CBA/H mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.R. [Battelle Pacific Northwest Labs., Health Protection Branch, Health Div., Richland, WA (United States); Myers, D.K.; Jackson, J.S.; Dunford, D.W.; Gragtmans, N.J.; Wyatt, H.M.; Jones, A.R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontairo (Canada); Percy, D.H. [Univ. of Guelph, Ontario Veterinary College, Guelph, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-07-01

    To help resolve uncertainties as to the most appropriate weighting factor for tritium {beta} rays, a large experiment was carried out to measure the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of tritiated water compared to X rays for the induction of myeloid leukemia in male mice of the CBA/H strain. The study was designed to estimate the lifetime incidence of myeloid leukemia in seven groups of about 750 mice each; radiation exposures were approximately 0, 1, 2 and 3 Gy both for tritiated water and for X rays. The lifetime incidence of leukemia in these mice increased from 0.13% in the control group to 6-8% in groups exposed to higher radiation doses. The results were fitted to various equations relating leukemia incidence to radiation dose, using both the raw data and data corrected for cumulative mouse-days at risk. The calculated RBE values for tritium 13 rays compared to X rays ranged from 1.0 {+-} 0.5 to 1.3 {+-} 0.3. A best estimate of the RBE for this experiment was about 1.2 {+-} 0.3. A w{sub R} value of 1 would thus appear to be more appropriate than a W{sub R} of 2 for tritium {beta} rays. (author)

  17. Relative biological effectiveness of tritium for induction of myeloid leukemia in CBA/H mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J R; Myers, D K; Jackson, J S; Dunford, D W; Gragtmans, N J; Wyatt, H M; Jones, A R; Percy, D H

    1995-10-01

    To help resolve uncertainties as to the most appropriate weighting factor for tritium beta rays, a large experiment was carried out to measure the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of tritiated water compared to X rays for the induction of myeloid leukemia in male mice of the CBA/H strain. The study was designed to estimate the lifetime incidence of myeloid leukemia in seven groups of about 750 mice each; radiation exposures were approximately 0, 1, 2 and 3 Gy both for tritiated water and for X rays. The lifetime incidence of leukemia in these mice increased from 0.13% in the control group to 6-8% in groups exposed to higher radiation doses. The results were fitted to various equations relating leukemia incidence to radiation dose, using both the raw data and data corrected for cumulative mouse-days at risk. The calculated RBE values for tritium beta rays compared to X rays ranged from 1.0 +/- 0.5 to 1.3 +/- 0.3. A best estimate of the RBE for this experiment was about 1.2 +/- 0.3. A wR value of 1 would thus appear to be more appropriate than a wR of 2 for tritium beta rays.

  18. Biological dose representation for carbon-ion radiotherapy of unconventional fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Inaniwa, Taku

    2017-02-01

    In carbon-ion radiotherapy, single-beam delivery each day in alternate directions has been common practice for efficient operation, taking advantage of the Bragg peak and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for uniform dose conformation to a tumor. Treatments are usually fractionated and treatment plans are evaluated with the total RBE-weighted dose; however, this is of limited relevance to the biological effect. In this study, we reformulate the biologically effective dose (BED) to normalize the dose-fractionation and cell-repopulation effects as well as the RBE of treating radiation, based on inactivation of a reference cell line by a reference carbon-ion radiation. The BED distribution virtually represents the biological effect of a treatment regardless of radiation modality or fractionation scheme. We applied the BED formulation to simplistic model treatments and to a preclinical survey for hypofractionation based on an actual prostate cancer treatment with carbon ions. The proposed formulation was demonstrated to be practical and to give theoretical implications. For a prostate cancer treatment in 12 fractions, the distributions of BED and of RBE-weighted dose were very similar. With hypofractionation, while the RBE-weighted dose distribution varied significantly, the BED distribution was nearly invariant, implying that carbon-ion radiotherapy would be effectively insensitive to fractionation. However, treatment evaluation with such a simplistic biological dose is intrinsically limited and must be complemented in practice by clinical experience and biological experiments.

  19. The RB/E2F pathway and regulation of RNA processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlander, Joseph [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, 1007 East Lowell Street, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Bosco, Giovanni, E-mail: gbosco@email.arizona.edu [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, 1007 East Lowell Street, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2009-07-03

    The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (RB) is inactivated in a majority of cancers. RB restricts cell proliferation by inhibiting the E2F family of transcription factors. The current model for RB/E2F function describes its role in regulating transcription at gene promoters. Whether the RB or E2F proteins might play a role in gene expression beyond transcription initiation is not well known. This review describes evidence that points to a novel role for the RB/E2F network in the regulation of RNA processing, and we propose a model as a framework for future research. The elucidation of a novel role of RB in RNA processing will have a profound impact on our understanding of the role of this tumor suppressor family in cell and developmental biology.

  20. Fractionation effects in particle radiotherapy: implications for hypo-fractionation regimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carabe-Fernandez, A; Paganetti, H [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Francis H Burr Proton Therapy Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Dale, R G [Department of Radiation Physics and Radiobiology, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Charing Cross Hospital, London W6 8RF (United Kingdom); Hopewell, J W; Jones, B, E-mail: acarabe@partners.or [Particle Therapy Cancer Research Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-07

    The aim is to demonstrate the potential impact of changes in the value of the {beta} parameter in the linear quadratic (LQ) model on the calculation of clinical relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values used for high linear energy transfer (LET) radiotherapy. The parameter RBE{sub min} is introduced into the LQ formulation to account for possible changes in the {beta} radiosensitivity coefficient with changing LET. The model is used to fit fractionated data under two conditions, where RBE{sub min} = 1 and RBE{sub min} {ne} 1. Nonlinear regression and analysis of variance are used to test the hypothesis that the inclusion of a non-unity value of RBE{sub min} better predicts the total iso-effective dose required at low number of fractions for fast neutrons, carbon ions, {pi}-meson and proton fractionation data obtained for various tissues from previous publications. For neutrons the assumption of RBE{sub min} {ne} 1 provided a better fit in 89% of the cases, whereas for carbon ions RBE{sub min} {ne} 1 provided a better fit only for normal tissue at the spread-out Bragg peak. The results provide evidence of the impact that variations in the {beta} parameter may have when calculating clinically relevant RBE values, especially when using high doses per fraction (i.e. hypofractionation) of high-LET radiations.

  1. Low LET proton microbeam to understand high-LET RBE by shaping spatial dose distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greubel, Christoph; Ilicic, Katarina; Rösch, Thomas; Reindl, Judith; Siebenwirth, Christian; Moser, Marcus; Girst, Stefanie; Walsh, Dietrich W. M.; Schmid, Thomas E.; Dollinger, Günther

    2017-08-01

    High LET radiation, like heavy ions, are known to have a higher biological effectiveness (RBE) compared to low LET radiation, like X- or γ -rays. Theories and models attribute these higher effectiveness mostly to their extremely inhomogeneous dose deposition, which is concentrated in only a few micron sized spots. At the ion microprobe SNAKE, low LET 20 MeV protons (LET in water of 2.6 keV/μm) can be applied to cells either randomly distributed or focused to submicron spots, approximating heavy ion dose deposition. Thus, the transition between low and high LET energy deposition is experimentally accessible and the effect of different spatial dose distributions can be analysed. Here, we report on the technical setup to cultivate and irradiate 104 cells with submicron spots of low LET protons to measure cell survival in unstained cells. In addition we have taken special care to characterise the beam spot of the 20 MeV proton microbeam with fluorescent nuclear track detectors.

  2. SU-E-T-47: Application of the Repair-Misrepair-Fixation RBE Model to Describe the Results of High Resolution Proton Irradiation Cell Survival Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeler, C; Bronk, L [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Taleei, R; Guan, F; Grosshans, D; Mirkovic, D; Titt, U; Mohan, R [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a system to rapidly and accurately calculate RBE with the repair-misrepair-fixation (RMF) model for proton therapy data sets and to evaluate its effectiveness in modeling RBE for cell survival experiments performed with the H460 cell line for a range of proton LET. Methods: A system for using the Monte Carlo Damage Simulation (MCDS) software with high performance computing was developed. Input for the MCDS software for a range of proton energies in increments of 0.1 MeV was generated and simulated. The output data were then used to determine doseaveraged quantities for the RMF model based on equivalently binned proton energy spectra. The method was applied to calculate RBE at 50% survival for experimental cell survival data. Experimental data were obtained using a system which allowed for the accumulation of cell survival data at known values of dose-averaged proton LETs at a range of doses. RBE was calculated based directly on a Cs-137 reference experiment and, additionally, according to fitted values of the θ and κ terms of the RMF model. Results: Dose-averaged RMF model quantities were calculated using the HPC system. Compared to experimental RBE determined using a Cs-137 irradiation as a reference, the RBE from the model differed by at most 49%. RBE based on the fitted values of θ and κ differed by at most 18% for the highest LET. Conclusion: A system for rapidly generating data necessary to calculate RBE with the RMF model has been developed. For the H460 cell line, the RMF model could not reproduce the experimentally determined RBE based solely on the photon reference data. Fitting of the θ and κ terms of the RMF model indicates that their values increase for proton LET exceeding approximately 10 keV/µm. NIH Program Project Grant P01CA021239.

  3. The Influence of Shielding on the Biological Effectiveness of Accelerated Particles for the Induction of Chromosome Damages

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, K.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2006-01-01

    Chromosome damage was assessed in human peripheral blood lymphocytes after in vitro exposure to the either Si-28 (490 or 600 MeV/n), Ti-48 (1000 MeV/n), or Fe-56 (600, 1000, or 5000 MeV/n). LET values for these ions ranged from approximately 50 to 174 keV/micrometers and doses ranged from 10 to 200 cGy. The effect of either aluminum or polyethylene shielding on the induction of chromosome aberrations was investigated for each ion. Chromosome exchanges were measured using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole chromosome probes in cells collected 48-56 hours after irradiation using a chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique. The yield of chromosomal aberrations increased linearly with dose and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for the primary beams, estimated from the initial slope of the dose response curve for total chromosomal exchanges with respect to gamma-rays, ranged from 14 to 35. The RBE values increased with LET, reaching a maximum for the 1 GeV/n Fe ions with LET of 150 keV/micrometers, and decreased with further increases in LET. When LET of the primary beam was in the region of increasing RBE (i.e. below approximately 100 keV/micrometers), the addition of shielding material increased the effectiveness per unit dose. Whereas shielding decreased the effectiveness per unit dose when the LET of the primary particle beam was higher than 150 keV/micrometers.

  4. Applications of tissue heterogeneity corrections and biologically effective dose volume histograms in assessing the doses for accelerated partial breast irradiation using an electronic brachytherapy source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi Chengyu; Guo Bingqi; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Nikos [Cancer Therapy and Research Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Cheng, Chih-Yao, E-mail: shic@uthscsa.ed [Radiation Oncology Department, Oklahoma University Health Science Center, Oklahoma, OK 73104 (United States)

    2010-09-21

    A low-energy electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the model S700 Axxent(TM) x-ray device developed by Xoft Inc., has been used in high dose rate (HDR) intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) as an alternative to an Ir-192 source. The prescription dose and delivery schema of the electronic brachytherapy APBI plan are the same as the Ir-192 plan. However, due to its lower mean energy than the Ir-192 source, an EBS plan has dosimetric and biological features different from an Ir-192 source plan. Current brachytherapy treatment planning methods may have large errors in treatment outcome prediction for an EBS plan. Two main factors contribute to the errors: the dosimetric influence of tissue heterogeneities and the enhancement of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of electronic brachytherapy. This study quantified the effects of these two factors and revisited the plan quality of electronic brachytherapy APBI. The influence of tissue heterogeneities is studied by a Monte Carlo method and heterogeneous 'virtual patient' phantoms created from CT images and structure contours; the effect of RBE enhancement in the treatment outcome was estimated by biologically effective dose (BED) distribution. Ten electronic brachytherapy APBI cases were studied. The results showed that, for electronic brachytherapy cases, tissue heterogeneities and patient boundary effect decreased dose to the target and skin but increased dose to the bones. On average, the target dose coverage PTV V{sub 100} reduced from 95.0% in water phantoms (planned) to only 66.7% in virtual patient phantoms (actual). The actual maximum dose to the ribs is 3.3 times higher than the planned dose; the actual mean dose to the ipsilateral breast and maximum dose to the skin were reduced by 22% and 17%, respectively. Combining the effect of tissue heterogeneities and RBE enhancement, BED coverage of the target was 89.9% in virtual patient phantoms with RBE enhancement (actual BED) as

  5. 3D silicon microdosimetry and RBE study using 12C ion of different energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, L. T.; Chartier, L.; Bolst, D.; Prokopovich, D.; Guatelli, S.; Petasecca, M.; Lerch, M.; Reinhard, M.; Perevertaylo, V.; Jackson, M.; Matsufuji, N.; Hinde, D.; Dasgupta, M.; Stuchbery, A.; Rosenfeld, A. B.

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a new version of the 3D mesa “bridge” microdosimeter comprised of an array of 4248 silicon cells fabricated on 10 µm thick silicon-on-insulator substrate. This microdosimeter has been designed to overcome limitations existing in previous generation silicon microdosimeters and it provides well-defined sensitive volumes and high spatial resolution. The charge collection characteristics of the new 3D mesa microdosimeter were investigated using the ANSTO heavy ion microprobe, utilizing 5.5 MeV He2+ ions. Measurement of microdosimetric quantities allowed for the determination of the Relative Biological Effectiveness of 290 MeV/u and 350 MeV/u 12C heavy ion therapy beams at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC), Japan. The microdosimetric RBE obtained showed good agreement with the tissue-equivalent proportional counter. Utilizing the high spatial resolution of the SOI microdosimeter, the LET spectra for 70 MeV 12C+6 ions, like those present at the distal edge of 290 and 350 MeV/u beams, were obtained as the ions passed through thin layers of polyethylene film. This microdosimeter can provide useful information about the lineal energy transfer (LET) spectra downstream of the protective layers used for shielding of electronic devices for single event upset prediction.

  6. Direct evaluation of radiobiological parameters from clinical data in the case of ion beam therapy: an alternative approach to the relative biological effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cometto, A; Russo, G; Bourhaleb, F; Milian, F M; Giordanengo, S; Marchetto, F; Cirio, R; Attili, A

    2014-12-07

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) concept is commonly used in treatment planning for ion beam therapy. Whether models based on in vitro/in vivo RBE data can be used to predict human response to treatments is an open issue. In this work an alternative method, based on an effective radiobiological parameterization directly derived from clinical data, is presented. The method has been applied to the analysis of prostate cancer trials with protons and carbon ions.Prostate cancer trials with proton and carbon ion beams reporting 5 year-local control (LC5) and grade 2 (G2) or higher genitourinary toxicity rates (TOX) were selected from literature to test the method. Treatment simulations were performed on a representative subset of patients to produce dose and linear energy transfer distribution, which were used as explicative physical variables for the radiobiological modelling. Two models were taken into consideration: the microdosimetric kinetic model (MKM) and a linear model (LM). The radiobiological parameters of the LM and MKM were obtained by coupling them with the tumor control probability and normal tissue complication probability models to fit the LC5 and TOX data through likelihood maximization. The model ranking was based on the Akaike information criterion.Results showed large confidence intervals due to the limited variety of available treatment schedules. RBE values, such as RBE = 1.1 for protons in the treated volume, were derived as a by-product of the method, showing a consistency with current approaches. Carbon ion RBE values were also derived, showing lower values than those assumed for the original treatment planning in the target region, whereas higher values were found in the bladder. Most importantly, this work shows the possibility to infer the radiobiological parametrization for proton and carbon ion treatment directly from clinical data.

  7. Effects of indirect actions and oxygen on relative biological effectiveness: estimate of DSB induction and conversion induced by gamma rays and helium ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ju-Ying; Chen, Fang-Hsin; Hsieh, Tsung-Yu; Hsiao, Ya-Yun

    2015-07-01

    Clustered DNA damage other than double-strand breaks (DSBs) can be detrimental to cells and can lead to mutagenesis or cell death. In addition to DSBs induced by ionizing radiation, misrepair of non-DSB clustered damage contributes extra DSBs converted from DNA misrepair via pathways for base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair. This study aimed to quantify the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) when DSB induction and conversion from non-DSB clustered damage misrepair were used as biological endpoints. The results showed that both linear energy transfer (LET) and indirect action had a strong impact on the yields for DSB induction and conversion. RBE values for DSB induction and maximum DSB conversion of helium ions (LET = 120 keV/μm) to (60)Co gamma rays were 3.0 and 3.2, respectively. These RBE values increased to 5.8 and 5.6 in the absence of interference of indirect action initiated by addition of 2-M dimethylsulfoxide. DSB conversion was ∼1-4% of the total non-DSB damage due to gamma rays, which was lower than the 10% estimate by experimental measurement. Five to twenty percent of total non-DSB damage due to helium ions was converted into DSBs. Hence, it may be possible to increase the yields of DSBs in cancerous cells through DNA repair pathways, ultimately enhancing cell killing.

  8. The Biological Effectiveness of Silicon Ions is Significantly Higher than Iron Ions for the Induction of Chromosome Damage in Human Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Kerry; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2010-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations were measured in human peripheral blood lymphocytes after in vitro exposure to Si-28-ions with energies ranging from 90 to 600 MeV/u, or Fe-56-ions with energies ranging from 200 to 5,000 MeV/u. The LET of the various Fe beams in this study ranged from 145 to 440 keV/micron and the LET Si ions ranged from 48 to 158 keV/micron. Doses delivered were in the 10 to 200 cGy range. Dose response curves for chromosome exchanges in cells at first division after exposure, measured using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole chromosome probes, were fitted with linear or linear-quadratic functions. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) was estimated from the initial slope of the dose response curve for chromosome damage with respect to gamma-rays. The estimates of RBE(sub max) values for total chromosome exchanges ranged from 4.4+/-0.4 to 31.5+/-2.6 for Fe ions, and 11.8+/-1.0 to 42.2+/-3.3 for Si ions. The highest RBE(sub max) value for Fe ions was obtained with the 600 Mev/u beam and 170 MeV/u beam produced the highest RBE(sub max) value for Si ions. For both ions the RBE(sub max) values increased with LET, reaching a maximum at about 180 keV/micron for Fe and about 100 keV/micron for Si, and decreased with further increase in LET.

  9. On the dose calculation at the cellular level and its implications for the RBE of {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 123}I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freudenberg, R., E-mail: robert.freudenberg@uniklinikum-dresden.de; Runge, R.; Maucksch, U.; Berger, V.; Kotzerke, J. [University Hospital/Faculty of Medicine Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Dresden, Saxony 01307 (Germany)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Based on the authors’ previous findings concerning the radiotoxicity of{sup 99m}Tc, the authors compared the cellular survival under the influence of this nuclide with that following exposure to the Auger electron emitter {sup 123}I. To evaluate the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of both radionuclides, knowledge of the absorbed dose is essential. Thus, the authors present the dose calculations and discuss the results based on different models of the radionuclide distribution. Both different target volumes and the influence of the uptake kinetics were considered. Methods: Rat thyroid PC Cl3 cells in culture were incubated with either{sup 99m}Tc or {sup 123}I or were irradiated using 200 kV x-rays in the presence or absence of perchlorate. The clonogenic cell survival was measured via colony formation. In addition, the intracellular radionuclide uptake was quantified. Single-cell dose calculations were based on Monte Carlo simulations performed using Geant4. Results: Compared with external radiation using x-rays (D{sub 37} = 2.6 Gy), the radionuclides {sup 99m}Tc (D{sub 37} = 3.5 Gy), and {sup 123}I (D{sub 37} = 3.8 Gy) were less toxic in the presence of perchlorate. In the absence of perchlorate, the amount of activity a{sub 37} that was necessary to reduce the surviving fraction (SF) to 0.37 was 22.8 times lower for {sup 99m}Tc and 12.4 times lower for {sup 123}I because of the dose increase caused by intracellular radionuclide accumulation. When the cell nucleus was considered as the target for the dose calculation, the authors found a RBE of 2.18 for {sup 99m}Tc and RBE = 3.43 for {sup 123}I. Meanwhile, regarding the dose to the entire cell, RBE = 0.75 for {sup 99m}Tc and RBE = 1.87 for {sup 123}I. The dose to the entire cell was chosen as the dose criterion because of the intracellular radionuclide accumulation, which was found to occur solely in the cytoplasm. The calculated number of intracellular decays per cell was (975 ± 109) decays

  10. Microdosimetry spectra and RBE of H-1, He-4, Li-7 and C-12 nuclei in water studied with Geant4

    CERN Document Server

    Burigo, Lucas; Mishustin, Igor; Bleicher, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    A Geant4-based Monte Carlo model for Heavy-Ion Therapy (MCHIT) is used to study radiation fields of H-1, He-4, Li-7 and C-12 beams with similar ranges (~160-180 mm) in water. Microdosimetry spectra are simulated for wall-less and walled Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counters (TEPCs) placed outside or inside a phantom, as in experiments performed, respectively, at NIRS, Japan and GSI, Germany. The impact of fragmentation reactions on microdosimetry spectra is investigated for He-4, Li-7 and C-12, and contributions from nuclear fragments of different charge are evaluated for various TEPC positions in the phantom. The microdosimetry spectra measured on the beam axis are well described by MCHIT, in particular, in the vicinity of the Bragg peak. However, the simulated spectra for the walled TEPC far from the beam axis are underestimated. Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) of the considered beams is estimated using a modified microdosimetric-kinetic model. Calculations show a similar rise of the RBE up to 2.2...

  11. Differential RBE values obtained for mammary adenocarcinoma tumor cell subpopulations after 14. 8-MeV neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeWyngaert, J.K.; Leith, J.T.; Peck, R.A.; Bliven, S.F.

    1981-10-01

    For tumor cell subpopulations which were isolated from a single mouse mammary adenocarcinoma were examined for their relative sensitivities to 250-kVp x irradiation and 14.8-MeV neutron irradiation. The sublines are designated 66, 67, 4.10, and 68H and differ significantly in their biological characteristics. Exponentially growing cells were exposed at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) at Brookhaven National Laboratories, Upton, NY. The purpose of these studies was to compare the response of these cell lines to ionizing radiation, for high-linear-energy-transfer radiation as well as for low. The interest of such an intercomparison lies in the fact that these different cell lines, while closely related, were biologically distinguishable. Survival curve parameters obtained by fitting the single dose-response curves to a linear-quadratic equation using linear least-squares regression analysis gave values for sublines 66, 67, 4.10, and 68H, respectively, of: ..cap alpha../sub n/ (G/sub 8//sup -1/) = 0.00. 0.150, 0.041, and 0.182; ..cap alpha../sub x/ (G/sub 8//sup -1/) = 0.672, 0.845, 0.787, and 0.709; ..beta../sub x/ (G/sub 8//sup -2/) = 0.0462, 0.0345, 0.0576, and 0.0503; and ..beta../sub n/ (G/sub 8//sup -2/) = 0.0253, 0.0000, 0.0156, and 0.0666. Different relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values were obtained for sublines 66, 67, 4.10, and 68H of 4.0, 3.6, 3.9, and 2.7 at the 50% level of survival and 2.4, 2.4, 2.2, and 2.0 at the 10% level. Sublines 67 and 68H show responses which suggest a constant RBE at low values of dose, while sublines 66 and 4.10 do not. It is felt that these data illustrate the need to consider biological information as well as microdosimetric considerations in attempts to relate celluar inactivation responses to radiation quality. Further implications of these data in relation to the dual-action model of radiation inactivation are discussed.

  12. SU-E-T-549: Modeling Relative Biological Effectiveness of Protons for Radiation Induced Brain Necrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirkovic, D; Peeler, C; Grosshans, D; Titt, U; Taleei, R; Mohan, R [UT M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a model of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of protons as a function of dose and linear energy transfer (LET) for induction of brain necrosis using clinical data. Methods: In this study, treatment planning information was exported from a clinical treatment planning system (TPS) and used to construct a detailed Monte Carlo model of the patient and the beam delivery system. The physical proton dose and LET were computed in each voxel of the patient volume using Monte Carlo particle transport. A follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study registered to the treatment planning CT was used to determine the region of the necrosis in the brain volume. Both, the whole brain and the necrosis volumes were segmented from the computed tomography (CT) dataset using the contours drawn by a physician and the corresponding voxels were binned with respect to dose and LET. The brain necrosis probability was computed as a function of dose and LET by dividing the total volume of all necrosis voxels with a given dose and LET with the corresponding total brain volume resulting in a set of NTCP-like curves (probability as a function of dose parameterized by LET). Results: The resulting model shows dependence on both dose and LET indicating the weakness of the constant RBE model for describing the brain toxicity. To the best of our knowledge the constant RBE model is currently used in all clinical applications which may Result in increased rate of brain toxicities in patients treated with protons. Conclusion: Further studies are needed to develop more accurate brain toxicity models for patients treated with protons and other heavy ions.

  13. The depth-dependence of the biological effectiveness of 60Co gamma rays in a large absorber determined by dicentric chromosomes in human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Ernst; Roos, Hartmut; Kramer, Hans-Michael

    2008-01-01

    Radiobiological evidence is shown concerning a significant depth-dependence of the maximum relative biological effectiveness at limiting low doses (RBE(M)) of (60)Co gamma rays in a cubic polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom of 30 cm edge length. Using the dose-response curve for the dicentric data in human lymphocytes obtained in the present experiment at a depth of 20 cm, together with the comprehensive and consistent data set determined earlier at smaller depths of the PMMA phantom, there is an increase in the RBE(M) value by a factor of 2.18 +/- 1.25 at a depth of 20 cm relative to 1 cm in the phantom. All the dicentric data are based on identical exposure durations and irradiation temperatures as well as identical culture and evaluation conditions, with blood from the same donor.

  14. Radiobiological aspects of high altitude flight: relative biological effectiveness of fast neutrons in suppressing immune capacity to an infective agent. [Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedberg, W.; Neas, B.R.; Faulkner, D.N.; Hanneman, G.D.; Darden, E.B. Jr.

    1978-02-01

    The authors investigated the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of fast neutrons compared with x rays in impeding development of immunity to an infective agent, the intestinal cestode Hymenolepis nana. Mice were irradiated with neutrons or x rays and 2 days later given an immunizing dose of H. nana eggs. After another 2 days, the mice received a challenge dose of the eggs. Challenge egg doses were also given to sham-irradiated unimmunized and immunized controls. All mice were killed 90 to 92 hours after challenge, and the H. nana larvae (cysticercoids) that developed in the intestinal tissue were counted. An increased cysticercoid count in the irradiated mice, as compared with the count in unirradiated immunized controls, reflects suppression of immune capacity by the radiation. The results indicate a neutron RBE of 4 at 50 and 101 rad.

  15. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, M.; Mason, W. B.; Whipple, G. H.; Howland, J. W.

    1952-04-07

    This report presents a review of present knowledge and concepts of the biological effects of ionizing radiations. Among the topics discussed are the physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems, morphological and physiological changes observed in biological systems subjected to ionizing radiations, physiological changes in the intact animal, latent changes following exposure of biological systems to ionizing radiations, factors influencing the biological response to ionizing radiation, relative effects of various ionizing radiations, and biological dosimetry.

  16. A comprehensive modular map of molecular interactions in RB/E2F pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzone, Laurence; Gelay, Amélie; Zinovyev, Andrei; Radvanyi, François; Barillot, Emmanuel

    2008-01-01

    We present, here, a detailed and curated map of molecular interactions taking place in the regulation of the cell cycle by the retinoblastoma protein (RB/RB1). Deregulations and/or mutations in this pathway are observed in most human cancers. The map was created using Systems Biology Graphical Notation language with the help of CellDesigner 3.5 software and converted into BioPAX 2.0 pathway description format. In the current state the map contains 78 proteins, 176 genes, 99 protein complexes, 208 distinct chemical species and 165 chemical reactions. Overall, the map recapitulates biological facts from approximately 350 publications annotated in the diagram. The network contains more details about RB/E2F interaction network than existing large-scale pathway databases. Structural analysis of the interaction network revealed a modular organization of the network, which was used to elaborate a more summarized, higher-level representation of RB/E2F network. The simplification of complex networks opens the road for creating realistic computational models of this regulatory pathway.

  17. Relative Biological Effect of Antiprotons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael

    purpose/objective The AD-4/ACE collaboration has recently performed experiments to directly measure the RBE of antiprotons. Antiprotons have very similar stopping power compared to protons, but when they come to rest, antiprotons will annihilate on a target nucleus and thereby release almost 2 Ge...

  18. SU-E-T-494: Influence of Proton Track-Cell Nucleus Incidence Angle On Relative Biological Effectiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pater, P; Backstrom, G; Enger, S; Seuntjens, J; El Naqa, I [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Villegas, F; Ahnesjo, A [Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To explain a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation artifact whereby differences in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) in the induction of initial double strand breaks are observed as a function of the proton track incidence angles in a geometric cell nucleus model. Secondly, to offer an alternative isotropic irradiation procedure to mitigate this effect. Methods: MC tracks of 1 MeV protons were generated in an event-by-event mode. They were overlaid on a cylindrical model of a cell nucleus containing 6×109 nucleotide base pairs. The tracks incidence angle θ with respect to the cell nucleus’s axis was varied in 10 degrees intervals, each time generating one hundred fractions of ∼2 Gy. Strand breaks were scored in the modeled DNA sugar-phosphate groups and further sub-classified into single or double strand breaks (ssbs or dsbs). For each angle, an RBE for the induction of initial dsbs with reference to Co-60 was calculated. Results: Our results show significant angular dependencies of RBE, with maximum values for incidence angles parallel to the nucleus central axis. Further examination shows that the higher cross-sections for the creation of dsbs is due to the preferential alignment of tracks with geometrical sub-parts of the cell nucleus model, especially the nucleosomes containing the sugar-phosphate groups. To alleviate the impact of this simulation artifact, an average RBE was calculated with a procedure based on a weighted sampling of the angular data. Conclusion: This work demonstrates a possible numerical artifact in estimated RBE if the influence of the particle incidence angle is not correctly taken into account. A correction procedure is presented to better conform the simulations to real-life experimental conditions. We would like to acknowledge support from the Fonds de recherche du Quebec Sante (FRQS), from the CREATE Medical Physics Research Training Network grant (number 432290) of NSERC, support from NSERC under grants RGPIN 397711-11 and

  19. Quantum Effects in Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseni, Masoud; Omar, Yasser; Engel, Gregory S.; Plenio, Martin B.

    2014-08-01

    List of contributors; Preface; Part I. Introduction: 1. Quantum biology: introduction Graham R. Fleming and Gregory D. Scholes; 2. Open quantum system approaches to biological systems Alireza Shabani, Masoud Mohseni, Seogjoo Jang, Akihito Ishizaki, Martin Plenio, Patrick Rebentrost, Alàn Aspuru-Guzik, Jianshu Cao, Seth Lloyd and Robert Silbey; 3. Generalized Förster resonance energy transfer Seogjoo Jang, Hoda Hossein-Nejad and Gregory D. Scholes; 4. Multidimensional electronic spectroscopy Tomáš Mančal; Part II. Quantum Effects in Bacterial Photosynthetic Energy Transfer: 5. Structure, function, and quantum dynamics of pigment protein complexes Ioan Kosztin and Klaus Schulten; 6. Direct observation of quantum coherence Gregory S. Engel; 7. Environment-assisted quantum transport Masoud Mohseni, Alàn Aspuru-Guzik, Patrick Rebentrost, Alireza Shabani, Seth Lloyd, Susana F. Huelga and Martin B. Plenio; Part III. Quantum Effects in Higher Organisms and Applications: 8. Excitation energy transfer in higher plants Elisabet Romero, Vladimir I. Novoderezhkin and Rienk van Grondelle; 9. Electron transfer in proteins Spiros S. Skourtis; 10. A chemical compass for bird navigation Ilia A. Solov'yov, Thorsten Ritz, Klaus Schulten and Peter J. Hore; 11. Quantum biology of retinal Klaus Schulten and Shigehiko Hayashi; 12. Quantum vibrational effects on sense of smell A. M. Stoneham, L. Turin, J. C. Brookes and A. P. Horsfield; 13. A perspective on possible manifestations of entanglement in biological systems Hans J. Briegel and Sandu Popescu; 14. Design and applications of bio-inspired quantum materials Mohan Sarovar, Dörthe M. Eisele and K. Birgitta Whaley; 15. Coherent excitons in carbon nanotubes Leonas Valkunas and Darius Abramavicius; Glossary; References; Index.

  20. Relative biological effectiveness of fission neutrons for producing micronuclei in the root-tip cells of onion seedlings after irradiation as dry seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, W.; Ishikawa, Masayori; Hoshi, Masaharu [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Radiation Biology and Medicine; Endo, Satoru [Hiroshima Univ., Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan). Graduate School of Engineering; Ikeda, Hideo [Hiroshima Univ., Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan). Faculty of Education

    2002-12-01

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of mixed neutron and gamma-ray radiation emitted at a {sup 252}Cf source at the Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, compared with {sup 60}Co gamma-ray radiation was determined. The tissue-absorbed dose contribution of the accompanying gamma radiation was about 35.7% to the total tissue-absorbed dose from the {sup 252}Cf mixed radiation. The {sup 252}Cf mixed radiation and {sup 60}Co gamma rays produced approximate linear changes in the frequency of micronuclei induced in root-tip cells of Allium cepa L. onion seedlings after irradiation as dry dormant seeds with varying absorbed doses in onion seeds. Therefore, the RBE for radiation-induced micronuclei was calculated as the ratio of the slopes for the {sup 252}Cf mixed radiation and the {sup 60}Co gamma rays. The deduced RBE value of {sup 252}Cf mixed radiation of {sup 60}Co gamma rays to induce micronuclei in dry dormant onion seed cells was about 90.5{+-}3.6 ({+-}1{sigma}); the RBE of neutrons from the {sup 252}Cf mixed radiation was about 150{+-}6 ({+-}1{sigma}). Furthermore, the sensitivity ratio of the induction rate of micronuclei in dry dormant seeds to that in seedlings by neutrons from {sup 252}Cf mixed radiation was significantly different from that by {sup 60}Co gamma rays. From these results, we concluded that the repair efficiency of DNA damage induced by neutrons may be different from that by gamma rays. (author)

  1. Study of the Clinical Proton Beam Relative Biological Effectiveness at the JINR Phasotron, Dubna

    CERN Document Server

    Vitanova, A; Gaevskii, V N; Molokonov, A G; Spurny, F; Fadeeva, T A; Shmakova, N L

    2002-01-01

    Proton clinical beams contain particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). Secondary heavy charged particles produced from nuclear interactions and degraded protons at the Bragg peak region are particles with high LET. These particles could enhance the Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) of the proton beam. We have carried out two radiobiological experiments to investigate the RBE of 150 MeV clinical proton beam. The irradiation of the Chinese Hamster V79 cells were performed at two points of the depth-dose distribution - at the beam entrance and at the Bragg peak. The contribution of the high LET particles to dosimetric and microdosimetric characteristics in the various depth of proton beam was also experimentally studied using the CR-39 track etched detectors. The LET spectra between 10 and 700 keV/{\\mu}m were measured by means of track detectors and the automatic optical image analyzer LUCIA-II. The relative contribution of the high LET particles to ab! sorbed dose increases from several per cent ...

  2. Distinct difference in relative biological effectiveness of {sup 252}Cf neutrons for the induction of mitotic crossing over and intragenic reversion of the white-ivory allele in Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Isao [Department of Genetics, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Nagasaki (Japan); Hoshi, Masaharu [International Radiation Information Center, Research Institute for Nuclear Medicine and Biology, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Ikenaga, Mituo [Radiation Biology Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    1996-10-25

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of {sup 252}Cf neutrons was determined for two different types of somatic mutations, i.e., loss of heterozygosity for wing-hair mutations and reversion of the mutant white-ivory eye-color, in Drosophila melanogaster. Loss of heterozygosity for wing-hair mutations results predominantly from mitotic crossing over induced in wing anlage cells of larvae, while the reverse mutation of eye-color is due to an intragenic structural change in the white locus on the X-chromosome. For a quantitative comparison of RBE values for these events, we have constructed a combined mutation assay system so that induced mutant wing-hair clones as well as revertant eye-color clones can be detected simultaneously in the same individuals. Larvae were irradiated at the age of 80{+-}4 h post-oviposition with {sup 252}Cf neutrons or {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays, and male adult flies were examined under the microscope for the presence of the two types of clonal mosaic spots appearing. The induction of wing-hair spots per dose unit was much greater for {sup 252}Cf neutrons than for {sup 137}Cs {gamma} -rays, whereas the frequencies of eye-color reversion were similar for neutrons and {gamma}-rays. The estimated RBE values of neutrons were 8.5 and 1.2 for the induction of mutant wing-hair spots and revertant eye-color spots, respectively. These results indicate that the RBE of neutrons is much greater for mitotic crossing over in comparison to the intragenic white-ivory reversion events. Possible causes for the difference in RBE are discussed.

  3. RBE values and repair characteristics for colo-rectal injury after caesium 137 gamma-ray and neutron irradiation. 2. Fractionation up to ten doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, N.H.A.; Denekamp, J. (Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood (UK). Gray Lab.)

    1984-07-01

    Early and late colo-rectal damage in mice have been assessed after /sup 137/Cs ..gamma.. irradiation and 3 MeV neutrons given as 1, 2, 5 or 10 fractions. Damage was measured by early changes in body weight, the late production of short faecal pellets and the pattern of lethality after irradiation. The data have been analysed in terms of the time course of expression of damage, fractionation effects and the RBE for neutrons over a wide range of doses per fraction (0.5-12.5 Gy neutrons, 3.5-33.5 Gy ..gamma.. rays). The RBE was strongly dependent on dose per fraction because of the lack of reparable damage after neutrons. The RBE for both early and late effects was 5.0 at a neutron dose per fraction of 1 Gy. Extrapolation of the RBE data to lower doses, using the linear quadratic model, predicts a higher RBE for late (7.4-12.7) than for early damage (5.7-8.5) if ..gamma..-ray doses below 5 Gy are used.

  4. The relative biological effectiveness for carbon and oxygen ion beams using the raster-scanning technique in hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Habermehl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aim of this study was to evaluate the relative biological effectiveness (RBE of carbon (12C and oxygen ion (16O-irradiation applied in the raster-scanning technique at the Heidelberg Ion beam Therapy center (HIT based on clonogenic survival in hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines compared to photon irradiation. METHODS: Four human HCC lines Hep3B, PLC, HepG2 and HUH7 were irradiated with photons, 12C and 16O using a customized experimental setting at HIT for in-vitro trials. Cells were irradiated with increasing physical photon single doses of 0, 2, 4 and 6 Gy and heavy ion-single doses of 0, 0.125, 0.5, 1, 2, 3 Gy (12C and 16O. SOBP-penetration depth and extension was 35 mm +/-4 mm and 36 mm +/-5 mm for carbon ions and oxygen ions respectively. Mean energy level and mean linear energy transfer (LET were 130 MeV/u and 112 keV/um for 12C, and 154 MeV/u and 146 keV/um for 16O. Clonogenic survival was computated and relative biological effectiveness (RBE values were defined. RESULTS: For all cell lines and both particle modalities α- and β-values were determined. As expected, α-values were significantly higher for 12C and 16O than for photons, reflecting a steeper decline of the initial slope of the survival curves for high-LET beams. RBE-values were in the range of 2.1-3.3 and 1.9-3.1 for 12C and 16O, respectively. CONCLUSION: Both irradiation with 12C and 16O using the raster-scanning technique leads to an enhanced RBE in HCC cell lines. No relevant differences between achieved RBE-values for 12C and 16O were found. Results of this work will further influence biological-adapted treatment planning for HCC patients that will undergo particle therapy with 12C or 16O.

  5. Effects of dose-delivery time structure on biological effectiveness for therapeutic carbon-ion beams evaluated with microdosimetric kinetic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaniwa, Taku; Suzuki, Masao; Furukawa, Takuji; Kase, Yuki; Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Shirai, Toshiyuki; Hawkins, Roland B

    2013-07-01

    Treatment plans of carbon-ion radiotherapy have been made on the assumption that the beams are delivered instantaneously irrespective to the dose delivery time as well as the interruption time. The advanced therapeutic techniques such as a hypofractionation and a respiratory gating usually require more time to deliver a fractioned dose than conventional techniques. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of dose-delivery time structure on biological effectiveness in carbon-ion radiotherapy. The rate equations defined in the microdosimetric kinetic model (MKM) for primary lesions caused in the DNA were reanalyzed and applied to continuous or interrupted irradiation with therapeutic carbon-ion beams. The rate constants characterizing the time of the primary nonlethal lesions to repair or to convert to lethal lesion were experimentally determined for human salivary gland (HSG) tumor cells. Treatment plans were made for a patient case on the assumption that the beam is delivered instantaneously. The RBE weighted absorbed doses of 2.65, 3.45 and 6.86 Gy (RBE) was prescribed to the target. These plans were recalculated by varying the dose delivery time and the interruption time ranging from 1-60 min based on the MKM with the determined parameters. The sum of rate constants for nonlethal lesion to repair a and to convert to lethal lesion c, (a + c), is 2.19 ± 0.40 h⁻¹. The biological effectiveness in the target decreases with the dose delivery time T in continuous irradiation compared to the planned one due to the repair of nonlethal lesions during the irradiation. The biological effectiveness in terms of equivalent acute dose decreases to 99.7% and 96.4% for T = 3 and 60 min in 2.65 Gy (RBE), 99.5% and 94.3% in 4.35 Gy (RBE), and 99.4% and 91.7% in 6.86 Gy (RBE), respectively. For all the cases, the decrease of biological effectiveness is larger at the proximal side with low-LET than the distal side with high-LET. Similar reductions of biological

  6. Biological Effectiveness and Application of Heavy Ions in Radiation Therapy Described by a Physical and Biological Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Kjeld J.; Hansen, Johnny W.

    is inadequately described by an RBE-factor, whereas the complete formulation of the probability of survival must be used, as survival depends on both radiation quality and dose. The theoretical model of track structure can be used in dose-effect calculations for neutron-, high-LET, and low-LET radiation applied...

  7. Flavonoid transport across RBE4 cells: A blood-brain barrier model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Ana; Pestana, Diogo; Teixeira, Diana; Azevedo, Joana; De Freitas, Victor; Mateus, Nuno; Calhau, Conceição

    2010-06-01

    There is a growing interest in dietary therapeutic strategies to combat oxidative stress-induced damage to the Central Nervous System (CNS), which is associated with a number of pathophysiological processes, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases and cerebrovascular diseases. Identifying the mechanisms associated with phenolic neuroprotection has been delayed by the lack of information concerning the ability of these compounds to enter the CNS. The aim of this study was to evaluate the transmembrane transport of flavonoids across RBE-4 cells (an immortalized cell line of rat cerebral capillary endothelial cells) and the effect of ethanol on this transport. The detection and quantification of all of the phenolic compounds in the studied samples (basolateral media) was performed using a HPLC-DAD (Diode Array Detector). All of the tested flavonoids (catechin, quercetin and cyanidin-3-glucoside) passed across the RBE-4 cells in a time-dependent manner. This transport was not influenced by the presence of 0.1% ethanol. In conclusion, the tested flavonoids were capable of crossing this blood-brain barrier model.

  8. The influence of shielding on the biological effectiveness of accelerated particles for the induction of chromosome damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, K.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    Chromosome damage was assessed in human peripheral blood lymphocytes after in vitro exposure to 28Si (490 or 600 MeV/n), 48Ti (1000 MeV/n), or 56Fe (600, 1000, or 5000 MeV/n). LET values for these ions ranged from 51 to 184 keV/μm and doses ranged from 10 to 200 cGy. The effect of either aluminum or polyethylene shielding on the induction of chromosome aberrations was investigated for each ion. After chromosomes were prematurely condensed using calyculin-A, chromosome exchanges were measured using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole chromosome probes in cells collected at G2 and at mitosis in first division post-irradiation. The yield of chromosome aberrations increased linearly with dose, and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for the primary beams, estimated from the initial slope of the dose-response curve for total chromosome exchanges with respect to γ-rays, ranged from 9 to 35. The RBE values increased with LET, reaching a maximum for the 600 MeV/n Fe ions with LET of 184 keV/μm. When the LET of the primary beam was below about 100 keV/μm, the addition of shielding material increased the effectiveness per unit dose. When the LET of the primary beam was greater than 100 keV/μm, shielding decreased the effectiveness per unit dose.

  9. Carbon Ion Irradiation of the Rat Spinal Cord: Dependence of the Relative Biological Effectiveness on Linear Energy Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saager, Maria, E-mail: m.saager@dkfz.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Glowa, Christin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Peschke, Peter [Clinical Cooperation Unit Molecular Radiooncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Brons, Stephan [Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); Scholz, Michael [Department of Biophysics, Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Huber, Peter E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Clinical Cooperation Unit Molecular Radiooncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, Jürgen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Karger, Christian P. [Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To measure the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of carbon ions in the rat spinal cord as a function of linear energy transfer (LET). Methods and Materials: As an extension of a previous study, the cervical spinal cord of rats was irradiated with single doses of carbon ions at 6 positions of a 6-cm spread-out Bragg peak (16-99 keV/μm). The TD{sub 50} values (dose at 50% complication probability) were determined according to dose-response curves for the development of paresis grade 2 within an observation time of 300 days. The RBEs were calculated using TD{sub 50} for photons of our previous study. Results: Minimum latency time was found to be dose-dependent, but not significantly LET-dependent. The TD{sub 50} values for the onset of paresis grade 2 within 300 days were 19.5 ± 0.4 Gy (16 keV/μm), 18.4 ± 0.4 Gy (21 keV/μm), 17.7 ± 0.3 Gy (36 keV/μm), 16.1 ± 1.2 Gy (45 keV/μm), 14.6 ± 0.5 Gy (66 keV/μm), and 14.8 ± 0.5 Gy (99 keV/μm). The corresponding RBEs increased from 1.26 ± 0.05 (16 keV/μm) up to 1.68 ± 0.08 at 66 keV/μm. Unexpectedly, the RBE at 99 keV/μm was comparable to that at 66 keV/μm. Conclusions: The data suggest a linear relation between RBE and LET at high doses for late effects in the spinal cord. Together with additional data from ongoing fractionated irradiation experiments, these data will provide an extended database to systematically benchmark RBE models for further improvements of carbon ion treatment planning.

  10. Quantum Effects in Biological Systems

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Since the last decade the study of quantum mechanical phenomena in biological systems has become a vibrant field of research. Initially sparked by evidence of quantum effects in energy transport that is instrumental for photosynthesis, quantum biology asks the question of how methods and models from quantum theory can help us to understand fundamental mechanisms in living organisms. This approach entails a paradigm change challenging the related disciplines: The successful framework of quantum theory is taken out of its low-temperature, microscopic regimes and applied to hot and dense macroscopic environments, thereby extending the toolbox of biology and biochemistry at the same time. The Quantum Effects in Biological Systems conference is a platform for researchers from biology, chemistry and physics to present and discuss the latest developments in the field of quantum biology. After meetings in Lisbon (2009), Harvard (2010), Ulm (2011), Berkeley (2012), Vienna (2013), Singapore (2014) and Florence (2015),...

  11. Radiobiological effects of heavy ions and protons. [on cells of mammals, bacteria and viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhov, N. I.; Vorozhtsova, S. V.; Krasavin, Y. A.; Mashinskaya, T. Y.; Savchenko, N. Y.; Fedorov, B. S.; Khlaponina, V. F.; Shelegedin, V. N.; Gut, L.; Sabo, L.

    1974-01-01

    Radiobiological effects of heavy ions and protons are studied on cells of mammals, bacteria, viruses and DNA of bacteria. Results show that the dose effect dependence bears an exponential character; the reduction of RBE as LET of particle increases reflects the different character of microdistribution of absorbed energy in biological objects with different levels of biological organization.

  12. Radiobiological effects of heavy ions and protons. [on cells of mammals, bacteria and viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhov, N. I.; Vorozhtsova, S. V.; Krasavin, Y. A.; Mashinskaya, T. Y.; Savchenko, N. Y.; Fedorov, B. S.; Khlaponina, V. F.; Shelegedin, V. N.; Gut, L.; Sabo, L.

    1974-01-01

    Radiobiological effects of heavy ions and protons are studied on cells of mammals, bacteria, viruses and DNA of bacteria. Results show that the dose effect dependence bears an exponential character; the reduction of RBE as LET of particle increases reflects the different character of microdistribution of absorbed energy in biological objects with different levels of biological organization.

  13. Biological Effectiveness of Antiproton Annihilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maggiore, C.; Agazaryan, N.; Bassler, N.;

    2004-01-01

    from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in ‘‘biological dose’’ in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct measurement of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation. The background, description, and status...

  14. The Biological Effectiveness of Four Energies of Neon Ions for the Induction of Chromosome Damage in Human Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Kerry; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations were measured in human peripheral blood lymphocytes after in vitro exposure to neon ions at energies of 64, 89, 142, or 267. The corresponding LET values for these energies of neon ranged from 38-103 keV/micrometers and doses delivered were in the 10 to 80 cGy range. Chromosome exchanges were assessed in metaphase and G2 phase cells at first division after exposure using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole chromosome probes and dose response curves were generated for different types of chromosomal exchanges. The yields of total chromosome exchanges were similar for the 64, 89, and 142 MeV exposures, whereas the 267 MeV/u neon with LET of 38 keV/micrometers produced about half as many exchanges per unit dose. The induction of complex type chromosome exchanges (exchanges involving three or more breaks and two or more chromosomes) showed a clear LET dependence for all energies. The ratio of simple to complex type exchanges increased with LET from 18 to 51%. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) was estimated from the initial slope of the dose response curve for chromosome damage with respect to gamma-rays. The RBE(sub max) values for total chromosome exchanges for the 64 MeV/u was around 30.

  15. Biological Effects of Acoustic Cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    rectified diffusion. 56 III. STABLE CAVITATION A. Introduction There are manv areas associated with the biological effects of ultrasound in which the...used said as cavitation indicators. Further, if clinical ultrasound systems are found to be inducing cavitation , either stable or transient, it will...O BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF ACOUSTIC CAVITATION by Lawrence A. Crum -- Physical Acoustics Research Laboratory Department of Physics and Astronomy ’ CTE

  16. Modeling the Biophysical Effects in a Carbon Beam Delivery Line using Monte Carlo Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, Ilsung; Cho, Sungho; Kim, Eun Ho; Song, Yongkeun; Shin, Jae-ik; Jung, Won-Gyun

    2016-01-01

    Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) plays an important role in designing a uniform dose response for ion beam therapy. In this study the biological effectiveness of a carbon ion beam delivery system was investigated using Monte Carlo simulation. A carbon ion beam delivery line was designed for the Korea Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (KHIMA) project. The GEANT4 simulation tool kit was used to simulate carbon beam transporting into media. An incident energy carbon ion beam in the range between 220 MeV/u and 290 MeV/u was chosen to generate secondary particles. The microdosimetric-kinetic (MK) model is applied to describe the RBE of 10% survival in human salivary gland (HSG) cells. The RBE weighted dose was estimated as a function of the penetrating depth of the water phantom along the incident beam direction. A biologically photon-equivalent Spread Out Bragg Peak (SOBP) was designed using the RBE weighted absorbed dose. Finally, the RBE of mixed beams was predicted as a function of the water phantom depth.

  17. Modeling the biophysical effects in a carbon beam delivery line by using Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Ilsung; Yoo, SeungHoon; Cho, Sungho; Kim, Eun Ho; Song, Yongkeun; Shin, Jae-ik; Jung, Won-Gyun

    2016-09-01

    The Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) plays an important role in designing a uniform dose response for ion-beam therapy. In this study, the biological effectiveness of a carbon-ion beam delivery system was investigated using Monte Carlo simulations. A carbon-ion beam delivery line was designed for the Korea Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (KHIMA) project. The GEANT4 simulation tool kit was used to simulate carbon-ion beam transport into media. An incident energy carbon-ion beam with energy in the range between 220 MeV/u and 290 MeV/u was chosen to generate secondary particles. The microdosimetric-kinetic (MK) model was applied to describe the RBE of 10% survival in human salivary-gland (HSG) cells. The RBE weighted dose was estimated as a function of the penetration depth in the water phantom along the incident beam's direction. A biologically photon-equivalent Spread Out Bragg Peak (SOBP) was designed using the RBE-weighted absorbed dose. Finally, the RBE of mixed beams was predicted as a function of the depth in the water phantom.

  18. Impaired degradation followed by enhanced recycling of epidermal growth factor receptor caused by hypo-phosphorylation of tyrosine 1045 in RBE cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gui Anping

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since cholangiocarcinoma has a poor prognosis, several epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR-targeted therapies with antibody or small molecule inhibitor treatment have been proposed. However, their effect remains limited. The present study sought to understand the molecular genetic characteristics of cholangiocarcinoma related to EGFR, with emphasis on its degradation and recycling. Methods We evaluated EGFR expression and colocalization by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence, cell surface EGFR expression by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS, and EGFR ubiquitination and protein binding by immunoprecipitation in the human cholangiocarcinoma RBE and immortalized cholangiocyte MMNK-1 cell lines. Monensin treatment and Rab11a depletion by siRNA were adopted for inhibition of EGFR recycling. Results Upon stimulation with EGF, ligand-induced EGFR degradation was impaired and the expression of phospho-tyrosine 1068 and phospho-p44/42 MAPK was sustained in RBE cells as compared with MMNK-1 cells. In RBE cells, the process of EGFR sorting for lysosomal degradation was blocked at the early endosome stage, and non-degradated EGFR was recycled to the cell surface. A disrupted association between EGFR and the E3 ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl, as well as hypo-phosphorylation of EGFR at tyrosine 1045 (Tyr1045, were also observed in RBE cells. Conclusion In RBE cells, up-regulation of EGFR Tyr1045 phosphorylation is a potentially useful molecular alteration in EGFR-targeted therapy. The combination of molecular-targeted therapy determined by the characteristics of individual EGFR phosphorylation events and EGFR recycling inhibition show promise in future treatments of cholangiocarcinoma.

  19. The EGFR mutation status affects the relative biological effectiveness of carbon-ion beams in non-small cell lung carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amornwichet, Napapat; Oike, Takahiro; Shibata, Atsushi; Nirodi, Chaitanya S; Ogiwara, Hideaki; Makino, Haruhiko; Kimura, Yuka; Hirota, Yuka; Isono, Mayu; Yoshida, Yukari; Ohno, Tatsuya; Kohno, Takashi; Nakano, Takashi

    2015-06-11

    Carbon-ion radiotherapy (CIRT) holds promise to treat inoperable locally-advanced non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), a disease poorly controlled by standard chemoradiotherapy using X-rays. Since CIRT is an extremely limited medical resource, selection of NSCLC patients likely to benefit from it is important; however, biological predictors of response to CIRT are ill-defined. The present study investigated the association between the mutational status of EGFR and KRAS, driver genes frequently mutated in NSCLC, and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of carbon-ion beams over X-rays. The assessment of 15 NSCLC lines of different EGFR/KRAS mutational status and that of isogenic NSCLC lines expressing wild-type or mutant EGFR revealed that EGFR-mutant NSCLC cells, but not KRAS-mutant cells, show low RBE. This was attributable to (i) the high X-ray sensitivity of EGFR-mutant cells, since EGFR mutation is associated with a defect in non-homologous end joining, a major pathway for DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, and (ii) the strong cell-killing effect of carbon-ion beams due to poor repair of carbon-ion beam-induced DSBs regardless of EGFR mutation status. These data highlight the potential of EGFR mutation status as a predictor of response to CIRT, i.e., CIRT may show a high therapeutic index in EGFR mutation-negative NSCLC.

  20. Biological effects of electromagnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrì, M. A.; Di Luzio, Sr.; Di Luzio, S.

    2002-01-01

    Nowadays, concerns about hazards from electromagnetic fields represent an alarming source for human lives in technologically developed countries. We are surrounded by electromagnetic fields everywhere we spend our working hours, rest or recreational activities. The aim of this review is to summarize the biological effects due to these fields arising from power and transmission lines, electrical cable splices, electronic devices inside our homes and work-places, distribution networks and associated devices such as cellular telephones and wireless communication tower, etc. Special care has been reserved to study the biological effects of electromagnetic fields on cell lines of the mammalian immune system about which our research group has been working for several years.

  1. Biological effectiveness of antiproton annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Bassler, Niels; Beyer, Gerd; De Marco, John J.; Doser, Michael; Ichioka, Toshiyasu; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Knudsen, Helge V.; Landua, Rolf; Maggiore, Carl; McBride, William H.; Møller, Søren Pape; Petersen, Jorgen; Smathers, James B.; Skarsgard, Lloyd D.; Solberg, Timothy D.; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.; Withers, H.Rodney; Vranjes, Sanja; Wong, Michelle; Wouters, Bradly G.

    2004-01-01

    We describe an experiment designed to determine whether or not the densely ionizing particles emanating from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in “biological dose” in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct measurement of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation. The experiment has been approved by the CERN Research Board for running at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD) as AD-4/ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) and has begun data taking in June of 2003. The background, description and the current status of the experiment are given.

  2. Biological effectiveness of antiproton annihilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzscheiter, M.H.; Agazaryan, N.; Bassler, Niels

    2004-01-01

    We describe an experiment designed to determine whether or not the densely ionizing particles emanating from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in ‘‘biological dose’’ in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct...... measurement of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation. The experiment has been approved by the CERN Research Board for running at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD) as AD-4/ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) and has begun data taking in June of 2003. The background, description and the current...

  3. The relative biological effectiveness of antiprotons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Alsner, Jan; Bassler, Niels

    2016-01-01

    consisting of V79 cells embedded in gelatin with an energy providing a range of approximately 10 cm. Results: The RBE in the entrance channel (the "plateau") is only slightly above the value for a comparable proton beam, and remains low until the proximal edge of the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP). A steep...

  4. Maximizing the biological effect of proton dose delivered with scanned beams via inhomogeneous daily dose distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng Chuan; Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Grassberger, Clemens; Goldberg, Saveli; Niemierko, Andrzej; Paganetti, Harald; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Trofimov, Alexei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: Biological effect of radiation can be enhanced with hypofractionation, localized dose escalation, and, in particle therapy, with optimized distribution of linear energy transfer (LET). The authors describe a method to construct inhomogeneous fractional dose (IFD) distributions, and evaluate the potential gain in the therapeutic effect from their delivery in proton therapy delivered by pencil beam scanning. Methods: For 13 cases of prostate cancer, the authors considered hypofractionated courses of 60 Gy delivered in 20 fractions. (All doses denoted in Gy include the proton's mean relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1.) Two types of plans were optimized using two opposed lateral beams to deliver a uniform dose of 3 Gy per fraction to the target by scanning: (1) in conventional full-target plans (FTP), each beam irradiated the entire gland, (2) in split-target plans (STP), beams irradiated only the respective proximal hemispheres (prostate split sagittally). Inverse planning yielded intensity maps, in which discrete position control points of the scanned beam (spots) were assigned optimized intensity values. FTP plans preferentially required a higher intensity of spots in the distal part of the target, while STP, by design, employed proximal spots. To evaluate the utility of IFD delivery, IFD plans were generated by rearranging the spot intensities from FTP or STP intensity maps, separately as well as combined using a variety of mixing weights. IFD courses were designed so that, in alternating fractions, one of the hemispheres of the prostate would receive a dose boost and the other receive a lower dose, while the total physical dose from the IFD course was roughly uniform across the prostate. IFD plans were normalized so that the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) of rectum and bladder did not increase, compared to the baseline FTP plan, which irradiated the prostate uniformly in every fraction. An EUD-based model was then applied to estimate tumor

  5. Decavanadate effects in biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aureliano, Manuel; Gândara, Ricardo M C

    2005-05-01

    Vanadium biological studies often disregarded the formation of decameric vanadate species known to interact, in vitro, with high-affinity with many proteins such as myosin and sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pump and also to inhibit these biochemical systems involved in energy transduction. Moreover, very few in vivo animal studies involving vanadium consider the contribution of decavanadate to vanadium biological effects. Recently, it has been shown that an acute exposure to decavanadate but not to other vanadate oligomers induced oxidative stress and a different fate in vanadium intracellular accumulation. Several markers of oxidative stress analyzed on hepatic and cardiac tissue were monitored after in vivo effect of an acute exposure (12, 24 h and 7 days), to a sub-lethal concentration (5 mM; 1 mg/kg) of two vanadium solutions ("metavanadate" and "decavanadate"). It was observed that "decavanadate" promote different effects than other vanadate oligomers in catalase activity, glutathione content, lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial superoxide anion production and vanadium accumulation, whereas both solutions seem to equally depress reactive oxygen species (ROS) production as well as total intracellular reducing power. Vanadium is accumulated in mitochondria in particular when "decavanadate" is administered. These recent findings, that are now summarized, point out the decameric vanadate species contributions to in vivo and in vitro effects induced by vanadium in biological systems.

  6. Relative biological effectiveness and tolerance dose of fission neutrons in canine skin for a potential combination of neutron capture therapy and fast-neutron therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadosawa, Tsuyoshi; Ohashi, Fumihito; Nishimura, Ryohei; Sasaki, Nobuo; Saito, Isao; Wakabayashi, Hiroaki; Takeuchi, Akira

    2003-10-01

    To investigate the potential efficacy of fission neutrons from a fast-neutron reactor for the treatment of radioresistant tumors, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and tolerance dose of fission neutrons in canine skin were determined. The forelimbs of 34 healthy mongrel dogs received a single dose of fission neutrons (5.6, 6.8, 8.2, 9.6 or 11 Gy) or 137Cs gamma rays (10, 15, 20, 25 or 30 Gy). Based on observations of radiodermatitis for each radiation, the single-fraction RBE of fission neutrons in the sixth month was calculated as approximately 3. The tolerance doses of fission neutrons and gamma rays, defined as the highest doses giving no moist desquamation on the irradiated skin in the recovery phase, were estimated as 7.6 Gy and 20 Gy, respectively. The tolerance dose of 7.6 Gy of fission neutrons included 5.0 Gy of fast neutrons possessing high anti-tumor effects and 1.4 x 10(12) n/cm2 of thermal neutrons, which could be applicable to neutron capture therapy (NCT). The combination of fast-neutron therapy and NCT using a fast-neutron reactor might be useful for the treatment of radioresistant tumors.

  7. The Influence of Shielding on the Biological Effectiveness of Accelerated Particles for the Induction of Chromosome Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeorge, Kerry; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    Chromosome damage was assessed in human peripheral blood lymphocytes after in vitro exposure to the either Si-28 (490 or 600 MeV/n), Ti-48 (1000 MeV/n), or Fe-56 (600, 1000, or 5000 MeV/n). LET values for these ions ranged from 51 to 184 keV/micron and doses ranged from 10 to 200 cGy. The effect of either aluminum or polyethylene shielding on the induction of chromosome aberrations was investigated for each ion. Chromosome exchanges were measured using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole chromosome probes in cells collected at G2 and mitosis in first division post irradiation after chromosomes were prematurely condensed using calyculin-A. The yield of chromosomal aberrations increased linearly with dose and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for the primary beams, estimated from the initial slope of the dose response curve for total chromosomal exchanges with respect to gamma-rays, ranged from 9 to 35. The RBE values increased with LET, reaching a maximum for the 600 MeV/n Fe ions with LET of 184 keV/micron. When the LET of the primary beam was below approximately 100 keV/micron, the addition of shielding material increased the effectiveness per unit dose. Whereas shielding decreased the effectiveness per unit dose when the LET of primary beams was higher than 100 keV/micron. The yield of aberrations correlated with the dose-average LET of the beam after traversal through the shielding.

  8. Quantum Effects in Biological Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sisir

    2014-07-01

    The debates about the trivial and non-trivial effects in biological systems have drawn much attention during the last decade or so. What might these non-trivial sorts of quantum effects be? There is no consensus so far among the physicists and biologists regarding the meaning of "non-trivial quantum effects". However, there is no doubt about the implications of the challenging research into quantum effects relevant to biology such as coherent excitations of biomolecules and photosynthesis, quantum tunneling of protons, van der Waals forces, ultrafast dynamics through conical intersections, and phonon-assisted electron tunneling as the basis for our sense of smell, environment assisted transport of ions and entanglement in ion channels, role of quantum vacuum in consciousness. Several authors have discussed the non-trivial quantum effects and classified them into four broad categories: (a) Quantum life principle; (b) Quantum computing in the brain; (c) Quantum computing in genetics; and (d) Quantum consciousness. First, I will review the above developments. I will then discuss in detail the ion transport in the ion channel and the relevance of quantum theory in brain function. The ion transport in the ion channel plays a key role in information processing by the brain.

  9. Biological studies of radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, J.H.

    1949-11-16

    This paper discusses procedures for research on biological effects of radiation, using mouse tissue: activation trace analysis including methods and proceedures for handling samples before during and after irradiation; methods and procedures for ion exchange study; method of separation and recovery of copper, iron, zinc, cobalt, pubidium and cesium. Also included are studies of trace elements with radioactive isotopes: the distribution of cobalt 60, zinc 65, and copper 64 in the cytoplasm and nuclei of normal mice and those with tumors. 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Biological dose representation for carbon-ion radiotherapy of unconventional fractionation

    CERN Document Server

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    In carbon-ion radiotherapy, single-beam delivery each day in alternate directions has been commonly practiced for operational efficiency, taking advantage of the Bragg peak and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for uniform dose conformation to a tumor. The treatment plans are usually evaluated with total RBE-weighted dose, which is however deficient in relevance to the biological effect in the linear-quadratic model due to its quadratic-dose term, or the dose-fractionation effect. In this study, we reformulate the extrapolated response dose (ERD), or synonymously BED, which normalizes the dose-fractionation and cell-repopulation effects as well as the RBE of treating radiation, based on inactivation of a single model cell system and a typical treating radiation in carbon-ion RT. The ERD distribution virtually represents the biological effect of the treatment regardless of radiation modality or fractionation scheme. We applied the ERD formulation to simplistic model treatments and to a preclinical su...

  11. RBE values and repair characteristics for colo-rectal injury after caesium 137 gamma-ray and neutron irradiation. II. Fractionation up to ten doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, N H; Denekamp, J

    1984-07-01

    Early and late colo-rectal damage in mice have been assessed after 137Cs gamma irradiation and 3 MeV neutrons given as 1,2,5 or 10 fractions. Damage was measured by early changes in body weight, the late production of short faecal pellets and the pattern of lethality after irradiation. The data have been analysed in terms of the time course of expression of damage, fractionation effects and the RBE for neutrons over a wide range of doses per fraction (0.5-12.5 Gy neutrons, 3.5-33.5 Gy gamma rays). An initial epithelial denudation led to an early loss of weight, maximal at 11-17 days after irradiation. A dose-dependent weight reduction persisted over the animals' life-time. Deaths after localised pelvic gamma irradiation were progressive with no sharp demarcation between early or late phases of injury. The time course for lethality was qualitatively similar after neutrons. Beyond six months the rectum became constricted by fibrosis and a higher proportion of small faecal pellets was observed. At 6-15 months relatively shallow dose-response curves were obtained for this change. The sparing effect of fractionation was marked for the gamma-irradiated mice and almost absent after neutrons. A very high repair increment (11 Gy) was seen with two gamma-ray fractions of 20 Gy. At lower doses per fraction the proportion of each gamma-ray fraction recovered was 50-69% for all assays, i.e., similar to that for other normal tissues. There was a slight enhancement in the sparing effect for the late compared with the early assays over the lower dose range. The RBE was strongly dependent on dose per fraction because of the lack of reparable damage after neutrons. The RBE for both early and late effects was 5.0 at a neutron dose per fraction of 1 Gy. Extrapolation of the RBE data to lower doses, using the linear quadratic model, predicts a higher RBE for late (7.4-12.7) than for early damage (5.7-8.5) if gamma-ray doses below 5 Gy are used.

  12. [Biological effect of wood dust].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewska, A; Wojtczak, J; Bielichowska-Cybula, G; Domańska, A; Dutkiewicz, J; Mołocznik, A

    1993-01-01

    The biological effect of exposure to wood dust depends on its composition and the content of microorganisms which are an inherent element of the dust. The irritant and allergic effects of wood dust have been recognised for a long time. The allergic effect is caused by the wood dust of subtropical trees, e.g. western red cedar (Thuja plicata), redwood (Sequoia sempervirens), obeche (Triplochiton scleroxylon), cocabolla (Dalbergia retusa) and others. Trees growing in the European climate such as: larch (Larix), walnut (Juglans regia), oak (Quercus), beech (Fagus), pine (Pinus) cause a little less pronounced allergic effect. Occupational exposure to irritative or allergic wood dust may lead to bronchial asthma, rhinitis, alveolitis allergica, DDTS (Organic dust toxic syndrome), bronchitis, allergic dermatitis, conjunctivitis. An increased risk of adenocarcinoma of the sinonasal cavity is an important and serious problem associated with occupational exposure to wood dust. Adenocarcinoma constitutes about half of the total number of cancers induced by wood dust. An increased incidence of the squamous cell cancers can also be observed. The highest risk of cancer applies to workers of the furniture industry, particularly those dealing with machine wood processing, cabinet making and carpentry. The cancer of the upper respiratory tract develops after exposure to many kinds of wood dust. However, the wood dust of oak and beech seems to be most carcinogenic. It is assumed that exposure to wood dust can cause an increased incidence of other cancers, especially lung cancer and Hodgkin's disease. The adverse effects of microorganisms, mainly mould fungi and their metabolic products are manifested by alveolitis allergica and ODTS. These microorganisms can induce aspergillomycosis, bronchial asthma, rhinitis and allergic dermatitis.

  13. Biological effects of drilling wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cranford, P. J. [Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Dartmouth, NS (Canada). Bedford Inst. of Oceanography

    2000-07-01

    An argument is made for the point of view that economic realities require that a sustainable fishery must co-exist with the offshore petroleum industry, and therefore to sustain the fishery comprehensive studies are needed to identify and minimize the impact of operational drilling wastes on fishery resources. Moreover, laboratory and field studies indicate that operational drilling platforms impact on fisheries at great distances, therefore studies should not be limited to the immediate vicinity of drilling sites. Studies on long-term exposure of resident organisms to low level contaminants and the chronic lethal and sublethal biological effects of production drilling wastes must be conducted under environmentally relevant conditions to ensure the validity of the results. Studies at the Bedford Institute of Oceanography on sea scallops (Placopecten magellanicus) shows them to be highly sensitive to impacts from drilling wastes. Results of these studies, integrated with toxicity data and information on the distribution and transport of drilling wastes have been used by regulatory agencies and industrial interests to develop scientifically sound and justifiable regulations. They also led to the development of practical, sensitive and cost-effective technologies that use resident resource species to detect environmental impacts at offshore production sites. 1 fig.

  14. Novel Biological Approaches for Testing the Contributions of Single DSBs and DSB Clusters to the Biological Effects of High LET Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mladenova, Veronika; Mladenov, Emil; Iliakis, George

    2016-01-01

    The adverse biological effects of ionizing radiation (IR) are commonly attributed to the generation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). IR-induced DSBs are generated by clusters of ionizations, bear damaged terminal nucleotides, and frequently comprise base damages and single-strand breaks in the vicinity generating a unique DNA damage-clustering effect that increases DSB "complexity." The number of ionizations in clusters of different radiation modalities increases with increasing linear energy transfer (LET), and is thought to determine the long-known LET-dependence of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Multiple ionizations may also lead to the formation of DSB clusters, comprising two or more DSBs that destabilize chromatin further and compromise overall processing. DSB complexity and DSB-cluster formation are increasingly considered in the development of mathematical models of radiation action, which are then "tested" by fitting available experimental data. Despite a plethora of such mathematical models the ultimate goal, i.e., the "a priori" prediction of the radiation effect, has not yet been achieved. The difficulty partly arises from unsurmountable difficulties in testing the fundamental assumptions of such mathematical models in defined biological model systems capable of providing conclusive answers. Recently, revolutionary advances in methods allowing the generation of enzymatic DSBs at random or in well-defined locations in the genome, generate unique testing opportunities for several key assumptions frequently fed into mathematical modeling - including the role of DSB clusters in the overall effect. Here, we review the problematic of DSB-cluster formation in radiation action and present novel biological technologies that promise to revolutionize the way we address the biological consequences of such lesions. We describe new ways of exploiting the I-SceI endonuclease to generate DSB-clusters at random locations in the genome and describe the

  15. Evaluation of relative biological efficiency of additives in sugarcane ensiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Maria Oliveira Borgatti

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of adding alkalis on the fermentative pattern, aerobic stability and nutritive value of the sugarcane silage. A completely randomized design with 6 additives in two concentrations (1 or 2%, plus a control group, totalizing 13 treatments [(6×2+1] with four replications, was used. The additives were sodium hydroxide (NaOH, limestone (CaCO3, urea (CO(NH22, sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3, quicklime (CaO and hydrated lime (Ca(OH2. The material was ensiled in 52 laboratory silos using plastic buckets with 12 L of capacity. Silos were opened 60 days after ensiling, when organic acids concentration, aerobic stability and chemical composition were determined. The Relative Biological Efficiency (RBE was calculated by the slope ratio method, using the data obtained from ratio between desirable and undesirable silage products, according to the equation: D/U ratio = [lactic/(ethanol + acetic + butyric]. All additives affected dry matter, crude protein, acid detergent fiber, neutral detergent fiber contents and buffering capacity. Except for urea and quicklime, all additives increased the in vitro dry matter digestibility. In general, these additives altered the fermentative pattern of sugarcane silage, inhibiting alcoholic fermentation and improving lactic acid production. The additive that showed the best RBE in relation to sodium hydroxide (100% was limestone (89.4%. The RBE values of urea, sodium bicarbonate and hydrated lime were 49.2%, 47.7% and 34.3%, respectively.

  16. Relative biological efficiency of 592 MeV protons. Analysis of the biological effect of secondary radiation; Efficacite biologique relative des protons de 592 MeV. Analyse de l'effet biologique du aux rayonnements secondaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legeay, G.; Baarli, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)

    1968-07-01

    The relative biological efficiency (RBE) of high energy protons is of importance because of their effects in the field of radioprotection around large accelerators and during space-flights. The nature of the interactions between 592 MeV protons and biological tissues makes it necessary to take into consideration the contribution of secondary radiation to the biological effect. Since it is not possible to obtain from a synchrotron a beam having a sufficiently large cross-section to irradiate large animals, one has to resort to certain devices concerning the mode of exposure when small laboratory animals are used. By irradiating rats individually and in groups, and by using the lethal test as a function of time, the authors show that the value of the RBE is different for animals of the same species having the same biological parameters. Thus there appears an increase in the biological effect due to secondary radiation produced in nuclear cascades which develop in a large volume, for example that of a human being. (author) [French] L'efficacite biologique relative des protons de haute energie doit etre etudiee en raison de leur incidence sur la radioprotection autour des grands accelerateurs et lors des vols spatiaux. La nature des interactions des protons de 592 MeV avec les tissus biologiques rend necessaire d'envisager la contribution des rayonnements secondaires a l'effet biologique. Ne pouvant obtenir aupres d'un synchrotron un faisceau de section importante pour irradier de gros animaux, il est necessaire de faire appel a des artifices portant sur le mode d'exposition lorsque l'on utilise les petits animaux de laboratoire. En irradiant des rats individuellement et en groupe et en utilisant le test de letalite en fonction du temps, les auteurs montrent que la valeur de l'EBR est differente sur des animaux de la meme espece presentant les memes parametres biologiques. Il apparait ainsi un accroissement de l'effet biologique

  17. Biological effects of high LET radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Masami [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences

    1997-03-01

    Biological effect of radiation is different by a kind of it greatly. Heavy ions were generally more effective in cell inactivation, chromosome aberration induction, mutation induction and neoplastic cell transformation induction than {gamma}-rays in SHE cells. (author)

  18. Relative Biological Effectiveness of HZE Fe Ions for Induction ofMicro-Nuclei at Low Doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groesser, Torsten; Chun, Eugene; Rydberg, Bjorn

    2007-01-16

    Dose-response curves for induction of micro-nuclei (MN) was measured in Chinese hamster V79 and xrs6 (Ku80-) cells and in human mammary epithelial MCF10A cells in the dose range of 0.05-1 Gy. The Chinese Hamster cells were exposed to 1 GeV/u Fe ions, 600 MeV/u Fe ions, and 300 MeV/u Fe ions (LETs of 151, 176 and 235 keV/{micro}m respectively) as well as with 320 kVp X-rays as reference. Second-order polynomials were fitted to the induction curves and the initial slopes (the alpha values) were used to calculate RBE. For the repair proficient V79 cells the RBE at these low doses increased with LET. The values obtained were 3.1 (LET=151 keV/{micro}m), 4.3 (LET = 176 keV/{micro}m) and 5.7 (LET = 235 keV/{micro}m), while the RBE was close to 1 for the repair deficient xrs6 cells regardless of LET. For the MCF10A cells the RBE was determined for 1 GeV/u Fe ions and found to be 5.4, slightly higher than for V79 cells. To test the effect of shielding, the 1 GeV/u Fe ion beam was intercepted by various thickness of high-density polyethylene plastic absorbers, which resulted in energy loss and fragmentation. It was found that the MN yield for V79 cells placed behind the absorbers decreased in proportion to the decrease in dose both before and after the Fe ion Bragg peak (excluding the area around the Fe-ion Bragg peak itself), indicating that RBE did not change significantly due to shielding. At the Bragg peak the effectiveness for MN formation per unit dose was decreased, indicating an 'overkill' effect by low-energy very high-LET Fe ions.

  19. Correlation Effects in Biological Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Bagdasaryan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Review of the complex network theory is presented and classification of such networks in accordance with the main statistical characteristics is considered. For the adjacency matrix of a real neural network the shortest distances for each pair of nodes as well as the node degree distribution and cluster coefficients are calculated. Comparison of the main statistical parameters with the random network is performed, and based on this, the conclusions about the correlation phenomena in biological system are made.

  20. The Mechanism of Effect on RB/E2F Pathway of Nitidine Chloride Inhibiting Proliferation of SMMC-7721%氯化两面针碱通过Rb/E2F途径抑制肝癌细胞SMMC-7721增殖作用机制研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄怡; 廖柳凤; 黄文涛; 吴琼; 何洁梅; 李敏; 徐恒

    2013-01-01

    Nitidine chloride ( Nitidine chloride,NC) is isolated from the foot of Zanthox-ylum nitidum ( Roxb. ) DC. It has good anti-tumor activity,and can inhibit cell proliferation of nasopharyngeal carcinoma,lung cancer in vitro. Studies have shown that NC can result in blocking the cell cycle G2/M period, and the induction of apoptosis. E2F/RB played an important role in cell cycle regulation, with CycLinDl , CDK4, CyclinE, and CDK2 complex feedback controlling the network. Arious chromatin regulatory complexes have been linked to RB/E2F proteins adjusting the cell from Gl to S phase transition. In addition, E2F is also an important transcription factor,which has traditionally been viewed in the context of cell-cycle control and involved in transcriptional regulation of the genes. The molecular changes of E2F/RB pathway in SMMC-7721 cells treated with Nitidine chloride (NC) were studied and the role of E2F/RB pathway in NC inhibiting the proliferation and participating the apoptosis of SMMC-7721 cells was illustrated. The effects of nitidine chloride on human Hepatoma SMMC-7721 cell in vitro were assayed by cell counting Kit-8. CCK8 was used to detect the cell survival level effects of NC on SMMC-7721 cells. Tumor cell apoptosis and necrosis were studied by Annexin-V and propidium iodide (PI). E2F and RB mRNA levels were quantified by real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR after detecting E2F protein expression levels by Western Blot. Results showed that NC was obviously inhibiting the proliferation of human hepatoma cells, reducing the cell survival rate, and promoting the cell apoptosis significantly. The mRNA and protein expression levels of E2F, RB were up-reduced after SMMC-7721 cells were exposed to NC. NC plays an important role on the E2F/RB regulatory pathway, inhibits the expression of E2F/RB and participates in the inhibition of apoptosis of cell growth.%氯化两面针碱(Nitidine chloride,NC)是从芸香科植物两面针根部提取的一种天然生物

  1. Effects of beam interruption time on tumor control probability in single-fractionated carbon-ion radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaniwa, T.; Kanematsu, N.; Suzuki, M.; Hawkins, R. B.

    2015-05-01

    Carbon-ion radiotherapy treatment plans are designed on the assumption that the beams are delivered instantaneously, irrespective of actual dose-delivery time structure in a treatment session. As the beam lines are fixed in the vertical and horizontal directions at our facility, beam delivery is interrupted in multi-field treatment due to the necessity of patient repositioning within the fields. Single-fractionated treatment for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is such a case, in which four treatment fields in multiple directions are delivered in one session with patient repositioning during the session. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the period of dose delivery, including interruptions due to patient repositioning, on tumor control probability (TCP) of NSCLC. All clinical doses were weighted by relative biological effectiveness (RBE) evaluated for instantaneous irradiation. The rate equations defined in the microdosimetric kinetic model (MKM) for primary lesions induced in DNA were applied to the single-fractionated treatment of NSCLC. Treatment plans were made for an NSCLC case for various prescribed doses ranging from 25 to 50 Gy (RBE), on the assumption of instantaneous beam delivery. These plans were recalculated by varying the interruption time τ ranging from 0 to 120 min between the second and third fields for continuous irradiations of 3 min per field based on the MKM. The curative doses that would result in a TCP of 90% were deduced for the respective interruption times. The curative dose was 34.5 Gy (RBE) for instantaneous irradiation and 36.6 Gy (RBE), 39.2 Gy (RBE), 41.2 Gy (RBE), 43.3 Gy (RBE) and 44.4 Gy (RBE) for τ = 0 min, 15 min, 30 min, 60 min and 120 min, respectively. The realistic biological effectiveness of therapeutic carbon-ion beam decreased with increasing interruption time. These data suggest that the curative dose can increase by 20% or more compared to the planned dose if the

  2. The ancient function of RB-E2F Pathway: insights from its evolutionary history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xianmei

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The RB-E2F pathway is conserved in most eukaryotic lineages, including animals and plants. E2F and RB family proteins perform crucial functions in cycle controlling, differentiation, development and apoptosis. However, there are two kinds of E2Fs (repressive E2Fs and active E2Fs and three RB family members in human. Till now, the detail evolutionary history of these protein families and how RB-E2F pathway evolved in different organisms remain poorly explored. Results We performed a comprehensive evolutionary analysis of E2F, RB and DP (dimerization partners of E2Fs protein family in representative eukaryotic organisms. Several interesting facts were revealed. First, orthologues of RB, E2F, and DP family are present in several representative unicellular organisms and all multicellular organisms we checked. Second, ancestral E2F, RB genes duplicated before placozoans and bilaterians diverged, thus E2F family was divided into E2F4/5 subgroup (including repressive E2Fs: E2F4 and E2F5 and E2F1/2/3 subgroup (including active E2Fs: E2F1, E2F2 and E2F3, RB family was divided into RB1 subgroup (including RB1 and RBL subgroup (including RBL1 and RBL2. Third, E2F4 and E2F5 share more sequence similarity with the predicted E2F ancestral sequence than E2F1, E2F2 and E2F3; E2F4 and E2F5 also possess lower evolutionary rates and higher purification selection pressures than E2F1, E2F2 and E2F3. Fourth, for RB family, the RBL subgroup proteins possess lower evolutionary rates and higher purification selection pressures compared with RB subgroup proteins in vertebrates, Conclusions Protein evolutionary rates and purification selection pressures are usually linked with protein functions. We speculated that function conducted by E2F4/5 subgroup and RBL subgroup proteins might mainly represent the ancient function of RB-E2F pathway, and the E2F1/2/3 subgroup proteins and RB1 protein might contribute more to functional diversification in RB-E2F

  3. The ancient function of RB-E2F pathway: insights from its evolutionary history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lihuan; Peng, Bo; Yao, Lei; Zhang, Xinming; Sun, Kuan; Yang, Xianmei; Yu, Long

    2010-09-20

    The RB-E2F pathway is conserved in most eukaryotic lineages, including animals and plants. E2F and RB family proteins perform crucial functions in cycle controlling, differentiation, development and apoptosis. However, there are two kinds of E2Fs (repressive E2Fs and active E2Fs) and three RB family members in human. Till now, the detail evolutionary history of these protein families and how RB-E2F pathway evolved in different organisms remain poorly explored. We performed a comprehensive evolutionary analysis of E2F, RB and DP (dimerization partners of E2Fs) protein family in representative eukaryotic organisms. Several interesting facts were revealed. First, orthologues of RB, E2F, and DP family are present in several representative unicellular organisms and all multicellular organisms we checked. Second, ancestral E2F, RB genes duplicated before placozoans and bilaterians diverged, thus E2F family was divided into E2F4/5 subgroup (including repressive E2Fs: E2F4 and E2F5) and E2F1/2/3 subgroup (including active E2Fs: E2F1, E2F2 and E2F3), RB family was divided into RB1 subgroup (including RB1) and RBL subgroup (including RBL1 and RBL2). Third, E2F4 and E2F5 share more sequence similarity with the predicted E2F ancestral sequence than E2F1, E2F2 and E2F3; E2F4 and E2F5 also possess lower evolutionary rates and higher purification selection pressures than E2F1, E2F2 and E2F3. Fourth, for RB family, the RBL subgroup proteins possess lower evolutionary rates and higher purification selection pressures compared with RB subgroup proteins in vertebrates, Protein evolutionary rates and purification selection pressures are usually linked with protein functions. We speculated that function conducted by E2F4/5 subgroup and RBL subgroup proteins might mainly represent the ancient function of RB-E2F pathway, and the E2F1/2/3 subgroup proteins and RB1 protein might contribute more to functional diversification in RB-E2F pathway. Our results will enhance the current

  4. Biological effects of thyroid hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Saatov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the findings from the study on multifunctional effects of thyroid hormones in relation to normal and malignantly transformed tissues and cells. Both “rapid” and «slow» effects of thyroid hormones including calorigenic effects and effects over adenylate cyclase – cAMP system have been described. Thyroxin (Т4 has been established capable to inhibit proliferation and to induce apoptosis of cells carrying Т4 receptors on their membranes as well as to change course of metabolic processes under its effect. Spectrum of Т4 targets is quite broad to include not only cells of hormone-producing organs, to name those of the breast and the colon, but also other types of cells to name melanin-containing ones; Т4 effects resulting in reconstruction of presentation of regulatory proteins on the cell membrane surface to ultimately activate the process of cell apoptosis. Our findings help determine alternative paths for hormonal regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis of cells of hormone-dependent tumors, breast cancer, in particular, upon impossibility to regulate the processes by conventional methods. This facilitates understanding mechanisms for activation of signal system of the breast cancer’s cells by hormones upon changes in expression of receptors on the cells’ surface, making possible development of novel strategy for replacement therapy of hormone-dependent tumors upon low efficacy of drug therapy.

  5. The RBE of 3.4 MeV alpha-particles and 0.565 MeV neutrons relative to 60Co gamma-rays for neoplastic transformation of human hybrid cells and the impact of culture conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankenberg-Schwager, M; Spieren, S; Pralle, E; Giesen, U; Brede, H J; Thiemig, M; Frankenberg, D

    2010-01-01

    The neoplastic transformation of human hybrid CGL1 cells is affected by perturbations from external influences such as serum batch and concentration, the number of medium changes during the 21-day expression period and cell seeding density. Nevertheless, for doses up to 1.5 Gy, published transformation frequencies for low linear energy transfer (LET) radiations (gamma-rays, MeV electrons or photons) are in good agreement, whereas for higher doses larger variations are reported. The (60)Co gamma-ray data here for doses up to 1.5 Gy, using a low-yield serum batch and only one medium change, are in agreement with published frequencies of neoplastic transformation of human hybrid cells. For 3.4 MeV alpha-particles (LET = 124 keV/mum) and 0.565 MeV monoenergetic neutrons relative to low doses of (60)Co gamma-rays, a maximum relative biological effectiveness (RBE(M)) of 2.8 +/- 0.2 and 1.5 +/- 0.2, respectively, was calculated. Surprisingly, at higher doses of (60)Co gamma-rays lower frequencies of neoplastic transformation were observed. This non-monotonic dose relationship for neoplastic transformation by (60)Co gamma-rays is likely due to the lack of a G2/M arrest observed at low doses resulting in higher transformation frequencies per dose, whereas the lower frequencies per dose observed for higher doses are likely related to the induction of a G2/M arrest.

  6. Biological effects of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, B.G. [SENES Oak Ridge Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Theodorakis, C.W.; Shugart, L.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division

    1996-12-31

    Natural populations have always been exposed to background levels of ionizing radiation; however, with the event of the nuclear age, studies about the effects of higher-than-background levels of ionizing radiation on individuals or populations of organisms became important. Originally, concern was focused on survival after large, acute radiation doses, and numerous studies document the somatic and genetic effects of acute ionizing radiation. However, there is a growing realization that chronic long-term exposure to higher-than-background levels of environmental radiation is more likely than is large acute exposure. Less than 10% of the literature on ionizing radiation effects deals with chronic long-term effects, and very few studies involve natural populations. In 1977, mosquito fish, Gambusia affinis, were experimentally introduced into a 0,45 ha, decommissioned, radioactive waste pond where the measured dose at the sediment-water interface was 1,150 rad/year. One year later, the fecundity of the population had not changed significantly. Eighteen years later, studies of the fish showed an inverse correlation between DNA strand breakage and fecundity in the contaminated pond. More recent studies have provided evidence that genetic diversity of the fish has increased in the contaminated site. These fish also have a greater prevalence of certain DNA banding patterns. Individuals displaying these banding patterns have a higher fecundity and lower degree of DNA strand breakage than individuals with less common banding patterns. Gambusia affinis has apparently adapted to the high background radiation, successfully surviving for approximately 50 generations. 31 refs, 5 figs.

  7. BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS ON THE SOURCE OF GEONEUTRINOS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sleep, Norman H.; Bird, Dennis K.; Rosing, Minik T.

    2013-01-01

    its bulk earth value of similar to 4; Pb isotope measurements on mantle-derived rocks yield low Th/U values, effectively averaged over geological time. The physics of the modern biological process is complicated, but the net effect is that much of the U in the mantle comes from subducted marine...

  8. Biological Effects of Low-Dose Exposure

    CERN Document Server

    Komochkov, M M

    2000-01-01

    On the basis of the two-protection reaction model an analysis of stochastic radiobiological effects of low-dose exposure of different biological objects has been carried out. The stochastic effects are the results published in the last decade: epidemiological studies of human cancer mortality, the yield of thymocyte apoptosis of mice and different types of chromosomal aberrations. The results of the analysis show that as dependent upon the nature of biological object, spontanous effect, exposure conditions and radiation type one or another form dose - effect relationship is realized: downwards concave, near to linear and upwards concave with the effect of hormesis included. This result testifies to the incomplete conformity of studied effects of 1990 ICRP recomendations based on the linear no-threshold hypothesis about dose - effect relationship. Because of this the methodology of radiation risk estimation recomended by ICRP needs more precisian and such quantity as collective dose ought to be classified into...

  9. Biological Effect of Magnetic Field in Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-Wei ZENG

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the biological effect of magnetic field in mice bodies. Method: With a piece of permanent magnet embeded in mice bodies beside the femoral artery and vein to measure the electrophoretic velocity(um/s). Result: The magnetic field in mice bodies on the experiment group that the electrophoretic velocity is faster more than control and free group.Conclusion:The magnetic field in animal's body can raise the negative electric charges on the surface of erythrocyte to improve the microcirculation, this is the biological effect of magnetic field.

  10. Biological effects of electric fields: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, L.E.; Phillips, R.D.

    1983-11-01

    An overview of the literature suggests tha electric-field exposure is an environmental agent/influence of relatively low potential toxicity to biological systems. Generally, many of the biological effects which have been reported are quite subtle and differences between exposed and unexposed subjects may be masked by normal biological variations. However, several recent reports indicate possibly more serious consequences from chronic exposure, emphasizing the need for more research in epidemiology and laboratory experiments. This paper presents a cursory overview of investigations on the biological consequences of exposure to ELF electromagnetic fields. Three important topics are discussed, including: 1) the general methodology of exposure experiments, including those elements which are critical for definitive studies in biological systems; 2) a brief discussion of epidemiological and clinical studies conducted to date; and 3) a somewhat more extensive examination of animal experiments representing major areas of investigation (behavior, biological rhythms, nervous and endocrine systems, bone growth and repair, cardiovascular system and blood chemistry, immunology, reproduction, growth and development mortality and pathology, cellular and membrane studies, and mutagenesis). A discussion of current concepts, possible mechanisms and future directions of research is presented. 110 references.

  11. Biological effectiveness of neutrons: Research needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casarett, G.W.; Braby, L.A.; Broerse, J.J.; Elkind, M.M.; Goodhead, D.T.; Oleinick, N.L.

    1994-02-01

    The goal of this report was to provide a conceptual plan for a research program that would provide a basis for determining more precisely the biological effectiveness of neutron radiation with emphasis on endpoints relevant to the protection of human health. This report presents the findings of the experts for seven particular categories of scientific information on neutron biological effectiveness. Chapter 2 examines the radiobiological mechanisms underlying the assumptions used to estimate human risk from neutrons and other radiations. Chapter 3 discusses the qualitative and quantitative models used to organize and evaluate experimental observations and to provide extrapolations where direct observations cannot be made. Chapter 4 discusses the physical principles governing the interaction of radiation with biological systems and the importance of accurate dosimetry in evaluating radiation risk and reducing the uncertainty in the biological data. Chapter 5 deals with the chemical and molecular changes underlying cellular responses and the LET dependence of these changes. Chapter 6, in turn, discusses those cellular and genetic changes which lead to mutation or neoplastic transformation. Chapters 7 and 8 examine deterministic and stochastic effects, respectively, and the data required for the prediction of such effects at different organizational levels and for the extrapolation from experimental results in animals to risks for man. Gaps and uncertainties in this data are examined relative to data required for establishing radiation protection standards for neutrons and procedures for the effective and safe use of neutron and other high-LET radiation therapy.

  12. Lunar biological effects and the magnetosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevington, Michael

    2015-12-01

    The debate about how far the Moon causes biological effects has continued for two millennia. Pliny the Elder argued for lunar power "penetrating all things", including plants, fish, animals and humans. He also linked the Moon with tides, confirmed mathematically by Newton. A review of modern studies of biological effects, especially from plants and animals, confirms the pervasive nature of this lunar force. However calculations from physics and other arguments refute the supposed mechanisms of gravity and light. Recent space exploration allows a new approach with evidence of electromagnetic fields associated with the Earth's magnetotail at full moon during the night, and similar, but more limited, effects from the Moon's wake on the magnetosphere at new moon during the day. The disturbance of the magnetotail is perhaps shown by measurements of electric fields of up to 16V/m compared with the usual effects on some sensitive organisms. Similar intensities found in sferics, geomagnetic storms, aurora disturbance, sensations of a 'presence' and pre-seismic electromagnetic radiation are known to affect animals and 10-20% of the human population. There is now evidence for mechanisms such as calcium flux, melatonin disruption, magnetite and cryptochromes. Both environmental and receptor variations explain confounding factors and inconsistencies in the evidence. Electromagnetic effects might also account for some evolutionary changes. Further research on lunar biological effects, such as acute myocardial infarction, could help the development of strategies to reduce adverse effects for people sensitive to geomagnetic disturbance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. II. Biological studies of radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, J.H.

    1948-05-24

    With the completion of the 184 inch cyclotron in Berkeley and the successful construction of a deflector system, it was possible to bring the 190 Mev deuteron and the 380 Mev alpha beams out into the air and to begin a study of the effects of high-energy deuteron beams by direct irradiation of biological specimens. The direct biological use of deuteron beams was attempted earlier in Berkeley by Marshak, MacLeish, and Walker in 1940. These and other investigators have been aware for some time of the potential usefulness of high energy particle beams for radio-biological studies and their suitability for biological investigations. R.R. Wilson advanced the idea of using fast proton beams to deliver radiation and intervening tissues. R.E. Zirkle pointed out that such particle beams may be focused or screened until a cross-section of the beam is small enough to study effects of irradiation under the microscope on single cells or on parts of single cells. This article gives an overview of the radiological use of high energy deuteron beams, including the following topics: potential uses of high energy particle beams; experiments on the physical properties of the beam; lethal effect of the deuteron beam on mice.

  14. [Biological effects of electromagnetic fields (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, J

    1979-08-01

    This résumé deals with thermal and nonthermal effects of electromagnetic fields on man. In consideration of two aspects a limitation is necessary. Firstly, there will be discussed only direct and immediate influences on biological cells and tissues, secondly, the treatment is limited to such phenomena, for which biophysical aproximations, based on experimental data, could be developed. Hazards for the human being may occur only by thermal effects within the microwave range. Regarding frequencies below approximately 30 kHz, excitation processes cannot be excluded in exceptional cases. Thermal effects are predominant, between 30 kHz and 100 kHz, before excitations can appear. Furthermore, by comparing the electrically and magnetically induced currents with the naturally flowing currents in man caused by the brain's and heart's electrical activity, a "lower boundaryline" was estimated. Regarding electric or magnetic field strengths undercutting this boundary-line, direct effects on the central nervous system may be excluded; other mechanisms should be responsible for demonstrated biological effects. The paper closes referring to some reports--presently discussed--on experimental findings of biological effects, which are observed as a result of the influence of electromagnetic fields of small field strengths.

  15. The effect of the beta-emitting yttrium-90 citrate on the dose-response of dicentric chromosomes in human lymphocytes: a basis for biological dosimetry after radiosynoviorthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, E; Selbach, H-J; Voth, M; Pinkert, J; Gildehaus, F J; Klett, R; Haney, M

    2006-07-01

    The production of dicentric chromosomes in human lymphocytes by beta-particles of yttrium-90 (Y-90) was studied in vitro to provide a basis of biological dosimetry after radiosynoviorthesis (RSO) of persistent synovitis by intra-articular administration of yttrium-90 citrate colloid. Since the injected colloid may leak into the lymphatic drainage exposing other parts of the body to radiation, the measurement of biological damage induced by beta-particles of Y-90 is important for the assessment of radiation risk to the patients. A linear dose-response relationship (alpha = 0.0229 +/- 0.0028 dicentric chromosomes per cell per gray) was found over the dose range of 0.2176-2.176 Gy. The absorbed doses were calculated for exposure of blood samples to Y-90 activities from 40 to 400 kBq using both Monte Carlo simulation and an analytical model. The maximum low-dose RBE, the RBE(M) which is equivalent to the ratio of the alpha coefficients of the dose-response curves, is well in line with published results obtained earlier for irradiation of blood of the same donor with heavily filtered 220 kV X-rays (3.35 mm copper), but half of the RBE(M) relative to weakly filtered 220 kV X-rays. Therefore, it can be concluded that for estimating an absorbed dose during RSO by the technique of biological dosimetry, in vitro and in vivo data for the same radiation quality are necessary.

  16. The Biological Effects of Bilirubin Photoisomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasprova, Jana; Dal Ben, Matteo; Vianello, Eleonora; Goncharova, Iryna; Urbanova, Marie; Vyroubalova, Karolina; Gazzin, Silvia; Tiribelli, Claudio; Sticha, Martin; Cerna, Marcela; Vitek, Libor

    2016-01-01

    Although phototherapy was introduced as early as 1950's, the potential biological effects of bilirubin photoisomers (PI) generated during phototherapy remain unclear. The aim of our study was to isolate bilirubin PI in their pure forms and to assess their biological effects in vitro. The three major bilirubin PI (ZE- and EZ-bilirubin and Z-lumirubin) were prepared by photo-irradiation of unconjugated bilirubin. The individual photoproducts were chromatographically separated (TLC, HPLC), and their identities verified by mass spectrometry. The role of Z-lumirubin (the principle bilirubin PI) on the dissociation of bilirubin from albumin was tested by several methods: peroxidase, fluorescence quenching, and circular dichroism. The biological effects of major bilirubin PI (cell viability, expression of selected genes, cell cycle progression) were tested on the SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line. Lumirubin was found to have a binding site on human serum albumin, in the subdomain IB (or at a close distance to it); and thus, different from that of bilirubin. Its binding constant to albumin was much lower when compared with bilirubin, and lumirubin did not affect the level of unbound bilirubin (Bf). Compared to unconjugated bilirubin, bilirubin PI did not have any effect on either SH-SY5Y cell viability, the expression of genes involved in bilirubin metabolism or cell cycle progression, nor in modulation of the cell cycle phase. The principle bilirubin PI do not interfere with bilirubin albumin binding, and do not exert any toxic effect on human neuroblastoma cells.

  17. Mechanistic Effects of Calcitriol in Cancer Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenza Díaz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Besides its classical biological effects on calcium and phosphorus homeostasis, calcitriol, the active vitamin D metabolite, has a broad variety of actions including anticancer effects that are mediated either transcriptionally and/or via non-genomic pathways. In the context of cancer, calcitriol regulates the cell cycle, induces apoptosis, promotes cell differentiation and acts as anti-inflammatory factor within the tumor microenvironment. In this review, we address the different mechanisms of action involved in the antineoplastic effects of calcitriol.

  18. The Biological Effects of Bilirubin Photoisomers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Jasprova

    Full Text Available Although phototherapy was introduced as early as 1950's, the potential biological effects of bilirubin photoisomers (PI generated during phototherapy remain unclear. The aim of our study was to isolate bilirubin PI in their pure forms and to assess their biological effects in vitro. The three major bilirubin PI (ZE- and EZ-bilirubin and Z-lumirubin were prepared by photo-irradiation of unconjugated bilirubin. The individual photoproducts were chromatographically separated (TLC, HPLC, and their identities verified by mass spectrometry. The role of Z-lumirubin (the principle bilirubin PI on the dissociation of bilirubin from albumin was tested by several methods: peroxidase, fluorescence quenching, and circular dichroism. The biological effects of major bilirubin PI (cell viability, expression of selected genes, cell cycle progression were tested on the SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line. Lumirubin was found to have a binding site on human serum albumin, in the subdomain IB (or at a close distance to it; and thus, different from that of bilirubin. Its binding constant to albumin was much lower when compared with bilirubin, and lumirubin did not affect the level of unbound bilirubin (Bf. Compared to unconjugated bilirubin, bilirubin PI did not have any effect on either SH-SY5Y cell viability, the expression of genes involved in bilirubin metabolism or cell cycle progression, nor in modulation of the cell cycle phase. The principle bilirubin PI do not interfere with bilirubin albumin binding, and do not exert any toxic effect on human neuroblastoma cells.

  19. Method for photo-altering a biological system to improve biological effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Richard A.; Doiron, Daniel R.; Crean, David H.

    2000-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy is a new adjunctive therapy for filtration surgery that does not use chemotherapy agents or radiation, but uses pharmacologically-active sensitizing compounds to produce a titratable, localized, transient, post operative avascular conjunctiva. A photosensitizing agent in a biological system is selectively activated by delivering the photosensitive agent to the biological system and laser activating only a spatially selected portion of the delivered photosensitive agent. The activated portion of the photosensitive agent reacts with the biological system to obtain a predetermined biological effect. As a result, an improved spatial disposition and effectuation of the biological effect by the photosensitive agent in the biological system is achieved.

  20. Development of novel rifampicin-derived P-glycoprotein activators/inducers. synthesis, in silico analysis and application in the RBE4 cell model, using paraquat as substrate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vânia Vilas-Boas

    Full Text Available P-glycoprotein (P-gp is a 170 kDa transmembrane protein involved in the outward transport of many structurally unrelated substrates. P-gp activation/induction may function as an antidotal pathway to prevent the cytotoxicity of these substrates. In the present study we aimed at testing rifampicin (Rif and three newly synthesized Rif derivatives (a mono-methoxylated derivative, MeORif, a peracetylated derivative, PerAcRif, and a reduced derivative, RedRif to establish their ability to modulate P-gp expression and activity in a cellular model of the rat's blood-brain barrier, the RBE4 cell line P-gp expression was assessed by western blot using C219 anti-P-gp antibody. P-gp function was evaluated by flow cytometry measuring the accumulation of rhodamine123. Whenever P-gp activation/induction ability was detected in a tested compound, its antidotal effect was further tested using paraquat as cytotoxicity model. Interactions between Rif or its derivatives and P-gp were also investigated by computational analysis. Rif led to a significant increase in P-gp expression at 72 h and RedRif significantly increased both P-gp expression and activity. No significant differences were observed for the other derivatives. Pre- or simultaneous treatment with RedRif protected cells against paraquat-induced cytotoxicity, an effect reverted by GF120918, a P-gp inhibitor, corroborating the observed P-gp activation ability. Interaction of RedRif with P-gp drug-binding pocket was consistent with an activation mechanism of action, which was confirmed with docking studies. Therefore, RedRif protection against paraquat-induced cytotoxicity in RBE4 cells, through P-gp activation/induction, suggests that it may be useful as an antidote for cytotoxic substrates of P-gp.

  1. Development of a low-energy particle irradiation facility for the study of the biological effectiveness of the ion track end

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manti, L.; Campajola, L.; Perozziello, F. M.; Kavanagh, J. N.; Schettino, G.

    2012-07-01

    Uncertainties surround the radiobiological consequences of exposure to charged particles, despite the increasing use of accelerated ion beams for cancer treatment (hadrontherapy). In particular, little is known about the long-term effects on normal tissue at the beam entrance or in the distal part of the Spread-Out Bragg Peak (SOBP). Moreover, although the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of particle radiation has been traditionally related to the radiation linear energy transfer (LET), it has become increasingly evident that radiation-induced cell death, as well as long term radiation effects, is not adequately described by this parameter. Hence, exploring the effectiveness of various ion beams at or around the Bragg peak of monoenergetic ion beams can prove useful to gain insights into the role played by parameters other than the particle LET in determining the outcome of particle radiation exposures. In this context, the upgrade of the Tandem irradiation facility at Naples University here described, has allowed us to perform a series of preliminary radiobiological measurements using proton and carbon ion beams. The facility is currently used to irradiate normal and cancer cell lines with ion beams such as oxygen and fluorine.

  2. Isoflavones: estrogenic activity, biological effect and bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Daniela Cristina; Piazza, Cateno; Melilli, Barbara; Drago, Filippo; Salomone, Salvatore

    2013-03-01

    Isoflavones are phytoestrogens with potent estrogenic activity; genistein, daidzein and glycitein are the most active isoflavones found in soy beans. Phytoestrogens have similarity in structure with the human female hormone 17-β-estradiol, which can bind to both alpha and beta estrogen receptors, and mimic the action of estrogens on target organs, thereby exerting many health benefits when used in some hormone-dependent diseases. Numerous clinical studies claim benefits of genistein and daidzein in chemoprevention of breast and prostate cancer, cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis as well as in relieving postmenopausal symptoms. The ability of isoflavones to prevent cancer and other chronic diseases largely depends on pharmacokinetic properties of these compounds, in particular absorption and distribution to the target tissue. The chemical form in which isoflavones occur is important because it influences their bioavailability and, therefore, their biological activity. Glucose-conjugated isoflavones are highly polar, water-soluble compounds. They are hardly absorbed by the intestinal epithelium and have weaker biological activities than the corresponding aglycone. Different microbial families of colon can transform glycosylated isoflavones into aglycones. Clinical studies show important differences between the aglycone and conjugated forms of genistein and daidzein. The evaluation of isoflavone metabolism and bioavailability is crucial to understanding their biological effects. Lipid-based formulations such as drug incorporation into oils, emulsions and self-microemulsifying formulations have been introduced to increase bioavailability. Complexation with cyclodextrin also represent a valid method to improve the physicochemical characteristics of these substances in order to be absorbed and distributed to target tissues. We review and discuss pharmacokinetic issues that critically influence the biological activity of isoflavones.

  3. Biological effects data: Fluoride and sulfur dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMechan, K.J. (ed.); Holton, R.L.; Ulbricht, R.J.; Morgan , J.B.

    1975-04-01

    The Alumax Pacific Aluminum Corporation has proposed construction of an aluminum reduction facility near Youngs Bay at Warrenton, Oregon. This report comprises one part of the final report to Alumax on a research project entitled, Physical, Chemical and Biological Studies of Youngs Bay.'' It presents data pertaining to the potential biological effects of fluoride and sulfur dioxide, two potentially hazardous plant-stack emissions, on selected aquatic species of the area. Companion volumes provide a description of the physical characteristics the geochemistry, and the aquatic animals present in Youngs Bay and adjacent ecosystems. An introductory volume provides general information and maps of the area, and summarizes the conclusions of all four studies. The data from the two phases of the experimental program are included in this report: lethal studies on the effects of selected levels of fluoride and sulfur dioxide on the survival rate of eleven Youngs Bay faunal species from four phyla, and sublethal studies on the effects of fluoride and sulfur dioxide on the rate of primary production of phytoplankton. 44 refs., 18 figs., 38 tabs.

  4. Xenon preconditioning: molecular mechanisms and biological effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Wenwu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Xenon is one of noble gases and has been recognized as an anesthetic for more than 50 years. Xenon possesses many of the characteristics of an ideal anesthetic, but it is not widely applied in clinical practice mainly because of its high cost. In recent years, numerous studies have demonstrated that xenon as an anesthetic can exert neuroprotective and cardioprotective effects in different models. Moreover, xenon has been applied in the preconditioning, and the neuroprotective and cardioprotective effects of xenon preconditioning have been investigated in a lot of studies in which some mechanisms related to these protections are proposed. In this review, we summarized these mechanisms and the biological effects of xenon preconditioning.

  5. Application of TSH bioindicator for studying the biological efficiency of neutrons from californium-252 source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cebulska-Wasilewska, A.; Rekas, K. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland); Kim, J.K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    The effectiveness of neutrons from a Californium-252 source in the induction of various abnormalities in the Tradescantia clone 4430 stamen hair cells (TSH-assay) was studied. The special attention was paid to check whether any enhancement in effects caused by process of boron neutron capture is visible in the cells enriched with boron ions. Two chemicals (borax and BSH) were applied to introduce boron-10 ions into cells. Inflorescence, normal or pretreated with chemicals containing boron, were irradiated in the air with neutrons from a Cf-252 source at KAERI, Taejon, Korea. To estimate the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) in the induction of gene mutations of the neutron beam under the study, Tradescantia inflorescences, without any chemical pretreatment, were irradiated with various doses of X-rays. The ranges of radiation doses used were 0-0.1 Gy in neutrons and 0-0.5 Gy in X-rays. After the time needed to complete the postirradiation repair Tradescantia cuttings were transferred to Cracow, where screening of gene and lethal; mutations, cell cycle alterations in somatic cells have been done, and dose response relationships were figured. The maximal RBE values were estimated in the range of 4.6-6.8. Alterations of RBE value were observed; from 6.8 to 7.8 in the case of plants pretreated with 240 ppm of B-10 from borax, and 4.6 to 6.1 in the case of 400 ppm of B-10 from BSH. Results showed a slight, although statistically insignificant increase in biological efficacy of radiation from the Cf-252 source in samples pretreated with boron containing chemicals. (author)

  6. Application of TSH bioindicator for studying the biological efficiency of neutrons from californium-252 source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cebulska-Wasilewska, A.; Rekas, K. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland); Kim, J.K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    The effectiveness of neutrons from a Californium-252 source in the induction of various abnormalities in the Tradescantia clone 4430 stamen hair cells (TSH-assay) was studied. The special attention was paid to check whether any enhancement in effects caused by process of boron neutron capture is visible in the cells enriched with boron ions. Two chemicals (borax and BSH) were applied to introduce boron-10 ions into cells. Inflorescence, normal or pretreated with chemicals containing boron, were irradiated in the air with neutrons from a Cf-252 source at KAERI, Taejon, Korea. To estimate the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) in the induction of gene mutations of the neutron beam under the study, Tradescantia inflorescences, without any chemical pretreatment, were irradiated with various doses of X-rays. The ranges of radiation doses used were 0-0.1 Gy in neutrons and 0-0.5 Gy in X-rays. After the time needed to complete the postirradiation repair Tradescantia cuttings were transferred to Cracow, where screening of gene and lethal; mutations, cell cycle alterations in somatic cells have been done, and dose response relationships were figured. The maximal RBE values were estimated in the range of 4.6-6.8. Alterations of RBE value were observed; from 6.8 to 7.8 in the case of plants pretreated with 240 ppm of B-10 from borax, and 4.6 to 6.1 in the case of 400 ppm of B-10 from BSH. Results showed a slight, although statistically insignificant increase in biological efficacy of radiation from the Cf-252 source in samples pretreated with boron containing chemicals. (author)

  7. The Biological Effectiveness of Different Radiation Qualities for the Induction of Chromosome Damage in Human Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, M.; George, Kerry; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations were measured in human peripheral blood lymphocytes after in vitro exposure to Si-28-ions with energies ranging from 90 to 600 MeV/u, Ti-48-ions with energies ranging from 240 to 1000 MeV/u, or to Fe-56-ions with energies ranging from 200 to 5,000 MeV/u. The LET of the various Si beams in this study ranged from 48 to 158 keV/ m, the LET of the Ti ions ranged from 107 to 240 keV/micron, and the LET of the Fe-ions ranged from 145 to 440 keV/ m. Doses delivered were in the 10- to 200-cGy range. Dose-response curves for chromosome exchanges in cells at first division after exposure, measured using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole-chromosome probes, were fitted with linear or linear-quadratic functions. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) was estimated from the initial slope of the dose-response curve for chromosome damage with respect to gamma-rays. The estimates of RBEmax values for total chromosome exchanges ranged from 4.4+/-0.4 to 31.5+/-2.6 for Fe ions, 21.4+/-1.7 to 28.3+/-2.4 for Ti ions, and 11.8+/-1.0 to 42.2+/-3.3 for Si ions. The highest RBEmax value for Fe ions was obtained with the 600 MeV/u beam, the highest RBEmax value for Ti ions was obtained 1000 MeV/u beam, and the highest RBEmax value for Si ions was obtained with the 170 MeV/u beam. For Si and Fe ions the RBEmax values increased with LET, reaching a maximum at about 180 keV/micron for Fe and about 100 keV/micron for Si, and decreasing with further increase in LET. Additional studies for low doses Si-28-ions down to 0.02 Gy will be discussed.

  8. Extension of TOPAS for the simulation of proton radiation effects considering molecular and cellular endpoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polster, Lisa; Schuemann, Jan; Rinaldi, Ilaria; Burigo, Lucas; McNamara, Aimee L.; Stewart, Robert D.; Attili, Andrea; Carlson, David J.; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Ramos Méndez, José; Faddegon, Bruce; Perl, Joseph; Paganetti, Harald

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this work is to extend a widely used proton Monte Carlo tool, TOPAS, towards the modeling of relative biological effect (RBE) distributions in experimental arrangements as well as patients. TOPAS provides a software core which users configure by writing parameter files to, for instance, define application specific geometries and scoring conditions. Expert users may further extend TOPAS scoring capabilities by plugging in their own additional C++ code. This structure was utilized for the implementation of eight biophysical models suited to calculate proton RBE. As far as physics parameters are concerned, four of these models are based on the proton linear energy transfer, while the others are based on DNA double strand break induction and the frequency-mean specific energy, lineal energy, or delta electron generated track structure. The biological input parameters for all models are typically inferred from fits of the models to radiobiological experiments. The model structures have been implemented in a coherent way within the TOPAS architecture. Their performance was validated against measured experimental data on proton RBE in a spread-out Bragg peak using V79 Chinese Hamster cells. This work is an important step in bringing biologically optimized treatment planning for proton therapy closer to the clinical practice as it will allow researchers to refine and compare pre-defined as well as user-defined models.

  9. Biological effects of space radiation and development of effective countermeasures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann R.

    2014-04-01

    As part of a program to assess the adverse biological effects expected from astronauts' exposure to space radiation, numerous different biological effects relating to astronauts' health have been evaluated. There has been major focus recently on the assessment of risks related to exposure to solar particle event (SPE) radiation. The effects related to various types of space radiation exposure that have been evaluated are: gene expression changes (primarily associated with programmed cell death and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling), oxidative stress, gastrointestinal tract bacterial translocation and immune system activation, peripheral hematopoietic cell counts, emesis, blood coagulation, skin, behavior/fatigue (including social exploration, submaximal exercise treadmill and spontaneous locomotor activity), heart functions, alterations in biological endpoints related to astronauts' vision problems (lumbar puncture/intracranial pressure, ocular ultrasound and histopathology studies), and survival, as well as long-term effects such as cancer and cataract development. A number of different countermeasures have been identified that can potentially mitigate or prevent the adverse biological effects resulting from exposure to space radiation.

  10. The biologically effective dose in inhalation nanotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Ken; Schinwald, Anja; Murphy, Fiona; Cho, Wan-Seob; Duffin, Rodger; Tran, Lang; Poland, Craig

    2013-03-19

    In all branches of toxicology, the biologically effective dose (BED) is the fraction of the total dose of a toxin that actually drives any toxic effect. Knowledge of the BED has a number of applications including in building structure-activity relationships, the selection of metrics, the design of safe particles, and the determination of when a nanoparticle (NP) can be considered to be "new" for regulatory purposes. In particle toxicology, we define the BED as "the entity within any dose of particles in tissue that drives a critical pathophysiogically relevant form of toxicity (e.g., oxidative stress, inflammation, genotoxicity, or proliferation) or a process that leads to it." In conventional chemical toxicology, researchers generally use the mass as the metric to describe dose (such as mass per unit tissue or cells in culture) because of its convenience. Concentration, calculated from mass, may also figure in any description of dose. In the case of a nanoparticle dose, researchers use either the mass or the surface area. The mass of nanoparticles is not the only driver of their activity: the surfaces of insoluble particles interact with biological systems, and soluble nanoparticles can release factors that interact with these systems. Nanoparticle shape can modify activity. In this Account, we describe the current knowledge of the BED as it pertains to different NP types. Soluble toxins released by NPs represent one potential indicator of BED for wholly or partially soluble NPs composed of copper or zinc. Rapid dissolution of these NPs into their toxic ions in the acidic environment of the macrophage phagolysosome causes those ions to accumulate, which leads to lysosome destabilization and inflammation. In contrast, soluble NPs that release low toxicity ions, such as magnesium oxide NPs, are not inflammogenic. For insoluble NPs, ζ potential can serve as a BED measurement because the exposure of the particle surface to the acidic milieu of the phagolysosome and

  11. Cell Biology of Thiazide Bone Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamba, Gerardo; Riccardi, Daniela

    2008-09-01

    The thiazide-sensitive Na+:Cl- cotransporter (NCC) is the major pathway for salt reabsorption in the mammalian kidney. The activity of NCC is not only related to salt metabolism, but also to calcium and magnesium homeostasis due to the inverse relationship between NCC activity and calcium reabsorption. Hence, the thiazide-type diuretics that specifically block NCC have been used for years, not only for treatment of hypertension and edematous disease, but also for the management of renal stone disease. Epidemiological studies have shown that chronic thiazide treatment is associated with higher bone mineral density and reduced risk of bone fractures, which can only partly be explained in terms of their effects on the kidney. In this regard, we have recently shown that NCC is expressed in bone cells and that inhibition of NCC in bone, either by thiazides or by reduction of NCC protein with specific siRNA, is associated with increased mineralization in vitro. These observations open a field of study to begin to understand the cell biology of the beneficial effects of thiazides in bone.

  12. What Makes Biology Learning Difficult and Effective: Students' Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimer, Atilla

    2012-01-01

    The present study aims to determine the biological topics that students have difficulties learning, the reasons why secondary school students have difficulties in learning biology, and ways to improve the effectiveness of students' biology learning. For these purposes, a self-administered questionnaire including three open-ended questions was…

  13. Disruption of Rb/E2F pathway results in increased cyclooxygenase-2 expression and activity in prostate epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Joanne N; McCabe, Michael T; Hayward, Simon W; Park, John M; Day, Mark L

    2005-05-01

    The loss of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene (RB) is common in many human cancers, including prostate. We previously reported that engineered deletion of RB in prostate epithelial cells results in sustained cell growth in serum-free media, a predisposition to develop hyperplasia and dysplasia in prostate tissue recombinant grafts, and sensitization to hormonal carcinogenesis. Examining the molecular consequence of RB loss in this system, we show that cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is significantly up-regulated following RB deletion in prostate tissue recombinants. To study the effect of RB deletion on COX-2 regulation, we generated wild-type (PrE) and Rb-/- (Rb-/-PrE) prostate epithelial cell lines rescued by tissue recombination. We show elevated COX-2 mRNA and protein expression in Rb-/-PrE cell lines with increased prostaglandin synthesis. We also find that loss of Rb leads to deregulated E2F activity, with increased expression of E2F target genes, and that exogenous expression of E2F1 results in elevated COX-2 mRNA and protein levels. COX-2 promoter studies reveal that E2F1 transcriptionally activates COX-2, which is dependent on the transactivation and DNA-binding domains of E2F1. Further analysis revealed that the E2F1 target gene, c-myb, is elevated in Rb-/-PrE cells and E2F1-overexpressing cells, whereas ectopic overexpression of c-myb activates the COX-2 promoter in prostate epithelial cells. Additionally, cotransfection with E2F1 and a dominant-negative c-myb inhibited E2F1 activation of the COX-2 promoter. Taken together, these results suggest activation of a transcriptional cascade by which E2F1 regulates COX-2 expression through the c-myb oncogene. This study reports a novel finding describing that deregulation of the Rb/E2F complex results in increased COX-2 expression and activity.

  14. Biologically based multistage modeling of radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Hazelton; Suresh Moolgavkar; E. Georg Luebeck

    2005-08-30

    This past year we have made substantial progress in modeling the contribution of homeostatic regulation to low-dose radiation effects and carcinogenesis. We have worked to refine and apply our multistage carcinogenesis models to explicitly incorporate cell cycle states, simple and complex damage, checkpoint delay, slow and fast repair, differentiation, and apoptosis to study the effects of low-dose ionizing radiation in mouse intestinal crypts, as well as in other tissues. We have one paper accepted for publication in ''Advances in Space Research'', and another manuscript in preparation describing this work. I also wrote a chapter describing our combined cell-cycle and multistage carcinogenesis model that will be published in a book on stochastic carcinogenesis models edited by Wei-Yuan Tan. In addition, we organized and held a workshop on ''Biologically Based Modeling of Human Health Effects of Low dose Ionizing Radiation'', July 28-29, 2005 at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington. We had over 20 participants, including Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff as keynote speaker, talks by most of the low-dose modelers in the DOE low-dose program, experimentalists including Les Redpath (and Mary Helen), Noelle Metting from DOE, and Tony Brooks. It appears that homeostatic regulation may be central to understanding low-dose radiation phenomena. The primary effects of ionizing radiation (IR) are cell killing, delayed cell cycling, and induction of mutations. However, homeostatic regulation causes cells that are killed or damaged by IR to eventually be replaced. Cells with an initiating mutation may have a replacement advantage, leading to clonal expansion of these initiated cells. Thus we have focused particularly on modeling effects that disturb homeostatic regulation as early steps in the carcinogenic process. There are two primary considerations that support our focus on homeostatic regulation. First, a number of

  15. Biological Effects on the Source of Geoneutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep, Norman H.; Bird, Dennis K.; Rosing, Minik T.

    2013-11-01

    Detection of antineutrinos from U and Th series decay within the Earth (geoneutrinos) constrains the absolute abundance of these elements. Marine detectors will measure the ratio over the mantle beneath the site and provide spatial averaging. The measured mantle Th/U may well be significantly below its bulk earth value of 4; Pb isotope measurements on mantle-derived rocks yield low Th/U values, effectively averaged over geological time. The physics of the modern biological process is complicated, but the net effect is that much of the U in the mantle comes from subducted marine sediments and subducted upper oceanic crust. That is, U subducts preferentially relative to Th. Oxygen ultimately from photosynthesis oxidizes U(IV) to U(VI), which is soluble during weathering and sediment transport. Dissolved U(VI) reacts with FeO in the oceanic crust and organic carbon within sediments to become immobile U(IV). These deep marine rocks are preferentially subducted relative to Th(IV)-bearing continental margin rocks. Ferric iron from anoxygenic photosynthesis and oxygen in local oases likely mobilized some U during the Archean Era when there was very little O2 in the air. Conversely, these elements behave similarly in the absence of life, where the elements occur as U(IV) and Th(IV), which do not significantly fractionate during igneous processes. Neither do they fractionate during weathering, as they are essentially insoluble in water in surface environments. Th(IV) and U(IV) remain in solid clay-sized material. Overall, geoneutrino data constrain the masses of mantle chemical and isotopic domains recognized by studies of mantle-derived rocks and show the extent of recycling into the mantle over geological time.

  16. Effects of biological sex on the pathophysiology of the heart

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fazal, Loubina; Azibani, Feriel; Vodovar, Nicolas; Cohen Solal, Alain; Delcayre, Claude; Samuel, Jane‐Lise

    2014-01-01

    .... While the effects of biological sex on cardiovascular pathophysiology have long been known, the sex-specific mechanisms mediating these processes have been further elucidated over recent years...

  17. Effects of fractionated doses of fast neutrons or photons on the canine brain: evaluation by computerized tomography and evoked response recording

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, E.W.; Davis, D.O.; Gaskill, J.W.; Deye, J.A.; Fisher, M.P.; Sloan, G.E.; Rogers, C.C.

    1980-12-01

    The use of fast neutrons in the treatment of cancer necessitates a knowledge of the normal tissue responses. This study was designed to compare the late effects of fractionated doses of fast neutrons with fractionated doses of photons on canine brains by evoked response recording and viewing computerized tomograms (CT). A relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 4 was obtained for normal brain tissue assessed by mortality and onset of neurologic symptoms. Every three months post-irradiation, visual and sensory evoked responses were recorded. Changes over time appeared to be minimal; however, computerized tomographs showed marked brain shrinkage. A method of quantitating cerebrospinal fluid and parenchymal volumes from scans is described and future use of these CT ratios to generate dose response curves and RBE values is postulated.

  18. SIX2 Effects on Wilms Tumor Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janene Pierce

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Wilms tumor (WT blastema retains gene expression profiles characteristic of the multipotent nephron progenitor pool, or cap mesenchyme (CM, in the developing kidney. As a result, WT blastema and the CM are believed to represent contextual analogues of one another. Sine oculis homeobox 2 (SIX2 is a transcription factor expressed specifically in the CM, provides a critical mechanism for CM self-renewal, and remains persistently active in WT blastema, although its purpose in this childhood malignancy remains unclear. We hypothesized that SIX2, analogous to its function in development, confers a survival pathway to blastema, the putative WT stem cell. To test its functional significance in WT biology, wild-type SIX2 was overexpressed in the human WT cell line, WiT49. After validating this model, SIX2 effects on anchorage-independent growth, proliferation, invasiveness, canonical WNT pathway signaling, and gene expression of specific WNT pathway participants were evaluated. Relative to controls, WiT49 cells overexpressing SIX2 showed significantly enhanced anchorage-independent growth and early-passage proliferation representing surrogates of cell survival. Interestingly, overexpression of SIX2 generally repressed TCF/LEF-dependent canonical WNT signaling, which activates and coordinates both differentiation and stem pathways, but significantly heightened canonical WNT signaling through the survivin promoter, a mechanism that exclusively maintains the stem state. In summary, when overexpressed in a human WT cell line, SIX2 enhances cell survival and appears to shift the balance in WNT/β-catenin signaling away from a differentiation path and toward a stem cell survival path.

  19. Effects of Individualized Assignments on Biology Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Philip L.

    1983-01-01

    Compared detailed (favoring field dependence and induction) and nondetailed (favoring field dependence and deduction) assignments on biology achievement of grade 10 male students (N=95) over a seven-month period. Detailed assignments, employing pictorial and verbal block diagrams and high structure, significantly enhanced learning among some…

  20. The Biological Effects of Nonionizing Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-29

    surrounding C-12-81 normal tissues. According to N.W. Bleehan, this was the method used by Hippocrates , with the aid of a hot iron. Hippocrates , by the way, is...temporal pattern of desired increases of tempera - ture in the body; (2) the biological consequences of doing this must be established and evaluated

  1. Technology Rich Biology Labs: Effects of Misconceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuech, Robert; Zogg, Gregory; Zeeman, Stephan; Johnson, Mark

    This paper describes a study conducted on the lab sections of the general biology course for non-science majors at the University of New England, and reports findings of student misconceptions about photosynthesis and the mass/carbon uptake during plant growth. The current study placed high technology analytic tools in the hands of introductory…

  2. In vitro evaluation of {sup 213}Bi-rituximab versus external gamma irradiation for the treatment of B-CLL patients: relative biological efficacy with respect to apoptosis induction and chromosomal damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandenbulcke, Katia; Lahorte, Christophe; Slegers, Guido [Department of Radiopharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ghent University, Harelbekestraat 72, 9000, Gent (Belgium); De Vos, Filip; Dierckx, Rudi A. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Ghent University Hospital (Belgium); Offner, Fritz [Department of Hematology, Ghent University Hospital (Belgium); Philippe, Jan [Department of Clinical Chemistry, Ghent University Hospital (Belgium); Apostolidis, Christos; Molinet, Roger; Nikula, Tuomo K. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Karlsruhe (Germany); Bacher, Klaus; De Gelder, Virginie; Vral, Anne; Thierens, Hubert [Department of Anatomy, Embryology, Histology and Medical Physics, Ghent University (Belgium)

    2003-10-01

    External source radiotherapy and beta radioimmunotherapy (RIT) are effective treatments for lymphoid malignancies. The development of RIT with alpha emitters is attractive because of the high linear energy transfer (LET) and short path length, allowing higher tumour cell kill and lower toxicity to healthy tissues. We assessed the relative biological efficacy (RBE) of alpha RIT (in vitro) compared to external gamma irradiation with respect to induction of apoptosis in B chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL) and induction of chromosomal damage in healthy donor B and T lymphocytes. The latter was measured by a micronucleus assay. {sup 213}Bi was eluted from a {sup 225}Ac generator and conjugated to CD20 antibody (rituximab) with CHX-A''-DTPA as a chelator. B-CLL cells from five patients were cultured for 24 h in RPMI/10% FCS while exposed to {sup 213}Bi conjugated to CD20 antibody or after external {sup 60}Co gamma irradiation. Binding assays were performed in samples of all patients to calculate the total absorbed dose. Apoptosis was scored by flow cytometric analyses of the cells stained with annexin V-FITC and 7-AAD. Apoptosis was expressed as % excess over spontaneous apoptosis in control. Full dose range experiments demonstrated {sup 213}Bi-conjugated CD20 antibody to be more effective than equivalent doses of external gamma irradiation, but showed that similar plateau values were reached at 10 Gy. The RBE for induction of apoptosis in B-CLL was 2 between 1.5 and 7 Gy. The micronucleus yield in lymphocytes of healthy volunteers was measured to assess the late toxicity caused by induction of chromosomal instability. While gamma radiation induced a steady increase in micronucleus yields in B and T cells, the damage induced by {sup 213}Bi was more dramatic, with RBE ranging from 5 to 2 between 0.1 Gy and 2 Gy respectively. In contrast to gamma irradiation, {sup 213}Bi inhibited mitogen-stimulated mitosis almost completely at 2 Gy. In conclusion, high

  3. Non-Thermal Effects Mobile Phones at Biological Objects

    OpenAIRE

    Ladislav Balogh

    2003-01-01

    The article deals with non-thermal effects of mobile phones on biological objects. Even though these effects are observed for longer period, there are not so far unequivocal results on obtained biological and biophysical results in this field. Biologicaleffects of electromagnetic field (EMF) depend on its character, its duration as well as on features of organism. As the receptors offield are not known (e.g. inputs of EMF into organism), its effects are judged only by non-specific reaction of...

  4. Topical Day on Biological Effects of Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baatout, S.; Jacquet, P.

    1997-05-15

    The topical day has been focussed on the potential effects of ionizing radiation on human health. A general overview on molecular and biophysical aspects of radiation, its effects on cells and organisms, and the contribution of radiobiology to radiation protection and risk assessment is given. The genetic effects of radiation and its effects on the developing organism, the effects of radiation on the cell cycle and the mechanisms of radiation induced apoptosis were also discussed.

  5. EUD-based biological optimization for carbon ion therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brüningk, Sarah C., E-mail: sarah.brueningk@icr.ac.uk; Kamp, Florian; Wilkens, Jan J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Technische Universität München, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Ismaninger Str. 22, München 81675, Germany and Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Str. 1, Garching 85748 (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Treatment planning for carbon ion therapy requires an accurate modeling of the biological response of each tissue to estimate the clinical outcome of a treatment. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) accounts for this biological response on a cellular level but does not refer to the actual impact on the organ as a whole. For photon therapy, the concept of equivalent uniform dose (EUD) represents a simple model to take the organ response into account, yet so far no formulation of EUD has been reported that is suitable to carbon ion therapy. The authors introduce the concept of an equivalent uniform effect (EUE) that is directly applicable to both ion and photon therapies and exemplarily implemented it as a basis for biological treatment plan optimization for carbon ion therapy. Methods: In addition to a classical EUD concept, which calculates a generalized mean over the RBE-weighted dose distribution, the authors propose the EUE to simplify the optimization process of carbon ion therapy plans. The EUE is defined as the biologically equivalent uniform effect that yields the same probability of injury as the inhomogeneous effect distribution in an organ. Its mathematical formulation is based on the generalized mean effect using an effect-volume parameter to account for different organ architectures and is thus independent of a reference radiation. For both EUD concepts, quadratic and logistic objective functions are implemented into a research treatment planning system. A flexible implementation allows choosing for each structure between biological effect constraints per voxel and EUD constraints per structure. Exemplary treatment plans are calculated for a head-and-neck patient for multiple combinations of objective functions and optimization parameters. Results: Treatment plans optimized using an EUE-based objective function were comparable to those optimized with an RBE-weighted EUD-based approach. In agreement with previous results from photon

  6. Critical appraisal: dental amalgam update--part II: biological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Michael J; Swift, Edward J

    2013-12-01

    Dental amalgam restorations have been controversial for over 150 years. In Part I of this Critical Appraisal, the clinical efficacy of dental amalgam was updated. Here in Part II, the biological effects of dental amalgam are addressed.

  7. Iron diminishes the in vitro biological effect of vanadium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanistic pathways underlying inflammatory injury following exposures to vanadium-containing compounds are not defined. We tested the postulate that the in vitro biological effect of vanadium results from its impact on iron homeostasis. Human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells ex...

  8. Effect of grain splitting on biology and development of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of grain splitting on biology and development of Callosobruchus Maculatus ... Data on oviposition, adult eclosion and weights of emergent adults were ... for C. maculatus at F1, F2 and F3 generations on spilt compared to whole grains.

  9. Some Biological Effects Of Ditching Tidewater Marshes Research Report 19

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Studies conducted over a 12-year period, 1935-47, of the biological effects of ditching tidewater marshes in Delaware for mosquito control showed that marked...

  10. Distinguishing between "function" and "effect" in genome biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolittle, W Ford; Brunet, Tyler D P; Linquist, Stefan; Gregory, T Ryan

    2014-05-09

    Much confusion in genome biology results from conflation of possible meanings of the word "function." We suggest that, in this connection, attention should be paid to evolutionary biologists and philosophers who have previously dealt with this problem. We need only decide that although all genomic structures have effects, only some of them should be said to have functions. Although it will very often be difficult or impossible to establish function (strictly defined), it should not automatically be assumed. We enjoin genomicists in particular to pay greater attention to parsing biological effects. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  11. Biological effects of exposure to magnetic resonance imaging: an overview

    OpenAIRE

    Formica Domenico; Silvestri Sergio

    2004-01-01

    Abstract The literature on biological effects of magnetic and electromagnetic fields commonly utilized in magnetic resonance imaging systems is surveyed here. After an introduction on the basic principles of magnetic resonance imaging and the electric and magnetic properties of biological tissues, the basic phenomena to understand the bio-effects are described in classical terms. Values of field strengths and frequencies commonly utilized in these diagnostic systems are reported in order to a...

  12. Hormesis [Biological Effects of Low Level Exposures (Belle)] and Dermatology

    OpenAIRE

    Thong, Haw-Yueh; Maibach, Howard I.

    2008-01-01

    Hormesis, or biological effects of low level exposures (BELLE), is characterized by nonmonotonic dose response which is biphasic, displaying opposite effects at low and high dose. Its occurrence has been documented across a broad range of biological models and diverse type of exposure. Since hormesis appears to be a relatively common phenomenon in many areas, the objective of this review is to explore its occurrence related to dermatology and its public health and risk assessment implication....

  13. Biological Effects of the Great Oxidation Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopf, J.

    2012-12-01

    Fossil evidence of photoautotrophy, documented in Precambrian sediments by stromatolites, stromatolitic microfossils, and carbon isotopic data consistent with autotrophic CO2-fixation, extends to ~3,500 Ma. Such data, however, are insufficient to establish the time of origin of O2-producing (cyanobacterial) photosynthesis from its anoxygenic, photosynthetic bacterial, evolutionary precursor. The oldest (Paleoarchean) stromatolites may have been formed by anoxygenic photoautotrophs, rather than the cyanobacteria that dominate Proterozoic and modern stromatolites. Unlike the cyanobacteria of Proterozoic microbial assemblages, the filamentous and coccoidal microfossils of Archean deposits may represent remnants of non-O2-producing prokaryotes. And although the chemistry of Archean organic matter shows it to be biogenic, its carbon isotopic composition is insufficient to differentiate between oxygenic and anoxygenic sources. Though it is well established that Earth's ecosystem has been based on autotrophy since its early stages and that O2-producing photosynthesis evolved earlier, perhaps much earlier, than the increase of atmospheric oxygen in the ~2,450 and ~2,320 Ma Great Oxidation Event (GOE), the time of origin of oxygenic photoautotrophy has yet to be established. Recent findings suggest that Earth's ecosystem responded more or less immediately to the GOE. The increase of atmospheric oxygen markedly affected ocean water chemistry, most notably by increasing the availability of biologically usable oxygen (which enabled the development of obligate aerobes, such as eukaryotes), and of nitrate, sulfate and hydrogen sulfide (the increase of H2S being a result of microbial reduction of sulfate), the three reactants that power the anaerobic basis of sulfur-cycling microbial sulfuretums. Fossil evidence of the earliest eukaryotes (widely accepted to date from ~1800 Ma and, arguably, ~2200 Ma) fit this scenario, but the most telling example of life's response to the GOE

  14. A comparison of the relative biological effectiveness of low energy electronic brachytherapy sources in breast tissue: a Monte Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Shane A.; Reniers, Brigitte; de Jong, Evelyn E. C.; Rusch, Thomas; Verhaegen, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Electronic brachytherapy sources use low energy photons to treat the tumor bed during or after breast-conserving surgery. The relative biological effectiveness of two electronic brachytherapy sources was explored to determine if spectral differences due to source design influenced radiation quality and if radiation quality decreased with distance in the breast. The RBE was calculated through the number of DNA double strand breaks (RBEDSB) using the Monte Carlo damage simulator (MCDS) in combination with other Monte Carlo electron/photon spectrum calculations. 50kVp photons from the Intrabeam (Carl Zeiss Surgical) and Axxent (Xoft) through 40-mm spherical applicators were simulated to account for applicator and tissue attenuation in a variety of breast tissue compositions. 40kVp Axxent photons were also simulated. Secondary electrons (known to be responsible for most DNA damage) spectra at different distance were inputted into MCDS to calculate the RBEDSB. All RBEDSB used a cobalt-60 reference. RBEDSB data was combined with corresponding average photon spectrum energy for the Axxent and applied to model-based average photon energy distributions to produce an RBEDSB map of an accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) patient. Both Axxent and Intrabeam 50kVp spectra were shown to have a comparable RBEDSB of between 1.4 and 1.6 at all distances in spite of progressive beam hardening. The Axxent 40kVp also demonstrated a similar RBEDSB at distances. Most RBEDSB variability was dependent on the tissue type as was seen in rib (RBEDSB  ≈  1.4), gland (≈1.55), adipose (≈1.59), skin (≈1.52) and lung (≈1.50). RBEDSB variability between both sources was within 2%. A correlation was shown between RBEDSB and average photon energy and used to produce an RBEDSB map of a dose distribution in an APBI patient dataset. Radiation quality is very similar between electronic brachytherapy sources studied. No significant reductions in RBEDSB were observed with

  15. Biological effects of fruit and vegetables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, L. O.; Krath, B.; Ravn-Haren, Gitte

    2006-01-01

    , enzyme inducers, apoptosis inducers etc. In human intervention studies the dose levels achieved tend to be lower than the levels found to be effective in animals and sampling from target organs is often not possible. A controlled dietary human intervention study was performed with forty-three volunteers...... and vegetables tends to increase the stability of lipids towards oxidative damage. Markers of oxidative enzymes indicate a steady increase in glutathione peroxidase (GPX1) activity in erythrocytes during intervention with fruit and vegetables but there is no effect on GPX1 transcription levels in leucocytes....... No change occurs in glutathione-conjugating or -reducing enzyme activities in erythrocytes or plasma, and there are no effects on the transcription of genes involved in phase 2 enzyme induction or DNA repair in leucocytes. Fruit and vegetable intake decreases the level of total cholesterol and LDL...

  16. Biological and therapeutical effects of Radon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deetjen, P. [Institute of Physiologie and Balneologie, University of Innsbruck (Austria)

    1998-12-31

    In spas with a somewhat elevated Radon{sup 222} (Rn) activity (between 300 and 3000 Bq/l), the empirical medicine ended - in all parts of the world - with the same list of indications. It mainly includes the more painful rheumatic diseases such as deformation or degeneration of the joints and non bacterial inflammation of muscles, tendons or joints; Morbus Bechterew and other diseases of the vertebral column like spondylosis, spondylarthrosis or osteochondrosis. While informer times these effects were seldom documented in an objective manner, in recent years several prospective randomized double-blind studies proved the pain reducing efficacy of Radon therapy in patients with cervical pain syndromes, with chronic polyarthritis or with Morbus Bechterew. Studies in experimental animal models have accumulated remarkable data in organs, tissue and cultured cells that provide a rationale to explain the observed effects of Radon therapy in patients. (author)

  17. Palytoxin and Analogs: Biological and Ecological Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vítor Ramos

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Palytoxin (PTX is a potent marine toxin that was originally found in soft corals from tropical areas of the Pacific Ocean. Soon after, its occurrence was observed in numerous other marine organisms from the same ecological region. More recently, several analogs of PTX were discovered, remarkably all from species of the dinoflagellate genus Ostreopsis. Since these dinoflagellates are also found in other tropical and even in temperate regions, the formerly unsuspected broad distribution of these toxins was revealed. Toxicological studies with these compounds shows repeatedly low LD50 values in different mammals, revealing an acute toxic effect on several organs, as demonstrated by different routes of exposure. Bioassays tested for some marine invertebrates and evidences from environmental populations exposed to the toxins also give indications of the high impact that these compounds may have on natural food webs. The recognition of its wide distribution coupled with the poisoning effects that these toxins can have on animals and especially on humans have concerned the scientific community. In this paper, we review the current knowledge on the effects of PTX and its analogs on different organisms, exposing the impact that these toxins may have in coastal ecosystems.

  18. Biological effects of stellar collapse neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Collar, J I

    1996-01-01

    Massive stars in their final stages of collapse radiate most of their binding energy in the form of MeV neutrinos. The recoil atoms that they produce in elastic scattering off nuclei in organic tissue create a radiation damage which is highly effective in the production of irreparable DNA harm, leading to cellular mutation, neoplasia and oncogenesis. Using a conventional model of the galaxy and of the collapse mechanism, the periodicity of nearby stellar collapses and the radiation dose are calculated. The possible contribution of this process to the paleontological record of mass extinctions is examined.

  19. Biological effects of fruit and vegetables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, L. O.; Krath, B.; Ravn-Haren, Gitte

    2006-01-01

    , providing 600hairspg fruit and vegetables/d or in the controls a carbohydrate-rich drink to balance energy intake. Surrogate markers of oxidative damage to DNA, protein and lipids, enzymic defence and lipid metabolism were determined in blood and urine. It was found that a high intake of fruit......, enzyme inducers, apoptosis inducers etc. In human intervention studies the dose levels achieved tend to be lower than the levels found to be effective in animals and sampling from target organs is often not possible. A controlled dietary human intervention study was performed with forty-three volunteers...

  20. Nanosilver – Harmful effects of biological activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Świdwińska-Gajewska

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanosilver, also identified as colloidal silver, has been known and used for ages to combat diseases or prolong food freshness. It usually occurs in the form of a suspension consisting of particles of size < 100 nm. Due to its specific properties, silver nanoparticles are used in many technologies to produce medical devices, textiles, conductive materials or photovoltaic cells. The growing popularity of nanosilver applications increases the number of people occupationally exposed to this substance. Potential exposure routes for silver nanoparticles are through dermal, oral and inhalation pathways. Silver nanoparticles may be absorbed through the lungs, intestine, and through the skin into circulation and thus may reach such organs as the liver, kidney, spleen, brain, heart and testes. Nanosilver may cause mild eyes and skin irritations. It can also act as a mild skin allergen. Inhalation of silver nanoparticles mainly affects the lungs and liver. It has been demonstrated that silver nanoparticles may be genotoxic to mammalian cells. There are some alarming reports on the adverse effects of silver nanoparticles on reproduction of experimental animals. Exposure to silver nanoparticles may exert a neurotoxic effect and affect cognitive functions, causing the impairment of short-term and working memory. Maximum admissible concentration (MAC for the inhalable fraction of silver of 0.05 mg/m3 is currently binding in Poland. In light of toxicological studies of silver nanoparticles it seems reasonable to update the hygiene standards for silver with nanoparticles as a separate fraction. Med Pr 2014;65(6:831–845

  1. Biologic

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffman, L H

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we explore the boundary between biology and the study of formal systems (logic). In the end, we arrive at a summary formalism, a chapter in "boundary mathematics" where there are not only containers but also extainers ><, entities open to interaction and distinguishing the space that they are not. The boundary algebra of containers and extainers is to biologic what boolean algebra is to classical logic. We show how this formalism encompasses significant parts of the logic of DNA replication, the Dirac formalism for quantum mechanics, formalisms for protein folding and the basic structure of the Temperley Lieb algebra at the foundations of topological invariants of knots and links.

  2. Electromagnetic field induced biological effects in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaszuba-Zwoińska, Jolanta; Gremba, Jerzy; Gałdzińska-Calik, Barbara; Wójcik-Piotrowicz, Karolina; Thor, Piotr J

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to artificial radio frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) has increased significantly in recent decades. Therefore, there is a growing scientific and social interest in its influence on health, even upon exposure significantly below the applicable standards. The intensity of electromagnetic radiation in human environment is increasing and currently reaches astronomical levels that had never before experienced on our planet. The most influential process of EMF impact on living organisms, is its direct tissue penetration. The current established standards of exposure to EMFs in Poland and in the rest of the world are based on the thermal effect. It is well known that weak EMF could cause all sorts of dramatic non-thermal effects in body cells, tissues and organs. The observed symptoms are hardly to assign to other environmental factors occurring simultaneously in the human environment. Although, there are still ongoing discussions on non-thermal effects of EMF influence, on May 31, 2011--International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC)--Agenda of World Health Organization (WHO) has classified radio electromagnetic fields, to a category 2B as potentially carcinogenic. Electromagnetic fields can be dangerous not only because of the risk of cancer, but also other health problems, including electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS). Electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS) is a phenomenon characterized by the appearance of symptoms after exposure of people to electromagnetic fields, generated by EHS is characterized as a syndrome with a broad spectrum of non-specific multiple organ symptoms including both acute and chronic inflammatory processes located mainly in the skin and nervous systems, as well as in respiratory, cardiovascular systems, and musculoskeletal system. WHO does not consider the EHS as a disease-- defined on the basis of medical diagnosis and symptoms associated with any known syndrome. The symptoms may be associated with a single source of EMF

  3. Biological effect of radiation on human

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yun Sil; Cho, Chul Koo; Lee, Su Jae [and others

    2000-04-01

    1. Adaptive response when 0.01 Gy was preirradiated before high challenging dose is induced in normal cell types such normal lymphocytes, primary keratinocytes, and L929 fibroblast cells but not in neoplastic cells such as L5178Y lymphoma cells, EL-4 lymphoma cells and 308 papilloma cells. 2. Heat shock protein (HSP) 25 and inducible HSP70 is responsible for the induction of adaptive response and radioresistance - cell cycle regulation, antiapoptotic molecule and PKC activation were involved. 3. Apoptosis was induced at most 5. hrs after irradiation in primary keratinocytes, in v-rasHa transformed keratinocytes, the maximum interval was 16 hrs, and in 308 papilloma cells, the maximum was 48 hrs. 4. PKC response by radiation is correlated with induction of apoptosis. 5. Rapid induction PKCdelta in primary keratinocytes and no response of PKC epsilon may involved in radiation induced apoptosis. 6. The rate of resorption was increased when radiation was given at 2.5 days after gestation. Early death including foetal death were highly expressed when radiation was given at 7.5 days after gestation. There are no difference in incidence of late death including embryonic death. 7. 2 Gy is the most effective dose in radiation induced teratogenesis in mouse model. 8. Growth retardation and small head was present when radiation was given at 5.5, 7.5, 11.5 and 15.5 days after gestation and small head showed high incidence at 11.5 days after gestation. 9. External malformation, internal malformation and skeletal malformation was induced when radiation was given at 7.5 days after gestation. 10. OGG1-mutated cells induced radiosensitive by G2/M cell cycle arrest. 11. Radiation induced G2/M phase cell cycle and correlated with radiosensitivity. 12. PKCalpha induced differentiation. 13. Radiation exposed cells showed carcinogenic effect. 14. Organ specific radiosensitivity was shown and protein expression was involved.

  4. Theory of RBE. Final report, January 1, 1967--October 31, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katz, R.

    1998-10-31

    The report begins with a historical survey of research activity. Next summaries of research accomplishments in the following areas are given: (1) Radiation Dose Distribution; (2) The 1-Hit Detector: Action Cross Sections; (3) Many Hit Detectors; (4) Biological Cells; (5) Implications for Radiation Protection; and (6) Implications for Radiation Oncology with Heavy Ion Beams.

  5. Third eye, the biological effects; 3. oeil, les effets biologiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2004-02-01

    The discovery of a third kind of photo-receptor cell in the human eye has permitted to better understand the biological effects of lighting, not only on the vision, but also on some nervous processes, like emotion, mood, stress, biological clock, etc.. This additional dimension has led the engineers of Philips Lighting company to launch a new indoor lighting concept named 'Carpe Diem'. This concept adapts both the illuminance and the color of a lighting system according to the type of work and to the expected stimulating effect. (J.S.)

  6. Biological effect of penetration controlled irradiation with ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Atsushi; Shimizu, Takashi; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Watanabe, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Yamashita, Takao

    1997-03-01

    To investigate the effect of local irradiation with ion beams on biological systems, technique for penetration controlled irradiation has been established. The range in a target was controlled by changing the distance from beam window in the atmosphere, and could be controlled linearly up to about 31 {mu}m in biological material. In addition, the effects of the penetration controlled irradiations with 1.5 MeV/u C and He ions were examined using tobacco pollen. The increased frequency of leaky pollen produced by ion beams suggests that the efficient pollen envelope damages would be induced at the range-end of ion beams. (author)

  7. Biological Effects of Laser Radiation. Volume II. Review of Our Studies on Biological Effects of Laser Radiation-1965-1971.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-10-17

    Ben Fine. 8. W.T. Ham,Jr., R.C. Williams, H.A. Mueller, Du Pont Guerry,III, A.M. Clarke and W.J. Geeraets, Effects of Laser Radiation on the Mammalian...and Applications course, Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn Graduate Center, September, 1969 35. S. Fine and E. Klein, "Biological Effects of Laser

  8. Plasma effects in electromagnetic field interaction with biological tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, R. P.; Batra, Karuna; Excell, Peter S.

    2011-02-01

    Theoretical analysis is presented of the nonlinear behavior of charge carriers in biological tissue under the influence of varying low-intensity electromagnetic (EM) field. The interaction occurs because of the nonlinear force arising due to the gradient of the EM field intensity acting on free electrons in the conduction band of proteins in metabolically active biological cell membrane receptors leading to a redistribution of charge carriers. Field dependence of the resulting dielectric constant is investigated by a suitable modification to include an additional electronic contribution term to the three-term Debye model. The exogenous EM field propagating in this nonlinear cellular medium satisfies the nonlinear Schrödinger equation and can be affected significantly. Resulting field effect can be substantially augmented and effective rectification/demodulation can occur. Possible implications of this modification on biological processes in white and grey matter are discussed.

  9. Challenges in Analyzing the Biological Effects of Resveratrol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erdogan, Cihan Süleyman; Vang, Ole

    2016-01-01

    The suggested health effects (e.g., disease prevention) of dietary bioactive compounds such as resveratrol are challenging to prove in comparison to man-made drugs developed for therapeutic purposes. Dietary bioactive compounds have multiple cellular targets and therefore have a variety of biolog...

  10. Adaptation hypothesis of biological effectiveness of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudritsky, Yu.K.; Georgievsky, A.B.; Karpov, V.I.

    1993-12-31

    The adoptation hypothesis of biological effectiveness of ionizing radiations is based on the recognition of the invariability of general biological laws for radiobiology and on the comprehension of life evolution regularities and axiomatic principles of environment and biota unity. The ionizing radiation factor is essential for life which could not exist beyond the radiation field. The possibility of future development of the adaptation hypothesis serves as a basis for it`s transformation into the theoretical foundation of radiobiology. This report discusses the aspects of the adaptation theory.

  11. Examining the nature of retrocausal effects in biology and psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossbridge, Julia

    2017-05-01

    Multiple laboratories have reported physiological and psychological changes associated with future events that are designed to be unpredictable by normal sensory means. Such phenomena seem to be examples of retrocausality at the macroscopic level. Here I will discuss the characteristics of seemingly retrocausal effects in biology and psychology, specifically examining a biological and a psychological form of precognition, predictive anticipatory activity (PAA) and implicit precognition. The aim of this examination is to offer an analysis of the constraints posed by the characteristics of macroscopic retrocausal effects. Such constraints are critical to assessing any physical theory that purports to explain these effects. Following a brief introduction to recent research on PAA and implicit precognition, I will describe what I believe we have learned so far about the nature of these effects, and conclude with a testable, yet embryonic, model of macroscopic retrocausal phenomena.

  12. RBE of quasi-monoenergetic 60 MeV neutron radiation for induction of dicentric chromosomes in human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, R; Mühlbradt, K-H; Meulders, J P; Stephan, G; Haney, M; Schmid, E

    2005-12-01

    The production of dicentric chromosomes in human lymphocytes by high-energy neutron radiation was studied using a quasi-monoenergetic 60 MeV neutron beam. The average yield coefficient [see text] of the linear dose-response relationship for dicentric chromosomes was measured to be (0.146+/-0.016) Gy-1. This confirms our earlier observations that above 400 keV, the yield of dicentric chromosomes decreases with increasing neutron energy. Using the linear-quadratic dose-response relationship for dicentric chromosomes established in blood of the same donor for 60Co gamma-rays as a reference radiation, an average maximum low-dose RBE (RBEM) of 14+/-4 for 60 MeV quasi-monoenergetic neutrons with a dose-weighted average energy [see text] of 41.0 MeV is obtained. A correction procedure was applied, to account for the low-energy continuum of the quasi-monoenergetic spectral neutron distribution, and the yield coefficient alpha for 60 MeV neutrons was determined from the measured average yield coefficient [see text]. For alpha, a value of (0.115+/-0.026) Gy-1 was obtained corresponding to an RBEM of 11+/-4. The present experiments extend earlier investigations with monoenergetic neutrons to higher energies.

  13. RBE values for colo-rectal injury after caesium 137 gamma-ray and neutron irradiation. 1. Single doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, N.H.A.; Denekamp, J.; Maughan, R.L. (Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood (UK). Gray Lab.)

    1983-04-01

    Colo-rectal damage in mice has been assessed after caesium ..gamma.. irradiation and 3 MeV neutrons given as single doses. Several assays were used, including body weight changes, faecal deformity and lethality. Dose response curves were constructed for each assay at times ranging from 10 days to 16 months after irradiation. An initial loss of weight at 10-20 days was presumably related to epithelial denudation, but a dose-dependent weight reduction (compared with controls) persisted over the animals' life span. Mice died progressively after localised pelvic ..gamma.. irradiation; there was no sharp demarcation between an early and late phase of lethal injury. Death resulted from intestinal stricture or stenosis. The time course for lethality was qualitatively different after neutron irradiation, with little progression of damage between 5 and 11 months. Faecal deformity was detectable as a higher proportion of small pellets when the rectum became constricted by fibrosis. No significant faecal deformity was observed before 6 months after which time dose response curves could be obtained. The RBE for early damage (assessed at 1-3 months) was 2.2-2.7, falling to 1.7-1.9 for late damage (determined at 10-15 months) over the range of neutron doses of 7.5-12 Gy.

  14. Effect of biologic agents on radiographic progression of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel J Tobón

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Gabriel J Tobón1, Alain Saraux1,2, Valérie Devauchelle-Pensec1,21Immunology Laboratory, Morvan Hospital, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest, France; 2Rheumatology Unit, Hôpital de la Cavale Blanche, CHU Brest, FranceAbstract: The treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA has benefited over the last few years from the introduction of biologic agents whose development was based on new insights into the immunological factors involved in the pathogenesis of RA and the development of joint damage. These biological agents have been proven effective in RA patients with inadequate responses to synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs. Preventing joint damage is now the primary goal of RA treatment, and guidelines exist for the follow-up of joint abnormalities. Most biologic agents produced high clinical and radiological response rates in patients with established or recent-onset RA. Thus, for the first time, obtaining a remission is a reasonable treatment goal in RA patients. Factors that are crucial to joint damage control are: early initiation of DMARDs, use of intensive treatments including biological agents, and close monitoring of clinical disease activity and radiographic progression. However, some patients remain unresponsive to all available treatments and continue to experience joint damage progression. A major objective now is to identify patients at high risk for severe joint damage, in order to tailor the treatment regimen to their specific needs.Keywords: rheumatoid arthritis, radiographic progression, biologics

  15. Predictive modeling of nanomaterial exposure effects in biological systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu X

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Xiong Liu,1 Kaizhi Tang,1 Stacey Harper,2 Bryan Harper,2 Jeffery A Steevens,3 Roger Xu1 1Intelligent Automation, Inc., Rockville, MD, USA; 2Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA; 3ERDC Environmental Laboratory, Vicksburg, MS, USA Background: Predictive modeling of the biological effects of nanomaterials is critical for industry and policymakers to assess the potential hazards resulting from the application of engineered nanomaterials. Methods: We generated an experimental dataset on the toxic effects experienced by embryonic zebrafish due to exposure to nanomaterials. Several nanomaterials were studied, such as metal nanoparticles, dendrimer, metal oxide, and polymeric materials. The embryonic zebrafish metric (EZ Metric was used as a screening-level measurement representative of adverse effects. Using the dataset, we developed a data mining approach to model the toxic endpoints and the overall biological impact of nanomaterials. Data mining techniques, such as numerical prediction, can assist analysts in developing risk assessment models for nanomaterials. Results: We found several important attributes that contribute to the 24 hours post-fertilization (hpf mortality, such as dosage concentration, shell composition, and surface charge. These findings concur with previous studies on nanomaterial toxicity using embryonic zebrafish. We conducted case studies on modeling the overall effect/impact of nanomaterials and the specific toxic endpoints such as mortality, delayed development, and morphological malformations. The results show that we can achieve high prediction accuracy for certain biological effects, such as 24 hpf mortality, 120 hpf mortality, and 120 hpf heart malformation. The results also show that the weighting scheme for individual biological effects has a significant influence on modeling the overall impact of

  16. Linking exposure to environmental pollutants with biological effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette; Autrup, Herman; Møller, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Exposure to ambient air pollution has been associated with cancer. Ambient air contains a complex mixture of toxics, including particulate matter (PM) and benzene. Carcinogenic effects of PM may relate both to the content of PAH and to oxidative DNA damage generated by transition metals, benzene......, metabolism and inflammation. By means of personal monitoring and biomarkers of internal dose, biologically effective dose and susceptibility, it should be possible to characterize individual exposure and identify air pollution sources with relevant biological effects. In a series of studies, individual...... breaks, base oxidation, 8-oxodG and PAH bulky adducts in lymphocytes, markers of oxidative stress in plasma and genotypes of glutathione transferases (GSTs) and NADPH:quinone reductase (NQO1). With respect to benzene, the main result indicates that DNA base oxidation is correlated with PMA excretion...

  17. Linking exposure to environmental pollutants with biological effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette; Autrup, Herman; Møller, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Exposure to ambient air pollution has been associated with cancer. Ambient air contains a complex mixture of toxics, including particulate matter (PM) and benzene. Carcinogenic effects of PM may relate both to the content of PAH and to oxidative DNA damage generated by transition metals, benzene......, metabolism and inflammation. By means of personal monitoring and biomarkers of internal dose, biologically effective dose and susceptibility, it should be possible to characterize individual exposure and identify air pollution sources with relevant biological effects. In a series of studies, individual....... With respect to exposure to PM, biomarkers of oxidative damage showed significant positive association with the individual exposure. Thus, 8-oxodG in lymphocyte DNA and markers of oxidative damage to lipids and protein in plasma associated with PM(2.5) exposure. Several types of DNA damage showed seasonal...

  18. Status Report for Experiment AD-4/ACE Biological Effectiveness of Antiproton Annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Holzscheiter, M H; Angelopoulos, Angelo; Bassler, Niels; Beyer, Gerd; Currell, Fred; De Marco, John; Doser, Michael; Hajdukovic, Dragan; Hartley, Oliver; Kavanagh, Joy; Iwamoto, Kei; Jäkel, Oliver; Kantemiris, Ioannis; Knudsen, Helge; Kovacevic, Sandra; McBride, Bill; Møller, Søren Pape; Overgaard, Jens; Petersen, Jørgen; Ratib, Osman; Schettino, Giuseppe; Timson, David; Singers-Sørensen, Brita; Solberg, Timothy; Vranjes, Sanja; Wouters, Brad

    2009-01-01

    Status report for experiment AD-4/ACE showing recent progress in RBE measurements for V79 Chinese Hamster cells irradiated with antiprotons. Also discussed are initial test experiments using the H2AX assay to study DNA damage to cells and initial experiments using liquid ionization chambers.

  19. Biological effects of exposure to magnetic resonance imaging: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Formica Domenico

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The literature on biological effects of magnetic and electromagnetic fields commonly utilized in magnetic resonance imaging systems is surveyed here. After an introduction on the basic principles of magnetic resonance imaging and the electric and magnetic properties of biological tissues, the basic phenomena to understand the bio-effects are described in classical terms. Values of field strengths and frequencies commonly utilized in these diagnostic systems are reported in order to allow the integration of the specific literature on the bio-effects produced by magnetic resonance systems with the vast literature concerning the bio-effects produced by electromagnetic fields. This work gives an overview of the findings about the safety concerns of exposure to static magnetic fields, radio-frequency fields, and time varying magnetic field gradients, focusing primarily on the physics of the interactions between these electromagnetic fields and biological matter. The scientific literature is summarized, integrated, and critically analyzed with the help of authoritative reviews by recognized experts, international safety guidelines are also cited.

  20. Advances in the biological effects of terahertz wave radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li; Hao, Yan-Hui; Peng, Rui-Yun

    2014-01-01

    The terahertz (THz) band lies between microwave and infrared rays in wavelength and consists of non-ionizing radiation. Both domestic and foreign research institutions, including the army, have attached considerable importance to the research and development of THz technology because this radiation exhibits both photon-like and electron-like properties, which grant it considerable application value and potential. With the rapid development of THz technology and related applications, studies of the biological effects of THz radiation have become a major focus in the field of life sciences. Research in this field has only just begun, both at home and abroad. In this paper, research progress with respect to THz radiation, including its biological effects, mechanisms and methods of protection, will be reviewed.

  1. Advances in the biological effects of terahertz wave radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zhao; Yan-Hui Hao; Rui-Yun Peng

    2014-01-01

    The terahertz (THz) band lies between microwave and infrared rays in wavelength and consists of non-ionizing radiation. Both domestic and foreign research institutions, including the army, have attached considerable importance to the research and development of THz technology because this radiation exhibits both photon-like and electron-like properties, which grant it considerable application value and potential. With the rapid development of THz technology and related applications, studies of the biological effects of THz radiation have become a major focus in the field of life sciences. Research in this field has only just begun, both at home and abroad. In this paper, research progress with respect to THz radiation, including its biological effects, mechanisms and methods of protection, will be reviewed.

  2. On Quantum Effects in a Theory of Biological Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Delgado, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    We construct a descriptive toy model that considers quantum effects on biological evolution starting from Chaitin's classical framework. There are smart evolution scenarios in which a quantum world is as favorable as classical worlds for evolution to take place. However, in more natural scenarios, the rate of evolution depends on the degree of entanglement present in quantum organisms with respect to classical organisms. If the entanglement is maximal, classical evolution turns out to be more favorable. PMID:22413059

  3. On quantum effects in a theory of biological evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Delgado, M A

    2012-01-01

    We construct a descriptive toy model that considers quantum effects on biological evolution starting from Chaitin's classical framework. There are smart evolution scenarios in which a quantum world is as favorable as classical worlds for evolution to take place. However, in more natural scenarios, the rate of evolution depends on the degree of entanglement present in quantum organisms with respect to classical organisms. If the entanglement is maximal, classical evolution turns out to be more favorable.

  4. Controlling the biological effects of spermine using a synthetic receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vial, Laurent; Ludlow, R Frederick; Leclaire, Julien; Pérez-Fernandez, Ruth; Otto, Sijbren

    2006-08-09

    Polyamines play an important role in biology, yet their exact function in many processes is poorly understood. Artificial host molecules capable of sequestering polyamines could be useful tools for studying their cellular function. However, designing synthetic receptors with affinities sufficient to compete with biological polyamine receptors remains a huge challenge. Binding affinities of synthetic hosts are typically separated by a gap of several orders of magnitude from those of biomolecules. We now report that a dynamic combinatorial selection approach can deliver a synthetic receptor that bridges this gap. The selected receptor binds spermine with a dissociation constant of 22 nM, sufficient to remove it from its natural host DNA and reverse some of the biological effects of spermine on the nucleic acid. In low concentrations, spermine induces the formation of left-handed DNA, but upon addition of our receptor, the DNA reverts back to its right-handed form. NMR studies and computer simulations suggest that the spermine complex has the form of a pseudo-rotaxane. The spermine receptor is a promising lead for the development of therapeutics or molecular probes for elucidating spermine's role in cell biology.

  5. Effect of Ceramic Scaffold Architectural Parameters on Biological Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gariboldi, Maria Isabella; Best, Serena M

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have focused on the optimization of ceramic architectures to fulfill a variety of scaffold functional requirements and improve biological response. Conventional fabrication techniques, however, do not allow for the production of geometrically controlled, reproducible structures and often fail to allow the independent variation of individual geometric parameters. Current developments in additive manufacturing technologies suggest that 3D printing will allow a more controlled and systematic exploration of scaffold architectures. This more direct translation of design into structure requires a pipeline for design-driven optimization. A theoretical framework for systematic design and evaluation of architectural parameters on biological response is presented. Four levels of architecture are considered, namely (1) surface topography, (2) pore size and geometry, (3) porous networks, and (4) macroscopic pore arrangement, including the potential for spatially varied architectures. Studies exploring the effect of various parameters within these levels are reviewed. This framework will hopefully allow uncovering of new relationships between architecture and biological response in a more systematic way as well as inform future refinement of fabrication techniques to fulfill architectural necessities with a consideration of biological implications.

  6. Effect of Ceramic Scaffold Architectural Parameters on Biological Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Isabella eGariboldi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have focused on the optimization of ceramic architectures to fulfill a variety of scaffold functional requirements and improve biological response. Conventional fabrication techniques, however, do not allow for the production of geometrically controlled, reproducible structures and often fail to allow the independent variation of individual geometric parameters. Current developments in additive manufacturing technologies suggest that 3D printing will allow a more controlled and systematic exploration of scaffold architectures. This more direct translation of design into structure requires a pipeline for design-driven optimization. A theoretical framework for systematic design and evaluation of architectural parameters on biological response is presented. Four levels of architecture are considered, namely (1 surface topography, (2 pore size and geometry, (3 porous networks and (4 macroscopic pore arrangement, including the potential for spatially varied architectures. Studies exploring the effect of various parameters within these levels are reviewed. This framework will hopefully allow uncovering of new relationships between architecture and biological response in a more systematic way, as well as inform future refinement of fabrication techniques to fulfill architectural necessities with a consideration of biological implications.

  7. Effect of pH on biological phosphorus uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serralta, J; Ferrer, J; Borrás, L; Seco, A

    2006-12-05

    An anaerobic aerobic laboratory scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was operated to study the effect of pH on enhanced biological phosphorus removal. Seven steady states were achieved under different operating conditions. In all of them, a slight variation in the pH value was observed during anaerobic phase. However, pH rose significantly during aerobic phase. The increase observed was due to phosphorus uptake and carbon dioxide stripping. When pH was higher than 8.2-8.25 the phosphorus uptake rate clearly decreased. The capability of Activated Sludge Model No. 2d (ASM2d) and Biological Nutrient Removal Model No. 1 (BNRM1) to simulate experimental results was evaluated. Both models successfully characterized the enhanced biological phosphorus removal performance of the SBR. Furthermore, BNRM1 also reproduced the pH variations observed and the decrease in the phosphorus uptake rate. This model includes a switch function in the kinetic expressions to represent the pH inhibition in biological processes. The pH inhibition constants related to polyphosphate storage process were obtained by adjusting model predictions to measured phosphorus concentrations. On the other hand, pH inhibition should be included in ASM2d to accurately simulate experimental phosphorus evolution observed in an A/O SBR.

  8. Differential superiority of heavy charged-particle irradiation to x-rays: Studies on biological effectivenes and side effect mechanisms in multicellular tumor and normal tissue models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan eWalenta

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This review is focused on the radiobiology of carbon ions compared to x-rays using multicellular models of tumors and normal mucosa. The first part summarizes basic radiobiological effects, as observed in cancer cells. The second, more clinically oriented part of the review deals with radiation-induced cell migration and mucositis.Multicellular spheroids (MCS from V79 hamster cells were irradiated with x-rays or carbon ions under ambient or restricted oxygen supply conditions. Oxygen enhancement ratios (OER were 2.9, 2.8, and 1.4 for irradiation with photons, 12C+6 in the plateau region, and 12C+6 in the Bragg peak, respectively. A relative biological effectiveness (RBE of 4.3 and 2.1 for ambient pO2 and hypoxia was obtained, respectively. The high effectiveness of carbon ions was reflected by an enhanced accumulation of cells in G2/M, and a dose-dependent massive induction of apoptosis. Clinically relevant doses (3 Gy of x-rays induced an increase in migratory activity of U87 but not of LN229 or HCT116 tumor cells. Such an increase in cell motility following irradiation in situ could be the source of recurrence. In contrast, carbon ion treatment was associated with a dose-dependent decrease in migration with all cell lines and under all conditions investigated. The radiation-induced loss of cell motility was correlated, in most cases, with corresponding changes in 1 integrin expression. Unlike with particles, the photon-induced increase in cell migration was paralleled by an elevated phosphorylation status of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and AKT-ERK1/2 pathway. Comparing the gene toxicity of x-rays with that of particles using the gamma-H2AX technique in organotypic cultures of the oral mucosa, the superior effectiveness of heavy ions was confirmed by a two-fold higher number of foci per nucleus. Pro-inflammatory signs, however, were similar for both treatment modalities, e. g., the activation of NFkappaB, and the release of IL

  9. Intuitive biological thought: Developmental changes and effects of biology education in late adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coley, John D; Arenson, Melanie; Xu, Yian; Tanner, Kimberly D

    2017-02-01

    A large body of cognitive research has shown that people intuitively and effortlessly reason about the biological world in complex and systematic ways. We addressed two questions about the nature of intuitive biological reasoning: How does intuitive biological thinking change during adolescence and early adulthood? How does increasing biology education influence intuitive biological thinking? To do so, we developed a battery of measures to systematically test three components of intuitive biological thought: anthropocentric thinking, teleological thinking and essentialist thinking, and tested 8th graders and university students (both biology majors, and non-biology majors). Results reveal clear evidence of persistent intuitive reasoning among all populations studied, consistent but surprisingly small differences between 8th graders and college students on measures of intuitive biological thought, and consistent but again surprisingly small influence of increasing biology education on intuitive biological reasoning. Results speak to the persistence of intuitive reasoning, the importance of taking intuitive knowledge into account in science classrooms, and the necessity of interdisciplinary research to advance biology education. Further studies are necessary to investigate how cultural context and continued acquisition of expertise impact intuitive biology thinking.

  10. Sulforaphane induces cell cycle arrest by protecting RB-E2F-1 complex in epithelial ovarian cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris Robert

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sulforaphane (SFN, an isothiocyanate phytochemical present predominantly in cruciferous vegetables such as brussels sprout and broccoli, is considered a promising chemo-preventive agent against cancer. In-vitro exposure to SFN appears to result in the induction of apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in a variety of tumor types. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to the inhibition of cell cycle progression by SFN are poorly understood in epithelial ovarian cancer cells (EOC. The aim of this study is to understand the signaling mechanisms through which SFN influences the cell growth and proliferation in EOC. Results SFN at concentrations of 5 - 20 μM induced a dose-dependent suppression of growth in cell lines MDAH 2774 and SkOV-3 with an IC50 of ~8 μM after a 3 day exposure. Combination treatment with chemotherapeutic agent, paclitaxel, resulted in additive growth suppression. SFN at ~8 μM decreased growth by 40% and 20% on day 1 in MDAH 2774 and SkOV-3, respectively. Cells treated with cytotoxic concentrations of SFN have reduced cell migration and increased apoptotic cell death via an increase in Bak/Bcl-2 ratio and cleavage of procaspase-9 and poly (ADP-ribose-polymerase (PARP. Gene expression profile analysis of cell cycle regulated proteins demonstrated increased levels of tumor suppressor retinoblastoma protein (RB and decreased levels of E2F-1 transcription factor. SFN treatment resulted in G1 cell cycle arrest through down modulation of RB phosphorylation and by protecting the RB-E2F-1 complex. Conclusions SFN induces growth arrest and apoptosis in EOC cells. Inhibition of retinoblastoma (RB phosphorylation and reduction in levels of free E2F-1 appear to play an important role in EOC growth arrest.

  11. Biological effects from electromagnetic field exposure and public exposure standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardell, Lennart; Sage, Cindy

    2008-02-01

    During recent years there has been increasing public concern on potential health risks from power-frequency fields (extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields; ELF) and from radiofrequency/microwave radiation emissions (RF) from wireless communications. Non-thermal (low-intensity) biological effects have not been considered for regulation of microwave exposure, although numerous scientific reports indicate such effects. The BioInitiative Report is based on an international research and public policy initiative to give an overview of what is known of biological effects that occur at low-intensity electromagnetic fields (EMFs) exposure. Health endpoints reported to be associated with ELF and/or RF include childhood leukaemia, brain tumours, genotoxic effects, neurological effects and neurodegenerative diseases, immune system deregulation, allergic and inflammatory responses, breast cancer, miscarriage and some cardiovascular effects. The BioInitiative Report concluded that a reasonable suspicion of risk exists based on clear evidence of bioeffects at environmentally relevant levels, which, with prolonged exposures may reasonably be presumed to result in health impacts. Regarding ELF a new lower public safety limit for habitable space adjacent to all new or upgraded power lines and for all other new constructions should be applied. A new lower limit should also be used for existing habitable space for children and/or women who are pregnant. A precautionary limit should be adopted for outdoor, cumulative RF exposure and for cumulative indoor RF fields with considerably lower limits than existing guidelines, see the BioInitiative Report. The current guidelines for the US and European microwave exposure from mobile phones, for the brain are 1.6 W/Kg and 2 W/Kg, respectively. Since use of mobile phones is associated with an increased risk for brain tumour after 10 years, a new biologically based guideline is warranted. Other health impacts associated with exposure to

  12. Biological effects of low level exposures to chemicals and radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calabrese, E.J. (ed.)

    1992-01-01

    In May 1990 a group of scientists representing several federal agencies, the International Society of Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology, the private sector, and academia met to develop a strategy to encourage the study of the biological effects of low level exposures (BELLE) to chemical agents and radioactivity. A workshop was held in 1991 with seven invited speakers focusing on the toxicological implications of biological adaptations. The selection of topics and speakers was designed to consider critically the concept of hormesis, not only in a broad, conceptual manner, but also at the molecular and biochemical levels. These presentations offered a complementary perspective on the diverse range of molecular mechanisms that can become activated at low levels of toxicant exposure. In addition to chemical toxicology research, an overview of current research on Effects of low-dose radiation on the immune response' was presented as well as Cellular adaptation as an important response during chemical carcinogenesis'. The final presentation was devoted to biostatistical considerations when designing studies that address issues associated with the biological responses to low doses of chemicals and radiation, as well as issues in interpretation of the findings from such studies.

  13. Isoeffective dose: a concept for biological weighting of absorbed dose in proton and heavier-ion therapies

    CERN Document Server

    Wambersie, A; Menzel, H G; Gahbauer, R; DeLuca, P M; Hendry, J H; Jones, D T L

    2011-01-01

    When reporting radiation therapy procedures, International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) recommends specifying absorbed dose at/in all clinically relevant points and/or volumes. In addition, treatment conditions should be reported as completely as possible in order to allow full understanding and interpretation of the treatment prescription. However, the clinical outcome does not only depend on absorbed dose but also on a number of other factors such as dose per fraction, overall treatment time and radiation quality radiation biology effectiveness (RBE). Therefore, weighting factors have to be applied when different types of treatments are to be compared or to be combined. This had led to the concept of `isoeffective absorbed dose', introduced by ICRU and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The isoeffective dose D(IsoE) is the dose of a treatment carried out under reference conditions producing the same clinical effects on the target volume as those of the actual treatment. It i...

  14. Biological effects of pulsating magnetic fields: role of solitons

    CERN Document Server

    Brizhik, Larissa

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze biological effects produced by magnetic fields in order to elucidate the physical mechanisms, which can produce them. We show that there is a chierarchy of such mechanisms and that the mutual interplay between them can result in the synergetic outcome. In particular, we analyze the biological effects of magnetic fields on soliton mediated charge transport in the redox processes in living organisms. Such solitons are described by nonlinear systems of equations and represent electrons that are self-trapped in alpha-helical polypeptides due to the moderately strong electron-lattice interaction. They represent a particular type of disssipativeless large polarons in low-dimensional systems. We show that the effective mass of solitons in the is different from the mass of free electrons, and that there is a resonant effect of the magnetic fields on the dynamics of solitons, and, hence, on charge transport that accompanies photosynthesis and respiration. These effects can result in non-therm...

  15. The Biological Effects of Ivabradine in Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziano Riccioni

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A large number of studies in healthy and asymptomatic subjects, as well as patients with already established cardiovascular disease (CAD have demonstrated that heart rate (HR is a very important and major independent cardiovascular risk factor for prognosis. Lowering heart rate reduces cardiac work, thereby diminishing myocardial oxygen demand. Several experimental studies in animals, including dogs and pigs, have clarified the beneficial effects of ivabradine associated with HR lowering. Ivabradine is a selective inhibitor of the hyperpolarisation activated cyclic-nucleotide-gated funny current (If involved in pacemaker generation and responsiveness of the sino-atrial node (SAN, which result in HR reduction with no other apparent direct cardiovascular effects. Several studies show that ivabradine substantially and significantly reduces major risks associated with heart failure when added to guideline-based and evidence-based treatment. However the biological effect of ivabradine have yet to be studied. This effects can appear directly on myocardium or on a systemic level improving endothelial function and modulating immune cell migration. Indeed ivabradine is an ‘open-channel’ blocker of human hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide gated channels of type-4 (hHCN4, and a ‘closed-channel’ blocker of mouse HCN1 channels in a dose-dependent manner. At endothelial level ivabradine decreased monocyte chemotactin protein-1 mRNA expression and exerted a potent anti-oxidative effect through reduction of vascular NADPH oxidase activity. Finally, on an immune level, ivabradine inhibits the chemokine-induced migration of CD4-positive lymphocytes. In this review, we discuss the biological effects of ivabradine and highlight its effects on CAD.

  16. Current research on biological effects of low-level exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagan, L.A.

    1994-12-31

    Rather substantial numbers of industrial chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and radiation display U-shaped or seemingly paradoxical dose-response relationships. A limited listing of studies providing examples of data fitting the U-shaped curve has been published. This array suggests that the U-shaped response is broadly generalizable and therefore potentially of considerable significance in the toxicological and public health domains. In fact, in 1992 and 1993, three conferences (Japan, United States, and China) were held exclusively on the topic of the biological effects of low doses of chemicals and radioactivity with articular emphasis on U-shaped curves. Substantial efforts have been made at understanding this observation.

  17. Hydrodynamic collective effects of active proteins in biological membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Koyano, Yuki; Mikhailov, Alexander S

    2016-01-01

    Lipid bilayers forming biological membranes are known to behave as viscous 2D fluids on submicrometer scales; usually they contain a large number of active protein inclusions. Recently, it has been shown [Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 112, E3639 (2015)] that such active proteins should in- duce non-thermal fluctuating lipid flows leading to diffusion enhancement and chemotaxis-like drift for passive inclusions in biomembranes. Here, a detailed analytical and numerical investigation of such effects is performed. The attention is focused on the situations when proteins are concentrated within lipid rafts. We demonstrate that passive particles tend to become attracted by active rafts and are accumulated inside them.

  18. Pigmentation Effect of Rice Bran Extracted Minerals Comprising Soluble Silicic Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Jun Jang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Our investigation focused on identifying melanogenesis effect of soluble minerals in rice bran ash extract (RBE which include orthosilicic acid (OSA. Melanocytes were apparently normal in terms of morphology. It was, however, shown that they were stressed a little in the RBE and OSA added media in aspect of LDH activity. Melanin synthesis and intracellular tyrosinase activity were increased by treatment of RBE which is similar to that of OSA. The Western blotting results showed that TRP-1, tyrosinase, and MITF expression levels were 2-3 times higher in the OSA and RBE groups compared to the control group which promoted melanin synthesis through CREB phosphorylation. Moreover, histology and immunohistochemistry were shown to have similar result to that of protein expression. As a result, minerals which comprise orthosilicic acid has the potential to promote melanogenesis and both RBE and OSA have similar cell viability, protein expression, and immunostaining results, suggesting that RBE comprises specific minerals which promote melanin synthesis through increasing of MITF and CREB phosphorylation. Therefore, RBE could be used as a novel therapeutic approach to combat melanin deficiency related diseases by stimulating melanocytes via its soluble Si and mineral components.

  19. Biological activity of selected plants with adaptogenic effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Ivanišová

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine biological activity of plants with adaptogenic effect: Panax ginseng Mayer., Withania somnifera L., Eleuterococcus senticosus Rupr. et Maxim., Astragallus membranaceus Fisch. and Codonopsis pilosulae Franch. The antioxidant activity was detected by DPPH and phosphomolybdenum method, total polyphenol content with Folin – Ciocalteu reagent, flavonoids content by aluminium chloride method. The detection of antimicrobial activity was carried out by disc diffusion method against three species of Gram-negative bacteria: Escherichia coli CCM 3988, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica CCM 3807, Yersinia enterocolitica CCM 5671 and two Gram-positive bacteria: Bacillus thuringiensis CCM 19, Stapylococcus aureus subsp. aureus CCM 2461. Results showed that plants with adaptogenic effect are rich for biologically active substances. The highest antioxidant activity by DPPH method was determined in the sample of Eleuterococcus senticosus (3.15 mg TEAC – Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity per g of sample and by phosphomolybdenum method in the sample of Codonopsis pilosulae (188.79 mg TEAC per g of sample. In the sample of Panax ginseng was measured the highest content of total polyphenols (8.10 mg GAE – galic acid equivalent per g of sample and flavonoids (3.41 μg QE – quercetin equivalent per g of sample. All samples also showed strong antimicrobial activity with the best results in Panax ginseng and Withania somnifera in particular for species Yersinia enterocolitica CCM 5671 and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica CCM 3807. The analyzed species of plant with high value of biological activity can be used more in the future, not only in food, but also in cosmetics and pharmaceutical industries.

  20. Conjugated linoleic acid isomers: differences in metabolism and biological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churruca, Itziar; Fernández-Quintela, Alfredo; Portillo, Maria Puy

    2009-01-01

    The term conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) refers to a mixture of linoleic acid positional and geometric isomers, characterized by having conjugated double bonds, not separated by a methylene group as in linoleic acid. CLA isomers appear as a minor component of the lipid fraction, found mainly in meat and dairy products from cows and sheep. The most abundant isomer is cis-9,trans-11, which represents up to 80% of total CLA in food. These isomers are metabolized in the body through different metabolic pathways, but important differences, that can have physiological consequences, are observed between the two main isomers. The trans-10,cis-12 isomer is more efficiently oxidized than the cis-9,trans-11 isomer, due to the position of its double bounds. Interest in CLA arose in its anticarcinogenic action but there is an increasing amount of specific scientific literature concerning the biological effects and properties of CLA. Numerous biological effects of CLA are due to the separate action of the most studied isomers, cis-9,trans-11 and trans-10,cis-12. It is also likely that some effects are induced and/or enhanced by these isomers acting synergistically. Although the cis-9,trans-11 isomer is mainly responsible for the anticarcinogenic effect, the trans-10,cis-12 isomer reduces body fat and it is referred as the most effective isomer affecting blood lipids. As far as insulin function is concerned, both isomers seem to be responsible for insulin resistance in humans. Finally, with regard to the immune system it is not clear whether individual isomers of CLA could act similarly or differently.

  1. Hafnium oxide nanoparticles: toward an in vitro predictive biological effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marill, Julie; Anesary, Naeemunnisa Mohamed; Zhang, Ping; Vivet, Sonia; Borghi, Elsa; Levy, Laurent; Pottier, Agnes

    2014-06-30

    Hafnium oxide, NBTXR3 nanoparticles were designed for high dose energy deposition within cancer cells when exposed to ionizing radiation. The purpose of this study was to assess the possibility of predicting in vitro the biological effect of NBTXR3 nanoparticles when exposed to ionizing radiation. Cellular uptake of NBTXR3 nanoparticles was assessed in a panel of human cancer cell lines (radioresistant and radiosensitive) by transmission electron microscopy. The radioenhancement of NBTXR3 nanoparticles was measured by the clonogenic survival assay. NBTXR3 nanoparticles were taken up by cells in a concentration dependent manner, forming clusters in the cytoplasm. Differential nanoparticle uptake was observed between epithelial and mesenchymal or glioblastoma cell lines. The dose enhancement factor increased with increase NBTXR3 nanoparticle concentration and radiation dose. Beyond a minimum number of clusters per cell, the radioenhancement of NBTXR3 nanoparticles could be estimated from the radiation dose delivered and the radiosensitivity of the cancer cell lines. Our preliminary results suggest a predictable in vitro biological effect of NBTXR3 nanoparticles exposed to ionizing radiation.

  2. BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF MICROWAVE RADIATION ON BRAIN TISSUE IN RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Đinđić

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to microwave radiation induces multiple organ dysfunctions, especially in CNS.The aim of this work was investigation of biological effects of microwave radiation on rats' brain and determination of increased oxidative stress as a possible pathogenetic's mechanism.Wis tar rats 3 months old were divided in experimental (4 female and 4 male animal and control group (5 female and 4 male. This experimental group was constantly exposed to a magnetic field of 5 mG. We simulated using of mobile phones 30 min every day. The source of NIR emitted MF that was similar to mobile phones at 900 MHz. The rats were killed after 2 months. Biological effects were determined by observation of individual and collective behavior and body mass changes. Lipid per oxidation was determined by measuring quantity of malondialdehyde (MDA in brain homogenate.The animals in experimental group exposed to EMF showed les weight gain. The most important observations were changing of basic behavior models and expression of aggressive or panic behavior. The content of MDA in brain tissue is singificantly higher (1.42 times in rats exposed to electromagnetic fields (3,82±0.65 vs. control 2.69±0.42 nmol/mg proteins, p<0.01.Increased oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation after exposition in EM fields induced disorders of function and structure of brain.

  3. Linking exposure to environmental pollutants with biological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Mette; Autrup, Herman; Møller, Peter; Hertel, Ole; Jensen, Steen Solvang; Vinzents, Peter; Knudsen, Lisbeth E; Loft, Steffen

    2003-11-01

    Exposure to ambient air pollution has been associated with cancer. Ambient air contains a complex mixture of toxics, including particulate matter (PM) and benzene. Carcinogenic effects of PM may relate both to the content of PAH and to oxidative DNA damage generated by transition metals, benzene, metabolism and inflammation. By means of personal monitoring and biomarkers of internal dose, biologically effective dose and susceptibility, it should be possible to characterize individual exposure and identify air pollution sources with relevant biological effects. In a series of studies, individual exposure to PM(2.5), nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) and benzene has been measured in groups of 40-50 subjects. Measured biomarkers included 1-hydroxypyrene, benzene metabolites (phenylmercapturic acid (PMA) and trans-trans-muconic acid (ttMA)), 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) in urine, DNA strand breaks, base oxidation, 8-oxodG and PAH bulky adducts in lymphocytes, markers of oxidative stress in plasma and genotypes of glutathione transferases (GSTs) and NADPH:quinone reductase (NQO1). With respect to benzene, the main result indicates that DNA base oxidation is correlated with PMA excretion. With respect to exposure to PM, biomarkers of oxidative damage showed significant positive association with the individual exposure. Thus, 8-oxodG in lymphocyte DNA and markers of oxidative damage to lipids and protein in plasma associated with PM(2.5) exposure. Several types of DNA damage showed seasonal variation. PAH adduct levels, DNA strand breaks and 8-oxodG in lymphocytes increased significantly in the summer period, requiring control of confounders. Similar seasonal effects on strand breaks and expression of the relevant DNA repair genes ERCC1 and OGG1 have been reported. In the present setting, biological effects of air pollutants appear mainly related to oxidative stress via personal exposure and not to urban background levels. Future developments include personal time

  4. Arsenic in the aquatic environment - speciation and biological effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landner, L. [Swedish Environmental Research Group (MFG)

    1998-03-01

    The present report is a contribution to EC Commission`s undertaking to review existing EC provisions on the substances for which Sweden has been granted transitional provisions. The provisions imply that Sweden may maintain more stringent regulations on four substances until the end of 1998. The present report deals with speciation and biological effects of arsenic in three types of aquatic environments - marine water, estuarine or brackish water and freshwater. The similarity between arsenate and phosphate and the interference in phosphorylation reactions is discussed. It is clear that in Scandinavian inland waters the concentration of phosphorous is on average lower than in most inland waters in continental Europe. However, in most inland waters phosphorus is the limiting factor for phytoplankton development and eutrophication, which means that there is a clear risk for detrimental effects in the great majority of inland waters, also eutrophic waters 167 refs, 27 figs, 12 tabs. Exemption Substances Project (Directive 89/677/EEC)

  5. Modeling of biological doses and mechanical effects on bone transduction

    CERN Document Server

    Rieger, Romain; Jennane, Rachid; 10.1016/j.jtbi.2011.01.003

    2012-01-01

    Shear stress, hormones like parathyroid and mineral elements like calcium mediate the amplitude of stimulus signal which affects the rate of bone remodeling. The current study investigates the theoretical effects of different metabolic doses in stimulus signal level on bone. The model was built considering the osteocyte as the sensing center mediated by coupled mechanical shear stress and some biological factors. The proposed enhanced model was developed based on previously published works dealing with different aspects of bone transduction. It describes the effects of physiological doses variations of Calcium, Parathyroid Hormone, Nitric Oxide and Prostaglandin E2 on the stimulus level sensed by osteocytes in response to applied shear stress generated by interstitial fluid flow. We retained the metabolic factors (Parathyroid Hormone, Nitric Oxide, and Prostaglandin E2) as parameters of bone cell mechanosensitivity because stimulation/inhibition of induced pathways stimulates osteogenic response in vivo. We t...

  6. Biological effects of Echinacea purpurea on human blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joksić, Gordana; Petrović, Sandra; Joksić, Ivana; Leskovac, Andreja

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate radioprotective properties of Echinacea purpurea tablets in vivo. We analysed lymphocyte chromosome aberrations (CA), micronuclei (MN), apoptosis of leukocytes and haematological parameters in a group of radiation workers who were identified as carrying dicentric chromosomes in their lymphocytes. All radiation workers were taking two 275 mg Echinacea tablets b.i.d., according to a pharmacist's recommendation. All parameters were analysed before and after the two-week treatment. At the end of the treatment lymphocyte CA frequency dropped significantly, and the number of apoptotic cells increased. The inverse lymphocyte-to-granulocyte ratio at the beginning of the study changed to normal at its end. In conclusion, biological effects observed after administration of Echinacea purpurea preparation suggest that it may be beneficial for the prevention of adverse health effects in workers exposed to ionising radiation.

  7. Late biological effects from internal and external exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    Information on late biological effects of radiation was obtained from the long-term medical followup of a small population of Marshallese accidentally exposed to radioactive fallout from a thermonuclear test in 1954. Endocrine data are compatible with a sequence of nonstochastic radiation effects. The ingestion of radioisotopes of iodine produced clinical thyroid hypofunction in children, biochemical evidence of thyroid dysfunction in some adults, thyroid adenomatous module formation, and, as a possible indirect effect of thyroid damage, at least two cases of pituitary adenoma. In contrast, the only evidence of a stochastic effect has been a real increase in thyroid cancers among the more highly exposed people of Rongelap, none of whom have evidence of residual disease. While three nonthyroidal cancers which are known to be inducible in humans by external irradiation have been documented in the exposed population, three similar cancers have occurred in an unexposed comparison population of Marshallese. Nonstochastic effects of radiation exposure may be common but subtle. In the Marshallese experience the morbidity of delayed nonstochastic effects far exceeds that of the stochastic. 20 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Effect of Organic Loading on Rotating Biological Contactor Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kossay K. Al-Ahmady

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Organic loading (weight per unit time per volume is useful for the design of rotating biological contactors (RBC and for comparison with the other processes such as activated sludge or oxidation ponds. The present study puts emphasis on the significance of this control or design parameter because it allows direct comparison of the RBC system's performance when operated under various circumstances and with different kinds of wastewater. The results of the paper proved that, the COD removal in rotating biological contactor systems is a function of the organic loading rate. However, each of the wastewater concentration and flow rate are also influence on the system efficiency but theirs impact can be combined by the effect of organic loading. The majority of COD removal (40-85 % of the total removal depending on the organic loading applied occurs in the first stages of the system. There is a strong correlation between the organic loading and the concentration of the suspended solids in the rotating biological contactor basin. At higher loadings higher concentrations noted. At a loading of about, (24 g/m2.d suspended solids were 225, 125, 35, and 25 mg/L in the first, second, third and, the fourth stage respectively. To achieve an effluent quality of (BOD < 25 mg/L, COD < 60 mg/L, the system must be operated on organic loadings of about (22 gBOD/m2.d and 65 gCOD/m2.d respectively. For nitrification process, the system must be designed to operate at organic loading of about (10 g/m2.d or less and, the reactor or basin volume should be designed to achieve a hydraulic loading of about (40 L/m2.d or less.

  9. Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal: Metabolic Insights and Salinity Effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welles, L.

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is a biological process for efficient phosphate removal from wastewaters through intracellular storage of polyphosphate by polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAO) and subsequent removal of PAO from the system through wastage of sludge. In comparison

  10. Biological effects due to weak magnetic field on plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyavskaya, N. A.

    2004-01-01

    magnetic field may cause different biological effects at the cellular, tissue and organ levels. They may be functionally related to systems that regulate plant metabolism including the intracellular Ca 2+ homeostasis. However, our understanding of very complex fundamental mechanisms and sites of interactions between weak magnetic fields and biological systems is still incomplete and still deserve strong research efforts.

  11. [DIRECTIONALITY OF THE BIOLOGICAL EFFECT OF DRINKING WATER].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibert, K K; Karasev, A K; Marasanov, A V; Stekhin, A A; Iakovleva, G V

    2015-01-01

    There have been performed the studies of the dimensional parameters of peroxide associates in drinking water, per- forming regulatory functions in cellular metabolism, that determine the character of the biological response of the human body to drinking water The direction of action of peroxide associates type Σ [(HO2-(*) ... OH-(*) (H2O) tp)]q, (where (H2O) tp is an associate with the tetragonal structure (Walrafen pentamer Is ice VI), q is the degree of association p--parameter of ion coordination) on the cellular structures of the organism is associated with their quantum properties, determining the macroscopic parameters of the electron wave packets. Research has confirmed the addressness of the nonlocal entering electron to certain cellular structures of the body, which is determined by the structural similarity of centers of condensation of electrons in the cells of systems and organs of the body with the parameters of the electron wave packets in the associates. Methodology for the estimation of the orientation of biological effect of the drinking water to the systems of the body on the base of the analysis of variations in heart rhythm under non-contact influence of water on the human body and its relationship with the dimensional parameters and peroxide activity of associates in drinking water can be suggested for the implementation of screening tests for drinking water quality, taking into account both the individualfeatures of responses of body systems to drinking water and its group action.

  12. Biological vs. physical mixing effects on benthic food web dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Braeckman

    Full Text Available Biological particle mixing (bioturbation and solute transfer (bio-irrigation contribute extensively to ecosystem functioning in sediments where physical mixing is low. Macrobenthos transports oxygen and organic matter deeper into the sediment, thereby likely providing favourable niches to lower trophic levels (i.e., smaller benthic animals such as meiofauna and bacteria and thus stimulating mineralisation. Whether this biological transport facilitates fresh organic matter assimilation by the metazoan lower part of the food web through niche establishment (i.e., ecosystem engineering or rather deprives them from food sources, is so far unclear. We investigated the effects of the ecosystem engineers Lanice conchilega (bio-irrigator and Abra alba (bioturbator compared to abiotic physical mixing events on survival and food uptake of nematodes after a simulated phytoplankton bloom. The (13C labelled diatom Skeletonema costatum was added to 4 treatments: (1 microcosms containing the bioturbator, (2 microcosms containing the bio-irrigator, (3 control microcosms and (4 microcosms with abiotic manual surface mixing. Nematode survival and subsurface peaks in nematode density profiles were most pronounced in the bio-irrigator treatment. However, nematode specific uptake (Δδ(13C of the added diatoms was highest in the physical mixing treatment, where macrobenthos was absent and the diatom (13C was homogenised. Overall, nematodes fed preferentially on bulk sedimentary organic material rather than the added diatoms. The total C budget (µg C m(-2, which included TO(13C remaining in the sediment, respiration, nematode and macrobenthic uptake, highlighted the limited assimilation by the metazoan benthos and the major role of bacterial respiration. In summary, bioturbation and especially bio-irrigation facilitated the lower trophic levels mainly over the long-term through niche establishment. Since the freshly added diatoms represented only a limited food

  13. Teratogenic effect of fission neutron and tritium water on rat embryo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satow, Yukio; Hori, Hiroshi; Lee, Juing-Yi

    1989-03-01

    A single whole body irradiation of Cf-252 was given at various doses in pregnant rats on Day 8 or 9 of pregnancy. Cobalt-60 gamma-ray irradiation was given at the same dose rate (one rad/min) to another group of pregnant rats as controls. When modified straight lines were obtained for the frequency of anomalous fetuses in the total implants and of survived embryos exposed to Cf-252 of 20-120 rad or to Co-60 of 80-220 rad on Day 8 of pregnancy, relative biological effects (RBE) ranged from 2.3 to 2.7. Malformation types were similar in the Cf-252 group and the Co-60 group. Using fetal LD/sub 50/ as an index, RBE was 2.4 in rats irradiated on Day 8 of pregnancy and 3.1 in rats irradiated on Day 9. Teratogenic effects of tritium water (HTO) on rat embryos were also examined, and the results were compared with those of tritium simulator (Cs-137 gamma-rays). Six groups of pregnant rats were injected intraperitoneally with HTO, containing 25, 50, 75, 100, 125 or 150 mCi HTO/300 g body weight, on Day 9. Malformations were seen in 100% of the survived embryos and 81.3% of the total implants in the group given 100 mCi (accumulated doses of 451 rad) of HTO. Accumulated tritium simulator doses of 680 rad induced malformations in 98.4% of survived embryos and in 71.7% of the total implants. Both kinds of radiation induced similar anomalies of the cardiovascular system in rat embryos. A comparison of HTO and tritium simulator showed the teratogenic effect of RBE to be greater than 1.8 and to reach approximately 2.6. (Namekawa, K).

  14. submitter Biologically optimized helium ion plans: calculation approach and its in vitro validation

    CERN Document Server

    Mairani, A; Magro, G; Tessonnier, T; Kamp, F; Carlson, D J; Ciocca, M; Cerutti, F; Sala, P R; Ferrari, A; Böhlen, T T; Jäkel, O; Parodi, K; Debus, J; Abdollahi, A; Haberer, T

    2016-01-01

    Treatment planning studies on the biological effect of raster-scanned helium ion beams should be performed, together with their experimental verification, before their clinical application at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT). For this purpose, we introduce a novel calculation approach based on integrating data-driven biological models in our Monte Carlo treatment planning (MCTP) tool. Dealing with a mixed radiation field, the biological effect of the primary $^4$He ion beams, of the secondary $^3$He and $^4$He (Z  =  2) fragments and of the produced protons, deuterons and tritons (Z  =  1) has to be taken into account. A spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) in water, representative of a clinically-relevant scenario, has been biologically optimized with the MCTP and then delivered at HIT. Predictions of cell survival and RBE for a tumor cell line, characterized by ${{(\\alpha /\\beta )}_{\\text{ph}}}=5.4$ Gy, have been successfully compared against measured clonogenic survival data. The mean ...

  15. Reactive Carbonyl Species In Vivo: Generation and Dual Biological Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halyna M. Semchyshyn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive carbonyls are widespread species in living organisms and mainly known for their damaging effects. The most abundant reactive carbonyl species (RCS are derived from oxidation of carbohydrates, lipids, and amino acids. Chemical modification of proteins, nucleic acids, and aminophospholipids by RCS results in cytotoxicity and mutagenicity. In addition to their direct toxicity, modification of biomolecules by RCS gives rise to a multitude of adducts and cross links that are increasingly implicated in aging and pathology of a wide range of human diseases. Understanding of the relationship between metabolism of RCS and the development of pathological disorders and diseases may help to develop effective approaches to prevent a number of disorders and diseases. On the other hand, constant persistence of RCS in cells suggests that they perform some useful role in living organisms. The most beneficial effects of RCS are their establishment as regulators of cell signal transduction and gene expression. Since RCS can modulate different biological processes, new tools are required to decipher the precise mechanisms underlying dual effects of RCS.

  16. Hydrodynamic collective effects of active proteins in biological membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyano, Yuki; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    2016-08-01

    Lipid bilayers forming biological membranes are known to behave as viscous two-dimensional fluids on submicrometer scales; usually they contain a large number of active protein inclusions. Recently, it was shown [A. S. Mikhailov and R. Kapral, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 112, E3639 (2015), 10.1073/pnas.1506825112] that such active proteins should induce nonthermal fluctuating lipid flows leading to diffusion enhancement and chemotaxislike drift for passive inclusions in biomembranes. Here, a detailed analytical and numerical investigation of such effects is performed. The attention is focused on the situations when proteins are concentrated within lipid rafts. We demonstrate that passive particles tend to become attracted by active rafts and are accumulated inside them.

  17. Effect of Computer Animations Upon Student's Achievement of Biology Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet YAKIŞAN

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The prime purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of computer animation supported biology education upon students’ academic achievement. The study was participated by 97 pre service teachers studying in the first year of university. The data were collected by “Cell Achievement Test” There were control and experimental groups formed and the experimental group was taught with computer animations related with diffusion, osmosis, active transport, protein synthesis, mitosis and meiosis phenomena taking place in cell while the control group was taught with traditional method based on question and answer process. The data obtained were evaluated by t- test and represented by tables and graphs. The results of the study indicated significant differences between the academic achievements of control and experimental groups. The difference is in the favor of the experimental group which revealed the fact the computer animations caused a significant increase in the academic achievements of the students.

  18. Investigation on inhibition of biological effects of endothelin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田青; 赵东; 张继峰; 高连如; 刘胜昔; 杨军; 苏静怡; 张肇康; 汤健; 唐朝枢

    1996-01-01

    The effects of a series of substances on the biological function of endothelin (ET) are reported. The substances used are: synthetic inhibitors of endothelium derived relaxing factors (EDRFs), inhibitor of big-endothelin converting enzyme phosphoramidon, antiserum of endothelin, antagonists of endothelin A receptor BQ123 and JKC301, and two Chinese anti-snake venom herb medicines Lobelia radians Thumb and Taris polyphylla Smith var. chinensis (Franch) Hara. The results showed that inhibiting the production of nitric oxide (NO) could stimulate ET release from vascular endothelium, elevate plasma ET and increase blood pressure. These changes could be reversed by L-arginine (L-Arg), the substrate of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). The amount of ET released by arterial endothelium could be increased or inhibited by inhibiting or stimulating the synthesis of prostacyclin (PGI2). The plasma ET level and blood pressure in both SHR and WKY rats could be decreased by giving phosphoramidon (PhR). The above results i

  19. Biological Effects on Fruit Fly by N+ ion Beam Implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Mutation induced by low energy ion beam implantation has beenapplied widely both in plants and microbes. However, due to the vacuum limitation, such ion implantation into animals was never studied except for silkworm. In this study, Pupae of fruit fly were irradiated with different dosage N+ ions at energy 20 KeV to study the biological effect of ion beam on animal. The results showed a saddle-like curve exists between incubate rate and dosage. Damage of pupae by ion beam implantation was observed using scanning electron microscope. Some individuals with incomplete wing were obtained after implantation but no similar character was observed in their offspring. Furthermore, about 5.47% mutants with wide variation appeared in M1 generation. Therefore, ion beam implantation could be widely used for mutation breeding.

  20. Biological effects and equivalent doses in radiotherapy: a software solution

    CERN Document Server

    Voyant, Cyril; Roustit, Rudy; Biffi, Katia; Marcovici, Celine Lantieri

    2013-01-01

    The limits of TDF (time, dose, and fractionation) and linear quadratic models have been known for a long time. Medical physicists and physicians are required to provide fast and reliable interpretations regarding the delivered doses or any future prescriptions relating to treatment changes. We therefore propose a calculation interface under the GNU license to be used for equivalent doses, biological doses, and normal tumor complication probability (Lyman model). The methodology used draws from several sources: the linear-quadratic-linear model of Astrahan, the repopulation effects of Dale, and the prediction of multi-fractionated treatments of Thames. The results are obtained from an algorithm that minimizes an ad-hoc cost function, and then compared to the equivalent dose computed using standard calculators in seven French radiotherapy centers.

  1. Effect of choline carboxylate ionic liquids on biological membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengstl, Doris; Kraus, Birgit; Van Vorst, Matthew; Elliott, Gloria D; Kunz, Werner

    2014-11-01

    Choline carboxylates, ChCm, with m=2-10 and choline oleate are known as biocompatible substances, yet their influence on biological membranes is not well-known, and the effect on human skin has not previously been investigated. The short chain choline carboxylates ChCm with m=2, 4, 6 act as hydrotropes, solubilizing hydrophobic compounds in aqueous solution, while the longer chain choline carboxylates ChCm with m=8, 10 and oleate are able to form micelles. In the present study, the cytotoxicity of choline carboxylates was tested using HeLa and SK-MEL-28 cells. The influence of these substances on liposomes prepared from dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) was also evaluated to provide insights on membrane interactions. It was observed that the choline carboxylates with a chain length of m>8 distinctly influence the bilayer, while the shorter ones had minimal interaction with the liposomes.

  2. Behavioural biology: an effective and relevant conservation tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, Richard

    2007-08-01

    'Conservation behaviour' is a young discipline that investigates how proximate and ultimate aspects of the behaviour of an animal can be of value in preventing the loss of biodiversity. Rumours of its demise are unfounded. Conservation behaviour is quickly building a capacity to positively influence environmental decision making. The theoretical framework used by animal behaviourists is uniquely valuable to elucidating integrative solutions to human-wildlife conflicts, efforts to reintroduce endangered species and reducing the deleterious effects of ecotourism. Conservation behaviourists must join with other scientists under the multidisciplinary umbrella of conservation biology without giving up on their focus: the mechanisms, development, function and evolutionary history of individual differences in behaviour. Conservation behaviour is an increasingly relevant tool in the preservation of nature.

  3. [The biological effect of fireproof ceramic fibers--literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajnow, A

    1996-01-01

    The work presents reports, selected from the world literature, on the studies of biological effect of refractory ceramic fibres, carried out on experimental animals. The discrepancy between the results of studies performed may originate from differences in the distribution of fibre sizes or the durability of fibres in the organism and their surface properties which, in turn, depend on the chemical composition of fibres. In all studies discussed, ceramic fibres generally activated macrophages and they were characterised by a moderate fibrotic activity. A statistically significant increase in the incidence of tumor (mesothelioma) observed in several very important experimental studies may suggest that some types of refractory ceramic fibres show a similar carcinogenic potential to that of natural asbestos: crocidolite or chrysotile.

  4. Effect of Antimicrobial Peptide-Amide: Indolicidin on Biological Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Gergely Végh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Indolicidin, a cationic antimicrobial tridecapeptide amide, is rich in proline and tryptophan residues. Its biological activity is intensively studied, but the details how indolicidin interacts with membranes are not fully understood yet. We report here an in situ atomic force microscopic study describing the effect of indolicidin on an artificial supported planar bilayer membrane of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC and on purple membrane of Halobacterium salinarum. Concentration dependent interaction of the peptide and membranes was found in case of DPPC resulting the destruction of the membrane. Purple membrane was much more resistant against indolicidin, probably due to its high protein content. Indolicidin preferred the border of membrane disks, where the lipids are more accessible. These data suggest that the atomic force microscope is a powerful tool in the study of indolicidin-membrane interaction.

  5. Interaction mechanisms and biological effects of static magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1994-06-01

    Mechanisms through which static magnetic fields interact with living systems are described and illustrated by selected experimental observations. These mechanisms include electrodynamic interactions with moving, ionic charges (blood flow and nerve impulse conduction), magnetomechanical interactions (orientation and translation of molecules structures and magnetic particles), and interactions with electronic spin states in charge transfer reactions (photo-induced electron transfer in photosynthesis). A general summary is also presented of the biological effects of static magnetic fields. There is convincing experimental evidence for magnetoreception mechanisms in several classes of lower organisms, including bacteria and marine organisms. However, in more highly evolved species of animals, there is no evidence that the interactions of static magnetic fields with flux densities up to 2 Tesla (1 Tesla [T] = 10{sup 4} Gauss) produce either behavioral or physiolocical alterations. These results, based on controlled studies with laboratory animals, are consistent with the outcome of recent epidemiological surveys on human populations exposed occupationally to static magnetic fields.

  6. 21 CFR 601.26 - Reclassification procedures to determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... licensed biological products are safe, effective, and not misbranded under prescribed, recommended, or... Reclassification procedures to determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective, and not misbranded... for the reclassification of all biological products that have been classified into Category IIIA....

  7. Biological effects due to weak magnetic fields on plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyavskaya, N.

    In the evolution process, living organisms have experienced the action of the Earth's magnetic field (MF) that is a natural component of our environment. It is known that a galactic MF induction does not exceed 0.1 nT, since investigations of weak magnetic field (WMF) effects on biological systems have attracted attention of biologists due to planning long-term space flights to other planets where the magnetizing force is near 10-5 Oe. However, the role of WMF and its influence on organisms' functioning are still insufficiently investigated. A large number of experiments with seedlings of different plant species placed in WMF has found that the growth of their primary roots is inhibited during the early terms of germination in comparison with control. The proliferation activity and cell reproduction are reduced in meristem of plant roots under WMF application. The prolongation of total cell reproductive cycle is registered due to the expansion of G phase in1 different plant species as well as of G phase in flax and lentil roots along with2 relative stability of time parameters of other phases of cell cycle. In plant cells exposed to WMF, the decrease in functional activity of genome at early prereplicate period is shown. WMF causes the intensification in the processes of proteins' synthesis and break-up in plant roots. Qualitative and quantitative changes in protein spectrum in growing and differentiated cells of plant roots exposed to WMF are revealed. At ultrastructural level, there are observed such ultrastructural peculiarities as changes in distribution of condensed chromatin and nucleolus compactization in nuclei, noticeable accumulation of lipid bodies, development of a lytic compartment (vacuoles, cytosegresomes and paramural bodies), and reduction of phytoferritin in plastids in meristem cells of pea roots exposed to WMF. Mitochondria are the most sensitive organelle to WMF application: their size and relative volume in cells increase, matrix is electron

  8. Effect of a biological activated carbon filter on particle counts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su-hua WU; Bing-zhi DONG; Tie-jun QIAO; Jin-song ZHANG

    2008-01-01

    Due to the importance of biological safety in drinking water quality and the disadvantages which exist in traditional methods of detecting typical microorganisms such as Cryptosporidium and Giardia,it is necessary to develop an alternative.Particle counts is a qualitative measurement of the amount of dissolved solids in water.The removal rate of particle counts was previously used as an indicator of the effectiveness of a biological activated carbon(BAC)filter in removing Cryptosporidium and Giardia.The particle counts in a BAC filter effluent over one operational period and the effects of BAC filter construction and operational parameters were investigated with a 10 m3/h pilot plant.The results indicated that the maximum particle count in backwash remnant water was as high as 1296 count/ml and it needed about 1.5 h to reduce from the maximum to less than 50 count/ml.During the standard filtration period,particle counts stay constant at less than 50 count/ml for 5 d except when influ-enced by sand filter backwash remnant water.The removal rates of particle counts in the BAC filter are related to characteristics of the carbon.For example,a columned carbon and a sand bed removed 33.3% and 8.5% of particles,respectively,while the particle counts in effluent from a cracked BAC filter was higher than that of the influent.There is no significant difference among particle removal rates with different filtration rates.High post-ozone dosage(>2 mg/L)plays an important role in particle count removal;when the dosage was 3 mg/L,the removal rates by carbon layers and sand beds decreased by 17.5% and increased by 9.5%,respectively,compared with a 2 mg/L dosage.

  9. The effect of air supply on nitrogen removal using a biological filter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of air supply on nitrogen removal using a biological filter proposed for ventilated pit latrines. ... In this research the nitrogen was removed in a biological filter using a combination of nitrification and denitrification ... Article Metrics.

  10. Studies about space radiation promote new fields in radiation biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Takeo; Takahashi, Akihisa; Ohnishi, Ken

    2002-12-01

    Astronauts are constantly exposed to space radiation of various types of energy with a low dose-rate during long-term stays in space. Therefore, it is important to determine correctly the biological effects of space radiation on human health. Studies about biological the effects at a low dose and a low dose-rate include various aspects of microbeams, bystander effects, radioadaptive responses and hormesis which are important fields in radiation biology. In addition, space radiations contain high linear energy transfer (LET) particles. In particular, neutrons may cause reverse effectiveness at a low dose-rate in comparison to ionizing radiation. We are also interested in p53-centered signal transduction pathways involved in the cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis induced by space radiations. We must also study whether the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of space radiation is affected by microgravity which is another typical component in space. To confirm this, we must prepare centrifuge systems in an International Space Station (ISS). In addition, we must prepare many types of equipment for space experiments in an ISS, because we cannot use conventional equipment from our laboratories. Furthermore, the research for space radiation might give us valuable information about the birth and evolution of life on the Earth. We can also realize the importance of preventing the ozone layer from depletion by the use of exposure equipment to sunlight in an ISS. For these reasons, we desire to educate space researchers of the next generation based on the consideration of the preservation of the Earth from research about space radiation.

  11. Mutagenic Effects of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles on Biological Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissanayake, Niluka M; Current, Kelley M; Obare, Sherine O

    2015-09-30

    In recent years, there has been an increased interest in the design and use of iron oxide materials with nanoscale dimensions for magnetic, catalytic, biomedical, and electronic applications. The increased manufacture and use of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) in consumer products as well as industrial processes is expected to lead to the unintentional release of IONPs into the environment. The impact of IONPs on the environment and on biological species is not well understood but remains a concern due to the increased chemical reactivity of nanoparticles relative to their bulk counterparts. This review article describes the impact of IONPs on cellular genetic components. The mutagenic impact of IONPs may damage an organism's ability to develop or reproduce. To date, there has been experimental evidence of IONPs having mutagenic interactions on human cell lines including lymphoblastoids, fibroblasts, microvascular endothelial cells, bone marrow cells, lung epithelial cells, alveolar type II like epithelial cells, bronchial fibroblasts, skin epithelial cells, hepatocytes, cerebral endothelial cells, fibrosarcoma cells, breast carcinoma cells, lung carcinoma cells, and cervix carcinoma cells. Other cell lines including the Chinese hamster ovary cells, mouse fibroblast cells, murine fibroblast cells, Mytilus galloprovincialis sperm cells, mice lung cells, murine alveolar macrophages, mice hepatic and renal tissue cells, and vero cells have also shown mutagenic effects upon exposure to IONPs. We further show the influence of IONPs on microorganisms in the presence and absence of dissolved organic carbon. The results shed light on the OPEN ACCESS Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2015, 16 23483 transformations IONPs undergo in the environment and the nature of the potential mutagenic impact on biological cells.

  12. The effect of green tea on radiation-induced late biological effect in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Ho; Kim, Se Ra; Lee, Hae June; Jo, Sung Kee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    This study was performed to determine the effect of Green tea on the late biological effect of mice irradiated with 3 Gy of gamma-radiation. There were various findings including hematopoietic and lymphoid tumor, lung cancer, ovarian cancer and cancer of other lesions. Further studies are needed to characterize better the protective nature of active compounds.

  13. Inhibitory effect of an ethanol extract of a rice bran mixture including Angelica gigas, Cnidium officinale, Artemisia princeps and Camellia sinensis on Brucella abortus uptake by professional and non-professional phagocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hop, Huynh Tan; Arayan, Lauren Togonon; Reyes, Alisha Wehdnesday Bernardo; Huy, Tran Xuan Ngoc; Baek, Eun Jin; Min, WonGi; Lee, Hu Jang; Lee, Chun Hee; Rhee, Man Hee; Kim, Suk

    2017-09-05

    In this study, we evaluated the inhibitory effect of a rice bran mixture extract (RBE) on Brucella (B.) abortus pathogenesis in professional (RAW 264.7) and non-professional (HeLa) phagocytes. We fermented the rice bran mixture and then extracted with 50% ethanol followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to identify components in RBE. Our results clearly showed that RBE caused a significant reduction in the adherence of B. abortus in both cell lines. Furthermore, analysis of phagocytic signaling proteins by Western blot revealed that RBE pretreatment resulted in inhibition of phosphorylation of JNK, ERK and p38, leading to decline of internalization compared with the controls. Additionally, the intensity of F-actin observed by fluorescence microscopy and FACS was remarkably reduced in RBE-pretreated cells compared with control cells. However, the intracellular replication of B. abortus within phagocytes was not affected by RBE. Taken together, these findings suggest that the phagocytic receptor blocking and suppressive effects of RBE on the MAPK-linked phagocytic signaling pathway could negatively affect the invasion of B. abortus into phagocytes.

  14. Teratogenic effect of Californium-252 irradiation in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satow, Yukio; Lee, Juing-Yi; Hori, Hiroshi; Okuda, Hiroe; Tsuchimoto, Shigeo; Sawada, Shozo; Yokoro, Kenjiro (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Nuclear Medicine and Biology)

    1989-06-01

    The teratogenicity of Californium-252 (Cf-252) irradiation which generates approximately 70% 2.3 MeV fast neutron and 30% gamma rays was evaluated. A single whole body exposure of Cf-252 at various doses was given to pregnant rats on day 8 or 9 of pregnancy, followed by microscopic autopsy of the fetuses at the terminal stage of pregnancy to search for external and internal malformations. For comparison, pregnant rats were irradiated with various doses of Cobalt-60 (Co-60) standard gamma rays at the same dose rate (1 rad/min.). The doses were 20-120 rad of Cf-252 and 80-220 rad of Co-60. Using frequency of radiation induced malformations observed on day 8 of pregnancy as an index, relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 2.3-2.7 was obtained from the straight line obtained by modifying by the least squares method the frequency curves of malformed fetuses in total implants and in surviving fetuses. The types of malformations induced by Cf-252 and Co-60 irradiation were alike. Using fetal LD/sub 50/ as an index, 2.4 was obtained as RBE when irradiated on day 8 of pregnancy and 3.1 as that when irradiated on day 9. The results showed that Cf-252 had stronger a teratogenic effect than Co-60 gamma rays. (author).

  15. New Scientific Pearl about Biologic Effect of Ionizing Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Alamdaran

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Soon after the discovery of X-ray by Rontgen in 1895, it became evident that radiation can cause some somatic damage to tissues. The hazards of X-ray exposure were clearly known when many large hospitals had radiology departments. The greatest increased in knowledge about X-ray risks had accrued from the dropping of the two atomic bombs in Japan in 1945 and some other atomic accident. For example, among the Japanese bomb survivors from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, there have been about 400 extra cancer deaths. These were the origin of radiology personnel and people fear from radiation exposure and resistant in against simple X-ray exam (radiophobia. However, new scientific data on the effects radiation on survivors, especially about biologic effect of ionizing rays, background radiation exposure, amount of endogenous radiation, hormosis phenomenon and comparison radiation risk with other risk over lifetime are still being continuously revised and risk estimates updated. Fundamentally, this risk is much"nlower than whatever already estimated and it is insignificant in diagnostic domain. Better perception of physician from these instances help to prevent of false radiophobia and to make proper use of diagnostic and therapeutic advantages of ionizing beam.

  16. Effect of Sedimentation on Treated Greywater Through Rotating Biological Contactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashfaque Ahmed Pathan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to study the effect of sedimentation on effluent of a pilot scale Rotating Biological Contactor (RBC. The treated greywater was given three hours sedimentation period and samples were analyzed to observe the effect of sedimentations under variousflow rates. Greywater was separated from the black water and collected in the collection tank and then it was pumped to an overhead tank. This tank supplied a regulated continuous flow of greywater into the RBC chamber at the required flow rate ranging between 0.28 to 1.89 l/min. A pilot scale RBC simulator was developed and placed outside a hall of residence at National Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, Sindh University, Jamshoro. The simulator was operated at the rotational speed of discs of 1.7 rpm. The disks were uneven and textured so as to encourage growth of bacteria on them. These discs were immersed about 40 percent in the greywater.The simulator produced effluent of significant quality and was found efficient in removal of BOD5, COD and TSS as 85%, 68% and 95% respectively.

  17. [Effects of decitabine on biological behavior of U266 cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei-Fang; Yang, Lin-Hua; Dong, Chun-Xia; Zhang, Rui-Juan; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Guo, Zhi-Ping; Chen, Jian-Fang; Zhagn, Li; Feng, Da-Wei

    2011-08-01

    This study was aimed to explore the effects of decitabine on the biological behaviour of U266 cells in vitro so as to provide a new thinking and experiment basis, as well as new evidences for the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma. MTT and colony formation assays were used to evaluate the impact of decitabine on the ability of proliferation of U266 cells; flow cytometry was used to analyze the cell distribution in cell cycle; transwell chamber and matrigel assays were used to observe the ability of migration and invasion. The results indicated that decitabine could significantly suppress the proliferation of U266 cells in time-and dose-dependent manners. The flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that the cells in G(0)-G(1) phase significantly increased while the cells in S and G(2)/M phase decreased. The migration and matrigel invading tests showed that the number of cells moving into under chamber of transwell decreased after U266 cells treated with decitabine. It is concluded that decitabine may act as an effective drug for MM by inhibiting the proliferation, migration and invasion ability, and the specific mechanism needs to be deeply explored.

  18. Relation between lineal energy distribution and relative biological effectiveness for photon beams according to the microdosimetric kinetic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Kase, Yuki; Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Fujita, Yukio; Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Itami, Jun; Kohno, Toshiyuki

    2011-01-01

    Our cell survival data showed the obvious dependence of RBE on photon energy: The RBE value for 200 kV X-rays was approximately 10% greater than those for mega-voltage photon beams. In radiation therapy using mega-voltage photon beams, the photon energy distribution outside the field is different with that in the radiation field because of a large number of low energy scattering photons. Hence, the RBE values outside the field become greater. To evaluate the increase in RBE, the method of deriving the RBE using the Microdosimetric Kinetic model (MK model) was proposed in this study. The MK model has two kinds of the parameters, tissue-specific parameters and the dose-mean lineal energy derived from the lineal energy distributions measured with a Tissue-Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC). The lineal energy distributions with the same geometries of the cell irradiations for 200 kV X-rays, (60)Co γ-rays, and 6 MV X-rays were obtained with the TEPC and Monte Carlo code GEANT4. The measured lineal energy distribution for 200 kV X-rays was quite different from those for mega-voltage photon beams. The dose-mean lineal energy of 200 kV X-rays showed the greatest value, 4.51 keV/µm, comparing with 2.34 and 2.36 keV/µm for (60)Co γ-rays and 6 MV X-rays, respectively. By using the results of the TEPC and cell irradiations, the tissue-specific parameters in the MK model were determined. As a result, the RBE of the photon beams (y(D): 2~5 keV/µm) in arbitrary conditions can be derived by the measurements only or the calculations only of the dose-mean lineal energy.

  19. Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal: Metabolic Insights and Salinity Effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welles, L.

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is a biological process for efficient phosphate removal from wastewaters through intracellular storage of polyphosphate by polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAO) and subsequent removal of PAO from the system through wastage of sludge. In comparison t

  20. The biological effects of ionising radiation on Crustaceans: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuller, Neil; Lerebours, Adélaïde [Institute of Marine Sciences, School of Biological Sciences, University of Portsmouth, Ferry Road, Portsmouth, Hampshire PO4 9LY (United Kingdom); Smith, Jim T. [School of Earth & Environmental Sciences, University of Portsmouth, Burnaby Building, Burnaby Road, Portsmouth, Hampshire PO1 3QL (United Kingdom); Ford, Alex T., E-mail: alex.ford@port.ac.uk [Institute of Marine Sciences, School of Biological Sciences, University of Portsmouth, Ferry Road, Portsmouth, Hampshire PO4 9LY (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • We comprehensively review the effects of ionising radiation in crustaceans. • Current environmental radioprotection levels found to be inadequate in some cases. • Mutation is shown to be a sensitive endpoint of radiation exposure. • Lowest observed effect dose rate varies by orders of magnitude. - Abstract: Historic approaches to radiation protection are founded on the conjecture that measures to safeguard humans are adequate to protect non-human organisms. This view is disparate with other toxicants wherein well-developed frameworks exist to minimise exposure of biota. Significant data gaps for many organisms, coupled with high profile nuclear incidents such as Chernobyl and Fukushima, have prompted the re-evaluation of our approach toward environmental radioprotection. Elucidating the impacts of radiation on biota has been identified as priority area for future research within both scientific and regulatory communities. The crustaceans are ubiquitous in aquatic ecosystems, comprising greater than 66,000 species of ecological and commercial importance. This paper aims to assess the available literature of radiation-induced effects within this subphylum and identify knowledge gaps. A literature search was conducted pertaining to radiation effects on four endpoints as stipulated by a number of regulatory bodies: mortality, morbidity, reproduction and mutation. A major finding of this review was the paucity of data regarding the effects of environmentally relevant radiation doses on crustacean biology. Extremely few studies utilising chronic exposure durations or wild populations were found across all four endpoints. The dose levels at which effects occur was found to vary by orders of magnitude thus presenting difficulties in developing phyla-specific benchmark values and reference levels for radioprotection. Based on the limited data, mutation was found to be the most sensitive endpoint of radiation exposure, with mortality the least sensitive

  1. The effect of network biology on drug toxicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gautier, Laurent; Taboureau, Olivier; Audouze, Karine Marie Laure

    2013-01-01

    it with bioinformatics. With this approach, the assessment of chemical safety can be done across multiple scales of complexity from molecular to cellular and system levels in human health. Network biology can be used at several levels of complexity. Areas covered: This review describes the strengths and limitations......Introduction: The high failure rate of drug candidates due to toxicity, during clinical trials, is a critical issue in drug discovery. Network biology has become a promising approach, in this regard, using the increasingly large amount of biological and chemical data available and combining...... of network biology. The authors specifically assess this approach across different biological scales when it is applied to toxicity. Expert opinion: There has been much progress made with the amount of data that is generated by various omics technologies. With this large amount of useful data, network...

  2. Examining the Effect of Multiple Writing Tasks on Year 10 Biology Students' Understandings of Cell and Molecular Biology Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Brian; Hohenshell, Liesl; Prain, Vaughan

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on a study that examined the cumulative effects on students' learning of science, and perceptions of the role of writing in learning, when the students engaged in multiple writing tasks with planning strategy support. The study was conducted with Year 10 biology students who completed two consecutive units on Cells and Molecular…

  3. Nanogold – Biological effects and occupational exposure levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Świdwińska-Gajewska

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Nanogold has different properties and biological activity compared to metallic gold. It can be applied in many fields, such as medicine, laboratory diagnostics and electronics. Studies on laboratory animals show that nanogold can be absorbed by inhalation and ingestion. It can penetrate deep into the epidermis and dermis, but there is no evidence that it is absorbed through the skin. Gold nanoobjects accumulate mainly in the liver and spleen, but they can also reach other internal organs. Nanogold can cross the blood–brain and blood–placenta barriers. Toxicokinetics of nanogold depends on the particle size, shape and surface charge. In animals exposure to gold nanoparticles via inhalation induces slight changes in the lungs. Exposure to nanogold by the oral route does not cause adverse health effects in rodents. In animals after injection of gold nanoobjects changes in the liver and lungs were observed. Nanogold induced genotoxic effects in cells, but not in animals. No adverse effects on the fetus or reproduction were found. There are no carcinogenicity studies on gold nanoparticles. The mechanism of toxicity may be related to the interaction of gold nanoobjects with proteins and DNA, and it leads to the induction of oxidative stress and genetic material damage. The impact of nanostructures on human health has not yet been fully understood. The person, who works with nanomaterials should exercise extreme caution and apply existing recommendations on the evaluation of nanoobjects exposure. The risk assessment should be the basis for taking appropriate measures to limit potential exposure to nanometals, including nanogold. Med Pr 2017;68(4:545–556

  4. Occurrence and Potential Biological Effects of Amphetamine on Stream Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sylvia S; Paspalof, Alexis M; Snow, Daniel D; Richmond, Erinn K; Rosi-Marshall, Emma J; Kelly, John J

    2016-09-06

    The presence of pharmaceuticals, including illicit drugs in aquatic systems, is a topic of environmental significance because of their global occurrence and potential effects on aquatic ecosystems and human health, but few studies have examined the ecological effects of illicit drugs. We conducted a survey of several drug residues, including the potentially illicit drug amphetamine, at 6 stream sites along an urban to rural gradient in Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A. We detected numerous drugs, including amphetamine (3 to 630 ng L(-1)), in all stream sites. We examined the fate and ecological effects of amphetamine on biofilm, seston, and aquatic insect communities in artificial streams exposed to an environmentally relevant concentration (1 μg L(-1)) of amphetamine. The amphetamine parent compound decreased in the artificial streams from less than 1 μg L(-1) on day 1 to 0.11 μg L(-1) on day 22. In artificial streams treated with amphetamine, there was up to 45% lower biofilm chlorophyll a per ash-free dry mass, 85% lower biofilm gross primary production, 24% greater seston ash-free dry mass, and 30% lower seston community respiration compared to control streams. Exposing streams to amphetamine also changed the composition of bacterial and diatom communities in biofilms at day 21 and increased cumulative dipteran emergence by 65% and 89% during the first and third weeks of the experiment, respectively. This study demonstrates that amphetamine and other biologically active drugs are present in urban streams and have the potential to affect both structure and function of stream communities.

  5. Determining environmental causes of biological effects: the need for a mechanistic physiological dimension in conservation biology

    OpenAIRE

    Seebacher, Frank; Craig E. Franklin

    2012-01-01

    The emerging field of Conservation Physiology links environmental change and ecological success by the application of physiological theory, approaches and tools to elucidate and address conservation problems. Human activity has changed the natural environment to a point where the viability of many ecosystems is now under threat. There are already many descriptions of how changes in biological patterns are correlated with environmental changes. The next important step is to determine the causa...

  6. Relative Biological Effectiveness and Peripheral Damage of Antiproton Annihilation

    CERN Multimedia

    Kavanagh, J N; Kaiser, F; Tegami, S; Schettino, G; Kovacevic, S; Hajdukovic, D; Currell, F J; Toelli, H T; Doser, M; Holzscheiter, M; Herrmann, R; Timson, D J; Alsner, J; Landua, R; Knudsen, H; Comor, J; Moller, S P; Beyer, G

    2002-01-01

    The use of ions to deliver radiation to a body for therapeutic purposes has the potential to be significant improvement over the use of low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation because of the improved energy deposition profile and the enhanced biological effects of ions relative to photons. Proton therapy centers exist and are being used to treat patients. In addition, the initial use of heavy ions such as carbon is promising to the point that new treatment facilities are planned. Just as with protons or heavy ions, antiprotons can be used to deliver radiation to the body in a controlled way; however antiprotons will exhibit additional energy deposition due to annihilation of the antiprotons within the body. The slowing down of antiprotons in matter is similar to that of protons except at the very end of the range beyond the Bragg peak. Gray and Kalogeropoulos estimated the additional energy deposited by heavy nuclear fragments within a few millimeters of the annihilation vertex to be approximately 30 MeV (...

  7. Effects of Simulated Rare Earth Recycling Wastewaters on Biological Nitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Yoshiko; Barnes, Joni; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Lencka, Malgorzata M; Anderko, Andrzej; Riman, Richard E; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-08-18

    Increasing rare earth element (REE) supplies by recycling and expanded ore processing will result in generation of new wastewaters. In some cases, disposal to a sewage treatment plant may be favored, but plant performance must be maintained. To assess the potential effects of such wastewaters on biological treatment, model nitrifying organisms Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi were exposed to simulated wastewaters containing varying levels of yttrium or europium (10, 50, and 100 ppm), and the extractant tributyl phosphate (TBP, at 0.1 g/L). Y and Eu additions at 50 and 100 ppm inhibited N. europaea, even when virtually all of the REE was insoluble. Provision of TBP with Eu increased N. europaea inhibition, although TBP alone did not substantially alter activity. For N. winogradskyi cultures, Eu or Y additions at all tested levels induced significant inhibition, and nitrification shut down completely with TBP addition. REE solubility was calculated using the previously developed MSE (Mixed-Solvent Electrolyte) thermodynamic model. The model calculations reveal a strong pH dependence of solubility, typically controlled by the precipitation of REE hydroxides but also likely affected by the formation of unknown phosphate phases, which determined aqueous concentrations experienced by the microorganisms.

  8. Stochastic Effects in Computational Biology of Space Radiation Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Pluth, Janis; Harper, Jane; O'Neill, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Estimating risk from space radiation poses important questions on the radiobiology of protons and heavy ions. We are considering systems biology models to study radiation induced repair foci (RIRF) at low doses, in which less than one-track on average transverses the cell, and the subsequent DNA damage processing and signal transduction events. Computational approaches for describing protein regulatory networks coupled to DNA and oxidative damage sites include systems of differential equations, stochastic equations, and Monte-Carlo simulations. We review recent developments in the mathematical description of protein regulatory networks and possible approaches to radiation effects simulation. These include robustness, which states that regulatory networks maintain their functions against external and internal perturbations due to compensating properties of redundancy and molecular feedback controls, and modularity, which leads to general theorems for considering molecules that interact through a regulatory mechanism without exchange of matter leading to a block diagonal reduction of the connecting pathways. Identifying rate-limiting steps, robustness, and modularity in pathways perturbed by radiation damage are shown to be valid techniques for reducing large molecular systems to realistic computer simulations. Other techniques studied are the use of steady-state analysis, and the introduction of composite molecules or rate-constants to represent small collections of reactants. Applications of these techniques to describe spatial and temporal distributions of RIRF and cell populations following low dose irradiation are described.

  9. Chemical and biological oxidative effects of carbon black nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Eiko; Kobayashi, Takahiro

    2006-11-01

    Several studies show that ultrafine particles have a larger surface area than coarse particles, thus causing a greater inflammatory response. In this study, we investigated chemical and biological oxidative effects of nanoparticles in vitro. Carbon black (CB) nanoparticles with mean aerodynamic diameters of 14, 56, and 95nm were examined. The innate oxidative capacity of the CB nanoparticles was measured by consumption of dithiothreitol (DTT) in cell-free system. The expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in rat alveolar type II epithelial cell line (SV40T2) and alveolar macrophages (AM) exposed to CB nanoparticles was measured by ELISA. DTT consumption of 14nm CB was higher than that of other CB nanoparticles having the same particle weight. However, DTT consumption was directly proportional to the particle surface area. HO-1 protein in SV40T2 cells was significantly increased by the 14nm and 56nm CB, however, 95nm CB did not affect. HO-1 protein in AM was significantly increased by the 14, 56, and 95nm CB. The increase in HO-1 expression was diminished by N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) treatment of each CB nanoparticles before exposure although the difference between the effects of NAC-treated and untreated 14nm CB did not achieve significant. In conclusion, CB nanoparticles have innate oxidative capacity that may be dependent on the surface area. CB nanoparticles can induce oxidative stress in alveolar epithelial cells and AM that is more prominent with smaller particles. The oxidative stress may, at least partially, be mediated by surface function of particles.

  10. Tea polyphenols, their biological effects and potential molecular targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, D; Milacic, V; Chen, M S; Wan, S B; Lam, W H; Huo, C; Landis-Piwowar, K R; Cui, Q C; Wali, A; Chan, T H; Dou, Q P

    2008-04-01

    Tea is the most popular beverage in the world, second only to water. Tea contains an infusion of the leaves from the Camellia sinensis plant rich in polyphenolic compounds known as catechins, the most abundant of which is (-)-EGCG. Although tea has been consumed for centuries, it has only recently been studied extensively as a health-promoting beverage that may act to prevent a number of chronic diseases and cancers. The results of several investigations indicate that green tea consumption may be of modest benefit in reducing the plasma concentration of cholesterol and preventing atherosclerosis. Additionally, the cancer-preventive effects of green tea are widely supported by results from epidemiological, cell culture, animal and clinical studies. In vitro cell culture studies show that tea polyphenols potently induce apoptotic cell death and cell cycle arrest in tumor cells but not in their normal cell counterparts. Green tea polyphenols were shown to affect several biological pathways, including growth factor-mediated pathway, the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase-dependent pathway, and ubiquitin/proteasome degradation pathways. Various animal studies have revealed that treatment with green tea inhibits tumor incidence and multiplicity in different organ sites such as skin, lung, liver, stomach, mammary gland and colon. Recently, phase I and II clinical trials have been conducted to explore the anticancer effects of green tea in humans. A major challenge of cancer prevention is to integrate new molecular findings into clinical practice. Therefore, identification of more molecular targets and biomarkers for tea polyphenols is essential for improving the design of green tea trials and will greatly assist in a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying its anti-cancer activity.

  11. Effectiveness of a biological control agent Palexorista gilvoides in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Uganda Journal of Agricultural Sciences by National Agricultural Research Organisation is licensed under a ... gilvoides as a potential biological control agent for G. podocarpi. Field and .... are related to stress factors and are considered ...

  12. Sex matters: The effects of biological sex on adipose tissue biology and energy metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa G. Valencak

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue is a complex and multi-faceted organ. It responds dynamically to internal and external stimuli, depending on the developmental stage and activity of the organism. The most common functional subunits of adipose tissue, white and brown adipocytes, regulate and respond to endocrine processes, which then determine metabolic rate as well as adipose tissue functions. While the molecular aspects of white and brown adipose biology have become clearer in the recent past, much less is known about sex-specific differences in regulation and deposition of adipose tissue, and the specific role of the so-called pink adipocytes during lactation in females. This review summarises the current understanding of adipose tissue dynamics with a focus on sex-specific differences in adipose tissue energy metabolism and endocrine functions, focussing on mammalian model organisms as well as human-derived data. In females, pink adipocytes trans-differentiate during pregnancy from subcutaneous white adipocytes and are responsible for milk-secretion in mammary glands. Overlooking biological sex variation may ultimately hamper clinical treatments of many aspects of metabolic disorders.

  13. The Effects of Ultrasound on Biological Systems: Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Karmi, Anan M.

    vs. 18 minutes). This demonstrates that the biological effects of ultrasound are influenced by Ca^ {2+}. The larger increases in G _{rm t} and the time constants confirm other studies addressing the role of Ca ^{2+} in potentiating lipid peroxidation by free radicals, and the role of calcium ions in the formation of tight junctions.

  14. Penetration and propagation into biological matter and biological effects of high-power ultra-wideband pulses: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunck, Thérèse; Bieth, François; Pinguet, Sylvain; Delmote, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Systems emitting ultra-wideband high power microwave (HP/UWB) pulses are developed for military and civilian applications. HP/UWB pulses typically have durations on the order of nanoseconds, rise times of picoseconds and amplitudes around 100 kV m(-1). This article reviews current research on biological effects from HP/UWB exposure. The different references were classified according to endpoints (cardiovascular system, central nervous system, behavior, genotoxicity, teratology …). The article also reviews the aspects of mechanisms of interactions and tissue damage as well as the numerical work that has been done for studying HP/UWB pulse propagation and pulse energy deposition inside biological tissues. The mechanisms proposed are the molecular conformation change, the modification of chemical reaction rates, membrane excitation and breakdown and direct electrical forces on cells or cell constituents, and the energy deposition. As regards the penetration of biological matter and the deposited energy, mainly computations were published. They have shown that the EM field inside the biological matter is strongly modified compared to the incident EM field and that the energy absorption for HP/UWB pulses occurs in the same way as for continuous waves. However, the energy carried by a HP/UWB pulse is very low and the deposited energy is low. The number of published studies dealing with the biological effects is small and only a few pointed out slight effects. It should be further noted that the animal populations used in the studies were not always large, the statistical analyses not always relevant and the teams involved in this research rather limited in number.

  15. Inhibitory effect of rice bran extracts and its phenolic compounds on polyphenol oxidase activity and browning in potato and apple puree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhonthara, Sukhontha; Kaewka, Kunwadee; Theerakulkait, Chockchai

    2016-01-01

    Full-fatted and commercially defatted rice bran extracts (RBE and CDRBE) were evaluated for their ability to inhibit enzymatic browning in potato and apple. RBE showed more effective inhibition of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity and browning in potato and apple as compared to CDRBE. Five phenolic compounds in RBE and CDRBE (protocatechuic acid, vanillic acid, p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid and sinapic acid) were identified by HPLC. They were then evaluated for their important role in the inhibition using a model system which found that ferulic acid in RBE and p-coumaric acid in CDRBE were active in enzymatic browning inhibition of potato and apple. p-Coumaric acid exhibited the highest inhibitory effect on potato and apple PPO (p ⩽ 0.05). Almost all phenolic compounds showed higher inhibitory effect on potato and apple PPO than 100 ppm citric acid.

  16. Countermeasures for Space Radiation Induced Malignancies and Acute Biological Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann

    The hypothesis being evaluated in this research program is that control of radiation induced oxidative stress will reduce the risk of radiation induced adverse biological effects occurring as a result of exposure to the types of radiation encountered during space travel. As part of this grant work, we have evaluated the protective effects of several antioxidants and dietary supplements and observed that a mixture of antioxidants (AOX), containing L-selenomethionine, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), ascorbic acid, vitamin E succinate, and alpha-lipoic acid, is highly effective at reducing space radiation induced oxidative stress in both in vivo and in vitro systems, space radiation induced cytotoxicity and malignant transformation in vitro [1-7]. In studies designed to determine whether the AOX formulation could affect radiation induced mortality [8], it was observed that the AOX dietary supplement increased the 30-day survival of ICR male mice following exposure to a potentially lethal dose (8 Gy) of X-rays when given prior to or after animal irradiation. Pretreatment of animals with antioxidants resulted in significantly higher total white blood cell and neutrophil counts in peripheral blood at 4 and 24 hours following exposure to doses of 1 Gy and 8 Gy. Antioxidant treatment also resulted in increased bone marrow cell counts following irradiation, and prevented peripheral lymphopenia following 1 Gy irradiation. Supplementation with antioxidants in irradiated animals resulted in several gene expression changes: the antioxidant treatment was associated with increased Bcl-2, and decreased Bax, caspase-9 and TGF-β1 mRNA expression in the bone marrow following irradiation. These results suggest that modulation of apoptosis may be mechanistically involved in hematopoietic system radioprotection by antioxidants. Maintenance of the antioxidant diet was associated with improved recovery of the bone marrow following sub-lethal or potentially lethal irradiation. Taken together

  17. Photon iso-effective dose for cancer treatment with mixed field radiation based on dose-response assessment from human and an animal model: clinical application to boron neutron capture therapy for head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Sara Josefina; Pozzi, Emiliano C C; Monti Hughes, Andrea; Provenzano, Lucas; Koivunoro, Hanna; Carando, Daniel Germán; Thorp, Silvia Inés; Casal, Mariana Rosalía; Bortolussi, Silva; Trivillin, Verónica A; Garabalino, Marcela A; Curotto, Paula; Heber, Elisa M; Santa Cruz, Gustavo A; Kankaanranta, Leena; Joensuu, Heikki; Schwint, Amanda E

    2017-08-31

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a treatment modality that combines different radiation qualities. Since the severity of biological damage following irradiation depends on the radiation type, a quantity different from absorbed dose is required to explain effects observed in the clinical BNCT in terms of outcome compared with conventional photon radiation therapy. A new approach for calculating photon iso-effective doses in BNCT was introduced previously. The present work extends this model to include information from dose-response assessments in animal models and humans. Parameters of the model were determined for tumour and precancerous tissue using dose-response curves obtained from BNCT and photon studies performed in the hamster cheek pouch in vivo models of oral cancer and/or pre-cancer, and from head and neck cancer radiotherapy data with photons. To this end, suitable expressions of the dose-limiting Normal Tissue Complication and Tumour Control Probabilities for the reference radiation and for the mixed field BNCT radiation were developed. Pearson's correlation coefficients and p-values showed that TCP and NTCP models agreed with experimental data (with r > 0.87 and p-values >0.57). The photon iso-effective dose model was applied retrospectively to evaluate the dosimetry in tumours and mucosa for head and neck cancer patients treated with BNCT in Finland. Photon iso-effective doses in tumour were lower than those obtained with the standard RBE-weighted model (between 10% to 45%). The results also suggested that the probabilities of tumour control derived from photon iso-effective doses are more adequate to explain the clinical responses than those obtained with the RBE-weighted values. The dosimetry in the mucosa revealed that the photon iso-effective doses were about 30% to 50% higher than the corresponding RBE-weighted values. While the RBE-weighted doses are unable to predict mucosa toxicity, predictions based on the proposed model are

  18. Essential Oils from Thyme (Thymus vulgaris): Chemical Composition and Biological Effects in Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetvicka, Vaclav; Vetvickova, Jana

    2016-12-01

    Thymus species are popular spices and contain volatile oils as main chemical constituents. Recently, plant-derived essential oils are gaining significant attention due to their significant biological activities. Seven different thymus-derived essential oils were compared in our study. First, we focused on their chemical composition, which was followed up by testing their effects on phagocytosis, cytokine production, chemotaxis, edema inhibition, and liver protection. We found limited biological activities among tested oils, with no correlation between composition and biological effects. Similarly, no oils were effective in every reaction. Based on our data, the tested biological use of these essential oils is questionable.

  19. Effect of Process-Oriented Guided-Inquiry Learning on Non-majors Biology Students' Understanding of Biological Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, Breann M.

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of process-oriented guided-inquiry learning (POGIL) on non-majors college biology students' understanding of biological classification. This study addressed an area of science instruction, POGIL in the non-majors college biology laboratory, which has yet to be qualitatively and quantitatively researched. A concurrent triangulation mixed methods approach was used. Students' understanding of biological classification was measured in two areas: scores on pre and posttests (consisting of 11 multiple choice questions), and conceptions of classification as elicited in pre and post interviews and instructor reflections. Participants were Minnesota State University, Mankato students enrolled in BIOL 100 Summer Session. One section was taught with the traditional curriculum (n = 6) and the other section in the POGIL curriculum (n = 10) developed by the researcher. Three students from each section were selected to take part in pre and post interviews. There were no significant differences within each teaching method (p vs. M = 7.330 +/- .330; z =-1.729, p = .084) and the traditional group may have scored higher on the pretest than the posttest (M = 8.333 +/- .333 vs M = 7.333 +/- .333; z = -1.650 , p = .099). Two themes emerged after the interviews and instructor reflections: 1) After instruction students had a more extensive understanding of classification in three areas: vocabulary terms, physical characteristics, and types of evidence used to classify. Both groups extended their understanding, but only POGIL students could explain how molecular evidence is used in classification. 2) The challenges preventing students from understanding classification were: familiar animal categories and aquatic habitats, unfamiliar organisms, combining and subdividing initial groupings, and the hierarchical nature of classification. The POGIL students were the only group to surpass these challenges after the teaching intervention. This

  20. Towards Space Exploration of Moon, Mars Neos: Radiation Biological Basis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellweg, Christine; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Berger, Thomas; Reitz, Guenther

    2016-07-01

    Radiation has emerged as the most critical issue to be resolved for long-term missions both orbital and interplanetary. Astronauts are constantly exposed to galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) of various energies with a low dose rate. Primarily late tissue sequels like genetic alterations, cancer and non-cancer effects, i.e. cataracts and degenerative diseases of e.g. the central nervous system or the cardiovascular system, are the potential risks. Cataracts were observed to occur earlier and more often in astronauts exposed to higher proportions of galactic ions (Cucinotta et al., 2001). Predictions of cancer risk and acceptable radiation exposure in space are subject to many uncertainties including the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of space radiation especially heavy ions, dose-rate effects and possible interaction with microgravity and other spaceflight environmental factors. The initial cellular response to radiation exposure paves the way to late sequelae and starts with damage to the DNA which complexity depends on the linear energy transfer (LET) of the radiation. Repair of such complex DNA damage is more challenging and requires more time than the repair of simple DNA double strand breaks (DSB) which can be visualized by immunofluorescence staining of the phosphorylated histone 2AX (γH2AX) and might explain the observed prolonged cell cycle arrests induced by high-LET in comparison to low-LET irradiation. Unrepaired or mis-repaired DNA DSB are proposed to be responsible for cell death, mutations, chromosomal aberrations and oncogenic cell transformation. Cell killing and mutation induction are most efficient in an LET range of 90-200 keV/µm. Also the activation of transcription factors such as Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) and gene expression shaping the cellular radiation response depend on the LET with a peak RBE between 90 and 300 keV/µm. Such LET-RBE relationships were observed for cataract and cancer induction by heavy ions in laboratory animals

  1. Biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure; Biologische Wirkungen niedriger Dosen ionisierender Strahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinoehl-Kompa, Sabine; Baldauf, Daniela; Heller, Horst (comps.)

    2009-07-01

    The report on the meeting of the Strahlenschutzkommission 2007 concerning biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure includes the following contributions: Adaptive response. The importance of DNA damage mechanisms for the biological efficiency of low-energy photons. Radiation effects in mammography: the relative biological radiation effects of low-energy photons. Radiation-induced cataracts. Carcinomas following prenatal radiation exposure. Intercellular apoptosis induction and low-dose irradiation: possible consequences for the oncogenesis control. Mechanistic models for the carcinogenesis with radiation-induced cell inactivation: application to all solid tumors in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Microarrays at low radiation doses. Mouse models for the analysis of biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. The bystander effect: observations, mechanisms and implications. Lung carcinoma risk of Majak workers - modeling of carcinogenesis and the bystander effect. Microbeam studies in radiation biology - an overview. Carcinogenesis models with radiation-induced genomic instability. Application to two epidemiological cohorts.

  2. Radon exposure of the skin: I. Biological effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles, M W [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-15

    Radon progeny can plate out on skin and give rise to exposure of the superficial epidermis from alpha emitters Po-218 (7.7 MeV, range {approx}66 {mu}m) and Po-214 (6 MeV, range {approx}44 {mu}m). Dose rates from beta/gamma emitters Pb-214 and Bi-214 are low and only predominate at depths in excess of the alpha range. This paper reviews the evidence for a causal link between exposure from radon and its progeny, and deterministic and stochastic biological effects in human skin. Radiation induced skin effects such as ulceration and dermal atrophy, which require irradiation of the dermis, are ruled out for alpha irradiation from radon progeny because the target cells are considerably deeper than the range of alpha particles. They have not been observed in man or animals. Effects such as erythema and acute epidermal necrosis have been observed in a few cases of very high dose alpha particle exposures in man and after acute high dose exposure in animals from low energy beta radiations with similar depth doses to radon progeny. The required skin surface absorbed doses are in excess of 100 Gy. Such effects would require extremely high levels of radon progeny. They would involve quite exceptional circumstances, way outside the normal range of radon exposures in man. There is no definitive identification of the target cells for skin cancer induction in animals or man. The stem cells in the basal layer which maintain the epidermis are the most plausible contenders for target cells. The majority of these cells are near the end of the range of radon progeny alpha particles, even on the thinnest body sites. The nominal depth of these cells, as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), is 70 {mu}m. There is evidence however that some irradiation of the hair follicles and/or the deeper dermis, as well as the inter-follicular epidermis, is also necessary for skin cancer induction. Alpha irradiation of rodent skin that is restricted to the

  3. Radioprotection, biological effects of the radiations and security in the handling of radioactive material

    CERN Document Server

    Teran, M

    2000-01-01

    The development of the philosophy of the radioprotection is dependent on the understanding of the effects of the radiation in the man. Behind the fact that the radiation is able to produce biological damages there are certain factors with regard to the biological effects of the radiations that determine the boarding of the radioprotection topics.

  4. Controlling the Biological Effects of Spermine Using a Synthetic Receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vial, Laurent; Ludlow, R. Frederick; Leclaire, Julien; Pérez-Fernández, Ruth; Otto, Sijbren

    2006-01-01

    Polyamines play an important role in biology, yet their exact function in many processes is poorly understood. Artificial host molecules capable of sequestering polyamines could be useful tools for studying their cellular function. However, designing synthetic receptors with affinities sufficient to

  5. Biological and technological effects of some mulberry varieties and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    egyptian hak

    Approaches for improving the nutritional wellbeing of humans such as food diversification, supplementation with capsules or syrups, molecular biology and industrial food ... To record growth, yield attributes and yields of corn, five plants were randomly selected ..... FAO (1996) Human vitamin and mineral requirements. No.

  6. Effect of sulphide on enhanced biological phosphorus removal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubio Rincon, F.J.

    2017-01-01

    The enhanced biological removal of phosphorus (EBPR) is a popular process due to high removal efficiency, low operational costs, and the possibility of phosphorus recovery. Nevertheless, the stability of the EBPR depends on different factors such as: temperature, pH, and the presence of toxic

  7. Biological Effects of Electromagnetic Radiation. Volume II, Number 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-12-01

    produce meat cubes and similar ingredients f or p ies , ready meals , and Alan H. Barrett and Philip C. Meyers of MIT have de— canned products. It can also...area and may cause hormonal and biochemical Cross e , Wisc.) and A. Prieto , Jr. Biologic and Cli~— changes . A series of p i l o t hormonal screening

  8. K-shell ionization and biological effects; Ionisation en couche K et effet biologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L' Hoir, A.; Herve du Penhoat, M.A.; Champion, C.; Fayard, B.; Touati, A.; Abel, F.; Politis, M.F.; Chetioui, A. [Paris-7 Univ., 75 (France); Paris-6 Univ., 75 (France); Despiney-Bailly, I. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France); Sabatier, L. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Direction des Sciences du Vivant

    1998-04-01

    Initial steps of radiation action mechanism on biological targets are still unknown. The strong correlation observed between inactivation cross sections by heavy ions and K-vacancy production cross sections has drawn the attention on this process. Although quite minor in the energy deposition of these particles, the K-ionization process gives rise to quite efficient ionization clusters. Values of K-ionization biological effectivenesses extracted from measured relative biological efficiencies of ultra soft X-rays support the idea of a major -may be a dominant- contribution of the K-vacancy process to the biological effect of heavy ions. (authors)

  9. Biological Effects of Listeriolysin O: Implications for Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. G. Hernández-Flores

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Listeriolysin O (LLO is a thiol-activated cholesterol-dependent pore-forming toxin and the major virulence factor of Listeria monocytogenes (LM. Extensive research in recent years has revealed that LLO exerts a wide array of biological activities, during the infection by LM or by itself as recombinant antigen. The spectrum of biological activities induced by LLO includes cytotoxicity, apoptosis induction, endoplasmic reticulum stress response, modulation of gene expression, intracellular calcium oscillations, and proinflammatory activity. In addition, LLO is a highly immunogenic toxin and the major target for innate and adaptive immune responses in different animal models and humans. Recently, the crystal structure of LLO has been published in detail. Here, we review the structure-function relationship for this fascinating microbial molecule, highlighting the potential uses of LLO in the fields of biomedicine and biotechnology, particularly in vaccination.

  10. Dehydroepiandrosterone biosynthesis, metabolism, biological effects, and clinical use (analytical review)

    OpenAIRE

    Goncharov, N. P.; G. V. Katsiya

    2015-01-01

    The review presents the fundamental information on the metabolism of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), its biological role and possibilities of its use for replacement therapy. There were studied species differences in the synthesis of DHEA in the adrenal cortex. It was found that DHEA and DHEA-sulfate are produced only by the adrenal glands of humans and monkeys, including lower monkeys. Their biosynthesis involves the following steps: cholesterol → pregnenolone → 17-hydroxypregnenolone → DHEA....

  11. Resurrecting the body: Has portmodernism had any effect on biology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, S F

    1995-01-01

    While postmodernism has had very little influence in biology (for reasons discussed in the paper), it can provide a framework for discussing the context in which biology is done. Here, four biological views of the body/self are contrasted: the neural, immunological, genetic, and phenotypic bodies. Each physical view of the body extrapolates into a different model of the body politic, and each posits a different relationship between bodies of knowledge. The neural view of the body models a body politic wherein society is defined by its culture and laws. The genetic view privileges views of polities based on ethnicity and race. The immune body extrapolates into polities that can defend themselves against other such polities. The phenotypic view of the body politic stands in opposition to these three major perspectives and integrates them without giving any predominance. The view of science as a "neural" body of knowledge contends that science is aperspectival and objective. The perspective of the "immune" body is that science exists to defend the interests of its creataors. The genetic view of science is that science is the basis of all culture. The extrapolation of the phenotypic body to science insists upon the utilitarian rationale for scientific interprises. In all instances, the genetic view of the body/body politic/body of science is presently in ascendance.

  12. Integrated Network Analysis and Effective Tools in Plant Systems Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi eFukushima

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the ultimate goals in plant systems biology is to elucidate the genotype-phenotype relationship in plant cellular systems. Integrated network analysis that combines omics data with mathematical models has received particular attention. Here we focus on the latest cutting-edge computational advances that facilitate their combination. We highlight (1 network visualization tools, (2 pathway analyses, (3 genome-scale metabolic reconstruction, and (4 the integration of high-throughput experimental data and mathematical models. Multi-omics data that contain the genome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome and mathematical models are expected to integrate and expand our knowledge of complex plant metabolisms.

  13. Biological influences on hydrogen effects in steel in seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edyvean, R.G.J.; Benson, J.; Thomas, C.J. [Univ. of Sheffield (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemical and Process Engineering; Beech, I.B. [Univ. of Portsmouth (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry; Videla, H.A. [Univ. of La Plata (Argentina). Dept. of Chemistry

    1997-08-01

    Conditions conducive to the enhancement of corrosion-fatigue crack growth and of hydrogen embrittlement can be generated by the activity of sulfate-reducing bacterial. However, while the presence of bacteria encourages more hydrogen entry into susceptible metals when compared to similar levels of sulfide generated abiotically, corrosion-fatigue crack growth rates are slower in biological environments than the equivalent abiological environment. These results are discussed in the light of recent findings on the enhancement and inhibition of surface corrosion by bacterial biofilms.

  14. Effects of outside air temperature on the preparation of antineoplastic drug solutions in biological safety cabinets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemura, Masayuki; Itoh, Akio; Ando, Yuichi; Yamada, Kiyofumi; Wakiya, Yoshifumi; Nabeshima, Toshitaka

    2015-08-01

    In Japan, biological safety cabinets are commonly used by medical staff to prepare antineoplastic agents. At the Division of Chemotherapy for Outpatients, Nagoya University Hospital, a class II B2 biological safety cabinet is used. The temperature inside this biological safety cabinet decreases in winter. In this study, we investigated the effect of low outside air temperature on the biological safety cabinet temperature, time required to admix antineoplastic agents, and accuracy of epirubicin weight measurement. Studies were conducted from 1 January to 31 March 2008 (winter). The outside air temperature near the biological safety cabinet intake nozzle was compared with the biological safety cabinet temperature. The correlation between the outside air temperature and the biological safety cabinet temperature, time for cyclophosphamide and gemcitabine solubilization, and accuracy of epirubicin weight measurement were investigated at low and high biological safety cabinet temperatures. The biological safety cabinet temperature correlated with the outside air temperature of 5-20℃ (p antineoplastic agents. We suggest that a decrease in biological safety cabinet temperature may increase the time required to admix antineoplastic agents, thereby increasing the time for which outpatients must wait for chemotherapy. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Gender Inequality in Biology Classes in China and Its Effects on Students' Short-Term Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Neuhaus, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated gender inequality in biology lessons and analysed the effects of the observed inequality on students' short-term knowledge achievement, situational interest and students' evaluation of teaching (SET). Twenty-two biology teachers and 803 7th-grade students from rural and urban classrooms in China participated in the study.…

  16. A Study of the Probe Effect on the Apparent Image of Biological Atomic Force Microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The probe effect on the apparent image of biological atomic force microscopy was explored in this study, and the potential of AFM in conformational study of gene related biological processes was illustrated by the specific nanostructural information of a new antitumor drug binding to DNA.

  17. Indirect ecological effects in invaded landscapes: Spillover and spillback from biological control agents to native analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biological control remains an effective option for managing large-scale weed problems in natural areas. The predation or parasitism of biological control agents by other species present in the introduced range (biotic resistance) is well studied and is often cited as the cause for a lack of establis...

  18. Adverse effects of biologics: a network meta-analysis and Cochrane overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, J. A.; Wells, G. A.; Christensen, Robin Daniel Kjersgaard

    2011-01-01

    Background Biologics are used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and many other conditions. While the efficacy of biologics has been established, there is uncertainty regarding the adverse effects of this treatment. Since serious risks such as tuberculosis (TB) reactivation, serious infect...

  19. Biological Effects of TMPRSS2/ERG Fusion Isoforms in Human Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    TITLE: Biological Effects of TMPRSS2/ERG Fusion Isoforms in Human Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jianghua Wang, M.D...6 JAN 2009 / / /4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Biological Effects of TMPRSS2/ERG Fusion Isoforms in Human Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH...quantitative RT-PCR arrays we have identified candidate mediators of these phenotypic effects . We propose to extend these studies to primary prostate epithelial

  20. Linear Energy Transfer Painting With Proton Therapy: A Means of Reducing Radiation Doses With Equivalent Clinical Effectiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fager, Marcus, E-mail: Marcus.Fager@UPHS.UPenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Medical Radiation Physics, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Toma-Dasu, Iuliana [Medical Radiation Physics, Stockholm University and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Kirk, Maura; Dolney, Derek; Diffenderfer, Eric S.; Vapiwala, Neha [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Carabe, Alejandro, E-mail: Alejandro.Carabe-Fernandez@UPHS.UPenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to propose a proton treatment planning method that trades physical dose (D) for dose-averaged linear energy transfer (LET{sub d}) while keeping the radiobiologically weighted dose (D{sub RBE}) to the target the same. Methods and Materials: The target is painted with LET{sub d} by using 2, 4, and 7 fields aimed at the proximal segment of the target (split target planning [STP]). As the LET{sub d} within the target increases with increasing number of fields, D decreases to maintain the D{sub RBE} the same as the conventional treatment planning method by using beams treating the full target (full target planning [FTP]). Results: The LET{sub d} increased 61% for 2-field STP (2STP) compared to FTP, 72% for 4STP, and 82% for 7STP inside the target. This increase in LET{sub d} led to a decrease of D with 5.3 ± 0.6 Gy for 2STP, 4.4 ± 0.7 Gy for 4STP, and 5.3 ± 1.1 Gy for 7STP, keeping the DRBE at 90% of the volume (DRBE, 90) constant to FTP. Conclusions: LET{sub d} painting offers a method to reduce prescribed dose at no cost to the biological effectiveness of the treatment.

  1. Biological effects of an impulse current according to laboratory researches of electroshock devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigoryev О.A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The federal law "About Weapons" permits the use of electroshock devices if they are safe for people. We developed requirements for the procedure medical-biological testing on the safety of electroshock devices. We did an experimental study assessing medical-biological safety of electroshock devices. The assessment is based on a point system, which use ranges of biological effects. The experiments were performed in rabbits. We used 13 electroshock devices with different characteristics. Electroshock devices were made in Russia. We found that the response of a biological object to inrush current included convulsions, respiratory and cardiac activity. We analyzed the biological effects of pulsed current electroshock device obtained in experimental conditions. It is concluded that the characteristic clinical and physiological response to the action of electric current is pulsepolyparametric and depending on a combination of characteristics and condition of the electric impulse influence object.

  2. Biological methanogenesis and the CO2 greenhouse effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, P. D.

    1986-01-01

    It is well established that plants tend to increase net photosynthesis under increased carbon dioxide. It is also well established that a large fraction of atmospheric methane is produced by microbial metabolism of organic sediments in paddies and freshwater wetlands, where a major source of organic debris is local plant growth. As CO2 increases, it may lead to increased methane production and a resulting enhancement of the expected greenhouse warming. A rough estimate of the present rate of this biologically mediated feedback on the climate system indicates that it might account for as much as 30 percent of the observed methane increase and speed up the greenhouse forcing by as much as 15 percent.

  3. Effects of Oxidative Stress on Mesenchymal Stem Cell Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells present in most fetal and adult tissues. Ex vivo culture-expanded MSCs are being investigated for tissue repair and immune modulation, but their full clinical potential is far from realization. Here we review the role of oxidative stress in MSC biology, as their longevity and functions are affected by oxidative stress. In general, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibit MSC proliferation, increase senescence, enhance adipogenic but reduce osteogenic differentiation, and inhibit MSC immunomodulation. Furthermore, aging, senescence, and oxidative stress reduce their ex vivo expansion, which is critical for their clinical applications. Modulation of sirtuin expression and activity may represent a method to reduce oxidative stress in MSCs. These findings have important implications in the clinical utility of MSCs for degenerative and immunological based conditions. Further study of oxidative stress in MSCs is imperative in order to enhance MSC ex vivo expansion and in vivo engraftment, function, and longevity. PMID:27413419

  4. Dehydroepiandrosterone biosynthesis, metabolism, biological effects, and clinical use (analytical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Goncharov

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The review presents the fundamental information on the metabolism of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA, its biological role and possibilities of its use for replacement therapy. There were studied species differences in the synthesis of DHEA in the adrenal cortex. It was found that DHEA and DHEA-sulfate are produced only by the adrenal glands of humans and monkeys, including lower monkeys. Their biosynthesis involves the following steps: cholesterol → pregnenolone → 17-hydroxypregnenolone → DHEA. The adrenal glands of other species, including rats and mice do not synthesize DHEA. At the same time, in certain brain structures not only in man and monkey, but also in other animals DHEA and its precursors are synthesized de novo which are denoted as neurosteroids. It was demonstrated that Purkinje cells which play an important role in memory formation and learning are mainly place neurosteroid formation in mammals and other vertebrates. To establish the relationship of age and the level of DHEA and other steroids we studied the dynamics of their levels at different periods of postnatal development of people. Peak concentration DHEA observed in aged 25–30 years. In the interval from 20 to 90 years in humans the level falls approximately for 90 %. Cortisol levels in blood does not vary with age, leading to an imbalance in the ratio of cortisol/DHEA. Proved a major role of DHEA as a source (precursor for the synthesis of biologically active sex steroids – testosterone, estradiol and estrone in peripheral tissues. This review presents the bioavailability of DHEA in various physiological and pathological processes in humans and animals. In animal experiments has shown a higher bioavailability of DHEA in transdermal administration as compared with oral administration as in this case there is no steroid rapid inactivation in the liver during its first passage. According to recent studies there is a pronounced dependence of bioavailability of DHEA

  5. Dehydroepiandrosterone biosynthesis, metabolism, biological effects, and clinical use (analytical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Goncharov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The review presents the fundamental information on the metabolism of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA, its biological role and possibilities of its use for replacement therapy. There were studied species differences in the synthesis of DHEA in the adrenal cortex. It was found that DHEA and DHEA-sulfate are produced only by the adrenal glands of humans and monkeys, including lower monkeys. Their biosynthesis involves the following steps: cholesterol → pregnenolone → 17-hydroxypregnenolone → DHEA. The adrenal glands of other species, including rats and mice do not synthesize DHEA. At the same time, in certain brain structures not only in man and monkey, but also in other animals DHEA and its precursors are synthesized de novo which are denoted as neurosteroids. It was demonstrated that Purkinje cells which play an important role in memory formation and learning are mainly place neurosteroid formation in mammals and other vertebrates. To establish the relationship of age and the level of DHEA and other steroids we studied the dynamics of their levels at different periods of postnatal development of people. Peak concentration DHEA observed in aged 25–30 years. In the interval from 20 to 90 years in humans the level falls approximately for 90 %. Cortisol levels in blood does not vary with age, leading to an imbalance in the ratio of cortisol/DHEA. Proved a major role of DHEA as a source (precursor for the synthesis of biologically active sex steroids – testosterone, estradiol and estrone in peripheral tissues. This review presents the bioavailability of DHEA in various physiological and pathological processes in humans and animals. In animal experiments has shown a higher bioavailability of DHEA in transdermal administration as compared with oral administration as in this case there is no steroid rapid inactivation in the liver during its first passage. According to recent studies there is a pronounced dependence of bioavailability of DHEA

  6. Biological Effects of Laser Radiation. Volume I. Review of the Literature on Biological Effects of Laser Radiation-to 1965.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-10-17

    Microbeam 51 7. Embryology 82 8. Studies on Normal Animals 91 9. Tumor Studies 159 10. Clinical Studies 188 11. Ophthalmology 232 12. Dental Studies 263...o f e:xnosures 7wacs cad st. Cn3 side of the lesion was Mnainted w-ith 1 7=ns blue. I-oia=io wsCarried out in a fch.eck-er- boar-d ditiuinZt 1...ocular structures. Abstr. - Biological sessions - Boston laser conference, Northeastern University, Boston, Mass. Aug 5-7, 1964. 53. Polyak , S.L.: The

  7. Risk of serious adverse effects of biological and targeted drugs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp, Simon; Eric Furst, Daniel; Boers, Maarten

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine possible differences in serious adverse effects among the 10 currently approved biological and targeted synthetic DMARDs (b/ts-DMARDs) for RA. METHODS: Systematic review in bibliographic databases, trial registries and websites of regulatory agencies identified randomized...

  8. Sequestration of mitochondrial iron by silica particles initiates a biological effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summary Inhalation of particulate matter has presented a challenge to human health for thousands of years. The underlying mechanism for biological effect following particle exposure is incompletely understood. We tested the postulate that particle sequestration of cell and mit...

  9. Effects of cage fish culture on water quality and selected biological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of cage fish culture on water quality and selected biological ... varied spatially and temporally but were generally within safe ranges for freshwater habitats. ... and depressed zooplankton diversity at WC suggested impacts from the fish ...

  10. TH-A-BRD-01: Radiation Biology for Radiation Therapy Physicists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orton, C [Wayne State University, Grosse Pointe, MI (United States); Borras, C [Radiological Physics and Health Services, Washington, DC (United States); Carlson, D [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2014-06-15

    they might be used to address clinically relevant problems. Underlying assumptions and limitations of existing models and their proper application will be discussed. This multidisciplinary educational session combines the fundamentals of radiobiology for radiation therapy and radiation protection with the practical application of biophysical models for treatment planning and evaluation. Learning Objectives: To understand fractionation in teletherapy and dose rate techniques in brachytherapy. To understand how the linear-quadratic models the effect of radiobiological parameters for radiotherapy. To understand the radiobiological basis of radiation protection standards applied to radiotherapy. To distinguish between stochastic effects and tissue reactions. To learn how to apply concepts of biological effective dose and RBE-weighted dose and to incorporate biological factors that alter radiation response. To discuss clinical strategies to increase therapeutic ratio, i.e., maximize local control while minimizing the risk of acute and late normal tissue effects.

  11. Professional development strategies for teaching urban biology teachers to use concept maps effectively

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor Petgrave, Dahlia M.

    Many teachers are not adequately prepared to help urban students who have trouble understanding conceptual ideas in biology because these students have little connection to the natural world. This study explored potential professional development strategies to help urban biology teachers use concept maps effectively with various topics in the biology curriculum. A grounded theory approach was used to develop a substantive professional development model for urban biology teachers. Qualitative data were collected through 16 semi-structured interviews of professional developers experienced in working with concept maps in the urban context. An anonymous online survey was used to collect quantitative data from 56 professional developers and teachers to support the qualitative data. The participants were from New York City, recruited through the NY Biology-Chemistry Professional Development Mentor Network and the NY Biology Teachers' Association. According to the participants, map construction, classroom applications, lesson planning, action research, follow-up workshops, and the creation of learning communities are the most effective professional development strategies. The interviewees also proposed English language learning strategies such as picture maps, native word maps, and content reading materials with underlined words. This study contributes to social change by providing a professional development model to use in planning workshops for urban teachers. Urban teachers improve their own conceptual understanding of biology while learning how to implement concept mapping strategies in the classroom. Students whose teachers are better prepared to teach biology in a conceptual manner have the potential of growing into more scientifically literate citizens.

  12. Effectiveness and biological compatibility of different generations of dentin adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, João M F; Rodrigues, José R; Camargo, Carlos H R; Fernandes, Virgilio Vilas Boas; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Schweikl, Helmut; Schmalz, Gottfried

    2014-01-01

    Besides possessing good mechanical properties, dental materials should present a good biological behavior and should not injure the involved tissues. Bond strength and biocompatibility are both highly significant properties of dentin adhesives. For that matter, these properties of four generations of adhesive systems (Multi-Purpose/Single Bond/SE Plus/Easy Bond) were evaluated. Eighty bovine teeth had their dentin exposed (500- and 200-μm thickness). Adhesive was applied on the dentin layer of each specimen. Following that, the microshearing test was performed for all samples. A dentin barrier test was used for the cytotoxicity evaluation. Cell cultures (SV3NeoB) were collected from testing materials by means of 200- or 500-μm-thick dentin slices and placed in a cell culture perfusion chamber. Cell viability was measured 24 h post-exposition by means of a photometrical test (MTT test). The best bonding performance was shown by the single-step adhesive Easy Bond (21 MPa, 200 μm; 27 MPa, 500 μm) followed by Single Bond (15.6 MPa, 200 μm; 23.4 MPa, 500 μm), SE Plus (18.2 MPa, 200 μm; 20 MPa, 500 μm), and Multi-Purpose (15.2 MPa, 200 μm; 17.9 MPa, 500 μm). Regarding the cytotoxicity, Multi-Purpose slightly reduced the cell viability to 92% (200 μm)/93% (500 μm). Single Bond was reasonably cytotoxic, reducing cell viability to 71% (200 μm)/64% (500 μm). The self-etching adhesive Scotchbond SE decreased cell viability to 85% (200 μm)/71% (500 μm). Conversely, Easy Bond did not reduce cell viability in this test, regardless of the dentin thickness. Results showed that the one-step system had the best bond strength performance and was the least toxic to pulp cells. In multiple-step systems, a correct bonding technique must be done, and a pulp capping strategy is necessary for achieving good performance in both properties. The study showed a promising system (one-step self-etching), referring to it as a good alternative for specific cases, mainly due to its

  13. The role of biological rates in the simulated warming effect on oceanic CO2 uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Long; Zhang, Han

    2017-05-01

    Marine biology plays an important role in the ocean carbon cycle. However, the effect of warming-induced changes in biological rates on oceanic CO2 uptake has been largely overlooked. We use an Earth system model of intermediate complexity to investigate the effect of temperature-induced changes in biological rates on oceanic uptake of atmospheric CO2 and compare it with the effects from warming-induced changes in CO2 solubility and ocean mixing and circulation. Under the representative CO2 concentration pathway RCP 8.5 and its extension, by year 2500, relative to the simulation without warming effect on the ocean carbon cycle, CO2-induced warming reduces cumulative oceanic CO2 uptake by 469 Pg C, of which about 20% is associated with the warming-induced change in marine biological rates. In our simulations, the bulk effect of biological-mediated changes on CO2 uptake is smaller than that mediated by changes in CO2 solubility and ocean mixing and circulation. However, warming-induced changes in individual biological rates, including phytoplankton growth, phytoplankton mortality, and detritus remineralization, are found to affect oceanic CO2 uptake by an amount greater than or comparable to that caused by changes in CO2 solubility and ocean physics. Our simulations, which include only a few temperature-dependent biological processes, demonstrate the important role of biological rates in the oceanic CO2 uptake. In reality, many more complicated biological processes are sensitive to temperature change, and their responses to warming could substantially affect oceanic uptake of atmospheric CO2.

  14. Bioaccumulation and biological effects in the earthworm Eisenia fetida exposed to natural and depleted uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovanetti, Anna, E-mail: anna.giovanetti@enea.i [ENEA, Institute of Radiation Protection, CR Casaccia Via Anguillarese 301, 00123 Rome (Italy); Fesenko, Sergey [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Agency' s Laboratories Seibersdorf, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); Cozzella, Maria L. [ENEA, National Institute for Metrology of Ionizing Radiation, CR Casaccia Via Anguillarese 301, 00123 Rome (Italy); Asencio, Lisbet D. [Centro de Estudios Ambientales, Carretera a Castillo de Jagua, CP. 59350 C. Nuclear, Cienfuegos (Cuba); Sansone, Umberto [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Agency' s Laboratories Seibersdorf, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria)

    2010-06-15

    The accumulations of both natural (U) and depleted (DU) uranium in the earthworms (Eisenia fetida) were studied to evaluate corresponding biological effects. Concentrations of metals in the experimental soil ranged from 1.86 to 600 mg kg{sup -1}. Five biological endpoints: mortality, animals' weight increasing, lysosomal membrane stability by measuring the neutral red retention time (the NRRT), histological changes and genetic effects (Comet assay) were used to evaluate biological effects in the earthworms after 7 and 28 days of exposure. No effects have been observed in terms of mortality or weight reduction. Cytotoxic and genetic effects were identified at quite low U concentrations. For some of these endpoints, in particular for genetic effects, the dose (U concentration)-effect relationships have been found to be non-linear. The results have also shown a statistically significant higher level of impact on the earthworms exposed to natural U compared to depleted U.

  15. III. Biological effects of radiation from external and internal sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, R.S.

    1948-05-24

    This report focuses on the hemotological effects of total body irradiation from external and internal sources observed in patients treated for arthritis with radioactive phosphorus administered intravenously.

  16. Soil degradation effect on biological activity in Mediterranean calcareous soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca-Pérez, L.; Alcover-Sáez, S.; Mormeneo, S.; Boluda, R.

    2009-04-01

    Soil degradation processes include erosion, organic matter decline, compaction, salinization, landslides, contamination, sealing and biodiversity decline. In the Mediterranean region the climatological and lithological conditions, together with relief on the landscape and anthropological activity are responsible for increasing desertification process. It is therefore considered to be extreme importance to be able to measure soil degradation quantitatively. We studied soil characteristics, microbiological and biochemical parameters in different calcareous soil sequences from Valencia Community (Easter Spain), in an attempt to assess the suitability of the parameters measured to reflect the state of soil degradation and the possibility of using the parameters to assess microbiological decline and soil quality. For this purpose, forest, scrubland and agricultural soil in three soil sequences were sampled in different areas. Several sensors of the soil biochemistry and microbiology related with total organic carbon, microbial biomass carbon, soil respiration, microorganism number and enzyme activities were determined. The results show that, except microorganism number, these parameters are good indicators of a soil biological activity and soil quality. The best enzymatic activities to use like indicators were phosphatases, esterases, amino-peptidases. Thus, the enzymes test can be used as indicators of soil degradation when this degradation is related with organic matter losses. There was a statistically significant difference in cumulative O2 uptake and extracellular enzymes among the soils with different degree of degradation. We would like to thank Spanish government-MICINN for funding and support (MICINN, project CGL2006-09776).

  17. Medical-biological aspects of radiation effects in Daphnia magna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarapultseva, E.; Uskalova, D.; Savina, N.; Ustenko, K.

    2017-01-01

    We have shown that γ-irradiation at doses of 100 and 1000 mGy significantly compromised fecundity and reproductive success of the directly exposed D. magna. These effects were also observed among the non-exposed first-generation progeny of irradiated parents, thus implying the manifestation of transgenerational effects in Daphnia. We have also shown that compromised viability of irradiated D. magna can be attributed cytotoxic effects of irradiation. It would therefore appear that the compromised viability may be attributed to the cytotoxic effects resulted from epigenetic changes affecting some metabolic pathways involved in detoxification of free-radicals. Additionally we have analyzed more distant progeny of irradiated at doses of 10, 100 and 1000 mGy Daphnia. Our data demonstrated that multicellular crustacean D. magna represent a very useful experimental model for analyse of long-term effects of ionising radiation at the organismal level.

  18. The biological effects of five feline IFN-alpha subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Susan L; Powell, Tim D; Sellins, Karen S; Radecki, Steven V; Cohen, J John; Milhausen, Michael J

    2004-06-01

    IFN-alpha has been shown to induce both antiviral and antiproliferative activities in animals. This report describes the biological activity of five recently identified feline IFN-alpha subtypes expressed in the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line (rfeIFN-alpha1[CHO], rfeIFN-alpha2[CHO], rfeIFN-alpha3[CHO], rfeIFN-alpha5[CHO] and rfeIFN-alpha6[CHO]) and the feIFN-alpha6 subtype expressed in and purified from Pichia pastoris (rfeIFN-alpha6[P. pastoris]). The rfeIFN-alpha[CHO] subtypes were tested for antiviral activity against either Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) or feline calicivirus (FCV) infected feline embryonic fibroblast cell line (AH927) or Crandell feline kidney cell line (CRFK). Antiviral activity was induced against both VSV and FCV infected AH927 cells and VSV infected CRFK cells by all five of the rfeIFN-alpha[CHO] subtypes and rfeIFN-alpha6[P. pastoris]. In addition, the IFN-alpha inducible Mx gene (associated with antiviral activity) was upregulated in vivo 24 h following treatment with rfeIFN-alpha6[P. pastoris], compared to baseline levels seen prior to treatment. All of the rfeIFN-alpha[CHO] subtypes and rfeIFN-alpha6[P. pastoris] exhibited antiproliferative activity in the FeT-J cell line (an IL-2 independent feline T-cell line). Both necrosis and apoptosis were observed in rfeIFN-alpha6[P. pastoris]-treated FeT-J cells. The rfeIFN-alpha3[CHO] subtype consistently exhibited lower antiviral and antiproliferative activity compared to that observed with the other four rfeIFN-alpha[CHO] subtypes. In summary, this paper demonstrates that five previously described feIFN-alpha subtypes induce both antiviral and antiproliferative activities in vitro and are capable of upregulating the feMx gene in vivo.

  19. Biological and technological effects of some mulberry varieties and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    egyptian hak

    Plant growth, yield attributes, yield and net ... nutrient cycle in agro-ecosystems, and could be utilized along with chemical fertilizers. ..... Choudhury ATMA & Khanif YM (2001) Evaluation of the effects of nitrogen and magnesium fertilization on ...

  20. MICROWAVE SYSTEM FOR RESEARCH BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS ON LABORATORY ANIMALS

    OpenAIRE

    Kopylov, Alexei; Kruglik, Olga; Khlebopros, Rem

    2014-01-01

    This research is concerned with development of the microwave system for research the radiophysical microwave radiation effects on laboratory animals. The frequency was 1 GHz. The results obtained demonstrate the metabolic changes in mice under the electromagnetic field influence.

  1. Radioprotective effect and other biological benefits associated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    fields including military, medicine, agriculture and industry. As a result, humans ... plant stems, leaves, and fruits, and generally exist in the plant ... effects of bailcalein on DNA damage in irradiated mice. The study ..... electric current production.

  2. Psychological Effects towards Humans Living in the Environment Made of Biological Concrete in Malaysia at 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirreza Talaiekhozani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In day-to-day life concrete become a compulsory material in the construction field as to make it a real concern among researchers for producing concrete with improved properties. Biological method is one of the new methods to improve concrete properties. Although, much research about biological concrete has been carried out, but till now nobody has not studied for the psychological effects of using a house or offices made up of biological concrete. The aim of this study is to investigate and find out the person's opinion about staying in a house or offices made up of biological concrete. In this study, a questionnaire containing eight questions was prepared and distributed among 21 persons in Malaysia University of Technology including students, academic and non-academic staffs among which few of them was an expert in the field of biological concrete and others did not have any knowledge about the bioconcrete. Finally, the results obtained from the questionnaires were analyzed. The results showed that 81% of participants in this study would like to stay in a house or office made up of biological concrete. However, 38% of participants believe that staying in a house or office made of biological concrete can cause health related problems. The current research paper can be considered significant for architects and civil engineers to have the insight to look into the psychological aspects of using biological concrete for various applications in the field of construction.

  3. Examining the effects of students' classroom expectations on undergraduate biology course reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Kristi Lyn

    In this dissertation, I perform and compare three studies of introductory biology students' classroom expectations -- what students expect to be the nature of the knowledge that they are learning, what they think they should be (or are) doing in order to learn, and what they think they should be (or are) doing in order to be successful. Previous work has shown that expectations can impact how students approach learning, yet biology education researchers have been reluctant to acknowledge or address the effects of student expectations on curricular reform (NRC, 2012). Most research in biology education reform has focused on students' conceptual understandings of biology and the efficacy of specific changes to content and pedagogy. The current research is lacking a deeper understanding of how students perceive the classroom environment and how those perceptions can shape students' interactions with the content and pedagogy. For present and future reforms in biology to reach their full potential, I argue that biology education should actively address the different ways students think about and approach learning in biology classes. The first study uses a Likert-scale instrument, adapted from the Maryland Physics Expectations Survey (Redish, Saul, & Steinberg, 1998). This new survey, the Maryland Biology Expectations Survey (MBEX) documents two critical results in biology classrooms: (i) certain student-centered pedagogical contexts can produce favorable changes in students' expectations, and (ii) more traditional classroom contexts appear to produce negative epistemological effects. The second study utilizes a modified version of the MBEX and focuses on students' interdisciplinary views. This study documents that: (i) biology students have both discipline-specific and context-specific classroom expectations, (ii) students respond more favorably to interdisciplinary content in the biology courses we surveyed (as opposed to biology content introduced into the physics

  4. A theoretical framework for biological control of soil-borne plant pathogens: Identifying effective strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunniffe, Nik J; Gilligan, Christopher A

    2011-06-07

    We develop and analyse a flexible compartmental model of the interaction between a plant host, a soil-borne pathogen and a microbial antagonist, for use in optimising biological control. By extracting invasion and persistence thresholds of host, pathogen and biological control agent, performing an equilibrium analysis, and numerical investigation of sensitivity to parameters and initial conditions, we determine criteria for successful biological control. We identify conditions for biological control (i) to prevent a pathogen entering a system, (ii) to eradicate a pathogen that is already present and, if that is not possible, (iii) to reduce the density of the pathogen. Control depends upon the epidemiology of the pathogen and how efficiently the antagonist can colonise particular habitats (i.e. healthy tissue, infected tissue and/or soil-borne inoculum). A sharp transition between totally effective control (i.e. eradication of the pathogen) and totally ineffective control can follow slight changes in biologically interpretable parameters or to the initial amounts of pathogen and biological control agent present. Effective biological control requires careful matching of antagonists to pathosystems. For preventative/eradicative control, antagonists must colonise susceptible hosts. However, for reduction in disease prevalence, the range of habitat is less important than the antagonist's bulking-up efficiency.

  5. Biological effects of lysophosphatidic acid in the nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisca, Frisca; Sabbadini, Roger A; Goldshmit, Yona; Pébay, Alice

    2012-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid that regulates a broad range of cellular effects in various cell types, leading to a variety of responses in tissues, including in the nervous system. LPA and its receptors are found in the nervous system, with different cellular and temporal profiles. Through its ability to target most cells of the nervous system and its induction of pleiotropic effects, LPA mediates events during neural development and adulthood. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the effects of LPA in the nervous system, during development and adulthood, and in various pathologies of the nervous system. We also explore potential LPA intervention strategies for anti-LPA therapeutics.

  6. Which chemicals drive biological effects in wastewater and recycled water?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Janet Y M; Busetti, Francesco; Charrois, Jeffrey W A; Escher, Beate I

    2014-09-01

    Removal of organic micropollutants from wastewater during secondary treatment followed by reverse osmosis and UV disinfection was evaluated by a combination of four in-vitro cell-based bioassays and chemical analysis of 299 organic compounds. Concentrations detected in recycled water were below the Australian Guidelines for Water Recycling. Thus the detected chemicals were considered not to pose any health risk. The detected pesticides in the wastewater treatment plant effluent and partially advanced treated water explained all observed effects on photosynthesis inhibition. In contrast, mixture toxicity experiments with designed mixtures containing all detected chemicals at their measured concentrations demonstrated that the known chemicals explained less than 3% of the observed cytotoxicity and less than 1% of the oxidative stress response. Pesticides followed by pharmaceuticals and personal care products dominated the observed mixture effects. The detected chemicals were not related to the observed genotoxicity. The large proportion of unknown toxicity calls for effect monitoring complementary to chemical monitoring.

  7. Some features of irradiated chitosan and its biological effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hai, Le; Hien, Nguyen Quoc; Luan, Le Quang; Hanh, Truong Thi; Man, Nguyen Tan; Ha, Pham Thi Le; Thuy, Tran Thi [Nuclear Research Institute, VAEC, Dalat (Viet Nam); Yoshii, Fumio; Kume, Tamikazu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    Preparation of chitosan oligomer by radiation degradation was carried out on the gamma Co-60 source. The radiation degradation yield (G{sub d}) of the chitosan was found to be of 1.03. The oligochitosan with 50% of dp>8 fraction was obtained by irradiating the 10% (w/v) chitosan solution in 5% acetic acid at 45 kGy for the chitosan having the initial viscometric average molecular weight, Mv=60,000. Irradiated chitosan showed higher antifungal effect than that of unirradiated one. Furthermore, the irradiated chitosan also showed the growth-promotion effect for plants. (author)

  8. Electrical and Biological Effects of Transmission Lines: A Review.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jack M.

    1989-06-01

    This review describes the electrical properties of a-c and d-c transmission lines and the resulting effects on plants, animals, and people. Methods used by BPA to mitigate undesirable effects are also discussed. Although much of the information in this review pertains to high-voltage transmission lines, information on distribution lines and electrical appliances is included. The electrical properties discussed are electric and magnetic fields and corona: first for alternating-current (a-c) lines, then for direct current (d-c).

  9. Radiation effects in Caenorhabditis elegans - Mutagenesis by high and low LET ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Gregory A.; Schubert, Wayne W.; Marshall, Tamara M.; Benton, Eric R.; Benton, Eugene V.

    1989-01-01

    The nematode C. elegans was used to measure the effectiveness of high-energy ionized particles in the induction of three types of genetic lesions. Recessive lethal mutations in a 40-map unit autosomal region, sterility, and X-chromosome nondisjunction or damage were investigated. Induction rates were measured as a function of linear energy transfer, LET(infinity), for nine ions of atomic nunmber 1-57 accelerated at the BEVALAC accelerator. Linear kinetics were observed for all three types of lesions within the dose/fluence ranges tested and were found to vary strongly as a function of particle LET(infinity). Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values of up to 4.2 were measured, and action cross sections were calculated and compared to mutagenic responses in other systems.

  10. Effect of solids retention time and wastewater characteristics on biological phosphorus removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henze, Mogens; Aspegren, H.; Jansen, J.l.C.

    2002-01-01

    The paper deals with the effect of wastewater, plant design and operation in relation to biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal and the possibilities to model the processes. Two Bio-P pilot plants were operated for 2.5 years in parallel receiving identical wastewater. The plants had SRT of 4...... with time which has importance in relation to modelling. The overall conclusion of the comparison between the two plants is that the biological phosphorus removal efficiency under practical operating conditions is affected by the SRT in the plant and the wastewater composition. Thus great care should...... in verification of models for Nitrogen and Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal....

  11. Biological effects of ionizing radiations; Effets biologiques des rayonnements ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nenot, J.C. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire]|[Commission Internationale de protection radiologique (France)]|[Association Internationale de Radiopathologie (France)

    1999-01-01

    Since ten years the ionizing radiations are more and more often used in various domains as medical, industrial or research sector. In the same way, these radiation impacts on the environment and the living organisms, have been studied intensively. The effects mechanism knowledge improved considerably and allowed to better protect the workers and the public. (A.L.B.)

  12. Biological Effects of Electromagnetic Fields on Cellular Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekhari, Beheshte; Wilson, James; Masood, Samina

    2012-10-01

    The interaction of organisms with environmental magnetic fields at the cellular level is well documented, yet not fully understood. We review the existing experimental results to understand the physics behind the effects of ambient magnetic fields on the growth, metabolism, and proliferation of in vitro cell cultures. Emphasis is placed on identifying the underlying physical principles responsible for alterations to cell structure and behavior.

  13. Biological and technological effects of some mulberry varieties and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    egyptian hak

    albino rats over two and five days, and also the effects of a two-week recovery period. Methomyl ... rabbits at a dose of 10 mg/kg body wt for seven days produced significant decrease in red blood cell ... role of vitamins on Japanese quails.

  14. Biological and technological effects of some mulberry varieties and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    egyptian hak

    The effect of light intensities (1500-6000 lux) and temperature (20-40 ... harvested in the exponential phase of growth by pelleting at high speed (8000 rpm) for 20 .... Figure 3: Biocidal activity (measured as zone of inhibition) of crude extract of ...

  15. Nanoscaled biological gated field effect transistors for cytogenetic analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwasny, Dorota; Dimaki, Maria; Andersen, Karsten Brandt;

    2014-01-01

    Cytogenetic analysis is the study of chromosome structure and function, and is often used in cancer diagnosis, as many chromosome abnormalities are linked to the onset of cancer. A novel label free detection method for chromosomal translocation analysis using nanoscaled field effect transistors...

  16. Resource Letter BELFEF-1: Biological effects of low-frequency electromagnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafemeister, David

    1996-08-01

    This Resource Letter provides a guide to the literature on the interaction of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF/EMF) interactions with biological matter, and on the possibility that such interactions could have a harmful effect on human health. Journal articles and books are cited for the following topics: ELF/EMF theoretical interactions with biological cells, organs and organisms, magnetic dipole interactions, sensing by animals, biomedical-biophysical experiments, epidemiology, and litigation-mitigation risk issues.

  17. High school and college biology: A multi-level model of the effects of high school biology courses on student academic performance in introductory college biology courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loehr, John Francis

    The issue of student preparation for college study in science has been an ongoing concern for both college-bound students and educators of various levels. This study uses a national sample of college students enrolled in introductory biology courses to address the relationship between high school biology preparation and subsequent introductory college biology performance. Multi-Level Modeling was used to investigate the relationship between students' high school science and mathematics experiences and college biology performance. This analysis controls for student demographic and educational background factors along with factors associated with the college or university attended. The results indicated that high school course-taking and science instructional experiences have the largest impact on student achievement in the first introductory college biology course. In particular, enrollment in courses, such as high school Calculus and Advanced Placement (AP) Biology, along with biology course content that focuses on developing a deep understanding of the topics is found to be positively associated with student achievement in introductory college biology. On the other hand, experiencing high numbers of laboratory activities, demonstrations, and independent projects along with higher levels of laboratory freedom are associated with negative achievement. These findings are relevant to high school biology teachers, college students, their parents, and educators looking beyond the goal of high school graduation.

  18. Biological activities and health effects of terpenoids from marine fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se-Kwon; Li, Yong-Xin

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a great deal of interest has been developed by the consumers toward natural bioactive compounds as functional ingredients in the nutraceutical, cosmeceutical, and pharmaceutical products due to their various health beneficial effects. Hence, it can be suggested that bioactive functional ingredients from marine bioresources and their by-products are alternative sources for synthetic ingredients that can contribute to consumer's well-being, as a part of nutraceuticals and functional foods. Marine-derived fungi produce a vast array of secondary metabolites including terpenes, steroids, polyketides, peptides, alkaloids, and polysaccharides. These secondary metabolites serve many biopharmaceutical purposes. This chapter discusses about marine fungi-derived terpenoids and presents an overview of their beneficial health effects.

  19. Biological Effects of Nonionizing Electromagnetic Radiation. Volume V, Number 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    7 Hz: field estimates were shorter than no-field killing fungi and retarding the fermentation of must. estimates. The differences were in the same...a photodiode detector association of t-caprolactam in cyclohexane. the The signal is processed and displayed as a digital association of n- butanol in... acetone effects c! Jirect current magnetic fields on E. coliare every second day) to induce skin cancer, and then much le..s than those reported by

  20. BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF TNF-BINDING VARIOLAVIRUS RECOMBINANT PROTEIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Orlovskaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. This review presents a summary of our data concerning in vivo and in vitro effects of recombinant TNF-binding protein from variola virus (VARVCrmB upon TNF-induced functional changes of human and murine cells. VARV-CrmB protein blocks TNF-induced production of IL-1β and IL-6 by human mononuclear cells, and their in vitro oxidation-related metabolic (OM activity. VARV-CrmB protein restores TNF-induced reduction of BFU-E+CFU-E colony-forming activity and normalizes TNF-induced effects upon CFU-GM formation in a colony-forming model of human and murine bone morrow cells (BMC. VARV-CrmB protein displays a pronounced in vivo alleviation of LPS-induced endotoxic shock symptoms in SPF BALB/C mice thus significantly increasing survival of experimental animals. Moreover, VARV-CrmBprotein decreases intensity of collagen-induced arthritis at early terms. Application of VARV-CrmB protein results in normalization of TNF-induced increase of migratory and OM activity of murine leukocytes, and exerts corrective effects upon colony-forming ability of murine hematopoietic precursors. Skin application of VARV-CrmB protein decreases leukocyte migration from a skin scrap in afferent phase of DNCB-induced contact reaction, as well as “ear oedema” index. Our results demonstrate TNF-blocking properties of VARVCrmB protein. In summary, our data allow to consider a recombinant variola virus VARV-CrmB as a new potential TNF-antagonist. Its effects can be explained by its ability of neutralizing TNF-induced activation of oxidation-related metabolic, cytokine-producing and migratory functions of effector cells in therapy of pathological inflammatory processes.

  1. Biologic Effects of Dopamine on Tumor Vasculature in Ovarian Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrthala Moreno-Smith

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic sympathetic nervous system activation results in increased angiogenesis and tumor growth in orthotopic mouse models of ovarian carcinoma. However, the mechanistic effects of such activation on the tumor vasculature are not well understood. Dopamine (DA, an inhibitory catecholamine, regulates the functions of normal and abnormal blood vessels. Here, we examined whether DA, an inhibitory catecholamine, could block the effects of chronic stress on tumor vasculature and tumor growth. Exogenous administration of DA not only decreased tumor microvessel density but also increased pericyte coverage of tumor vessels following daily restraint stress in mice. Daily restraint stress resulted in significantly increased tumor growth in the SKOV3ip1 and HeyA8 ovarian cancer models. DA treatment blocked stress-mediated increases in tumor growth and increased pericyte coverage of tumor endothelial cells. Whereas the antiangiogenic effect of DA is mediated by dopamine receptor 2 (DR2, our data indicate that DA, through DR1, stimulates vessel stabilization by increasing pericyte recruitment to tumor endothelial cells. DA significantly stimulated migration of mouse 10T1/2 pericyte-like cells in vitro and increased cyclic adenosine mono-phosphate (cAMP levels in these cells. Moreover, DA or the DR1 agonist SKF 82958 increased platinum concentration in SKOV3ip1 tumor xenografts following cisplatin administration. In conclusion, DA stabilizes tumor blood vessels through activation of pericyte cAMP-protein kinase A signaling pathway by DR1. These findings could have implications for blocking the stimulatory effects of chronic stress on tumor growth.

  2. [Effects and Biological Response on Bioremediation of Petroleum Contaminated Soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qian; Wu, Man-li; Nie, Mai-qian; Wang, Ting-ting; Zhang, Ming-hui

    2015-05-01

    Bioaugmentation and biostimulation were used to remediate petroleum-contaminated soil which were collected from Zichang city in North of Shaanxi. The optimal bioremediation method was obtained by determining the total petroleum hydrocarbon(TPH) using the infrared spectroscopy. During the bioremediation, number of degrading strains, TPH catabolic genes, and soil microbial community diversity were determined by Most Probable Number (MPN), polymerase chain reaction (PCR) combined agarose electrophoresis, and PCR-denaturing gradient electrophoresis (DGGE). The results in different treatments showed different biodegradation effects towards total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH). Biostimulation by adding N and P to soils achieved the best degradation effects towards TPH, and the bioaugmentation was achieved by inoculating strain SZ-1 to soils. Further analysis indicated the positive correlation between catabolic genes and TPH removal efficiency. During the bioremediation, the number of TPH and alkanes degrading strains was higher than the number of aromatic degrading strains. The results of PCR-DGGE showed microbial inoculums could enhance microbial community functional diversity. These results contribute to understand the ecologically microbial effects during the bioremediation of petroleum-polluted soil.

  3. Biological Effects of Culture Substrates on Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohei Hayashi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, as human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs have been commonly cultured in feeder-free conditions, a number of cell culture substrates have been applied or developed. However, the functional roles of these substrates in maintaining hPSC self-renewal remain unclear. Here in this review, we summarize the types of these substrates and their effect on maintaining hPSC self-renewal. Endogenous extracellular matrix (ECM protein expression has been shown to be crucial in maintaining hPSC self-renewal. These ECM molecules interact with integrin cell-surface receptors and transmit their cellular signaling. We discuss the possible effect of integrin-mediated signaling pathways on maintaining hPSC self-renewal. Activation of integrin-linked kinase (ILK, which transmits ECM-integrin signaling to AKT (also known as protein kinase B, has been shown to be critical in maintaining hPSC self-renewal. Also, since naïve pluripotency has been widely recognized as an alternative pluripotent state of hPSCs, we discuss the possible effects of culture substrates and integrin signaling on naïve hPSCs based on the studies of mouse embryonic stem cells. Understanding the role of culture substrates in hPSC self-renewal and differentiation enables us to control hPSC behavior precisely and to establish scalable or microfabricated culture technologies for regenerative medicine and drug development.

  4. Radioactivity in the ocean: laws and biological effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunsaker, C.T.

    1985-01-01

    This paper summarizes the literature on US laws and international agreements, experimental and monitoring data, and ongoing studies to provide background information for environmental assessment and regulatory compliance activities for ocean dumping of low-level radioactive waste. The Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act is the major US legislation governing ocean disposal of radioactive waste. The major international agreement on ocean dumping is the Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and other Matter. The United States ended its ocean dumping of radioactive wastes in 1970, but other countries have continued ocean dumping under international supervision in the northeast Atlantic. Monitoring of former US disposal sites has neither revealed significant effects on marine biota nor indicated a hazard to human health. Also, no effects on marine organisms have been found that could be attributed to routine discharges into the Irish Sea from the Windscale reprocessing plant. We must improve our ability to predict the oceanic carrying capacity and the fate and effects of ionizing radiation in the marine environment.

  5. Potential biological and ecological effects of flickering artificial light.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Inger

    Full Text Available Organisms have evolved under stable natural lighting regimes, employing cues from these to govern key ecological processes. However, the extent and density of artificial lighting within the environment has increased recently, causing widespread alteration of these regimes. Indeed, night-time electric lighting is known significantly to disrupt phenology, behaviour, and reproductive success, and thence community composition and ecosystem functioning. Until now, most attention has focussed on effects of the occurrence, timing, and spectral composition of artificial lighting. Little considered is that many types of lamp do not produce a constant stream of light but a series of pulses. This flickering light has been shown to have detrimental effects in humans and other species. Whether a species is likely to be affected will largely be determined by its visual temporal resolution, measured as the critical fusion frequency. That is the frequency at which a series of light pulses are perceived as a constant stream. Here we use the largest collation to date of critical fusion frequencies, across a broad range of taxa, to demonstrate that a significant proportion of species can detect such flicker in widely used lamps. Flickering artificial light thus has marked potential to produce ecological effects that have not previously been considered.

  6. Neutron Exposures in Human Cells: Bystander Effect and Relative Biological Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Isheeta; Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Stewart, Robert D.; Emery, Robert; Joiner, Michael C.; Tucker, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Bystander effects have been observed repeatedly in mammalian cells following photon and alpha particle irradiation. However, few studies have been performed to investigate bystander effects arising from neutron irradiation. Here we asked whether neutrons also induce a bystander effect in two normal human lymphoblastoid cell lines. These cells were exposed to fast neutrons produced by targeting a near-monoenergetic 50.5 MeV proton beam at a Be target (17 MeV average neutron energy), and irradiated-cell conditioned media (ICCM) was transferred to unirradiated cells. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay was used to quantify genetic damage in radiation-naïve cells exposed to ICCM from cultures that received 0 (control), 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3 or 4 Gy neutrons. Cells grown in ICCM from irradiated cells showed no significant increase in the frequencies of micronuclei or nucleoplasmic bridges compared to cells grown in ICCM from sham irradiated cells for either cell line. However, the neutron beam has a photon dose-contamination of 5%, which may modulate a neutron-induced bystander effect. To determine whether these low doses of contaminating photons can induce a bystander effect, cells were irradiated with cobalt-60 at doses equivalent to the percent contamination for each neutron dose. No significant increase in the frequencies of micronuclei or bridges was observed at these doses of photons for either cell line when cultured in ICCM. As expected, high doses of photons induced a clear bystander effect in both cell lines for micronuclei and bridges (pbystander effect in these cells. Finally, neutrons had a relative biological effectiveness of 2.0±0.13 for micronuclei and 5.8±2.9 for bridges compared to cobalt-60. These results may be relevant to radiation therapy with fast neutrons and for regulatory agencies setting standards for neutron radiation protection and safety. PMID:24896095

  7. Neutron exposures in human cells: bystander effect and relative biological effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Isheeta; Schwartz, Jeffrey L; Stewart, Robert D; Emery, Robert; Joiner, Michael C; Tucker, James D

    2014-01-01

    Bystander effects have been observed repeatedly in mammalian cells following photon and alpha particle irradiation. However, few studies have been performed to investigate bystander effects arising from neutron irradiation. Here we asked whether neutrons also induce a bystander effect in two normal human lymphoblastoid cell lines. These cells were exposed to fast neutrons produced by targeting a near-monoenergetic 50.5 MeV proton beam at a Be target (17 MeV average neutron energy), and irradiated-cell conditioned media (ICCM) was transferred to unirradiated cells. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay was used to quantify genetic damage in radiation-naïve cells exposed to ICCM from cultures that received 0 (control), 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3 or 4 Gy neutrons. Cells grown in ICCM from irradiated cells showed no significant increase in the frequencies of micronuclei or nucleoplasmic bridges compared to cells grown in ICCM from sham irradiated cells for either cell line. However, the neutron beam has a photon dose-contamination of 5%, which may modulate a neutron-induced bystander effect. To determine whether these low doses of contaminating photons can induce a bystander effect, cells were irradiated with cobalt-60 at doses equivalent to the percent contamination for each neutron dose. No significant increase in the frequencies of micronuclei or bridges was observed at these doses of photons for either cell line when cultured in ICCM. As expected, high doses of photons induced a clear bystander effect in both cell lines for micronuclei and bridges (pbystander effect in these cells. Finally, neutrons had a relative biological effectiveness of 2.0 ± 0.13 for micronuclei and 5.8 ± 2.9 for bridges compared to cobalt-60. These results may be relevant to radiation therapy with fast neutrons and for regulatory agencies setting standards for neutron radiation protection and safety.

  8. Biological effect of non-ionizing radiations on microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Kikuo; Yamamoto, Takayoshi [Osaka Univ., Radioisotope Research Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Nakaoka, Yasuo [Osaka Univ., Graduate School of Engineering Science, Department of Biophysical Engineering, Toyonaka, Osaka (Japan)

    2000-05-01

    We studied the effect of extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) of 60-Hz and 500 mT on the growth and the mutation frequency of the budding yeast S.cerevisiae and on the behavior of the ciliate Paramecium multimicronucleatum. The growth rate and mutation frequencies of several strains of S.cerevisiae (wild type and radiation sensitive mutants, rad or rev) were examined but no significant difference was observed. Moreover, the behavior of P.multimicronucleatum under the ELF-MF was examined. When exposed to a vertical field of 0.6 T, the cells accumulated at the upper end of the cuvette. (author)

  9. Behavioral and Biological Effects of Resonant Electromagnetic Absorption in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-11-01

    C) -c C) C) C) tj~ C) C) -c C -C C C’: k ~ ~f jt~ - 39 - anesthetized wits Nembuta] 𔃿 mg/kg). !he LCOF temperature probe1 0 " ] a,, 7 : t. ’on.. enI...Animals with and wit ,.hout Ground Effects", to be submitted for publication to IEEEr Trcznsac -ions or IMior’clave Theory and T,,chriques. 2. 0. P. G... B17 ... .- .- 20 Value for various regions of the leg * aValue for various regions of the arm 10 Ci a U 6 *\\ , c0 0.3 0.6 0.9 1.5 3.0 2 Cross

  10. Effect of biologic therapy on radiological progression in rheumatoid arthritis: what does it add to methotrexate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones G

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Graeme Jones, Erica Darian-Smith, Michael Kwok, Tania WinzenbergMenzies Research Institute, University of Tasmania, Tasmania, AustraliaAbstract: There have been substantial advances in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in recent years. Traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs have been shown to have small effects on the progression of radiographic damage. This quantitative overview summarizes the evidence for biologic DMARDS and radiographic damage either alone or in combination with methotrexate. Two outcomes were used (standardized mean difference and odds of progression. A total of 21 trials were identified of which 18 had useable data. For biologic monotherapy, tocilizumab, adalimumab, and etanercept were significantly better than methotrexate, with tocilizumab ranking first in both outcomes while golimumab was ineffective in both outcomes. For a biologic in combination with methotrexate compared with methotrexate alone, most therapies studied (etanercept, adalimumab, infliximab, certolizumab, tocilizumab, and rituximab were effective at slowing X-ray progression using either outcome, with infliximab ranking first in both outcomes. The exceptions to this were golimumab (no effect on standardized mean difference and abatacept (no effect on odds of progression. This effect was additional to methotrexate; thus, the overall benefit is moderate to large in magnitude, which is clearly of major clinical significance for sufferers of rheumatoid arthritis and supports the use of biologic DMARDs in those with a poor disease prognosis.Keywords: rheumatoid, trials, meta-analysis, radiographs, biologic, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, DMARDs

  11. EFFECTS OF 5E LEARNING CYCLE ON STUDENTS ACHIEVEMENT IN BIOLOGY AND CHEMISTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Osawaru Ajaja,

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The major purpose of this study was to determine the effects of learning cycle as an instructional strategy on biology andchemistry students achievement. To guide this study, six research hypotheses were stated and tested at 0.05 level ofsignificance. The design of this study was 2x2x3x6 Pre-test Post-test non-equivalent control group quasi experimental design.These included two instructional groups (experimental and control groups, sex (male and female, repeated testing (Pre,Post and follow-up tests, and six weeks of experience. The samples of the study included six senior secondary schools, 112science students, and 12 biology and chemistry teachers. The instruments used for this study were: teacher’s questionnaireon knowledge and use of learning cycle (KULC; and Biology and Chemistry Achievement Test (BCAT. The data collected wereanalyzed with simple percentage, Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA and student t-test statistics. The major findings of thestudy included that only 30.43% and 26.31% of biology and chemistry teachers have the knowledge that learning cycle is aninstructional method; all the biology and chemistry teachers sampled have never used learning cycle as an instructionalmethod; learning cycle had a significant effect on students achievement in biology and chemistry; students taught withlearning cycle significantly achieved better in biology/chemistry Post-test than those taught with lecture method; the posttestscores of students in the learning cycle group increased over the period of experience; non-significant difference in Posttestscores between males and females taught with learning cycle; non-significant interaction effect between method andsex on achievement; and a significant higher retention of biology and chemistry knowledge by students taught with learningcycle than those taught with lecture method. It was concluded that the method seems an appropriate instructional modelthat could be used to solve the problems of

  12. Catalytically and noncatalytically treated automobile exhaust: biological effects in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, G.P. (Univ. of Cincinnati); Lewkowski, J.P.; Hastings, L.; Malanchuk, M.

    1977-12-01

    Chronic exposure to catalytically treated or noncatalytically treated automobile exhaust significantly depressed the spontaneous locomotor activity (SLA) of rats. Exposure to H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ alone or CO at comparable levels did not alter the SLA. Exposure to noncatalytically treated exhaust resulted in significant reductions in growth rate and food and water intake. However, these effects were not evident in the exposure to catalytically treated exhaust or in the control H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and CO exposures. Blood acid-base analyses indicated that exposure to either catalytically treated exhaust or H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ elicits a metabolic alkalosis, while exposure to CO alone results in a metabolic acidosis. All acid-base parameters were within the normal range several weeks after the termination of exposure.

  13. Oil spills: Biological effects. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the biological and ecological effects of oil spills. Citations discuss effects on microorganisms, plants, and animals. Damage assessment, ecological modeling, and environmental impact statements are included. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  14. Low power laser therapy — an introduction and a review of some biological effects

    OpenAIRE

    Thiel, Haymo

    1986-01-01

    This report gives a brief introduction to the characteristics of therapeutic low power laser devices. Absorption, tissue penetration and physiological mechanisms of laser irradiation are discussed. The biological effects of low power laser light are reviewed in the areas of collagen metabolism, woundhealing, inflammation and pain control. Contraindications, precautions and side effects of low power laser irradiation are discussed.

  15. Biological effect markers for exposure to carcinogenic compound and their relevance for risk assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delft, J.H.M. van; Baan, R.A.; Roza, L.

    1998-01-01

    In this review data are summarized on biomarkers that are used for biological effect monitoring of human populations exposed to genotoxic carcinogens. The biomarkers are DNA and protein adducts and cytogenetic effects. Most of these biomarkers are relevant for the process of carcinogenesis. Emphasis

  16. The First Time Ever I Saw Your Feet: Inversion Effect in Newborns' Sensitivity to Biological Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardi, Lara; Regolin, Lucia; Simion, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Inversion effect in biological motion perception has been recently attributed to an innate sensitivity of the visual system to the gravity-dependent dynamic of the motion. However, the specific cues that determine the inversion effect in naïve subjects were never investigated. In the present study, we have assessed the contribution of the local…

  17. [Adipogenic function and other biologic effects of insulin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankov, Y A

    2016-01-01

    Studies on experimental animals with knockout of the insulin receptor gene Insr (in the whole body or in certain tissues) and/or related genes encoding proteins involved in realization of insulin signal transduction in target cells, have made an important contribution to the elucidation of insulin regulation of metabolism, particularly fat metabolism. Since the whole insulin secreted by b-cells, together with the products of gastrointestinal tract digestion of proteins, fats, and carbohydrates reach the liver, the latter is the first organ on which this hormone acts. The liver employs released amino acids for synthesis of proteins, including apoproteins for various lipoproteins. Glucose is used for synthesis of glycogen, fatty acids, and triglycerides, which enter all the organs in very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). The LIRKO mice with knockout of the Insr gene in the liver demonstrated inhibition of synthesis of macromolecular compounds from amino acids, glucose, and fatty acids. Low molecular weight substances demonstrated increased entry to circulation, and together with other disorders induced hyperglycemia. In LIRKO mice blood glucose levels and glucose tolerance demonstrated time-dependent normalization and at later stages the increase in glucose levels was replaced by hypoglycemia. These changes can be well explained if we take into consideration that one of the main functions of insulin consists in stimulation of energy accumulation by means of activation of triglyceride deposition in adipose tissue. FIRKO mice with selective knockout of adipose tissue Insr were characterized by decreased uptake of glucose in adipocytes, and its transformation into lipids. However, the level of body fat in animals remained normal, possibly due to preserved insulin receptor in the liver and insulin-induced activation of triglyceride production which maintained normal levels of body fat stores, the effective functioning of adipose tissue and secretion of leptin by

  18. [Quality of interior air: biological contaminants and their effects on health; bioaerosols and gathering techniques].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bălan, Gabriela

    2007-01-01

    Indoor Air Quality: biological contaminants and health effects; airborne organisms and sampling instruments. Biological contaminants include bacteria, molds, viruses, animal dander and cat saliva, house dust, mites, cockroaches and pollen. Symptoms of health problems caused by biological pollutants include sneezing, watery eyes, coughing, shortness of breath, dizziness, lethargy, fevers. Children, elderly people with breathing problems, allergies and lung diseases are particularly susceptible to disease-causing biological agents in the indoor air. It is convenient to consider microbiological samplers for collecting organisms in air as falling into several broad categories. Many popular microbiological air samplers use the principle of impaction to trap the organisms by impacting them directly on to agar. Further distinct groups are the impingers, which operate by impinging organisms into liquid.

  19. Biologic effects of fenbendazole in rats and mice: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, David; Cray, Carolyn; Zaias, Julia; Altman, Norman H

    2007-11-01

    This review summarizes findings from toxicologic, carcinogenic, immunologic, and metabolic studies on fenbendazole (FBZ). Currently, FBZ is used to treat or prevent pinworm outbreaks in laboratory rodents. Because antiparasitic treatments usually are not part of experimental designs, interactions from the medication on the outcomes of ongoing experiments are a concern. At therapeutic levels, FBZ does not alter the total content of cytochromes P450 but does induce certain hepatic cytochrome P450 isoforms, namely 1A1, 1A2, and 2B1. Although expressed constitutively at low or undetectable levels, these isoforms particularly are known for bioactivating a number of procarcinogens. Lifetime studies in rats have shown that FBZ is not a carcinogen but that it may behave as a tumor promoter when given after certain initiators. Unlike in other animal species, FBZ treatment-associated myelosuppression has not been reported to occur in rodents. The few currently available immunologic studies in mice, including an autoimmune model, have not shown effects on selected immune responses. However, data from other animal species suggest that the ability of B and T lymphocytes to proliferate in the secondary immune response may be suppressed during treatment with FBZ.

  20. Bioaccumulation and biological effects of cigarette litter in marine worms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Stephanie L.; Rowe, Darren; Reid, Malcolm J.; Thomas, Kevin V.; Galloway, Tamara S.

    2015-01-01

    Marine debris is a global environmental issue. Smoked cigarette filters are the predominant coastal litter item; 4.5 trillion are littered annually, presenting a source of bioplastic microfibres (cellulose acetate) and harmful toxicants to marine environments. Despite the human health risks associated with smoking, little is known of the hazards cigarette filters present to marine life. Here we studied the impacts of smoked cigarette filter toxicants and microfibres on the polychaete worm Hediste diversicolor (ragworm), a widespread inhabitant of coastal sediments. Ragworms exposed to smoked cigarette filter toxicants in seawater at concentrations 60 fold lower than those reported for urban run-off exhibited significantly longer burrowing times, >30% weight loss, and >2-fold increase in DNA damage compared to ragworms maintained in control conditions. In contrast, ragworms exposed to smoked cigarette filter microfibres in marine sediment showed no significant effects. Bioconcentration factors for nicotine were 500 fold higher from seawater than from sediment. Our results illustrate the vulnerability of organisms in the water column to smoking debris and associated toxicants, and highlight the risks posed by smoked cigarette filter debris to aquatic life. PMID:26369692

  1. Biological effects of exposure to intermediate neutron and repair mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utsumi, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Masao [Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Onishi, Takeo; Onizuka, Masahiko

    2000-01-01

    An investigation was made on cytotoxic effects of neutron capture using chicken B-cell line mutants, DT40, KURO{sup -/-}, RAD54 {sup -/-} and KU70{sup -/-} / RAD54{sup -/-}. Suspensions of these cells were exposed to two times X-radiation at various doses and the cell surviving was evaluated. The sensitivity to radiation was highest in the double defective mutant, KU70{sup -/-} / RAD54{sup -/-} and followed by that of RAD54 {sup -/-}, a homologous recombination mutant, whereas KURO {sup -/-} cell, a non-homologous end-joining mutant showed a peculiar surviving curve composed of two phases and the cell was highly sensitive to a low-dose radiation. This indicates that there are two different DNA repair systems for double-strand breaks and the system for non-homologous end-joining repair can be involved in all phases of cell cycle, but the system for the homologous one is involved only in S-phase. Therefore, it was thought that variation of sensitivity to radiation exposure depending to the phase of cell cycle might explain the alternation of repair system depending to the phase progressing of cell cycle. It was thus likely that the recovery from radiation injury, which is still a black box might be explained with the double strand breaks of DNA. (M.N.)

  2. The biological effect and medical functions of the Infrared Rays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANG Xiao-feng

    2001-01-01

    The quantum vibrational energy-spectra including high excited states of the protein molecules have been calculated by new theory of bio-energy transport along the protein molecules and its dynamic equation, discrete nonlinear Schrodinger equation, appropriate to the protein molecules on the basis of the level of molecular structure. This energy-spectra obtained are basically consistent with the experimental values by infrared absorption and radiated measurement of person's hands and laser-Raman spectrum from metabolically active E. Coli.. From this energy-spectra we know that the infrared lights with (1-3)x1000nm and (5-7)x1000nm wavelength can be absorbed by the protein molecules in the living systems.In accordance with the non-linear theory of the bio-energy transport we know that the energy of the infrared light absorbed by the proteins can result in vibrations of amide-I in amino acids and can facilitate the bio-energy transport along the protein molecular chains from one place to other for the growth of living bodies. This processe is non-thermal. This is just non-thermal effect of the infrared lights. According to the mechanism we explained further the medical functions of the infrared lights absorbed.

  3. Cardiometabolic risk in psoriasis: differential effects of biologic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana J Kaplan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Mariana J KaplanDepartment of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USAAbstract: Psoriasis is associated to an increased risk of cardiovascular (CV complications. Overall, the pathogenic mechanisms involved in premature CV complications in psoriasis appear to be complex and multifactorial, with traditional and nontraditional risk factors possibly contributing to the increased risk. Based on what is known about the pathogenesis of psoriasis and extrapolating the current knowledge on CV complications in other inflammatory diseases, studies are needed to investigate if appropriate control of the inflammatory, immunologic and metabolic disturbances present in psoriasis can prevent the development of this potentially lethal complication. It is clear that there is a great need for heightened awareness of the increased risk for vascular damage in patients with psoriasis. It is also crucial to closely monitor patients with psoriasis for CV risk factors including obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and hyperlipidemia. Whether treatment regimens that effectively manage systemic inflammation will lead to prevention of CV complications in psoriasis needs to be investigated. Clearly, studies should focus on establishing the exact mechanisms that determine CV risk in psoriasis so that appropriate preventive strategies and treatment guidelines can be established.Keywords: psoriasis, atherosclerosis, inflammation, vascular

  4. In vitro studies on radiosensitization effect of glucose capped gold nanoparticles in photon and ion irradiation of HeLa cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Harminder; Pujari, Geetanjali; Semwal, Manoj K.; Sarma, Asitikantha; Avasthi, Devesh Kumar

    2013-04-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles are of great interest due to their potential applications in diagnostics and therapeutics. In the present work, we synthesized glucose capped gold nanoparticle (Glu-AuNP) for internalization in the HeLa cell line (human cervix cancer cells). The capping of glucose on Au nanoparticle was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. The Glu-AuNP did not show any toxicity to the HeLa cell. The γ-radiation and carbon ion irradiation of HeLa cell with and without Glu-AuNP were performed to evaluate radiosensitization effects. The study revealed a significant reduction in radiation dose for killing the HeLa cells with internalized Glu-AuNPs as compared to the HeLa cells without Glu-AuNP. The Glu-AuNP treatment resulted in enhancement of radiation effect as evident from increase in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for carbon ion irradiated HeLa cells.

  5. Effects of Magnetic Field on Biological Cells and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Jen

    2001-03-01

    While there has been extensive research performed in the physics of magnetic fields and the physics and chemistry in life sciences, independent of each other, there has been a paucity of scientific research and development investigating the possible applications of magnetic fields in life sciences. The focus of this presentation is to present the stimulation mechanism by which magnetic fields affect (a) yeast cells (b) plant cells and (c) mammalian normal and cancer cells. Recently we have found that the Saccharomyces Cerevsa yeast growth increases by about 30to a 1 tesla field and the production of CO2 increases by about 30of yeast metabolism may be due to an increase in intercellular interaction and protein channel alignment, the introduction of an alteration in the DNA from the magnetic field exposure or a combination of these mechanisms. We also have found that the application of high magnetic fields (1 tesla and above) can have marked effects on the germination and growth of plants, especially corn, beans and peas. This finding has opened up the possibility of technology developments in botanical growth systems to accelerate seed germination and crop harvesting. Most recently we have investigated the application of high magnetic fields on leukemia, CaCoII and HEP G2 cancer cell lines. We found that when leukemia are exposed to a 12 tesla field for 2 hours has an increase in cell death by about 30that were not exposed to the magnetic field. Viability of CaCoII cells sandwiched between permanent magnets of maximum strength of 1.2 tesla was measured. A decrease in viable cells by 33unexposed cells. HSP 70 was measured for HEPG2 cells that were exposed to permanent magnetic field of 1.2 tesla for 40 minutes and for unexposed cells. It was found that the exposed cells produce 19 times more HSP70 compared to unexposed cells. Our results together with other investigators report suggest a strong evidence of a reduction in the cell growth rate for cancer cells when

  6. Allee effects in tritrophic food chains: some insights in pest biological control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Michel Iskin da S; Dos Anjos, Lucas

    2016-12-01

    Release of natural enemies to control pest populations is a common strategy in biological control. However, its effectiveness is supposed to be impaired, among other factors, by Allee effects in the biological control agent and by the fact that introduced pest natural enemies interact with some native species of the ecosystem. In this work, we devise a tritrophic food chain model where the assumptions previously raised are proved correct when a hyperpredator attacks the introduced pest natural enemy by a functional response type 2 or 3. Moreover, success of pest control is shown to be related to the release of large amounts (i.e., inundative releases) of natural enemies.

  7. Study of complex matrix effect on solid phase microextraction for biological sample analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ruifen; Xu, Jianqiao; Zhu, Fang; Luan, Tiangang; Zeng, Feng; Shen, Yong; Ouyang, Gangfeng

    2015-09-11

    Solid phase microextraction (SPME) has become a useful tool for in vivo monitoring the behavior of environmental organic pollutants in biological species due to its simplicity, relatively non-invasive, and cost-effective manner. However, the complex matrices in biological samples could significantly influence the extraction kinetic, and bias the quantification result. In this study, we investigated the effect of complex matrix on the extraction kinetic of SPME for biological sample analysis. Two sample matrices, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and agarose gel with BSA were used to simulate the biological fluid and tissue. Results showed that the addition of BSA significantly enhanced the mass transfer of organic compounds onto SPME fiber in both PBS buffer and gel sample. Enhancement factors ranging from 1.3 to 27, and 2.0 to 80 were found for all selected polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in PBS buffer and agarose gel with BSA concentration of 0.1-5%, respectively. Then, an improved theoretical model was applied to quantify the observed enhancement effect, and the result showed that the predicted sampling time constant agreed well with the experimental one in complex matrix. Furthermore, a simplified equation was proposed for the real biological sample analysis.

  8. Nonlinear effects of the finite amplitude ultrasound wave in biological tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Nonlinear effects will occur during the transmission of the finite amplitude wave in biological tissues.The theoretical prediction and experimental demonstration of the nonlinear effects on the propagation of the finite amplitude wave at the range of biomedical ultrasound frequency and intensity are studied.Results show that the efficiency factor and effective propagation distance will decrease while the attenuation coefficient increases due to the existence of nonlinear effects.The experimental results coincided quite well with the theory.This shows that the effective propagation distance and efficiency factor can be used to describe quantitatively the influence of nonlinear effects on the propagation of the finite amplitude sound wave in biological tissues.

  9. ICBEN review of research on the biological effects of noise 2011-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basner, Mathias; Brink, Mark; Bristow, Abigail; de Kluizenaar, Yvonne; Finegold, Lawrence; Hong, Jiyoung; Janssen, Sabine A; Klaeboe, Ronny; Leroux, Tony; Liebl, Andreas; Matsui, Toshihito; Schwela, Dieter; Sliwinska-Kowalska, Mariola; Sörqvist, Patrik

    2015-01-01

    The mandate of the International Commission on Biological Effects of Noise (ICBEN) is to promote a high level of scientific research concerning all aspects of noise-induced effects on human beings and animals. In this review, ICBEN team chairs and co-chairs summarize relevant findings, publications, developments, and policies related to the biological effects of noise, with a focus on the period 2011-2014 and for the following topics: Noise-induced hearing loss; nonauditory effects of noise; effects of noise on performance and behavior; effects of noise on sleep; community response to noise; and interactions with other agents and contextual factors. Occupational settings and transport have been identified as the most prominent sources of noise that affect health. These reviews demonstrate that noise is a prevalent and often underestimated threat for both auditory and nonauditory health and that strategies for the prevention of noise and its associated negative health consequences are needed to promote public health.

  10. Acute biological effects of simulating the whole-body radiation dose distribution from a solar particle event using a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jolaine M; Sanzari, Jenine K; Diffenderfer, Eric S; Yee, Stephanie S; Seykora, John T; Maks, Casey; Ware, Jeffrey H; Litt, Harold I; Reetz, Jennifer A; McDonough, James; Weissman, Drew; Kennedy, Ann R; Cengel, Keith A

    2011-11-01

    In a solar particle event (SPE), an unshielded astronaut would receive proton radiation with an energy profile that produces a highly inhomogeneous dose distribution (skin receiving a greater dose than internal organs). The novel concept of using megavoltage electron-beam radiation to more accurately reproduce both the total dose and the dose distribution of SPE protons and make meaningful RBE comparisons between protons and conventional radiation has been described previously. Here, Yucatan minipigs were used to determine the effects of a superficial, SPE-like proton dose distribution using megavoltage electrons. In these experiments, dose-dependent increases in skin pigmentation, ulceration, keratinocyte necrosis and pigment incontinence were observed. Five of 18 animals (one each exposed to 7.5 Gy and 12.5 Gy radiation and three exposed to 25 Gy radiation) developed symptomatic, radiation-associated pneumonopathy approximately 90 days postirradiation. The three animals from the highest dose group showed evidence of mycoplasmal pneumonia along with radiation pneumonitis. Moreover, delayed-type hypersensitivity was found to be altered, suggesting that superficial irradiation of the skin with ionizing radiation might cause immune dysfunction or dysregulation. In conclusion, using total doses, patterns of dose distribution, and dose rates that are compatible with potential astronaut exposure to SPE radiation, animals experienced significant toxicities that were qualitatively different from toxicities previously reported in pigs for homogeneously delivered radiation at similar doses.

  11. Effective identification of conserved pathways in biological networks using hidden Markov models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoning Qian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The advent of various high-throughput experimental techniques for measuring molecular interactions has enabled the systematic study of biological interactions on a global scale. Since biological processes are carried out by elaborate collaborations of numerous molecules that give rise to a complex network of molecular interactions, comparative analysis of these biological networks can bring important insights into the functional organization and regulatory mechanisms of biological systems. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this paper, we present an effective framework for identifying common interaction patterns in the biological networks of different organisms based on hidden Markov models (HMMs. Given two or more networks, our method efficiently finds the top matching paths in the respective networks, where the matching paths may contain a flexible number of consecutive insertions and deletions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on several protein-protein interaction (PPI networks obtained from the Database of Interacting Proteins (DIP and other public databases, we demonstrate that our method is able to detect biologically significant pathways that are conserved across different organisms. Our algorithm has a polynomial complexity that grows linearly with the size of the aligned paths. This enables the search for very long paths with more than 10 nodes within a few minutes on a desktop computer. The software program that implements this algorithm is available upon request from the authors.

  12. Waist circumference as a mediator of biological maturation effect on the motor coordination in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo G.O. Luz

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: The present study aimed to: 1 examine the association of biological maturation effect on performance at a motor coordination battery and 2 to assess whether the association between biological maturation and scores obtained in motor coordination tests is mediated by some anthropometric measurement. Methods: The convenience sample consisted of 73 male children aged 8 years old. Anthropometric data considered the height, body mass, sitting height, waist circumference, body mass index, fat mass and fat-free mass estimates. Biological maturation was assessed by the percentage of the predicted mature stature. Motor coordination was tested by the Körperkoordinationstest für Kinder. A partial correlation between anthropometric measurements, z-score of maturation and the motor coordination tests were performed, controlling for chronological age. Finally, causal mediation analysis was performed. Results: Height, body mass, waist circumference and fat mass showed a slight to moderate inverse correlation with motor coordination. Biological maturation was significantly associated with the balance test with backward walking (r=-0.34. Total mediation of the waist circumference was identified in the association between biological maturation and balance test with backward walking (77%. Conclusions: We identified an association between biological maturation and KTK test performance in male children and also verified that there is mediation of waist circumference. It is recommended that studies be carried out with female individuals and at other age ranges.

  13. A Study Assessing the Potential of Negative Effects in Interdisciplinary Math–Biology Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madlung, Andreas; Bremer, Martina; Himelblau, Edward; Tullis, Alexa

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing enthusiasm for teaching approaches that combine mathematics and biology. The call for integrating more quantitative work in biology education has led to new teaching tools that improve quantitative skills. Little is known, however, about whether increasing interdisciplinary work can lead to adverse effects, such as the development of broader but shallower skills or the possibility that math anxiety causes some students to disengage in the classroom, or, paradoxically, to focus so much on the mathematics that they lose sight of its application for the biological concepts in the center of the unit at hand. We have developed and assessed an integrative learning module and found disciplinary learning gains to be equally strong in first-year students who actively engaged in embedded quantitative calculations as in those students who were merely presented with quantitative data in the context of interpreting biological and biostatistical results. When presented to advanced biology students, our quantitative learning tool increased test performance significantly. We conclude from our study that the addition of mathematical calculations to the first year and advanced biology curricula did not hinder overall student learning, and may increase disciplinary learning and data interpretation skills in advanced students. PMID:21364099

  14. Waist circumference as a mediator of biological maturation effect on the motor coordination in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Leonardo G.O.; Seabra, André; Padez, Cristina; Duarte, João P.; Rebelo-Gonçalves, Ricardo; Valente-dos-Santos, João; Luz, Tatiana D.D.; Carmo, Bruno C.M.; Coelho-e-Silva, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The present study aimed to: 1) examine the association of biological maturation effect on performance at a motor coordination battery and 2) to assess whether the association between biological maturation and scores obtained in motor coordination tests is mediated by some anthropometric measurement. Methods: The convenience sample consisted of 73 male children aged 8 years old. Anthropometric data considered the height, body mass, sitting height, waist circumference, body mass index, fat mass and fat-free mass estimates. Biological maturation was assessed by the percentage of the predicted mature stature. Motor coordination was tested by the Körperkoordinationstest für Kinder. A partial correlation between anthropometric measurements, z-score of maturation and the motor coordination tests were performed, controlling for chronological age. Finally, causal mediation analysis was performed. Results: Height, body mass, waist circumference and fat mass showed a slight to moderate inverse correlation with motor coordination. Biological maturation was significantly associated with the balance test with backward walking (r=-0.34). Total mediation of the waist circumference was identified in the association between biological maturation and balance test with backward walking (77%). Conclusions: We identified an association between biological maturation and KTK test performance in male children and also verified that there is mediation of waist circumference. It is recommended that studies be carried out with female individuals and at other age ranges. PMID:26972616

  15. Waist circumference as a mediator of biological maturation effect on the motor coordination in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Leonardo G O; Seabra, André; Padez, Cristina; Duarte, João P; Rebelo-Gonçalves, Ricardo; Valente-Dos-Santos, João; Luz, Tatiana D D; Carmo, Bruno C M; Coelho-E-Silva, Manuel

    2016-09-01

    The present study aimed to: 1) examine the association of biological maturation effect on children's performance at a motor coordination battery and 2) to assess whether the association between biological maturation and scores obtained in motor coordination tests is mediated by some anthropometric measurement. The convenience sample consisted of 73 male children aged 8 years old. Anthropometric data considered the height, body mass, sitting height, waist circumference, body mass index, fat mass and fat-free mass estimates. Biological maturation was assessed by the percentage of the predicted mature stature. Motor coordination was tested by the Körperkoordinationstest für Kinder. A partial correlation between anthropometric measurements, z-score of maturation and the motor coordination tests were performed, controlling for chronological age. Finally, causal mediation analysis was performed. Height, body mass, waist circumference and fat mass showed a slight to moderate inverse correlation with motor coordination. Biological maturation was significantly associated with the balance test with backward walking (r=-0.34). Total mediation of the waist circumference was identified in the association between biological maturation and balance test with backward walking (77%). We identified an association between biological maturation and KTK test performance in male children and also verified that there is mediation of waist circumference. It is recommended that studies be carried out with female individuals and at other age ranges. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Neutron exposures in human cells: bystander effect and relative biological effectiveness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isheeta Seth

    Full Text Available Bystander effects have been observed repeatedly in mammalian cells following photon and alpha particle irradiation. However, few studies have been performed to investigate bystander effects arising from neutron irradiation. Here we asked whether neutrons also induce a bystander effect in two normal human lymphoblastoid cell lines. These cells were exposed to fast neutrons produced by targeting a near-monoenergetic 50.5 MeV proton beam at a Be target (17 MeV average neutron energy, and irradiated-cell conditioned media (ICCM was transferred to unirradiated cells. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay was used to quantify genetic damage in radiation-naïve cells exposed to ICCM from cultures that received 0 (control, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3 or 4 Gy neutrons. Cells grown in ICCM from irradiated cells showed no significant increase in the frequencies of micronuclei or nucleoplasmic bridges compared to cells grown in ICCM from sham irradiated cells for either cell line. However, the neutron beam has a photon dose-contamination of 5%, which may modulate a neutron-induced bystander effect. To determine whether these low doses of contaminating photons can induce a bystander effect, cells were irradiated with cobalt-60 at doses equivalent to the percent contamination for each neutron dose. No significant increase in the frequencies of micronuclei or bridges was observed at these doses of photons for either cell line when cultured in ICCM. As expected, high doses of photons induced a clear bystander effect in both cell lines for micronuclei and bridges (p<0.0001. These data indicate that neutrons do not induce a bystander effect in these cells. Finally, neutrons had a relative biological effectiveness of 2.0 ± 0.13 for micronuclei and 5.8 ± 2.9 for bridges compared to cobalt-60. These results may be relevant to radiation therapy with fast neutrons and for regulatory agencies setting standards for neutron radiation protection and safety.

  17. Methods for studying and criteria for evaluating the biological effects of electric fields of industrial frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savin, B.M.; Shandala, M.G.; Nikonova, K.V.; Morozov, Yu.A.

    1978-10-01

    Data are reviewed from a number of USSR research studies on the biological effects of electric power transmission lines of 1150 Kv and above. Effects on man, plants, animals, and terrestrial ecosystems are reported. Existing health standards in the USSR for the exposure of personnel working in electric fields are included. It is concluded that high-voltage electric fields have a harmful effect on man and his environment.

  18. Biologically templated assembly of hybrid semiconducting nanomesh for high performance field effect transistors and sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byeon, Hye-Hyeon; Lee, Seung-Woo; Lee, Eun-Hee; Kim, Woong; Yi, Hyunjung

    2016-10-01

    Delicately assembled composites of semiconducting nanomaterials and biological materials provide an attractive interface for emerging applications, such as chemical/biological sensors, wearable health monitoring devices, and therapeutic agent releasing devices. The nanostructure of composites as a channel and a sensing material plays a critical role in the performance of field effect transistors (FETs). Therefore, it is highly desirable to prepare elaborate composite that can allow the fabrication of high performance FETs and also provide high sensitivity and selectivity in detecting specific chemical/biological targets. In this work, we demonstrate that high performance FETs can be fabricated with a hydrodynamically assembled composite, a semiconducting nanomesh, of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (S-SWNTs) and a genetically engineered M13 phage to show strong binding affinity toward SWNTs. The semiconducting nanomesh enables a high on/off ratio (~104) of FETs. We also show that the threshold voltage and the channel current of the nanomesh FETs are sensitive to the change of the M13 phage surface charge. This biological gate effect of the phage enables the detection of biologically important molecules such as dopamine and bisphenol A using nanomesh-based FETs. Our results provide a new insight for the preparation of composite material platform for highly controllable bio/electronics interfaces.

  19. Predator interference effects on biological control: The "paradox" of the generalist predator revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parshad, Rana D.; Bhowmick, Suman; Quansah, Emmanuel; Basheer, Aladeen; Upadhyay, Ranjit Kumar

    2016-10-01

    An interesting conundrum in biological control questions the efficiency of generalist predators as biological control agents. Theory suggests, generalist predators are poor agents for biological control, primarily due to mutual interference. However field evidence shows they are actually quite effective in regulating pest densities. In this work we provide a plausible answer to this paradox. We analyze a three species model, where a generalist top predator is introduced into an ecosystem as a biological control, to check the population of a middle predator, that in turn is depredating on a prey species. We show that the inclusion of predator interference alone, can cause the solution of the top predator equation to blow-up in finite time, while there is global existence in the no interference case. This result shows that interference could actually cause a population explosion of the top predator, enabling it to control the target species, thus corroborating recent field evidence. Our results might also partially explain the population explosion of certain species, introduced originally for biological control purposes, such as the cane toad (Bufo marinus) in Australia, which now functions as a generalist top predator. We also show both Turing instability and spatio-temporal chaos in the model. Lastly we investigate time delay effects.

  20. Biologically templated assembly of hybrid semiconducting nanomesh for high performance field effect transistors and sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byeon, Hye-Hyeon; Lee, Seung-Woo; Lee, Eun-Hee; Kim, Woong; Yi, Hyunjung

    2016-01-01

    Delicately assembled composites of semiconducting nanomaterials and biological materials provide an attractive interface for emerging applications, such as chemical/biological sensors, wearable health monitoring devices, and therapeutic agent releasing devices. The nanostructure of composites as a channel and a sensing material plays a critical role in the performance of field effect transistors (FETs). Therefore, it is highly desirable to prepare elaborate composite that can allow the fabrication of high performance FETs and also provide high sensitivity and selectivity in detecting specific chemical/biological targets. In this work, we demonstrate that high performance FETs can be fabricated with a hydrodynamically assembled composite, a semiconducting nanomesh, of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (S-SWNTs) and a genetically engineered M13 phage to show strong binding affinity toward SWNTs. The semiconducting nanomesh enables a high on/off ratio (~104) of FETs. We also show that the threshold voltage and the channel current of the nanomesh FETs are sensitive to the change of the M13 phage surface charge. This biological gate effect of the phage enables the detection of biologically important molecules such as dopamine and bisphenol A using nanomesh-based FETs. Our results provide a new insight for the preparation of composite material platform for highly controllable bio/electronics interfaces. PMID:27762315

  1. Biologically effective doses of postoperative radiotherapy in the prevention of keloids. Dose-effect relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kal, H.B.; Veen, R.E. [University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To review the recurrence rates of keloids after surgical excision followed by radiotherapy, and to answer the question whether after normalization of the dose, a dose-effect relationship could be derived. Material and Methods: A literature search was performed to identify studies dealing with the efficacy of various irradiation regimes for the prevention of keloids after surgery. Biologically effective doses (BEDs) of the various irradiation regimens were calculated using the linear-quadratic concept. A distinction between recurrence rates of keloids in the face and neck region and those in other parts of the body was made. Results: 31 reports were identified with PubMed with the search terms keloids, surgery, radiation therapy, radiotherapy. 13 reports were excluded, because no link could be found between recurrence rate and dose, or if less than ten patients per dose group. The recurrence rate for surgery only was 50-80%. For BED values >10 Gy the recurrence rate decreased as a function of BED. For BED values >30 Gy the recurrence rate was <10%. For a given dose, the recurrence rates of keloids in the sites with high stretch tension were not significantly higher than in sites without stretch tension. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that for effectively treating keloids postoperatively, a relatively high dose must be applied in a short overall treatment time. The optimal treatment probably is an irradiation scheme resulting in a BED value of at least 30 Gy. A BED value of 30 Gy can be obtained with, for instance, a single acute dose of 13 Gy, two fractions of 8 Gy two fractions of 8 Gy or three fractions of 6 Gy, or a single dose of 27 Gy at low dose rate. The radiation treatment should be administered within 2 days after surgery. (orig.)

  2. Simulation of the radiation effects on biological objects; Simulation der Strahlenwirkung auf biologische Objekte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bug, Marion; Nettelbeck, Heidi [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany). Arbeitsgruppe ' Biologische Wirksamkeit Ionisierender Strahlung'

    2013-06-15

    The simulation of biological radiation effects by means of the electron transport in water and DNA and the cross sections for elastic scattering, electronic excitation, and ionization in electron collisions with tetrahydrofuran molecules is described, whereby the strand-breaking probabilities are determined. (HSI)

  3. Genotoxic exposure and biological effects in the rubber manufacturing industry. Relevance of the dermal route

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, R.

    2001-01-01

    This thesis describes an industry wide survey on genotoxic exposure and biological effects in the rubber manifacturing industry. Chapters are devoted to long-term trends in inhalable and dermal contamination levels, identification of dermal exposure pathways and the assessment of mutagenic

  4. Fertility among HIV-infected Indian women Indian women : the biological effect and its implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darak, Shrinivas; Janssen, Fanny; Hutter, Inge

    In India, nearly one million women of childbearing age are infected with HIV. This study sought to examine the biological effect of HIV on the fertility of HIV-infected Indian women. This is relevant for the provision of pregnancy-related counselling and care to the infected women, and for

  5. Effects of Developed Electronic Instructional Medium on Students' Achievement in Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinna, Nsofor Caroline; Dada, Momoh Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    The study investigated the effects of developed electronic instructional medium (video DVD instructional package) on students' achievement in Biology. It was guided by two research questions and two hypotheses, using a quasi-experimental, pretest-postest control group design. The sample comprised of 180 senior secondary, year two students from six…

  6. Fertility among HIV-infected Indian women Indian women : the biological effect and its implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darak, Shrinivas; Janssen, Fanny; Hutter, Inge

    2011-01-01

    In India, nearly one million women of childbearing age are infected with HIV. This study sought to examine the biological effect of HIV on the fertility of HIV-infected Indian women. This is relevant for the provision of pregnancy-related counselling and care to the infected women, and for estimatin

  7. Effects of organic versus conventional management on chemical and biological parameters in agricultural soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diepeningen, van A.D.; Vos, de O.J.; Korthals, G.W.; Bruggen, van A.H.C.

    2006-01-01

    A comparative study of organic and conventional arable farming systems was conducted in The Netherlands to determine the effect of management practices on chemical and biological soil properties and soil health. Soils from thirteen accredited organic farms and conventionally managed neighboring farm

  8. Effectiveness of the Biology PTechLS Module in a Felda Science Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alias, Norlidah; DeWitt, Dorothy; Rahman, Mohd Nazri Abdul; Gelamdin, Rashidah Begum; Rauf, Rose Amnah Abd; Siraj, Saedah

    2014-01-01

    The PTechLS module combines learning styles with the use of technology to increase students' learning experience, especially in learning abstract concepts. The PTechLS module prototype was developed by Norlidah Alias (2010). The aim of this study is to evaluate the implementation effectiveness of the Biology PTechLS module in a Felda Learning…

  9. The Effectiveness of the New 9th Grade Biology Curriculum on Students' Environmental Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetin, Gulcan; Nisanci, Seda Hilal

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a new 9th grade biology curriculum on students' environmental awareness. Participants included 91 ninth grade students in a high school in Balikesir during the spring semester of the 2008-2009 academic years. Two classrooms, including 22 and 24 students respectively, were randomly assigned…

  10. Effect of temperature on the biology of Paracoccus marginatus Williams and Granara de Willink (Homoptera: Pseudococcidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract: Effect of temperature on the biology of Paracoccus marginatus was investigated. P. marginatus was able to develop and complete its life cycle at 18°, 20°, 25° and 30°C. At 15°, 34° and 35°C eggs hatched, but further development was arrested. Approximately 80 -90% of the eggs survived betw...

  11. The Effectiveness of a Virtual Field Trip (VFT) Module in Learning Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haris, Norbaizura; Osman, Kamisah

    2015-01-01

    Virtual Field Trip is a computer aided module of science developed to study the Colonisation and Succession in Mangrove Swamps, as an alternative to the real field trip in Form for Biology. This study is to identify the effectiveness of the Virtual Field Trip (VFT) module towards the level of achievement in the formative test for this topic. This…

  12. Effectiveness of Blended Cooperative Learning Environment in Biology Teaching: Classroom Community Sense, Academic Achievement and Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yapici, I. Ümit

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of Blended Cooperative Learning Environment (BCLE) in biology teaching on students' classroom community sense, their academic achievement and on their levels of satisfaction. In the study, quantitative and qualitative research methods were used together. The study was carried out with 30 students in…

  13. Why magnetic and electromagnetic effects in biology are irreproducible and contradictory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchachenko, Anatoly

    2016-01-01

    The main source of magnetic and electromagnetic effects in biological systems is now generally accepted and demonstrated in this paper to be radical pair mechanism which implies pairwise generation of radicals in biochemical reactions. This mechanism was convincingly established for enzymatic adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and desoxynucleic acid (DNA) synthesis by using catalyzing metal ions with magnetic nuclei ((25)Mg, (43)Ca, (67)Zn) and supported by magnetic field effects on these reactions. The mechanism, is shown to function in medicine as a medical remedy or technology (trans-cranial magnetic stimulation, nuclear magnetic control of the ATP synthesis in heart muscle, the killing of cancer cells by suppression of DNA synthesis). However, the majority of magnetic effects in biology remain to be irreproducible, contradictory, and enigmatic. Three sources of such a state are shown in this paper to be: the presence of paramagnetic metal ions as a component of enzymatic site or as an impurity in an uncontrollable amount; the property of the radical pair mechanism to function at a rather high concentration of catalyzing metal ions, when at least two ions enter into the catalytic site; and the kinetic restrictions, which imply compatibility of chemical and spin dynamics in radical pair. It is important to keep in mind these factors to properly understand and predict magnetic effects in magneto-biology and biology itself and deliberately use them in medicine.

  14. Biological effects from electric fields associated with high voltage transmission lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-11-01

    Efforts during the past year by the US Department of Energy and the Electric Power Research Institute-funded laboratories to investigate the biological effects from electric fields are described in resume form. Investigations generally have been summarized with objectives, accomplishments of the past year, and some indication of projected studies.

  15. Effects of Conceptual Change Text Based Instruction on Ecology, Attitudes toward Biology and Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çetin, Gülcan; Ertepinar, Hamide; Geban, Ömer

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the conceptual change text based instruction on ninth grade students' understanding of ecological concepts, and attitudes toward biology and environment. Participants were 82 ninth grade students in a public high school in the Northwestern Turkey. A treatment was employed over a five-week…

  16. Biological assessment of effects of combined sewer overflows and storm water discharges.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lijklema, L.; Roijackers, R.M.M.; Cuppen, J.G.M.

    1989-01-01

    The biological effects of discharges from combined or separated sewer systems are difficult to assess or to predict due to variahilities in concentrations, environmental conditions, morphometry, susceptibility of organisms, seasonality and other factors. A general discussion of the problem results i

  17. Wood smoke particle sequesters cell iron to impact a biological effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The biological effect of an inorganic particle (i.e., silica) can be associated with a disruption in cell iron homeostasis. Organic compounds included in particles originating from combustion processes can also complex sources of host cell iron to disrupt metal homeostasis. We te...

  18. Static magnetic fields: A summary of biological interactions, potential health effects, and exposure guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1992-05-01

    Interest in the mechanisms of interaction and the biological effects of static magnetic fields has increased significantly during the past two decades as a result of the growing number of applications of these fields in research, industry and medicine. A major stimulus for research on the bioeffects of static magnetic fields has been the effort to develop new technologies for energy production and storage that utilize intense magnetic fields (e.g., thermonuclear fusion reactors and superconducting magnet energy storage devices). Interest in the possible biological interactions and health effects of static magnetic fields has also been increased as a result of recent developments in magnetic levitation as a mode of public transportation. In addition, the rapid emergence of magnetic resonance imaging as a new clinical diagnostic procedure has, in recent years, provided a strong rationale for defining the possible biological effects of magnetic fields with high flux densities. In this review, the principal interaction mechanisms of static magnetic fields will be described, and a summary will be given of the present state of knowledge of the biological, environmental, and human health effects of these fields.

  19. Effects of charged particles on human tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn D Held

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of charged particle therapy in cancer treatment is growing rapidly, in large part because the exquisite dose localization of charged particles allows for higher radiation doses to be given to tumor tissue while normal tissues are exposed to lower doses and decreased volumes of normal tissues are irradiated. In addition, charged particles heavier than protons have substantial potential clinical advantages because of their additional biological effects including greater cell killing effectiveness, decreased radiation resistance of hypoxic cells in tumors and reduced cell cycle dependence of radiation response. These biological advantages depend on many factors such as endpoint, cell or tissue type, dose, dose rate or fractionation, charged particle type and energy, and oxygen concentration. This review summarizes the unique biological advantages of charged particle therapy and highlights recent research and areas of particular research needs, such as quantification of Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE for various tumor types and radiation qualities, role of genetic background of tumor cells in determining response to charged particles, sensitivity of cancer stem-like cells to charged particles, role of charged particles in tumors with hypoxic fractions and importance of fractionation, including use of hypofractionation, with charged particles.

  20. Beneficial Effects of Ethanolic and Hexanic Rice Bran Extract on Mitochondrial Function in PC12 Cells and the Search for Bioactive Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Hagl

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are involved in the aging processes that ultimately lead to neurodegeneration and the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. A healthy lifestyle, including a diet rich in antioxidants and polyphenols, represents one strategy to protect the brain and to prevent neurodegeneration. We recently reported that a stabilized hexanic rice bran extract (RBE rich in vitamin E and polyphenols (but unsuitable for human consumption has beneficial effects on mitochondrial function in vitro and in vivo (doi:10.1016/j.phrs.2013.06.008, 10.3233/JAD-132084. To enable the use of RBE as food additive, a stabilized ethanolic extract has been produced. Here, we compare the vitamin E profiles of both extracts and their effects on mitochondrial function (ATP concentrations, mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial biogenesis in PC12 cells. We found that vitamin E contents and the effects of both RBE on mitochondrial function were similar. Furthermore, we aimed to identify components responsible for the mitochondria-protective effects of RBE, but could not achieve a conclusive result. α-Tocotrienol and possibly also γ-tocotrienol, α-tocopherol and δ-tocopherol might be involved, but hitherto unknown components of RBE or a synergistic effect of various components might also play a role in mediating RBE’s beneficial effects on mitochondrial function.

  1. EFFECTS OF POLLUTANTS ON BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS. CHAPTER FROM THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Authors, Various

    1980-10-01

    Planning a rational energy future requires anticipating the environmental consequences of various technologies. This is difficult to do with precision as the effects of pollutants are often determined by interactions between and among complex physical (abiotic) and biological (biotic) systems. A given pollutant may affect human beings through direct exposure or indirectly through inducing changes to biological systems which humans need to utilize. The concentration of a toxin in the food chain or the destruction of organisms necessary for the maintenance of high quality water are examples of indirect effects. Pollutants can be transformed and/or degraded as they establish residence in various components of an ecosystem. Anticipation and amelioration of pollutant effects involves the integration of a vast range of data. This data includes: (1) physical and chemical characterization cf the pollutant as it enters the environment; (2) determining effects on the various components (biotic and abiotic) within the context of the functioning ecosystem of interest; (3) transformation in movements and/or degradation of the pollutant within that ecosystem and within specific organisms and physical components; and (4) determining a detailed biochemical and biological picture of the interactions of pollutants with particular organisms and/or their cellular components judged salient for various processes. The major programs described below are designed to answer parts of the above fundamental questions relevant to pollutants generated by energy related technologies. Their emphasis is on anticipating consequences to the biological components of various ecosystems. The work ranges from studies involving parts of a single cell (the membranes) to studies involving the whole ecosystem (in the pelagic zone of a lake). The programs take advantage of expertise and technical abilities present at LBL. Two small exploratory projects which were of brief duration and not related to

  2. Information on biological health effects of ionizing radiation and radionuclides: the rule of a web site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comte, A.; Gaillard-Lecanu, E.; Flury-Herard, A. [CEA Fontenay aux Roses, 92 (France); Ourly, F. [CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Hemidy, P.; Lallemand, J. [Electricite de France (EDF), Service de Radioprotection, 75 - Paris (France)

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this project is to provide a source of information on biological and health effects of radionuclides and ionizing radiation in an easy to use format. Reported work is made up of two distinct parts: data sheets for selected radionuclides and a web file. Data sheets: Specific radiation data sheets provide an overview of the properties, the environmental behaviour, the different pathways of human exposure and the biological and health consequences of selected radionuclides. Radionuclides that have been selected are those commonly dealt with in nuclear industry (and in other areas such as medicine) and released to the environment or naturally occurring (plutonium, tritium, carbon 14). Data sheets corresponding to the different radionuclides are based on the main sources of scientific information in dosimetry, epidemiology, radiobiology and radiation protection. These data sheets are intended for radiation protection specialists and physicians. They include: main physical and chemical characteristics, main radiation protection data: dose coefficients (public, workers), dose limits sources, total released estimate (nuclear industry, atmospheric tests, main pathway of human exposure and biological behaviour, biological and health effects, medical supervision, treatment a list of the main references, appendix providing accurate information. Web file: http://www-dsv.cea.fr/doc/carmin{sub e}xt/fond.php This web file provides a source of information on biological and health effects of ionizing radiation and biological basic knowledge of radiation protection. Available for consultation via Internet, compiled information provides, in a same file, subjects as varied as biological mechanisms, ionizing radiations action, biological and health effects, risk assessment This file is mainly intended to assist in informing and training of non-specialist readership (students, teaching on radiation protection basic knowledge. This electronic document is divided in three

  3. STUDY ON THE RELATIONSHIP OF ARSENIC TRIOXIDE-INDUCED BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS AND DEGRADATIONOF PML PROTEINS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To understand whether arsenic trioxide (As2O3)-induced biological effects are associated with degradation of PML proteins. Methods Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cell line NB4, acute T-lymphocytic leukemia cell line Jurkat, acute myeloid leukemia cell line U937, and chronic myelocytic leukemia blast crisis cell line K562 were used as in vitro models. In different cell lines, the As2O3-induced bio- logical effects were determined by cell growth, cell viability, cell morphology, and flow cytometry assay on sub- G1 cell content. The alteration of PML proteins was analyzed by immunofluorescence. Results In terms of growth inhibition and apoptosis induction, 1.0μmol/L As2O3 had different effects on different cell lines. However, degradation of PML proteins occurred in all the cell lines with As2O3 treatment. Conclusion As2O3-induced biological effects may be independent of PML protein degradation.

  4. Status of study on biological and toxicological effects of nanoscale materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Bing; FENG; Weiyue; ZHAO; Yuliang; XING; Gengmei; CH

    2005-01-01

    Because the physical and chemical properties of nanosized materials mostly differ from the existing microsized materials, their potential impacts on human health and the environment will be topics under the serious discussions in press and in a number of international scientific journals. We analyze and summarize the existing data of the experimental study on the biological activities and adverse effects of nanoscale materials/particles including single wall carbon nanotubes, multi wall carbon nanotubes, titanium oxide and iron powders. Though some biological behaviors of nanoscale materials observed cannot be understood on the basis of the current knowledge, as the existing data are mostly preliminary, it is too early to make some exclusive conclusions on biological activities (or the toxicity) of any of nanoscale materials. The experimental techniques, the current topics, and the future research directions for this new research field are also discussed.

  5. Biological effects of mercury pollution. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning biological and biochemical effects of mercury pollutants on humans, animals, and plants. References cover long-term and short-term experiments, biochemical reaction kinetics, pollution sources, and ecosystems. Mercury poisoning, metabolism, and related diseases are described. Carcinogenicity testing, health risk and assessment, and the effects on food chains are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  6. Biological effects of low-level exposures: a perspective from U.S. EPA scientists.

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, J M; Farland, W H

    1998-01-01

    Biological effects of low-level exposures (BELLE) may be very important in characterizing the potential health risks of environmental pollutants. Before some features of BELLE, such as effects that may be modulated by adaptive or defense mechanisms, can be taken into greater consideration in U.S. Environmental Protection Agency risk assessments, however adequate information on a toxicant's mode of action and answers to other questions are needed.

  7. Biological effects of atmospheric particles on human bronchial epithelial cells. Comparison with diesel exhaust particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baulig, Augustin; Sourdeval, Matthieu; Meyer, Martine; Marano, Francelyne; Baeza-Squiban, Armelle

    2003-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have associated the increase of respiratory disorders with high levels of ambient particulate matter (PM) levels although the underlying biological mechanisms are unclear. PM are a complex mixture of particles with different origins but in urban areas, they mainly contain soots from transport like Diesel exhaust particles (DEP). In order to determine whether PM biological effects can be explained by the presence of DEP, the effects of urban PM, DEP and carbon black particles (CB) were compared on a human bronchial epithelial cell line (16-HBE14o-). Two types of PM were used : reference material (RPM) and PM with an aerodynamic diameter particles. However, DEP and to a lower extent PM inhibited cell proliferation, induced the release of a pro-inflammatory cytokine, GM-CSF, and generated a pro-oxidant state as shown by the increased intracellular peroxides production. By contrast, CB never induced such effects. Nevertheless CB are more endocytosed than DEP whereas PM are the less endocytosed particles. In conclusion, PM induced to a lower extent the same biological effects than DEP in 16-HBE cells suggesting that particle characteristics should be thoroughly considered in order to clearly correlate adverse effects of PM to their composition and to clarify the role of DEP in PM effects.

  8. Is ground cover vegetation an effective biological control enhancement strategy against olive pests?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Paredes

    Full Text Available Ground cover vegetation is often added or allowed to generate to promote conservation biological control, especially in perennial crops. Nevertheless, there is inconsistent evidence of its effectiveness, with studies reporting positive, nil or negative effects on pest control. This might arise from differences between studies at the local scale (e.g. orchard management and land use history, the landscape context (e.g. presence of patches of natural or semi-natural vegetation near the focal orchard, or regional factors, particularly climate in the year of the study. Here we present the findings from a long-term regional monitoring program conducted on four pest species (Bactrocera oleae, Prays oleae, Euphyllura olivina, Saissetia oleae in 2,528 olive groves in Andalusia (Spain from 2006 to 2012. Generalized linear mixed effect models were used to analyze the effect of ground cover on different response variables related to pest abundance, while accounting for variability at the local, landscape and regional scales. There were small and inconsistent effects of ground cover on the abundance of pests whilst local, landscape and regional variability explained a large proportion of the variability in pest response variables. This highlights the importance of local and landscape-related variables in biological control and the potential effects that might emerge from their interaction with practices, such as groundcover vegetation, implemented to promote natural enemy activity. The study points to perennial vegetation close to the focal crop as a promising alternative strategy for conservation biological control that should receive more attention.

  9. Is ground cover vegetation an effective biological control enhancement strategy against olive pests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Daniel; Cayuela, Luis; Gurr, Geoff M; Campos, Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    Ground cover vegetation is often added or allowed to generate to promote conservation biological control, especially in perennial crops. Nevertheless, there is inconsistent evidence of its effectiveness, with studies reporting positive, nil or negative effects on pest control. This might arise from differences between studies at the local scale (e.g. orchard management and land use history), the landscape context (e.g. presence of patches of natural or semi-natural vegetation near the focal orchard), or regional factors, particularly climate in the year of the study. Here we present the findings from a long-term regional monitoring program conducted on four pest species (Bactrocera oleae, Prays oleae, Euphyllura olivina, Saissetia oleae) in 2,528 olive groves in Andalusia (Spain) from 2006 to 2012. Generalized linear mixed effect models were used to analyze the effect of ground cover on different response variables related to pest abundance, while accounting for variability at the local, landscape and regional scales. There were small and inconsistent effects of ground cover on the abundance of pests whilst local, landscape and regional variability explained a large proportion of the variability in pest response variables. This highlights the importance of local and landscape-related variables in biological control and the potential effects that might emerge from their interaction with practices, such as groundcover vegetation, implemented to promote natural enemy activity. The study points to perennial vegetation close to the focal crop as a promising alternative strategy for conservation biological control that should receive more attention.

  10. The role of cell hydration in realization of biological effects of non-ionizing radiation (NIR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayrapetyan, Sinerik

    2015-09-01

    The weak knowledge on the nature of cellular and molecular mechanisms of biological effects of NIR such as static magnetic field, infrasound frequency of mechanical vibration, extremely low frequency of electromagnetic fields and microwave serves as a main barrier for adequate dosimetry from the point of Public Health. The difficulty lies in the fact that the biological effects of NIR depend not only on their thermodynamic characteristics but also on their frequency and intensity "windows", chemical and physical composition of the surrounding medium, as well as on the initial metabolic state of the organism. Therefore, only biomarker can be used for adequate estimation of biological effect of NIR on organisms. Because of the absence of such biomarker(s), organizations having the mission to monitor hazardous effects of NIR traditionally base their instruction on thermodynamic characteristics of NIR. Based on the high sensitivity to NIR of both aqua medium structure and cell hydration, it is suggested that cell bathing medium is one of the primary targets and cell hydration is a biomarker for NIR effects on cells and organisms. The purpose of this article is to present a short review of literature and our own experimental data on the effects of NIR on plants' seeds germination, microbe growth and development, snail neurons and heart muscle, rat's brain and heart tissues.

  11. Benthic biological effects of seasonal hypoxia in a eutrophic estuary predate rapid coastal development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Melanie J.; Powers, Sean P.; Porter, Hugh J.; Peterson, Charles H.

    2006-11-01

    Nutrient and organic loading associated with escalating human activities increases biological oxygen demand from microbial decomposition. In the Neuse River estuary, North Carolina, recurrent nuisance algal blooms, bottom-water hypoxic events, and fish kills during summers of the 1990s suggest that uncapped nutrient loading may have increased the frequency, duration, and/or spatial scope of important biological effects of hypoxia during summer, when persistent water column stratification can occur and microbial metabolism is greatest. We test the hypothesis that the severity of benthic biological effects of hypoxia in this estuary has increased over a 30-year period of dramatic human population growth in eastern North Carolina by comparing survival over summer of the benthic bivalve Macoma spp. between historical (1968-1970) and recent (1997-1998) years. Macoma is a demonstrated indicator of oxygen availability, the benthic biomass dominant in the Neuse and other temperate estuaries and the major prey link to higher trophic levels. All three historical summers exhibited patterns of collapse in Macoma populations indistinguishable from the recent summer of severe hypoxia (1997) but distinct from the modest changes documented during the mildly hypoxic summer of 1998. The only Macoma to survive any severely hypoxic summer were those in shallows where oxygen could be renewed by surface mixing. Thus, the biological effects of hypoxia observed in the Neuse River estuary in the late 1990s appear no more severe than 30 years before. Historic rates of organic loading to the Neuse River estuary may have been sufficient to induce widespread and intense hypoxia beneath the surface mixed layer, implying that even if algal blooms are diminished through nutrient reductions, the severity of biological effects of bottom-water hypoxia may not change detectably.

  12. Acute effects of solar particle event radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann R.; Weissman, Drew; Sanzari, Jenine K.; Krigsfeld, Gabriel S.; Wan, X. Steven; Romero-Weaver, Ana L.; Diffenderfer, Eric S.; Lin, L.; Cengel, K.

    2014-01-01

    A major solar particle event (SPE) may place astronauts at significant risk for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS), which may be exacerbated when combined with other space flight stressors, such that the mission or crew health may be compromised. The National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) Center of Acute Radiation Research (CARR) is focused on the assessment of risks of adverse biological effects related to the ARS in animals exposed to space flight stressors combined with the types of radiation expected during an SPE. The CARR studies are focused on the adverse biological effects resulting from exposure to the types of radiation, at the appropriate energies, doses and dose-rates, present during an SPE (and standard reference radiations: gamma rays or electrons). All animal studies described have been approved by the University of PA IACUC. Some conclusions from recent CARR investigations are as follows: (i) the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for SPE-like protons compared with standard reference radiations (gammas or electrons) for white blood cells (WBCs) vary greatly between mice, ferrets and pigs, with the RBE values being greater in ferrets than those in mice, and considerably greater in pigs compared with those in ferrets or mice [1, 2]. This trend for the data suggests that the RBE values for WBCs in humans could be considerably greater than those observed in small mammals, and SPE proton radiation may be far more hazardous to humans than previously estimated from small animal studies. (ii) Very low doses of SPE proton radiation (25 cGy) increase blood clotting times in ferrets, and the low SPE-like dose rate has more severe effects than high dose rate radiation [3]. (iii) Results from pig and ferret studies suggest that disseminated intravascular coagulation is a major cause of death at doses near the LD50 level for SPE-like proton and gamma radiation. (iv) Exposure to SPE-like proton or gamma radiation, in combination with

  13. Assessment of the Effectiveness of the Studio Format in Introductory Undergraduate Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rintoul, David A.; Williams, Larry G.

    2008-01-01

    Kansas State University converted its introductory biology course, previously taught as an audio-tutorial (A-T), to a studio format in 1997. We share with others information about the process involved and present assessment data for the studio format course that address 1) student exam performance in A-T and studio; 2) student course grades in A-T and studio; 3) student and instructor perceptions and attitudes for A-T and studio; 4) student performance in subsequent biology courses for A-T and studio; and 5) gains in student learning for the studio course and other traditional lecture/lab courses. Collectively, these measures demonstrate that the studio format is as effective as or more effective (for some measures) than the A-T approach and traditional approaches in providing an effective learning environment. We discuss the issues involved in comparing course formats. PMID:18519615

  14. Plant ecdysteroids: plant sterols with intriguing distributions, biological effects and relations to plant hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarkowská, Danuše; Strnad, Miroslav

    2016-09-01

    The present review summarises current knowledge of phytoecdysteroids' biosynthesis, distribution within plants, biological importance and relations to plant hormones. Plant ecdysteroids (phytoecdysteroids) are natural polyhydroxylated compounds that have a four-ringed skeleton, usually composed of either 27 carbon atoms or 28-29 carbon atoms (biosynthetically derived from cholesterol or other plant sterols, respectively). Their physiological roles in plants have not yet been confirmed and their occurrence is not universal. Nevertheless, they are present at high concentrations in various plant species, including commonly consumed vegetables, and have a broad spectrum of pharmacological and medicinal properties in mammals, including hepatoprotective and hypoglycaemic effects, and anabolic effects on skeletal muscle, without androgenic side-effects. Furthermore, phytoecdysteroids can enhance stress resistance by promoting vitality and enhancing physical performance; thus, they are considered adaptogens. This review summarises current knowledge of phytoecdysteroids' biosynthesis, distribution within plants, biological importance and relations to plant hormones.

  15. Distinct biological effects of different nanoparticles commonly used in cosmetics and medicine coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Julia X

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metal oxides in nanoparticle form such as zinc oxide and titanium dioxide now appear on the ingredient lists of household products as common and diverse as cosmetics, sunscreens, toothpaste, and medicine. Previous studies of zinc oxide and titanium dioxide in non-nanoparticle format using animals have found few adverse effects. This has led the FDA to classify zinc oxide as GRAS (generally recognized as safe for use as a food additive. However, there is no regulation specific for the use of these chemicals in nanoparticle format. Recent studies, however, have begun to raise concerns over the pervasive use of these compounds in nanoparticle forms. Unfortunately, there is a lack of easily-adaptable screening methods that would allow for the detection of their biological effects. Results We adapted two image-based assays, a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based caspase activation assay and a green fluorescent protein coupled-LC3 assay, to test for the biological effects of different nanoparticles in a high-throughput format. We show that zinc oxide nanoparticles are cytotoxic. We also show that titanium dioxide nanoparticles are highly effective in inducing autophagy, a cellular disposal mechanism that is often activated when the cell is under stress. Conclusion We suggest that these image-based assays provide a method of screening for the biological effects of similar compounds that is both efficient and sensitive as well as do not involve the use of animals.

  16. Biological Effect of Ultraviolet Photocatalysis on Nanoscale Titanium with a Focus on Physicochemical Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingyi; Zhou, Lei; Ding, Xianglong; Gao, Yan; Liu, Xiangning

    2015-09-15

    Physicochemical properties, regulated by various surface modifications, influence the biological performance of materials. The interaction between surface charge and biomolecules is key to understanding the mechanism of surface-tissue integration. The objective of this study was to evaluate the biological response to a nanoscale titanium surface after ultraviolet (UVC, λ = 250 ± 20 nm) irradiation and to analyze the effects via a physicochemical mechanism. The surface characteristics were evaluated by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, surface profilometry, and contact angle assay. In addition, we applied the zeta-potential, a direct method to measure the electrostatic charge on UV-treated and UV-untreated titanium nanotube surfaces. The effect of the Ti surface after UV treatment on the biological process was determined by analyzing bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorption and osteoblast-like MG-63 early adhesion, morphology, cytoskeletal arrangement, proliferation, and focal adhesion. Compared to an anodized titanium nanotube coating, UV irradiation altered the contact angles on the control surface from 51.5° to 6.2° without changing the surface topography or roughness. Furthermore, titanium nanotubes after UV treatment showed a significant reduction in the content of acidic hydroxyl groups and held less negative charge than the anodized coating. With regard to the biological response, along with an enhanced capability to adsorb BSA, osteoblasts exhibited higher colonization and viability on the UV-treated material. The results suggest that UV treatment enhances the biocompatibility by reducing the electrostatic repulsion between biomaterials and biomolecules.

  17. In vitro cultured cells as probes for space radiation effects on biological systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meli, A.; Perrella, G.; Curcio, F.; Ambesi-Impiombato, F.S. [Dipartimento di Patologia e Medicina Sperimentale e Clinica, Universita di Udine, P.le S. Maria della Misericordia, 33100 Udine (Italy)

    1999-12-06

    Near future scenarios of long-term and far-reaching manned space missions, require more extensive knowledge of all possible biological consequences of space radiation, particularly in humans, on both a long-term and a short-term basis. In vitro cultured cells have significantly contributed to the tremendous advancement of biomedical research. It is therefore to be expected that simple biological systems such as cultured cells, will contribute to space biomedical sciences. Space represents a novel environment, to which life has not been previously exposed. Both microgravity and space radiation are the two relevant components of such an environment, but biological adaptive mechanisms and efficient countermeasures can significantly minimize microgravity effects. On the other hand, it is felt that space radiation risks may be more relevant and that defensive strategies can only stem from our deeper knowledge of biological effects and of cellular repair mechanisms. Cultured cells may play a key role in such studies. Particularly, thyroid cells may be relevant because of the exquisite sensitivity of the thyroid gland to radiation. In addition, a clone of differentiated, normal thyroid follicular cells (FRTL5 cells) is available in culture, which is well characterized and particularly fit for space research.

  18. The effect of cosmic rays on biological systems - an investigation during GLE events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belisheva, N. K.; Lammer, H.; Biernat, H. K.; Vashenuyk, E. V.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, first direct and circumstantial evidences of the effects of cosmic rays (CR) on biological systems are presented. A direct evidence of biological effects of CR is demonstrated in experiments with three cellular lines growing in culture during three events of Ground Level Enhancement (GLEs) in the neutron count rate detected by ground-based neutron monitor in October 1989. Various phenomena associated with DNA lesion on the cellular level demonstrate coherent dynamics of radiation effects in all cellular lines coincident with the time of arrival of high-energy solar particles to the near-Earth space and with the main peak in GLE. These results were obtained in the course of six separate experiments, with partial overlapping of the time of previous and subsequent experiments, which started and finished in the quiet period of solar activity (SA). A significant difference between the values of multinuclear cells in all cellular lines in the quiet period and during GLE events indicates that the cause of radiation effects in the cell cultures is an exposure of cells to the secondary solar CR near the Earth's surface. The circumstantial evidence was obtained by statistical analysis of cases of congenital malformations (CM) at two sites in the Murmansk region. The number of cases of all classes of CM reveals a significant correlation with the number of GLE events. The number of cases of CM with pronounced chromosomal abnormalities clearly correlates with the GLE events that occurred a year before the birth of a child. We have found a significant correlation between modulations of the water properties and daily background variations of CR intensity. We believe that the effects of CR on biological systems can be also mediated by fluctuations in water properties, considered as one of possible mechanisms controlling the effects of CRs on biological systems.

  19. Effectiveness of biological surrogates for predicting patterns of marine biodiversity: a global meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Mellin

    Full Text Available The use of biological surrogates as proxies for biodiversity patterns is gaining popularity, particularly in marine systems where field surveys can be expensive and species richness high. Yet, uncertainty regarding their applicability remains because of inconsistency of definitions, a lack of standard methods for estimating effectiveness, and variable spatial scales considered. We present a Bayesian meta-analysis of the effectiveness of biological surrogates in marine ecosystems. Surrogate effectiveness was defined both as the proportion of surrogacy tests where predictions based on surrogates were better than random (i.e., low probability of making a Type I error; P and as the predictability of targets using surrogates (R(2. A total of 264 published surrogacy tests combined with prior probabilities elicited from eight international experts demonstrated that the habitat, spatial scale, type of surrogate and statistical method used all influenced surrogate effectiveness, at least according to either P or R(2. The type of surrogate used (higher-taxa, cross-taxa or subset taxa was the best predictor of P, with the higher-taxa surrogates outperforming all others. The marine habitat was the best predictor of R(2, with particularly low predictability in tropical reefs. Surrogate effectiveness was greatest for higher-taxa surrogates at a <10-km spatial scale, in low-complexity marine habitats such as soft bottoms, and using multivariate-based methods. Comparisons with terrestrial studies in terms of the methods used to study surrogates revealed that marine applications still ignore some problems with several widely used statistical approaches to surrogacy. Our study provides a benchmark for the reliable use of biological surrogates in marine ecosystems, and highlights directions for future development of biological surrogates in predicting biodiversity.

  20. Biological effects of exposure to static electric fields in humans and vertebrates: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petri, Anne-Kathrin; Schmiedchen, Kristina; Stunder, Dominik; Dechent, Dagmar; Kraus, Thomas; Bailey, William H; Driessen, Sarah

    2017-04-17

    High-voltage direct current (HVDC) lines are the technology of choice for the transport of large amounts of energy over long distances. The operation of these lines produces static electric fields (EF), but the data reviewed in previous assessments were not sufficient to assess the need for any environmental limit. The aim of this systematic review was to update the current state of research and to evaluate biological effects of static EF. Using the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses) recommendations, we collected and evaluated experimental and epidemiological studies examining biological effects of exposure to static EF in humans (n = 8) and vertebrates (n = 40). There is good evidence that humans and animals are able to perceive the presence of static EF at sufficiently high levels. Hair movements caused by electrostatic forces may play a major role in this perception. A large number of studies reported responses of animals (e.g., altered metabolic, immunologic or developmental parameters) to a broad range of static EF strengths as well, but these responses are likely secondary physiological responses to sensory stimulation. Furthermore, the quality of many of the studies reporting physiological responses is poor, which raises concerns about confounding. The weight of the evidence from the literature reviewed did not indicate that static EF have adverse biological effects in humans or animals. The evidence strongly supported the role of superficial sensory stimulation of hair and skin as the basis for perception of the field, as well as reported indirect behavioral and physiological responses. Physical considerations also preclude any direct effect of static EF on internal physiology, and reports that some physiological processes are affected in minor ways may be explained by other factors. While this literature does not support a level of concern about biological effects of exposure to static EF, the conditions

  1. State-of-the-art exposure chamber for highly controlled and reproducible THz biological effects studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerna, Cesario Z.; Elam, David P.; Echchgadda, Ibtissam; Sloan, Mark A.; Wilmink, Gerald J.

    2014-03-01

    Terahertz (THz) imaging and sensing technologies are increasingly being used at international airports for security screening purposes and at major medical centers for cancer and burn diagnosis. The emergence of new THz applications has directly resulted in an increased interest regarding the biological effects associated with this frequency range. Knowledge of THz biological effects is also desired for the safe use of THz systems, identification of health hazards, and development of empirically-based safety standards. In this study, we developed a state-of-the-art exposure chamber that allowed for highly controlled and reproducible studies of THz biological effects. This innovative system incorporated an industry grade cell incubator system that permitted a highly controlled exposure environment, where temperatures could be maintained at 37 °C +/- 0.1 °C, carbon dioxide (CO2) levels at 5% +/- 0.1%, and relative humidity (RH) levels at 95% +/- 1%. To maximize the THz power transmitted to the cell culture region inside the humid incubator, a secondary custom micro-chamber was fabricated and incorporated into the system. This micro-chamber shields the THz beam from the incubator environment and could be nitrogen-purged to eliminate water absorption effects. Additionally, a microscope that allowed for real-time visualization of the live cells before, during, and after THz exposure was integrated into the exposure system.

  2. The Cost-Effectiveness of Biologics for the Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joensuu, Jaana T.; Huoponen, Saara; Aaltonen, Kalle J.; Konttinen, Yrjö T.; Nordström, Dan; Blom, Marja

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Economic evaluations provide information to aid the optimal utilization of limited healthcare resources. Costs of biologics for Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are remarkably high, which makes these agents an important target for economic evaluations. This systematic review aims to identify existing studies examining the cost-effectiveness of biologics for RA, assess their quality and report their results systematically. Methods A literature search covering Medline, Scopus, Cochrane library, ACP Journal club and Web of Science was performed in March 2013. The cost-utility analyses (CUAs) of one or more available biological drugs for the treatment of RA in adults were included. Two independent investigators systematically collected information and assessed the quality of the studies. To enable the comparison of the results, all costs were converted to 2013 euro. Results Of the 4890 references found in the literature search, 41 CUAs were included in the current systematic review. While considering only direct costs, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of the tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi) ranged from 39,000 to 1 273,000 €/quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained in comparison to conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (cDMARDs) in cDMARD naïve patients. Among patients with an insufficient response to cDMARDs, biologics were associated with ICERs ranging from 12,000 to 708,000 €/QALY. Rituximab was found to be the most cost-effective alternative compared to other biologics among the patients with an insufficient response to TNFi. Conclusions When 35,000 €/QALY is considered as a threshold for the ICER, TNFis do not seem to be cost-effective among cDMARD naïve patients and patients with an insufficient response to cDMARDs. With thresholds of 50,000 to 100,000 €/QALY biologics might be cost-effective among patients with an inadequate response to cDMARDs. Standardization of multiattribute utility instruments

  3. The cost-effectiveness of biologics for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaana T Joensuu

    Full Text Available Economic evaluations provide information to aid the optimal utilization of limited healthcare resources. Costs of biologics for Rheumatoid arthritis (RA are remarkably high, which makes these agents an important target for economic evaluations. This systematic review aims to identify existing studies examining the cost-effectiveness of biologics for RA, assess their quality and report their results systematically.A literature search covering Medline, Scopus, Cochrane library, ACP Journal club and Web of Science was performed in March 2013. The cost-utility analyses (CUAs of one or more available biological drugs for the treatment of RA in adults were included. Two independent investigators systematically collected information and assessed the quality of the studies. To enable the comparison of the results, all costs were converted to 2013 euro.Of the 4890 references found in the literature search, 41 CUAs were included in the current systematic review. While considering only direct costs, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER of the tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi ranged from 39,000 to 1,273,000 €/quality adjusted life year (QALY gained in comparison to conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (cDMARDs in cDMARD naïve patients. Among patients with an insufficient response to cDMARDs, biologics were associated with ICERs ranging from 12,000 to 708,000 €/QALY. Rituximab was found to be the most cost-effective alternative compared to other biologics among the patients with an insufficient response to TNFi.When 35,000 €/QALY is considered as a threshold for the ICER, TNFis do not seem to be cost-effective among cDMARD naïve patients and patients with an insufficient response to cDMARDs. With thresholds of 50,000 to 100,000 €/QALY biologics might be cost-effective among patients with an inadequate response to cDMARDs. Standardization of multiattribute utility instruments and a validated standard conversion method

  4. Effective diffusion coefficient of biological liquids in porous calcium phosphate coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarenko, N. N.; Knyazeva, A. G.

    2016-11-01

    The study offers a method to estimate effective diffusion coefficients for transfer of biological liquids in porous materials. The method is based on the analysis of areas occupied by pores and solid materials on slice images. The possibility is shown for ascertaining a correlation between the effective coefficient and technological conditions because different structure and porosity are observed experimentally. The correlations of effective diffusion coefficients with the production voltage for different coating-base compositions, on which the coating was grown, have been built.

  5. Genomic instability and bystander effects: a paradigm shift in radiation biology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, William F.

    2002-01-01

    A basic paradigm in radiobiology is that, following exposure to ionizing radiation, the deposition of energy in the cell nucleus and the resulting damage to DNA, the principal target, are responsible for the radiation's deleterious biological effects. Findings in two rapidly expanding fields of research--radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects--have caused us to reevaluate these central tenets. In this article, the potential influence of induced genomic instability and bystander effects on cellular injury after exposure to low-level radiation will be reviewed.

  6. Effect of some botanical materials on certain biological aspects of the house fly, Musca domestica L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabawy A. I. Elkattan, Khalafalla S. Ahmed, Saadya M. Elbermawy and Rabab

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of Lantana camara (leaves, Pelargonium zonale (leaves, Cupressus macrocarpa (leaves, Cyperus rotundus (whole plant and Acacia nilotica (seeds powders on some biological aspects of house fly, M. domestica L. were tested. The effects of three lethal concentrations LC25, LC50 and LC75 on the larval duration, pupation percent, pupal weight, pupal duration, adult emergence percent, sex ratio, adult longevity, and fecundity were determined. The induced malformed larvae, pupae and adults were recorded and photographed. The powders of the five plants were found to have promising effects in controlling this insect.

  7. Glyphosate accumulation, translocation, and biological effects in Coffea arabica after single and multiple exposures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrübbers, Lars Christoph; Valverde, Bernal E.; Strobel, Bjarne W.

    2016-01-01

    In perennial crops like coffee, glyphosate drift exposure can occur multiple times during its commercial life span. Due to limited glyphosate degradation in higher plants, a potential accumulation of glyphosate could lead to increased biological effects with increased exposure frequency....... In this study, we investigated glyphosate translocation over time, and its concentration and biological effects after single and multiple simulated spray-drift exposures. Additionally, shikimic acid/glyphosate ratios were used as biomarkers for glyphosate binding to its target enzyme.Four weeks after...... the exposure, glyphosate was continuously translocated. Shikimic acid levels were lin-ear correlated with glyphosate levels. After two months, however, glyphosate appeared to have reduced activity. In the greenhouse, multiple applications resulted in higher internal glyphosate concentrations.The time...

  8. Characterization of the angular memory effect of scattered light in biological tissues

    CERN Document Server

    Schott, Sam; Léger, Jean-Francois; Bourdieu, Laurent; Gigan, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    High resolution optical microscopy is essential in neuroscience but suffers from scattering in biological tissues. It therefore grants access to superficial layers only. Recently developed techniques use scattered photons for imaging by exploiting angular correlations in transmitted light and could potentially increase imaging depths. But those correlations (`angular memory effect') are of very short range and, in theory, only present behind and not inside scattering media. From measurements on neural tissues and complementary simulations, we find that strong forward scattering in biological tissues can enhance the memory effect range (and thus the possible field-of-view) by more than an order of magnitude compared to isotropic scattering for $\\sim$1\\,mm thick tissue layers.

  9. Biological effects induced by K photo-ionisation in and near constituent atoms of DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Touati, A.; Herve du Penhoot, M.A.; Fayard, B.; Champion, C.; Abel, F.; Gobert, F.; Lamoureux, M.; Politis, M.F.; Martins, L.; Ricoul, M.; Sabatier, L.; Sage, E.; Chetioui, A

    2002-07-01

    In order to assess the lethal efficiency and other biological effects of inner shell ionisations of constituent atoms of DNA ('K' events), experiments were developed at the LURE synchrotron facility using ultrasoft X rays as a probe of K events. The lethal efficiency of ultrasoft X rays above the carbon K threshold was especially investigated using V79 cells and compared with their efficiency to induce double strand breaks in dry plasmid-DNA. A correlation between the K event efficiencies for these processes is shown. Beams of 340 eV were found to be twice as efficient at killing cells than were beams at 250 eV. In addition, a rough two-fold increase of the relative biological effectiveness for dicentric+ring induction has also been observed between 250 and 340 eV radiations. (author)

  10. Characterization of the angular memory effect of scattered light in biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Sam; Bertolotti, Jacopo; Léger, Jean-Francois; Bourdieu, Laurent; Gigan, Sylvain

    2015-05-01

    High resolution optical microscopy is essential in neuroscience but suffers from scattering in biological tissues. It therefore grants access to superficial layers only. Recently developed techniques use scattered photons for imaging by exploiting angular correlations in transmitted light and could potentially increase imaging depths. But those correlations (`angular memory effect') are of very short range and, in theory, only present behind and not inside scattering media. From measurements on neural tissues and complementary simulations, we find that strong forward scattering in biological tissues can enhance the memory effect range (and thus the possible field-of-view) by more than an order of magnitude compared to isotropic scattering for $\\sim$1\\,mm thick tissue layers.

  11. Characterization of the angular memory effect of scattered light in biological tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Sam; Bertolotti, Jacopo; Léger, Jean-Francois; Bourdieu, Laurent; Gigan, Sylvain

    2015-05-18

    High resolution optical microscopy is essential in neuroscience but suffers from scattering in biological tissues and therefore grants access to superficial brain layers only. Recently developed techniques use scattered photons for imaging by exploiting angular correlations in transmitted light and could potentially increase imaging depths. But those correlations ('angular memory effect') are of a very short range and should theoretically be only present behind and not inside scattering media. From measurements on neural tissues and complementary simulations, we find that strong forward scattering in biological tissues can enhance the memory effect range and thus the possible field-of-view by more than an order of magnitude compared to isotropic scattering for ∼1 mm thick tissue layers.

  12. Computation of the effective mechanical response of biological networks accounting for large configuration changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Nady, K; Ganghoffer, J F

    2016-05-01

    The asymptotic homogenization technique is involved to derive the effective elastic response of biological membranes viewed as repetitive beam networks. Thereby, a systematic methodology is established, allowing the prediction of the overall mechanical properties of biological membranes in the nonlinear regime, reflecting the influence of the geometrical and mechanical micro-parameters of the network structure on the overall response of the equivalent continuum. Biomembranes networks are classified based on nodal connectivity, so that we analyze in this work 3, 4 and 6-connectivity networks, which are representative of most biological networks. The individual filaments of the network are described as undulated beams prone to entropic elasticity, with tensile moduli determined from their persistence length. The effective micropolar continuum evaluated as a continuum substitute of the biological network has a kinematics reflecting the discrete network deformation modes, involving a nodal displacement and a microrotation. The statics involves the classical Cauchy stress and internal moments encapsulated into couple stresses, which develop internal work in duality to microcurvatures reflecting local network undulations. The relative ratio of the characteristic bending length of the effective micropolar continuum to the unit cell size determines the relevant choice of the equivalent medium. In most cases, the Cauchy continuum is sufficient to model biomembranes. The peptidoglycan network may exhibit a re-entrant hexagonal configuration due to thermal or pressure fluctuations, for which micropolar effects become important. The homogenized responses are in good agreement with FE simulations performed over the whole network. The predictive nature of the employed homogenization technique allows the identification of a strain energy density of a hyperelastic model, for the purpose of performing structural calculations of the shape evolutions of biomembranes.

  13. Cumulative and Synergistic Effects of Physical, Biological, and Acoustic Signals on Marine Mammal Habitat Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    seasonal breakup of the ice has begun. The bowhead whales detections finally disappear as these mammals begin their annual migration to the Arctic Ocean...Final Report Cumulative and Synergistic Effects of Physical, Biological, and Acoustic Signals on Marine Mammal Habitat Use Jeffrey A Nystuen...signals impact marine mammal habitat use. This is especially critical in areas like the Bering Sea where global climate change can lead to rapid changes

  14. Effectiveness of Biology-Based Methods for Inhibiting Orthodontic Tooth Movement. A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadenas de Llano-Pérula, M; Yañez-Vico, R M; Solano-Reina, E; Palma-Fernandez, J C; Iglesias-Linares, A

    2017-09-22

    Several experimental studies in the literature have tested different biology-based methods for inhibiting or decreasing orthodontic tooth movement (OTM) in humans. This systematic review investigated the effects of these interventions on the rate of tooth movement. Electronic [MedLine; SCOPUS; Cochrane Library; OpenGrey;Web of Science] and manual searches were conducted up to January 26th, 2016 in order to identify publications of clinical trials that compared the decreasing or inhibiting effects of different biology-based methods over OTM in humans. A primary outcome (rate of OTM deceleration/inhibition) and a number of secondary outcomes were examined (clinical applicability, orthodontic force used, possible side effects). Two reviewers selected the studies complying with the eligibility criteria (PICO format) and assessed risk of bias [Cochrane Collaboration's tool]. Data collection and analysis were performed following the Cochrane recommendations. From the initial electronic search, 3726 articles were retrieved and 5 studies were finally included. Two types of biology-based techniques used to reduce the rate of OTM in humans were described: pharmacological and low-level laser therapy. In the first group, human Relaxin was compared to a placebo and administered orally. It was described as having no effect on the inhibition of OTM in humans after 32 days, while the drug tenoxicam, injected locally, inhibited the rate of OTM by up to 10% in humans after 42 days. In the second group, no statistically significant differences were reported, compared to placebo, for the rate of inhibition of OTM in humans after 90 days of observation when a 860 nm continuous wave GaAlA slow-level laser was used. The currently available data do not allow us to draw definitive conclusions about the use of various pharmacological substances and biology-based therapies in humans able to inhibit or decrease the OTM rate. There is an urgent need for more sound well-designed randomized

  15. Effects of organic amendment on soil quality as assessed by biological indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Sultana, Salma

    2011-01-01

    Soil quality decline is one of the most predominant effect deriving from human activities. In particular, intensive agricultural management can affect negatively soils, principally due to rapid depletion of soil organic matter, that affects, in turn, soil physical, chemical and biological properties. The declining trend of soil quality coupled with mismanagement of agricultural production is pose a serious threat to sustainability of intensive agriculture. Sustainable intensive agriculture is...

  16. Effect of non-crop vegetation types on conservation biological control of pests in olive groves

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Conservation biological control (CBC) is an environmentally sound potential alternative to the use of chemical insecticides. It involves modifications of the environment to promote natural enemy activity on pests. Despite many CBC studies increasing abundance of natural enemies, there are far fewer demonstrations of reduced pest density and very little work has been conducted in olive crops. In this study we investigated the effects of four forms of non-crop vegetation on the abundance of two...

  17. Biological Effects of Short, High-Level Exposure to Gases: Nitrogen Oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOT ES3 This project was one of four under the same contract; the others covered ammonia , carbon monoxide, and sulfur dioxide. 3 IS. KEY wOROS...characterize the biological responses to short, high-level exposures to four gases associated with certain Army weapons systems ( ammonia , carbon monoxide...20- i --- 7 (2) Biochemical and Other Effects Buckley and BalchumlO found biochemical changes, principally in enzyme activity of the liver, spleen

  18. [Properties and biological effect of dust of various artificial mineral fibers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elovskaja, L T; Werner, I; Kupina, L M; Loscilov, J A; Efremov, L D

    1990-09-01

    Developments and use of man-made mineral fibres are important for the progress in some technical fields. In the last years the number of man-made mineral fibres increased extraordinarily. For the medical evaluation it is necessary to determine the physico-chemical characteristics of the man-made mineral fibre dust and its biological effects in animal experiments. The results of the investigations are described.

  19. Effect of the flavonoid rutin on the biology of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talita Roberta Ferreira Borges Silva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae is a major pest of maize crops in Brazil. The effects of plant metabolites on the biology and behavior of insects is little studied. The aim of the study was to evaluate the activity of rutin on the biology of the S. frugiperda by using artificial diets containing rutin. The study evaluated four treatments: regular diet (control group and diets containing 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 mg g-1 of rutin. The following biological variables parameters of the larvae were evaluated daily: development time (days, larval and pupal weight (g and viability (%, adult longevity and total life cycle (days. A completely randomized experimental design was used with 25 replication. The rutin flavonoid negatively affected the biology of S. frugiperda by prolonging the larval development time, reducing the weight of larvae and pupae and decreasing the viability of the pupae. The addition of different concentrations of rutin prolonged the S. frugiperda life cycle. The use of plant with insecticidal activity has the potential with strategy in IPM.

  20. Effectiveness of computer-assisted learning in biology teaching in primary schools in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Županec Vera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the comparative effectiveness of Computer-Assisted Learning (CAL and the traditional teaching method in biology on primary school pupils. A stratified random sample consisted of 214 pupils from two primary schools in Novi Sad. The pupils in the experimental group learned the biology content (Chordate using CAL, whereas the pupils in the control group learned the same content using traditional teaching. The research design was the pretest-posttest equivalent groups design. All instruments (the pretest, the posttest and the retest contained the questions belonging to three different cognitive domains: knowing, applying, and reasoning. Arithmetic mean, standard deviation, and standard error were analyzed using the software package SPSS 14.0, and t-test was used in order to establish the difference between the same statistical indicators. The analysis of results of the post­test and the retest showed that the pupils from the CAL group achieved significantly higher quantity and quality of knowledge in all three cognitive domains than the pupils from the traditional group. The results accomplished by the pupils from the CAL group suggest that individual CAL should be more present in biology teaching in primary schools, with the aim of raising the quality of biology education in pupils. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 179010: Quality of Educational System in Serbia in the European Perspective

  1. On the effect of prestrain and residual stress in thin biological membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausch, Manuel K; Kuhl, Ellen

    2013-09-01

    Understanding the difference between ex vivo and in vivo measurements is critical to interpret the load carrying mechanisms of living biological systems. For the past four decades, the ex vivo stiffness of thin biological membranes has been characterized using uniaxial and biaxial tests with remarkably consistent stiffness parameters, even across different species. Recently, the in vivo stiffness was characterized using combined imaging techniques and inverse finite element analyses. Surprisingly, ex vivo and in vivo stiffness values differed by up to three orders of magnitude. Here, for the first time, we explain this tremendous discrepancy using the concept of prestrain. We illustrate the mathematical modeling of prestrain in nonlinear continuum mechanics through the multiplicative decomposition of the total elastic deformation into prestrain-induced and load-induced parts. Using in vivo measured membrane kinematics and associated pressure recordings, we perform an inverse finite element analysis for different prestrain levels and show that the resulting membrane stiffness may indeed differ by four orders of magnitude depending on the prestrain level. Our study motivates the hypothesis that prestrain is important to position thin biological membranes in vivo into their optimal operating range, right at the transition point of the stiffening regime. Understanding the effect of prestrain has direct clinical implications in regenerative medicine, medical device design, and and tissue engineering of replacement constructs for thin biological membranes.

  2. Deciphering the biological effects of acupuncture treatment modulating multiple metabolism pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aihua; Yan, Guangli; Sun, Hui; Cheng, Weiping; Meng, Xiangcai; Liu, Li; Xie, Ning; Wang, Xijun

    2016-02-16

    Acupuncture is an alternative therapy that is widely used to treat various diseases. However, detailed biological interpretation of the acupuncture stimulations is limited. We here used metabolomics and proteomics technology, thereby identifying the serum small molecular metabolites into the effect and mechanism pathways of standardized acupuncture treatments at 'Zusanli' acupoint which was the most often used acupoint in previous reports. Comprehensive overview of serum metabolic profiles during acupuncture stimulation was investigated. Thirty-four differential metabolites were identified in serum metabolome and associated with ten metabolism pathways. Importantly, we have found that high impact glycerophospholipid metabolism, fatty acid metabolism, ether lipid metabolism were acutely perturbed by acupuncture stimulation. As such, these alterations may be useful to clarify the biological mechanism of acupuncture stimulation. A series of differentially expressed proteins were identified and such effects of acupuncture stimulation were found to play a role in transport, enzymatic activity, signaling pathway or receptor interaction. Pathway analysis further revealed that most of these proteins were found to play a pivotal role in the regulation of multiple metabolism pathways. It demonstrated that the metabolomics coupled with proteomics as a powerful approach for potential applications in understanding the biological effects of acupuncture stimulation.

  3. Analysis of MIR-18 results for physical and biological dosimetry: radiation shielding effectiveness in LEO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Williams, J. R.; Dicello, J. F.

    2000-01-01

    We compare models of radiation transport and biological response to physical and biological dosimetry results from astronauts on the Mir space station. Transport models are shown to be in good agreement with physical measurements and indicate that the ratio of equivalent dose from the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) to protons is about 3/2:1 and that this ratio will increase for exposures to internal organs. Two biological response models are used to compare to the Mir biodosimetry for chromosome aberration in lymphocyte cells; a track-structure model and the linear-quadratic model with linear energy transfer (LET) dependent weighting coefficients. These models are fit to in vitro data for aberration formation in human lymphocytes by photons and charged particles. Both models are found to be in reasonable agreement with data for aberrations in lymphocytes of Mir crew members: however there are differences between the use of LET dependent weighting factors and track structure models for assigning radiation quality factors. The major difference in the models is the increased effectiveness predicted by the track model for low charge and energy ions with LET near 10 keV/micrometers. The results of our calculations indicate that aluminum shielding, although providing important mitigation of the effects of trapped radiation, provides no protective effect from the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) in low-earth orbit (LEO) using either equivalent dose or the number of chromosome aberrations as a measure until about 100 g/cm 2 of material is used.

  4. Nanometallomics: an emerging field studying the biological effects of metal-related nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Feng; Gao, Yuxi; Chai, Zhifang; Chen, Chunying

    2014-02-01

    Metallomics, focusing on the global and systematic understanding of the metal uptake, trafficking, role and excretion in biological systems, has attracted more and more attention. Metal-related nanomaterials, including metallic and metal-containing nanomaterials, have unique properties compared to their micro-scaled counterparts and therefore require special attention. The small size effect, surface effect, and quantum size effect directly influence the physicochemical properties of nanostructured materials and their fate and behavior in biota. However, to our knowledge, the metallomics itself did not touch this special category of materials yet. Therefore, the term "nanometallomics" is proposed and the systematic study on the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion (ADME) behavior of metal-related nanomaterials in biological systems and their interactions with genes, proteins and other biomolecules will be reviewed. The ADME behavior of metal-related nanomaterials in the biological systems is influenced by their physicochemical properties, the exposure route, and the microenvironment of the deposition site. Nanomaterials may not only interact directly or indirectly with genes, proteins and other molecules to cause DNA damage, genotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and cytotoxicity, but also stimulate the immune responses, circumvent tumor resistance and inhibit tumor metastasis. Nanometallomics needs to be integrated with other omics sciences, such as genomics, proteomics and metabolomics, to explore the biomedical data and obtain the overall knowledge of underlying mechanisms, and therefore to improve the application performance and to reduce the potential risk of metal-related nanomaterials.

  5. New insight into the molecular mechanisms of the biological effects of DNA minor groove binders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinbo Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bisbenzimides, or Hoechst 33258 (H258, and its derivative Hoechst 33342 (H342 are archetypal molecules for designing minor groove binders, and widely used as tools for staining DNA and analyzing side population cells. They are supravital DNA minor groove binders with AT selectivity. H342 and H258 share similar biological effects based on the similarity of their chemical structures, but also have their unique biological effects. For example, H342, but not H258, is a potent apoptotic inducer and both H342 and H258 can induce transgene overexpression in in vitro studies. However, the molecular mechanisms by which Hoechst dyes induce apoptosis and enhance transgene overexpression are unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To determine the molecular mechanisms underlying different biological effects between H342 and H258, microarray technique coupled with bioinformatics analyses and multiple other techniques has been utilized to detect differential global gene expression profiles, Hoechst dye-specific gene expression signatures, and changes in cell morphology and levels of apoptosis-associated proteins in malignant mesothelioma cells. H342-induced apoptosis occurs in a dose-dependent fashion and is associated with morphological changes, caspase-3 activation, cytochrome c mitochondrial translocation, and cleavage of apoptosis-associated proteins. The antagonistic effect of H258 on H342-induced apoptosis indicates a pharmacokinetic basis for the two dyes' different biological effects. Differential global gene expression profiles induced by H258 and H342 are accompanied by unique gene expression signatures determined by DNA microarray and bioinformatics software, indicating a genetic basis for their different biological effects. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A unique gene expression signature associated with H342-induced apoptosis provides a new avenue to predict and classify the therapeutic class of minor groove binders in the drug

  6. Biologically optimized helium ion plans: calculation approach and its in vitro validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairani, A.; Dokic, I.; Magro, G.; Tessonnier, T.; Kamp, F.; Carlson, D. J.; Ciocca, M.; Cerutti, F.; Sala, P. R.; Ferrari, A.; Böhlen, T. T.; Jäkel, O.; Parodi, K.; Debus, J.; Abdollahi, A.; Haberer, T.

    2016-06-01

    Treatment planning studies on the biological effect of raster-scanned helium ion beams should be performed, together with their experimental verification, before their clinical application at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT). For this purpose, we introduce a novel calculation approach based on integrating data-driven biological models in our Monte Carlo treatment planning (MCTP) tool. Dealing with a mixed radiation field, the biological effect of the primary 4He ion beams, of the secondary 3He and 4He (Z  =  2) fragments and of the produced protons, deuterons and tritons (Z  =  1) has to be taken into account. A spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) in water, representative of a clinically-relevant scenario, has been biologically optimized with the MCTP and then delivered at HIT. Predictions of cell survival and RBE for a tumor cell line, characterized by {{(α /β )}\\text{ph}}=5.4 Gy, have been successfully compared against measured clonogenic survival data. The mean absolute survival variation ({μΔ \\text{S}} ) between model predictions and experimental data was 5.3%  ±  0.9%. A sensitivity study, i.e. quantifying the variation of the estimations for the studied plan as a function of the applied phenomenological modelling approach, has been performed. The feasibility of a simpler biological modelling based on dose-averaged LET (linear energy transfer) has been tested. Moreover, comparisons with biophysical models such as the local effect model (LEM) and the repair-misrepair-fixation (RMF) model were performed. {μΔ \\text{S}} values for the LEM and the RMF model were, respectively, 4.5%  ±  0.8% and 5.8%  ±  1.1%. The satisfactorily agreement found in this work for the studied SOBP, representative of clinically-relevant scenario, suggests that the introduced approach could be applied for an accurate estimation of the biological effect for helium ion radiotherapy.

  7. Biological Maturity Status Strongly Intensifies the Relative Age Effect in Alpine Ski Racing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Lisa; Müller, Erich; Hildebrandt, Carolin; Raschner, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The relative age effect (RAE) is a well-documented phenomenon in youth sports. This effect exists when the relative age quarter distribution of selected athletes shows a biased distribution with an over-representation of relatively older athletes. In alpine ski racing, it exists in all age categories (national youth levels up to World Cup). Studies so far could demonstrate that selected ski racers are relatively older, taller and heavier. It could be hypothesized that relatively younger athletes nearly only have a chance for selection if they are early maturing. However, surprisingly this influence of the biological maturity status on the RAE could not be proven, yet. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of the biological maturity status on the RAE in dependence of the level of competition. The study investigated 372 elite youth ski racers: 234 provincial ski racers (P-SR; high level of competition) and 137 national ski racers (N-SR; very high level of competition). Anthropometric characteristics were measured to calculate the age at peak height velocity (APHV) as an indicator of the biological maturity status. A significant RAE was present among both P-SR and N-SR, with a larger effect size among the latter group. The N-SR significantly differed in APHV from the P-SR. The distribution of normal, early and late maturing athletes significantly differed from the expected normal distribution among the N-SR, not among the P-SR. Hardly any late maturing N-SR were present; 41.7% of the male and 34% of the female N-SR of the last relative age quarter were early maturing. These findings clearly demonstrate the significant influence of the biological maturity status on the selection process of youth alpine ski racing in dependence of the level of competition. Relatively younger athletes seem to have a chance of selection only if they are early maturing.

  8. Effects of transgenic Bt cotton on soil fertility and biology under field conditions in subtropical inceptisol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Raman Jeet; Ahlawat, I P S; Singh, Surender

    2013-01-01

    Although there is large-scale adoption of Bt cotton by the farmers because of immediate financial gain, there is concern that Bt crops release Bt toxins into the soil environment which reduces soil chemical and biological activities. However, the majorities of such studies were mainly performed under pot experiments, relatively little research has examined the direct and indirect effects of associated cover crop of peanut with fertilization by combined application of organic and inorganic sources of nitrogen under field conditions. We compared soil chemical and biological parameters of Bt cotton with pure crop of peanut to arrive on a valid conclusion. Significantly higher dehydrogenase enzyme activity and KMnO(4)-N content of soil were observed in Bt cotton with cover crop of peanut over pure Bt cotton followed by pure peanut at all the crop growth stages. However, higher microbial population was maintained by pure peanut over intercropped Bt cotton, but these differences were related to the presence of high amount of KMnO(4)-N content of soil. By growing cover crop of peanut between Bt cotton rows, bacteria, fungi, and actinomycetes population increased by 60%, 14%, and 10%, respectively, over Bt cotton alone. Bt cotton fertilized by combined application of urea and farm yard manure (FYM) maintained higher dehydrogenase enzyme activity, KMnO(4)-N content of soil and microbial population over urea alone. Significant positive correlations were observed for dry matter accumulation, dehydrogenase enzyme activity, KMnO(4)-N content, and microbial population of soil of Bt cotton, which indicates no harmful effects of Bt cotton on soil biological parameters and associated cover crop. Our results suggest that inclusion of cover crop of peanut and FYM in Bt cotton enhanced soil chemical and biological parameters which can mask any negative effect of the Bt toxin on microbial activity and thus on enzymatic activities.

  9. Systems Biology and Biomarkers of Early Effects for Occupational Exposure Limit Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBord, D Gayle; Burgoon, Lyle; Edwards, Stephen W; Haber, Lynne T; Kanitz, M Helen; Kuempel, Eileen; Thomas, Russell S; Yucesoy, Berran

    2015-01-01

    In a recent National Research Council document, new strategies for risk assessment were described to enable more accurate and quicker assessments. This report suggested that evaluating individual responses through increased use of bio-monitoring could improve dose-response estimations. Identification of specific biomarkers may be useful for diagnostics or risk prediction as they have the potential to improve exposure assessments. This paper discusses systems biology, biomarkers of effect, and computational toxicology approaches and their relevance to the occupational exposure limit setting process. The systems biology approach evaluates the integration of biological processes and how disruption of these processes by chemicals or other hazards affects disease outcomes. This type of approach could provide information used in delineating the mode of action of the response or toxicity, and may be useful to define the low adverse and no adverse effect levels. Biomarkers of effect are changes measured in biological systems and are considered to be preclinical in nature. Advances in computational methods and experimental -omics methods that allow the simultaneous measurement of families of macromolecules such as DNA, RNA, and proteins in a single analysis have made these systems approaches feasible for broad application. The utility of the information for risk assessments from -omics approaches has shown promise and can provide information on mode of action and dose-response relationships. As these techniques evolve, estimation of internal dose and response biomarkers will be a critical test of these new technologies for application in risk assessment strategies. While proof of concept studies have been conducted that provide evidence of their value, challenges with standardization and harmonization still need to be overcome before these methods are used routinely.

  10. Biological Maturity Status Strongly Intensifies the Relative Age Effect in Alpine Ski Racing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Lisa; Müller, Erich; Hildebrandt, Carolin; Raschner, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The relative age effect (RAE) is a well-documented phenomenon in youth sports. This effect exists when the relative age quarter distribution of selected athletes shows a biased distribution with an over-representation of relatively older athletes. In alpine ski racing, it exists in all age categories (national youth levels up to World Cup). Studies so far could demonstrate that selected ski racers are relatively older, taller and heavier. It could be hypothesized that relatively younger athletes nearly only have a chance for selection if they are early maturing. However, surprisingly this influence of the biological maturity status on the RAE could not be proven, yet. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of the biological maturity status on the RAE in dependence of the level of competition. The study investigated 372 elite youth ski racers: 234 provincial ski racers (P-SR; high level of competition) and 137 national ski racers (N-SR; very high level of competition). Anthropometric characteristics were measured to calculate the age at peak height velocity (APHV) as an indicator of the biological maturity status. A significant RAE was present among both P-SR and N-SR, with a larger effect size among the latter group. The N-SR significantly differed in APHV from the P-SR. The distribution of normal, early and late maturing athletes significantly differed from the expected normal distribution among the N-SR, not among the P-SR. Hardly any late maturing N-SR were present; 41.7% of the male and 34% of the female N-SR of the last relative age quarter were early maturing. These findings clearly demonstrate the significant influence of the biological maturity status on the selection process of youth alpine ski racing in dependence of the level of competition. Relatively younger athletes seem to have a chance of selection only if they are early maturing. PMID:27504832

  11. Biological Effects of Gamma-Ray Bursts: Critical distances for severe damage on the biota

    CERN Document Server

    Galante, D; Galante, Douglas; Horvath, Jorge Ernesto

    2005-01-01

    We present in this work a unified, quantitative synthesis of analytical and numerical calculations of the effects caused on an Earth-like planet by a Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB), considering atmospheric and biological implications. The main effects of the illumination by a GRB are classified in four distinct ones and analyzed separately, namely the direct gamma radiation transmission, UV flash, ozone layer depletion and cosmic rays. The effectiveness of each of these effects is compared and lethal distances for significant biological damage are given for each one. We find that the first three effects have potential to cause global environmental changes and biospheric damages, even if the source is located at great distances (perhaps up to ~ 100 kpc). Instead, cosmic rays would only be a serious threat for very close sources. As a concrete example of a recorded similar event, the effects of the giant flare from SGR1806-20 of Dec 27, 2004 could cause on the biosphere are addressed. In spite of not belonging to the so...

  12. The study of biological effects of electromagnetic mobile phone radiation on experimental animals by combining numerical modeling and experimental research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Krstić

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to study biological effects of electromagneticradiation, it is essential to know the real values of field componentsthat penetrated the tissue. The study of biological effects is usuallyperformed on experimental animals. The biological effects observedon experimental animals should be linked with penetrating field inthe tissue. The penetrating electromagnetic field is almost impossibleto measure; therefore, modeling process must be carried out and thefield components in models of experimental animals could becalculated. This paper presents an approach to modeling of fieldpenetration and gives contribution to understanding the real effects of the fields and the sensitivity of tissues to electromagnetic radiation generated by mobile phone.

  13. Comparing Effects of Biologic Agents in Treating Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Multiple Treatment Comparison Regression Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingunn Fride Tvete

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis patients have been treated with disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs and the newer biologic drugs. We sought to compare and rank the biologics with respect to efficacy. We performed a literature search identifying 54 publications encompassing 9 biologics. We conducted a multiple treatment comparison regression analysis letting the number experiencing a 50% improvement on the ACR score be dependent upon dose level and disease duration for assessing the comparable relative effect between biologics and placebo or DMARD. The analysis embraced all treatment and comparator arms over all publications. Hence, all measured effects of any biologic agent contributed to the comparison of all biologic agents relative to each other either given alone or combined with DMARD. We found the drug effect to be dependent on dose level, but not on disease duration, and the impact of a high versus low dose level was the same for all drugs (higher doses indicated a higher frequency of ACR50 scores. The ranking of the drugs when given without DMARD was certolizumab (ranked highest, etanercept, tocilizumab/ abatacept and adalimumab. The ranking of the drugs when given with DMARD was certolizumab (ranked highest, tocilizumab, anakinra/rituximab, golimumab/ infliximab/ abatacept, adalimumab/ etanercept [corrected]. Still, all drugs were effective. All biologic agents were effective compared to placebo, with certolizumab the most effective and adalimumab (without DMARD treatment and adalimumab/ etanercept (combined with DMARD treatment the least effective. The drugs were in general more effective, except for etanercept, when given together with DMARDs.

  14. Effect of radiation and fungal treatment on ligno celluloses and their biological activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, N.D.; Nagasawa, Naotsugu; Kume, Tamikazu E-mail: kume@taka.jaeri.go.jp

    2000-10-01

    Effects of high-dose irradiation and fungal treatment on some kinds of lignocellulose material were investigated in order to assess the potential effects of bioactive substances on plants. Each treatment and combination of treatments significantly altered the components of lignocellulose materials. Irradiation strongly affected all plant materials, causing a series of changes in physico-chemical parameters such as solubilization during solvent extraction and losses of fibre components. By these degradations, certain biologically active substances formed and acted as antagonists of auxin-induced growth.

  15. Lethal and Sublethal Effects of Fenpropathrin on the Biological Performance of Scolothrips longicornis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakyari, Hajar; Enkegaard, Annie

    2013-01-01

    affected the biological characteristics of treated females of S. longicornis, the most noticeable effects being a shortening of female life span by >70% accompanied by large reductions in oviposition period and fecundity. The offspring of females treated with low-lethal concentrations of fenpropathrin...... likewise had significantly reduced longevity, oviposition period, and fecundity, although not to the same extent as experienced by their mothers. Their juvenile development time was, however, not affected. These effects on the offspring were reflected in reduced rates of population increase and increased...

  16. Cost-effective management alternatives for Snake river chinook salmon: A biological-economic synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsing, D.L.; Moore, M.R.

    2008-01-01

    The mandate to increase endangered salmon populations in the Columbia River Basin of North America has created a complex, controversial resource-management issue. We constructed an integrated assessment model as a tool for analyzing biological-economic trade-offs in recovery of Snake River spring- and summer-run chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). We merged 3 frameworks: a salmon-passage model to predict migration and survival of smolts; an age-structured matrix model to predict long-term population growth rates of salmon stocks; and a cost-effectiveness analysis to determine a set of least-cost management alternatives for achieving particular population growth rates. We assessed 6 individual salmon-management measures and 76 management alternatives composed of one or more measures. To reflect uncertainty, results were derived for different assumptions of effectiveness of smolt transport around dams. Removal of an estuarine predator, the Caspian Tern (Sterna caspia), was cost-effective and generally increased long-term population growth rates regardless of transport effectiveness. Elimination of adult salmon harvest had a similar effect over a range of its cost estimates. The specific management alternatives in the cost-effective set depended on assumptions about transport effectiveness. On the basis of recent estimates of smolt transport effectiveness, alternatives that discontinued transportation or breached dams were prevalent in the cost-effective set, whereas alternatives that maximized transportation dominated if transport effectiveness was relatively high. More generally, the analysis eliminated 80-90% of management alternatives from the cost-effective set. Application of our results to salmon management is limited by data availability and model assumptions, but these limitations can help guide research that addresses critical uncertainties and information. Our results thus demonstrate that linking biology and economics through integrated models can

  17. Effects of physical therapy for the management of patients with ankylosing spondylitis in the biological era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannotti, Erika; Trainito, Sabina; Arioli, Giovanni; Rucco, Vincenzo; Masiero, Stefano

    2014-09-01

    Exercise is considered a fundamental tool for the management of ankylosing spondylitis (AS), in combination with pharmacological therapy that with the advent of biological therapy has improved dramatically the control of signs and symptoms of this challenging disease. Current evidence shows that a specific exercise protocol has not been validated yet. The purpose of this review is to update the most recent evidence (July 2010-November 2013) about physiotherapy in AS, analyzing the possible role and synergistic interactions between exercise and biological drugs. From 117 studies initially considered, only 15 were included in the review. The results support a multimodal approach, including educational sessions, conducted in a group setting, supervised by a physiotherapist and followed by a maintaining home-based regimen. Spa exercise and McKenzie, Heckscher, and Pilates methods seem promising in AS rehabilitation, but their effectiveness should be further investigated in future randomized controlled trials (RCTs). When performed in accordance with the American College of Sports Medicine guidelines, cardiovascular training has been proven safe and effective and should be included in AS rehabilitation protocols. Exercise training plays an important role in the biological era, being now applicable to stabilized patients, leading ultimately to a better management of AS by physiatrists and rheumatologists throughout the world. On the basis of the current evidence, further research should aim to determine which exercise protocols should be recommended.

  18. eQTL epistasis: detecting epistatic effects and inferring hierarchical relationships of genes in biological pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Mingon; Zhang, Chunling; Chun, Hyung-Wook; Ding, Chris; Liu, Chunyu; Gao, Jean

    2015-03-01

    Epistasis is the interactions among multiple genetic variants. It has emerged to explain the 'missing heritability' that a marginal genetic effect does not account for by genome-wide association studies, and also to understand the hierarchical relationships between genes in the genetic pathways. The Fisher's geometric model is common in detecting the epistatic effects. However, despite the substantial successes of many studies with the model, it often fails to discover the functional dependence between genes in an epistasis study, which is an important role in inferring hierarchical relationships of genes in the biological pathway. We justify the imperfectness of Fisher's model in the simulation study and its application to the biological data. Then, we propose a novel generic epistasis model that provides a flexible solution for various biological putative epistatic models in practice. The proposed method enables one to efficiently characterize the functional dependence between genes. Moreover, we suggest a statistical strategy for determining a recessive or dominant link among epistatic expression quantitative trait locus to enable the ability to infer the hierarchical relationships. The proposed method is assessed by simulation experiments of various settings and is applied to human brain data regarding schizophrenia. The MATLAB source codes are publicly available at: http://biomecis.uta.edu/epistasis. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Quantum effects in biology: golden rule in enzymes, olfaction, photosynthesis and magnetodetection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, Jennifer C.

    2017-05-01

    Despite certain quantum concepts, such as superposition states, entanglement, `spooky action at a distance' and tunnelling through insulating walls, being somewhat counterintuitive, they are no doubt extremely useful constructs in theoretical and experimental physics. More uncertain, however, is whether or not these concepts are fundamental to biology and living processes. Of course, at the fundamental level all things are quantum, because all things are built from the quantized states and rules that govern atoms. But when does the quantum mechanical toolkit become the best tool for the job? This review looks at four areas of `quantum effects in biology'. These are biosystems that are very diverse in detail but possess some commonality. They are all (i) effects in biology: rates of a signal (or information) that can be calculated from a form of the `golden rule' and (ii) they are all protein-pigment (or ligand) complex systems. It is shown, beginning with the rate equation, that all these systems may contain some degree of quantumeffect, and where experimental evidence is available, it is explored to determine how the quantum analysis aids in understanding of the process.

  20. Biological Effects of Cloth Containing Specific Ore Powder in Patients with Pollen Allergy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suni LEE; YasuzoKIRITA; YoshioFUJII; TakemiOTSUKI; HitoshiOKAMOTO; ShokoYAMAMOTO; TamayoHATAYAMA; HidenoriMATSUZAKI; Naoko KUMAGAI-TAKEI; KeiYOSHITOME; YasumitsuNISHIMURA; ToshiakiSATO

    2016-01-01

    ObjectiveThe custom-homebuilding company, Cosmic Garden Co. Ltd., located in Okayama City, Japan was established in 1997 and uses specific natural ore powder (SNOP) in wall materials and surveys customers in order to improve allergic symptoms. MethodsTo investigate the biological effects of SNOP, patients with a pollen allergy were recruited to stay in a room surrounded by cloth containing SNOP (CCSNOP), and their symptoms and various biological parameters were compared with those of individuals staying in a room surrounded by control non-woven cloth (NWC). Each stay lasted 60 min. Before and immediately after the stay, a questionnaire regarding allergic symptoms, as well as POMS (Profile of Mood Status) and blood sampling, was performed. Post-stay minus pre-stay values were calculated and compared between CCSNOP and NWC groups. ResultsResults indicated that some symptoms, such as nasal obstruction and lacrimation, improved, and POMS evaluation showed that patients were calmer following a stay in CCSNOP. Relative eosinophils, non-specific Ig E, epidermal growth factor, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and tumor necrosis factor-α increased following a stay in CCSNOP. ConclusionThis ore powder improved allergic symptoms, and long-term monitoring involving 1 to 2 months may be necessary to fully explore the biological and physical effects of SNOP on allergic patients.

  1. High school teachers' perspectives on effective approaches for teaching biology to students with special needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, Agnieszka

    The demands of national educational reforms require high school biology teachers to provide high quality instruction to students with and without special needs. The reforms, however, do not provide teachers with adequate teaching strategies to meet the needs of all students in the same context. The purpose of this grounded theory study was to understand high school biology teachers' perspectives, practices, and challenges in relation to teaching students with special needs. This approach was used to develop a substantive model for high school biology teachers who are challenged with teaching students with and without special needs. Data were collected via in-depth interviews with 15 high school teachers in a Midwestern school district. The data were analyzed using open coding, axial coding, and selective coding procedures in accordance with the grounded theory approach. Essential model components included skills and training for teachers, classroom management strategies, teaching strategies, and student skills. The emergent substantive theory indicated that that teacher preparation and acquired skills greatly influence the effectiveness of inclusion implementation. Key findings also indicated the importance of using of a variety of instructional strategies and classroom management strategies that address students' special needs and their learning styles. This study contributes to social change by providing a model for teaching students and effectively implementing inclusion in regular science classrooms. Following further study, this model may be used to support teacher professional development and improve teaching practices that in turn may improve science literacy supported by the national educational reforms.

  2. Cellular burdens and biological effects on tissue level caused by inhaled radon progenies

    CERN Document Server

    Madas, Balázs G; Farkas, Árpád; Szőke, István

    2014-01-01

    In the case of radon exposure, the spatial distribution of deposited radioactive particles is highly inhomogeneous in the central airways. The objective of this research is to investigate the consequences of this heterogeneity regarding cellular burdens in the bronchial epithelium and to study the possible biological effects on tissue level. Applying a computational fluid dynamics program, the deposition distribution of inhaled radon daughters has been determined in a bronchial airway model for 23 minutes of work in the New Mexico uranium mine corresponding to 0.0129 WLM exposure. A numerical epithelium model based on experimental data has been utilized in order to quantify cellular hits and doses. Finally, a carcinogenesis model considering cell death induced cell cycle shortening has been applied to assess the biological responses. Computations present, that cellular dose may reach 1.5 Gy, which is several orders of magnitude higher than tissue dose. The results are in agreement with the histological findin...

  3. The Biological Effects of Sex Hormones on Rabbit Articular Chondrocytes from Different Genders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shwu Jen Chang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the biological effects of sex hormones (17β-estradiol and testosterone on rabbit articular chondrocytes from different genders. We cultured primary rabbit articular chondrocytes from both genders with varying concentration of sex hormones. We evaluate cell proliferation and biochemical functions by MTT and GAG assay. The chondrocyte function and phenotypes were analyzed by mRNA level using RT-PCR. Immunocytochemical staining was also used to evaluate the generation of collagen-II. This study demonstrated that 17β-estradiol had greater positive regulation on the biological function and gene expressions of articular chondrocytes than testosterone, with the optimal concentrations of 10−6 and 10−7 M, particularly for female chondrocytes.

  4. Biological effects of high strength electric fields. Second interim progress report, September 1976--March 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, R.D.; Kaune, W.T.

    1977-05-01

    This report describes progress made on the Project during the period of September 9, 1976 to March 31, 1977 towards the determination of the biological effects of high strength electric fields on small laboratory animals. The efforts to date can be divided into five categories: (1) the design, construction, and testing of a prototype and special studies exposure system; (2) the design and construction of exposure systems for rats and mice; (3) dosimetry; (4) experiments to determine the maximum field strength which does not produce corona discharge, ozone formation, shocks to the animal, hair stimulation, or a behavioral preference by rats to avoid exposure to the field; and (5) preparations for the biological screening experiments.

  5. Biological Matrix Effects in Quantitative Tandem Mass Spectrometry-Based Analytical Methods: Advancing Biomonitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panuwet, Parinya; Hunter, Ronald E.; D’Souza, Priya E.; Chen, Xianyu; Radford, Samantha A.; Cohen, Jordan R.; Marder, M. Elizabeth; Kartavenka, Kostya; Ryan, P. Barry; Barr, Dana Boyd

    2015-01-01

    The ability to quantify levels of target analytes in biological samples accurately and precisely, in biomonitoring, involves the use of highly sensitive and selective instrumentation such as tandem mass spectrometers and a thorough understanding of highly variable matrix effects. Typically, matrix effects are caused by co-eluting matrix components that alter the ionization of target analytes as well as the chromatographic response of target analytes, leading to reduced or increased sensitivity of the analysis. Thus, before the desired accuracy and precision standards of laboratory data are achieved, these effects must be characterized and controlled. Here we present our review and observations of matrix effects encountered during the validation and implementation of tandem mass spectrometry-based analytical methods. We also provide systematic, comprehensive laboratory strategies needed to control challenges posed by matrix effects in order to ensure delivery of the most accurate data for biomonitoring studies assessing exposure to environmental toxicants. PMID:25562585

  6. Across the Great Divide: The Effects of Technology in Secondary Biology Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Johnny Howard, II

    This study investigates the relationship between technology use and student achievement in public high school across North Carolina. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a digital divide (differences in technology utilization based on student demographics of race/ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic status, and municipality) exists among schools and whether those differences relate to student achievement in high school biology classrooms. The study uses North Carolina end-of-course (EOC) data for biology to analyze student demographic data and assessment results from the 2010-2011 school year from the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. The data analyses use descriptive and factorial univariate statistics to determine the existence of digital divides and their effects on biology achievement. Analysis of these data described patterns of technology use to determine whether potential variances resulted in a digital divide. Specific technology uses were identified in the data and then their impact on biology achievement scores within various demographic groups was examined. Research findings revealed statistically significant variations of use within different population groups. Despite being statistically significant, the relevance of the association in the variations was minimal at best -- based on the effect scale established by Cohen (1988). Additional factorial univariate analyses were employed to determine potential relationships between technology use and student achievement. The data revealed that technology use did not influence the variation of student achievement scale scores as much as race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status. White students outperformed Hispanic students by an average of three scale score points and Black students by an average of six scale score points. Technology use alone averaged less than a one point difference in mean scale scores, and only when interacting with race, gender, and/or SES did the mean difference

  7. RANTES/CCL5 mediated-biological effects depend on the syndecan-4/PKCα signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loïc Maillard

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The perpetuation of angiogenesis is involved in certain chronic inflammatory diseases. The accelerated neovascularisation may result from an inflammatory status with a response of both endothelial cells and monocytes to inflammatory mediators such as chemokines. We have previously described in vitro and in vivo the pro-angiogenic effects of the chemokine Regulated on Activation, Normal T Cell Expressed and Secreted (RANTES/CCL5. The effects of RANTES/CCL5 may be related to its binding to G protein-coupled receptors and to proteoglycans such as syndecan-1 and -4. The aim of this study was to evaluate the functionality of syndecan-4 as a co-receptor of RANTES/CCL5 by the use of mutated syndecan-4 constructs. Our data demonstrate that site-directed mutations in syndecan-4 modify RANTES/CCL5 biological activities in endothelial cells. The SDC4S179A mutant, associated with an induced protein kinase C (PKCα activation, leads to higher RANTES/CCL5 pro-angiogenic effects, whereas the SDC4L188QQ and the SDC4A198del mutants, leading to lower phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2 binding or to lower PDZ protein binding respectively, are associated with reduced RANTES/CCL5 cellular effects. Moreover, our data highlight that the intracellular domain of SDC-4 is involved in RANTES/CCL5-induced activation of the PKCα signaling pathway and biological effect. As RANTES/CCL5 is involved in various physiopathological processes, the development of a new therapeutic strategy may be reliant on the mechanism by which RANTES/CCL5 exerts its biological activities, for example by targeting the binding of the chemokine to its proteoglycan receptor.

  8. Effect of capping agents: Structural, optical and biological properties of ZnO nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javed, Rabia [Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Usman, Muhammad, E-mail: uk_phy@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Department of Physics, School of Science and Engineering, Lahore University of Management Sciences, Lahore 54729 (Pakistan); Tabassum, Saira; Zia, Muhammad [Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • ZnO nanoparticles have been effectively capped with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) shown by the data of XRD, FTIR and UV–visible spectroscopy. • Reduction in size occurred from 34 nm to 26 nm due to capping agent and band gap energy increases with the decrease in the particle size. • Antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria is greater than the Gram-negative bacteria. • All biological assays reveal highest activities in capped ZnO nanoparticles as compared to the uncapped ZnO nanoparticles. • Highest antibacterial activity has been exhibited by ZnO-PVP while highest antioxidant and antidiabetic activities have been conferred by ZnO- PEG. - Abstract: Different biological activities of capped and uncapped ZnO nanoparticles were investigated, and the effects of potential capping agents on these biological activities were studied. ZnO nanoparticles were synthesized and capped by polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) using a simple chemical method of co-precipitation. Characterization by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and UV–vis spectroscopy confirmed the crystallinity, size, functional group, and band gap of synthesized nanoparticles. Reduction in size occurred from 34 nm to 26 nm due to surfactant. Results of all biological activities indicated significantly higher values in capped as compared to uncapped nanoparticles. Antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538), Bacillus subtilis (ATCC 6633), Escherichia coli (ATCC15224), and Acetobacter was obtained. This activity was more prominent against Gram-positive bacteria, and ZnO-PVP nanoparticles elucidated highest antibacterial activity (zone of inhibition 17 mm) against Gram-positive, Bacillus subtilis species. Antioxidant activities including total flavonoid content, total phenolic content, total antioxidant capacity, total reducing power and %age inhibition of DPPH, and

  9. Heavy-ion radiobiology: new approaches to delineate mechanisms underlying enhanced biological effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, E A; Kronenberg, A

    1998-11-01

    Shortly after the discovery of polonium and radium by Marie Curie and her husband and colleague, Pierre Curie, it was learned that exposure to these alpha-particle emitters produced deleterious biological effects. The mechanisms underlying the increased biological effectiveness of densely ionizing radiations, including alpha particles, neutrons and highly energetic heavy charged particles, remain an active area of investigation. In this paper, we review recent advances in several areas of the radiobiology of these densely ionizing radiations, also known as heavy ions. Advances are described in the areas of DNA damage and repair, chromosome aberrations, mutagenesis, neoplastic transformation in vitro, genomic instability, normal tissue radiobiology and carcinogenesis in vivo. We focus on technical innovations, including novel applications of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), linkage analysis, and studies of gene expression and protein expression. We also highlight the use of new cellular and animal systems, including those with defined DNA repair deficiencies, as well as epithelial cell model systems to assess neoplastic transformation both in vitro and in vivo. The studies reviewed herein have had a substantial impact on our understanding of the genotoxic effects of heavy ions as well as their distinct effects on tissue homeostasis. The use of these radiations in cancer therapy is also discussed. The use of both heavy-ion and proton therapy is on the upswing in several centers around the world, due to their unique energy deposition characteristics that enhance the therapeutic effect and help reduce damage to normal tissue.

  10. Heavy-ion radiobiology: new approaches to delineate mechanisms underlying enhanced biological effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, E. A.; Kronenberg, A.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Shortly after the discovery of polonium and radium by Marie Curie and her husband and colleague, Pierre Curie, it was learned that exposure to these alpha-particle emitters produced deleterious biological effects. The mechanisms underlying the increased biological effectiveness of densely ionizing radiations, including alpha particles, neutrons and highly energetic heavy charged particles, remain an active area of investigation. In this paper, we review recent advances in several areas of the radiobiology of these densely ionizing radiations, also known as heavy ions. Advances are described in the areas of DNA damage and repair, chromosome aberrations, mutagenesis, neoplastic transformation in vitro, genomic instability, normal tissue radiobiology and carcinogenesis in vivo. We focus on technical innovations, including novel applications of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), linkage analysis, and studies of gene expression and protein expression. We also highlight the use of new cellular and animal systems, including those with defined DNA repair deficiencies, as well as epithelial cell model systems to assess neoplastic transformation both in vitro and in vivo. The studies reviewed herein have had a substantial impact on our understanding of the genotoxic effects of heavy ions as well as their distinct effects on tissue homeostasis. The use of these radiations in cancer therapy is also discussed. The use of both heavy-ion and proton therapy is on the upswing in several centers around the world, due to their unique energy deposition characteristics that enhance the therapeutic effect and help reduce damage to normal tissue.

  11. Leishmania tropica: the effect of darkness and light on biological activities in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdiyev, Adil M; Koc, Rabia Cakir; Ates, Sezen Canim; Bagirova, Malahat; Elcicek, Serhat; Oztel, Olga Nehir

    2011-08-01

    Leishmania parasites can be exposed to effects of light in their vectors and hosts, at various periods. However, there is no information about the effects of light on Leishmania parasites. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of light on various cell parameters of Leishmania tropica, in vitro. All experiments were conducted on L. tropica promastigotes and amastigote-macrophage cultures, using flow cytometric analysis, MTT and phenol-sulfuric acid assay, DAPI and Giemsa. The results showed that the morphology of parasites has changed; the cell cycle has been affected and this caused parasites to remain at G0/G1 phase. Furthermore the proliferation, infectivity, glucose consumption and mitochondrial dehydrogenase activities of parasites were decreased. Thus, for the first time, in this study, the effects of light on biological activities of Leishmania parasites were shown. These new information about parasites' biology, would be very important to investigate the effects of light on the parasites in infected vectors and hosts.

  12. Track Structure and the Biological Effectiveness of Accelerated Particles for the Induction of Chromosome Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, K.; Hada, M.; Chappell, L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    Track structure models predict that at a fixed value of LET, particles with lower charge number, Z will have a higher biological effectiveness compared to particles with a higher Z. In this report we investigated how track structure effects induction of chromosomal aberration in human cells. Human lymphocytes were irradiated in vitro with various energies of accelerated iron, silicon, neon, or titanium ions and chromosome damage was assessed in using three color FISH chromosome painting in chemically induced PCC samples collected a first cell division post irradiation. The LET values for these ions ranged from 30 to195 keV/micron. Of the particles studied, Neon ions have the highest biological effectiveness for induction of total chromosome damage, which is consistent with track structure model predictions. For complex-type exchanges 64 MeV/ u Neon and 450 MeV/u Iron were equally effective and induced the most complex damage. In addition we present data on chromosomes exchanges induced by six different energies of protons (5 MeV/u to 2.5 GeV/u). The linear dose response term was similar for all energies of protons suggesting that the effect of the higher LET at low proton energies is balanced by the production of nuclear secondaries from the high energy protons.

  13. The Effects of Using Concept Mapping for Improving Advanced Level Biology Students' Lower- and Higher-Order Cognitive Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramwell-Lalor, Sharon; Rainford, Marcia

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on teachers' use of concept mapping as an alternative assessment strategy in advanced level biology classes and its effects on students' cognitive skills on selected biology concepts. Using a mixed methods approach, the study employed a pre-test/post-test quasi-experimental design involving 156 students and 8 teachers from…

  14. Biological monitoring of non-thermal effects of mobile phone radiation: recent approaches and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaestel, Matthias

    2010-08-01

    This review describes recent developments in analysing the influence of radio-frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs ) on biological systems by monitoring the cellular stress response as well as overall gene expression. Recent data on the initiation and modulation of the classical cellular stress response by RF-EMFs, comprising expression of heat shock proteins and stimulation of stress-activated protein kinases, are summarised and evaluated. Since isothermic RF-EMF exposure is assumed rather than proven there are clear limitations in using the stress response to describe non-thermal effects of RF-EMFs. In particular, further experiments are needed to characterise better the threshold of the thermal heat shock response and the homogeneity of the cellular response in the whole sample for each biological system used. Before then, it is proposed that the absence of the classical stress response can define isothermal experimental conditions and qualifies other biological effects of RF-EMFs detected under these conditions to be of non-thermal origin. To minimise the probability that by making this assumption valuable insights into the nature of biological effects of RF-EMFs could be lost, proteotoxic non-thermal RF-EMF effects should also be monitored by measuring activities of labile intracellular enzymes and/or levels of their metabolites before the threshold for the heat shock response is reached. In addition, non-thermal induction of the stress response via promoter elements distinct from the heat shock element (HSE) should be analysed using HSE-mutated heat shock promoter reporter constructs. Screening for non-thermal RF-EMF effects in the absence of a classical stress response should be performed by transcriptomics and proteomics. Recent approaches demonstrate that due to their high-throughput characteristics, these methods inherently generate false positive results and require statistical evaluation based on quantitative expression analysis from a sufficient

  15. Effective automated feature construction and selection for classification of biological sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uday Kamath

    Full Text Available Many open problems in bioinformatics involve elucidating underlying functional signals in biological sequences. DNA sequences, in particular, are characterized by rich architectures in which functional signals are increasingly found to combine local and distal interactions at the nucleotide level. Problems of interest include detection of regulatory regions, splice sites, exons, hypersensitive sites, and more. These problems naturally lend themselves to formulation as classification problems in machine learning. When classification is based on features extracted from the sequences under investigation, success is critically dependent on the chosen set of features.We present an algorithmic framework (EFFECT for automated detection of functional signals in biological sequences. We focus here on classification problems involving DNA sequences which state-of-the-art work in machine learning shows to be challenging and involve complex combinations of local and distal features. EFFECT uses a two-stage process to first construct a set of candidate sequence-based features and then select a most effective subset for the classification task at hand. Both stages make heavy use of evolutionary algorithms to efficiently guide the search towards informative features capable of discriminating between sequences that contain a particular functional signal and those that do not.To demonstrate its generality, EFFECT is applied to three separate problems of importance in DNA research: the recognition of hypersensitive sites, splice sites, and ALU sites. Comparisons with state-of-the-art algorithms show that the framework is both general and powerful. In addition, a detailed analysis of the constructed features shows that they contain valuable biological information about DNA architecture, allowing biologists and other researchers to directly inspect the features and potentially use the insights obtained to assist wet-laboratory studies on retainment or modification

  16. Comparative study of RBE and cell survival fractions for $^{1}$H, $^{4}$He, $^{12}$C and $^{16}$O beams using Geant4 and Microdosimetric Kinetic model

    CERN Document Server

    Burigo, Lucas; Mishustin, Igor; Bleicher, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Beams of $^{4}$He and $^{16}$O nuclei are considered for ion-beam cancer therapy as alternative options to protons and $^{12}$C nuclei. Spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) distributions of physical dose and relative biological effectiveness for 10% survival are calculated by means of our Geant4-based Monte Carlo model for Heavy Ion Therapy (MCHIT) and the modified microdosimetric kinetic model. The depth distributions of cell survival fractions are calculated for $^{1}$H, $^{4}$He, $^{12}$C and $^{16}$O for tissues with normal (HSG cells), low and high radiosensitivity. In each case the cell survival fractions were compared separately for the target volume, behind and in front of it. In the case of normal radiosensitivity $^{4}$He and $^{12}$C better spare tissues in the entrance channel compared to protons and $^{16}$O. The cell survival fractions calculated, respectively, for the entrance channel and target volume are similar for $^{4}$He and $^{12}$C. When it is important to spare healthy tissues located after th...

  17. Combined exposures: an update from the International Commission on Biological Effects of Noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroux, Tony; Klaeboe, Ronny

    2012-01-01

    International Commission on Biological Effects of Noise (ICBEN) Team 8 deals with the effects of combined "agents" in the urban and work place settings. Results presented at the ICBEN conference indicate that some pesticides, more specifically the organophosphates, and a wider range of industrial chemicals are harmful to the auditory system at concentrations often found in occupational settings. Effects of occupational noise on hearing are exacerbated by toluene and possibly by carbon monoxide. Several of the chemicals studied found to be potentially toxic not only to hair cells in the cochlea but also to the auditory nerve. In urban environments, team 8 focuses on additive and synergetic effects of ambient stressors. It was argued that noise policies need to pay attention to grey areas with intermediate noise levels. Noteworthy is also stronger reactions to vibrations experienced in the evening and during the night. An innovative event-based model for sound perception was presented.

  18. Assessment of the biological effects of 'strange' radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pryakhin, E.A.; Tryapitsina, G.A. [Chelyabinsk State University, Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation); Urutskoyev, L.I. [RECOM Company, Kurchatov Russian Research Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Akleyev, A.V. [Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-01

    The results from studies of the effects produced by electrical explosions of foils made from super pure materials in water point to the emergence of new chemical elements. An additional finding was the discharge of 'strange' radiation accompanying the transformation of chemical elements. However, currently, the mechanism involved in the interaction between 'strange' radiation and a substance or a biological entity remains obscure. Therefore, the aim of the present research is to investigate the biological effects of the 'strange' radiation. Pilot studies were performed at the RECOM RRC 'Kurchatov Institute' in April-May of 2004. The animals used in the experiment were female mice of C57Bl/6 line aged 80 days with body weight 16-18 g. The animals were exposed to radiation discharged during explosions of Ti foils in water and aqueous solutions. The cages with animals were placed at 1 m from the epicenter of the explosion. Explosions were carried out on the 19. (3 explosions), 20. (4 explosions) and 22. (3 explosions) of April, 2004 (explosions No1373 - No1382, respectively). The animals were assigned to 4 experimental groups comprised of 17-20 mice per group. The animals received experimental exposure within 1, 2 and 3 days of the experiment. In total, the experimental groups were exposed to 3, 7 and 10 explosions, respectively. In order to identify the biological reactions, the following parameters were estimated: number of nucleated cells in the bone marrow, number of CFU in the spleen after additional gamma-irradiation (6 Gy), cell composition of the bone marrow, the rate of erythrocytes with the different level of maturation in the bone marrow, the rate of erythrocytes with the micronuclei in the bone marrow, the reaction of bone marrow cells to additional gamma-irradiation (2 Gy), number of leucocytes in the peripheral blood, and cell composition of the peripheral blood. The following conclusions were drawn from these

  19. Biological therapies (immunomodulatory drugs), worsening of psoriasis and rebound effect: new evidence of similitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Marcus Zulian

    2016-11-01

    Employing the secondary action or adaptative reaction of the organism as therapeutic response, homeopathy uses the treatment by similitude (similia similibus curentur) administering to sick individuals the medicines that caused similar symptoms in healthy individuals. Such homeostatic or paradoxical reaction of the organism is scientifically explained through the rebound effect of drugs, which cause worsening of symptoms after withdrawal of several palliative treatments. Despite promoting an improvement in psoriasis at the beginning of the treatment, modern biological therapies provoke worsening of the psoriasis (rebound psoriasis) after discontinuation of drugs. Exploratory qualitative review of the literature on the occurrence of the rebound effect with the use of immunomodulatory drugs [T-cell modulating agents and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors drugs] in the treatment of psoriasis. Several researches indicate the rebound effect as the mechanism of worsening of psoriasis with the use of efalizumab causing the suspension of its marketing authorization in 2009, in view of some severe cases. Other studies also have demonstrated the occurrence of rebound psoriasis with the use of alefacept, etanercept and infliximab. As well as studied in other classes of drugs, the rebound effect of biologic agents supports the principle of similitude (primary action of the drugs followed by secondary action and opposite of the organism). Copyright © 2016 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [EFFECT OF MICROSYMBIONTS ON THE ABILITY OF VAGINAL EPITHELIOCYTES TO MODIFY BIOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF BACTERIA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremleva, E A; Sgibnev, A V; Cherkasov, S V

    2015-01-01

    Study regularities of effects of various types of vaginal microsymbionts on the ability of mucosal epitheliocytes of the vagina to modify biological properties of bacteria. Effect of thermo-inactivated cells of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, H2O2-producing and H2O2-non-producing lactobacilli on the ability of primary vaginal epitheliocytes to alter growth and antagonistic activity of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia colt, H2O2-producing and H2O2-nonproducing lactobacilli was studied using a multi-component module system. Alterations of composition of vaginal epitlieliocyte exometabolites under the effect of S. aureus and E. coli was established to result in a pronounced stimulation of antagonistic activity of H2O2-producing and an increase of the number of H2O2-nonproducing lactobacilli. Thermo-inactivated cells of lactobacilli stimulated production of metabolites by epitheliocytes, that suppress the growth and antagonistic activity of allochthonous microflora and stimulate similar parameters of lactobacilli. The strongest effects on the ability of vaginal epitheliocytes to alter biological properties of bacteria were rendered by H2O2-producing lactobacilli. The regularities identified allow to examine epitheliocytes and normoflora of vagina as a symbiotic system, the coordinated interaction of its components is directed on maintaining microecological stability of female reproductive tract.

  1. Comparison of ethanol, methanol and succinate effects as carbon sources on effluent biological denitrification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    abbas Rezaee

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Increase of nitrate concentration in water sources is becoming a serious problem in many parts of the world. Nitrogen containing compounds released into environment can create serious problems, such as eutrophication of water sources and hazard potential to human health, because it has potency of causing methemoglubinemia disease and cancer. Between recommended methods, biological denitrification is an effective method to remove nitrate from water and wastewater. Materials and methods: In this study, biological nitrogen removal process was evaluated using ethanol, methanol and succinate as different organic carbon sources in batch scale. The different parameters, carbon source, initial nitrate concentration, pH, and inoculated of bacteria were evaluated. Results: The experimental re