WorldWideScience

Sample records for biological drug products

  1. 75 FR 59935 - Investigational New Drug Safety Reporting Requirements for Human Drug and Biological Products and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    ... ``E2A Clinical Safety Data Management: Definitions and Standards for Expedited Reporting'' (60 FR 11284... 0910-AG13 Investigational New Drug Safety Reporting Requirements for Human Drug and Biological Products... safety reporting for human biological products: Laura Rich, Center for Biologics Evaluation and...

  2. 37 CFR 1.775 - Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Human Services that applicant did not act with due diligence; (iii) One-half the number of days... extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. 1.775 Section 1.775 Patents... Review § 1.775 Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human...

  3. 78 FR 58311 - Complex Issues in Developing Drug and Biological Products for Rare Diseases; Public Workshop...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-23

    ... for Rare Diseases; Public Workshop; Request for Comments AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... for Rare Diseases.'' The purpose of the public workshop is twofold: To discuss complex issues in clinical trials for developing drug and biological products (``drugs'') for rare diseases,...

  4. Natural product diversity and its role in chemical biology and drug discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Jiyong

    2011-01-01

    Through the natural selection process, natural products possess a unique and vast chemical diversity and have been evolved for optimal interactions with biological macromolecules. Owing to their diversity, target affinity, and specificity, natural products have demonstrated enormous potential as modulators of biomolecular function, been an essential source for drug discovery, and provided design principles for combinatorial library development.

  5. Statistical and regulatory considerations in assessments of interchangeability of biological drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóthfalusi, Lászlo; Endrényi, László; Chow, Shein-Chung

    2014-05-01

    When the patent of a brand-name, marketed drug expires, new, generic products are usually offered. Small-molecule generic and originator drug products are expected to be chemically identical. Their pharmaceutical similarity can be typically assessed by simple regulatory criteria such as the expectation that the 90% confidence interval for the ratio of geometric means of some pharmacokinetic parameters be between 0.80 and 1.25. When such criteria are satisfied, the drug products are generally considered to exhibit therapeutic equivalence. They are then usually interchanged freely within individual patients. Biological drugs are complex proteins, for instance, because of their large size, intricate structure, sensitivity to environmental conditions, difficult manufacturing procedures, and the possibility of immunogenicity. Generic and brand-name biologic products can be expected to show only similarity but not identity in their various features and clinical effects. Consequently, the determination of biosimilarity is also a complicated process which involves assessment of the totality of the evidence for the close similarity of the two products. Moreover, even when biosimilarity has been established, it may not be assumed that the two biosimilar products can be automatically substituted by pharmacists. This generally requires additional, careful considerations. Without declaring interchangeability, a new product could be prescribed, i.e. it is prescribable. However, two products can be automatically substituted only if they are interchangeable. Interchangeability is a statistical term and it means that products can be used in any order in the same patient without considering the treatment history. The concepts of interchangeability and prescribability have been widely discussed in the past but only in relation to small molecule generics. In this paper we apply these concepts to biosimilars and we discuss: definitions of prescribability and interchangeability and

  6. Postmarketing safety reports for human drug and biological products; electronic submission requirements. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-10

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or we) is amending its postmarketing safety reporting regulations for human drug and biological products to require that persons subject to mandatory reporting requirements submit safety reports in an electronic format that FDA can process, review, and archive. FDA is taking this action to improve the Agency's systems for collecting and analyzing postmarketing safety reports. The change will help the Agency to more rapidly review postmarketing safety reports, identify emerging safety problems, and disseminate safety information in support of FDA's public health mission. In addition, the amendments will be a key element in harmonizing FDA's postmarketing safety reporting regulations with international standards for the electronic submission of safety information.

  7. Exploiting plug-and-play synthetic biology for drug discovery and production in microorganisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medema, Marnix H.; Breitling, Rainer; Bovenberg, Roel; Takano, Eriko

    2011-01-01

    One of the most promising applications of synthetic biology is the biosynthesis of new drugs from secondary metabolites. Here, we survey a wide range of strategies that control the activity of biosynthetic modules in the cell in space and time, and illustrate how these strategies can be used to desi

  8. 78 FR 65904 - Permanent Discontinuance or Interruption in Manufacturing of Certain Drug or Biological Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    ...(D) Immune Globulin and Hepatitis B Immune Globulin; Coagulation Factor VIIa (Recombinant); and..., or mitigate shortages of these products. b. Vaccines. We are proposing to apply section 506C of the FD&C Act to all biological products, including vaccines. Under section 506C(i)(3)(B) of the FD&C...

  9. 77 FR 47397 - Request for Nominations of Specific Drug/Biologic Product(s) That Could Be Brought Before the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    ... pediatric oncology product development. DATES: Nominations must be received by September 4, 2012, to receive....gov , and please include the subject line ``Suggested Product for 2012 Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee...) That Could Be Brought Before the Food and Drug Administration's Pediatric Subcommittee of the...

  10. 78 FR 67985 - Supplemental Applications Proposing Labeling Changes for Approved Drugs and Biological Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-13

    ... the labeling for the generic drug(s) and the RLD should be revised (see 57 FR 17950 at 17961; April 28... and Mitigation Strategies (REMS) that include one or more generic drugs (see 21 U.S.C. 355-1(i)(2... Requirements Related to Generic Drugs D. Recent Court Decisions II. Description of the Proposed Rule...

  11. Form for reporting serious adverse events and product problems with human drug and biological products and devices; availability--FDA. Notice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a new form for reporting adverse events and product problems with human drug products, biologic products, medical devices (including in-vitro diagnostics), special nutritional products (dietary supplements, medical foods, infant formulas), and other products regulated by FDA. There are two versions of the form. One version of the form (FDA Form 3500) is available for use by health professionals for voluntary reporting; the other version of the form (FDA Form 3500A) is to be used by user facilities, distributors, and manufacturers for reporting that is required by statute or FDA regulations. The new form will simplify and consolidate the reporting of adverse events and product problems and will enhance agency-wide consistency in the collection of postmarketing data. This notice also responds to written comments the agency received on proposed versions of this form. Copies of both versions of the new form appear at the end of this document. PMID:10171452

  12. Identification of transformation products of antiviral drugs formed during biological wastewater treatment and their occurrence in the urban water cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funke, Jan; Prasse, Carsten; Ternes, Thomas A

    2016-07-01

    The fate of five antiviral drugs (abacavir, emtricitabine, ganciclovir, lamivudine and zidovudine) was investigated in biological wastewater treatment. Investigations of degradation kinetics were accompanied by the elucidation of formed transformation products (TPs) using activated sludge lab experiments and subsequent LC-HRMS analysis. Degradation rate constants ranged between 0.46 L d(-1) gSS(-1) (zidovudine) and 55.8 L d(-1) gSS(-1) (abacavir). Despite these differences of the degradation kinetics, the same main biotransformation reaction was observed for all five compounds: oxidation of the terminal hydroxyl-moiety to the corresponding carboxylic acid (formation of carboxy-TPs). In addition, the oxidation of thioether moieties to sulfoxides was observed for emtricitabine and lamivudine. Antiviral drugs were detected in influents of municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) with concentrations up to 980 ng L(-1) (emtricitabine), while in WWTP effluents mainly the TPs were found with concentration levels up to 1320 ng L(-1) (carboxy-abacavir). Except of zidovudine none of the original antiviral drugs were detected in German rivers and streams, whereas the concentrations of the TPs ranged from 16 ng L(-1) for carboxy-lamivudine up to 750 ng L(-1) for carboxy-acyclovir. These concentrations indicate an appreciable portion from WWTP effluents present in rivers and streams, as well as the high environmental persistence of the carboxy-TPs. As a result three of the carboxylic TPs were detected in finished drinking water. PMID:27082694

  13. Biological hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benemann, J.R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Biological hydrogen production can be accomplished by either thermochemical (gasification) conversion of woody biomass and agricultural residues or by microbiological processes that yield hydrogen gas from organic wastes or water. Biomass gasification is a well established technology; however, the synthesis gas produced, a mixture of CO and H{sub 2}, requires a shift reaction to convert the CO to H{sub 2}. Microbiological processes can carry out this reaction more efficiently than conventional catalysts, and may be more appropriate for the relatively small-scale of biomass gasification processes. Development of a microbial shift reaction may be a near-term practical application of microbial hydrogen production.

  14. Drugs and other product choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, Paul M; Carvajal, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    Dermatologists have at their disposal a wide range of products to recommend or prescribe to their patients, all of which are regulated in some way by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). However, the degree to which FDA has confirmed the safety and efficacy of a dermatological product can vary widely. Most prescription and some over-the-counter drugs and medical devices are approved by the FDA based on scientific data. Most over-the-counter drugs are marketed in compliance with FDA regulations based on expert medical review. The FDA clears most medical devices based on their substantial equivalence to other legally marketed devices. Cosmetics, medical foods, and dietary supplements are subject only to general postmarket prohibitions against adulterated and misbranded products, although the FDA may review ingredient safety and specific claims for dietary supplements. Some product information is available on FDA's Web site, but the prudent physician should supplement that information by reviewing available scientific literature. PMID:19453345

  15. Generic Biologic Drugs Seem as Effective as Originals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_160183.html Generic Biologic Drugs Seem as Effective as Originals Biologics are made from living cells and ... treating rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease and psoriasis, a new study says. Biologics are medications made from ...

  16. Stem cell biology and drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haston Kelly M

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There are many reasons to be interested in stem cells, one of the most prominent being their potential use in finding better drugs to treat human disease. This article focuses on how this may be implemented. Recent advances in the production of reprogrammed adult cells and their regulated differentiation to disease-relevant cells are presented, and diseases that have been modeled using these methods are discussed. Remaining difficulties are highlighted, as are new therapeutic insights that have emerged.

  17. Synthetic Biology Guides Biofuel Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R. Connor

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The advancement of microbial processes for the production of renewable liquid fuels has increased with concerns about the current fuel economy. The development of advanced biofuels in particular has risen to address some of the shortcomings of ethanol. These advanced fuels have chemical properties similar to petroleum-based liquid fuels, thus removing the need for engine modification or infrastructure redesign. While the productivity and titers of each of these processes remains to be improved, progress in synthetic biology has provided tools to guide the engineering of these processes through present and future challenges.

  18. Biological hydrogen production from phytomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartacek, J.; Zabranska, J. [Inst. of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic). Dept. of Water Technology and Environmental Engineering

    2004-07-01

    Renewable sources of energy have received wide attention lately. One candidate is hydrogen which has the added advantage of involving no greenhouse gases. Biological hydrogen production from wastewater or biowastes is a very attractive production technique. So far, most studies have concentrated on the use of photosynthetic bacteria. However, dark fermentation has recently become a popular topic of research as it has the advantage of not requiring light energy input, something that limits the performance of the photosynthetic method. While pure cultures have been used in most of the investigations to date, in industrial situations mixed cultures will probably be the norm because of unavoidable contamination. In this investigation the phytomass of amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus L) was used to produce hydrogen. Specific organic loading, organic loading, and pH were varied to study the effect on hydrogen production. 18 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs.

  19. New Biologic Drug Tackles Hard-To-Control Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html New Biologic Drug Tackles Hard-to-Control Asthma Benralizumab significantly cuts respiratory attacks, two trials show ... drug reduces flare-ups in patients with severe asthma that is not controlled by steroid inhalers alone, ...

  20. Biology of Addiction: Drugs and Alcohol Can Hijack Your Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... External link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Biology of Addiction Drugs and Alcohol Can Hijack Your ... scientists are working to learn more about the biology of addiction. They’ve shown that addiction is ...

  1. Capturing Biological Activity in Natural Product Fragments by Chemical Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Erika A; Gademann, Karl

    2016-03-14

    Natural products have had an immense influence on science and have directly led to the introduction of many drugs. Organic chemistry, and its unique ability to tailor natural products through synthesis, provides an extraordinary approach to unlock the full potential of natural products. In this Review, an approach based on natural product derived fragments is presented that can successfully address some of the current challenges in drug discovery. These fragments often display significantly reduced molecular weights, reduced structural complexity, a reduced number of synthetic steps, while retaining or even improving key biological parameters such as potency or selectivity. Examples from various stages of the drug development process up to the clinic are presented. In addition, this process can be leveraged by recent developments such as genome mining, antibody-drug conjugates, and computational approaches. All these concepts have the potential to identify the next generation of drug candidates inspired by natural products.

  2. Administration costs of intravenous biologic drugs for rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Soini, Erkki J.; Leussu, Miina; Hallinen, Taru

    2013-01-01

    Background Cost-effectiveness studies explicitly reporting infusion times, drug-specific administration costs for infusions or real-payer intravenous drug cost are few in number. Yet, administration costs for infusions are needed in the health economic evaluations assessing intravenously-administered drugs. Objectives To estimate the drug-specific administration and total cost of biologic intravenous rheumatoid arthritis (RA) drugs in the adult population and to compare the obtained costs wit...

  3. Genetic and biological markers in drug abuse and alcoholism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braude, M.C.; Chao, H.M.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 11 selections. Some of the titles are: Polymorphic Gene Marker Studies; Pharmacogenetic Approaches to the Prediction of Drug Response; Genetic Markers of Drug Abuse in Mouse Models; Genetics as a Tool for Identifying Biological Markers of Drug Abuse; and Studies of an Animal Model of Alcoholism.

  4. [What have biological drugs changed in inflammatory rheumatic, skin and bowel diseases?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannonen, Pekka; Rantanen, Tapio; Jussila, Airi

    2016-01-01

    Biological drugs are the most rapidly growing group of medicinal agents. In addition to hormone and vaccine products, the significance of drugs produced using genetic engineering has increased in numerous indications, especially in oncology. Furthermore, they have significantly contributed to the treatment of inflammatory musculoskeletal as well as cutaneous and intestinal diseases. Their use is limited by parenteral administration, immunogenicity, uncertainty about possible severe adverse effects and especially the high price of the drugs. The cessation of patent protection of the original brand pharmaceuticals, and marketing of biosimilar drugs are expected to lower the prices of the original biological, as well. PMID:27017788

  5. Toxicological Analysis of Some Drugs of Abuse in Biological Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Anne Marie Ciobanu; Daniela Baconi; Cristian Bălălău; Carolina Negrei; Miriana Stan; Maria Bârcă

    2015-01-01

    Consumption of drugs of abuse is a scourge of modern world. Abuse, drug addiction and their consequences are one of the major current problems of European society because of the significant repercussions in individual, family, social and economic level. In this context, toxicological analysis of the drugs of abuse in biological samples is a useful tool for: diagnosis of drug addiction, checking an auto-response, mandatory screening in some treatment programs, identification of a substance ...

  6. Requirements for Foreign and Domestic Establishment Registration and Listing for Human Drugs, Including Drugs That Are Regulated Under a Biologics License Application, and Animal Drugs. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-31

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending its regulations governing drug establishment registration and drug listing. These amendments reorganize, modify, and clarify current regulations concerning who must register establishments and list human drugs, human drugs that are also biological products, and animal drugs. The final rule requires electronic submission, unless waived in certain circumstances, of registration and listing information. This rulemaking pertains to finished drug products and to active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) alone or together with one or more other ingredients. The final rule describes how and when owners or operators of establishments at which drugs are manufactured or processed must register their establishments with FDA and list the drugs they manufacture or process. In addition, the rule makes certain changes to the National Drug Code (NDC) system. We are taking this action to improve management of drug establishment registration and drug listing requirements and make these processes more efficient and effective for industry and for us. This action also supports implementation of the electronic prescribing provisions of the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 (MMA) and the availability of current drug labeling information through DailyMed, a computerized repository of drug information maintained by the National Library of Medicine. PMID:27580511

  7. The year's new drugs & biologics 2014 - Part II: trends & challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graul, A I; Serebrov, M; Cruces, E; Tracy, M; Dulsat, C

    2015-02-01

    2014 was a year of continued high activity in the pharma and biotech industry, as evidenced in part I of this annual two-part review article published last month in this journal (1). As of December 23, 2014, a total of 55 new chemical and biological entities had reached their first markets worldwide, together with another 29 important new line extensions. Another 19 products were approved for the first time during the year but not yet launched by December 23. Furthermore, during the now-traditional year-end sprint, several regulatory agencies issued last-minute approvals for other compounds that missed the deadline for inclusion in that article, bringing the total of new approvals for the year to a somewhat higher number. In addition to the successful development, registration and launch of new drugs and biologics, there are various other trends and tendencies that serve as indicators of the overall health and status of the industry. These include the pursuit of novel programs designed by regulators to stimulate the development of drugs for diseases that are currently under-treated; the regular and pragmatic culling by companies of their R&D pipelines; and the decision to unify pipelines, portfolios and sales forces through mergers and acquisitions. PMID:25756068

  8. Raman Barcode for Counterfeit Drug Product Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Latevi S; Rodriguez, Jason D

    2016-05-01

    Potential infiltration of counterfeit drug products-containing the wrong or no active pharmaceutical ingredient (API)-into the bona fide drug supply poses a significant threat to consumers worldwide. Raman spectroscopy offers a rapid, nondestructive avenue to screen a high throughput of samples. Traditional qualitative Raman identification is typically done with spectral correlation methods that compare the spectrum of a reference sample to an unknown. This is often effective for pure materials but is quite challenging when dealing with drug products that contain different formulations of active and inactive ingredients. Typically, reliable identification of drug products using common spectral correlation algorithms can only be made if the specific product under study is present in the library of reference spectra, thereby limiting the scope of products that can be screened. In this paper, we introduce the concept of the Raman barcode for identification of drug products by comparing the known peaks in the API reference spectrum to the peaks present in the finished drug product under study. This method requires the transformation of the Raman spectra of both API and finished drug products into a barcode representation by assigning zero intensity to every spectral frequency except the frequencies that correspond to Raman peaks. By comparing the percentage of nonzero overlap between the expected API barcode and finished drug product barcode, the identity of API present can be confirmed. In this study, 18 approved finished drug products and nine simulated counterfeits were successfully identified with 100% accuracy utilizing this method. PMID:27043140

  9. FDA 101: Regulating Biological Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Human Services FDA U.S. Food and Drug Administration Protecting and Promoting Your Health A to Z ... public health needs enforces regulations to prevent the introduction or spread of communicable diseases within the country ...

  10. Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis: Are Biologic Drugs Right for You?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis: Are Biologic Drugs Right for You? What is rheumatoid arthritis (RA)? Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a serious condition. The body’s immune system attacks the lining of ...

  11. 21 CFR 310.4 - Biologics; products subject to license control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Biologics; products subject to license control. 310.4 Section 310.4 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... to license control. (a) If a drug has an approved license under section 351 of the Public...

  12. Results of a survey of biological drug and device industries inspected by FDA under the Team Biologics Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, Steve; Gangi, Victor J; Johnson, Anne; Little, Jacqueline; Mendivil, Steven; Trott, Carolyn; Webber, Keith; Weinstein, Mark

    2007-01-01

    The Product Quality Research Institute, in conjunction with the Food and Drug Administration, conducted an anonymous, electronic survey of the biological products manufacturing industry inspected by Team Biologics, with emphasis in obtaining industry input on inspection and compliance aspects of program operations. Representatives from all of the product-specific manufacturing industries inspected under the Team Biologics Program responded to this survey (vaccines; fractionated plasma proteins and recombinant analogs; allergenics; therapeutics and in-vivo diagnostics; and in-vitro diagnostics, including blood grouping reagents). Data and written feedback was obtained regarding each firm's interactions and experiences of Team Biologics inspections at its facilities over the past three years. The three areas most impacted by Team Biologic inspections were "Production and Process Controls", "Failure Investigations" and "Facility / Equipment Controls". Overall assessment of the program was generally positive with 68% identifying a positive impact on the sites operations and 88% assessed the inspections as being conducted fairly. The findings and conclusions of this report will be utilized by the FDA to evaluate and further assess the impact of the Team Biologics Program and to implement any necessary changes. This report provides useful information to companies currently manufacturing licensed biologic products subject to Team Biologics inspections and also to those companies anticipating these inspections for future product manufacturing.

  13. Bone Effects of Biologic Drugs in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Addolorata Corrado; Anna Neve; Nicola Maruotti; Francesco Paolo Cantatore

    2013-01-01

    Biologic agents used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are able to reduce both disease activity and radiographic progression of joint disease. These drugs are directed against several proinflammatory cytokines (TNFα, IL-6, and IL-1) which are involved both in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation and progression of joint structural damage and in systemic and local bone loss typically observed in RA. However, the role of biologic drugs in preventing bone loss in clinical pract...

  14. Toxicological Analysis of Some Drugs of Abuse in Biological Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Marie Ciobanu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Consumption of drugs of abuse is a scourge of modern world. Abuse, drug addiction and their consequences are one of the major current problems of European society because of the significant repercussions in individual, family, social and economic level. In this context, toxicological analysis of the drugs of abuse in biological samples is a useful tool for: diagnosis of drug addiction, checking an auto-response, mandatory screening in some treatment programs, identification of a substance in the case of an overdose, determining compliance of the treatment. The present paper aims to address the needs of healthcare professionals involved in drugs addiction treatment through systematic presentation of information regarding their toxicological analysis. Basically, it is a tool that help you to select the suitable biological sample and the right collecting time, as well as the proper analysis technique, depending on the purpose of analysis, pharmacokinetic characteristics of the drugs of abuse, available equipment and staff expertise.

  15. Lipophilic drug transfer between liposomal and biological membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahr, Alfred; van Hoogevest, Peter; Kuntsche, Judith;

    2006-01-01

    This review presents the current knowledge on the interaction of lipophilic, poorly water soluble drugs with liposomal and biological membranes. The center of attention will be on drugs having the potential to dissolve in a lipid membrane without perturbing them too much. The degree of interactio...

  16. 77 FR 3780 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... portion of the meeting will be closed to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological..., Parasitic and Allergenic Products, Office of Vaccines Research and Review, Center for Biologics...

  17. Advanced Systems Biology Methods in Drug Discovery and Translational Biomedicine

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Zou; Ming-Wu Zheng; Gen Li; Zhi-Guang Su

    2013-01-01

    Systems biology is in an exponential development stage in recent years and has been widely utilized in biomedicine to better understand the molecular basis of human disease and the mechanism of drug action. Here, we discuss the fundamental concept of systems biology and its two computational methods that have been commonly used, that is, network analysis and dynamical modeling. The applications of systems biology in elucidating human disease are highlighted, consisting of human disease networ...

  18. The effect of network biology on drug toxicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gautier, Laurent; Taboureau, Olivier; Audouze, Karine Marie Laure

    2013-01-01

    biology has the opportunity to contribute to a better understanding of a drug's safety profile. The authors believe that considering a drug action and protein's function in a global physiological environment may benefit our understanding of the impact some chemicals have on human health and toxicity. The...... network biology. The authors specifically assess this approach across different biological scales when it is applied to toxicity. Expert opinion: There has been much progress made with the amount of data that is generated by various omics technologies. With this large amount of useful data, network...

  19. Systems Biology Approaches to a Rational Drug Discovery Paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prathipati, Philip; Mizuguchi, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Ligand- and structure-based drug design approaches complement phenotypic and target screens, respectively, and are the two major frameworks for guiding early-stage drug discovery efforts. Since the beginning of this century, the advent of the genomic era has presented researchers with a myriad of high throughput biological data (parts lists and their interaction networks) to address efficacy and toxicity, augmenting the traditional ligand- and structure-based approaches. This data rich era has also presented us with challenges related to integrating and analyzing these multi-platform and multi-dimensional datasets and translating them into viable hypotheses. Hence in the present paper, we review these existing approaches to drug discovery research and argue the case for a new systems biology based approach. We present the basic principles and the foundational arguments/underlying assumptions of the systems biology based approaches to drug design. Also discussed are systems biology data types (key entities, their attributes and their relationships with each other, and data models/representations), software and tools used for both retrospective and prospective analysis, and the hypotheses that can be inferred. In addition, we summarize some of the existing resources for a systems biology based drug discovery paradigm (open TG-GATEs, DrugMatrix, CMap and LINCs) in terms of their strengths and limitations. PMID:26306988

  20. Systems Biology Approaches to a Rational Drug Discovery Paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prathipati, Philip; Mizuguchi, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Ligand- and structure-based drug design approaches complement phenotypic and target screens, respectively, and are the two major frameworks for guiding early-stage drug discovery efforts. Since the beginning of this century, the advent of the genomic era has presented researchers with a myriad of high throughput biological data (parts lists and their interaction networks) to address efficacy and toxicity, augmenting the traditional ligand- and structure-based approaches. This data rich era has also presented us with challenges related to integrating and analyzing these multi-platform and multi-dimensional datasets and translating them into viable hypotheses. Hence in the present paper, we review these existing approaches to drug discovery research and argue the case for a new systems biology based approach. We present the basic principles and the foundational arguments/underlying assumptions of the systems biology based approaches to drug design. Also discussed are systems biology data types (key entities, their attributes and their relationships with each other, and data models/representations), software and tools used for both retrospective and prospective analysis, and the hypotheses that can be inferred. In addition, we summarize some of the existing resources for a systems biology based drug discovery paradigm (open TG-GATEs, DrugMatrix, CMap and LINCs) in terms of their strengths and limitations.

  1. Synthetic biology advances for pharmaceutical production

    OpenAIRE

    Breitling, Rainer; Takano, Eriko

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology enables a new generation of microbial engineering for the biotechnological production of pharmaceuticals and other high-value chemicals. This review presents an overview of recent advances in the field, describing new computational and experimental tools for the discovery, optimization and production of bioactive molecules, and outlining progress towards the application of these tools to pharmaceutical production systems.

  2. Synthetic Biology Guides Biofuel Production

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The advancement of microbial processes for the production of renewable liquid fuels has increased with concerns about the current fuel economy. The development of advanced biofuels in particular has risen to address some of the shortcomings of ethanol. These advanced fuels have chemical properties similar to petroleum-based liquid fuels, thus removing the need for engine modification or infrastructure redesign. While the productivity and titers of each of these processes remains to be improve...

  3. Translating Stem Cell Biology Into Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singeç, Ilyas; Simeonov, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cell research has made extraordinary progress over the last decade. The robustness of nuclear reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has created entirely novel opportunities for drug discovery and personalized regenerative medicine. Patient- and disease-specific iPSCs can be expanded indefinitely and differentiated into relevant cell types of different organ systems. As the utilization of iPSCs is becoming a key enabling technology across various scientific disciplines, there are still important challenges that need to be addressed. Here we review the current state and reflect on the issues that the stem cell and translational communities are facing in bringing iPSCs closer to clinical application.

  4. Novel computational biology methods and their applications to drug discovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sharangdhar S. PHATAK; Hoang T. TRAN; Shuxing ZHANG

    2011-01-01

    Computational biology methods are now firmly entrenched in the drug discovery process.These methods focus on modeling and simulations of biological systems to complement and direct conventional experimental approaches.Two important branches of computational biology include protein homology modeling and the computational biophysics method of molecular dynamics.Protein modeling methods attempt to accurately predict three-dimensional (3D) structures of uncrystallized proteins for subsequent structure-based drug design applications.Molecular dynamics methods aim to elucidate the molecular motions of the static representations of crystallized protein structures.In this review we highlight recent novel methodologies in the field of homology modeling and molecular dynamics.Selected drug discovery applications using these methods conclude the review.

  5. 9 CFR 114.6 - Mixing biological products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mixing biological products. 114.6... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS PRODUCTION REQUIREMENTS FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 114.6 Mixing biological products. Each biological product, when in liquid form,...

  6. Biological production of organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jianping; Paddock, Troy; Carrieri, Damian; Maness, Pin-Ching; Seibert, Michael

    2016-04-12

    Strains of cyanobacteria that produce high levels of alpha ketoglutarate (AKG) and pyruvate are disclosed herein. Methods of culturing these cyanobacteria to produce AKG or pyruvate and recover AKG or pyruvate from the culture are also described herein. Nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides that function as ethylene-forming enzymes and their use in the production of ethylene are further disclosed herein. These nucleic acids may be expressed in hosts such as cyanobacteria, which in turn may be cultured to produce ethylene.

  7. Inactive ingredient Search for Approved Drug Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — According to 21 CFR 210.3(b)(8), an inactive ingredient is any component of a drug product other than the active ingredient. Only inactive ingredients in the final...

  8. Natural product synthesis at the interface of chemistry and biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jiyong

    2014-08-11

    Nature has evolved to produce unique and diverse natural products that possess high target affinity and specificity. Natural products have been the richest sources for novel modulators of biomolecular function. Since the chemical synthesis of urea by Wöhler, organic chemists have been intrigued by natural products, leading to the evolution of the field of natural product synthesis over the past two centuries. Natural product synthesis has enabled natural products to play an essential role in drug discovery and chemical biology. With the introduction of novel, innovative concepts and strategies for synthetic efficiency, natural product synthesis in the 21st century is well poised to address the challenges and complexities faced by natural product chemistry and will remain essential to progress in biomedical sciences.

  9. Counting on natural products for drug design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Tiago; Reker, Daniel; Schneider, Petra; Schneider, Gisbert

    2016-06-01

    Natural products and their molecular frameworks have a long tradition as valuable starting points for medicinal chemistry and drug discovery. Recently, there has been a revitalization of interest in the inclusion of these chemotypes in compound collections for screening and achieving selective target modulation. Here we discuss natural-product-inspired drug discovery with a focus on recent advances in the design of synthetically tractable small molecules that mimic nature's chemistry. We highlight the potential of innovative computational tools in processing structurally complex natural products to predict their macromolecular targets and attempt to forecast the role that natural-product-derived fragments and fragment-like natural products will play in next-generation drug discovery.

  10. Genetics of rheumatoid arthritis contributes to biology and drug discovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okada, Yukinori; Wu, Di; Trynka, Gosia; Raj, Towfique; Terao, Chikashi; Ikari, Katsunori; Kochi, Yuta; Ohmura, Koichiro; Suzuki, Akari; Yoshida, Shinji; Graham, Robert R.; Manoharan, Arun; Ortmann, Ward; Bhangale, Tushar; Denny, Joshua C.; Carroll, Robert J.; Eyler, Anne E.; Greenberg, Jeffrey D.; Kremer, Joel M.; Pappas, Dimitrios A.; Jiang, Lei; Yin, Jian; Ye, Lingying; Su, Ding-Feng; Yang, Jian; Xie, Gang; Keystone, Ed; Westra, Harm-Jan; Esko, Tonu; Metspalu, Andres; Zhou, Xuezhong; Gupta, Namrata; Mirel, Daniel; Stahl, Eli A.; Diogo, Dorothee; Cui, Jing; Liao, Katherine; Guo, Michael H.; Myouzen, Keiko; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Coenen, Marieke J. H.; van Riel, Piet L. C. M.; van de laar, Mart A. F. J.; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Dieude, Philippe; Mariette, Xavier; Bridges, S. Louis; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Toes, Rene E. M.; Tak, Paul P.; Miceli-Richard, Corinne; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Martin, Javier; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Rantapaa-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Arlestig, Lisbeth; Choi, Hyon K.; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Galan, Pilar; Lathrop, Mark; Eyre, Steve; Bowes, John; Barton, Anne; de Vries, Niek; Moreland, Larry W.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Karlson, Elizabeth W.; Taniguchi, Atsuo; Yamada, Ryo; Kubo, Michiaki; Liu, Jun S.; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Worthington, Jane; Padyukov, Leonid; Klareskog, Lars; Gregersen, Peter K.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Stranger, Barbara E.; De Jager, Philip L.; Franke, Lude; Visscher, Peter M.; Brown, Matthew A.; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Takahashi, Atsushi; Xu, Huji; Behrens, Timothy W.; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Momohara, Shigeki; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Plenge, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge in human genetics is to devise a systematic strategy to integrate disease-associated variants with diverse genomic and biological data sets to provide insight into disease pathogenesis and guide drug discovery for complex traits such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA)(1). Here we perform

  11. Genetics of rheumatoid arthritis conributes to biology and drug discovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okada, Y.; Wu, D.; Trynka, G.; Raj, T.; Terao, C.; Ikari, K.; Kochi, Y.; Ohmura, K.; Suzuki, A.; Yoshida, S.; Graham, R.R.; Manoharan, A.; Ortmann, W.; Bhangale, T.; Denny, J.C.; Carroll, R.J.; Eyler, A.E.; Greenberg, J.D.; Kremer, J.M.; Pappas, D.A.; Jiang, L.; Yin, L.; Ye, L.; Su, D.F.; Yang, J.; Xie, G.; Keystone, E.; Westra, H.J.; Esko, T.; Metspalu, A.; Zhou, X.; Gupta, N.; Mirel, D.; Stahl, Eli A.; Diogo, D.; Cui, J.; Liao, K.; Guo, M.H.; Myouzen, K.; Kawaguchi, T.; Coenen, M.J.; Riel, van P.L.; Laar, van de M.A.; Guchelaar, H.J.; Huizinga, T.W.; Dieudé, P.; Mariette, X.; Louis Bridges Jr, S.; Zhernakova, A.; Toes, R.E.; Tak, P.P.; Miceli-Richard, C.; Bang, S.Y.; Lee, H.S.; Martin, J.; Gonzales-Gay, M.A.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, L.; Rantapää-Dhlqvist, S.; Arlestig, L.; Choi, H.K.; Kamatani, Y.; Galan, P.; Lathrop, M.; Eyre, S.; Bowes, J.; Barton, A.; Vries, de N.; Moreland, L.W.; Criswell, L.A.; Karlson, E.W.; Taniguchi, A.; Yamada, R; Kubo, M.; Bae, S.C.; Worthington, J.; Padyukov, L.; Klareskog, L.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Raychaudhuri, S.; Stranger, B.E.; Jager, de P.L.; Franke, L.; Visscher, P.M.; Brown, M.A.; Yamanaka, H.; Mimori, T.; Takahashi, A.; Xu, H.; Behrens, T.W.; Siminovitch, K.A.; Momohara, S.; Matsuda, F.; Yamamoto, K.; Plenge, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge in human genetics is to devise a systematic strategy to integrate disease-associated variants with diverse genomic and biological data sets to provide insight into disease pathogenesis and guide drug discovery for complex traits such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA)1. Here we performed

  12. Genetics of rheumatoid arthritis contributes to biology and drug discovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okada, Y.; Wu, D.; Trynka, G.; Raj, T.; Terao, C.; Ikari, K.; Kochi, Y.; Ohmura, K.; Suzuki, A.; Yoshida, S.; Graham, R.R.; Manoharan, A.; Ortmann, W.; Bhangale, T.; Denny, J.C.; Carroll, R.J.; Eyler, A.E.; Greenberg, J.D.; Kremer, J.M; Pappas, D.A.; Jiang, L.; Yin, J.; Ye, L; Su, D.F.; Yang, J.; Xie, G.; Keystone, E.; Westra, H.J.; Esko, T.; Metspalu, A.; Zhou, X.; Gupta, N.; Mirel, D.; Stahl, E.A.; Diogo, D.; Cui, J.; Liao, K.; Guo, M.H.; Myouzen, K.; Kawaguchi, T.; Coenen, M.J.H.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Laar, M.A. van der; Guchelaar, H.J.; Huizinga, T.W.J.; Dieude, P.; Mariette, X.; Bridges, S.L., Jr.; Zhernakova, A.; Toes, R.E.; Tak, P.P.; Miceli-Richard, C.; Bang, S.Y.; Lee, H.S.; Martin, J.; Gonzalez-Gay, M.A.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, L.; Rantapaa-Dahlqvist, S.; Arlestig, L.; Choi, H.K.; Kamatani, Y.; Galan, P.; Lathrop, M.; Eyre, S.; Bowes, J.; Barton, A.; Vries, N. de; Moreland, L.W.; Criswell, L.A.; Karlson, E.W.; Taniguchi, A.; Yamada, R.; Kubo, M.; Liu, J.S.; Bae, S.C.; Worthington, J.; Padyukov, L.; Klareskog, L.; Gregersen, P.K.; Raychaudhuri, S.; Stranger, B.E.; Jager, P.L. De; Franke, L.; Visscher, P.M.; Brown, M.A.; Yamanaka, H.; Mimori, T.; Takahashi, A.; Xu, H.; Behrens, T.W.; Siminovitch, K.A.; Momohara, S.; Matsuda, F.; Yamamoto, K.; Plenge, R.M.

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge in human genetics is to devise a systematic strategy to integrate disease-associated variants with diverse genomic and biological data sets to provide insight into disease pathogenesis and guide drug discovery for complex traits such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here we performed

  13. Antibacterial Cleaning Products and Drug Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Aiello, Allison E.; Marshall, Bonnie; Levy, Stuart B.; Della-Latta, Phyllis; Lin, Susan X.; Larson, Elaine

    2005-01-01

    We examined whether household use of antibacterial cleaning and hygiene products is an emerging risk factor for carriage of antimicrobial drug–resistant bacteria on hands of household members. Households (N = 224) were randomized to use of antibacterial or nonantibacterial cleaning and hygiene products for 1 year. Logistic regression was used to assess the influence of antibacterial product use in homes. Antibacterial product use did not lead to a significant increase in antimicrobial drug re...

  14. Standardization for natural product synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huimin; Medema, Marnix H

    2016-08-27

    Standardization is one of the foundational features of modern-day engineering, and the use of standardized parts and processes is a key element that distinguishes bona fide synthetic biology from traditional genetic engineering. Here, we discuss the role of standardization in natural product synthetic biology, focusing on standardization of data on biosynthetic pathways and gene clusters, as well as the role of standardization in the process of biosynthetic gene cluster engineering. PMID:27313083

  15. Standardization for natural product synthetic biology

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Huimin; Medema, Marnix H.

    2016-01-01

    Standardization is one of the foundational features of modern-day engineering, and the use of standardized parts and processes is a key element that distinguishes bona fide synthetic biology from traditional genetic engineering. Here, we discuss the role of standardization in natural product synthetic biology, focusing on standardization of data on biosynthetic pathways and gene clusters, as well as the role of standardization in the process of biosynthetic gene cluster engineering.

  16. Modeling drug- and chemical- induced hepatotoxicity with systems biology approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudin eBhattacharya

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We provide an overview of computational systems biology approaches as applied to the study of chemical- and drug-induced toxicity. The concept of ‘toxicity pathways’ is described in the context of the 2007 US National Academies of Science report, Toxicity testing in the 21st Century: A Vision and A Strategy. Pathway mapping and modeling based on network biology concepts are a key component of the vision laid out in this report for a more biologically-based analysis of dose-response behavior and the safety of chemicals and drugs. We focus on toxicity of the liver (hepatotoxicity – a complex phenotypic response with contributions from a number of different cell types and biological processes. We describe three case studies of complementary multi-scale computational modeling approaches to understand perturbation of toxicity pathways in the human liver as a result of exposure to environmental contaminants and specific drugs. One approach involves development of a spatial, multicellular virtual tissue model of the liver lobule that combines molecular circuits in individual hepatocytes with cell-cell interactions and blood-mediated transport of toxicants through hepatic sinusoids, to enable quantitative, mechanistic prediction of hepatic dose-response for activation of the AhR toxicity pathway. Simultaneously, methods are being developing to extract quantitative maps of intracellular signaling and transcriptional regulatory networks perturbed by environmental contaminants, using a combination of gene expression and genome-wide protein-DNA interaction data. A predictive physiological model (DILIsymTM to understand drug-induced liver injury (DILI, the most common adverse event leading to termination of clinical development programs and regulatory actions on drugs, is also described. The model initially focuses on reactive metabolite-induced DILI in response to administration of acetaminophen, and spans multiple biological scales.

  17. 78 FR 20663 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ... DNA Viruses, Division of Viral Products, Office of Vaccines Research and Review, Center for Biologics... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... portion of the meeting will be closed to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related...

  18. 75 FR 17929 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-08

    ... will review and discuss available data regarding the unexpected finding of DNA originating from porcine... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory...

  19. 76 FR 3639 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... selection of strains to be included in the influenza virus vaccine for the 2011-2012 influenza season....

  20. 75 FR 2876 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... selection of strains to be included in the influenza virus vaccine for the 2010 - 2011 influenza season....

  1. 78 FR 5465 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... strains to be included in the influenza virus vaccine for the 2013- 2014 influenza season. FDA intends...

  2. Standardization for natural product synthetic biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Huimin; Medema, Marnix H.

    2016-01-01

    Standardization is one of the foundational features of modern-day engineering, and the use of standardized parts and processes is a key element that distinguishes bona fide synthetic biology from traditional genetic engineering. Here, we discuss the role of standardization in natural product synt

  3. 21 CFR 349.50 - Labeling of ophthalmic drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling of ophthalmic drug products. 349.50... (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE OPHTHALMIC DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Labeling § 349.50 Labeling of ophthalmic drug products. (a) The word “physician” may be substituted for the word “doctor”...

  4. 9 CFR 114.17 - Rebottling of biological products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rebottling of biological products. 114... OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS PRODUCTION REQUIREMENTS FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 114.17 Rebottling of biological products. The Administrator...

  5. 9 CFR 114.18 - Reprocessing of biological products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reprocessing of biological products..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS PRODUCTION REQUIREMENTS FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 114.18 Reprocessing of biological products. The Administrator...

  6. 9 CFR 114.4 - Identification of biological products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Identification of biological products... OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS PRODUCTION REQUIREMENTS FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 114.4 Identification of biological products. Suitable tags or labels...

  7. 21 CFR 333.250 - Labeling of antifungal drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling of antifungal drug products. 333.250... Antifungal Drug Products § 333.250 Labeling of antifungal drug products. (a) Statement of identity. The... “antifungal.” (b) Indications. The labeling of the product states, under the heading “Indications,” the...

  8. Biologically erodable microspheres as potential oral drug delivery systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathiowitz, Edith; Jacob, Jules S.; Jong, Yong S.; Carino, Gerardo P.; Chickering, Donald E.; Chaturvedi, Pravin; Santos, Camilla A.; Vijayaraghavan, Kavita; Montgomery, Sean; Bassett, Michael; Morrell, Craig

    1997-03-01

    Biologically adhesive delivery systems offer important advantages1-5 over conventional drug delivery systems6. Here we show that engineered polymer microspheres made of biologically erodable polymers, which display strong adhesive interactions with gastrointestinal mucus and cellular linings, can traverse both the mucosal absorptive epithelium and the follicle-associated epithelium covering the lymphoid tissue of Peyer's patches. The polymers maintain contact with intestinal epithelium for extended periods of time and actually penetrate it, through and between cells. Thus, once loaded with compounds of pharmacological interest, the microspheres could be developed as delivery systems to transfer biologically active molecules to the circulation. We show that these microspheres increase the absorption of three model substances of widely different molecular size: dicumarol, insulin and plasmid DNA.

  9. 9 CFR 106.1 - Biological products; exemption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS EXEMPTION FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS USED IN DEPARTMENT PROGRAMS OR UNDER DEPARTMENT CONTROL OR SUPERVISION § 106.1 Biological products... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Biological products; exemption....

  10. Use of Natural Products as Chemical Library for Drug Discovery and Network Pharmacology

    OpenAIRE

    Jiangyong Gu; Yuanshen Gui; Lirong Chen; Gu Yuan; Hui-Zhe Lu; Xiaojie Xu

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Natural products have been an important source of lead compounds for drug discovery. How to find and evaluate bioactive natural products is critical to the achievement of drug/lead discovery from natural products. METHODOLOGY: We collected 19,7201 natural products structures, reported biological activities and virtual screening results. Principal component analysis was employed to explore the chemical space, and we found that there was a large portion of overlap between natural pr...

  11. Defining Patient Centric Pharmaceutical Drug Product Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegemann, Sven; Ternik, Robert L; Onder, Graziano; Khan, Mansoor A; van Riet-Nales, Diana A

    2016-09-01

    The term "patient centered," "patient centric," or "patient centricity" is increasingly used in the scientific literature in a wide variety of contexts. Generally, patient centric medicines are recognized as an essential contributor to healthy aging and the overall patient's quality of life and life expectancy. Besides the selection of the appropriate type of drug substance and strength for a particular indication in a particular patient, due attention must be paid that the pharmaceutical drug product design is also adequately addressing the particular patient's needs, i.e., assuring adequate patient adherence and the anticipate drug safety and effectiveness. Relevant pharmaceutical design aspects may e.g., involve the selection of the route of administration, the tablet size and shape, the ease of opening the package, the ability to read the user instruction, or the ability to follow the recommended (in-use) storage conditions. Currently, a harmonized definition on patient centric drug development/design has not yet been established. To stimulate scientific research and discussions and the consistent interpretation of test results, it is essential that such a definition is established. We have developed a first draft definition through various rounds of discussions within an interdisciplinary AAPS focus group of experts. This publication summarizes the outcomes and is intended to stimulate further discussions with all stakeholders towards a common definition of patient centric pharmaceutical drug product design that is useable across all disciplines involved. PMID:27317470

  12. Defining Patient Centric Pharmaceutical Drug Product Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegemann, Sven; Ternik, Robert L; Onder, Graziano; Khan, Mansoor A; van Riet-Nales, Diana A

    2016-09-01

    The term "patient centered," "patient centric," or "patient centricity" is increasingly used in the scientific literature in a wide variety of contexts. Generally, patient centric medicines are recognized as an essential contributor to healthy aging and the overall patient's quality of life and life expectancy. Besides the selection of the appropriate type of drug substance and strength for a particular indication in a particular patient, due attention must be paid that the pharmaceutical drug product design is also adequately addressing the particular patient's needs, i.e., assuring adequate patient adherence and the anticipate drug safety and effectiveness. Relevant pharmaceutical design aspects may e.g., involve the selection of the route of administration, the tablet size and shape, the ease of opening the package, the ability to read the user instruction, or the ability to follow the recommended (in-use) storage conditions. Currently, a harmonized definition on patient centric drug development/design has not yet been established. To stimulate scientific research and discussions and the consistent interpretation of test results, it is essential that such a definition is established. We have developed a first draft definition through various rounds of discussions within an interdisciplinary AAPS focus group of experts. This publication summarizes the outcomes and is intended to stimulate further discussions with all stakeholders towards a common definition of patient centric pharmaceutical drug product design that is useable across all disciplines involved.

  13. Genetics of rheumatoid arthritis contributes to biology and drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yukinori; Wu, Di; Trynka, Gosia; Raj, Towfique; Terao, Chikashi; Ikari, Katsunori; Kochi, Yuta; Ohmura, Koichiro; Suzuki, Akari; Yoshida, Shinji; Graham, Robert R.; Manoharan, Arun; Ortmann, Ward; Bhangale, Tushar; Denny, Joshua C.; Carroll, Robert J.; Eyler, Anne E.; Greenberg, Jeffrey D.; Kremer, Joel M.; Pappas, Dimitrios A.; Jiang, Lei; Yin, Jian; Ye, Lingying; Su, Ding-Feng; Yang, Jian; Xie, Gang; Keystone, Ed; Westra, Harm-Jan; Esko, Tõnu; Metspalu, Andres; Zhou, Xuezhong; Gupta, Namrata; Mirel, Daniel; Stahl, Eli A.; Diogo, Dorothée; Cui, Jing; Liao, Katherine; Guo, Michael H.; Myouzen, Keiko; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Coenen, Marieke J.H.; van Riel, Piet L.C.M.; van de Laar, Mart A.F.J.; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan; Huizinga, Tom W.J.; Dieudé, Philippe; Mariette, Xavier; Bridges, S. Louis; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Toes, Rene E.M.; Tak, Paul P.; Miceli-Richard, Corinne; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Martin, Javier; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Ärlestig, Lisbeth; Choi, Hyon K.; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Galan, Pilar; Lathrop, Mark; Eyre, Steve; Bowes, John; Barton, Anne; de Vries, Niek; Moreland, Larry W.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Karlson, Elizabeth W.; Taniguchi, Atsuo; Yamada, Ryo; Kubo, Michiaki; Liu, Jun S.; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Worthington, Jane; Padyukov, Leonid; Klareskog, Lars; Gregersen, Peter K.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Stranger, Barbara E.; De Jager, Philip L.; Franke, Lude; Visscher, Peter M.; Brown, Matthew A.; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Takahashi, Atsushi; Xu, Huji; Behrens, Timothy W.; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Momohara, Shigeki; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Plenge, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge in human genetics is to devise a systematic strategy to integrate disease-associated variants with diverse genomic and biological datasets to provide insight into disease pathogenesis and guide drug discovery for complex traits such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA)1. Here, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analysis in a total of >100,000 subjects of European and Asian ancestries (29,880 RA cases and 73,758 controls), by evaluating ~10 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We discovered 42 novel RA risk loci at a genome-wide level of significance, bringing the total to 1012–4. We devised an in-silico pipeline using established bioinformatics methods based on functional annotation5, cis-acting expression quantitative trait loci (cis-eQTL)6, and pathway analyses7–9 – as well as novel methods based on genetic overlap with human primary immunodeficiency (PID), hematological cancer somatic mutations and knock-out mouse phenotypes – to identify 98 biological candidate genes at these 101 risk loci. We demonstrate that these genes are the targets of approved therapies for RA, and further suggest that drugs approved for other indications may be repurposed for the treatment of RA. Together, this comprehensive genetic study sheds light on fundamental genes, pathways and cell types that contribute to RA pathogenesis, and provides empirical evidence that the genetics of RA can provide important information for drug discovery. PMID:24390342

  14. Genetics of rheumatoid arthritis contributes to biology and drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yukinori; Wu, Di; Trynka, Gosia; Raj, Towfique; Terao, Chikashi; Ikari, Katsunori; Kochi, Yuta; Ohmura, Koichiro; Suzuki, Akari; Yoshida, Shinji; Graham, Robert R; Manoharan, Arun; Ortmann, Ward; Bhangale, Tushar; Denny, Joshua C; Carroll, Robert J; Eyler, Anne E; Greenberg, Jeffrey D; Kremer, Joel M; Pappas, Dimitrios A; Jiang, Lei; Yin, Jian; Ye, Lingying; Su, Ding-Feng; Yang, Jian; Xie, Gang; Keystone, Ed; Westra, Harm-Jan; Esko, Tõnu; Metspalu, Andres; Zhou, Xuezhong; Gupta, Namrata; Mirel, Daniel; Stahl, Eli A; Diogo, Dorothée; Cui, Jing; Liao, Katherine; Guo, Michael H; Myouzen, Keiko; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Coenen, Marieke J H; van Riel, Piet L C M; van de Laar, Mart A F J; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan; Huizinga, Tom W J; Dieudé, Philippe; Mariette, Xavier; Bridges, S Louis; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Toes, Rene E M; Tak, Paul P; Miceli-Richard, Corinne; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Martin, Javier; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Arlestig, Lisbeth; Choi, Hyon K; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Galan, Pilar; Lathrop, Mark; Eyre, Steve; Bowes, John; Barton, Anne; de Vries, Niek; Moreland, Larry W; Criswell, Lindsey A; Karlson, Elizabeth W; Taniguchi, Atsuo; Yamada, Ryo; Kubo, Michiaki; Liu, Jun S; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Worthington, Jane; Padyukov, Leonid; Klareskog, Lars; Gregersen, Peter K; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Stranger, Barbara E; De Jager, Philip L; Franke, Lude; Visscher, Peter M; Brown, Matthew A; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Takahashi, Atsushi; Xu, Huji; Behrens, Timothy W; Siminovitch, Katherine A; Momohara, Shigeki; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Plenge, Robert M

    2014-02-20

    A major challenge in human genetics is to devise a systematic strategy to integrate disease-associated variants with diverse genomic and biological data sets to provide insight into disease pathogenesis and guide drug discovery for complex traits such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here we performed a genome-wide association study meta-analysis in a total of >100,000 subjects of European and Asian ancestries (29,880 RA cases and 73,758 controls), by evaluating ∼10 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms. We discovered 42 novel RA risk loci at a genome-wide level of significance, bringing the total to 101 (refs 2 - 4). We devised an in silico pipeline using established bioinformatics methods based on functional annotation, cis-acting expression quantitative trait loci and pathway analyses--as well as novel methods based on genetic overlap with human primary immunodeficiency, haematological cancer somatic mutations and knockout mouse phenotypes--to identify 98 biological candidate genes at these 101 risk loci. We demonstrate that these genes are the targets of approved therapies for RA, and further suggest that drugs approved for other indications may be repurposed for the treatment of RA. Together, this comprehensive genetic study sheds light on fundamental genes, pathways and cell types that contribute to RA pathogenesis, and provides empirical evidence that the genetics of RA can provide important information for drug discovery. PMID:24390342

  15. 9 CFR 112.6 - Packaging biological products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Packaging biological products. 112.6... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS PACKAGING AND LABELING § 112.6 Packaging biological products. (a) Each multiple-dose final container of a biological...

  16. Intralesional Use of Chemotherapeutic and Biological Drugs in Dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ercan Çalışkan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Intralesional injection applications being used more frequently in the practice of dermatology were primarily developed in order to avoid systemic side effects of steroids. Intralesional applications enable the potent drugs to achieve local effect with regionally high concentrations but without systemic toxicities. Commonly known, chemotherapeutic agents have the potential for many side effects and cytotoxicities with systemic use. Intralesional use of chemotherapeutic drugs is becoming widespread in the treatment of non-melanoma skin cancers in which surgery is contraindicated or may result in functional or cosmetic loss. In this article, intralesional use of chemotherapeutic and biological agents, their advantages and disadvantages, administered dosages as well as efficacy and safety profiles were summarized and it was aimed to encourage intralesional applications to be more frequently used by all dermatologists.

  17. Genetics of Psoriasis and Pharmacogenetics of Biological Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocío Prieto-Pérez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the skin. The causes of psoriasis are unknown, although family and twin studies have shown genetic factors to play a key role in its development. The many genes associated with psoriasis and the immune response include TNFα, IL23, and IL12. Advances in knowledge of the pathogenesis of psoriasis have enabled the development of new drugs that target cytokines (e.g., etanercept, adalimumab, and infliximab, which target TNFα, and ustekinumab, which targets the p40 subunit of IL23 and IL12. These drugs have improved the safety and efficacy of treatment in comparison with previous therapies. However, not all patients respond equally to treatment, possibly owing to interindividual genetic variability. In this review, we describe the genes associated with psoriasis and the immune response, the biological drugs used to treat chronic severe plaque psoriasis, new drugs in phase II and III trials, and current knowledge on the implications of pharmacogenomics in predicting response to these treatments.

  18. 21 CFR 341.72 - Labeling of antihistamine drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling of antihistamine drug products. 341.72... OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Labeling § 341.72 Labeling of antihistamine drug products. (a) Statement of... product as an “antihistamine.” (b) Indications. The labeling of the product states, under the...

  19. The impact of natural products upon modern drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, A

    2008-06-01

    In the period 1970-2006, a total of 24 unique natural products were discovered that led to an approved drug. We analyze these successful leads in terms of drug-like properties, and show that they can be divided into two equal subsets. The first falls in the 'Lipinski universe' and complies with the Rule of Five. The second is a 'parallel universe' that violates the rules. Nevertheless, the latter compounds remain largely compliant in terms of logP and H-bond donors, highlighting the importance of these two metrics in predicting bioavailability. Natural products are often cited as an exception to Lipinski's rules. We believe this is because nature has learned to maintain low hydrophobicity and intermolecular H-bond donating potential when it needs to make biologically active compounds with high molecular weight and large numbers of rotatable bonds. In addition, natural products are more likely than purely synthetic compounds to resemble biosynthetic intermediates or endogenous metabolites, and hence take advantage of active transport mechanisms. Interestingly, the natural product leads in the Lipinski and parallel universe had an identical success rate (50%) in delivering an oral drug.

  20. Approved Drug Products with Therapuetic Equivalence Evaluations (Orange Book)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The publication Approved Drug Products with Therapeutic Equivalence Evaluations (the List, commonly known as the Orange Book) identifies drug products approved on...

  1. Extending the “Web of Drug Identity” with Knowledge Extracted from United States Product Labels

    OpenAIRE

    Hassanzadeh, Oktie; Zhu, Qian; Freimuth, Robert; Boyce, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Structured Product Labels (SPLs) contain information about drugs that can be valuable to clinical and translational research, especially if it can be linked to other sources that provide data about drug targets, chemical properties, interactions, and biological pathways. Unfortunately, SPLs currently provide coarsely-structured drug information and lack the detailed annotation that is required to support computational use cases. To help address this issue we created LinkedSPLs, a Linked Data ...

  2. Use of natural products as chemical library for drug discovery and network pharmacology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangyong Gu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Natural products have been an important source of lead compounds for drug discovery. How to find and evaluate bioactive natural products is critical to the achievement of drug/lead discovery from natural products. METHODOLOGY: We collected 19,7201 natural products structures, reported biological activities and virtual screening results. Principal component analysis was employed to explore the chemical space, and we found that there was a large portion of overlap between natural products and FDA-approved drugs in the chemical space, which indicated that natural products had large quantity of potential lead compounds. We also explored the network properties of natural product-target networks and found that polypharmacology was greatly enriched to those compounds with large degree and high betweenness centrality. In order to make up for a lack of experimental data, high throughput virtual screening was employed. All natural products were docked to 332 target proteins of FDA-approved drugs. The most potential natural products for drug discovery and their indications were predicted based on a docking score-weighted prediction model. CONCLUSIONS: Analysis of molecular descriptors, distribution in chemical space and biological activities of natural products was conducted in this article. Natural products have vast chemical diversity, good drug-like properties and can interact with multiple cellular target proteins.

  3. Prescription Drugs, Over-the-Counter Drugs, Supplements and Herbal Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... herbal products Prescription drugs, over-the-counter drugs, supplements and herbal products Now playing: E-mail to ... it’s safe for you and your baby. Are supplements safe to take during pregnancy? A supplement is ...

  4. High concentrations of drug in target tissues following local controlled release are utilized for both drug distribution and biologic effect: An example with epicardial inotropic drug delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Maslov, Mikhail Y.; Edelman, Elazer R.; Wei, Abraham E.; Pezone, Matthew J.; Lovich, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Local drug delivery preferentially loads target tissues with a concentration gradient from the surface or point of release that tapers down to more distant sites. Drug that diffuses down this gradient must be in unbound form, but such drug can only elicit a biologic effect through receptor interactions. Drug excess loads tissues, increasing gradients and driving penetration, but with limited added biological response. We examined the hypothesis that local application reduces dramatically syst...

  5. Systems biology of microbial exopolysaccharides production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem eAtes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Exopolysaccharides (EPS produced by diverse group of microbial systems are rapidly emerging as new and industrially important biomaterials. Due to their unique and complex chemical structures and many interesting physicochemical and rheological properties with novel functionality, the microbial EPSs find wide range of commercial applications in various fields of the economy such as food, feed, packaging, chemical, textile, cosmetics and pharmaceutical industry, agriculture and medicine. EPSs are mainly associated with high-value applications and they have received considerable research attention over recent decades with their biocompatibility, biodegradability, and both environmental and human compatibility. However only a few microbial EPSs have achieved to be used commercially due to their high production costs. The emerging need to overcome economic hurdles and the increasing significance of microbial EPSs in industrial and medical biotechnology call for the elucidation of the interrelations between metabolic pathways and EPS biosynthesis mechanism in order to control and hence enhance its microbial productivity. Moreover a better understanding of biosynthesis mechanism is a significant issue for improvement of product quality and properties and also for the design of novel strains. Therefore a systems-based approach constitutes an important step towards understanding the interplay between metabolism and EPS biosynthesis and further enhances its metabolic performance for industrial application. In this review, primarily the microbial EPSs, their biosynthesis mechanism and important factors for their production will be discussed. After this brief introduction, recent literature on the application of omics technologies and systems biology tools for the improvement of production yields will be critically evaluated. Special focus will be given to EPSs with high market value such as xanthan, levan, pullulan and dextran.

  6. Biological production of ethanol from coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    Due to the abundant supply of coal in the United States, significant research efforts have occurred over the past 15 years concerning the conversion of coal to liquid fuels. Researchers at the University of Arkansas have concentrated on a biological approach to coal liquefaction, starting with coal-derived synthesis gas as the raw material. Synthesis gas, a mixture of CO, H[sub 2], CO[sub 2], CH[sub 4] and sulfur gases, is first produced using traditional gasification techniques. The CO, CO[sub 2] and H[sub 2] are then converted to ethanol using a bacterial culture of Clostridium 1jungdahlii. Ethanol is the desired product if the resultant product stream is to be used as a liquid fuel. However, under normal operating conditions, the wild strain'' produces acetate in favor of ethanol in conjunction with growth in a 20:1 molar ratio. Research was performed to determine the conditions necessary to maximize not only the ratio of ethanol to acetate, but also to maximize the concentration of ethanol resulting in the product stream.

  7. Drug diffusion and biological responses of arteries using a drug-eluting stent with nonuniform coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saito N

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Noboru Saito, Yuhei Mori, Sayaka Uchiyama Terumo Corporation R&D Center, Inokuchi, Nakai-machi, Ashigarakami-gun, Kanagawa, Japan Abstract: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a nonuniform coating, abluminal-gradient coating (AGC, which leaves the abluminal surface of the curves and links parts of the stent free from the drug coating, on the diffusion direction of the drug and the biological responses of the artery to drug-eluting stent (DES by comparing the AGC-sirolimus stent and the conventional full-surface coating (CFC sirolimus stent. The study aimed to verify whether the AGC approach was appropriate for the development of a safer DES, minimizing the risks of stent thrombosis due to delayed endothelialization by the drug and distal embolization due to cracking of the coating layer on the hinge parts of the DES on stent expansion. In the in vitro local drug diffusion study, we used rhodamine B as a model drug, and rhodamine B released from the AGC stent diffused predominantly into the abluminal side of the alginate artery model. Conversely, rhodamine B released from the CFC stent quickly spread to the luminal side of the artery model, where endothelial cell regeneration is required. In the biological responses study, the luminal surface of the iliac artery implanted with the AGC-sirolimus stent in a rabbit iliac artery for 2 weeks was completely covered with endothelial-like cells. On the other hand, the luminal surface of the iliac artery implanted with the CFC-sirolimus stent for 2 weeks only showed partial coverage with endothelial-like cells. While thrombosis was observed in two of the three CFC-sirolimus stents, it was observed in only one of the three AGC-sirolimus stents. Taken together, these findings indicate that the designed nonuniform coating (AGC is an appropriate approach to ensure a safer DES. However, the number of studies is limited and a larger study should be conducted to reach a statistically

  8. Natural Products as Leads in Schistosome Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno J. Neves

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a neglected parasitic tropical disease that claims around 200,000 human lives every year. Praziquantel (PZQ, the only drug recommended by the World Health Organization for the treatment and control of human schistosomiasis, is now facing the threat of drug resistance, indicating the urgent need for new effective compounds to treat this disease. Therefore, globally, there is renewed interest in natural products (NPs as a starting point for drug discovery and development for schistosomiasis. Recent advances in genomics, proteomics, bioinformatics, and cheminformatics have brought about unprecedented opportunities for the rapid and more cost-effective discovery of new bioactive compounds against neglected tropical diseases. This review highlights the main contributions that NP drug discovery and development have made in the treatment of schistosomiasis and it discusses how integration with virtual screening (VS strategies may contribute to accelerating the development of new schistosomidal leads, especially through the identification of unexplored, biologically active chemical scaffolds and structural optimization of NPs with previously established activity.

  9. 9 CFR 103.1 - Preparation of experimental biological products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Preparation of experimental biological..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS EXPERIMENTAL PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION, AND EVALUATION OF BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS PRIOR TO LICENSING § 103.1 Preparation...

  10. 9 CFR 103.3 - Shipment of experimental biological products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shipment of experimental biological..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS EXPERIMENTAL PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION, AND EVALUATION OF BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS PRIOR TO LICENSING § 103.3 Shipment...

  11. Structure-based synthesis from natural products to drug prototypes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-Ray crystallographic data available from complexes of natural and synthetic molecules with the enzyme thrombin has aided to the design and synthesis of truncated and hybrid molecules exhibiting excellent inhibition in vitro. The vital importance of natural products for the well-being of man has been known lor millennia. Their therapeutic benefits to alleviate pain or cure diseases continue to rank natural products among the primary sources of potential drugs. Great advances have been made in the methods of isolation, identification, and structure elucidation of some of the most complex natural products in recent years. The advent of molecular biology and genetic mapping has also aided in our understanding of the intriguing biosynthetic pathways leading to various classes of therapeutically relevant antibiotic, anticancer, and related natural products. Elegant and practical methodology has been developed leading to the total synthesis of virtually every class of medicinally important natural product. In some cases, natural products or their chemically modified congeners have been manufactured by total synthesis on an industrial level which is a testament to the ingenuity of process chemists. In spite of their potent activities HI enzymatic ox receptor-mediated assays, not all natural products are amenable to being developed as marketable drags. In many instances unfavorable pharmacological effects cannot be overcome without drastic structural and functional modifications, which may also result in altered efficacy. Structure modification through truncation, functional group variations, isosteric replacements, and skeletal rigidifications aided by molecular modeling, X ray crystallography of protein targets, or NMR data are valid objectives in the context of small molecule drug discovery starting with bioactive natural products. A large proportion of these pertain to chemotherapeutic agents against cancer

  12. Derivatization reactions in the gas—liquid chromatographic analysis of drugs in biological fluids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulshoff, A.; Lingeman, H.

    1984-01-01

    Alkylation, acylation, silylation and other derivatization reactions applied to the gas chromatographic analysis of drugs in biological matrices are reviewed. Reaction conditions are discussed in relation to reaction mechanisms. Detector-oriented labelling of drugs, and derivatization with chiral re

  13. 21 CFR 352.52 - Labeling of sunscreen drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling of sunscreen drug products. 352.52 Section 352.52 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... § 352.10. “ reapply as needed or after towel drying, swimming, or” (select one of the...

  14. 21 CFR 346.50 - Labeling of anorectal drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... not use this product if you have heart disease, high blood pressure, thyroid disease, diabetes, or... doctor or pharmacist before use if you are 1 presently taking a prescription drug for high blood pressure... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling of anorectal drug products....

  15. 78 FR 38053 - Determination That OPANA ER (Oxymorphone Hydrochloride) Drug Products Covered by New Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-25

    ... Products Covered by New Drug Application 21-610 Were Not Withdrawn From Sale for Reasons of Safety or... products approved under new drug application (NDA) 21-610 were not withdrawn from sale for reasons of... drug was withdrawn from sale for reasons of safety or effectiveness (21 U.S.C. 355(j)(7)(C); 21 CFR...

  16. Biological treatment of shrimp production wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boopathy, Raj

    2009-07-01

    Over the last few decades, there has been an increase in consumer demand for shrimp, which has resulted in its worldwide aquaculture production. In the United States, the stringent enforcement of environmental regulations encourages shrimp farmers to develop new technologies, such as recirculating raceway systems. This is a zero-water exchange system capable of producing high-density shrimp yields. The system also produces wastewater characterized by high levels of ammonia, nitrate, nitrite, and organic carbon, which make waste management costs prohibitive. Shrimp farmers have a great need for a waste management method that is effective and economical. One such method is the sequencing batch reactor (SBR). A SBR is a variation of the activated sludge biological treatment process. This process uses multiple steps in the same reactor to take the place of multiple reactors in a conventional treatment system. The SBR accomplishes equalization, aeration, and clarification in a timed sequence in a single reactor system. This is achieved through reactor operation in sequences, which includes fill, react, settle, decant, and idle. A laboratory scale SBR was successfully operated using shrimp aquaculture wastewater. The wastewater contained high concentrations of carbon and nitrogen. By operating the reactors sequentially, namely, aerobic and anoxic modes, nitrification and denitrification were achieved as well as removal of carbon. Ammonia in the waste was nitrified within 4 days. The denitrification of nitrate was achieved by the anoxic process, and 100% removal of nitrate was observed within 15 days of reactor operation. PMID:19396482

  17. United States Food and Drug Administration Product Label Changes

    OpenAIRE

    Kircik, Leon; Sung, Julie C.; Stein-Gold, Linda; Goldenberg, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Once a drug has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration and is on the market, the Food and Drug Administration communicates new safety information through product label changes. Most of these label changes occur after a spontaneous report to either the drug manufacturing companies or the Food and Drug Administration MedWatch program. As a result, 400 to 500 label changes occur every year. Actinic keratosis treatments exemplify the commonality of label changes throughou...

  18. 21 CFR 1310.11 - Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 1310.11 Section 1310.11 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT... Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. (a)...

  19. Marinopyrroles: Unique Drug Discoveries Based on Marine Natural Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rongshi

    2016-01-01

    Natural products provide a successful supply of new chemical entities (NCEs) for drug discovery to treat human diseases. Approximately half of the NCEs are based on natural products and their derivatives. Notably, marine natural products, a largely untapped resource, have contributed to drug discovery and development with eight drugs or cosmeceuticals approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency, and ten candidates undergoing clinical trials. Collaborative efforts from drug developers, biologists, organic, medicinal, and natural product chemists have elevated drug discoveries to new levels. These efforts are expected to continue to improve the efficiency of natural product-based drugs. Marinopyrroles are examined here as a case study for potential anticancer and antibiotic agents. PMID:26332654

  20. Biological hydrogen production using a membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sang-Eun; Iyer, Prabha; Bruns, Mary Ann; Logan, Bruce E

    2004-07-01

    A cross-flow membrane was coupled to a chemostat to create an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (MBR) for biological hydrogen production. The reactor was fed glucose (10,000 mg/L) and inoculated with a soil inoculum heat-treated to kill non-spore-forming methanogens. Hydrogen gas was consistently produced at a concentration of 57-60% in the headspace under all conditions. When operated in chemostat mode (no flow through the membrane) at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 3.3 h, 90% of the glucose was removed, producing 2200 mg/L of cells and 500 mL/h of biogas. When operated in MBR mode, the solids retention time (SRT) was increased to SRT = 12 h producing a solids concentration in the reactor of 5800 mg/L. This SRT increased the overall glucose utilization (98%), the biogas production rate (640 mL/h), and the conversion efficiency of glucose-to-hydrogen from 22% (no MBR) to 25% (based on a maximum of 4 mol-H(2)/mol-glucose). When the SRT was increased from 5 h to 48 h, glucose utilization (99%) and biomass concentrations (8,800 +/- 600 mg/L) both increased. However, the biogas production decreased (310 +/- 40 mL/h) and the glucose-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency decreased from 37 +/- 4% to 18 +/- 3%. Sustained permeate flows through the membrane were in the range of 57 to 60 L/m(2) h for three different membrane pore sizes (0.3, 0.5, and 0.8 microm). Most (93.7% to 99.3%) of the membrane resistance was due to internal fouling and the reversible cake resistance, and not the membrane itself. Regular backpulsing was essential for maintaining permeate flux through the membrane. Analysis of DNA sequences using ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis indicated bacteria were most closely related to members of Clostridiaceae and Flexibacteraceae, including Clostridium acidisoli CAC237756 (97%), Linmingia china AF481148 (97%), and Cytophaga sp. MDA2507 AF238333 (99%). No PCR amplification of 16s rRNA genes was obtained when archaea-specific primers were used.

  1. 21 CFR 341.74 - Labeling of antitussive drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... coughing.” (vii) For products containing chlophedianol hydrochloride, dextromethorphan, dextromethorphan... (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE COLD, COUGH, ALLERGY, BRONCHODILATOR, AND ANTIASTHMATIC DRUG PRODUCTS FOR... product as a “cough suppressant” or an “antitussive (cough suppressant).” (b) Indications. The labeling...

  2. A Two-Layer Mathematical Modelling of Drug Delivery to Biological Tissues

    CERN Document Server

    Chakravarty, Koyel

    2016-01-01

    Local drug delivery has received much recognition in recent years, yet it is still unpredictable how drug efficacy depends on physicochemical properties and delivery kinetics. The purpose of the current study is to provide a useful mathematical model for drug release from a drug delivery device and consecutive drug transport in biological tissue, thereby aiding the development of new therapeutic drug by a systemic approach. In order to study the complete process, a two-layer spatio-temporal model depicting drug transport between the coupled media is presented. Drug release is described by considering solubilisation dynamics of drug particle, diffusion of the solubilised drug through porous matrix and also some other processes like reversible dissociation / recrystallization, drug particle-receptor binding and internalization phenomena. The model has led to a system of partial differential equations describing the important properties of drug kinetics. This model contributes towards the perception of the roles...

  3. Biological control and sustainable food production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bale, J.S.; Lenteren, van J.C.; Bigler, F.

    2008-01-01

    The use of biological control for the management of pest insects pre-dates the modern pesticide era. The first major successes in biological control occurred with exotic pests controlled by natural enemy species collected from the country or area of origin of the pest (classical control). Augmentati

  4. Implementation of mechanism of action biology-driven early drug development for children with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Andrew D J; Herold, Ralf; Rousseau, Raphaël; Copland, Chris; Bradley-Garelik, Brigid; Binner, Debbie; Capdeville, Renaud; Caron, Hubert; Carleer, Jacqueline; Chesler, Louis; Geoerger, Birgit; Kearns, Pamela; Marshall, Lynley V; Pfister, Stefan M; Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Skolnik, Jeffrey; Spadoni, Cesare; Sterba, Jaroslav; van den Berg, Hendrick; Uttenreuther-Fischer, Martina; Witt, Olaf; Norga, Koen; Vassal, Gilles

    2016-07-01

    An urgent need remains for new paediatric oncology drugs to cure children who die from cancer and to reduce drug-related sequelae in survivors. In 2007, the European Paediatric Regulation came into law requiring industry to create paediatric drug (all types of medicinal products) development programmes alongside those for adults. Unfortunately, paediatric drug development is still largely centred on adult conditions and not a mechanism of action (MoA)-based model, even though this would be more logical for childhood tumours as these have much fewer non-synonymous coding mutations than adult malignancies. Recent large-scale sequencing by International Genome Consortium and Paediatric Cancer Genome Project has further shown that the genetic and epigenetic repertoire of driver mutations in specific childhood malignancies differs from more common adult-type malignancies. To bring about much needed change, a Paediatric Platform, ACCELERATE, was proposed in 2013 by the Cancer Drug Development Forum, Innovative Therapies for Children with Cancer, the European Network for Cancer Research in Children and Adolescents and the European Society for Paediatric Oncology. The Platform, comprising multiple stakeholders in paediatric oncology, has three working groups, one with responsibility for promoting and developing high-quality MoA-informed paediatric drug development programmes, including specific measures for adolescents. Key is the establishment of a freely accessible aggregated database of paediatric biological tumour drug targets to be aligned with an aggregated pipeline of drugs. This will enable prioritisation and conduct of early phase clinical paediatric trials to evaluate these drugs against promising therapeutic targets and to generate clinical paediatric efficacy and safety data in an accelerated time frame. Through this work, the Platform seeks to ensure that potentially effective drugs, where the MoA is known and thought to be relevant to paediatric

  5. Effectiveness and drug adherence of biologic monotherapy in routine care of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Tanja Schjodt; Kristensen, Lars Erik; Christensen, Robin;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To estimate the prevalence of Danish RA patients currently on biologic monotherapy and compare the effectiveness and drug adherence of biologic therapies applied as monotherapy. METHODS: All RA patients registered in the Danish biologics database (DANBIO) as receiving biologic DMARD (b...... for prevalence, effectiveness and drug adherence of bDMARD monotherapy were calculated. RESULTS: Of the 775 patients on bDMARD monotherapy, adalimumab (21.3%), etanercept (36.6%) and tocilizumab (15.3%) were the most prevalent biologic agents administered. At the 6-month follow-up, the overall crude clinical...... disease activity index remission rate in patients still on a biologic drug was 22%, the 28-joint DAS remission rate was 41% and the response rate of those with a 50% improvement in ACR criteria was 28%. At the 6-month follow-up, the drug adherence rates were similar for the different b...

  6. Effects on bone metabolism of new therapeutic strategies with standard chemotherapy and biologic drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Ciolli, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    Recent biological advances have provided the framework for novel therapeutic strategies in oncology. Many new treatments are now based on standard cytotoxic drugs plus biologic agents. In Multiple Myeloma, a plasma cell neoplasm characterized by a severe bone disease, biologic drugs such as proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory agents, above their antineoplastic efficacy have a beneficial effects on bone disease. Bortezomib, a clinically available proteasome inhibitor active against myel...

  7. Advanced Drug Delivery Systems - a Synthetic and Biological Applied Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Lise Nørkjær

    Specific delivery of drugs to diseased sites in the body is a major topic in the development of drug delivery system today. Especially, the field of cancer treatment needs improved drug delivery systems as the strong dose-limiting side effects of chemotherapy today often present a barrier....... The results were encouraging and proved the large potential of radiolabeled liposomes as candidates for revealing the biodistribution of drug delivery systems. Chapter four deals with one of the large dilemmas, when using liposomes as drug delivery agents. The presence of a shielding polymer layer...... for an effective cure. Liposomes have attracted much attention since they were first proposed as potential drug carrier agents in the 1970s. Chapter one gives an introduction to the strategies used in liposomal drug delivery today. The important issues as enhanced specific uptake in diseased tissue and effective...

  8. Stabilization of Protein-Protein Interactions in chemical biology and drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bier, David; Thiel, Philipp; Briels, Jeroen; Ottmann, Christian

    2015-10-01

    More than 300,000 Protein-Protein Interactions (PPIs) can be found in human cells. This number is significantly larger than the number of single proteins, which are the classical targets for pharmacological intervention. Hence, specific and potent modulation of PPIs by small, drug-like molecules would tremendously enlarge the "druggable genome" enabling novel ways of drug discovery for essentially every human disease. This strategy is especially promising in diseases with difficult targets like intrinsically disordered proteins or transcription factors, for example neurodegeneration or metabolic diseases. Whereas the potential of PPI modulation has been recognized in terms of the development of inhibitors that disrupt or prevent a binary protein complex, the opposite (or complementary) strategy to stabilize PPIs has not yet been realized in a systematic manner. This fact is rather surprising given the number of impressive natural product examples that confer their activity by stabilizing specific PPIs. In addition, in recent years more and more examples of synthetic molecules are being published that work as PPI stabilizers, despite the fact that in the majority they initially have not been designed as such. Here, we describe examples from both the natural products as well as the synthetic molecules advocating for a stronger consideration of the PPI stabilization approach in chemical biology and drug discovery. PMID:26093250

  9. 9 CFR 115.2 - Inspections of biological products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inspections of biological products. 115.2 Section 115.2 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS...

  10. Protein Complex Production from the Drug Discovery Standpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moarefi, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Small molecule drug discovery critically depends on the availability of meaningful in vitro assays to guide medicinal chemistry programs that are aimed at optimizing drug potency and selectivity. As it becomes increasingly evident, most disease relevant drug targets do not act as a single protein. In the body, they are instead generally found in complex with protein cofactors that are highly relevant for their correct function and regulation. This review highlights selected examples of the increasing trend to use biologically relevant protein complexes for rational drug discovery to reduce costly late phase attritions due to lack of efficacy or toxicity.

  11. Synthetic Biology in the FDA Realm: Toward Productive Oversight Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatehi, Leili; Hall, Ralph F

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology (SB) is expected to create tremendous opportunities in a wide range of areas, including in foods, therapeutics, and diagnostics subject to regulatory oversight by the United States Food and Drug Administration. At the same time, there is substantial basis for concern about the uncertainties of accurately assessing the human health and environmental risks of such SB products. As such, SB is the latest in a string of emerging technologies that is the subject of calls for new approaches to regulation and oversight that involve "thinking ahead" to anticipate governance challenges upstream of technological development and adopting oversight mechanisms that are both adaptive to new information about risks and reflexive to performance data and feedback on policy outcomes over time. These new approaches constitute a marked departure from the status quo, and their development and implementation will require considerable time, resources, and reallocation of responsibilities. Furthermore, in order to develop an appropriate oversight response, adaptive or otherwise, there is first a need to identify the specific types and natures of applications, uncertainties, and regulatory issues that are likely to pose oversight challenges. This article presents our vision for a Productive Oversight Assessment (POA) approach in which the abilities and deficits of an oversight system are evaluated with the aim of enabling productive decisions (i.e., timely, feasible, effective for achieving desired policy outcomes) about oversight while also building capacity to facilitate broader governance efforts. The value ofPOA is two-fold. First, it will advance the development of a generalizable approach for making productive planning and decision-making about the oversight of any given new technology that presents challenges and uncertainties for any given oversight system whose policy goals are implicated by that technology. Second, this effort can enhance the very processes

  12. Approved Animal Drug Products (Green Book)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — On November 16, 1988, the President of the United States signed into law the Generic Animal Drug and Patent Restoration Act (GADPTRA). Among its major provisions,...

  13. Cholesterol oxidation products and their biological importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulig, Waldemar; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Rog, Tomasz; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2016-09-01

    The main biological cause of oxysterols is the oxidation of cholesterol. They differ from cholesterol by the presence of additional polar groups that are typically hydroxyl, keto, hydroperoxy, epoxy, or carboxyl moieties. Under typical conditions, oxysterol concentration is maintained at a very low and precisely regulated level, with an excess of cholesterol. Like cholesterol, many oxysterols are hydrophobic and hence confined to cell membranes. However, small chemical differences between the sterols can significantly affect how they interact with other membrane components, and this in turn can have a substantial effect on membrane properties. In this spirit, this review describes the biological importance and the roles of oxysterols in the human body. We focus primarily on the effect of oxysterols on lipid membranes, but we also consider other issues such as enzymatic and nonenzymatic synthesis processes of oxysterols as well as pathological conditions induced by oxysterols. PMID:26956952

  14. COTTAGE CHEESE PRODUCTS ENRICHED BIOLOGICALLY ACTIVE ADDITIVES

    OpenAIRE

    Салкинбаева Г. Т.; Байбалинова Г. М.; Смаилова М. Н.

    2015-01-01

    This article deals with a reliable means of improving the structure of supply and optimum balance of the diet of the population, is the use of biologically active additives in a daily diet of the people to food dietary supplements. Supplements such advantages as an expression of food oriented, high nutritional density, homogeneity, easy preparation and forms of transport, good taste allow us to use them successfully in catering.

  15. BIOLOGICALLY ACTIVE SUBSTANCES OF SPIRIT PRODUCTION WASTE

    OpenAIRE

    A. S. Kayshev; N. S. Kaysheva

    2014-01-01

    A content of biologically active compounds (BAC) with signified pharmacological activity in distillers grains was proved. It is prospective for applications of these grains as a raw material resource of pharmaceuticals. A composition of BAC distillers grains received from wheat, corn, barley, millet at different spirit enterprises which use hydro fermentative grain processing. Considering polydispersity of distillers grains they were separated on solid and liquid phases preliminary. Physical ...

  16. Production and consumption of biological particles in temperate tidal estuaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heip, C.H.R.; Goosen, N.K.; Herman, P.M.J.; Kromkamp, J.C.; Middelburg, J.J.; Soetaert, K.E.R.

    1995-01-01

    The question is reviewed whether a balance exists between production and consumption of biological particles in temperate tidal estuaries and what the relationships are between the magnitude of production and consumption processes and system carbon metabolism. The production terms considered are pri

  17. Translational research in ovarian carcinoma : cell biological aspects of drug resistance and tumor aggressiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, Ate Gerard Jan van der

    1994-01-01

    In this thesis diverse cell biological features that in cultured (ovarian) tumor cells have been linked to drug resistance and/or tumor aggressiveness are studied in tumor specimens of epithelial ovarian carcinomas.

  18. Biological hydrogen production from industrial wastewaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peixoto, Guilherme; Pantoja Filho, Jorge Luis Rodrigues; Zaiat, Marcelo [Universidade de Sao Paulo (EESC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). School of Engineering. Dept. Hydraulics and Sanitation], Email: peixoto@sc.usp.br

    2010-07-01

    This research evaluates the potential for producing hydrogen in anaerobic reactors using industrial wastewaters (glycerol from bio diesel production, wastewater from the parboilization of rice, and vinasse from ethanol production). In a complementary experiment the soluble products formed during hydrogen production were evaluated for methane generation. The assays were performed in batch reactors with 2 liters volume, and sucrose was used as a control substrate. The acidogenic inoculum was taken from a packed-bed reactor used to produce hydrogen from a sucrose-based synthetic substrate. The methanogenic inoculum was taken from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor treating poultry slaughterhouse wastewater. Hydrogen was produced from rice parboilization wastewater (24.27 ml H{sub 2} g{sup -1} COD) vinasse (22.75 ml H{sub 2} g{sup -1} COD) and sucrose (25.60 ml H{sub 2} g{sup -1} COD), while glycerol only showed potential for methane generation. (author)

  19. Intralesional Use of Chemotherapeutic and Biological Drugs in Dermatology

    OpenAIRE

    Ercan Çalışkan; İbrahim Özmen; Gürol Açikgöz; Mustafa Tunca

    2014-01-01

    Intralesional injection applications being used more frequently in the practice of dermatology were primarily developed in order to avoid systemic side effects of steroids. Intralesional applications enable the potent drugs to achieve local effect with regionally high concentrations but without systemic toxicities. Commonly known, chemotherapeutic agents have the potential for many side effects and cytotoxicities with systemic use. Intralesional use of chemotherapeutic drugs is becoming wides...

  20. Evaluating the administration costs of biologic drugs: development of a cost algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Tetteh, E. K.; Morris, S

    2014-01-01

    Biologic drugs, as with all other medical technologies, are subject to a number of regulatory, marketing, reimbursement (financing) and other demand-restricting hurdles applied by healthcare payers. One example is the routine use of cost-effectiveness analyses or health technology assessments to determine which medical technologies offer value-for-money. The manner in which these assessments are conducted suggests that, holding all else equal, the economic value of biologic drugs may be deter...

  1. Diversity-Oriented Synthetic Strategies Applied to Cancer Chemical Biology and Drug Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Ian Collins; Jones, Alan M.

    2014-01-01

    How can diversity-oriented strategies for chemical synthesis provide chemical tools to help shape our understanding of complex cancer pathways and progress anti-cancer drug discovery efforts? This review (surveying the literature from 2003 to the present) considers the applications of diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS), biology-oriented synthesis (BIOS) and associated strategies to cancer biology and drug discovery, summarising the syntheses of novel and often highly complex scaffolds from p...

  2. Recent Developments in Biological Hydrogen Production Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DEBABRATA DAS

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Biohydrogen production technology can utilize renewable energy sources like biomass for the generation of hydrogen, the cleanest form of energy for the use of mankind. However, major constraints to the commercialization of these processes include lower hydrogen yields and rates of hydrogen production. To overcome these bottlenecks intensive research work has already been carried out on the advancement of these processes such as the development of genetically modified microorganisms, the improvement of the bioreactor design, molecular engineering of the key enzyme hydrogenases, the development of two stage processes, etc. The present paper explores the recent advancements that have been made till date and also presents the state of the art in molecular strategies to improve the hydrogen production.

  3. United States Food and Drug Administration Product Label Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kircik, Leon; Sung, Julie C; Stein-Gold, Linda; Goldenberg, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Once a drug has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration and is on the market, the Food and Drug Administration communicates new safety information through product label changes. Most of these label changes occur after a spontaneous report to either the drug manufacturing companies or the Food and Drug Administration MedWatch program. As a result, 400 to 500 label changes occur every year. Actinic keratosis treatments exemplify the commonality of label changes throughout the postmarket course of a drug. Diclofenac gel, 5-fluorouracil cream, imiquimod, and ingenol mebutate are examples of actinic keratosis treatments that have all undergone at least one label revision. With the current system of spontaneous reports leading to numerous label changes, each occurrence does not necessarily signify a radical change in the safety of a drug. PMID:26962391

  4. Electricity-mediated biological hydrogen production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geelhoed, J.S.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria have the ability to produce electricity from the oxidation of organic substrates. They also may use electricity to support chemical reactions that are energetically unfavorable. In the fermentation of sugars, hydrogen can be formed as one of the main products. However, a yield of

  5. Predicting Drug Use at Electronic Music Dance Events: Self-Reports and Biological Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mark B.; Voas, Robert A.; Miller, Brenda A.; Holder, Harold D.

    2009-01-01

    Most information on the prevalence of drug use comes from self-report surveys. The sensitivity of such information is cause for concern about the accuracy of self-report measures. In this study, self-reported drug use in the last 48 hr is compared to results from biological assays of saliva samples from 371 young adults entering clubs. The…

  6. Network-based drug discovery by integrating systems biology and computational technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Elaine L; Cao, Zhi-Wei; Jiang, Zhi-Hong; Zhou, Hua; Liu, Liang

    2013-07-01

    Network-based intervention has been a trend of curing systemic diseases, but it relies on regimen optimization and valid multi-target actions of the drugs. The complex multi-component nature of medicinal herbs may serve as valuable resources for network-based multi-target drug discovery due to its potential treatment effects by synergy. Recently, robustness of multiple systems biology platforms shows powerful to uncover molecular mechanisms and connections between the drugs and their targeting dynamic network. However, optimization methods of drug combination are insufficient, owning to lacking of tighter integration across multiple '-omics' databases. The newly developed algorithm- or network-based computational models can tightly integrate '-omics' databases and optimize combinational regimens of drug development, which encourage using medicinal herbs to develop into new wave of network-based multi-target drugs. However, challenges on further integration across the databases of medicinal herbs with multiple system biology platforms for multi-target drug optimization remain to the uncertain reliability of individual data sets, width and depth and degree of standardization of herbal medicine. Standardization of the methodology and terminology of multiple system biology and herbal database would facilitate the integration. Enhance public accessible databases and the number of research using system biology platform on herbal medicine would be helpful. Further integration across various '-omics' platforms and computational tools would accelerate development of network-based drug discovery and network medicine.

  7. Extending the "web of drug identity" with knowledge extracted from United States product labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh, Oktie; Zhu, Qian; Freimuth, Robert; Boyce, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Structured Product Labels (SPLs) contain information about drugs that can be valuable to clinical and translational research, especially if it can be linked to other sources that provide data about drug targets, chemical properties, interactions, and biological pathways. Unfortunately, SPLs currently provide coarsely-structured drug information and lack the detailed annotation that is required to support computational use cases. To help address this issue we created LinkedSPLs, a Linked Data resource that extends the "web of drug identity" using information extracted from SPLs. In this paper we describe the mapping that LinkedSPLs provides between SPL active ingredients and DrugBank chemical entities. These mappings were created using three approaches: InChI chemical structure descriptors comparison, exact string matching based on the chemical name, and automatic (unsupervised) linkage identification. Comparison of the approaches found that, while these three approaches are complementary, the automatic approach performs well in terms of precision and recall. PMID:24303301

  8. Biological evaluation of layered double hydroxides as efficient drug vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Yan; Liu Dan; Chang Qing; Liu Dandan; Xia Ying; Liu Shuwen; Peng Nanfang; Yang Xu [Hubei Key Laboratory of Genetic Regulation and Integrative Biology, College of Life Science, Huazhong Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Ai Hanhua [College of Physical Science and Technology, Huazhong Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Xi Zhuge, E-mail: yangxu@mail.ccnu.edu.cn [Tianjin Institutes of Health and Environmental Medicine, Tianjin 300050 (China)

    2010-03-12

    Recently there has been a rapid expansion of the development of bioinorganic hybrid systems for safe drug delivery. Layered double hydroxides (LDH), a variety of available inorganic matrix, possess great promise for this purpose. In this study, an oxidative stress biomarker system, including measurement of reactive oxygen species, glutathione content, endogenous nitric oxide, carbonyl content in proteins, DNA strand breaks and DNA-protein crosslinks, was designed to evaluate the biocompatibility of different concentrations of nano-Zn/Al-LDH with a Hela cell line. The drug delivery activity of the LDH-folic-acid complex was also assessed. The resulting data clearly demonstrated that nano-LDH could be applied as a relatively safe drug vehicle with good delivery activity, but with the caveat that the effects of high dosages observed here should not be ignored when attempting to maximize therapeutic activity by increasing LDH concentration.

  9. Aromatase inhibitors and antiepileptic drugs: a computational systems biology analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustata Gabriela

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study compares antiepileptic drugs and aromatase (CYP19 inhibitors for chemical and structural similarity. Human aromatase is well known as an important pharmacological target in anti-breast cancer therapy, but recent research demonstrates its role in epileptic seizures, as well. The current antiepileptic treatment methods cause severe side effects that endanger patient health and often preclude continued use. As a result, less toxic and more tolerable antiepileptic drugs (AEDs are needed, especially since every individual responds differently to given treatment options. Methods Through a pharmacophore search, this study shows that a model previously designed to search for new classes of aromatase inhibitors is able to identify antiepileptic drugs from the set of drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Chemical and structural similarity analyses were performed using five potent AIs, and these studies returned a set of AEDs that the model identifies as hits. Results The pharmacophore model returned 73% (19 out of 26 of the drugs used specifically to treat epilepsy and approximately 82% (51 out of 62 of the compounds with anticonvulsant properties. Therefore, this study supports the possibility of identifying AEDs with a pharmacophore model that had originally been designed to identify new classes of aromatase inhibitors. Potential candidates for anticonvulsant therapy identified in this manner are also reported. Additionally, the chemical and structural similarity between antiepileptic compounds and aromatase inhibitors is proved using similarity analyses. Conclusions This study demonstrates that a pharmacophore search using a model based on aromatase inhibition and the enzyme's structural features can be used to screen for new candidates for antiepileptic therapy. In fact, potent aromatase inhibitors and current antiepileptic compounds display significant - over 70% - chemical and structural similarity

  10. The pharmaceutical biochemistry group: where pharmaceutical chemistry meets biology and drug delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Kalia, Yogeshvar; Perozzo, Remo; Scapozza, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    Successful drug discovery and development of new therapeutics is a long, expensive multidisciplinary process needing innovation and the integration of smart cutting edge science and technology to overcome the challenges in taking a drug from the bench to the bedside. The research activities of the Pharmaceutical Biochemistry group span the drug discovery and development process, providing an interface that brings together pharmaceutical chemistry, biochemistry, structural biology, computation...

  11. Biological production of liquid fuels from biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-01-01

    A scheme for the production of liquid fuels from renewable resources such as poplar wood and lignocellulosic wastes from a refuse hydropulper was investigated. The particular scheme being studied involves the conversion of a cellulosic residue, resulting from a solvent delignified lignocellulosic feed, into either high concentration sugar syrups or into ethyl and/or butyl alcohol. The construction of a pilot apparatus for solvent delignifying 150 g samples of lignocellulosic feeds was completed. Also, an analysis method for characterizing the delignified product has been selected and tested. This is a method recommended in the Forage Fiber Handbook. Delignified samples are now being prepared and tested for their extent of delignification and susceptibility to enzyme hydrolysis. Work is continuing on characterizing the cellulase and cellobiase enzyme systems derived from the YX strain of Thermomonospora.

  12. Progressive anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome associated with change of drug product

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabroe, T.P.; Sabers, A.

    2008-01-01

    This report describes the laboratory and physical manifestations of lamotrigine-like toxicity in a young man with refractory epilepsy receiving lamotrigine presenting as anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome (AHS) associated with an abrupt change of drug product Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6...

  13. Synthetic biology and microbioreactor platforms for programmable production of biologics at the point-of-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Han, Ningren; Cleto, Sara; Cao, Jicong; Purcell, Oliver; Shah, Kartik A.; Lee, Kevin; Ram, Rajeev; Lu, Timothy K.

    2016-01-01

    Current biopharmaceutical manufacturing systems are not compatible with portable or distributed production of biologics, as they typically require the development of single biologic-producing cell lines followed by their cultivation at very large scales. Therefore, it remains challenging to treat patients in short time frames, especially in remote locations with limited infrastructure. To overcome these barriers, we developed a platform using genetically engineered Pichia pastoris strains designed to secrete multiple proteins on programmable cues in an integrated, benchtop, millilitre-scale microfluidic device. We use this platform for rapid and switchable production of two biologics from a single yeast strain as specified by the operator. Our results demonstrate selectable and near-single-dose production of these biologics in system with analytical, purification and polishing technologies could lead to a small-scale, portable and fully integrated personal biomanufacturing platform that could advance disease treatment at point-of-care. PMID:27470089

  14. Interfacing materials science and biology for drug carrier design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Such, Georgina K; Yan, Yan; Johnston, Angus P R; Gunawan, Sylvia T; Caruso, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Over the last ten years, there has been considerable research interest in the development of polymeric carriers for biomedicine. Such delivery systems have the potential to significantly reduce side effects and increase the bioavailability of poorly soluble therapeutics. The design of carriers has relied on harnessing specific variations in biological conditions, such as pH or redox potential, and more recently, by incorporating specific peptide cleavage sites for enzymatic hydrolysis. Although much progress has been made in this field, the specificity of polymeric carriers is still limited when compared with their biological counterparts. To synthesize the next generation of carriers, it is important to consider the biological rationale for materials design. This requires a detailed understanding of the cellular microenvironments and how these can be harnessed for specific applications. In this review, several important physiological cues in the cellular microenvironments are outlined, with a focus on changes in pH, redox potential, and the types of enzymes present in specific regions. Furthermore, recent studies that use such biologically inspired triggers to design polymeric carriers are highlighted, focusing on applications in the field of therapeutic delivery.

  15. BIOLOGICALLY ACTIVE SUBSTANCES OF SPIRIT PRODUCTION WASTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Kayshev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A content of biologically active compounds (BAC with signified pharmacological activity in distillers grains was proved. It is prospective for applications of these grains as a raw material resource of pharmaceuticals. A composition of BAC distillers grains received from wheat, corn, barley, millet at different spirit enterprises which use hydro fermentative grain processing. Considering polydispersity of distillers grains they were separated on solid and liquid phases preliminary. Physical and chemical characteristics of distillers grains' liquid base were identified. Elementary composition of distillers grains is signified by active accumulation of biogenic elements (phosphorus, potassium, magnesium, calcium, sodium, iron and low content of heavy metals. The solid phase of distillers grains accumulates carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen in high concentration. The liquid phase of distillers grains contains: proteins and amino acids (20-46%, reducing sugars (5,6%-17,5%, galacturonides (0,8-1,4%, ascorbic acid (6,2-11,4 mg%. The solid base of distillers grains contains: galacturonides (3,4-5,3%, fatty oil (8,4-11,1% with predomination of essential fatty acids, proteins and amino acids (2,1-2,5%, flavonoids (0,4-0,9%, tocopherols (3,4-7,7 mg%. A method of complex processing of distillers grains based on application of membrane filtering of liquid phase and liquid extraction by inorganic and organic solvents of solid phase, which allows almost full extraction of the sum of biologically active compounds (BAC from liquid phase (Biobardin BM and solid phase (Biobardin UL. Biobardin BM comprises the following elements: proteins and amino acids (41-69%, reducing sugars (3,5-15,6%, fatty oil (0,2-0,3%, flavonoids (0,2-0,7%, ascorbic acid (17-37 mg%. Biobardin UL includes: oligouronids (16,4-19,5%, proteins and amino acids (11-21%, fatty oil (3,2-4,9% which includes essential acids; flavonoids (0,6-1,5%, tocopherols (6,6-10,2 mg%, carotinoids (0,13-0,21 mg

  16. 21 CFR 216.24 - Drug products withdrawn or removed from the market for reasons of safety or effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... Bromfenac sodium: All drug products containing bromfenac sodium. Butamben: All parenteral drug products containing butamben. Camphorated oil: All drug products containing camphorated oil. Carbetapentane citrate: All oral gel drug products containing carbetapentane citrate. Casein, iodinated: All drug...

  17. Downscaling drug nanosuspension production: processing aspects and physicochemical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eerdenbrugh, Bernard; Stuyven, Bernard; Froyen, Ludo; Van Humbeeck, Jan; Martens, Johan A; Augustijns, Patrick; Van den Mooter, Guy

    2009-01-01

    In this study, scaling down nanosuspension production to 10 mg of drug compound and evaluation of the nanosuspensions to 1 mg of drug compound per test were investigated. Media milling of seven model drug compounds (cinnarizine-indomethacin-itraconazole-loviride-mebendazole-naproxen-phenytoin) was evaluated in a 96-well plate setup (10, 20, and 30 mg) and a glass-vial-based system in a planetary mill (10, 100, and 1,000 mg). Physicochemical properties evaluated on 1 mg of drug compound were drug content (high-performance liquid chromatography), size [dynamic light scattering (DLS)], morphology (scanning electron microscopy), thermal characteristics (differential scanning calorimetry), and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). Scaling down nanosuspension production to 10 mg of drug compound was feasible for the seven model compounds using both designs, the planetary mill design being more robust. Similar results were obtained for both designs upon milling 10 mg of drug compound. Drug content determination was precise and accurate. DLS was the method of choice for size measurements. Morphology evaluation and thermal analysis were feasible, although sample preparation had a big influence on the results. XRPD in capillary mode was successfully performed, both in the suspended state and after freeze-drying in the capillary. Results obtained for the latter were superior. Both the production and the physicochemical evaluation of nanosuspensions can be successfully downscaled, enabling nanosuspension screening applications in preclinical development settings.

  18. 21 CFR 201.24 - Labeling for systemic antibacterial drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling for systemic antibacterial drug products. 201.24 Section 201.24 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... antibacterial drug products. The labeling of all systemic drug products intended for human use indicated...

  19. The potential of plants as a system for the development and production of human biologics

    OpenAIRE

    Qiang Chen; Davis, Keith R.

    2016-01-01

    The growing promise of plant-made biologics is highlighted by the success story of ZMapp™ as a potentially life-saving drug during the Ebola outbreak of 2014-2016. Current plant expression platforms offer features beyond the traditional advantages of low cost, high scalability, increased safety, and eukaryotic protein modification. Novel transient expression vectors have been developed that allow the production of vaccines and therapeutics at unprecedented speed to control potential pandemics...

  20. Genetics of Psoriasis and Pharmacogenetics of Biological Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Rocío Prieto-Pérez; Teresa Cabaleiro; Esteban Daudén; Dolores Ochoa; Manuel Roman; Francisco Abad-Santos

    2013-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the skin. The causes of psoriasis are unknown, although family and twin studies have shown genetic factors to play a key role in its development. The many genes associated with psoriasis and the immune response include TNF α , IL23, and IL12. Advances in knowledge of the pathogenesis of psoriasis have enabled the development of new drugs that target cytokines (e.g., etanercept, adalimumab, and infliximab, which target TNF α , and ustekinumab, whi...

  1. Exosomes as therapeutic drug carriers and delivery vehicles across biological membranes: current perspectives and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Dinh; Yang, Ningning; Nadithe, Venkatareddy

    2016-07-01

    Exosomes are small intracellular membrane-based vesicles with different compositions that are involved in several biological and pathological processes. The exploitation of exosomes as drug delivery vehicles offers important advantages compared to other nanoparticulate drug delivery systems such as liposomes and polymeric nanoparticles; exosomes are non-immunogenic in nature due to similar composition as body׳s own cells. In this article, the origin and structure of exosomes as well as their biological functions are outlined. We will then focus on specific applications of exosomes as drug delivery systems in pharmaceutical drug development. An overview of the advantages and challenges faced when using exosomes as a pharmaceutical drug delivery vehicles will also be discussed. PMID:27471669

  2. Exosomes as therapeutic drug carriers and delivery vehicles across biological membranes: current perspectives and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Dinh; Yang, Ningning; Nadithe, Venkatareddy

    2016-07-01

    Exosomes are small intracellular membrane-based vesicles with different compositions that are involved in several biological and pathological processes. The exploitation of exosomes as drug delivery vehicles offers important advantages compared to other nanoparticulate drug delivery systems such as liposomes and polymeric nanoparticles; exosomes are non-immunogenic in nature due to similar composition as body׳s own cells. In this article, the origin and structure of exosomes as well as their biological functions are outlined. We will then focus on specific applications of exosomes as drug delivery systems in pharmaceutical drug development. An overview of the advantages and challenges faced when using exosomes as a pharmaceutical drug delivery vehicles will also be discussed.

  3. 21 CFR 310.509 - Parenteral drug products in plastic containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Parenteral drug products in plastic containers... Parenteral drug products in plastic containers. (a) Any parenteral drug product packaged in a plastic... parenteral drug product for intravenous use in humans that is packaged in a plastic immediate container on...

  4. High concentrations of drug in target tissues following local controlled release are utilized for both drug distribution and biologic effect: an example with epicardial inotropic drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslov, Mikhail Y; Edelman, Elazer R; Wei, Abraham E; Pezone, Matthew J; Lovich, Mark A

    2013-10-28

    Local drug delivery preferentially loads target tissues with a concentration gradient from the surface or point of release that tapers down to more distant sites. Drug that diffuses down this gradient must be in unbound form, but such drug can only elicit a biologic effect through receptor interactions. Drug excess loads tissues, increasing gradients and driving penetration, but with limited added biological response. We examined the hypothesis that local application reduces dramatically systemic circulating drug levels but leads to significantly higher tissue drug concentration than might be needed with systemic infusion in a rat model of local epicardial inotropic therapy. Epinephrine was infused systemically or released locally to the anterior wall of the heart using a novel polymeric platform that provides steady, sustained release over a range of precise doses. Epinephrine tissue concentration, upregulation of cAMP, and global left ventricular response were measured at equivalent doses and at doses equally effective in raising indices of contractility. The contractile stimulation by epinephrine was linked to drug tissue levels and commensurate cAMP upregulation for IV systemic infusion, but not with local epicardial delivery. Though cAMP was a powerful predictor of contractility with local application, tissue epinephrine levels were high and variable--only a small fraction of the deposited epinephrine was utilized in second messenger signaling and biologic effect. The remainder of deposited drug was likely used in diffusive transport and distribution. Systemic side effects were far more profound with IV infusion which, though it increased contractility, also induced tachycardia and loss of systemic vascular resistance, which were not seen with local application. Local epicardial inotropic delivery illustrates then a paradigm of how target tissues differentially handle and utilize drug compared to systemic infusion. PMID:23872515

  5. 75 FR 65565 - Animal Drugs, Feeds, and Related Products; Withdrawal of Approval of New Animal Drug Applications...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 520, 556, and 558 Animal Drugs, Feeds, and Related Products; Withdrawal of Approval of New Animal Drug Applications; Aklomide; Levamisole...: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the animal drug regulations by removing...

  6. Posttranslational Modification Biology of Glutamate Receptors and Drug Addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Min eMao

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Posttranslational covalent modifications of glutamate receptors remain a hot topic. Early studies have established that this family of receptors, including almost all ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptor subtypes, undergoes active phosphorylation at serine, threonine, or tyrosine residues on their intracellular domains. Recent evidence identifies several glutamate receptor subtypes to be direct substrates for palmitoylation at cysteine residues. Other modifications such as ubiquitination and sumoylation at lysine residues also occur to certain glutamate receptors. These modifications are dynamic and reversible in nature and are regulatable by changing synaptic inputs. The regulated modifications significantly impact the receptor in many ways, including interrelated changes in biochemistry (synthesis, subunit assembling and protein-protein interactions, subcellular redistribution (trafficking, endocytosis, synaptic delivery and clustering, and physiology, usually associated with changes in synaptic plasticity. Glutamate receptors are enriched in the striatum and cooperate closely with dopamine to regulate striatal signaling. Emerging evidence shows that modification processes of striatal glutamate receptors are sensitive to addictive drugs, such as psychostimulants (cocaine and amphetamines. Altered modifications are believed to be directly linked to enduring receptor/synaptic plasticity and drug-seeking. This review summarizes several major types of modifications of glutamate receptors and analyzes the role of these modifications in striatal signaling and in the pathogenesis of psychostimulant addiction.

  7. The Impact of Conventional and Biological Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs on Bone Biology. Rheumatoid Arthritis as a Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreira, Sofia Carvalho; Fonseca, João Eurico

    2016-08-01

    The bone and the immune system have a very tight interaction. Systemic immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), induce bone loss, leading to a twofold increase in osteoporosis and an increase of fragility fracture risk of 1.35-2.13 times. This review focuses on the effects of conventional and biological disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) on bone biology, in the context of systemic inflammation, with a focus on RA. Published evidence supports a decrease in osteoclastic activity induced by DMARDs, which leads to positive effects on bone mineral density (BMD). It is unknown if this effect could be translated into fracture risk reduction. The combination with antiosteoclastic drugs can have an additional benefit.

  8. MILK KEFIR: COMPOSITION, MICROBIAL CULTURES, BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITIES AND RELATED PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rosa Prado

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been a strong focus on beneficial foods with probiotic microorganisms and functional organic substances. In this context, there is an increasing interest in the commercial use of kefir, since it can be marketed as a natural beverage that has health promoting bacteria. There are numerous commercially available kefir based-products. Kefir may act as a matrix in the effective delivery of probiotic microorganisms in different types of products. Also, the presence of kefir’s exopolysaccharides, known as kefiran, which has biological activity, certainly adds value to products. Kefiran can also be used separately in other food products and as a coating film for various food and pharmaceutical products. This article aims to update the information about kefir and its microbiological composition, biological activity of the kefir’s microflora and the importance of kefiran as a beneficial health substance.

  9. Ionizing radiation for sterilization of medical products and biological tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article reviews the deliberations of the International Symposium on Ionizing Radiation for Sterilization of Medical Products and Biological Tissues which was held during 9-13 December 1974 under the auspices of the IAEA at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay. 42 papers were presented in the following broad subject areas: (1) Microbiological Control aspects of radiation sterilization, (2) Dosimetry aspects of radiation sterilization practices, (3) Effects of sterilizing radiation dose on the constituents of medical products, (4) Application of radiation sterilization of medical products of biological origin, (5) Technological aspects of radiation sterilization facilities, (6) Radiation sterilization of pharmaceutical substances, (7) Reports on current status of radiation sterilization of medical products in IAEA member states and (8) Working group discussion on the revision of the IAEA recommended code of practice for radiation sterilization of medical products. (S.K.K.)

  10. Assessment of biological Hydrogen production processes: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafpour, G. D.; Shahavi, M. H.; Neshat, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    Energy crisis created a special attention on renewable energy sources. Among these sources; hydrogen through biological processes is well-known as the most suitable and renewable energy sources. In terms of process yield, hydrogen production from various sources was evaluated. A summary of microorganisms as potential hydrogen producers discussed along with advantages and disadvantages of several bioprocesses. The pathway of photo-synthetic and dark fermentative organisms was discussed. In fact, the active enzymes involved in performance of biological processes for hydrogen generation were identified and their special functionalities were discussed. The influential factors affecting on hydrogen production were known as enzymes assisting liberation specific enzymes such as nitrogenase, hydrogenase and uptake hydrogenase. These enzymes were quite effective in reduction of proton and form active molecular hydrogen. Several types of photosynthetic systems were evaluated with intension of maximum hydrogen productivities. In addition dark fermentative and light intensities on hydrogen productions were evaluated. The hydrogen productivities of efficient hydrogen producing strains were evaluated.

  11. Using Molecular Biology to Develop Drugs for Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowey, C. Lance; Rathmell, W. Kimryn

    2010-01-01

    Background Renal cell carcinoma is a disease marked by a unique biology which has governed it’s long history of poor response to conventional cancer treatments. The discovery of the signaling pathway activated as a result of inappropriate constitutive activation of the hypoxia inducible factors (HIF), transcription factors physiologically and transiently stabilized in response to low oxygen, has provided a primary opportunity to devise treatment strategies to target this oncogenic pathway. Objective A review of the molecular pathogenesis of renal cell cancer as well as molecularly targeted therapies, both those currently available and those in development, will be provided. In addition, trials involving combination or sequential targeted therapy are discussed. Methods A detailed review of the literature describing the molecular biology of renal cell cancer and novel therapies was performed and summarized. Results/Conclusion Therapeutics targeting angiogenesis have provided the first class of agents which provide clinical benefit in a large majority of patients and heralded renal cell carcinoma as a solid tumor paradigm for the development of novel therapeutics. Multiple strategies targeting this pathway and now other identified pathways in renal cell carcinoma provide numerous potential opportunities to make major improvements in treating this historically devastating cancer. PMID:20648240

  12. A look at emerging delivery systems for topical drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fireman, Sharon; Toledano, Ofer; Neimann, Karine; Loboda, Natalia; Dayan, Nava

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of new topical drugs based on new chemical entities has become a rare event. Instead, pharmaceutical companies have been focused on reformulating existing drugs resulting in an ever-growing number of topical drug products for every approved drug substance. In light of this trend, soon reformulations may not be as rewarding to their sponsors as they are today unless they offer a substantial improvement over other formulations of the same drug substance and the same indication, namely improved efficacy over existing drugs, reduced side effects, unique drug combinations, or applicability for new indications. This article reviews and compares topical drug delivery systems currently under active research that are designed to offer such advantages in the coming years. The reviewed delivery systems are: liposomes, niosomes, transferosomes, ethosomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid carriers, cyclodextrin, and sol-gel microcapsules. Among all the topical drug delivery systems currently undergoing active research, only the sol-gel microencapsulation is at clinical stages. PMID:22353154

  13. Constructing Database for Drugs and its Application to Biological Sample by HPTLC and GC/MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Y.C.; Park, S.W.; Lim, M.A.; Baeck, S.K.; Park, S.Y.; Lee, J.S.; Lee, J.S. [National Institute of Scientific investigation, Seoul (Korea); Lho, D.S. [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    For the identification of unknown drugs in biological samples, we attempted rapid high performance thin layer chromatographic method which is sensitive and selective chromatographic analysis of high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) with automated TLC sampler and ultra-violet (UV) scanner. We constructed HPTLC database (DB) on two hundred five drugs by using the data of Rf values and UV spectra (scan 200-360 nm) as well as gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) DB on ninety six drugs by using the data of relative retention time (RRT) on lidocain and mass spectra. After extracting drugs in geological sample by solid phase extraction (Clean Screen ZSDAU020), we applied them to HPTLC and GC/MS DB. Drugs, especially extracted from biological samples, showed good matching ratio to HPTLC DB and these drugs were confirmed by GC/MS. In conclusion, this DB system is thought to be very useful method for the screening of unknown drugs in biological samples. (author). 9 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs.

  14. Biological studies of matrix metalloproteinase sensitive drug delivery systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Pia Thermann

    of a negatively charged lipopeptide-PEG conjugates containing a MMP-2 cleavable peptide, which leads to cationic liposomes with enhanced ability to interact with negatively charged cell membranes. Activation of the liposomal formulation developed here resulted in enhanced association of liposomes with cancer......Cancer, which is a group of diseases characterized by cells with elevated replication rate and compromised DNA damage response, is often treated with cytotoxic drugs, chemotherapeutics, inducing DNA damage that results in cell death. The use of chemotherapeutics in the clinic, however, is limited...... investigated the interaction between liposomes and cell populations in the blood, resulting in a novel liposomal system for specific targeting to CD14+ monocytes. Monocytes play an important role in in ammatory diseases, which are commonly treated with steroids, through their secretion of proin ammatory...

  15. Cell culture media impact on drug product solution stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdie, Jennifer L; Kowle, Ronald L; Langland, Amie L; Patel, Chetan N; Ouyang, Anli; Olson, Donald J

    2016-07-01

    To enable subcutaneous administration of monoclonal antibodies, drug product solutions are often needed at high concentrations. A significant risk associated with high drug product concentrations is an increase in aggregate level over the shelf-life dating period. While much work has been done to understand the impact of drug product formulation on aggregation, there is limited understanding of the link between cell culture process conditions and soluble aggregate growth in drug product. During cell culture process development, soluble aggregates are often measured at harvest using cell-free material purified by Protein A chromatography. In the work reported here, cell culture media components were evaluated with respect to their impact on aggregate levels in high concentration solution drug product during accelerated stability studies. Two components, cysteine and ferric ammonium citrate, were found to impact aggregate growth rates in our current media (version 1) leading to the development of new chemically defined media and concentrated feed formulations. The new version of media and associated concentrated feeds (version 2) were evaluated across four cell lines producing recombinant IgG4 monoclonal antibodies and a bispecific antibody. In all four cell lines, the version 2 media reduced aggregate growth over the course of a 12 week accelerated stability study compared with the version 1 media, although the degree to which aggregate growth decreased was cell line dependent. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:998-1008, 2016.

  16. Molecular basis of high viscosity in concentrated antibody solutions: Strategies for high concentration drug product development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar, Dheeraj S; Kumar, Sandeep; Singh, Satish K; Goswami, Sumit; Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    Effective translation of breakthrough discoveries into innovative products in the clinic requires proactive mitigation or elimination of several drug development challenges. These challenges can vary depending upon the type of drug molecule. In the case of therapeutic antibody candidates, a commonly encountered challenge is high viscosity of the concentrated antibody solutions. Concentration-dependent viscosity behaviors of mAbs and other biologic entities may depend on pairwise and higher-order intermolecular interactions, non-native aggregation, and concentration-dependent fluctuations of various antibody regions. This article reviews our current understanding of molecular origins of viscosity behaviors of antibody solutions. We discuss general strategies and guidelines to select low viscosity candidates or optimize lead candidates for lower viscosity at early drug discovery stages. Moreover, strategies for formulation optimization and excipient design are also presented for candidates already in advanced product development stages. Potential future directions for research in this field are also explored. PMID:26736022

  17. 21 CFR 333.150 - Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products... First Aid Antibiotic Drug Products § 333.150 Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products. (a... identifies the product as a “first aid antibiotic.” (b) Indications. The labeling of the product...

  18. Overcome Cancer Cell Drug Resistance Using Natural Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pu Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy is one of the major treatment methods for cancer. However, failure in chemotherapy is not uncommon, mainly due to dose-limiting toxicity associated with drug resistance. Management of drug resistance is important towards successful chemotherapy. There are many reports in the Chinese literature that natural products can overcome cancer cell drug resistance, which deserve sharing with scientific and industrial communities. We summarized the reports into four categories: (1 in vitro studies using cell line models; (2 serum pharmacology; (3 in vivo studies using animal models; and (4 clinical studies. Fourteen single compounds were reported to have antidrug resistance activity for the first time. In vitro, compounds were able to overcome drug resistance at nontoxic or subtoxic concentrations, in a dose-dependent manner, by inhibiting drug transporters, cell detoxification capacity, or cell apoptosis sensitivity. Studies in vivo showed that single compounds, herbal extract, and formulas had potent antidrug resistance activities. Importantly, many single compounds, herbal extracts, and formulas have been used clinically to treat various diseases including cancer. The review provides comprehensive data on use of natural compounds to overcome cancer cell drug resistance in China, which may facilitate the therapeutic development of natural products for clinical management of cancer drug resistance.

  19. Quantitative high-throughput analysis of drugs in biological matrices by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopfgartner, Gérard; Bourgogne, Emmanuel

    2003-01-01

    To support pharmacokinetic and drug metabolism studies, LC-MS/MS plays more and more an essential role for the quantitation of drugs and their metabolites in biological matrices. With the new challenges encountered in drug discovery and drug development, new strategies are put in place to achieve high-throughput analysis, using serial and parallel approaches. To speed-up method development and validation, generic approaches with the direct injection of biological fluids is highly desirable. Column-switching, using various packing materials for the extraction columns, is widely applied. Improvement of mass spectrometers performance, and in particular triple quadrupoles, also strongly influences sample preparation strategies, which remain a key element in the bioanalytical process. PMID:12838545

  20. Molecular biology of liver disorders: the hepatitis C virus and moleculartargets for drug development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Howard J. Worman; Feng Lin

    2000-01-01

    Advances in molecular biology made possible the discovery of the virus that causes hepatitis C. However,little is known about the fundamental aspects of hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication, primarily because arobust cell culture has not been established. As a result, the currently available drugs for the treatment ofhepatitis C are not specifically directed against HCV. Based on what is known about the molecular biology ofHCV, however, drugs can now be developed against specific viral and cellular targets. The next generationof drugs for the treatment of hepatitis C will likely be directed against non-structural HCV proteins withknown enzymatic activities, such as the proteases, RNA helicase and RNA polymerase. Others agentstargeted against the viral RNA, core protein that assembles into the virion capsid and putative cellular“receptors” that bind HCV envelope proteins are also being developed. These drugs should have fewer sideeffects than those currently available and be much more effective for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C.

  1. [Research advances in gene polymorphisms in biological pathways of drugs for asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dan-Dan; Zheng, Xiang-Rong

    2016-06-01

    The studies on gene polymorphisms in biological pathways of the drugs for the treatment of asthma refer to the studies in which pharmacogenetic methods, such as genome-wide association studies, candidate gene studies, genome sequencing, admixture mapping analysis, and linkage disequilibrium, are used to identify, determine, and repeatedly validate the effect of one or more single nucleotide polymorphisms on the efficacy of drugs. This can provide therapeutic strategies with optimal benefits, least side effects, and lowest costs to patients with asthma, and thus realize individualized medicine. The common drugs for asthma are β2 receptor agonists, glucocorticoids, and leukotriene modifiers. This article reviews the research achievements in polymorphisms in biological pathways of the common drugs for asthma, hoping to provide guidance for pharmacogenetic studies on asthma in future and realize individualized medicine for patients with asthma soon.

  2. Importance of systems biology in engineering microbes for biofuel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Redding, Alyssa M.; Rutherford, Becky J.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-12-02

    Microorganisms have been rich sources for natural products, some of which have found use as fuels, commodity chemicals, specialty chemicals, polymers, and drugs, to name a few. The recent interest in production of transportation fuels from renewable resources has catalyzed numerous research endeavors that focus on developing microbial systems for production of such natural products. Eliminating bottlenecks in microbial metabolic pathways and alleviating the stresses due to production of these chemicals are crucial in the generation of robust and efficient production hosts. The use of systems-level studies makes it possible to comprehensively understand the impact of pathway engineering within the context of the entire host metabolism, to diagnose stresses due to product synthesis, and provides the rationale to cost-effectively engineer optimal industrial microorganisms.

  3. Drug-Encoded Biomarkers for Monitoring Biological Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoneva, Desislava; Stritzker, Jochen; Bedenk, Kristina; Zhang, Qian; Frentzen, Alexa; Cappello, Joseph; Fischer, Utz; Szalay, Aladar A

    2015-01-01

    Blood tests are necessary, easy-to-perform and low-cost alternatives for monitoring of oncolytic virotherapy and other biological therapies in translational research. Here we assessed three candidate proteins with the potential to be used as biomarkers in biological fluids: two glucuronidases from E. coli (GusA) and Staphylococcus sp. RLH1 (GusPlus), and the luciferase from Gaussia princeps (GLuc). The three genes encoding these proteins were inserted individually into vaccinia virus GLV-1h68 genome under the control of an identical promoter. The three resulting recombinant viruses were used to infect tumor cells in cultures and human tumor xenografts in nude mice. In contrast to the actively secreted GLuc, the cytoplasmic glucuronidases GusA and GusPlus were released into the supernatants only as a result of virus-mediated oncolysis. GusPlus resulted in the most sensitive detection of enzyme activity under controlled assay conditions in samples containing as little as 1 pg/ml of GusPlus, followed by GusA (25 pg/ml) and GLuc (≥375 pg/ml). Unexpectedly, even though GusA had a lower specific activity compared to GusPlus, the substrate conversion in the serum of tumor-bearing mice injected with the GusA-encoding virus strains was substantially higher than that of GusPlus. This was attributed to a 3.2 fold and 16.2 fold longer half-life of GusA in the blood stream compared to GusPlus and GLuc respectively, thus a more sensitive monitor of virus replication than the other two enzymes. Due to the good correlation between enzymatic activity of expressed marker gene and virus titer, we conclude that the amount of the biomarker protein in the body fluid semiquantitatively represents the amount of virus in the infected tumors which was confirmed by low light imaging. We found GusA to be the most reliable biomarker for monitoring oncolytic virotherapy among the three tested markers. PMID:26348361

  4. Analytical detection and biological assay of antileukemic drug using gold nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    V. Selvaraj; Alagar, M.; Hamerton, I

    2006-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are reported and evaluated as probes for the detection of anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil (5FU). The nature of binding between 5FU and gold nanoparticles via complexation is investigated using ultraviolet visible spectrophotometry, cyclic voltammetry, transmission electron microscopy, fluorescence and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The bound antileukemic drug is fluorescent and the quenching property of gold nanoparticles could be exploited for biological in...

  5. The preparation of albumin as a biological drug from human plasma by fiber filtration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousavi Hosseini K

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: In recent years, consumption of whole-blood for the treatment of patients has decreased but use of biological plasma-derived medicines such as albumin, immunoglobulin and coagulation factors have increased instead. Paying attention to albumin molecular structure is important for its isolation from human plasma. Albumin is a single-chain protein consisting of about 585 amino acids and a molecular weight of 66500 Daltons. Albumin is a stable molecule and it is spherical in shape. There are different methods for human albumin preparation. Considering the large consumption of this biological drug in clinical settings, methods with fewer steps in production line are of big advantage in saving time and manufacturing more products."n "nMethods: In this project, we prepared human albumin using hollow fiber cartridges in order to omit the rework on fraction V+VI. Human albumin is usually produced by the application of cold ethanol method, where albumin is obtained from fraction V by doing a rework on fraction V+VI to separate fraction V."n "nResults: In the current work, human albumin was prepared from fraction V+VI by the help of hollow fiber cartridges. With a concentration of 20%, the obtained albumin had 96.5% of monomer and 3.5% of polymer and polymer aggregate."n "nConclusion: Comparing the obtained human albumin with a number of commercial human albumin samples by the use of SDS-page, the results were satisfactory regarding the 3.5 percent polymer and aggregate rate for the prepared albumin.

  6. 21 CFR 338.50 - Labeling of nighttime sleep-aid drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling of nighttime sleep-aid drug products. 338... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE NIGHTTIME SLEEP-AID DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Labeling § 338.50 Labeling of nighttime sleep-aid drug products. (a) Statement of identity. The labeling...

  7. Can Invalid Bioactives Undermine Natural Product-Based Drug Discovery?

    OpenAIRE

    Bisson, Jonathan; McAlpine, James B.; Friesen, J. Brent; Chen, Shao-Nong; Graham, James; Pauli, Guido F.

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput biology has contributed a wealth of data on chemicals, including natural products (NPs). Recently, attention was drawn to certain, predominantly synthetic, compounds that are responsible for disproportionate percentages of hits but are false actives. Spurious bioassay interference led to their designation as pan-assay interference compounds (PAINS). NPs lack comparable scrutiny, which this study aims to rectify. Systematic mining of 80+ years of the phytochemistry and biology ...

  8. Technical suitability mapping of feedstocks for biological hydrogen production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panagiotopoulos, I.A.; Karaoglanoglou, L.S.; Koullas, D.P.; Bakker, R.R.; Claassen, P.A.M.; Koukios, E.G.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to map and compare the technical suitability of different raw materials for biological hydrogen production. Our model was based on hydrogen yield potential, sugar mobilization efficiency, fermentability and coproduct yield and value. The suitability of the studied r

  9. PREDICTING DRUG USE AT ELECTRONIC MUSIC DANCE EVENTS: SELF-REPORTS AND BIOLOGICAL MEASUREMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Mark B.; Voas, Robert A.; MILLER, BRENDA A.; Holder, Harold D.

    2009-01-01

    Most information on the prevalence of drug use comes from self-report surveys. The sensitivity of such information is cause for concern about the accuracy of self-report measures. In this study, self-reported drug use in the last 48 hours is compared to results from biological assays of saliva samples from 371 young adults entering clubs. The relationship between self-reports and drug presence in oral fluid was determined for three substances: cocaine, marijuana, and amphetamine. Forty-one pe...

  10. Back to the Roots: Prediction of Biologically Active Natural Products from Ayurveda Traditional Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polur, Honey; Joshi, Tejal; Workman, Christopher;

    2011-01-01

    . We hereby present a number of examples where the traditional medicinal use of the plant matches with the medicinal use of the drug that is structurally similar to a plant component. With this approach, we have brought to light a number of obscure compounds of natural origin (e.g. kanugin......Ayurveda, the traditional Indian medicine is one of the most ancient, yet living medicinal traditions. In the present work, we developed an in silico library of natural products from Ayurveda medicine, coupled with structural information, plant origin and traditional therapeutic use. Following this......, we compared their structures with those of drugs from DrugBank and we constructed a structural similarity network. Information on the traditional therapeutic use of the plants was integrated in the network in order to provide further evidence for the predicted biologically active natural compounds...

  11. Neocryptolepine: A Promising Indoloisoquinoline Alkaloid with Interesting Biological Activity. Evaluation of the Drug and its Most Relevant Analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larghi, Enrique L; Bracca, Andrea B J; Arroyo Aguilar, Abel A; Heredia, Daniel A; Pergomet, Jorgelina L; Simonetti, Sebastian O; Kaufman, Teodoro S

    2015-01-01

    Plants are one of the most important resources for the discovery of new drugs. The potential of natural compounds as new drug leads is clearly illustrated by the discovery and development of many modern medicines. This is an encouraging factor that drives natural products research in the vegetable kingdom. Neocryptolepine is a tetracyclic nitrogen heterocycle isolated from the African climber Cryptolepis sanguinolenta, which is widely used in traditional African medicine in many countries of Central and West Africa. The natural product is one of the representative examples of the small family of indolo[2,3-b]quinoline alkaloids, being endowed of multiple biological activities, including DNA-binding and inhibition of the enzyme topoisomerase II. It is also cytotoxic, antibacterial, antifungal and molluscicidal, also displaying antiprotozoal activity, particularly as antitrypanosomal, antileishmanial, antischistosomal and antiplasmodial. Some of these activities have been related to the product's ability to bind to DNA and to inhibit topoisomerase II; however, the exact mechanisms behind all of the observed bioactivities have not been comprehensively clarified. Major research activities regarding neocryptolepine have been focused into two seemingly opposite fields, related to its cytotoxic and antimalarial properties. Optimization of the natural product as a cytotoxic agent implied improvements in its bioavailability and activity, while the need of non-cytotoxic compounds guided the design and optimization of antimalarial agents. Therefore, the aim of the present article is to systematically review the current knowledge about the diversity of the biological activities related to neocryptolepine, its analogs and derivatives. PMID:25915612

  12. Recreational drug discovery: natural products as lead structures for the synthesis of smart drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appendino, Giovanni; Minassi, Alberto; Taglialatela-Scafati, Orazio

    2014-07-01

    Covering: up to December 2013. Over the past decade, there has been a growing transition in recreational drugs from natural materials (marijuana, hashish, opium), natural products (morphine, cocaine), or their simple derivatives (heroin), to synthetic agents more potent than their natural prototypes, which are sometimes less harmful in the short term, or that combine properties from different classes of recreational prototypes. These agents have been named smart drugs, and have become popular both for personal consumption and for collective intoxication at rave parties. The reasons for this transition are varied, but are mainly regulatory and commercial. New analogues of known illegal intoxicants are invisible to most forensic detection techniques, while the alleged natural status and the lack of avert acute toxicity make them appealing to a wide range of users. On the other hand, the advent of the internet has made possible the quick dispersal of information among users and the on-line purchase of these agents and/or the precursors for their synthesis. Unlike their natural products chemotypes (ephedrine, mescaline, cathinone, psilocybin, THC), most new drugs of abuse are largely unfamiliar to the organic chemistry community as well as to health care providers. To raise awareness of the growing plague of smart drugs we have surveyed, in a medicinal chemistry fashion, their development from natural products leads, their current methods of production, and the role that clandestine home laboratories and underground chemists have played in the surge of popularity of these drugs.

  13. Recreational drug discovery: natural products as lead structures for the synthesis of smart drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appendino, Giovanni; Minassi, Alberto; Taglialatela-Scafati, Orazio

    2014-07-01

    Covering: up to December 2013. Over the past decade, there has been a growing transition in recreational drugs from natural materials (marijuana, hashish, opium), natural products (morphine, cocaine), or their simple derivatives (heroin), to synthetic agents more potent than their natural prototypes, which are sometimes less harmful in the short term, or that combine properties from different classes of recreational prototypes. These agents have been named smart drugs, and have become popular both for personal consumption and for collective intoxication at rave parties. The reasons for this transition are varied, but are mainly regulatory and commercial. New analogues of known illegal intoxicants are invisible to most forensic detection techniques, while the alleged natural status and the lack of avert acute toxicity make them appealing to a wide range of users. On the other hand, the advent of the internet has made possible the quick dispersal of information among users and the on-line purchase of these agents and/or the precursors for their synthesis. Unlike their natural products chemotypes (ephedrine, mescaline, cathinone, psilocybin, THC), most new drugs of abuse are largely unfamiliar to the organic chemistry community as well as to health care providers. To raise awareness of the growing plague of smart drugs we have surveyed, in a medicinal chemistry fashion, their development from natural products leads, their current methods of production, and the role that clandestine home laboratories and underground chemists have played in the surge of popularity of these drugs. PMID:24823967

  14. Drug Interactions: What You Should Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health and Human Services FDA U.S. Food and Drug Administration Protecting and Promoting Your Health A to ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Drugs Home Drugs Resources for You Drug Interactions: What ...

  15. Postmarket Drug Safety Information for Patients and Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health and Human Services FDA U.S. Food and Drug Administration Protecting and Promoting Your Health A to ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Drugs Home Drugs Drug Safety and Availability Postmarket Drug ...

  16. The potential of plants as a system for the development and production of human biologics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiang; Davis, Keith R

    2016-01-01

    The growing promise of plant-made biologics is highlighted by the success story of ZMapp™ as a potentially life-saving drug during the Ebola outbreak of 2014-2016. Current plant expression platforms offer features beyond the traditional advantages of low cost, high scalability, increased safety, and eukaryotic protein modification. Novel transient expression vectors have been developed that allow the production of vaccines and therapeutics at unprecedented speed to control potential pandemics or bioterrorism attacks. Plant-host engineering provides a method for producing proteins with unique and uniform mammalian post-translational modifications, providing opportunities to develop biologics with increased efficacy relative to their mammalian cell-produced counterparts. Recent demonstrations that plant-made proteins can function as biocontrol agents of foodborne pathogens further exemplify the potential utility of plant-based protein production. However, resolving the technical and regulatory challenges of commercial-scale production, garnering acceptance from large pharmaceutical companies, and obtaining U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for several major classes of biologics are essential steps to fulfilling the untapped potential of this technology. PMID:27274814

  17. The potential of plants as a system for the development and production of human biologics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiang; Davis, Keith R.

    2016-01-01

    The growing promise of plant-made biologics is highlighted by the success story of ZMapp™ as a potentially life-saving drug during the Ebola outbreak of 2014-2016. Current plant expression platforms offer features beyond the traditional advantages of low cost, high scalability, increased safety, and eukaryotic protein modification. Novel transient expression vectors have been developed that allow the production of vaccines and therapeutics at unprecedented speed to control potential pandemics or bioterrorism attacks. Plant-host engineering provides a method for producing proteins with unique and uniform mammalian post-translational modifications, providing opportunities to develop biologics with increased efficacy relative to their mammalian cell-produced counterparts. Recent demonstrations that plant-made proteins can function as biocontrol agents of foodborne pathogens further exemplify the potential utility of plant-based protein production. However, resolving the technical and regulatory challenges of commercial-scale production, garnering acceptance from large pharmaceutical companies, and obtaining U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for several major classes of biologics are essential steps to fulfilling the untapped potential of this technology. PMID:27274814

  18. The potential of plants as a system for the development and production of human biologics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiang; Davis, Keith R

    2016-01-01

    The growing promise of plant-made biologics is highlighted by the success story of ZMapp™ as a potentially life-saving drug during the Ebola outbreak of 2014-2016. Current plant expression platforms offer features beyond the traditional advantages of low cost, high scalability, increased safety, and eukaryotic protein modification. Novel transient expression vectors have been developed that allow the production of vaccines and therapeutics at unprecedented speed to control potential pandemics or bioterrorism attacks. Plant-host engineering provides a method for producing proteins with unique and uniform mammalian post-translational modifications, providing opportunities to develop biologics with increased efficacy relative to their mammalian cell-produced counterparts. Recent demonstrations that plant-made proteins can function as biocontrol agents of foodborne pathogens further exemplify the potential utility of plant-based protein production. However, resolving the technical and regulatory challenges of commercial-scale production, garnering acceptance from large pharmaceutical companies, and obtaining U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for several major classes of biologics are essential steps to fulfilling the untapped potential of this technology.

  19. Irradiation of advanced health care products – Tissues and biologics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation sterilization of tissues and biologics has become more common in recent years. As a result it has become critical to understand how to adapt the typical test methods and validation approaches to a tissue or biological product scenario. Also data evaluation sometimes becomes more critical than with traditional medical devices because for many tissues and biologics a low radiation dose is required. It is the intent behind this paper to provide information on adapting bioburden tests used in radiation validations such that the data can be most effectively used on tissues and biologics. In addition challenges with data evaluation are discussed, particularly the use of less-than values for bioburden results in radiation validation studies. - Highlights: • MPN testing can provide good bioburden results for tissue/biologics. • There are appropriate situations to pool products for bioburden testing. • Options on dealing with bioburden results of “less-than” the limit of detection. • Underestimation and overestimation of bioburden and the dangers of both

  20. A Practical Guide for Exploring Opportunities of Repurposing Drugs for CNS Diseases in Systems Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Hongkang; Feng, Gang; Zhu, Jason; Lin, Simon; Qiu, Yang; Wang, Yue; Xia, Tian

    2016-01-01

    Systems biology has shown its potential in facilitating pathway-focused therapy development for central nervous system (CNS) diseases. An integrated network can be utilized to explore the multiple disease mechanisms and to discover repositioning opportunities. This review covers current therapeutic gaps for CNS diseases and the role of systems biology in pharmaceutical industry. We conclude with a Multiple Level Network Modeling (MLNM) example to illustrate the great potential of systems biology for CNS diseases. The system focuses on the benefit and practical applications in pathway centric therapy and drug repositioning. PMID:26235090

  1. Utility and importance of animal data in drug product labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldrick, Paul

    2014-08-01

    Information on the use and safety of medicines to assist prescription by healthcare professionals occurs in drug labels (Summary of Product Characteristics in Europe and Package Insert in the USA). Animal data (notably genotoxicity, reproduction toxicity and carcinogenicity and/or repeat dose toxicity testing) comprise an important component of the information (having a vital role in giving assurance that an extensive safety assessment for the medicinal product has occurred) and regulatory guidance is available to help inform on its input into drug labels. However, an evaluation of animal data for the 27 new drugs approved in the USA in 2013 (and the same drugs if available in Europe) shows great variability in detail and level of information presented within and across regions and/or the possibility of confusion on interpretation of some of the presented animal study findings. It is concluded that it may be time to revisit what animal data are presented in drug product labels (although bearing in mind current regional regulatory guidance requirements), not only to allow within and across region consistency on information given but to present it in a way that fully assists healthcare professions when prescribing a medicine. PMID:24928564

  2. 21 CFR 344.52 - Labeling of ear drying aid drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling of ear drying aid drug products. 344.52... Labeling of ear drying aid drug products. (a) Statement of identity. The labeling of the product contains the established name of the drug, if any, and identifies the product as an “ear drying aid.”...

  3. 21 CFR 310.518 - Drug products containing iron or iron salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...: Accidental overdose or iron-containing products is a leading cause of fatal poisoning in children under 6... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drug products containing iron or iron salts. 310... Drug products containing iron or iron salts. Drug products containing elemental iron or iron salts...

  4. Animal Drug Safety FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Animal & Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Frequently Asked Questions Animal Drug Safety Frequently Asked Questions Share Tweet Linkedin ...

  5. 42 CFR 409.25 - Drugs, biologicals, supplies, appliances, and equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... equipment. 409.25 Section 409.25 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Posthospital SNF Care § 409.25... in paragraph (b) of this section, Medicare pays for drugs and biologicals as posthospital SNF...

  6. Viral hepatitis screening guideline before biological drug use in rheumatic patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadağ, Ömer; Kaşifoğlu, Timuçin; Özer, Birol; Kaymakoğlu, Sabahattin; Kuş, Yeşim; İnanç, Murat; Keser, Gökhan; Kiraz, Sedat

    2016-01-01

    Biological drugs (tumor necrosis factor inhibitors, rituximab, tocilizumab, abatacept, and tofacitinib) are important treatment alternatives in rheumatology, particularly for resistant patients. However, they may cause hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) reactivation; for instance, HBV reactivation may occur in a patient who is an inactive hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) carrier or who has resolved HBV infection. Therefore, the screening of patients before biological treatment and the application of a prophylactic treatment, particularly with respect to latent HBV infections, are recommended when necessary. This guideline covers pre-treatment screening and follow-up recommendations, if required, with respect to viral hepatitides in rheumatology patients who are planned to be given biological drugs. Although this guideline is prepared for biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), it is recommended to be used also for target-oriented DMARDS and medium–high dose corticosteroids (>7.5 mg prednisolone/day equivalent). It should be considered that the reactivation risk is higher when more than one immunosuppressive drug is used.

  7. 76 FR 16533 - Animal Drugs, Feeds, and Related Products; Withdrawal of Approval of New Animal Drug Applications...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 558 Animal Drugs, Feeds, and Related Products..., 2010 (75 FR 65565) amending the animal drug regulations. The October 26, 2010, final rule amended the... medicated feed. This correction is being made to improve the accuracy of the animal drug regulations....

  8. Identification of antimycotic drugs transformation products upon UV exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casado, Jorge; Rodríguez, Isaac, E-mail: isaac.rodriguez@usc.es; Ramil, María; Cela, Rafael

    2015-05-30

    Highlights: • Evaluation of antimycotic drugs UV stabilities in model supports. • Simultaneous detection of precursor drugs and transformation products. • Transformation products identification from their scan, accurate MS/MS spectra. • Directed search of identified transformation products in sand and soil samples. • Preliminary toxicity estimations. - Abstract: The reactivity of three imidazolic, environmental persistent antimycotic drugs (clotrimazole, CTZ; ketoconazole, KTZ; and miconazole, MCZ) upon exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is discussed. First, precursor compounds were immobilized in a silicone support which was further exposed to UV light at two different wavelengths: 254 and 365 nm. After solvent desorption, degradation kinetics of the precursor pharmaceuticals, identification of the arising transformation products (TPs) and evaluation of their time-course were investigated by liquid chromatography (LC) with quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometry (MS) detection. The three antimycotics displayed similar stabilities when exposed to 254 nm light; however, CTZ was significantly more stable than MCZ and KTZ when irradiated with the 365 nm lamp. TPs identified in silicone supports resulted from de-chlorination, cleavage, intra-molecular cyclization and hydroxylation reactions. Many of these species were also detected when exposing other solid matrices, such as sand and agricultural soil, previously spiked with target compounds, to UV light. The 50% estimated lethal concentration, calculated using the 48-h Daphnia magna test, for the two main TPs of CTZ and MCZ, at both wavelengths, were lower than those corresponding to the precursor drugs.

  9. 21 CFR 335.50 - Labeling of antidiarrheal drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...(b). (i) “Ask a doctor or pharmacist before use if you are taking any other drugs. Try to use at...) “Ask a doctor before use if you have fever mucus in the stool”. (2) For products containing bismuth... salicylate products”. (ii) “Do not use if you have an ulcer a bleeding problem”. (iii) “Ask a doctor...

  10. 21 CFR 341.76 - Labeling of bronchodilator drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... you do not know if your prescription drug contains an MAOI, ask a doctor or pharmacist before taking... heading “Warnings”: (1) “Do not use this product unless a diagnosis of asthma has been made by a doctor..., diabetes, or difficulty in urination due to enlargement of the prostate gland unless directed by a...

  11. 9 CFR 102.5 - U.S. Veterinary Biological Product License.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false U.S. Veterinary Biological Product..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS LICENSES FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 102.5 U.S. Veterinary Biological Product License. (a) Authorization to produce...

  12. 21 CFR 355.55 - Principal display panel of all fluoride rinse drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Principal display panel of all fluoride rinse drug products. 355.55 Section 355.55 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 355.55 Principal display panel of all fluoride rinse drug products. In addition to the statement...

  13. FDA's requirements for radiation dosimetry of radiopharmaceutical drug products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary concern of the Office of Drug Research and Review of the Food and Drug Administration in the field of radiation dosimetry is to ensure that radiopharmaceutical drug products are safe when used as investigational drugs (INDs) and are both safe and effective when a new drug application (NDA) is approved. In order to accomplish this, the sponsor of either an IND or applicant in the case of NDA must provide information that clearly describes the radiation dose that a patient will receive from the administration of the drug. The submitted numerical estimates of the radiation dose should be based on an absorbed fraction method of radiation dose calculation, such as the system set forth by the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine or the system set forth by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). This presentation will describe in detail the data that a sponsor of an IND needs to submit to satisfy the regulatory requirements. Examples will be given of common mistakes and omissions by sponsors in their presentation of data

  14. Systems Biology Approaches to Understand Natural Products Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licona-Cassani, Cuauhtemoc; Cruz-Morales, Pablo; Manteca, Angel; Barona-Gomez, Francisco; Nielsen, Lars K.; Marcellin, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    Actinomycetes populate soils and aquatic sediments that impose biotic and abiotic challenges for their survival. As a result, actinomycetes metabolism and genomes have evolved to produce an overwhelming diversity of specialized molecules. Polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides, post-translationally modified peptides, lactams, and terpenes are well-known bioactive natural products with enormous industrial potential. Accessing such biological diversity has proven difficult due to the complex regulation of cellular metabolism in actinomycetes and to the sparse knowledge of their physiology. The past decade, however, has seen the development of omics technologies that have significantly contributed to our better understanding of their biology. Key observations have contributed toward a shift in the exploitation of actinomycete’s biology, such as using their full genomic potential, activating entire pathways through key metabolic elicitors and pathway engineering to improve biosynthesis. Here, we review recent efforts devoted to achieving enhanced discovery, activation, and manipulation of natural product biosynthetic pathways in model actinomycetes using genome-scale biological datasets. PMID:26697425

  15. Systems biology approaches to understand natural products biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuauhtemoc eLicona-Cassani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Actinomycetes populate soils and aquatic sediments which impose biotic and abiotic challenges for their survival. As a result, actinomycetes metabolism and genomes have evolved to produce an overwhelming diversity of specialized molecules. Polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides, post-translationally modified peptides, lactams and terpenes are well known bioactive natural products with enormous industrial potential. Accessing such biological diversity has proven difficult due to the complex regulation of cellular metabolism in actinomycetes and to the sparse knowledge of their physiology. The past decade, however, has seen the development of omics technologies that have significantly contributed to our better understanding of their biology. Key observations have contributed towards a shift in the exploitation of actinomycetes biology, such as using their full genomic potential, activating entire pathways through key metabolic elicitors and pathway engineering to improve biosynthesis. Here, we review recent efforts devoted to achieving enhanced discovery, activation and manipulation of natural product biosynthetic pathways in model actinomycetes using genome-scale biological datasets.

  16. Systems Biology Approaches to Understand Natural Products Biosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Licona-Cassani, Cuauhtemoc; Cruz-Morales, Pablo; Manteca, Angel; Barona-Gomez, Francisco; Nielsen, Lars K; Marcellin, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    Actinomycetes populate soils and aquatic sediments that impose biotic and abiotic challenges for their survival. As a result, actinomycetes metabolism and genomes have evolved to produce an overwhelming diversity of specialized molecules. Polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides, post-translationally modified peptides, lactams, and terpenes are well-known bioactive natural products with enormous industrial potential. Accessing such biological diversity has proven difficult due to the complex regul...

  17. Systems biology approaches to understand natural products biosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Cuauhtemoc eLicona-Cassani; Pablo Cruz Morales; Angel eManteca; Francisco eBarona-Gomez; Lars Keld Nielsen; Esteban eMarcellin

    2015-01-01

    Actinomycetes populate soils and aquatic sediments which impose biotic and abiotic challenges for their survival. As a result, actinomycetes metabolism and genomes have evolved to produce an overwhelming diversity of specialized molecules. Polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides, post-translationally modified peptides, lactams and terpenes are well known bioactive natural products with enormous industrial potential. Accessing such biological diversity has proven difficult due to the complex regul...

  18. Polycyclic Xanthone Natural Products: Structure, Biological Activity and Chemical Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Winter, Dana K.; Sloman, David L.; Porco, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Polycyclic xanthone natural products are a family of polyketides which are characterized by highly oxygenated, angular hexacyclic frameworks. In the last decade, this novel class of molecules has attracted noticeable attention from the synthetic and biological communities due to emerging reports of their potential use as antitumour agents. The aim of this article is to highlight the most recent developments of this subset of the xanthone family by detailing the innate challenges of the constr...

  19. Random laser in biological tissues impregnated with a fluorescent anticancer drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahoz, F.; Martín, I. R.; Urgellés, M.; Marrero-Alonso, J.; Marín, R.; Saavedra, C. J.; Boto, A.; Díaz, M.

    2015-04-01

    We have demonstrated that chemically modified anticancer drugs can provide random laser (RL) when infiltrated in a biological tissue. A fluorescent biomarker has been covalently bound to tamoxifen, which is one of the most frequently used drugs for breast cancer therapy. The light emitted by the drug-dye composite is scattered in tissue, which acts as a gain medium. Both non-coherent and coherent RL regimes have been observed. Moreover, the analysis of power Fourier transforms of coherent RL spectra indicates that the tissues show a dominant random laser cavity length of about 18 µm, similar to the average size of single cells. These results show that RL could be obtained from other drugs, if properly marked with a fluorescent tag, which could be appealing for new forms of combined opto-chemical therapies.

  20. Reproductive biology traits affecting productivity of sour cherry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milica Fotiric Aksic

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate variability in reproductive biology traits and the correlation between them in genotypes of 'Oblačinska' sour cherry (Prunus cerasus. High genetic diversity was found in the 41 evaluated genotypes, and significant differences were observed among them for all studied traits: flowering time, pollen germination, number of fruiting branches, production of flower and fruit, number of flowers per bud, fruit set, and limb yield efficiency. The number of fruiting branches significantly influenced the number of flower and fruit, fruit set, and yield efficiency. In addition to number of fruiting branches, yield efficiency was positively correlated with fruit set and production of flower and fruit. Results from principal component analysis suggested a reduction of the reproductive biology factors affecting yield to four main characters: number and structure of fruiting branches, flowering time, and pollen germination. Knowledge of the reproductive biology of the 'Oblačinska' genotypes can be used to select the appropriate ones to be grown or used as parents in breeding programs. In this sense, genotypes II/2, III/9, III/13, and III/14 have very good flower production and satisfactory pollen germination.

  1. Formate Formation and Formate Conversion in Biological Fuels Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan R. Crable

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomethanation is a mature technology for fuel production. Fourth generation biofuels research will focus on sequestering CO2 and providing carbon-neutral or carbon-negative strategies to cope with dwindling fossil fuel supplies and environmental impact. Formate is an important intermediate in the methanogenic breakdown of complex organic material and serves as an important precursor for biological fuels production in the form of methane, hydrogen, and potentially methanol. Formate is produced by either CoA-dependent cleavage of pyruvate or enzymatic reduction of CO2 in an NADH- or ferredoxin-dependent manner. Formate is consumed through oxidation to CO2 and H2 or can be further reduced via the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway for carbon fixation or industrially for the production of methanol. Here, we review the enzymes involved in the interconversion of formate and discuss potential applications for biofuels production.

  2. Community-Reviewed Biological Network Models for Toxicology and Drug Discovery Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namasivayam, Aishwarya Alex; Morales, Alejandro Ferreiro; Lacave, Ángela María Fajardo; Tallam, Aravind; Simovic, Borislav; Alfaro, David Garrido; Bobbili, Dheeraj Reddy; Martin, Florian; Androsova, Ganna; Shvydchenko, Irina; Park, Jennifer; Calvo, Jorge Val; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C.; Racero, Manuel González Vélez; Biryukov, Maria; Talikka, Marja; Pérez, Modesto Berraquero; Rohatgi, Neha; Díaz-Díaz, Noberto; Mandarapu, Rajesh; Ruiz, Rubén Amián; Davidyan, Sergey; Narayanasamy, Shaman; Boué, Stéphanie; Guryanova, Svetlana; Arbas, Susana Martínez; Menon, Swapna; Xiang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Biological network models offer a framework for understanding disease by describing the relationships between the mechanisms involved in the regulation of biological processes. Crowdsourcing can efficiently gather feedback from a wide audience with varying expertise. In the Network Verification Challenge, scientists verified and enhanced a set of 46 biological networks relevant to lung and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The networks were built using Biological Expression Language and contain detailed information for each node and edge, including supporting evidence from the literature. Network scoring of public transcriptomics data inferred perturbation of a subset of mechanisms and networks that matched the measured outcomes. These results, based on a computable network approach, can be used to identify novel mechanisms activated in disease, quantitatively compare different treatments and time points, and allow for assessment of data with low signal. These networks are periodically verified by the crowd to maintain an up-to-date suite of networks for toxicology and drug discovery applications.

  3. Drugs@FDA Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Information about FDA-approved brand name and generic prescription and over-the-counter human drugs and biological therapeutic products. Drugs@FDA includes most of...

  4. Food and Drug Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drugs @ FDA Device Approvals & Clearances Biologics Products & Establishments Food & Color Additives Animal Drugs @ FDA MedWatch: Adverse Event Reporting Report a Non-Emergency For Industry: Reportable Food Registry Report an Emergency Report Suspected Criminal Activity ...

  5. Indicators of Club Management Practices and Biological Measurements of Patrons’ Drug and Alcohol Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Hilary F.; Miller, Brenda A.; Johnson, Mark B.; Voas, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Electronic Music Dance Events in nightclubs attract patrons with heavy alcohol/drug use. Public health concerns are raised from risks related to these behaviors. Practices associated with increased risk in these club settings need to be identified. Objectives The relationship between club management practices and biological measures of patrons’ alcohol/drug use is examined. Methods Observational data from 25 events across 6 urban clubs were integrated with survey data (N=738 patrons, 42.8% female) from patrons exiting these events, 2010–2012. Five indicators of club management practices were examined using mixed model regressions: club security, bar crowding, safety signs, serving intoxicated patrons, and isolation. Results Analyses revealed that serving intoxicated patrons and safety signs were related to less substance use. Specifically, serving intoxicated patrons was related to heavy alcohol and drug use at exit, while safety signs were marginally related to less exit drug use. Conclusions/Importance Findings indicate observable measures in nightclubs provide important indicators for alcohol/drug use, suggesting practices to target. Study strengths include the use of biological measures of substance use on a relatively large scale. Limitations and future directions are discussed. PMID:24832721

  6. Searching for disease-modifying drugs in AD: can we combine neuropsychological tools with biological markers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraci, Filippo; Castellano, Sabrina; Salomone, Salvatore; Drago, Filippo; Bosco, Paolo; Di Nuovo, Santo

    2014-02-01

    Drug discovery efforts in Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been directed in the last ten years to develop "disease-modifying drugs" able to exert neuroprotective effects in an early phase of AD pathogenesis. Unfortunately several candidate disease-modifying drugs have failed in Phase III clinical trials conducted in mild to moderate AD for different methodological difficulties, such as the time course of treatment in relation to development of disease as well as the appropriate use of validated biological and neuropsychological markers. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) has been considered a precursor of AD. Much effort is now directed to identify the most appropriate and sensitive markers which can predict the progression from MCI to AD, such as neuroimaging markers (e.g. hippocampal atrophy and amyloid positron emission tomography imaging), cerebrospinal fluid markers (i.e. association of elevated tau with low levels of amyloid β -peptide(1-42) and neuropsychological markers (i.e. episodic memory deficits and executive dysfunction). Recent studies demonstrate that the combination of these different biomarkers significantly increases the chance to predict the conversion into AD within 24 months. These biomarkers will be essential in the future to analyze clinical efficacy of disease-modifying drugs in MCI patients at high risk to develop AD. In the present review we analyze recent evidence on the combination of neuropsychological and biological markers in AD as a new tool to track disease progression in early AD as well as the response to disease-modifying drugs. PMID:24040795

  7. [Special considerations for the regulation of biological medicinal products in individualised medicine. More than stratified medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Berghaus, J; Volkers, P; Scherer, J; Cichutek, K

    2013-11-01

    The term individualised medicine, also called personalised medicine, is commonly used as an equivalent to stratified medicine. However, this is erroneous since quite often it is forgotten that especially biological medicinal products have other aspects of individualization that go beyond mere stratification. The principles of stratified medicine have been applied for biological medicinal products for many years. A historical example is diphtheria antitoxin made from horse serum, while current examples are transfusion of red blood cells and the administration of factor VIII in haemophilia A. The stratifying aspects of these medicinal products are given by the following considerations: diphtheria antitoxin is only administered after a diagnosis of diphtheria and not in other forms of tonsillitis, red blood cells should only be transfused once blood group compatibility as been established and factor VIII replacement is only administered in haemophilia A as opposed to other acquired or hereditary disease of the coagulation system. The peculiarities of biological medicinal products, in particular the inherent variability of the drug, are especially important for autologous cellular medicinal products. In addition to the expected variability of the biological source material there is interindividual variability of patients as cell donors, which make definition of specifications and determination of criteria for pharmaceutical quality and potency tests difficult. Therapy with modified autologous cells, a common and important application of advanced therapy medicinal products, is exemplary for the special considerations that must be made when evaluating pharmaceutical quality, mode of action and toxicological properties of the biological medicine. The clinical investigation of advanced therapy medicinal products with the intent of demonstrating safety and efficacy is particularly challenging because of the complexity of therapy, which often involves invasive interventions

  8. [Special considerations for the regulation of biological medicinal products in individualised medicine. More than stratified medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Berghaus, J; Volkers, P; Scherer, J; Cichutek, K

    2013-11-01

    The term individualised medicine, also called personalised medicine, is commonly used as an equivalent to stratified medicine. However, this is erroneous since quite often it is forgotten that especially biological medicinal products have other aspects of individualization that go beyond mere stratification. The principles of stratified medicine have been applied for biological medicinal products for many years. A historical example is diphtheria antitoxin made from horse serum, while current examples are transfusion of red blood cells and the administration of factor VIII in haemophilia A. The stratifying aspects of these medicinal products are given by the following considerations: diphtheria antitoxin is only administered after a diagnosis of diphtheria and not in other forms of tonsillitis, red blood cells should only be transfused once blood group compatibility as been established and factor VIII replacement is only administered in haemophilia A as opposed to other acquired or hereditary disease of the coagulation system. The peculiarities of biological medicinal products, in particular the inherent variability of the drug, are especially important for autologous cellular medicinal products. In addition to the expected variability of the biological source material there is interindividual variability of patients as cell donors, which make definition of specifications and determination of criteria for pharmaceutical quality and potency tests difficult. Therapy with modified autologous cells, a common and important application of advanced therapy medicinal products, is exemplary for the special considerations that must be made when evaluating pharmaceutical quality, mode of action and toxicological properties of the biological medicine. The clinical investigation of advanced therapy medicinal products with the intent of demonstrating safety and efficacy is particularly challenging because of the complexity of therapy, which often involves invasive interventions

  9. Biological characteristics of dengue virus and potential targets for drug design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui-feng Qi; Ling Zhang; Cheng-wu Chi

    2008-01-01

    Dengue infection is a major cause of morbidity in tropical and subtropical regions, bringing nearly 40% of the world population at risk and causing more than 20,000 deaths per year. But there is neither a vaccine for dengue disease nor antiviral drugs to treat the infection. In recent years, dengue infection has been particularly prevalent in India, Southeast Asia, Brazil, and Guangdong Province, China. In this article, we present a brief summary of the biological characteristics of dengue virus and associated flaviviruses, and outline the progress on studies of vaccines and drugs based on potential targets of the dengue virus.

  10. Biological treatment of chicken feather waste for improved biogas production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gergely Forgács; Saeid Alinezhad; Amir Mirabdollah; Elisabeth Feuk-Lagerstedt; Ilona Sárvári Horwáth

    2011-01-01

    A two-stage system was developed which combines the biological degradation of keratin-rich waste with the production of biogas.Chicken feather waste was treated biologically with a recombinant Bacillus megaterium strain showing keratinase activity prior to biogas production.Chopped,autoclaved chicken feathers (4%,W/V) were completely degraded,resulting in a yellowish fermentation broth with a level of 0.51 mg/mL soluble proteins after 8 days of cultivation of the recombinant strain.During the subsequent anaerobic batch digestion experiments,methane production of 0.35 Nm3/kg dry feathers (i.e.,0.4 Nm3/kg volatile solids of feathers),corresponding to 80% of the theoretical value on proteins,was achieved from the feather hydrolyzates,independently of the prehydrolysis time period of 1,2 or 8 days.Cultivation with a native keratinase producing strain,Bacillus licheniformis resulted in only 0.25 mg/mL soluble proteins in the feather hydrolyzate,which then was digested achieving a maximum accumulated methane production of 0.31 Nm3/kg dry feathers.Feather hydrolyzates treated with the wild type B.megaterium produced 0.21 Nm3 CH4/kg dry feathers as maximum yield.

  11. Computational systems biology in drug discovery and development: methods and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materi, Wayne; Wishart, David S

    2007-04-01

    Computational systems biology is an emerging field in biological simulation that attempts to model or simulate intra- and intercellular events using data gathered from genomic, proteomic or metabolomic experiments. The need to model complex temporal and spatiotemporal processes at many different scales has led to the emergence of numerous techniques, including systems of differential equations, Petri nets, cellular automata simulators, agent-based models and pi calculus. This review provides a brief summary and an assessment of most of these approaches. It also provides examples of how these methods are being used to facilitate drug discovery and development.

  12. Vasoprotective Effects of Genetically Engineered Biologic Drugs in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    N.S. Meshcherina; L.А. Knyazeva; I I Goryainov; L I Knyazeva

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was to evaluate the impact of genetically engineered biologic drugs (GEBD) — infliximab and rituximab — on endothelium functional state in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) without any concomitant cardiovascular diseases. Materials and Мethods. The study involved 77 patients with RA aged from 18 to 50. The patients matched ACR (1987) or ACR/EULAR (2010) classification criteria, had no concomitant cardiovascular diseases, and had at least a two-year RA hi...

  13. The Redox Biology of Schistosome Parasites and Applications for Drug Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsin-Hung; Rigouin, Coraline; Williams, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Schistosomiasis caused by Schistosoma spp. is a serious public health concern, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. Praziquantel is the only drug currently administrated to treat this disease. However, praziquantel-resistant parasites have been identified in endemic areas and can be generated in the laboratory. Therefore, it is essential to find new therapeutics. Antioxidants are appealing drug targets. In order to survive in their hosts, schistosomes are challenged by reactive oxygen species from intrinsic and extrinsic sources. Schistosome antioxidant enzymes have been identified as essential proteins and novel drug targets and inhibition of the antioxidant response can lead to parasite death. Because the organization of the redox network in schistosomes is significantly different form that in humans, new drugs are being developed targeting schistosome antioxidants. In this paper the redox biology of schistosomes is discussed and their potential use as drug targets is reviewed. It is hoped that compounds targeting parasite antioxidant responses will become clinically relevant drugs in the near future. PMID:22607149

  14. Microbial biotransformation as a tool for drug development based on natural products from mevalonic acid pathway: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed-Elamir F. Hegazy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural products are structurally and biologically interesting metabolites, but they have been isolated in minute amounts. The syntheses of such natural products help in obtaining them in bulk amounts. The recognition of microbial biotransformation as important manufacturing tool has increased in chemical and pharmaceutical industries. In recent years, microbial transformation is increasing significantly from limited interest into highly active area in green chemistry including preparation of pharmaceutical products. This is the first review published on the usage of microbial biocatalysts for some natural product classes and natural product drugs.

  15. Molecular biology in studies of oceanic primary production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remote sensing and the use of moored in situ instrumentation has greatly improved our ability to measure phytoplankton chlorophyll and photosynthesis on global scales with high temporal resolution. However, the interpretation of these measurements and their significance with respect to the biogeochemical cycling of carbon relies on their relationship with physiological and biochemical processes in phytoplankton. For example, the use of satellite images of surface chlorophyll to estimate primary production is often based on the functional relationship between photosynthesis and irradiance. A variety of environmental factors such as light, temperature, nutrient availability affect the photosynthesis/irradiance (P vs I) relationship in phytoplankton. We present three examples showing how molecular biology can be used to provide basic insight into the factors controlling primary productivity at three different levels of complexity: 1. Studies of light intensity regulation in unicellular alga show how molecular biology can help understand the processing of environmental cues leading to the regulation of photosynthetic gene expression. 2. Probing of the photosynthetic apparatus using molecular techniques can be used to test existing mechanistic models derived from the interpretation of physiological and biophysical measurements. 3. Exploratory work on the expression of specific proteins during nutrient-limited growth of phytoplankton may lead to the identification and production of molecular probes for field studies

  16. Analytical detection and biological assay of antileukemic drug using gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvaraj, V. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Alagappa College of Technology, Anna University, Chennai 600025 (India)]. E-mail: rajselva_77@yahoo.co.in; Alagar, M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Alagappa College of Technology, Anna University, Chennai 600025 (India)]. E-mail: mkalagar@yahoo.com; Hamerton, I. [Chemistry Division, School of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2006-11-12

    Gold nanoparticles are reported and evaluated as probes for the detection of anticancer drug 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP). The nature of binding between 6-MP and the gold nanoparticles via complexation is investigated using ultraviolet-visible spectrum, cyclic voltammetry, transmission electron microscopy, fluorescence and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The bound antileukemic drug is fluorescent and the quenching property of gold nanoparticles could be exploited for biological investigations. The 6-MP-colloidal gold complex is observed to have appreciable antibacterial and antifungal activity against Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Aspergillus niger. The experimental studies suggest that gold nanoparticles have the potential to be used as effective carriers for anticancer drugs.

  17. In-silico prediction of drug targets, biological activities, signal pathways and regulating networks of dioscin based on bioinformatics

    OpenAIRE

    Yin, Lianhong; Zheng, Lingli; Xu, Lina; Dong, Deshi; Han, Xu; Qi, Yan; Zhao, Yanyan; Xu, Youwei; Peng, Jinyong

    2015-01-01

    Background Inverse docking technology has been a trend of drug discovery, and bioinformatics approaches have been used to predict target proteins, biological activities, signal pathways and molecular regulating networks affected by drugs for further pharmacodynamic and mechanism studies. Methods In the present paper, inverse docking technology was applied to screen potential targets from potential drug target database (PDTD). Then, the corresponding gene information of the obtained drug-targe...

  18. Current good manufacturing practice in plant automation of biological production processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorresteijn, R C; Wieten, G; van Santen, P T; Philippi, M C; de Gooijer, C D; Tramper, J; Beuvery, E C

    1997-01-01

    The production of biologicals is subject to strict governmental regulations. These are drawn up in current good manufacturing practices (cGMP), a.o. by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. To implement cGMP in a production facility, plant automation becomes an essential tool. For this purpose Manufacturing Execution Systems (MES) have been developed that control all operations inside a production facility. The introduction of these recipe-driven control systems that follow ISA S88 standards for batch processes has made it possible to implement cGMP regulations in the control strategy of biological production processes. Next to this, an MES offers additional features such as stock management, planning and routing tools, process-dependent control, implementation of software sensors and predictive models, application of historical data and on-line statistical techniques for trend analysis and detection of instrumentation failures. This paper focuses on the development of new production strategies in which cGMP guidelines are an essential part.

  19. The Role of Carrier Geometry in Overcoming Biological Barriers to Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Carolyn; Shuvaev, Vladimir V; Bailey, Mark; Muzykantov, Vladimir R; Dziubla, Thomas D

    2016-01-01

    For a variety of diseases, effective therapy is severely limited or rendered impossible due to an inability to deliver medications to the intended sites of action. Multiple barriers exist through the body, which have evolved over time to limit the migration of foreign compounds from entering the tissues. Turning toward biology as inspiration, it has been the general goal of drug delivery to create carrier strategies that mimic, in part, features of bacteria/ viruses that allow them overcome these barriers. By packaging drugs into nano and micron scale vehicles, it should be possible to completely change the biodistribution and residence times of pharmaceutically active compounds. Recently, due to advances in formulation technologies, it has become possible to control not just the material selection, surface chemistry, and/or size, but also the overall geometry and plasticity of the drug carriers. These approaches aid in the formulation of nonspherical particles such as, discs, rods, and even unique structures such as cubes and nanodiamonds. The adjustment of size and shape can be used for the aid or prevention in cellular uptake and also to overcome the vascular and mucosal barrier. In this review, we present a summary of some approaches used to control carrier shape and the impact these geometries have upon drug transport across biological barriers. PMID:26675218

  20. The Role of Carrier Geometry in Overcoming Biological Barriers to Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Carolyn; Shuvaev, Vladimir V; Bailey, Mark; Muzykantov, Vladimir R; Dziubla, Thomas D

    2016-01-01

    For a variety of diseases, effective therapy is severely limited or rendered impossible due to an inability to deliver medications to the intended sites of action. Multiple barriers exist through the body, which have evolved over time to limit the migration of foreign compounds from entering the tissues. Turning toward biology as inspiration, it has been the general goal of drug delivery to create carrier strategies that mimic, in part, features of bacteria/ viruses that allow them overcome these barriers. By packaging drugs into nano and micron scale vehicles, it should be possible to completely change the biodistribution and residence times of pharmaceutically active compounds. Recently, due to advances in formulation technologies, it has become possible to control not just the material selection, surface chemistry, and/or size, but also the overall geometry and plasticity of the drug carriers. These approaches aid in the formulation of nonspherical particles such as, discs, rods, and even unique structures such as cubes and nanodiamonds. The adjustment of size and shape can be used for the aid or prevention in cellular uptake and also to overcome the vascular and mucosal barrier. In this review, we present a summary of some approaches used to control carrier shape and the impact these geometries have upon drug transport across biological barriers.

  1. Evolutionary game based control for biological systems with applications in drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaobo; Lenaghan, Scott C; Zhang, Mingjun

    2013-06-01

    Control engineering and analysis of biological systems have become increasingly important for systems and synthetic biology. Unfortunately, no widely accepted control framework is currently available for these systems, especially at the cell and molecular levels. This is partially due to the lack of appropriate mathematical models to describe the unique dynamics of biological systems, and the lack of implementation techniques, such as ultra-fast and ultra-small devices and corresponding control algorithms. This paper proposes a control framework for biological systems subject to dynamics that exhibit adaptive behavior under evolutionary pressures. The control framework was formulated based on evolutionary game based modeling, which integrates both the internal dynamics and the population dynamics. In the proposed control framework, the adaptive behavior was characterized as an internal dynamic, and the external environment was regarded as an external control input. The proposed open-interface control framework can be integrated with additional control algorithms for control of biological systems. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed framework, an optimal control strategy was developed and validated for drug delivery using the pathogen Giardia lamblia as a test case. In principle, the proposed control framework can be applied to any biological system exhibiting adaptive behavior under evolutionary pressures.

  2. Finding novel pharmaceuticals in the systems biology era using multiple effective drug targets, phenotypic screening and knowledge of transporters: where drug discovery went wrong and how to fix it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kell, Douglas B

    2013-12-01

    Despite the sequencing of the human genome, the rate of innovative and successful drug discovery in the pharmaceutical industry has continued to decrease. Leaving aside regulatory matters, the fundamental and interlinked intellectual issues proposed to be largely responsible for this are: (a) the move from 'function-first' to 'target-first' methods of screening and drug discovery; (b) the belief that successful drugs should and do interact solely with single, individual targets, despite natural evolution's selection for biochemical networks that are robust to individual parameter changes; (c) an over-reliance on the rule-of-5 to constrain biophysical and chemical properties of drug libraries; (d) the general abandoning of natural products that do not obey the rule-of-5; (e) an incorrect belief that drugs diffuse passively into (and presumably out of) cells across the bilayers portions of membranes, according to their lipophilicity; (f) a widespread failure to recognize the overwhelmingly important role of proteinaceous transporters, as well as their expression profiles, in determining drug distribution in and between different tissues and individual patients; and (g) the general failure to use engineering principles to model biology in parallel with performing 'wet' experiments, such that 'what if?' experiments can be performed in silico to assess the likely success of any strategy. These facts/ideas are illustrated with a reasonably extensive literature review. Success in turning round drug discovery consequently requires: (a) decent systems biology models of human biochemical networks; (b) the use of these (iteratively with experiments) to model how drugs need to interact with multiple targets to have substantive effects on the phenotype; (c) the adoption of polypharmacology and/or cocktails of drugs as a desirable goal in itself; (d) the incorporation of drug transporters into systems biology models, en route to full and multiscale systems biology models that

  3. Assessment of nitrogen and sulphur cycle bacteria and shrimp production in ponds treated with biological products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thangapalam Jawahar Abraham; Shubhadeep Ghosh; Debasis Sasmal

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To study the influence of biological products on the levels of nitrogen and sulphur cycle bacteria in shrimp culture systems of West Bengal, India. Methods: The pond water and sediment samples were analyzed for physico-chemical parameters as per standard methods. The bacteria involved in ammonification, nitrification, denitrification, sulphate reduction and sulphur oxidation were enumerated by most probable number technique. Results:The semi-intensive and modified extensive shrimp farms used a variety of biological products during various stages of production. No biological products were used in traditional farms. The water and sediment samples of modified extensive system recorded significantly higher mean heterotrophic bacterial counts. The counts of ammonia, nitrite and sulphur oxidizers, and nitrate and sulphate reducers varied among the systems. The cycling of nitrogen and sulphur appeared to be affected with the intensification of culture practices. Conclusions:The application of biological products in certain systems helped to maintain the bacteria involved in nitrogen and sulphur cycles and safe levels of ammonia, nitrite and nitrate. An assessment of these metabolically active bacteria in shrimp culture ponds and the application of right kind microbial products would help ameliorate the organic pollution in shrimp aquaculture.

  4. A systematic screen of FDA-approved drugs for inhibitors of biological threat agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter B Madrid

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The rapid development of effective medical countermeasures against potential biological threat agents is vital. Repurposing existing drugs that may have unanticipated activities as potential countermeasures is one way to meet this important goal, since currently approved drugs already have well-established safety and pharmacokinetic profiles in patients, as well as manufacturing and distribution networks. Therefore, approved drugs could rapidly be made available for a new indication in an emergency. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A large systematic effort to determine whether existing drugs can be used against high containment bacterial and viral pathogens is described. We assembled and screened 1012 FDA-approved drugs for off-label broad-spectrum efficacy against Bacillus anthracis; Francisella tularensis; Coxiella burnetii; and Ebola, Marburg, and Lassa fever viruses using in vitro cell culture assays. We found a variety of hits against two or more of these biological threat pathogens, which were validated in secondary assays. As expected, antibiotic compounds were highly active against bacterial agents, but we did not identify any non-antibiotic compounds with broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. Lomefloxacin and erythromycin were found to be the most potent compounds in vivo protecting mice against Bacillus anthracis challenge. While multiple virus-specific inhibitors were identified, the most noteworthy antiviral compound identified was chloroquine, which disrupted entry and replication of two or more viruses in vitro and protected mice against Ebola virus challenge in vivo. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The feasibility of repurposing existing drugs to face novel threats is demonstrated and this represents the first effort to apply this approach to high containment bacteria and viruses.

  5. Comparison of long-term drug survival and safety of biologic agents in patients with psoriasis vulgaris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    zbr735, zbr735; Bang, B; Bryld, L E;

    2015-01-01

    and to analyse the factors that influence drug survival. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data were extracted from the prospective registry DERMBIO covering all patients with psoriasis vulgaris treated with biologic agents in the academic centres in Denmark. Drug survival was analysed using the Kaplan-Meier method......BACKGROUND: Drug survival (time to drug discontinuation) has recently emerged as an important parameter reflecting the long-term therapeutic performance in a real-life setting. Biologic drug survival in psoriasis is mainly limited by a gradual loss of efficacy over time. Previous studies have been...... limited by small patient population size and short observation times and yielded discrepant survival times for different biologics. OBJECTIVES: To calculate the long-term drug survival for adalimumab, etanercept, infliximab and ustekinumab in a large cohort of real-life patients with psoriasis vulgaris...

  6. Biological hydrogen production from biomass by thermophilic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claassen, P.A.M.; Mars, A.E.; Budde, M.A.W.; Lai, M.; de Vrije, T. [Wageningen UR, Agrotechnology and Food Sciences Group (AFSG), Business Unit Biobased Products, P.O. Box 17, 6700 AA Wageningen, (Netherlands); van Niel, E.W.J. [Lund University, Applied microbiology, P.O. Box 124, 221 000 Lund, (Sweden)

    2006-07-01

    To meet the reduction of the emission of CO{sub 2} imposed by the Kyoto protocol, hydrogen should be produced from renewable primary energy. Besides the indirect production of hydrogen by electrolysis using electricity from renewable resources, such as sunlight, wind and hydropower, hydrogen can be directly produced from biomass. At present, there are two strategies for the production of hydrogen from biomass: the thermochemical technology, such as gasification, and the biotechnological approach using micro-organisms. Biological hydrogen production delivers clean hydrogen with an environmental-friendly technology and is very suitable for the conversion of wet biomass in small-scale applications, thus having a high chance of becoming an economically feasible technology. Many micro-organisms are able to produce hydrogen from mono- and disaccharides, starch and (hemi)cellulose under anaerobic conditions. The anaerobic production of hydrogen is a common phenomenon, occurring during the process of anaerobic digestion. Here, hydrogen producing micro-organisms are in syn-trophy with methanogenic bacteria which consume the hydrogen as soon as it is produced. In this way, hydrogen production remains obscure and methane is the end-product. By uncoupling hydrogen production from methane production, hydrogen becomes available for recovery and exploitation. This study describes the use of extreme thermophilic bacteria, selected because of a higher hydrogen production efficiency as compared to mesophilic bacteria, for the production of hydrogen from renewable resources. As feedstock energy crops like Miscanthus and Sorghum bicolor and waste streams like domestic organic waste, paper sludge and potato steam peels were used. The feedstock was pretreated and/or enzymatically hydrolyzed prior to fermentation to make a fermentable substrate. Hydrogen production by Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus, Thermotoga elfii and T. neapolitana on all substrates was observed. Nutrient

  7. Biological hydrogen production from biomass by thermophilic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To meet the reduction of the emission of CO2 imposed by the Kyoto protocol, hydrogen should be produced from renewable primary energy. Besides the indirect production of hydrogen by electrolysis using electricity from renewable resources, such as sunlight, wind and hydropower, hydrogen can be directly produced from biomass. At present, there are two strategies for the production of hydrogen from biomass: the thermochemical technology, such as gasification, and the biotechnological approach using micro-organisms. Biological hydrogen production delivers clean hydrogen with an environmental-friendly technology and is very suitable for the conversion of wet biomass in small-scale applications, thus having a high chance of becoming an economically feasible technology. Many micro-organisms are able to produce hydrogen from mono- and disaccharides, starch and (hemi)cellulose under anaerobic conditions. The anaerobic production of hydrogen is a common phenomenon, occurring during the process of anaerobic digestion. Here, hydrogen producing micro-organisms are in syn-trophy with methanogenic bacteria which consume the hydrogen as soon as it is produced. In this way, hydrogen production remains obscure and methane is the end-product. By uncoupling hydrogen production from methane production, hydrogen becomes available for recovery and exploitation. This study describes the use of extreme thermophilic bacteria, selected because of a higher hydrogen production efficiency as compared to mesophilic bacteria, for the production of hydrogen from renewable resources. As feedstock energy crops like Miscanthus and Sorghum bicolor and waste streams like domestic organic waste, paper sludge and potato steam peels were used. The feedstock was pretreated and/or enzymatically hydrolyzed prior to fermentation to make a fermentable substrate. Hydrogen production by Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus, Thermotoga elfii and T. neapolitana on all substrates was observed. Nutrient requirements

  8. 21 CFR 314.92 - Drug products for which abbreviated applications may be submitted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... offered for sale by its manufacturer, a person who wishes to submit an abbreviated new drug application... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drug products for which abbreviated applications may be submitted. 314.92 Section 314.92 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT...

  9. Computer-Aided Drug Design of Bioactive Natural Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prachayasittikul, Veda; Worachartcheewan, Apilak; Shoombuatong, Watshara; Songtawee, Napat; Simeon, Saw; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Nantasenamat, Chanin

    2015-01-01

    Natural products have been an integral part of sustaining civilizations because of their medicinal properties. Past discoveries of bioactive natural products have relied on serendipity, and these compounds serve as inspiration for the generation of analogs with desired physicochemical properties. Bioactive natural products with therapeutic potential are abundantly available in nature and some of them are beyond exploration by conventional methods. The effectiveness of computational approaches as versatile tools for facilitating drug discovery and development has been recognized for decades, without exception, in the case of natural products. In the post-genomic era, scientists are bombarded with data produced by advanced technologies. Thus, rendering these data into knowledge that is interpretable and meaningful becomes an essential issue. In this regard, computational approaches utilize the existing data to generate knowledge that provides valuable understanding for addressing current problems and guiding the further research and development of new natural-derived drugs. Furthermore, several medicinal plants have been continuously used in many traditional medicine systems since antiquity throughout the world, and their mechanisms have not yet been elucidated. Therefore, the utilization of computational approaches and advanced synthetic techniques would yield great benefit to improving the world's health population and well-being.

  10. Current studies on physiological functions and biological production of lactosucrose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Wanmeng; Chen, Qiuming; Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Tao; Jiang, Bo

    2013-08-01

    Lactosucrose (O-β-D-galactopyranosyl-(1,4)-O-α-D-glucopyranosyl-(1,2)-β-D-fructofuranoside) is a trisaccharide formed from lactose and sucrose by enzymatic transglycosylation. This rare trisaccharide is a kind of indigestible carbohydrate, has good prebiotic effect, and promotes intestinal mineral absorption. It has been used as a functional ingredient in a range of food products which are approved as foods for specified health uses in Japan. Using lactose and sucrose as substrates, lactosucrose can be produced through transfructosylation by β-fructofuranosidase from Arthrobacter sp. K-1 or a range of levansucrases, or through transgalactosylation by β-galactosidase from Bacillus circulans. This article presented a review of recent studies on the physiological functions of lactosucrose and the biological production from lactose and sucrose by different enzymes.

  11. Current studies on physiological functions and biological production of lactosucrose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Wanmeng; Chen, Qiuming; Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Tao; Jiang, Bo

    2013-08-01

    Lactosucrose (O-β-D-galactopyranosyl-(1,4)-O-α-D-glucopyranosyl-(1,2)-β-D-fructofuranoside) is a trisaccharide formed from lactose and sucrose by enzymatic transglycosylation. This rare trisaccharide is a kind of indigestible carbohydrate, has good prebiotic effect, and promotes intestinal mineral absorption. It has been used as a functional ingredient in a range of food products which are approved as foods for specified health uses in Japan. Using lactose and sucrose as substrates, lactosucrose can be produced through transfructosylation by β-fructofuranosidase from Arthrobacter sp. K-1 or a range of levansucrases, or through transgalactosylation by β-galactosidase from Bacillus circulans. This article presented a review of recent studies on the physiological functions of lactosucrose and the biological production from lactose and sucrose by different enzymes. PMID:23828605

  12. Beware When Buying "All Natural" Erectile Dysfunction Products

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products For ... back Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products

  13. [Instrumental analysis of medicinal plants and their drug products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petri, G; Lemberkovics, E

    1994-05-01

    The experiences obtained during the development of gas chromatographic and other (GC, TLC and infrared spectrophotometric) methods for the 7th edition of the Hungarian Pharmacopoeia for essential oils and drugs containing essential oils are summarized with emphasis on the selection of suitable internal standard for the gas chromatographic assays. The qualitative and quantitative estimation of bitter compounds and polyphenoles e.g. flavonoids and procyanidines by means of ultraviolet and infrared spectrophotometry and HPLC is also described. Some HPLC methods for the determination of anthocyan and carotinoid derivatives are also presented. These are not yet included in the pharmacopoeia but are successfully used for the analytical investigation of commercially available medicinal plants and drug products made thereof. PMID:7942042

  14. Predicting drug-target interaction networks based on functional groups and biological features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhisong He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Study of drug-target interaction networks is an important topic for drug development. It is both time-consuming and costly to determine compound-protein interactions or potential drug-target interactions by experiments alone. As a complement, the in silico prediction methods can provide us with very useful information in a timely manner. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To realize this, drug compounds are encoded with functional groups and proteins encoded by biological features including biochemical and physicochemical properties. The optimal feature selection procedures are adopted by means of the mRMR (Maximum Relevance Minimum Redundancy method. Instead of classifying the proteins as a whole family, target proteins are divided into four groups: enzymes, ion channels, G-protein- coupled receptors and nuclear receptors. Thus, four independent predictors are established using the Nearest Neighbor algorithm as their operation engine, with each to predict the interactions between drugs and one of the four protein groups. As a result, the overall success rates by the jackknife cross-validation tests achieved with the four predictors are 85.48%, 80.78%, 78.49%, and 85.66%, respectively. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that the network prediction system thus established is quite promising and encouraging.

  15. Removal of Review and Reclassification Procedures for Biological Products Licensed Prior to July 1, 1972. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-12

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA, the Agency, or we) is removing two regulations that prescribe procedures for FDA's review and classification of biological products licensed before July 1, 1972. FDA is taking this action because the two regulations are obsolete and no longer necessary in light of other statutory and regulatory authorities established since 1972, which allow FDA to evaluate and monitor the safety and effectiveness of all biological products. In addition, other statutory and regulatory authorities authorize FDA to revoke a license for biological products because they are not safe and effective, or are misbranded. FDA is taking this action as part of its retrospective review of its regulations to promote improvement and innovation. PMID:26878738

  16. Biological evaluation of nanosilver incorporated cellulose pulp for hygiene products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavitha Sankar, P C; Ramakrishnan, Reshmi; Rosemary, M J

    2016-04-01

    Cellulose pulp has a visible market share in personal hygiene products such as sanitary napkins and baby diapers. However it offers good surface for growth of microorganisms. Huge amount of research is going on in developing hygiene products that do not initiate microbial growth. The objective of the present work is to produce antibacterial cellulose pulp by depositing silver nanopowder on the cellulose fiber. The silver nanoparticles used were of less than 100 nm in size and were characterised using transmission electron microscopy and X-ray powder diffraction studies. Antibacterial activity of the functionalized cellulose pulp was proved by JIS L 1902 method. The in-vitro cytotoxicity, in-vivo vaginal irritation and intracutaneous reactivity studies were done with silver nanopowder incorporated cellulose pulp for introducing a new value added product to the market. Cytotoxicity evaluation suggested that the silver nanoparticle incorporated cellulose pulp is non-cytotoxic. No irritation and skin sensitization were identified in animals tested with specific extracts prepared from the test material in the in-vivo experiments. The results indicated that the silver nanopowder incorporated cellulose pulp meets the requirements of the standard practices recommended for evaluating the biological reactivity and has good biocompatibility, hence can be classified as a safe hygiene product. PMID:26838891

  17. Formulation of Pharmacovigilance Plan of Biological Generic Drug%生物仿制药警戒计划的制订

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张淑兰; 关丽

    2012-01-01

    目的:按照药物临床安全性和警戒性的要求,对生物仿制药的生物利用度、临床疗效安全性进行评价,以制订生物仿制药警戒计划.方法:对我国生物仿制药在前期研究、临床试验、生产等过程存在的问题进行分析.结果与结论:生物仿制药品相似但不相同,生物制剂生产过程复杂,容易出现变异,有必要进行临床安全性评价.国家各卫生医疗机构部门应高度关注,加强药品的自检、抽检、监督管理,在生物仿制药使用过程中发现问题,提高我国生物仿制药的临床安全用药水平.%OBJECTIVE: To evaluate bioavailability and safety of clinical efficacy of biological generic drug according to the requirement of drug safety and pharmacovigilance, and to formulate the pharmacovigilance plan for it. METHODS: Problems of biological generic drug in China were analyzed in terms of preliminary study, clinical trial and production. RESULTS&CONCLU-SION: Biological generic drugs are similar but not same, and the production process is complex and easily results in variable. It is necessary to evaluate clinical safety of drugs. Medical institutions should be intensely focused on self-checking, sampling inspection, supervision and management, find out problems to improve safety of biological generic drugs in China.

  18. Biological productivity and carbon cycling in the Arctic Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Primary production, bacterial production, particulate organic carbon fluxes and organic carbon burial rates were quantified during the summer period of 1999 in the Arctic Ocean via 14C uptake, 3H uptake, 234Th/238U disequilibrium and 210Pbex dating, respectively. The integrated primary production in the water column was as high as 197 mmolC/(m2@d) in the Chukchi shelf and was 3.8 mmolC/(m2@d) in the Canada Basin. These rates are higher than those reported previously. The ratios of bacterial production to primary production in the study region were higher than 0.5, indicating that microbial activity is not depressed but important in cold Arctic waters. 234Th/238U disequilibria were evident at the station in the Canada Basin. The presence of significant 234Th deficiency suggested that scavenging and removal processes are also important to biogeochemical cycles of trace elements in the Arctic Ocean. Particulate organic carbon export flux was estimated to be 1.0 mmolC/(m2@d). Measurements of sediment excess 210Pb profile in the Chukchi shelf allowed us to estimate the amount of organic carbon buried in the bottom sediment, which ranged from 25 to 35 mmolC/(m2@d) and represented about 59%-82% of the mean primary production in the euphotic zone. Overall, our results indicated that the Arctic Ocean has active carbon cycling and is not a biological desert as previously believed. Therefore, the Arctic Ocean may play an important role in the global carbon cycle and climate change.

  19. Clinical, Pharmacokinetic, and In Vitro Studies to Support Bioequivalence of Ophthalmic Drug Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Stephanie H; Lionberger, Robert A

    2016-07-01

    For ophthalmic drug products, the determination of bioequivalence can be challenging, as drug concentrations at the site of action cannot always be measured. The FDA has recommended a variety of studies that can be used to demonstrate bioequivalence for different ophthalmic drug products. Product-specific bioequivalence recommendations for 28 ophthalmic products have been posted on FDA's website as of May 2016, outlining the specific tests which should be performed to demonstrate bioequivalence. The type of study that can be used to demonstrate bioequivalence depends on the drug product's active pharmaceutical ingredient(s), dosage form, indication, site of action, mechanism of action, and scientific understanding of drug release/drug availability and drug product characteristics. This article outlines the FDA's current guidance on studies to demonstrate bioequivalence through clinical endpoint studies, pharmacokinetic studies, and in vitro studies for generic ophthalmic drug products. PMID:27184578

  20. Suitability of Gray Water for Hydroponic Crop Production Following Biological and Physical Chemical and Biological Subsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubenheim, David L.; Harper, Lynn D.; Wignarajah, Kanapathipillai; Greene, Catherine

    1994-01-01

    The water present in waste streams from a human habitat must be recycled in Controlled Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS) to limit resupply needs and attain self-sufficiency. Plants play an important role in providing food, regenerating air, and producing purified water via transpiration. However, we have shown that the surfactants present in hygiene waste water have acute toxic effects on plant growth (Bubenheim et al. 1994; Greene et al., 1994). These phytotoxic affects can be mitigated by allowing the microbial population on the root surface to degrade the surfactant, however, a significant suppression (several days) in crop performance is experienced prior to reaching sub-toxic surfactant levels and plant recovery. An effective alternative is to stabilize the microbial population responsible for degradation of the surfactant on an aerobic bioreactor and process the waste water prior to utilization in the hydroponic solution (Wisniewski and Bubenheim, 1993). A sensitive bioassay indicates that the surfactant phytotoxicity is suppressed by more than 90% within 5 hours of introduction of the gray water to the bioreactor; processing for more than 12 hours degrades more than 99% of the phytotoxin. Vapor Compression Distillation (VCD) is a physical / chemical method for water purification which employees sequential distillation steps to separate water from solids and to volatilize contaminants. The solids from the waste water are concentrated in a brine and the pure product water (70 - 90% of the total waste water volume depending on operating conditions) retains non of the phytotoxic effects. Results of the bioassay were used to guide evaluations of the suitability of recovered gray water following biological and VCD processing for hydroponic lettuce production in controlled environments. Lettuce crops were grown for 28 days with 100% of the input water supplied with recovered water from the biological processor or VCD. When compared with the growth of plants

  1. The effect of exposure misclassification in spontaneous ADR reports on the time to detection of product-specific risks for biologicals : A simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, Niels S.; Ebbers, Hans C.; Straus, Sabine M J M; Leufkens, Hubert G M; Egberts, Toine C G; De Bruin, Marie L.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: The availability of accurate product-specific exposure information is essential in the pharmacovigilance of biologicals, because differences in the safety profile may emerge between products containing the same active substance. In spontaneous adverse drug reaction (ADR) re

  2. Synthetic and bioengineered products in nuclear medicine and drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text. The supply of radio pharmaceuticals based on pooled human blood products, for example human serum albumin (H S A) and fibrinogen, has previously met with some problems due to the possibility of donor infection A common feature of all biologicals of animal or human origin is the potential risk of viral contamination from the source material. Recombinant DNA technology provides an alternative source of biological materials that have applications throughout medicine. Micro capsules prepared from recombinant human serum albumin (r H S A) are currently under development as ultrasound contrast agents. Similar products would serve as an alternative source of material to serum albumin pooled from human donors and would offer great potential in the production of radio pharmaceuticals. There is a growing interest in the use of macromolecular carriers for therapeutic agents. When labelled with and appropriate gamma-emitter, their biodistribution can be be followed by scintigraphy. The biodistribution of a synthetic branched polypeptide, based on a poly-L-lysine backbone (average molecular mass 45 kDa) is described. The polymer was conjugated to diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid and labelled by chelation with Indium-111. Mice were injected i.v. with labelled material and imaged with a gamma camera with a pin hole collimator. Images showed the majority of tracer remaining in the blood poll, but about 35% appeared in the urinary bladder within 1.5 h

  3. Synthetic and bioengineered products in nuclear medicine and drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frier, M. [Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom). Dept. of Medical Physics

    1997-12-31

    Full text. The supply of radio pharmaceuticals based on pooled human blood products, for example human serum albumin (H S A) and fibrinogen, has previously met with some problems due to the possibility of donor infection A common feature of all biologicals of animal or human origin is the potential risk of viral contamination from the source material. Recombinant DNA technology provides an alternative source of biological materials that have applications throughout medicine. Micro capsules prepared from recombinant human serum albumin (r H S A) are currently under development as ultrasound contrast agents. Similar products would serve as an alternative source of material to serum albumin pooled from human donors and would offer great potential in the production of radio pharmaceuticals. There is a growing interest in the use of macromolecular carriers for therapeutic agents. When labelled with and appropriate gamma-emitter, their biodistribution can be be followed by scintigraphy. The biodistribution of a synthetic branched polypeptide, based on a poly-L-lysine backbone (average molecular mass 45 kDa) is described. The polymer was conjugated to diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid and labelled by chelation with Indium-111. Mice were injected i.v. with labelled material and imaged with a gamma camera with a pin hole collimator. Images showed the majority of tracer remaining in the blood poll, but about 35% appeared in the urinary bladder within 1.5 h

  4. Natural Products Towards the Discovery of Potential Future Antithrombotic Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Asiful; Alam, Fahmida; Khalil, Md Ibrahim; Sasongko, Teguh Haryo; Gan, Siew Hua

    2016-01-01

    Globally, thrombosis-associated disorders are one of the main contributors to fatalities. Besides genetic influences, there are some acquired and environmental risk factors dominating thrombotic diseases. Although standard regimens have been used for a long time, many side effects still occur which can be life threatening. Therefore, natural products are good alternatives. Although the quest for antithrombotic natural products came to light only since the end of last century, in the last two decades, a considerable number of natural products showing antithrombotic activities (antiplatelet, anticoagulant and fibrinolytic) with no or minimal side effects have been reported. In this review, several natural products used as antithrombotic agents including medicinal plants, vegetables, fruits, spices and edible mushrooms which have been discovered in the last 15 years and their target sites (thrombogenic components, factors and thrombotic pathways) are described. In addition, the side effects, limitations and interactions of standard regimens with natural products are also discussed. The active compounds could serve as potential sources for future research on antithrombotic drug development. As a future direction, more advanced researches (in quest of the target cofactor or component involved in antithrombotic pathways) are warranted for the development of potential natural antithrombotic medications (alone or combined with standard regimens) to ensure maximum safety and efficacy. PMID:26951101

  5. Potential strategies for increasing drug-discovery productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumming, John G; Finlay, M Raymond V; Giordanetto, Fabrizio; Hemmerling, Martin; Lister, Troy; Sanganee, Hitesh; Waring, Michael J

    2014-04-01

    The productivity challenge facing the pharmaceutical industry is well documented. Strategies to improve productivity have mainly focused on enhancing efficiency, such as the application of Lean Six Sigma process improvement methods and the introduction of modeling and simulation in place of 'wet' experiments. While these strategies have their benefits, the real challenge is to improve effectiveness by reducing clinical failure rates. We advocate redesigning the screening cascade to identify and optimize novel compounds with improved efficacy against disease, not just with improved potency against the target. There should be greater use of disease-relevant phenotypic screens in conjunction with target-based assays to drive medicinal chemistry optimization. An opportunistic approach to polypharmacology is recommended. There should also be more emphasis on optimization of the molecular mechanism of action incorporating understanding of binding kinetics, consideration of covalent drug strategies and targeting allosteric modulators.

  6. Antimicrobial drug resistance ofStaphylococcus aureus in dairy products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sasidharan S; Prema B; Yoga Latha L

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the prevalence of multidrug resistantStaphylococcus aureus(S. aureus) in dairy products.Methods:Isolation and identification ofS. aureus were performed in3 dairy-based food products. The isolates were tested for their susceptibility to5 different common antimicrobial drugs.Results:Of50 samples examined,5 (10%) were contaminated with S. aureus. Subsequently, the5 isolates were subjected to antimicrobial resistance pattern using five antibiotic discs (methicillin, vancomycin, kanamycin, chloramphenicol and tetracycline). Sample 29 showed resistance to methicillin and vancomycin. Sample18 showed intermediate response to tetracycline. The other samples were susceptible to all the antibiotics tested.Conclusions:The results provide preliminary data on sources of food contamination which may act as vehicles for the transmission of antimicrobial-resistantStaphylococcus.Therefore, it enables us to develop preventive strategies to avoid the emergence of new strains of resistantS. aureus.

  7. Biological production of ethanol from coal. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    Due to the abundant supply of coal in the United States, significant research efforts have occurred over the past 15 years concerning the conversion of coal to liquid fuels. Researchers at the University of Arkansas have concentrated on a biological approach to coal liquefaction, starting with coal-derived synthesis gas as the raw material. Synthesis gas, a mixture of CO, H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and sulfur gases, is first produced using traditional gasification techniques. The CO, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} are then converted to ethanol using a bacterial culture of Clostridium 1jungdahlii. Ethanol is the desired product if the resultant product stream is to be used as a liquid fuel. However, under normal operating conditions, the ``wild strain`` produces acetate in favor of ethanol in conjunction with growth in a 20:1 molar ratio. Research was performed to determine the conditions necessary to maximize not only the ratio of ethanol to acetate, but also to maximize the concentration of ethanol resulting in the product stream.

  8. Systems biology of recombinant protein production using Bacillus megaterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedendieck, Rebekka; Borgmeier, Claudia; Bunk, Boyke; Stammen, Simon; Scherling, Christian; Meinhardt, Friedhelm; Wittmann, Christoph; Jahn, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli is the most widely used production host for recombinant proteins in both academia and industry. The Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus megaterium represents an increasingly used alternative for high yield intra- and extracellular protein synthesis. During the past two decades, multiple tools including gene expression plasmids and production strains have been developed. Introduction of free replicating and integrative plasmids into B. megaterium is possible via protoplasts transformation or transconjugation. Using His(6)- and StrepII affinity tags, the intra- or extracellular produced proteins can easily be purified in one-step procedures. Different gene expression systems based on the xylose controlled promoter P(xylA) and various phage RNA polymerase (T7, SP6, K1E) driven systems enable B. megaterium to produce up to 1.25g of recombinant protein per liter. Biomass concentrations of up to 80g/l can be achieved by high cell density cultivations in bioreactors. Gene knockouts and gene replacements in B. megaterium are possible via an optimized gene disruption system. For a safe application in industry, sporulation and protease-deficient as well as UV-sensitive mutants are available. With the help of the recently published B. megaterium genome sequence, it is possible to characterize bottle necks in the protein production process via systems biology approaches based on transcriptome, proteome, metabolome, and fluxome data. The bioinformatical platform (Megabac, http://www.megabac.tu-bs.de) integrates obtained theoretical and experimental data. PMID:21943898

  9. High performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry of pharmaceuticals and personal care products in environmental and biological matrices

    OpenAIRE

    Purcell, Martha

    2009-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) have emerged in recent years as a new class of chemical and biological pollutants in our environment. In the search for suitably sensitive and specific techniques for detection of these compounds at very low concentrations, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LCMS/ MS) has emerged as the new technique of choice. This work describes methods for screening and quantification of various pharmaceutical and illicit drug residues i...

  10. Enhanced saccharification of biologically pretreated wheat straw for ethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Abelairas, M; Lu-Chau, T A; Lema, J M

    2013-02-01

    The biological pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass with white-rot fungi for the production of bioethanol is an alternative to the most used physico-chemical processes. After biological treatment, a solid composed of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin-this latter is with a composition lower than that found in the initial substrate-is obtained. On the contrary, after applying physico-chemical methods, most of the hemicellulose fraction is solubilized, while cellulose and lignin fractions remain in the solid. The optimization of the combination of cellulases and hemicellulases required to saccharify wheat straw pretreated with the white-rot fungus Irpex lacteus was carried out in this work. The application of the optimal dosage made possible the increase of the sugar yield from 33 to 54 %, and at the same time the reduction of the quantity of enzymatic mixture in 40 %, with respect to the initial dosage. The application of a pre-hydrolysis step with xylanases was also studied. PMID:23306886

  11. [Radio protective drug production from fresh leaves of Aloe arborescens Mill].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakuridze, A Dzh; Nikolaev, S M; Berashvili, D T; Bakuridze, K A; Tsomaia, I V

    2009-06-01

    Nowadays, phytogenous drugs are wildly used as radio protective substances. The aim of the research was to study radio protective characteristics of aloe juice fraction and to develop new technology for radio protective drug production. Technological scheme for getting the drug in two stages. The first stage - extraction of juice from fresh leaves; the second stage - extracting bagasse have been developed and optimal environment for bagasse extraction are defined: Infusion of bagasse with 96 % ethyl spirit (1:1) during 30 minutes, continuation of extracting with water on correlation to raw materials 10:1 at temperature of 70 degrees C during 30 minutes. For the basis of the first series of balanced loading there are taken the optimal parameters of extracting process, on the basis of which in its turn was developed technological scheme of getting dry extract of aloe. Dry extract is a fine-dispersed reddish-yellow (brownish-yellow) powder, which can be easily dissolved in warm (40-60 degrees C) water. Pharmacological researches were conducted in the Institute of General and Experimental Biology, Siberian Branch, Russian. Academy of Sciences. The remarkable radio protective effect of the drug was revealed. PMID:19578223

  12. Chromatographic immunoassays: strategies and recent developments in the analysis of drugs and biological agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Ryan; Rodriguez, Elliott; Suresh, Doddavenkatanna; Hage, David S

    2015-01-01

    A chromatographic immunoassay is a technique in which an antibody or antibody-related agent is used as part of a chromatographic system for the isolation or measurement of a specific target. Various binding agents, detection methods, supports and assay formats have been developed for this group of methods, and applications have been reported that range from drugs, hormones and herbicides to peptides, proteins and bacteria. This review discusses the general principles and applications of chromatographic immunoassays, with an emphasis being given to methods and formats that have been developed for the analysis of drugs and biological agents. The relative advantages or limitations of each format are discussed. Recent developments and research in this field, as well as possible future directions, are also considered.

  13. Production and biological activities of yellow pigments from Monascus fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gong; Wu, Zhenqiang

    2016-08-01

    Monascus yellow pigments (MYPs), are azaphilone compounds and one of the three main components of total Monascus pigments (MPs). Thirty-five hydrophilic or hydrophobic MYPs have been identified, with the majority being hydrophobic. Apart from screening special Monascus strains, some advanced approaches, such as extractive and high-cell-density fermentations, have been applied for developing or producing new MYPs, especially extracellular hydrophilic MYPs. The outstanding performance of MYPs in terms of resistance to photodegradation, as well as tolerance for temperature and pH, give natural MYPs reasonable prospects, compared with the orange and red MPs, for practical use in the present and future. Meanwhile, MYPs have shown promising potential for applications in the food and pharmaceutical industries based on their described bioactivities. This review briefly summarizes the reports to date on chemical structures, biological activities, biosynthetic pathways, production technologies, and physicochemical performances of MYPs. The existing problems for MYPs are discussed and research prospects proposed. PMID:27357404

  14. Biologically active amines in fermented and non-fermented commercial soybean products from the Spanish market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro-Funes, N; Bosch-Fuste, J; Latorre-Moratalla, M L; Veciana-Nogués, M T; Vidal-Carou, M C

    2015-04-15

    Biologically active amines were determined in commercial soybean products. The antioxidant polyamines were found in both non-fermented and fermented soybean products. Natto and tempeh showed the highest content of polyamines (75-124 and 11-24 mg/kg of spermidine and spermine, respectively). On the other hand, the bacterial-related biogenic amines, tyramine, histamine, tryptamine and β-phenylethylamine, were detected in practically all fermented products with a high variability. The highest contents were found in sufu, tamari and soybean paste. Extremely high tyramine and histamine contents, 1700 and 700 mg/kg, respectively, found in some sufu samples could be unhealthy. However, biogenic amines observed in the other soybean products should not be a risk for healthy consumers. However, individuals who take monoamine and diamine oxidase inhibitors drugs should be strongly recommended to avoid this kind of products in order to suffer no adverse health effects. These biogenic amines were not detected in non-fermented soybean products.

  15. Determination of Strong Acidic Drugs in Biological Matrices: A Review of Separation Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingli Mu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Strong acidic drugs are a class of chemical compounds that normally have high hydrophilicity and large negative charges, such as organophosphatic compounds and organosulphonic compounds. This review focuses on sample preparation and separation methods for this group of compounds in biological matrices in recent years. A wide range of separation techniques, especially chromatographic method, are presented and critically discussed, which include liquid chromatography (e.g., ion-pair and ion-exchange chromatography, capillary electrophoresis (CE, and other types. Due to the extremely low concentration level of target analytes as well as the complexity of biological matrices, sample pretreatment methods, such as dilute and shoot methods, protein precipitation (PP, liquid-liquid extraction (LLE, solid-phase extraction (SPE, degradation, and derivatization strategy, also play important roles for the development of successful analytical methods and thus are also discussed.

  16. Surrogate biochemical markers: precise measurement for strategic drug and biologics development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J W; Hulse, J D; Colburn, W A

    1995-05-01

    More efficient drug and biologics development is necessary for future success of pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. One way to achieve this objective is to use rationally selected surrogate markers to improve the early decision-making process. Using typical clinical chemistry methods to measure biochemical markers may not ensure adequate precision and reproducibility. In contrast, using analytical methods that meet good laboratory practices along with rational selection and validation of biochemical markers can give those who use them a competitive advantage over those who do not by providing meaningful data for earlier decision making. PMID:7657845

  17. 75 FR 8968 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Adaptive Design Clinical Trials for Drugs and Biologics; Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... entitled ``Adaptive Design Clinical Trials for Drugs and Biologics.'' The draft guidance provides sponsors... Evaluation and Research (CBER) with information regarding adaptive design clinical trials when used in drug... design clinical trials (i.e., clinical, statistical, regulatory) call for special consideration, when...

  18. Non conventional biological treatment based on Trametes versicolor for the elimination of recalcitrant anticancer drugs in hospital wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrando Climent, Laura; Cruz Morató, Carles; Marco Urrea, Ernest; Vicent, Teresa; Sarrà i Adroguer, Montserrat; Rodríguez Mozaz, Sara; Barceló i Cullerés, Damià

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a study about the elimination of anticancer drugs, a group of pollutants considered recalcitrant during conventional activated sludge wastewater treatment, using a biological treatment based on the fungus Trametes versicolor. A 10-L fluidized bed bioreactor inoculated with this fungus was set up in order to evaluate the removal of 10 selected anticancer drugs in real hospital wastewater. Almost all the tested anticancer drugs were completely removed from the wastewater at ...

  19. 21 CFR 355.70 - Testing procedures for fluoride dentifrice drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Testing procedures for fluoride dentifrice drug... Procedures § 355.70 Testing procedures for fluoride dentifrice drug products. (a) A fluoride dentifrice drug... tests: Enamel solubility reduction or fluoride enamel uptake. The testing procedures for...

  20. 78 FR 21612 - Medical Device Classification Product Codes; Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Medical Device Classification Product Codes; Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of...

  1. 77 FR 71803 - Guidance on Food and Drug Administration Oversight of Positron Emission Tomography Drug Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance on Food and Drug Administration Oversight of... Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the... surveillance processes, including application submission, review, compliance with good manufacturing...

  2. Biological conversion of pyrolytic products to ethanol and lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Jieni

    Pyrolysis is a promising technology that can convert up to 75 % of lignocellulosic biomass into crude bio-oil. However, due to the complex chemical compositions of bio-oil, its further refining into fuels and high value chemicals faces great challenges. This dissertation research proposed new technologies for biological conversion of pyrolytic products derived from cellulose and hemicellulose, such as anhydrosugars and carbolic acids to fuels and chemicals. First, the pyrolytic anhydrosugars (chiefly levoglucosan (LG)) were hydrolysed into glucose followed by neutralization, detoxification and fermentation to produce ethanol by ethanogenetic yeast and lipids by oleaginous yeasts. Second, a novel process for the conversion of C1-C4 pyrolytic products to lipid with oleaginous yeasts was investigated. Third, oleaginous yeasts that can directly convert LG to lipids were studied and a recombined yeast with LG kinase was constructed for the direct convertion of LG into lipids. This allowed a reduction of existing process for LG fermentation from four steps into two steps and eliminated the need for acids and bases as well as the disposal of chemicals. The development of genetic modified organisms with LG kinase opens a promising avenue for the direct LG fermentation to produce a wide range of fuels and chemicals. The simplification of LG utilization process would enhance the economic viability of this technology.

  3. Competency development in antibody production in cancer cell biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, M.S.

    1998-12-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The main objective of this project was to develop a rapid recombinant antibody production technology. To achieve the objective, the authors employed (1) production of recombinant antigens that are important for cell cycle regulation and DNA repair, (2) immunization and specific selection of antibody-producing lymphocytes using the flow cytometry and magnetic bead capturing procedure, (3) construction of single chain antibody library, (4) development of recombinant vectors that target, express, and regulate the expression of intracellular antibodies, and (5) specific inhibition of tumor cell growth in tissue culture. The authors have accomplished (1) optimization of a selection procedure to isolate antigen-specific lymphocytes, (2) optimization of the construction of a single-chain antibody library, and (3) development of a new antibody expression vector for intracellular immunization. The future direction of this research is to continue to test the potential use of the intracellular immunization procedure as a tool to study functions of biological molecules and as an immuno-cancer therapy procedure to inhibit the growth of cancer cells.

  4. Biological hydrogen production measured in batch anaerobic respirometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Bruce E; Oh, Sang-Eun; Kim, In S; Van Ginkel, Steven

    2002-06-01

    The biological production of hydrogen from the fermentation of different substrates was examined in batch tests using heat-shocked mixed cultures with two techniques: an intermittent pressure release method (Owen method) and a continuous gas release method using a bubble measurement device (respirometric method). Under otherwise identical conditions, the respirometric method resulted in the production of 43% more hydrogen gas from glucose than the Owen method. The lower conversion of glucose to hydrogen using the Owen protocol may have been produced by repression of hydrogenase activity from high partial pressures in the gastight bottles, but this could not be proven using a thermodynamic/rate inhibition analysis. In the respirometric method, total pressure in the headspace never exceeded ambient pressure, and hydrogen typically composed as much as 62% of the headspace gas. High conversion efficiencies were consistently obtained with heat-shocked soils taken at different times and those stored for up to a month. Hydrogen gas composition was consistently in the range of 60-64% for glucose-grown cultures during logarithmic growth but declined in stationary cultures. Overall, hydrogen conversion efficiencies for glucose cultures were 23% based on the assumption of a maximum of 4 mol of hydrogen/ mol of glucose. Hydrogen conversion efficiencies were similar for sucrose (23%) and somewhat lower for molasses (15%) but were much lower for lactate (0.50%) and cellulose (0.075%).

  5. Monitoring Drug and Antidrug Levels: A Rational Approach in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Treated with Biologic Agents Who Experience Inadequate Response While Being on a Stable Biologic Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Mazilu

    2014-01-01

    and ETN regarding EULAR response (P=0.002 and P=0.023, DAS28 score (P=0.002 and P=0.003, and SDAI score (P=0.001 and P=0.026. Detectable biologic drug levels correlated with a better clinical response in patients experiencing their first RA inadequate response while being on a stable biologic treatment with RTX, IFX, and ETN.

  6. 78 FR 17933 - Determination That BENADRYL (diphenhydramine hydrochloride) Injection and Two Other Drug Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-25

    ...) Injection and Two Other Drug Products Were Not Withdrawn From Sale for Reasons of Safety or Effectiveness...) has determined that the three drug products listed in this document were not withdrawn from ] sale for... or effectiveness, or if FDA determines that the listed drug was withdrawn from sale for reasons...

  7. 76 FR 59141 - Determination That LOXITANE (Loxapine Succinate) Capsules and Three Other Drug Products Were Not...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-23

    ... and Three Other Drug Products Were Not Withdrawn From Sale for Reasons of Safety or Effectiveness...) has determined that the four drug products listed in this document were not withdrawn from sale for... effectiveness, or if FDA determines that the listed drug was withdrawn from sale for reasons of safety...

  8. 76 FR 11488 - Determination That MEGACE (Megestrol Acetate) Tablets and Nine Other Drug Products Were Not...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-02

    ... Register of July 21, 2010 (75 FR 42455).) Application No. Drug Applicant NDA 16-979 MEGACE (megestrol... Nine Other Drug Products Were Not Withdrawn From Sale for Reasons of Safety or Effectiveness AGENCY... determined that the 10 drug products listed in this document were not withdrawn from sale for reasons...

  9. 76 FR 45267 - Determination That INVERSINE (Mecamylamine Hydrochloride) Tablet and Six Other Drug Products Were...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-28

    ...) Oral Solution in the Federal Register of July 21, 2010 (75 FR 42455).) Application No. Drug Applicant...) Tablet and Six Other Drug Products Were Not Withdrawn From Sale for Reasons of Safety or Effectiveness...) has determined that the seven drug products listed in this document were not withdrawn from sale...

  10. 75 FR 73109 - Guidance for Industry on Antibacterial Drug Products: Use of Noninferiority Trials to Support...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-29

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a guidance for industry entitled ``Antibacterial Drug Products: Use of Noninferiority Trials to Support Approval.'' The purpose of this guidance is to provide information on FDA's current thinking regarding appropriate use of noninferiority (NI) clinical trial designs to evaluate antibacterial drug products. The Agency's......

  11. 78 FR 21611 - Guidance for Industry on Self-Selection Studies for Nonprescription Drug Products; Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a guidance for industry entitled ``Self-Selection Studies for Nonprescription Drug Products.'' This guidance is intended to provide recommendations to industry involved in developing and conducting self-selection studies to support an application for nonprescription drug products. A self-selection study assesses the......

  12. Prediction of in vivo drug performance using in vitro dissolution coupled with STELLA: a study with selected drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sumon; Yadav, Lokesh; Aggarwal, Deepika

    2015-01-01

    Prediction of the in vivo performance of the drug product from the in vitro studies is the major challenging job for the pharmaceutical industries. From the current regulatory perspective, biorelevant dissolution media should now be considered as quality control media in order to avoid the risk associated. Physiological based pharmacokinetic models (PBPK) coupled with biorelevant dissolution medium is widely used in simulation and prediction of the plasma drug concentration and in vivo drug performance. The present investigation deals with the evaluation of biorelevant dissolution media as well as in vivo drug performance by PBPK modelling using STELLA® simulation software. The PBPK model was developed using STELLA® using dissolution kinetics, solubility, standard gastrointestinal parameters and post-absorptive disposition parameters. The drug product selected for the present study includes Linezolid film-coated immediate-release tablets (Zyvox), Tacrolimus prolonged-release capsules (Advagraf), Valganciclovir tablets (Valcyte) and Mesalamine controlled-release capsules (Pentasa) each belonging to different biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS). The simulated plasma drug concentration was analyzed and pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated and compared with the reported values. The result from the present investigation indicates that STELLA® when coupled with biorelevant dissolution media can predict the in vivo performance of the drug product with prediction error less than 20% irrespective of the dosage form (immediate release versus modified release) and BCS Classification. Thus, STELLA® can be used for in vivo drug prediction which will be helpful in generic drug development. PMID:25494535

  13. Perspective for the production of antimalarial drugs in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, B

    1992-01-01

    There appears to be no chemical manufacture of antimalarial drugs in Brazil. Technology at the laboratory process level has been developed for chloroquine, mefloquine, pyrimethamine and cycloguanil, but not perfected nor scaled-up, largely for economic reasons and market uncertainty. Development of primaquine has been contracted but it will run into the same difficulty. Manufacturing capacity for sulfadoxine was registered in the SDI by Roche. A project to produce artemisinine and its derivatives is under way at UNICAMP-CPQBA but is hampered by low content in the plant. Proguanil could be produced easily, but apparently no attempt has been made to do so. Quinine is imported on a large scale mostly for soft-drink production. Since malarial treatment falls largely within the responsibility of the Government health authorities, manufacture of drugs in Brazil will depend on an assured medium-term purchase order made to a potential local manufacturer, since competition in the world market is scarcely viable at the present moment.

  14. Virtual target screening to rapidly identify potential protein targets of natural products in drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Pevzner

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Inherent biological viability and diversity of natural products make them a potentially rich source for new therapeutics. However, identification of bioactive compounds with desired therapeutic effects and identification of their protein targets is a laborious, expensive process. Extracts from organism samples may show desired activity in phenotypic assays but specific bioactive compounds must be isolated through further separation methods and protein targets must be identified by more specific phenotypic and in vitro experimental assays. Still, questions remain as to whether all relevant protein targets for a compound have been identified. The desire is to understand breadth of purposing for the compound to maximize its use and intellectual property, and to avoid further development of compounds with insurmountable adverse effects. Previously we developed a Virtual Target Screening system that computationally screens one or more compounds against a collection of virtual protein structures. By scoring each compound-protein interaction, we can compare against averaged scores of synthetic drug-like compounds to determine if a particular protein would be a potential target of a compound of interest. Here we provide examples of natural products screened through our system as we assess advantages and shortcomings of our current system in regards to natural product drug discovery.

  15. Ten years of publicly funded biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Ashley M; Proudman, Susanna M; Vitry, Agnes I; Sorich, Michael J; Cleland, Leslie G; Wiese, Michael D

    2016-02-01

    Biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treatment were among the first high-cost medicines to be subsidised in Australia. High-cost medicines pose several challenges to the Australian National Medicines Policy, which aims to provide timely access to effective medicines at a cost individuals and the community can afford. Thus, novel restriction criteria were developed to encourage cost-effective use of bDMARDs. Government expenditure on bDMARD subsidies for RA treatment grew to about $383 million in 2014. Evidence that initiation and continuation criteria for bDMARDs meet usually applied cost-benefit criteria is lacking. The combined expenditure on tocilizumab, certolizumab pegol and golimumab (added to the Australian Government's Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme in 2010) was $93 million in 2014, which is 210% over the initial estimate. Present and future challenges with regard to bDMARDs for RA and other high-cost drugs include improved expenditure predictions, monitoring of cost-effectiveness in relation to actual use and strategic development, regulation and use of biosimilars. Ten years of documentation on clinical and laboratory findings indicating eligibility to initiate and continue on bDMARDs remains un-used. These data represent an untapped opportunity to promote quality of use of bDMARDs and biosimilars and to improve cost predictions for high-cost drugs. PMID:26821102

  16. Ten years of publicly funded biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Ashley M; Proudman, Susanna M; Vitry, Agnes I; Sorich, Michael J; Cleland, Leslie G; Wiese, Michael D

    2016-02-01

    Biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treatment were among the first high-cost medicines to be subsidised in Australia. High-cost medicines pose several challenges to the Australian National Medicines Policy, which aims to provide timely access to effective medicines at a cost individuals and the community can afford. Thus, novel restriction criteria were developed to encourage cost-effective use of bDMARDs. Government expenditure on bDMARD subsidies for RA treatment grew to about $383 million in 2014. Evidence that initiation and continuation criteria for bDMARDs meet usually applied cost-benefit criteria is lacking. The combined expenditure on tocilizumab, certolizumab pegol and golimumab (added to the Australian Government's Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme in 2010) was $93 million in 2014, which is 210% over the initial estimate. Present and future challenges with regard to bDMARDs for RA and other high-cost drugs include improved expenditure predictions, monitoring of cost-effectiveness in relation to actual use and strategic development, regulation and use of biosimilars. Ten years of documentation on clinical and laboratory findings indicating eligibility to initiate and continue on bDMARDs remains un-used. These data represent an untapped opportunity to promote quality of use of bDMARDs and biosimilars and to improve cost predictions for high-cost drugs.

  17. Recent insights into the biological activities and drug delivery systems of tanshinones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Y

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Yuee Cai,1,* Wenji Zhang,2,* Zirong Chen,3 Zhi Shi,1,2 Chengwei He,1 Meiwan Chen1 1State Key Laboratory of Quality Research in Chinese Medicine, Institute of Chinese Medical Sciences, University of Macau, Macau, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Cell Biology & Institute of Biomedicine, National Engineering Research Center of Genetic Medicine, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Bioengineering Medicine, College of Life Science and Technology, Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Shands Cancer Center, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Tanshinones, the major lipid-soluble pharmacological constituents of the Chinese medicinal herb Tanshen (Salvia miltiorrhiza, have attracted growing scientific attention because of the prospective biomedical applications of these compounds. Numerous pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and cardio-cerebrovascular protection activities, are exhibited by the three primary bioactive constituents among the tanshinones, ie, tanshinone I (TNI, tanshinone IIA (TNIIA, and cryptotanshinone (CPT. However, due to their poor solubility and low dissolution rate, the clinical applications of TNI, TNIIA, and CPT are limited. To solve these problems, many studies have focused on loading tanshinones into liposomes, nanoparticles, microemulsions, cyclodextrin inclusions, solid dispersions, and so on. In this review, we aim to offer an updated summary of the biological activities and drug delivery systems of tanshinones to provide a reference for these constituents in clinical applications. Keywords: tanshinones, biological activities, drug delivery systems, bioavailability, solubility

  18. 78 FR 32667 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Rheumatoid Arthritis: Developing Drug Products for Treatment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Rheumatoid Arthritis... guidance for industry entitled ``Rheumatoid Arthritis: Developing Drug Products for Treatment.''...

  19. Fractional derivatives in the transport of drugs across biological materials and human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Michele; Cametti, Cesare

    2016-11-01

    The diffusion of drugs across a composite structure such as a biological membrane is a rather complex phenomenon, because of its inhomogeneous nature, yielding a diffusion rate and a drug solubility strongly dependent on the local position across the membrane itself. These problems are particularly strengthened in composite structures of a considerable thickness like, for example, the human skin, where the high heterogeneity provokes the transport through different simultaneous pathways. In this note, we propose a generalization of the diffusion model based on Fick's 2nd equation by substituting a diffusion constant by means of the memory formalism approach (diffusion with memory). In particular, we employ two different definitions of the fractional derivative, i.e., the usual Caputo fractional derivative and a new definition recently proposed by Caputo and Fabrizio. The model predictions have been compared to experimental results concerning the permeation of two different compounds through human skin in vivo, such as piroxicam, an anti-inflammatory drug, and 4-cyanophenol, a test chemical model compound. Moreover, we have also considered water penetration across human stratum corneum and the diffusion of an antiviral agent employed as model drugs across the skin of male hairless rats. In all cases, a satisfactory good agreement based on the diffusion with memory has been found. However, the model based on the new definition of fractional derivative gives a better description of the experimental data, on the basis of the residuals analysis. The use of the new definition widens the applicability of the fractional derivative to diffusion processes in highly heterogeneous systems.

  20. 9 CFR 105.3 - Notices re: worthless, contaminated, dangerous, or harmful biological products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., dangerous, or harmful biological products. 105.3 Section 105.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS SUSPENSION, REVOCATION, OR TERMINATION OF BIOLOGICAL LICENSES OR PERMITS §...

  1. Integrated anaerobic/aerobic biological treatment for intensive swine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortone, Giuseppe

    2009-11-01

    Manure processing could help farmers to effectively manage nitrogen (N) surplus load. Many pig farms have to treat wastewater. Piggery wastewater treatment is a complex challenge, due to the high COD and N concentrations and low C/N ratio. Anaerobic digestion (AD) could be a convenient pre-treatment, particularly from the energetic view point and farm income, but this causes further reduction of C/N ratio and makes denitrification difficult. N removal can only be obtained integrating anaerobic/aerobic treatment by taking into account the best use of electron donors. Experiences gained in Italy during development of integrated biological treatment approaches for swine manure, from bench to full scale, are reported in this paper. Solid/liquid separation as pre-treatment of raw manure is an efficient strategy to facilitate liquid fraction treatment without significantly lowering C/N ratio. In Italy, two full scale SBRs showed excellent efficiency and reliability. Current renewable energy policy and incentives makes economically attractive the application of AD to the separated solid fraction using high solid anaerobic digester (HSAD) technology. Economic evaluation showed that energy production can reduce costs up to 60%, making sustainable the overall treatment. PMID:19135363

  2. Pharmacognosy: Science of natural products in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orhan, Ilkay Erdogan

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacognosy deals with the natural drugs obtained from organisms such as most plants, microbes, and animals. Up to date, many important drugs including morphine, atropine, galanthamine, etc. have originated from natural sources which continue to be good model molecules in drug discovery. Traditional medicine is also a part of pharmacognosy and most of the third world countries still depend on the use of herbal medicines. Consequently, pharmacognosy always keeps its popularity in pharmaceutical sciences and plays a critical role in drug discovery.

  3. Differential Drug Survival of Biologic Therapies for the Treatment of Psoriasis: A Prospective Observational Cohort Study from the British Association of Dermatologists Biologic Interventions Register (BADBIR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Richard B; Smith, Catherine H; Yiu, Zenas Z N; Ashcroft, Darren M; Barker, Jonathan N W N; Burden, A David; Lunt, Mark; McElhone, Kathleen; Ormerod, Anthony D; Owen, Caroline M; Reynolds, Nick J; Griffiths, Christopher E M

    2015-11-01

    Drug survival reflects a drug's effectiveness, safety, and tolerability. We assessed the drug survival of biologics used to treat psoriasis in a prospective national pharmacovigilance cohort (British Association of Dermatologists Biologic Interventions Register (BADBIR)). The survival rates of the first course of biologics for 3,523 biologic-naive patients with chronic plaque psoriasis were compared using survival analysis techniques and predictors of discontinuation analyzed using a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model. Data for patients on adalimumab (n=1,879), etanercept (n=1,098), infliximab (n=96), and ustekinumab (n=450) were available. The overall survival rate in the first year was 77%, falling to 53% in the third year. Multivariate analysis showed that female gender (hazard ratio (HR) 1.22; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.09-1.37), being a current smoker (HR 1.19; 95% CI: 1.03-1.38), and a higher baseline dermatology life quality index (HR 1.01; 95% CI: 1.00-1.02) were predictors of discontinuation. Presence of psoriatic arthritis (HR 0.82; 95% CI: 0.71-0.96) was a predictor for drug survival. As compared with adalimumab, patients on etanercept (HR 1.63; 95% CI: 1.45-1.84) or infliximab (HR 1.56; 95% CI: 1.16-2.09) were more likely to discontinue therapy, whereas patients on ustekinumab were more likely to persist (HR 0.48; 95% CI: 0.37-0.62). After accounting for relevant covariates, ustekinumab had the highest first-course drug survival. The results of this study will aid clinical decision making when choosing biologic therapy for psoriasis patients. PMID:26053050

  4. Differential Drug Survival of Biologic Therapies for the Treatment of Psoriasis: A Prospective Observational Cohort Study from the British Association of Dermatologists Biologic Interventions Register (BADBIR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Richard B; Smith, Catherine H; Yiu, Zenas Z N; Ashcroft, Darren M; Barker, Jonathan N W N; Burden, A David; Lunt, Mark; McElhone, Kathleen; Ormerod, Anthony D; Owen, Caroline M; Reynolds, Nick J; Griffiths, Christopher E M

    2015-11-01

    Drug survival reflects a drug's effectiveness, safety, and tolerability. We assessed the drug survival of biologics used to treat psoriasis in a prospective national pharmacovigilance cohort (British Association of Dermatologists Biologic Interventions Register (BADBIR)). The survival rates of the first course of biologics for 3,523 biologic-naive patients with chronic plaque psoriasis were compared using survival analysis techniques and predictors of discontinuation analyzed using a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model. Data for patients on adalimumab (n=1,879), etanercept (n=1,098), infliximab (n=96), and ustekinumab (n=450) were available. The overall survival rate in the first year was 77%, falling to 53% in the third year. Multivariate analysis showed that female gender (hazard ratio (HR) 1.22; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.09-1.37), being a current smoker (HR 1.19; 95% CI: 1.03-1.38), and a higher baseline dermatology life quality index (HR 1.01; 95% CI: 1.00-1.02) were predictors of discontinuation. Presence of psoriatic arthritis (HR 0.82; 95% CI: 0.71-0.96) was a predictor for drug survival. As compared with adalimumab, patients on etanercept (HR 1.63; 95% CI: 1.45-1.84) or infliximab (HR 1.56; 95% CI: 1.16-2.09) were more likely to discontinue therapy, whereas patients on ustekinumab were more likely to persist (HR 0.48; 95% CI: 0.37-0.62). After accounting for relevant covariates, ustekinumab had the highest first-course drug survival. The results of this study will aid clinical decision making when choosing biologic therapy for psoriasis patients.

  5. Recent insights into the biological activities and drug delivery systems of tanshinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yuee; Zhang, Wenji; Chen, Zirong; Shi, Zhi; He, Chengwei; Chen, Meiwan

    2016-01-01

    Tanshinones, the major lipid-soluble pharmacological constituents of the Chinese medicinal herb Tanshen (Salvia miltiorrhiza), have attracted growing scientific attention because of the prospective biomedical applications of these compounds. Numerous pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and cardio-cerebrovascular protection activities, are exhibited by the three primary bioactive constituents among the tanshinones, ie, tanshinone I (TNI), tanshinone IIA (TNIIA), and cryptotanshinone (CPT). However, due to their poor solubility and low dissolution rate, the clinical applications of TNI, TNIIA, and CPT are limited. To solve these problems, many studies have focused on loading tanshinones into liposomes, nanoparticles, microemulsions, cyclodextrin inclusions, solid dispersions, and so on. In this review, we aim to offer an updated summary of the biological activities and drug delivery systems of tanshinones to provide a reference for these constituents in clinical applications.

  6. Immunomodulation of rheumatologic disorders with non-biologic disease modifying antirheumtic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Ulrich A

    2016-04-01

    Although biological agents have revolutionized the immunomodulation of many rheumatic disorders, conventional disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) remain important glucocorticosteroid sparing agents and combination partners. In rheumatoid arthritis, low-dose glucocorticosteroids can be regarded as a DMARD due to preventive effects on joint erosions. Therapy with methothrexate and possibly also other DMARDs may alter the natural evolution of rheumatoid arthritis severity over time and therapy should be instituted as early as possible. Leflunomide is an equipotent alternative to methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis, if methotrexate cannot be tolerated. Hydroxychloroquine inhibits toll-like receptor signaling and exerts antithrombotic and antihyperlipidemic effects, all thought to be beneficial in systemic lupus erythematosus. Hydroxychloroquine improves organ involvement in lupus, prevents lupus flares, and reduces mortality. It should be given to every lupus patient without contraindications. PMID:27312168

  7. Recent insights into the biological activities and drug delivery systems of tanshinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yuee; Zhang, Wenji; Chen, Zirong; Shi, Zhi; He, Chengwei; Chen, Meiwan

    2016-01-01

    Tanshinones, the major lipid-soluble pharmacological constituents of the Chinese medicinal herb Tanshen (Salvia miltiorrhiza), have attracted growing scientific attention because of the prospective biomedical applications of these compounds. Numerous pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and cardio-cerebrovascular protection activities, are exhibited by the three primary bioactive constituents among the tanshinones, ie, tanshinone I (TNI), tanshinone IIA (TNIIA), and cryptotanshinone (CPT). However, due to their poor solubility and low dissolution rate, the clinical applications of TNI, TNIIA, and CPT are limited. To solve these problems, many studies have focused on loading tanshinones into liposomes, nanoparticles, microemulsions, cyclodextrin inclusions, solid dispersions, and so on. In this review, we aim to offer an updated summary of the biological activities and drug delivery systems of tanshinones to provide a reference for these constituents in clinical applications. PMID:26792989

  8. The potential of plants as a system for the development and production of human biologics [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Chen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The growing promise of plant-made biologics is highlighted by the success story of ZMapp™ as a potentially life-saving drug during the Ebola outbreak of 2014-2016. Current plant expression platforms offer features beyond the traditional advantages of low cost, high scalability, increased safety, and eukaryotic protein modification. Novel transient expression vectors have been developed that allow the production of vaccines and therapeutics at unprecedented speed to control potential pandemics or bioterrorism attacks. Plant-host engineering provides a method for producing proteins with unique and uniform mammalian post-translational modifications, providing opportunities to develop biologics with increased efficacy relative to their mammalian cell-produced counterparts. Recent demonstrations that plant-made proteins can function as biocontrol agents of foodborne pathogens further exemplify the potential utility of plant-based protein production. However, resolving the technical and regulatory challenges of commercial-scale production, garnering acceptance from large pharmaceutical companies, and obtaining U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for several major classes of biologics are essential steps to fulfilling the untapped potential of this technology.

  9. Computational Biology Tools for Identifying Specific Ligand Binding Residues for Novel Agrochemical and Drug Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neshich, Izabella Agostinho Pena; Nishimura, Leticia; de Moraes, Fabio Rogerio; Salim, Jose Augusto; Villalta-Romero, Fabian; Borro, Luiz; Yano, Inacio Henrique; Mazoni, Ivan; Tasic, Ljubica; Jardine, Jose Gilberto; Neshich, Goran

    2015-01-01

    The term "agrochemicals" is used in its generic form to represent a spectrum of pesticides, such as insecticides, fungicides or bactericides. They contain active components designed for optimized pest management and control, therefore allowing for economically sound and labor efficient agricultural production. A "drug" on the other side is a term that is used for compounds designed for controlling human diseases. Although drugs are subjected to much more severe testing and regulation procedures before reaching the market, they might contain exactly the same active ingredient as certain agrochemicals, what is the case described in present work, showing how a small chemical compound might be used to control pathogenicity of Gram negative bacteria Xylella fastidiosa which devastates citrus plantations, as well as for control of, for example, meningitis in humans. It is also clear that so far the production of new agrochemicals is not benefiting as much from the in silico new chemical compound identification/discovery as pharmaceutical production. Rational drug design crucially depends on detailed knowledge of structural information about the receptor (target protein) and the ligand (drug/agrochemical). The interaction between the two molecules is the subject of analysis that aims to understand relationship between structure and function, mainly deciphering some fundamental elements of the nanoenvironment where the interaction occurs. In this work we will emphasize the role of understanding nanoenvironmental factors that guide recognition and interaction of target protein and its function modifier, an agrochemical or a drug. The repertoire of nanoenvironment descriptors is used for two selected and specific cases we have approached in order to offer a technological solution for some very important problems that needs special attention in agriculture: elimination of pathogenicity of a bacterium which is attacking citrus plants and formulation of a new fungicide. Finally

  10. Prioritizing drug targets in Clostridium botulinum with a computational systems biology approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Syed Aun; Ahmed, Safia; Ali, Amjad; Huang, Hui; Wu, Xiaogang; Yang, X Frank; Naz, Anam; Chen, Jake

    2014-07-01

    A computational and in silico system level framework was developed to identify and prioritize the antibacterial drug targets in Clostridium botulinum (Clb), the causative agent of flaccid paralysis in humans that can be fatal in 5 to 10% of cases. This disease is difficult to control due to the emergence of drug-resistant pathogenic strains and the only available treatment antitoxin which can target the neurotoxin at the extracellular level and cannot reverse the paralysis. This study framework is based on comprehensive systems-scale analysis of genomic sequence homology and phylogenetic relationships among Clostridium, other infectious bacteria, host and human gut flora. First, the entire 2628-annotated genes of this bacterial genome were categorized into essential, non-essential and virulence genes. The results obtained showed that 39% of essential proteins that functionally interact with virulence proteins were identified, which could be a key to new interventions that may kill the bacteria and minimize the host damage caused by the virulence factors. Second, a comprehensive comparative COGs and blast sequence analysis of these proteins and host proteins to minimize the risks of side effects was carried out. This revealed that 47% of a set of C. botulinum proteins were evolutionary related with Homo sapiens proteins to sort out the non-human homologs. Third, orthology analysis with other infectious bacteria to assess broad-spectrum effects was executed and COGs were mostly found in Clostridia, Bacilli (Firmicutes), and in alpha and beta Proteobacteria. Fourth, a comparative phylogenetic analysis was performed with human microbiota to filter out drug targets that may also affect human gut flora. This reduced the list of candidate proteins down to 131. Finally, the role of these putative drug targets in clostridial biological pathways was studied while subcellular localization of these candidate proteins in bacterial cellular system exhibited that 68% of the

  11. Biological evaluation of recombinant human erythropoietin in pharmaceutical products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramos A.S.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The potencies of mammalian cell-derived recombinant human erythropoietin pharmaceutical preparations, from a total of five manufacturers, were assessed by in vivo bioassay using standardized protocols. Eight-week-old normocythemic mice received a single subcutaneous injection followed by blood sampling 96 h later or multiple daily injections with blood sampling 24 h after the last injection. Reticulocyte counting by microscopic examination was employed as the end-point using the brilliant cresyl blue or selective hemolysis methods, together with automated flow cytometry. Different injection schedules were investigated and dose-response curves for the European Pharmacopoeia Biological Reference Preparation of erythropoietin were compared. Manual and automated methods of reticulocyte counting were correlated with respect to assay validity and precision. Using 8 mice per treatment group, intra-assay precision determined for all of the assays in the study showed coefficients of variation of 12.1-28.4% for the brilliant cresyl blue method, 14.1-30.8% for the selective hemolysis method and 8.5-19.7% for the flow cytometry method. Applying the single injection protocol, a combination of at least two independent assays was required to achieve the precision potency and confidence limits indicated by the manufacturers, while the multiple daily injection protocol yielded the same acceptable results within a single assay. Although the latter protocol using flow cytometry for reticulocyte counting gave more precise and reproducible results (intra-assay coefficients of variation: 5.9-14.2%, the well-characterized manual methods provide equally valid alternatives for the quality control of recombinant human erythropoietin therapeutic products.

  12. Understanding the biology of the Plasmodium falciparum apicoplast; an excellent target for antimalarial drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Arnish

    2016-08-01

    Malaria is a life-threatening tropical disease, caused by the intracellular parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The World Health Organization counts malaria as one of the top ten causes of worldwide death. The unavailability of a successful malaria vaccine and the ever-increasing instances of drug resistance in the malaria parasite demand the discovery of new targets within P. falciparum for the development of next generation antimalarials. Fortunately, all apicomplexan parasites, including P. falciparum harbor a relict, non-photosynthetic plastid known as the apicoplast. The apicoplast is a semi-autonomous organelle within P. falciparum containing a 35kb circular genome. Despite a genome of its own, majority of the apicoplast proteins are encoded by the parasite nucleus and imported into the apicoplast. The organelle has been shown to be essential to P. falciparum survival and the loss the apicoplast manifests as a 'delayed death' response in the parasite. The apicoplast has evolved out of cyanobacteria in a complex, two step endosymbiotic event. As a result the architecture and the gene expression machinery of the apicoplast is quite bacteria-like and is susceptible to a wide range of antibiotics such as fosmidomycin, tetracycline, azithromycin, clindamycin and triclosan. The biosynthetic pathways for isoprenoids, fatty acids and heme operate within the malaria apicoplast, making the organelle an excellent target for drug development. The review focuses on the evolution, biology and the essentiality of the apicoplast within the malaria parasite and discusses some of the recent achievements towards the design and discovery of apicoplast targeted antimalarial compounds.

  13. 9 CFR 103.2 - Disposition of animals administered experimental biological products or live organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Disposition of animals administered experimental biological products or live organisms. 103.2 Section 103.2 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND... PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS EXPERIMENTAL PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION, AND EVALUATION OF...

  14. Site-selective protein-modification chemistry for basic biology and drug development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krall, Nikolaus; da Cruz, Filipa P.; Boutureira, Omar; Bernardes, Gonçalo J. L.

    2016-02-01

    Nature has produced intricate machinery to covalently diversify the structure of proteins after their synthesis in the ribosome. In an attempt to mimic nature, chemists have developed a large set of reactions that enable post-expression modification of proteins at pre-determined sites. These reactions are now used to selectively install particular modifications on proteins for many biological and therapeutic applications. For example, they provide an opportunity to install post-translational modifications on proteins to determine their exact biological roles. Labelling of proteins in live cells with fluorescent dyes allows protein uptake and intracellular trafficking to be tracked and also enables physiological parameters to be measured optically. Through the conjugation of potent cytotoxicants to antibodies, novel anti-cancer drugs with improved efficacy and reduced side effects may be obtained. In this Perspective, we highlight the most exciting current and future applications of chemical site-selective protein modification and consider which hurdles still need to be overcome for more widespread use.

  15. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in the analysis of biological samples and pharmaceutical drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossipov, K.; Seregina, I. F.; Bolshov, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is widely used in the analysis of biological samples (whole blood, serum, blood plasma, urine, tissues, etc.) and pharmaceutical drugs. The shortcomings of this method related to spectral and non-spectral interferences are manifested in full measure in determination of the target analytes in these complex samples strongly differing in composition. The spectral interferences are caused by similarity of masses of the target component and sample matrix components. Non-spectral interferences are related to the influence of sample matrix components on the physicochemical processes taking place during formation and transportation of liquid sample aerosols into the plasma, on the value and spatial distribution of plasma temperature and on the transmission of the ion beam from the interface to mass spectrometer detector. The review is devoted to analysis of different mechanisms of appearance of non-spectral interferences and to ways for their minimization or elimination. Special attention is paid to the techniques of biological sample preparation, which largely determine the mechanisms of the influence of sample composition on the results of element determination. The ways of lowering non-spectral interferences by instrumental parameter tuning and application of internal standards are considered. The bibliography includes 189 references.

  16. Development of biological platform for the autotrophic production of biofuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nymul

    The research described herein is aimed at developing an advanced biofuel platform that has the potential to surpass the natural rate of solar energy capture and CO2 fixation. The underlying concept is to use the electricity from a renewable source, such as wind or solar, to capture CO 2 via a biological agent, such as a microbe, into liquid fuels that can be used for the transportation sector. In addition to being renewable, the higher rate of energy capture by photovoltaic cells than natural photosynthesis is expected to facilitate higher rate of liquid fuel production than traditional biofuel processes. The envisioned platform is part of ARPA-E's (Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy) Electrofuels initiative which aims at supplementing the country's petroleum based fuel production with renewable liquid fuels that can integrate easily with the existing refining and distribution infrastructure (http://arpae. energy.gov/ProgramsProjects/Electrofuels.aspx). The Electrofuels initiative aimed to develop liquid biofuels that avoid the issues encountered in the current generation of biofuels: (1) the reliance of biomass-derived technologies on the inefficient process of photosynthesis, (2) the relatively energy- and resource-intensive nature of agronomic processes, and (3) the occupation of large areas of arable land for feedstock production. The process proceeds by the capture of solar energy into electrical energy via photovoltaic cells, using the generated electricity to split water into molecular hydrogen (H2) and oxygen (O2), and feeding these gases, along with carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted from point sources such as a biomass or coal-fired power plant, to a microbial bioprocessing platform. The proposed microbial bioprocessing platform leverages a chemolithoautotrophic microorganism (Rhodobacter capsulatus or Ralstonia eutropha) naturally able to utilize these gases as growth substrates, and genetically modified to produce a triterpene hydrocarbon fuel

  17. Network-based discovery through mechanistic systems biology. Implications for applications--SMEs and drug discovery: where the action is.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Neil

    2015-08-01

    Phase II attrition remains the most important challenge for drug discovery. Tackling the problem requires improved understanding of the complexity of disease biology. Systems biology approaches to this problem can, in principle, deliver this. This article reviews the reports of the application of mechanistic systems models to drug discovery questions and discusses the added value. Although we are on the journey to the virtual human, the length, path and rate of learning from this remain an open question. Success will be dependent on the will to invest and make the most of the insight generated along the way. PMID:26464089

  18. Indole alkaloid marine natural products: An established source of cancer drug leads with considerable promise for the control of parasitic, neurological and other diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Gul, Waseem; Mark T. Hamann

    2005-01-01

    The marine environment produces natural products from a variety of structural classes exhibiting activity against numerous disease targets. Historically marine natural products have largely been explored as anticancer agents. The indole alkaloids are a class of marine natural products that show unique promise in the development of new drug leads. This report reviews the literature on indole alkaloids of marine origin and also highlights our own research. Specific biological activities of indo...

  19. A retrosynthetic biology approach to metabolic pathway design for therapeutic production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faulon Jean-Loup

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synthetic biology is used to develop cell factories for production of chemicals by constructively importing heterologous pathways into industrial microorganisms. In this work we present a retrosynthetic approach to the production of therapeutics with the goal of developing an in situ drug delivery device in host cells. Retrosynthesis, a concept originally proposed for synthetic chemistry, iteratively applies reversed chemical transformations (reversed enzyme-catalyzed reactions in the metabolic space starting from a target product to reach precursors that are endogenous to the chassis. So far, a wider adoption of retrosynthesis into the manufacturing pipeline has been hindered by the complexity of enumerating all feasible biosynthetic pathways for a given compound. Results In our method, we efficiently address the complexity problem by coding substrates, products and reactions into molecular signatures. Metabolic maps are represented using hypergraphs and the complexity is controlled by varying the specificity of the molecular signature. Furthermore, our method enables candidate pathways to be ranked to determine which ones are best to engineer. The proposed ranking function can integrate data from different sources such as host compatibility for inserted genes, the estimation of steady-state fluxes from the genome-wide reconstruction of the organism's metabolism, or the estimation of metabolite toxicity from experimental assays. We use several machine-learning tools in order to estimate enzyme activity and reaction efficiency at each step of the identified pathways. Examples of production in bacteria and yeast for two antibiotics and for one antitumor agent, as well as for several essential metabolites are outlined. Conclusions We present here a unified framework that integrates diverse techniques involved in the design of heterologous biosynthetic pathways through a retrosynthetic approach in the reaction signature space

  20. Beware of Products Promising Miracle Weight Loss

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products For ... Medical Devices Nutrition Radiation-Emitting Products Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Articulos en Espanol Alimentos y Bebidas ...

  1. Examination of the regulatory frameworks applicable to biologic drugs (including stem cells and their progeny) in Europe, the U.S., and Australia: part I--a method of manual documentary analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilic, Nina; Savic, Snezana; Siegel, Evan; Atkinson, Kerry; Tasic, Ljiljana

    2012-12-01

    Recent development of a wide range of regulatory standards applicable to production and use of tissues, cells, and other biologics (or biologicals), as advanced therapies, indicates considerable interest in the regulation of these products. The objective of this study was to analyze and compare high-tier documents within the Australian, European, and U.S. biologic drug regulatory environments using qualitative methodology. Cohort 1 of the selected 18 high-tier regulatory documents from the European Medicines Agency (EMA), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) regulatory frameworks were subject to a manual documentary analysis. These documents were consistent with the legal requirements for manufacturing and use of biologic drugs in humans and fall into six different categories. Manual analysis included a terminology search. The occurrence, frequency, and interchangeable use of different terms and phrases were recorded in the manual documentary analysis. Despite obvious differences, manual documentary analysis revealed certain consistency in use of terminology across analyzed frameworks. Phrase search frequencies have shown less uniformity than the search of terms. Overall, the EMA framework's documents referred to "medicinal products" and "marketing authorization(s)," the FDA documents discussed "drug(s)" or "biologic(s)," and the TGA documents referred to "biological(s)." Although high-tier documents often use different terminology they share concepts and themes. Documents originating from the same source have more conjunction in their terminology although they belong to different frameworks (i.e., Good Clinical Practice requirements based on the Declaration of Helsinki, 1964). Automated (software-based) documentary analysis should be obtained for the conceptual and relational analysis.

  2. 76 FR 60504 - Guidance for Industry on Time and Extent Applications for Nonprescription Drug Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration (Formerly 2004D-0027) Guidance for Industry on Time and... a guidance for industry entitled ``Time and Extent Applications for Nonprescription Drug Products... (TEA) to determine whether a condition is eligible for inclusion in the OTC drug monograph system...

  3. 77 FR 9528 - Animal Drugs, Feeds, and Related Products; N-Methyl-2-Pyrrolidone; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 500 Animal Drugs, Feeds, and Related Products; N... CFR Part 500 Animal drugs, Animal feeds, Cancer, Labeling, Packaging and containers, Polychlorinated... Register of November 25, 2011 (76 FR 72617), codifying a method of detection for residues of...

  4. 78 FR 72897 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Interim Product Reporting for Human Drug Compounding Outsourcing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-04

    ... Human Drug Compounding Outsourcing Facilities Under Section 503B of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic... entitled ``Interim Product Reporting for Human Drug Compounding Outsourcing Facilities Under Section 503B... register as outsourcing facilities (outsourcing facilities). DATES: Although you can comment on...

  5. Natural product synthesis at the interface of chemistry and biology

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Jiyong

    2014-01-01

    Nature has evolved to produce unique and diverse natural products that possess high target affinity and specificity. Natural products have been the richest sources for novel modulators of biomolecular function. Since the chemical synthesis of urea by Wöhler, organic chemists have been intrigued by natural products, leading to the evolution of the field of natural product synthesis over the past two centuries. Natural product synthesis has enabled natural products to play an essential role in ...

  6. Hydrological structure and biological productivity of the tropical Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Muraleedharan, U.D.; Muraleedharan, P.M.

    Hydrological structure analyses of regions in the tropical Atlantic Ocean have consistently revealed the existence of a typical tropical structure characterized by a nitrate-depleted mixed layer above the thermocline. The important biological...

  7. 76 FR 53912 - FDA's Public Database of Products With Orphan-Drug Designation: Replacing Non-Informative Code...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-30

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Office of Orphan Products Development, is announcing that it has replaced non- informative code names with descriptive identifiers on its public database of products that have received orphan-drug designation. The Orphan Drug Act mandates that FDA provide notice to the public respecting the designation of a drug as an orphan-drug. FDA typically provides......

  8. Model Analytical Development for Physical, Chemical, and Biological Characterization of Momordica charantia Vegetable Drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Deysiane Oliveira; Guimarães, Geovani Pereira; Santos, Ravely Lucena; Júnior, Fernando José de Lima Ramos; da Silva, Karla Monik Alves; de Souza, Fabio Santos; Macêdo, Rui Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Momordica charantia is a species cultivated throughout the world and widely used in folk medicine, and its medicinal benefits are well documented, especially its pharmacological properties, including antimicrobial activities. Analytical methods have been used to aid in the characterization of compounds derived from plant drug extracts and their products. This paper developed a methodological model to evaluate the integrity of the vegetable drug M. charantia in different particle sizes, using different analytical methods. M. charantia was collected in the semiarid region of Paraíba, Brazil. The herbal medicine raw material derived from the leaves and fruits in different particle sizes was analyzed using thermoanalytical techniques as thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA), pyrolysis coupled to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (PYR-GC/MS), and nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR), in addition to the determination of antimicrobial activity. The different particle surface area among the samples was differentiated by the techniques. DTA and TG were used for assessing thermal and kinetic parameters and PYR-GC/MS was used for degradation products chromatographic identification through the pyrograms. The infusions obtained from the fruit and leaves of Momordica charantia presented antimicrobial activity. PMID:27579215

  9. Model Analytical Development for Physical, Chemical, and Biological Characterization of Momordica charantia Vegetable Drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Geovani Pereira; Santos, Ravely Lucena; Júnior, Fernando José de Lima Ramos; da Silva, Karla Monik Alves; de Souza, Fabio Santos

    2016-01-01

    Momordica charantia is a species cultivated throughout the world and widely used in folk medicine, and its medicinal benefits are well documented, especially its pharmacological properties, including antimicrobial activities. Analytical methods have been used to aid in the characterization of compounds derived from plant drug extracts and their products. This paper developed a methodological model to evaluate the integrity of the vegetable drug M. charantia in different particle sizes, using different analytical methods. M. charantia was collected in the semiarid region of Paraíba, Brazil. The herbal medicine raw material derived from the leaves and fruits in different particle sizes was analyzed using thermoanalytical techniques as thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA), pyrolysis coupled to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (PYR-GC/MS), and nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR), in addition to the determination of antimicrobial activity. The different particle surface area among the samples was differentiated by the techniques. DTA and TG were used for assessing thermal and kinetic parameters and PYR-GC/MS was used for degradation products chromatographic identification through the pyrograms. The infusions obtained from the fruit and leaves of Momordica charantia presented antimicrobial activity.

  10. In vitro release of diclofenac diethylamine from gels: evaluation of generic semisolid drug products in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Goebel

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In order for the pharmacological action of a topical dermal drug product to occur, the drug must first be released from the vehicle to be available to penetrate the skin layers and reach the site of action. Drug release is mainly dependent on the characteristics of the formulation. Currently, to register a generic or a similar drug product in Brazil performance testing of topical drug products for local action is not required. In this context, this aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro release of commercial diclofenac diethylamine gel products available on the Brazilian pharmaceutical market, using the vertical diffusion cell method. Factors which may influence the test, such as the type of membrane used, and the effect of the formulation characteristics on the diffusion rate were evaluated. Brazilian legislation currently allows generic drug products to contain excipients other than the reference drug, which may affect the drug release from the vehicle. Only one of the four generic drug products tested could be considered equivalent to the reference Cataflam Emulgel®. The cellulose acetate and polyethersulfone membranes tested were found to be interchangeable in the in vitro release studies carried out on this product.

  11. Potential for widespread application of biological control of stored-product pests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lise Stengaard

    2007-01-01

    Biological control of stored product pests has substantial potential in Europe". This is essentially the conclusion of the activities of a European working group funded by the COST system, an intergovernmental networking system. Working group 4 of COST action 842 (2000-2005) focussed on biological...... control of stored-product pests and has considered a number of existing and potential fields for application of biological control. Three situations were identified where biological control would be a valuable component of integrated pest management: (1) Empty room treatment against stored-product mites......, beetles and moths; (2) Preventative treatment of bulk commodities against weevils (Sitophilus spp.) and storage mites; (3) Preventative application of egg-parasitoids against moths in packaged products. Development of methods for biological control and of mass production of natural enemies...

  12. 21 CFR 347.52 - Labeling of astringent drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... to 3 packets in of cool or warm water stir until fully dissolved; do not strain or filter. The... form. The labeling states “ dissolve 1 to 3 tablets in of cool or warm water stir until fully dissolved... Section 347.52 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  13. 21 CFR 211.110 - Sampling and testing of in-process materials and drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... PHARMACEUTICALS Production and Process Controls § 211.110 Sampling and testing of in-process materials and drug... production process, e.g., at commencement or completion of significant phases or after storage for long... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sampling and testing of in-process materials...

  14. Metabolic engineering with systems biology tools to optimize production of prokaryotic secondary metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Hyun Uk; Charusanti, Pep; Lee, Sang Yup;

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic engineering using systems biology tools is increasingly applied to overproduce secondary metabolites for their potential industrial production. In this Highlight, recent relevant metabolic engineering studies are analyzed with emphasis on host selection and engineering approaches...... for the optimal production of various prokaryotic secondary metabolites: native versus heterologous hosts (e.g., Escherichia coli) and rational versus random approaches. This comparative analysis is followed by discussions on systems biology tools deployed in optimizing the production of secondary metabolites....... The potential contributions of additional systems biology tools are also discussed in the context of current challenges encountered during optimization of secondary metabolite production....

  15. Metabolic engineering with systems biology tools to optimize production of prokaryotic secondary metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Uk; Charusanti, Pep; Lee, Sang Yup; Weber, Tilmann

    2016-08-27

    Covering: 2012 to 2016Metabolic engineering using systems biology tools is increasingly applied to overproduce secondary metabolites for their potential industrial production. In this Highlight, recent relevant metabolic engineering studies are analyzed with emphasis on host selection and engineering approaches for the optimal production of various prokaryotic secondary metabolites: native versus heterologous hosts (e.g., Escherichia coli) and rational versus random approaches. This comparative analysis is followed by discussions on systems biology tools deployed in optimizing the production of secondary metabolites. The potential contributions of additional systems biology tools are also discussed in the context of current challenges encountered during optimization of secondary metabolite production. PMID:27072921

  16. EULAR recommendations for the management of rheumatoid arthritis with synthetic and biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs: 2013 update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolen, J.S.; Landewe, R.; Breedveld, F.C.; Buch, M.; Burmester, G.; Dougados, M.; Emery, P.; Gaujoux-Viala, C.; Gossec, L.; Nam, J.; Ramiro, S.; Winthrop, K.; Wit, M. de; Aletaha, D.; Betteridge, N.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.; Boers, M.; Buttgereit, F.; Combe, B.; Cutolo, M.; Damjanov, N.; Hazes, J.M.; Kouloumas, M.; Kvien, T.K.; Mariette, X.; Pavelka, K.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Rubbert-Roth, A.; Scholte-Voshaar, M.; Scott, D.L.; Sokka-Isler, T.; Wong, J.B.; Heijde, D. van der

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the 2010 European League against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with synthetic and biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (sDMARDs and bDMARDs, respectively) have been updated. The 2013 update has been developed by an int

  17. Zeolite H-BEA catalysed multicomponent reaction: One-pot synthesis of amidoalkyl naphthols - Biologically active drug-like molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sunil R Mistry; Rikesh S Joshi; Kalpana C Maheria

    2011-07-01

    Zeolite has been used as an efficient and a novel heterogeneous catalyst for one-pot synthesis of biologically active drug-like molecules, amidoalkyl naphthols. This green route involves multicomponent reaction of 2-naphthol, aromatic aldehydes and amide in the presence of a catalytic amount of zeolite H-Beta (H-BEA) under solvent reflux as well as solvent-free conditions.

  18. Synthetic biology for microbial production of lipid-based biofuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Espaux, Leo; Mendez-Perez, Daniel; Li, Rachel; Keasling, Jay D

    2015-12-01

    The risks of maintaining current CO2 emission trends have led to interest in producing biofuels using engineered microbes. Microbial biofuels reduce emissions because CO2 produced by fuel combustion is offset by CO2 captured by growing biomass, which is later used as feedstock for biofuel fermentation. Hydrocarbons found in petroleum fuels share striking similarity with biological lipids. Here we review synthetic metabolic pathways based on fatty acid and isoprenoid metabolism to produce alkanes and other molecules suitable as biofuels. We further discuss engineering strategies to optimize engineered biosynthetic routes, as well as the potential of synthetic biology for sustainable manufacturing.

  19. Synthetic biology for microbial production of lipid-based biofuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Espaux, Leo; Mendez-Perez, Daniel; Li, Rachel; Keasling, Jay D

    2015-12-01

    The risks of maintaining current CO2 emission trends have led to interest in producing biofuels using engineered microbes. Microbial biofuels reduce emissions because CO2 produced by fuel combustion is offset by CO2 captured by growing biomass, which is later used as feedstock for biofuel fermentation. Hydrocarbons found in petroleum fuels share striking similarity with biological lipids. Here we review synthetic metabolic pathways based on fatty acid and isoprenoid metabolism to produce alkanes and other molecules suitable as biofuels. We further discuss engineering strategies to optimize engineered biosynthetic routes, as well as the potential of synthetic biology for sustainable manufacturing. PMID:26479184

  20. Management of Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients with Interstitial Lung Disease: Safety of Biological Antirheumatic Drugs and Assessment of Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Shunsuke

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Accompanying the increased number of reports on the development or exacerbation of ILD in RA patients following therapy with biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), RA-associated ILD (RA-ILD) has aroused renewed interest. Although such cases have been reported mainly in association with the use of tumor necrosis factor inhibitors, the use of other biological DMARDs has also become a matter of concern. Nevertheless, it is difficult to establish a causative relationship between the use of biological DMARDs and either the development or exacerbation of ILD. Such pulmonary complications may occur in the natural course of RA regardless of the use of biological DMARDs. Since rheumatologists currently aim to achieve remission in RA patients, the administration of biological DMARDs is increasing, even for those with RA-ILD. However, there are no reliable, evidence-based guidelines for deciding whether biological DMARDs can be safely introduced and continued in RA-ILD patients. A standardized staging system for pulmonary conditions of RA-ILD patients is needed when making therapeutic decisions at baseline and monitoring during biological DMARD therapy. Based on the available information regarding the safety of biological DMARDs and the predictive factors for a worse prognosis, this review discusses candidate parameters for risk evaluation of ILD in RA patients who are scheduled to receive biological antirheumatic therapy.

  1. 9 CFR 101.3 - Biological products and related terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS DEFINITIONS..., the harvest date shall be the date blood or tissues are collected for production or the date cultures..., representing a whole culture or a concentrate thereof, with or without the unevaluated growth products,...

  2. Peptidyl anthraquinones as potential antineoplastic drugs: synthesis, DNA binding, redox cycling, and biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatto, B; Zagotto, G; Sissi, C; Cera, C; Uriarte, E; Palù, G; Capranico, G; Palumbo, M

    1996-08-01

    A series of new compounds containing a 9,10-anthracenedione moiety and one or two peptide chains at position 1 and/or 4 have been synthesized. The amino acid residues introduced are glycine (Gly), lysine (Lys), and tryptophan (Trp), the latter two in both the L- and D-configurations. The peptidyl anthraquinones maintain the ability of intercalating efficiently into DNA, even though the orientation within the base-pair pocket may change somewhat with reference to the parent drugs mitoxantrone (MX) and ametantrone (AM). The interaction constants of the mono-, di-, and triglycyl derivatives are well comparable to those found for AM but 5-10 times lower than the value reported for MX. On the other hand, the glycyl-lysyl compounds bind DNA to the same extent as (L-isomer) or even better than (D-isomer) MX. As for the parent drugs without peptidyl chains, the new compounds prefer alternating CG binding sites, although to different extents. The bis-Gly-Lys derivatives are the least sensitive to base composition, which may be due to extensive aspecific charged interactions with the polynucleotide backbone. As far as redox properties are concerned, all peptidyl anthraquinones show a reduction potential very close to that of AM and 60-80 mV less negative than that of MX; hence, they can produce free-radical-damaging species to an extent similar to the parent drugs. The biological activity has been tested in human tumor and murine leukemia cell lines. Most of the test anthraquinones exhibit cytotoxic properties close to those of AM and considerably lower than those of MX. Stimulation of topoisomerase-mediated DNA cleavage is moderately present in representatives of the glycylanthraquinone family, whereas inhibition of the background cleavage occurs when Lys is present in the peptide chain. For most of the test anthraquinones, the toxicity data are in line with the DNA affinity scale and the topoisomerase II stimulation activity. However, in the lysyl derivatives, for which

  3. Biological Pretreatment of Rubberwood with Ceriporiopsis subvermispora for Enzymatic Hydrolysis and Bioethanol Production

    OpenAIRE

    Forough Nazarpour; Dzulkefly Kuang Abdullah; Norhafizah Abdullah; Nazila Motedayen; Reza Zamiri

    2013-01-01

    Rubberwood (Hevea brasiliensis), a potential raw material for bioethanol production due to its high cellulose content, was used as a novel feedstock for enzymatic hydrolysis and bioethanol production using biological pretreatment. To improve ethanol production, rubberwood was pretreated with white rot fungus Ceriporiopsis subvermispora to increase fermentation efficiency. The effects of particle size of rubberwood (1 mm, 0.5 mm, and 0.25 mm) and pretreatment time on the biological pretreatmen...

  4. Sex Roles: A Product of Socialization or a Biological Heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaha, Steven H.

    This paper reviews selected studies of aggression in males and females and concludes that physiological, emotional and behavioral differences exist between the sexes. Primate studies, conducted by Harlow, are employed as evidence that sex differences in aggression are primarily biological and not primarily cultural phenomena. It is further…

  5. Kinetic study of biological hydrogen production by anaerobic fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sangeetha, R. [Annamalai Univ., Chidambaram (India). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Karunanithi, T. [Annamalai Univ., Tamilnadu (India). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2009-07-01

    This study examined the kinetics of batch biohydrogen production from glucose. Clostridium pasteurianum was used to produce biohydrogen by dark anaerobic fermentation. The initial substrate concentration, initial pH and temperature were optimized for biohydrogen production. The maximum production of hydrogen under optimum conditions was found to be 5.376 l/l. The kinetic parameters were determined for the optimized medium and conditions in the batch reactor. The by product was expressed as total acidic equivalent. This presentation discussed the logistic equation that was used to model the growth of the organism and described how the kinetic parameters were calculated. The Leudeking piret kinetic model was used to express the hydrogen production and substrate use because it combines both growth associated and non associated contributions. It was concluded the production of biohydrogen can be predicted well using the logistic model for cell growth kinetics and the logistic incorporated Leudeking Piret model for product and substrate utilization kinetics.

  6. Chemometric Analysis of Some Biologically Active Groups of Drugs on the Basis Chromatographic and Molecular Modeling Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasiak, Jolanta; Koba, Marcin; Baczek, Tomasz; Bucinski, Adam

    2015-01-01

    In this work, three different groups of drugs such as 12 analgesic drugs, 11 cardiovascular system drugs and 36 "other" compounds, respectively, were analyzed with cluster analysis (CA), principal component analysis (PCA) and factor analysis (FA) methods. All chemometric analysis were based on the chromatographic parameters (logk and logk(w)) determined by means of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and also by molecular modeling descriptors calculated using various computer programs (HyperChem, Dragon, and the VCCLAB). The clustering of compounds were obtained by CA (using various algorithm as e.g. Ward method or unweighted pair-group method using arithmetic averages as well as Euclidean or Manhattan distance), and allowed to build dendrograms linked drugs with similar physicochemical and pharmacological properties were discussed. Moreover, the analysis performed for analyzed groups of compounds with the use of FA or PCA methods indicated that almost all information reached in input chromatographic parameters as well as in molecular modeling descriptors can be explained by first two factors. Additionally, all analyzed drugs were clustered according to their chemical structure and pharmacological activity. Summarized, the performed classification analysis of studied drugs was focused on similarities and differences in methods being used for chemometric analysis as well as focused abilities to drugs classification (clustering) according to their molecular structures and pharmacological activity performed on the basis of chromatographic experimental and molecular modeling data. Thus, the most important application of statistically important molecular descriptors taken from QSRR models to classification analysis allow detailed biological (pharmacological) classification of analyzed drugs.

  7. Important biology events and pathways in Brucella infection and implications for novel antibiotic drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Guangjun; Xu, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Brucellosis caused by Brucella spp. is a common zoonosis in many parts of the world. Humans are infected through contact with infected animals or their dirty products. Many mechanisms are needed for this successful infection, although the mechanisms are still unclear. Host immune response and some signaling molecules play an important role in the infection event. Bacterial pathogens operate by attacking crucial intracellular pathways or some important molecules in each of these pathways for survival in their hosts. The crucial components (molecules) of immunity or pathway play a critical role in the whole process of Brucella infection. Here we summarize the findings of the Brucella-host interactions' immune system and signaling molecular cascades involved in the TLR-initiated immune response to Brucella spp. infection. The paper serves to deepen our understanding of this complex process and to provide some clues regarding the discovery of drug targets for prevention and control.

  8. 78 FR 68854 - Over-the-Counter Ophthalmic Drug Products-Emergency Use Eyewash Products; Rescheduling of Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ..., 2013 (78 FR 57397), FDA announced that it would hold a public hearing on December 4, 2013, to obtain... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Over-the-Counter Ophthalmic Drug Products--Emergency...

  9. Validation of N-myristoyltransferase as an antimalarial drug target using an integrated chemical biology approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Megan H.; Clough, Barbara; Rackham, Mark D.; Rangachari, Kaveri; Brannigan, James A.; Grainger, Munira; Moss, David K.; Bottrill, Andrew R.; Heal, William P.; Broncel, Malgorzata; Serwa, Remigiusz A.; Brady, Declan; Mann, David J.; Leatherbarrow, Robin J.; Tewari, Rita; Wilkinson, Anthony J.; Holder, Anthony A.; Tate, Edward W.

    2014-02-01

    Malaria is an infectious disease caused by parasites of the genus Plasmodium, which leads to approximately one million deaths per annum worldwide. Chemical validation of new antimalarial targets is urgently required in view of rising resistance to current drugs. One such putative target is the enzyme N-myristoyltransferase, which catalyses the attachment of the fatty acid myristate to protein substrates (N-myristoylation). Here, we report an integrated chemical biology approach to explore protein myristoylation in the major human parasite P. falciparum, combining chemical proteomic tools for identification of the myristoylated and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteome with selective small-molecule N-myristoyltransferase inhibitors. We demonstrate that N-myristoyltransferase is an essential and chemically tractable target in malaria parasites both in vitro and in vivo, and show that selective inhibition of N-myristoylation leads to catastrophic and irreversible failure to assemble the inner membrane complex, a critical subcellular organelle in the parasite life cycle. Our studies provide the basis for the development of new antimalarials targeting N-myristoyltransferase.

  10. Similar effects of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, glucocorticoids, and biologic agents on radiographic progression in rheumatoid arthritis: meta-analysis of 70 randomized placebo-controlled or drug-controlled studies, including 112 comparisons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graudal, Niels; Jürgens, Gesche

    2010-01-01

    To define the differences in effects on joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients between therapy with single and combination disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), glucocorticoids, and biologic agents.......To define the differences in effects on joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients between therapy with single and combination disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), glucocorticoids, and biologic agents....

  11. Extensions of indication throughout the drug product lifecycle: a quantitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langedijk, Joris; Whitehead, Christopher J; Slijkerman, Diederick S; Leufkens, Hubert G M; Schutjens, Marie-Hélène D B; Mantel-Teeuwisse, Aukje K

    2016-02-01

    The marketing authorisation of the first generic product version is an important moment in a drug product lifecycle. The subsequently changed intellectual property protection prospects could affect the incentives for further drug development. We assessed the quantity and nature of extensions of indication of small molecule medicinal products authorised through the European Medicines Agency throughout the drug product lifecycle with special attention for the impact of the introduction of a first generic competitor. The majority (92.5%) of the extensions of indication was approved during the exclusivity period of the innovator product. Regulatory rethinking might be needed for a sustainable stimulation of extensions of indications in the post-generic period of a drug product lifecycle. PMID:26657087

  12. Exploitation of biological wastes for the production of value-added products under solid-state fermentation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Couto, Susana

    2008-07-01

    Biological wastes contain several reusable substances of high value such as soluble sugars and fibre. Direct disposal of such wastes to soil or landfill causes serious environmental problems. Thus, the development of potential value-added processes for these wastes is highly attractive. These biological wastes can be used as support-substrates in solid-state fermentation (SSF) to produce industrially relevant metabolites with great economical advantage. In addition, it is an environmentally friendly method of waste management. This paper reviews the reutilization of biological wastes for the production of value-added products using the SSF technique. PMID:18543242

  13. 77 FR 22327 - Draft Guidance for Industry on New Animal Drugs and New Animal Drug Combination Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... concerns regarding the development of antimicrobial resistance in human and animal bacterial pathogens when... those products consistent with FDA's GFI 209, ``The Judicious Use of Medically Important Antimicrobial... of a final guidance entitled ``The Judicious Use of Medically Important Antimicrobial Drugs in...

  14. Biology Needs a Modern Assessment System for Professional Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDade, Lucinda A.; Maddison, David R.; Guralnick, Robert; Piwowar, Heather A.; Jameson, Mary Liz; Helgen, Kristofer M.; Herendeen, Patrick S.; Hill, Andrew; Vis, Morgan L.

    2011-01-01

    Stimulated in large part by the advent of the Internet, research productivity in many academic disciplines has changed dramatically over the last two decades. However, the assessment system that governs professional success has not kept pace, creating a mismatch between modes of scholarly productivity and academic assessment criteria. In this…

  15. The use of isolated natural products as scaffolds for the generation of chemically diverse screening libraries for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Emma C; Kumar, Rohitesh; Davis, Rohan A

    2016-03-01

    A diverse range of strategies leading to natural product derived or inspired screening libraries aims to increase the number of new chemical entities emerging per year. However, the use of isolated natural products as scaffolds for the semi-synthesis of larger biological screening libraries remains rare. This particular method avoids the time-consuming and resource intensive de novo synthetic strategy for scaffold production, and has become more feasible through improvements to synthetic and isolation methodologies. This Highlight examines the increasing popularity of small- to large-sized screening libraries generated directly from isolated natural products. Several of the examples detailed herein show how this strategy can lead to improvements in not only potency but also other important (and often forgotten) drug discovery parameters such as toxicity, selectivity, lipophilicity and bioavailability. However, there are still improvements to be made to this method, particularly in the choice of the natural product scaffold and the derivatising reagents used. Avoidance of known nuisance compounds or structural alert motifs (e.g. PAINS) that interfere with bioactivity screens, and impact downstream drug development will play a significant role in the future success of this methodology. Incorporation of rational design strategies that take into account the physicochemical parameters (e.g. log P, MW, HBA, HBD) of the final semi-synthetic library analogues will also facilitate the discovery and development of leads and drugs. A multi-pronged approach to drug discovery that incorporates the use of isolated natural product scaffolds for library generation will surely be beneficial. PMID:26739749

  16. [New drugs for horses and production animals in 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmerich, I U

    2011-01-01

    In 2010, three new active pharmaceutical ingredients were released on the German market for horses and food-producing animals. These were gamithromycin (Zactran®), a new macrolide antibiotic, Monepantel (Zolvix®), a broad spectrum anthelmintic with a novel mechanism, and Pergolide (Prascend®), the first dopamine receptor agonist for animals. Two substances have been approved for additional species. The tetracycline antibiotic doxycycline is now also authorized for turkeys and the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug firocoxib from the group of cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors is now available for horses. Furthermore, four new preparations with an interesting new pharmaceutical form, one drug with a new formulation and two drugs, which are interesting because of other criteria, were added to the market for horses and food producing animals. PMID:22167083

  17. Beware of Products Promising Miracle Weight Loss

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... FDA Submit search Popular Content Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & ... Veterinary Children's Health Cosmetics Dietary Supplements Drugs Food Medical Devices Nutrition Radiation-Emitting Products Tobacco Products Vaccines, ...

  18. 9 CFR 113.29 - Determination of moisture content in desiccated biological products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Determination of moisture content in desiccated biological products. 113.29 Section 113.29 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Standard Procedures § 113.29 Determination of moisture content in...

  19. Surface Modifications of Titanium Implants by Multilayer Bioactive Coatings with Drug Delivery Potential: Antimicrobial, Biological, and Drug Release Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordikhani, Farideh; Zustiak, Silviya Petrova; Simchi, Abdolreza

    2016-04-01

    Recent strategies to locally deliver antimicrobial agents to combat implant-associated infections—one of the most common complications in orthopedic surgery—are gaining interest. However, achieving a controlled release profile over a desired time frame remains a challenge. In this study, we present an innovative multifactorial approach to combat infections which comprises a multilayer chitosan/bioactive glass/vancomycin nanocomposite coating with an osteoblastic potential and a drug delivery capacity. The bioactive drug-eluting coating was prepared on the surface of titanium foils by a multistep electrophoretic deposition technique. The adopted deposition strategy allowed for a high antibiotic loading of 1038.4 ± 40.2 µg/cm2. The nanocomposite coating exhibited a suppressed burst release with a prolonged sustained vancomycin release for up to 6 weeks. Importantly, the drug release profile was linear with respect to time, indicating a zero-order release kinetics. An in vitro bactericidal assay against Staphylococcus aureus confirmed that releasing the drug reduced the risk of bacterial infection. Excellent biocompatibility of the developed coating was also demonstrated by in vitro cell studies with a model MG-63 osteoblast cell line.

  20. Study on drug release of and biological response to UHMWPE wear debris carrying estradiol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu Shuxin, E-mail: qushuxin@swjtu.edu.cn [Key Lab of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Material Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Liu Aiqin; Liu Xiaomin; Bai Yinlong; Weng Jie [Key Lab of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Material Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China)

    2012-12-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We prepared ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) loaded with 17{beta}-estradiol (E2) to treat osteolysis after artificial joint replacement. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigate the in vitro release of E2 and the cell biological response to UHMWPE-E2 wear debris. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The in vitro E2 release included three stages during the release process: initial burst release, celerity release and steady release. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The UHMWPE-E2 wear debris could promote the proliferation and ALP activity of osteoblasts and inhibit the expression of IL-6 of osteoblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The E2 in UHMWPE-E2 would play a role in the treatment of the osteolysis after artificial hip joint replacement. - Abstract: The aim of this study is to investigate in vitro release of 17{beta}-estradiol (E2), the potential drug to treat osteolysis, and the biological response to ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene loaded with E2 (UHMWPE-E2) wear debris. The osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1) and macrophages (RAW264.7) were co-cultured with UHMWPE-E2 wear debris via inversion culture technique, respectively. MTT, ALP and ELISA assay were employed to evaluate the cell proliferation, ALP activity and the expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6). In vitro E2 release included: initial burst release, celerity release and steady release. The E2 released steadily after 40 d and lasted more than 60 d. The E2 in UHMWPE-E2 wear debris promoted the proliferation and ALP activity of MC3T3-E1 cells at the high debris dosages of 8-10 mg. In particular, the UHMWPE-E2 wear debris inhibited the expression of IL-6 of osteoblasts at all dosages in the present study. RAW264.7 cells cultured with UHMWPE-E2 and UHMWPE wear debris exhibited large sizes about 100 {mu}m in diameter. The small size wear debris presented inside of cells indicated that the wear debris activated the phagocytosis of macrophages. The results indicated

  1. Applied systems biology - vanillin production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strucko, Tomas; Eriksen, Jens Christian; Nielsen, J.;

    2012-01-01

    Vanillin is the most important aroma compound based on market value, and natural vanillin is extracted from the cured seed pods of the Vanilla orchid. Most of the world’s vanillin, however, is obtained by chemical synthesis from petrochemicals or wood pulp lignins. As an alternative, de novo...... biosynthesis of vanillin in baker’s yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was recently demonstrated by successfully introducing the metabolic pathway for vanillin production in yeast. Nevertheless, the amount of vanillin produced in this S. cerevisiae strain is insufficient for commercial production and improvements...... need to be done. We have introduced the genes necessary for vanillin production in an identical manner in two different yeast strains S288c and CEN.PK,where comprehensive – omics datasets are available, hence, allowing vanillin production in the two strain backgrounds to be evaluated and compared...

  2. 78 FR 51732 - The Food and Drug Administration/European Medicines Agency Orphan Product Designation and Grant...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration The Food and Drug Administration/European Medicines Agency Orphan Product Designation and Grant Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public workshop. The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Office of Orphan Products...

  3. A Systems Biology Approach in Therapeutic Response Study for Different Dosing Regimens—a Modeling Study of Drug Effects on Tumor Growth using Hybrid Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Xiangfang Li; Lijun Qian; Bittner, Michale L.; Dougherty, Edward R.

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by the frustration of translation of research advances in the molecular and cellular biology of cancer into treatment, this study calls for cross-disciplinary efforts and proposes a methodology of incorporating drug pharmacology information into drug therapeutic response modeling using a computational systems biology approach. The objectives are two fold. The first one is to involve effective mathematical modeling in the drug development stage to incorporate preclinical and clinical...

  4. Hydrodynamics-Biology Coupling for Algae Culture and Biofuel Production

    OpenAIRE

    Bernard, Olivier; Sainte-Marie, Jacques; Sialve, Bruno; Steyer, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Biofuel production from microalgae represents an acute optimization problem for industry. There is a wide range of parameters that must be taken into account in the development of this technology. Here, mathematical modelling has a vital role to play. The potential of microalgae as a source of biofuel and as a technological solution for CO2 fixation is the subject of intense academic and industrial research. Large-scale production of microalgae has potential for biofuel applications owing to ...

  5. Strategies for optimizing algal biology for enhanced biomass production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda N. Barry

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the more environmentally sustainable ways to produce high energy density (oils feed stocks for the production of liquid transportation fuels is from biomass. Photosynthetic carbon capture combined with biomass combustion (point source and subsequent carbon capture and sequestration (BECCS has also been proposed in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Report as one of the most effective and economical strategies to remediate atmospheric greenhouse gases. To maximize photosynthetic carbon capture efficiency and energy-return-on-investment, we must develop biomass production systems that achieve the greatest yields with the lowest inputs. Numerous studies have demonstrated that microalgae have among the greatest potentials for biomass production. This is in part due to the fact that all alga cells are photoautotrophic, they have active carbon concentrating mechanisms to increase photosynthetic productivity, and all the biomass is harvestable unlike plants. All photosynthetic organisms, however, convert only a fraction of the solar energy they capture into chemical energy (reduced carbon or biomass. To increase aerial carbon capture rates and biomass productivity it will be necessary to identify the most robust algal strains and increase their biomass production efficiency often by genetic manipulation. We review recent large-scale efforts to identify the best biomass producing strains and metabolic engineering strategies to improve aerial productivity. These strategies include optimization of photosynthetic light-harvesting antenna size to increase energy capture and conversion efficiency and the potential development of advanced molecular breeding techniques. To date, these strategies have resulted in up to two-fold increases in biomass productivity.

  6. PRODUCT REALIZATION AND SERVICE PROVISION IN HERBAL DRUG RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ACCORDING TO ISO 9001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameh Sunday

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Product realization according to the International Organization for Standardization (ISO includes: planning of product realization; customer-related processes; design and development; purchasing; production and service provision; and control of measuring and monitoring equipment, as specified in the 7th clause of ISO 9001. Purpose: The article takes a critical look at product realization as per ISO 9001and the critical stages of herbal drug research and development (R&D from traditional medicine (TM, with a view to synthesizing a framework that can be used to introduce quality into herbal products from the stage of ethnobotanical survey, through product conception and development, up to the stage of clinical trials.Methodology: The provisions of the 7th clause of ISO 9001 and the WHO model of herbal drug R&D as adopted by the Nigerian National Institute for Pharmaceutical Research and Development (NIPRD were determinatively reviewed and fused to yield a framework which is then discussed in the context of guiding herbal drug R&D from TM. Results and Discussion: The resulting tabular framework is discussed in terms of the applicability of the provisions of the 7th clause of ISO 9001 to the critical stages of herbal drug R&D at NIPRD, with the aim of introducing quality into herbal drug products.Conclusion: The provisions of ISO 9001’s 7th clause can be applied, albeit selectively, in introducing quality to herbal drug products developed from traditional herbal medicine.

  7. Molecular Farming in Artemisia annua, a Promising Approach to Improve Anti-malarial Drug Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulice, Giuseppe; Pelaz, Soraya; Matías-Hernández, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a parasite infection affecting millions of people worldwide. Even though progress has been made in prevention and treatment of the disease; an estimated 214 million cases of malaria occurred in 2015, resulting in 438,000 estimated deaths; most of them occurring in Africa among children under the age of five. This article aims to review the epidemiology, future risk factors and current treatments of malaria, with particular focus on the promising potential of molecular farming that uses metabolic engineering in plants as an effective anti-malarial solution. Malaria represents an example of how a health problem may, on one hand, influence the proper development of a country, due to its burden of the disease. On the other hand, it constitutes an opportunity for lucrative business of diverse stakeholders. In contrast, plant biofarming is proposed here as a sustainable, promising, alternative for the production, not only of natural herbal repellents for malaria prevention but also for the production of sustainable anti-malarial drugs, like artemisinin (AN), used for primary parasite infection treatments. AN, a sesquiterpene lactone, is a natural anti-malarial compound that can be found in Artemisia annua. However, the low concentration of AN in the plant makes this molecule relatively expensive and difficult to produce in order to meet the current worldwide demand of Artemisinin Combination Therapies (ACTs), especially for economically disadvantaged people in developing countries. The biosynthetic pathway of AN, a process that takes place only in glandular secretory trichomes of A. annua, is relatively well elucidated. Significant efforts have been made using plant genetic engineering to increase production of this compound. These include diverse genetic manipulation approaches, such as studies on diverse transcription factors which have been shown to regulate the AN genetic pathway and other biological processes. Results look promising; however, further

  8. Some aspects of biological production and fishery resources of the EEZ of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhargava, R.M.S.

    Region and season-wise biological production in the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of India has been computed from the data of more than twenty years available at the Indian National Oceanographic Data Centre of the National Institute of Oceanography...

  9. Can Production and Trafficking of Illicit Drugs be Reduced or Merely Shifted?

    OpenAIRE

    Reuter, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The production of cocaine and heroin, the two most important drugs economically, has been concentrated in a small number of poor nations for 25 years. A slightly larger number of developing nations have been affected by large-scale trafficking in these two drugs. This paper reviews what is known about drug control programs and considers non-traditional options. The usual array of programs...

  10. Biological Methanol Production by a Type II Methanotroph Methylocystis bryophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sanjay K S; Mardina, Primata; Kim, Sang-Yong; Lee, Jung-Kul; Kim, In-Won

    2016-04-28

    Methane (CH₄) is the most abundant component in natural gas. To reduce its harmful environmental effect as a greenhouse gas, CH₄ can be utilized as a low-cost feed for the synthesis of methanol by methanotrophs. In this study, several methanotrophs were examined for their ability to produce methanol from CH₄; including Methylocella silvestris, Methylocystis bryophila, Methyloferula stellata, and Methylomonas methanica. Among these methanotrophs, M. bryophila exhibited the highest methanol production. The optimum process parameters aided in significant enhancement of methanol production up to 4.63 mM. Maximum methanol production was observed at pH 6.8, 30°C, 175 rpm, 100 mM phosphate buffer, 50 mM MgCl₂ as a methanol dehydrogenase inhibitor, 50% CH₄ concentration, 24 h of incubation, and 9 mg of dry cell mass ml(-1) inoculum load, respectively. Optimization of the process parameters, screening of methanol dehydrogenase inhibitors, and supplementation with formate resulted in significant improvements in methanol production using M. bryophila. This report suggests, for the first time, the potential of using M. bryophila for industrial methanol production from CH₄. PMID:26838340

  11. Biological pretreatment and ethanol production from olive cake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurado, Esperanza; Gavala, Hariklia N.; Baroi, George Nabin;

    2010-01-01

    Olive oil is one of the major Mediterranean products, whose nutritional and economic importance is well-known. However the extraction of olive oil yields a highly contaminating residue that causes serious environmental concerns in the olive oil producing countries. The olive cake (OC) coming out...... of the three-phase olive oil production process could be used as low price feedstock for lignocellulosic ethanol production due to its high concentration in carbohydrates. However, the binding of the carbohydrates with lignin may significantly hinder the necessary enzymatic hydrolysis of the polymeric sugars...... before ethanol fermentation. Treatment with three white rot fungi, Phaneroachaete chrysosporium, Ceriporiopsis subvermispora and Ceriolopsis polyzona has been applied on olive cake in order to investigate the potential for performing delignification and thus enhancing the efficiency of the subsequent...

  12. Systems-Level Synthetic Biology for Advanced Biofuel Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruffing, Anne [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jensen, Travis J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Strickland, Lucas Marshall [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Meserole, Stephen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Tallant, David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Cyanobacteria have been shown to be capable of producing a variety of advanced biofuels; however, product yields remain well below those necessary for large scale production. New genetic tools and high throughput metabolic engineering techniques are needed to optimize cyanobacterial metabolisms for enhanced biofuel production. Towards this goal, this project advances the development of a multiple promoter replacement technique for systems-level optimization of gene expression in a model cyanobacterial host: Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. To realize this multiple-target approach, key capabilities were developed, including a high throughput detection method for advanced biofuels, enhanced transformation efficiency, and genetic tools for Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Moreover, several additional obstacles were identified for realization of this multiple promoter replacement technique. The techniques and tools developed in this project will help to enable future efforts in the advancement of cyanobacterial biofuels.

  13. Recent advances in biological production of sugar alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong-Cheol; Oh, Eun Joong; Jo, Jung-Hyun; Jin, Yong-Su; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2016-02-01

    Sugar alcohols, such as xylitol, mannitol, sorbitol, and erythritol are emerging food ingredients that provide similar or better sweetness/sensory properties of sucrose, but are less calorigenic. Also, sugar alcohols can be converted into commodity chemicals through chemical catalysis. Biotechnological production offers the safe and sustainable supply of sugar alcohols from renewable biomass. In contrast to early studies that aimed to produce sugar alcohols with microorganisms capable of producing sugar alcohols naturally, recent studies have focused on rational engineering of metabolic pathways to improve yield and productivity as well as to use inexpensive and abundant substrates. Metabolic engineering strategies to utilize inexpensive substrates, alleviate catabolite repression, reduce byproduct formation, and manipulate redox balances led to enhanced production of sugar alcohols.

  14. Recent advances in biological production of sugar alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong-Cheol; Oh, Eun Joong; Jo, Jung-Hyun; Jin, Yong-Su; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2016-02-01

    Sugar alcohols, such as xylitol, mannitol, sorbitol, and erythritol are emerging food ingredients that provide similar or better sweetness/sensory properties of sucrose, but are less calorigenic. Also, sugar alcohols can be converted into commodity chemicals through chemical catalysis. Biotechnological production offers the safe and sustainable supply of sugar alcohols from renewable biomass. In contrast to early studies that aimed to produce sugar alcohols with microorganisms capable of producing sugar alcohols naturally, recent studies have focused on rational engineering of metabolic pathways to improve yield and productivity as well as to use inexpensive and abundant substrates. Metabolic engineering strategies to utilize inexpensive substrates, alleviate catabolite repression, reduce byproduct formation, and manipulate redox balances led to enhanced production of sugar alcohols. PMID:26723007

  15. Xenicane Natural Products: Biological Activity and Total Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betschart, Leo; Altmann, Karl-Heinz

    2015-01-01

    The xenicanes are a large class of mostly bicyclic marine diterpenoids featuring a cyclononane ring as a common structural denominator. After a brief introduction into the characteristic structural features of xenicanes and some biogenetic considerations, the major focus of this review will be on the various biological activities that have been reported for xenicanes and on efforts towards the total synthesis of these structures. Several xenicanes have been shown to be potent antiproliferative agents in vitro, but activities have also been reported in relation to inflammatory processes. However, so far, data on the possible in vivo activity of xenicanes are lacking. The major challenge in the total synthesis of xenicanes is the construction of the nine-membered ring. Different strategies have been pursued to establish this crucial substructure, including Grob fragmentation, ring-closing olefin metathesis, or Suzuki cross coupling as the enabling transformations. PMID:26429717

  16. 76 FR 58018 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Self-Selection Studies for Nonprescription Drug Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Self-Selection Studies for... entitled ``Self-Selection Studies for Nonprescription Drug Products.'' The draft guidance is intended to provide recommendations to industry on the design of self- selection studies for nonprescription...

  17. Molecular Farming in Artemisia annua, a sustainable approach to improve anti-malarial drug production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe ePulice

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a parasite infection affecting millions of people worldwide. Even though progresses in prevention and treatment have been developed, 198 million cases of malaria occurred in 2013, resulting in 584000 estimated deaths. 90% of all malaria deaths occurred in Africa, mostly among children under the age of five. This article aims to review malaria’s history, epidemiology and current treatments, with a particular focus on the potential of molecular farming that use metabolic engineering in plants as effective anti-malarial solution. Malaria indeed represents an example of how a health problem on one hand, may eventually influence the proper development of a country due to the burden of the disease, and on the other hand, constitutes an opportunity for lucrative business of diverse stakeholders. In contrast, plant biofarming is here proposed as a sustainable alternative for the production not only of natural herbal repellents used for malaria prevention but also for the production of sustainable anti-malarial drugs like artemisinin used for primary parasite infection treatments.Artemisinin, a sesquiterpene lactone, is a natural anti-malarial compound that can be found in Artemisia annua plant. However, the low concentration of artemisinin in plant makes this molecule relatively expensive and difficult to meet the worldwide demand of Artemisinin Combination Therapies, especially for economically disadvantaged people in developing countries. The biosynthetic pathway of artemisinin, a process that only takes place in glandular secretory trichomes of A. annua, is relatively well elucidated, and significant efforts using plant genetic engineering have been made to increase the production of this compound. These include studies on diverse transcription factors, which all have been shown to regulate artemisinin genetic pathway and other biological processes. Therefore, genetic manipulation of these genes may be used as a cost-effective potential

  18. 9 CFR 113.3 - Sampling of biological products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS... bacterial vaccines; (iii) Two samples of Coccidiosis Vaccine; (iv) Eighteen samples of Rabies Vaccine... as follows: (1) Ten samples of Bacterial Master Seeds. (2) Thirteen samples of viral Master Seeds...

  19. Regeneration of nutrients and biological productivity in Antarctic waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Verlecar, X.N.; Somasundar, K.; Qasim, S.Z.

    contribute to the biomass production, reforming of plate ice during late summer (towards the end of February) may result in a shift of zooplanktonic organisms towards the north. Other oceanic regions north of 61° S Fig. 9 shows the distribution of chlorophyll...

  20. Improvements in Fermentative Biological Hydrogen Production Through Metabolic Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dramatically rising oil prices and increasing awareness of the dire environmental consequences of fossil fuel use, including startling effects of climate change, are refocusing attention world-wide on the search for alternative fuels. Hydrogen is poised to become an important future energy carrier. Renewable hydrogen production is pivotal in making it a truly sustainable replacement for fossil fuels. (Author)

  1. Biological production of monoethanolamine by engineered Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foti, M.J.; Médici, R.; Ruijssenaars, H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida S12 was engineered for the production of monoethanolamine (MEA) from glucose via the decarboxylation of the central metabolite l-serine, which is catalyzed by the enzyme l-serine decarboxylase (SDC).The host was first evaluated for its tolerance towards MEA as well as its endogeno

  2. Improvements in Fermentative Biological Hydrogen Production Through Metabolic Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallenbeck, P. C.; Ghosh, D.; Sabourin-Provost, G.

    2009-07-01

    Dramatically rising oil prices and increasing awareness of the dire environmental consequences of fossil fuel use, including startling effects of climate change, are refocusing attention world-wide on the search for alternative fuels. Hydrogen is poised to become an important future energy carrier. Renewable hydrogen production is pivotal in making it a truly sustainable replacement for fossil fuels. (Author)

  3. BIOLOGICAL FEATURES AND PRODUCTIVITY OF BLACK-AND-WHITE CATTLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kochueva Y. V.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The behavior, interior and milk yield of the mature Black-and-White cows with various productivity levels, as well as etology of the replacement heifers are researched. The superiority of the high milk yielding cows for the lying duration and eating feed and water is revealed. Reduced variability of vital behavioral actions of animals is found. In addition, high yielding cows has been lower variability in all feeding acts. It was noted that high yielding animals exceeded equal age cows by the level of most interior factors. The differences were significant on the content of hemoglobin, vitamin E, and especially on the content of iron. Positive correlations between some interior design indicators is found. The analysis of lifetime productivity during our research found that high milk yielding cows had highest yields on the first lactation and kept the same level in the next lactations with insignificant variations. The lower productivity animals reached maximal yields on the third lactation with the followed downward trend. Differences between groups in lifetime productivity during research amounted to 16 992 kg. The significant superiority of the heifers with high grown intensity above equal age animals for the duration of feed and water eating, physiological functions and lying. The analysis of variation coefficient is confirmed the observed regularities.

  4. Bovine mammary stem cells: Cell biology meets production agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammary stem cells (MaSC) provide for net growth, renewal and turnover of mammary epithelial cells, and are therefore potential targets for strategies to increase production efficiency. Appropriate regulation of MaSC can potentially benefit milk yield, persistency, dry period management and tissue ...

  5. A Natural Product as Drug Lead against both SARS and Flu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ In cooperation with colleagues of Singapore Polytechnic, CAS scientists have discovered a natural product from fruits that could be a drug lead to battle both severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and flu viruses.

  6. Technological Diversity and Future Product Diversity in the Drug Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Cantner, Uwe; Plotnikova, Tatiana

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the topic of related R&D and innovation strategies of large firms. We ask what determines the diversity of a firm's product portfolio. More specifically, we try to explain large firms' expansion into new product markets driven by the characteristics of their technological knowledge. Empirically, we study firms in the pharmaceutical and biotech industries, using relevant data on product development and technological knowledge. We find a positive relationship between the d...

  7. Common biology of craving across legal and illegal drugs - a quantitative meta-analysis of cue-reactivity brain response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, Simone; Gallinat, Jürgen

    2011-04-01

    The present quantitative meta-analysis set out to test whether cue-reactivity responses in humans differ across drugs of abuse and whether these responses constitute the biological basis of drug craving as a core psychopathology of addiction. By means of activation likelihood estimation, we investigated the concurrence of brain regions activated by cue-induced craving paradigms across studies on nicotine, alcohol and cocaine addicts. Furthermore, we analysed the concurrence of brain regions positively correlated with self-reported craving in nicotine and alcohol studies. We found direct overlap between nicotine, alcohol and cocaine cue reactivity in the ventral striatum. In addition, regions of close proximity were observed in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC; nicotine and cocaine) and amygdala (alcohol, nicotine and cocaine). Brain regions of concurrence in drug cue-reactivity paradigms that overlapped with brain regions of concurrence in self-reported craving correlations were found in the ACC, ventral striatum and right pallidum (for alcohol). This first quantitative meta-analysis on drug cue reactivity identifies brain regions underlying nicotine, alcohol and cocaine dependency, i.e. the ventral striatum. The ACC, right pallidum and ventral striatum were related to drug cue reactivity as well as self-reported craving, suggesting that this set of brain regions constitutes the core circuit of drug craving in nicotine and alcohol addiction. PMID:21261758

  8. 76 FR 35665 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Enforcement Policy for Over-the-Counter Sunscreen Drug Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-17

    ... Enforcement Policy for Over-the- Counter Sunscreen Drug Products Marketed Without an Approved Application... ``Enforcement Policy--OTC Sunscreen Drug Products Marketed Without an Approved Application.'' The draft guidance... enforcement policy for certain OTC sunscreen products marketed without an approved new drug application....

  9. Positive Drug Screen for Benzodiazepine Due to a Chinese Herbal Product

    OpenAIRE

    Eachus, Patricia L.

    1996-01-01

    A female athlete tested positive for benzodiazepine on a random drug screen. She denied taking any illicit or prescription drugs. The positive screen was found to be caused by undeclared addiction of diazepam to a Chinese herbal product, “Miracle Herb.” Some foreign vitamins, health care products, or herbal tea may contain banned or dangerous additives unknown to the consumer. These additives may include ingredients such as benzodiazepine, mefenamic acid, or corticosteroids. Possible physical...

  10. Identification of antidepressant drug leads through the evaluation of marine natural products with neuropsychiatric pharmacophores

    OpenAIRE

    Diers, Jeffrey A.; Ivey, Kelly D.; El-Alfy, Abir; Shaikh, Jamaluddin; Wang, Jiajia; Kochanowska, Anna J.; Stoker, John F.; Mark T. Hamann; Matsumoto, Rae R.

    2007-01-01

    The marine environment is a valuable resource for drug discovery due to its diversity of life and associated secondary metabolites. However, there is very little published data on the potential application of marine natural products to treat neuropsychiatric disorders. Many natural products derived from chemically defended organisms in the marine environment have pharmacophores related to serotonin or clinically utilized antidepressant drugs. Therefore, in the present study, compounds selecte...

  11. Production of biological reagents for radioimmunoassay second antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental production of second antibody to be used in hormonal assays, in which the first antibody is raised in rabbits, is described. Four sheep were immunized with the rabbit immunoglobulin prepared at IPEN-CNEN laboratory. Their antisera were evaluated by the human thyrotropin radioimmunoassay employing materials provided by the National Hormone and Pituitary Program (USA), in comparison with a reference antiserum of known quality, produced in goat by the Radioassay Systems Laboratories - RSL (USA). From the fourth booster injection the animals developed antiserum with titer similar to that exhibited by the commercial product, even presenting higher values. These antisera are now being examinated for the optimal conditions of precipitation before be packed for future use and distribution. (author)

  12. Biological Impact of Bioactive Glasses and Their Dissolution Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Alexander; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2015-01-01

    For many years, bioactive glasses (BGs) have been widely considered for bone tissue engineering applications due to their ability to bond to hard as well as soft tissue (a property termed bioactivity) and for their stimulating effects on bone formation. Ionic dissolution products released during the degradation of the BG matrix induce osteogenic gene expression leading to enhanced bone regeneration. Recently, adding bioactive metallic ions (e.g. boron, copper, cobalt, silver, zinc and strontium) to silicate (or phosphate and borate) glasses has emerged as a promising route for developing novel BG formulations with specific therapeutic functionalities, including antibacterial, angiogenic and osteogenic properties. The degradation behaviour of BGs can be tailored by adjusting the glass chemistry making these glass matrices potential carrier systems for controlled therapeutic ion release. This book chapter summarises the fundamental aspects of the effect of ionic dissolution products from BGs on osteogenesis and angiogenesis, whilst discussing novel BG compositions with controlled therapeutic ion release. PMID:26201273

  13. Applied systems biology - vanillin production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Strucko, Tomas; Eriksen, Carsten; Nielsen, J.; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro

    2012-01-01

    Vanillin is the most important aroma compound based on market value, and natural vanillin is extracted from the cured seed pods of the Vanilla orchid. Most of the world’s vanillin, however, is obtained by chemical synthesis from petrochemicals or wood pulp lignins. As an alternative, de novo biosynthesis of vanillin in baker’s yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was recently demonstrated by successfully introducing the metabolic pathway for vanillin production in yeast. Nevertheless, the amount of...

  14. Strategies for optimizing algal biology for enhanced biomass production

    OpenAIRE

    Barry, Amanda N.; Starkenburg, Shawn R.; Richard eSayre

    2015-01-01

    One of the more environmentally sustainable ways to produce high energy density (oils) feed stocks for the production of liquid transportation fuels is from biomass. Photosynthetic carbon capture combined with biomass combustion (point source) and subsequent carbon capture and sequestration (BECCS) has also been proposed in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Report as one of the most effective and economical strategies to remediate atmospheric greenhouse gases. To maximize photosyn...

  15. Strategies for Optimizing Algal Biology for Enhanced Biomass Production

    OpenAIRE

    Barry, Amanda N.; Starkenburg, Shawn R.; Sayre, Richard T.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most environmentally sustainable ways to produce high-energy density (oils) feed stocks for the production of liquid transportation fuels is from biomass. Photosynthetic carbon capture combined with biomass combustion (point source) and subsequent carbon capture and sequestration has also been proposed in the intergovernmental panel on climate change report as one of the most effective and economical strategies to remediate atmospheric greenhouse gases. To maximize photosynthetic c...

  16. Selection for milk production from a lactation biology viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akers, R M

    2000-05-01

    The success of selection for increased milk production in dairy cows is apparent. Certainly, many herds now have average production levels that would have only been associated with the best producers in the herd 30 yr ago. There are, of course, many reasons for this success. Among these are improvements in genetic selection methods and associated use of artificial insemination, better fulfillment of nutritional needs and diet formulation, and careful attention to mastitis control and milking management. Development of new management tools (i.e., bovine somatotropin, improved crops, estrus detection devices, estrus synchronization, monitoring of individual animal performance, and disease prevention) should not be forgotten. Although many aspects of a dairy operation determine overall performance and profitability, the focus of this paper is the udder. Information indicates that both the structure and function of the bovine mammary gland have been directly impacted by long-term selection for increased milk production but improved functionality may have been more important. This review also considered studies that attempt to develop techniques and measurements for possible selection of genetically superior animals including measurement of circulating hormones and direct assay of mammary tissue function. PMID:10821592

  17. BIOLOGICAL AND PRODUCTIVE RESOURCES OF LACTATING COWS AT DENITRIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kokaeva M. G.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results obtained in the process of two scientific-practical experiments carried jut on two milk cows (Shvitskay breed aimed at the antioxidants detoxication properties and mould inhibitor revealing. This factor is actual in the Republic of North Ossetia-Alania as the intensive technologies of the fodder crops cultivation using the nitrate fertilizers are widely applied in the region leading to the excess nitrates and nitrite penetration into the animals’ organism. During the first experiment, the antioxidants of epophen and vitamin C were added into the ration of the lactating cows with the subtoxic dosage of nitrates both separately and in complex. The complex feeding proved to increase the milk productivity, the fat mass and protein mass in milk while reducing the fodder expenditure per product unit. Beside, the lactating cows revealed the digestive and intermediate exchange betterment and the reduction of nitrates and nitrites level in blood. The second experiment helped to study Khadoks antioxidant and mould inhibitor called Mold-Zap efficiency use for the nitrates and aflotoxicin B1 detoxication. The researches showed that the complex admixtures of the said preparations introduction into the rations of the animals increased the milk productivity, fat and protein content and reduced aflatoxineM1 content. The cows activated the digestive and intermediate exchange, accompanied with the nitrates and nitrites level reduction in the organism

  18. Microvesicle formulations used in topical drugs and cosmetics affect product efficiency, performance and allergenicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jakob Torp; Ejner Andersen, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Attempts to improve the formulations of topical products are continuing processes (ie, to increase cosmetic performance, enhance effects, and protect ingredients from degradation). The development of micro- and nanovesicular systems has led to the marketing of topical drugs and cosmetics that use...... transdermal delivery more efficient for a number of drugs. Vesicular systems may also allow a more precise drug delivery to the site of action (ie, the hair follicles) and thereby minimize the applied drug concentration, reducing potential side effects. On the other hand, this may increase the risk of other...

  19. Biological fouling of ethylene production water recycling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurdish, I.K.; Khenkina, L.M.; Pavlenko, N.I.

    A study was made of biotic factors determining the intensity of biological overgrowth of ethylene as well as the distribution of sulfate-reducing bacteria in the system. The total quantity of microorganisms was determined by counting on membrane filters. The content of heterotrophic aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms was determined by inoculating specimens on meat-peptone agar and wort agar. The resistance of the microflora in the water supply system to high temperatures was studied by exposure of the specimens to various temperatures for one hour. The results indicated presence of large quantities of a number of biogenous substances in the water, including compounds of phosphorus and carbon. Large numbers of both aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms were present, consuming the oxygen absorbed by the water in the cooling tower, creating favorable conditions for development of both aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms. The sulfate-reducing bacteria present caused accumulation of hydrogen sulfide in the system, increasing corrosion. One possible means of controlling the fouling organisms might be to heat the water. Heating to 60C for sixty minutes significantly reduces the microorganism population, while 70C results in almost total elimination. 8 references, 4 figures.

  20. Biological Hydrogen Production Using Chloroform-treated Methanogenic Granules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bo; Chen, Shulin

    In fermentative hydrogen production, the low-hydrogen-producing bacteria retention rate limits the suspended growth reactor productivity because of the long hydraulic retention time (HRT) required to maintain adequate bacteria population. Traditional bacteria immobilization methods such as calcium alginate entrapment have many application limitations in hydrogen fermentation, including limited duration time, bacteria leakage, cost, and so on. The use of chloroform-treated anaerobic granular sludge as immobilized hydrogen-producing bacteria in an immobilized hydrogen culture may be able to overcome the limitations of traditional immobilization methods. This paper reports the findings on the performance of fed-batch cultures and continuous cultures inoculated with chloroform-treated granules. The chloroform-treated granules were able to be reused over four fed-batch cultures, with pH adjustment. The upflow reactor packed with chloroform-treated granules was studied, and the HRT of the upflow reactor was found to be as low as 4 h without any decrease in hydrogen production yield. Initial pH and glucose concentration of the culture medium significantly influenced the performance of the reactor. The optimum initial pH of the culture medium was neutral, and the optimum glucose concentration of the culture medium was below 20 g chemical oxygen demand/L at HRT 4 h. This study also investigated the possibility of integrating immobilized hydrogen fermentation using chloroform-treated granules with immobilized methane production using untreated granular sludge. The results showed that the integrated batch cultures produced 1.01 mol hydrogen and 2 mol methane per mol glucose. Treating the methanogenic granules with chloroform and then using the treated granules as immobilized hydrogen-producing sludge demonstrated advantages over other immobilization methods because the treated granules provide hydrogen-producing bacteria with a protective niche, a long duration of an active

  1. High-Performance Liquid Chromatographic Analysis of Drugs of Abuse in Biologic Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Nakashima,Kenichiro

    2005-01-01

    Recently, drug abuse has become a serious social problem world wide. In Japan, methamphetamine (MP) is the most popular drug of abuse. In addition to MP, the use of 4,5-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), called ecstacy, is rapidly increasing, especially among young people. The development of simple and convenient analytical methods for the analysis of these drugs of abuse is necessary for the prediction of and protection from human health risks. Many useful methods have been developed for ...

  2. Generation of wear during the production of drug nanosuspensions by wet media milling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhnke, Michael; Märtin, Dirk; John, Edgar

    2012-05-01

    Wet media milling is an established technique for the commercialized top-down production of nanoparticulate drug suspensions. These drug nanosuspensions can be transferred into the related drug products, like capsules, tablets and injectables. The generation of wear during stirred media milling of a drug compound was investigated for grinding media made from yttrium stabilized zirconia. Drug compound and drug nanosuspension were characterized initially by their mechanical and rheological properties. The generation of wear from grinding media has been investigated simultaneously with the reduction of drug particle size by evaluating several grinding media supplier and diameter as well as process parameters stirrer tip speed and specific energy input. Grinding media quality and process parameters were identified with strong impact on the amount of generated wear and on drug particle size distribution. Wear from grinding media characterized by elemental zirconium and yttrium could be significantly minimized by operating with the favored grinding media quality and with optimal stirrer tip speed and specific energy input. Wear debris, respectively wear particles from grinding media, were identified with respect to morphology and particle size. Finally, the overall contamination by raw materials and by wear during processing characterized by elemental iron, silicium, yttrium and zirconium as well as the mean size of contamination particles are presented for selected drug nanosuspensions. PMID:22269938

  3. An Engineering Approach to Biomedical Sciences: Advanced Strategies in Drug Delivery Systems Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba, Anna Angela; Dalmoro, Annalisa; d’Amore, Matteo

    2012-01-01

    Development and optimization of novel production techniques for drug delivery systems are fundamental steps in the “from the bench to the bedside” process which is the base of translational medicine. In particular, in the current scenery where the need for reducing energy consumption, emissions, wastes and risks drives the development of sustainable processes, new pharmaceutical manufacturing does not constitute an exception. In this paper, concepts of process intensification are presented and their transposition in drug delivery systems production is discussed. Moreover, some examples on intensified techniques, for drug microencapsulation and granules drying, are reported. PMID:23905058

  4. Production, Secretion and Biological Activity of Bacillus cereus Enterotoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Senesi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus cereus behaves as an opportunistic pathogen frequently causing gastrointestinal diseases, and it is increasingly recognized to be responsible for severe local or systemic infections. Pathogenicity of B. cereus mainly relies on the secretion of a wide array of toxins and enzymes and also on the ability to undergo swarming differentiation in response to surface-sensing. In this report, the pathogenicity exerted by B. cereus toxins is described with particular attention to the regulatory mechanisms of production and secretion of HBL, Nhe and CytK enterotoxins.

  5. Molecular biology of liver disorders: the hepatitis C virus and molecular targets for drug development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Howard J. Worman; Feng Lin

    2000-01-01

    Molecular biology has made a tremendous impact on the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases[1,2]. In particular, advances in molecular biology made possible the discovery of the virus that causes hepatitis C. In this review, we use hepatitis C as an example of the impact that molecular biology has made in the area of liver disorders. We emphasize how our growing understanding of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) has lead to the identification of targets for development of new treatments.

  6. Development of polymeric drug delivery systems for biotech products

    OpenAIRE

    Pasqualin, Matteo

    2013-01-01

    Since the early 80’s the forward steps in genetics and proteomics, have led a particular interest to biotech products, such as DNA and proteins. Although difficult, their large-scale production enabled the therapeutic use of this compounds. Proteins and DNA sequences can be very interesting therapeutic molecules owing to their high selectivity/affinity for the receptor or the specific site of action. Unfortunately, some issues still limit their pharmaceutical use, such as the susceptibilit...

  7. Application of Olefin Cross-Metathesis to the Synthesis of Biologically Active Natural Products

    OpenAIRE

    Prunet, Joëlle

    2005-01-01

    An overview of the use of olefin cross-metathesis in the synthesis of biologically active natural products is presented. The diverse examples are organized according to the outcome of the olefin constructed by the cross-metathesis reaction: this olefin can be either present in the final product, reduced, engaged in other transformations, or involved in tandem processes.

  8. 9 CFR 113.51 - Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... of the final pool of harvested material or samples of each subculture of cells used to prepare the... completed product or samples of the final pool of harvested material or samples of each subculture of cells... cells or each subculture of primary cells used to prepare a biological product shall be shown free...

  9. The Food and Drug Administration and pragmatic clinical trials of marketed medical products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Monique L; Griffin, Joseph; Goldkind, Sara F; Zeitler, Emily P; Wing, Liz; Al-Khatib, Sana M; Sherman, Rachel E

    2015-10-01

    Pragmatic clinical trials can help answer questions of comparative effectiveness for interventions routinely used in medical practice. Pragmatic clinical trials may examine outcomes of one or more marketed medical products, and they are heterogeneous in design and risk. The Food and Drug Administration is charged with protecting the rights, safety, and welfare of individuals enrolled in clinical investigations, as well as assuring the integrity of the data upon which approval of medical products is made. The Food and Drug Administration has broad jurisdiction over drugs and medical devices (whether or not they are approved for marketing), and as such, clinical investigations of these products are subject to applicable Food and Drug Administration regulations. While many pragmatic clinical trials will meet the criteria for an exemption from the requirements for an investigational new drug application or investigational device exemption, in general, all clinical investigations of medical products that fall under Food and Drug Administration jurisdiction must adhere to regulations for informed consent and review by an institutional review board. We are concerned that current Food and Drug Administration requirements for obtaining individual informed consent may deter or delay the conduct of pragmatic clinical trials intended to develop reliable evidence of comparative safety and effectiveness of approved medical products that are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration. Under current regulations, there are no described mechanisms to alter or waive informed consent to make it less burdensome or more practicable for low-risk pragmatic clinical trials. We recommend that the Food and Drug Administration establish a risk-based approach to obtaining informed consent in pragmatic clinical trials that would facilitate the conduct of pragmatic clinical trials without compromising the protection of enrolled individuals or the integrity of the resulting data.

  10. The effects of four different drugs administered through catheters on slime production in coagulase negative Staphylococci

    OpenAIRE

    Göçmen, Julide Sedef; Büyükkoçak, Ünase; AZAP, Alpay; Pekuz, Yasemin; Çağlayan, Osman

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Higher rate of slime production has been found in pathogen bacteria strains. Accordingly, the factors that contribute to higher slime production rate increase the infection risk, while the factors that reduce the slime production rate will reduce the infection risk. The effect of some drugs that are administered through catheters in intensive care units on slime production with coagulase negative Staphylococci was investigated. Methods: In this study, the effect of four differe...

  11. Development of biological functional material and product from Nelumbo nucifera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solvent extracts of Nelumbo nucifera G. were investigated for the activities of antioxidant, whitening, anti-wrinkle and antimicrobial effects to apply as a functional ingredient for cosmetic products. The electron donating ability of irradiated NN-L extract was above 85% at the concentration of 50ppm. The superoxide dismutase(SOD)-like activity of irradiated NN-L extract was about 76% at 1,000ppm concentration. The xanthine oxidase inhibitory effect of irradiated NN-L extract was about 15% at 1,000ppm. The tyrosinase inhibitory effect of irradiated NN-L extract was about 18% at 1,000ppm. Anti-wrinkle effect, the elastase inhibition activity of irradiated NN-L extract was about 45% at 1,000ppm concentration. All these findings suggested that Nelumbo nucifera G. has a great potential as a cosmeceutical ingredient

  12. Development of biological functional material and product from Nelumbo nucifera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Il Yun; Park, Yong Dae; Jin, Chang Hyun; Choi, Dae Seong

    2008-01-15

    The solvent extracts of Nelumbo nucifera G. were investigated for the activities of antioxidant, whitening, anti-wrinkle and antimicrobial effects to apply as a functional ingredient for cosmetic products. The electron donating ability of irradiated NN-L extract was above 85% at the concentration of 50ppm. The superoxide dismutase(SOD)-like activity of irradiated NN-L extract was about 76% at 1,000ppm concentration. The xanthine oxidase inhibitory effect of irradiated NN-L extract was about 15% at 1,000ppm. The tyrosinase inhibitory effect of irradiated NN-L extract was about 18% at 1,000ppm. Anti-wrinkle effect, the elastase inhibition activity of irradiated NN-L extract was about 45% at 1,000ppm concentration. All these findings suggested that Nelumbo nucifera G. has a great potential as a cosmeceutical ingredient.

  13. A novel biological hydrogen production system. Impact of organic loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafez, Hisham; Nakhla, George; El Naggar, Hesham [Western Ontario Univ. (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    The patent-pending system comprises a novel biohydrogen reactor with a gravity settler for decoupling of SRT from HRT. Two biohydrogenators were operated for 220 days at 37 C, hydraulic retention time 8 h and solids retention time ranged from 1.4 to 2 days under four different glucose concentrations of 2, 8, 16, 32, 48 and 64 g/L, corresponding to organic loading rates of 6.5-206 kg COD/m{sup 3}-d, and started up using anaerobically-digested sludge from the St. Marys wastewater treatment plant (St.Mary, Ontario, Canada) as the seed. The system steadily produced hydrogen with no methane. A maximum hydrogen yield of 3.1 mol H{sub 2} /mol glucose was achieved in the system for all the organic loading rates with an average of 2.8mol H{sub 2} /mol glucose. Acetate and butyrate were the main effluent liquid products at concentrations ranging from 640-7400 mg/L and 400-4600 mg/l, respectively, with no lactate detection. Microbial community analysis using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) confirmed the absence of lactate producing bacteria Lactobacillus fermentum and other non-hydrogen producing species, and the predominance of various Clostridium species. Biomass concentrations in the biohydrogenators were steady, during the runs, varying form 1500 mg/L at the OLR of 6.5 kg COD/m{sup 3}-d to 14000 mg/L at the 104 kg COD/m{sup 3}-d, thus emphasizing the potential of this novel system for sustained stable hydrogen production and prevention of biomass washout. (orig.)

  14. Overview of Skin Whitening Agents: Drugs and Cosmetic Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Couteau

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Depigmentation and skin lightening products, which have been in use for ages in Asian countries where skin whiteness is a major esthetic criterion, are now also highly valued by Western populations, who expose themselves excessively to the sun and develop skin spots as a consequence. After discussing the various possible mechanisms of depigmentation, the different molecules that can be used as well as the status of the products containing them will now be presented. Hydroquinone and derivatives thereof, retinoids, alpha- and beta-hydroxy acids, ascorbic acid, divalent ion chelators, kojic acid, azelaic acid, as well as diverse herbal extracts are described in terms of their efficacy and safety. Since a genuine effect (without toxic effects is difficult to obtain, prevention by using sunscreen products is always preferable.

  15. Metabolic Engineering for Production of Biorenewable Fuels and Chemicals: Contributions of Synthetic Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura R. Jarboe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Production of fuels and chemicals through microbial fermentation of plant material is a desirable alternative to petrochemical-based production. Fermentative production of biorenewable fuels and chemicals requires the engineering of biocatalysts that can quickly and efficiently convert sugars to target products at a cost that is competitive with existing petrochemical-based processes. It is also important that biocatalysts be robust to extreme fermentation conditions, biomass-derived inhibitors, and their target products. Traditional metabolic engineering has made great advances in this area, but synthetic biology has contributed and will continue to contribute to this field, particularly with next-generation biofuels. This work reviews the use of metabolic engineering and synthetic biology in biocatalyst engineering for biorenewable fuels and chemicals production, such as ethanol, butanol, acetate, lactate, succinate, alanine, and xylitol. We also examine the existing challenges in this area and discuss strategies for improving biocatalyst tolerance to chemical inhibitors.

  16. Phototrophic pigment production with microalgae: biological constraints and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulders, Kim J M; Lamers, Packo P; Martens, Dirk E; Wijffels, René H

    2014-04-01

    There is increasing interest in naturally produced colorants, and microalgae represent a bio-technologically interesting source due to their wide range of colored pigments, including chlorophylls (green), carotenoids (red, orange and yellow), and phycobiliproteins (red and blue). However, the concentration of these pigments, under optimal growth conditions, is often too low to make microalgal-based pigment production economically feasible. In some Chlorophyta (green algae), specific process conditions such as oversaturating light intensities or a high salt concentration induce the overproduction of secondary carotenoids (β-carotene in Dunaliella salina (Dunal) Teodoresco and astaxanthin in Haematococcus pluvialis (Flotow)). Overproduction of all other pigments (including lutein, fucoxanthin, and phycocyanin) requires modification in gene expression or enzyme activity, most likely combined with the creation of storage space outside of the photosystems. The success of such modification strategies depends on an adequate understanding of the metabolic pathways and the functional roles of all the pigments involved. In this review, the distribution of commercially interesting pigments across the most common microalgal groups, the roles of these pigments in vivo and their biosynthesis routes are reviewed, and constraints and opportunities for overproduction of both primary and secondary pigments are presented.

  17. Models of risk assessments for biologicals or related products in the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moos, M

    1995-12-01

    In the context of veterinary biologicals, environmental risk assessment means the evaluation of the risk to human health and the environment (which includes plants and animals) connected with the release of such products. The following categories or types of veterinary biologicals can be distinguished: non-genetically modified organisms (non-GMOs) (inactivated/live) GMOs (inactivated/live) carrier products related products (e.g. non-specific "inducers'). Suitable models used in risk assessment for these products should aim to identify all possible adverse effects. A good working model should lead, at least, to a qualitative judgement on the environmental risk of the biological product (e.g. negligible, low, medium, severe, unacceptable). Quantifiable outcomes are rare; therefore, the producer of a biological product and the European control authorities should accept only models which are based on testable points and which are relevant to the type of product and its instructions for use. In view of animal welfare aspects, models working without animals should be preferred. In recent years, some of these methods have been integrated into safety tests described in European Union Directives and in monographs of the European Pharmacopoeia. By reviewing vaccine/registration problems (e.g. Aujeszky's disease live vaccine for pigs, and vaccinia-vectored rabies vaccine), several models used in risk assessment are demonstrated and discussed. PMID:8639943

  18. Organic Production Systems: What the Biological Cell Can Teach Us About Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Lieven Demeester; Knut Eichler; Christoph H. Loch

    2004-01-01

    Biological cells run complicated and sophisticated production systems. The study of the cell's production technology provides us with insights that are potentially useful in industrial manufacturing. When comparing cell metabolism with manufacturing techniques in industry, we find some striking commonalities, but also some important differences. Like today's well-run factories, the cell operates a very lean production system, assures quality at the source, and uses component commonality to si...

  19. 21 CFR 211.84 - Testing and approval or rejection of components, drug product containers, and closures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Testing and approval or rejection of components, drug product containers, and closures. 211.84 Section 211.84 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... with filth, insect infestation, or other extraneous adulterant shall be examined against...

  20. 77 FR 71006 - Sodium Nitrite Injection and Sodium Thiosulfate Injection Drug Products Labeled for the Treatment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-N-1134 Sodium Nitrite Injection and... products containing sodium nitrite labeled for the treatment of cyanide poisoning and unapproved injectable... products containing sodium nitrite or sodium thiosulfate that are labeled for the treatment of...

  1. 76 FR 12916 - Benzocaine; Weight Control Drug Products for Over-the-Counter Human Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-09

    ... of gum, lozenges, or candy is an effective OTC drug product for weight control'' (47 FR 8466 at 8474... were published in the Federal Register as an ANPR for OTC weight control products in 1982 (47 FR 8466...) Group 5: Glucose candy only (control group) Over the course of 4 weeks, 170 participants dropped out...

  2. Safety and Efficacy of Biological Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs in Older Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients: Staying the Distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishchenko, Alla; Lories, Rik J

    2016-06-01

    The population of older individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is rapidly expanding, mainly due to increased life expectancy. While targeted biological therapies are well established for the treatment of this disease, their use may be lower in older patients (age > 65 years) and very old patients (age > 75 years) as a result of perceived higher risks for adverse events in this population, taking into account comorbidity, polypharmacy, and frailty. In this review, we discuss the available evidence for the use of biological therapies in this growing patient group with specific attention towards the eventual reasons for biological treatment failure or withdrawal. The majority of data is found in secondary analyses of clinical trials and in retrospective cohorts. The most information available is on tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockers. Older patients seem to have a less robust response to anti-TNF agents than a younger population, but drug survival as a proxy for efficacy does not seem to be influenced by age. Despite an overall rate of adverse effects comparable to that in younger patients, older RA patients are at higher risk of serious infections. Other biologics appear to have an efficacy similar to anti-TNF agents, also in older RA patients. Again, the drug survival rates for tocilizumab, rituximab, and abatacept resemble those in young RA patients with good general tolerability and safety profiles. The cardiovascular risk and the risk of cancer, increased in RA patients and in the older RA patients, do not appear to be strongly influenced by biologicals. PMID:27154398

  3. Occurrence, pathways and implications of biological production of reactive oxygen species in natural waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T.; Hansel, C. M.; Voelker, B. M.; Lamborg, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide (O2-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) play a critical role in the redox cycling of both toxic (e.g., Hg) and nutrient (e.g., Fe) metals. Despite the discovery of extracellular ROS production in various microbial cultures, including fungi, algae and bacteria, photo-dependent processes are generally considered as the predominant source of ROS in natural waters. Here we show that biological production of ROS is ubiquitous and occurs at a significant rate in freshwater and brackish water environments. Water samples were collected from three freshwater and one brackish water ponds in Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA, periodically from 2012 to 2014. Production of O2- and H2O2 were measured in dark incubations of natural water using a chemiluminescent and a colorimetric probe, respectively. Rates of biological ROS production were obtained by comparing unfiltered with 0.2-μm filtered samples. The role of biological activity in ROS production was confirmed by the cessation of ROS production upon addition of formaldehyde. In surface water, production rates of O2- ranged from undetectable to 96.0 ± 30.0 nmol L-1 h-1, and production rates of H2O2 varied between 9.9 ± 1.3 nmol L-1 h-1 and 145.6 ± 11.2 nmol L-1 h-1. The maximum production rates of both ROS were observed in mid-summer 2013, which coincides with peak biological activity. ROS production in the water from aphotic zone was greater than in the water from photic zone. Thus, non-light dependent biological processes are likely the major contributors to ROS production in this system. Moreover, O2- production appeared to be enhanced by NADH and inhibited by proteinase-K, suggesting the possible involvement of NADH oxidoreductases in this process. The potential role of different microbial communities in ROS production, and the implications of biological ROS production for mercury speciation will also be discussed.

  4. Biologic

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffman, L H

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we explore the boundary between biology and the study of formal systems (logic). In the end, we arrive at a summary formalism, a chapter in "boundary mathematics" where there are not only containers but also extainers ><, entities open to interaction and distinguishing the space that they are not. The boundary algebra of containers and extainers is to biologic what boolean algebra is to classical logic. We show how this formalism encompasses significant parts of the logic of DNA replication, the Dirac formalism for quantum mechanics, formalisms for protein folding and the basic structure of the Temperley Lieb algebra at the foundations of topological invariants of knots and links.

  5. Application of synthetic biology for production of chemicals in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borodina, Irina; Li, Mingji

    2015-01-01

    biology has the potential to bring down this cost by improving our ability to predictably engineer biological systems. This review highlights synthetic biology applications for design, assembly, and optimization of non-native biochemical pathways in baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We describe......-of-concept chemicals have been made in yeast, only a very small fraction of those has reached commercial-scale production so far. The limiting factor is the high research cost associated with the development of a robust cell factory that can produce the desired chemical at high titer, rate, and yield. Synthetic...

  6. Marine Natural Products as Lead Compound for New Drug Discovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG; Biao

    2001-01-01

    The study of natural product has long been motivated by a quest for some benefit to man, the discover. Recent years have witnessed growing attention to the isolation, identification and synthesis of the marine natural. Although marine organisms do not have a long history of medicine applications like terrestrial plants, some marine organisms have left an extensive record of hazard to mankind. The isolation and identification of saxtoxin, tetradotoxin and lyngbyatoxin resulted from such reported. The marine biosphere has long held great promise as source of anticancer compounds, while a number of screening efforts has indicated a much higher percentage of antineplastic and antitumor activity than terrestrial plants. Several marine natural products have made their appearance in clinical trials at the National Cancer Institute, such as the didemnis, , bryostatins, This finds marine invertebratehave reinvigorated interest and effort in anticancer agent from marine invertebrate.  ……

  7. Marine Natural Products as Lead Compound for New Drug Discovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Biao

    2001-01-01

    @@ The study of natural product has long been motivated by a quest for some benefit to man, the discover. Recent years have witnessed growing attention to the isolation, identification and synthesis of the marine natural. Although marine organisms do not have a long history of medicine applications like terrestrial plants, some marine organisms have left an extensive record of hazard to mankind. The isolation and identification of saxtoxin, tetradotoxin and lyngbyatoxin resulted from such reported. The marine biosphere has long held great promise as source of anticancer compounds, while a number of screening efforts has indicated a much higher percentage of antineplastic and antitumor activity than terrestrial plants. Several marine natural products have made their appearance in clinical trials at the National Cancer Institute, such as the didemnis, , bryostatins, This finds marine invertebratehave reinvigorated interest and effort in anticancer agent from marine invertebrate.

  8. 21 CFR 333.350 - Labeling of acne drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... stated: (select one of the following: ‘elsewhere on this label,’ ‘above,’ or ‘below.’)” (e) The word “physician” may be substituted for the word “doctor” in any of the labeling statements in this section. § 333..., and mouth avoid contact with hair and dyed fabrics, which may be bleached by this product...

  9. BICLUSTERING METHODS FOR RE-ORDERING DATA MATRICES IN SYSTEMS BIOLOGY, DRUG DISCOVERY AND TOXICOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christodoulos A. Floudas

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Biclustering has emerged as an important problem in the analysis of gene expression data since genes may only jointly respond over a subset of conditions. Many of the methods for biclustering, and clustering algorithms in general, utilize simplified models or heuristic strategies for identifying the ``best'' grouping of elements according to some metric and cluster definition and thus result in suboptimal clusters. In the first part of the presentation, we present a rigorous approach to biclustering, OREO, which is based on the Optimal RE-Ordering of the rows and columns of a data matrix so as to globally minimize the dissimilarity metric [1,2]. The physical permutations of the rows and columns of the data matrix can be modeled as either a network flow problem or a traveling salesman problem. The performance of OREO is tested on several important data matrices arising in systems biology to validate the ability of the proposed method and compare it to existing biclustering and clustering methods. In the second part of the talk, we will focus on novel methods for clustering of data matrices that are very sparse [3]. These types of data matrices arise in drug discovery where the x- and y-axis of a data matrix can correspond to different functional groups for two distinct substituent sites on a molecular scaffold. Each possible x and y pair corresponds to a single molecule which can be synthesized and tested for a certain property, such as percent inhibition of a protein function. For even moderate size matrices, synthesizing and testing a small fraction of the molecules is labor intensive and not economically feasible. Thus, it is of paramount importance to have a reliable method for guiding the synthesis process to select molecules that have a high probability of success. In the second part of the presentation, we introduce a new strategy to enable efficient substituent reordering and descriptor-free property estimation. Our approach casts

  10. 75 FR 11549 - Determination That PRO-BANTHINE (Propantheline Bromide) Tablets and 14 Other Drug Products Were...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-11

    ..., 2009 (74 FR 6896).) Application No. Drug Applicant NDA 8-732 PRO-BANTHINE Shire Pharmaceuticals...) Tablets and 14 Other Drug Products Were Not Withdrawn From Sale for Reasons of Safety or Effectiveness...) has determined that the 15 drug products listed in this document were not withdrawn from sale...

  11. 78 FR 48172 - Minimizing Risk for Children's Toy Laser Products; Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Minimizing Risk for Children's Toy Laser Products; Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug... specifically address children's toy laser products. FDA recently issued a proposed rule (78 FR 37723)...

  12. 21 CFR 358.750 - Labeling of drug products for the control of dandruff, seborrheic dermatitis, or psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... dandruff, seborrheic dermatitis, or psoriasis. 358.750 Section 358.750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Dermatitis, and Psoriasis § 358.750 Labeling of drug products for the control of dandruff, seborrheic dermatitis, or psoriasis. (a) Statement of identity. The labeling of the product contains the...

  13. Recent progress in synthetic biology for microbial production of C3-C10 alcohols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edna N. Lamsen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The growing need to address current energy and environmental problems has sparked an interest in developing improved biological methods to produce liquid fuels from renewable sources. While microbial ethanol production is well established, higher chain alcohols possess chemical properties that are more similar to gasoline. Unfortunately, these alcohols (except 1-butanol are not produced efficiently in natural microorganisms, and thus economical production in industrial volumes remains a challenge. Synthetic biology, however, offers additional tools to engineer synthetic pathways in user-friendly hosts to help increase titers and productivity of these advanced biofuels. This review concentrates on recent developments in synthetic biology to produce higher-chain alcohols as viable renewable replacements for traditional fuel.

  14. Studies on production and biological potential of prodigiosin by Serratia marcescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryawanshi, Rahul K; Patil, Chandrashekhar D; Borase, Hemant P; Salunke, Bipinchandra K; Patil, Satish V

    2014-07-01

    Efficacy of Serratia marcescens for pigment production and biological activity was investigated. Natural substrates like sweet potato, mahua flower extract (Madhuca latifolia L.), and sesam at different concentrations were taken. As a carbon source microorganism favored potato powder was followed by sesam and mannitol, and as nitrogen source casein hydrolysate was followed by yeast and malt extract. The effect of inorganic salts on pigment production was also studied. At final optimized composition of suitable carbon, nitrogen source, and trace materials and at suitable physiological conditions, prodigiosin production was 4.8 g L(-1). The isolated pigment showed antimicrobial activity against different pathogenic bacteria and fungi. Extracted pigment was characterized by spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and thin layer chromatography (TLC) which confirm production of biological compound prodigiosin. This study suggests that use of sweet potato powder and casein can be a potential alternative bioresource for commercial production of pigment prodigiosin. PMID:24781979

  15. 76 FR 11330 - Animal Drugs, Feeds, and Related Products; Withdrawal of Approval of a New Animal Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 510, 520, and 558 Animal Drugs, Feeds, and... Animal drugs. 21 CFR Part 558 Animal drugs, Animal feeds. Therefore, under the Federal Food, Drug, and... DRUGS FOR USE IN ANIMAL FEEDS 0 5. The authority citation for 21 CFR part 558 continues to read...

  16. Modeling the Drug Discovery Process: The Isolation and Biological Testing of Eugenol from Clove Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, William H.; Smiley, Patricia M.

    2002-01-01

    This experiment describes the isolation and biological testing of eugenol and neutral compounds from commercially available clove oil. By coupling the chemical separation of the components of clove oil (an experiment described in many introductory organic laboratory textbooks) with a simple antibiotic test, the students "discover" the biologically active compound in clove oil. This experiment models one of the primary methods used in the discovery of new pharmaceutical agents.

  17. Drug: D08779 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available N) Plasma product [DS:H00085] Therapeutic category: 6343 Therapeutic category of drugs in Japan [BR:br08301] 6 Agents against patholo...gic organisms and parasites 63 Biological preparations 634 Human blood preparations

  18. Drug: D08781 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ologic organisms and parasites 63 Biological preparations 634 Human blood preparati... (TN) plasma product [DS:H00412] Therapeutic category: 6343 Therapeutic category of drugs in Japan [BR:br08301] 6 Agents against path

  19. Drug: D08783 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hologic organisms and parasites 63 Biological preparations 634 Human blood preparat...H (TN) plasma product [DS:H00085] Therapeutic category: 6343 Therapeutic category of drugs in Japan [BR:br08301] 6 Agents against pat

  20. Are eddies nature’s trigger to enhance biological productivity in the Bay of Bengal?

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrasannaKumar, S.; Nuncio, M.; Kumar, A.; Sardessai, S.; DeSouza, S.N.; Gauns, M.; Ramaiah, N.; Madhupratap, M.

    -1 Are eddies nature?s trigger to enhance biological productivity in the Bay of Bengal? S. Prasanna Kumar, M. Nuncio, Jayu Narvekar, Ajoy Kumar1, S. Sardesai, S.N. de Souza, Mangesh Gauns, N. Ramaiah and M. Madhupratap National Institute of Oceanography... of nutrient supply to the oligotrophic upper ocean waters such as wind- driven mixing, upwelling etc. cannot account for this. In this paper we explore the role of eddies in enhancing the biological productivity in the Bay of Bengal. 2. Data and Analysis...

  1. Bioinformatics for the synthetic biology of natural products: integrating across the Design-Build-Test cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell, Pablo; Currin, Andrew; Jervis, Adrian J; Rattray, Nicholas J W; Swainston, Neil; Yan, Cunyu; Takano, Eriko; Breitling, Rainer

    2016-08-27

    Covering: 2000 to 2016Progress in synthetic biology is enabled by powerful bioinformatics tools allowing the integration of the design, build and test stages of the biological engineering cycle. In this review we illustrate how this integration can be achieved, with a particular focus on natural products discovery and production. Bioinformatics tools for the DESIGN and BUILD stages include tools for the selection, synthesis, assembly and optimization of parts (enzymes and regulatory elements), devices (pathways) and systems (chassis). TEST tools include those for screening, identification and quantification of metabolites for rapid prototyping. The main advantages and limitations of these tools as well as their interoperability capabilities are highlighted. PMID:27185383

  2. Bioinformatics for the synthetic biology of natural products: integrating across the Design–Build–Test cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currin, Andrew; Jervis, Adrian J.; Rattray, Nicholas J. W.; Swainston, Neil; Yan, Cunyu; Breitling, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Covering: 2000 to 2016 Progress in synthetic biology is enabled by powerful bioinformatics tools allowing the integration of the design, build and test stages of the biological engineering cycle. In this review we illustrate how this integration can be achieved, with a particular focus on natural products discovery and production. Bioinformatics tools for the DESIGN and BUILD stages include tools for the selection, synthesis, assembly and optimization of parts (enzymes and regulatory elements), devices (pathways) and systems (chassis). TEST tools include those for screening, identification and quantification of metabolites for rapid prototyping. The main advantages and limitations of these tools as well as their interoperability capabilities are highlighted. PMID:27185383

  3. The effects of four different drugs administered through catheters on slime production in coagulase negative Staphylococci

    OpenAIRE

    J. Sedef Göçmen; Ünase Büyükkoçak; Alpay Azap; Yasemin Ö. Pekuz; Osman Çağlayan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Higher rate of slime production has been found in pathogen bacteria strains. Accordingly, the factors thatcontribute to higher slime production rate increase the infection risk, while the factors that reduce the slime productionrate will reduce the infection risk. The effect of some drugs that are administered through catheters in intensive careunits on slime production with coagulase negative Staphylococci was investigated.Materials and methods: In this study, the effect of four ...

  4. Natural products against cancer: A comprehensive bibliometric study of the research projects, publications, patents and drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Jian Du; Xiaoli L Tang

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze multi-source data including awards, publications, patents and drugs, and try to draw the whole landscape of the research and development community in the area of natural products (NPs) against cancer. Materials and Methods: Awards, publications, patents and drugs data from National Institute of Health/Natural Science Foundation of China (NIH/NSFC), PubMed, Derwent Innovation Index and Cortellis were collected. Bibliometric methodologies and technology are used to in...

  5. 21 CFR 347.50 - Labeling of skin protectant drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... identified in § 347.10(f)—(i) For products requiring dispersal in water. The labeling states “ turn warm... “For use as a soak in a bath: dissolve 1 to 2 cupfuls in a tub of warm water soak for 10 to 30 minutes... Section 347.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  6. Biosimilars: A New Aspect in the Biological Treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Başak Yalçın; Nilgün Atakan; Nihal Kundakçı; Ferda Artüz

    2014-01-01

    Biotechnological drugs (biological agents, biologics) are medical products, which are produced by DNA technology and hybridoma methods. Nowadays these drugs are effectively used in the treatment of several diseases with a consistently increasing diversity and indication spectrum. Psoriasis is the major dermatological disease in which biologics are used successfully. With the use of these drugs important improvements were achieved in the treatment of the disease. However these drugs are very e...

  7. Illicit drugs as new environmental pollutants: cyto-genotoxic effects of cocaine on the biological model Dreissena polymorpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binelli, A; Pedriali, A; Riva, C; Parolini, M

    2012-03-01

    The increase in global consumption of illicit drugs has produced not only social and medical problems but also a potential new environmental danger. Indeed, it has been established that drugs consumed by humans end up in surface waters, after being carried through the sewage system. Although many studies to measure concentrations of several drugs of abuse in freshwater worldwide have been conducted, no data have been available to evaluate their potentially harmful effects on non-target organisms until now. The present study represents the first attempt to investigate the cyto-genotoxic effects of cocaine, one of the primary drugs consumed in Western Countries, in the biological model Dreissena polymorpha by the use of a biomarker battery. We performed the following tests on Zebra mussel hemocytes: the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay, the apoptosis frequency evaluation and the micronucleus assay (MN test) for the evaluation of genotoxicity and the lysosomal membranes stability test (neutral red retention assay; NRRA) to identify the cocaine cytotoxicity. We exposed the molluscs for 96 h to three different nominal concentrations in water (40 ng L(-1); 220 ng L(-1); and 10 μg L(-1)). Cocaine caused significant (papoptosis, which was evident in samples from even the lowest environmental cocaine concentration. Because cocaine decreased the stability of lysosomal membranes, we also highlighted its cytotoxicity and the possible implications of oxidative stress for the observed genotoxic effects. PMID:22119280

  8. Towards targeting anticancer drugs: ruthenium(ii)-arene complexes with biologically active naphthoquinone-derived ligand systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubanik, Mario; Kandioller, Wolfgang; Kim, Kunwoo; Anderson, Robert F; Klapproth, Erik; Jakupec, Michael A; Roller, Alexander; Söhnel, Tilo; Keppler, Bernhard K; Hartinger, Christian G

    2016-08-16

    Anticancer active metal complexes with biologically active ligands have the potential to interact with more than one biological target, which could help to overcome acquired and/or intrinsic resistance of tumors to small molecule drugs. In this paper we present the preparation of 2-hydroxy-[1,4]-naphthoquinone-derived ligands and their coordination to a Ru(II)(η(6)-p-cymene)Cl moiety. The synthesis of oxime derivatives resulted in the surprising formation of nitroso-naphthalene complexes, as confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis. The compounds were shown to be stable in aqueous solution but reacted with glutathione and ascorbic acid rather than undergoing reduction. One-electron reduction with pulse radiolysis revealed different behavior for the naphthoquinone and nitroso-naphthalene complexes, which was also observed in in vitro anticancer assays. PMID:27214822

  9. Production of antiretroviral drugs in middle- and low-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Eloan dos Santos; Brüning, Karin; Macedo, M Fernanda; Siani, Antonio C

    2014-01-01

    This review outlines the main issues concerning the production of antiretroviral (ARV) drugs in middle- and low-income countries and the relevant political, legal and technical requirements for supporting such production. The requirements for efficient local production, including the manufacture of generic and branded products and public demand, have been considered from economic, market and socio-political perspectives. A steady and consistent government policy is crucial to success. Additional crucial factors in establishing local production are adequate infrastructure, qualified human resources in technical and managerial areas, and production-distribution logistics systems. The creation or strengthening of a national drug regulatory agency is a basic requirement. Production of ARVs relies on the structure of the international market for active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), which are highly monopolized for inclusion in branded or patented drugs, or are concentrated in a few Asian generic companies. Countries seeking to begin local production must develop strategies to overcome the various barriers. For instance, sub-Saharan African countries may benefit from developing multilateral health agreements with neighbouring countries. Such agreements are recommended and should be complemented by technology transfers, especially for the manufacture of APIs. Achieving a production level that is sustainable in the long term is crucial to maintaining patients' access to ARVs.

  10. Production of antiretroviral drugs in middle- and low-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Eloan dos Santos; Brüning, Karin; Macedo, M Fernanda; Siani, Antonio C

    2014-01-01

    This review outlines the main issues concerning the production of antiretroviral (ARV) drugs in middle- and low-income countries and the relevant political, legal and technical requirements for supporting such production. The requirements for efficient local production, including the manufacture of generic and branded products and public demand, have been considered from economic, market and socio-political perspectives. A steady and consistent government policy is crucial to success. Additional crucial factors in establishing local production are adequate infrastructure, qualified human resources in technical and managerial areas, and production-distribution logistics systems. The creation or strengthening of a national drug regulatory agency is a basic requirement. Production of ARVs relies on the structure of the international market for active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), which are highly monopolized for inclusion in branded or patented drugs, or are concentrated in a few Asian generic companies. Countries seeking to begin local production must develop strategies to overcome the various barriers. For instance, sub-Saharan African countries may benefit from developing multilateral health agreements with neighbouring countries. Such agreements are recommended and should be complemented by technology transfers, especially for the manufacture of APIs. Achieving a production level that is sustainable in the long term is crucial to maintaining patients' access to ARVs. PMID:25310755

  11. Using the pea aphid Acrythociphon pisum as a tool for screening biological responses to chemicals and drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ledger Terence

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Though the biological process of aphid feeding is well documented, no one to date has sought to apply it as a tool to screen the biological responses to chemicals and drugs, in ecotoxicology, genotoxicology and/or for interactions in the cascade of sequential molecular events of embryogenesis. Parthenogenetic insect species present the advantage of an anatomical system composed of multiple germarium/ovarioles in the same mother with all the intermediate maturation stages of embryos from oocyte to first instar larva birth. This could be used as an interesting model to visualize at which step drugs interact with the cell signalling pathway during the ordered developmental process. Findings We designed a simple test for screening drugs by investigating simultaneously zygote mitotic division, the progression of embryo development, cell differentiation at early developmental stages and finally organogenesis and population growth rate. We aimed to analyze the toxicology effects of compounds and/or their interference on cellular signalling by examining at which step of the cascade, from zygote to mature embryo, the developmental process is perturbed. We reasoned that a parthenogenetic founder insect, in which the ovarioles shelter numerous embryos at different developmental stages, would allow us to precisely pinpoint the step of embryogenesis in which chemicals act through specific molecular targets as the known ordered homeobox genes. Conclusion Using this method we report the results of a genotoxicological and demographic analysis of three compound models bearing in common a bromo group: one is integrated as a base analog in DNA synthesis, two others activate permanently kinases. We report that one compound (Br-du altered drastically embryogenesis, which argues in favor of this simple technique as a cheap first screening of chemicals or drugs to be used in a number of genotoxicology applications.

  12. 21 CFR 310.546 - Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for the treatment and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the act and part 314 of this chapter is required for marketing. In the absence of an approved new drug..., any such OTC drug product initially introduced or initially delivered for introduction into...

  13. Electroanalysis of antitubercular drugs in pharmaceutical dosage forms and biological fluids: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapliyal, Neeta; Karpoormath, Rajshekhar V; Goyal, Rajendra N

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a major global public health problem. Given the need for extensive analysis of antitubercular drugs, the development of sensitive, reliable and facile analytical methods to determine these compounds becomes necessary. Electrochemical techniques have inherent advantages over other well-established analytical methods, this review aiming to provide an updated overview of the latest trends (from 2006 till date) in the voltammetric determination of antitubercular drugs. Furthermore, the advantages and limitations of these methods are critically discussed. The review reveals that in spite of using a variety of chemically modified electrodes to determine antitubercular drugs, there is still a dearth of applicability of the voltammetric methods to quantify these compounds in human body fluids, especially in blood plasma.

  14. Ethnic hair care products may increase false positives in hair drug testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidwell, David A; Smith, Frederick P; Shepherd, Arica R

    2015-12-01

    The question of why different races appear more susceptible to hair contamination by external drugs remains controversial. This research studied susceptibility of head hair to external cocaine and methamphetamine when hair products have been applied. Three different chemical classes of ethnic hair products were applied to Caucasian, Asian, and African hair. Some products increased the methamphetamine and cocaine concentrations in all hair types. A unique finding of this research is that certain ethnic hair products can replace moisture as a diffusion medium, thereby increasing the susceptibility to contamination over 100-fold compared to petroleum-based products.

  15. New approaches to estimation of peat deposits for production of biologically active compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepchenko, L. M.; Yurchenko, V. I.; Krasnik, V. G.; Syedykh, N. J.

    2009-04-01

    It is known, that biologically active preparations from peat increase animals productivity as well as resistance against stress-factors and have adaptogeneous, antioxidant, immunomodulative properties. Optymal choice of peat deposits for the production of biologically active preparations supposes the detailed comparative analysis of peat properties from different deposits. For this the cadastre of peat of Ukraine is developed in the humic substances laboratory named after prof. Khristeva L.A. (Dnipropetrovsk Agrarian University, Ukraine). It based on the research of its physical and chemical properties, toxicity and biological activity, and called Biocadastre. The Biocadastre is based on the set of parameters, including the descriptions of physical and chemical properties (active acidity, degree of decomposition, botanical composition etc.), toxicity estimation (by parabyotyc, infusorial, inhibitor and other tests), biological activity indexes (growth-promoting, antioxidative, adaptogeneous, immunomodulative antistress and other actions). The blocks of Biocadastre indexes are differentiated, taking into account their use for creation the preparations for vegetable, animals and microorganisms. The Biocadastre will allow to choose the peat deposits, most suitable for the production of different biologically active preparations, both wide directed and narrow spectrum of action, depending on application fields (medicine, agriculture, veterinary medicine, microbiological industry, balneology, cosmetology).

  16. Combination Drug Products for HIV-A Word of Caution for the Transplant Clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, S J; Kuten, S A; Musick, W L; Gaber, A O; Monsour, H P; Knight, R J

    2016-08-01

    Modern-day treatment regimens for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are not only highly effective, but are now more often available as convenient fixed-dose combination products. Furthermore, as medication adherence is of utmost importance in this setting, national guidelines endorse the use of such products. Transplant providers of HIV-infected patients will undoubtedly encounter these products, some of which contain medications known to drastically alter the metabolism of certain immunosuppressants. Herein, we describe an instance of drug interaction-induced calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) nephrotoxicity in a renal transplant recipient being started on a cobicistat-containing combination product for HIV. CNI toxicity, in turn, was resolved with the aid of phenytoin as an inducer of drug metabolism. This case underscores the importance of familiarity with newer combination products on the market and constant communication with HIV-positive transplant recipients and their providers. PMID:27089541

  17. A patient with adrenocortical carcinoma : Characterization of its biological activity and drug resistance profile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feller, N; Hoekman, K; Linn, SC; Verheul, HMW; Wolthers, BG; PoppSnijders, C; Pinedo, HM

    1997-01-01

    We describe a patient with a metastasized adrenocortical cancer who exhibited excessive production of both glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids combined with suppressed androgen production, Unusual steroid metabolites found in the patient's urine have not been described previously in association w

  18. Compound Activity Mapping: Integrating Chemical and Biological Profiling for the Functional Annotation of Natural Product Libraries

    OpenAIRE

    Kurita, Kenji Long

    2015-01-01

    Natural products research has had a significant impact on human-health and our understanding of the natural world as a pillar of pharmacognosy, organic chemistry, ecology, and chemical biology. But while this science has yielded countless discoveries such as penicillin, taxol, and artimesinin and will continue to improve quality of life around the world, the idea that natural products is a panacea of chemical diversity has been challenged by problems including the endless rediscovery of known...

  19. What controls biological productivity in coastal upwelling systems? Insights from a comparative modeling study

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Lachkar; Gruber, N.

    2011-01-01

    The magnitude of the biological productivity in Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS) is traditionally viewed as directly reflecting the upwelling intensity. Yet, different EBUS show different sensitivities of productivity to upwelling-favorable winds (Carr and Kearns, 2003). Here, using a comparative modeling study of the California Current System (California CS) and Canary Current System (Canary CS), we show how physical and environmental factors, such as light, temperature and c...

  20. REGULATION OF PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF CHICORY PLANTS BY FOLIAR APPLICATION OF BIOLOGICALLY ACTIVE SUBSTANCES

    OpenAIRE

    MAREK KOVÁR; IVAN ČERNÝ

    2012-01-01

    In this study were evaluated both the growth and yield potentials of three chicory (Cichorium intybus var. sativum) varieties ('Fredonia Nova', 'Oesia' a 'Maurane') growing in natural agro-ecological conditions from 2006 to 2008. Regulation of the crop productivity by foliar application of biologically active substances (Atonik, Polybor 150, and Biafit Gold) was also studied. Evaluation of growth-production performance of chicory was realized as: leaf area index (LAI), photosynthetic potentia...

  1. 75 FR 55676 - Animal Drugs, Feeds, and Related Products; Withdrawal of Approval of New Animal Drug Applications...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 510, 520, and 558 Animal Drugs, Feeds, and... drugs, Animal feeds. 0 Therefore, under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and under authority... section. * * * * * PART 558--NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR USE IN ANIMAL FEEDS 0 5. The authority citation for...

  2. 76 FR 17776 - Animal Drugs, Feeds, and Related Products; Withdrawal of Approval of New Animal Drug Applications...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 510, 520, 522, 524, and 558 Animal Drugs, Feeds... Part 558 Animal drugs, Animal feeds. Therefore, under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and.... 000010 and 000069''. PART 558--NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR USE IN ANIMAL FEEDS 0 12. The authority citation...

  3. Eddy-mediated biological productivity in the Bay of Bengal during fall and spring intermonsoons

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrasannaKumar, S.; Nuncio, M.; Ramaiah, N.; Sardesai, S.; Narvekar, J.; Fernandes, V.; Paul, J.T.

    but also enhanced the nutrient concentrations. This in turn increased the biological productivity of the Bay to 1½-2 times. In addition, the subsurface chlorophyll maximum (SCM), which is generally located between 40 and 70 m in fall and 60 and 90 m...

  4. Process for the continuous biological production of lipids, hydrocarbons or mixtures thereof

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Wielen, L.A.M.; Heijnen, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a process for the continuous biological production of lipids, hydrocarbons, hydrocarbon like material or mixtures thereof by conversion of a suitable substrate using micro-organisms, in which process the said substrate is continuously, anaerobically fermented to

  5. Do biological medicinal products pose a risk to the environment?: a current view on ecopharmacovigilance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühler, Thomas C; Andersson, Mikael; Carlin, Gunnar; Johnsson, Ann; Akerblom, Lennart

    2009-01-01

    The occurrence of active pharmaceutical substances in the environment is of growing concern. The vast majority of the compounds in question are of low molecular weight, intended for oral use and designed to tolerate, for example, the digestive enzymes in the upper alimentary tract, the harsh milieus found in the acidic stomach, or the microbe rich intestine. Accordingly, these xenobiotic compounds may, due to their inherent biological activity, constitute a risk to the environment. Biological medicinal products, for example recombinant human insulin or monoclonal antibodies, however, are different. They are primarily made up of oligomers or polymers of amino acids, sugars or nucleotides and are thus readily metabolized. They are therefore generally not considered to pose any risk to the environment. Certain classes of biological medicinal products, however, are associated with specific safety issues. Genetically modified organisms as vectors in vaccines or in gene therapy products have attracted much attention in this regard. Issues include the degree of attenuation of the live recombinant vaccine, replication restrictions of the vaccine vector, alteration of the host and tissue tropism of the vector, the possibility of reversion to virulence, and risk to the ecosystem. In this review we discuss the fate and the potential environmental impact of biological medicinal products following clinical use from an ecopharmacovigilance point of view, and review relevant policy documents and regulatory statements. PMID:19810773

  6. 9 CFR 113.52 - Requirements for cell lines used for production of biologics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... of origin of the MCS may be used if approved by APHIS. (c) The MCS and either each subculture of... sources of cells in the batch. (d) The MCS and either each subculture used to prepare a biological product... not be used. If bacteria or fungi are found in a subculture, the subculture shall not be used. (e)...

  7. Dilute-acid pretreatment of barley straw for biological hydrogen production using Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panagiotopoulos, I.A.; Bakker, R.R.C.; Vrije, de G.J.; Claassen, P.A.M.; Koukios, E.G.

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to use the fermentability test to investigate the feasibility of applying various dilute acids in the pretreatment of barley straw for biological hydrogen production. At a fixed acid loading of 1% (w/w dry matter) 28-32% of barley straw was converted to soluble m

  8. Comprehensive data-driven analysis of the impact of chemoinformatic structure on the genome-wide biological response profiles of cancer cells to 1159 drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Suleiman A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detailed and systematic understanding of the biological effects of millions of available compounds on living cells is a significant challenge. As most compounds impact multiple targets and pathways, traditional methods for analyzing structure-function relationships are not comprehensive enough. Therefore more advanced integrative models are needed for predicting biological effects elicited by specific chemical features. As a step towards creating such computational links we developed a data-driven chemical systems biology approach to comprehensively study the relationship of 76 structural 3D-descriptors (VolSurf, chemical space of 1159 drugs with the microarray gene expression responses (biological space they elicited in three cancer cell lines. The analysis covering 11350 genes was based on data from the Connectivity Map. We decomposed the biological response profiles into components, each linked to a characteristic chemical descriptor profile. Results Integrated analysis of both the chemical and biological space was more informative than either dataset alone in predicting drug similarity as measured by shared protein targets. We identified ten major components that link distinct VolSurf chemical features across multiple compounds to specific cellular responses. For example, component 2 (hydrophobic properties strongly linked to DNA damage response, while component 3 (hydrogen bonding was associated with metabolic stress. Individual structural and biological features were often linked to one cell line only, such as leukemia cells (HL-60 specifically responding to cardiac glycosides. Conclusions In summary, our approach identified several novel links between specific chemical structure properties and distinct biological responses in cells incubated with these drugs. Importantly, the analysis focused on chemical-biological properties that emerge across multiple drugs. The decoding of such systematic relationships is necessary

  9. Medicamentos Biotecnológicos: Requisitos Exigidos para el Desarrollo y Aprobación de Biosimilares Biological Medicinal Products: Requirements for the Development and Approval of Biosimilars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begoña Calvo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se revisan las directrices europeas de comparabilidad que establecen la metodología para la determinación de biosimilitud entre los medicamentos biosimilares (follow-on biologics en USA y el medicamento biológico de referencia. Los biosimilares son medicamentos biológicos parecidos pero no idénticos al medicamento original y pueden ser fabricados por cualquier fabricante al finalizar el periodo de patente de los medicamentos biotecnológicos. En el articulo se detallan las directrices de la Agencia Europea del Medicamento (EMA y de la Conferencia Internacional de Armonización (ICH a tener en cuenta en el desarrollo y aprobación de estos medicamentos. Se demuestra que los medicamentos biosimilares no pueden considerarse medicamentos genéricos, siendo necesario realizar una serie de ensayos adicionales previos a la obtención de la autorización de comercialización.This article reviews the European guidelines on drugs comparability that establish the methodology for verifying biosimilarity between the so-called biosimilar drugs and the reference biological medicinal product. Biosimilars are biological medicines similar but not identical to the original drugs and can be manufactured by any laboratory after the expiration of biotech drugs patent. The guidelines of the European Medicines Agency (EMA and the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH that must be considered in the development and approval of these drugs also are reviewed. It is shown that biosimilars cannot be considered as generic drugs, being necessary to conduct additional assays prior to obtain marketing authorization.

  10. The use of the United States FDA programs as a strategy to advance the development of drug products for neglected tropical diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs-Barrable, Kristina; Conway, Jocelyn; Gershkovich, Pavel; Ibrahim, Fady; Wasan, Kishor M

    2014-11-01

    Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) are infections which are endemic in poor populations in lower- and middle-income countries (LMIC). Approximately one billion people have now or are at risk of getting an NTD and yet less than 5% of research dollars are focused on providing treatments and prevention of these highly debilitating and deadly conditions. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Orphan Drug Designation program (ODDP) provides orphan status to drugs and biologics, defined as those intended for the safe and effective treatment, diagnosis or prevention of rare diseases and/or disorders that affect fewer than 200 000 people in the United States, or that affect more than 200 000 persons but are not expected to recover the costs of developing and marketing a treatment drug. These regulations have led to the translation of rare disease knowledge into innovative rare disease therapies. The FDA Guidance for Industry on developing drugs for the treatment and prevention of NTDs describes the following regulatory strategies: Orphan Product Designation, Fast Track Designation, Priority Review Designation, Accelerated Approval and Tropical Disease Priority Review Voucher. This paper will discuss how these regulations and especially the ODDP can improve the clinical development and accessibility of drug products for NTDs. PMID:24512098

  11. The effects of four different drugs administered through catheters on slime production in coagulase negative Staphylococci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sedef Göçmen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Higher rate of slime production has been found in pathogen bacteria strains. Accordingly, the factors thatcontribute to higher slime production rate increase the infection risk, while the factors that reduce the slime productionrate will reduce the infection risk. The effect of some drugs that are administered through catheters in intensive careunits on slime production with coagulase negative Staphylococci was investigated.Materials and methods: In this study, the effect of four different preparations containing Glyceryl trinitrate (Perlinganit®, Dexmedetomidine (Precedex®, Esmolol (Brevibloc®, and Propofol (Propofol® on slime production of 24Staphylococcus epidermidis strains isolated from blood cultures of patients, and reference strain were investigated. Slimeproduction was determined using ‘the quantitative microdilution plaque test’ described by Christensen.Results: Under controlled medium, eight strains formed slimes, and in the media containing esmolol, glyceryl trinitrate,dexmedetomidine, and propofol slimes were positive for five, 21, 15, and 18 strains, respectively. The rate of slime productionin glyceryl trinitrate, dexmedetomidine, and propofol containing media were higher than that of the controls.Conclusions: In the light of the results of this study, it is concluded that the drugs and/or additives increase the rate ofslime production. The effects of the preparations administered through catheters on slime production should be investigated,and these effects should be kept in mind during their use. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2012; 2(4: 150-154Key words: Slime Production, Coagulase Negative Staphyloccoci, Parenteral drugs

  12. An update on molecular biology and drug resistance mechanisms of multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu, Pelin; Kiraz, Yağmur; Gündüz, Ufuk; Baran, Yusuf

    2015-12-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM), a neoplasm of plasma cells, is the second most common hematological malignancy. Incidance rates increase after age 40. MM is most commonly seen in men and African-American population. There are several factors to this, such as obesity, environmental factors, family history, genetic factors and monoclonal gammopathies of undetermined significance (MGUS) that have been implicated as potentially etiologic. Development of MM involves a series of complex molecular events, including chromosomal abnormalities, oncogene activation and growth factor dysregulation. Chemotherapy is the most commonly used treatment strategy in MM. However, MM is a difficult disease to treat because of its marked resistance to chemotherapy. MM has been shown to be commonly multidrug resistance (MDR)-negative at diagnosis and associated with a high incidence of MDR expression at relapse. This review deals with the molecular aspects of MM, drug resistance mechanisms during treatment and also possible new applications for overcoming drug resistance. PMID:26235594

  13. Strategies of bringing drug product marketing applications to meet current regulatory standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan; Freed, Anita; Lavrich, David; Raghavachari, Ramesh; Huynh-Ba, Kim; Shah, Ketan; Alasandro, Mark

    2015-08-01

    In the past decade, many guidance documents have been issued through collaboration of global organizations and regulatory authorities. Most of these are applicable to new products, but there is a risk that currently marketed products will not meet the new compliance standards during audits and inspections while companies continue to make changes through the product life cycle for continuous improvement or market demands. This discussion presents different strategies to bringing drug product marketing applications to meet current and emerging standards. It also discusses stability and method designs to meet process validation and global development efforts.

  14. Strategies of bringing drug product marketing applications to meet current regulatory standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan; Freed, Anita; Lavrich, David; Raghavachari, Ramesh; Huynh-Ba, Kim; Shah, Ketan; Alasandro, Mark

    2015-08-01

    In the past decade, many guidance documents have been issued through collaboration of global organizations and regulatory authorities. Most of these are applicable to new products, but there is a risk that currently marketed products will not meet the new compliance standards during audits and inspections while companies continue to make changes through the product life cycle for continuous improvement or market demands. This discussion presents different strategies to bringing drug product marketing applications to meet current and emerging standards. It also discusses stability and method designs to meet process validation and global development efforts. PMID:26024722

  15. Structural biology contributions to the discovery of drugs to treat chronic myelogenous leukaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowan-Jacob, Sandra W., E-mail: sandra.jacob@novartis.com; Fendrich, Gabriele; Floersheimer, Andreas; Furet, Pascal; Liebetanz, Janis; Rummel, Gabriele; Rheinberger, Paul; Centeleghe, Mario; Fabbro, Doriano; Manley, Paul W. [Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Basel (Switzerland)

    2007-01-01

    A case study showing how the determination of multiple cocrystal structures of the protein tyrosine kinase c-Abl was used to support drug discovery, resulting in a compound effective in the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukaemia. Chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML) results from the Bcr-Abl oncoprotein, which has a constitutively activated Abl tyrosine kinase domain. Although most chronic phase CML patients treated with imatinib as first-line therapy maintain excellent durable responses, patients who have progressed to advanced-stage CML frequently fail to respond or lose their response to therapy owing to the emergence of drug-resistant mutants of the protein. More than 40 such point mutations have been observed in imatinib-resistant patients. The crystal structures of wild-type and mutant Abl kinase in complex with imatinib and other small-molecule Abl inhibitors were determined, with the aim of understanding the molecular basis of resistance and to aid in the design and optimization of inhibitors active against the resistance mutants. These results are presented in a way which illustrates the approaches used to generate multiple structures, the type of information that can be gained and the way that this information is used to support drug discovery.

  16. Dreams, hallucinogenic drug states, and schizophrenia: a psychological and biological comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischman, L G

    1983-01-01

    Many observers have noted similarities between dreams, hallucinogenic drug states, and schizophrenia. In the present article, certain fundamental areas of convergence between the three states are described. Consideration is given to the hallucinogenic drug model of psychosis: the reasons for its initial attractiveness, and the reasons for its current disfavor. The concept of ego boundaries is defined, examined, and applied to the three states. In these states, the ego's capacity to average or synthesize various self-representations into a continuous, coherent self is compromised--leading to an impairment of the reality-oriented secondary process, and the emergence of the florid attributes of the primary process. This can account for many of the familiar characteristics of the three states. Current neurophysiological theories of dream and hallucinogenic drug states are presented, with emphasis upon serotonin neurotransmission. Serotonin appears to play a prominent role in the regulation of these states. The analogy contained in the present article suggests that serotonin may play a role in regulating schizophrenic states as well.

  17. Radioiodination and Biological Evaluation of some Drugs for Inflammatory Foci Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiopharmaceutical is defined as a chemical or pharmaceutical preparation labeled with a radionuclide in tracer or therapeutic concentration, used as a diagnostic or therapeutic agent. A radiopharmaceutical agent is usually administrated into a vein. Depending on which type of scan is being performed, the imaging will be done either immediately, a few hours later, or even several days after the injection. Imaging time varies, generally ranging from 20 to 45 minutes.In this thesis, we are more interested in the drugs that can be used for the treatment of all kinds of inflammation whether septic or aseptic. The inflammation by itself can be a controllable disease, but as the inflammation, specially the chronic type, can be the reason and the beginning of many more serious diseases as autoimmune disease, pulmonary disease, cardiovascular disease, neurological disease and cancer, the study and the early diagnosis of the inflammation can prevent many future problems for the patient. The study of the inflammation has been discussed before by labeling drugs with Iodine-125 for the imaging of inflammatory foci like etodolac, meloxicam, piroxicam and other drugs.

  18. Decreased Core Crystallinity Facilitated Drug Loading in Polymeric Micelles without Affecting Their Biological Performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Jingxin; Feng, Shuangshuang; Xu, Helin; Fang, Guihua; Chao, Yanhui; Zhang, Yu; Xu, Hui; Tang, Xing

    2015-09-14

    Cargo-loading capacity of polymeric micelles could be improved by reducing the core crystallinity and the improvement in the amount of loaded cargo was cargo-polymer affinity dependent. The effect of medium chain triglyceride (MCT) in inhibiting PCL crystallization was confirmed by DSC and polarized microscope. When incorporating MCT into polymeric micelles, the maximum drug loading of disulfiram (DSF), cabazitaxel (CTX), and TM-2 (a taxane derivative) increased from 2.61 ± 0.100%, 13.5 ± 0.316%, and 20.9 ± 1.57% to 8.34 ± 0.197%, 21.7 ± 0.951%, and 28.0 ± 1.47%, respectively. Moreover, the prepared oil-containing micelles (OCMs) showed well-controlled particle size, good stability, and decreased drug release rate. MCT incorporation showed little influence on the performances of micelles in cell studies or pharmacokinetics. These results indicated that MCT incorporation could be a core construction module applied in the delivery of hydrophobic drugs. PMID:26314832

  19. Drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics of nanodrugs from Chinese medicines and natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang-Xiao; Si, Duan-Yun; Xiao, Xue-Feng; He, Xin; Li, Ya-Zhuo

    2012-06-01

    Over the past few years, nanoscale Chinese medicine has become one of focuses in modern Chinese medicine research. There is an increasing need for a more systematic study on the basic issues involved in traditional Chinese medicine and a more active participation of researchers in the application area of nanoscale traditional Chinese drugs. In this review, author analyzed the current applications of nanotechnology in research and development of drugs from natural products and herbal medicines involving traditional Chinese medicines, and also discussed the bio-medicinal evaluation issues on ADME including bio-distribution and metabolism of nanodrugs. Author noted that great challenges faced in nanodrugs from herb drugs and natural products are the follows: (1) the first challenge is to prepare nanodrug delivery system and quantitatively evaluate the therapeutic effects and safety; (2) the second challenge is to clarify the concrete metabolism course; and (3) the third challenge is to study the pharmacokinetics of nanodrugs. PMID:22475334

  20. Immobilized Biofilm in Thermophilic Biohydrogen Production using Synthetic versus Biological Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaruwan Wongthanate

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Biohydrogen production was studied from the vermicelli processing wastewater using synthetic and biological materials as immobilizing substrate employing a mixed culture in a batch reactor operated at the initial pH 6.0 and thermophilic condition (55 ± 1ºC. Maximum cumulative hydrogen production (1,210 mL H2/L wastewater was observed at 5% (v/v addition of ring-shaped synthetic material, which was the ring-shaped hydrophobic acrylic. Regarding 5% (v/v addition of synthetic and biological materials, the maximum cumulative hydrogen production using immobilizing synthetic material of ball-shaped hydrophobic polyethylene (HBPE (1,256.5 mL H2/L wastewater was a two-fold increase of cumulative hydrogen production when compared to its production using immobilizing biological material of rope-shaped hydrophilic ramie (609.8 mL H2/L wastewater. SEM observation of immobilized biofilm on a ball-shaped HBPE or a rope-shaped hydrophilic ramie was the rod shape and gathered into group.

  1. Assessing the effectiveness of synthetic and biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in psoriatic arthritis – a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kingsley GH

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Gabrielle H Kingsley, David L Scott Rheumatology Unit, Kings College London, London, UK Background: Psoriatic arthritis is an inflammatory arthritis the primary manifestations of which are locomotor and skin disease. Although a number of guidelines have been published citing strategies for reducing disease progression, the evidence base for disease-modifying agents is unclear. This forms the focus of this systematic review. Methods: The systematic review was undertaken according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses 2009 checklist. We selected randomized controlled trials (RCTs that looked at the impact of interventions with disease-modifying agents, either synthetic drugs or biologics on musculoskeletal outcomes, notably American College of Rheumatology 20 percent responders. Results were analyzed using Review Manager 5.1.6 (Cochrane Collaboration, Oxford, UK. Whilst our primary focus was on published trials, we also looked at new trials presented in abstract form in 2013–2014 that were not yet published to avoid omitting important and up-to-date information on developing treatments. Results: Our in-depth analysis included 28 trials overall enrolling 5,177 patients published between the 1980s and now as well as limited analysis of some studies in abstract form as described earlier. The most frequently available locomotor outcome measure was the American College of Rheumatology 20 percent responders. The risk ratio for achieving an American College of Rheumatology 20 percent responders response was positive in favor of treatment (risk ratio 2.30; 95% confidence interval 1.78–2.96; however, there was evidence of considerable heterogeneity between trials. Overall randomized controlled trials of established synthetic disease-modifying agents were largely negative (methotrexate, ciclosporin and sulfasalazine though leflunomide showed a small positive effect. A new synthetic agent, apremilast, did show a

  2. Apple biological and physiological disorders in the orchard and in postharvest according to production system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Roberto Martins

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to evaluate the incidence of biological and physiological disorders in the field and postharvested apples cvs. Gala, Fuji and Catarina grown in four production systems: conventional, organic transition, integrated and organic. Apples were evaluated for damages related to biological and physiological disorders in the orchard and after harvest. The greatest damages were attributed to pests, especially Anastrepha fraterculus in the organic system and Grapholita molesta in the organic transition. Apples produced in organic orchards had higher damage levels caused by postharvest physiological disorders than those grown in other production systems. For apples becoming from organic orchards most of the damage was due to lenticels breakdown and degeneration ('Gala', and bitter pit ('Fuji' and 'Catarina'. The incidence of postharvest rot was not influenced by apple production system.

  3. Natural Products as Sources of New Drugs from 1981 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, David J; Cragg, Gordon M

    2016-03-25

    This contribution is a completely updated and expanded version of the four prior analogous reviews that were published in this journal in 1997, 2003, 2007, and 2012. In the case of all approved therapeutic agents, the time frame has been extended to cover the 34 years from January 1, 1981, to December 31, 2014, for all diseases worldwide, and from 1950 (earliest so far identified) to December 2014 for all approved antitumor drugs worldwide. As mentioned in the 2012 review, we have continued to utilize our secondary subdivision of a "natural product mimic", or "NM", to join the original primary divisions and the designation "natural product botanical", or "NB", to cover those botanical "defined mixtures" now recognized as drug entities by the U.S. FDA (and similar organizations). From the data presented in this review, the utilization of natural products and/or their novel structures, in order to discover and develop the final drug entity, is still alive and well. For example, in the area of cancer, over the time frame from around the 1940s to the end of 2014, of the 175 small molecules approved, 131, or 75%, are other than "S" (synthetic), with 85, or 49%, actually being either natural products or directly derived therefrom. In other areas, the influence of natural product structures is quite marked, with, as expected from prior information, the anti-infective area being dependent on natural products and their structures. We wish to draw the attention of readers to the rapidly evolving recognition that a significant number of natural product drugs/leads are actually produced by microbes and/or microbial interactions with the "host from whence it was isolated", and therefore it is considered that this area of natural product research should be expanded significantly. PMID:26852623

  4. One-pot multi-reaction processes: synthesis of natural products and drug-like scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    Calder, Ewen D D; Grafton, Mark W.; Sutherland, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    One-pot multi-reaction processes involving Overman rearrangements, metathesis cyclizations, and Diels–Alder reactions have been developed for the rapid and efficient synthesis of amino-substituted carbocyclic and heterocyclic compounds. This account describes the development and optimization of these processes, as well as their applications in the synthesis of natural products and drug-like scaffolds.

  5. Improved therapeutic entities derived from known generics as an unexplored source of innovative drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegemann, Sven; Klebovich, Imre; Antal, István; Blume, Henning H; Magyar, Kálmán; Németh, György; Paál, Tamás L; Stumptner, Willibald; Thaler, György; Van de Putte, Armand; Shah, Vinod P

    2011-11-20

    With a New Drug Application (NDA) innovative drug therapies are reaching the market in a specific dosage form for one or more clinically proven indications of which after expiration of the patent or the data exclusivity copies are launched using Abbreviated New Drug Applications (ANDA). Advanced therapies that emerged from launched molecules during their product life-cycle have gained considerable attention as clinical practice provides evidence for additional therapeutic values, patient centric delivery systems show improved therapeutic outcomes or emerging technologies offer efficiency gains in manufacturing or access to emerging markets. The USA and European regulatory framework has set reasonable regulations in place for these "Supergenerics" or "hybrid" applications. While these regulations are relatively recent the pharmaceutical industry is just starting to use this route for their product development and life-cycle management. From a clinical perspective the potential for advanced product development have been demonstrated. Yet, there is still a lag of common understanding between the different stakeholders regarding the development, application process and commercial incentive in developing enhanced therapeutic entities based on existing drug products for the market.

  6. Endophytes : exploiting biodiversity for the improvement of natural product-based drug discovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staniek, Agata; Woerdenbag, Herman J.; Kayser, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    Endophytes, microorganisms that colonize internal tissues of all plant species, create a huge biodiversity with yet unknown novel natural products, presumed to push forward the frontiers of drug discovery. Next to the clinically acknowledged antineoplastic agent, paclitaxel, endophyte research has y

  7. Improved therapeutic entities derived from known generics as an unexplored source of innovative drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegemann, Sven; Klebovich, Imre; Antal, István; Blume, Henning H; Magyar, Kálmán; Németh, György; Paál, Tamás L; Stumptner, Willibald; Thaler, György; Van de Putte, Armand; Shah, Vinod P

    2011-11-20

    With a New Drug Application (NDA) innovative drug therapies are reaching the market in a specific dosage form for one or more clinically proven indications of which after expiration of the patent or the data exclusivity copies are launched using Abbreviated New Drug Applications (ANDA). Advanced therapies that emerged from launched molecules during their product life-cycle have gained considerable attention as clinical practice provides evidence for additional therapeutic values, patient centric delivery systems show improved therapeutic outcomes or emerging technologies offer efficiency gains in manufacturing or access to emerging markets. The USA and European regulatory framework has set reasonable regulations in place for these "Supergenerics" or "hybrid" applications. While these regulations are relatively recent the pharmaceutical industry is just starting to use this route for their product development and life-cycle management. From a clinical perspective the potential for advanced product development have been demonstrated. Yet, there is still a lag of common understanding between the different stakeholders regarding the development, application process and commercial incentive in developing enhanced therapeutic entities based on existing drug products for the market. PMID:21968337

  8. What controls biological productivity in coastal upwelling systems? Insights from a comparative modeling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Lachkar

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The magnitude of the biological productivity in Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS is traditionally viewed as directly reflecting the upwelling intensity. Yet, different EBUS show different sensitivities of productivity to upwelling-favorable winds (Carr and Kearns, 2003. Here, using a comparative modeling study of the California Current System (California CS and Canary Current System (Canary CS, we show how physical and environmental factors, such as light, temperature and cross-shore circulation modulate the response of biological productivity to upwelling strength. To this end, we made a series of eddy-resolving simulations of the California CS and Canary CS using the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS, coupled to a nitrogen based Nutrient-Phytoplankton-Zooplankton-Detritus (NPZD ecosystem model. We find the nutrient content of the euphotic zone to be 20 % smaller in the Canary CS relative to the California CS. Yet, the biological productivity is 50 % smaller in the latter. This is due to: (1 a faster nutrient-replete growth in the Canary CS relative to the California CS, related to a more favorable light and temperature conditions in the Canary CS, and (2 the longer nearshore water residence times in the Canary CS which lead to larger buildup of biomass in the upwelling zone, thereby enhancing the productivity. The longer residence times in the Canary CS appear to be associated with the wider continental shelves and the lower eddy activity characterizing this upwelling system. This results in a weaker offshore export of nutrients and organic matter, thereby increasing local nutrient recycling and enhancing the coupling between new and export production in the Northwest African system. Our results suggest that climate change induced perturbations such as upwelling favorable wind intensification might lead to contrasting biological responses in the California CS and the Canary CS, with major implications for the biogeochemical cycles

  9. Application of Absorption Modeling in Rational Design of Drug Product Under Quality-by-Design Paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesisoglou, Filippos; Mitra, Amitava

    2015-09-01

    Physiologically based absorption models can be an important tool in understanding product performance and hence implementation of Quality by Design (QbD) in drug product development. In this report, we show several case studies to demonstrate the potential application of absorption modeling in rational design of drug product under the QbD paradigm. The examples include application of absorption modeling—(1) prior to first-in-human studies to guide development of a formulation with minimal sensitivity to higher gastric pH and hence reduced interaction when co-administered with PPIs and/or H2RAs, (2) design of a controlled release formulation with optimal release rate to meet trough plasma concentrations and enable QD dosing, (3) understanding the impact of API particle size distribution on tablet bioavailability and guide formulation design in late-stage development, (4) assess impact of API phase change on product performance to guide specification setting, and (5) investigate the effect of dissolution rate changes on formulation bioperformance and enable appropriate specification setting. These case studies are meant to highlight the utility of physiologically based absorption modeling in gaining a thorough understanding of the product performance and the critical factors impacting performance to drive design of a robust drug product that would deliver the optimal benefit to the patients.

  10. Cytotoxic Drugs Departments as a precondition for high-quality product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Głuszek

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer control is a tremendous challenge not only for the ill patient and physicians, but also for the whole health care system. For the first time, during the European Conference of Oncology Pharmacists, the highest standards of pharmaceutical care were proposed for cancer patients. Undoubtedly, the lifestyle and prophylaxis which would enable the detection of cancer at an early stage exert an effect on the development of the disease. Cytostatics show toxic, mutagenic, oncogenic and immunosuppressive effects; therefore, their preparation should be handled by the Central Cytotoxic Drugs Department, because the majority of the drugs prepared belong to Register A. Drugs are manufactured in accordance with GMP principles. All-Polish Standards adopted by the Polish Pharmaceutical Association delineate the direction to be developed by every hospital with respect to its own procedures and instructions. The Master of Pharmacy is responsible for the preparation of cytotoxic drugs. At one bench should work an operator and an assistant. The recommended working time should not exceed 2 h without break, and 5 h daily. The person who collects cytotoxic drugs from the Central Department should use a legible sign and a stamp including the hour and date of collection. While manufacturing cytostatics for patients in daily doses it is recommended to use concentrates in the form of solutions rather than lyophilised powders, which results in the shortening of the stage of production of the drug and reduces the possibility of forming aerosols; in the case of closed infusion systems (containers for infusion liquids which are used for the production of daily doses, the cabinet should be equipped in two tight docks for dispensing. Needleless connection of the LUER-LOCK type – a recommendation of the ISOPP – guarantees a tight connection with the drug transfer port even in the case of an increase in pressure during the manufacture of drugs. To a certain extent

  11. Systems Biology-Based Investigation of Cellular Antiviral Drug Targets Identified by Gene-Trap Insertional Mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Feixiong; Murray, James L; Zhao, Junfei; Sheng, Jinsong; Zhao, Zhongming; Rubin, Donald H

    2016-09-01

    Viruses require host cellular factors for successful replication. A comprehensive systems-level investigation of the virus-host interactome is critical for understanding the roles of host factors with the end goal of discovering new druggable antiviral targets. Gene-trap insertional mutagenesis is a high-throughput forward genetics approach to randomly disrupt (trap) host genes and discover host genes that are essential for viral replication, but not for host cell survival. In this study, we used libraries of randomly mutagenized cells to discover cellular genes that are essential for the replication of 10 distinct cytotoxic mammalian viruses, 1 gram-negative bacterium, and 5 toxins. We herein reported 712 candidate cellular genes, characterizing distinct topological network and evolutionary signatures, and occupying central hubs in the human interactome. Cell cycle phase-specific network analysis showed that host cell cycle programs played critical roles during viral replication (e.g. MYC and TAF4 regulating G0/1 phase). Moreover, the viral perturbation of host cellular networks reflected disease etiology in that host genes (e.g. CTCF, RHOA, and CDKN1B) identified were frequently essential and significantly associated with Mendelian and orphan diseases, or somatic mutations in cancer. Computational drug repositioning framework via incorporating drug-gene signatures from the Connectivity Map into the virus-host interactome identified 110 putative druggable antiviral targets and prioritized several existing drugs (e.g. ajmaline) that may be potential for antiviral indication (e.g. anti-Ebola). In summary, this work provides a powerful methodology with a tight integration of gene-trap insertional mutagenesis testing and systems biology to identify new antiviral targets and drugs for the development of broadly acting and targeted clinical antiviral therapeutics. PMID:27632082

  12. Novel factors in the pathogenesis of psoriasis and potential drug candidates are found with systems biology approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Máté Manczinger

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a multifactorial inflammatory skin disease characterized by increased proliferation of keratinocytes, activation of immune cells and susceptibility to metabolic syndrome. Systems biology approach makes it possible to reveal novel important factors in the pathogenesis of the disease. Protein-protein, protein-DNA, merged (containing both protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions and chemical-protein interaction networks were constructed consisting of differentially expressed genes (DEG between lesional and non-lesional skin samples of psoriatic patients and/or the encoded proteins. DEGs were determined by microarray meta-analysis using MetaOMICS package. We used STRING for protein-protein, CisRED for protein-DNA and STITCH for chemical-protein interaction network construction. General network-, cluster- and motif-analysis were carried out in each network. Many DEG-coded proteins (CCNA2, FYN, PIK3R1, CTGF, F3 and transcription factors (AR, TFDP1, MEF2A, MECOM were identified as central nodes, suggesting their potential role in psoriasis pathogenesis. CCNA2, TFDP1 and MECOM might play role in the hyperproliferation of keratinocytes, whereas FYN may be involved in the disturbed immunity in psoriasis. AR can be an important link between inflammation and insulin resistance, while MEF2A has role in insulin signaling. A controller sub-network was constructed from interlinked positive feedback loops that with the capability to maintain psoriatic lesional phenotype. Analysis of chemical-protein interaction networks detected 34 drugs with previously confirmed disease-modifying effects, 23 drugs with some experimental evidences, and 21 drugs with case reports suggesting their positive or negative effects. In addition, 99 unpublished drug candidates were also found, that might serve future treatments for psoriasis.

  13. Systems Biology-Based Investigation of Cellular Antiviral Drug Targets Identified by Gene-Trap Insertional Mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Junfei; Sheng, Jinsong; Rubin, Donald H.

    2016-01-01

    Viruses require host cellular factors for successful replication. A comprehensive systems-level investigation of the virus-host interactome is critical for understanding the roles of host factors with the end goal of discovering new druggable antiviral targets. Gene-trap insertional mutagenesis is a high-throughput forward genetics approach to randomly disrupt (trap) host genes and discover host genes that are essential for viral replication, but not for host cell survival. In this study, we used libraries of randomly mutagenized cells to discover cellular genes that are essential for the replication of 10 distinct cytotoxic mammalian viruses, 1 gram-negative bacterium, and 5 toxins. We herein reported 712 candidate cellular genes, characterizing distinct topological network and evolutionary signatures, and occupying central hubs in the human interactome. Cell cycle phase-specific network analysis showed that host cell cycle programs played critical roles during viral replication (e.g. MYC and TAF4 regulating G0/1 phase). Moreover, the viral perturbation of host cellular networks reflected disease etiology in that host genes (e.g. CTCF, RHOA, and CDKN1B) identified were frequently essential and significantly associated with Mendelian and orphan diseases, or somatic mutations in cancer. Computational drug repositioning framework via incorporating drug-gene signatures from the Connectivity Map into the virus-host interactome identified 110 putative druggable antiviral targets and prioritized several existing drugs (e.g. ajmaline) that may be potential for antiviral indication (e.g. anti-Ebola). In summary, this work provides a powerful methodology with a tight integration of gene-trap insertional mutagenesis testing and systems biology to identify new antiviral targets and drugs for the development of broadly acting and targeted clinical antiviral therapeutics. PMID:27632082

  14. A new kind of magnetic targeting induction heating drug carrier and its physical and biological properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Nano-carbon and iron composite―carbon-coated iron nanoparticles (CCINs) produced by carbon arc method can be used as a new kind of magnetic targeting induction heating drug carrier for cancer therapy. The structure and morphology of CCINs are studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Mossbauer spectra of these nanoparticles show that they contain only iron and carbon, without ferric carbide and ferric oxide. CCINs can be used as the magnetic drug carrier, with the effect of targeting magnetic induction heating in its inner core and higher drug adsorption in its nano-carbon shell outside because of its high specific surface area. CCINs can absorb Epirubicin (EPI) of 160 μg/mg measured by an optical spectrometer. In acute toxicity experiment with mice, the median lethal dose (LD50) of EPI is 16.9 mg/kg, while that of EPI-CCINs mixture is 20.7 mg/kg and none of the mice died after pure CCINs medication. The results show that pure CCINs belong to non-toxic grade and EPI delivery in mixture with CCINs can reduce its acute toxicity in mice. The magnetic properties of CCINs and their magnetic induction heating are investigated. The iron nanoparticle in its inner core has better magnetism with a good effect on targeting magnetic induction heating. When the CCINs are mixed with physiological salt water and are injected uniformly in pig’s liver, the temperature goes up to 48℃. While in the case that CCINs are filled in a certain section of pig’s liver, the temperature goes up to 52℃. In both cases the temperature is high enough to kill the cancer cell. CCINs have potential applications in cancer therapy.

  15. Laser-induced luminescence of singlet molecular oxygen: generation by drugs and pigments of biological importance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorov, Sergei Y.; Krasnovsky, Alexander A., Jr.

    1991-05-01

    The photon counting technique and flashlaser excitation were applied to the timeresolved measurement of photosensitized singlet oxygen luminescence in organic and aqueous media. The quantum yields for singlet oxygen generation have been measured in solutions of photosynthetic pigments synthetic and natural porphyrins porphyrins conjugated with monoclonal antibodies furocoumarins flavins fluorescein tetracycline and endogenous photosensitizers of human lens. The data obtained indicate that the measurement of the singlet oxygen luminescence is a reliable tool to study the photosensitizing activity of drugs and to elucidate primary mechanisms of photodynamic destruction. 1.

  16. Implications of In-Use Photostability: Proposed Guidance for Photostability Testing and Labeling to Support the Administration of Photosensitive Pharmaceutical Products, Part 3. Oral Drug Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allain, Leonardo; Baertschi, Steven W; Clapham, David; Foti, Chris; Lantaff, Wendy M; Reed, Robert A; Templeton, Allen C; Tønnesen, Hanne Hjorth

    2016-05-01

    The ICH Q1B guidance and additional clarifying manuscripts provide the essential information needed to conduct photostability testing for pharmaceutical drug products in the context of manufacturing, packaging, and storage. As the previous 2 papers in this series highlight for drug products administered by injection (part 1) and drug products administered via topical application (part 2), there remains a paucity of guidance and methodological approaches to conducting photostability testing to ensure effective product administration. Part 3 in the series is presented here to provide a similar approach and commentary for photostability testing for oral drug products. The approach taken, as was done previously, is to examine "worst case" photoexposure scenarios in combination with ICH-defined light sources to derive a set of practical experimental approaches to support the safe and effective administration of photosensitive oral drug products. PMID:27056630

  17. ASM Inaugural Lecture 2010: Single crystal X-ray structural determination: A powerful technique for natural products research and drug discovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drug discovery from natural products resources have been extensively studied worldwide because natural products with their great structural diversity have traditionally provided most of the drugs in use. They offer major opportunities for finding novel low molecular weight leading-structures that are active against a wide range of assay targets. The most important step in the discovery process is the identification of compounds with interesting biological activity. Single crystal X-ray structure determination is a powerful technique for natural products research and drug discovery. The detailed three-dimensional structures that emerge can be co-related to the activities to these structures. In this article the following is presented: (i) co-crystal and disorder structures; (ii) determination of absolute configuration and (iii) the ability to distinguish between whether a natural product compound is a natural product or a natural product artifact. All these three properties are unique to the technique of single crystal X-ray structure determination. Case (iii) was demonstrated with a compound containing a chromene ring, namely macluraxanthone (which was isolated from Cratoxylum formosum subsp. pruniflorum, a Thai medicinal plant). (author)

  18. Production of dosage forms for oral drug delivery by laminar extrusion of wet masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müllers, Katrin C; Wahl, Martin A; Pinto, João F

    2013-08-01

    Laminar extrusion of wet masses was studied as a novel technology for the production of dosage forms for oral drug delivery. Extrusion was carried out with a ram extruder. Formulations contained either microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) or dicalcium phosphate (DCP) as diluent, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), lactose, and water. Extrudates were characterized for their tensile strength, Young's modulus of elasticity, water absorption, gel forming capacity, and release of two model drugs, coumarin (COU) and propranolol hydrochloride (PRO). Cohesive extrudates could be produced with both filling materials (MCC and DCP) when HPMC was included as a binder at low amounts (3.3-4.5% w/w dry weight). Employing more HPMC, the elasticity of the wet masses increased which resulted in distinct surface defects. For MCC, the maximum HPMC amount that could be included in the formulations (15% w/w dry weight) did not affect the mechanical properties or decrease the drug release significantly. For DCP extrudates, the maximally effective HPMC amount was 30% (w/w dry weight) with influence on both the mechanical properties and drug release. This study suggests that laminar extrusion of wet masses is a feasible technique for the production of dosage forms for oral drug delivery.

  19. Development of Analytical Method and Monitoring of Veterinary Drug Residues in Korean Animal Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jae-Sang; Park, Su-Jeong; Choi, Jung-Yun; Kim, Jin-Sook; Kang, Myung-Hee; Choi, Bo-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the residual amount of veterinary drugs such as meloxicam, flunixin, and tulathromycin in animal products (beef, pork, horsemeat, and milk). Veterinary drugs have been widely used in the rearing of livestock to prevent and treat diseases. A total of 152 samples were purchased from markets located in major Korean cities (Seoul, Busan, Incheon, Daegu, Daejeon, Gwangju, Ulsan and Jeju), including Jeju. Veterinary drugs were analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry according to the Korean Food Standards Code. The resulting data, which are located within 70-120% of recovery range and less than 20% of relative standard deviations, are in compliance with the criteria of CODEX. A total of five veterinary drugs were detected in 152 samples, giving a detection rate of approximately 3.3%; and no food source violated the guideline values. Our result indicated that most of the veterinary drug residues in animal products were below the maximum residue limits specified in Korea. PMID:27433102

  20. Affinity of Drugs and Small Biologically Active Molecules to Carbon Nanotubes: A Pharmacodynamics and Nanotoxicity Factor?

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, John; Yang, Liu; Hopfinger, Anton J.

    2009-01-01

    The MM-PBSA MD method was used to estimate the affinity, as represented by log kb, of each of a variety of biologically active molecules to a carbon nanotube in an aqueous environment. These ligand-receptor binding simulations were calibrated by first estimating the log kb values for eight ligands to human serum albumin, HSA, whose log kb values have been observed. A validation linear correlation equation was established [R2 = 0.888 Q2 = 0.603] between the observed and estimated log kb values...

  1. Mutagenic Deimmunization of Diphtheria Toxin for Use in Biologic Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joerg U. Schmohl

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Targeted toxins require multiple treatments and therefore must be deimmunized. We report a method of protein deimmunization based on the point mutation of highly hydrophilic R, K, D, E, and Q amino acids on the molecular surface of truncated diphtheria-toxin (DT390. Methods: Based on their surface position derived from an X-ray-crystallographic model, residues were chosen for point mutation that were located in prominent positions on the molecular surface and away from the catalytic site. Mice were immunized with a targeted toxin containing either a mutated DT390 containing seven critical point mutations or the non-mutated parental toxin form. Results: Serum analysis revealed a significant 90% reduction in anti-toxin antibodies in mice immunized with the mutant, but not the parental drug form despite multiple immunizations. The experiment was repeated in a second strain of mice with a different MHC-haplotype to address whether point mutation removed T or B cell epitopes. Findings were identical indicating that B cell epitopes were eliminated from DT. The mutant drug form lost only minimal activity in vitro as well as in vivo. Conclusion: These findings indicate that this method may be effective for deimmunizing of other proteins and that discovery of a deimmunized form of DT may lead to the development of more effective targeted toxin.

  2. Metabolic engineering of microorganisms for biofuels production: from bugs to synthetic biology to fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuk Lee, Sung; Chou, Howard; Ham, Timothy S.; Soon Lee, Taek; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-12-02

    The ability to generate microorganisms that can produce biofuels similar to petroleum-based transportation fuels would allow the use of existing engines and infrastructure and would save an enormous amount of capital required for replacing the current infrastructure to accommodate biofuels that have properties significantly different from petroleum-based fuels. Several groups have demonstrated the feasibility of manipulating microbes to produce molecules similar to petroleum-derived products, albeit at relatively low productivity (e.g. maximum butanol production is around 20 g/L). For cost-effective production of biofuels, the fuel-producing hosts and pathways must be engineered and optimized. Advances in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology will provide new tools for metabolic engineers to better understand how to rewire the cell in order to create the desired phenotypes for the production of economically viable biofuels.

  3. The impact of the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity on natural products research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cragg, Gordon M; Katz, Flora; Newman, David J; Rosenthal, Joshua

    2012-12-01

    The discovery and development of novel, biologically active agents from natural sources, whether they be drugs, agrochemicals or other bioactive entities, involve a high level of interdisciplinary as well as international collaboration. Such collaboration, particularly at the international level, requires the careful negotiation of collaborative agreements protecting the rights of all parties, with special attention being paid to the rights of host (source) country governments, communities and scientific organizations. While many biodiversity-rich source countries currently might not have the necessary resources for in-country drug discovery and advanced development, they provide valuable opportunities for collaboration in this endeavor with research organizations from more high-income nations. This chapter discusses the experiences of the US National Cancer Institute and the US government-sponsored International Cooperative Biodiversity Groups program in the establishment of international agreements in the context of the Convention of Biological Diversity's objectives of promoting fair and equitable collaboration with multiple parties in many countries, and includes some specific lessons of value in developing such collaborations.

  4. Functional evaluation of healthcare products such as cosmetics, drugs, and foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper surveys analytical methods recently employed in the field of healthcare products such as cosmetics, drugs, and foods by using Spring-8 facility which delivers high-intensity X-ray beams from electron cyclotron accelerator. These X-ray beams can be used to analyze atoms and their chemical state in human tissues such as skin, hair, whisker, teeth, and new developed products. Thus, a variety of products related with medical supplies, health food products, health maintenance, and preventive medicine concern this research group. Here, the results on colloidal states, such as lipid-molecule aggregates and lamellar structure type, generally present in cosmetic products and food substances, are focused and reported, specifically focusing on hair cuticle and honey cell layer of the skin regarding to cosmetic and pharmaceutical products. (S. Ohno)

  5. Milk proteins-derived bioactive peptides in dairy products: molecular, biological and methodological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartłomiej Dziuba

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Proteins are one of the primary components of the food, both in terms of nutrition and function. They are main source of amino acids, essential for synthesis of proteins, and also source of energy. Additionally, many proteins exhibit specifi c biological activities, which may have effect on functional or pro-health properties of food products. These proteins and their hydrolysis products, peptides, may infl uence the properties of food and human organism. The number of commercially available food products containing bioactive peptides is very low, apart from that milk proteins are their rich source. It could be supposed that number of available products with declared activity will rise in near future because of observed strong uptrend on interest in such products. Molecular and biological properties of milk proteins, as precursors of bioactive peptides was characterised in the work. Therefore, the strategy of research and obtaining of such peptides both in laboratory and industrial scale, as well as the range of their commercial application, was presented. Several examples of research efforts presenting high potential to develop new products containing bioactive peptides from milk proteins and predetermined as nutraceuticals was described.

  6. Milk proteins-derived bioactive peptides in dairy products: molecular, biological and methodological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziuba, Bartłomiej; Dziuba, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Proteins are one of the primary components of the food, both in terms of nutrition and function. They are main source of amino acids, essential for synthesis of proteins, and also source of energy. Additionally, many proteins exhibit specific biological activities, which may have effect on functional or pro-health properties of food products. These proteins and their hydrolysis products, peptides, may influence the properties of food and human organism. The number of commercially available food products containing bioactive peptides is very low, apart from that milk proteins are their rich source. It could be supposed that number of available products with declared activity will rise in near future because of observed strong uptrend on interest in such products. Molecular and biological properties of milk proteins, as precursors of bioactive peptides was characterised in the work. Therefore, the strategy of research and obtaining of such peptides both in laboratory and industrial scale, as well as the range of their commercial application, was presented. Several examples of research efforts presenting high potential to develop new products containing bioactive peptides from milk proteins and predetermined as nutraceuticals was described.

  7. Modifying release characteristics from 3D printed drug-eluting products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boetker, Johan; Water, Jorrit Jeroen; Aho, Johanna; Arnfast, Lærke; Bohr, Adam; Rantanen, Jukka

    2016-07-30

    This work describes an approach to modify the release of active compound from a 3D printed model drug product geometry intended for flexible dosing and precision medication. The production of novel polylactic acid and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose based feed materials containing nitrofurantoin for 3D printing purposes is demonstrated. Nitrofurantoin, Metolose® and polylactic acid were successfully co-extruded with up to 40% Metolose® content, and subsequently 3D printed into model disk geometries (ø10mm, h=2mm). Thermal analysis with differential scanning calorimetry and solid phase identification with Raman spectroscopy showed that nitrofurantoin remained in its original solid form during both hot-melt extrusion and subsequent 3D printing. Rheological measurements of the different compositions showed that the flow properties were sensitive to the amount of undissolved particles present in the formulation. Release of nitrofurantoin from the disks was dependent on Metolose® loading, with higher accumulated release observed for higher Metolose® loads. This work shows the potential of custom-made, drug loaded feed materials for 3D printing of precision drug products with tailored drug release characteristics. PMID:26987609

  8. 21 CFR 310.532 - Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) to relieve the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... chapter is required for marketing. In the absence of an approved application, such product is also..., 1990, any such OTC drug product initially introduced or initially delivered for introduction...

  9. Bioprospecting microbial natural product libraries from the marine environment for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangyang; Ashforth, Elizabeth; Ren, Biao; Song, Fuhang; Dai, Huanqin; Liu, Mei; Wang, Jian; Xie, Qiong; Zhang, Lixin

    2010-08-01

    Marine microorganisms are fascinating resources due to their production of novel natural products with antimicrobial activities. Increases in both the number of new chemical entities found and the substantiation of indigenous marine actinobacteria present a fundamental difficulty in the future discovery of novel antimicrobials, namely dereplication of those compounds already discovered. This review will share our experience on the taxonomic-based construction of a highly diversified and low redundant marine microbial natural product library for high-throughput antibiotic screening. We anticipate that libraries such as these can drive the drug discovery process now and in the future. PMID:20606699

  10. High-latitude controls of thermocline nutrients and low latitude biological productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, J L; Gruber, N; Brzezinski, M A; Dunne, J P

    2004-01-01

    The ocean's biological pump strips nutrients out of the surface waters and exports them into the thermocline and deep waters. If there were no return path of nutrients from deep waters, the biological pump would eventually deplete the surface waters and thermocline of nutrients; surface biological productivity would plummet. Here we make use of the combined distributions of silicic acid and nitrate to trace the main nutrient return path from deep waters by upwelling in the Southern Ocean and subsequent entrainment into subantarctic mode water. We show that the subantarctic mode water, which spreads throughout the entire Southern Hemisphere and North Atlantic Ocean, is the main source of nutrients for the thermocline. We also find that an additional return path exists in the northwest corner of the Pacific Ocean, where enhanced vertical mixing, perhaps driven by tides, brings abyssal nutrients to the surface and supplies them to the thermocline of the North Pacific. Our analysis has important implications for our understanding of large-scale controls on the nature and magnitude of low-latitude biological productivity and its sensitivity to climate change.

  11. Orphan G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs):biological functions and potential drug targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-long TANG; Ying WANG; Da-li LI; Jian LUO; Ming-yao LIU

    2012-01-01

    The superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) includes at least 800 seven-transmembrane receptors that participate in diverse physiological and pathological functions.GPCRs are the most successful targets of modern medicine,and approximately 36%of marketed pharmaceuticals target human GPCRs.However,the endogenous ligands of more than 140 GPCRs remain unidentified,leaving the natural functions of those GPCRs in doubt.These are the so-called orphan GPCRs,a great source of drug targets.This review focuses on the signaling transduction pathways of the Adhesion GPCR family,the LGR subfamily,and the PSGR subfamily,and their potential functions in immunology,development,and cancers.In this review,we present the current approaches and difficulties of orphan GPCR deorphanization and characterization.

  12. Food, drug, and cosmetic dyes: biological effects related to lipid solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitan, H

    1977-07-01

    Food, drug, and cosmetic dyes of the xanthane type (analogs of fluorescein) were applied to isolated molluscan ganglia and changes in the electrophysiological properties of identified neurons were monitored. The synthetic coloring agents increased the resting membrane potential and conductance of the neurons in a dose-dependent manner by increasing the potassium permeability of the membrane relative to that of other ions. The relative activity of these anionic dyes was highly correlated with their lipid solubility. The structure-activity study of the effects of the dyes on molluscan neurophysiology provides a basis for estimating the toxicity and brain uptake of the dyes in vertebrates, and predicting their effects on metabolism and blood clotting. PMID:268642

  13. Funding the new biologics--public policy issues in drug formulary decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Steven

    2002-12-01

    One function of drug formularies is to allow health care providers to exert some control over spending. Decisions about whether to include a given medication in a formulary are based on estimates of its costs and effectiveness, relative to other treatment strategies. These decisions are made from a societal perspective, as opposed to that of individual patients, which sometimes results in conflicts. The clinical response to a medication often varies widely among subjects, which means that a small subgroup of patients might benefit dramatically, while others with the same disease do not. The result would be that a drug might appear not to be cost effective in an economic analysis, even though it is of proven value for some patients. New and innovative medications are assessed according to high standards of cost effectiveness, even though established treatments are wasteful of valuable health care resources. Moreover, quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) discriminate against certain patient groups, including those with diseases that are associated with a high morbidity but a low mortality. Such patients often incur high indirect costs, including loss of employment income and costs incurred by family caregivers that QALYs do not reflect. Therefore, even though QALYs are transparent and widely applicable, they are not necessarily appropriate in the evaluation of a particular therapeutic intervention. A new paradigm should be developed for evaluating emerging therapies. An example would be a risk-sharing approach, whereby the pharmaceutical industry and public insurers share in the costs and rewards of introducing new treatments. This would have implications for the prices charged for new medications.

  14. Funding the New Biologics – Public Policy Issues in Drug Formulary Decision Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Lewis

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available One function of drug formularies is to allow health care providers to exert some control over spending. Decisions about whether to include a given medication in a formulary are based on estimates of its costs and effectiveness, relative to other treatment strategies. These decisions are made from a societal perspective, as opposed to that of individual patients, which sometimes results in conflicts. The clinical response to a medication often varies widely among subjects, which means that a small subgroup of patients might benefit dramatically, while others with the same disease do not. The result would be that a drug might appear not to be cost effective in an economic analysis, even though it is of proven value for some patients. New and innovative medications are assessed according to high standards of cost effectiveness, even though established treatments are wasteful of valuable health care resources. Moreover, quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs discriminate against certain patient groups, including those with diseases that are associated with a high morbidity but a low mortality. Such patients often incur high indirect costs, including loss of employment income and costs incurred by family caregivers that QALYs do not reflect. Therefore, even though QALYs are transparent and widely applicable, they are not necessarily appropriate in the evaluation of a particular therapeutic intervention. A new paradigm should be developed for evaluating emerging therapies. An example would be a risk-sharing approach, whereby the pharmaceutical industry and public insurers share in the costs and rewards of introducing new treatments. This would have implications for the prices charged for new medications.

  15. Adherence and resource use among patients treated with biologic drugs: findings from BEETLE study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degli Esposti, Luca; Sangiorgi, Diego; Perrone, Valentina; Radice, Sonia; Clementi, Emilio; Perone, Francesco; Buda, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Systemic administration of anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF alpha) leads to an anti-inflammatory and joint protective effect in pathologies such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and Crohn’s disease. The aim of this study was to assess adherence to therapy, persistence in treatment (no switches or interruptions), and consumption of care resources (drugs, outpatient services, hospitalizations). Methods We conducted an observational retrospective cohort analysis using the administrative databases of five local health units. Patients filling at least one prescription for anti-TNF alpha between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2011 were included and followed up for 1 year. Patients were defined as adherent if >80% of the follow-up period was covered by drugs dispensation. Results A total of 1,219 patients were analyzed (mean age 49.6±14.6, male 47%). Among enrolled patients, 36% were affected by rheumatoid arthritis, and 31% and 10% were affected by psoriasis and Crohn’s disease, respectively; other indications remained below these percentages. Thirty-four percent of patients (420) were treated with adalimumab, 51% (615) with etanercept, and 15% (184) with infliximab. Among the 94% of patients who did not switch, those treated with infliximab had a higher rate of adherence across all indications (51% overall) when compared to that observed in patients treated with etanercept (27%) or adalimumab (23%). The mean annual nonpharmacological expenditure for each patient in analysis was €988 for adherent and €1,255 for nonadherent patients. Infliximab was associated with the lowest cost for all indications as determined by the multivariate generalized linear model. Conclusions Patients treated with infliximab were associated with higher adherence and persistence in treatment and lower costs, as compared to those treated with adalimumab or etanercept. PMID:25258545

  16. Solid recovered fuel production through the mechanical-biological treatment of wastes

    OpenAIRE

    Velis, C.A.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the production of solid recovered fuel (SRF) from municipal solid waste using mechanical biological treatment (MBT) plants. It describes the first in-depth analysis of a UK MBT plant and addresses the fundamental research question: are MBT plants and their unit operations optimised to produce high quality SRF in the UK? A critical review of the process science and engineering of MBT provides timely insights into the quality management and standa...

  17. [Biologic age as a criterion for work evaluation (exemplified by titanium alloys production)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanas'eva, R F; Prokopenko, L V

    2009-01-01

    The article deals with results of studies concerning biologic age of workers (males) under occupational hazards of titanium alloys (jeopardy classes 3.3, 3.4.4) in Verkhne-Saldinsky metallurgic production association. Based on mathematic statistic analysis, the authors worked out an equation of multiple regression for ageing pace to forecast the ageing with consideration of age, length of service, occupation. The authors determined occupational groups characterized by premature ageing and increased risk of health disorders.

  18. 21 CFR 310.543 - Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for human use in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... pancreatic insufficiency drug products. Pancreatin and pancrelipase are composed of enzymes: amylase, trypsin... potential for serious risk to patients using these drug products. The bioavailability of pancreatic enzymes... offered over-the-counter (OTC) for human use in exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. 310.543 Section...

  19. Structure investigation of sertraline drug and its iodine product using mass spectrometry, thermal analyses and MO-calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayed, M. A.; Hawash, M. F.; Fahmey, M. A.; El-Habeeb, Abeer A.

    2007-11-01

    Sertraline (C 17H 17Cl 2N) as an antidepressant drug was investigated using thermal analysis (TA) measurements (TG/DTG and DTA) in comparison with electron impact (EI) mass spectral (MS) fragmentation at 70 eV. Semi-empirical MO-calculations, using PM3 procedure, has been carried out on neutral molecule and positively charged species. These calculations included bond length, bond order, bond strain, partial charge distribution and heats of formation (Δ Hf). Also, in the present work sertraline-iodine product was prepared and its structure was investigated using elemental analyses, IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, MS and TA. It was also subjected to molecular orbital calculations (MOC) in order to confirm its fragmentation behavior by both MS and TA in comparison with the sertraline parent drug. In MS of sertraline the initial rupture occurred was CH 3NH 2+ fragment ion via H-rearrangement while in sertraline-iodine product the initial rupture was due to the loss of I + and/or HI + fragment ions followed by CH 2dbnd NH + fragment ion loss. In thermal analyses (TA) the initial rupture in sertraline is due to the loss of C 6H 3Cl 2 followed by the loss of CH 3-NH forming tetraline molecule which thermally decomposed to give C 4H 8, C 6H 6 or the loss of H 2 forming naphthalene molecule which thermally sublimated. In sertraline-iodine product as a daughter the initial thermal rupture is due to successive loss of HI and CH 3NH followed by the loss of C 6H 5HI and HCl. Sertraline biological activity increases with the introduction of iodine into its skeleton. The activities of the drug and its daughter are mainly depend upon their fragmentation to give their metabolites in vivo systems, which are very similar to the identified fragments in both MS and TA. The importance of the present work is also due to the decision of the possible mechanism of fragmentation of the drug and its daughter and its confirmation by MOC.

  20. 75 FR 68802 - Report on the Performance of Drug and Biologics Firms in Conducting Postmarketing Requirements...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-09

    .... FDA's Implementing Regulations On October 30, 2000 (65 FR 64607), FDA published a final rule... of the anniversary date of U.S. approval of the original application. In fiscal year 2009 (FY09), 25..., FDA completed a consolidation of certain therapeutic products formerly regulated by CBER into...