WorldWideScience

Sample records for biological dosimetry benefit

  1. (Biological dosimetry)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preston, R.J.

    1990-12-17

    The traveler attended the 1st International Conference on Biological Dosimetry in Madrid, Spain. This conference was organized to provide information to a general audience of biologists, physicists, radiotherapists, industrial hygiene personnel and individuals from related fields on the current ability of cytogenetic analysis to provide estimates of radiation dose in cases of occupational or environmental exposure. There is a growing interest in Spain in biological dosimetry because of the increased use of radiation sources for medical and occupational uses, and with this the anticipated and actual increase in numbers of overexposure. The traveler delivered the introductory lecture on Biological Dosimetry: Mechanistic Concepts'' that was intended to provide a framework by which the more applied lectures could be interpreted in a mechanistic way. A second component of the trip was to provide advice with regard to several recent cases of overexposure that had been or were being assessed by the Radiopathology and Radiotherapy Department of the Hospital General Gregorio Maranon'' in Madrid. The traveler had provided information on several of these, and had analyzed cells from some exposed or purportedly exposed individuals. The members of the biological dosimetry group were referred to individuals at REACTS at Oak Ridge Associated Universities for advice on follow-up treatment.

  2. Biological dosimetry; Dosimetria biologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero C, C.; Arceo M, C., E-mail: citlali.guerrero@inin.gob.m [ININ, Departamento de Biologia, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    In the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) the works to establish a laboratory of biological dosimetry were initiated in 1998, with the purpose that could assist any situation with respect to the exposition to radiation, so much of the occupational exposed personnel as of individuals not related with the handling of radio-active material. The first activity that was realized was to develop the corresponding curves in vitro of dose response for different qualities and radiation types. In the year 2000 the curve corresponding to the gamma radiation of {sup 60}Co was published and up to 2002 the curve corresponding to the X rays of 58 KeV, 120 and 250 kVp. In all the cases, the curves contain the requirements to be used in the determination of the exposition dose. At the present time the curves dose-response are developing for neutrons take place in the reactor Triga Mark III of ININ. Additionally to these activities, cases of suspicion of accidental exposition to radiation have been assisted, using in a beginning the curves published by the IAEA and, from the year 2000, the curves developed in the ININ. (Author)

  3. Development of radiation biological dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Chul Koo; Kim, Tae Hwan; Lee, Yun Sil; Son, Young Sook; Kim, Soo Kwan; Jang, Won Suk; Le, Sun Joo; Jee, Young Heun; Jung, Woo Jung

    1999-04-01

    Up until now, only a few methods have been developed for radiation biological dosimetry such as conventional chromosome aberration and micronucleus in peripheral blood cell. However, because these methods not only can be estimated by the expert, but also have a little limitation due to need high technique and many times in the case of radiation accident, it is very difficult to evaluate the absorbed dose of victims. Therefore, we should develop effective, easy, simple and rapid biodosimetry and its guideline (triage) to be able to be treated the victims as fast as possible. We established the premature chromosome condensation assay and apoptotic fragment assay which was the significant relationship between dose and cell damages to evaluate the irradiation dose as correct and rapid as possible using lymphocytes and crypt cells, and compared with conventional chromosome aberration assay and micronuclei assay.

  4. Development of radiation biological dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Up until now, only a few methods have been developed for radiation biological dosimetry such as conventional chromosome aberration and micronucleus in peripheral blood cell. However, because these methods not only can be estimated by the expert, but also have a little limitation due to need high technique and many times in the case of radiation accident, it is very difficult to evaluate the absorbed dose of victims. Therefore, we should develop effective, easy, simple and rapid biodosimetry and its guideline (triage) to be able to be treated the victims as fast as possible. We established the premature chromosome condensation assay and apoptotic fragment assay which was the significant relationship between dose and cell damages to evaluate the irradiation dose as correct and rapid as possible using lymphocytes and crypt cells, and compared with conventional chromosome aberration assay and micronuclei assay

  5. Biological dosimetry - Dose estimation method using biomakers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The individual radiation dose estimation is an important step in the radiation risk assessment. In case of radiation incident or radiation accident, sometime, physical dosimetry method can not be used for calculating the individual radiation dose, the other complement method such as biological dosimetry is very necessary. This method is based on the quantitative specific biomarkers induced by ionizing radiation, such as dicentric chromosomes, translocations, micronuclei... in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. The basis of the biological dosimetry method is the close relationship between the biomarkers and absorbed dose or dose rate; the effects of in vitro and in vivo are similar, so it is able to generate the calibration dose-effect curve in vitro for in vivo assessment. Possibilities and perspectives for performing biological dosimetry method in radiation protection area are presented in this report. (author)

  6. DRDC Ottawa working standard for biological dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segura, T.M.; Prud' homme-Lalonde, L. [Defence Research and Development Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Thorleifson, E. [Health Canada, Gatineau, Quebec (Canada); Lachapelle, S.; Mullins, D. [JERA Consulting (Canada); Qutob, S. [Health Canada, Gatineau, Quebec (Canada); Wilkinson, D.

    2005-07-15

    This Standard provides quality assurance, quality control, and evaluation of the performance criteria for the purpose of accreditation of the Radiation Biology laboratory at Defence Research and Development Canada - Ottawa (DRDC Ottawa) using biological dosimetry to predict radiation exposure doses. The International Standard (ISO 19238) and the International Atomic Energy Association (IAEA) Technical Report Series No. 405 are used as guiding documents in preparation of this working document specific to the DRDC Ottawa Radiation Biology Laboratory. This Standard addresses: 1. The confidentiality of personal information, for the customer and the service laboratory; 2. The laboratory safety requirements; 3. The calibration sources and calibration dose ranges useful for establishing the reference dose-effect curves allowing the dose estimation from chromosome aberration frequency, and the minimum detection levels; 4. Transportation criteria for shipping of test samples to the laboratory; 5. Preparation of samples for analysis; 6. The scoring procedure for unstable chromosome aberrations used for biological dosimetry; 7. The criteria for converting a measured aberration frequency into an estimate of absorbed dose; 8. The reporting of results; 9. The quality assurance and quality control plan for the laboratory; and 10. Informative annexes containing examples of a questionnaire, instructions for customers, a data sheet for recording aberrations, a sample report and other supportive documents. (author)

  7. DRDC Ottawa working standard for biological dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Standard provides quality assurance, quality control, and evaluation of the performance criteria for the purpose of accreditation of the Radiation Biology laboratory at Defence Research and Development Canada - Ottawa (DRDC Ottawa) using biological dosimetry to predict radiation exposure doses. The International Standard (ISO 19238) and the International Atomic Energy Association (IAEA) Technical Report Series No. 405 are used as guiding documents in preparation of this working document specific to the DRDC Ottawa Radiation Biology Laboratory. This Standard addresses: 1. The confidentiality of personal information, for the customer and the service laboratory; 2. The laboratory safety requirements; 3. The calibration sources and calibration dose ranges useful for establishing the reference dose-effect curves allowing the dose estimation from chromosome aberration frequency, and the minimum detection levels; 4. Transportation criteria for shipping of test samples to the laboratory; 5. Preparation of samples for analysis; 6. The scoring procedure for unstable chromosome aberrations used for biological dosimetry; 7. The criteria for converting a measured aberration frequency into an estimate of absorbed dose; 8. The reporting of results; 9. The quality assurance and quality control plan for the laboratory; and 10. Informative annexes containing examples of a questionnaire, instructions for customers, a data sheet for recording aberrations, a sample report and other supportive documents. (author)

  8. Dosimetry and biological effects of fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis contains studies on two types of cellular damage: cell reproductive death and chromosome aberrations induced by irradiation with X rays, gamma rays and fast neutrons of different energies. A prerequisite for the performance of radiobiological experiments is the determination of the absorbed dose with a sufficient degree of accuracy and precision. Basic concepts of energy deposition by ionizing radiation and practical aspects of neutron dosimetry for biomedical purposes are discussed. Information on the relative neutron sensitivity of GM counters and on the effective point of measurement of ionization chambers for dosimetry of neutron and photon beams under free-in-air conditions and inside phantoms which are used to simulate the biological objects is presented. Different methods for neutron dosimetry are compared and the experimental techniques used for the investigations of cell reproductive death and chromosome aberrations induced by ionizing radiation of different qualities are presented. Dose-effect relations for induction cell inactivation and chromsome aberrations in three cultured cell lines for different radiation qualities are presented. (Auth.)

  9. Radio-analysis. Applications: biological dosimetry; Radioanalyse. Applications: dosage biologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourrel, F. [CEA Saclay, INSTN, Institut National des Sciences et Techniques Nucleaires, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Courriere, Ph. [UFR de Pharmacie, 31 - Toulouse (France)

    2003-06-01

    Radioisotopes have revolutionized the medical biology. Radio-immunology remains the reference measurement of the infinitely small in biology. Constant efforts have been performed to improve the simpleness, detectability and fastness of the method thanks to an increasing automation. This paper presents: 1 - the advantages of compounds labelling and the isotopic dilution; 2 - the antigen-antibody system: properties, determination of the affinity constant using the Scatchard method; 3 - radio-immunologic dosimetry: competitive dosimetry (radioimmunoassay), calibration curve and mathematical data processing, application to the free thyroxine dosimetry, immunoradiometric dosimetry (immunoradiometric assay), evaluation of the analytical efficiency of a radioimmunoassay; 4 - detection of the radioactive signal (solid and liquid scintillation). (J.S.)

  10. Biological dosimetry for astronauts: a real challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testard, I; Sabatier, L

    1999-12-01

    Manned space missions recently increased in number and duration, thus it became important to estimate the biological risks encountered by astronauts. They are exposed to cosmic and galactic rays, a complex mixture of different radiations. In addition to the measurements realized by physical dosimeters, it becomes essential to estimate real biologically effective doses and compare them to physical doses. Biological dosimetry of radiation exposures has been widely performed using cytogenetic analysis of chromosomes. This approach has been used for many years in order to estimate absorbed doses in accidental or chronic overexposures of humans. In addition to conventional techniques (Giemsa or FPG staining, R- or G-banding), faster and accurate means of analysis have been developed (fluorescence in situ hybridization [FISH] painting). As results accumulate, it appears that strong interindividual variability exists in the basal level of aberrations. Moreover, some aberrations such as translocations exhibit a high background level. Radiation exposures seem to induce variability between individual responses. Its extent strongly differs with the mode of exposure, the doses delivered, the kind of radiation, and the cytogenetic method used. This paper aims to review the factors that may influence the reliability of cytogenetic dosimetry. The emphasis is on the exposure to high linear energy transfer (LET) particles in space as recent studies demonstrated interindividual variations in doses estimated from aberration analysis after long-term space missions. In addition to the problem of dose estimates, the heterogeneity of cosmic radiation raises questions relating to the real numbers of damaged cells in an individual, and potential long-term risks. Actually, densely ionizing particles are extremely potent to induce late chromosomal instability, and again, interindividual variability exists in the expression of damage. PMID:10631347

  11. The micronucleus test in biological dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of micronuclei in lymphocytes on the basis of the Cytochalasine B method may already be regarded as a most useful tool following short-term wholebody exposure to doses in the range between approx. 0.3 and 7 Gy and thus offers a genuine alternative to the conventional analysis of chromosomes. Further efforts in the research on micronuclei as a biological system of dosimetry should primarily be made in the field of radiosensitive subpopulations and, additionally, the field of automated evaluation procedures. It is to be expected that this will permit the limit of detection to be lowered to doses of even less than approx. 0.2 - 0.3 Gy. (orig.)

  12. Occupational dosimetry in real time. Benefits for interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Occupational dosimetry is still a challenge in fluoroscopy-guided procedures. Personal dosimeters are not regularly used by many professionals. Most of the dosimeters used are worn under the lead apron and it is difficult to estimate radiation doses to the unprotected organs and tissues. New electronic dosimeters make it possible to know staff doses and dose rates in real time, inside interventional laboratories. A system using solid-state detectors and equipped with a wireless connection (DoseAware distributed by Philips) that sends the scatter dose rate and cumulative scatter dose readings to a base station, inside the catheterization room, has been evaluated. The initial test was carried out over a period of 4 months in two laboratories (a cardiology one and a second one dedicated to general interventional procedures). In addition to the educational value of the dosimetry system, other benefits have been identified such as the detailed information on occupational dose rate during the procedures, the possibility of comparing occupational doses registered among different staff during the procedures, the capability of establishing correlations between occupational and patient doses, and correlations between staff doses and geometry and radiographic factors used during the procedures. From all this information, it is possible to derive criteria for optimization of occupational radiation protection.

  13. Alternative statistical methods for cytogenetic radiation biological dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Fornalski, Krzysztof Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents alternative statistical methods for biological dosimetry, such as the Bayesian and Monte Carlo method. The classical Gaussian and robust Bayesian fit algorithms for the linear, linear-quadratic as well as saturated and critical calibration curves are described. The Bayesian model selection algorithm for those curves is also presented. In addition, five methods of dose estimation for a mixed neutron and gamma irradiation field were described: two classical methods, two Bayesian methods and one Monte Carlo method. Bayesian methods were also enhanced and generalized for situations with many types of mixed radiation. All algorithms were presented in easy-to-use form, which can be applied to any computational programming language. The presented algorithm is universal, although it was originally dedicated to cytogenetic biological dosimetry of victims of a nuclear reactor accident.

  14. Chromosome aberration analysis for biological dosimetry: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among various biological dosimetry techniques, dicentric chromosome aberration method appears to be the method of choice in analysing accidental radiation exposure in most of the laboratories. The major advantage of this method is its sensitivity as the number of dicentric chromosomes present in control population is too small and more importantly radiation induces mainly dicentric chromosome aberration among unstable aberration. This report brings out the historical development of various cytogenetic methods, the basic structure of DNA, chromosomes and different forms of chromosome aberrations. It also highlights the construction of dose-response curve for dicentric chromosome and its use in the estimation of radiation dose. (author)

  15. Biological dosimetry: chromosomal aberration analysis for dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In view of the growing importance of chromosomal aberration analysis as a biological dosimeter, the present report provides a concise summary of the scientific background of the subject and a comprehensive source of information at the technical level. After a review of the basic principles of radiation dosimetry and radiation biology basic information on the biology of lymphocytes, the structure of chromosomes and the classification of chromosomal aberrations are presented. This is followed by a presentation of techniques for collecting blood, storing, transporting, culturing, making chromosomal preparations and scaring of aberrations. The physical and statistical parameters involved in dose assessment are discussed and examples of actual dose assessments taken from the scientific literature are given

  16. Biological dosimetry of ionizing radiation in the high dose range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report reviews briefly methods of dose evaluation after exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation. Validation of two methods also is described: micronucleus (Mn) frequency estimation according Muller and Rode and premature chromosome condensation (PCC) combined with painting of 3 pairs of chromosomes in human lymphocytes. According to Muller and Rode, micronucleus frequency per binucleated cells with at least one Mn linearly increases with dose up to 15 Gy and is suitable end-point for biological dosimetry. These authors, however, examined cells from only one donor. The data reported below were obtained for 5 donors; they point to a considerable individual variation of thus measured response to irradiation. Due to the high degree of inter-donor variability, there is no possibility to apply this approach in biological dosimetry in the dose range 5 - 20 Gy gamma 60Co radiation. A linear response up to 10 Gy was observed only in the case of certain donors. In contrast, determination of the dose-effect relationship with the PCC method gave good results (small inter-individual variation, no plateau effect up to dose 10 Gy), so that with a calibration curve it could be used for dose estimation after exposure to doses up to 10 Gy of X or gamma 60Co radiation. (author)

  17. A Novel Biological Dosimetry Method for Monitoring Occupational Radiation Exposure in Diagnostic and Therapeutic Wards: From Radiation Dosimetry to Biological Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Heydarheydari, S.; Haghparast, A.; Eivazi, M.T.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Professional radiation workers are occupationally exposed to long-term low levels of ionizing radiation. Occupational health hazards from radiation exposure, in a large occupational segment of the population, are of special concern. Biological dosimetry can be performed in addition to physical dosimetry with the aim of individual dose assessment and biological effects. Methods In this biodosimetry study, some hematological parameters have been examined in 40 exposed a...

  18. Biological dosimetry of X-rays by micronuclei study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological dosimetry consists of estimating absorbed doses for people exposed to radiation by mean biological methods. Several indicators used are based in hematological, biochemical an cytogenetics data, although nowadays without doubt, the cytogenetic method is considered to be the most reliable, in this case, the study of micronuclei in peripheral blood lymphocytes cytokinetic blocked can be related to absorbed dose through an experimental calibration curve. An experimental dose-response curve, using micronuclei assay for X-rays at 250 kVp, 43,79 rads/min and temperature 37 degree celsius has been produced. Experimental data is fitted to model Y=c+ α D+β D2 where. Y is the number micronuclei per cell and D the dose. the curve is compared with those produced elsewhere

  19. Biological dosimetry of ionizing radiation by chromosomal aberration analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological dosimetry consists of estimating absorbed doses for people exposed to radiation by mean biological methods. Several indicators used are based in haematological, biochemical, and cytogenetic data, although nowadays without doubt, the cytogenetic method is considered to be the most reliable. In this case, the study ol chromosomal aberrations, normally dicentric chromosomes, in peripheral lymphocytes can be related to absorbed dose through an experimental calibration curve. An experimental dose-response curve, using dicentric chromosomes analysis, X-rays at 300 kVp, 114 rad/min and temperature 37 degree celsius has been produced. Experimental data is fitted to model Y =α + β1D + β2D 2 , where Y is the number of dicentrics per cell and D the dose. The curve is compared with those produced elsewhere. (Author) 14 refs

  20. Biological Dosimetry of X-rays by micronuclei study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological dosimetry consists of estimating absorbed doses for people exposed to radiation by mean biological methods. Several indicators used are based in haematological, biochemical an cytogenetics data, although nowadays without doubt, the cytogenetic method is considered to be the most reliable, in this case, the study of micronuclei in peripheral blood lymphocytes citokinetics blocked can be related to absorbed dose through an experimental calibration curve. An experimental dose-response curve, using micronuclei assay for X-rays at 250 kVp, 43,79 rads/min and temperature 37 degree centigree has been produced. Experimental data is fitted to model Y=C+ αD+BD''2 where Y is the number of micronuclei per cell and D the dose. The curve is compared with those produced elsewhere. (Author) 24 refs

  1. The method validation step of biological dosimetry accreditation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, L.; Voisin, P.A.; Guillou, A.C.; Busset, A.; Gregoire, E.; Buard, V.; Delbos, M.; Voisin, Ph. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, LDB, 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France)

    2006-07-01

    One of the missions of the Laboratory of Biological Dosimetry (L.D.B.) of the Institute for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (I.R.S.N.) is to assess the radiological dose after an accidental overexposure suspicion to ionising radiation, by using radio-induced changes of some biological parameters. The 'gold standard' is the yield of dicentrics observed in patients lymphocytes, and this yield is converted in dose using dose effect relationships. This method is complementary to clinical and physical dosimetry, for medical team in charge of the patients. To obtain a formal recognition of its operational activity, the laboratory decided three years ago, to require an accreditation, by following the recommendations of both 17025 General Requirements for the Competence of Testing and Calibration Laboratories and 19238 Performance criteria for service laboratories performing biological dosimetry by cyto-genetics. Diagnostics, risks analysis were realized to control the whole analysis process leading to documents writing. Purchases, personnel department, vocational training were also included in the quality system. Audits were very helpful to improve the quality system. One specificity of this technique is that it is not normalized therefore apart from quality management aspects, several technical points needed some validations. An inventory of potentially influent factors was carried out. To estimate their real effect on the yield of dicentrics, a Placket-Burman experimental design was conducted. The effect of seven parameters was tested: the BUdr (bromodeoxyuridine), PHA (phytohemagglutinin) and colcemid concentration, the culture duration, the incubator temperature, the blood volume and the medium volume. The chosen values were calculated according to the uncertainties on the way they were measured i.e. pipettes, thermometers, test tubes. None of the factors has a significant impact on the yield of dicentrics. Therefore the uncertainty linked to their use was

  2. New methodologies of biological dosimetry applied to human protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological dosimetry is a diagnostic methodology for the measurement of the individual dose absorbed in the case of accidental overexposition to ionizing radiation. It is demonstrated how in vitro radiobiological and chemobiological studies using cytogenetic methods (count of chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei) on human lymphocytes from healthy subjects and individuals undergoing radiotherapy or chemotherapy, as well as on lymphocytes of mammals other than man (comparative cytogenetics), can help to increase the basic radiobiological and chemobiological scientific information. Such information gives a valid contribution to understanding of the action of ionizing radiation or of pharmaceuticals on cells and, in return, can be of value to human radioprotection and chemoprotection. Cytogenetic studies can be summerized as follows: a) biodosimetry (estimate of dose received after accidental events); b) individual radiosensitivity (level of individual response); c) clinical radiobiology and chemobiology (individual response to radiopharmaceuticals, to radiotherapy and to chemopharmaceuticals); d) comparative radiobiology (cytogenetic studies on species other than man); e) animal model in the environmental surveillance

  3. Confocal microscopy, a tool for biological dosimetry in tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritsch, P.; Lenaour, H.; Morlier, J.P. [CEA/DSV/DRR, Laboratoire de Radio Toxicologie, 91 - Bruyeres-le-chatel (France)

    1997-03-01

    Because standard histological methods and related observation are very time consuming, only a few studies have concerned biological dosimetry in tissues. This experimental approach is however the only one that could characterize a heterogeneous irradiation such as that induced after internal contamination with {alpha} and/or {beta} emitters. The aim advantage of CM is to observe thin optical sections (<0.5{mu}m) within a thick section (>50{mu}m) which allows observation of many cells and to score events even those occurring at a low frequency if an appropriate staining has been performed. Two rat tissues have been studies, cerebellum during its histogenesis which was irradiated from bone after {sup 90}Sr contamination, and lungs from adults after radon daughter inhalation. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that CM might be an appropriate method to characterize the heterogeneous distribution of doses after internal contamination. (authors)

  4. Developments in biological dosimetry for the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this program is to develop methods for providing estimates of radiation exposure based on changes in the cells/tissues of exposed individuals. This work arises from the need for independent measures of exposure of workers when standard dose measurements are unavailable or questionable. The radiation-induced changes that we propose to measure have been correlated with carcinogenesis. It follows that the methods used should also provide indications of the likely biological consequences of radiation exposure for an individual. The consequences of radiation exposure lie in the resolution of the radiation effects at the cellular level. Accordingly, it is at the cellular level that our attention is directed. More precisely, since the consequences of most concern, cancer induction and the induction of inherited diseases, are the result of changes to the genetic material of cells (the DNA), it is the measurement of effects on DNA that are being investigated as possible dose meters. Individuals are unique in terms of their DNA and differ in their cellular capacities to repair the damage from an ionizing radiation dose. Because of these features, not only do biological dosimetry tools offer us a means of measuring a dose at the individual level but may also provide us with a measure of the ultimate risk associated with a given exposure. (author). 7 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs

  5. Cost-benefit of computed tomography application in dosimetry calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cost-benefit analysis of CT-assisted radiation therapy treatment planning is incomplete at the moment. In fact, there are those who argue that the analysis will never be completed and cite the failure to obtain comparable data relative to previous technical innovations, e.g., megavoltage radiation (especially very high energy photon beam machines), computerized treatment planning units, and simulators

  6. Methods of biological dosimetry employing chromosome-specific staining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods are provided to disable the hybridization capacity of shared, high copy repetitive sequences and/or remove such sequences to provide for useful contrast. Still further methods are provided to produce chromosome-specific staining reagents which are made specific to the targeted chromosomal material, which can be one or more whole chromosomes, one or more regions on one or more chromosomes, subsets of chromosomes and/or the entire genome. Probes and test kits are provided for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, in analysis of structural abnormalities, such as translocations, and for biological dosimetry. Further, methods and prenatal test kits are provided to stain targeted chromosomal material of fetal cells, including fetal cells obtained from maternal blood. Still further, the invention provides for automated means to detect and analyse chromosomal abnormalities.

  7. DOSIMETRY

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    From the month of May on, the neutron dosimeter will be worn in an extra package distinct from the usual film-badge. We will give you more ample information in Weekly Bulletin No. 18/2001 of April 30, 2001. In the week following Easter (17 - 20. 4. 2001) the Individual Dosimetry Service will be opened in the mornings from 8:30 to 11:30 h only. The Service will be closed on April 30.

  8. An improved in vitro micronucleus assay to biological dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocampo, Ivette Z.; Okazaki, Kayo; Vieira, Daniel P., E-mail: dpvieira@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), So Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The biological dosimetry is widely used to estimate the absorbed dose in people occupationally or accidentally exposed to the radiation for a better medical treatment, minimizing the harmful effects. Many techniques and methods have been proposed to detect and quantify the radioinduced lesions in genetic material, among them, the micronucleus (MN) assay. In the present study, we proposed an improved in vitro micronucleus technique that is rapid, sensitive and with minor cell manipulations. Assays were carried out with human tumor cells (MCF-7) seeded (3x10{sup 4} cells) in slides placed into Petri dishes. Adherent cells were maintained with RPMI medium, supplemented with fetal calf serum, 1 % antibiotics, cytochalasin B (2 μg/mL), and incubated at 37 deg C in the presence of 5% CO2 for 72h. Cells were pre-treated for 24h with aminoguanidine, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor. Nitric oxide is an intracellular free-radical, involved in DNA double-strand break repair mechanisms. After incubation, adherent cells on slides were briefly fixed with paraformaldehyde and stained with acridine orange (100 μg/mL) for analysis through fluorescence microscopy. Dye fluorescence permitted accurate discrimination between nuclei and micronuclei (bright green) and cytoplasm (red), and made possible a faster counting of binucleated cells. Aminoguanidine (2 mM) induced significant increase (p< 0.05) in frequencies of binucleated cells with micronuclei and in the number of micronuclei per binucleated cell. Data showed that proposed modifications permit to understand an early aspect of NO inhibition and suggested an improved protocol to MN assays. (author)

  9. Dosimetry using environmental and biological materials. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haskell, E.; Kenner, G.; Hayes, R.

    1998-02-01

    This report summarizes a five year effort to improve the sensitivity and reliability of retrospective dosimetry methods, to collaborate with laboratories engaged in related research and to share the technology with startup laboratories seeking similar capabilities. This research program has focused on validation of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) as a dosimetry tool and on optimization of the technique by reducing the lower limits of detection, simplifying the process of sample preparation and analysis and speeding analysis to allow greater throughput in routine measurement situations. The authors have investigated the dosimetric signal of hard tissues in enamel, deorganified dentin, synthetic carbonated apatites and synthetic hydroxyapatite. This research has resulted in a total of 27 manuscripts which have been published, are in press, or have been submitted for publication. Of these manuscripts, 14 are included in this report and were indexed separately for inclusion in the data base.

  10. Report of the workshop on biological dosimetry: increasing capacity for emergency response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, V; Wilkins, R C

    2010-11-01

    Recent events have brought increased attention to the possibility and dangers of a radiological terrorist threat and its potential implication on the national capacity for radiation accident preparedness. In such an event, there is a pressing need to rapidly identify severely irradiated individuals who require prompt medical attention from those who have not been exposed or have been subject to low doses. Initial dose assessment is a key component in rapid triage and treatment, however, the development of accurate methods for rapid dose assessment remains a challenge. In this report, the authors describe a recent workshop supported by the Chemical, Biological, Radiological-Nuclear and Explosives Research and Technology Initiative regarding the international effort to increase biological dosimetry capacity to effectively mount an emergency response in a mass casualty situation. Specifically, the focus of the workshop was on the current state of biological dosimetry capabilities and capacities in North America, recent developments towards increasing throughput for biological dosimetry and to identify opportunities for developing a North American Biological Dosimetry Network and forming partnerships and collaborations within Canada and the USA.

  11. Report of the workshop on biological dosimetry: Increasing capacity for emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent events have brought increased attention to the possibility and dangers of a radiological terrorist threat and its potential implication on the national capacity for radiation accident preparedness. In such an event, there is a pressing need to rapidly identify severely irradiated individuals who require prompt medical attention from those who have not been exposed or have been subject to low doses. Initial dose assessment is a key component in rapid triage and treatment, however, the development of accurate methods for rapid dose assessment remains a challenge. In this report, the authors describe a recent workshop supported by the Chemical, Biological, Radiological-Nuclear and Explosives Research and Technology Initiative regarding the international effort to increase biological dosimetry capacity to effectively mount an emergency response in a mass casualty situation. Specifically, the focus of the workshop was on the current state of biological dosimetry capabilities and capacities in North America, recent developments towards increasing throughput for biological dosimetry and to identify opportunities for developing a North American Biological Dosimetry Network and forming partnerships and collaborations within Canada and the USA. (authors)

  12. Radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Hine, Gerald J; Hine, Gerald J

    1956-01-01

    Radiation Dosimetry focuses on the advancements, processes, technologies, techniques, and principles involved in radiation dosimetry, including counters and calibration and standardization techniques. The selection first offers information on radiation units and the theory of ionization dosimetry and interaction of radiation with matter. Topics include quantities derivable from roentgens, determination of dose in roentgens, ionization dosimetry of high-energy photons and corpuscular radiations, and heavy charged particles. The text then examines the biological and medical effects of radiation,

  13. Activation methods of retrospective dosimetry using biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    23Na and 32S are stable isotopes which are present in humans - 23Na in blood and other tissues, 32S in hair. When human body is irradiated by neutrons, nuclear reactions 23Na(n,γ)24Na and 32S(n,p)32P occur, the products, 24Na and 32P, being radioactive. The induced activity can be used for retrospective assessment of the neutron dose. The principle of this dosimetry application is described. As a particular case, the relations between the activity and neutron dose were derived for irradiation of a human by the fission neutron spectrum. (orig.)

  14. Latin-American Biological Dosimetry Network (LBDNET) Intercomparison Exercise. Evaluation through triage and conventional scoring criteria. Development of a new approach for statistical data analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological Dosimetry is a necessary support for National Radiation Protection Programs and Emergency Response Schemes. A Latin-American Biological Dosimetry Network (LBDNET) has been constituted by the biological dosimetry laboratories from: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Cuba, Mexico, Peru, and Uruguay (IAEA Regional Project RLA9/054, 2007). The biological dosimetry laboratory of Argentina organized an international biological dosimetry intercomparison for the analysis of some relevant parameters involved in dose assessment, to reinforce the response capability in accidental situations requiring the activation of mutual assistance mechanisms and thus, constituting the bases of the LBDNET organization. (authors)

  15. Biological and clinical dosimetry, July 1, 1964 to December 31, 1984. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal was to develop systems for the determination of absorbed dose in biological research and clinical applications. The primary method under study is the local absorbed dose calorimeter. In addition, secondary dosimetric systems such as ionization chambers, chemical dosimeters and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) are being developed and applied to provide an absolute basis for the evaluation and comparison of experiments, treatments and other procedures using radiation. In keeping with these objectives this project has accomplished significant advances in the following areas: (1) local absorbed dose calorimetry; (2) neutron dosimetry; (3) dosimetry of ultra-high intensity radiation sources; (4) solid state detector and germanium gamma camera program; (5) dosimetry for brachytherapy; and (6) ''non-isolated sensor'' calorimeters

  16. Activities developed by the biological dosimetry laboratory of the Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear - ARN of Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological dosimetry (DB) allows to estimate doses absorbed in individuals exposed to ionizing radiation through the quantification of stable and unstable chromosome aberrations (SCA and UCA). The frequency of these aberrations is referred to a calibration dose response curve (in vitro) to determine the doses of the individual to the whole body. The DB is a necessary support for programs of national radiation protection and response systems in nuclear or radiological emergencies in the event of accidental or incidental, single overexposure or large scale. In this context the Laboratory of Dosimetry Biological (LDB) of the Authority Regulatory Nuclear (ARN) Argentina develops and applies different dosimeters cytogenetic from four decades ago. These dosimeters provide a fact more within the whole of the information necessary for an accidental, complementing the physical and clinical dosimetry exposure assessment. The most widely used in the DB biodosimetric method is the quantification of SCA (dicentrics and rings Central) from a sample of venous blood. The LDB is accredited for the trial, under rules IRAM 301: 2005 (ISO / IEC 17025: 2005) and ISO 19238:2004. Test applies to the immediate dosimetry evaluation of acute exposures, all or a large part of the body in the range 0,1-5 Gy. In this context the LDB is part of the Latin American network of DB (LBDNet), BioDoseNet-who and response system in radiological emergencies and nuclear IAEA-RANET, being enabled to summon the LBDNet if necessary

  17. The Latin American Biological Dosimetry Network (LBDNet): Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Cuba, Mexico, Peru, Uruguay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero C, C.; Arceo M, C. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Di Giorgio, M.; Vallerga, M.; Radl, A. [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Av. del Libertador 8250, C1429 BNP CABA (Argentina); Taja, M.; Seoane, A.; De Luca, J. [Universidad Nacionald de La Plata, Av. 7 No. 1776, La Plata 1900, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Stuck O, M. [Instituto de Radioproteccion y Dosimetria, Av. Salvador Allende s/n, Recreio dos Bandeirantes, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Valdivia, P., E-mail: lbdnet@googlegroups.co [Comision Chilena de Energia, Amutanegui 95, Santiago Centro, Santiago (Chile)

    2010-10-15

    Biological dosimetry is a necessary support for national radiation protection programs and emergency response schemes. The Latin American Biological Dosimetry Network (LBDNet) was formally founded in 2007 for mutual assistance in case of radiation emergencies and for providing support to other Latin American countries that do not have bio dosimetry laboratories. In the frame of the IAEA Technical Cooperation Projects RLA/9/54 and RLA/9/61 the following activities have been performed: a) An international intercomparison exercise organized during 2007-2008 included six European countries and LBDNet laboratories. Relevant parameters related with dose assessment were evaluated through triage and conventional scoring criteria. A new approach for statistical data analysis was developed including assessment of inter-laboratory reproducibility and intra-laboratory repeatability. Overall, the laboratory performance was satisfactory for mutual cooperation purposes. b) In 2009, LBDNet and two European countries carried out a digital image intercomparison exercise involving dose assessment from metaphase images distributed electronically through internet. The main objectives were to evaluate scoring feasibility on metaphase images and time response. In addition a re-examination phase was considered in which the most controversial images were discussed jointly, this allowed for the development of a homogeneous scoring criteria within the network. c) A further exercise was performed during 2009 involving the shipment of biological samples for biological dosimetry assessment. The aim of this exercise was to test the timely and properly sending and receiving blood samples under national and international regulations. A total of 14 laboratories participated in this joint IAEA, PAHO and WHO. (Author)

  18. Main activities of the Latin American Network of Biological Dosimetry (LBDNet)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Latin American Biological Dosimetry Network (LBDNET) was constituted in 2007 for mutual assistance in case of a radiation emergency in the region supported by IAEA Technical Cooperation Projects RLA/9/054 and RLA/9/061. The main objectives are: a) to strengthen the technical capacities of Biological Dosimetry Services belonging to laboratories existing in the region (Argentine, Brazil, Chile, Cuba, Mexico, Peru and Uruguay) integrated in National Radiological Emergency Plans to provide a rapid biodosimetric response in a coordinated manner between countries and with RANET-IAEA/BioDoseNet-WHO, b) to provide support to other countries in the region lacking Biological Dosimetry laboratories, c) to consolidate the organization of the Latin American Biological Dosimetry Network for mutual assistance. The activities developed include technical meetings for protocols and chromosomal aberration scoring criteria unification, blood samples cultures exercises, chromosomal aberrations analysis at microscope, discussion of statistical methods and specialized software for dose calculation, the intercomparison between laboratory data after the analysis of slides with irradiated material and the intercomparison of the analysis of captured images distributed electronically in the WEB. The last exercise was the transportation of an irradiated human blood sample to countries inside and outside of the region. At the moment the exercises are concluded and they are pending to be published in reference journals. Results obtained show the capacity in the region for a biodosimetric response to a radiological accident. In the future the network will integrate techniques for high dose exposure evaluation and will enhance the interaction with other emergency systems in the region. (authors)

  19. Neutron and Gamma Dosimetry in the Biological Cavity of NRX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NRX reactor at Chalk River has been equipped with a biological cavity for the experimental irradiation of biological material with slow neutrons. The high intensity of gamma radiation in the thermal beam is sharply reduced by bismuth shielding (average thickness 18 cm) which entirely surrounds the biological cavity. The internal dimensions of the cavity are 18 cm in height and 10 cm in diameter. The neutrons in the biological cavity are predominantly thermal neutrons, as can be seen from the ratio of captures by gold with and without cadmium (>3000). When the reactor is operating at maximum power, the mean slow-neutron flux is 9 x 108 n/cm2s. The neutron-flux densities are obtained by activating calibrated gold or manganese detectors or else derived from the currents obtained by passing carbon dioxide and nitrogen in turn through a graphite ionization chamber. In the case of prolonged irradiation, the total neutron flux is obtained by measuring the activity of cobalt wires which are placed in the cavity along with the biological specimens that are being irradiated. The mean intensity of the gamma-radiation field in the biological cavity is 145 r/h. This can be further reduced to 95 r/h merely by placing a removable bismuth lining in the cavity, though this of course reduces the available space. The gamma-exposure doses are measured by means of a graphite-CO2 ionization chamber insensitive to thermal neutrons. The gamma radiation and the neutron-flux density vary considerably, depending on the position inside the cavity and inside the organisms that are being irradiated. The various factors which may lead to error when measuring the exposure dose and dose absorbed during irradiation are analysed. (author)

  20. Development of radiation biological dosimetry and treatment of radiation-induced damaged tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Util now, only a few methods have been developed for radiation biological dosimetry such as conventional chromosome aberration and micronucleus in peripheral blood cell. However, because these methods not only can be estimated by the expert, but also have a little limitation due to need high technique and many times in the case of radiation accident, it is very difficult to evaluate the absorbed dose of victims. Therefore, we should develop effective, easy, simple and rapid biodosimetry and its guideline(triage) to be able to be treated the victims as fast as possible. We established the apoptotic fragment assay, PCC, comet assay, and micronucleus assay which was the significant relationship between dose and cell damages to evaluate the irradiated dose as correct and rapid as possible using lymphocytes and crypt cells, and compared with chromosome dosimetry and micronucleus assay

  1. Development of radiation biological dosimetry and treatment of radiation-induced damaged tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Chul Koo; Kim, Tae Hwan; Lee, Yun Sil [and others

    2000-04-01

    Util now, only a few methods have been developed for radiation biological dosimetry such as conventional chromosome aberration and micronucleus in peripheral blood cell. However, because these methods not only can be estimated by the expert, but also have a little limitation due to need high technique and many times in the case of radiation accident, it is very difficult to evaluate the absorbed dose of victims. Therefore, we should develop effective, easy, simple and rapid biodosimetry and its guideline(triage) to be able to be treated the victims as fast as possible. We established the apoptotic fragment assay, PCC, comet assay, and micronucleus assay which was the significant relationship between dose and cell damages to evaluate the irradiated dose as correct and rapid as possible using lymphocytes and crypt cells, and compared with chromosome dosimetry and micronucleus assay.

  2. Development of radiological emergency preparedness and biological dosimetry technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large-scale field tracer experiments have been conducted on Ulchin and Wolsung nuclear sites for the purpose of validating FADAS and of analyzing the environmental characteristics around the nuclear site. The most influential factor in atmospheric dispersion is the meteorological condition. During the experiment, meteorological data were measured on the release point and the selected positions among sampling points. Once radioactive materials are released to the atmosphere, members of public may be exposed through the environmental media such as air, soil and foods. Therefore, to protect the public, adequate countermeasures should be taken at due time for those exposure pathways. Both processes of justification and optimization are applied to a countermeasure simultaneously for decision-making. The work scope of biological research for the radiation protection had contained the search of biological microanalytic methods for the assessment of health effect by radiation and toxic agents, the standardization of human t-lymphocyte cell culture and polymerase chain reaction, T-cell clonal assay, and the quantification of mutation frequency in hypoxanthine (guanine) phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) gene locus by single exposure or combined exposure. Especially, the polymerase chain reaction methods by usage of reverse transcriptase had been developed to analyze of gene product by γ - radiation and chemical (pentachlorophenol) agent exposure, and investigate the point mutation in hprt gene locus of T-lymphocytes. (author)

  3. Development of radiological emergency preparedness and biological dosimetry technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Moon Hee; Kim, In Gyoo; Kim, Kook Chan; Kim, Eun Han; Suh, Kyung Suk; Hwang, Won Tae; Choi, Young Gil; Shim, Hae Won; Lee, Jeong Ho; Lee, Kang Suk

    1999-04-01

    Large-scale field tracer experiments have been conducted on Ulchin and Wolsung nuclear sites for the purpose of validating FADAS and of analyzing the environmental characteristics around the nuclear site. The most influential factor in atmospheric dispersion is the meteorological condition. During the experiment, meteorological data were measured on the release point and the selected positions among sampling points. Once radioactive materials are released to the atmosphere, members of public may be exposed through the environmental media such as air, soil and foods. Therefore, to protect the public, adequate countermeasures should be taken at due time for those exposure pathways. Both processes of justification and optimization are applied to a countermeasure simultaneously for decision-making. The work scope of biological research for the radiation protection had contained the search of biological microanalytic methods for the assessment of health effect by radiation and toxic agents, the standardization of human t-lymphocyte cell culture and polymerase chain reaction, T-cell clonal assay, and the quantification of mutation frequency in hypoxanthine (guanine) phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) gene locus by single exposure or combined exposure. Especially, the polymerase chain reaction methods by usage of reverse transcriptase had been developed to analyze of gene product by {gamma} - radiation and chemical (pentachlorophenol) agent exposure, and investigate the point mutation in hprt gene locus of T-lymphocytes. (author)

  4. Biological dosimetry, scopes and limitations; Dosimetria biologica, alcances y limitaciones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero C, C.; Brena V, M. [Departamento de Biologia, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, C.P. 52045 Salazar, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    The analysis of the aberrations in chromosomes is an alternative to establish the exposure dose to the radiation, when the information provided by the traditional physical methods is insufficient. There are diverse causes by which it can reached to apply an alternative system, such is the case of exposures of another persons to the management of radiation sources, which not carry physical dosemeter. Contrary case is to the occupational exposure personnel (OEP), what must to utilize some system for determining the exposure dose, even so can be needed the case for more information. In any case, the cells from the affected person are the alternative without the biological system be overlap to the physical, it is complementary. (Author)

  5. Transient impedance changes in venous endothelial monolayers as a biological radiation dosimetry response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Fossum Young

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In March of 2011, a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and subsequent 14 m-high tsunami caused major damage to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan.  While cancer incidence in the radiation-exposed population is a logical concern, the complex effects of radiation on the heart and cardiovascular system are also of interest.  Immediate and early vascular radiation effects could be exploited as a dosimetry modality.  To test whether non-coronary vasculature exhibited transient perturbation in barrier function, video microscopy studies and Electric Cell Substrate Impedance Sensing technology were used to probe very subtle changes in primary human vascular endothelium.  Human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC monolayers exhibit a transient, statistically significant decrease (P = 0.017 in monolayer resistance 3 h after irradiation with 5.0 Gy of g rays.  Radiation induced perturbations in HUVEC monolayer permeability are similar in magnitude and kinetics to those observed in coronary arterial endothelium.  Therefore, at least two types of vasculature respond to radiation on ECIS arrays with an early transient disruption in permeability.  The finding supports the use of early passage HUVECs for use in bioelectric dosimetry studies of vasculature and suggests that permeability of vessels could potentially serve as a biological dosimetry tool.

  6. Biological dosimetry study in differentiated thyroid carcinoma patients treated with 131Iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological Dosimetry allows individual dose assessments based on the effect produced by ionizing radiation on a given biological parameter. The current biological endpoint being scored is chromosomal aberrations, relying on a lymphocytes culture from the patient's blood. The measured yield of chromosome aberrations is referred to a calibration curve obtaining the whole body dose. Different scenarios of overexposure can be taken into account by modifying the calculations leading to the dose estimate. Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma patients undergo thyroidectomy followed by internal radiotherapy with 131I. The treatment's success entails the delivery of a lethal dose to the tumour within the maximum tolerable dose to a critical organ (blood doses over 2 Gy could lead to bone marrow depression). Currently, there is no established agreement for the selection of radioiodine dosage. Historically, the empiric approach, based on clinical and biochemical data, has been recommended. Nevertheless, this method may not be associated with optimal outcomes. On the other hand, the dosimetric approach attempts to determine the maximum allowable activity to be administered, establishing its biokinetics by a diagnostic 131I study. The methodology may be modified to further individualized treatment, however it requires validation. Biological dosimetry provides an independent measure of radiotherapy effect, as such it might aid in the validation process. Nonetheless, biological dosimetry has traditionally been applied in cases of external and accidental overexposure to ionizing radiation. Accordingly, it is mandatory to assess its value in medical internal incorporations (main objective of the present study). The applied treatment strategy comprises whole body dose assessment by biological and internal dosimetry in order to administer a personalized therapeutic activity. Overall, 20 patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma were included in the study. For biological dosimetry

  7. Present Status and Prospects for Biological Dosimetry using Chromosome Aberration Analysis (invited paper)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, C.Z.; Liu, X.L.; Zhang, Z.Y.; Luo, Y.S

    1998-07-01

    Biological dosimetry of radiation exposures was performed in 21 persons who received an overexposure to radiation in several radiation accidents during 1980-1996 in China. Based on the frequencies of dicentrics and rings the individual dose was estimated. Long-term follow-up studies have been carried out on five of the moderate and high dose exposed victims. The automated karyotype analysis system and the FISH technique have been established. The application of FISH for a dose-response relationship for translocations after irradiation with {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays has been performed. (author)

  8. Bibliographical database of radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment: Part 1, through June 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straume, T.; Ricker, Y.; Thut, M.

    1988-08-29

    This database was constructed to support research in radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment. Relevant publications were identified through detailed searches of national and international electronic databases and through our personal knowledge of the subject. Publications were numbered and key worded, and referenced in an electronic data-retrieval system that permits quick access through computerized searches on publication number, authors, key words, title, year, and journal name. Photocopies of all publications contained in the database are maintained in a file that is numerically arranged by citation number. This report of the database is provided as a useful reference and overview. It should be emphasized that the database will grow as new citations are added to it. With that in mind, we arranged this report in order of ascending citation number so that follow-up reports will simply extend this document. The database cite 1212 publications. Publications are from 119 different scientific journals, 27 of these journals are cited at least 5 times. It also contains reference to 42 books and published symposia, and 129 reports. Information relevant to radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment is widely distributed among the scientific literature, although a few journals clearly dominate. The four journals publishing the largest number of relevant papers are Health Physics, Mutation Research, Radiation Research, and International Journal of Radiation Biology. Publications in Health Physics make up almost 10% of the current database.

  9. Bibliographical database of radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment: Part 1, through June 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This database was constructed to support research in radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment. Relevant publications were identified through detailed searches of national and international electronic databases and through our personal knowledge of the subject. Publications were numbered and key worded, and referenced in an electronic data-retrieval system that permits quick access through computerized searches on publication number, authors, key words, title, year, and journal name. Photocopies of all publications contained in the database are maintained in a file that is numerically arranged by citation number. This report of the database is provided as a useful reference and overview. It should be emphasized that the database will grow as new citations are added to it. With that in mind, we arranged this report in order of ascending citation number so that follow-up reports will simply extend this document. The database cite 1212 publications. Publications are from 119 different scientific journals, 27 of these journals are cited at least 5 times. It also contains reference to 42 books and published symposia, and 129 reports. Information relevant to radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment is widely distributed among the scientific literature, although a few journals clearly dominate. The four journals publishing the largest number of relevant papers are Health Physics, Mutation Research, Radiation Research, and International Journal of Radiation Biology. Publications in Health Physics make up almost 10% of the current database

  10. Effect of contrast agent administration on consequences of dosimetry and biology in radiotherapy planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Ching-Jung [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333 Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333 Taiwan (China); Yang, Pei-Ying [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333 Taiwan (China); Chao, Tsi-Chian, E-mail: chaot@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333 Taiwan (China); Tu, Shu-Ju, E-mail: sjtu@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333 Taiwan (China)

    2015-06-01

    In the treatment planning of radiation therapy, patients may be administrated with contrast media in CT scanning to assist physicians for accurate delineation of the target or organs. However, contrast media are not used in patients during the treatment delivery. In particular, contrast media contain materials with high atomic numbers and dosimetric variations may occur between scenarios where contrast media are present in treatment planning and absent in treatment delivery. In this study we evaluate the effect of contrast media on the dosimetry and biological consequence. An analytical phantom based on AAPM TG 119 and five sets of CT images from clinical patients are included. Different techniques of treatment planning are considered, including 1-field AP, 2-field AP+PA, 4-field box, 7-field IMRT, and RapidArc. RapidArc is a recent technique of volumetric modulated arc therapy and is used in our study of contrast media in clinical scenarios. The effect of RapidArc on dosimetry and biological consequence for administration of contrast media in radiotherapy is not discussed previously in literature. It is shown that dose difference is reduced as the number of external beams is increased, suggesting RapidArc may be favored to be used in the treatment planning enhanced by contrast media. Linear trend lines are fitted for assessment of percent dose differences in the planning target volume versus concentrations of contrast media between plans where contrast media are present and absent, respectively.

  11. Advances in dosimetry and biological predictors of radiation-induced esophagitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Guan, Hui; Dong, Yuanli; Xing, Ligang; Li, Xiaolin

    2016-01-01

    Objective To summarize the research progress about the dosimetry and biological predictors of radiation-induced esophagitis. Methods We performed a systematic literature review addressing radiation esophagitis in the treatment of lung cancer published between January 2009 and May 2015 in the PubMed full-text database index systems. Results Twenty-eight eligible documents were included in the final analysis. Many clinical factors were related to the risk of radiation esophagitis, such as elder patients, concurrent chemoradiotherapy, and the intense radiotherapy regimen (hyperfractionated radiotherapy or stereotactic body radiotherapy). The parameters including Dmax, Dmean, V20, V30, V50, and V55 may be valuable in predicting the occurrence of radiation esophagitis in patients receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Genetic variants in inflammation-related genes are also associated with radiation-induced toxicity. Conclusion Dosimetry and biological factors of radiation-induced esophagitis provide clinical information to decrease its occurrence and grade during radiotherapy. More prospective studies are warranted to confirm their prediction efficacy. PMID:26869804

  12. Advances in dosimetry and biological predictors of radiation-induced esophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Y

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Yang Yu,1 Hui Guan,1 Yuanli Dong,1 Ligang Xing,2 Xiaolin Li2 1School of Medicine and Life Sciences, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, University of Jinan, Jinan, 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China Objective: To summarize the research progress about the dosimetry and biological predictors of radiation-induced esophagitis.Methods: We performed a systematic literature review addressing radiation esophagitis in the treatment of lung cancer published between January 2009 and May 2015 in the PubMed full-text database index systems.Results: Twenty-eight eligible documents were included in the final analysis. Many clinical factors were related to the risk of radiation esophagitis, such as elder patients, concurrent chemoradiotherapy, and the intense radiotherapy regimen (hyperfractionated radiotherapy or stereotactic body radiotherapy. The parameters including Dmax, Dmean, V20, V30, V50, and V55 may be valuable in predicting the occurrence of radiation esophagitis in patients receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Genetic variants in inflammation-related genes are also associated with radiation-induced toxicity.Conclusion: Dosimetry and biological factors of radiation-induced esophagitis provide clinical information to decrease its occurrence and grade during radiotherapy. More prospective studies are warranted to confirm their prediction efficacy. Keywords: lung cancer, esophagitis, radiation injuries, predictors

  13. Benefits of online in vivo dosimetry for single-fraction total body irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, David J; Warry, Alison J; Trimble, Rachel E; Vilarino-Varela, Maria J; Collis, Christopher H

    2014-01-01

    Use of a patient test dose before single-fraction total body irradiation (TBI) allows review of in vivo dosimetry and modification of the main treatment setup. However, use of computed tomography (CT) planning and online in vivo dosimetry may reduce the need for this additional step. Patients were treated using a supine CT-planned extended source-to-surface distance (SSD) technique with lead compensators and bolus. In vivo dosimetry was performed using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and diodes at 10 representative anatomical locations, for both a 0.1-Gy test dose and the treatment dose. In total, 28 patients were treated between April 2007 and July 2013, with changes made in 10 cases (36%) following test dose results. Overall, 98.1% of measured in vivo treatment doses were within 10% of the prescribed dose, compared with 97.0% of test dose readings. Changes made following the test dose could have been applied during the single-fraction treatment itself, assuming that the dose was delivered in subportions and online in vivo dosimetry was available for all clinically important anatomical sites. This alleviates the need for a test dose, saving considerable time and resources.

  14. Benefits of online in vivo dosimetry for single-fraction total body irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eaton, David J., E-mail: davideaton@nhs.net [Department of Radiotherapy, Royal Free Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Warry, Alison J. [Department of Radiotherapy Physics, University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Trimble, Rachel E.; Vilarino-Varela, Maria J.; Collis, Christopher H. [Department of Radiotherapy, Royal Free Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-01

    Use of a patient test dose before single-fraction total body irradiation (TBI) allows review of in vivo dosimetry and modification of the main treatment setup. However, use of computed tomography (CT) planning and online in vivo dosimetry may reduce the need for this additional step. Patients were treated using a supine CT-planned extended source-to-surface distance (SSD) technique with lead compensators and bolus. In vivo dosimetry was performed using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and diodes at 10 representative anatomical locations, for both a 0.1-Gy test dose and the treatment dose. In total, 28 patients were treated between April 2007 and July 2013, with changes made in 10 cases (36%) following test dose results. Overall, 98.1% of measured in vivo treatment doses were within 10% of the prescribed dose, compared with 97.0% of test dose readings. Changes made following the test dose could have been applied during the single-fraction treatment itself, assuming that the dose was delivered in subportions and online in vivo dosimetry was available for all clinically important anatomical sites. This alleviates the need for a test dose, saving considerable time and resources.

  15. The PUR Experiment on the EXPOSE-R facility: biological dosimetry of solar extraterrestrial UV radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bérces, A.; Egyeki, M.; Fekete, A.; Horneck, G.; Kovács, G.; Panitz, C.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our experiment Phage and Uracil Response was to extend the use of bacteriophage T7 and uracil biological dosimeters for measuring the biologically effective ultraviolet (UV) dose in the harsh extraterrestrial radiation conditions. The biological detectors were exposed in vacuum-tightly cases in the European Space Agency (ESA) astrobiological exposure facility attached to the external platform of Zvezda (EXPOSE-R). EXPOSE-R took off to the International Space Station (ISS) in November 2008 and was installed on the External platform of the Russian module Zvezda of the ISS in March 2009. Our goal was to determine the dose-effect relation for the formation of photoproducts (i.e. damage to phage DNA and uracil, respectively). The extraterrestrial solar UV radiation ranges over the whole spectrum from vacuum-UV (λcomponents either by photoionization or excitation. However, these wavelengths cause not only photolesions but in a wavelength-dependent efficiency the reversion of some photolesions, too. Our biological detectors measured in situ conditions the resultant of both reactions induced by the extraterrestrial UV radiation. From this aspect the role of the photoreversion in the extension of the biological UV dosimetry are discussed.

  16. Bibliographical database of radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment: Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is part 11 of a database constructed to support research in radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment. Relevant publications were identified through detailed searches of national and international electronic databases and through our personal knowledge of the subject. Publications were numbered and key worded, and referenced in an electronic data-retrieval system that permits quick access through computerized searches on authors, key words, title, year, journal name, or publication number. Photocopies of the publications contained in the database are maintained in a file that is numerically arranged by our publication acquisition numbers. This volume contains 1048 additional entries, which are listed in alphabetical order by author. The computer software used for the database is a simple but sophisticated relational database program that permits quick information access, high flexibility, and the creation of customized reports. This program is inexpensive and is commercially available for the Macintosh and the IBM PC. Although the database entries were made using a Macintosh computer, we have the capability to convert the files into the IBM PC version. As of this date, the database cites 2260 publications. Citations in the database are from 200 different scientific journals. There are also references to 80 books and published symposia, and 158 reports. Information relevant to radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment is widely distributed within the scientific literature, although a few journals clearly predominate. The journals publishing the largest number of relevant papers are Health Physics, with a total of 242 citations in the database, and Mutation Research, with 185 citations. Other journals with over 100 citations in the database, are Radiation Research, with 136, and International Journal of Radiation Biology, with 132

  17. Biological dosimetry of patients with differenced carcinoma of thyroid treated with Iodine-131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The administration of I-131 to patient with Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma (CaDiT) it is used inside the therapeutic outline as later step to the thyroidectomy. However, the good activity to give is of difficult determination due to factors such as, the variability in the capacity of tumoral reception of the I-131, distribution of the pharmaceutical, physiologic status, other associate pathologies, grade of advance of the illness, and previous treatments. Additionally, the activity to administer is dependent of the dose of tolerance in the healthy tissues; superior dose to 2 Gy in bone marrow, its could drive to myelotoxicity. At the moment, the form more extended of administration it is the empiric prescription that considers clinical parameters and of laboratory for their determination. Presently work, the protocol of applied treatment incorporates the evaluation for internal dosimetry and biological dosimetry to estimate absorbed dose in bone marrow. The biological estimate of the dose of these patients is based on the quantification of chromosomal aberrations whose frequency is referred to a curve-dose response in which the lymphocytes is irradiated in vitro with I-131, allowing to determine the in vivo dose to the patient's circulating lymphocytes. The objective of the present work is to determine the applicability of different cytogenetic essays in the estimate of the absorbed dose to the whole body or specific organs. Three patients were evaluated with CaDiT. Their treatment protocol consisted on a tracer administration of radioactive iodine of 74 - 111 MBq (2 - 3 mCi) and a therapy 7,4 - 11,1 GBq (200 - 300 mCi). Previous to the tracer administration and 8 days post-therapeutic administration took samples of veined blood that were evaluated by biological dosimetry by means of the application of the techniques: conventional cytogenetic Micronucleus and FISH (Hybridization in situ by Fluorescence). Starting from the frequencies of observed chromosomal

  18. Assessment of occupational exposure and individual radiosensitivity in people exposed to radiation using methods of physical and biological dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examined people professionally in contact with sources of ionizing radiation.The incidence of chromosomal aberrations, the radionuclide content in the urine of the radiochemical method and calculation of internal doses based on the results of direct measurement of the concentration of incorporated radionuclides 137Cs and 241Am using human radiation spectrometer (HRS). According to the results of physical and biological dosimetry identified individual cumulative doses and the ratio defined cohort surveyed by radiosensitivity Key words: chromosomal aberrations, physical methods of dosimetry, radiation sensitivity, ionizing radiation, biodosimetry

  19. Chromosome painting and prematurely condensed chromosomes (PCC) - new methods of biological dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Classic methods of biological dosimetry - micronucleus and dicentric assay pose several problems. In the case of micronucleus there is a wide range of spontaneous frequencies and smoking and age are powerfull contributing factors. In the case of dicentrics - low mitotic index in some individuals especially in the elderly or accidentally exposed to high radiation doses. So, there are 2 quite new molecular techniques which at least in part solve these problems: chromosome painting and PCC. Chromosome painting by employing chromosome-specific DNA probes allow easy identification and quantification of translocations. recently, it was shown that calyculin A or okadaic acid, inhibitors of 1 and 2A protein phosphatases, induce PCC in peripheral blood cells. This is an easy biodosimetric method with a high PCC index and independent of the ability of cells to divide e.g. after high (20 Gy) doses when the mitotic index is extremely low. (author)

  20. Calibration curves for biological dosimetry; Curvas de calibracion para dosimetria biologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero C, C.; Brena V, M. [ININ, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail cgc@nuclear.inin.mx

    2004-07-01

    The generated information by the investigations in different laboratories of the world, included the ININ, in which settles down that certain class of chromosomal leisure it increases in function of the dose and radiation type, has given by result the obtaining of calibrated curves that are applied in the well-known technique as biological dosimetry. In this work is presented a summary of the work made in the laboratory that includes the calibrated curves for gamma radiation of {sup 60} Cobalt and X rays of 250 k Vp, examples of presumed exposure to ionizing radiation, resolved by means of aberration analysis and the corresponding dose estimate through the equations of the respective curves and finally a comparison among the dose calculations in those people affected by the accident of Ciudad Juarez, carried out by the group of Oak Ridge, USA and those obtained in this laboratory. (Author)

  1. Analysis and assessment of the detriment in interventional radiology using biological dosimetry methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montoro, A.; Almonacid, M.; Villaescusa, J.I. [Hospital Univ. la Fe de Valen cian, Servicio de Proteccion Radiologica, Valencia (Spain); Barquinero, J.F.; Rodriguez, P. [Universitat Autonom a de Barcelona, Servicio de Dosimetria Biologica, Unidad de Antropologia, Departamento de Biologia Animal, Vegetal y Ecologia., Barcelona (Spain); Barrios, L. [Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, Dept. de Biologia Celular y Fisiologia. Unidad de Biologia Celular, Barcelona (Spain); Verdu, G.; Ramos, M. [Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear, Valencia, (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    Interventional radiologist and staff members usually are exposed to high levels of scattered radiation. As a result, the exposition to radiation procedures can produce detrimental effects that we would have to know. Effective dose is the quantity that better estimates the radiation risk. For this study we have realized an estimation of the radiological detriment to exposed workers of the Hospital la Fe de Valencia. For it, have been used physical doses registered in detectors T.L.D., and doses estimated by biological dosimetry in lymphocytes of peripheral blood. There has been estimated for every case the probability of effect of skin cancer and of non-solid cancers (leukaemia, lymphoma and myeloma), being compared with the baseline probability of natural effect. Biological doses were obtained by extrapolating the yield of dicentrics and translocations to their respective dose -effect curves. The discrepancies observed between physically recorded doses and biological estimated doses indicate that workers did not always wear their dosimeters or the dosimeters were not always in the radiation field. Cytogenetic studies should be extended to more workers to assess the risk derived from their occupational exposure. (authors)

  2. Analysis of MIR-18 results for physical and biological dosimetry: radiation shielding effectiveness in LEO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cucinotta, F.A.; Wilson, J.W.; Williams, J.R.; Dicello, J.F

    2000-06-01

    We compare models of radiation transport and biological response to physical and biological dosimetry results from astronauts on the Mir space station. Transport models are shown to be in good agreement with physical measurements and indicate that the ratio of equivalent dose from the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) to protons is about 3/2:1 and that this ratio will increase for exposures to internal organs. Two biological response models are used to compare to the Mir biodosimetry for chromosome aberration in lymphocyte cells; a track-structure model and the linear-quadratic model with linear energy transfer (LET) dependent weighting coefficients. These models are fit to in vitro data for aberration formation in human lymphocytes by photons and charged particles. Both models are found to be in reasonable agreement with data for aberrations in lymphocytes of Mir crew members: however there are differences between the use of LET dependent weighting factors and track structure models for assigning radiation quality factors. The major difference in the models is the increased effectiveness predicted by the track model for low charge and energy ions with LET near 10 keV/{mu}m. The results of our calculations indicate that aluminum shielding, although providing important mitigation of the effects of trapped radiation, provides no protective effect from the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) in low-earth orbit (LEO) using either equivalent dose or the number of chromosome aberrations as a measure until about 100 g/cm{sup 2} of material is used.

  3. Analysis of MIR-18 results for physical and biological dosimetry: radiation shielding effectiveness in LEO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F A; Wilson, J W; Williams, J R; Dicello, J F

    2000-06-01

    We compare models of radiation transport and biological response to physical and biological dosimetry results from astronauts on the Mir space station. Transport models are shown to be in good agreement with physical measurements and indicate that the ratio of equivalent dose from the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) to protons is about 3/2:1 and that this ratio will increase for exposures to internal organs. Two biological response models are used to compare to the Mir biodosimetry for chromosome aberration in lymphocyte cells; a track-structure model and the linear-quadratic model with linear energy transfer (LET) dependent weighting coefficients. These models are fit to in vitro data for aberration formation in human lymphocytes by photons and charged particles. Both models are found to be in reasonable agreement with data for aberrations in lymphocytes of Mir crew members: however there are differences between the use of LET dependent weighting factors and track structure models for assigning radiation quality factors. The major difference in the models is the increased effectiveness predicted by the track model for low charge and energy ions with LET near 10 keV/micrometers. The results of our calculations indicate that aluminum shielding, although providing important mitigation of the effects of trapped radiation, provides no protective effect from the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) in low-earth orbit (LEO) using either equivalent dose or the number of chromosome aberrations as a measure until about 100 g/cm 2 of material is used. PMID:11543368

  4. Biological dosimetry in radiological protection: dose response curves elaboration for 60Co and 137Cs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation sources for pacific uses are being extensively utilized by modern society and the applications of these sources have raised the probability of the occurrence of accidents. The accidental exposition to radiation creates a necessity of the development of methods to evaluate dose quantity. This data could be obtained by the measurement of damage caused by radiation in the exposed person. The radiation dose can be estimated in exposed persons through physical methods (physical dosimetry) but the biological methods can't be dispensed, and among them, the cytogenetic one that makes use of chromosome aberrations (dicentric and centric ring) formed in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) exposed to ionizing radiation. This method correlates the frequency of radioinduced aberrations with the estimated absorbed dose, as in vitro as in vivo, which is called cytogenetic dosimetry. By the introduction of improved new techniques in culture, in the interpretation of aberrations in the different analysers of slides and by the adoption of different statistical programs to analyse the data, significant differences are observed among laboratories in dose-response curves (calibration curves). The estimation of absorbed dose utilizing other laboratory calibration curves may introduce some uncertainties, so the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) advises that each laboratory elaborates your own dose-response curve for cytogenetic dosimetry. The results were obtained from peripheral blood lymphocytes of the healthy and no-smoking donors exposed to 60Co and 137Cs radiation, with dose rate of 5 cGy.min.-1. Six points of dose were determined 20,50,100,200,300,400 cGy and the control not irradiated. The analysed aberrations were of chromosomic type, dicentric and centric ring. The dose response curve for dicentrics were obtained by frequencies weighted in liner-quadratic mathematic model and the equation resulted were for 60Co: Y = (3 46 +- 2.14)10-4 cGy-1 + (3.45 +- 0

  5. Neutron dosimetry - A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review summarizes information on the following subjects: (1) physical processes of importance in neutron dosimetry; (2) biological effects of neutrons; (3) neutron sources; and (4) instruments and methods used in neutron dosimetry. Also, possible improvements in dosimetry instrumentation are outlined and discussed. (author)

  6. Preface [to] "Authenticity in biology education : benefits and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Yarden, Anat; Carvalho, Graça Simões

    2011-01-01

    This volume consists of 31 original papers presented at the 8th Conference of European Researchers in Didactics of Biology (ERIDOB) held in July 2010 and hosted by the Research Centre CIEC of the Institute of Education, University of Minho, Portugal. The theme of the conference was Authenticity in Biology Education: Benefits and Challenges. This theme emerged from discussions that took place at the ERIDOB 2008 meeting in Utrecht. During those discussions it became apparent that various ERI...

  7. Solid State and Chemical Radiation Dosimetry in Medicine and Biology. Proceedings of a Symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proceedings of a Symposium organized by the IAEA and held in Vienna, 3-7 October 1966. The meeting was attended by 104 participants from 21 countries and three international organizations. Contents: Solid state dosimetry (17 papers); Chemical dosimetry (10 papers); Invited lectures (2 papers); General aspects and other methods of dosimetry (6 papers); Panel discussion on research and development needed in dosimetry. Each paper is in its original language (32 English, 2 French and 1 Spanish) and is preceded by an abstract in English and one in the original language, if this is not English. Discussions are in English. (author)

  8. Radiation effects analysis in a group of interventional radiologists using biological and physical dosimetry methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, M., E-mail: WEMLmirapas@iqn.upv.e [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, Polytechnic University of Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Montoro, A.; Almonacid, M. [Radiation Protection Service, Hospital Universitario La Fe Valencia (Spain); Ferrer, S. [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, Polytechnic University of Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Barquinero, J.F. [Biological Dosimetry Service, Unit of Anthropology, Department of Animal and Vegetable Biology and Ecology, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB) (Spain); Tortosa, R. [Radiation Protection Service, Hospital Universitario La Fe Valencia (Spain); Verdu, G. [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, Polytechnic University of Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Rodriguez, P. [Biological Dosimetry Service, Unit of Anthropology, Department of Animal and Vegetable Biology and Ecology, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB) (Spain); Barrios, L.L. [Department of Physiology and Cellular Biology, Unit of Cellular Biology (UAB) (Spain); Villaescusa, J.I. [Radiation Protection Service, Hospital Universitario La Fe Valencia (Spain)

    2010-08-15

    excess radio-induced risk of leukemia in the group under study. Finally, the maximum radiological detriment in the group, evaluated as the total number of radio-induced cancers using physical dosimetry, has been of 2.18/1000 person-year (skin and leukemia), and using biological dosimetry of 9.20/1000 PY (leukemia). As a conclusion, this study has provided an assessment of the non-deterministic effects (rate of radio-induced cancer incidence) attributable to the group under study due to their professional activity.

  9. Biological dosimetry: the potential use of radiation-induced apoptosis in human T-lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An assay for biological dosimetry based on the induction of apoptosis in human T-lymphocytes is described. Radiation-induced apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometric identification of cells displaying apoptosis-associated DNA condensation. CD4 and CD8 T-lymphocytes were analysed. They were recognized on the basis of their cell-surface antigens. Four parameters were measured for both cell types: cell size, granularity, antigen immunofluorescence and DNA content. Apoptosis was quantified as the fraction of CD4-, or CD8-positive cells with a characteristic reduction of cell size and DNA content. At doses below 1 Gy, levels of radiation-induced apoptosis increased for up to 5 days after irradiation. Optimal dose discrimination was observed 4 days after irradiation, at which time the dose-response curves were linear, with a slope of 8% ± 0.5% per 0.1 Gy. In controlled, dose-response experiments the lowest dose level at which the radiation-induced apoptosis frequency was still significantly above control was 0.05 Gy. After 5 days post-irradiation incubation, intra- and interdonor variations were measured and found to be similar; thus, apoptotic levels depend more on the dose than on the donor. The results demonstrate the potential of this assay as a biological dosimeter. (orig.)

  10. Physical and biological organ dosimetry analysis for international space station astronauts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A; Kim, Myung-Hee Y; Willingham, Veronica; George, Kerry A

    2008-07-01

    In this study, we analyzed the biological and physical organ dose equivalents for International Space Station (ISS) astronauts. Individual physical dosimetry is difficult in space due to the complexity of the space radiation environment, which consists of protons, heavy ions and secondary neutrons, and the modification of these radiation types in tissue as well as limitations in dosimeter devices that can be worn for several months in outer space. Astronauts returning from missions to the ISS undergo biodosimetry assessment of chromosomal damage in lymphocyte cells using the multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique. Individual-based pre-flight dose responses for lymphocyte exposure in vitro to gamma rays were compared to those exposed to space radiation in vivo to determine an equivalent biological dose. We compared the ISS biodosimetry results, NASA's space radiation transport models of organ dose equivalents, and results from ISS and space shuttle phantom torso experiments. Physical and biological doses for 19 ISS astronauts yielded average effective doses and individual or population-based biological doses for the approximately 6-month missions of 72 mSv and 85 or 81 mGy-Eq, respectively. Analyses showed that 80% or more of organ dose equivalents on the ISS are from galactic cosmic rays and only a small contribution is from trapped protons and that GCR doses were decreased by the high level of solar activity in recent years. Comparisons of models to data showed that space radiation effective doses can be predicted to within about a +/-10% accuracy by space radiation transport models. Finally, effective dose estimates for all previous NASA missions are summarized. PMID:18582161

  11. The use of apoptosis in human lymphocytes peripheral as alternative methods in biological dosimetry of radiation effects from cobalt-60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma rays affect cells in dose-response manner, resulting in cell death, as in cancer radiotherapy. The ionizing radiation acts by transferring energy, mainly by free radicals from water radiolysis that result in nucleic acid damage and other effects in lipids and proteins, The level of exposure is indirectly estimated by physical dosimetry, but the biological dosimetry can measure the direct radiation effect, mainly in post-dividing cells by classical cytogenetic approach. Recently, it was reported that irradiated cells develop an induced programmed death or apoptosis. With a biological dosimetric technique, we measured apoptotic cell fraction in 60Co in vitro irradiated blood cells from voluntary healthy donors. The agarose gel electrophoresis showed a low sensitivity, because cell DNA presented the characteristic pattern only when the cells were exposed to 100 c Gy or more. Using a terminal DNA labeling technique we observed that the apoptotic cell fraction proportionally increases with irradiation. Similar sensitivity was observed when compared to classical cytogenetics (3 c Gy minimum detection level). These techniques are easier to perform, do not need cell culture and all cells, including interphase ones, can be analyzed, providing a good tool in biological dosimetry. (author)

  12. A contribution to the study of the biological dosimetry in clinical radiopathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of total body irradiation with different radiation doses from a 4MeV linear accelerator on organs and tissues of adult male rabbits were studied. Doses of 0.50, 2.00, 6.00 and 8.00 Gy were applied. Different organic parameters were evaluated before and after various periods of the post-irradiation time. Mortality did not occured for 0.50 or 2.00 Gy, but morbility was greater in comparison with the control; sexual potency was maintained. 'Impotentia colundi' occured with 6 Gy. A small loss of weight occured with 2.00 Gy and a higher loss for 6.00 Gy, with later recovery. Blood parameters varied even for lowest dose. Alterations were evident in the bone marrow activity for 2.00 and 6.00 Gy. Spermatides, spermatocytes and mature spermatozoids were affect even by low doses, the laters loosing motility. Significant difference was observed in the relation DNA/RNA for irradiated-and control animals. The results showed that T3 asssay could serve as 'biological indicator' of irradiation in a period of at least 7 hours and for doses of 4Gy or more. Using the kinetic method, an increase of glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (GOT) seric levels was observed for 6.00 Gy after 7 hours and a decrease for the glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT). Fasting glycemy and catecolamines urinary extraction were not statiscally significants. The study of chromosomal aberrations that occur in lymphocytes after 'in vitro' irradiation showed that this is at the present moment the most efficient method for biological dosimetry. (M.A.)

  13. Access and benefit sharing of Antarctica's biological material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig-Marcó, Roser

    2014-10-01

    Searching and sampling of Antarctic Biological Material (ABM) is happening with no explicit regulation on access and benefit sharing requirements. Patents already exist on inventions stemming from Antarctic living organisms. The Antarctic Treaty System (ATS) provides mechanisms to ensure that scientific knowledge and data generated from the collection and use of ABM are shared, although commercialization might be a threat to this free exchange of scientific knowledge. Some of the underlying problems regarding the access and benefit sharing of ABM are that under the ATS there are gaps concerning definitions, access to specimens, benefit sharing, commercialization and reporting issues. The Antarctic Treaty Consultative Parties (ATCPs) have decided that the Antarctic Treaty Consultative Meeting (ATCM) is the competent body to discuss the matter, and the ATS is the appropriate framework for managing the collection of biological material in the Antarctic Treaty area and for considering its use. Nevertheless, opinions diverge as to the need for more specific rules on access and benefit sharing other than that already resulting from the obligation to give prior notification and share scientific results.

  14. Dosimetry; La dosimetrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Couteulx, I.; Apretna, D.; Beaugerie, M.F. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France)] [and others

    2003-07-01

    Eight articles treat the dosimetry. Two articles evaluate the radiation doses in specific cases, dosimetry of patients in radiodiagnosis, three articles are devoted to detectors (neutrons and x and gamma radiations) and a computer code to build up the dosimetry of an accident due to an external exposure. (N.C.)

  15. Evaluation of the Biological Shields of the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory of Ghana Using MCNP5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Deatanyah

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective with radiation sources and facilities is the protection of both radiation workers and the general public. The biological shields of the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory of the Radiation Protection Institute (RPI Ghana had been evaluated for a collimated isotropic cesium-137 source for calibration purpose using MCNP5 code. The dose rate at supervised areas ranged from 0.57 to 8.35 :Sv/h and 0.26 to 10.22 :Sv/h at control areas when the source was panoramic. When the source was collimated, the dose rate ranged from 0.05 to 0.30 :Sv/h at supervised areas and 0.23 to 8.88 :Sv/h at control areas for 22.2 GBq of the cesium-137 source. The scatter contribution from the surfaces of the walls and roofs were also accounted for. The scatter radiation in the room decreased to 400 :Sv/h when the source was first collimated and to 3.5 :Sv/h when the source was further collimated. These results agreed quite well with experimental measurement. To effectively protect the staff, a narrow beam of 1.2 cm diameter which was defined at 1.0 m by the total surface of the ISO slab phantom was recommended to reduce the dose rate to less than 1.5 :Sv/h outside the calibration bunker even when the current activity is doubled. It was concluded that the 4.7 cm diameter of the existing narrow beam should be decreased to 1.2 cm by further collimation of the beam.

  16. SU-E-T-54: Benefits of Biological Cost Functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demirag, N [Elekta CMS GmbH, Freiburg Im Breisgau, baden wurttemberg (Germany)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To verify the benefits of the biological cost functions. Methods: TG166 patients were used for the test case scenarios. Patients were planned using Monaco V5.0 (CMS/Elekta, St.Louis, MO) Monaco has 3 biological and 8 physical CFs. In this study the plans were optimized using 3 different scenarios. 1- Biological CFs only 2-Physical CFs only 3- Combination of Physical and Biological CFsMonaco has 3 biological CFs. Target EUD used for the targets, derived from the poisson cell kill model, has an α value that controls the cold spots inside the target. α values used in the optimization were 0.5 and 0.8. if cold spots needs to be penalized α value increased. Serial CF: it's called serial to mimic the behaviour of the serial organs, if a high k value like 12 or 14 is used it controls the maximum dose. Serial CF has a k parameter that is used to shape the whole dvh curve. K value ranges between 1–20. k:1 is used to control the mean dose, lower k value controls the mean dose, higher k value controls the higher dose, using 2 serial CFs with different k values controls the whole DVH. Paralel CF controls the percentage of the volume that tolerates higher doses than the reference dose to mimic the behaviour of the paralel organs. Results: It was possible to achive clinically accepted plans in all 3 scenarios. The benefit of the biological cost functions were to control the mean dose for target and OAR, to shape the DVH curve using one EUD value and one k value simplifies the optimization process. Using the biological CFs alone, it was hard to control the dose at a point. Conclusion: Biological CFs in Monaco doesn't require the ntcp/tcp values from the labs and useful to shape the whole dvh curve. I work as an applications support specialist for Elekta and I am a Ph.D. Student in Istanbul University for radiation therapy physics.

  17. Gm crops: between biological risk and environmental and economic benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transgenic crops were the result of the application of recombinant DNA technology in agriculture. These crops were developed by transfer of foreign genes (transgenes) from any biological origin (animal, plant, microbial, viral) to the genome of cultivated species of plants. The crops genetically modified (GM) have been used in the world since 1996; up to December 2010 they counted to a billion hectares planted throughout the period. In just the past year 2010 148 million hectares were planted, grown by 15.4 million farmers in 29 countries. GM crops that are used in global agriculture are mainly soybean, cotton, corn and canola, which express transgenes derived from bacteria, and confer resistance to lepidopteron insects (ILR) or herbicide tolerance (HT; glyphosate and glufosinate ammonium). the first transgenic varieties containing only a single transgene, or simple event, while the current varieties express several transgenes, or stacked, conferring resistance to different species of Lepidoptera and coleopteran insects and tolerance to two different herbicides. In 2010 were planted in Colombia, 18.874 hectares of GM cotton, 16.793 hectares of GM corn, and 4 hectares of GM carnations and GM roses. GM corn and GM cotton were planted in Sucre, Cesar, Cordoba, Huila and Tolima. GM corn was planted in Antioquia, Valle del Cauca, Meta, Cundinamarca and Santander. Carnations and roses were planted in Cundinamarca. GM maize and GM cotton expressing ILR and HT features, as simple events or stacked. In the case of GM carnation and GM roses, these genotypes that express the color blue. Academia has tried to organize the debate on the adoption of GM crops around the analysis of biological risks and environmental vs environmental and economic benefits. Biological hazards are defined by the possible negative effects on human consumers or negative effects on the environment. The environmental benefits are related to reduce use of agrochemicals (insecticides and herbicides

  18. Biological dosimetry of ionizing radiation: Evaluation of the dose with cytogenetic methodologies by the construction of calibration curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafiropoulos, Demetre; Facco, E.; Sarchiapone, Lucia

    2016-09-01

    In case of a radiation accident, it is well known that in the absence of physical dosimetry biological dosimetry based on cytogenetic methods is a unique tool to estimate individual absorbed dose. Moreover, even when physical dosimetry indicates an overexposure, scoring chromosome aberrations (dicentrics and rings) in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) at metaphase is presently the most widely used method to confirm dose assessment. The analysis of dicentrics and rings in PBLs after Giemsa staining of metaphase cells is considered the most valid assay for radiation injury. This work shows that applying the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique, using telomeric/centromeric peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes in metaphase chromosomes for radiation dosimetry, could become a fast scoring, reliable and precise method for biological dosimetry after accidental radiation exposures. In both in vitro methods described above, lymphocyte stimulation is needed, and this limits the application in radiation emergency medicine where speed is considered to be a high priority. Using premature chromosome condensation (PCC), irradiated human PBLs (non-stimulated) were fused with mitotic CHO cells, and the yield of excess PCC fragments in Giemsa stained cells was scored. To score dicentrics and rings under PCC conditions, the necessary centromere and telomere detection of the chromosomes was obtained using FISH and specific PNA probes. Of course, a prerequisite for dose assessment in all cases is a dose-effect calibration curve. This work illustrates the various methods used; dose response calibration curves, with 95% confidence limits used to estimate dose uncertainties, have been constructed for conventional metaphase analysis and FISH. We also compare the dose-response curve constructed after scoring of dicentrics and rings using PCC combined with FISH and PNA probes. Also reported are dose response curves showing scored dicentrics and rings per cell, combining

  19. Collaborative Physical and Biological Dosimetry Studies for Neutron Capture Therapy at the RA-1 Research Reactor Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David W. Nigg; Amanda E. Schwint; John K. Hartwell; Elisa M. Heber; Veronica Trivillin; Jorge Castillo; Luis Wentzeis; Patrick Sloan; Charles A. Wemple

    2004-10-01

    Initial physical dosimetry measurements have been completed using activation spectrometry and thermoluminiscent dosimeters to characterize the BNCT irradiation facility developed at the RA-1 research reactor operated by the Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission in Buenos Aires. Some biological scoping irradiations have also been completed using a small-animal (hamster) oral mucosa tumor model. Results indicate that the RA-1 neutron source produces useful dose rates but that some improvements in the initial configuration will be needed to optimize the spectrum for thermal-neutron BNCT research applications.

  20. Collaborative Physical and Biological Dosimetry Studies for Neutron Capture Therapy at the RA-1 Research Reactor Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigg, D.W.; Schwint, A.E.; Hartwell, J.K.; Heber, E.M.; Trivillin, V.; Castillo, J.; Wentzeis, L.; Sloan, P.; Wemple, C.A.

    2004-10-04

    Initial physical dosimetry measurements have been completed using activation spectrometry and thermoluminiscent dosimeters to characterize the BNCT irradiation facility developed at the RA-1 research reactor operated by the Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission in Buenos Aires. Some biological scoping irradiations have also been completed using a small-animal (hamster) oral mucosa tumor model. Results indicate that the RA-1 neutron source produces useful dose rates but that some improvements in the initial configuration will be needed to optimize the spectrum for thermal-neutron BNCT research applications.

  1. On the biological basis for competing macroscopic dose descriptors for kilovoltage dosimetry: cellular dosimetry for brachytherapy and diagnostic radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, R. M.; Carlsson Tedgren, Å.; Williamson, J. F.

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate how alternative macroscopic dose descriptors track absorbed dose to biologically relevant subcellular targets via Monte Carlo (MC) analysis of cellular models for a variety of cancerous and normal soft tissues for kilovoltage radiation. The relative mass distributions of water, light inorganic elements, and protein components of nuclear and cytoplasm compartments for various tissues are determined from a literature review. These data are used to develop representative cell models to demonstrate the range of mass elemental compositions of these subcellular structures encountered in the literature from which radiological quantities (energy absorption and attenuation coefficients; stopping powers) are computed. Using representative models of cell clusters, doses to subcellular targets are computed using MC simulation for photon sources of energies between 20 and 370 keV and are compared to bulk medium dose descriptors. It is found that cells contain significant and varying mass fractions of protein and inorganic elements, leading to variations in mass energy absorption coefficients for cytoplasm and nuclear media as large as 10% compared to water for sub-50 keV photons. Doses to subcellular structures vary by as much as 23% compared to doses to the corresponding average bulk medium or to small water cavities embedded in the bulk medium. Relationships between cellular target doses and doses to the bulk medium or to a small water cavity embedded in the bulk medium are sensitive to source energy and cell morphology, particularly for lower energy sources, e.g., low energy brachytherapy (water or the corresponding average bulk tissue. For kilovoltage photon sources, neither dose to bulk medium nor dose to water quantitatively tracks energy imparted to biologically relevant subcellular targets for the range of cellular morphologies and tissues considered.

  2. Biological dosimetry intercomparison exercise: an evaluation of Triage and routine mode results by robust methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Well-defined protocols and quality management standards are indispensable for biological dosimetry laboratories. Participation in periodic proficiency testing by interlaboratory comparisons is also required. This harmonization is essential if a cooperative network is used to respond to a mass casualty event. Here we present an international intercomparison based on dicentric chromosome analysis for dose assessment performed in the framework of the IAEA Regional Latin American RLA/9/054 Project. The exercise involved 14 laboratories, 8 from Latin America and 6 from Europe. The performance of each laboratory and the reproducibility of the exercise were evaluated using robust methods described in ISO standards. The study was based on the analysis of slides from samples irradiated with 0.75 (DI) and 2.5 Gy (DII). Laboratories were required to score the frequency of dicentrics and convert them to estimated doses, using their own dose-effect curves, after the analysis of 50 or 100 cells (triage mode) and after conventional scoring of 500 cells or 100 dicentrics. In the conventional scoring, at both doses, all reported frequencies were considered as satisfactory, and two reported doses were considered as questionable. The analysis of the data dispersion among the dicentric frequencies and among doses indicated a better reproducibility for estimated doses (15.6% for DI and 8.8% for DII) than for frequencies (24.4% for DI and 11.4% for DII), expressed by the coefficient of variation. In the two triage modes, although robust analysis classified some reported frequencies or doses as unsatisfactory or questionable, all estimated doses were in agreement with the accepted error of ±0.5 Gy. However, at the DI dose and for 50 scored cells, 5 out of the 14 reported confidence intervals that included zero dose and could be interpreted as false negatives. This improved with 100 cells, where only one confidence interval included zero dose. At the DII dose, all estimations fell within

  3. Translational Research: From Biological Discovery to Public Benefit (or Not

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R. Emmert-Buck

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in biology are occurring at a breathtaking pace today, from genetic insights facilitated by the Human Genome Project and next generation DNA sequencing technologies, to global nucleic acid and proteomic expression measurement using new high-throughput methods. Less publicized in recent years, yet still the central driver of progress, are the steadily proceeding biological insights gained through tried and true hypothesis-driven investigation into the complex worlds of metabolism, growth, development, and regulation. Certainly, the basic science ecosystem is productive and this portends well for the myriad new applications that will benefit mankind; drugs, vaccines, devices, and related economic growth—or perhaps not—in stark contrast to the generation of fundamental biological knowledge are inefficiencies in applying this information to real-world problems, especially those of the clinic. While investigation hums along at light speed, translation often does not. The good news is that obstacles to progress are tractable. The bad news, however, is that these problems are difficult. The present paper examines translational research from multiple perspectives, beginning with a historical account and proceeding to the current state of the art. Included are descriptions of successes and challenges, along with conjecture on how the field may need to evolve in the future.

  4. Extension of the biological effective dose to the MIRD schema and possible implications in radionuclide therapy dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baechler, Sébastien; Hobbs, Robert F; Prideaux, Andrew R; Wahl, Richard L; Sgouros, George

    2008-03-01

    In dosimetry-based treatment planning protocols, patients with rapid clearance of the radiopharmaceutical require a larger amount of initial activity than those with slow clearance to match the absorbed dose to the critical organ. As a result, the dose-rate to the critical organ is higher in patients with rapid clearance and may cause unexpected toxicity compared to patients with slow clearance. In order to account for the biological impact of different dose-rates, radiobiological modeling is beginning to be applied to the analysis of radionuclide therapy patient data. To date, the formalism used for these analyses is based on kinetics derived from activity in a single organ, the target. This does not include the influence of other source organs to the dose and dose-rate to the target organ. As a result, only self-dose irradiation in the target organ contributes to the dose-rate. In this work, the biological effective dose (BED) formalism has been extended to include the effect of multiple source organ contributions to the net dose-rate in a target organ. The generalized BED derivation has been based on the Medical Internal Radionuclide Dose Committee (MIRD) schema assuming multiple source organs following exponential effective clearance of the radionuclide. A BED-based approach to determine the largest safe dose to critical organs has also been developed. The extended BED formalism is applied to red marrow dosimetry, as well as kidney dosimetry considering the cortex and the medulla separately, since both those organs are commonly dose limiting in radionuclide therapy. The analysis shows that because the red marrow is an early responding tissue (high alpha/beta), it is less susceptible to unexpected toxicity arising from rapid clearance of high levels of administered activity in the marrow or in the remainder of the body. In kidney dosimetry, the study demonstrates a complex interplay between clearance of activity in the cortex and the medulla, as well as the

  5. Biological Dosimetry of X-rays by micronuclei study; Dosimetria Biologica de rayos-X mediante el estudio de micronucleos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, E.; Silva, A.; Navlet, J.

    1991-07-01

    Biological dosimetry consists of estimating absorbed doses for people exposed to radiation by mean biological methods. Several indicators used are based in haematological, biochemical an cytogenetics data, although nowadays without doubt, the cytogenetic method is considered to be the most reliable, in this case, the study of micronuclei in peripheral blood lymphocytes citokinetics blocked can be related to absorbed dose through an experimental calibration curve. An experimental dose-response curve, using micronuclei assay for X-rays at 250 kVp, 43,79 rads/min and temperature 37 degree centigree has been produced. Experimental data is fitted to model Y=C+ {alpha}D+BD''2 where Y is the number of micronuclei per cell and D the dose. The curve is compared with those produced elsewhere. (Author) 24 refs.

  6. Biological effects of radiation and dosimetry in X-ray diagnostics of children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chest radiograms represent the basic radiological examinations of thorax. The basis for radiation protection especially in pediatrics is the exact determination of doses. The risk estimation of genome damages can be received in human peripheral blood lymphocytes using alkaline version of Comet Assay. The aim of this work was assessment and quantification of the level of DNA damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes of children during airways X-ray examinations of chest and to compare data to the dose of exposure. Doses were determined using thermoluminescence (TL) dosimetry and radiophotoluminescent (RPL) glass dosimetry system. Twenty children with pulmonary diseases, ages between 5 and 14 years were assessed. Dose measurements were conducted for poster-anterior (PA) projection on the forehead, thyroid gland, gonads, chest and back. We used a 150 kV Shimadzu CH-200 M X-ray unit. Peripheral blood samples were taken from children after and prior to X-ray exposure and were examined with the alkaline Comet Assay. Comet Assay is one of the standard techniques for assessing genome damage with variety applications in genotoxicity testing as well as fundamental research in DNA damage and repair. As a measure of DNA damage tail length was used, calculated from the centre of the head and presented in micrometers (μm). Mean value of group after irradiation was 14.04 ± 1.74 as opposed to mean value of group before irradiation that was 13.15 ± 1.33. Differences between mean tail lengths were statistically significant (P<0.05, ANOVA). In addition, correlation was found between doses in primary beam (measured on the back) and the ratio of tail length (DNA damage) before and after irradiation. Doses measured with TL and RPL dosimeters showed satisfactory agreement and both dosimetry methods are suitable for dosimetric measurements in X-ray diagnostics. (author)

  7. Biological dosimetry of atomic bomb survivors exposed within 500 meters from the hypocenter and the health consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, N

    1999-12-01

    Seventy-eight atomic bomb survivors were examined for biological dosimetry using chromosome abnormality. They had been exposed within 500 meters from the hypocenter in heavily shielded conditions and were found from NHK-RIRBM joint study carried out from 1966 to 1971. Estimation of the exposure doses for these survivors was made under the following steps; 1) calculation by DS86 system (physically estimated doses) in survivors who had been exposed within 1,500 meters and had precise records of exposure conditions. RBE for the neutron was defined as 10. 2) setting of exposure dose-chromosome aberration curve, and 3) observation of chromosome aberrations in the proximally exposed survivors, for whom biological doses were estimated. Estimation of the exposure doses were possible from the aberration rate of chromosome in the peripheral lymphocytes, even 25-40 years after the exposure. Of the 78 survivors, 96% were estimated to have exposed more than one Sv. Detection of transforming gene(s) of N and K RAS genes in DNAs from non-leukemic survivors was carried out as one of the biological investigations for these heavily exposed survivors. All four survivors examined showed N or K RAS gene mutation. Three of the four healthy survivors had cancer or leukemia 7-10 years after the examination. Further continuous follow-up study of these heavily exposed people will give us more information on the late effects of A-bomb radiation, which may arise in the future. PMID:10805004

  8. High sensitive pulse oximeter-spectrophotometer for laser-optical dosimetry in biology and medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asimov, M. M.; Asimov, R. M.; Rubinov, A. N.; Mamilov, S. A.; Plaksiy, Yu. S.

    2006-03-01

    High sensitive multi channel pulse oxymeter - spectrophotometer for control of the local tissue oxygen saturation is presented. Due to an original method of data storing and processing the accuracy of measurements 3-4 times are increased in compare with similar systems. This system is used for registration of the local changes of arterial blood saturation with oxygen under effect of low intensity laser radiation. It is shown that the photodissociation of oxyhemoglobin in cutaneous blood vessels play a dominant role in the mechanism of biostimulating and therapeutic effect of low intensity laser radiation. The results of experimental investigation in vivo the dependence of arterial oxygen blood saturation on temperature and the wavelength of laser radiation are presented. It is suggested that dosimetry for laser therapy could be base on regulation of local concentration of free oxygen in tissue.

  9. Review of translocations detected by fish for retrospective biological dosimetry applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several European laboratories have combined their research efforts to arrive at a consensus view on using fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) for retrospective dosimetry. The aim of this review is to report these views and to highlight some areas where further work is needed. Translocations in the stable cells should be measured only in the cells that contain the full complement of the painted material. Two-way and one-way translocations should be combined with equal weight. The control level of translocations has a strong dependence on age, which has now been measured and the system has been calibrated. In conclusion, the technique works and a lifetime dose to the bone marrow from low-linear energy transfer radiation of 0.5 Gy above normal background levels can be measured for any individual. The main application is considered to provide an independent verification of lifetime doses to individuals who might form a part of an epidemiological study. (authors)

  10. [Long-term follow-up cytogenetic survey and biological dosimetry in persons evacuated from 30-km Chernobyl NPP zone].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maznik, N A

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents the results of the follow-up cytogenetic survey and biological dosimetry carried out in inhabitants of Pripiat' town and nearby villages, who were departured from the Chernobyl NPP 30-km exclusive zone during first days after the Chernobyl catastrophe. The unstable chromosome aberration level in inhabitants were significantly increased above control in terms up to 1 year after evacuation and declined gardually during next 14 years. In early period the cytogenetic damage frequency in evacuees showed no dependence on gender. The chromosome type aberration level appeared to be lower in young persons comparing with adults. The dicentrics plus centric rings yield had a positive correlation with duration of staying at Chernobyl zone. The average doses of protracted exposure were calculated from the dicentrics and centric rings yields; the dose estimations appeared to be 1.4 times higher in persons evacuated 3-11 days after the accident than that of in persons with shorter departure time. Uing the Bayesian analysis the probabilistic distribution of biological doses was constructed for the studied evacuees group. This distribution was characterized by a mean dose of 360 mGy, the modal doses of 200-450 mGy and 80% of probability density within the dose range 0-1000 mGy, that seems to be sufficient for considering the increased risk of late somatic radiation effects for this cohort. PMID:15571047

  11. MIRD Commentary: Proposed Name for a Dosimetry Unit Applicable to Deterministic Biological Effects-The Barendsen (Bd)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sgouros, George; Howell, R. W.; Bolch, Wesley E.; Fisher, Darrell R.

    2009-03-02

    The fundamental physical quantity for relating all biologic effects to radiation exposure is the absorbed dose, the energy imparted per unit mass of tissue. Absorbed dose is expressed in units of joules per kilogram (J/kg) and is given the special name gray (Gy). Exposure to ionizing radiation may cause both deterministic and stochastic biologic effects. To account for the relative effect per unit absorbed dose that has been observed for different types of radiation, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has established radiation weighting factors for stochastic effects. The product of absorbed dose in Gy and the radiation weighting factor is defined as the equivalent dose. Equivalent dose values are designated by a special named unit, the sievert (Sv). Unlike the situation for stochastic effects, no well-defined formalism and associated special named quantities have been widely adopted for deterministic effects. The therapeutic application of radionuclides and, specifically, -particle emitters in nuclear medicine has brought to the forefront the need for a well-defined dosimetry formalism applicable to deterministic effects that is accompanied by corresponding special named quantities. This commentary reviews recent proposals related to this issue and concludes with a recommendation to establish a new named quantity.

  12. Contribution of new cytogenetic techniques in the estimations of old irradiations in retrospective biological dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to answer three questions: if the translocations are steady: the results have shown that the translocations even if they are not obligatory steady can be used in retrospective dosimetry. Furthermore, it appeared important to consider the complex translocations in view of their relative stability and complementary information they bring ( quality of radiation, received dose). The second question is what contribution of the M-F.I.S.H. in the translocations analysis in comparison with the F.I.S.H.-3: we have shown that the M-F.I.S.H. would allow to raise the whole of doubt due to a partial genome observation. that has for effect to increase the precision of the analysis and that what ever be the received dose. The third question is if there are differences between the chromosomal aberrations generated by x radiation of 50 keV and by gamma radiation from cobalt-60: yes, the low energy photons generate more translocations than the photons coming from cobalt-60. But they generate less dicentrics. this difference comes from the way the energy is deposited that leads to a more important formation of complex and multiple translocations with the low energy photons. this could constitute a problem in the use of low energy photons in radiotherapy. it would seem that the simple translocations rate is not influenced by the photons energy. (N.C.)

  13. In-situ fluorescence hybridization applied to biological dosimetry: contribution of automation to the counting of radio-induced chromosome aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The frequency of chromosome aberrations on peripheral blood lymphocytes is a dose indicator in the case of ionizing radiations over-exposure. Stable chromosome aberrations (translocations, insertions) are visualized after labelling of some chromosomes using the fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH). The study of the use of the FISH technique in biological dosimetry is done with dose-effect curves. It seems that a bias is introduced during the observation of chromosome aberrations involving only 3 pairs of chromosomes. In order to avoid this bias, it would be useful to test the feasibility of using the multi-FISH technique in biological dosimetry. Moreover, this type of chromosome aberration changes with the type of irradiation. It is thus important to define the aberrations to be considered when the FISH technique is used. In order to reduce the time of image analysis, the CYTOGEN system, developed by IMSTAR company (Paris, France) has been adapted to the needs of biological dosimetry. This system allows to localize automatically the metaphases on the slide, which reduces the observation time by 2 or 4. An automatic detection protocol for chromosome aberrations has been implemented. It comprises the image capture, the contours detection and the classification of some chromosome aberrations. The different steps of this protocol have been tested in order to check that no bias is introduced by the automation. However, because radio-induced aberrations are rare events, it seems that a totally automatic system is not foreseeable. A semi-automatic analysis is more suitable. The use of the Slit-Scan technology (Laboratory of applied physics, Heidelberg, Germany) in biological dosimetry has been studied too. This technique allows to analyze rapidly a huge number of chromosomes. A good correlation has been observed between the dicentric frequency measured automatically and by manual counting. The system is under development and should be adapted to the detection of

  14. Activities of Project 'Cooperation and development with Latin America and Iberian in Biological Dosimetry of Iberian Group of Radiation Protection Societies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1996 the GRIAPRA Group (Latin American and Iberian Group of Radiation Protection Societies) was established with the participation of Argentina, Brazil, Cuba, Mexico, Peru, Portugal and Spain. In 1998 began the biennial Collaborative Working Project 'Cooperation and Development with Latin America in Biological Dosimetry', partially supported by the Extremadura Government, Spain, initially involving five countries: Argentina, Cuba, Peru, Portugal and Spain. The general aim of the project is to create an Latin American and Iberian Biological Dosimetry Laboratories Coordinated Group in order to: give mutual cooperation and to other countries if required, in the case of radiological accident; contribute to enhance the technical capabilities of the participant laboratories; promote the installment of laboratories on this field in countries that does not have it yet through the training of human resources and providing the necessary equipment and, finally, perform jointly research activities in biological dosimetry. The activities designed in order to accomplish the project specific aims for the 1998-2000 period have been achieved. Description and results are presented. (author)

  15. Application of the alkaline comet assay to rat alveolar macrophages after homogeneous or heterogeneous irradiation: a biological dosimetry method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alkaline comet assay, also called alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis, is a simple technique to assess single strand breaks, double strand breaks and alkali sites. It is based on the ability of broken DNA to migrate more easily in an electric field than normal DNA. This method is well adapted for the assessment of the ionising radiations effects on single cells. The aim of this study is to develop a biological dosimetry method to estimate the dose delivered to the respiratory tract by an homogeneous (60Co) or an heterogeneous (radon) irradiation. The animal model chosen is the rat because it has been validated for the study of the carcinogenic role of radon in man. Alveolar macrophages have been selected for there homogeneous distribution in the deep lung. After an in vivo thoracic 60Co gamma irradiation or a radon inhalation, it can be considered that these cells received a dose which is representative from the whole dose received by the lung. The comet assay is performed on alveolar macrophages recovered by broncho-alveolar lavage, and comet moment is measured with an epi-fluorescence microscope coupled to an image acquisition and analysis computing system. The results show the residence of a dose - comet moment relationship after in vivo 60Co gamma and radon irradiations. The technique used enabled us to show differences between homogeneous and heterogeneous irradiations in term of comet moments distributions. Although these results are promising, this technique has to be improved for the detection of biological effects induced by low doses of irradiation in order to detect potential effects of indoor radon exposure. (authors)

  16. Studying Biology to Understand Risk: Dosimetry Models and Quantitative Adverse Outcome Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Confidence in the quantitative prediction of risk is increased when the prediction is based to as great an extent as possible on the relevant biological factors that constitute the pathway from exposure to adverse outcome. With the first examples now over 40 years old, physiologi...

  17. Local therapy, systemic benefit: challenging the paradigm of biological predeterminism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, J M

    2006-04-01

    This paper briefly reviews the historical evolution of paradigms that have been purported to characterise the clinical behaviour of breast cancer, with the intention of guiding treatment approaches. Results from randomised clinical trials and the explosion of knowledge in the area of cancer biology have discredited the monolithic paradigms that had dominated thinking about breast cancer in the past. Contemporary notions of breast cancer biology recognise that, although some cancers disseminate well before becoming clinically detectable, acquisition of a metastatic phenotype can occur at any point (or not at all) in the local evolution of the tumour. As a consequence, both systemic and timely local--regional therapies can be expected to influence disease dissemination and patient survival. This is consistent with results observed in clinical trials, overviews of which indicate that prevention of four local recurrences will, on the average, prevent one death from breast cancer. Optimisation of local-regional treatment is an important goal in breast cancer management. PMID:16605046

  18. Dosimetry Service

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Cern Staff and Users can now consult their dose records for an individual or an organizational unit with HRT. Please see more information on our web page: http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry Dosimetry Service is open every morning from 8.30 - 12.00. Closed in the afternoons. We would like to remind you that dosimeters cannot be sent to customers by internal mail. Short-term dosimeters (VCT's) must always be returned to the Service after the use and must not be left on the racks in the experimental areas or in the secretariats. Dosimetry Service Tel. 7 2155 Dosimetry.service@cern.ch http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  19. Physical Activity: A Tool for Improving Health (Part 1--Biological Health Benefits)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallaway, Patrick J.; Hongu, Nobuko

    2015-01-01

    Extension educators have been promoting and incorporating physical activities into their community-based programs and improving the health of individuals, particularly those with limited resources. This article is the first of a three-part series describing the benefits of physical activity for human health: 1) biological health benefits of…

  20. X-ray imaging and the skin: Radiation biology, patient dosimetry and observed effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A wide variety of radiation-induced deterministic skin effects have been observed after X-ray guided interventions ranging from mild effects, such as transient erythema or temporary epilation, to severe effects, such as desquamation and necrosis. Radiation biologists have identified, in addition to absorbed dose to the skin, other factors that strongly influence the type and severity of a skin reaction, including exposure-related factors (dose rate, fractionation, the size of the exposed area and its site), biological factors (age, oxygen status, capillary density, hormonal status and genetic factors) and ethnic differences. A peak entrance skin dose of 2 Gy is an arbitrary, but pragmatic, threshold for radiation-induced skin effects after X-ray guided interventions. Transient skin injury originating in the epidermis is not expected in the average patient population at peak entrance skin doses up to 6 Gy. Serious skin effects are not likely to occur in clinical practice when optimised X-ray equipment is used in combination with good techniques for fluoroscopy and imaging. However, this might not be true for patients with biological factors that are associated with an increased sensitivity for radiation-induced skin reactions. (authors)

  1. Reproductive function and biological dosimetry prospective study of young thyroid differentiated cancer patients treated with I-131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The administration of I-131 in the management of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is a well established practice. As the spermatogonia is highly sensitive to radiation, large doses of internal radiation could result in adverse effects on reproductive function such as oligo/azoospermia and infertility. During spermiogenesis, mammalian chromatin undergoes replacement of nuclear histones by protamines, which yields a DNA sixfold more highly condensed in spermatozoa than in mitotic chromosomes. The structure of this highly packaged chromatin shows a low binding capacity for several fluoro chromes and dyes such as chromo mycin A3 (CMA3). The aim of this study is to assess the correlation between reproductive function (endocrine and exocrine testicular function, and levels of CMA3 stainability) and biological dosimetry in a prospective study of 4 young DTC patients treated with I-131. In this context, a background level of CMA3 binding in mature human sperm was established. It revealed a variable accessibility of CMA3 to the DNA that is dependant on packaging quality and thus, indicative of protamine deficiency. The identification of altered stainability suggests DNA damage as well as epigenetic effects, which may be indicators of male infertility. Transient impairment of spermatogenesis associated with an increase in FSH, an altered spermiogram and even azoospermia was observed after the administration of cumulative activities. Overall, testosterone levels were preserved, except in one case, which presented a drastically diminished value associated with an increase in LH level. As peripheral blood lymphocytes and spermatogonia have equivalent radiosensitivity (interphase death) we hypothesize that the knowledge of DNA damage recovery in peripheral lymphocytes could correlate with spermatogonia recovery and with FSH evolution. Therefore, a prospective study on the decline of unstable chromosome aberrations is being conducted, considering the damage induced

  2. Reproductive function and biological dosimetry prospective study of young thyroid differentiated cancer patients treated with I-131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The administration of I-131 in the management of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is a well established practice. As the spermatogonia is highly sensitive to radiation, large doses of internal radiation could result in adverse effects on reproductive function such as oligo/azoospermia and infertility. During spermiogenesis, mammalian chromatin undergoes replacement of nuclear histones by protamines, which yields a DNA sixfold more highly condensed in spermatozoa than in mitotic chromosomes. The structure of this highly packaged chromatin shows a low binding capacity for several fluorochromes and dyes such as chromomycin A3 (CMA3). The aim of this study is to assess the correlation between reproductive function (endocrine and exocrine testicular function, and levels of CMA3 stainability) and biological dosimetry in a prospective study of 4 young DTC patients treated with I-131. In this context, a background level of CMA3 binding in mature human sperm was established. It revealed a variable accessibility of CMA3 to the DNA that is dependant on packaging quality and thus, indicative of protamine deficiency. The identification of altered stainability suggests DNA damage as well as epigenetic effects, which may be indicators of male infertility. Transient impairment of spermatogenesis associated with an increase in FSH, an altered spermiogram and even azoospermia was observed after the administration of cumulative activities. Overall, testosterone levels were preserved, except in one case, which presented a drastically diminished value associated with an increase in LH level. As peripheral blood lymphocytes and spermatogonia have equivalent radiosensitivity (interphase death) we hypothesize that the knowledge of DNA damage recovery in peripheral lymphocytes could correlate with spermatogonia recovery and with FSH evolution. (authors)

  3. Benefits and Costs of Biologically Contained Genetically Modified Tomatoes and Eggplants in Italy and Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf A. Groeneveld

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we assess the benefits and costs of introducing biologically contained genetically modified (GM crops, with an application to the potential introduction of GM tomatoes and eggplants in Italy and Spain. Such crops possess both the standard beneficial GM traits, and they prevent introgression of transgenes from GM crops to their conventional or wild relatives, thereby adding to the safety of their cultivation. As a result, coexistence regulations for these crops are less stringent than for crops without biological containment. The potential adoption of biologically contained GM tomatoes and eggplants is assessed in a cost-benefit framework for Italy and Spain. We conclude that biological containment has considerable potential benefits if policy makers are willing to loosen the restrictions on the introduction of these varieties.

  4. Nanoparticle-aided Radiation Therapy: Micro-dosimetry and Evaluation of the Mediators Producing Biological Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Nava Raj

    Radiation therapy has been established as a standard technique for cancer treatment. Advances in nanotechnology have enabled the application of many new approaches in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Achievement of selective enhancement in radiation dose deposition within a targeted tumor, while sparing surrounding normal structures, remains a challenge and one of the major objectives of cancer-related research. This objective can be realized by the insertion of high atomic number (Z) materials in the tumor site. Due to their high atomic number (Z=79) and favorable biological compatibility, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been found very promising in this respect. Another candidate material, platinum (Z=78), offering very similar radiation interaction properties to gold and exhibiting additional cytotoxic effects, has been exploited in chemotherapeutic agents for a long time. We explore the radiation effects near the interface of gold and platinum with tissue under a wide range of energies with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Our studies show that AuNPs and PtNPs (platinum nanoparticles) can offer a useful dose enhancement effect even in high energy radiotherapy beams, which can be important when critical structures are located close to the tumor. Our MC calculated dose enhancement increase of about 50% due to the removal of the flattening filter from the path of the photon beam of Varian TrueBeam accelerator suggests that flattening-filter-free beams are better suited for nanoparticle-aided radiation therapy. Also, the increase in dose enhancement with the tumor depth suggests that nanopartcle-aided radiation therapy can yield a better outcome while treating deep-seated tumors. Experimental microdosimetry is a non-trivial task, demanding detectors with small sensitive volumes to achieve a high spatial resolution. We have developed a microdosimetry technique utilizing an inexpensive in-house-built photodetector for the measurement of dose in a narrow high dose

  5. Chromosomal analysis and application of biological dosimetry in two cases of apparent over exposure; Analisis cromosomico y aplicacion de la dosimetria biologica en dos casos de aparente sobreexposicion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero C, C.; Brena V, M. [Departamento de Biologia, ININ A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    The gamma radiation calibration curve of {sup 60} Co is used which was generated in the ININ Laboratory of Biology to calculate the exposure dose of two workers whose dosemeters marked values above of the limit allowed. The analysis indicates that in a first case, the aberrations frequency corresponded to the basal value, therefore there is not over exposure. The aberrations frequency of the second case is lightly above to the basal value and therefore the probability favors to what the physical dosimetry indicates. (Author)

  6. Nuclear medicine radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    McParland, Brian J

    2010-01-01

    Complexities of the requirements for accurate radiation dosimetry evaluation in both diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine (including PET) have grown over the past decade. This is due primarily to four factors: growing consideration of accurate patient-specific treatment planning for radionuclide therapy as a means of improving the therapeutic benefit, development of more realistic anthropomorphic phantoms and their use in estimating radiation transport and dosimetry in patients, design and use of advanced Monte Carlo algorithms in calculating the above-mentioned radiation transport and

  7. New tool for biological dosimetry: Reevaluation and automation of the gold standard method following telomere and centromere staining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M’kacher, Radhia [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie (LRO), Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique (CEA), Route du Panorama, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Maalouf, Elie E.L. [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie (LRO), Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique (CEA), Route du Panorama, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Laboratoire MIPS – Groupe TIIM3D, Université de Haute-Alsace, F-68093 Mulhouse (France); Ricoul, Michelle [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie (LRO), Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique (CEA), Route du Panorama, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Heidingsfelder, Leonhard [MetaSystems GmbH, Robert-Bosch-Str. 6, 68804 Altlussheim (Germany); Laplagne, Eric [Pole Concept, 61 Rue Erlanger, 75016 Paris (France); Cuceu, Corina; Hempel, William M. [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie (LRO), Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique (CEA), Route du Panorama, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Colicchio, Bruno; Dieterlen, Alain [Laboratoire MIPS – Groupe TIIM3D, Université de Haute-Alsace, F-68093 Mulhouse (France); Sabatier, Laure, E-mail: laure.sabatier@cea.fr [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie (LRO), Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique (CEA), Route du Panorama, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We have applied telomere and centromere (TC) staining to the scoring of dicentrics. • TC staining renders the scoring of dicentrics more rapid and robust. • TC staining allows the scoring of not only dicentrics but all chromosomal anomalies. • TC staining has led to a reevaluation of the radiation dose–response curve. • TC staining allows automation of the scoring of chromosomal aberations. • Automated scoring of dicentrics after TC staining was as efficient as manual scoring. - Abstract: Purpose: The dicentric chromosome (dicentric) assay is the international gold-standard method for biological dosimetry and classification of genotoxic agents. The introduction of telomere and centromere (TC) staining offers the potential to render dicentric scoring more efficient and robust. In this study, we improved the detection of dicentrics and all unstable chromosomal aberrations (CA) leading to a significant reevaluation of the dose–effect curve and developed an automated approach following TC staining. Material and methods: Blood samples from 16 healthy donors were exposed to {sup 137}Cs at 8 doses from 0.1 to 6 Gy. CA were manually and automatically scored following uniform (Giemsa) or TC staining. The detection of centromeric regions and telomeric sequences using PNA probes allowed the detection of all unstable CA: dicentrics, centric and acentric rings, and all acentric fragments (with 2, 4 or no telomeres) leading to the precise quantification of estimated double strand breaks (DSB). Results: Manual scoring following TC staining revealed a significantly higher frequency of dicentrics (p < 10{sup −3}) (up to 30%) and estimated DSB (p < 10{sup −4}) compared to uniform staining due to improved detection of dicentrics with centromeres juxtaposed with other centromeres or telomeres. This improvement permitted the development of the software, TCScore, that detected 95% of manually scored dicentrics compared to 50% for

  8. ESR Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ESR dosimetry is widely used for several applications such as dose assessment in accidents, medical applications and sterilization of food and other materials. In this work the dosimetric properties of natural and synthetic Hydroxyapatite, Alanine, and 2-Methylalanine are presented. Recent results on the use of a K-Band (24 GHz) ESR spectrometer in dosimetry are also presented

  9. Dosimetry Service

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Please remember to read your dosimeter at least once a month. Regular read-outs are vital to ensure that your personal dose is periodically monitored. Dosimeters should be read even if you have not visited the controlled areas. Dosimetry Service - Tel. 72155 http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  10. Dosimetry Service

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Please remember to read your dosimeter at least once a month. Regular read-outs are vital to ensure that your personal dose is periodically monitored. Dosimeters should be read even if you have not visited the controlled areas. Dosimetry Service Tel. 7 2155 http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  11. Dosimetry Service

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Please remember to read your dosimeter at least once a month. Regular read-outs are vital to ensure that your personal dose is periodically monitored. Dosimeters should be read even if you have not visited the controlled areas. Dosimetry Service - Tel. 7 2155 http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  12. Computational dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siebert, B.R.L.; Thomas, R.H.

    1996-01-01

    The paper presents a definition of the term ``Computational Dosimetry`` that is interpreted as the sub-discipline of computational physics which is devoted to radiation metrology. It is shown that computational dosimetry is more than a mere collection of computational methods. Computational simulations directed at basic understanding and modelling are important tools provided by computational dosimetry, while another very important application is the support that it can give to the design, optimization and analysis of experiments. However, the primary task of computational dosimetry is to reduce the variance in the determination of absorbed dose (and its related quantities), for example in the disciplines of radiological protection and radiation therapy. In this paper emphasis is given to the discussion of potential pitfalls in the applications of computational dosimetry and recommendations are given for their avoidance. The need for comparison of calculated and experimental data whenever possible is strongly stressed.

  13. Biological and chemical removal of Cr(VI) from waste water: cost and benefit analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Aynur; Arisoy, Münevver

    2007-08-17

    The objective of the present study is cost and benefit analysis of biological and chemical removal of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] ions. Cost and benefit analysis were done with refer to two separate studies on removal of Cr(VI), one of heavy metals with a crucial role concerning increase in environmental pollution and disturbance of ecological balance, through biological adsorption and chemical ion-exchange. Methods of biological and chemical removal were compared with regard to their cost and percentage in chrome removal. According to the result of the comparison, cost per unit in chemical removal was calculated 0.24 euros and the ratio of chrome removal was 99.68%, whereas those of biological removal were 0.14 and 59.3% euros. Therefore, it was seen that cost per unit in chemical removal and chrome removal ratio were higher than those of biological removal method. In the current study where chrome removal is seen as immeasurable benefit in terms of human health and the environment, percentages of chrome removal were taken as measurable benefit and cost per unit of the chemicals as measurable cost.

  14. Biological dosimetry of ionizing radiation by chromosomal aberration analysis; Dosimetria biologica de las radiaciones ionizantes mediante el analisis de aberraciones cromosomicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Castano, S.; Silva, A.; Navlet, J.

    1990-07-01

    Biological dosimetry consists of estimating absorbed doses for people exposed to radiation by mean biological methods. Several indicators used are based in haematological, biochemical, and cytogenetic data, although nowadays without doubt, the cytogenetic method is considered to be the most reliable. In this case, the study ol chromosomal aberrations, normally dicentric chromosomes, in peripheral lymphocytes can be related to absorbed dose through an experimental calibration curve. An experimental dose-response curve, using dicentric chromosomes analysis, X-rays at 300 kVp, 114 rad/min and temperature 37 degree celsius has been produced. Experimental data is fitted to model Y ={alpha} + {beta}{sub 1}D + {beta}{sub 2}D 2 , where Y is the number of dicentrics per cell and D the dose. The curve is compared with those produced elsewhere. (Author) 14 refs.

  15. Dosimetry Service

    CERN Multimedia

    Dosimetry Service

    2005-01-01

    Please remember to read your dosimeter at least once every month. A regular read-out is indispensable to ensure periodic monitoring of your personal dose. You must read your dosimeter even if you have not visited the controlled areas. Film badges are no longer valid at CERN and holders of film badges are no longer allowed to enter the controlled radiation areas or work with a source. Dosimetry Service Tel. 72155 http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  16. Dosimetry methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, W.L.; Miller, A.; Kovacs, A.;

    2003-01-01

    Chemical and physical radiation dosimetry methods, used for the measurement of absorbed dose mainly during the practical use of ionizing radiation, are discussed with respect to their characteristics and fields of application.......Chemical and physical radiation dosimetry methods, used for the measurement of absorbed dose mainly during the practical use of ionizing radiation, are discussed with respect to their characteristics and fields of application....

  17. Biological dosimetry of patients with differenced carcinoma of thyroid treated with Iodine-131; Dosimetria biologica de pacientes con carcinoma diferenciado de tiroides tratados con Iodo-131

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallerga, M. B.; Rojo, A.M.; Taja, M.R.; Deluca, G.; Di Giorgio, M. [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear Av. Del Libertador 8250 (C1429BNP). Buenos Aires (Argentina); Fadel, A. [Hospital General de Agudos Dr. Carlos Durand Av. Diaz Velez 5044. Buenos Aires (Argentina); Cabrejas, M.; Valdivieso, C. [Hospital de Clfnicas Jose de San Martin Av. Cordoba 2351 (CP1120). Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. e-mail: mvallerg@cae.arn.gov.ar

    2006-07-01

    The administration of I-131 to patient with Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma (CaDiT) it is used inside the therapeutic outline as later step to the thyroidectomy. However, the good activity to give is of difficult determination due to factors such as, the variability in the capacity of tumoral reception of the I-131, distribution of the pharmaceutical, physiologic status, other associate pathologies, grade of advance of the illness, and previous treatments. Additionally, the activity to administer is dependent of the dose of tolerance in the healthy tissues; superior dose to 2 Gy in bone marrow, its could drive to myelotoxicity. At the moment, the form more extended of administration it is the empiric prescription that considers clinical parameters and of laboratory for their determination. Presently work, the protocol of applied treatment incorporates the evaluation for internal dosimetry and biological dosimetry to estimate absorbed dose in bone marrow. The biological estimate of the dose of these patients is based on the quantification of chromosomal aberrations whose frequency is referred to a curve-dose response in which the lymphocytes is irradiated in vitro with I-131, allowing to determine the in vivo dose to the patient's circulating lymphocytes. The objective of the present work is to determine the applicability of different cytogenetic essays in the estimate of the absorbed dose to the whole body or specific organs. Three patients were evaluated with CaDiT. Their treatment protocol consisted on a tracer administration of radioactive iodine of 74 - 111 MBq (2 - 3 mCi) and a therapy 7,4 - 11,1 GBq (200 - 300 mCi). Previous to the tracer administration and 8 days post-therapeutic administration took samples of veined blood that were evaluated by biological dosimetry by means of the application of the techniques: conventional cytogenetic Micronucleus and FISH (Hybridization in situ by Fluorescence). Starting from the frequencies of observed chromosomal

  18. Green mathematics: Benefits of including biological variation in your data analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.M.M TIJSKENS

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Biological variation is omnipresent in nature. It contains useful information that is neglected by the usually applied statistical procedures. To extract this information special procedures have to be applied. Biological variation is seen in properties (e.g. size, colour, firmness, but the underlying issue is almost always to the variation in development or maturity in a batch of individuals generated by small scale environmental differences. The principles of assessing biological variation in batches of individuals are explained without putting emphasis on mathematical details. Obtained explained parts increase from about 60 to 80 % for the usual approach to 95 when the biological variation is taken into account. When technical variation or measuring error is small even 99 % can be achieved. The benefit of the presented technology is highlighted based on a number of already published studies covering the colour of apples during growth and storage and the firmness of cut tomatoes during storage

  19. Radiation dosimetry and radiation biophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation dosimetry and radiation biophysics are two closely integrated programs whose joint purpose is to explore the connections between the primary physical events produced by radiation and their biological consequences in cellular systems. The radiation dosimetry program includes the theoretical description of primary events and their connection with the observable biological effects. This program also is concerned with the design and measurement of physical parameters used in theory or to support biological experiments. The radiation biophysics program tests and uses the theoretical developments for experimental design, and provides information for further theoretical development through experiments on cellular systems

  20. Radiation dosimetry and radiation biophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation dosimetry and radiation biophysics are two closely integrated programs whose joint purpose is to explore the connections between the primary physical events produced by radiation and their biological consequences in cellular systems. The radiation dosimetry program includes the theoretical description of primary events and their connection with the observable biological effects. This program also is concerned with design and measurement of those physical parameters used in the theory or to support biological experiments. The radiation biophysics program tests and makes use of the theoretical developments for experimental design. Also, this program provides information for further theoretical development through experiments on cellular systems

  1. Benefits and costs of biologically contained genetically modified tomatoes and eggplants in Italy and Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Groeneveld, Rolf A.; Erik Ansink; Clemens C.M. Van de Wiel; Justus Wesseler

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we assess the benefits and costs of introducing biologically contained genetically modified (GM) crops, with an application to the potential introduction of GM tomatoes and eggplants in Italy and Spain. Such crops possess both the standard beneficial GM traits, and they prevent introgression of transgenes from GM crops to their conventional or wild relatives, thereby adding to the safety of their cultivation. As a result, coexistence regulations for these crops are less stringen...

  2. Governing synthetic biology in the light of the Access and Benefit Sharing regulation (ABS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augusto, Carlos; Gutiérrez, Conde

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic biology is a change of paradigm, i.e. from the exploitation of natural and genetic resources to lab production of biological entities. This transitional shift represents a great challenge for developing countries, particularly those which host biodiversity, and users of genetic resources, since the latter might not be longer required to access to actual genetic resources (tangible genetic resources) but rather genetic resources' information (intangible genetic resources) in order to replicate those resources in labs. This could mean that users of genetic resource would not have to comply with the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and its complementary treaty, the Nagoya Protocol, known also as the Access and Benefit Sharing regime (ABS). Both international instrument demands that States create legal mechanisms to secure access and benefit sharing, i.e., users of genetic resources are required to obtain prior informed consent (PIC) from host countries of biodiversity and reach mutual agreed terms (MATs), in which users and countries agree how to share the benefits arise from the utilization of genetic resources. The ABS regime is particularly relevant since its implementation at national and regional level has created tensions between users of genetic resources and developing countries. This situation could lead to users removing interest in the exploitation of genetic resources, subsequently, meaning that their focus would move towards technologies that rely less on tangible genetic resources, including synthetic biology. This papers aim to discuss the scope of the CBD and the Nagoya Protocol in the light of synthetic biology and the implications for developing countries. PMID:25845206

  3. Dosimetry standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following leaflets are contained in this folder concerning the National Physical Laboratory's measurement services available in relation to dosimetry standards: Primary standards of X-ray exposure and X-ray irradiation facilities, X-ray dosimetry at therapy levels, Protection-level X-ray calibrations, Therapy-level gamma-ray facility, Fricke dosemeter reference service, Low-dose-rate gamma-ray facility, Penetrameter and kV meter calibration, Measurement services for radiation processing, Dichromate dosemeter reference service, Electron linear accelerator. (U.K.)

  4. Activities developed by the biological dosimetry laboratory of the Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear - ARN of Argentina; Actividades desarrolladas por el laboratorio de dosimetria biologica de la Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear de Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radl, A.; Sapienza, C.E.; Taja, M.R.; Bubniak, R.; Deminge, M.; Di Giorgio, M., E-mail: csapienza@arn.gob.ar [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear (ARN), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2013-07-01

    Biological dosimetry (DB) allows to estimate doses absorbed in individuals exposed to ionizing radiation through the quantification of stable and unstable chromosome aberrations (SCA and UCA). The frequency of these aberrations is referred to a calibration dose response curve (in vitro) to determine the doses of the individual to the whole body. The DB is a necessary support for programs of national radiation protection and response systems in nuclear or radiological emergencies in the event of accidental or incidental, single overexposure or large scale. In this context the Laboratory of Dosimetry Biological (LDB) of the Authority Regulatory Nuclear (ARN) Argentina develops and applies different dosimeters cytogenetic from four decades ago. These dosimeters provide a fact more within the whole of the information necessary for an accidental, complementing the physical and clinical dosimetry exposure assessment. The most widely used in the DB biodosimetric method is the quantification of SCA (dicentrics and rings Central) from a sample of venous blood. The LDB is accredited for the trial, under rules IRAM 301: 2005 (ISO / IEC 17025: 2005) and ISO 19238:2004. Test applies to the immediate dosimetry evaluation of acute exposures, all or a large part of the body in the range 0,1-5 Gy. In this context the LDB is part of the Latin American network of DB (LBDNet), BioDoseNet-who and response system in radiological emergencies and nuclear IAEA-RANET, being enabled to summon the LBDNet if necessary.

  5. Dosimetry by ESR spectroscopy of alanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosimetry based on electron spin resonance analysis of radiation-induced free radicals in amino acids (e.g. L-alanine) is relevant to biological dosimetry applications. Typical features are a wide dose range covering more than 5 decades (1-105Gy), energy independent response for photons above 100 keV, long-term stability of the ESR signal, and fast straightforward readout technique. Typical dosimeter samples, consisting of small pellets of microcrystalline amino acids in paraffin, are rugged, non-toxic, and insensitive to surface contaminations. Moreover, they are prepared homogeneously and inexpensively in large batches and can be evaluated repeatedly and supply archival dosimetry data. They have proven to be highly useful in various applications of radiation processing and sterilization dosimetry, food irradiation, quality control, radiation dosimetry, radiation therapy measurements, and as a reference system for dosimetry mailing intercomparisons. (author)

  6. Neutron personnel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current state-of-the-art in neutron personnel dosimetry is reviewed. Topics covered include dosimetry needs and alternatives, current dosimetry approaches, personnel monitoring devices, calibration strategies, and future developments

  7. Dosimetry Service

    CERN Multimedia

    Dosimetry Service

    2005-01-01

    Please remember to read your dosimeter every month at least once and preferably during the first week. A regular read-out is indispensable in order to ensure a periodic monitoring of the personal dose. You should read your dosimeter even if you have not visited the controlled areas. If you still have the old dosimeter (film badge), please send it immediately for evaluation to us (Bdg 24 E-011). After January 2005 there will be no developing process for the old film system. Information for Contractors: Please remember also to bring the form ‘Confirm Reception of a CERN Dosimeter' signed with ‘Feuille d'enregistrement du CERN'. Without these forms the dosimeter cannot be assigned. Thank you for your cooperation. Dosimetry Service Tel 767 2155 http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  8. Equitably sharing benefits from the utilization of natural genetic resources: the Brazilian interpretation of the Convention of Biological Diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pena-Neira, S.; Dieperink, C.; Addink, G.H.

    2002-01-01

    The utilization of natural genetic resources could yield great benefits. The Convention on Biological Diversity introduced a number of rules concerning the sharing of these benefits. However, the interpretation and application (legal implementation) of these rules is a matter of discussion among spe

  9. Is there any measurable benefit in publishing preprints in the arXiv section Quantitative Biology?

    CERN Document Server

    Aman, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    A public preprint server such as arXiv allows authors to publish their manuscripts before submitting them to journals for peer review. It offers the chance to establish priority by making the results available upon completion. This article presents the arXiv section Quantitative Biology and investigates the advantages of preprint publications in terms of reception, which can be measured by means of citations. This paper focuses on the publication and citation delay, citation counts and the authors publishing their e-prints on arXiv. Moreover, the paper discusses the benefit for scientists as well as publishers. The results that are based on 12 selected journals show that submitting preprints to arXiv has become more common in the past few years, but the number of papers submitted to Quantitative Biology is still small and represents only a fraction of the total research output in biology. An immense advantage of arXiv is to overcome the long publication delay resulting from peer review. Although preprints are...

  10. Biological dosimetry - a Bayesian approach in the presentation of the uncertainty of the estimated dose in cases of exposure to low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biodosimetry laboratory experience has shown that there are limitations in the existing statistical methodology. Statistical difficulties generally occur due to the low number of aberrations leading to large uncertainties for dose estimation. Some problems derived from limitations of the classical statistical methodology, which requires that chromosome aberration yields be considered as something fixed and consequently provides a deterministic dose estimation and associated confidence limits. On the other hand, recipients of biological dosimetry reports, including medical doctors, regulators and the patients themselves may have a limited comprehension of statistics and of informed reports. Thus, the objective of the present paper is to use a Bayesian approach to present the uncertainty on the estimated dose to which a person could be exposed, in the case of low dose (occupational doses) radiation exposure. Such methodology will allow the biodosimetrists to adopt a probabilistic approach for the cytogenetic data analysis. At present, classical statistics allows to produce a confidence interval to report such dose, with a lower limit that could not detach from zero. In this situation it becomes difficult to make decisions as they could impact on the labor activities of the worker if an exposure exceeding the occupational dose limits is inferred. The proposed Bayesian approach is applied to occupational exposure scenario to contribute to take the appropriate radiation protection measures. (authors)

  11. Benefits of a Biological Monitoring Program for Assessing Remediation Performance and Long-Term Stewardship - 12272

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) is a long-running program that was designed to evaluate biological conditions and trends in waters downstream of Department of Energy (DOE) facilities in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. BMAP monitoring has focused on aquatic pathways from sources to biota, which is consistent with the sites' clean water regulatory focus and the overall cleanup strategy which divided remediation areas into watershed administrative units. Specific programmatic goals include evaluating operational and legacy impacts to nearby streams and the effectiveness of implemented remediation strategies at the sites. The program is characterized by consistent, long-term sampling and analysis methods in a multidisciplinary and quantitative framework. Quantitative sampling has shown conclusively that at most Oak Ridge stream sites, fish and aquatic macro-invertebrate communities have improved considerably since the 1980s. Monitoring of mercury and PCBs in fish has shown that remedial and abatement actions have also improved stream conditions, although in some cases biological monitoring suggests further actions are needed. Follow-up investigations have been implemented by BMAP to identify sources or causes, consistent with an adaptive management approach. Biological monitoring results to date have not only been used to assess regulatory compliance, but have provided additional benefits in helping address other components of the DOE's mission, including facility operations, natural resource, and scientific goals. As a result the program has become a key measure of long-term trends in environmental conditions and of high value to the Oak Ridge environmental management community, regulators, and the public. Some of the BMAP lessons learned may be of value in the design, implementation, and application of other long-term monitoring and stewardship programs, and assist environmental managers in the assessment and prediction of the effectiveness of remedial

  12. Biological effects of 224Ra. Benefit and risk of therapeutic application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Second Symposium on the Biological effects of 224Ra, held at Neuherberg, was focused on two topical aspects of radiation protection. One aspect was the long-term effects of high-LET ionizing radiations on man and the quantitative data involved in risk assessment at low doses. The evaluation of epidemiological studies and experimental research was discussed in order to provide facts and figures contributing to an objective assessment of the radiation hazard from incorporated radionuclides. The other aspect was that of radiation protection in medicine. In the case of 224Ra treatment of ankylosing spondylitis the questions of benefit and risk of this therapeutic use of ionizing radiations were discussed, the aim being to achieve the therapeutic effect while reducing radiation exposure - and therefore the hazard - to a minimum. The proceedings contain the complete texts of 23 papers as well as the final round table discussions

  13. Quantitative autoradiography of radionuclides in biological tissues by high resolution nuclear analysis: application in radio-toxicology and dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of radiation damage on cells in living organisms an auto-radiograph, based on the STIC method, has been developed for the particles detection. This apparatus associates a thin scintillator with a photosensitive detector (CCD). The design and the performance of this well adapted tool for low activity biological samples study, are described. (A.L.B.)

  14. Topics in radiation dosimetry radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    1972-01-01

    Radiation Dosimetry, Supplement 1: Topics in Radiation Dosimetry covers instruments and techniques in dealing with special dosimetry problems. The book discusses thermoluminescence dosimetry in archeological dating; dosimetric applications of track etching; vacuum chambers of radiation measurement. The text also describes wall-less detectors in microdosimetry; dosimetry of low-energy X-rays; and the theory and general applicability of the gamma-ray theory of track effects to various systems. Dose equivalent determinations in neutron fields by means of moderator techniques; as well as developm

  15. How can increased use of biological N2 fixation in agriculture benefit the environment?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asymbiotic, associative or symbiotic biological N2 fixation (BNF), is a free and renewable resource, which should constitute an integral part of sustainable agro-ecosystems. Yet there has been a rapid increase in use of fertiliser N and a parallel decline in the cultivation of leguminous plants and BNF, especially in the developed world. Fertilisers have boosted crop yields, but intensive agricultural systems have increasingly negative effects on the atmospheric and aquatic environments. BNF, either alone or in combination with fertilisers and animal manures, may prove to be a better solution to supply nitrogen to the cropping systems of the future. This review focuses on the potential benefit of BNF on the environment especially on soil acidification, rhizosphere processes and plant CO2 fixation. As fertiliser N has supplanted BNF in agriculture the re-substitution of BNF is considered. What is the consequence of fertiliser N production on energy use? The effect of fertiliser use on the release of the greenhouse gas CO2 is estimated at approximately 1 % of the global anthropogenic emission of CO2. The role of BNF on nitrogen cycling, ammonia volatilisation, N2O emission and NO3 leaching suggests that BNF is less likely than fertilisers to cause losses during pre-cropping and cropping. Sometimes however the post-harvest losses may be greater, due to the special qualities of legume residues. Nevertheless, legumes provide other 'ecological services' including improved soil structure, erosion protection and greater biological diversity. (author)

  16. Field models and numerical dosimetry inside an extremely-low-frequency electromagnetic bioreactor: the theoretical link between the electromagnetically induced mechanical forces and the biological mechanisms of the cell tensegrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mognaschi, Maria Evelina; Di Barba, Paolo; Magenes, Giovanni; Lenzi, Andrea; Naro, Fabio; Fassina, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    We have implemented field models and performed a detailed numerical dosimetry inside our extremely-low-frequency electromagnetic bioreactor which has been successfully used in in vitro Biotechnology and Tissue Engineering researches. The numerical dosimetry permitted to map the magnetic induction field (maximum module equal to about 3.3 mT) and to discuss its biological effects in terms of induced electric currents and induced mechanical forces (compression and traction). So, in the frame of the tensegrity-mechanotransduction theory of Ingber, the study of these electromagnetically induced mechanical forces could be, in our opinion, a powerful tool to understand some effects of the electromagnetic stimulation whose mechanisms remain still elusive. PMID:25202652

  17. Amylase and blood cell-count hematological radiation-injury biomarkers in a rhesus monkey radiation model-use of multiparameter and integrated biological dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effective medical management of suspected radiation exposure incidents requires the recording of dynamic medical data (clinical signs and symptoms), biological assessments of radiation exposure, and physical dosimetry in order to provide diagnostic information to the treating physician and dose assessment for personnel radiation protection records. The need to rapidly assess radiation dose in mass-casualty and population-monitoring scenarios prompted an evaluation of suitable biomarkers that can provide early diagnostic information after exposure. We investigated the utility of serum amylase and hematological blood-cell count biomarkers to provide early assessment of severe radiation exposures in a non-human primate model (i.e., rhesus macaques; n=8) exposed to whole-body radiation of 60Co-gamma rays (6.5 Gy, 40cGymin-1). Serum amylase activity was significantly elevated (12.3±3.27- and 2.6±0.058-fold of day zero samples) at 1 and 2-days, respectively, after radiation. Lymphocyte cell counts decreased (≤15% of day zero samples) 1 and 2 days after radiation exposure. Neutrophil cell counts increased at day one by 1.9(±0.38)-fold compared with levels before irradiation. The ratios of neutrophil to lymphocyte cell counts increased by 13(±2.66)- and 4.23(±0.95)-fold at 1 and 2 days, respectively, after irradiation. These results demonstrate that increases in serum amylase activity along with decreases of lymphocyte counts, increases in neutrophil cell counts, and increases in the ratio of neutrophil to lymphocyte counts 1 day after irradiation can provide enhanced early triage discrimination of individuals with severe radiation exposure and injury. Use of the biodosimetry assessment tool (BAT) application is encouraged to permit dynamic recording of medical data in the management of a suspected radiological casualty

  18. Analysis behaviour of free radicals produced by ionizing radiations in human blood by EPR for biological dosimetry in patients; Analisis del comportamiento de los radicales libre en la radiolisis de la sangre por EPR para dosimetria biologia en pacientes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza, O. O.; Almanza, A.; Plazas, M. M. C.

    2006-07-01

    In this work is analyzed the biological dosimetry of the free radicals produced by ionizing radiations in human blood obtained by EPR and the biological behaviour of samples In-Vitro, with Rh: O+, in tubes with EDTA (Acid Etilen Diamino Tetracetic) the samples was extracted of the main investigator, these samples were radiated with gammas of ''60Co of a Theratron 780 between plates of PMMA to a depth of Z{sub m}ax of 0.5 cm and between doses 1 to 25 Gy. In these results the behaviors of signal the free radicals presented a increasing a their intensity depending on applied dose, of equal way are results of the biologic dosimetry displayed in sanguineous populations like. White Globules, Red. Platelets etc, to being compared with Resonance Paramagnetic Electronic (EPR). The results show changes in sanguineous populations in high doses (D>10 Gy) in the case of lymphocytes, granulocitos, macusanita, plaquetas, hemoglobina, haematocrit with change similarly in medium and low doses (D>10Gy) in linfocites, platelets, granulocytes, monocytes and the haematocrit. A sanguineous sample without radiating analyzes by EPR giving the presence of signals with values of g=2.13 2,41 in blood. For the first certain value of g authors have associated it to free radicals like: globin (Fe(IV)=0) or Cu''+ incorporated to the ceruloplasmin molecule. (Author)

  19. Dosimetry for radiation processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne

    1986-01-01

    During the past few years significant advances have taken place in the different areas of dosimetry for radiation processing, mainly stimulated by the increased interest in radiation for food preservation, plastic processing and sterilization of medical products. Reference services both...... and sterilization dosimetry, optichromic dosimeters in the shape of small tubes for food processing, and ESR spectroscopy of alanine for reference dosimetry. In this paper the special features of radiation processing dosimetry are discussed, several commonly used dosimeters are reviewed, and factors leading...

  20. European Crew Personal Active Dosimeter (EuCPAD), a novel dosimetry system utilizing operational and scientific synergies for the benefit of humans in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straube, Ulrich; Berger, Thomas

    Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC) and an internal MU(iMU) to enable complex environmental measurements and cross calibrations. This presentation will give an introduction to the dosimetry system and of the current status. The EuCPAD project is carried out under ESA Contract No. 4200023059/09/NL/CP,

  1. Personal dosimetry service of VF, a.s. company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The VF, a.s. Company will extend its services in the area of personal dosimetry at the end of 2008, which is fully in compliance with the requirements of the Atomic Act, section 9 paragraph (1) letter r) and Decree on Radiation Protection, section 59 paragraph (1) letter a). Optically stimulated luminescence was selected in VF .a.s. as the most advantageous and the most advanced technology for the integral personal dosimetry . Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) has been using in dosimetry for more than ten years. Although it is relatively new technology , its indisputable advantages predetermine that technology has significantly benefited in personal dosimetry services within a short time all over the advanced world. The VF, a.s. personal dosimetry service is based on the licensed products of LANDAUER, the US company, which is the world leader in OSL dosimetry. Crystalline Al2O3:C was selected as the detection material. All equipment of personal dosimetry service is installed in the VF Centre of Technology in Cerna Hora. The personal dosimetry service is incorporated in the International LANDAUER Dosimetry Service Network, and in the European Union, it is directly linked to the LANDAUER European Headquarters with its office in Paris. As a part of the OSL technology licence, the VF personal dosimetry service was included in the inter-laboratory comparison programme of the LANDAUER syndicate. (author)

  2. Dosimetry of iodoantipyrine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosimetry of iodoantipyrine labeled with radioactive iodine was determined by measuring the biodistribution of 131I-iodoantipyrine in 41 female rabbits. Following administration of the radiopharmaceutical, subjects were killed at 0.5, 6, 12, 17, 24, 36, and 48 h. Organs and samples of tissues and body fluids were assayed. Results were corrected for physical decay. Exponential functions were employed to describe the time-concentration curves; representative value would be the biological half life of 9.96±0.55 h for blood. Cumulated activity estimates for 123I, 125I and 131I were then computed. Extrapolation to absorbed dose in humans followed the formulation of the Medical International Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine. The whole body absorbed doses are 0.7 μGray, 0.5 μGray and 2.9 μGray per MBq of 123I, 123I, and 131I administered respectively. (orig.)

  3. ESR dosimetry: achievements and challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baffa, O., E-mail: baffa@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Departamento de Fisica, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Electron Spin Resonance (ESR), also known as Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and more recently as Electron Magnetic Resonance (Emr), is a spectroscopy technique able to detect unpaired electrons such as those created by the interaction ionizing radiation with matter. When the unpaired electrons created by ionizing radiation are stable over some reasonable time, ESR can be used to measure the radiation dose deposited in the material under study. In principle, any insulating material that satisfies this requisite can be used as a dosimeter. ESR has been used in retrospective dosimetry in case of radiological accidents using natural constituents of human body such as teeth, bones and nails as well as fortuitous materials as sugar, sweeteners and plastics. When using teeth the typical detected dose is 0.5 Gy for, for X-Band spectrometers (9 GHz) and even lower doses if higher frequency spectrometers are used. Clinical dosimetry is another area of potential use of this dosimetric modality. In this application the amino acid alanine has been proposed and being used. Alanine dosimeters are very easy to prepare and require no complicated treatments for use. Alanine/ESR dosimetry satisfies many of the required properties for clinical applications such as water equivalent composition, independence of response for the energy range used in therapy and high precision. Other organic materials such as ammonium tartrate are being investigated to increase the sensitivity of ESR for clinical applications. Finally, industrial applications can also benefit from this dosimetry. The challenges to expand applications, the number of users and research groups of ESR dosimetry will be discussed. (Author)

  4. Dosimetry of internal emitting: principles and perspectives of the MIRD technology; Dosimetria de emisores internos: principios y perspectivas de la metodologia MIRD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferro F, G. [Gerencia de Aplicaciones Nucleares en la Salud, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Salazar, Estado de Mexico C.P. 52045 (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    The development of the radiopharmaceutical technology have multiplied the number of radioisotopes with applications in therapeutical nuclear medicine so known as Directed radiotherapy. Assuming the radiation is capable to produce noxious effects in the biological systems, it is important to evaluate appropriately the risks and benefits of the administration of radioactive agents in the patient. The outstanding parameter in this evaluation is the absorbed dose, which is product of the radiation emitted by a radionuclide that is localized or distributed to the interior of the human body in study and whose its estimation helps to predict the efficacy of the treatment. The scheme generalized of MIRD, it was formulated from thirty years ago for evaluating the interior dosimetry at level of organs.The finality of this work is to show the basic principles of the MIRD methodology and its perspectives using innovator tools as the dosimetry for dynamic masses, in particular the personnel dosimetry for the organs of each patient, the dosimetry for the small structures inside the organs (sub organic dosimetry), the distributions of doses in three dimensions (S voxel), the dosimetry at cellular level and the quantitative acquisition of pharmaceutical data. (Author)

  5. [Instrumental radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation dosimetry: general principals and modern methodology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perov, S Iu; Kudriashov, Iu B; Rubtsova, N B

    2012-01-01

    The modern experimental radiofrequency electromagnetic field dosimetry approach has been considered. The main principles of specific absorbed rate measurement are analyzed for electromagnetic field biological effect assessment. The general methodology of specific absorbed rate automated dosimetry system applied to establish the compliance of radiation sources with the safety standard requirements (maximum permissible levels and base restrictions) is described.

  6. Green mathematics: Benefits of including biological variation in your data analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijskens, L.M.M.; Schouten, R.E.; Unuk, T.; Simcic, M.

    2015-01-01

    Biological variation is omnipresent in nature. It contains useful information that is neglected by the usually applied statistical procedures. To extract this information special procedures have to be applied. Biological variation is seen in properties (e.g. size, colour, firmness), but the underlyi

  7. Interpersonal amplification of risk? Citizen discussions and their impact on perceptions of risks and benefits of a biological research facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Andrew R; Scheufele, Dietram A; Brossard, Dominique; Gunther, Albert C

    2011-02-01

    Much risk communication research has demonstrated how mass media can influence individual risk perceptions, but lacks a comprehensive conceptual understanding of another key channel of communication: interpersonal discussion. Using the social amplification of risk as a theoretical framework, we consider the potential for discussions to function as amplification stations. We explore this possibility using data from a public opinion survey of residents living in potential locations for a new biological research facility in the United States. Controlling for a variety of key information variables, our results show that two dimensions of discussion-frequency and valence-have impacts on residents' perceptions of the facility's benefits and its risks. We also explore the possibility that an individual's overall attitude moderates the effect of discussion on their perceptions of risks and benefits. Our results demonstrate the potential for discussions to operate as amplifiers or attenuators of perceptions of both risks and benefits. PMID:21039705

  8. Dosimetry in radiotherapy. V.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of symposia on dosimetry in medicine and biology have been held by the IAEA in co-operation with WHO. The present symposium was the first one focusing on ''Dosimetry in Radiotherapy''. The papers presented reflected the different steps in the calibration chain such as the calibration standards established by the National Standards Laboratories and the conversion of the reading of calibrated instruments to the desired quantity, i.e. absorbed dose to water at a reference point in the user's beam at the radiotherapy clinic. The programme further examined the procedures necessary for optimization of the treatment of the patient, such as treatment planning methods, dose distribution studies, new techniques of dose measurement, improvements in the physical dose distributions/conformation therapy and special problems involved in total body treatments. Results of quality assurance in radiotherapy were presented from local hospitals as well as from national and international studies. Refs, figs and tabs

  9. Dosimetry in radiotherapy. V.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of symposia on dosimetry in medicine and biology have been held by the IAEA in co-operation with WHO. The present symposium was the first one focusing on ''Dosimetry in Radiotherapy''. The papers presented reflected the different steps in the calibration chain such as the calibration standards established by the National Standards Laboratories and the conversion of the reading of calibrated instruments to the desired quantity, i.e. absorbed dose to water at a reference point in the user's beam at the radiotherapy clinic. The programme further examined the procedures necessary for optimization of the treatment of the patient, such as treatment planning methods, dose distribution studies, new techniques of dose measurement, improvements in the physical dose distributions/conformation therapy and special problems involved in total body treatments. Results of quality assurance in radiotherapy were presented from local hospitals as well as from national and international studies. Refs, figs and tabs

  10. Dosimetry in intravascular brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the cardiovascular diseases responsible for deaths in the adult population in almost all countries of the world, the most common is acute myocardial infarction, which generally occurs because of the occlusion of one or more coronary arteries. Several diagnostic techniques and therapies are being tested for the treatment of coronary artery disease. Balloon angioplasty has been a popular treatment which is less invasive than traditional surgeries involving revascularization of the myocardium, thus promising a better quality of life for patients. Unfortunately, the rate of restenosis (re-closing of the vessel) after balloon angioplasty is high (approximately 30-50% within the first year after treatment).Recently, the idea of delivering high radiation doses to coronary arteries to avoid or delay restenosis has been suggested. Known as intravascular brachytherapy, the technique has been used with several radiation sources, and researchers have obtained success in decreasing the rate of restenosis in some patient populations. In order to study the radiation dosimetry in the patient and radiological protection for the attending staff for this therapy, radiation dose distributions for monoenergetic electrons and photons (at nine discrete energies) were calculated for blood vessels of diameter 0.15, o,30 and 0.45 cm with balloon and wire sources using the radiation transport code MCNP4B. Specific calculations were carried out for several candidate radionuclides as well. Two s tent sources (metallic prosthesis that put inside of patient's artery through angioplasty) employing 32 P are also simulated. Advantages and disadvantages of the various radionuclides and source geometries are discussed. The dosimetry developed here will aid in the realization of the benefits obtained in patients for this promising new technology. (author)

  11. Contribution of new cytogenetic techniques in the estimations of old irradiations in retrospective biological dosimetry; Apport des nouvelles techniques de cytogenetiques dans l'estimation des irradiations anciennes en dosimetrie biologique retrospective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pouzoulet, F

    2007-10-15

    The objective of this study was to answer three questions: if the translocations are steady: the results have shown that the translocations even if they are not obligatory steady can be used in retrospective dosimetry. Furthermore, it appeared important to consider the complex translocations in view of their relative stability and complementary information they bring ( quality of radiation, received dose). The second question is what contribution of the M-F.I.S.H. in the translocations analysis in comparison with the F.I.S.H.-3: we have shown that the M-F.I.S.H. would allow to raise the whole of doubt due to a partial genome observation. that has for effect to increase the precision of the analysis and that what ever be the received dose. The third question is if there are differences between the chromosomal aberrations generated by x radiation of 50 keV and by gamma radiation from cobalt-60: yes, the low energy photons generate more translocations than the photons coming from cobalt-60. But they generate less dicentrics. this difference comes from the way the energy is deposited that leads to a more important formation of complex and multiple translocations with the low energy photons. this could constitute a problem in the use of low energy photons in radiotherapy. it would seem that the simple translocations rate is not influenced by the photons energy. (N.C.)

  12. Dosimetry in radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While it is known that therapeutic effects of radionuclides are due to absorbed radiation dose and to radiosensitivity, individual dosimetry in 'Gy' is practiced rarely in clinical Nuclear Medicine but 'doses' are described in 'mCi' or 'MBq', which is only indirectly related to 'Gy' in the target. To estimate 'Gy', the volume of the target, maximum concentration of the radiopharmaceutical in it and residence time should be assessed individually. These parameters can be obtained usually only with difficulty, involving possibly also quantitative SPET or PET, modern imaging techniques (sonography, CT, MRT), substitution of y- or positron emitting radiotracers for β-emitting radiopharmaceuticals as well as whole-body distribution studies. Residence time can be estimated by obtaining data on biological half-life of a comparable tracer and transfer of these data in the physical characteristics of the therapeutic agent. With all these possibilities for gross dosimetry the establishment of a dose-response-relation should be possible. As distribution of the radiopharmaceutical in lesions is frequently inhomogenous and microdosimetric conditions are difficult to assess in vivo as yet, it could be observed since decades that empirically set, sometimes 'fixed' doses (mCi or MBq) can also be successful in many diseases. Detailed dosimetric studies, however, are work- and cost-intensive. Nevertheless, one should be aware at a time when more sophisticated therapeutic possibilities in Nuclear Medicine arise, that we should try to estimate radiation dose (Gy) in our new methods even as differences in individual radiosensitivity cannot be assessed yet and studies to define individual radiosensitivity in lesions should be encouraged. (author)

  13. Measurement assurance in dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uses of radiation in medicine and industry are today wide in scope and diversity and there is a need for reliable dosimetry in most applications. In particular, high accuracy in dosimetry is required in the therapeutic use of radiation. Consequently, calibration procedures for radiotherapy generally meet also the accuracy requirements for applications in other fields, such as diagnostic radiology, radiation protection and industrial radiation processing. The emphasis at this symposium was therefore mainly or radiotherapy dosimetry, but the meeting also included one session devoted to dosimetry in diagnostic radiology. Refs, fig and tabs

  14. Low-level radiation: biological interactions, risks, and benefits. A bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bibliography contains 3294 references that were selected from the Department of Energy's data base (EDB). The subjects covered are lower-level radiation effects on man, environmental radiation, and other biological interactions of radiation that appear to be applicable to the low-level radiation problem

  15. The Benefits of Using Clickers in Small-Enrollment Seminar-Style Biology Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michelle K.; Trujillo, Caleb; Su, Tin Tin

    2011-01-01

    Although the use of clickers and peer discussion is becoming common in large-lecture undergraduate biology courses, their use is limited in small-enrollment seminar-style courses. To investigate whether facilitating peer discussion with clickers would add value to a small-enrollment seminar-style course, we evaluated their usefulness in an…

  16. Economic Benefits of Advanced Control Strategies in Biological Nutrient Removal Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, J.; Nielsen, M.K.; Harremoës, Poul

    1994-01-01

    Advances in on-line monitoring of nutrient salt concentrations and computer technology has created a large potential for the implementation of advanced and complex control strategies in biological nutrient removal systems. The majority of wastewater treatment plants today are operated with very...

  17. Is 'class effect' relevant when assessing the benefit/risk profile of a biologic agent?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterry, W.; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de

    2012-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic, genetically predisposed skin disorder, characterised by thickened scaly plaques. Although no therapy is recognised as curative, therapies aimed at symptom control include biologic agents that are generally designed to block molecular activation of cellular pathways of a patho

  18. Low-level radiation: biological interactions, risks, and benefits. A bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-09-01

    The bibliography contains 3294 references that were selected from the Department of Energy's data base (EDB). The subjects covered are lower-level radiation effects on man, environmental radiation, and other biological interactions of radiation that appear to be applicable to the low-level radiation problem.

  19. EPR Dosimetry - Present and Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regulla, D.F. [GSF - National Research Centre for Environment and Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    In the past, IAEA has played a central role in stipulating research and development in EPR high-dose standardisation as well as in coordinating and organising international dose intercomparison programs, within the Member States of the United Nations from the mid-seventies till today. The future tasks of EPR dosimetry seem to tend towards different subjects such as bio markers, biological radiation effects, post-accident dose reconstruction in the environment, and retrospective human dosimetry. The latter may be considered a promising tool for epidemiology on the way to re-define radiation risk of man for chronicle radiation exposures, based on e.g. South Ural civil population and radiation workers. There are on-going international activities in the field of standardising high-level dosimetry by the American Standards on Testing and Materials (Astm), and by the International Organisation of Standards (ISO). The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) is considering the establishment of relevant recommendations concerning industrial radiation processing, but also human dose reconstruction. (Author)

  20. Phenolic compounds and biological effects of edible Rumex scutatus and Pseudosempervivum sempervivum: potential sources of natural agents with health benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savran, Ahmet; Zengin, Gokhan; Aktumsek, Abdurrahman; Mocan, Andrei; Glamoćlija, Jasmina; Ćirić, Ana; Soković, Marina

    2016-07-13

    The present study outlines a chemical characterization and further effects beneficial to health of edible Rumex scutatus and Pseudosempervivum sempervivum, in addition to presenting the antioxidant, enzyme inhibitory effects and antimicrobial properties of different extracts. The phenolic compounds composition of the extracts was assessed by RP-HPLC-DAD, outlining benzoic acid and rutin as major constituents in P. sempervivum and rutin and hesperidin in R. scutatus. Moreover, further biological effects were tested on key enzymes involved in diabetes mellitus, Alzheimer's disease and skin melanogenesis revealing an important tyrosinase inhibitory effect of Pseudosempervivum water extract. Moreover, both species possessed antimicrobial properties towards bacteria and fungi relevant to public health. Accordingly, we find that R. scutatus and P. sempervivum can be considered as novel functional foods because they are rich sources of biologically active compounds that provide health benefits. PMID:27364042

  1. Dosimetry service removal

    CERN Multimedia

    Safety Commission

    2010-01-01

    Dear personal dosimeter user, Please note that the Dosimetry service has moved in building 55, the service is now located in the main floor: 55-R-004. Main floor instead of second floor. On your right hand when accessing in the building. Thank you Dosimetry Service

  2. Dosimetry in process control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of absorbed dose and dose distribution in irradiated medical products relies on the use of quality dosimetry systems, trained personnel and a thorough understanding of the energy deposition process. The interrelationship of these factors will be discussed with emphasis on the current and future practices of process control dosimetry. (author)

  3. Maize benefits the predatory beetle, Propylea japonica (Thunberg, to provide potential to enhance biological control for aphids in cotton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Ouyang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Biological control provided by natural enemies play an important role in integrated pest management. Generalist insect predators provide an important biological service in the regulation of agricultural insect pests. Our goal is to understand the explicit process of oviposition preference, habitat selection and feeding behavior of predators in farmland ecosystem consisting of multiple crops, which is central to devising and delivering an integrated pest management program. METHODOLOGY: The hypotheses was that maize can serve as habitat for natural enemies and benefits predators to provide potential to enhance biological control for pest insects in cotton. This explicit process of a predatory beetle, Propylea japonica, in agricultural ecosystem composed of cotton and maize were examined by field investigation and stable carbon isotope analysis during 2008-2010. PRINCIPAL FINDING: Field investigation showed that P. japonica adults will search host plants for high prey abundance before laying eggs, indicating indirectly that P. japonica adults prefer to inhabit maize plants and travel to cotton plants to actively prey on aphids. The δ(13C values of adult P. japonica in a dietary shift experiment found that individual beetles were shifting from a C(3- to a C(4-based diet of aphids reared on maize or cotton, respectively, and began to reflect the isotope ratio of their new C(4 resources within one week. Approximately 80-100% of the diet of P. japonica adults in maize originated from a C(3-based resource in June, July and August, while approximately 80% of the diet originated from a C(4-based resource in September. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Results suggest that maize can serve as a habitat or refuge source for the predatory beetle, P. japonica, and benefits predators to provide potential to enhance biological control for insect pests in cotton.

  4. Ecosystem Services in Biologically Diversified versus Conventional Farming Systems: Benefits, Externalities, and Trade-Offs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albie Miles

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesize that biological diversification across ecological, spatial, and temporal scales maintains and regenerates the ecosystem services that provide critical inputs--such as maintenance of soil quality, nitrogen fixation, pollination, and pest control--to agriculture. Agrobiodiversity is sustained by diversified farming practices and it also supplies multiple ecosystem services to agriculture, thus reducing environmental externalities and the need for off-farm inputs. We reviewed the literature that compares biologically diversified farming systems with conventional farming systems, and we examined 12 ecosystem services: biodiversity; soil quality; nutrient management; water-holding capacity; control of weeds, diseases, and pests; pollination services; carbon sequestration; energy efficiency and reduction of warming potential; resistance and resilience to climate change; and crop productivity. We found that compared with conventional farming systems, diversified farming systems support substantially greater biodiversity, soil quality, carbon sequestration, and water-holding capacity in surface soils, energy-use efficiency, and resistance and resilience to climate change. Relative to conventional monocultures, diversified farming systems also enhance control of weeds, diseases, and arthropod pests and they increase pollination services; however, available evidence suggests that these practices may often be insufficient to control pests and diseases or provide sufficient pollination. Significantly less public funding has been applied to agroecological research and the improvement of diversified farming systems than to conventional systems. Despite this lack of support, diversified farming systems have only somewhat reduced mean crop productivity relative to conventional farming systems, but they produce far fewer environmental and social harms. We recommend that more research and crop breeding be conducted to improve diversified farming

  5. Nutritional epidemiology in the context of nitric oxide biology: a risk-benefit evaluation for dietary nitrite and nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milkowski, Andrew; Garg, Harsha K; Coughlin, James R; Bryan, Nathan S

    2010-02-15

    The discovery of the nitric oxide (NO) pathway in the 1980s represented a critical advance in understanding cardiovascular disease, and today a number of human diseases are characterized by NO insufficiency. In the interim, recent biomedical research has demonstrated that NO can be modulated by the diet independent of its enzymatic synthesis from l-arginine, e.g., the consumption of nitrite- and nitrate-rich foods such as fruits, leafy vegetables, and cured meats along with antioxidants. Regular intake of nitrate-containing food such as green leafy vegetables may ensure that blood and tissue levels of nitrite and NO pools are maintained at a level sufficient to compensate for any disturbances in endogenous NO synthesis. However, some in the public perceive that dietary sources of nitrite and nitrate are harmful, and some epidemiological studies reveal a weak association between foods that contain nitrite and nitrate, namely cured and processed meats, and cancer. This paradigm needs revisiting in the face of undisputed health benefits of nitrite- and nitrate-enriched diets. This review will address and interpret the epidemiological data and discuss the risk-benefit evaluation of dietary nitrite and nitrate in the context of nitric oxide biology. The weak and inconclusive data on the cancer risk of nitrite, nitrate and processed meats are far outweighed by the health benefits of restoring NO homeostasis via dietary nitrite and nitrate. This risk/benefit balance should be a strong consideration before there are any suggestions for new regulatory or public health guidelines for dietary nitrite and nitrate exposures.

  6. Free form source representation for a VR dosimetry training application

    OpenAIRE

    MOLTO CARACENA Teofilo; Goncalves, Joao; Peerani, Paolo; Vendrell Vidal, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    A method to model free form nuclear sources in Virtual Reality (VR) based dosimetry applications for training purposes is presented in this paper. A VR based dosimetry application can provide advantages in terms of time, cost and logistics with respect to traditional on-site training courses, representing a valid complement to the traditional ones. In order to benefit from these advantages, methods need to be developed to overcome the requirements such a VR application requires, such as real...

  7. Do new Access and Benefit Sharing procedures under the Convention on Biological Diversity threaten the future of biological control? Supplemental material (case studies, natural enemy releases, country views concerning ABS)

    OpenAIRE

    Cock, M.J.W.; Lenteren, van, J.C.; Brodeur, J; Barratt, I.P.; Bigler, F.; Bolckmans, K.; Cônsoli, F.L.; Haas, F.; Mason, P.G.; J.R.P. PARRA

    2010-01-01

    Under the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) countries have sovereign rights over their genetic resources. Agreements governing the access to these resources and the sharing of the benefits arising from their use need to be established between involved parties [i.e. Access and Benefit Sharing (ABS)]. This also applies to species collected for potential use in biological control. Recent applications of CBD principles have already made it difficult or impossible to collect and export natu...

  8. Do new Access and Benefit Sharing procedures under the Convention on Biological Diversity threaten the future of biological control? Supplemental material (case studies, natural enemy releases, country views concerning ABS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cock, M.J.W.; Lenteren, van J.C.; Brodeur, J.; Barratt, I.P.; Bigler, F.; Bolckmans, K.; Cônsoli, F.L.; Haas, F.; Mason, P.G.; Parra, J.R.P.

    2010-01-01

    Under the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) countries have sovereign rights over their genetic resources. Agreements governing the access to these resources and the sharing of the benefits arising from their use need to be established between involved parties [i.e. Access and Benefit Sharing

  9. Activities of Project 'Cooperation and development with Latin America and Iberian in Biological Dosimetry of Iberian Group of Radiation Protection Societies; Actividades del proyecto 'Cooperacion y desarrollo con Iberoamerica en dosimetria biologica' del Grupo Iberoamericano de Sociedades de Proteccion Radiologica (GRIAPRA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasazzi, Nora B.; Taja, Maria R.; Giorgio, Marina di [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. E-mail: nnasazzi@cae.arn.gov.ar; Garcia Lima, Omar; Lamadrid, Ana I. [Centro de Proteccion y Higiene de las Radiaciones, La Habana (Cuba)]. E-mail: omar@cprh.edu.cu; Olivares, Pilar; Moreno, Mercedes; Prieto, Maria J. [Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: polivares@radonc.hggm.es; Espinosa, Marco [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Lima (Peru)]. E-mail: mespinoza@ipen.gob.pe

    2001-07-01

    In 1996 the GRIAPRA Group (Latin American and Iberian Group of Radiation Protection Societies) was established with the participation of Argentina, Brazil, Cuba, Mexico, Peru, Portugal and Spain. In 1998 began the biennial Collaborative Working Project 'Cooperation and Development with Latin America in Biological Dosimetry', partially supported by the Extremadura Government, Spain, initially involving five countries: Argentina, Cuba, Peru, Portugal and Spain. The general aim of the project is to create an Latin American and Iberian Biological Dosimetry Laboratories Coordinated Group in order to: give mutual cooperation and to other countries if required, in the case of radiological accident; contribute to enhance the technical capabilities of the participant laboratories; promote the installment of laboratories on this field in countries that does not have it yet through the training of human resources and providing the necessary equipment and, finally, perform jointly research activities in biological dosimetry. The activities designed in order to accomplish the project specific aims for the 1998-2000 period have been achieved. Description and results are presented. (author)

  10. Radiotherapy Based On α Emitting Radionuclides: Geant4 For Dosimetry And Micro-/Nano-Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Possible physics approaches to evaluate the efficacy of TAT are dosimetry, microdosimetry and nanodosimetry. Dosimetry is adequate when mean absorbed dose to a macroscopic target volume is important to understand the biological effect of radiation. General purpose Monte Carlo (MC) codes, based on condensed history approach, are a very useful, cost effective tool to solve dosimetric problems. The condensed history approach is based on the use of multiple scattering theories to calculate the energy losses and angular changes in the direction of the particle. The short α particle range and high LET make the microdosimetric approach more suitable than dosimetry to study TAT from first physics principles, as this approach takes into account the stochastic nature of energy deposition at cellular level

  11. Fast neutron dosimetry: Progress summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose was to investigate the radiological physics and biology of very low energy photons derived from a 1-GeV electron synchrotron storage ring. An extensive beam line and irradiation apparatus was designed, developed, and constructed. Dosimetry measurements required invention and testing of a miniature absolute calorimeter and a cell irradiation fixture suitable for scanning exposures under computer control. Measurements of the kerma factors of oxygen, aluminum and silicon for 14-20 MeV neutrons. Custom designed miniature proportional counters of cylindrical symmetry were employed in these determinations. The oxygen kerma factor was found significantly lower than values calculated from microscopic cross sections. We also tested Mg and Fe walled conventional spherical counters. The direct neutron-counting gas interaction is significant enough for these counters that a correction is needed. We also investigated the application of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy to radiation dosimetry. Our purpose was to take advantage of recent development of very high-field magnets, complex RF-pulse techniques for solvent suppression, and improved spectral analysis techniques

  12. Dosimetry of ionising radiation in modern radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kron, Tomas; Lehmann, Joerg; Greer, Peter B

    2016-07-21

    Dosimetry of ionising radiation is a well-established and mature branch of physical sciences with many applications in medicine and biology. In particular radiotherapy relies on dosimetry for optimisation of cancer treatment and avoidance of severe toxicity for patients. Several novel developments in radiotherapy have introduced new challenges for dosimetry with small and dynamically changing radiation fields being central to many of these applications such as stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy. There is also an increasing awareness of low doses given to structures not in the target region and the associated risk of secondary cancer induction. Here accurate dosimetry is important not only for treatment optimisation but also for the generation of data that can inform radiation protection approaches in the future. The article introduces some of the challenges and highlights the interdependence of dosimetric calculations and measurements. Dosimetric concepts are explored in the context of six application fields: reference dosimetry, small fields, low dose out of field, in vivo dosimetry, brachytherapy and auditing of radiotherapy practice. Recent developments of dosimeters that can be used for these purposes are discussed using spatial resolution and number of dimensions for measurement as sorting criteria. While dosimetry is ever evolving to address the needs of advancing applications of radiation in medicine two fundamental issues remain: the accuracy of the measurement from a scientific perspective and the importance to link the measurement to a clinically relevant question. This review aims to provide an update on both of these. PMID:27351409

  13. Dosimetry of ionising radiation in modern radiation oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kron, Tomas; Lehmann, Joerg; Greer, Peter B.

    2016-07-01

    Dosimetry of ionising radiation is a well-established and mature branch of physical sciences with many applications in medicine and biology. In particular radiotherapy relies on dosimetry for optimisation of cancer treatment and avoidance of severe toxicity for patients. Several novel developments in radiotherapy have introduced new challenges for dosimetry with small and dynamically changing radiation fields being central to many of these applications such as stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy. There is also an increasing awareness of low doses given to structures not in the target region and the associated risk of secondary cancer induction. Here accurate dosimetry is important not only for treatment optimisation but also for the generation of data that can inform radiation protection approaches in the future. The article introduces some of the challenges and highlights the interdependence of dosimetric calculations and measurements. Dosimetric concepts are explored in the context of six application fields: reference dosimetry, small fields, low dose out of field, in vivo dosimetry, brachytherapy and auditing of radiotherapy practice. Recent developments of dosimeters that can be used for these purposes are discussed using spatial resolution and number of dimensions for measurement as sorting criteria. While dosimetry is ever evolving to address the needs of advancing applications of radiation in medicine two fundamental issues remain: the accuracy of the measurement from a scientific perspective and the importance to link the measurement to a clinically relevant question. This review aims to provide an update on both of these.

  14. New dosimetry of atomic bomb radiations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, R J; Sinclair, W K

    1987-10-10

    The reassessment of the radiation dosimetry from the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombs is almost complete. Since atomic bomb survivors provide a major source of data for estimates of risk of cancer induction by radiation the impact of the new dosimetry on risk estimates and radiation protection standards is important. The changes include an increase of about 20% in the estimated yield of the Hiroshima bomb and a reduction in the estimated doses from neutrons in both cities. The estimated neutron dose for Hiroshima is about 10% of the previous estimate. The neutron doses are now so small that direct estimates of neutron relative biological effectiveness may be precluded or be much more difficult. There is little change in most of the gamma ray organ doses because various changes in the new estimates tend to cancel each other out. The new estimate of the attenuation of the free-in-air kerma by the walls of the homes is about twice that used in the previous dosimetry. But the transmission of gamma radiation to the deep organs such as bone marrow is significantly greater than earlier estimates. Probably future risk estimates for radiogenic cancer will be somewhat higher because of both the new dosimetry and the new cancer mortality data. New risk estimates should be available in 1988. PMID:2889042

  15. Complete Biological Evaluation of Therapeutical Radiopharmaceuticals in Rodents, Laboratory Beagles and Veterinary Patients - Preclinical Distribution-, Kinetic-, Excretion-, Internal Dosimetry-, Radiotoxicological-, Radiation Safety- and Efficacy Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development of various novel therapeutical radiopharmaceuticals is a huge demand in many laboratories world-wide. Beside of multiple bone metastases pain-palliation and radiosynovectomy agents a number of specific radiopharmaceutical applicants mainly for oncological applications are in the pipeline. Numerous in vitro methods are available in the first line to test the radiolabelling efficiency, the possible radioactive and non-labelled impurities, the stability of the label at different conditions and mediums, and some specific characteristics of radiopharmaceutical applicants eg.: receptor binding assays, antigen-antibody assays. But, still before human clinical trials there are several questions to be solved in regards of toxicology, radiotoxicology, radiation safety and maybe most importantly the efficacy tasks. All these issues cannot be answered without animal tests. Several decades back animal tests in radiopharmacy meant only standard bioassays in a large number of healthy rodents. Later on pathological models eg.: human tumor xenografts in immunodeficient animals came-out and through them radiopharmaceutical tumor-uptake by the targets were available to evaluate in vivo as well. Xenografts are still popular and widely used models in the field but instead of wide-scaled bioassays nowadays repeated scintiscans or hybrid images (SPECT/CT, PET/CT) are more and more often used to answer kinetic-, excretion-, tumor uptake, internal dosimetry (Minimum Effective Dose, Maximum Tolerable Dose, critical organ doses, tumor doses) questions. Greater animals like laboratory Beagles are more closely in size, clinical and metabolic parameters to the human objects so playing a more perfect role of human medical doctor and especially veterinary patients. Easy to understand that many of the spontaneously occurring companion animal diseases are a good model of human pathological diseases. The need of a better diagnosis and treatment of that animals meets with

  16. INDIVIDUAL DOSIMETRY SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Personnel in the distribution groups Aleph, Delphi, L3, Opal who also work for other experiments than at LEP, should contact their dispatchers to explain their activities for the future, after LEP dismantling in order to be maintained on the regular distribution list at Individual DosimetryWe inform all staff and users under regular dosimetric control that the dosimeters for the monitoring period MAY/JUNE will be available from their usual dispatchers on Tuesday 2 May.Please have your films changed before the 12 May.The colour of the dosimeter valid in is MAY/JUNE is YELLOW.Individual Dosimetry Service will be closed on Friday 28 April.

  17. Status of radiation processing dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, A.

    1993-01-01

    Several milestones have marked the field of radiation processing dosimetry since IMRP 7. Among them are the IAEA symposium on High Dose Dosimetry for Radiation Processing and the international Workshops on Dosimetry for Radiation Processing organized by the ASTM. Several standards have been...... or are being published by the ASTM in this field, both on dosimetry procedures and on the proper use of specific dosimeter systems. Several individuals are involved in this international cooperation which contribute significantly to the broader understanding of the role of dosimetry in radiation processing....... The importance of dosimetry is emphasized in the standards on radiation sterilization which are currently drafted by the European standards organization CEN and by the international standards organization ISO. In both standards, dosimetry plays key roles in characterization of the facility, in qualification...

  18. Radiation dosimetry in radiotherapy with internal emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stabin, Michael G. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Full text. Radiation dosimetry radionuclides are currently being labeled to various biological agents used in internal emitter radiotherapy. This talk will review the various technologies and types of radiolabel in current use, with focus on the characterization of the radiation dose to the various important tissues of the body. Methods for obtaining data, developing kinetic models, and calculating radiation doses will be reviewed. Monoclonal antibodies are currently being labeled with both alpha and beta emitting radionuclides in attempts to find effective agents against cancer. Several radionuclides are also being used as bone pain palliation agents. These agents must be studied in clinical trials to determine the biokinetics and radiation dosimetry prior to approval for general use. In such studies, it is important to ensure the collection of the appropriate kinds of data and to collect the data at appropriate time intervals. The uptake and retention of activity in all significant source organs and in excreta be measured periodically (with at least 2 data points phase of uptake or clearance). Then, correct dosimetry methods must be applied - the best available methods for characterizing the radionuclide kinetic and for estimating the dosimetry in the various organs of the body especially the marrow, should be used. Attempts are also under way to develop methods for estimating true patient-specific dosimetry. Cellular and animal studies are also. Valuable in evaluating the efficacy of the agents in shrinking or eliminating tumors; some results from such studies will also be discussed. The estimation of radiation doses to patients in therapy with internal emitters involves several complex phases of analysis. Careful attention to detail and the use of the best available methods are essential to the protection of the patient and a successful outcome

  19. Dosimetry in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosimetry is an area of increasing importance in diagnostic radiology. There is a realisation amongst health professionals that the radiation dose received by patients from modern X-ray examinations and procedures can be at a level of significance for the induction of cancer across a population, and in some unfortunate instances, in the acute damage to particular body organs such as skin and eyes. The formulation and measurement procedures for diagnostic radiology dosimetry have recently been standardised through an international code of practice which describes the methodologies necessary to address the diverging imaging modalities used in diagnostic radiology. Common to all dosimetry methodologies is the measurement of the air kerma from the X-ray device under defined conditions. To ensure the accuracy of the dosimetric determination, such measurements need to be made with appropriate instrumentation that has a calibration that is traceable to a standards laboratory. Dosimetric methods are used in radiology departments for a variety of purposes including the determination of patient dose levels to allow examinations to be optimized and to assist in decisions on the justification of examination choices. Patient dosimetry is important for special cases such as for X-ray examinations of children and pregnant patients. It is also a key component of the quality control of X-ray equipment and procedures.

  20. Ion storage dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, V. K.

    2001-09-01

    The availability of a reliable, accurate and cost-effective real-time personnel dosimetry system is fascinating to radiation workers. Electronic dosimeters are contemplated to meet this demand of active dosimetry. The development of direct ion storage (DIS) dosimeters, a member of the electronic dosimeter family, for personnel dosimetry is also an attempt in this direction. DIS dosimeter is a hybrid of the well-established technology of ion chambers and the latest advances in data storage using metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) analog memory device. This dosimeter is capable of monitoring legal occupational radiation doses of gamma, X-rays, beta and neutron radiation. Similar to an ion chamber, the performance of the dosimeter for a particular application can be optimized through the selection of appropriate wall materials. The use of the floating gate of a MOSFET as one of the electrodes of the ion chamber allows the miniaturization of the device to the size of a dosimetry badge and avoids the use of power supplies during dose accumulation. The concept of the device, underlying physics and the design of the DIS dosimeter are discussed. The results of preliminary testing of the device are also provided.

  1. Dosimetry in diagnostic radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghzifene, Ahmed; Dance, David R; McLean, Donald; Kramer, Hans-Michael

    2010-10-01

    Dosimetry is an area of increasing importance in diagnostic radiology. There is a realisation amongst health professionals that the radiation dose received by patients from modern X-ray examinations and procedures can be at a level of significance for the induction of cancer across a population, and in some unfortunate instances, in the acute damage to particular body organs such as skin and eyes. The formulation and measurement procedures for diagnostic radiology dosimetry have recently been standardised through an international code of practice which describes the methodologies necessary to address the diverging imaging modalities used in diagnostic radiology. Common to all dosimetry methodologies is the measurement of the air kerma from the X-ray device under defined conditions. To ensure the accuracy of the dosimetric determination, such measurements need to be made with appropriate instrumentation that has a calibration that is traceable to a standards laboratory. Dosimetric methods are used in radiology departments for a variety of purposes including the determination of patient dose levels to allow examinations to be optimized and to assist in decisions on the justification of examination choices. Patient dosimetry is important for special cases such as for X-ray examinations of children and pregnant patients. It is also a key component of the quality control of X-ray equipment and procedures. PMID:20655679

  2. Dosimetry and Calibration Section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two tasks of the Dosimetry and Calibration Section at CERN are the Individual Dosimetry Service which assures the personal monitoring of about 5000 persons potentially exposed to ionizing radiation at CERN, and the Calibration Laboratory which verifies all the instruments and monitors. This equipment is used by the sections of the RP Group for assuring radiation protection around CERN's accelerators, and by the Environmental Section of TISTE. In addition, nearly 250 electronic and 300 quartz fibre dosimeters, employed in operational dosimetry, are calibrated at least once a year. The Individual Dosimetry Service uses an extended database (INDOS) which contains information about all the individual doses ever received at CERN. For most of 1997 it was operated without the support of a database administrator as the technician who had assured this work retired. The Software Support Section of TIS-TE took over the technical responsibility of the database, but in view of the many other tasks of this Section and the lack of personnel, only a few interventions for solving immediate problems were possible

  3. High frequency electromagnetic dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez-Hernández, David A

    2009-01-01

    Along with the growth of RF and microwave technology applications, there is a mounting concern about the possible adverse effects over human health from electromagnetic radiation. Addressing this issue and putting it into perspective, this groundbreaking resource provides critical details on the latest advances in high frequency electromagnetic dosimetry.

  4. Eleventh DOE workshop on personnel neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since its formation, the Office of Health (EH-40) has stressed the importance of the exchange of information related to and improvements in neutron dosimetry. This Workshop was the eleventh in the series sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). It provided a forum for operational personnel at DOE facilities to discuss current issues related to neutron dosimetry and for leading investigators in the field to discuss promising approaches for future research. A total of 26 papers were presented including the keynote address by Dr. Warren K. Sinclair, who spoke on, ''The 1990 Recommendations of the ICRP and their Biological Background.'' The first several papers discussed difficulties in measuring neutrons of different energies and ways of compensating or deriving correction factors at individual facilities. Presentations were also given by the US Navy and Air Force. Current research in neutron dosimeter development was the subject of the largest number of papers. These included a number on the development of neutron spectrometers

  5. In vivo dosimetry for IMRT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vial, Philip

    2011-05-01

    In vivo dosimetry has a well established role in the quality assurance of 2D radiotherapy and 3D conformal radiotherapy. The role of in vivo dosimetry for IMRT is not as well established. IMRT introduces a range of technical issues that complicate in vivo dosimetry. The first decade or so of IMRT implementation has largely relied upon pre-treatment phantom based dose verification. During that time, several new devices and techniques for in vivo dosimetry have emerged with the promise of providing the ultimate form of IMRT dose verification. Solid state dosimeters continue to dominate the field of in vivo dosimetry in the IMRT era. In this report we review the literature on in vivo dosimetry for IMRT, with an emphasis on clinical evidence for different detector types. We describe the pros and cons of different detectors and techniques in the IMRT setting and the roles that they are likely to play in the future.

  6. The dosimetry of ionizing radiation

    CERN Document Server

    1990-01-01

    A continuation of the treatise The Dosimetry of Ionizing Radiation, Volume III builds upon the foundations of Volumes I and II and the tradition of the preceeding treatise Radiation Dosimetry. Volume III contains three comprehensive chapters on the applications of radiation dosimetry in particular research and medical settings, a chapter on unique and useful detectors, and two chapters on Monte Carlo techniques and their applications.

  7. Ambiguities in thermoluminescence dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On one hand, thermoluminescence dosimetry is one of most reliable, rugged and economical system of passive dosimetry but on the other hand there are several ambiguities, which need attention. The PTTL is a complex phenomenon and it is difficult to identify the source for the transfer of the charge carrier to repopulate the traps related to the glow peaks. For the photon energy dependence it is difficult to explain the change in the response for 662 keV gamma rays of 137Cs as compared to the response for 1.25 MeV gamma rays of 60Co. The increase in the response of a TLD with increasing heating rate poses another ambiguity and so is the case with the observations of the supra linearity of different glow peaks. To over come the ambiguities, efforts have to continue to enhance the understanding and to harmonize the protocol for reliable experimental data

  8. Neutron beam measurement dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaro, C.R. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-11-01

    This report describes animal dosimetry studies and phantom measurements. During 1994, 12 dogs were irradiated at BMRR as part of a 4 fraction dose tolerance study. The animals were first infused with BSH and irradiated daily for 4 consecutive days. BNL irradiated 2 beagles as part of their dose tolerance study using BPA fructose. In addition, a dog at WSU was irradiated at BMRR after an infusion of BPA fructose. During 1994, the INEL BNCT dosimetry team measured neutron flux and gamma dose profiles in two phantoms exposed to the epithermal neutron beam at the BMRR. These measurements were performed as a preparatory step to the commencement of human clinical trials in progress at the BMRR.

  9. Quantitative imaging for clinical dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardiès, Manuel; Flux, Glenn; Lassmann, Michael; Monsieurs, Myriam; Savolainen, Sauli; Strand, Sven-Erik

    2006-12-01

    Patient-specific dosimetry in nuclear medicine is now a legal requirement in many countries throughout the EU for targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) applications. In order to achieve that goal, an increased level of accuracy in dosimetry procedures is needed. Current research in nuclear medicine dosimetry should not only aim at developing new methods to assess the delivered radiation absorbed dose at the patient level, but also to ensure that the proposed methods can be put into practice in a sufficient number of institutions. A unified dosimetry methodology is required for making clinical outcome comparisons possible.

  10. Sixth symposium on neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This booklet contains all abstracts of papers presented in 13 sessions. Main topics: Cross sections and Kerma factors; analytical radiobiology; detectors for personnel monitoring; secondary charged particles and microdosimetric basis of q-value for neutrons; personnel dosimetry; concepts for radiation protection; ambient monitoring; TEPC and ion chambers in radiation protection; beam dosimetry; track detectors (CR-39); dosimetry at biomedical irradiation facilities; health physics at therapy facilities; calibration for radiation protection; devices for beam dosimetry (TLD and miscellaneous); therapy and biomedical irradiation facilities; treatment planning. (HP)

  11. Personnel radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book contains the 21 technical papers presented at the Technical Committee Meeting to Elaborate Procedures and Data for the Intercomparison of Personnel Dosimeters organizaed by the IAEA on 22-26 April 1985. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. A list of areas in which additional research and development work is needed and recommendations for an IAEA-sponsored intercomparison program on personnel dosimetry is also included

  12. INDIVIDUAL DOSIMETRY SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    Personnel in the distribution groups Aleph, Delphi, L3, Opal who also work for other experiments than at LEP, should contact the Individual Dosimetry ServiceWe inform all staff and users under regular dosimetric control that the dosimeters for the monitoring period JANUARY/FEBRUARY will be available from their usual dispatchers on Monday the third of January 2000.Please have your films changed:before the 12 January.The colour of the dosimeter valid in JANUARY/FEBRUARY is WHITE.

  13. INDIVIDUAL DOSIMETRY SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Personnel in the distribution groups Aleph, Delphi, L3, Opal who also work for other experiments than at LEP, should contact the Individual Dosimetry Service.We inform all staff and users under regular dosimetric control that the dosimeters for the monitoring period MARCH/APRIL will be available from their usual dispatchers on the third of March 2000.Please have your films changed before the 13th of March.The colour of the dosimeter valid in MARCH/APRIL is BLUE.

  14. Personal radon daughter dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conventional means of radon daughter exposure estimatikn for uranium miners in Canada is by grab sampling and time weighting. Personal dosimetry is a possible alternative method with its own advantages and limitations. The author poses basic questions with regard to two methods of radon daughter detection, thermoluminescent chips and track-etch film. An historical review of previous and current research and development programs in Canada and in other countries is presented, as are brief results and conclusions of each dosimeter evaluation

  15. Dosimetry: an ARDENT topic

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2012-01-01

    The first annual ARDENT workshop took place in Vienna from 20 to 23 November. The workshop gathered together the Early-Stage Researchers (ESR) and their supervisors, plus other people involved from all the participating institutions.   “The meeting, which was organised with the local support of the Austrian Institute of Technology, was a nice opportunity for the ESRs to get together, meet each other, and present their research plans and some preliminary results of their work,” says Marco Silari, a member of CERN Radiation Protection Group and the scientist in charge of the programme. Two full days were devoted to a training course on radiation dosimetry, delivered by renowned experts. The workshop closed with a half-day visit to the MedAustron facility in Wiener Neustadt. ARDENT (Advanced Radiation Dosimetry European Network Training) is a Marie Curie ITN project funded under EU FP7 with €4 million. The project focuses on radiation dosimetry exploiting se...

  16. Biological dosimetry after radiosynoviorthesis with rhenium-186 sulphide and erbium-169 citrate; Strahlenbiologische Effekte nach Radiosynoviorthese mit Rhenium-186-Sulfid und Erbium-169-Citrat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnurbus-Duhs, Annika Jeannine

    2013-08-16

    Aim. The aim of the present studies was to investigate the biological radiation effect of radiosynoviorthesis (RSO) with Re-186 and Er-169 in order to evaluate the safety of this procedure. Methods. RSO with rhenium-186 sulfide colloid (10 patients) or erbium-169 citrate colloid (13 patients) was carried out in a total of 23 patients. Afterwards, the treated joint was immobilised for three days using splints. From all patients, blood was drawn immediately before and 17 to 19 days (Re-186) or 45 to 50 days (Er-169) after RSO. To evaluate the radiation dose, the yield of dicentric chromosomes in lymphocytes was determined exclusively in metaphases of the first cell cycle in vitro. At least 1000 cells per patient have been analysed before and after RSO which is sufficient to find potential radiation effects after long-term exposure to low energy radiation such as to expect after RSO. In addition, for Re-186 the activity leakage from the treated joint was measured by whole-body scintigraphy. Results. In a total of 47017 cells analysed from 46 blood samples, 40 and 88 before and 59 and 105 dicentrics after RSO with Re-186 and Er-169 were found. This showed no statistically significant increase in the number of dicentric chromosomes. The measured average activity leakage of less than 5 % (less than 3 MBq) was considered to be low. Conclusion. The results of chromosome analysis and activity measurement after RSO prove that this procedure is associated with a low effective dose in treated patients and thus can be considered a safe treatment.

  17. Physical and biological dosimetry at the RA-3 facility for small animal irradiation: preliminary BNCT studies in an experimental model of oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a binary treatment modality based on the capture reaction that occurs between thermal neutrons and boron-10 atoms that accumulate selectively in tumor tissue, emitting high linear energy transfer (LET), short range (5-9 microns) particles (alpha y 7Li). Thus, BNCT would potentially target tumor tissue selectively, sparing normal tissue. Herein we evaluated the feasibility of treating experimental oral mucosa tumors with BNCT at RA-3 (CAE) employing the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model and characterized the irradiation field at the RA-3 facility. We evaluated the therapeutic effect on tumor of BNCT mediated by BPA in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model and the potential radio toxic effects in normal tissue. We evidenced a moderate biological response in tumor, with no radio toxic effects in normal tissue following irradiations with no shielding for the animal body. Given the sub-optimal therapeutic response, we designed and built a 6Li2CO3 shielding for the body of the animal to increase the irradiation dose to tumor, without exceeding normal tissue radio tolerance. The measured absolute magnitude of thermal neutron flux and the characterization of the beam with and without the shielding in place, suggest that the irradiation facility in the thermal column of RA-3 would afford an excellent platform to perform BNCT studies in vitro and in vivo in small experimental animals. The present findings must be confirmed and extended by performing in vivo BNCT radiobiological studies in small experimental animals, employing the shielding device for the animal body. (author)

  18. The effect of changes in dosimetry on cancer mortality risk estimates in the atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the spring of 1986, RERF received a new dosimetry system which was developed by the US-Japan Committee for Reassessment of Atomic Bomb Radiation Dosimetry in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. This report presents the comparisons of leukemia and nonleukemia cancer mortality risk estimates under the old and new dosimetries. In terms of total kerma (essentially whole-body gamma-ray plus neutron exposure), the risk estimates for both types of cancer are 75 %-85 % higher with the new dosimetry. This and other summary comparisons here make some allowance for possible nonlinearity at high estimated doses. It is also important to consider the changes in relation to organ doses and assumptions about the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of neutrons. Without regard to RBE, the risk estimates for total organ dose are essentially unchanged by the dosimetry revision. However, with increasing assumed values of RBE, the estimated low-LET risk decreases much less rapidly under the new dosimetry, due to the smaller neutron component. Thus at an assumed constant RBE of 10, for example, the effect of the dosimetry revision is to increase organ dose risk estimates, relative to those based on the old dosimetry, by 30 % for nonleukemia and 80 % for leukemia. At an RBE of 20 these increases are 72 % and 136 %, respectively. A number of other issues are discussed. The city difference in dose-response is smaller with the new dosimetry, and is no longer statistically significant, even at an RBE of one. Estimation of RBE is even less feasible with the new dosimetry. There is substantial question of the linearity in dose-response, in the sense of a leveling off at higher doses. Finally, some indication is given of how estimated lifetime risks from this dosimetry may compare to widely-used estimates based largely on the RERF data with the previous dosimetry. (author)

  19. A human head phantom for experimental dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to achieve a better understanding of the behavior of nuclear particles in a human head experiment a phantom preserving similar tissues as well as similar anthropomorphic characteristics was used. In this work a biologic equivalent tissue material was developed, maintaining the chemical composition and tissue density, based on enriched PMMA. A humanoid head phantom was built using a human skull as a base, donated by the Morphology Department of the Institute for Biologic Sciences-ICB/UFMG. Muscles were replaced with biologic equivalent tissue material following anatomic precepts. The phantom presents: formalized animal salivary glands, brain and submandibular lymph nodes; human teeth; hair; prosthetic eyes and nose as well as human equivalent skin containing silicone and animal collagen. This phantom present several important conditions as human morphological characteristics, equivalent biological tissue and the head bone structure. It will be used in radiotherapy and brachytherapy studies, dosimetry and quality control of medical diagnostic image. (author)

  20. Risks and benefits of combining immunosuppressives and biological agents in inflammatory bowel disease: is the synergy worth the risk?

    OpenAIRE

    Hanauer, Stephen B.

    2007-01-01

    Since the introduction of infliximab to treat Crohn's disease, combination therapy with immunosuppressants has reduced immunogenicity, without impacting efficacy. The availability of novel anti‐TNF agents and potential combined toxicities question the risk/benefit of combination therapies.

  1. PeerWise provides significant academic benefits to biological science students across diverse learning tasks, but with minimal instructor intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQueen, H A; Shields, C; Finnegan, D J; Higham, J; Simmen, M W

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that student engagement with PeerWise, an online tool that allows students to author and answer multiple-choice questions (MCQs), is associated with enhanced academic performance across diverse assessment types on a second year Genetics course. Benefits were consistent over three course deliveries, with differential benefits bestowed on groups of different prior ability. A rating scheme, to assess the educational quality of students' questions, is presented and demonstrates that our students are able intuitively to make such quality assessments, and that the process of authoring high quality questions alone does not explain the academic benefits. We further test the benefits of providing additional PeerWise support and conclude that PeerWise works efficiently with minimal intervention, and can be reliably assessed using automatically generated PeerWise scores.

  2. Implementing ‘Mutually Supportive’ Access and Benefit Sharing Mechanisms Under the Plant Treaty, Convention on Biological Diversity, and Nagoya Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Halewood et. al.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture (ITPGRFA and the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD commit their member states to implement very different access and benefit-sharing systems: one system, under the ITPGRFA, is designed to encourage international pooling and sharing of genetic diversity; the other system, under the CBD, is designed to maximise each country’s sovereign control over their genetic resources. Progress in domestic implementation of both systems has been relatively slow. One factor contributing to delays is that policy makers in many countries are uncertain about how to address the interface between these two access and benefit-sharing systems. Based on research and policy development experiences in several countries, the authors first identify the issues national policy-makers need to address, and the steps they need to follow, to implement the multilateral system of access and benefit sharing under the ITPGRFA. Second, the authors analyse the points of intersection, at the national level, between the ITPGRFA’s multilateral system and access and benefit-sharing, and mechanisms developed (or being developed pursuant to the Convention on Biological Diversity and its recently adopted Nagoya Protocol. Third, the authors analyse factors that are contributing to the lack of coordination, in many countries, between the national public environment and agriculture agencies that have mandates to lead national implementation of these international agreements.

  3. Integration of behavioral and biological control for the management of cotton insect pests: Significance and cost benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earias pheromones. The pheromones were applied once in a season at the start of square formation stage of the cotton crop. The fourth block was treated with conventional insecticides. The farmer applied organophosphate (confidor) and Pyrethroid (Polytrin-C) insecticides in two sprays each. The infestation of pink bollworm and Earias spp. was recorded at weekly intervals. Establishment of the parasitoids was determined by placing Angoumois grain moth eggs in the field. These cards were brought into the laboratory after 24 hours exposure in the differently treated blocks and parasitoid emergence was recorded. For the control of sucking pests, insecticide (confidor) was sprayed uniformly in all the treatments in the third week of June during both years. The cost of the treatments was worked out and the cost benefit ratio for each treatment was calculated. Integration of parasitoids and pheromones, suppressed the bollworms infestation below the economic injury level (5-10%). Separate treatment of pheromones or parasitoids was less effective, and required supplemental measures. The population of the parasitoids in the field was low in the hot months of June and July and thereafter it gradually increased in the succeeding months. Maximum number of the parasitoids was observed in the month of October. The cost of integrated treatment with parasitoids and pheromones was also less than that of insecticide treatment alone. Potential of behavioural and biological control tactics for launching the integrated approach on an area-wide basis is discussed

  4. Audit of radiotherapy dosimetry in New Zealand: Practical considerations and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to verify regulatory compliance, every two years staff of the National Radiation Laboratory (NRL) of New Zealand visit each of the radiotherapy departments in New Zealand to carry out an independent audit of the dosimetry of their external radiation beams. The audit is carried out under Technical Reports Series No. 277 reference conditions using dosimetry equipment belonging to the NRL to maximize the independence of the measurements. Audits have been carried out regularly since 1991 and the results show that discrepancies of up to 2% for linac beams are within normal output variability. However, much greater discrepancies are observed in kilovoltage X ray beams.This is due to the use of different dosimetry protocols rather than error. Experience to date suggests that the dosimetry audit is of continuing benefit to radiotherapy departments, but should be supplemented with dosimetry of planned treatments in an anthropomorphic phantom. (author)

  5. Fast neutron dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    This progress report concentrates on two major areas of dosimetry research: measurement of fast neutron kerma factors for several elements for monochromatic and white spectrum neutron fields and determination of the response of thermoluminescent phosphors to various ultra-soft X-ray energies and beta-rays. Dr. Zhixin Zhou from the Shanghai Institute of Radiation Medicine, People's Republic of China brought with him special expertise in the fabrication and use of ultra-thin TLD materials. Such materials are not available in the USA. The rather unique properties of these materials were investigated during this grant period.

  6. INDIVIDUAL DOSIMETRY SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Personnel in the distribution groups Aleph, Delphi, L3, Opal who also work for other experiments than at LEP, should contact their dispatchers to explain their activities for the future, after LEP dismantling in order to be maintained on the regular distribution list at Individual Dosimetry ServiceWe inform all staffs and users under regular dosimetric control that the dosimeters for the monitoring period JULY/AUGUST are available from their usual dispatchers.Please have your films changed before the 10th of July.The colour of the dosimeter valid in JULY/AUGUST is PINK.

  7. Individual dosimetry and calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1995 both the Individual Dosimetry and Calibration Sections worked under the condition of a status quo and concentrated fully on the routine part of their work. Nevertheless, the machine for printing the bar code which will be glued onto the film holder and hence identify the people when entering into high radiation areas was put into operation and most of the holders were equipped with the new identification. As far as the Calibration Section is concerned the project of the new source control system that is realized by the Technical Support Section was somewhat accelerated

  8. Cytogenetic Dosimetry: Applications in Preparedness for and Response to Radiation Emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cytogenetic dosimetry is recognized as a valuable dose assessment method which fills a gap in dosimetric technology, particularly when there are difficulties in interpreting the data, in cases where there is reason to believe that persons not wearing dosimeters have been exposed to radiation, in cases of claims for compensation for radiation injuries that are not supported by unequivocal dosimetric evidence, or in cases of exposure over an individual's working lifetime. The IAEA has maintained a long standing involvement in biological dosimetry commencing in 1978. This association has been through a sequence of coordinated research programmes (CRPs), the running of regional and national training courses, the sponsorship of individual training fellowships, and the provision of equipment to laboratories in Member States, establishing capabilities in biological dosimetry. From this has arisen the provision to Member States of advice regarding the best focus for research and suggestions for the most suitable techniques for future practice in biological dosimetry. One CRP resulted in the publication in 1986 of a manual, entitled Biological Dosimetry: Chromosomal Aberration Analysis for Dose Assessment (Technical Reports Series No. 260). This was superseded in 2001 by a revised second edition, Technical Reports Series No. 405. This present publication constitutes a third edition, with extensive updating to reflect the considerable advances that have been made in cytogenetic biological dosimetry during the past decade.

  9. Cytogenetic Dosimetry: Applications in Preparedness for and Response to Radiation Emergencies (Russian Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cytogenetic dosimetry is recognized as a valuable dose assessment method which fills a gap in dosimetric technology, particularly when there are difficulties in interpreting the data, in cases where there is reason to believe that persons not wearing dosimeters have been exposed to radiation, in cases of claims for compensation for radiation injuries that are not supported by unequivocal dosimetric evidence, or in cases of exposure over an individual's working lifetime. The IAEA has maintained a long standing involvement in biological dosimetry commencing in 1978. This association has been through a sequence of coordinated research programmes (CRPs), the running of regional and national training courses, the sponsorship of individual training fellowships, and the provision of equipment to laboratories in Member States, establishing capabilities in biological dosimetry. From this has arisen the provision to Member States of advice regarding the best focus for research and suggestions for the most suitable techniques for future practice in biological dosimetry. One CRP resulted in the publication in 1986 of a manual, entitled Biological Dosimetry: Chromosomal Aberration Analysis for Dose Assessment (Technical Reports Series No. 260). This was superseded in 2001 by a revised second edition, Technical Reports Series No. 405. This present publication constitutes a third edition, with extensive updating to reflect the considerable advances that have been made in cytogenetic biological dosimetry during the past decade

  10. Cytogenetic Dosimetry: Applications in Preparedness for and Response to Radiation Emergencies (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cytogenetic dosimetry is recognized as a valuable dose assessment method which fills a gap in dosimetric technology, particularly when there are difficulties in interpreting the data, in cases where there is reason to believe that persons not wearing dosimeters have been exposed to radiation, in cases of claims for compensation for radiation injuries that are not supported by unequivocal dosimetric evidence, or in cases of exposure over an individual’s working lifetime. The IAEA has maintained a long standing involvement in biological dosimetry commencing in 1978. This association has been through a sequence of coordinated research programmes (CRPs), the running of regional and national training courses, the sponsorship of individual training fellowships, and the provision of equipment to laboratories in Member States, establishing capabilities in biological dosimetry. From this has arisen the provision to Member States of advice regarding the best focus for research and suggestions for the most suitable techniques for future practice in biological dosimetry. One CRP resulted in the publication in 1986 of a manual, entitled Biological Dosimetry: Chromosomal Aberration Analysis for Dose Assessment (Technical Reports Series No. 260). This was superseded in 2001 by a revised second edition, Technical Reports Series No. 405. This present publication constitutes a third edition, with extensive updating to reflect the considerable advances that have been made in cytogenetic biological dosimetry during the past decade

  11. Cytogenetic Dosimetry: Applications in Preparedness for and Response to Radiation Emergencies (French Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cytogenetic dosimetry is recognized as a valuable dose assessment method which fills a gap in dosimetric technology, particularly when there are difficulties in interpreting the data, in cases where there is reason to believe that persons not wearing dosimeters have been exposed to radiation, in cases of claims for compensation for radiation injuries that are not supported by unequivocal dosimetric evidence, or in cases of exposure over an individual's working lifetime. The IAEA has maintained a long standing involvement in biological dosimetry commencing in 1978. This association has been through a sequence of coordinated research programmes (CRPs), the running of regional and national training courses, the sponsorship of individual training fellowships, and the provision of equipment to laboratories in Member States, establishing capabilities in biological dosimetry. From this has arisen the provision to Member States of advice regarding the best focus for research and suggestions for the most suitable techniques for future practice in biological dosimetry. One CRP resulted in the publication in 1986 of a manual, entitled Biological Dosimetry: Chromosomal Aberration Analysis for Dose Assessment (Technical Reports Series No. 260). This was superseded in 2001 by a revised second edition, Technical Reports Series No. 405. This present publication constitutes a third edition, with extensive updating to reflect the considerable advances that have been made in cytogenetic biological dosimetry during the past decade

  12. Development of technology for biological dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adult male rats were treated a single, whole body exposure to a dose of 0.1, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 5, 7 and 9 Gy. The animal were sacrificed 6, 24, 48, 72, 96 and 212 hours following exposure. Enzyme activity changes such as alkaline phosphatase, GOT, creating kinase, MDH and LDH in rat serum as biochemical indicators useful for evaluating radiation exposure were measured. An competitive enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) has been developed to measure acute phase reactants (APRs) in rat serum after gamma-irradiation. Rat alpha-2 macroglobulin, alpha-1 acid glycoprotein, haptoglobin, ceruloplasmin, C-reactive protein and alpha-1 antitrypsin were purified from the plasma of turpentine treated rats. In vitro somatic mutation induced by gamma-irradiation and pentachlorophenol (PCP) which is representative of chemical pollutant was measured at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphorybosyl transferase (HPRT) locus in human T-lymphocytes by a cell cloning assay. Mutant cells were selected by their ability to form a clone in the presence of purine analogue 6-thioguanine. Reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction technique was needed for the mutation spectrum to discriminate combined exposure to radiation and chemicals. (author). 98 refs., 7 tabs., 47 figs

  13. Development of technology for biological dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Gyu; Kim, Kug Chan; Lee, Kang Sik; Kim, Jin Kyu; Chun, Ki Jung; Shim, Hye Won; Park, Seon Young

    1997-07-01

    Adult male rats were treated a single, whole body exposure to a dose of 0.1, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 5, 7 and 9 Gy. The animal were sacrificed 6, 24, 48, 72, 96 and 212 hours following exposure. Enzyme activity changes such as alkaline phosphatase, GOT, creating kinase, MDH and LDH in rat serum as biochemical indicators useful for evaluating radiation exposure were measured. An competitive enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) has been developed to measure acute phase reactants (APRs) in rat serum after gamma-irradiation. Rat alpha-2 macroglobulin, alpha-1 acid glycoprotein, haptoglobin, ceruloplasmin, C-reactive protein and alpha-1 antitrypsin were purified from the plasma of turpentine treated rats. In vitro somatic mutation induced by gamma-irradiation and pentachlorophenol (PCP) which is representative of chemical pollutant was measured at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphorybosyl transferase (HPRT) locus in human T-lymphocytes by a cell cloning assay. Mutant cells were selected by their ability to form a clone in the presence of purine analogue 6-thioguanine. Reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction technique was needed for the mutation spectrum to discriminate combined exposure to radiation and chemicals. (author). 98 refs., 7 tabs., 47 figs.

  14. Internal Dosimetry. Chapter 18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Committee on Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) is a committee within the Society of Nuclear Medicine. The MIRD Committee was formed in 1965 with the mission to standardize internal dosimetry calculations, improve the published emission data for radionuclides and enhance the data on pharmacokinetics for radiopharmaceuticals [18.1]. A unified approach to internal dosimetry was published by the MIRD Committee in 1968, MIRD Pamphlet No. 1 [18.2], which was updated several times thereafter. Currently, the most well known version is the MIRD Primer from 1991 [18.3]. The latest publication on the formalism was published in 2009 in MIRD Pamphlet No. 21 [18.4], which provides a notation meant to bridge the differences in the formalism used by the MIRD Committee and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) [18.5]. The formalism presented in MIRD Pamphlet No. 21 [18.4] will be used here, although some references to the quantities and parameters used in the MIRD primer [18.3] will be made. All symbols, quantities and units are presented

  15. Retrospective accident dosimetry using trapped charges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. I.; Kim, J. L.; Chang, I.; Kim, B. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Dicentric chromosome aberrations technique scoring of aberrations in metaphases prepared from human lymphocytes is most commonly used. This is considered as a reliable technique because the sample is extracted from the individual human body itself. There are other techniques in biological dosimetry such as Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) using translocations, premature chromosome condensation (PCC) and micronucleus assay. However the minimum detectable doses (MDD) are relatively high and sample preparation time is also relatively longer. Therefore, there is limitation in use of these techniques for the purpose of triage in a short time in case of emergency situation relating large number of persons. Electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique is based on the signal from unpaired electrons such as free radicals in irradiated materials especially tooth enamel, however it has also limitation for the purpose of triage because of difficulty of sample taking and its high MDD. Recently as physical methods, thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) technique have been attracted due to its lower MDD and simplicity of sample preparation. Density of the trapped charges is generally proportional to the radiation dose absorbed and the intensity of emitting light is also proportional to the density of trapped charges, thus it can be applied to measure radiation dose retrospectively. In this presentation, TL and OSL techniques are going to introduced and discussed as physical methods for retrospective accident dosimetry using trapped charges especially in electronic component materials. As a tool for dose reconstruction for emergency situation, thermoluminescece and optically stimulated luminescence techniques which are based on trapped charges during exposure of material are introduced. These techniques have several advantages such as high sensitivity, fast evaluation and ease to sample collection over common biological dosimetry and EPR

  16. Coming Out in Class: Challenges and Benefits of Active Learning in a Biology Classroom for LGBTQIA Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Katelyn M; Brownell, Sara E

    2016-01-01

    As we transition our undergraduate biology classrooms from traditional lectures to active learning, the dynamics among students become more important. These dynamics can be influenced by student social identities. One social identity that has been unexamined in the context of undergraduate biology is the spectrum of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, and asexual (LGBTQIA) identities. In this exploratory interview study, we probed the experiences and perceptions of seven students who identify as part of the LGBTQIA community. We found that students do not always experience the undergraduate biology classroom to be a welcoming or accepting place for their identities. In contrast to traditional lectures, active-learning classes increase the relevance of their LGBTQIA identities due to the increased interactions among students during group work. Finally, working with other students in active-learning classrooms can present challenges and opportunities for students considering their LGBTQIA identity. These findings indicate that these students' LGBTQIA identities are affecting their experience in the classroom and that there may be specific instructional practices that can mitigate some of the possible obstacles. We hope that this work can stimulate discussions about how to broadly make our active-learning biology classes more inclusive of this specific population of students.

  17. The Benefits of Mouse Keeping--An Empirical Study on Students' Flow and Intrinsic Motivation in Biology Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Annika; Klingenberg, Konstantin; Wilde, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Contact with living animals is an exceptional possibility within biology education to facilitate an intense immersion into the study topic and even allow for a flow experience (Csikszentmihalyi 2000). Further, it might affect the perceptions of the students' basic needs for autonomy and competence and thereby their quality of motivation (Deci and…

  18. Coming Out in Class: Challenges and Benefits of Active Learning in a Biology Classroom for LGBTQIA Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Katelyn M.; Brownell, Sara E.

    2016-01-01

    As we transition our undergraduate biology classrooms from traditional lectures to active learning, the dynamics among students become more important. These dynamics can be influenced by student social identities. One social identity that has been unexamined in the context of undergraduate biology is the spectrum of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, and asexual (LGBTQIA) identities. In this exploratory interview study, we probed the experiences and perceptions of seven students who identify as part of the LGBTQIA community. We found that students do not always experience the undergraduate biology classroom to be a welcoming or accepting place for their identities. In contrast to traditional lectures, active-learning classes increase the relevance of their LGBTQIA identities due to the increased interactions among students during group work. Finally, working with other students in active-learning classrooms can present challenges and opportunities for students considering their LGBTQIA identity. These findings indicate that these students’ LGBTQIA identities are affecting their experience in the classroom and that there may be specific instructional practices that can mitigate some of the possible obstacles. We hope that this work can stimulate discussions about how to broadly make our active-learning biology classes more inclusive of this specific population of students. PMID:27543636

  19. Delivering The Benefits of Chemical-Biological Integration in Computational Toxicology at the EPA (ACS Fall meeting)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract: Researchers at the EPA’s National Center for Computational Toxicology integrate advances in biology, chemistry, and computer science to examine the toxicity of chemicals and help prioritize chemicals for further research based on potential human health risks. The intent...

  20. Information from the Dosimetry Service

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Please note the following opening hours of the Service: From 31st July onwards: Every morning from 8:30 to 12:00 The Service is closed in the afternoons. We should like to remind you that dosimeters cannot be sent to customers by internal mail. Short-term dosimeters (VCTs) must always be returned to the Service after use and must not be left on the racks in the experimental areas or in the secretariats. Dosimetry Service Tel 72155 Bldg. 24 E 011 Dosimetry.service@cern.ch http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  1. Computing the origin and evolution of the ribosome from its structure — Uncovering processes of macromolecular accretion benefiting synthetic biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Caetano-Anollés

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Accretion occurs pervasively in nature at widely different timeframes. The process also manifests in the evolution of macromolecules. Here we review recent computational and structural biology studies of evolutionary accretion that make use of the ideographic (historical, retrodictive and nomothetic (universal, predictive scientific frameworks. Computational studies uncover explicit timelines of accretion of structural parts in molecular repertoires and molecules. Phylogenetic trees of protein structural domains and proteomes and their molecular functions were built from a genomic census of millions of encoded proteins and associated terminal Gene Ontology terms. Trees reveal a ‘metabolic-first’ origin of proteins, the late development of translation, and a patchwork distribution of proteins in biological networks mediated by molecular recruitment. Similarly, the natural history of ancient RNA molecules inferred from trees of molecular substructures built from a census of molecular features shows patchwork-like accretion patterns. Ideographic analyses of ribosomal history uncover the early appearance of structures supporting mRNA decoding and tRNA translocation, the coevolution of ribosomal proteins and RNA, and a first evolutionary transition that brings ribosomal subunits together into a processive protein biosynthetic complex. Nomothetic structural biology studies of tertiary interactions and ancient insertions in rRNA complement these findings, once concentric layering assumptions are removed. Patterns of coaxial helical stacking reveal a frustrated dynamics of outward and inward ribosomal growth possibly mediated by structural grafting. The early rise of the ribosomal ‘turnstile’ suggests an evolutionary transition in natural biological computation. Results make explicit the need to understand processes of molecular growth and information transfer of macromolecules.

  2. The sensitivity analysis of tooth enamel to the absorbed dose for the application to EPR dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Dae Seok; Lee, Kun Jai [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Young Hwan [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-10-01

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is one of the methods applicable to retrospective dosimetry. The retrospective dosimetry is a process that is a part of dose reconstruction for estimation of exposed dose occurred years before the estimation. Many techniques can be used to the retrospective dosimetry. As a physical method, EPR analysis of biological material measures the quantity of free radicals generated in the material from the interaction of radiation and material. Since the later 80s, in many countries, EPR dosimetry with tooth enamel has been studied and applied for the retrospective dosimetry. In the consideration of the biological materials for EPR dosimetry, human fingernail, hair, bone and tooth are generally considered. The tooth can be separated as enamel, dentine and cementum. Among the three parts, enamel shows the best sensitivity to the absorbed dose and is most widely used. In this study, the characteristics of tooth enamel for EPR dosimetry is examined and experimented. At the experiment, for easy separation, tooth was cut into 4 parts and then each part is treated by ultrasonic vibration in NaOH liquid to reduce mechanically induced noise in the corresponding signal. After the separation of the enamel from dentine, background EPR signal is measured and then radiation-induced EPR spectrum is estimated.

  3. Internal dosimetry technical basis manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The internal dosimetry program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) consists of radiation protection programs and activities used to detect and evaluate intakes of radioactive material by radiation workers. Examples of such programs are: air monitoring; surface contamination monitoring; personal contamination surveys; radiobioassay; and dose assessment. The objectives of the internal dosimetry program are to demonstrate that the workplace is under control and that workers are not being exposed to radioactive material, and to detect and assess inadvertent intakes in the workplace. The Savannah River Site Internal Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual (TBM) is intended to provide a technical and philosophical discussion of the radiobioassay and dose assessment aspects of the internal dosimetry program. Detailed information on air, surface, and personal contamination surveillance programs is not given in this manual except for how these programs interface with routine and special bioassay programs

  4. Radioembolization Dosimetry: The Road Ahead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smits, Maarten L. J., E-mail: m.l.j.smits-3@umcutrecht.nl; Elschot, Mattijs [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Netherlands); Sze, Daniel Y. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Interventional Radiology (United States); Kao, Yung H. [Austin Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine (Australia); Nijsen, Johannes F. W. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Netherlands); Iagaru, Andre H. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (United States); Jong, Hugo W. A. M. de; Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den; Lam, Marnix G. E. H. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Netherlands)

    2015-04-15

    Methods for calculating the activity to be administered during yttrium-90 radioembolization (RE) are largely based on empirical toxicity and efficacy analyses, rather than dosimetry. At the same time, it is recognized that treatment planning based on proper dosimetry is of vital importance for the optimization of the results of RE. The heterogeneous and often clustered intrahepatic biodistribution of millions of point-source radioactive particles poses a challenge for dosimetry. Several studies found a relationship between absorbed doses and treatment outcome, with regard to both toxicity and efficacy. This should ultimately lead to improved patient selection and individualized treatment planning. New calculation methods and imaging techniques and a new generation of microspheres for image-guided RE will all contribute to these improvements. The aim of this review is to give insight into the latest and most important developments in RE dosimetry and to suggest future directions on patient selection, individualized treatment planning, and study designs.

  5. Internal dosimetry technical basis manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-20

    The internal dosimetry program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) consists of radiation protection programs and activities used to detect and evaluate intakes of radioactive material by radiation workers. Examples of such programs are: air monitoring; surface contamination monitoring; personal contamination surveys; radiobioassay; and dose assessment. The objectives of the internal dosimetry program are to demonstrate that the workplace is under control and that workers are not being exposed to radioactive material, and to detect and assess inadvertent intakes in the workplace. The Savannah River Site Internal Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual (TBM) is intended to provide a technical and philosophical discussion of the radiobioassay and dose assessment aspects of the internal dosimetry program. Detailed information on air, surface, and personal contamination surveillance programs is not given in this manual except for how these programs interface with routine and special bioassay programs.

  6. Medical dosimetry in Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turák, O.; Osvay, M.; Ballay, L.

    2012-09-01

    Radiation exposure of medical staff during cardiological and radiological procedures was investigated. The exposure of medical staff is directly connected to patient exposure. The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of doses on uncovered part of body of medical staff using LiF thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeters in seven locations. Individual Kodak film dosimeters (as authorized dosimetry system) were used for the assessment of medical staff's effective dose. Results achieved on dose distribution measurements confirm that wearing only one film badge under the lead apron does not provide enough information on the personal dose. The value of estimated annual doses on eye lens and extremities (fingers) were in good correlation with international publications.

  7. Strahlungsmessung und Dosimetrie

    CERN Document Server

    Krieger, Hanno

    2013-01-01

    „Strahlungsquellen und Dosimetrie“ ist Teil einer Lehrbuchreihe zur Strahlungsphysik und zum Strahlenschutz. Der erste Teil befasst sich mit den physikalischen Grundlagen der Strahlungsdetektoren und der Strahlungsmessung. Im zweiten Teil werden die Konzepte und Verfahren der klinischen Dosimetrie dargestellt. Der dritte Abschnitt erläutert ausführlich die Dosisverteilungen der klinisch angewendeten Strahlungsarten. Im vierten Teil werden weitere Messaufgaben der Strahlungsphysik einschließlich der Messsysteme für die Bildgebung mit Röntgenstrahlung dargestellt. Neben den grundlegenden Ausführungen enthält dieser Band im laufenden Text zahlreiche Tabellen und Grafiken zur technischen und medizinischen Radiologie, die bei der praktischen Arbeit sehr hilfreich sein können und 199 Übungsaufgaben mit Lösungen zur Vertiefung der Inhalte. Für die zweite Auflage wurden die Darstellungen der Elektronen- und der Protonendosimetrie sowie der bildgebenden Verfahren mit Computertomografen deutlich erweit...

  8. Hanford internal dosimetry program manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes the Hanford Internal Dosimetry program. Program Services include administrating the bioassay monitoring program, evaluating and documenting assessments of internal exposure and dose, ensuring that analytical laboratories conform to requirements, selecting and applying appropriate models and procedures for evaluating internal radionuclide deposition and the resulting dose, and technically guiding and supporting Hanford contractors in matters regarding internal dosimetry. 13 refs., 16 figs., 42 tabs

  9. Fifth international radiopharmaceutical dosimetry symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This meeting was held to exchange information on how to get better estimates of the radiation absorbed dose. There seems to be a high interest of late in patient dosimetry; discussions were held in the light of revised risk estimates for radiation. Topics included: Strategies of Dose Assessment; Dose Estimation for Radioimmunotherapy; Dose Calculation Techniques and Models; Dose Estimation for Positron Emission Tomography (PET); Kinetics for Dose Estimation; and Small Scale Dosimetry and Microdosimetry. (VC)

  10. Hanford internal dosimetry program manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbaugh, E.H.; Sula, M.J.; Bihl, D.E.; Aldridge, T.L.

    1989-10-01

    This document describes the Hanford Internal Dosimetry program. Program Services include administrating the bioassay monitoring program, evaluating and documenting assessments of internal exposure and dose, ensuring that analytical laboratories conform to requirements, selecting and applying appropriate models and procedures for evaluating internal radionuclide deposition and the resulting dose, and technically guiding and supporting Hanford contractors in matters regarding internal dosimetry. 13 refs., 16 figs., 42 tabs.

  11. Proton minibeam radiation therapy: Experimental dosimetry evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peucelle, C.; Martínez-Rovira, I.; Prezado, Y., E-mail: prezado@imnc.in2p3.fr [IMNC-UMR 8165, CNRS, Paris 7 and Paris 11 Universities, 15 rue Georges Clemenceau, Orsay Cedex 91406 (France); Nauraye, C.; Patriarca, A.; Hierso, E.; Fournier-Bidoz, N. [Institut Curie - Centre de Protonthérapie d’Orsay, Campus Universitaire, Bât. 101, Orsay 91898 (France)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: Proton minibeam radiation therapy (pMBRT) is a new radiotherapy (RT) approach that allies the inherent physical advantages of protons with the normal tissue preservation observed when irradiated with submillimetric spatially fractionated beams. This dosimetry work aims at demonstrating the feasibility of the technical implementation of pMBRT. This has been performed at the Institut Curie - Proton Therapy Center in Orsay. Methods: Proton minibeams (400 and 700 μm-width) were generated by means of a brass multislit collimator. Center-to-center distances between consecutive beams of 3200 and 3500 μm, respectively, were employed. The (passive scattered) beam energy was 100 MeV corresponding to a range of 7.7 cm water equivalent. Absolute dosimetry was performed with a thimble ionization chamber (IBA CC13) in a water tank. Relative dosimetry was carried out irradiating radiochromic films interspersed in a IBA RW3 slab phantom. Depth dose curves and lateral profiles at different depths were evaluated. Peak-to-valley dose ratios (PVDR), beam widths, and output factors were also assessed as a function of depth. Results: A pattern of peaks and valleys was maintained in the transverse direction with PVDR values decreasing as a function of depth until 6.7 cm. From that depth, the transverse dose profiles became homogeneous due to multiple Coulomb scattering. Peak-to-valley dose ratio values extended from 8.2 ± 0.5 at the phantom surface to 1.08 ± 0.06 at the Bragg peak. This was the first time that dosimetry in such small proton field sizes was performed. Despite the challenge, a complete set of dosimetric data needed to guide the first biological experiments was achieved. Conclusions: pMBRT is a novel strategy in order to reduce the side effects of RT. This works provides the experimental proof of concept of this new RT method: clinical proton beams might allow depositing a (high) uniform dose in a brain tumor located in the center of the brain (7.5 cm depth

  12. The Vinca dosimetry experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On 15 October 1958 there occurred a very brief uncontrolled run of the zero-power reactor at the Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Science, Vinca, near Belgrade, Yugoslavia. During this run six persons received various doses of radiation. They were subsequently given medical treatment of a novel kind at the Curie Hospital, Paris. In atomic energy operations to date, very few accidents involving excessive radiation exposure to human beings have occurred. In fact, the cases of acute radiation injury are limited to about 30 known high exposures, few of which were in the lethal or near-lethal range. Since direct experiment to determine the effects of ionizing radiation on man is unacceptable, information on these effects has to be based on a consideration of data relating to accidental exposures, viewed in the light of the much more extensive data obtained from experiments on animals. Therefore, any direct information on the effects of radiation on humans is very valuable. The international dosimetry project described in this report was carried out at Vinca, Yugoslavia, under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency to determine the precise amount of radiation to which the persons had been exposed during the accident. These dosimetry data, together with the record of the carefully observed clinical effects, are of importance both for the scientific study of radiation effects on man and for the development of methods of therapy. The experiment and measurements were carried out at the end of April 1960. The project formed part of the Agency's research programme in the field of health and safety. The results of the experiment are made available through this report to all Member States

  13. Biologic

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffman, L H

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we explore the boundary between biology and the study of formal systems (logic). In the end, we arrive at a summary formalism, a chapter in "boundary mathematics" where there are not only containers but also extainers ><, entities open to interaction and distinguishing the space that they are not. The boundary algebra of containers and extainers is to biologic what boolean algebra is to classical logic. We show how this formalism encompasses significant parts of the logic of DNA replication, the Dirac formalism for quantum mechanics, formalisms for protein folding and the basic structure of the Temperley Lieb algebra at the foundations of topological invariants of knots and links.

  14. Internal dosimetry, past and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is a review of the progress in the dosimetry of internally deposited radionuclides (internal dosimetry) since World War II. Previous to that, only naturally occurring radionuclides were available and only a limited number of studies of biokinetics and dosimetry were done. The main radionuclides studied were 226Ra, 228Ra, and 224Ra but natural uranium was also studied mainly because of its toxic effect as a heavy metal, and not because it was radioactive. The effects of 226Ra in bone, mainly from the radium dial painters, also formed the only bases for the radiotoxicity of radionuclides in bone for many years, and it is still, along with 224Ra, the main source of information on the effects of alpha emitters in bone. The publications of the International Commission on Radiological Protection that have an impact on internal dosimetry are used as mileposts for this review. These series of publications, more than any other, represent a broad consensus of opinion within the radiation protection community at the time of their publication, and have formed the bases for radiation protection practice throughout the world. This review is not meant to be exhaustive; it is meant to be a personnel view of the evolution of internal dosimetry, and to present the author's opinion of what the future directions in internal dosimetry will be. 39 refs., 2 tabs

  15. Dosimetry and process control for food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whatever a radiation process is designed to achieve, dosimetry is fundamental to it, either as a necessary control, or to establish the process, or for research and development studies. Dosimetry provides the quantitative baseline against which the biological or chemical changes induced by radiation can be measured. In the case of irradiation of food, a minimum dose will be required to achieve the technological objective. A maximum dose will be defined by the onset of the loss of acceptable quality of the food, but upper dose limits will usually be prescribed by regulatory bodies. There is no accurate way of assessing the dose once the food has left the irradiation plant. Therefore the dose must be properly applied and verified during processing. The dose is measured using dosimeters. There are many different types of dosimeters for different applications, dose ranges and conditions of use. All dosimeters must be calibrated, with a measurement traceability chain to a national or international primary standard. This paper describes the classification of dosimeters and gives examples and their applications. Calibration and use of a typical dosimetry system used for food irradiation is then discussed, including the effects of environmental influence factors such as dose rate and temperature, and how measurement traceability can be established. Before routine processing of a product can occur, process qualification must be carried out to ensure the irradiation process produces acceptable results. An example of a dose mapping study is given, followed by discussion of some practical considerations of process control, including measurement uncertainty and how this relates to the setting of process limits

  16. Accreditation ISO/IEC 1705 in dosimetry: Experience and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this work is to present the experience in the process of accreditation of the radiation dosimetry service in which there are trials for the determination of radiation doses due to internal and external exhibitions. Is They describe the aspects that were considered for the design and development of a system of quality and results after its implementation. A review of the benefits accreditation has been reported to the organization is finally made. (Author)

  17. Clinical radionuclide therapy dosimetry: the quest for the ''Holy Gray''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brans, B. [University Hospital Maastricht, Department of Nuclear Medicine, P.O. Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Bodei, L. [Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); Giammarile, F. [Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Centre Leon Berard, Lyon (France); Linden, O.; Tennvall, J. [Lund University Hospital, Department of Oncology, Lund (Sweden); Luster, M. [University of Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); Oyen, W.J.G. [University Medical Center Nijmegen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2007-05-15

    Radionuclide therapy has distinct similarities to, but also profound differences from external radiotherapy. This review discusses techniques and results of previously developed dosimetry methods in thyroid carcinoma, neuro-endocrine tumours, solid tumours and lymphoma. In each case, emphasis is placed on the level of evidence and practical applicability. Although dosimetry has been of enormous value in the preclinical phase of radiopharmaceutical development, its clinical use to optimise administered activity on an individual patient basis has been less evident. In phase I and II trials, dosimetry may be considered an inherent part of therapy to establish the maximum tolerated dose and dose-response relationship. To prove that dosimetry-based radionuclide therapy is of additional benefit over fixed dosing or dosing per kilogram body weight, prospective randomised phase III trials with appropriate end points have to be undertaken. Data in the literature which underscore the potential of dosimetry to avoid under- and overdosing and to standardise radionuclide therapy methods internationally are very scarce. In each section, particular developments and insights into these therapies are related to opportunities for dosimetry. The recent developments in PET and PET/CT imaging, including micro-devices for animal research, and molecular medicine provide major challenges for innovative therapy and dosimetry techniques. Furthermore, the increasing scientific interest in the radiobiological features specific to radionuclide therapy will advance our ability to administer this treatment modality optimally. (orig.)

  18. Clinical radionuclide therapy dosimetry: the quest for the “Holy Gray”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodei, L.; Giammarile, F.; Linden, O.; Luster, M.; Oyen, W. J. G.; Tennvall, J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Radionuclide therapy has distinct similarities to, but also profound differences from external radiotherapy. Review This review discusses techniques and results of previously developed dosimetry methods in thyroid carcinoma, neuro-endocrine tumours, solid tumours and lymphoma. In each case, emphasis is placed on the level of evidence and practical applicability. Although dosimetry has been of enormous value in the preclinical phase of radiopharmaceutical development, its clinical use to optimise administered activity on an individual patient basis has been less evident. In phase I and II trials, dosimetry may be considered an inherent part of therapy to establish the maximum tolerated dose and dose–response relationship. To prove that dosimetry-based radionuclide therapy is of additional benefit over fixed dosing or dosing per kilogram body weight, prospective randomised phase III trials with appropriate end points have to be undertaken. Data in the literature which underscore the potential of dosimetry to avoid under- and overdosing and to standardise radionuclide therapy methods internationally are very scarce. Developments In each section, particular developments and insights into these therapies are related to opportunities for dosimetry. The recent developments in PET and PET/CT imaging, including micro-devices for animal research, and molecular medicine provide major challenges for innovative therapy and dosimetry techniques. Furthermore, the increasing scientific interest in the radiobiological features specific to radionuclide therapy will advance our ability to administer this treatment modality optimally. PMID:17268773

  19. Dosimetry requirements derived from the sterilization standards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, A.

    1998-01-01

    The main standards for radiation sterilization, ISO 11137 and EN 552, rest the documentation for the properly executed sterilization process on dosimetry. Both standards describe general requirements to the dosimetry system: The dose measurements must be traceable to national standards...

  20. The Benefits of Mouse Keeping—an Empirical Study on Students' Flow and Intrinsic Motivation in Biology Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Annika; Klingenberg, Konstantin; Wilde, Matthias

    2016-02-01

    Contact with living animals is an exceptional possibility within biology education to facilitate an intense immersion into the study topic and even allow for a flow experience (Csikszentmihalyi 2000). Further, it might affect the perceptions of the students' basic needs for autonomy and competence and thereby their quality of motivation (Deci and Ryan 1985, 2002). Still, there is little empirical evidence about the duration of the exposure with living animals that is required. We investigated the students' flow experience, and the students' motivation, reported retrospectively in three different treatments: lessons involving short-term or long-term contact with living harvest mice and a control group without living animals. Our sample consisted of 156 fifth graders (10.76 years, SD = 0.513). The test instruments were adapted versions of the Flow Short Scale (FSS, Rheinberg et al. 2003) and of the Intrinsic Motivation Inventory (IMI, Ryan 1982). As expected, the control group produced significantly lower scores for both FSS and IMI. In addition, we found a significant difference between students with short-term versus long-term contact. Whereas the flow experience was indistinguishable for all pupils who had contact with living animals, those with long-term experience reported significantly higher intrinsic motivation.

  1. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, M.; Mason, W. B.; Whipple, G. H.; Howland, J. W.

    1952-04-07

    This report presents a review of present knowledge and concepts of the biological effects of ionizing radiations. Among the topics discussed are the physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems, morphological and physiological changes observed in biological systems subjected to ionizing radiations, physiological changes in the intact animal, latent changes following exposure of biological systems to ionizing radiations, factors influencing the biological response to ionizing radiation, relative effects of various ionizing radiations, and biological dosimetry.

  2. Thermoluminescence Dosimetry Applied to Radiation Protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Poul; Bøtter-Jensen, Lars; Majborn, Benny

    1982-01-01

    This is a general review of the present state of the development and application of thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) for radiation protection purposes. A description is given of commonly used thermoluminescent dosimeters and their main dosimetric properties, e.g. energy response, dose range......, fading, and LET dependence. The applications of thermoluminescence dosimetry in routine personnel monitoring, accident dosimetry, u.v. radiation dosimetry, and environmental monitoring are discussed with particular emphasis on current problems in routine personnel monitoring. Finally, the present state...

  3. Eleventh DOE workshop on personnel neutron dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    Since its formation, the Office of Health (EH-40) has stressed the importance of the exchange of information related to and improvements in neutron dosimetry. This Workshop was the eleventh in the series sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). It provided a forum for operational personnel at DOE facilities to discuss current issues related to neutron dosimetry and for leading investigators in the field to discuss promising approaches for future research. A total of 26 papers were presented including the keynote address by Dr. Warren K. Sinclair, who spoke on, ``The 1990 Recommendations of the ICRP and their Biological Background.`` The first several papers discussed difficulties in measuring neutrons of different energies and ways of compensating or deriving correction factors at individual facilities. Presentations were also given by the US Navy and Air Force. Current research in neutron dosimeter development was the subject of the largest number of papers. These included a number on the development of neutron spectrometers. Selected papers were processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  4. Fast neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During 1988--1990 the magnetic resonance dosimetry project was completed, as were the 250 MeV proton shielding measurements. The first cellular experiment using human cells in vitro at the 1 GeV electron storage ring was also accomplished. More detail may be found in DOE Report number-sign DOE/EV/60417-002 and the open literature cited in the individual progress subsections. We report Kinetic Energy Released in Matter (KERMA), factor measurements in several elements of critical importance to neutron radiation therapy and radiation protection for space habitation and exploration for neutron energies below 30 MeV. The results of this effort provide the only direct measurements of the oxygen and magnesium kerma factors above 20 MeV neutron energy, and the only measurements of the iron kerma factor above 15 MeV. They provide data of immediate relevance to neutron radiotherapy and impose strict criteria for normalizing and testing nuclear models used to calculate kerma factors at higher neutron energies

  5. Nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, C S

    1989-09-01

    Twenty-two nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison studies utilizing the fast-pulse Health Physics Research Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been conducted since 1965. These studies have provided a total of 62 different organizations a forum for discussion of criticality accident dosimetry, an opportunity to test their neutron and gamma-ray dosimetry systems under a variety of simulated criticality accident conditions, and the experience of comparing results with reference dose values as well as with the measured results obtained by others making measurements under identical conditions. Sixty-nine nuclear accidents (27 with unmoderated neutron energy spectra and 42 with eight different shielded spectra) have been simulated in the studies. Neutron doses were in the 0.2-8.5 Gy range and gamma doses in the 0.1-2.0 Gy range. A total of 2,289 dose measurements (1,311 neutron, 978 gamma) were made during the intercomparisons. The primary methods of neutron dosimetry were activation foils, thermoluminescent dosimeters, and blood sodium activation. The main methods of gamma dose measurement were thermoluminescent dosimeters, radiophotoluminescent glass, and film. About 68% of the neutron measurements met the accuracy guidelines (+/- 25%) and about 52% of the gamma measurements met the accuracy criterion (+/- 20%) for accident dosimetry. PMID:2777549

  6. Initial radiation dosimetry at Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dosimetry of A-bomb survivors at Hiroshima and Nagasaki is discussed in light of the new dosimetry developed in 1980 by the author. The important changes resulting from the new dosimetry are the ratios of neutron to gamma doses, particularly at Hiroshima. The implications of these changes in terms of epidemiology and radiation protection standards are discussed

  7. Information from the Dosimetry Service

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Please note the following opening hours of the Service: In June: Every morning from 8:30 to 12:00 In July: Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 8:30 to 11:30 Closed all day on Tuesdays and Thursdays From 31st July onwards: Every morning from 8:30 to 12:00 The Service is closed in the afternoons. We should like to remind you that dosimeters cannot be sent to customers by internal mail. Short-term dosimeters (VCTs) must always be returned to the Service after use and must not be left on the racks in the experimental areas or in the secretariats. Dosimetry Service Tel 72155 Bldg. 24 E 011 Dosimetry.service@cern.ch http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  8. External audit in radiotherapy dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quality audit forms an essential part of any comprehensive quality assurance programme. This is true in radiotherapy generally and in specific areas such as radiotherapy dosimetry. Quality audit can independently test the effectiveness of the quality system and in so doing can identify problem areas and minimize their possible consequences. Some general points concerning quality audit applied to radiotherapy are followed by specific discussion of its practical role in radiotherapy dosimetry, following its evolution from dosimetric intercomparison exercises to routine measurement-based on-going audit in the various developing audit networks both in the UK and internationally. Specific examples of methods and results are given from some of these, including the Scottish+ audit group. Quality audit in radiotherapy dosimetry is now well proven and participation by individual centres is strongly recommended. Similar audit approaches are to be encouraged in other areas of the radiotherapy process. (author)

  9. For information: Individual dosimetry service

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    The service has noticed that there are dosimeter holders who have changed their activities and thus have no longer need of dosimeter as a permanent basis in their work (persons who go rarely to the controlled areas). The reduction of persons in the regular distribution list of dosimeters will lighten the work of the service (distribution, evaluation and consolidation of doses) as well as the work of the distributors, needless to say the economical input this would have for CERN. For the persons who only need a dosimeter temporarily we would like to remind that there is a quick and simple procedure to have one immediately from the Individual Dosimetry Service. Please contact the service (dosimetry.service@cern.ch) if you do not need a dosimeter regularly. Thank you for your cooperation. http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  10. Dosimetry standards for radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For irradiation treatments to be reproducible in the laboratory and then in the commercial environment, and for products to have certified absorbed doses, standardized dosimetry techniques are needed. This need is being satisfied by standards being developed by experts from around the world under the auspices of Subcommittee E10.01 of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). In the time period since it was formed in 1984, the subcommittee has grown to 150 members from 43 countries, representing a broad cross-section of industry, government and university interests. With cooperation from other international organizations, it has taken the combined part-time effort of all these people more than 13 years to complete 24 dosimetry standards. Four are specifically for food irradiation or agricultural applications, but the majority apply to all forms of gamma, x-ray, Bremsstrahlung and electron beam radiation processing, including dosimetry for sterilization of health care products and the radiation processing of fruits, vegetables, meats, spices, processed foods, plastics, inks, medical wastes and paper. An additional 6 standards are under development. Most of the standards provide exact procedures for using individual dosimetry systems or for characterizing various types of irradiation facilities, but one covers the selection and calibration of dosimetry systems, and another covers the treatment of uncertainties. Together, this set of standards covers essentially all aspects of dosimetry for radiation processing. The first 20 of these standards have been adopted in their present form by the International Organization of Standardization (ISO), and will be published by ISO in 1999. (author)

  11. Information from the Dosimetry Service

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    CERN Staff and Users can now consult their dose records for an individual or an organizational unit with HRT. Please see more information on our web page http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry. The Dosimetry Service is open every morning from 8.30 - 12.00, and closed in the afternoons. We would like to remind you that dosimeters cannot be sent to customers by internal mail. Short-term dosimeters (VCT's) must always be returned to the Service after use and must not be left on the racks in the experimental areas or in the secretariats.

  12. Information from the Dosimetry Service

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    CERN Staff and Users can now consult their dose records for an individual or an organizational unit with HRT. Please see more information on our web page: http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry. The Dosimetry Service is open every morning from 8.30 to 12.00 and is closed in the afternoons. We would like to remind you that dosimeters cannot be sent to customers by internal mail. Short-term dosimeters (VCT's) must always be returned to the Service after use and must not be left on the racks in the experimental areas or in the secretariats.

  13. In aqua vivo EPID dosimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wendling, M.; McDermott, L.N.; Mans, A.; Olaciregui-Ruiz, I.; Pecharroman-Gallego, R.; Sonke, J.J.; Stroom, J.; Herk, M. van; Mijnheer, B.J.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: At the Netherlands Cancer Institute--Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital in vivo dosimetry using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) has been implemented for almost all high-energy photon treatments of cancer with curative intent. Lung cancer treatments were initially excluded, because t

  14. Portal dosimetry in wedged beams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spreeuw, H.; Rozendaal, R.; Camargo, P.; Mans, A.; Wendling, M.; Olaciregui-Ruiz, I.; Sonke, J.J.; Herk, M. van; Mijnheer, B.

    2015-01-01

    Portal dosimetry using electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) is often applied to verify high-energy photon beam treatments. Due to the change in photon energy spectrum, the resulting dose values are, however, not very accurate in the case of wedged beams if the pixel-to-dose conversion for the s

  15. Plutonium worker dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchall, Alan; Puncher, M; Harrison, J; Riddell, A; Bailey, M R; Khokryakov, V; Romanov, S

    2010-05-01

    Epidemiological studies of the relationship between risk and internal exposure to plutonium are clearly reliant on the dose estimates used. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is currently reviewing the latest scientific information available on biokinetic models and dosimetry, and it is likely that a number of changes to the existing models will be recommended. The effect of certain changes, particularly to the ICRP model of the respiratory tract, has been investigated for inhaled forms of (239)Pu and uncertainties have also been assessed. Notable effects of possible changes to respiratory tract model assumptions are (1) a reduction in the absorbed dose to target cells in the airways, if changes under consideration are made to the slow clearing fraction and (2) a doubling of absorbed dose to the alveolar region for insoluble forms, if evidence of longer retention times is taken into account. An important factor influencing doses for moderately soluble forms of (239)Pu is the extent of binding of dissolved plutonium to lung tissues and assumptions regarding the extent of binding in the airways. Uncertainty analyses have been performed with prior distributions chosen for application in epidemiological studies. The resulting distributions for dose per unit intake were lognormal with geometric standard deviations of 2.3 and 2.6 for nitrates and oxides, respectively. The wide ranges were due largely to consideration of results for a range of experimental data for the solubility of different forms of nitrate and oxides. The medians of these distributions were a factor of three times higher than calculated using current default ICRP parameter values. For nitrates, this was due to the assumption of a bound fraction, and for oxides due mainly to the assumption of slower alveolar clearance. This study highlights areas where more research is needed to reduce biokinetic uncertainties, including more accurate determination of particle transport rates

  16. The personal dosimetry in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Personal Dosimetry in Mexico, has an approximately 30 year-old history; and it had been and it is at the moment, one of the more important resources with which the personnel that works with ionizing radiation sources counts for its protection. The Personal Dosimetry begins with the film dosimetry, technique that even continues being used at the present time by some users, and the main reason of its use is for economic reasons. At the moment this technique, it has been surpassed, by the Thermoluminescent dosimetry, which has taken a lot of peak, mainly by the technological development with which it is counted at the present time; what has given as a result that this technique becomes tip technology; that supported in the characteristic of the used materials, as the handling and processing of the information associated with the new PC, digitizer cards, software etc, what has allowed increases it potential. In this work the current necessities of the market are presented as well as an analysis of the future real necessities in Mexico, at national level, the companies that provide this service and that they spread to satisfy this necessity of the market, including the different used technologies are also mentioned. The application ranges, at the same time, of the advantages and disadvantages of the different systems of Personal Dosimetry in the market. The companies that at the moment provide the service of Personal Dosimetry, its use materials and equipment in indistinct form, for the monitoring of gamma radiation, beta particles, different qualities of x-ray radiation, and sometimes neutrons. The monitoring of the exposed personnel at the diverse sources of ionizing radiation mentioned is carried out in many occasions without having with the materials (detectors), neither the appropriate infrastructure and therefore without the quality control that guarantees a correct evaluation of the dose equivalent, as a result of the exposure to the ionizing radiations; it

  17. Performance of the CEDS Accident Dosimetry System at the 1995 Los Alamos National Laboratory Nuclear Accident Dosimetry Intercomparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahan, K.L.; Schwanke, L.J.

    1996-12-01

    In July 1995, LANL hosted an accident dosimetry intercomparison. When all reactors on the Oak Ridge Reservation were idled in 1988, the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR), which had been used for 22 previous intercomparisons dating from 1965, was shut down for an indefinite period. The LANL group began characterization of two critical assemblies for dosimetry purposes. As a result, NAD-23 was conceived and 10 DOE facilities accepted invitations to participate in the intercomparison. This report is a summary of the performance of one of the participants, the Centralized External Dosimetry System (CEDS). The CEDS is a cooperative personnel dosimetry arrangement between three DOE sites in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Many successes and failures are reported herein. Generally, the TL dosimeters performed poorly and always over-reported the delivered dose. The TLD processing procedures contain efforts that would lead to large biases in the reported absorbed dose, and omit several key steps in the TLD reading process. The supralinear behavior of lithium fluoride (LiF) has not been characterized for this particular dosimeter and application (i.e., in high-dose mixed neutron/gamma fields). The use of TLD materials may also be precluded given the limitations of the LiF material itself, the TLD reading system, and the upper dose level to which accident dosimetry systems are required to perform as set forth in DOE regulations. The indium foil results confirm the expected inability of that material to predict the magnitude of the wearer`s dose reliably, although it is quite suitable as a quick-sort material. Biological sample (hair) results were above the minimum detectable activity (MDA) for only one of the tests. Several questions as to the best methods for sample handling and processing remain.

  18. Doses and biological effect of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic values and their symbols as well as units of physical dosimetry are given. The most important information about biological radiation effects is presented. Polish radiation protection standards are cited. (A.S.)

  19. Medical radiation dosimetry theory of charged particle collision energy loss

    CERN Document Server

    McParland, Brian J

    2014-01-01

    Accurate radiation dosimetry is a requirement of radiation oncology, diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine. It is necessary so as to satisfy the needs of patient safety, therapeutic and diagnostic optimisation, and retrospective epidemiological studies of the biological effects resulting from low absorbed doses of ionising radiation. The radiation absorbed dose received by the patient is the ultimate consequence of the transfer of kinetic energy through collisions between energetic charged particles and atoms of the tissue being traversed. Thus, the ability of the medical physicist to both measure and calculate accurately patient dosimetry demands a deep understanding of the physics of charged particle interactions with matter. Interestingly, the physics of charged particle energy loss has an almost exclusively theoretical basis, thus necessitating an advanced theoretical understanding of the subject in order to apply it appropriately to the clinical regime. ​ Each year, about one-third of the worl...

  20. Radiation Protection and Dosimetry An Introduction to Health Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stabin, Michael G

    2007-01-01

    This comprehensive text provides an overview of all relevant topics in the field of radiation protection (health physics). Radiation Protection and Dosimetry serves as an essential handbook for practicing health physics professionals, and is also ideal as a teaching text for courses at the university level. The book is organized to introduce the reader to basic principles of radiation decay and interactions, to review current knowledge and historical aspects of the biological effects of radiation, and to cover important operational topics such as radiation shielding and dosimetry. In addition to presenting the most up to date treatment of the topics and references to the literature, most chapters contain numerical problems with their solutions for use in teaching or self assessment. One chapter is devoted to Environmental Health Physics, which was written in collaboration with leading professionals in the area.

  1. Proceedings of the 5. symposium on neutron dosimetry. Beam dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proceedings of the fifth symposium on neutron dosimetry, organized at Neuherberg, 17-21 September 1984, by the Commission of the European Communities and the GSF Neuherberg, with the co-sponsorship of the US Department of Energy, Office of Health and Environmental Research. The proceedings deal with research on concepts, instruments and methods in radiological protection for neutrons and mixed neutron-gamma fields, including the generation, collection and evaluation of new dosimetric data, the derivation of relevant radiation protection quantitites, and the harmonization of experimental methods and instrumentation by intercomparison programmes. Besides radiation protection monitoring, the proceedings also report on the improvement of neutron beam dosimetry in the fields of radiobiology and radiation therapy

  2. Benefits of using a hybrid problem-based learning curriculum to improve long-term learning acquisition in undergraduate biology education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrió, Mar; Agell, Laia; Baños, Josep Eladi; Moyano, Elisabeth; Larramona, Pilar; Pérez, Jorge

    2016-08-01

    Although problem-based learning (PBL) has been used for over 40 years, with many studies comparing the benefits of PBL versus other educational approaches, little attention has been paid to the effectiveness of hybrid PBL (H-PBL) curricula. Here we aimed to compare the learning outcomes of two groups of undergraduate biology students working towards a bachelor's degree: one group used an H-PBL approach, while the second used a lecture-based learning (LBL) approach. Specifically, the H-PBL group used a PBL module with interdisciplinary problems, which represented 20% of the entire curriculum. The main outcomes of evaluation were the long-term acquisition of factual knowledge and the problem-solving skills at the end of the bachelor's degree. The sample included 85 students, 39 in the H-PBL group and 46 in the LBL group. We found that an H-PBL curriculum can improve the students' learning outcomes such as long-term knowledge acquisition, problem solving skills and generic competences. PMID:27302468

  3. Dosimetry in Phototherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huurto, L. [STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland); Snellman, E. [Department of Dermatology, Central Hospital of Paeijaet-Haeme, Lahti (Finland)

    2003-06-01

    Artificial ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is used in phototherapy, the medical treatment of various skin diseases like psoriasis and atopic eczema. Both solar and artificial UVR exposure have also carcinogenic effects. Long term phototherapy with high cumulative UVR doses is shown to be risk for squamous cell carcinoma. Various biological effects are strongly dependent of the wavelength of the UVR. UV-B-radiation with short wavelength (280 - 320 nm) is more effective to cause sunburn of the skin than UV-A - radiation with longer wavelength (320 - 400 nm). The correlation between wavelength of UVR and the tissue sensitivity is described by action spectra. An action spectrum is a mathematical model describing the efficiency of UVR of different wavelength for producing a certain biological phenomena. Specific action spectra have been determined for the most important health effects like erythema and skin cancers as regard squamous cell carcinomas and basal cell carcinomas. (orig.)

  4. Programme Biology - Health protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scientific results for 1975, of the five-year Biology-Health Protection programme adopted in 1971, are presented in two volumes. In volume one, Research in Radiation Protection are developed exclusively, including the following topics: measurement and interpretation of radiation (dosimetry); transfer of radioactive nuclides in the constituents of the environment; hereditary effects of radiation; short-term effects (acute irradiation syndrome and its treatment); long-term effects and toxicology of radioactive elements. In volume, two Research on applications in Agriculture and Medicine are developed. It includes: mutagenesis; soil-plant relations; radiation analysis; food conservation; cell culture; radioentomology. Research on applications in Medicine include: Nuclear Medicine and Neutron Dosimetry

  5. NOTE FROM THE DOSIMETRY SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    During March, the Dosimetry Service will be opened from 8h30 to 12h in the morning and closed every afternoon.   We have established that many people, who are provided regularly with a personal dosimeter (film badge), have changed their activity and do not need it anymore, because they do not, or only exceptionally, enter controlled areas. If you are one of these persons, please contact the Personal Dosimeter Service (tel: 72155). There is a simplified procedure for obtaining a dosimeter if you have an immediate need for short-term visits in controlled areas. A reduction of the number of persons on the regular distribution list of dosimeters would decrease our and the distributors workload. It would also contribute to significant savings in the dosimetry, and thus CERN, budget. We thank you in advance for your understanding and for your collaboration.

  6. MISTI Shielding and Dosimetry Experiment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Reliable on-orbit dosimetry is necessary for understanding effects of space radiation environments on spacecraft microelectronics performance and comparison of...

  7. History of dose specification in Brachytherapy: From Threshold Erythema Dose to Computational Dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    2006-09-01

    This paper briefly reviews the evolution of brachytherapy dosimetry from 1900 to the present. Dosimetric practices in brachytherapy fall into three distinct eras: During the era of biological dosimetry (1900-1938), radium pioneers could only specify Ra-226 and Rn-222 implants in terms of the mass of radium encapsulated within the implanted sources. Due to the high energy of its emitted gamma rays and the long range of its secondary electrons in air, free-air chambers could not be used to quantify the output of Ra-226 sources in terms of exposure. Biological dosimetry, most prominently the threshold erythema dose, gained currency as a means of intercomparing radium treatments with exposure-calibrated orthovoltage x-ray units. The classical dosimetry era (1940-1980) began with successful exposure standardization of Ra-226 sources by Bragg-Gray cavity chambers. Classical dose-computation algorithms, based upon 1-D buildup factor measurements and point-source superposition computational algorithms, were able to accommodate artificial radionuclides such as Co-60, Ir-192, and Cs-137. The quantitative dosimetry era (1980- ) arose in response to the increasing utilization of low energy K-capture radionuclides such as I-125 and Pd-103 for which classical approaches could not be expected to estimate accurate correct doses. This led to intensive development of both experimental (largely TLD-100 dosimetry) and Monte Carlo dosimetry techniques along with more accurate air-kerma strength standards. As a result of extensive benchmarking and intercomparison of these different methods, single-seed low-energy radionuclide dose distributions are now known with a total uncertainty of 3%-5%.

  8. Topical Review: Polymer gel dosimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Baldock, C; De Deene, Y; Doran, S.; Ibbott, G; Jirasek, A.; Lepage, M.; McAuley, K B; Oldham, M; Schreiner, L J

    2010-01-01

    Polymer gel dosimeters are fabricated from radiation sensitive chemicals which, upon irradiation, polymerize as a function of the absorbed radiation dose. These gel dosimeters, with the capacity to uniquely record the radiation dose distribution in three-dimensions (3D), have specific advantages when compared to one-dimensional dosimeters, such as ion chambers, and two-dimensional dosimeters, such as film. These advantages are particularly significant in dosimetry situations where steep dose ...

  9. Dosimetry of total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the treatment of disseminated malignancies an improvement in the curability and reduction of complication rates require high precision total body irradiation (TBI) and correct reporting of relevant treatment parameters. Optimal TBI dosimetry is the basis. Radiooncological and radiobiological requirements as well as the special physical situation have to be considered. To review the efforts of medical physicists, highlights from TBI workshops and publications are summarized. Additionally, dosimetric data from 34 European radiooncological centres contributing to the recent ESTRO inquiry on TBI are analysed. The topics are: absorbed dose and dose monitor calibration, determination of absolute and relative doses, dose ratios, attenuation data and heterogeneity corrections; TBI dose calculation methods regarding patient position, beam incidence, body shape and thickness, lung size and density; methods of TBI treatment planning including calculated dose modification and of TBI quality assurance. In conclusion, the following recommendations can be given: TBI dosimetry shall be performed under TBI conditions, close to the real treatment situation. The absorbed dose to water must be determined. The dose monitor should be calibrated against dose measurements at the centre of a water equivalent phantom of TBI equivalent size and typical thickness. Photon fluence profiles have to be measured with small phantoms. Influences on the local dose must be investigated systematically. A reproducible AP/PA TBI technique should be used. The TBI dose shall be specified to mid-abdomen and reported in units of gray. The single and total dose and the dose rate to the lungs, the number of fractions and the treatment time schedule must be stated. In vivo dosimetry is required if non-reliable TBI techniques are used. An international TBI dosimetry intercomparison could assist these efforts to improve the treatment of acute leukaemia. (author). 89 refs, 3 figs, 13 tabs

  10. Fourth international radiopharmaceutical dosimetry symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The focus of the Fourth International Radiopharmaceutical Dosimetry Symposium was to explore the impact of current developments in nuclear medicine on absorbed dose calculations. This book contains the proceedings of the meeting including the edited discussion that followed the presentations. Topics that were addressed included the dosimetry associated with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies and blood elements, ultrashort-lived radionuclides, and positron emitters. Some specific areas of discussion were variations in absorbed dose as a result of alterations in the kinetics, the influence of radioactive contaminants on dose, dose in children and in the fetus, available instrumentation and techniques for collecting the kinetic data needed for dose calculation, dosimetry requirements for the review and approval of new radiopharmaceuticals, and a comparison of the effect on the thyroid of internal versus external irradiation. New models for the urinary blader, skeleton including the active marrow, and the blood were presented. Several papers dealt with the validity of traditional ''average-organ'' dose estimates to express the dose from particulate radiation that has a short range in tissue. These problems are particularly important in the use of monoclonal antibodies and agents used to measure intracellular functions. These proceedings have been published to provide a resource volume for anyone interested in the calculation of absorbed radiation dose

  11. CULTIVOS TRANSGÉNICOS:: ENTRE LOS RIESGOS BIOLÓGICOS Y LOS BENEFICIOS AMBIENTALES Y ECONÓMICOS Gm Crops:: Between Biological Risk and Environmental and Economics Benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEJANDRO CHAPARRO GIRALDO

    and GM cotton expressing ILR and HT features, as simple events or stacked. In the case of GM carnation and GM roses, these genotypes that express the color blue. Academia has tried to organize the debate on the adoption of GM crops around the analysis of biological risks and environmental vs environmental and economic benefits. Biological hazards are defined by the possible negative effects on human consumers or negative effects on the environment. The environmental benefits are related to reduce use of agrochemicals (insecticides and herbicides, and the economic benefits from the reduction in losses due to insect and weed competition to reduction of production costs.

  12. Advanced Corneal Cross-Linking System with Fluorescence Dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc D. Friedman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This paper describes an advanced system that combines corneal cross-linking with riboflavin with fluorescence dosimetry, the ability to measure riboflavin diffusion within the cornea both before and during UVA treatment. Methods and Results. A corneal cross-linking system utilizing a digital micromirror device (DMD was assembled and used to measure diffusion coefficients of 0.1% riboflavin in 20% dextran in porcine eyes. A value of (3.3±0.2×10−7 cm2/s was obtained for the stroma. Diffusion coefficients for the transepithelial formulation of 0.1% riboflavin in 0.44% saline and 0.02% BAK were also measured to be 4.7±0.3×10−8 cm2/s for epithelium only and (4.6±0.4×10−7 cm2/s for stroma only. Riboflavin consumption during a UVA treatment was also demonstrated. Conclusion. A new advanced corneal cross-linking system with fluorescence dosimetry of riboflavin has been demonstrated. It is hoped that this method may play a significant role in determining the underlying mechanisms of corneal cross-linking and assist with the development of additional riboflavin formulations. Moreover, dosimetry may prove valuable in providing a method to account for the biological differences between individuals, potentially informing cornea-specific UVA treatment doses in real time.

  13. Patient dosimetry and protection in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper discussed the following subjects: x-ray in medicine as they represent by far the largest man-made sources of population exposure to ionizing radiation, methods of patient dosimetry, entrance surface dose per radiograph, dose-area product per examination, dosimetry for assessing risk, potential of dose reduction

  14. High dose dosimetry for radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation processing today offers various advantages in the field of sterilization of medical and pharmaceutical products, food preservation, treatment of chemical materials and a variety of other products widely used in modern society, all of which are of direct relevance to health and welfare. The safety and economic importance of radiation processing is clearly recognized. It is understood that reliable dosimetry is a key parameter for quality assurance of radiation processing and irradiated products. Furthermore, the standardization of dosimetry can provide a justification for the regulatory approval of irradiated products and form the basis of international clearance for free trade. After the initiation of the Agency's high dose standardization programme (1977), the first IAEA Symposium on High Dose Dosimetry was organized in 1984. As a result, concern as to the necessity of reliable dosimetry has greatly escalated not only in the scientific community but also in the radiation processing industry. The second International Symposium on High Dose Dosimetry for Radiation Processing was held in Vienna from 5 to 9 November, 1990, with a view to providing an international forum for the exchange of technical information on up to date developments in this particular field. The scientific programme held promises for an authoritative account of the status of high dose dosimetry throughout the world in 1990. Forty-one papers presented at the meeting discussed the development of new techniques, the improvement of reference and routine dosimetry systems, and the quality control and assurance of dosimetry. Refs, figs and tabs

  15. Novel MR dosimetry system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors are developing a novel high-range dosimeter based on the radiolysis of methanol and the quantitative ability of NMR spectroscopy. Radiation interactions in methanol from radiolytic products proportional to the absorbed dose. The chemical shifts of these products relative to the methanol solvent allow quantification with NMR spectroscopic techniques. Deuterated methanol is used to reduce the large hydroxyl proton peak. A presaturation solvent suppression sequence is implemented on a 270-MHz spectrometer for data acquisition. The solvent C-13-coupled proton resonance is used as an internal reference to normalize product signals otherwise subject to spectrometer variability. Preliminary data on reproducibility, dose response, and temporal stability have been acquired. System reproducibility for a given sample at 1 kGy is ∼ 10%. The dose response is linear in the range between 200 Gy and 50 kGy. No significant signal degradation has been observed during a 4-month period. Advantages to this type of dosimeter system over previous chemical dosimeters include ease of use, large dynamic range, and good temporal stability. An additional advantage in using a methanol-based system is the similarity in the linear energy transfer dependence between biologic response and the radiochemical yield from methanol

  16. ESR dosimetry using eggshells and tooth enamel for accidental dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CO2- signal of eggshells showed a good dose linearity and was appropriate in the wide dose range from 1 to 10 kGy, while ESR signal of CO2- in sea and fresh water shells were saturated at a dose od below 10 kGy. The minimum detectable dose and G-value of CO2- in eggshells were estimated 0.3 Gy and 0.28, respectively. The lifetime of CO2- in eggshells could not be determined exactly because of overlapping organic signals, however it is still sufficiently long for practical use as ESR dosimeter materials. Various bird's or reptile's eggshells would be available as natural retrospective ESR dosimeter materials after nuclear accidents. Eggshells will be useful for the food irradiation dosimetry in the dose range of about a few kGy. Tooth enamel is one of the most useful dosimeter materials in public at a accident because of its high sensitivity. ESR dosimetry will replace TLD in near future if the cost of an ESR reader is further reduced . (author)

  17. Radiation dosimetry and standards at the austrian dosimetry laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Austrian Dosimetry Laboratory, established and operated in cooperation between the Austrian Research Center Seibersdorf and the Federal Office of Metrology and Surveying (Bundesamt and Eich- und Vermessungswesen) maintains the national primary standards for radiation dosimetry. Furthermore its tasks include routine calibration of dosemeters and dosimetric research. The irradiation facilities of the laboratory comprise three X-ray machines covering the voltage range from 5 kV to 420 kV constant potential, a 60Co teletherapy unit, a circular exposure system for routine batch calibration of personnel dosemeters with four gamma ray sources (60Co and 137Cs) and a reference source system with six gamma ray sources (60Co and 137Cs). In addition a set of calibrated beta ray sources are provided (147Pm, 204Tl and 90Sr). The dosimetric equipment consists of three free-air parallelplate ionization chambers serving as primary standards of exposure for the X-ray energy region, graphite cavity chambers with measured volume as primary standards for the gamma radiation of 137Cs and 60Co as well as different secondary standard ionization chambers covering the dose rate range from the natural background level up to the level of modern therapy accelerators. In addition for high energy photon and electron radiation a graphite calorimeter is provided as primary standard of absorbed dose. The principle experimental set-ups for the practical use of the standards are presented and the procedures for the calibration of the different types of dosemeters are described. (Author)

  18. Air Force neutron dosimetry program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Approximately 1000 Air Force personnel are monitored for neutron radiation resulting from various sources at more than thirty worldwide locations. Neutron radiation spanning several orders of magnitude in energy is encountered. The Air Force currently uses albedo thermoluminescent neutron dosimeters for personnel monitoring. The energy dependence of the albedo neutron dosimeter is a current problem and the development of site specific correction factors is ongoing. A summary of data on the energy dependence is presented as well as efforts to develop algorithms for the dosimeter. An overview of current Air Force neutron dosimetry users and needs is also presented

  19. Radiation dosimetry by potassium feldspar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arun Pandya; S G Vaijapurkar; P K Bhatnagar

    2000-04-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) properties of raw and annealed feldspar have been studied for their use in gamma dosimetry. The raw gamma exposed feldspar shows glow peaks at 120°C and 319°C. Gamma dose beyond 500 cGy can be measured without any significant fading even after 40 days of termination of exposure. The annealed feldspar shows a glow peak at 120°C after gamma exposure. This peak can be used to measure gamma doses beyond 25 cGy when the TL is measured after 24 h from termination of exposure.

  20. Millimeter wave dosimetry of human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, S I; Radzievsky, A A; Logani, M K; Ziskin, M C

    2008-01-01

    To identify the mechanisms of biological effects of mm waves it is important to develop accurate methods for evaluating absorption and penetration depth of mm waves in the epidermis and dermis. The main characteristics of mm wave skin dosimetry were calculated using a homogeneous unilayer model and two multilayer models of skin. These characteristics included reflection, power density (PD), penetration depth (delta), and specific absorption rate (SAR). The parameters of the models were found from fitting the models to the experimental data obtained from measurements of mm wave reflection from human skin. The forearm and palm data were used to model the skin with thin and thick stratum corneum (SC), respectively. The thin SC produced little influence on the interaction of mm waves with skin. On the contrary, the thick SC in the palm played the role of a matching layer and significantly reduced reflection. In addition, the palmar skin manifested a broad peak in reflection within the 83-277 GHz range. The viable epidermis plus dermis, containing a large amount of free water, greatly attenuated mm wave energy. Therefore, the deeper fat layer had little effect on the PD and SAR profiles. We observed the appearance of a moderate SAR peak in the therapeutic frequency range (42-62 GHz) within the skin at a depth of 0.3-0.4 mm. Millimeter waves penetrate into the human skin deep enough (delta = 0.65 mm at 42 GHz) to affect most skin structures located in the epidermis and dermis.

  1. Dosimetry at the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility: Past, present, and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the primary reason for the existence of the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility is to provide basic data on the physics of systems of fissile material, the physical arrangements and ability to provide sources of radiation have led to applications for all types of radiation dosimetry. In the broad definition of radiation phenomena, the facility has provided sources to evaluate biological effects, radiation shielding and transport, and measurements of basic parameters such as the evaluation of delayed neutron parameters. Within the last 15 years, many of the radiation measurements have been directed to calibration and intercomparison of dosimetry related to nuclear criticality safety. Future plans include (1) the new applications of Godiva IV, a bare-metal pulse assembly, for dosimetry (including an evaluation of neutron and gamma-ray room return); (2) a proposal to relocate the Health Physics Research Reactor from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to Los Alamos, which will provide the opportunity to continue the application of a primary benchmark source to radiation dosimetry; and (3) a proposal to employ SHEBA, a low-enrichment solution assembly, for accident dosimetry and evaluation

  2. Internal dosimetry, past and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress in the dosimetry of internally deposited radionuclides since World War II is reviewed. The Permissible Doses Conference held at Chalk River in 1949 defined the Standard Man and a biokinetic lung model, setting maximum permissible body burdens (MPBB), maximum permissible concentrations in air (MPCA), and maximum permissible concentrations in water (MPCW) for selected radionuclides. ICRP publications 2, 6 and 9 followed, focusing on setting MPCs. The use of the power function to describe radionuclide retention in the human body was discussed in Publication 2, but not recommended for use until Publication 6. Publication 2 defined the term effective energy. The integration time for internal exposures became 50 years, and the committed dose was defined. ICRP publications 10, 10A and 54 provided guidance for the calculation of doses from measured activity in vivo or in excreta. In 1979 ICRP publication 30 replaced publication 2 as the handbook for internal dosimetry. There will be a major revision of Publication 30 following the release of the new ICRP recommendations. A future publication will give doses to patients who have been administered radiopharmaceuticals. New computer tools will allow the development of more realistic metabolic models, and new dosimetric models that calculate doses to cells will be developed. The availability of high resolution solid state detectors has resulted in improvement in measurements of radionuclides in vivo, and some improvement in radiochemical analyses of excreta. However, poor sensitivity to actinides leaves something to be desired in vitro measurements and air monitoring

  3. Dosimetry effects of film packing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Dosimetric artefacts in film based dosimetry have been addressed by a number of authors. We have investigated the influence on film dose results, of a number of materials that are commonly packed against the film including, solid water, paper, air and plastic. The results indicate that variations in optical density occur due to the character and relative quantity of the packing material as well as the film itself. Kodak X-omat V and GAFChromic film samples were placed in a solid water cassette with packing sheets of various materials placed in contact with the film. Photon and electron exposures were carried out with various film orientation and beam qualities. Results have been obtained for solid water, paper and air. An example of the relative change in film density as a function of depth due to four paper sheets packed adjacent to a film aligned with the central axis of a 6MV photon beam is shown. Other results indicate dose variation can be attributed to Cerenkov radiation. Packing materials in contact or in close proximity with dosimetric film, contribute to optical density variations of the order of several percent. Careful consideration of these effects is necessary when using film in high accuracy dosimetry. Copyright (2001) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  4. CT dosimetry and risk estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional approaches to CT dosimetry are inadequate because they fail to evaluate the risk to the patient. A risk related approach to CT dosimetry is developed which explicitly takes into account the non-uniform dose distribution in the body and the relative sensitivities of different organs and tissues. The principal radiological risks to patients undergoing CT examinations are the stochastic processes of carcinogenesis and genetic effects. Radiation risk estimates have been obtained for an EMI 5005 CT scanner by measuring the mean organ doses in a Rando phantom for CT studies on the head, chest, abdomen and pelvis. The application of these risk estimates to the population served by this CT scanner indicates that during the lifetime of the CT scanner, approximately 50,000 patients will undergo CT scanning and 60% will result in a positive diagnosis. The radiation detriment is estimated to be about 1 induced cancer and a negligible genetic effect. The radiation detriment is considerably smaller than the total detriment associated with contrast material used in 76% of the CT studies. (author)

  5. Health physics research reactor reference dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reference neutron dosimetry is developed for the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) in the new operational configuration directly above its storage pit. This operational change was physically made early in CY 1985. The new reference dosimetry considered in this document is referred to as the 1986 HPRR reference dosimetry and it replaces any and all HPRR reference documents or papers issued prior to 1986. Reference dosimetry is developed for the unshielded HPRR as well as for the reactor with each of five different shield types and configurations. The reference dosimetry is presented in terms of three different dose and six different dose equivalent reporting conventions. These reporting conventions cover most of those in current use by dosimetrists worldwide. In addition to the reference neutron dosimetry, this document contains other useful dosimetry-related data for the HPRR in its new configuration. These data include dose-distance measurements and calculations, gamma dose measurements, neutron-to-gamma ratios, ''9-to-3 inch'' ratios, threshold detector unit measurements, 56-group neutron energy spectra, sulfur fluence measurements, and details concerning HPRR shields. 26 refs., 11 figs., 31 tabs

  6. Electron paramagnetic resonance technique for radiation dosimetry: emerging trends for laboratory and accidental dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The applications of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) for radiation dosimetry are briefly reviewed. In particular, EPR-alanine dosimetry and accidental dosimetry using EPR signals from human tooth enamel have been discussed. The alanine dosimetry was found to be useful from low doses such as 1 Gy to high doses such as 100 kGy. The signals from tooth enamel are found to be invaluable in assessing the absorbed dose of people exposed to radiation accidents and also survivors of atomic bomb explosions. New emerging trends using EPR signals from bones exposed to radiation have also been briefly reviewed. (author)

  7. Medicaid Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Medicaid Outreach Tools Medicaid State Plan Amendments Benefits States establish and administer their own Medicaid programs ... Medicare certified hospital, and critical access hospital (CAH). Benefits Content Autism Services Early Periodic Screening Diagnosis & Treatment ...

  8. Retrospective dosimetry by electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in dental enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biophysical dosimetry based on EPR in biological solid samples (like bone and teeth) or in organic materials (like textile fibres, sugar, etc.) is a complementary technique that could contribute, along with the biological dosimetry, to the retrospective evaluation of the absorbed dose in accidental situations. Dental enamel could be considered as the only tissue with structure and composition essentially constant over time: this characteristic feature allows its use as an index of radiation exposure since tooth retains indefinitely its radiation history. Samples of human molars were exposed to gamma-Rays (Co 60) with doses between 0,5 Gy to 10 Gy. After a chemical treatment of samples, enamel was removed by grinding with a dental drill and reduced to a fine powder. A characteristic EPR signal was detected at g=2.002. The dose effect curves were done using 20 mw of microwave power. Measurements were done both, with flat cells and disposable Pasteur pipettes allowing the use of lower amounts of sample. The intensity of the signal was proportional to the dose and linearity was verified in both cases. We discuss the applicability of this technique in evaluating radiation dose in accidental overexposures. (author)

  9. Alanine - ESR dosimetry, feasibility and possible applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alanine ESR dosimetry presents a great interest for quality controls in radiotherapy. This new developed water equivalent alanine dosimeter allows a reproducible dose measurement, by a non-destructive readout technique in a large dose range. In this paper the stability of the dosimeter response has been shown but also its independence with the energy or the dose rate of the absorbed radiation. Through this different studies, one can broaden the application field of alanine / ESR dosimetry especially for in-vivo dosimetry. The results of the experiments and the intra operative treatment, indicate that this kind of dosimetry seems to be a promising technique for in-vivo quality controls in electron beam, γ ray or X ray radiotherapy. (authors)

  10. Advanced materials in radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Bruzzi, M; Nava, F; Pini, S; Russo, S

    2002-01-01

    High band-gap semiconductor materials can represent good alternatives to silicon in relative dosimetry. Schottky diodes made with epitaxial n-type 4 H SiC and Chemical Vapor Deposited diamond films with ohmic contacts have been exposed to a sup 6 sup 0 Co gamma-source, 20 MeV electrons and 6 MV X photons from a linear accelerator to test the current response in on-line configuration in the dose range 0.1-10 Gy. The released charge as a function of the dose and the radiation-induced current as a function of the dose-rate are found to be linear. No priming effects have been observed using epitaxial SiC, due to the low density of lattice defects present in this material.

  11. Audits for advanced treatment dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy has advanced rapidly over the last few decades, progressing from 3D conformal treatment to image-guided intensity modulated therapy of several different flavors, both 3D and 4D and to adaptive radiotherapy. The use of intensity modulation has increased the complexity of quality assurance and essentially eliminated the physicist's ability to judge the validity of a treatment plan, even approximately, on the basis of appearance and experience. Instead, complex QA devices and procedures are required at the institutional level. Similarly, the assessment of treatment quality through remote and on-site audits also requires greater sophistication. The introduction of 3D and 4D dosimetry into external audit systems must follow, to enable quality assurance systems to perform meaningful and thorough audits

  12. Application of radiation damage effects in dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    some general aspects of radiation dosimetry are outlined. The techniques of radiophotoluminescence, radiothermoluminescence and exo-electron emission are discussed individually. It is thought that the trend in personnel dosimetry is such that thermoluminescence will steadily replace film and photoluminescence techniques over the next decade, and that more unusual techniques, such as exo-electron emission, will make inroads only for special purposes. (B.R.H.)

  13. Developments in Patient Dosimetry for Unsealed Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In molecular radiotherapy, treatment planning essentially is the determination of the activity to administer to optimize safety and efficacy of a treatment. Individualization is possible, for example, by using quantitative imaging modalities, external counting and blood sampling for pre-therapeutic biokinetics measurements. Patient specific dosimetry can be performed as in radiation therapy. Over- or under treatment of patients can be avoided. Here, the standard methods and the expected advances in performing individualized dosimetry are discussed. (author)

  14. The Radiotherapy Dosimetry Audit System In the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two national radiotherapy dosimetry intercomparisons have been earned out in the UK, involving all radiotherapy institutes. The first was concerned with megavoltage photon beams and looked at beam calibration and simple three-field planned distributions in a geometric phantom. The intercomparisons were carried out by an independent intercomparison physicist visiting each department in turn and making measurements with ion chambers, following a fixed protocol. The beam calibration intercomparison was earned out on every 60Co beam and every MV x-ray beam, whilst the planned comparisons were carried out on one beam only. The plans included effects of wedges, oblique incidence and inhomogeneities. The study was unfunded and took a significant time (1988-1991) to cover the 65 or so centres. It was followed up by a national electron dosimetry intercomparison which was fended (Department of Health) and which ran from 1994-1996. This audited three electron beam energies in each centre (depth dose, beam energy, dose calibration) and also included a follow-up of the original photon beam intercomparison. In general these studies showed good consistency of dosimetry across the UK centres, with mean (measured/locally stated) doses being close to unity and standard deviations of the distributions of values being approx. 1.5 and 1% for photons, 1.8% for electrons for beam calibration and 2.5-3.5% for the planned multi-beam situations. 97-100% of measurements were within the pre-set 3% tolerance for beam calibration and around 90% of the measurements within a pre-set 5% tolerance for planned situations. The studies did highlight some areas where increased on Q A could provide benefits. In particular the photon intercomparison discovered one 60Co unit mis calibration which led to national recommendations for the implementation of Quality Systems in radiotherapy departments

  15. Twelfth Symposium on Neutron and Ion Dosimetry - NEUDOS-12. Editorial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ), and a workshop on Biologically Weighted Quantities in Radiotherapy (European project BioQuaRT), chaired by Hans Rabus from German National Metrology Institute (PTB). A best poster Award was presented to Michal Sadel, from the Institute of Nuclear Physics, of the Polish Academy of Science (Poland), for his poster dealing with 'Relative TL and OSL efficiency to protons of various dosimetric materials'. The scientific programme of this 12. NEUDOS symposium covered a wide variety of topics related to neutron and ion dosimetry, which were organised into six sessions: I-Basic aspects and new issues, II-Instrumentation and techniques, III-Neutrons and ions in medicine, IV-Neutrons and complex radiation fields in research and industry, V-Complex radiation fields in aviation and space activities and VI-Physics-biology interface. It is interesting to note that >50 % of the posters were related to the topics of Session II (Dosimetry, Metrology and Spectrometry, Calibrations and Facilities, and Intercomparisons). A total of 134 manuscripts were submitted for publication in these proceedings. (authors)

  16. Scientific days on electromagnetic fields: from dosimetry to human health - Conference proceedings; Journees scientifiques - Champs electromagnetiques: de la dosimetrie a la sante humaine - Recueil des resumes et presentations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiart, J.; Ghanmi, A.; Picon, O.; Conil, E.; Varsier, N.; Hadjem, A.; Sudret, B.; Magne, I.; Souques, M.; Gaudaire, F.; De Seze, R.; Jawad, O.; Lautru, D.; Dricot, J.M.; Horlin, F.; De Doncker, P.; Drissaoui, A.; Musy, F.; Nicolas, L.; Perrussel, R.; Scorretti, R.; Voyer, D.; Jala, M.; Moulines, E.; Levy-Leduc, C.; Mahfouz, Z.; Gati, A.; Fouad Hanna, V.; Leveque, P.; Arnaud-Cormos, D.; Zhadobov, M.; Jarrige, P.; Gaborit, G.; Kohler, S.; Ticaud, N.; Duvillaret, L.; Guelilia, Z.; Loison, R.; Gillard, R.; Laisne, A.; Favet, D.; Benadhira, R.; Mir, L.; Nadi, M.; Kourtiche, D.; Gazeau, F.; Wilhelm, C.; Delemotte, L.; Breton, M.; Tarek, M.; Marc-Vergnes, J.P.; Yardin, C.; Perrin, A.; Le Drean, Y.; Sauleau, R.; Lambrozo, J.; Selmaoui, B.; Ghosn, R.; Thuroczy, G.; Villegier, A.S.; Loos, N.; Brenet-Dufour, V.; Liabeuf, S.; Bach, V.; Moretti, D.; Lewis, N.; Garenne, A.; Poulletier De Gannes, F.; Haro, E.; Lagroye, I.; Bornat, Y.; Boutaib, Y.; Saighi, S.; Renaud, S.; Veyre, B.; Schuz, J.; Deltour, I.; Van Deventer, E.; Vecchia, P.; Merckel, O.; Bellaouel, A.; Demaret, P.; Donati, P.; Jovanovic, D.; Chauvin, S.; Desreumaux, J.P.; Fouquet, L.; Picard, D.; Massardier-Pilonchery, A.; Hours, M.; Bergeret, A.; Person, C.; Toutain, Y.; Butet, R.; Berrahma, K.; Balderelli, I.; Stelmaszyk, V.; Cretallaz, C.; Lamproglou, I.; Amourette, C.; Diserbo, M.; Fauquette, W.; Martigne, P.; Collin, A.; Lagroye, I.; Ait Aissa, S.; Hurtier, A.; Taxile, M.; Le Montagner, L.; Athane, A.; Duleu, S.; Percherancier, Y.; Geffard, M.; Ruffie, G.; Billaudel, B.; Veyret, B.; Pelletier, A.; Delanaud, S.; Libert, J.P.; Schunck, T.; Bieth, F.; Soubere Mahamoud, Y.; Le Quement, C.; Ferrand, G.; Le Guevel, R.; Carton, P.H.; Luong, M.; Tanvir, S.; Selmaoui, B.; Silva Pires-Antonietti, V.; Sonnet, P.; Pulvin, S.; Kuster, O.; Tetelin, C.

    2012-04-15

    This document brings together the available presentations (articles and slides) given at the URSI scientific days on electromagnetic fields: dosimetry, peoples' exposure, biological and health risks, risk management, and medical uses. 48 presentations are compiled in this document and deal with: 1 - Stochastic dosimetry: variability challenge; 2 - How to estimate the exposure to 50/60 Hz magnetic field in an epidemiological study?; 3 - Joint analysis of population exposure and radio coverage of GSM and UMTS mobile phone networks; 4 - Study of the specific energy absorption rate (SAR) sensitiveness to phone positions near the head for 2 GSM mobile phones; 5 - Statistical Study of SAR under Wireless Channel - Exposure in Indoor Environment; 6 - Uncertainty propagation in numerical dosimetry: how to reduce calculation costs?; 7 - Use of a simplified pregnant woman model for foetus exposure analysis; 8 - SAR estimation using multi-exposure with a mobile phone; 9 - State-of-the-art in experimental dosimetry (RF and pulses); 10 - Mm-waves dosimetry: issues, stakes and actual solutions; 11 - Use of DG-FDTD for a dosimetry calculation in a strongly multi-scale problem: determination of the eye-SAR near a HF/VHF vehicle-borne source; 12 - Dosimetric measurements with a fiber-type electro-optical sensor; 13 - Partial experimental evaluation of basic restrictions in the HF/VHF range; 14 - Repetitive trans-cranial magnetic stimulation Stimulation (rTMS) in psychiatry: present day situation and perspectives; 15 - Medical applications of electric fields; 16 - Measurements for life: new perspectives? 17 - Nano-particles and magnetic stimuli for medical imaging and therapy; 18 - Molecular Insights into electroporation and siRNA electro-transfer through model cell membranes; 19 - State of knowledge on electromagnetic fields hypersensitivity (HS-CEM); 20 - Experimentation methodology: from results to interpretation; 22 - Mm waves - update on biological effects at 40-60 GHz; 23

  17. RADON PROGENY AS AN EXPERIMENTAL TOOL FOR DOSIMETRY OF NANOAEROSOLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruzer, Lev; Ruzer, Lev S.; Apte, Michael G.

    2008-02-25

    The study of aerosol exposure and dosimetry measurements and related quantitation of health effects are important to the understanding of the consequences of air pollution, and are discussed widely in the scientific literature. During the last 10 years the need to correlate aerosol exposure and biological effects has become especially important due to rapid development of a new, revolutionary industry ?-- nanotechnology. Nanoproduct commerce is predicted to top $1 trillion by 2015. Quantitative assessment of aerosol particle behavior in air and in lung deposition, and dosimetry in different parts of the lung, particularly for nanoaerosols, remains poor despite several decades of study. Direct measurements on humans are still needed in order to validate the hollow cast, animal studies, and lung deposition modeling. We discuss here the use of nanoscale radon decay products as an experimental tool in the study of local deposition and lung dosimetry for nanoaerosols. The issue of the safe use of radon progeny in such measurements is discussed based on a comparison of measured exposure in 3 settings: general population, miners, and in a human experiment conducted at the Paul Scherer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland. One of the properties of radon progeny is that they consist partly of 1 nm radioactive particles called unattached activity; having extremely small size and high diffusion coefficients, these particles can be potentially useful as radioactive tracers in the study of nanometer-sized aerosols. We present a theoretical and experimental study of the correlation between the unattached activity and aerosol particle surface area, together with a description of its calibration and method for measurement of the unattached fraction.

  18. Radon progeny as an experimental tool for dosimetry of nanoaerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of aerosol exposure and dosimetry measurements and related quantitation of health effects are important to the understanding of the consequences of air pollution, and are discussed widely in the scientific literature. During the last 10 years the need to correlate aerosol exposure and biological effects has become especially important due to rapid development of a new, revolutionary industry — nano technology. Nano product commerce is predicted to top $1 trillion by 2015. Quantitative assessment of aerosol particle behavior in air and in lung deposition, and dosimetry in different parts of the lung, particularly for nano aerosols, remains poor despite several decades of study. Direct measurements on humans are still needed in order to validate the hollow cast, animal studies, and lung deposition modeling. We discuss here the use of nano scale radon decay products as an experimental tool in the study of local deposition and lung dosimetry for nano aerosols. The issue of the safe use of radon progeny in such measurements is discussed based on a comparison of measured exposure in 3 settings: general population, miners, and in a human experiment conducted at the Paul Scherer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland One of the properties of radon progeny is that they consist partly of 1 nm radioactive particles called unattached activity; having extremely small size and high diffusion coefficients, these particles can be potentially useful as radioactive tracers in the study of nanometer-sized aerosols. We present a theoretical and experimental study of the correlation between the unattached activity and aerosol particle surface area, together with a description of its calibration and method for measurement of the unattached fraction. (author)

  19. Imaging based, patient specific dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The prognosis of achieving longtime remission for disseminated cancer disease is in many cases poor. A systemic treatment is required and therefore external beam radiation therapy is less suited. Treatment with radiolabeled pharmaceuticals, so called radionuclide therapy is such a systemic treatment. In radionuclide therapy, the absorbed dose is delivered by administration of radionuclides that emit electrons or alpha particles. It is here assumed that the released kinetic energy is transferred by interactions to sensitive parts of the cells activating cell death, and thus an accurate dosimetry is important. However, absorbed dose planning for radionuclide therapy is a real challenge in that the source cannot be turned on or off (as in external beam therapy) but decays exponentially with characteristics depending on the biokinetics and the radionuclide half-life. On a small-scale, the radiopharmaceutical is also heterogeneously distributed which means that the energy deposition is generally nonuniform. The biokinetics may also change over time which means that activity measurements need to be made at several time points to estimate the total amount of released energy in an organ or tumour. Practical issues regarding the number of measurements and patient mobility may therefore limit the accuracy in this calculation. The dose-rate for radionuclide therapy is also much lower than in external beam therapy. Since the treatment is systemic, circulating activity may result in absorbed doses to normal organs and tissues. Often this poses a problem and puts a limit on the amount of activity to can be administered. This is one of the major reasons for the requirement of an accurate patient-specific dosimetry. One of the major problems is that the biokinetics varies between patients and the activity uptake and clearance should therefore be measured for each individual patient in order to estimate the total number of decays in a particular organ/tissue. The way

  20. Dosimetry and operation of irradiation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The industrial use of ionizing radiation has required, from the very first, the measurement of delivered and absorbed doses; hence the necessity of providing dosimetric systems. Laboratories, scientists, industries and potential equipment manufacturers have all collaborated in this new field of activity. Dosimetric intercomparisons have been made by each industry at their own facilities and in collaboration with specialists, national organizations and the IAEA. Dosimetry has become a way of ensuring that treatment by irradiation has been carried out in accordance with the rules. It has become in effect assurance of quality. Routine dosimetry should determine a maximum and minimum dose. Numerous factors play a part in dosimetry. Industry is currently in possession of routine dosimetric systems that are sufficiently accurate, fairly easy to handle and reasonable in cost, thereby satisfying all the requirements of industry and the need for control. Dosimetry is important in the process of marketing irradiated products. The operator of an industrial irradiation facility bases his dosimetry on comparison with reference systems. Research aimed at simplifying the practice of routine dosimetry should be continued. New physical and chemical techniques will be incorporated into systems already in use. The introduction of microcomputers into the operation of radiation facilities has increased the value of dosimetry and made the conditions of treatment more widespread. Stress should be placed on research in several areas apart from reference systems, for example: dosimetric systems at temperatures from +8 deg. C to -45 deg. C, over the dose range 100 krad to a little more than 1 Mrad, liquids and fluidized solids carried at high speed through ducts, thin-film liquids circulating at a high flow rate, and various other problems. (author)

  1. Dosimetry intercomparisons in European medical device sterilization plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, A.; Sharpe, P.H.G.

    2000-01-01

    Dosimetry intercomparisons have been carried out involving two-thirds of all European radiation sterilization facilities. Dosimeters for the intercomparisons were supplied by two accredited calibration laboratories. The results show good agreement, and indicate overall dosimetry accuracy of the o...

  2. Biological Literacy in a College Biology Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demastes, Sherry; Wandersee, James H.

    1992-01-01

    Examines the proposed definition of biological literacy as the understanding of a small number of pervasive biological principles appropriate to making informed personal and societal decisions. Utilizes the content of a major daily newspaper to adjust biology instruction to focus on this notion of biological literacy. Discusses benefits and…

  3. In vivo dosimetry with semiconductor and thermoluminescent detectors applied to head and neck cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vivo dosimetry in radiotherapy, i. e, the assessment of the doses received by patients during their treatments, permits a verification of the therapy quality. A routine of in vivo dosimetry is, undoubtedly, a direct benefit for the patient. Unfortunately, in Brazil and in Latin America this procedure is still a privilege for only a few patients. This routine is of common application only in developed countries. The aim of this work is to show the viability and implementation of a routine in vivo dosimetry, using diodes semiconductors and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD), at the radiotherapy section of the National Institute of Cancer in Brazil, in the case of head and neck cancer treatment. In order to reach that aim, the characteristics of the response of diodes ISORAD-p and LiF:Mg;Ti (TLD-100) thermoluminescent detectors in powder form were determined. The performance of those detectors for in vivo dosimetry was tested using an RANDO Alderson anthropomorfic phantom and, once their adequacy proved for the kind of measurements proposed, they were used for dose assessment in the case of tumour treatments in the head and neck regions, for Cobalt-60 irradiations. (author)

  4. Applications of Cherenkov Light Emission for Dosimetry in Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Adam Kenneth

    Since its discovery in the 1930's, the Cherenkov effect has been paramount in the development of high-energy physics research. It results in light emission from charged particles traveling faster than the local speed of light in a dielectric medium. The ability of this emitted light to describe a charged particle's trajectory, energy, velocity, and mass has allowed scientists to study subatomic particles, detect neutrinos, and explore the properties of interstellar matter. However, only recently has the phenomenon been considered in the practical context of medical physics and radiation therapy dosimetry, where Cherenkov light is induced by clinical x-ray photon, electron, and proton beams. To investigate the relationship between this phenomenon and dose deposition, a Monte Carlo plug-in was developed within the Geant4 architecture for medically-oriented simulations (GAMOS) to simulate radiation-induced optical emission in biological media. Using this simulation framework, it was determined that Cherenkov light emission may be well suited for radiation dosimetry of clinically used x-ray photon beams. To advance this application, several novel techniques were implemented to realize the maximum potential of the signal, such as time-gating for maximizing the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and Cherenkov-excited fluorescence for generating isotropic light release in water. Proof of concept experiments were conducted in water tanks to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method for two-dimensional (2D) projection imaging, three-dimensional (3D) parallel beam tomography, large field of view 3D cone beam tomography, and video-rate dynamic imaging of treatment plans for a number of common radiotherapy applications. The proposed dosimetry method was found to have a number of unique advantages, including but not limited to its non-invasive nature, water-equivalence, speed, high-resolution, ability to provide full 3D data, and potential to yield data in-vivo. Based on

  5. Personnel neutron dosimetry at Department of Energy facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Endres, G.W.R.; Selby, J.M.; Vallario, E.J.

    1980-08-01

    This study assesses the state of personnel neutron dosimetry at DOE facilities. A survey of the personnel dosimetry systems in use at major DOE facilities was conducted, a literature search was made to determine recent advances in neutron dosimetry, and several dosimetry experts were interviewed. It was concluded that personnel neutron dosimeters do not meet current needs and that serious problems exist now and will increase in the future if neutron quality factors are increased and/or dose limits are lowered.

  6. Technical Basis Document for PFP Area Monitoring Dosimetry Program

    CERN Document Server

    Cooper, J R

    2000-01-01

    This document describes the phantom dosimetry used for the PFP Area Monitoring program and establishes the basis for the Plutonium Finishing Plant's (PFP) area monitoring dosimetry program in accordance with the following requirements: Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), part 835, ''Occupational Radiation Protection'' Part 835.403; Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM-1), Part 514; HNF-PRO-382, Area Dosimetry Program; and PNL-MA-842, Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual.

  7. Experimental verification of internal dosimetry calculations. Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past year a dosimetry research program has been established in the School of Nuclear Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. The major objective of this program has been to provide research results upon which a useful internal dosimetry system could be based. The important application of this dosimetry system will be the experimental verification of internal dosimetry calculations such as those published by the MIRD Committee

  8. Personnel neutron dosimetry at Department of Energy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study assesses the state of personnel neutron dosimetry at DOE facilities. A survey of the personnel dosimetry systems in use at major DOE facilities was conducted, a literature search was made to determine recent advances in neutron dosimetry, and several dosimetry experts were interviewed. It was concluded that personnel neutron dosimeters do not meet current needs and that serious problems exist now and will increase in the future if neutron quality factors are increased and/or dose limits are lowered

  9. Irradiation planning and dosimetry with π-mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analytical program for irradiation planning is presented for the 60-beam π-applicator (Piotron). Using this program, the three-dimensional dose distribution can be calculated for an arbitrary orientation of the patient and arbitrary applicator parameters. To study the influence of inhomogenieties of the human body, the stopping power for π--mesons has been measured for relevant materials. As a result, the stopping power of heavy particles can be described with a high precision by the Bethe-Bloch-equation using an appropriate average of the ionisation potentials. Thus also the range variations due to inhomogenieties can be taken into account by an analytical program. To verify the calculated dose distributions, an experimental method has been developed to measure the three-dimensional π--dose distributions simultaneously, using CaF2:Tm thermoluminescence dosemeters. From the analysis of the glow curve the total dose can be determined as well as the mean LET-value, so that the distribution of the biological efficiency can be predicted. A special treatment of the TL-materials opens new possibilities for the application in ''in vivo'' dosimetry, for the dosimetry of other heavy charged particles and for neutrondosimetry. (orig./HP)

  10. Femtosecond laser pulse filamentation characterized by polymer gel dosimetry and Fricke dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meesat, Ridthee; Allard, Jean-Francois; Houde, Daniel; Tremblay, Luc; Khalil, Abdelouahed; Jay-Gerin, Jean-Paul; Lepage, Martin, E-mail: Martin.Lepage@USherbrooke.c [Departement de medecine nucleaire et de radiobiologie, Faculte de medecine et des sciences de la sante, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke (Quebec) J1H 5N4 (Canada)

    2010-11-01

    A femtosecond laser pulse that can generate water radiolysis species was studied in view of its potential medical and biological applications. Intense ultra-short laser pulses can propagate in liquid water, leading to self-focusing and filamentation. Briefly, electrons produced by either multiphoton or tunnel ionization are further accelerated by the electric field of the pulse in an inverse Bremsstrahlung effect. If the electrons acquire enough kinetic energy, they will give rise to a second generation of electrons by impact ionization of other molecules in an avalanche-like process. The geometry and trajectory of femtosecond filaments were captured within a polymer gel dosimeter and imaged by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at high resolution. The results revealed that changing pulse duration modifies the penetration of the filament track in the medium. In addition, we used Fricke dosimetry to measure the absorbed dose and dose rate of the femtosecond laser pulse filamentation. A very high dose rate of 5.3 x 10{sup 12} Gy/s was calculated in filaments having a diameter of {approx}600 {mu}m.

  11. Recent trends in radioprotection dosimetry: Promising solutions for personal neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper new detecting methods will be described, which are very sensitive to fast neutrons and are completely insensitive to gamma radiations. These new detectors are based on the same properties of highly ionizing particles which determine their high biological effectiveness, namely the high deposition of energy at microscopic and submicroscopic distances from the particle trajectory in solid materials. Another important characteristic, common to these new detecting methods, is the exploitation of the high-energy deposition in the vicinity of the track to initiate avalanche-type of processes, which can be easily detected. These new registration techniques are respectively the electrochemically etched damage track detectors and the bubble damage polymer detectors. The simplicity, low cost and small size of these new detecting systems, together with their high sensitivity and their ability to discriminate against large fluxes of sparsely ionizing radiations make it possible to tackle some of the most difficult problems yet to be solved in radioprotection monitoring, such as personnel neutron dosimetry. (orig./HSI)

  12. Sixth personnel dosimetry intercomparison study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Sixth Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study was conducted March 25 to 27, 1980, at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Dosimeters from 28 participating agencies were mounted on anthropomorphic phantoms and exposed to a range of low-level dose equivalents (1.8 to 11.5 mSv neutron, 0.1 to 1.1 mSv gamma) which could be encountered during routine personnel monitoring in mixed radiation fields. The Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) operated in the steady-state mode served as the source of radiation for six separate exposures. Lucite and concrete shields along with the unshielded reactor were used to provide three different neutron and gamma spectra. Results reported by the participating agencies showed that TLD-albedo and TLD-700 dosimeters generally provided the most accurate measurements of neutron and gamma dose equivalents, respectively. Film was found to be unsatisfactory for measuring neutron doses produced by HPRR spectra in that measured dose equivalents were much lower than reference values. The TLD-100 dosimeters yielded gamma doses which were much too high indicating that this dosimeter type is generally unsuitable for use in mixed radiation fields similar to those encountered in this study without the use of large correction factors. Although the overall reported results exhibited improvement in performance relative to previous intercomparison studies, the composite measured data showed variations of more than a factor of 2 between measurements of the same exposure made by different agencies

  13. Radiosynoviorthesis. Clinical and preclinical dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate calculation of internal dose estimates in the Radiosynoviorthesis treatment requires several steps of analysis. The use of animal models (rabbits) to predict human kinetics and dosimetry is an essential first step in the evaluation of new radiocolloids, but involves many uncertainties. There is no gold standard method for extrapolating animal data to humans. Nonetheless, human dose estimates based on animal data are considered to be reasonable approximations to be used for proceeding with dose estimates based on human data, which are ultimately used to assess the safety and efficacy evaluations of radiopharmaceuticals, and continues to be an important element in the radiopharmaceutical approval process. The obtained absorbed dose profiles versus synovial tissue, bone and articular cartilage depth will permit the specialist to prescribe the adequate dose of radionuclide to treat rheumatoid arthritis in medium and large joints without expose the healthy structures of the synovial joint to an excessive and unnecessary irradiation risk, eliminating the fixed dose and fixed radionuclides for each joints (Author)

  14. Dosimetry in radiation processing- Indian scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation processing is a method for producing chemical, physical, and microbiological changes in substances by exposing to ionizing radiation. Availability of high intensity cobalt-60 gamma ray sources and high power electron beam accelerators has led to a continuous growth of radiation processing industry in India. Commercial viability and safe operation of these radiation-processing plants depends on accurate dosimetry. Depending on the purpose to be achieved, a widespread dose range, from few grays to few hundred kilo grays, is encountered in radiation processing technology and this necessitates the use of different dosimetry systems. In the present paper, current status of radiation processing facilities in India has been reviewed. Various indigenously developed dosimetry systems such as Alanine/glutamine (Spectrophotometric readout), FBX and ceric-cerous (potentiometry) are being used for quality assurance and routine plant dosimetry. Fricke dosimeter is used as a reference standard for calibrating other dosimetry systems. Glutamine (Spectrophotometric read out) dosimeter, used as transfer standard for Q.A. has traceability to NPL, UK and has shown an agreement within ±2% during dose intercomparisons carried out with various international standards laboratories. Performance of these dosimeters was found to be better than ±10% during dose measurements in radiation sterilization and food irradiation plants. (author)

  15. 10 CFR 835.1304 - Nuclear accident dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nuclear accident dosimetry. 835.1304 Section 835.1304... Nuclear accident dosimetry. (a) Installations possessing sufficient quantities of fissile material to... nuclear accident is possible, shall provide nuclear accident dosimetry for those individuals. (b)...

  16. Dosimetry methods for fuels, cladding and structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume of the proceedings of the symposium on reactor dosimetry covers the following topics: the metallurgy and dosimetry interface, radiation damage correlations of structural materials and damage analyses techniques, dosimetry for fusion materials, light water reactor pressure vessel surveillance in practice and irradiation experiments, fast reactor and reseach reactor characterization

  17. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy applied to radiation dosimetry and other fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short introduction to the theory and practice of ESR spectroscopy is given. ESR alanine dosimetry for low and high LET (linear energy transfer) ionising radiation is described, indicating its advantages over traditional methods. Problems arising in the therapy dose range (below 5 Gy), and possible future developments, are mentioned. The application of ESR to the radiation processing of materials and foodstuffs, to geological dating, biology, molecular chemistry and to medicine is discussed. Some examples of chemical analyses are also presented. (orig.)

  18. Light and drug dosimetry considerations in porphyrin precursor–based photodynamic therapy

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    This thesis concerns light and drug dosimetry for photodynamic cancer treatment – a treatment modality where a photosensitizer uses the energy of light to damage biological matter. Porphyrin precursors were used as prodrugs which are synthesized into photosensitizers inside cells. Human subjects were studied as a part of developing a treatment for non-melanotic skin cancer. A 3-hour application of a topical cream photosensitized the tumor tissue with good selectivity versus normal skin, wh...

  19. Evolution and current status of personal dosimetry in the Slovak NPPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the archives of the Public Health Office, there are a lot of documents which demonstrate that since the beginning of design of the fir=st NPP in Slovakia, there has been considerable attention dedicated to personal dosimetry. But only few facts will be mentioned here. The external exposure was monitored by national (Czechoslovak) dosimetry service in Prague until 1977. NPPs have had their own services since then. Film detectors have been used for legal purposes since the beginning. The structure of the film detector allows measurements of beta and gamma radiation, assessment of main direction and energy of radiation, identification of surface contamination. Exposed films are kept in the archive. The operational dosimetry has been developed significantly, from simple pen detectors with ionisation chamber to electronic dosimeters. The internal contamination has been monitored by medical service (under Health Ministry) which was established in NPP Bohunice until 19,7. Since then the internal dosimetry services have been operated by the NPPs. The whole body counters and laboratories for analysis of biological samples have been available on both nuclear sites of Slovakia. The measurement system, the rules and the methodology were regularly improved. Quick body monitors and monitors for thyroid monitoring are available also on both sites at present. (authors)

  20. Incapacity Benefits versus Benefit Transfers

    OpenAIRE

    Orszag, Jonathan Michael; Snower, Dennis J.

    1996-01-01

    The paper explores the employment implications of allowing people the opportunity of using a portion of their incapacity benefits to provide employment vouchers for employers that hire them. The analysis indicates that introducing this policy could increase employment, raise the incomes of incapacity benefit recipients, and reduce employers’ labour costs.

  1. Bayesian Methods for Radiation Detection and Dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Groer, Peter G

    2002-01-01

    We performed work in three areas: radiation detection, external and internal radiation dosimetry. In radiation detection we developed Bayesian techniques to estimate the net activity of high and low activity radioactive samples. These techniques have the advantage that the remaining uncertainty about the net activity is described by probability densities. Graphs of the densities show the uncertainty in pictorial form. Figure 1 below demonstrates this point. We applied stochastic processes for a method to obtain Bayesian estimates of 222Rn-daughter products from observed counting rates. In external radiation dosimetry we studied and developed Bayesian methods to estimate radiation doses to an individual with radiation induced chromosome aberrations. We analyzed chromosome aberrations after exposure to gammas and neutrons and developed a method for dose-estimation after criticality accidents. The research in internal radiation dosimetry focused on parameter estimation for compartmental models from observed comp...

  2. Performance testing of UK personal dosimetry laboratories

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, T O

    1985-01-01

    The proposed Ionising Radiations Regulations will require all UK personal dosimetry laboratories that monitor classified personnel to be approved for personal dosimetry by the Health and Safety Executive. It is suggested that these approvals should be based on general and supplementary criteria published by the British Calibration Service (BCS) for laboratory approval for the provision of personal dosimetry services. These criteria specify certain qualitative requirements and also indicate the need for regular tests of performance to be carried out to ensure constancy of dosimetric standards. This report concerns the latter. The status of the BCS criteria is discussed and the need for additional documents to cover new techniques and some modifications to existing documents is indicated. A means is described by which the technical performance of laboratories, concerned with personal monitoring for external radiations, can be assessed, both initially and ongoing. The costs to establish the scheme and operate it...

  3. Model selection for radiochromic film dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Méndez, Ignasi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find the most accurate model for radiochromic film dosimetry by comparing different channel independent perturbation models. A model selection approach based on (algorithmic) information theory was followed, and the results were validated using gamma-index analysis on a set of benchmark test cases. Several questions were addressed: (a) whether incorporating the information of the non-irradiated film, by scanning prior to irradiation, improves the results; (b) whether lateral corrections are necessary when using multichannel models; (c) whether multichannel dosimetry produces better results than single-channel dosimetry; (d) which multichannel perturbation model provides more accurate film doses. It was found that scanning prior to irradiation and applying lateral corrections improved the accuracy of the results. For some perturbation models, increasing the number of color channels did not result in more accurate film doses. Employing Truncated Normal perturbations was found to...

  4. Reference dosimetry and measurement quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of absorbed dose made by a reference dosimetry system, such as alanine, have been suggested for achieving quality assurance through traceability to primary standards. Such traceability can assist users of radiation worldwide in enhancing quality control in medicine, agriculture, and industry. International and national standards of absorbed dose are still needed for applications of γ-ray and electron dosimetry at high doses (e.g. radiation therapy, food irradiation and industrial radiation processing). Reference systems, such as ferrous sulfate dosimeters measured by spectrophotometry and alanine measured by electron spin resonance spectrometry are already well established. Another useful reference system for high doses is supplied as dichromate solutions measured by spectrophotometry. Reference dosimetry, particularly for electron beams, can be accomplished with thin alanine or radiochromic dye film dosemeters. (author)

  5. Dosimetry procedures for an industrial irradiation plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grahn, Ch.

    Accurate and reliable dosimetry procedures constitute a very important part of process control and quality assurance at a radiation processing plant. γ-Dose measurements were made on the GBS 84 irradiator for food and other products on pallets or in containers. Chemical dosimeters wre exposed in the facility under conditions of the typical plant operation. The choice of the dosimeter systems employed was based on the experience in chemical dosimetry gained over several years. Dose uniformity information was obtained in air, spices, bulbs, feeds, cosmetics, plastics and surgical goods. Most products currently irradiated require dose uniformity which can be efficiently provided by pallet or box irradiators like GBS 84. The radiation performance characteristics and some dosimetry procedures are discussed.

  6. A dynamic dosimetry system for prostate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Nathanael; Dehghan, Ehsan; Deguet, Anton; Song, Danny Y.; Prince, Jerry L.; Lee, Junghoon

    2013-03-01

    The lack of dynamic dosimetry tools for permanent prostate brachytherapy causes otherwise avoidable problems in prostate cancer patient care. The goal of this work is to satisfy this need in a readily adoptable manner. Using the ubiquitous ultrasound scanner and mobile non-isocentric C-arm, we show that dynamic dosimetry is now possible with only the addition of an arbitrarily configured marker-based fiducial. Not only is the system easily configured from accessible hardware, but it is also simple and convenient, requiring little training from technicians. Furthermore, the proposed system is built upon robust algorithms of seed segmentation, fiducial detection, seed reconstruction, and image registration. All individual steps of the pipeline have been thoroughly tested, and the system as a whole has been validated on a study of 25 patients. The system has shown excellent results of accurately computing dose, and does so with minimal manual intervention, therefore showing promise for widespread adoption of dynamic dosimetry.

  7. Radiation dosimetry activities in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Netherlands Commission for Radiation Dosimetry (NCS) was officially established on 3 September 1982 with the aim of promoting the appropriate use of dosimetry of ionizing radiation both for scientific research and practical applications. The present report provides a compilation of the dosimetry acitivities and expertise available in the Netherlands, based on the replies to a questionnaire mailed under the auspices of the NCS and might suffer from some incompleteness in specific details. The addresses of the Dutch groups with the names of the scientists are given. Individual scientists, not connected with a scientific group, hospital or organization have not been included in this list. Also the names of commercial firms producing dosimetric systems have been omitted. (Auth.)

  8. Survey of international personnel radiation dosimetry programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In September of 1983, a mail survey was conducted to determine the status of external personnel gamma and neutron radiation dosimetry programs at international agencies. A total of 130 agencies participated in this study including military, regulatory, university, hospital, laboratory, and utility facilities. Information concerning basic dosimeter types, calibration sources, calibration phantoms, corrections to dosimeter responses, evaluating agencies, dose equivalent reporting conventions, ranges of typical or expected dose equivalents, and degree of satisfaction with existing systems was obtained for the gamma and neutron personnel monitoring programs at responding agencies. Results of this survey indicate that to provide the best possible occupational radiation monitoring programs and to improve dosimetry accuracy in performance studies, facility dosimetrists, regulatory and standards agencies, and research laboratories must act within their areas of responsibility to become familiar with their radiation monitoring systems, establish common reporting guidelines and performance standards, and provide opportunities for dosimetry testing and evaluation. 14 references, 10 tables

  9. Instrumentation for the individual dosimetry of workers

    CERN Document Server

    Thévenin, J C

    2003-01-01

    The control of the radiation dose exposure of workers and personnel exposed to ionizing radiations (nuclear industry, nuclear medicine, army, university laboratories etc..) is ensured by individual dosemeters. This dosimetry is mandatory for all workers susceptible to be exposed to more than 30% of the regulatory dose limit. dosemeters are worn on the chest and in some particular cases, on the finger (dosemeter rings) or on the wrist. Passive dosemeters allow to measure the dose a posteriori, while electronic dosemeters allow a direct reading and recording of the dose. This article presents successively: 1 - the general principles of individual dosimetry: situations of exposure, radiation detection, operational data, standardization, calibration and quality assurance, measurement uncertainties; 2 - goals and regulatory framework of individual dosimetry: regulation and recommendations, optimization, respect of dose limits, accidental situations; 3 - passive dosemeters: film, thermoluminescent, radio-photolumin...

  10. Individual dosimetry of workers and patients: implementation and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These days organised by the section of the technical protection of the S.F.R.P. review the different techniques of dosimetry used in France and Europe, and present the future orientations.The different interventions are as follow: Individual exposures of the workers: historic assessment and perspectives; medical exposure: where are the doses; legal obligations in individual dosimetry: which are the objective and the need on the subject; the dosimetry follow-up of workers by the S.I.S.E.R.I. system: assessment and perspectives; impact of the norm ISO 20553 on the follow-up of internal exposure; the implementation of the patient dose measurement in Belgium; techniques of passive dosimetry used in Europe; Supervision radiation protection at EDF: long term and short term approach; Comparison active and passive dosimetry at Melox; methodology for the choice of new neutron dosemeters; the working group M.E.D.O.R.: guide of internal dosimetry for the use of practitioners; O.E.D.I.P.E.: tool of modeling for the personalized internal dosimetry; the use of the Monte-Carlo method for the planning of the cancer treatment by radiotherapy becomes a reality; the works of the committee 2 of the ICRP; passive dosimetry versus operational dosimetry: situation in Europe; Implementation of the in vivo dosimetry in a radiotherapy department: experience of the Gustave Roussy institute; experience feedback on the in vivo measures in radiotherapy, based on the use of O.S.L. pellets; multi points O.S.L. instrumentation for the radiation dose monitoring in radiotherapy; dosimetry for extremities for medical applications: principle results of the European contract C.O.N.R.A.D.; references and perspectives in dosimetry; what perspectives for numerical dosimetry, an example: Sievert; system of dose management: how to answer to needs; the last technical evolutions in terms of electronic dosimetry in nuclear power plant; the fourth generation type reactors: what dosimetry. (N.C.)

  11. HSE performance tests for dosimetry services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the United Kingdom a dosimetry service that measures and assesses whole-body or part-body doses arising from external radiation must successfully complete a performance test. Results of the performance tests for routine whole-body, routine extremity/skin and special accident dosimetry, carried out over the past six years by the AEA Technology Calibration Service at Winfrith, and DRaStaC, the AWE Calibration Service at Aldermaston, are presented. The test involves irradiating groups of dosemeters to known doses of gamma radiation and determining the bias and relative standard deviations for each dose group. The results are compared with the pass criteria specified by the UK Health and Safety Executive. For routine whole-body dosimetry, both the film badge and thermoluminescent dosemeter (TLD) perform adequately for irradiations between 0.6 and 30 mSv. For higher doses up to 250 mSv, where the slow emulsion of the film is used, the film badge shows poorer performance with a tendency to overestimate the dose. For routine extremity/skin dosimetry there is a wider spread of relative standard deviation results than is seen for routine whole-body dosimetry. This is to be expected since the results will include dosemeters that are based on 'disposable' TLDs and ones based on lithium fluoride powder in sachets. For special accident dosimetry the dosemeters are tested between 0.26 and 6 Gy. For the highest dose group the film badge invariably underestimates the true dose, whereas the TLD has a tendency to overestimate it. (author)

  12. Technical basis for internal dosimetry at Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sula, M.J.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.

    1989-04-01

    The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program, administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, provides routine bioassay monitoring for employees who are potentially exposed to radionuclides in the workplace. This report presents the technical basis for routine bioassay monitoring and the assessment of internal dose at Hanford. The radionuclides of concern include tritium, corrosion products (/sup 58/Co, /sup 60/Co, /sup 54/Mn, and /sup 59/Fe), strontium, cesium, iodine, europium, uranium, plutonium, and americium. Sections on each of these radionuclides discuss the sources and characteristics; dosimetry; bioassay measurements and monitoring; dose measurement, assessment, and mitigation; and bioassay follow-up treatment. 64 refs., 42 figs., 118 tabs.

  13. Dosimetry of Low-Energy Beta Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, Jette

    Useful techniques and procedures for derermination of absorbed doses from exposure in a low-energy beta radiation were studied and evaluated. The four techniques included were beta spectrometry, extrapolation chamber dosimetry, Monte Carlo (MC) calculations, and exoelectron dosimetry. As a typical...... low-energy beta radiation field a moderated spectrum from a carbon-14 source was used. The measured responce of a Si(Li) detector to photons (bremsstrahlung) showed fine agreemant with the MC calculated photon response, whereas the difference between measured and MC calculated response to electrons...

  14. Technical basis for internal dosimetry at Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sula, M.J.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.

    1991-07-01

    The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program, administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, provides routine bioassay monitoring for employees who are potentially exposed to radionuclides in the workplace. This report presents the technical basis for routine bioassay monitoring and the assessment of internal dose at Hanford. The radionuclides of concern include tritium, corrosion products ({sup 58}Co, {sup 60}Co, {sup 54}Mn, and {sup 59}Fe), strontium, cesium, iodine, europium, uranium, plutonium, and americium,. Sections on each of these radionuclides discuss the sources and characteristics; dosimetry; bioassay measurements and monitoring; dose measurement, assessment, and mitigation and bioassay follow-up treatment. 78 refs., 35 figs., 115 tabs.

  15. Role of dosimetry in quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosimetry plays an important role in the quality control of radiation processing. Increasingly, quality control systems are based on the standards in the 9000 series from the International Organization for Standardization, ISO. This is true not only in radiation sterilization but also in food treatment, polymer modification and other uses of radiation. It is required that all measurements - including radiation measurements -are traceable to national standards, and the uncertainty of the measurements must be stated with appropriate confidence limits. The paper discusses the significance of dosimetry, the evaluation of uncertainty, and the way in which traceability may be obtained. (author). 11 refs, 2 tabs

  16. Technical basis for internal dosimetry at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program, administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, provides routine bioassay monitoring for employees who are potentially exposed to radionuclides in the workplace. This report presents the technical basis for routine bioassay monitoring and the assessment of internal dose at Hanford. The radionuclides of concern include tritium, corrosion products (58Co, 60Co, 54Mn, and 59Fe), strontium, cesium, iodine, europium, uranium, plutonium, and americium. Sections on each of these radionuclides discuss the sources and characteristics; dosimetry; bioassay measurements and monitoring; dose measurement, assessment, and mitigation; and bioassay follow-up treatment. 64 refs., 42 figs., 118 tabs

  17. Third conference on radiation protection and dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    This conference has been designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, research, regulatory, and standards personnel involved in radiation protection and providing them with sufficient information to evaluate their programs. To partly fulfill these objectives, a technical program consisting of more than 75 invited and contributed oral presentations encompassing all aspects of radiation protection has been prepared. General topics include external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, instruments, regulations and standards, accreditation and test programs, research advances, and applied program experience. This publication provides a summary of the technical program and a collection of abstracts of the oral presentations.

  18. Third conference on radiation protection and dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This conference has been designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, research, regulatory, and standards personnel involved in radiation protection and providing them with sufficient information to evaluate their programs. To partly fulfill these objectives, a technical program consisting of more than 75 invited and contributed oral presentations encompassing all aspects of radiation protection has been prepared. General topics include external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, instruments, regulations and standards, accreditation and test programs, research advances, and applied program experience. This publication provides a summary of the technical program and a collection of abstracts of the oral presentations

  19. Scientific days on electromagnetic fields: from dosimetry to human health - Conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document brings together the available presentations (articles and slides) given at the URSI scientific days on electromagnetic fields: dosimetry, peoples' exposure, biological and health risks, risk management, and medical uses. 48 presentations are compiled in this document and deal with: 1 - Stochastic dosimetry: variability challenge; 2 - How to estimate the exposure to 50/60 Hz magnetic field in an epidemiological study?; 3 - Joint analysis of population exposure and radio coverage of GSM and UMTS mobile phone networks; 4 - Study of the specific energy absorption rate (SAR) sensitiveness to phone positions near the head for 2 GSM mobile phones; 5 - Statistical Study of SAR under Wireless Channel - Exposure in Indoor Environment; 6 - Uncertainty propagation in numerical dosimetry: how to reduce calculation costs?; 7 - Use of a simplified pregnant woman model for foetus exposure analysis; 8 - SAR estimation using multi-exposure with a mobile phone; 9 - State-of-the-art in experimental dosimetry (RF and pulses); 10 - Mm-waves dosimetry: issues, stakes and actual solutions; 11 - Use of DG-FDTD for a dosimetry calculation in a strongly multi-scale problem: determination of the eye-SAR near a HF/VHF vehicle-borne source; 12 - Dosimetric measurements with a fiber-type electro-optical sensor; 13 - Partial experimental evaluation of basic restrictions in the HF/VHF range; 14 - Repetitive trans-cranial magnetic stimulation Stimulation (rTMS) in psychiatry: present day situation and perspectives; 15 - Medical applications of electric fields; 16 - Measurements for life: new perspectives? 17 - Nano-particles and magnetic stimuli for medical imaging and therapy; 18 - Molecular Insights into electroporation and siRNA electro-transfer through model cell membranes; 19 - State of knowledge on electromagnetic fields hypersensitivity (HS-CEM); 20 - Experimentation methodology: from results to interpretation; 22 - Mm waves - update on biological effects at 40-60 GHz; 23

  20. Automation at NRCN Dosimetry Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Running a dosimetric service based on TLD technology such as at the Nuclear Research Centre Negev (NRCN) requires a large group of workers to carry out simple mechanical actions such as opening and closing TLD badges, placing and removal of TLD cards from the badges and operating the TLD reader. These actions can be automated to free human resources for other assignments and to improve the quality assurance. At NRCN a project was undertaken to design and build a robotic system based on a manipulator arm. The design was based on the experience achieved with an earlier prototype (1,2). The system stores the TLD badges in special designed boxes, which are transported and stored in computer defined bins. The robotic arm loads and unloads TLD cards to the badges, and loads/unloads the cards to a magazine for the TLD reader. At the Nuclear Research Center Negev (NRCN) each badge is assigned to a specific worker and bears a sticker containing the worker's personal details, also in a machine readable form (barcode). In order to establish a proper QA check, a barcode reader records the information on the badge and on the TLD card placed in this badge and checks their compatibility with the information contained in the main database. Besides the TLD cards loading/unloading station, there is a contamination check station, a cards cleaning station and a UV irradiation box used to reduce the history dependent residual dose. The system was installed at the NRCN dosimetry laboratory It was successfully tested for several hundreds of cycles and will become operational in the first quarter of 2014. As far as we know, there is no similar product available for automatic handling in a TLD laboratory

  1. Kinetics model for lutate dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of compartmental analysis to predict the behavior of drugs in the organism is considered the better option among numerous methods employed in pharmacodynamics. A six compartments model was developed to determinate the kinetic constants of 177Lu-DOTATATO biodistribution using data from one published study with 67 patients treated by PRRT (Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy) and followed by CT during 68,25 hours. The compartmental analysis was made using the software AnaComp®. The influence of the time pos-injection over the dose assessment was studied taking into account the renal excretion management by aminoacid coinfusion, whose direct effects persist in the first day. The biodistribution curve was split in five sectors: 0-0.25h; 0-3.25h; 3.25-24.25h; 24.25-68.25h and 3.25-68.25h. After the examination of that influence, the study was concentrated in separate the biodistribution curve in two phases. Phase 1: governed by uptake from the blood, considering the time pos-injection until 3.25h and phase 2: governed by renal excretion, considering the time pos-injection from 3.25h to 68.25h. The model considered the organs and tissues superposition in the CT image acquisition by sampling parameters as the contribution of the the activity concentration in blood and relation between the sizes of the whole body and measured organs. The kinetic constants obtained from each phase (1 and 2) were used in dose assessment to patients in 26 organs and tissues described by MIRD. Dosimetry results were in agreement with the available results from literature, restrict to whole body, kidneys, bone marrow, spleen and liver. The advantage of the proposed model is the compartmental method quickness and power to estimate dose in organs and tissues, including tumor that, in the most part, were not discriminate by voxels of phantoms built using CT images. (author)

  2. EPR dosimetry with synthetic A-type carbonated apatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synthetic A-type carbonated apatite prepared in reproducible conditions were irradiated at room temperature with 60 Co γ rays. The EPR spectrum is associated to axial CO2- and orthorhombic CO3- species. Radicals used as dose marker in biological apatite are long live paramagnetic species. The stability of the post-irradiation signal of A-type apatite was investigated for more than one year. Measurements showed variations in the spectra attributed to unstable CO3- species, which can be eliminated by thermal treatments at 100 deg C for 24 hours. The CO2- spectrum can be identified in samples irradiated up to 0.2 Gy. All results indicate the A-type apatite as an appropriate material for radiotherapy dosimetry. (author)

  3. Preparation and dosimetry of radiotherapeutic particles for arthropaties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was developed a new formulation of macro aggregates of Samarium 153 (153 Sm-MH) for the arthropaties treatment. The radio pharmaceutic was prepared by reaction of Samarium 153 chloride (SmCl3) in aqueous environment with sodium boron hydride in NaOH 0.5 N. The microscopic analysis shown that the particles have an average size of 4% m (range 1-14 μ m). The velocity of sedimentation was 0.008 cm/min with high stability in vitro in human serum. The biological studies in healthy rabbits, shown that the complex is retained inside the articulation still eight days after of the administration of the radiopharmaceutical. Likewise, it is presented the data of absorbed dose in the different target organs, which was determined by thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) through the use of a REMCAL phantom (radiation equivalent manikin calibration). (Author)

  4. Application of computerised glow curve analysis in a TLD based personnel dosimetry service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The methods and techniques of computerised Glow Curve Analysis (GCA) have clearly a potential for improvement of the thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) performance still to be exploited for practical work. Particularly personal dosimetry, whose results must comply with specific quality criteria, can be benefited from the more accurate handling of the usually complex glow curves, including several peaks with different properties and also different interest for dosimetry, notably their different intensity and thermal stability. Most of the so called standard procedures for TLD were proposed in the 70s aiming to obtain a sufficiently stable response for the usual integration periods, one to three months, in personal or environmental dosimetry. Mostly these procedures consisted in more or less complex annealing procedures applied before or after irradiation but having a common objective: the modification of the natural glow curve structure trying to eliminate the unstable low temperature peaks favouring the presence of high temperature peaks with better long term stability. In these initial stages of the employment of TLD, the physics behind the thermally activated light emissions in the materials employed for dosimetry was not properly understood and so these standard procedures were mainly of phenomenological nature, presenting important differences among laboratories. Since these early times and in parallel with an impressive increase of the practical use of TLD, an important research effort has been developed that have clarified many of the features of the TL physical processes in dosimetric materials, particularly LiF(Mg,Ti) and more recently also LiF(Mg,Cu,P). On the light of the accumulated knowledge, the old standard procedures should be revised and simplified. If achieved, this simplification will be excellent for TLD routine measurements

  5. MonitorNet: the Italian multi-centre observational study aimed at estimating the risk/benefit profile of biologic agents in real-world rheumatology practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfriso, P; Salaffi, F; Montecucco, C M; Bombardieri, S; Todesco, S

    2009-01-01

    MonitorNet is a database established by the Italian Society of Rheumatology (SIR) in January 2007 and funded by the Italian Medicines Agency (AIFA), for the active long-term follow-up of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis treated with biologic agents. All hospital Rheumatology Units in Italy were invited to participate in a non-interventional, observational, epidemiological study. The study is conducted in a routine clinical setting (real-world practice) where biologics are prescribed on the basis of current recommendations. In this report we describe the design, methodology, and present preliminary data of the study. At the time of the analysis (April 2009) the database included 3510 patients: 2469 (70.3%) with established RA, 675 (19.2%) with PsA and 366 (10.4%) with AS. The cumulative follow up period was 8,787 patient-years (RA: 8,388, PsA: 157; AS: 242). There were 1,538 adverse events in 938 (26.7%) patients. Infections were recorded in 630 patients, skin-related adverse events in 142 and post-infusion reactions in 90. A total of 30 malignancies were reported. An interim analysis of efficacy was conducted on 2,148 RA patients. Seven hundred and thirty-one patients (35.8%) achieved EULAR remission (defined as DAS28<2.4). When assessed with the more restrictive CDAI and SDAI criteria, the frequency of remission was lower (17.9% and 14.7% respectively). Availability of funding for this study provided an opportunity to organize a collaborative national network of rheumatology clinics to develop a large multicentre observational study.

  6. MonitorNet: the Italian multi-centre observational study aimed at estimating the risk/benefit profile of biologic agents in real-world rheumatology practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfriso, P; Salaffi, F; Montecucco, C M; Bombardieri, S; Todesco, S

    2009-01-01

    MonitorNet is a database established by the Italian Society of Rheumatology (SIR) in January 2007 and funded by the Italian Medicines Agency (AIFA), for the active long-term follow-up of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis treated with biologic agents. All hospital Rheumatology Units in Italy were invited to participate in a non-interventional, observational, epidemiological study. The study is conducted in a routine clinical setting (real-world practice) where biologics are prescribed on the basis of current recommendations. In this report we describe the design, methodology, and present preliminary data of the study. At the time of the analysis (April 2009) the database included 3510 patients: 2469 (70.3%) with established RA, 675 (19.2%) with PsA and 366 (10.4%) with AS. The cumulative follow up period was 8,787 patient-years (RA: 8,388, PsA: 157; AS: 242). There were 1,538 adverse events in 938 (26.7%) patients. Infections were recorded in 630 patients, skin-related adverse events in 142 and post-infusion reactions in 90. A total of 30 malignancies were reported. An interim analysis of efficacy was conducted on 2,148 RA patients. Seven hundred and thirty-one patients (35.8%) achieved EULAR remission (defined as DAS28<2.4). When assessed with the more restrictive CDAI and SDAI criteria, the frequency of remission was lower (17.9% and 14.7% respectively). Availability of funding for this study provided an opportunity to organize a collaborative national network of rheumatology clinics to develop a large multicentre observational study. PMID:19633800

  7. Flash for Biological Dosimetry Experiments- A BEXUS 16 Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigge, K.; Cermak, D.; Schuberg, V.; Guerin, E. A.; Blessenohl, M. A.; Passenberg, F.; Bach, M.; Hausmann, M.; Hildenbrand, G.

    2015-09-01

    The effects of low dose radiation on living organisms are still topic of current research and radiation protection. Complex compound radiation, such as of cosmic origin, is of special interest, since it is of pivotal significance for human space flight and, in the long run, cancer research. Fluid LAb in the StratospHere (FLASH) is a Heidelberg University student project that transported specimens of living cells of human origin into the stratosphere to investigate the effects of cosmic radiation on the 3D chromatin nanostructure of their genome. Since, owing to its complexity, cosmic radiation is extremely difficult to replicate on the ground, the FLASH project took part in the BEXUS (Balloon Experiments for University Students) program of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) and the Swedish National Space Board (SNSB) to use a balloon to get better access to cosmic radiation over several hours. To keep the cells alive and allow for in-flight fixation after given radiation exposure times in order to prevent restorative processes, a compact and fully automated fluid lab suited for low-pressure environments was designed and built. Challenges included fluid exchange of specimen buffers and temperature control, as well as low-budget insulating mounting. After the flight, the specimens fixed during the flight were subjected to further analysis. After antibody labeling specific against heterochromatin, Spectral Precision Distance Microscopy (SPDM) (an embodiment of super-resolution localization microscopy) was used, which is a new approach for the sensitive detection and analysis of structure modifying irradiation effects on organisms. This technique allows light resolution on the order of tens of nanometers. Preliminary evaluation of the data indicated reasonable differences in chromatin conformation compared to control specimen data.

  8. Cytogenetic effects of low ionising radiation doses and biological dosimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Gricienė, Birutė

    2010-01-01

    The intensive use of ionising radiation (IR) sources and development of IR technology is related to increased exposure and adverse health risk to workers and public. The unstable chromosome aberration analysis in the group of nuclear energy workers (N=84) has shown that doses below annual dose limit (50 mSv) can induce chromosome aberrations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Significantly higher frequencies of the total chromosome aberrations were determened in the study group when compa...

  9. Emergency preparedness exercise for biological dosimetry - BIOPEX (2008)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindholm, C.; Paile, W. (Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) (Finland)); Stricklin, D. (Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI) (Sweden)); Jaworska, A. (Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA) (Norway))

    2009-03-15

    As a continuation to the NKS-funded BIODOS project, the BIOPEX project has aimed at testing and validation of the newly established dose calibration curve for PCC rings, a specific chromosome aberration for use in biodosimetry in large casualty emergency preparedness. The testing of the PCC ring technique was performed by direct comparison to the conventional dicentric assay, both conducted with a triage approach that gives a crude dose estimate through analysis of a relatively small number of cells. Altogether 62 blood samples were analysed, each irradiated with an individual dose using gamma-rays, and representing casualties in a simulated radiation accident resulting in a broad spectrum of whole body and partial body doses, ranging from zero dose up to a lethal whole body dose of 13 Gy. The results indicated that both triage assays were capable of discerning non-exposed cases and that in the uniform irradiations, the dose estimates based on data from both assays were fairly consistent with the given dose. However, differences were observed depending on the dose level. At doses about 5 Gy and below, dicentric scoring resulted in more accurate whole-body dose estimates than PCC rings. At very high doses, PCC rings appeared to give more accurate dose estimates than dicentrics. The discrepancies are mainly caused by shortcomings in the respective dose calibration curves. In non-uniform irradiations, the PCC ring assay was slightly better in the approximation of the partial body dose than dicentrics, but neither assay enabled accurate estimation of either dose or fraction of cells irradiated. The irradiated fraction of cells for the casualties in this scenario was apparently too small (10-40%) to be distinguished with the triage approach applied in the current study. With respect to the technical aspects, scoring of the PCC rings is easier and therefore somewhat faster but may be more sensitive to quality aspects. In conclusion, the study demonstrated that the PCC ring assay is suitable for use as a biodosimeter, especially for estimation of very high doses (au)

  10. Emergency preparedness exercise for biological dosimetry - BIOPEX (2008)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a continuation to the NKS-funded BIODOS project, the BIOPEX project has aimed at testing and validation of the newly established dose calibration curve for PCC rings, a specific chromosome aberration for use in biodosimetry in large casualty emergency preparedness. The testing of the PCC ring technique was performed by direct comparison to the conventional dicentric assay, both conducted with a triage approach that gives a crude dose estimate through analysis of a relatively small number of cells. Altogether 62 blood samples were analysed, each irradiated with an individual dose using γ-rays, and representing casualties in a simulated radiation accident resulting in a broad spectrum of whole body and partial body doses, ranging from zero dose up to a lethal whole body dose of 13 Gy. The results indicated that both triage assays were capable of discerning non-exposed cases and that in the uniform irradiations, the dose estimates based on data from both assays were fairly consistent with the given dose. However, differences were observed depending on the dose level. At doses about 5 Gy and below, dicentric scoring resulted in more accurate whole-body dose estimates than PCC rings. At very high doses, PCC rings appeared to give more accurate dose estimates than dicentrics. The discrepancies are mainly caused by shortcomings in the respective dose calibration curves. In non-uniform irradiations, the PCC ring assay was slightly better in the approximation of the partial body dose than dicentrics, but neither assay enabled accurate estimation of either dose or fraction of cells irradiated. The irradiated fraction of cells for the casualties in this scenario was apparently too small (10-40%) to be distinguished with the triage approach applied in the current study. With respect to the technical aspects, scoring of the PCC rings is easier and therefore somewhat faster but may be more sensitive to quality aspects. In conclusion, the study demonstrated that the PCC ring assay is suitable for use as a biodosimeter, especially for estimation of very high doses (au)

  11. Dosimetry using environmental and biological materials. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haskell, E.; Kenner, G.; Hayes, R.

    1996-09-01

    Although theoretical models have been the traditional tool for assessment of doses delivered by nuclear accidents, their use is now accompanied by increasing political and scientific demand for physical measurements which provide site specific dose information related directly to the original events, can be used to verify and augment the theoretical models, and can be performed and reflicated by independent laboratories. This report details a four year effort to improve the sensitivity and reliability of retrospective methods, to collaborate with laboratories engaged in related research, and to share the technology with startup laboratories seeking similar capabilities.

  12. Benefit of STR-based chimerism analysis to identify TA-GVHD as a cause of death: Utility of various biological specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raina, Anupuma; Chaudhary, Garima; Dogra, Tirath Das; Khandelwal, Deepchand; Balayan, Ajay; Jain, Vandana; Kanga, Uma; Seth, Tulika

    2016-04-01

    Transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD) is a rare condition. It can occur after blood transfusion in immune-compromised and occasionally even in immune-competent patients, and is associated with a mortality rate of >90%. The diagnosis of TA-GVHD is often delayed because of its non-specific clinical features. A case of an immune-competent child who developed TA-GVHD is reported here. DNA profiling (short tandem repeat analysis), a technique that has a wide application in forensic medicine, was performed to detect the presence of donor cells in this patient. The findings suggest that more studies are needed with this tool, and the diagnostic potential of using other multiple biological specimens for DNA profiling such as the hair follicle and buccal swab should be evaluated. This is the first case report where the donor's DNA fingerprinting pattern was substantiated from a patient's hair follicle sample. Chimerism was also present in the blood and buccal swab specimens. PMID:25852093

  13. Dosimetry implant for treating restenosis and hyperplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Suresh; Gonzales, Gilbert R; Howell, Roger W; Bolch, Wesley E; Adzic, Radoslav

    2014-09-16

    The present invention discloses a method of selectively providing radiation dosimetry to a subject in need of such treatment. The radiation is applied by an implant comprising a body member and .sup.117mSn electroplated at selected locations of the body member, emitting conversion electrons absorbed immediately adjacent selected locations while not affecting surrounding tissue outside of the immediately adjacent area.

  14. A history of medical internal dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a short history of the development of medical dosimetry. It reviews the evaluation of the equations and discusses the development of various mathematical models used to improve radiation absorbed dose estimates. The contributions of Leonides Marinelli, Edith Qulmby, William Mayneord, Robert Loevinger, Walter Snyder, and others are emphasized. (author), 74 Refs., 7 Figs., 3 Tabs

  15. Dosimetry for the MR-linac

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, K.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the inuence of the MR scanner on dosimetry for the radiation modality, and to investigate the possible solutions for the dosimetric measurements discussed in section 1.7. Chapter 2 investigates the feasibility to use a standardized national reference dosi

  16. Secondary standard dosimetry laboratories: Development and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication describes the work of the IAEA and the WHO in the establishment of a network of Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories. Membership in the SSDL network has now risen to about 50 laboratories, of which 36 are in developing countries

  17. The United Kingdom's radiotherapy dosimetry audit network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first comprehensive national dosimetry intercomparison in the United Kingdom involving all UK radiotherapy centres was carried out in the late 1980s. Out of this a regular radiotherapy dosimetry audit network evolved in the early 1990s. The network is co-ordinated by the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine and comprises eight co-operative regional groups. Audits are based on site visits using ionization chambers and epoxy resin water substitute phantoms. The basic audit methodology and phantom design follows that of the original national intercomparison exercise. However, most of the groups have evolved more complex methods, to extend the audit scope to include other parameters, other parts of the radiotherapy process and other treatment modalities. A number of the groups have developed phantoms to simulate various clinical treatment situations, enabling the sharing of phantoms and expertise between groups, but retaining a common base. Besides megavoltage external beam photon dosimetry, a number of the groups have also included the audit of kilovoltage X ray beams, electron beams and brachytherapy dosimetry. The National Physical Laboratory is involved in the network and carries out basic beam calibration audits to link the groups. The network is described and the methods and results are illustrated using the Scottish+ group as an example. (author)

  18. Computational Techniques of Electromagnetic Dosimetry for Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Akimasa; Fujiwara, Osamu

    There has been increasing public concern about the adverse health effects of human exposure to electromagnetic fields. This paper reviews the rationale of international safety guidelines for human protection against electromagnetic fields. Then, this paper also presents computational techniques to conduct dosimetry in anatomically-based human body models. Computational examples and remaining problems are also described briefly.

  19. Personnel radiation dosimetry symposium: program and abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose was to provide applied and research dosimetrists with sufficient information to evaluate the status and direction of their programs relative to the latest guidelines and techniques. A technical program was presented concerning experience, requirements, and advances in gamma, beta, and neutron personnel dosimetry

  20. Dosimetry and control of radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eight invited papers on the general theme of 'Dosimetry and Control of Radiation Processing', presented at a one day symposium held at the National Physical Laboratory, are collected together in this document. Seven of the papers are selected and indexed separately. (author)

  1. Optically stimulated luminescence techniques in retrospective dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence signals from natural quartz and feldspar are now used routinely in dating geological and archaeological materials. More recently they have also been employed in accident dosimetry, i.e. the retrospective assessment of doses received as a result of a nuclear...

  2. Neutron dosimetry; Dosimetria de neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fratin, Luciano

    1993-12-31

    A neutron irradiation facility was designed and built in order to establish a procedure for calibrating neutron monitors and dosemeters. A 185 GBq {sup 241} Am Be source of known is used as a reference source. The irradiation facility using this source in the air provides neutron dose rates between 9 nSv s{sup -1} and 0,5 {sup {mu}}Sv s{sup -1}. A calibrated 50 nSv s{sup -1} thermal neutron field is obtained by using a specially designed paraffin block in conjunction with the {sup 241} Am Be source. A Bonner multisphere spectrometer was calibrated, using a procedure based on three methods proposed by international standards. The unfold {sup 241} Am Be neutron spectrum was determined from the Bonner spheres data and resulted in a good agreement with expected values for fluence rate, dose rate and mean energy. A dosimetric system based on the electrochemical etching of CR-39 was developed for personal dosimetry. The dosemeter badge using a (n,{alpha}) converter, the etching chamber and high frequency power supply were designed and built specially for this project. The electrochemical etching (ECE) parameters used were: a 6N KOH solution, 59 deg C, 20 kV{sub pp} cm{sup -1}, 2,0 kHz, 3 hours of ECE for thermal and intermediate neutrons and 6 hours for fast neutrons. The calibration factors for thermal, intermediate and fast neutrons were determined for this personal dosemeter. The sensitivities determined for the developed dosimetric system were (1,46{+-} 0,09) 10{sup 4} tracks cm{sup -2} mSv{sup -1} for thermal neutrons, (9{+-}3) 10{sup 2} tracks cm{sup -2} mSV{sup -1} for intermediate neutrons and (26{+-}4) tracks cm{sup -2} mSv{sup -1} for fast neutrons. The lower and upper limits of detection were respectively 0,002 mSv and 0,6 mSv for thermal neutrons, 0,04 mSv and 8 mSv for intermediate neutrons and 1 mSv and 12 mSv for fast neutrons. In view of the 1990`s ICRP recommendations, it is possible to conclude that the personal dosemeter described in this work is

  3. Film dosimetry in conformal radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danciu, C.; Proimos, B.S. [Patras Univ. (Greece). Dept. of Medical Physics

    1995-12-01

    Dosimetry, through a film sandwiched in a transverse cross-section of a solid phantom, is a method of choice in Conformal Radiotherapy because: (a) the blackness (density) of the film at each point offers a measure of the total dose received at that point, and (b) the film is easily calibrated by exposing a film strip in the same cross-section, through a stationary field. The film must therefore have the following properties: (a) it must be slow, in order not to be overexposed, even at a therapeutic dose of 200 cGy, and (b) the response of the film (density versus dose curve) must be independent of the photon energy spectrum. A few slow films were compared. It was found that the Kodak X-Omat V for therapy verification was the best choice. To investigate whether the film response was independent of the photon energy, response curves for six depths, starting from the depth of maximum dose to the depth of 25 cm, in solid phantom were derived. The vertical beam was perpendicular to the anterior surface of the phantom, which was at the distance of 100 cm from the source and the field was 15x15 cm at that distance. This procedure was repeated for photon beams emitted by a Cobalt-60 unit, two 6 MV and 15 MV Linear Accelerators, as well as a 45 MV Betatron. For each of those four different beams the film response was the same for all six depths. The results, as shown in the diagrams, are very satisfactory. The response curve under a geometry similar to that actually applied, when the film is irradiated in a transverse cross-section of the phantom, was derived. The horizontal beam was almost parallel (angle of 85) to the plane of the film. The same was repeated with the central ray parallel to the film (angle 90) and at a distance of 1.5 cm from the horizontal film. The field size was again 15x15 at the lateral entrance surface of the beam. The response curves remained the same, as when the beam was perpendicular to the films.

  4. 3-dimensional polymer gel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    was observed. Polymer gel dosimetry system used in this study proved that it is reliable system for dose distribution measurement with error less than 5 % for doses higher than 3 Gy. (author)

  5. Protocol for emergency dosimetry based on phaners using EPR spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the case of a radiological accident due to an external overexposure involving a limited number of persons from the public or workers without dosemeters, dosimetry by Electronic Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectrometry on tooth enamel, among other techniques such as biological dosimetry, can be an efficient tool. However, for an accident involving a large number of victims, most of dosimetric techniques are limited by the necessary short delay of the answer. Indeed, in this specific case, it is very important in a first time and as quick as possible to sort population according to the severity of the exposure and, in a second time, to assess the dose more accurately, especially for the most irradiated victims in order to define the best therapeutic strategy. As a matter of fact, EPR dosimetry on tooth enamel due to the invasive sampling cannot be used for emergency dosimetry. Nevertheless, EPR dosimetry on materials easily sampled on the victims or in their vicinity may be a pertinent tool. In this context, the objective of this work was to study the dosimetric properties of phaners and to provide operational guidelines describing the sampling, the storage conditions, the sample preparation and the EPR signal measurement for fast triage of population and dose assessment.We studied the dosimetric properties of fingernails and different types of hair. After having optimized the recording parameters, the analysis of EPR signal was carried out according to specific criteria, such as anisotropy, temporal fading, influence of external parameters and dose response.The important fading of the radio-induced signal may be diminished with an appropriate storage at low temperature, allowing measurements up to several weeks after irradiation. The signal intensity was found linear with the received dose at least until 50 Gy for studied materials. Detection limits were respectively estimated equal to 2 Gy f or fingernails and about 3 Gy for hairs. Concerning hair, a strong

  6. Dose modulated computed tomography automated dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Computed Tomography (CT) scans contribute a significant portion of the effective radiation dose from medical procedures and generally large effective radiation doses per diagnostic examination. With the advent of Multislice CT, the potential for large radiation exposures increased. This combined with the appeal of the resultant isotropic imaging and the increasing number of applications for which CT could be utilised (including screening procedures) has further increased the need for vigilant monitoring of CT protocols and use with respect to radiation dose. The introduction of dose modulated Computed Tomography has proven an effective method for reducing patient dose and is now widely used by CT manufacturers. This involves lowering the mA when scanning through anatomical regions which do not require a large mA. Many CT investigations now utilise dose modulation. Some of these studies will include over 900 images for which the mA and occasionally other factors could vary. In order to utilise the existing software to perform CT dosimetry a program has been written to automatically extract scan parameters from CT dicom image files and apply the ImPACT CT Patient Dosimetry Calculator, for slices with differing factors. Matlab has been used to write and compile a program which sorts through a folder of dicom images and extracts the appropriate dicom header information. Some manufacturers store different series and reformatted images all within the same folder. The images of the CT study for which the dosimetry is to be performed must be stored within the one folder and must be in a dicom format. The program has been written to accommodate several manufacturers, which all contain different information in their dicom headers. The Matlab program groups the various study/image types, extracting the relevant dicom header information, which is written to an Excel worksheet. An Excel file uses this information to run the ImPACT CT Patient Dosimetry Calculator with

  7. Benefiting All

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A new law promotes individual equality in social security benefits and forbids the misuse of funds The Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress (NPC),China’s top legislature, voted to adopt a social insurance law on October 28 that prevents the

  8. Radiation processing dosimetry - past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the two United Nations Conferences were held in Geneva in 1955 and 1958 on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy and the concurrent foundation of the International Atomic Energy Agency in 1957, the IAEA has fostered high-dose dosimetry and its applications. This field is represented in industrial radiation processing, agricultural programmes, and therapeutic and preventative medicine. Such dosimetry is needed specifically for pest and quarantine control and in the processing of medical products, pharmaceuticals, blood products, foodstuffs, solid, liquid and gaseous wastes, and a variety of useful commodities, e.g. polymers, composites, natural rubber and elastomers, packaging, electronic, and automotive components, as well as in radiotherapy. Improvements and innovations of dosimetry materials and analytical systems and software continue to be important goals for these applications. Some of the recent advances in high-dose dosimetry include tetrazolium salts and substituted polydiacetylene as radiochromic media, on-line real-time as well as integrating semiconductor and diamond-detector monitors, quantitative label dosimeters, photofluorescent sensors for broad dose range applications, and improved and simplified parametric and computational codes for imaging and simulating 3D radiation dose distributions in model products. The use of certain solid-state devices, e.g. optical quality LiF, at low (down to 4K) and high (up to 500 K) temperatures, is of interest for materials testing. There have also been notable developments in experimental dose mapping procedures, e.g. 2D and 3D dose distribution analyses by flat-bed optical scanners and software applied to radiochromic and photofluorescent images. In addition, less expensive EPR spectrometers and new EPR dosimetry materials and high-resolution semiconductor diode arrays, charge injection devices, and photostimulated storage phosphors have been introduced. (author)

  9. An IAEA Survey of Dosimetry Audit Networks for Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Survey: In 2010, the IAEA undertook a task to investigate and review the coverage and operations of national and international dosimetry audit programmes for radiotherapy. The aim was to organize the global database describing the activities of dosimetry audit networks in radiotherapy. A dosimetry audit questionnaire has been designed at an IAEA consultants' meeting held in 2010 for organizations conducting various levels of dosimetry audits for radiotherapy. Using this questionnaire, a survey was conducted for the first time in 2010 and repeated in 2011. Request for information on different aspects of the dosimetry audit was included, such as the audit framework and resources, its coverage and scope, the dosimetry system used and the modes of audit operation, i.e. remotely and through on-site visits. The IAEA questionnaire was sent to over 80 organizations, members of the IAEA/WHO Network of Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs) and other organizations known for having operated dosimetry audits for radiotherapy in their countries or internationally. Survey results and discussion: In response to the IAEA survey, 53 organizations in 45 countries confirmed that they operate dosimetry audit services for radiotherapy. Mostly, audits are conducted nationally, however there are five organizations offering audits abroad, with two of them operating in various parts of the world and three of them at the regional level, auditing radiotherapy centres in neighbouring countries. The distribution of dosimetry audit services in the world is given. (author)

  10. An international dosimetry exchange for BNCT part II: computational dosimetry normalizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, K J; Binns, P J; Harling, O K; Albritton, J R; Kiger, W S; Rezaei, A; Sköld, K; Seppälä, T; Savolainen, S; Auterinen, I; Marek, M; Viererbl, L; Nievaart, V A; Moss, R L

    2008-12-01

    The meaningful sharing and combining of clinical results from different centers in the world performing boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) requires improved precision in dose specification between programs. To this end absorbed dose normalizations were performed for the European clinical centers at the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Petten (The Netherlands), Nuclear Research Institute, Rez (Czech Republic), VTT, Espoo (Finland), and Studsvik, Nyköping (Sweden). Each European group prepared a treatment plan calculation that was bench-marked against Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) dosimetry performed in a large, water-filled phantom to uniformly evaluate dose specifications with an estimated precision of +/-2%-3%. These normalizations were compared with those derived from an earlier exchange between Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and MIT in the USA. Neglecting the uncertainties related to biological weighting factors, large variations between calculated and measured dose are apparent that depend upon the 10B uptake in tissue. Assuming a boron concentration of 15 microg g(-1) in normal tissue, differences in the evaluated maximum dose to brain for the same nominal specification of 10 Gy(w) at the different facilities range between 7.6 and 13.2 Gy(w) in the trials using boronophenylalanine (BPA) as the boron delivery compound and between 8.9 and 11.1 Gy(w) in the two boron sulfhydryl (BSH) studies. Most notably, the value for the same specified dose of 10 Gy(w) determined at the different participating centers using BPA is significantly higher than at BNL by 32% (MIT), 43% (VTT), 49% (JRC), and 74% (Studsvik). Conversion of dose specification is now possible between all active participants and should be incorporated into future multi-center patient analyses. PMID:19175101

  11. Development of 111In DOTMP for dosimetry of bone pain palliation agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Particle emitter 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10 tetraethylene phosphonic acid complexes (DOTMP) are used for delivering high doses to bone marrow as well as palliative therapy. In this research production, quality control and biodistribution studies of [111In]-DOTMP with respect to its radiochemical and in vivo biological characteristics have been presented for imaging as well as dosimetry studies of therapeutic analogs. [111In]-DOTMP complex was obtained in high radiochemical purity (>99 %, ITLC) under at optimized conditions. This complex exhibited excellent in vitro stability at room temperature and human serum. Biodistribution studies in rats showed favorable selective skeletal uptake with rapid clearance from blood along with insignificant accumulation of activity in other non-target organs using tissue dissection and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). This tracer can be used in the long term skeletal studies in SPECT procedures as well as presenting a dosimetry probe for therapeutic DOTMP analogs. (author)

  12. Contribution of customised dosimetry for small animal to the treatments of cancers by metabolic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research thesis first reports a bibliographical study which addressed the use of ionizing radiations in cancer therapy (evolution from ionizing radiation to metabolic radiotherapy, biological and physical parameters, and absorbed dose in metabolic radiotherapy) and the role imagery has in customised dosimetry (absorbed dose calculation methods, determination of cumulative activity, dosimetric models for S factor calculation). Then, the author presents a software which has been specifically developed for the creation of dosimetric models, and reports its validation. He reports the comparison between different dosimetric models in the case of mice. He highlights two applications of the developed tool: radio-immunotherapy and metabolic radiotherapy. He finally proposes a general discussion on the impact of small animal dosimetry on metabolic radiotherapy

  13. Dosimetry in intravascular brachytherapy; Calculos dosimetricos em braquiterapia intravascular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Laelia Pumilla Botelho

    2000-03-01

    Among the cardiovascular diseases responsible for deaths in the adult population in almost all countries of the world, the most common is acute myocardial infarction, which generally occurs because of the occlusion of one or more coronary arteries. Several diagnostic techniques and therapies are being tested for the treatment of coronary artery disease. Balloon angioplasty has been a popular treatment which is less invasive than traditional surgeries involving revascularization of the myocardium, thus promising a better quality of life for patients. Unfortunately, the rate of restenosis (re-closing of the vessel) after balloon angioplasty is high (approximately 30-50% within the first year after treatment).Recently, the idea of delivering high radiation doses to coronary arteries to avoid or delay restenosis has been suggested. Known as intravascular brachytherapy, the technique has been used with several radiation sources, and researchers have obtained success in decreasing the rate of restenosis in some patient populations. In order to study the radiation dosimetry in the patient and radiological protection for the attending staff for this therapy, radiation dose distributions for monoenergetic electrons and photons (at nine discrete energies) were calculated for blood vessels of diameter 0.15, o,30 and 0.45 cm with balloon and wire sources using the radiation transport code MCNP4B. Specific calculations were carried out for several candidate radionuclides as well. Two s tent sources (metallic prosthesis that put inside of patient's artery through angioplasty) employing {sup 32} P are also simulated. Advantages and disadvantages of the various radionuclides and source geometries are discussed. The dosimetry developed here will aid in the realization of the benefits obtained in patients for this promising new technology. (author)

  14. 12''th International Conference on Solid State Dosimetry Casa del Cordon. Conference Center (Caja de Burgos), July 5''th-10''th, 1998, Burgos Spain: Programme and Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 12 International Conference on Solid State Dosimetry celebrate in Burgos (Spain) during July on 1998. 1.- Basic Physical Processes 2.- Materials characteristics 3.- Instrumentation 4.- Personal Dosimetry 5.- Clinical Dosimetry 6.- Environmental Dosimetry 7.- Dating retrospective dosimetry 8.- Miscellaneous

  15. Who benefits?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Frederik Georg

    2016-01-01

    Cross-border welfare rights for citizens of European Union member states are intensely contested, yet there is limited research into voter opposition to such rights, sometimes denoted ‘welfare chauvinism’. We highlight an overlooked aspect in scholarly work: the role of stereotypes about benefici...... recipient identity. These effects are strongest among respondents high in ethnic prejudice and economic conservatism. The findings imply that stereotypes about who benefits from cross-border welfare rights condition public support for those rights....

  16. Tax Benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Hayhoe, Celia Ray; Hsu, Chungwen

    2009-01-01

    There are seven main categories on which the USDA bases its calculations for raising a child: housing, food, transportation, clothing, health care, childcare, education, and miscellaneous goods and services. This is an overview of tax benefits. This is one fact sheet in a series entitled Children and Family Finances. This fact sheet was revised from Planning for Baby ヨ Family Finances by Hayhoe, C., Jamison, S. Dillard, A. F., and Chase, M.

  17. Progress report, Biology and Health Physics Division, July 1 to September 30, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interim results are reported for research in health physics, i.e. dosimetry, detectors, and monitoring; environmental research (limnology, radionuclide migration and kinetics; population research (radiation carcinogenesis, radiation effects in human populations); and biology (radiobiology). (E.C.B.)

  18. Progress report, Biology and Health Physics Division, October 1 to December 31, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interim research results are reported in health physics (dosimetry, monitoring), environmental research, population research (tumor induction in mammals, human health record linkage), and biology (radiobiology of rodents, bacteria, bacteriophage T4, and insects). (E.C.B.)

  19. Progress report, Biology and Health Physics Division, October 1 to December 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research results are reported on such topics as dosimetry, monitoring, biological impact of thermal effluents, radioecology and radiobiology, hydrology, waste management, neutron activation analysis, and data analysis for radiation effects on humans. (E.C.B.)

  20. Experiences with alanine dosimetry in afterloading brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the present, the most commonly used dosimetry for radiotherapy applications are ionisation chambers and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). However, there are some undesirable characteristics of these dosimetry systems, such as large detection volume (ionisation chamber) as well as fading of the radiation induced signal with time and destructive readout (TLG). The present study is an investigation into the use of the alanine/ESR dosimetry in fractionated afterloading brachytherapy during the whole radiotherapy course. There are some qualities which make alanine dosimetry attractive. These are the linear energy response, low fading under standard conditions, and the nondestructive readout. Thus the alanine dosimetry makes possible cumulative dose measurements during the radiotherapy course and an archival storage. By ionizing radiation (gamma, e, n, p, charged particles) free radicals (unpaired electrons) are produced in the amino acid alanine. The continuous wave electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is used to determine the number of free radicals, which is proportional to the absorbed dose and the alanine content of the dosimeter. The ESR measurements were made at room temperature using a Bruker EPR analyzer EMS-104. The dosimeters used in the test are alanine pellets (23.72 mg weight, 4.9 mm diameter, 1 mm height) as well as flexible alanine film dosimeters (thickness about 500 μm). The dosimeters consist of a blend of L-alpha-alanine and a binder. The alanine content of the pellets and the film dosimeters is about 88 % and 50 % by weight, respectively. The dosimeters for the calculation of the dose-effect-relationship were irradiated at the Physical-Technical Bundesanstalt in Braunschweig by a standard 60Co source. The maximum deviation from the calculated linear function is about 0.12 Gy in the dose range up to 80 Gy. The goal of medical applications was the superficial dose measurement in afterloading brachytherapy during the radiotherapy course in

  1. Thermoluminescence in medical dosimetry; Termoluminiscencia en dosimetria medica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera, T., E-mail: trivera@ipn.mx [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Av. Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2011-10-15

    The dosimetry by thermoluminescence (Tl) is applied in the entire world for the dosimetry of ionizing radiations specially to personal and medical dosimetry. This dosimetry method has been very interesting for measures in vivo because the Tl dosimeters have the advantage of being very sensitive in a very small volume and they are also equivalent to tissue and they do not need additional accessories (for example, cable, electrometer, etc.) The main characteristics of the diverse Tl materials to be used in the radiation measures and practical applications are: the Tl curve, the share homogeneity, the signal stability after the irradiation, precision and exactitude, the response in function with the dose and the energy influence. In this work a brief summary of the advances of the radiations dosimetry is presented by means of the thermally stimulated luminescence and its application to the dosimetry in radiotherapy. (Author)

  2. The program of international intercomparison of accident dosimetry; Le programme d'intercomparaison internationale de dosimetrie d'accident 10-12 juin 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-06-01

    The French institute of radioprotection and nuclear safety (IRSN) has carried out in June 2002 an international intercomparison program for the testing of the physical and biological accident dosimetry techniques. The intercomparison is jointly organized by the IRSN and the OECD-NEA with the sustain of the European commission and the collaboration of the CEA centre of Valduc (France). About 30 countries have participated to this program. Each country has supplied its own dosimeters and biological samples which have been irradiated using the Silene reactor of CEA-Valduc or a {sup 60}Co source. These experiments allow to test the new dosimetric techniques that have been developed since the previous intercomparison program (1993) and to confirm or improve the performances of older techniques. Aside from the intercomparison exercise, this report makes a status of the known radiological accidents and of the effects of high doses of ionizing radiations on human health (symptoms, therapeutics). It explains the phenomenology of criticality accidents, the prevention means, and the history of such accidents up to the Tokai-Mura one in 1999. Finally, the dosimetry of criticality is presented with its physical and biological techniques. (J.S.)

  3. Small Field Dosimetry Using Optical-Fiber Radioluminescence and Radpos Dosimetry Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploquin, N.; Kertzscher Schwencke, Gustavo Adolfo Vladimir; Vandervoort, E.;

    2012-01-01

    to the small dimensions of the Al2O3 crystal, the system may have applications in small field dosimetry. The second system is the RADPOS system (Med Phys, 36, 167279, 2009), a novel 4D dosimetry system available from BEST Medical Canada. RADPOS probe consists of 2 sensors: a small antenna......Purpose/Objective: We have investigated the use of two new dosimetry systems for small field dosimetry. The first system is based on Al2O3:C radioluminescence (RL) (Radiat Meas, 46 (10), 109098, 2011). The main part of the RL dosimetry system is a small (2x0.5x0.5 mm3) Al2O3:C crystal (Landauer...... as an electromagnetic positioning sensor and a μMOSFET for dose measurement. Materials and Methods: Relative output factors (ROF) for Cyberknife cones ranging from 5 to 60 mm were measured using RL and RADPOS systems. For comparison, measurements were also carried out using a mobileMOSFET system (BEST Medical Canada...

  4. Personal dosimetry for external radiation exposure in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article summarizes a report on harmonisation and dosimetric quality assurance in individual monitoring for external radiation, published by the European Radiation Dosimetry Group (EURADOS). The report comprises three parts: (1) procedures and regulations in countries of the European Union and Switzerland with respect to personal dosimetry; (2) a catalogue with descriptions of dosimetry systems in the fore-mentioned countries; and (3) performance testing of dosimetric services in EU Member States and Switzerland. 17 refs

  5. Technical basis document for internal dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Hickman, D P

    1991-01-01

    This document provides the technical basis for the Chem-Nuclear Geotech (Geotech) internal dosimetry program. Geotech policy describes the intentions of the company in complying with radiation protection standards and the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) program. It uses this policy and applicable protection standards to derive acceptable methods and levels of bioassay to assure compliance. The models and computational methods used are described in detail within this document. FR-om these models, dose- conversion factors and derived limits are computed. These computations are then verified using existing documentation and verification information or by demonstration of the calculations used to obtain the dose-conversion factors and derived limits. Recommendations for methods of optimizing the internal dosimetry program to provide effective monitoring and dose assessment for workers are provided in the last section of this document. This document is intended to be used in establishing an accredited dosi...

  6. Mathematical operations in cytogenetic dosimetry: Dosgen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handling of formulas and mathematical procedures for fitting and using of dose-response relationships in cytogenetic dosimetry is often difficulted by the absence of collaborators specialized in mathematics and computation. DOSGEN program contains the main mathematical operations which are used in cytogenetic dosimetry. It is able to run in IBM compatible Pc's by non-specialized personnel.The program possibilities are: Poisson distribution fitting test for the number of aberration per cell, dose assessment for whole body irradiation, dose assessment for partial irradiation and determination of irradiated fraction. The program allows on screen visualization and printing of results. DOSGEN has been developed in turbo pascal and is 33Kb of size. (authors). 4 refs

  7. Trigeminal neuralgia treatment dosimetry of the Cyberknife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are 2 Cyberknife units at Stanford University. The robot of 1 Cyberknife is positioned on the patient's right, whereas the second is on the patient's left. The present study examines whether there is any difference in dosimetry when we are treating patients with trigeminal neuralgia when the target is on the right side or the left side of the patient. In addition, we also study whether Monte Carlo dose calculation has any effect on the dosimetry. We concluded that the clinical and dosimetric outcomes of CyberKnife treatment for trigeminal neuralgia are independent of the robot position. Monte Carlo calculation algorithm may be useful in deriving the dose necessary for trigeminal neuralgia treatments.

  8. Trigeminal neuralgia treatment dosimetry of the Cyberknife

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Anthony [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Lo, Anthony T., E-mail: tonyho22003@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Dieterich, Sonja; Soltys, Scott G.; Gibbs, Iris C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Chang, Steve G.; Adler, John R. [Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2012-04-01

    There are 2 Cyberknife units at Stanford University. The robot of 1 Cyberknife is positioned on the patient's right, whereas the second is on the patient's left. The present study examines whether there is any difference in dosimetry when we are treating patients with trigeminal neuralgia when the target is on the right side or the left side of the patient. In addition, we also study whether Monte Carlo dose calculation has any effect on the dosimetry. We concluded that the clinical and dosimetric outcomes of CyberKnife treatment for trigeminal neuralgia are independent of the robot position. Monte Carlo calculation algorithm may be useful in deriving the dose necessary for trigeminal neuralgia treatments.

  9. Considerations regarding dosimetry in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most important consideration when deciding whether or not to perform a nuclear medicine procedure in a child is whether the benefit of the information obtained exceeds the potential risk. In most circumstances the potential benefits are well define. No patient should be studied unless the question to be answered is clearly understood and there is a reasonable change to answer it. To properly perform procedures in children one must not only have a schedule to scale the radiopharmaceutical dose to be administered to the child's body surface area but also one must have an established minimum dose for small babies and infants. There is no point in under-dosing the patient as then the information will not be obtained from the nuclear medicine society. The value of nuclear medicine in the pediatric population cannot be underestimated. It is often the single most important test that can be performed diagnostically. For these reasons it is very important to understand the proper relationship of an adequate study versus the minimization of radiation. 3 references

  10. Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2005-02-25

    The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at Hanford. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with 10 CFR 835, DOELAP, DOE-RL, ORP, PNSO, and Hanford contractor requirements. The dosimetry system is operated by PNNL’s Hanford External Dosimetry Program which provides dosimetry services to all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. Rev. 0 marks the first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture (ERICA) database.

  11. Utilization of photodiodes for ionizing radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviour of silicon photodiodes as detector, for gama and x-ray dosimetry is discussed. Measurements were realized with photodiodes operating in the photovoltaic mode, the current produzed was detected in the eletrometer constructed in the DEN/UFPE. The results obtained showed that the photodiode response is linear with the dose and that variation of 40 degrees in the incidence angule of the radiation caused a variation of 5% in the dose determination. (author)

  12. Current status of internal dosimetry in Lithuania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griciene, B.; Ladygiene, R.; Morkunas, G.; Pilkyte, L

    2003-07-01

    After Lithuania regained independence, the legal basis for existing radiation protection was modified radically according to the IAEA, ICRP recommendations and the requirements of legislation of the European Community. The legal basis for internal dosimetry and a functioning system of assessment of exposure to intake of radionuclides have been created in the Radiation Protection Centre (regulatory authority in radiation protection). Direct and indirect measurements of concentrations of radionuclides are used for the assessment of internal doses of workers and the public. (author)

  13. Current status of internal dosimetry in Lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After Lithuania regained independence, the legal basis for existing radiation protection was modified radically according to the IAEA, ICRP recommendations and the requirements of legislation of the European Community. The legal basis for internal dosimetry and a functioning system of assessment of exposure to intake of radionuclides have been created in the Radiation Protection Centre (regulatory authority in radiation protection). Direct and indirect measurements of concentrations of radionuclides are used for the assessment of internal doses of workers and the public. (author)

  14. a Generalized Program for Internal Radionuclide Dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Timothy Karl

    The development of monoclonal antibodies specific for tumor surface antigens promises a highly specific carrier medium for delivering a tumorcidal radiation dose. Dosimetry calculations of monoclonal antibodies are made difficult, however, precisely because the focus of radioactivity is targeted for a nonstandard volume in a nonstandard geometry. This precludes straightforward application of the formalism developed for internal radionuclide dosimetry by the Medical Internal Radiation Dose Committee. A software program was written to account for the perturbations introduced by the inclusion of a tumor mass as an additional source of, and target for, radiation. The program allows the interactive development of a mathematical model to account for observed biodistribution data. The model describes the time dependence of radioactivity in each organ system that retains radiolabeled antibody, including tumor. Integration of these "time-activity" curves yield cumulative activity for each organ system identified as a 'source' of radioactivity. A Monte Carlo simulation of photon transport is then executed for each source organ to obtain the fraction of radiation energy absorbed by various 'target' organs. When combined with the cumulative activity, this absorbed fraction allows an estimate of dose to be made for each target organ. The program has been validated against ten analytic models designed to span a range of common input data types. Additionally, a performance benchmark has been defined to assess the practicality of implementing the program on different computing hardware platforms. Sources of error in the computation are elaborated on, and future directions and improvements discussed. The software presents an integrated modeling/dosimetry environment particularly suited for performing Monoclonal Antibody dosimetry. It offers a viable methodology for performing prospective treatment planning, based on extrapolation of tracer kinetic data to therapeutic levels.

  15. Dosimetry intercomparisons between fast neutron radiotherapy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron dosimetry intercomparisons have been made between M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute, Naval Research Laboratory, University of Washington Hospital, and Hammersmith Hospital. The parameters that are measured during these visits are: tissue kerma in air, tissue dose at depth of dose maximum, depth dose, beam profiles, neutron/gamma ratios and photon calibrations of ionization chambers. A preliminary report of these intercomparisons will be given including a comparison of the calculation and statement of tumor doses for each institution

  16. Applications of alanine-based dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alanine-based radiation dosimetry and related dosimeters developed at the Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome, Italy, and capable of providing high accuracy absorbed dose determination by ESR are presented. Overall uncertainty is shown to be +-3.9% in the 10 Gy to 3 kGy range. Possible applications to radiotherapy and industry are discussed. Percentage depth dose values and dose profiles measured with alanine dosimeters in phantom are presented. (author)

  17. Calliope. A pedagogic tool for internal dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Calliope CD-Rom brings together all principal data published in the documents of the international commission of radiation protection (ICRP) since 1990. Calliope is a support devoted to the training of professionals and future actors of radioprotection (doctors, biologists, radiation protection services, teachers etc..). It provides some useful help for the enforcement and the respect of new dosimetry standards as defined in the European directive 96/29. (J.S.)

  18. Thermocurrent dosimetry with high purity aluminum oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fullerton, G.D.; Cameron, J.R.; Moran, P.R.

    1976-01-01

    The application of thermocurrent (TC) to ionizing radiation dosimetry was studied. It was shown that TC in alumina (Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/) has properties that are suited to personnel dosimetry and environmental monitoring. TC dosimeters were made from thin disks of alumina. Aluminum electrodes were evaporated on each side: on one face a high voltage electrode and on the opposite face a measuring electrode encircled by a guard ring. Exposure to ionizing radiation resulted in stored electrons and holes in metastable trapping sites. The signal was read-out by heating the dosimeter with a voltage source and picnometer connected in series between the opposite electrodes. The thermally remobilized charge caused a transient TC. The thermogram, TC versus time or temperature, is similar to a TL glow curve. Either the peak current or the integrated current is a measure of absorbed dose. Six grades of alumina were studied from a total of four commercial suppliers. All six materials displayed radiation induced TC signals. Sapphire of uv-grade quality from the Adolf Meller Co. (AM) had the best dosimetry properties of those investigated. Sources of interference were studied. Thermal fading, residual signal and radiation damage do not limit TC dosimetry. Ultraviolet light can induce a TC response but it is readily excluded with uv-opaque cladding. Improper surface preparation prior to electrode evaporation was shown to cause interference. A spurious TC signal resulted from polarization of surface contaminants. Spurious TC was reduced by improved cleaning prior to electrode application. Polished surfaces resulted in blocking electrodes and caused a sensitivity shift due to radiation induced thermally activated polarization. This was not observed with rough cut surfaces.

  19. Self-expanding stent effects on radiation dosimetry in esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Samual R; Anker, Christopher J; Wang, Brian; Williams, Greg V; Cox, Kristen; Adler, Douglas G; Shrieve, Dennis C; Salter, Bill J

    2013-01-01

    It is the purpose of this study to evaluate how self-expanding stents (SESs) affect esophageal cancer radiation planning target volumes (PTVs) and dose delivered to surrounding organs at risk (OARs). Ten patients were evaluated, for whom a SES was placed before radiation. A computed tomography (CT) scan obtained before stent placement was fused to the post-stent CT simulation scan. Three methods were used to represent pre-stent PTVs: 1) image fusion (IF), 2) volume approximation (VA), and 3) diameter approximation (DA). PTVs and OARs were contoured per RTOG 1010 protocol using Eclipse Treatment Planning software. Post-stent dosimetry for each patient was compared to approximated pre-stent dosimetry. For each of the three pre-stent approximations (IF, VA, and DA), the mean lung and liver doses and the estimated percentages of lung volumes receiving 5 Gy, 10 Gy, 20 Gy, and 30 Gy, and heart volumes receiving 40 Gy were significantly lower (p-values benefits for treating patients with significant dysphagia, physicians considering stent placement and radiation therapy must realize the effects stents can have on the dosimetry. PMID:23835387

  20. Technical basis document for internal dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides the technical basis for the Chem-Nuclear Geotech (Geotech) internal dosimetry program. Geotech policy describes the intentions of the company in complying with radiation protection standards and the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) program. It uses this policy and applicable protection standards to derive acceptable methods and levels of bioassay to assure compliance. The models and computational methods used are described in detail within this document. FR-om these models, dose- conversion factors and derived limits are computed. These computations are then verified using existing documentation and verification information or by demonstration of the calculations used to obtain the dose-conversion factors and derived limits. Recommendations for methods of optimizing the internal dosimetry program to provide effective monitoring and dose assessment for workers are provided in the last section of this document. This document is intended to be used in establishing an accredited dosimetry program in accordance with expected Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) requirements for the selected radionuclides provided in this document, including uranium mill tailing mixtures. Additions and modifications to this document and procedures derived FR-om this document are expected in the future according to changes in standards and changes in programmatic mission

  1. EPR dosimetry with tooth enamel: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattibene, Paola; Callens, Freddy

    2010-11-01

    When tooth enamel is exposed to ionizing radiation, radicals are formed, which can be detected using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques. EPR dosimetry using tooth enamel is based on the (presumed) correlation between the intensity or amplitude of some of the radiation-induced signals with the dose absorbed in the enamel. In the present paper a critical review is given of this widely applied dosimetric method. The first part of the paper is fairly fundamental and deals with the main properties of tooth enamel and some of its model systems (e.g., synthetic apatites). Considerable attention is also paid to the numerous radiation-induced and native EPR signals and the radicals responsible for them. The relevant methods for EPR detection, identification and spectrum analyzing are reviewed from a general point of view. Finally, the needs for solid-state modelling and studies of the linearity of the dose response are investigated. The second part is devoted to the practical implementation of EPR dosimetry using enamel. It concerns specific problems of preparation of samples, their irradiation and spectrum acquisition. It also describes how the dosimetric signal intensity and dose can be retrieved from the EPR spectra. Special attention is paid to the energy dependence of the EPR response and to sources of uncertainties. Results of and problems encountered in international intercomparisons and epidemiological studies are also dealt with. In the final section the future of EPR dosimetry with tooth enamel is analyzed.

  2. EPR dosimetry with tooth enamel: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fattibene, Paola, E-mail: paola.fattibene@iss.i [Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Department of Technology and Health, Viale Regina Elena 299, I-00161 Rome (Italy); Callens, Freddy, E-mail: freddy.callens@ugent.b [Ghent University, Department of Solid State Sciences, Krijgslaan 281-S1, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2010-11-15

    When tooth enamel is exposed to ionizing radiation, radicals are formed, which can be detected using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques. EPR dosimetry using tooth enamel is based on the (presumed) correlation between the intensity or amplitude of some of the radiation-induced signals with the dose absorbed in the enamel. In the present paper a critical review is given of this widely applied dosimetric method. The first part of the paper is fairly fundamental and deals with the main properties of tooth enamel and some of its model systems (e.g., synthetic apatites). Considerable attention is also paid to the numerous radiation-induced and native EPR signals and the radicals responsible for them. The relevant methods for EPR detection, identification and spectrum analyzing are reviewed from a general point of view. Finally, the needs for solid-state modelling and studies of the linearity of the dose response are investigated. The second part is devoted to the practical implementation of EPR dosimetry using enamel. It concerns specific problems of preparation of samples, their irradiation and spectrum acquisition. It also describes how the dosimetric signal intensity and dose can be retrieved from the EPR spectra. Special attention is paid to the energy dependence of the EPR response and to sources of uncertainties. Results of and problems encountered in international intercomparisons and epidemiological studies are also dealt with. In the final section the future of EPR dosimetry with tooth enamel is analyzed.

  3. Electron paramagnetic resonance dosimetry using synthetic hydroxyapatite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kwon; Kim, Hwi Young; Ye, Sung Joon [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hirata, Hiroshi [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Park, Jong Min [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    The victims exposed doses under 3.5-4.0 Gy have chance to survive if treated urgently. To determine the priority of treatment among a large number of victims, the triage – distinguishing patients who need an urgent treatment from who may not be urgent – is necessary based on radiation biodosimetry. A current gold standard for radiation biodosimetry is the chromosomal assay using human lymphocytes. But this method requires too much time and skilled labors to cover the mass victims in radiation emergencies. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) has been known for its capability of quantifying radicals in matters. EPR dosimetry is based on the measurement of stable radiation-induced radicals in tooth enamel. Hydroxyapatite (HAP) (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) contained in tooth enamel is a major probe for radiation dose reconstruction. This HAP dosimetry study was performed using a novel EPR spectrometer in Hokkaido University, Japan. The EPR dose-response curve was made using HAP samples. The blind test using 250 cGy samples showed the feasibility of EPR dosimetry for the triage purpose.

  4. Diagnostic radiology dosimetry: status and trends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera M, T., E-mail: trivera@ipn.mx [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Av. Legaria 694, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Medical radiation is by far the largest man-made source of public exposure to ionizing radiation. Since 1970 the expression of protection standards shifted from a dose- to a risk-based approach, with dose limits established to yield risks to radiation workers comparable with those for workers in other safe industries. Another hand, worldwide interest in patient dose measurement was stimulated by the publication of Patient Dose Reduction in Diagnostic Radiology by the UK National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB). In response to heightened awareness of the importance of patient dose contributed by radiology procedures, there has been a general trend to effect control of patient doses by applying the principles of optimization coupled with an increase in regulatory enforcement. In this sense, thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) has been actively proposed in the last 3 decades thanks to their successful applications in diagnostic radiology. At the same time, it is emerged as the best radiation dosimetry method. The present work presents advantages of thermoluminescent dosimetry for X-ray beams measurements and its optimization. (Author)

  5. Reconstructive dosimetry for cutaneous radiation syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, C.M.A.; Lima, A.R.; Degenhardt, Ä.L.; Da Silva, F.C.A., E-mail: dasilva@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Valverde, N.J. [Fundacao Eletronuclear de Assistencia Medica, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    According to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), a relatively significant number of radiological accidents have occurred in recent years mainly because of the practices referred to as potentially high-risk activities, such as radiotherapy, large irradiators and industrial radiography, especially in gammagraphy assays. In some instances, severe injuries have occurred in exposed persons due to high radiation doses. In industrial radiography, 80 cases involving a total of 120 radiation workers, 110 members of the public including 12 deaths have been recorded up to 2014. Radiological accidents in industrial practices in Brazil have mainly resulted in development of cutaneous radiation syndrome (CRS) in hands and fingers. Brazilian data include 5 serious cases related to industrial gammagraphy, affecting 7 radiation workers and 19 members of the public; however, none of them were fatal. Some methods of reconstructive dosimetry have been used to estimate the radiation dose to assist in prescribing medical treatment. The type and development of cutaneous manifestations in the exposed areas of a person is the first achievable gross dose estimation. This review article presents the state-of-the-art reconstructive dosimetry methods enabling estimation of local radiation doses and provides guidelines for medical handling of the exposed individuals. The review also presents the Chilean and Brazilian radiological accident cases to highlight the importance of reconstructive dosimetry. (author)

  6. Hanford Internal Dosimetry Project manual. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Project, as it is administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy and its Hanford contractors. Project services include administrating the bioassay monitoring program, evaluating and documenting assessment of potential intakes and internal dose, ensuring that analytical laboratories conform to requirements, selecting and applying appropriate models and procedures for evaluating radionuclide deposition and the resulting dose, and technically guiding and supporting Hanford contractors in matters regarding internal dosimetry. Specific chapters deal with the following subjects: practices of the project, including interpretation of applicable DOE Orders, regulations, and guidance into criteria for assessment, documentation, and reporting of doses; assessment of internal dose, including summary explanations of when and how assessments are performed; recording and reporting practices for internal dose; selection of workers for bioassay monitoring and establishment of type and frequency of bioassay measurements; capability and scheduling of bioassay monitoring services; recommended dosimetry response to potential internal exposure incidents; quality control and quality assurance provisions of the program

  7. Current work on dosimetry standards in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic concepts on standardization of radiation dosimetry are reviewed. The present situation regarding primary standards in the Electrotechnical Laboratory, the primary standard dosimetry laboratory in Japan, is presented, considering the following; (i) Established dosimetric standards of exposure for soft and medium-energy X-rays and gamma rays. This section includes methods of their standardization, and discusses accuracies of instruments operating as environmental-level, protection-level, inspection-level, therapy-level, and processing-level measuring systems. The results of international comparisons between ETL and other, foreign primary standard dosimetry laboratories are presented; (ii) Other established radiation standards related to derivation of radiation absorbed dose. These primary standards include those for the neutron emission rates, thermal and fast neutron flux densities, energy fluences for high-energy photons and electrons, and activities of several kinds of radioactive material. The accuracies and results of international comparisons relating to them are also presented; (iii) Research being carried out at ETL. The current status of the dissemination of radiation standards is presented considering in particular: (i) The calibration services available at ETL, the categories of these services, energy and dose rate ranges, methods, accuracies, etc.; (ii) The calibration services available in certain other organizations considered as SSDLs in Japan, the categories of such work, methods, accuracies etc.; (iii) Present endeavours towards establishing a systematic and effective dissemination system (a so-called Traceability System) in Japan

  8. Factors influencing EPR dosimetry in fingernails

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technique based on the detection of ionizing radiation induced radicals by EPR in tooth enamel is an established method for the dosimetry of exposed persons in radiological emergencies. Dosimetry based on EPR spectral analysis of fingernail clippings, currently under development, has the practical advantage of the easier sample collection. A limiting factor is that overlapping the radiation induced signal (RIS), fingernails have shown the presence of two mechanically induced signals, called MIS1 and MIS2, due to elastic and plastic deformation respectively, at the time of fingernails cutting. With a water treatment, MIS1 is eliminated while MIS2 is considerably reduced. The calibration curves needed for radiation accident dosimetry should have 'universal' characteristics, ie. Represent the variability that can be found in different individuals. Early studies were directed to the analysis of factors affecting the development of such universal calibration curves. The peak to peak amplitude of the signal before and after the water treatment as well as the effect of size and number of clippings were studied. Furthermore, the interpersonal and intrapersonal variability were analyzed. Taking into account these previous studies, the optimal conditions for measurement were determined and EPR spectra of samples irradiated at different doses were used for the developing of dose-response curves. This paper presents the analysis of the results.(authors)

  9. EPR dosimetry with tooth enamel: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When tooth enamel is exposed to ionizing radiation, radicals are formed, which can be detected using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques. EPR dosimetry using tooth enamel is based on the (presumed) correlation between the intensity or amplitude of some of the radiation-induced signals with the dose absorbed in the enamel. In the present paper a critical review is given of this widely applied dosimetric method. The first part of the paper is fairly fundamental and deals with the main properties of tooth enamel and some of its model systems (e.g., synthetic apatites). Considerable attention is also paid to the numerous radiation-induced and native EPR signals and the radicals responsible for them. The relevant methods for EPR detection, identification and spectrum analyzing are reviewed from a general point of view. Finally, the needs for solid-state modelling and studies of the linearity of the dose response are investigated. The second part is devoted to the practical implementation of EPR dosimetry using enamel. It concerns specific problems of preparation of samples, their irradiation and spectrum acquisition. It also describes how the dosimetric signal intensity and dose can be retrieved from the EPR spectra. Special attention is paid to the energy dependence of the EPR response and to sources of uncertainties. Results of and problems encountered in international intercomparisons and epidemiological studies are also dealt with. In the final section the future of EPR dosimetry with tooth enamel is analyzed.

  10. Bayesian Methods for Radiation Detection and Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We performed work in three areas: radiation detection, external and internal radiation dosimetry. In radiation detection we developed Bayesian techniques to estimate the net activity of high and low activity radioactive samples. These techniques have the advantage that the remaining uncertainty about the net activity is described by probability densities. Graphs of the densities show the uncertainty in pictorial form. Figure 1 below demonstrates this point. We applied stochastic processes for a method to obtain Bayesian estimates of 222Rn-daughter products from observed counting rates. In external radiation dosimetry we studied and developed Bayesian methods to estimate radiation doses to an individual with radiation induced chromosome aberrations. We analyzed chromosome aberrations after exposure to gammas and neutrons and developed a method for dose-estimation after criticality accidents. The research in internal radiation dosimetry focused on parameter estimation for compartmental models from observed compartmental activities. From the estimated probability densities of the model parameters we were able to derive the densities for compartmental activities for a two compartment catenary model at different times. We also calculated the average activities and their standard deviation for a simple two compartment model

  11. Quality assurance in radiotherapy dosimetry in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1995, the SSDL in the Laboratory of Industrial Hygiene cooperated with Beijing Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical science joined the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme (NO.8769/RO). According to the requirements of the project, an External Audit Group (EAG) in China was established in 1996 with the responsibilities of operating TLD-based quality audit for radiotherapy dosimetry. Since then. The national TLD dose quality audit services have been carried out in 7 provinces in China. Besides this, the national programmes for brachytherapy and stereostatic radiosurgery (SRS) treatment dosimetry were initiated in 2001. The activity measurement intercomparison between the SSDL and some hospitals for Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy sources has been performed using a HDR well-type ionization chamber (Model HDR 1000 plus) and CDX-2000A Charge Digitizer, which were calibrated in Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory, University of Wisconsin, USA. The preliminary results indicated that the agreement between SSDL measured activity and hospital stated activity was within ±5% for more than 80% of total participants

  12. Accreditation ISO/IEC 1705 in dosimetry: Experience and results; Acreditacion ISO/IEC 17025 en dosimetria: Experiencia y resultados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin Garcia, R.; Navarro Bravo, T.

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this work is to present the experience in the process of accreditation of the radiation dosimetry service in which there are trials for the determination of radiation doses due to internal and external exhibitions. Is They describe the aspects that were considered for the design and development of a system of quality and results after its implementation. A review of the benefits accreditation has been reported to the organization is finally made. (Author)

  13. The IAEA/WHO thermoluminescent dosimetry intercomparison used for the improvement of clinical dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of thermoluminescent dosimetry collected over 5 years in the Eastern Mediterranean region of WHO were analyzed in an attempt to improve clinical dosimetry. Data for 16 radiotherapy departments showed considerable inconsistencies. It was found that the clinical dosemeters used by 3 of the departments were not working properly. The remainder of the departments had one or more dosemeters in perfect working order but the procedure for measuring machine output was inadequate or the correction factors (pressure, temperature) were wrongly applied due to lack of reliable instruments for such measurements. Problems encountered in the sending and returning of TLD dosemeters for assessment are discussed

  14. Hybrid 3D pregnant woman and fetus modeling from medical imaging for dosimetry studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerical simulations studying the interactions between radiations and biological tissues require the use of three-dimensional models of the human anatomy at various ages and in various positions. Several detailed and flexible models exist for adults and children and have been extensively used for dosimetry. On the other hand, progress of simulation studies focusing on pregnant women and the fetus have been limited by the fact that only a small number of models exist with rather coarse anatomical details and a poor representation of the anatomical variability of the fetus shape and its position over the entire gestation. In this paper, we propose a new computational framework to generate 3D hybrid models of pregnant women, composed of fetus shapes segmented from medical images and a generic maternal body envelope representing a synthetic woman scaled to the dimension of the uterus. The computational framework includes the following tasks: image segmentation, contour regularization, mesh-based surface reconstruction, and model integration. A series of models was created to represent pregnant women at different gestational stages and with the fetus in different positions, all including detailed tissues of the fetus and the utero-fetal unit, which play an important role in dosimetry. These models were anatomically validated by clinical obstetricians and radiologists who verified the accuracy and representativeness of the anatomical details, and the positioning of the fetus inside the maternal body. The computational framework enables the creation of detailed, realistic, and representative fetus models from medical images, directly exploitable for dosimetry simulations. (orig.)

  15. Accreditation of a personal dosimetry service in Switzerland: practical experience and transition from EN 45004 to ISO 17025.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschung, M; Wernli, C

    2001-01-01

    In compliance with the Swiss legislation on radiological protection, the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) operates a dosimetry service that is approved by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate. In 1997, the dosimetry service was also accredited by the Swiss Federal Office of Metrology and Accreditation as an inspection body for legal personal and environmental dosimetry, according to EN 45004. The accreditation covers determination of personal dose equivalent for photon, neutron and beta radiation, and ambient dose equivalent for photon and neutron radiation, by means of thermoluminescence and solid state track detection techniques. Within this formal accreditation it was confirmed that the relevant requirements of ISO 9002 are also fulfilled. The first re-accreditation will take place in 2001 and work is going on to achieve the transition from EN 45004 to ISO 17025. Accreditation is a feasible, practicable and acceptable way to achieve harmonisation in the field of dosimetry. However, before starting on the path to formal accreditation, a careful analysis should be made, taking into consideration not only cost-benefit aspects but also national legal requirements. PMID:11586715

  16. Accreditation of a personal dosimetry service in Switzerland: Practical experience and transition from EN 45004 to ISO 17025

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boschung, M.; Wernli, C

    2001-07-01

    In compliance with the Swiss legislation on radiological protection, the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) operates a dosimetry service that is approved by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate. In 1997, the dosimetry service was also accredited by the Swiss Federal Office of Metrology and Accreditation as an inspection body for legal personal and environmental dosimetry, according to EN 45004. The accreditation covers determination of personal dose equivalent for photon, neutron and beta radiation, and ambient dose equivalent for photon and neutron radiation, by means of thermoluminescence and solid state track detection techniques. Within this formal accreditation it was confirmed that the relevant requirements of ISO 9002 are also fulfilled. The first re-accreditation will take place in 2001 and work is going on to achieve the transition from EN 45004 to ISO 17025. Accreditation is a feasible, practicable and acceptable way to achieve harmonisation in the field of dosimetry. However, before starting on the path to formal accreditation, a careful analysis should be made, taking into consideration not only cost-benefit aspects but also national legal requirements. (author)

  17. Reactor Dosimetry State of the Art 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorbraak, Wim; Debarberis, Luigi; D'Hondt, Pierre; Wagemans, Jan

    2009-08-01

    Oral session 1: Retrospective dosimetry. Retrospective dosimetry of VVER 440 reactor pressure vessel at the 3rd unit of Dukovany NPP / M. Marek ... [et al.]. Retrospective dosimetry study at the RPV of NPP Greifswald unit 1 / J. Konheiser ... [et al.]. Test of prototype detector for retrospective neutron dosimetry of reactor internals and vessel / K. Hayashi ... [et al.]. Neutron doses to the concrete vessel and tendons of a magnox reactor using retrospective dosimetry / D. A. Allen ... [et al.]. A retrospective dosimetry feasibility study for Atucha I / J. Wagemans ... [et al.]. Retrospective reactor dosimetry with zirconium alloy samples in a PWR / L. R. Greenwood and J. P. Foster -- Oral session 2: Experimental techniques. Characterizing the Time-dependent components of reactor n/y environments / P. J. Griffin, S. M. Luker and A. J. Suo-Anttila. Measurements of the recoil-ion response of silicon carbide detectors to fast neutrons / F. H. Ruddy, J. G. Seidel and F. Franceschini. Measurement of the neutron spectrum of the HB-4 cold source at the high flux isotope reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory / J. L. Robertson and E. B. Iverson. Feasibility of cavity ring-down laser spectroscopy for dose rate monitoring on nuclear reactor / H. Tomita ... [et al.]. Measuring transistor damage factors in a non-stable defect environment / D. B. King ... [et al.]. Neutron-detection based monitoring of void effects in boiling water reactors / J. Loberg ... [et al.] -- Poster session 1: Power reactor surveillance, retrospective dosimetry, benchmarks and inter-comparisons, adjustment methods, experimental techniques, transport calculations. Improved diagnostics for analysis of a reactor pulse radiation environment / S. M. Luker ... [et al.]. Simulation of the response of silicon carbide fast neutron detectors / F. Franceschini, F. H. Ruddy and B. Petrović. NSV A-3: a computer code for least-squares adjustment of neutron spectra and measured dosimeter responses / J. G

  18. Is there a future for dosimetry by portal imaging?; Le controle dosimetrique par imagerie portale a-t-il un avenir?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huyskens, D.P. [Hopital Universitairel Gasthuisberg, Dept. de Radiotherapie, Louvain (Belgium)

    2000-12-01

    This article deals with the potential benefits of portal imaging as a tool for the dosimetric control of a radiotherapy treatment. In the introduction the advantages of dosimetric control with portal imaging are described. Subsequently, the physical problem is considered between patient exit dose and dose at the level of the portal detector. Measurements with phantoms have shown that this relationship is complex: different algorithms have been developed by groups of researchers and some of them are summarised in this article. Finally, three examples of dosimetric control using portal imaging are presented: in vivo dosimetry on the beam axis, dosimetric profiles in two dimensions and portal dosimetry for intensity modulation. (author)

  19. Performance testing of dosimetry processors, status of NRC rulemaking for improved personnel dosimetry processing, and some beta dosimetry and instrumentation problems observed by NRC regional inspectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early dosimetry processor performance studies conducted between 1967 and 1979 by several different investigators indicated that a significant percentage of personnel dosimetry processors may not be performing with a reasonable degree of accuracy. Results of voluntary performance testing of US personnel dosimetry processors against the final Health Physics Society Standard, Criteria for Testing Personnel Dosimetry Performance by the University of Michigan for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) will be summarized with emphasis on processor performance in radiation categories involving beta particles and beta particles and photon mixtures. The current status of the NRC's regulatory program for improved personnel dosimetry processing will be reviewed. The NRC is proposing amendments to its regulations, 10 CFR Part 20, that would require its licensees to utilize specified personnel dosimetry services from processors accredited by the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program of the National Bureau of Standards. Details of the development and schedule for implementation of the program will be highlighted. Finally, selected beta dosimetry and beta instrumentation problems observed by NRC Regional Staff during inspections of NRC licensed facilities will be discussed

  20. Toxicity and dosimetry of tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium doses to the general public are very low (currently about 0.2 μSv per year). Radiation doses from tritium to members of the public living in the vicinity of a CANDU power station are higher but rarely exceed 20 μSv per year or 1% of normal exposures to radiation from all natural sources, but doses to some radiation workers can approach ten mSv per year. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of tritium beta rays varies appreciably depending upon the biological endpoint. Observed RBE values at low doses and low dose-rates are usually about 2 to 3 when tritium beta rays are compared to 60Co gamma rays but are closer to 1 than to 2 when compared to 200 kVp X-rays. This conclusion is supported by microdosimetric considerations of the quality of tritium beta rays, 60Co gamma rays and X-rays. Since X-rays have traditionally been accepted as reference radiation by the International Commission on Radiological Protection, it seems reasonable that the quality factor (Q) assigned to tritium beta rays should be close to one. Recommended procedures in Canada for estimation of effective dose equivalents from exposures to HTO and HT assume that Q = 1 and that body water represents 67% of the mass of soft tissue; they take into account conversions of HTO to appear to be reasonable for radiation protection purposes when the source of exposure is HTO or HT, but will not be adequate for exposures to other tritiated compounds. (modified author abstract) (137 refs., 11 figs., 12 tabs.)

  1. An international dosimetry exchange for boron neutron capture therapy. Part I: Absorbed dose measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binns, P J; Riley, K J; Harling, O K; Kiger, W S; Munck af Rosenschöld, P M; Giusti, V; Capala, J; Sköld, K; Auterinen, I; Serén, T; Kotiluoto, P; Uusi-Simola, J; Marek, M; Viererbl, L; Spurny, F

    2005-12-01

    An international collaboration was organized to undertake a dosimetry exchange to enable the future combination of clinical data from different centers conducting neutron capture therapy trials. As a first step (Part I) the dosimetry group from the Americas, represented by MIT, visited the clinical centers at Studsvik (Sweden), VTT Espoo (Finland), and the Nuclear Research Institute (NRI) at Rez (Czech Republic). A combined VTT/NRI group reciprocated with a visit to MIT. Each participant performed a series of dosimetry measurements under equivalent irradiation conditions using methods appropriate to their clinical protocols. This entailed in-air measurements and dose versus depth measurements in a large water phantom. Thermal neutron flux as well as fast neutron and photon absorbed dose rates were measured. Satisfactory agreement in determining absorbed dose within the experimental uncertainties was obtained between the different groups although the measurement uncertainties are large, ranging between 3% and 30% depending upon the dose component and the depth of measurement. To improve the precision in the specification of absorbed dose amongst the participants, the individually measured dose components were normalized to the results from a single method. Assuming a boron concentration of 15 microg g(-1) that is typical of concentrations realized clinically with the boron delivery compound boronophenylalanine-fructose, systematic discrepancies in the specification of the total biologically weighted dose of up to 10% were apparent between the different groups. The results from these measurements will be used in future to normalize treatment plan calculations between the different clinical dosimetry protocols as Part II of this study. PMID:16475772

  2. Application of numerical analysis methods to thermoluminescence dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the application of numerical methods to thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD), showing the advantages obtained over conventional evaluation systems. Different configurations of the analysis method are presented to operate in specific dosimetric applications of TLD, such as environmental monitoring and mailed dosimetry systems for quality assurance in radiotherapy facilities. (Author) 10 refs

  3. Methods and procedures for internal radiation dosimetry at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Procedures, methods, materials, records, and reports used for accomplishing the personnel, internal radiation monitoring program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory are described for the purpose of documenting what is done now for future reference. This document does not include procedures for nuclear accident dosimetry except insofar as routine techniques may apply also to nuclear accident dosimetry capability

  4. Radiation chemical dosimetry by means of nitrate-nitrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The different chemical systems used in dosimetry and the selection criteria for them are described. The general topics in dosimetry with alkali nitrates as well as the phenomena occurring in their radiolysis are also treated. The possibility of application in dosimetric areas useful in radiosterilization and industrial processes is studied too. (Author) 22 refs

  5. Dosimetry computer module of the gamma irradiator of ININ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work present the technical specifications for the upgrade of the dosimetry module of the computer system of the gamma irradiator of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) whose result allows the integration and consultation of information in industrial dosimetry subject under an outline client-server. (Author)

  6. Neutron dosimetry and radiation damage calculations for HFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwood, L.R.; Ratner, R.T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Neutron dosimetry measurements have been conducted for various positions of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in order to measure the neutron flux and energy spectra. Neutron dosimetry results and radiation damage calculations are presented for positions V10, V14, and V15.

  7. Present status and expected progress in radiation processing dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovács, A.; Miller, A.

    2004-01-01

    The paper describes the present status of radiation processing dosimetry including the methods used most widely in gamma- and electron processing as well as the new methods under development or introduction. The recent trends with respect to calibrationof routine dosimetry systems as well as stan...

  8. Factors affecting dosimetry in pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Society has made attempts to reduce fetal exposure. Of note recently in the practice of medicine is the use of diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics to supplant radiographic procedures. During the incident at Three Mile Island pregnant women were removed from the immediate vicinity to minimize internal contamination and thus fetal exposure. BRH is currently launching a public campaign to heighten public awareness of the need to question diagnostic x-ray procedures during pregnancy or suspected pregnancy. Despite these admirable intentions our pursuit of knowledge, at least when concerned with the fetal dose from internally deposited radionuclides, has been less than exemplary. There is a paucity of biological information available to determine the radiation absorbed dose to the fetus when the mother's body contains radioactivity, either by intent or by accidental exposure. The government has severely limited fetal research on humans with a net result of preventing the accumulation of valuable information. The delivered placenta, the study of which would yield currently unavailable information, has historically been treated with disrespect. Even in a well regulated American hospital, it is the only human tissue that can be discarded with the impunity. Unpredictable interspecies differences cause animal data to be tenuous and unreliable when quantitatively extrapolated to humans

  9. Dosimetry Methods of Fast Neutron Using the Semiconductor Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Zaki, Dizaji; Kakavand, T.; F. Abbasi, Davani

    2014-01-01

    Semiconductor detectors based on a silicon pin diode are frequently used in the detection of different nuclear radiations. For the detection and dosimetry of fast neutrons, these silicon detectors are coupled with a fast neutron converter. Incident neutrons interact with the converter and produce charged particles that can deposit their energy in the detectors and produce a signal. In this study, three methods are introduced for fast neutron dosimetry by using the silicon detectors, which are: recoil proton spectroscopy, similarity of detector response function with conversion function, and a discriminator layer. Monte Carlo simulation is used to calculate the response of dosimetry systems based on these methods. In the different doses of an 241Am-Be neutron source, dosimetry responses are evaluated. The error values of measured data for dosimetry by these methods are in the range of 15-25%. We find fairly good agreement in the 241Am-Be neutron sources.

  10. EURADOS strategic research agenda: vision for dosimetry of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since autumn 2012, the European Radiation Dosimetry Group (EURADOS) has been developing its Strategic Research Agenda (SRA), which is intended to contribute to the identification of future research needs in radiation dosimetry in Europe. The present article summarises-based on input from EURADOS Working Groups (WGs) and Voting Members-five visions in dosimetry and defines key issues in dosimetry research that are considered important for the next decades. The five visions include scientific developments required towards (a) updated fundamental dose concepts and quantities, (b) improved radiation risk estimates deduced from epidemiological cohorts, (c) efficient dose assessment for radiological emergencies, (d) integrated personalised dosimetry in medical applications and (e) improved radiation protection of workers and the public. The SRA of EURADOS will be used as a guideline for future activities of the EURADOS WGs. A detailed version of the SRA can be downloaded as a EURADOS report from the EURADOS web site (www.eurados.org). (authors)

  11. Performing personnel dosimetry investigations and records quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation Safety Officers (RSOs) sometimes face situations in which personnel dosimetry estimates are required after dosimeters issued to radiation workers (film or TLD badges, extremity dosimeters, etc.) are lost or damaged before processing. This article was prepared to help those involved with personnel dosimetry investigations became aquatinted with this process. A factor that contributes to the anxiety of those unfamiliar with dosimetry investigations is the lack of published guidance available in this subject. More printed resources are needed to help radiation safety professionals familiarize themselves and understand personnel dosimetry investigations. Topics discussed in this presentation include the justification of performing dosimetry investigations, recommendations on how to perform them and the advantages of performing such investigations

  12. Dosimetry on the radiological risks prevention in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosimetry in its various forms plays a determining role on the radiological risks prevention in radiotherapy. To prove this in this paper is shown an analysis based on the risk matrix method, how the dosimetry can influence in each stages of a radiotherapy service; installation and acceptance, operation, maintenance and calibration. For each one of these stages the role that can play is analyzed as either the initiating event of a radiological accident or limiting barrier of these events of the dosimetric processes used for the individual dosimetry, the area monitoring, fixed or portable, for radiation beam dosimetry and of the patients for a radiotherapy service with cobalt-therapy equipment. The result of the study shows that the application of a prospective approach in the role evaluation of dosimetry in the prevention and mitigation of the consequences of a radiological accident in radiotherapy is crucial and should be subject to permanent evaluation at each development stage of these services. (author)

  13. EURADOS strategic research agenda: vision for dosimetry of ionising radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rühm, W; Fantuzzi, E; Harrison, R; Schuhmacher, H; Vanhavere, F; Alves, J; Bottollier Depois, J F; Fattibene, P; Knežević, Ž; Lopez, M A; Mayer, S; Miljanić, S; Neumaier, S; Olko, P; Stadtmann, H; Tanner, R; Woda, C

    2016-02-01

    Since autumn 2012, the European Radiation Dosimetry Group (EURADOS) has been developing its Strategic Research Agenda (SRA), which is intended to contribute to the identification of future research needs in radiation dosimetry in Europe. The present article summarises-based on input from EURADOS Working Groups (WGs) and Voting Members-five visions in dosimetry and defines key issues in dosimetry research that are considered important for the next decades. The five visions include scientific developments required towards (a) updated fundamental dose concepts and quantities, (b) improved radiation risk estimates deduced from epidemiological cohorts, (c) efficient dose assessment for radiological emergencies, (d) integrated personalised dosimetry in medical applications and (e) improved radiation protection of workers and the public. The SRA of EURADOS will be used as a guideline for future activities of the EURADOS WGs. A detailed version of the SRA can be downloaded as a EURADOS report from the EURADOS website (www.eurados.org). PMID:25752758

  14. Impact of Radiation Biology on Fundamental Insights in Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setlow, Richard B.

    1982-07-27

    Research supported by OHER [Office of Health and Environmental Research] and its predecessors has as one of its major goals an understanding of the effects of radiation at low doses and dose rates on biological systems, so as to predict their effects on humans. It is not possible to measure such effects directly. They must be predicted from basic knowledge on how radiation affects cellular components such as DNA and membranes and how cells react to such changes. What is the probability of radiation producing human mutations and what are the probabilities of radiation producing cancer? The end results of such studies are radiation exposure standards for workers and for the general population. An extension of these goals is setting standards for exposure to chemicals involved in various energy technologies. This latter problem is much more difficult because chemical dosimetry is a primitive state compared to radiation dosimetry.

  15. Optimisation of an EPR dosimetry system for robust and high precision dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical applications of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry systems demand high accuracy causing time consuming analysis. The need for high spatial resolution dose measurements in regions with steep dose gradients demands small sized dosimeters. An optimization of the analysis was therefore needed to limit the time consumption. The aim of this work was to introduce a new smaller lithium formate dosimeter model (diameter reduced from standard diameter 4.5 mm to 3 mm and height from 4.8 mm to 3 mm). To compensate for reduced homogeneity in a batch of the smaller dosimeters, a method for individual sensitivity correction suitable for EPR dosimetry was tested. Sensitivity and repeatability was also tested for a standard EPR resonator and a super high Q (SHQE) one. The aim was also to optimize the performance of the dosimetry system for better efficiency regarding measurement time and precision. A systematic investigation of the relationship between measurement uncertainty and number of readouts per dosimeter was performed. The conclusions drawn from this work were that it is possible to decrease the dosimeter size with maintained measurement precision by using the SHQE resonator and introducing individual calibration factors for dosimeter batches. It was also shown that it is possible reduce the number of readouts per dosimeter without significantly decreasing the accuracy in measurements. - Highlights: • A lithium formate dosimetry system was optimized for accurate dose determinations. • Smaller-sized dosimeters for measurements in dose gradient regions was developed. • Individual sensitivity calibration was introduced for EPR dosimetry. • Measurement precision versus measurement time was evaluated

  16. EPR Dosimetry in Irradiated Fingernails

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) is being transformed in a complementary tool of biologically-based methods for evaluation of dose after accidental radiation exposure. Many efforts are being carried out in laboratories to evaluate the performance of different materials for its use in EPR doses measurements and for improving the current methods for spectrum analysis and calibration curves determinations. In our country the EPR techniques have been used in different areas with dosimetric (alanine) and non dosimetric purposes. Now we are performing the first studies to obtain properly dose response curves to be used for accidental dose assessments through irradiated fingernails. It is by now well known that the fingernails present two types of signals, a background one (BKS), originated in elastic and inelastic mechanical deformations and the radio induced one (RIS), object of interest (I). In this work we will present some of the previous studies performed to characterize the fingernail samples and we analyse the additive dose method for data obtained employing the technique of the substraction of the spectrum recorded at two different microwave powers in order to reduce the BKS signal. Fingernail samples collected from different donors were treated by soaking in water during 10 min and 5 min drying on paper towel and the BKS signals were studied previously its irradiation. The statistical analysis (R statistics) show a distribution with a Standard Deviation of 24% respects to its media. During these studies we also conserved in freezer for more than 6 months irradiated fingernails that, were periodically measured and the statistical analysis of the peak to peak amplitude show a normal distribution through the Quantile correlation test with a SD 11% respected to its median. (authors)

  17. Verification of IMRT fields by film dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) the aim of an accurate conformal dose distribution is obtained through a complex process. This ranges from the calculation of the optimal distribution of fluence by the treatment planning system (TPS), to the dose delivery through a multilamellar collimator (MLC), with several segments per beam in the step and shoot approach. The above-mentioned consideration makes mandatory an accurate dosimetric verification of the IM beams. A high resolution and integrating dosimeter, like the radiographic film, permits one to simultaneously measure the dose in a matrix of points, providing a good means of obtaining dose distributions. The intrinsic limitation of film dosimetry is the sensitivity dependence on the field size and on the measurement depth. However, the introduction of a scattered radiation filter permits the use of a single calibration curve for all field sizes and measurement depths. In this paper the quality control procedure developed for dosimetric verification of IMRT technique is reported. In particular a system of film dosimetry for the verification of a 6 MV photon beam has been implemented, with the introduction of the scattered radiation filter in the clinical practice that permits one to achieve an absolute dose determination with a global uncertainty within 3.4% (1 s.d.). The film has been calibrated to be used both in perpendicular and parallel configurations. The work also includes the characterization of the Elekta MLC. Ionimetric independent detectors have been used to check single point doses. The film dosimetry procedure has been applied to compare the measured absolute dose distributions with the ones calculated by the TPS, both for test and clinical plans. The agreement, quantified by the gamma index that seldom reaches the 1.5 value, is satisfying considering that the comparison is performed between absolute doses

  18. State-of-the-Art Beta Detection and Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David M. Hamby

    2008-08-15

    The research funded by this NEER grant establishes the framework for a detailed understanding of the challenges in beta dosimetry, especially in the presence of a mixed radiation field. The work also stimulated the thinking of the research group which will lead to new concepts in digital signal processing to allow collection of detection signals and real-time analysis such that simultaneous beta and gamma spectroscopy can take place. The work described herein (with detail in the many publications that came out of this research) was conducted in a manner that provided dissertation and thesis topics for three students, one of whom was completely funded by this grant. The overall benefit of the work came in the form of a dramatic shift in signal processing that is normally conducted in analog pulse shape analysis. Analog signal processing was shown not to be feasible for this type of work; digital signal processing was a must. This, in turn, led the research team to a new understanding of pulse analysis, one in which expands the state-of-the-art in simultaneous beta and gamma spectroscopy with a single detector.

  19. Secondary standard dosimetry laboratory at INFLPR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarlat, F.; Minea, R.; Scarisoreanu, A.; Badita, E.; Sima, E.; Dumitrascu, M.; Stancu, E.; Vancea, C., E-mail: scarlat.f@gmail.com [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics - INFLPR, Bucharest (Romania)

    2011-07-01

    National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics (INFLPR) has constructed a High Energy Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory SSDL-STARDOOR - for performing dosimetric calibrations according to ISO IEC SR/EN 17025:2005 standards. This is outfitted with UNIDOS Secondary Standard Dosimeter from PTW (Freiburg Physikalisch-Technische Werksttaten) calibrated at the PTB-Braunschweig (German Federal Institute of Physics and Metrology). A radiation beam of the quality of Q used by our laboratory as calibration source are provided by INFLPR 7 MeV electron beam linear accelerator mounted in our facility. (author)

  20. Eurados trial performance test for photon dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stadtmann, H.; Bordy, J.M.; Ambrosi, P.;

    2001-01-01

    Within the framework of the EURADOS Action entitled Harmonisation and Dosimetric Quality Assurance in Individual Monitoring for External Radiation, trial performance tests for whole-body and extremity personal dosemeters were carried out. Photon, beta and neutron dosemeters were considered. This...... paper summarises the results of the whole-body photon dosemeter test. Twenty-six dosimetry services from all EU Member States and Switzerland participated. Twelve different radiation fields were used to simulate various workplace irradiation fields. Dose values from 0.4 mSv to 80 mSv were chosen. From...

  1. Thermoluminescent dosimetry and assessment of personal dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermoluminescence is discussed in terms of the energy band structure of a crystalline solid and the trapping of charge carriers by point defects. Some general properties of thermoluminescent materials used for dosimetry are outlined, with thermoluminescence of CaSO4:Dy being described in detail. The energy response function and the modification of the energy response of a dosimeter by shielding are discussed. The final section covers the connection between exposure, as recorded by a TLD badge, and the absorbed dose to various organs from gamma radiation in a uranium mine; the conversion from absorbed dose to dose equivalent; and uncertainties in assessment of dose equivalent

  2. The next decade in external dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, R.V.

    1986-10-01

    As the radiation protection community moves through the last half of the '80s and into the next decade, we can expect the requirements for external dosimetry to become increasingly more restrictive and demanding. As in other health protection fields, growing regulatory and legal pressures, together with a natural evolution in philosophy, require the health physicist to display an increasing degree of accountability, rigor, and professionalism. The good news is that, for the most part, the technology necessary to solve many of the problems will be available or not far behind. This paper describes anticipated technology. 66 refs., 10 figs.

  3. Characterization of new materials for fiberoptic dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, P.; Santiago, M.; Marcassó, J.; Caselli, E.; Prokic, M.; Khaidukov, N.; Furetta, C.

    2011-09-01

    In this work we have investigated the radioluminescence (RL) characteristics of three materials (Mg2SiO4:Tb, CsY2F7:Tb and KMgF3:Sm) in order to determine whether they can be used as real time dosimeters in the the framework the fiberoptic dosimetry (FOD) technique. This technique is based on the use of scintillating materials coupled to the end of an optical fiber, which collects the light emitted by the scintillator during irradiation. Since usually the intensity of the emitted light is proportional to the dose-rate, the technique provides a reliable measuring method, which can be employed in radiotherapy treatments.

  4. The UK radiotherapy dosimetry audit network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Radiotherapy dosimetry intercomparison in the UK has been carried out in limited studies since the 1960s. However the first national dosimetry intercomparison involving all radiotherapy centres was conducted in the late 1980s. This was based on visits to each centre, using ionisation chamber dosimetry. It audited megavoltage photon beam calibration and other single field parameters. It also measured doses in a three-field 'treatment' in a trapezoidal phantom constructed from epoxy-resin water-equivalent material and compared these to locally planned doses. This included off-axis points, oblique incidence, inhomogeneities, etc. The study found mean measured beam calibration doses close to stated values (ratio 1.003), with a standard deviation (sd) of the distribution of 1.5% and 97% of doses within the pro-set 3% tolerance. For the planned multi-field irradiations, mean dose ratios (measured/stated) were 1.01 (sd 3%, 90% of results within 5%). A number of discrepancies were identified, leading to improved practice. A follow up study (mid-1990s) for electron beam audit also repeated the megavoltage photon calibration audit. For photons, an improvement was noted (mean ratio 1.003, sd 1.0%, 100% within 3%), whilst for electron beams, the mean ratio of measured/stated dose was 0.994 (sd 1.8%, 94% within 3%, 99% within 5%). In parallel with - and growing out of - this, a national audit network began to develop in 1991/2. It utilised similar methodology to the intercomparison and a network approach to allow parallel developments of the scope of the system. The network has eight regional groups, each with up to 10 radiotherapy centres, serving average populations of 7-8 million. Each group organises audits of its own centres and has developed at its own pace. Most have piloted methodology, phantoms, etc. for new audits which can then be used by other groups. All 65 UK centres are included. The network is co-ordinated by an IPEM Steering Committee (current chair

  5. Monte Carlo simulations for heavy ion dosimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Geithner, Oksana

    2006-01-01

    Water-to-air stopping power ratio ( ) calculations for the ionization chamber dosimetry of clinically relevant ion beams with initial energies from 50 to 450 MeV/u have been performed using the Monte Carlo technique. To simulate the transport of a particle in water the computer code SHIELD-HIT v2 was used which is a substantially modified version of its predecessor SHIELD-HIT v1. The code was partially rewritten, replacing formerly used single precision variables with double precision variabl...

  6. High sensitivity MOSFET-based neutron dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fragopoulou, M.; Konstantakos, V. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Physics Department, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Zamani, M., E-mail: zamani@physics.auth.g [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Physics Department, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Siskos, S.; Laopoulos, T. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Physics Department, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Sarrabayrouse, G. [CNRS, LAAS, 7 avenue du colonel Roche, F-31077 Toulouse (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INSA, INP, ISAE, LAAS, F-31077 Toulouse (France)

    2010-09-21

    A new dosemeter based on a metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor sensitive to both neutrons and gamma radiation was manufactured at LAAS-CNRS Laboratory, Toulouse, France. In order to be used for neutron dosimetry, a thin film of lithium fluoride was deposited on the surface of the gate of the device. The characteristics of the dosemeter, such as the dependence of its response to neutron dose and dose rate, were investigated. The studied dosemeter was very sensitive to gamma rays compared to other dosemeters proposed in the literature. Its response in thermal neutrons was found to be much higher than in fast neutrons and gamma rays.

  7. Neutron dosimetry for low dose rate Cf-252 AT sources and adherence to recent clinical dosimetry protocol for brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, M.J.; Wierzbicki, J.G.; Van den Heuvel, F. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Martin, R.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

    1997-12-01

    In 1995, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 43 (AAPM TG-43) published a protocol obsoleting all mixed-field radiation dosimetry for Cf-252. Recommendations for a new brachytherapy dosimetry formalism made by this Task Group favor quantification of source strength in terms of air kerma rather than apparent Curies or other radiation units. Additionally, representation of this dosimetry data in terms of radial dose functions, anisotropy functions, geometric factors, and dose rate constants are in an angular and radial (spherical) coordinate system as recommended, rather than the along-away dosimetry data (Cartesian coordinate system) currently available. This paper presents the initial results of calculated neutron dosimetry in a water phantom for a Cf-252 applicator tube (AT) type medical source soon available from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

  8. Review on the characteristics of radiation detectors for dosimetry and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seco, Joao; Clasie, Ben; Partridge, Mike

    2014-10-01

    The enormous advances in the understanding of human anatomy, physiology and pathology in recent decades have led to ever-improving methods of disease prevention, diagnosis and treatment. Many of these achievements have been enabled, at least in part, by advances in ionizing radiation detectors. Radiology has been transformed by the implementation of multi-slice CT and digital x-ray imaging systems, with silver halide films now largely obsolete for many applications. Nuclear medicine has benefited from more sensitive, faster and higher-resolution detectors delivering ever-higher SPECT and PET image quality. PET/MR systems have been enabled by the development of gamma ray detectors that can operate in high magnetic fields. These huge advances in imaging have enabled equally impressive steps forward in radiotherapy delivery accuracy, with 4DCT, PET and MRI routinely used in treatment planning and online image guidance provided by cone-beam CT. The challenge of ensuring safe, accurate and precise delivery of highly complex radiation fields has also both driven and benefited from advances in radiation detectors. Detector systems have been developed for the measurement of electron, intensity-modulated and modulated arc x-ray, proton and ion beams, and around brachytherapy sources based on a very wide range of technologies. The types of measurement performed are equally wide, encompassing commissioning and quality assurance, reference dosimetry, in vivo dosimetry and personal and environmental monitoring. In this article, we briefly introduce the general physical characteristics and properties that are commonly used to describe the behaviour and performance of both discrete and imaging detectors. The physical principles of operation of calorimeters; ionization and charge detectors; semiconductor, luminescent, scintillating and chemical detectors; and radiochromic and radiographic films are then reviewed and their principle applications discussed. Finally, a general

  9. SU-D-304-03: Small Field Proton Dosimetry Using MicroDiamond and Gafchromic Film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, A; Das, I [Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Coutinho, L [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, NJ, Pittstown, NJ (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Certain dosimetric characteristics continue to make proton beam therapy an appealing modality for cancer treatment. The proton Bragg peak allows for conformal radiation dose delivery to the target while reducing dose to normal tissue and organs. As field sizes become very small the benefit of the Bragg peak is diminished due to loss of transverse equilibrium along the central beam axis. Furthermore, aperture scattering contributes additional dose along the central axis. These factors warrant the need for accurate small field dosimetry. In this study small field dosimetry was performed using two different methods. Methods: Small field dosimetry measurements were performed using a PTW microdiamond detector and Gafchromic EBT2 film for aperture sizes ranging from 0.5cm to 10cm and a proton range in water of 10cm to 27cm. The measurements were analyzed and then compared to each other and to reference dosimetry data acquired with a Markus chamber. Results: A decrease in normalized output is observed at small field sizes and at larger ranges in water using both measurement methods. Also, a large variation is observed between the output measurements by microdiamond and film at very small field sizes. At the smallest aperture, normalized output ranged from 0.16 to 0.72 and the percent difference between both measurement methods ranged from 36% to 70% depending on proton range. At field sizes above 5cm the film and microdiamond agree within 3%. Conclusion: Although both measurement methods exhibit a general decrease in output factor at small field sizes, dosimetric measurements for small fields using these two methods can vary significantly. Dosimetry under standard conditions is not sufficient to correctly model the dose distributions and outputs factors for small field sizes, additional small field measurements should be performed.

  10. Thermoluminescence dosimetry in quality imaging in CR mammography systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaona, E.; Franco E, J.G. [UAM-Xochimilco, 04960 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Azorin N, J. [UAM-Iztapalapa, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Diaz G, J.A.I. [CICATA, Unidad Legaria, Av. Legaria 694, 11599 mexico D.F. (Mexico); Arreola, M. [Department of Radiology, Shands Hospital at UF, PO Box 100374, Gainesville, FL 32610-0374 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this work is to estimate the average glandular dose with Thermoluminescence Dosimetry (TLD) and comparison with quality imaging in CR mammography. For measuring dose, FDA and ACR use a phantom, so that dose and image quality are assessed with the same test object. The mammography is a radiological image to visualize early biological manifestations of breast cancer. Digital systems have two types of image-capturing devices, Full Field Digital Mammography (FFDM) and CR mammography. In Mexico, there are several CR mammography systems in clinical use, but only one CR mammography system has been approved for use by the FDA. Mammography CR uses a photostimulable phosphor detector (PSP) system. Most CR plates are made of 85% BaFBr and 15% BaFI doped with europium (Eu) commonly called barium fluoro halide. We carry out an exploratory survey of six CR mammography units from three different manufacturers and six dedicated x-ray mammography units with fully automatic exposure. The results show three CR mammography units (50%) have a dose that overcomes 3.0 mGy and it doesn't improve the image quality and dose to the breast will be excessive. The differences between doses averages from TLD system and dosimeter with ionization chamber are less than 10%. TLD system is a good option for average glandular dose measurement. (Author)

  11. Internal dosimetry for uranium fuel manufacture at BNFL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At its Springfields Works, near Preston, UK BNFL manufactures uranium fuels and fuel intermediates, in a range of chemical and metallurgical processes. Uranium ore concentrate is converted to uranium metal for the Magnox reactors, uranium hexafluoride (UF6) to uranium dioxide (UO2) for AGR and other oxide reactors, and various intermediate products are produced to meet customer requirements. Thus, uranium compounds with biological retention periods ranging from days (UF6) to years (UO2) are handled on multi-hundred, or thousand, tonne per year scales. Control and minimisation of workforce exposure is exercised primarily by engineered methods (e.g. total enclosures and high integrity plant), backed up by use of respiratory and other protective equipment. A high profile is given to good standards of housekeeping. Assessment of intake is by methods approved by HSE (NII) in the Approved Laboratory Statement on internal dosimetry. The principal method is assessment by use of continuous air sampling combined with occupancy. This is back up by routine personal air sampling (PAS) in selected relevant areas in which ceramic UO2 is handled. Further assurance is provided by programmed PAS in other areas and by systematic, and routine, urinalysis and whole-body monitoring of all relevant members of the workforce. The results of the above are presented in detail. (Author)

  12. Fast neutron dosimetry: [Progress report, 1986-1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new research area was initiated in ultrasoft x-rays with the University of Wisconsin 1-GeV electron storage ring used as a radiation source. A new beam line and irradiation apparatus was designed and constructed. Amongst the distinguishing features are an irradiation vessel of considerable generality allowing many types of radiological/biological experiments to be performed; the ability to maintain low-pressure, high humidity environments with good control; and a computer controlled sample slide for [X,Y,Z] motions of high precision that allows fully controlled velocities and accelerations for complex sample irradiations. Work in the area of chromosomal aberration studies has continued after the completion of the investigation into the possible synergistic effects of mixed beams of neutrons and photons. Of special interest is the damage dependence on absorbed dose and dose rate for low-dose and low-dose rate exposures to high LET radiation. A unique microdosimetric instrument was employed in the continuing effort to measure dose distribution in LET from fast neutron irradiation of metal-metal oxide walls. Our purpose is to determine this distribution for oxygen, an element of critical importance to fast neutron dosimetry. 31 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Recent experience in applying the cytogenetic dosimetry assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khvostunov, I.K., E-mail: 726727@mrrc.obninsk.ru [Medical Radiological Research Centre, Koroliov Str. 4, Obninsk, Kaluga Region, 249036 (Russian Federation); Sevan' kaev, A.V. [Medical Radiological Research Centre, Koroliov Str. 4, Obninsk, Kaluga Region, 249036 (Russian Federation); Lloyd, D.C. [Health Protection Agency, Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Nugis, V.Yu. [Burnasyan Federal Medical Biophysical Center of the Federal Medical Biological Agency, Marshala Novikova Str., 23, Moscow (Russian Federation); Voisin, P. [Institute for Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety, SRBE, B.P. 17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses Cedex (France)

    2011-09-15

    This paper considers how well standard calibration curve for translocations constructed for lymphocyte cultures irradiated in vitro with gamma-rays from {sup 60}Co compares with the translocations yield in lymphocytes taken from people at a long post-exposure time. Data were used from radiation accident victims overexposed to doses ranging from 0.2 to 8.5 Gy and who were cytogenetically followed-up for various times upto 50 y. Their cultured lymphocytes had been scored both by the conventional dicentric method and by FISH for all translocations involving painted chromosomes (2, 3, 8); (2, 3, 5) or (2, 4, 12). The in vivo dose response relationship was derived by fitting translocation frequencies to the contemporary individual doses obtained independently and confirmed by different biological assays and physical dosimetry. A comparison with the conventional in vitro curve indicates reductions of translocation frequencies with increasing time which would prejudice retrospective dose assessment by FISH. This has led to the possibility to amend the in vitro dose response curve for translocations to make it more suitable for use in retrospective biodosimetry. This approach for retrospective biodosimetry therefore uses a dose response relationship based on truly persisting translocations.

  14. Dosimetry for radiobiological experiments using energetic heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The availability of the Bevalac facility of energetic heavy ions with range greater than the size of small mammals makes possible the determination of the biological effects of relatively well defined high LET, whole body irradiation. With the increasing application of high-energy heavy ions in radiobiology there is a corresponding need to develop reliable techniques of both relative and absolute absorbed dose measurement. This paper describes dosimetry studies by the Health Physics Department of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory with activation detectors, ionization chambers, nuclear emulsion, thermoluminescent dosimeters and X-ray film. The application of these techniques to an experiment designed to study the leukemogenic effect of the whole-body irradiation of mice by 250 MeV/amu carbon ions is briefly described. Values of absorbed dose in tissue, obtained during this experiment, with a nitrogen filled ionization chamber and 7LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters are compared and shown to be in good agreement. As a result of this work a value for the average energy to produce an ion pair (W) in nitrogen by 250 MeV/amu 6+C ions of 37 +- eV was determined. Values of the efficiency of 7LiF relative to 60Co γ-rays for ions with dE/dx in the range 110-260 MeV g-1 cm2 are reported

  15. Monte Carlo simulations for heavy ion dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geithner, O.

    2006-07-26

    Water-to-air stopping power ratio (s{sub w,air}) calculations for the ionization chamber dosimetry of clinically relevant ion beams with initial energies from 50 to 450 MeV/u have been performed using the Monte Carlo technique. To simulate the transport of a particle in water the computer code SHIELD-HIT v2 was used which is a substantially modified version of its predecessor SHIELD-HIT v1. The code was partially rewritten, replacing formerly used single precision variables with double precision variables. The lowest particle transport specific energy was decreased from 1 MeV/u down to 10 keV/u by modifying the Bethe- Bloch formula, thus widening its range for medical dosimetry applications. Optional MSTAR and ICRU-73 stopping power data were included. The fragmentation model was verified using all available experimental data and some parameters were adjusted. The present code version shows excellent agreement with experimental data. Additional to the calculations of stopping power ratios, s{sub w,air}, the influence of fragments and I-values on s{sub w,air} for carbon ion beams was investigated. The value of s{sub w,air} deviates as much as 2.3% at the Bragg peak from the recommended by TRS-398 constant value of 1.130 for an energy of 50 MeV/u. (orig.)

  16. The importance of 3D dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy has been getting progressively more complex for the past 20 years. Early radiation therapy techniques needed only basic dosimetry equipment; motorized water phantoms, ionization chambers, and basic radiographic film techniques. As intensity modulated radiation therapy and image guided therapy came into widespread practice, medical physicists were challenged with developing effective and efficient dose measurement techniques. The complex 3-dimensional (3D) nature of the dose distributions that were being delivered demanded the development of more quantitative and more thorough methods for dose measurement. The quality assurance vendors developed a wide array of multidetector arrays that have been enormously useful for measuring and characterizing dose distributions, and these have been made especially useful with the advent of 3D dose calculation systems based on the array measurements, as well as measurements made using film and portal imagers. Other vendors have been providing 3D calculations based on data from the linear accelerator or the record and verify system, providing thorough evaluation of the dose but lacking quality assurance (QA) of the dose delivery process, including machine calibration. The current state of 3D dosimetry is one of a state of flux. The vendors and professional associations are trying to determine the optimal balance between thorough QA, labor efficiency, and quantitation. This balance will take some time to reach, but a necessary component will be the 3D measurement and independent calculation of delivered radiation therapy dose distributions

  17. Dosimetry considerations in patients with renal pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adult dosimetry is generally performed for normal individuals and these are the absorbed dose calculations sent to FDA and listed on package inserts. However, in a variety of circumstances pathophysiologic state may significantly alter the biodistribution and kinetics of a radiopharmaceutical, and radiation doses calculated for normal individuals may not be appropriate approximations for these patients. In addition, the presence of certain pathophysiologic states often guarantees that the patient will have multiple studies over a period of days, weeks, months, or years. In order to have a true appreciation for the radiation dose commitment to such patients, it is important to examine dose totals from multiple nuclear medicine studies. Dosimetry calculations will be presented for I-123, I-124, I-125, and I-131 labeled hippuran in moderate and severe ATN, acute and chronic near-total obstruction, and renal transplants. In addition, a nuclear medicine examination profile will be presented for patients receiving renal transplants. This profile was constructed by retrospectively examining the records of 20 randomly-chosen transplant patients and recording all nuclear medicine procedures performed up to July, 1985. A total of 172 studies was performed, of which 69 were Tc-99m-DTPA flows, 62 were hippurans, and 22 were indium-111-oxine-platelets. The dosimetric contribution of all studies was assessed. The importance of the hippuran component will be discussed. 8 references, 8 tables

  18. Air density correction in ionization dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Air density must be taken into account when ionization dosimetry is performed with unsealed ionization chambers. The German dosimetry protocol DIN 6800-2 states an air density correction factor for which current barometric pressure and temperature and their reference values must be known. It also states that differences between air density and the attendant reference value, as well as changes in ionization chamber sensitivity, can be determined using a radioactive check source. Both methods have advantages and drawbacks which the paper discusses in detail. Barometric pressure at a given height above sea level can be determined by using a suitable barometer, or data downloaded from airport or weather service internet sites. The main focus of the paper is to show how barometric data from measurement or from the internet are correctly processed. Therefore the paper also provides all the requisite equations and terminological explanations. Computed and measured barometric pressure readings are compared, and long-term experience with air density correction factors obtained using both methods is described

  19. Radiation Dosimetry Management: Quality Assurance and Investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In a litigation-prone society, it is prudent for any business to evaluate its potential exposure to legal action, initiated by either an employee or a member of the general public. This potential is exacerbated when the phobia of radiation exposure and radioactive materials is interjected into the equation. This phobia is fuelled by the perceived risks of radiation exposure, be they fact or fantasy. With the current cancer incidence rate being approximately 1 in every 2.5 individuals (for all types of cancer), it is imperative that all facilities take a proactive look at their business vulnerability. When radiation exposure is the issue, records documentation is a critical factor, and a significant amount of effort should be expended to implement a comprehensive records management system. A comprehensive Radiation Dosimetry Management Program is essential if a business is going to mitigate any regulatory or legal intervention. This lecture will address appropriate Records Quality Assurance, and, the appropriate requirements for investigations of dosimetry results. (author)

  20. Dosimetry methods in boron neutron capture therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambarini, G.; Artuso, E.; Felisi, M.; Regazzoni, V.; Giove, D. [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Department of Physics, Via Festa del Patrono 7, 20122 Milano (Italy); Agosteo, S.; Barcaglioni, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milano (Italy); Campi, F.; Garlati, L. [Politecnico di Milano, Energy Department, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); De Errico, F. [Universita degli Studi di Pisa, Department of Civil and Industrial Engineering, Lungamo Pacinotti 43, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Borroni, M.; Carrara, M. [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Medical Physics Unit, Via Venezian 1, 20133 Milano (Italy); Burian, J.; Klupak, V.; Viererbl, L.; Marek, M. [Research Centre Rez, Department of Neutron Physics, 250-68 Husinec-Rez (Czech Republic)

    2014-08-15

    Dosimetry studies have been carried out at thermal and epithermal columns of Lvr-15 research reactor for investigating the spatial distribution of gamma dose, fast neutron dose and thermal neutron fluence. Two different dosimetry methods, both based on solid state detectors, have been studied and applied and the accuracy and consistency of the results have been inspected. One method is based on Fricke gel dosimeters that are dilute water solutions and have good tissue equivalence for neutrons and also for all the secondary radiations produced by neutron interactions in tissue or water phantoms. Fricke gel dosimeters give the possibility of separating the various dose contributions, i.e. the gamma dose, the fast neutron dose and the dose due to charged particles generated during thermal neutron reactions by isotopes having high cross section, like 10-B. From this last dose, thermal neutron fluence can be obtained by means of the kerma factor. The second method is based on thermoluminescence dosimeters. In particular, the developed method draw advantage from the different heights of the peaks of the glow curve of such phosphors when irradiated with photons or with thermal neutrons. The results show that satisfactory results can be obtained with simple methods, in spite of the complexity of the subject. However, the more suitable dosimeters and principally their utilization and analysis modalities are different for the various neutron beams, mainly depending on the relative intensities of the three components of the neutron field, in particular are different for thermal and epithermal columns. (Author)

  1. Dosimetry of radium-223 and progeny

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, D.R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Sgouros, G. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Radium-223 is a short-lived (11.4 d) alpha emitter with potential applications in radioimmunotherapy of cancer. Radium-223 can be complexed and linked to protein delivery molecules for specific tumor-cell targeting. It decays through a cascade of short-lived alpha- and beta-emitting daughters with emission of about 28 MeV of energy through complete decay. The first three alpha particles are essentially instantaneous. Photons associated with Ra-223 and progeny provide the means for tumor and normal-organ imaging and dosimetry. Two beta particles provide additional therapeutic value. Radium-223 may be produced economically and in sufficient amounts for widescale application. Many aspects of the chemistry of carrier-free isotope preparation, complexation, and linkage to the antibody have been developed and are being tested. The radiation dosimetry of a Ra-223-labeled antibody shows favorable tumor to normal tissue dose ratios for therapy. The 11.4-d half-life of Ra-223 allows sufficient time for immunoconjugate preparation, administration, and tumor localization by carrier antibodies before significant radiological decay takes place. If 0.01 percent of a 37 MBq (1 mCi) injection deposits in a one gram tumor mass, and if the activity is retained with a typical effective half-time (75 h), the absorbed dose will be 163 mGy MBq{sup {minus}1} (600 rad mCi{sup {minus}1}) administered. 49 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Dosimetry methods in boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosimetry studies have been carried out at thermal and epithermal columns of Lvr-15 research reactor for investigating the spatial distribution of gamma dose, fast neutron dose and thermal neutron fluence. Two different dosimetry methods, both based on solid state detectors, have been studied and applied and the accuracy and consistency of the results have been inspected. One method is based on Fricke gel dosimeters that are dilute water solutions and have good tissue equivalence for neutrons and also for all the secondary radiations produced by neutron interactions in tissue or water phantoms. Fricke gel dosimeters give the possibility of separating the various dose contributions, i.e. the gamma dose, the fast neutron dose and the dose due to charged particles generated during thermal neutron reactions by isotopes having high cross section, like 10-B. From this last dose, thermal neutron fluence can be obtained by means of the kerma factor. The second method is based on thermoluminescence dosimeters. In particular, the developed method draw advantage from the different heights of the peaks of the glow curve of such phosphors when irradiated with photons or with thermal neutrons. The results show that satisfactory results can be obtained with simple methods, in spite of the complexity of the subject. However, the more suitable dosimeters and principally their utilization and analysis modalities are different for the various neutron beams, mainly depending on the relative intensities of the three components of the neutron field, in particular are different for thermal and epithermal columns. (Author)

  3. EPR Dosimetry: an update and prospective studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) technique is useful to quantify the paramagnetic species in any matrix. The unpaired electrons present in paramagnetic materials have non - zero spin value, have an associated spin magnetic moment. When such a system is subjected to an external magnetic field, electronic Zeeman splitting of ground level state occurs. On application of suitable stimulant microwave energy, the electrons flip between the Zeeman levels of ground state, result in resonant absorption of the microwave energy. The intensity of resonant absorption signal is proportional to the concentration of the unpaired electrons in the irradiated material, could lead to possible use of such materials in EPR dosimetric applications. New materials were investigated for EPR dosimetry, wherein the radiation induced paramagnetic species retains the radiation signatures, lead to idea on radiation dose. Few of the materials have been identified as prospective EPR dosimeters. The radiation induced radical in Li2CO3 powder material being paramagnetic in nature (signals at g = 2.0036 and at g 2.0006) and radical concentration varying as a function of irradiation dose, led to its identification for possible use in EPR dosimetric applications. Besides, during the neutron irradiations, the reaction 6Li (n,α) 3H, led to the yield of radicals many folds higher compared to that of gamma irradiation. Thus, the commonly available Li2CO3 material has been assessed for the EPR dosimetric response in gamma and neutron environments. EPR investigation of Li2C2O4, Na2C2O4 mixtures was carried out to measure the radiation dose from γ photons and thermal neutrons in a mixed radiation field. A single line spectrum of CO2- radical at g = 2.0045 ± 0.0005 was found on gamma and neutron irradiations. Of all the mixture combinations, the 2:1 mixture was found more sensitive for gamma / thermal neutrons. Intensity of CO2- radical signal was found linear from 6 Gy - 11 kGy for gamma and 40 - 1500

  4. Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2009-08-28

    The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at Hanford. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with 10 CFR 835, DOELAP, DOE-RL, ORP, PNSO, and Hanford contractor requirements. The dosimetry system is operated by PNNL’s Hanford External Dosimetry Program (HEDP) which provides dosimetry services to all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee (HPDAC) which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. The first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture (ERICA) database was designated Revision 0. Revision numbers that are whole numbers reflect major revisions typically involving changes to all chapters in the document. Revision numbers that include a decimal fraction reflect minor revisions, usually restricted to selected chapters or selected pages in the document.

  5. Patient-Specific Dosimetry and Radiobiological Modeling of Targeted Radionuclide Therapy Grant - final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Sgouros, Ph.D.

    2007-03-20

    The broad, long-term objectives of this application are to 1. develop easily implementable tools for radionuclide dosimetry that can be used to predict normal organ toxicity and tumor response in targeted radionuclide therapy; and 2. to apply these tools to the analysis of clinical trial data in order to demonstrate dose-response relationships for radionuclide therapy treatment planning. The work is founded on the hypothesis that robust dose-response relationships have not been observed in targeted radionuclide therapy studies because currently available internal dosimetry methodologies are inadequate, failing to adequately account for individual variations in patient anatomy, radionuclide activity distribution/kinetics, absorbed dose-distribution, and absorbed dose-rate. To reduce development time the previously available software package, 3D-ID, one of the first dosimetry software packages to incorporate 3-D radionuclide distribution with individual patient anatomy; and the first to be applied for the comprehensive analysis of patient data, will be used as a platform to build the functionality listed above. The following specific aims are proposed to satisfy the long-term objectives stated above: 1. develop a comprehensive and validated methodology for converting one or more SPECT images of the radionuclide distribution to a 3-D representation of the cumulated activity distribution; 2. account for differences in tissue density and atomic number by incorporating an easily implementable Monte Carlo methodology for the 3-D dosimetry calculations; 3. incorporate the biologically equivalent dose (BED) and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) models to convert the spatial distribution of absorbed dose and dose-rate into equivalent single values that account for differences in dose uniformity and rate and that may be correlated with tumor response and normal organ toxicity; 4. test the hypothesis stated above by applying the resulting package to patient trials of targeted

  6. Three-dimensional radiobiological dosimetry of kidneys for treatment planning in peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baechler, Sebastien; Hobbs, Robert F.; Boubaker, Ariane; Buchegger, Franz; He Bin; Frey, Eric C.; Sgouros, George [Institute of Radiation Physics, Lausanne University Hospital, 1007 Lausanne (Switzerland); Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Lausanne University Hospital, 1011 Lausanne (Switzerland); Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) delivers high absorbed doses to kidneys and may lead to permanent nephropathy. Reliable dosimetry of kidneys is thus critical for safe and effective PRRT. The aim of this work was to assess the feasibility of planning PRRT based on 3D radiobiological dosimetry (3D-RD) in order to optimize both the amount of activity to administer and the fractionation scheme, while limiting the absorbed dose and the biological effective dose (BED) to the renal cortex. Methods: Planar and SPECT data were available for a patient examined with {sup 111}In-DTPA-octreotide at 0.5 (planar only), 4, 24, and 48 h post-injection. Absorbed dose and BED distributions were calculated for common therapeutic radionuclides, i.e., {sup 111}In, {sup 90}Y and {sup 177}Lu, using the 3D-RD methodology. Dose-volume histograms were computed and mean absorbed doses to kidneys, renal cortices, and medullae were compared with results obtained using the MIRD schema (S-values) with the multiregion kidney dosimetry model. Two different treatment planning approaches based on (1) the fixed absorbed dose to the cortex and (2) the fixed BED to the cortex were then considered to optimize the activity to administer by varying the number of fractions. Results: Mean absorbed doses calculated with 3D-RD were in good agreement with those obtained with S-value-based SPECT dosimetry for {sup 90}Y and {sup 177}Lu. Nevertheless, for {sup 111}In, differences of 14% and 22% were found for the whole kidneys and the cortex, respectively. Moreover, the authors found that planar-based dosimetry systematically underestimates the absorbed dose in comparison with SPECT-based methods, up to 32%. Regarding the 3D-RD-based treatment planning using a fixed BED constraint to the renal cortex, the optimal number of fractions was found to be 3 or 4, depending on the radionuclide administered and the value of the fixed BED. Cumulative activities obtained using the proposed simulated

  7. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Z > Exercise: Benefits of Exercise: Health Benefits In This Topic Health Benefits Benefits for Everyday Life Frequently ... Exercise: How to Stay Active The information in this topic was provided by the National Institute on ...

  8. On-Board TL Dosimetry: Possibilities and Limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The paper shortly deals with application of TLDs for dosimetry of ISS, e.g. personal dosimetry, phantom measurements, mapping, monitoring and neutron dosimetry. The main characteristics of the on-board and ground evaluation are compared. The main advantages and disadvantages of the on-board evaluation are summarised. Finally the planned future improvements of the Pille system are discussed like development of an RS485 interface for alternative data transfer, introduction of smaller dosimeters (capsules), use of a more use-friendly display (80 characters), application of internal memory instead of memory card and improvement of the dosimeter evaluation (glow curve fit, background subtraction). (author)

  9. Radiation Dosimetry for Quality Control of Food Preservation and Disinfestation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, W.L.; Miller, Arne; Uribe, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    In the use of x and gamma rays and scanned electron beams to extend the shelf life of food by delay of sprouting and ripening, killing of microbes, and control of insect population, quality assurance is provided by standardized radiation dosimetry. By strategic placement of calibrated dosimeters...... speed) to meet changes that occur in product and source parameters (e.g. bulk density and radiation spectrum). Routine dosimetry methods and certain corrections of dosimetry data may be selected for the radiations used in typical food processes....

  10. Methods and procedures for external radiation dosimetry at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Procedures, methods, materials, records, and reports used for accomplishing the personnel, external radiation monitoring program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory are described for the purpose of documenting what is done now for future reference. This document provides a description of the methods and procedures for external radiation metering, monitoring, dosimetry, and records which are in effect at ORNL July 1, 1981. This document does not include procedures for nuclear accident dosimetry except insofar as routine techniques may apply also to nuclear accident dosimetry capability

  11. a Decade of Dosimetry for Magnox Reactor Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, T. A.; Thornton, D. A.

    2003-06-01

    This paper reviews the reactor dosimetry program that has supported steel pressure vessel integrity assessments for magnox power plants over the last ten years. The dosimetry program has aimed to achieve consistent:. • calculated and measured fast and thermal neutron doses. • data for surveillance specimens and reactor pressure vessels. Throughout the program, the flux measurements on the plants have been judged essential for any doses where a high degree of confidence is required. The work to support operation is now largely complete and the dosimetry is being extended to assess radioactive inventories as part of the decommissioning process.

  12. The significance and impact of dosimetry audits in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overall, dosimetry audit has improved consistency in radiotherapy results and outcomes for patients and provided confidence to clinicians in the dosimetry supporting their practice. Its importance and impact is clearly recognised and its encouragement of and links to other wider radiotherapy audit has been significant. As it is estimated that a large number of the existing radiotherapy facilities world-wide have not yet participated in some level of independent external dose quality audit, the breadth of uptake of audit is to be encouraged. As the complexity of radiotherapy develops, the scope of what can be included in dosimetry and wider radiotherapy quality audits also needs to continue to increase

  13. The Significance and Impact of Dosimetry Audits in Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overall, dosimetry audit has improved consistency in radiotherapy results and outcomes for patients and provided confidence to clinicians in the dosimetry supporting their practice. Its importance and impact is clearly recognised and its encouragement of and links to other wider radiotherapy audit has been significant. As it is estimated that a large number of the existing radiotherapy facilities world-wide have not yet participated in some level of independent external dose quality audit, the breadth of uptake of audit is to be encouraged. As the complexity of radiotherapy develops, the scope of what can be included in dosimetry and wider radiotherapy quality audits also needs to continue to increase

  14. Radiation Dosimetry for Quality Control of Food Preservation and Disinfestation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, W.L.; Miller, Arne; Uribe, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    In the use of x and gamma rays and scanned electron beams to extend the shelf life of food by delay of sprouting and ripening, killing of microbes, and control of insect population, quality assurance is provided by standardized radiation dosimetry. By strategic placement of calibrated dosimeters...... parameters (e.g. conveyor speed) to meet changes that occur in product and source parameters (e.g. bulk density and radiation spectrum). Routine dosimetry methods and certain corrections of dosimetry data may be selected for the radiations used in typical food processes....

  15. Spectrometry and in core dosimetry of neutron radiation. Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings contain 8 invited papers discussing current problems of spectrometry and in core neutron dosimetry with regard to applications in nuclear power engineering. The papers deal with the following areas: reactor physics and in core dosimetry; calculations of the spatial and energy distribution of neutrons in the reactor core and shielding; proton-recoil neutron spectrometry; determining neutron spectra with activation detectors; assessment of measurement system used in core dosimetry; in core measurement and monitoring of the reactor radiation field; monitoring the radiation damage to reactor structural materials. (J.P.)

  16. Medical reference dosimetry using EPR measurements of alanine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helt-Hansen, Jakob; Rosendal, F.; Kofoed, I.M.;

    2009-01-01

    Background. Electron spin resonance (EPR) is used to determine the absorbed dose of alanine dosimeters exposed to clinical photon beams in a solid-water phantom. Alanine is potentially suitable for medical reference dosimetry, because of its near water equivalence over a wide energy spectrum, low...... methods the proposed algorithm can be applied without normalisation of phase shifts caused by changes in the g-value of the cavity. The study shows that alanine dosimetry is a suitable candidate for medical reference dosimetry especially for quality control applications....

  17. Implementation of high-dose chemical dosimetry for industrial facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is the implementation of methodology for high dose measurements using chemical dosimeters in liquid phase, traceable to the international metrology system, and make available in the country, the standard of high-dose to industrial irradiation facilities and research irradiators, trough the quality program with comparative measurements and direct use of the standard dosimeters in routine. The use of these low cost dosimetry systems in industrial irradiation facilities, assists to the certification requirements and it can reduce the costs with dosimetry for approximately 20% of the total dosimetry costs, using these systems in routine measurements and validation process, largely substituting the imported PMMA dosimeters, among others. (author)

  18. Dosimetry for computed tomography using Fricke gel dosimetry and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work it was determined a new method for the determination of absorbed doses in Computed Tomography (CT) examinations using Fricke gel dosimetry developed at IPEN. Absorbed doses were determined by different methods of analysis, such as optical absorption spectrometry, ionization chambers and magnetic resonance imaging. Lower limit of sensitivity of the Fricke gel solution, the solution repeatability signal Fricke gel and CT equipment, detection sensitivity, among other tests were performed. Different equipment of computed tomography with multiple detectors were used. The Fricke gel solution showed better repeatability than ±5.5% using the technique of optical absorption spectrophotometry and computed tomography equipment showed repeatability better than ±0.2%. The Fricke gel solution features an easy and relatively quick preparation, but it is necessary to be careful not to contaminate and lose the solution. With the results, it was confirmed the application of this type of dosimetry for computed tomography equipment. (author)

  19. Automation of the particle dosimetry and the dose application for radiobiological experiments at a vertical proton beam

    CERN Document Server

    Moertel, H; Eyrich, W; Fritsch, M; Distel, L

    2002-01-01

    A facility with a vertical beam for radiobiological experiments with low-energy protons has been setup at the Tandem accelerator at Erlangen. This energy region is optimal to investigate the biological effects of the linear energy transfer in the Bragg region under physiological conditions. A new automated data acquisition system for dosimetry and monitoring based on a personal computer was developed and optimized for this setup. A specially designed sample holder offers possibilities of cooling or changing of atmosphere during irradiation. First irradiations of biological samples have shown the functionality of the setup.

  20. Using animal dosimetry models to interpret human bioassay data for actinide exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioassay and dosimetry models are needed to estimate intakes of radionuclides, and to calculate radiation doses to target tissues following such intakes. Because of the diversity of exposure materials, individual biological variabilities, and the general lack of adequate bioassay information and knowledge of the metabolism of radionuclides, current models are based mostly on empiricism. This paper describes biokinetic/dosimetry models for U, Am and Cm. They are based on experimental data developed from studies in dogs that inhaled one of the above radionuclides in specific chemical forms and specific particle sizes. The models, which are based on similar biological principles, and, therefore, have similar structure, are applied to the very sparse human bioassay data available from cases of exposure to either U, Am, or Cm. The results thus far indicate that the lung retention for the different actinides are well described by the models, that urinary bioassay data can be described within limited time periods, and that the fecal excretion rate is not adequately described. Improvements in modeling are predicted on increased publication of human bioassay data, and better cooperative interaction between model developers and health protection professionals responsible for industrial bioassay programs. (author) 36 refs.; 6 figs.; 2 tabs

  1. Comparison of Real-Time Intraoperative Ultrasound-Based Dosimetry With Postoperative Computed Tomography-Based Dosimetry for Prostate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate whether real-time intraoperative ultrasound (US)-based dosimetry can replace conventional postoperative computed tomography (CT)-based dosimetry in prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between December 2001 and November 2002, 82 patients underwent 103Pd prostate brachytherapy. An interplant treatment planning system was used for real-time intraoperative transrectal US-guided treatment planning. The dose distribution was updated according to the estimated seed position to obtain the dose-volume histograms. Postoperative CT-based dosimetry was performed a few hours later using the Theraplan-Plus treatment planning system. The dosimetric parameters obtained from the two imaging modalities were compared. Results: The results of this study revealed correlations between the US- and CT-based dosimetry. However, large variations were found in the implant-quality parameters of the two modalities, including the doses covering 100%, 90%, and 80% of the prostate volume and prostate volumes covered by 100%, 150%, and 200% of the prescription dose. The mean relative difference was 38% and 16% for doses covering 100% and 90% of the prostate volume and 10% and 21% for prostate volumes covered by 100% and 150% of the prescription dose, respectively. The CT-based volume covered by 200% of the prescription dose was about 30% greater than the US-based one. Compared with CT-based dosimetry, US-based dosimetry significantly underestimated the dose to normal organs, especially for the rectum. The average US-based maximal dose and volume covered by 100% of the prescription dose for the rectum was 72 Gy and 0.01 cm3, respectively, much lower than the 159 Gy and 0.65 cm3 obtained using CT-based dosimetry. Conclusion: Although dosimetry using intraoperative US-based planning provides preliminary real-time information, it does not accurately reflect the postoperative CT-based dosimetry. Until studies have determined whether US-based dosimetry or postoperative CT

  2. Permanent Breast Seed Implant Dosimetry Quality Assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Brian M., E-mail: Brian.Keller@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, ON (Canada); Ravi, Ananth [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, ON (Canada); Sankreacha, Raxa [Carlo Fidani Regional Cancer Center, Mississauga, ON (Canada); Pignol, Jean-Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: A permanent breast seed implant is a novel method of accelerated partial breast irradiation for women with early-stage breast cancer. This article presents pre- and post-implant dosimetric data, relates these data to clinical outcomes, and makes recommendations for those interested in starting a program. Methods and Materials: A total of 95 consecutive patients were accrued into one of three clinical trials after breast-conserving surgery: a Phase I/II trial (67 patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma); a Phase II registry trial (25 patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma); or a multi-center Phase II trial for patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (3 patients). Contouring of the planning target volume (PTV) was done on a Pinnacle workstation and dosimetry calculations, including dose-volume histograms, were done using a Variseed planning computer. Results: The mean pre-implant PTV coverage for the V{sub 90}, V{sub 100}, V{sub 150}, and V{sub 200} were as follows: 98.8% {+-} 1.2% (range, 94.5-100%); 97.3% {+-} 2.1% (range, 90.3-99.9%), 68.8% {+-} 14.3% (range, 32.7-91.5%); and 27.8% {+-} 8.6% (range, 15.1-62.3%). The effect of seed motion was characterized by post-implant dosimetry performed immediately after the implantation (same day) and at 2 months after the implantation. The mean V{sub 100} changed from 85.6% to 88.4% (p = 0.004) and the mean V{sub 200} changed from 36.2% to 48.3% (p < 0.001). Skin toxicity was associated with maximum skin dose (p = 0.014). Conclusions: Preplanning dosimetry should aim for a V{sub 90} of approximately 100%, a V{sub 100} between 95% and 100%, and a V{sub 200} between 20% and 30%, as these numbers are associated with no local recurrences to date and good patient tolerance. In general, the target volume coverage improved over the duration of the seed therapy. The maximum skin dose, defined as the average dose over the hottest 1 Multiplication-Sign 1-cm{sup 2} surface area, should be limited to 90% of the

  3. Radiobiologic effect of radiation emitted by Tc-99m as determined with a bioluminescent bacterial dosimetry system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous work with light-emitting bacteria has shown that, after external irradiation, there is a decrease in bioluminescence and that the decrease is related to the absorbed dose and relative biological effectiveness (RBE). This project is designed to use these bacteria for internal dosimetry of Tc-99m and to compare such dosimetry with calculations of absorbed dose that uses standard methods. Sixty-millicurie and .02-mCi samples of Tc-99m were added to 1-mL water solutions containing approximately 1 million luminescent bacteria. Light emitted from these bacteria was measured at 30-minute intervals for 4 1/2 hours by means of a photomultiplier detection system. Bioluminescent bacterial survival curves were thus obtained

  4. Impact of Track Structure Effects on Shielding and Dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Schimmerling, W.; Kim, M. Y.

    1999-01-01

    Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) consisting of nuclei of all the known elements with kinetic energies extending from tens to millions of MeV pose a significant health hazard to future deep space operations. Even half of the radiation exposures expected in ISS will result from GCR components. The biological actions of these radiations are known to depend on the details of the energy deposition (not just linear energy transfer, LET, but the lateral dispersion of energy deposition about the particle track). Energy deposits in tissues are dominated by the transfer of tens to hundreds of eV to the tissue's atomic electrons. In the case of low LET radiations, the collisions are separated by large dimensions compared to the size of important biomolecular structures. If such events are also separated in time, then the radiation adds little to the background of radicals occurring from ordinary metabolic processes and causes little or no biological injury. Hence, dose rate is a strong determinant of the action of low LET exposures. The GCR exposures are dominated by ions of high charge and energy (HZE) characterized by many collisions with atomic electrons over biomolecular dimensions, resulting in high radical- density events associated with a few isolated ion paths through the cell and minimal dose rate dependence at ordinary exposure levels. The HZE energy deposit declines quickly laterally and merges with the background radical density in the track periphery for which the exact lateral distribution of the energy deposit is the determinant of the biological injury. Although little data exists on human exposures from HZE radiations, limited studies in mice and mammalian cell cultures allow evaluation of the effects of track structure on shield attenuation properties and evaluation of implications for dosimetry. The most complete mammalian cell HZE exposure data sets have been modeled including the C3H10T1/2 survival and transformation data of Yang et al., the V79 survival and

  5. A digital approach to neutron dosimetry and microdosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work has begun in an effort to develop a new, digital approach to neutron dosimetry. In contrast to analogue methods in current use, digital information describes the track of a recoil charged particle produced by a neutron in a gas in terms of the numbers of ions that occur in given volume elements of a detector. It appears that a device based on the time-projection chamber used in particle physics would enable one to measure relevant data for neutron dosimetry. Such an instrument would also furnish data sought in microdosimetry. In this paper we will describe the digital approach to dosimetry and will report on the initial Monte Carlo calculations of the detailed transport of protons and electrons in Ar, CH4, and P-10 gases. These calculations are being used to assess the feasibility of constructing a practical chamber for use in neutron dosimetry and in microdosimetry

  6. External dosimetry in the aftermath of a radiological terrorist event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews external dosimetry in emergency preparedness planning for a potential terrorist release of radioactive material in a densely populated area. The radiation dose received by response workers and members of the public is needed to understand health risks. The existing framework for dosimetry of routinely occupationally exposed workers is not directly applicable to all emergency workers who would respond to a radiological terrorist event. Emergency preparedness plans incorporate various old and new dosimetry technologies, including quartz fibre electrets, electronic dosemeters, personnel badges and wallet cards. Environmental monitoring and dose calculations are the usual methods for determining public dose. However, during the late-phase response, after removable contamination has been eliminated, it may be easier and more straightforward to provide individual dosimetry for members of the public who may be moving through a city with varying contamination areas. Doing so could allow resumption of normal activities earlier and promote confidence in reusing the site. (authors)

  7. Research on the experimental verification of dosimetry calculations. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research has been directed toward the development of experimental techniques for the evaluation of internal-dosimetry calculations. There have been three major objectives. The first was the development and refinement of dosimetric techniques necessary to obtain absorbed doses averaged over the entire volume of particular organs. Other major objectives have included the utilization of these dosimetry systems to measure absorbed doses in anthropomorphic phantoms, and the comparison of these experimental results to absorbed dose estimates obtained from Monte Carlo computer calculations. At the present time, only limited data are available for direct comparison. However, more data should be available soon and comparisons will be made before the end of the present contract period. This proposal outlines the current status of our research toward that end. In addition, it is proposed that this contract be renewed to continue investigations into other aspects of dosimetry, for example, dosimetry for the survivors of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

  8. Natural dose level determination at Johor State with thermoluminescence dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paperwork presented the results of using thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) method in measuring background dose level, which is done at State of Johor, South Malaysia. The problems faced also discussed

  9. Gamma-ray dosimetry measurements of the Little Boy replica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plassmann, E.A.; Pederson, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    We present the current status of our gamma-ray dosimetry results for the Little Boy replica. Both Geiger-Mueller and thermoluminescent detectors were used in the measurements. Future work is needed to test assumptions made in data analysis.

  10. Proceedings of the third conference on radiation protection and dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swaja, R.E.; Sims, C.S.; Casson, W.H. [eds.

    1991-10-01

    The Third Conference on Radiation Protection and Dosimetry was held during October 21--24, 1991, at the Sheraton Plaza Hotel in Orlando, Florida. This meeting was designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, research, regulatory, and standards personnel involved in radiation protection, and providing them with sufficient information to evaluate their programs. To meet these objectives, a technical program consisting of more than 75 invited and contributed oral presentations encompassing all aspects of radiation protection was prepared. General topics considered in the technical session included external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, instruments, accident dosimetry, regulations and standards, research advances, and applied program experience. In addition, special sessions were held to afford attendees the opportunity to make short presentations of recent work or to discuss topics of general interest. Individual reports are processed separately on the database.

  11. IAEA Support to National TLD Audit Networks for Radiotherapy Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For several years, the IAEA has supported the development of methodology and establishment of national quality audit networks for radiotherapy dosimetry. The main objective was to extend the availability of radiotherapy dosimetry audits to as many radiotherapy centres as possible throughout the world. Since 1995, a series of three coordinated research projects (CRPs) has been conducted by the IAEA to assist its Member States to develop such national audit programmes. The first CRP focused on the basic beam calibration audits. The basic programme was extended to audits in non-reference conditions through a second CRP. The third CRP initiated in 2009 is expanding the dosimetry audit tools for more complex techniques used for treatment of cancer patients. The national audit networks participating in these CRPs have incorporated in their programmes procedures for auditing hospital dosimetry for these techniques. (author)

  12. Proceedings of the third conference on radiation protection and dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Third Conference on Radiation Protection and Dosimetry was held during October 21--24, 1991, at the Sheraton Plaza Hotel in Orlando, Florida. This meeting was designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, research, regulatory, and standards personnel involved in radiation protection, and providing them with sufficient information to evaluate their programs. To meet these objectives, a technical program consisting of more than 75 invited and contributed oral presentations encompassing all aspects of radiation protection was prepared. General topics considered in the technical session included external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, instruments, accident dosimetry, regulations and standards, research advances, and applied program experience. In addition, special sessions were held to afford attendees the opportunity to make short presentations of recent work or to discuss topics of general interest. Individual reports are processed separately on the database

  13. Albedo neutron dosimetry in Germany: regulations and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luszik-Bhadra, M; Zimbal, A; Busch, F; Eichelberger, A; Engelhardt, J; Figel, M; Frasch, G; Günther, K; Jordan, M; Martini, E; Haninger, T; Rimpler, A; Seifert, R

    2014-12-01

    Personal neutron dosimetry has been performed in Germany using albedo dosemeters for >20 y. This paper describes the main principles, the national standards, regulations and recommendations, the quality management and the overall performance, giving some examples. PMID:24639589

  14. Surveillance dosimetry of operating power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main focus of the research efforts presently underway is the LWR power reactor surveillance program in which metallurgical test specimens of the reactor PV and dosimetry sensors are placed in three or more surveillance capsules at or near the reactor PV inner wall. They are then irradiated in a temperature and neutron flux-spectrum environment as similar as possible to the PV itself for periods of about 1.5 to 15 effective full-power years (EFPY), with removal of the last capsule at a fluence corresponding to the 30- to 40-year plant end-of-life (EOL) fluence. Because the neutron flux level at the surveillance position is greater than at the vessel, the test is accelerated wit respect to the vessel exposure, allowing early assessment of EOL conditions

  15. Course on internal dosimetry in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This documentation was distributed to the participants in the Course of Internal Dosimetry in Nuclear Medicine organised by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) of Argentina and held in Buenos Aires, Argentina, August 9-13, 2004. The course was intended for people from IAEA Member States in the Latin American and Caribbean region, and for professionals and workers in medicine, related with the radiation protection. Spanish and English were the languages of the course. The following subjects were covered: radioprotection of the patient in nuclear medicine; injuries by ionizing radiations; MIRD methodology; radiation dose assessment in nuclear medicine; small scale and microdosimetry; bone and marrow dose modelling; medical internal dose calculations; SPECT and image reconstruction; principles of the gamma camera; scattering and attenuation correction in SPECT; tomography in nuclear medicine

  16. Internal Dosimetry for Nuclear Power Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Internal dosimetry which refers to dosage estimation from internal part of an individual body is an important and compulsory component in order to ensure the safety of the personnel involved in operational of a Nuclear Power Program. Radionuclides particle may deposit in the human being through several pathways and release wave and/or particle radiation to irradiate that person and give dose to body until it been excreted or completely decayed from the body. Type of radionuclides of concerning, monitoring program, equipment's and technique used to measure the concentration level of such radionuclides and dose calculation will be discussed in this article along with the role and capability of Malaysian Nuclear Agency. (author)

  17. Polymer gel dosimetry system for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: Recently developed treatment modalities such as stereotactic and conformal radiation therapy produce complex dose distributions which are difficult or impractical to measure with conventional dosimetry instrumentation. Three-dimensional treatment planning systems which purport to calculate these complex dose distributions should be compared to experimental results before being routinely applied to clinical problems. There is a need for a new class of tissue-equivalent dosimeters capable of providing accurate, high resolution, time-integrated and three dimensional dose distributions. The recently developed BANG polymer gel dosimetry system (MGS Research, Inc., Guilford, CT) is ideally suited for the task described above. Physico-chemical principles of the polymer gel dosimetry are presented, together with examples of its application to radiation therapy. Data analysis and display program, written for Macintosh computer, is demonstrated. Materials and Methods: Radiation-induced polymerization of acrylic monomers, which are dispersed in tissue-equivalent gelatin, has been shown to be dependent on the dose, but independent of the dose rate or photon energy. Therefore, the spatial distribution of polymer in the gel is precisely representative of the dose distribution. As the polymeric microparticles reduce the water proton NMR relaxation times in the gel, the dose distribution can be measured with high resolution and accuracy using magnetic resonance imaging. Also, as these microparticles cannot diffuse through the gelatin matrix, their distribution is permanent. An improved formulation of the BANG dosimeter consists of 3% w/v acrylic acid, 3% N,N'-methylene-bis-acrylamide, 1% sodium hydroxide, 5% gelatin, and 88% water. MR images are transferred via a local network to a Macintosh computer, and R2 maps constructed on the basis of multiple TE images, using a non-linear least squares fit based on the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. A dose-to-R2

  18. Applied internal dosimetry staff exposed to Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosimetric calculations are performed in order to estimate the quantity of a radionuclide that is incorporated by a worker. Urine determinations of activity and mass of uranium are made in the laboratory of Personal and Area Dosimetry. The paper presents reference values concerning the activity excreted in urine due to the incorporation of uranium compounds. The compounds analyzed are natural uranium and uranium enriched to 20 %, both soluble and insoluble. According to the limits allowed for the incorporation of uranium compounds of Type F and M, we verify that the times of monitoring and the detection limits of the equipment used to determine the activity are appropriate. On the other hand, the S-type compounds determination in urine is useful in cases of accidental incorporations (above the ALI) as a first and quick estimate; MDA (0.017 Bq / L) does not allow detection in routine monitoring; measurement in lungs, and faeces should be included. (author)

  19. Radiation protection and dosimetry: basis. 9. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A revised book 'Radiation Protection and Dosimetry: Fundamentals, prepared to meet the training courses offered by the Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria - IRD, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil and people interested in the subject, is presented. Concepts have been updated, especially the chapter on Radiological Magnitudes, due to upgrade of Standard CNEN-NN-3.01-Basic Guidelines on Radiological Protection, published in the Diario Oficial da Uniao on September 1, 2011. A chapter related to Waste Management, another on the Transport of Radioactive Materials and three annexes on: Standards of CNEN, Ionizing Radiation and Personnel Legislation and Determination of shields in Radiotherapy were included. Were also added several tables for use in radiological protection, to facilitate consultation

  20. The radiation dosimetry of intrathecally administered radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stabin, M.G. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States); Evans, J.F. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1999-01-01

    The radiation dose to the spine, spinal cord, marrow, and other organs of the body from intrathecal administration of several radiopharmaceuticals was studied. Anatomic models were developed for the spine, spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), spinal cord, spinal skeleton, cranial skeleton, and cranial CSF. A kinetic model for the transport of CSF was used to determine residence times in the CSF; material leaving the CSF was thereafter assumed to enter the bloodstream and follow the kinetics of the radiopharmaceutical as if intravenously administered. The radiation transport codes MCNP and ALGAMP were used to model the electron and photon transport and energy deposition. The dosimetry of Tc-99m DTPA and HSA, In-111 DTPA, I-131 HSA, and Yb-169 DTPA was studied. Radiation dose profiles for the spinal cord and marrow in the spine were developed and average doses to all other organs were estimated, including dose distributions within the bone and marrow.