WorldWideScience

Sample records for biological disease modifying

  1. Management of coccidioidomycosis in patients receiving biologic response modifiers or disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taroumian, Sara; Knowles, Susan L; Lisse, Jeffrey R; Yanes, James; Ampel, Neil M; Vaz, Austin; Galgiani, John N; Hoover, Susan E

    2012-12-01

    Coccidioidomycosis (valley fever) is an endemic fungal infection of the American Southwest, an area with a large population of patients with rheumatic diseases. There are currently no guidelines for management of patients who develop coccidioidomycosis while under treatment with biologic response modifiers (BRMs) or disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). We conducted a retrospective study of how both concurrent diseases were managed and the patient outcomes at 2 centers in Tucson, Arizona. A retrospective chart review identified patients who developed coccidioidomycosis during treatment with DMARDs or BRMs. Patients were seen at least once in a university-affiliated or Veterans Affairs outpatient rheumatology clinic in Tucson, Arizona, between 2007 and 2009. Forty-four patients were identified. Rheumatologic treatment included a BRM alone (n = 11), a DMARD alone (n = 8), or combination therapy (n = 25). Manifestations of coccidioidomycosis included pulmonary infection (n = 29), disseminated disease (n = 9), and asymptomatic positive coccidioidal serologies (n = 6). After the diagnosis of coccidioidomycosis, 26 patients had BRMs and DMARDs stopped, 8 patients had BRMs stopped but DMARD therapy continued, and 10 patients had no change in their immunosuppressive therapy. Forty-one patients had antifungal therapy initiated for 1 month or longer. Followup data were available for 38 patients. BRM and/or DMARD therapy was continued or resumed in 33 patients, only 16 of whom continued concurrent antifungal therapy. None of the patients have had subsequent dissemination or complications of coccidioidomycosis. Re-treating rheumatic disease patients with a BRM and/or a DMARD after coccidioidomycosis appears to be safe in some patients. We propose a management strategy based on coccidioidomycosis disease activity. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  2. The Impact of Conventional and Biological Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs on Bone Biology. Rheumatoid Arthritis as a Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreira, Sofia Carvalho; Fonseca, João Eurico

    2016-08-01

    The bone and the immune system have a very tight interaction. Systemic immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), induce bone loss, leading to a twofold increase in osteoporosis and an increase of fragility fracture risk of 1.35-2.13 times. This review focuses on the effects of conventional and biological disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) on bone biology, in the context of systemic inflammation, with a focus on RA. Published evidence supports a decrease in osteoclastic activity induced by DMARDs, which leads to positive effects on bone mineral density (BMD). It is unknown if this effect could be translated into fracture risk reduction. The combination with antiosteoclastic drugs can have an additional benefit.

  3. Biologic and oral disease-modifying antirheumatic drug monotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Paul; Sebba, Anthony; Huizinga, Tom W J

    2013-01-01

    Clinical evidence demonstrates coadministration of tumour necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) agents and methotrexate (MTX) is more efficacious than administration of TNFi agents alone in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, leading to the perception that coadministration of MTX with all biologic agents or oral disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs is necessary for maximum efficacy. Real-life registry data reveal approximately one-third of patients taking biologic agents use them as monotherapy. Additionally, an analysis of healthcare claims data showed that when MTX was prescribed in conjunction with a biologic agent, as many as 58% of patients did not collect the MTX prescription. Given this discrepancy between perception and real life, we conducted a review of the peer-reviewed literature and rheumatology medical congress abstracts to determine whether data support biologic monotherapy as a treatment option for patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Our analysis suggests only for tocilizumab is there evidence that the efficacy of biologic monotherapy is comparable with combination therapy with MTX. PMID:23918035

  4. Biological response modifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    Much of what used to be called immunotherapy is now included in the term biological response modifiers. Biological response modifiers (BRMs) are defined as those agents or approaches that modify the relationship between the tumor and host by modifying the host's biological response to tumor cells with resultant therapeutic effects.'' Most of the early work with BRMs centered around observations of spontaneous tumor regression and the association of tumor regression with concurrent bacterial infections. The BRM can modify the host response in the following ways: Increase the host's antitumor responses through augmentation and/or restoration of effector mechanisms or mediators of the host's defense or decrease the deleterious component by the host's reaction; Increase the host's defenses by the administration of natural biologics (or the synthetic derivatives thereof) as effectors or mediators of an antitumor response; Augment the host's response to modified tumor cells or vaccines, which might stimulate a greater response by the host or increase tumor-cell sensitivity to an existing response; Decrease the transformation and/or increase differentiation (maturation) of tumor cells; or Increase the ability of the host to tolerate damage by cytotoxic modalities of cancer treatment.

  5. [Therapeutic Concepts for Treatment of Patients with Non-infectious Uveitis Biologic Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walscheid, Karoline; Pleyer, Uwe; Heiligenhaus, Arnd

    2018-04-12

    Biologic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) can be highly efficient in the treatment of various non-infectious uveitis entities. Currently, the TNF-α-inhibitor Adalimumab is the only in-label therapeutic option, whereas, all other bDMARDs need to be given as an off-label therapy. bDMARDs are indicated in diseases refractory to conventional synthetic DMARD therapy and/or systemic steroids, or in patients in whom treatment with those is not possible due to side effects. Therapeutic mechanisms currently employed are cytokine-specific (interferons, inhibition of TNF-α or of interleukin [IL]-1-, IL-6- or IL-17-signalling), inhibit T cell costimulation (CTLA-4 fusion protein), or act via depletion of B cells (anti-CD20). All bDMARDs need to be administered parenterally, and therapy is initiated by the treating internal specialist only after interdisciplinary coordination of all treating subspecialties and after exclusion of contraindications. Regular clinical and laboratory monitoring is mandatory for all patients while under bDMARD therapy. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Assessing the effectiveness of synthetic and biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in psoriatic arthritis – a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kingsley GH

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Gabrielle H Kingsley, David L Scott Rheumatology Unit, Kings College London, London, UK Background: Psoriatic arthritis is an inflammatory arthritis the primary manifestations of which are locomotor and skin disease. Although a number of guidelines have been published citing strategies for reducing disease progression, the evidence base for disease-modifying agents is unclear. This forms the focus of this systematic review. Methods: The systematic review was undertaken according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses 2009 checklist. We selected randomized controlled trials (RCTs that looked at the impact of interventions with disease-modifying agents, either synthetic drugs or biologics on musculoskeletal outcomes, notably American College of Rheumatology 20 percent responders. Results were analyzed using Review Manager 5.1.6 (Cochrane Collaboration, Oxford, UK. Whilst our primary focus was on published trials, we also looked at new trials presented in abstract form in 2013–2014 that were not yet published to avoid omitting important and up-to-date information on developing treatments. Results: Our in-depth analysis included 28 trials overall enrolling 5,177 patients published between the 1980s and now as well as limited analysis of some studies in abstract form as described earlier. The most frequently available locomotor outcome measure was the American College of Rheumatology 20 percent responders. The risk ratio for achieving an American College of Rheumatology 20 percent responders response was positive in favor of treatment (risk ratio 2.30; 95% confidence interval 1.78–2.96; however, there was evidence of considerable heterogeneity between trials. Overall randomized controlled trials of established synthetic disease-modifying agents were largely negative (methotrexate, ciclosporin and sulfasalazine though leflunomide showed a small positive effect. A new synthetic agent, apremilast, did show a

  7. Efficacy of biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs: a systematic literature review informing the 2013 update of the EULAR recommendations for the management of rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nam, Jackie L.; Ramiro, Sofia; Gaujoux-Viala, Cecile; Takase, Kaoru; Leon-Garcia, Mario; Emery, Paul; Gossec, Laure; Landewe, Robert; Smolen, Josef S.; Buch, Maya H.

    2014-01-01

    To update the evidence for the efficacy of biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARD) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to inform the European League Against Rheumatism(EULAR) Task Force treatment recommendations. Medline, Embase and Cochrane databases were searched for

  8. Efficacy and safety of tofacitinib following inadequate response to conventional synthetic or biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles-Schoeman, Christina; Burmester, Gerd; Nash, Peter; Zerbini, Cristiano A F; Soma, Koshika; Kwok, Kenneth; Hendrikx, Thijs; Bananis, Eustratios; Fleischmann, Roy

    2016-07-01

    Biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) have shown diminished clinical response following an inadequate response (IR) to ≥1 previous bDMARD. Here, tofacitinib was compared with placebo in patients with an IR to conventional synthetic DMARDs (csDMARDs; bDMARD-naive) and in patients with an IR to bDMARDs (bDMARD-IR). Data were taken from phase II and phase III studies of tofacitinib in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Patients received tofacitinib 5 or 10 mg twice daily, or placebo, as monotherapy or with background methotrexate or other csDMARDs. Efficacy endpoints and incidence rates of adverse events (AEs) of special interest were assessed. 2812 bDMARD-naive and 705 bDMARD-IR patients were analysed. Baseline demographics and disease characteristics were generally similar between treatment groups within subpopulations. Across subpopulations, improvements in efficacy parameters at month 3 were generally significantly greater for both tofacitinib doses versus placebo. Clinical response was numerically greater with bDMARD-naive versus bDMARD-IR patients (overlapping 95% CIs). Rates of safety events of special interest were generally similar between tofacitinib doses and subpopulations; however, patients receiving glucocorticoids had more serious AEs, discontinuations due to AEs, serious infection events and herpes zoster. Numerically greater clinical responses and incidence rates of AEs of special interest were generally reported for tofacitinib 10 mg twice daily versus tofacitinib 5 mg twice daily (overlapping 95% CIs). Tofacitinib demonstrated efficacy in both bDMARD-naive and bDMARD-IR patients with RA. Clinical response to tofacitinib was generally numerically greater in bDMARD-naive than bDMARD-IR patients. The safety profile appeared similar between subpopulations. (NCT00413660, NCT00550446, NCT00603512, NCT00687193, NCT00960440, NCT00847613, NCT00814307, NCT00856544, NCT00853385). Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited

  9. A comparison of discontinuation rates of tofacitinib and biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs in rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review and Bayesian network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun-Kyeong; Lee, Min-Young; Jang, Eun-Jin; Kim, Hye-Lin; Ha, Dong-Mun; Lee, Eui-Kyung

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the discontinuation rates of tofacitinib and biologics (tumour necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi), abatacept, rituximab, and tocilizumab) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients considering inadequate responses (IRs) to previous treatment(s). Randomised controlled trials of tofacitinib and biologics - reporting at least one total discontinuation, discontinuation due to lack of efficacy (LOE), and discontinuation due to adverse events (AEs) - were identified through systematic review. The analyses were conducted for patients with IRs to conventional synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (cDMARDs) and for patients with biologics-IR, separately. Bayesian network meta-analysis was used to estimate rate ratio (RR) of a biologic relative to tofacitinib with 95% credible interval (CrI), and probability of RR being tofacitinib and biologics in the cDMARDs-IR group. In the biologics-IR group, however, TNFi (RR 0.17, 95% CrI 0.01-3.61, P[RRtofacitinib did. Despite the difference, discontinuation cases owing to LOE and AEs revealed that tofacitinib was comparable to the biologics. The comparability of discontinuation rate between tofacitinib and biologics was different based on previous treatments and discontinuation reasons: LOE, AEs, and total (due to other reasons). Therefore, those factors need to be considered to decide the optimal treatment strategy.

  10. Dyneins: structure, biology and disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    King, Stephen M

    2012-01-01

    .... From bench to bedside, Dynein: Structure, Biology and Disease offers research on fundamental cellular processes to researchers and clinicians across developmental biology, cell biology, molecular biology, biophysics, biomedicine...

  11. Biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs and the risk of non-vertebral osteoporotic fractures in patients with rheumatoid arthritis aged 50 years and over.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussy, J-P; Bessette, L; Bernatsky, S; Rahme, E; Lachaine, J

    2013-09-01

    Prevention of bone mineral density loss in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been associated with use of biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs). However, in this study, we could not demonstrate a reduction in the risk of non-vertebral fractures. Additional research is required to clarify the impact of biologic DMARDs on fracture risk in RA. Small studies have suggested biologic DMARDs preserve bone mineral density at 6-12 months. Our objective was to determine the association between biologic DMARD use and the risk of non-vertebral osteoporotic fractures in RA subjects aged ≥50 years. A nested case-control study was conducted using Quebec physician billing and hospital discharge data. RA subjects were identified from International Classification of Disease-9/10 codes in billing and hospitalisation data and followed from cohort entry until the earliest of non-vertebral osteoporotic fracture, death, or end of study period. Controls were matched to cases (4:1 ratio) on age, sex, and date of cohort entry. Biologic DMARD exposure was defined as being on treatment for ≥180 days pre-fracture (index). Conditional logistic regression was used, adjusting for indicators of RA severity, comorbidity, drugs influencing fracture risk, and measures of health care utilisation. Over the study period, 1,515 cases were identified (6,023 controls). The most frequent fracture site was hip/femur (42.3%). In total, 172 subjects (49 cases and 123 controls) were exposed to biologic DMARDs. The median duration of exposure was 735 (interquartile range (IQR), 564) and 645 (IQR, 903) days in cases and controls, respectively. We were unable to demonstrate an association between biologic DMARDs and fracture risk (odds ratio, 1.03; 95% confidence interval, 0.42-2.53). RA duration significantly increased the fracture risk. Despite the positive impact of biologic DMARDs on bone remodelling observed in small studies, we were unable to demonstrate a reduction in the risk of non

  12. Clinical utility of therapeutic drug monitoring in biological disease modifying anti-rheumatic drug treatment of rheumatic disorders: a systematic narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Herwaarden, Noortje; Van Den Bemt, Bart J F; Wientjes, Maike H M; Kramers, Cornelis; Den Broeder, Alfons A

    2017-08-01

    Biological Disease Modifying Anti-Rheumatic Drugs (bDMARDs) have improved the treatment outcomes of inflammatory rheumatic diseases including Rheumatoid Arthritis and spondyloarthropathies. Inter-individual variation exists in (maintenance of) response to bDMARDs. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring (TDM) of bDMARDs could potentially help in optimizing treatment for the individual patient. Areas covered: Evidence of clinical utility of TDM in bDMARD treatment is reviewed. Different clinical scenarios will be discussed, including: prediction of response after start of treatment, prediction of response to a next bDMARD in case of treatment failure of the first, prediction of successful dose reduction or discontinuation in case of low disease activity, prediction of response to dose-escalation in case of active disease and prediction of response to bDMARD in case of flare in disease activity. Expert opinion: The limited available evidence does often not report important outcomes for diagnostic studies, such as sensitivity and specificity. In most clinical relevant scenarios, predictive value of serum (anti-) drug levels is absent, therefore the use of TDM of bDMARDs cannot be advocated. Well-designed prospective studies should be done to further investigate the promising scenarios to determine the place of TDM in clinical practice.

  13. [Biologics and mycobacterial diseases].

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    Tsuyuguchi, Kazunari; Matsumoto, Tomoshige

    2013-03-01

    Various biologics such as TNF-alpha inhibitor or IL-6 inhibitor are now widely used for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Many reports suggested that one of the major issues is high risk of developing tuberculosis (TB) associated with using these agents, which is especially important in Japan where tuberculosis still remains endemic. Another concern is the risk of development of nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) diseases and we have only scanty information about it. The purpose of this symposium is to elucidate the role of biologics in the development of mycobacterial diseases and to establish the strategy to control them. First, Dr. Tohma showed the epidemiologic data of TB risks associated with using biologics calculated from the clinical database on National Database of Rheumatic Diseases by iR-net in Japan. He estimated TB risks in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients to be about four times higher compared with general populations and to become even higher by using biologics. He also pointed out a low rate of implementation of QuantiFERON test (QFT) as screening test for TB infection. Next, Dr. Tokuda discussed the issue of NTM disease associated with using biologics. He suggested the airway disease in RA patients might play some role in the development of NTM disease, which may conversely lead to overdiagnosis of NTM disease in RA patients. He suggested that NTM disease should not be uniformly considered a contraindication to treatment with biologics, considering from the results of recent multicenter study showing relatively favorable outcome of NTM patients receiving biologics. Patients with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) should receive LTBI treatment before starting biologics. Dr. Kato, a chairperson of the Prevention Committee of the Japanese Society for Tuberculosis, proposed a new LTBI guideline including active implementation of LTBI treatment, introducing interferon gamma release assay, and appropriate selection of persons at high risk for

  14. MS Disease-Modifying Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease-modifying therapies Approval: 2014 US; 2014 CAN Pregnancy Category C (see footnote, page 11) Rash, headache, fever, nasal congestion, nausea, urinary tract infection, fatigue, insomnia, upper respiratory tract infection, herpes viral ...

  15. Delayed wound healing and postoperative surgical site infections in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with or without biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Masahiro; Inui, Kentaro; Sugioka, Yuko; Mamoto, Kenji; Okano, Tadashi; Kinoshita, Takuya; Hidaka, Noriaki; Koike, Tatsuya

    2016-06-01

    Biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) have become more popular for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Whether or not bDMARDs increase the postoperative risk of surgical site infection (SSI) has remained controversial. We aimed to clarify the effects of bDMARDs on the outcomes of elective orthopedic surgery. We used multivariate logistic regression analysis to analyze risk factors for SSI and delayed wound healing among 227 patients with RA (mean age, 65.0 years; disease duration, 16.9 years) after 332 elective orthopedic surgeries. We also attempted to evaluate the effects of individual medications on infection. Rates of bDMARD and conventional synthetic DMARD (csDMARD) administration were 30.4 and 91.0 %, respectively. Risk factors for SSI were advanced age (odds ratio [OR], 1.11; P = 0.045), prolonged surgery (OR, 1.02; P = 0.03), and preoperative white blood cell count >10,000/μL (OR, 3.66; P = 0.003). Those for delayed wound healing were advanced age (OR, 1.16; P = 0.001), prolonged surgery (OR, 1.02; P = 0.007), preoperative white blood cell count >10,000/μL (OR, 4.56; P = 0.02), and foot surgery (OR, 6.60; P = 0.001). Risk factors for SSI and medications did not significantly differ. No DMARDs were risk factors for any outcome examined. Biological DMARDs were not risk factors for postoperative SSI. Foot surgery was a risk factor for delayed wound healing.

  16. Subclinical Synovitis Measured by Ultrasound in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients With Clinical Remission Induced by Synthetic and Biological Modifying Disease Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruces, Marcos; Al Snih, Soham; Serra-Bonett, Natalí; Rivas, Juan C

    2017-10-09

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with disease in clinical remission might show subclinical synovitis, which can be related to the progress of structural joint damage. To determine and compare the degree of synovial inflammation by ultrasound (US) in patients with RA in clinical remission, treated with DMARD or combination therapy with DMARD and anti-TNF. Hospital-based cross-sectional study of 58 patients with RA in sustained remission for at least 6 months by DAS28 <2.6, who attended the Rheumatology Service at the Hospital Universitario de Caracas. Patients underwent clinical, functional, and laboratory assessments. Ultrasound was performed in hands measuring synovial effusion, synovial hypertrophy and power Doppler signal; using a semiquantitative 4-point scale of 0=none to 3=severe. Chi-square and t-test were used to compare the clinical, functional, laboratory and US assessments between the DMARD (N=37) and combination therapy with DMARD and anti-TNF (N=21) groups. A p-value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Out of 58 patients, 25.9% had remission by US and 74.1% had synovial effusion or hypertrophy or positive power Doppler signal. Non-significant differences in US synovitis between the two groups were found. Persistent US activity was evident in a high percentage of rheumatoid arthritis patients in clinical remission by DAS28. No differences in subclinical synovitis measured by US were found between patients with DMARD and anti-TNF-induced clinical remission. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  17. Distribution of Podoplanin in Synovial Tissues in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Using Biologic or Conventional Disease-Modifying Anti-Rheumatic Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakubo, Yuya; Oki, Hiroharu; Naganuma, Yasushi; Saski, Kan; Sasaki, Akiko; Tamaki, Yasunobu; Suran, Yang; Konta, Tsuneo; Takagi, Michiaki

    2017-01-01

    Podoplanin (PDPN) mediates tumor cell migration and invasion, which phenomena might also play a role in severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Therefore, the precise cellular distribution of PDPN and it's relationships with inflammation was studied in RA treated with biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARD) or conventional DMARDs (cDMARD). PDPN+ cells were immunostained by NZ-1 mAb, and scored (3+; >50%/ area, 2+; 20%- 50%, 1+; 5%-20%, 0: <5%) in synovial tissues from RA treated with biologic DMARDs (BIO, n=20) or cDMARD (n=20) for comparison with osteoarthritis (OA, n=5), followed by cell grading of inflammation and cell-typing. Inflammatory synovitis score was 1.4 in both BIO and cDMARD, compared to only 0.2 in OA. PDPN+ cells were found in the lining layer (BIO 1.6, cDMARD 1.3, OA 0.2) and lymphoid aggregates (BIO 0.6, cDMRD 0.7, OA 0.2), and correlated with RA-inflammation in BIO- and cDMARD-groups in both area (r=0.7/0.9, r=0.6/0.7, respectively p<0.05). PDPN was expressed in CD68+ type A macrophage-like and 5B5+ type B fibroblast-like cells in the lining layer, and in IL- 17+ cells in lymphoid aggregates in RA. PDPN was markedly increased in the immunologically inflamed RA synovitis, which was surgically treated due to BIO- and cDMARD-resistant RA. PDPN may have potential of a new marker of residual arthritis in local joints for inflammation-associated severe RA. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. Systematic review and meta-analysis of serious infections with tofacitinib and biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drug treatment in rheumatoid arthritis clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Vibeke; Ahadieh, Sima; French, Jonathan; Geier, Jamie; Krishnaswami, Sriram; Menon, Sujatha; Checchio, Tina; Tensfeldt, Thomas G; Hoffman, Elaine; Riese, Richard; Boy, Mary; Gómez-Reino, Juan J

    2015-12-15

    were 2.21 (0.60, 8.14) and 2.02 (0.56, 7.28), respectively. Risk differences (95% CIs) versus placebo for tofacitinib 5 and 10 mg BID were 0.38% (-0.24%, 0.99%) and 0.40% (-0.22%, 1.02%), respectively. In interventional studies, the risk of serious infections with tofacitinib is comparable to published rates for biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in patients with moderate to severely active RA.

  19. Disease-modifying drugs in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghezzi L

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Laura Ghezzi, Elio Scarpini, Daniela Galimberti Neurology Unit, Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, University of Milan, Fondazione Cà Granda, IRCCS Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy Abstract: Alzheimer's disease (AD is an age-dependent neurodegenerative disorder and the most common cause of dementia. The early stages of AD are characterized by short-term memory loss. Once the disease progresses, patients experience difficulties in sense of direction, oral communication, calculation, ability to learn, and cognitive thinking. The median duration of the disease is 10 years. The pathology is characterized by deposition of amyloid beta peptide (so-called senile plaques and tau protein in the form of neurofibrillary tangles. Currently, two classes of drugs are licensed by the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of AD, ie, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors for mild to moderate AD, and memantine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, for moderate and severe AD. Treatment with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors or memantine aims at slowing progression and controlling symptoms, whereas drugs under development are intended to modify the pathologic steps leading to AD. Herein, we review the clinical features, pharmacologic properties, and cost-effectiveness of the available acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and memantine, and focus on disease-modifying drugs aiming to interfere with the amyloid beta peptide, including vaccination, passive immunization, and tau deposition. Keywords: Alzheimer's disease, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, memantine, disease-modifying drugs, diagnosis, treatment

  20. Quantity and economic value of unused oral anti-cancer and biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs among outpatient pharmacy patients who discontinue therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekker, C L; Melis, E J; Egberts, A C G; Bouvy, M L; Gardarsdottir, H; van den Bemt, B J F

    2018-03-24

    Patients sometimes discontinue the use of expensive oral anti-cancer drug (OACD) or biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug (bDMARD) therapies early, leading to medication waste if the patient has not used all dispensed medication. To determine the proportion of patients who have unused OACDs or bDMARDs after therapy discontinuation, and the quantity and economic value of these unused medications. Furthermore, patients' reasons for therapy discontinuation and their disposal method for unused medications were determined. In a retrospective follow-up study using a Dutch outpatient pharmacy database, patients (≥18 years) who did not refill an OACD or bDMARD prescription, dispensed between November 2015 and February 2016, within two weeks of the prescription end date were contacted by phone and asked about their unused medication and reasons thereof. The economic value was calculated using Dutch medication prices. Data were descriptively analyzed in STATA13. The database included 1173 patients, of whom 159 likely had discontinued therapy and were contacted. Of these, 88 patients were excluded (39 refilled, 47 missing, and 2 other). Of the 71 patients who had discontinued therapy, 39 (54.9%) had unused medications, comprising 22 OACD users (mean age 63.0 (SD ± 15.9) years, 50.0% female) and 17 bDMARD users (mean age 50.7 (SD ± 13.5) years, 47.1% female). A total of 59 packages were unused, with a total value of €60,341. Unused OACD packages and bDMARD packages had median values of €179 (IQR €24-2487) and €992 (IQR €681-1093), respectively. Patients primarily discontinued therapy due to adverse or insufficient effects. This study illustrates that more than half of patients discontinuing OACD or bDMARD therapies have unused medication. This emphasizes the need for waste-reducing interventions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The Cost-effectiveness of Sequences of Biological Disease-modifying Antirheumatic Drug Treatment in England for Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Who Can Tolerate Methotrexate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Matt D; Wailoo, Allan J; Tosh, Jonathan C; Hernandez-Alava, Monica; Gibson, Laura A; Stevens, John W; Archer, Rachel J; Simpson, Emma L; Hock, Emma S; Young, Adam; Scott, David L

    2017-07-01

    To ascertain whether strategies of treatment with a biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (bDMARD) are cost-effective in an English setting. Results are presented for those patients with moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and those with severe RA. An economic model to assess the cost-effectiveness of 7 bDMARD was developed. A systematic literature review and network metaanalysis was undertaken to establish relative clinical effectiveness. The results were used to populate the model, together with estimates of Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) score following European League Against Rheumatism response; annual costs, and utility, per HAQ band; trajectory of HAQ for patients taking bDMARD; and trajectory of HAQ for patients using nonbiologic therapy (NBT). Results were presented as those associated with the strategy with the median cost-effectiveness. Supplementary analyses were undertaken assessing the change in cost-effectiveness when only patients with the most severe prognoses taking NBT were provided with bDMARD treatment. The costs per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) values were compared with reported thresholds from the UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence of £20,000 to £30,000 (US$24,700 to US$37,000). In the primary analyses, the cost per QALY of a bDMARD strategy was £41,600 for patients with severe RA and £51,100 for those with moderate to severe RA. Under the supplementary analyses, the cost per QALY fell to £25,300 for those with severe RA and to £28,500 for those with moderate to severe RA. The cost-effectiveness of bDMARD in RA in England is questionable and only meets current accepted levels in subsets of patients with the worst prognoses.

  2. Radiographic complications of biologic response modifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miketic, L.M.; Bahnson, R.R.; Ernstoff, M.S.; Kirkwood, J.M.; Nair, S.; Logan, T.; Downs, M.A.; Neuhart, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Biologic response modifiers, such as the interferons, are increasingly used in the treatment of cancer as an adjunct to conventional chemotherapy. In certain malignancies, particularly renal cell carcinoma, they are becoming agents of choice due to higher tumor response rate. The authors have reviewed 202 patients. Protocols include interferon, interleukin, tumor necrosis factor, and monoclonal antibodies. The radiology of significant clinical complications is discussed, especially the vascular leak syndrome often seen with interleukin administration and the cardiac toxicity of interferon. Less common abnormalities include progressive splenomegaly in one interferon study and a hemorrhagic episode caused by tumor necrosis factor

  3. Ultrasound-detected bone erosion is a relapse risk factor after discontinuation of biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis whose ultrasound power Doppler synovitis activity and clinical disease activity are well controlled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashiri, Shin-Ya; Fujikawa, Keita; Nishino, Ayako; Okada, Akitomo; Aramaki, Toshiyuki; Shimizu, Toshimasa; Umeda, Masataka; Fukui, Shoichi; Suzuki, Takahisa; Koga, Tomohiro; Iwamoto, Naoki; Ichinose, Kunihiro; Tamai, Mami; Mizokami, Akinari; Nakamura, Hideki; Origuchi, Tomoki; Ueki, Yukitaka; Aoyagi, Kiyoshi; Maeda, Takahiro; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2017-05-25

    In the present study, we explored the risk factors for relapse after discontinuation of biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (bDMARD) therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) whose ultrasound power Doppler (PD) synovitis activity and clinical disease activity were well controlled. In this observational study in clinical practice, the inclusion criteria were based on ultrasound disease activity and clinical disease activity, set as low or remission (Disease Activity Score in 28 joints based on erythrocyte sedimentation rate Ultrasound was performed in 22 joints of bilateral hands at discontinuation for evaluating synovitis severity and presence of bone erosion. Patients with a maximum PD score ≤1 in each joint were enrolled. Forty patients with RA were consecutively recruited (November 2010-March 2015) and discontinued bDMARD therapy. Variables at the initiation and discontinuation of bDMARD therapy that were predictive of relapse during the 12 months after discontinuation were assessed. The median patient age was 54.5 years, and the median disease duration was 3.5 years. Nineteen (47.5%) patients relapsed during the 12 months after the discontinuation of bDMARD therapy. Logistic regression analysis revealed that only the presence of bone erosion detected by ultrasound at discontinuation was predictive of relapse (OR 8.35, 95% CI 1.78-53.2, p = 0.006). No clinical characteristics or serologic biomarkers were significantly different between the relapse and nonrelapse patients. The ultrasound synovitis scores did not differ significantly between the groups. Our findings are the first evidence that ultrasound bone erosion may be a relapse risk factor after the discontinuation of bDMARD therapy in patients with RA whose PD synovitis activity and clinical disease activity are well controlled.

  4. Design, Synthesis, and Biological Evaluation of 2-(Benzylamino-2-HydroxyalkylIsoindoline-1,3-Diones Derivatives as Potential Disease-Modifying Multifunctional Anti-Alzheimer Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawid Panek

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The complex nature of Alzheimer’s disease calls for multidirectional treatment. Consequently, the search for multi-target-directed ligands may lead to potential drug candidates. The aim of the present study is to seek multifunctional compounds with expected activity against disease-modifying and symptomatic targets. A series of 15 drug-like various substituted derivatives of 2-(benzylamino-2-hydroxyalkylisoindoline-1,3-diones was designed by modification of cholinesterase inhibitors toward β-secretase inhibition. All target compounds have been synthesized and tested against eel acetylcholinesterase (eeAChE, equine serum butyrylcholinesterase (eqBuChE, human β-secretase (hBACE-1, and β-amyloid (Aβ-aggregation. The most promising compound, 12 (2-(5-(benzylamino-4-hydroxypentylisoindoline-1,3-dione, displayed inhibitory potency against eeAChE (IC50 = 3.33 μM, hBACE-1 (43.7% at 50 μM, and Aβ-aggregation (24.9% at 10 μM. Molecular modeling studies have revealed possible interaction of compound 12 with the active sites of both enzymes—acetylcholinesterase and β-secretase. In conclusion: modifications of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors led to the discovery of a multipotent anti-Alzheimer’s agent, with moderate and balanced potency, capable of inhibiting acetylcholinesterase, a symptomatic target, and disease-modifying targets: β-secretase and Aβ-aggregation.

  5. Biologics or tofacitinib for rheumatoid arthritis in incomplete responders to methotrexate or other traditional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Jasvinder A; Hossain, Alomgir; Tanjong Ghogomu, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    , tocilizumab) and small molecule tofacitinib, versus comparator (MTX, DMARD, placebo (PL), or a combination) in adults with rheumatoid arthritis who have failed to respond to methotrexate (MTX) or other disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), i.e., MTX/DMARD incomplete responders (MTX.......78)) were similarly inconclusive and downgraded to low quality for both imprecision and indirectness.Main results text shows the results for tofacitinib and differences between medications. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Based primarily on RCTs of 6 months' to 12 months' duration, there is moderate quality evidence...

  6. Modified laminar flow biological safety cabinet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarrity, G J; Coriell, L L

    1974-10-01

    Tests are reported on a modified laminar flow biological safety cabinet in which the return air plenum that conducts air from the work area to the high efficiency particulate air filters is under negative pressure. Freon gas released inside the cabinet could not be detected outside by a freon gas detection method capable of detecting 10(-6) cc/s. When T3 bacteriophage was aerosolized 5 cm outside the front opening in 11 tests, no phage could be detected inside the cabinet with the motor-filter unit in operation. An average of 2.8 x 10(5) plaque-forming units (PFU)/ft(3) (ca. 0.028 m(3)) were detected with the motor-filter unit not in operation, a penetration of 0.0%. Aerosolization 5 cm inside the cabinet yielded an average of 10 PFU/ft(3) outside the cabinet with the motor-filter unit in operation and an average of 4.1 x 10(5) PFU/ft(3) with the motor-filter unit not in operation, a penetration of 0.002%. These values are the same order of effectiveness as the positive-pressure laminar flow biological safety cabinets previously tested. The advantages of the negative-pressure return plenum design include: (i) assurance that if cracks or leaks develop in the plenum it will not lead to discharge of contaminated air into the laboratory; and (ii) the price is lower due to reduced manufacturing costs.

  7. Safety and effectiveness of tacrolimus add-on therapy for rheumatoid arthritis patients without an adequate response to biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs): Post-marketing surveillance in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Ishida, Kota; Shiraki, Katsuhisa; Yoshiyasu, Takashi

    2018-01-01

    Post-marketing surveillance (PMS) was conducted to assess the safety and effectiveness of tacrolimus (TAC) add-on therapy for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and an inadequate response to biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Patients with RA from 180 medical sites across Japan were registered centrally with an electronic investigation system. The observational period was 24 weeks from the first day of TAC administration concomitantly with biological DMARDs. Safety and effectiveness populations included 624 and 566 patients, respectively. Patients were predominantly female (81.1%), with a mean age of 61.9 years. Overall, 125 adverse drug reactions (ADRs) occurred in 94 patients (15.1%), and 15 serious ADRs occurred in 11 patients (1.8%). These incidences were lower compared with previously reported incidences after TAC treatment in PMS, and all of the observed ADRs were already known. A statistically significant improvement was observed in the primary effectiveness variable of Simplified Disease Activity Index after TAC treatment; 62.7% of patients achieved remission or low disease activity at week 24. TAC is well tolerated and effective when used as an add-on to biological DMARDs in Japanese patients with RA who do not achieve an adequate response to biological DMARDs in a real-world clinical setting.

  8. EFFECTS OF SYNTHETIC DISEASE-MODIFYING ANTIRHEUMATIC DRUGS, BIOLOGICAL AGENTS, AND PSYCHOPHARMACOTHERAPY ON THE MENTAL DISORDERS IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Abramkin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mental disorders (MDs of the anxiety-depressive spectrum (ADS and cognitive impairment (CI are characteristic of the majority of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA; however, the effects of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs, biological agents (BAs, and their combinations with psychopharmacological drugs (PPDs on these abnormalities have been insufficiently studied. Objective: to investigate trends in the incidence of MDs in RA patients receiving different treatment regimens.Subjects and methods. The investigation included 128 RA patients (13% men and 87% women who fulfilled the 1987 American College of Rheumatology criteria; their mean age was 47.4±0.9 years; the median duration of RA was 96 [48; 228] months. RA activity was found to be high, moderate, and low in 48, 56, and 24 patients, respectively. DAS28 averaged 5.34±0.17. 80% of the patients received DMARDs. MDs were diagnosed based on ICD-10 coding, by using a semi-structured interview and scales, such as the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Hamilton Anxiety Scale, and the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale. Clinical and psychological procedures were used to diagnose CI. At the study inclusion stage, ADS disorders were detected in 123 (96.1% patients; CI was found in 88 (68.7%. Forty-one (32.1% patients were diagnosed with major depression (an obvious or moderate depressive episode, 53 (41.4% patients had minor depression (a mild depressive episode and dysthymia, and 29 (22.6% had anxiety disorders (ADs (adjustment disorders with anxiety symptoms, as well as generalized anxiety disorder. The dynamics of MDs was estimated in 112 (87.5% of the 128 patients and in 83 (64.8% at one- and five-year follow-ups, respectively. The following groups were identified according to the performed therapy: 1 synthetic DMARDs (n = 39; 2 synthetic DMARDs + PPDs (n = 43; 3 BAs + DMARDs (n = 32; 4 BAs + DMARDs + PPDs (n = 9.Results and discussion. In Group 1, the

  9. The marked and rapid therapeutic effect of tofacitinib in combination with subcutaneous methotrexate in a rheumatoid arthritis patient with poor prognostic factors who is resistant to standard disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and biologicals: A clinical case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Demidova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, it is generally accepted that it is necessary to achieve clinical remission in rheumatoid arthritis (RA or as minimum a low disease activity. The paper describes a clinical case of a female patient diagnosed with RA who was observed to have inefficiency of standard disease-modifying antirheumatic therapy with methotrexate 25 mg/week, secondary inefficiency of tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors (adalimumab, and inefficiency/poor tolerance of the interlukin-6 receptor antagonist tocilizumab. This determined the need to use fofacitinib (TOFA, a drug with another mechanism of action. TOFA is the first agent from a new group of immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory drugs, intracellular kinase inhibitors. Disease remission could be achieved during therapy with TOFA, which enables one to consider this synthetic drug as a therapy option that potentially competes with therapy with biologicals.

  10. Biological treatment of Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Bjerrum, Jacob Tveiten; Seidelin, Jakob Benedict

    2012-01-01

    Introduction of biological agents for the treatment of Crohn's disease (CD) has led to a transformation of the treatment paradigm. Several biological compounds have been approved for patients with CD refractory to conventional treatment: infliximab, adalimumab and certolizumab pegol (and...... natalizumab in several countries outside the European Union). However, despite the use of biologics for more than a decade, questions still remain about the true efficacy and the best treatment regimens - especially about when to discontinue treatment. Furthermore, a need for optimizing treatment...... with biologics still exists, as 20-40% of patients with CD (depending on selection criteria) do not have any relevant response to the current biological agents (i.e. primary failures). A better patient selection might maximize the clinical outcome while minimizing the complications associated with this type...

  11. Biologics in Paediatric Crohn's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Gouldthorpe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Crohn's disease affects increasing numbers of children worldwide. Generally, childhood-onset disease runs a more severe course than in adults and has a greater impact on quality of life. Therapy in children must take account of a different set of risks for toxicity compared to adults, but also to their longevity. Biologic drugs present remarkable advantages in terms of disease control for children, especially in those whose disease cannot be controlled with conventional therapies, but their long-term risks are still being assessed. Data regarding biologic use in children is limited and mostly amounts to case series, but results have been promising, both in terms of controlling disease activity and improving growth parameters. Adverse reactions are infrequent in the short term, but loss of response is a long-term problem, particularly in children. More information is needed about very long term risks. Infliximab and adalimumab are the most studied agents in children, while there is relatively limited data on certolizumab and natalizumab. Further collection of data on these agents is still needed, but this should not restrict access to these agents for children in whom no other agent is effective.

  12. Genetic Modifiers of Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Martin H.; Sebastiani, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is associated with unusual clinical heterogeneity for a Mendelian disorder. Fetal hemoglobin concentration and coincident ∝ thalassemia, both which directly affect the sickle erythrocyte, are the major modulators of the phenotype of disease. Understanding the genetics underlying the heritable subphenotypes of sickle cell anemia would be prognostically useful, could inform personalized therapeutics, and might help the discovery of new “druggable” pathophysiologic targets. Genotype-phenotype association studies have been used to identify novel genetic modifiers. In the future, whole genome sequencing with its promise of discovering hitherto unsuspected variants could add to our understanding of the genetic modifiers of this disease. PMID:22641398

  13. The effect of tofacitinib on function and quality of life indicators in patients with rheumatoid arthritis resistant to synthetic and biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in real clinical practice: Results of a multicenter observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Karateev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tofacitinib (TOFA, a representative of a new class of targeted synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (s-DMARD, is a promising drug for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA and other immune inflammatory diseases.Objective: to evaluate the efficiency and safety of therapy with TOFA in combination with methotrexate (MTX and other s-DMARDs in real clinical practice in patients with active RA and previous ineffective therapy.Patients and methods. A 6-month Russian multicenter study of function and quality of life enrolled 101 patients with resistant RA: 18 men and 83 women; mean age, 51.03±11.28 years; mean disease duration, 105.4±81.43 months; rheumatoid factor-positive individuals (89.1%; and anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibody-positive ones (74.7%. 93 (92,1% of these patients completed a 24-week study. TOFA was used as both second-line drug (after failure of therapy with s-DMARD (n=74 and as a third-line drug (after failure of therapy with s-DMARDs and biological agents (BAs (n=74. The tools RAPID3, HAQ, and EQ-5D were used to determine disease outcomes from a patient's assessment.Results. All the three tools demonstrated significant positive changes at 3–6 months following therapy initiation. RAPID3 scores for the status of a patient achieving a low disease activity or remission coincided with the mean DAS28-ESR and SDAI scores in 60% and 68% of cases, respectively. The achievement rates of the minimally clinically significant improvement (ΔHAQ≥0.22 and functional remission (HAQ≤0.5 at 6 months of TOFA therapy were 79.6 and 30.1%, respectively. The mean change value in EQ-5D scores over 6 months was -0.162±0.21. There were no significant between the groups of patients who used TOFA as a second- or third-line agent in the majority of indicators, except EQ-5D scores at 6 months.Conclusions. The results of our multicenter study using considerable Russian material confirmed the pronounced positive effect of TOFA used

  14. Fungal endophytes: modifiers of plant disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busby, Posy E; Ridout, Mary; Newcombe, George

    2016-04-01

    Many recent studies have demonstrated that non-pathogenic fungi within plant microbiomes, i.e., endophytes ("endo" = within, "phyte" = plant), can significantly modify the expression of host plant disease. The rapid pace of advancement in endophyte ecology warrants a pause to synthesize our understanding of endophyte disease modification and to discuss future research directions. We reviewed recent literature on fungal endophyte disease modification, and here report on several emergent themes: (1) Fungal endophyte effects on plant disease span the full spectrum from pathogen antagonism to pathogen facilitation, with pathogen antagonism most commonly reported. (2) Agricultural plant pathosystems are the focus of research on endophyte disease modification. (3) A taxonomically diverse group of fungal endophytes can influence plant disease severity. And (4) Fungal endophyte effects on plant disease severity are context-dependent. Our review highlights the importance of fungal endophytes for plant disease across a broad range of plant pathosystems, yet simultaneously reveals that complexity within plant microbiomes presents a significant challenge to disentangling the biotic environmental factors affecting plant disease severity. Manipulative studies integrating eco-evolutionary approaches with emerging molecular tools will be poised to elucidate the functional importance of endophytes in natural plant pathosystems that are fundamental to biodiversity and conservation.

  15. Use of tofacitinib in real clinical practice to treat patients with rheumatoid arthritis resistant to synthetic and biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs: Results of a multicenter observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Karateev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tofacitinib (TOFA, a member of a new class of targeted synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs, is a promising medication for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA and other immunoinflammatory diseases. The paper describes the Russian experi-ence with TOFA used to treat severe RA.Patients and methods. 101 RA patients (18 men and 83 women; mean age, 51.03±11.28 years; mean disease duration, 105.4±81.43 months who were positive for rheumatoid factor (89.1% and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (74.7% and resistant to therapy with synthetic DMARDs (sDMARDs (80.2% and biological agents (19.8% were given TOFA at a dose of 5 mg twice daily, which could be doubled if necessary. TOFA was used alone (n=9 or in combination with methotrexate (MT (n=75 or other sDMARDs (n=17. The achievement of low disease activity (LDA and clinical remission at 3 and 6 months of treatment by DAS28-ESR SDAI, and CDAI scores, and the indices of safety and tolerability were assessed.Results. A total of 93 (92.1% of the 101 patients completed a 24-week period of the investigation. 8 (7.9% patients prematurely discontinued TOFA after an average of 2.75±0.71 months. At the end of the study, the patients achieved the primary endpoint (LDA including remission in terms of DAS28-ESR ≤3.2 (34.7%, SDAI ≤11 (47.5%, and CDAI ≤10 (48.5% and the secondary endpoints (clinical remission in terms of DAS28-ESR ≤2.6 (17.8%, SDAI ≤3.3 (8.9%, and CDAI ≤2.8 (6.9%. When TOFA was combined with MT, the discontinuation rate for the former was significantly lower (2.7% than when TOFA was used in combination with other sDMARDs (29.4% or alone (11.1%; p<0.01. At 3 and 6 months of follow-up, LDA was achieved more frequently when TOFA was combined with MT than when other treatment regimens were used. Fatal outcomes and serious adverse events (AEs, as AEs previously undescribed in the literature, were not seen during a follow-up within

  16. Modified rotating biological contactor for removal of dichloromethane vapours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, R; Philip, Ligy; Swaminathan, T

    2015-01-01

    Bioreactors are used for the treatment of waste gas and odour that has gained much acceptance in the recent years to treat volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The different types of bioreactors (biofilter, biotrickling filter and bioscrubber) have been used for waste gas treatment. Each of these reactors has some advantages and some limitations. Though biodegradation is the main process for the removal of the pollutants, the mechanisms of removal and the microbial communities may differ among these bioreactors. Consequently, their performance or removal efficiency may also be different. Clogging of reactor and pressure drop are the main problems. In this study attempts are made to use the principle of rotating biological contactor (RBC) used for wastewater treatment for the removal of VOC. To overcome the above problem the RBC is modified which is suitable for the treatment of VOC (dichloromethane, DCM). DCM is harmful to human health and hazardous to the atmospheric environment. Modified RBC had no clogging problems and no pressure drop. So, it can handle the pollutant load for a longer period of time. A maximum elimination capacity of 25.7 g/m3 h has been achieved in this study for the DCM inlet load of 58 g/m3 h. The average biofilm thickness is 1 mm. The transient behaviour of the modified RBC treating DCM was investigated. The modified RBC is able to handle shutdown, restart and shock loading operations.

  17. Wildlife disease prevalence in human-modified landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brearley, Grant; Rhodes, Jonathan; Bradley, Adrian; Baxter, Greg; Seabrook, Leonie; Lunney, Daniel; Liu, Yan; McAlpine, Clive

    2013-05-01

    have been based on a one-dimensional comparison between unmodified and modified sites. What is lacking are spatially and temporally explicit quantitative approaches which are required to enable an understanding of the range of key causal mechanisms and the reasons for variability. This is particularly important for replicated studies across different host-pathogen systems. Furthermore, there are few studies that have attempted to separate the independent effects of habitat loss and fragmentation on wildlife disease, which are the major determinants of wildlife population dynamics in human-modified landscapes. There is an urgent need to understand better the potential causal links between the processes of human-induced landscape change and the associated influences of habitat fragmentation, matrix hostility and loss of connectivity on an animal's physiological stress, immune response and disease susceptibility. This review identified no study that had assessed the influence of human-induced landscape change on the prevalence of a wildlife sexually transmitted disease. A better understanding of the various mechanisms linking human-induced landscape change and the prevalence of wildlife disease will lead to more successful conservation management outcomes. © 2012 The Authors. Biological Reviews © 2012 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  18. Dupuytren's: a systems biology disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rehman, S.; Goodacre, R.; Day, P.J.; Bayat, A.; Westerhoff, H.V.

    2011-01-01

    Dupuytren's disease (DD) is an ill-defined fibroproliferative disorder of the palm of the hands leading to digital contracture. DD commonly occurs in individuals of northern European extraction. Cellular components and processes associated with DD pathogenesis include altered gene and protein

  19. Classifying PML risk with disease modifying therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Joseph R

    2017-02-01

    To catalogue the risk of PML with the currently available disease modifying therapies (DMTs) for multiple sclerosis (MS). All DMTs perturb the immune system in some fashion. Natalizumab, a highly effective DMT, has been associated with a significant risk of PML. Fingolimod and dimethyl fumarate have also been unquestionably associated with a risk of PML in the MS population. Concerns about PML risk with other DMTs have arisen due to their mechanism of action and pharmacological parallel to other agents with known PML risk. A method of contextualizing PML risk for DMTs is warranted. Classification of PML risk was predicated on three criteria:: 1) whether the underlying condition being treated predisposes to PML in the absence of the drug; 2) the latency from initiation of the drug to the development of PML; and 3) the frequency with which PML is observed. Among the DMTs, natalizumab occupies a place of its own with respect to PML risk. Significantly lesser degrees of risk exist for fingolimod and dimethyl fumarate. Whether PML will be observed with other DMTs in use for MS, such as, rituximab, teriflunomide, and alemtuzumab, remains uncertain. A logical classification for stratifying DMT PML risk is important for both the physician and patient in contextualizing risk/benefit ratios. As additional experience accumulates regarding PML and the DMTs, this early effort will undoubtedly require revisiting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Optimizing biological therapy in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gecse, Krisztina Barbara; Végh, Zsuzsanna; Lakatos, Péter László

    2016-01-01

    Anti-TNF therapy has revolutionized the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases, including both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. However, a significant proportion of patients does not respond to anti-TNF agents or lose response over time. Recently, therapeutic drug monitoring has gained a major role in identifying the mechanism and management of loss of response. The aim of this review article is to summarize the predictors of efficacy and outcomes, the different mechanisms of anti-TNF/biological failure in Crohn's disease and identify strategies to optimize biological treatment.

  1. Beyond Psoriasis: Novel Uses for Biologic Response Modifiers in Pediatric Dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellodi-Schmidt, Fernanda; Shah, Kara N

    2016-01-01

    Dermatologists have witnessed the increasing availability of novel biologic response modifiers for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases in recent years. The most common dermatologic indication for the use of biologic response modifiers in adults is psoriasis, but the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has not approved any of these agents for use in any dermatologic disease in children with the exception of omalizumab, and as such, use in this population is considered off-label. In this review, we focus on the use of these agents in children to treat inflammatory skin diseases other than psoriasis, including atopic dermatitis, hidradenitis suppurativa, pemphigus vulgaris, bullous pemphigoid, and toxic epidermal necrolysis, with an emphasis on the use of etanercept, infliximab, rituximab, omalizumab, and ustekinumab. By highlighting novel uses of these agents, particularly for the treatment of dermatologic conditions for which optimal therapies are yet to be established, we hope to raise awareness of the potential use of this class of medications to treat inflammatory skin diseases in children. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Network biology concepts in complex disease comorbidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Jessica Xin; Thomas, Cecilia Engel; Brunak, Søren

    2016-01-01

    collected electronically, disease co-occurrences are starting to be quantitatively characterized. Linking network dynamics to the real-life, non-ideal patient in whom diseases co-occur and interact provides a valuable basis for generating hypotheses on molecular disease mechanisms, and provides knowledge......The co-occurrence of diseases can inform the underlying network biology of shared and multifunctional genes and pathways. In addition, comorbidities help to elucidate the effects of external exposures, such as diet, lifestyle and patient care. With worldwide health transaction data now often being...

  3. Evolutionary perspectives into placental biology and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward B. Chuong

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In all mammals including humans, development takes place within the protective environment of the maternal womb. Throughout gestation, nutrients and waste products are continuously exchanged between mother and fetus through the placenta. Despite the clear importance of the placenta to successful pregnancy and the health of both mother and offspring, relatively little is understood about the biology of the placenta and its role in pregnancy-related diseases. Given that pre- and peri-natal diseases involving the placenta affect millions of women and their newborns worldwide, there is an urgent need to understand placenta biology and development. Here, we suggest that the placenta is an organ under unique selective pressures that have driven its rapid diversification throughout mammalian evolution. The high divergence of the placenta complicates the use of non-human animal models and necessitates an evolutionary perspective when studying its biology and role in disease. We suggest that diversifying evolution of the placenta is primarily driven by intraspecies evolutionary conflict between mother and fetus, and that many pregnancy diseases are a consequence of this evolutionary force. Understanding how maternal–fetal conflict shapes both basic placental and reproductive biology – in all species – will provide key insights into diseases of pregnancy.

  4. Quantifying the contributions of behavioral and biological risk factors to socioeconomic disparities in coronary heart disease incidence: the MORGEN study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kershaw, Kiarri N.; Droomers, Mariël; Robinson, Whitney R.; Carnethon, Mercedes R.; Daviglus, Martha L.; Verschuren, W. M. Monique

    2013-01-01

    Quantifying the impact of different modifiable behavioral and biological risk factors on socioeconomic disparities in coronary heart disease (CHD) may help inform targeted, population-specific strategies to reduce the unequal distribution of the disease. Previous studies have used analytic

  5. Proposal for a new nomenclature of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolen, Josef S.; van der Heijde, Desiree; Machold, Klaus P.; Aletaha, Daniel; Landewe, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In light of the recent emergence of new therapeutics for rheumatoid arthritis, such as kinase inhibitors and biosimilars, a new nomenclature for disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), which are currently often classified as synthetic (or chemical) DMARDs (sDMARDS) and biological DMARDs

  6. The disease modifying osteoarthritis drug (DMOAD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, Per; Bay-Jensen, Anne-Christine; Christiansen, Claus

    2008-01-01

    and with DMOADs in particular, and we advance the need for a new development paradigm for DMOADs. Two central elements in this paradigm are a stronger focus on the biology of the joint and the application of new and more sensitive biomarkers allowing redesign of clinical trials in osteoarthritis....

  7. [Biological treatment of rare inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baslund, B.

    2008-01-01

    The current status of the use of biological medicine in the treatment of adult onset morbus still, Wegeners granulomatosis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is reviewed. The need for controlled trials is emphasized. Anti-CD20 treatment for SLE patients with kidney involvement and patients wi...... with Wegeners granulomatosis seems promising. Anti-TNF and IL1 receptor antagonist can control disease activity in most patients with adult morbus still Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/9...

  8. Leukotrienes and leukotriene modifiers in pediatric allergic diseases

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ehab

    ... 12(1):3-12. 3. Leukotrienes and leukotriene modifiers in pediatric allergic diseases ... childhood allergic diseases. This review ... produce cysteinyl-LTs and LTB4 spontaneously in vitro.8. Although nonleukocyte cells generally do not have sufficient 5-LO and FLAP to synthesize .... uninterrupted sleep in these patients.55.

  9. Modifiable risk factors in periodontitis: at the intersection of aging and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Mark A

    2014-02-01

    Chronic inflammation is a prominent feature of aging and of common age-related diseases, including atherosclerosis, cancer and periodontitis. This volume examines modifiable risk factors for periodontitis and other chronic inflammatory diseases. Oral bacterial communities and viral infections, particularly with cytomegalovirus and other herpesviruses, elicit distinct immune responses and are central in the initiation of periodontal diseases. Risk of disease is dynamic and changes in response to complex interactions of genetic, environmental and stochastic factors over the lifespan. Many modifiable risk factors, such as smoking and excess caloric intake, contribute to increases in systemic markers of inflammation and can modify gene regulation through a variety of biologic mechanisms (e.g. epigenetic modifications). Periodontitis and other common chronic inflammatory diseases share multiple modifiable risk factors, such as tobacco smoking, psychological stress and depression, alcohol consumption, obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome and osteoporosis. Interventions that target modifiable risk factors have the potential to improve risk profiles for periodontitis as well as for other common chronic diseases. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Molecular biological aspects of acquired bullous diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, Erik

    1998-01-01

    Bullous diseases of the oral mucosa and skin were originally classified on the basis of clinical and histological criteria. The discovery of autoantibodies in some of these patients and the introduction of molecular biology have resulted in a new understanding of the pathological mechanisms of many...... of the bullous lesions. In this article, updated topics of the immune-mediated bullous lesions which involve oral mucosa and skin are reviewed. Pemphigus antigens, which are desmosomal-associated proteins and belong to the cadherin superfamily of cell adhesion proteins, have been isolated, and their genes have...

  11. Biologic therapies for chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Martínez-Montiel

    Full Text Available Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC make up the so-called chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Advances in the understanding of IBD pathophysiologic mechanisms in the last few years have allowed the development of novel therapies such as biologic therapies, which at least theoretically represent a more specific management of this disease with fewer side effects. Currently, the only effective and widely accepted biologic therapy for the treatment of intraluminal, fistulizing CD, both for remission induction and maintenance, is infliximab. The role of other monoclonal antibodies such as adalimumab is not clearly established. It could be deemed an alternative for patients with allergic reactions to infliximab, and for those with lost response because of anti-infliximab antibody development. However, relevant issues such as dosage and administration regimen remain to be established. Anti-integrin α4 therapies, despite encouraging results in phase-3 studies, are still unavailable, as their marketing authorization was held back in view of a number of reports regarding progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy cases. Immunostimulating therapy may be highly relevant in the near future, as it represents a novel strategy against disease with the inclusion of granulocyte-monocyte colony-stimulating factors. Regarding ulcerative colitis, results from the ACT-1 and ACT-2 studies showed that infliximab is also useful for the management of serious UC flare-ups not responding to standard treatment, which will lead to a revision of therapeutic algorithms, where this drug should be given preference before intravenous cyclosporine. In the next few years, the role of anti-CD3 drugs (vilisilizumab, T-cell inhibiting therapies, and epithelial repair and healing stimulating factors will be established.

  12. Biological resistance of polyethylene composites made with chemically modified fiber or flour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebecca E. Ibach; Craig M. Clemons

    2002-01-01

    The role of moisture in the biological decay of wood-plastic composites was investigated. Southern pine wood fiber and ponderosa pine wood flour were chemically modified using either acetic anhydride (AA), butylene oxide (BO), or propylene oxide (PO). A 50:50 mixture of high density polyethylene and either chemically modified fiber or flour, or untreated fiber or flour...

  13. New trends in the use of biological response modifiers for treatment of malignant neoplasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saad, Sherif Y.

    2002-01-01

    Biological response modifiers are critical controllers of cell division and hence tissue, growth, migration development and differentiation. The family of biological response modifiers includes interferons, tumor necrosis factor, interleukins, colony stimulating factors and hematopoietic growth factors as well as tumor vaccines and monoclonal antibodies. Biological response modifiers have important roles in cancer development and progression, control of cell replication and apoptosis and modulation of immune reactions such as sensitization. This article reviews the biology, pharmacology and clinical application of biological response modifiers in oncology. The antitumor activity of biological response modifiers may be augmented immune response including activation of natural killer lymphocytes and enhanced expression of cell surface antigens (MHC I and II). Combination of biological therapy with chemotherapy improves the response of those tumors refractory to conventional therapies. Colony stimulating factors are used for manipulating immune system to fight against cancer and to prevent chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. Recent advances in tumor immunology, most notably the identification of genes encoding for cancer regression antigens, have paved the way for the development of a variety of novel and specific vaccines and monoclonal antibody approaches. These approaches are discussed from a therapeutic perspective. (author)

  14. In silico search for modifier genes associated with pancreatic and liver disease in Cystic Fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Trouvé

    Full Text Available Cystic Fibrosis is the most common lethal autosomal recessive disorder in the white population, affecting among other organs, the lung, the pancreas and the liver. Whereas Cystic Fibrosis is a monogenic disease, many studies reveal a very complex relationship between genotype and clinical phenotype. Indeed, the broad phenotypic spectrum observed in Cystic Fibrosis is far from being explained by obvious genotype-phenotype correlations and it is admitted that Cystic Fibrosis disease is the result of multiple factors, including effects of the environment as well as modifier genes. Our objective was to highlight new modifier genes with potential implications in the lung, pancreatic and liver outcomes of the disease. For this purpose we performed a system biology approach which combined, database mining, literature mining, gene expression study and network analysis as well as pathway enrichment analysis and protein-protein interactions. We found that IFI16, CCNE2 and IGFBP2 are potential modifiers in the altered lung function in Cystic Fibrosis. We also found that EPHX1, HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB1, DSP and SLC33A1, GPNMB, NCF2, RASGRP1, LGALS3 and PTPN13, are potential modifiers in pancreas and liver, respectively. Associated pathways indicate that immune system is likely involved and that Ubiquitin C is probably a central node, linking Cystic Fibrosis to liver and pancreatic disease. We highlight here new modifier genes with potential implications in Cystic Fibrosis. Nevertheless, our in silico analysis requires functional analysis to give our results a physiological relevance.

  15. Biological and biomedical aspects of genetically modified food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celec, Peter; Kukucková, Martina; Renczésová, Veronika; Natarajan, Satheesh; Pálffy, Roland; Gardlík, Roman; Hodosy, Július; Behuliak, Michal; Vlková, Barbora; Minárik, Gabriel; Szemes, Tomás; Stuchlík, Stanislav; Turna, Ján

    2005-12-01

    Genetically modified (GM) foods are the product of one of the most progressive fields of science-biotechnology. There are major concerns about GM foods in the public; some of them are reasonable, some of them are not. Biomedical risks of GM foods include problems regarding the potential allergenicity, horizontal gene transfer, but environmental side effects on biodiversity must also be recognized. Numerous methods have been developed to assess the potential risk of every GM food type. Benefits of the first generation of GM foods were oriented towards the production process and companies, the second generation of GM foods offers, on contrary, various advantages and added value for the consumer. This includes improved nutritional composition or even therapeutic effects. Recombinant probiotics and the principle of alternative gene therapy represent the latest approach of using GM organisms for biomedical applications. This article tries to summarize and to explain the problematic topic of GM food.

  16. Behavioural biology of Chagas disease vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzari, Claudio Ricardo; Pereira, Marcos Horácio; Lorenzo, Marcelo Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    Many arthropod species have adopted vertebrate blood as their main food source. Blood is rich in nutrients and, except for the presence of parasites, sterile. However, this food source is not freely available, nor is obtaining it devoid of risk. It circulates inside vessels hidden underneath the skin of mobile hosts that are able to defend themselves and even predate the insects that try to feed on them. Thus, the haematophagous lifestyle is associated with major morphological, physiological and behavioural adaptations that have accumulated throughout the evolutionary history of the various lineages of blood-sucking arthropods. These adaptations have significant consequences for the evolution of parasites as well as for the epidemiology of vector-transmitted diseases. In this review article, we analyse various aspects of the behaviour of triatomine bugs to illustrate how each behavioural trait represents a particular adaptation to their close association with their hosts, which may easily turn into predators. Our aim is to offer to the reader an up-to-date integrative perspective on the behaviour of Chagas disease vectors and to propose new research avenues to encourage both young and experienced colleagues to explore this aspect of triatomine biology.

  17. Behavioural biology of Chagas disease vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Ricardo Lazzari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many arthropod species have adopted vertebrate blood as their main food source. Blood is rich in nutrients and, except for the presence of parasites, sterile. However, this food source is not freely available, nor is obtaining it devoid of risk. It circulates inside vessels hidden underneath the skin of mobile hosts that are able to defend themselves and even predate the insects that try to feed on them. Thus, the haematophagous lifestyle is associated with major morphological, physiological and behavioural adaptations that have accumulated throughout the evolutionary history of the various lineages of blood-sucking arthropods. These adaptations have significant consequences for the evolution of parasites as well as for the epidemiology of vector-transmitted diseases. In this review article, we analyse various aspects of the behaviour of triatomine bugs to illustrate how each behavioural trait represents a particular adaptation to their close association with their hosts, which may easily turn into predators. Our aim is to offer to the reader an up-to-date integrative perspective on the behaviour of Chagas disease vectors and to propose new research avenues to encourage both young and experienced colleagues to explore this aspect of triatomine biology.

  18. Demographic, genetic, and environmental factors that modify disease course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrie, Ruth Ann

    2011-05-01

    As with susceptibility to disease, it is likely that multiple factors interact to influence the phenotype of multiple sclerosis and long-term disease outcomes. Such factors may include genetic factors, socioeconomic status, comorbid diseases, and health behaviors, as well as environmental exposures. An improved understanding of the influence of these factors on disease course may reap several benefits, such as improved prognostication, allowing us to tailor disease management with respect to intensity of disease-modifying therapies and changes in specific health behaviors, in the broad context of coexisting health issues. Such information can facilitate appropriately adjusted comparisons within and between populations. Elucidation of these factors will require careful study of well-characterized populations in which the roles of multiple factors are considered simultaneously. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mining biological databases for candidate disease genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Terry A.; Scheetz, Todd; Webster, Gregg L.; Casavant, Thomas L.

    2001-07-01

    The publicly-funded effort to sequence the complete nucleotide sequence of the human genome, the Human Genome Project (HGP), has currently produced more than 93% of the 3 billion nucleotides of the human genome into a preliminary `draft' format. In addition, several valuable sources of information have been developed as direct and indirect results of the HGP. These include the sequencing of model organisms (rat, mouse, fly, and others), gene discovery projects (ESTs and full-length), and new technologies such as expression analysis and resources (micro-arrays or gene chips). These resources are invaluable for the researchers identifying the functional genes of the genome that transcribe and translate into the transcriptome and proteome, both of which potentially contain orders of magnitude more complexity than the genome itself. Preliminary analyses of this data identified approximately 30,000 - 40,000 human `genes.' However, the bulk of the effort still remains -- to identify the functional and structural elements contained within the transcriptome and proteome, and to associate function in the transcriptome and proteome to genes. A fortuitous consequence of the HGP is the existence of hundreds of databases containing biological information that may contain relevant data pertaining to the identification of disease-causing genes. The task of mining these databases for information on candidate genes is a commercial application of enormous potential. We are developing a system to acquire and mine data from specific databases to aid our efforts to identify disease genes. A high speed cluster of Linux of workstations is used to analyze sequence and perform distributed sequence alignments as part of our data mining and processing. This system has been used to mine GeneMap99 sequences within specific genomic intervals to identify potential candidate disease genes associated with Bardet-Biedle Syndrome (BBS).

  20. Biological safety evaluation of the modified urinary catheter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalczuk, Dorota, E-mail: dorota.kowalczuk@umlub.pl [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Medical University of Lublin, Jaczewskiego 4, 20-090 Lublin (Poland); Przekora, Agata; Ginalska, Grazyna [Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Medical University of Lublin, Chodzki 1, 20-093 Lublin (Poland)

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vitro safety of the novel tosufloxacin (TOS)-treated catheters with the prolonged antimicrobial activity. The test samples of silicone latex catheter were prepared by the immobilization of TOS on chitosan (CHIT)-coated catheter by means of covalent bonds and non-covalent interactions. Each step of the modification process of catheter surface was observed using ATR–Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In vitro cytotoxicity of the modified and unmodified catheters was assessed by direct and indirect tests in accordance with ISO standards using green monkey kidney (GMK) cell line. The MTT, lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH), WST-8, Sulforhodamine B (SRB) test results and microscopic observation clearly indicated that unmodified silicone latex catheters decrease cell metabolic activity, act as a cytotoxic agent causing cell lysis and induce cell death through necrotic or apoptotic process. We suggest that chitosan coat with TOS immobilized limits leaching of harmful agents from silicone latex material, which significantly enhances survivability of GMK cells and therefore is quite a good protection against the cytotoxic effect of this material. - Highlights: • Characterization of the novel antimicrobial urinary catheters • Monitoring of the catheter modification by FTIR analysis • Confirmation of high cytotoxicity of latex-based catheter used in urological practice • Chitosan-coated and tosufloxacin-treated catheter is less toxic than the untreated one. • The proposed surface modification protects cells against latex-induced death.

  1. Alginate-modifying enzymes: Biological roles and biotechnological uses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helga eErtesvåg

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Alginate denotes a group of industrially important 1-4-linked biopolymers composed of the C-5-epimers β-D-mannuronic acid (M and α-L-guluronic acid (G. The polysaccharide is manufactured from brown algae where it constitutes the main structural cell wall polymer. The physical properties of a given alginate molecule, e.g. gel-strength, water-binding capacity, viscosity and biocompatibility, are determined by polymer length, the relative amount and distribution of G residues and the acetyl content, all of which are controlled by alginate modifying enzymes. Alginate has also been isolated from some bacteria belonging to the genera Pseudomonas and Azotobacter, and bacterially synthesized alginate may be O-acetylated at O-2 and/or O-3. Initially, alginate is synthesized as polymannuronic acid, and some M residues are subsequently epimerized to G residues. In bacteria a mannuronan C-5-epimerase (AlgG and an alginate acetylase (AlgX are integral parts of the protein complex necessary for alginate polymerisation and export. All alginate-producing bacteria use periplasmic alginate lyases to remove alginate molecules aberrantly released to the periplasm. Alginate lyases are also produced by organisms that utilize alginate as carbon source. Most alginate-producing organisms encode more than one mannuronan C-5 epimerase, each introducing its specific pattern of G residues. Acetylation protects against further epimerization and from most alginate lyases. One enzyme with alginate deacetylase activity from Pseudomonas syringae has been reported. Functional and structural studies reveal that alginate lyases and epimerases have related enzyme mechanisms and catalytic sites. Alginate lyases are now utilized as tools for alginate characterization. Secreted epimerases have been shown to function well in vitro, and have been engineered further in order to obtain enzymes that can provide alginates with new and desired properties for use in medical and

  2. Progress in the understanding and utilization of biologic response modifiers in the treatment of uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Arash; Meese, Halea; Sahawneh, Haitham; Foster, C Stephen

    2016-07-01

    Uveitis is the third most common cause of blindness in developed countries. Considering the systemic and local complications of long-term corticosteroid therapy and the intolerance due to side effects and ineffectiveness of conventional chemotherapy, use of biologic response modifiers is a reasonable alternative in the treatment of non-infectious uveitis and persistent uveitic macular edema. The majority of the evidence presented here comes from open uncontrolled analyses. Based on these studies, tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors, especially infliximab and adalimumab, have been shown to be effective in the treatment of non-infectious uveitis in numerous studies. More research is necessary, particularly multi-center randomized clinical trials, to address the choice of biologic response modifier agent and the length of treatment as we employ biologic response modifiers in different types of uveitis and persistent uveitic macular edema.

  3. Disease-threat model explains acceptance of genetically modified products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prokop Pavol

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural selection favoured survival of individuals who were able to avoid disease. The behavioural immune system is activated especially when our sensory system comes into contact with disease-connoting cues and/or when these cues resemble disease threat. We investigated whether or not perception of modern risky technologies, risky behaviour, expected reproductive goals and food neophobia are associated with the behavioural immune system related to specific attitudes toward genetically modified (GM products. We found that respondents who felt themselves more vulnerable to infectious diseases had significantly more negative attitudes toward GM products. Females had less positive attitudes toward GM products, but engaging in risky behaviours, the expected reproductive goals of females and food neophobia did not predict attitudes toward GM products. Our results suggest that evolved psychological mechanisms primarily designed to protect us against pathogen threat are activated by modern technologies possessing potential health risks.

  4. Telomere biology in healthy aging and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oeseburg, Hisko; de Boer, Rudolf A.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; van der Harst, Pim

    Aging is a biological process that affects most cells, organisms and species. Telomeres have been postulated as a universal biological clock that shortens in parallel with aging in cells. Telomeres are located at the end of the chromosomes and consist of an evolutionary conserved repetitive

  5. Biomarker-driven phenotyping in Parkinson disease: a translational missing link in disease-modifying clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espay, Alberto J.; Schwarzschild, Michael A.; Tanner, Caroline M.; Fernandez, Hubert H; Simon, David K.; Leverenz, James B.; Merola, Aristide; Chen-Plotkin, Alice; Brundin, Patrik; Kauffman, Marcelo A.; Erro, Roberto; Kieburtz, Karl; Woo, Daniel; Macklin, Eric A.; Standaert, David G.; Lang, Anthony E.

    2016-01-01

    Past clinical trials of putative neuroprotective therapies have targeted Parkinson disease (PD) as a single pathogenic disease entity. From an Oslerian clinico-pathologic perspective, the wide complexity of PD converges into Lewy bodies and justifies a reductionist approach to PD: a single-mechanism therapy can affect most of those sharing the classic pathologic hallmark. From a systems-biology perspective, PD is a group of disorders that, while related by sharing the feature of nigral dopamine-neuron degeneration, exhibit unique genetic, biological and molecular abnormalities, which probably respond differentially to a given therapeutic approach, particularly for strategies aimed at neuroprotection. Under this model, only biomarker-defined, homogenous subtypes of PD are likely to respond optimally to therapies proven to affect the biological processes within each subtype. Therefore, we suggest that precision medicine applied to PD requires a reevaluation of the biomarker-discovery effort. This effort is currently centered on correlating biological measures to clinical features of PD and on identifying factors that predict whether various prodromal states will convert into the classical movement disorder. We suggest, instead, that subtyping of PD requires the reverse view, where abnormal biological signals (i.e., biomarkers) rather than clinical definitions are used to define disease phenotypes. Successful development of disease-modifying strategies will depend on how relevant the specific biological processes addressed by an intervention are to the pathogenetic mechanisms in the subgroup of targeted patients. This precision-medicine approach will likely yield smaller but well-defined subsets of PD amenable to successful neuroprotection. PMID:28233927

  6. Benefits and costs of biologically contained genetically modified tomatoes and eggplants in Italy and Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneveld, R.A.; Ansink, E.; Wiel, van de C.C.M.; Wesseler, J.H.H.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we assess the benefits and costs of introducing biologically contained genetically modified (GM) crops, with an application to the potential introduction of GM tomatoes and eggplants in Italy and Spain. Such crops possess both the standard beneficial GM traits, and they prevent

  7. ChemProt: a disease chemical biology database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taboureau, Olivier; Nielsen, Sonny Kim; Audouze, Karine Marie Laure

    2011-01-01

    Systems pharmacology is an emergent area that studies drug action across multiple scales of complexity, from molecular and cellular to tissue and organism levels. There is a critical need to develop network-based approaches to integrate the growing body of chemical biology knowledge with network...... biology. Here, we report ChemProt, a disease chemical biology database, which is based on a compilation of multiple chemical-protein annotation resources, as well as disease-associated protein-protein interactions (PPIs). We assembled more than 700 000 unique chemicals with biological annotation for 30...... evaluation of environmental chemicals, natural products and approved drugs, as well as the selection of new compounds based on their activity profile against most known biological targets, including those related to adverse drug events. Results from the disease chemical biology database associate citalopram...

  8. Discussion: DMARDs and biologic therapies in the management of inflammatory joint diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Austin; Lisse, Jeffrey; Rizzo, Warren; Albani, Salvatore

    2009-05-01

    Therapy for inflammatory joint diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, includes various conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). These therapeutic agents are termed DMARDs because they have the potential to reduce or prevent joint damage and preserve joint integrity and function. Conventional DMARDs are used as monotherapy or in combination and include methotrexate, leflunomide, azathioprine, ciclosporin, hydroxychloroquine, sulfasalazine, gold and minocycline. Biologic response modifiers, which are based on proteins made by living cells, are newer agents available for the treatment of various inflammatory joint diseases. Biologic therapies now approved for use in inflammatory joint diseases are TNF inhibitors, T-cell modulators and B-cell depleters. They have all been shown to have clinical efficacy and are able to retard structural damage. However, all current immune-modulating therapies also have potential side effects, and the decision to use a particular agent for treatment should be based on a thorough discussion of the benefits and risks with the patient. Newer biologic response modifiers and other immunologic therapies are currently being developed for the treatment of inflammatory joint diseases and are discussed in this review.

  9. Guidance for Modifying the Definition of Diseases: A Checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doust, Jenny; Vandvik, Per O; Qaseem, Amir; Mustafa, Reem A; Horvath, Andrea R; Frances, Allen; Al-Ansary, Lubna; Bossuyt, Patrick; Ward, Robyn L; Kopp, Ina; Gollogly, Laragh; Schunemann, Holger; Glasziou, Paul

    2017-07-01

    No guidelines exist currently for guideline panels and others considering changes to disease definitions. Panels frequently widen disease definitions, increasing the proportion of the population labeled as unwell and potentially causing harm to patients. We set out to develop a checklist of issues, with guidance, for panels to consider prior to modifying a disease definition. We assembled a multidisciplinary, multicontinent working group of 13 members, including members from the Guidelines International Network, Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation working group, and the World Health Organisation. We used a 5-step process to develop the checklist: (1) a literature review of issues, (2) a draft outline document, (3) a Delphi process of feedback on the list of issues, (4) a 1-day face-to-face meeting, and (5) further refinement of the checklist. The literature review identified 12 potential issues. From these, the group developed an 8-item checklist that consisted of definition changes, number of people affected, trigger, prognostic ability, disease definition precision and accuracy, potential benefits, potential harms, and the balance between potential harms and benefits. The checklist is accompanied by an explanation of each item and the types of evidence to assess each one. We used a panel's recent consideration of a proposed change in the definition of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) to illustrate use of the checklist. We propose that the checklist be piloted and validated by groups developing new guidelines. We anticipate that the use of the checklist will be a first step to guidance and better documentation of definition changes prior to introducing modified disease definitions.

  10. An overview of the biological disease modifying drugs available for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    transcription factors AP-1 and NF-κB to the cell nucleus, as shown in Figure ... of naïve T cells requires the CD80/86 costimulatory molecules on .... arthritis: abridged Cochrane systematic review and network meta-analysis. Br ... N. Engl J Med.

  11. ChemProt: A disease chemical biology database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taboureau, Olivier; Oprea, Tudor I.

    2013-01-01

    The integration of chemistry, biology, and informatics to study drug actions across multiple biological targets, pathways, and biological systems is an emerging paradigm in drug discovery. Rather than reducing a complex system to simplistic models, fields such as chemogenomics and translational...... informatics are seeking to build a holistic model for a better understanding of the drug pharmacology and clinical effects. Here we will present a webserver called ChemProt that can assist, in silico, the drug actions in the context of cellular and disease networks and contribute in the field of disease...... chemical biology, drug repurposing, and off-target effects prediction....

  12. Modifiable Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors among Indigenous Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam A. Lucero

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To identify modifiable cardio-metabolic and lifestyle risk factors among indigenous populations from Australia (Aboriginal Australians/Torres Strait Islanders, New Zealand (Māori, and the United States (American Indians and Alaska Natives that contribute to cardiovascular disease (CVD. Methods. National health surveys were identified where available. Electronic databases identified sources for filling missing data. The most relevant data were identified, organized, and synthesized. Results. Compared to their non-indigenous counterparts, indigenous populations exhibit lower life expectancies and a greater prevalence of CVD. All indigenous populations have higher rates of obesity and diabetes, hypertension is greater for Māori and Aboriginal Australians, and high cholesterol is greater only among American Indians/Alaska Natives. In turn, all indigenous groups exhibit higher rates of smoking and dangerous alcohol behaviour as well as consuming less fruits and vegetables. Aboriginal Australians and American Indians/Alaska Natives also exhibit greater rates of sedentary behaviour. Conclusion. Indigenous groups from Australia, New Zealand, and the United States have a lower life expectancy then their respective non-indigenous counterparts. A higher prevalence of CVD is a major driving force behind this discrepancy. A cluster of modifiable cardio-metabolic risk factors precede CVD, which, in turn, is linked to modifiable lifestyle risk factors.

  13. Healthy aging and disease : role for telomere biology?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Haidong; Belcher, Matthew; van der Harst, Pim

    Aging is a biological process that affects most cells, organisms and species. Human aging is associated with increased susceptibility to a variety of chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease, Type 2 diabetes, neurological diseases and cancer. Despite the remarkable progress made during the

  14. 77 FR 59930 - Clinical Development Programs for Disease-Modifying Agents for Peripheral Neuropathy; Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ...] Clinical Development Programs for Disease-Modifying Agents for Peripheral Neuropathy; Public Workshop... to the clinical development of disease-modifying agents for the treatment of peripheral neuropathy... disease-modifying products for the management of peripheral neuropathy. Date and Time: The public workshop...

  15. Modified clay minerals efficiency against chemical and biological warfare agents for civil human protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plachá, Daniela; Rosenbergová, Kateřina; Slabotínský, Jiří; Kutláková, Kateřina Mamulová; Studentová, Soňa; Martynková, Gražyna Simha

    2014-04-30

    Sorption efficiencies of modified montmorillonite and vermiculite of their mono ionic Na and organic HDTMA and HDP forms were studied against chemical and biological warfare agents such as yperite and selected bacterial strains. Yperite interactions with modified clay minerals were observed through its capture in low-density polyethylene foil-modified clay composites by measuring yperite gas permeation with using chemical indication and gas chromatography methods. The antibacterial activities of synthetized organoclays were tested against selected Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial species in minimum inhibitory concentration tests. The obtained results showed a positive influence of modified clay minerals on the significant yperite breakthrough-time increase. The most effective material was the polyethylene-Na form montmorillonite, while the polyethylene-Na form vermiculite showed the lowest efficiency. With increasing organic cations loading in the interlayer space the montmorillonite efficiency decreased, and in the case of vermiculite an opposite effect was observed. Generally the modified montmorillonites were more effective than modified vermiculites. The HDP cations seem to be more effective compare to the HDTMA. The antibacterial activity tests confirmed efficiency of all organically modified clay minerals against Gram-positive bacteria. The confirmation of antibacterial activity against Y. pestis, plague bacteria, is the most interesting result of this part of the study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. [Biological treatment of rare inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baslund, B.

    2008-01-01

    The current status of the use of biological medicine in the treatment of adult onset morbus still, Wegeners granulomatosis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is reviewed. The need for controlled trials is emphasized. Anti-CD20 treatment for SLE patients with kidney involvement and patients wi...

  17. Systems Biology of Glucocorticoids in Muscle Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    Introduction Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common and incurable muscular dystrophy of childhood. Muscle regeneration fails with...SUBJECT TERMS Duchenne Muscular dystrophy , Glucocorticoids, Systems biology, Drug mechanism 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: U 17. LIMITATION...better targeted and more effective therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy dynamically. This MDA grant proposal is led by Dr. Eric Hoffman, and it

  18. The biological substrates of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheibel, A.B.; Wechsler, A.F.; Brazier, M.A.B.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 21 selections. Some of the titles are: Dementia of the Alzheimer Type: Genetic Aspects; Determination of Cerebral Metabolic Patterns in Dementia Using Positron Emission Tomography; Pathology of the Basal Forebrain in Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias; Characterization of Neurofibrillary Tangles with Monoclonal Antibodies Raised Against Alzheimer Neurofibrillary Tangles; and HLA Associations in Alzheimer's Disease

  19. Benefits and Costs of Biologically Contained Genetically Modified Tomatoes and Eggplants in Italy and Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf A. Groeneveld

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we assess the benefits and costs of introducing biologically contained genetically modified (GM crops, with an application to the potential introduction of GM tomatoes and eggplants in Italy and Spain. Such crops possess both the standard beneficial GM traits, and they prevent introgression of transgenes from GM crops to their conventional or wild relatives, thereby adding to the safety of their cultivation. As a result, coexistence regulations for these crops are less stringent than for crops without biological containment. The potential adoption of biologically contained GM tomatoes and eggplants is assessed in a cost-benefit framework for Italy and Spain. We conclude that biological containment has considerable potential benefits if policy makers are willing to loosen the restrictions on the introduction of these varieties.

  20. Molecular biology applications to infectious diseases diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This project goes directed to the applications of the techniques of molecular biology in hepatitis virus.A great advance of these techniques it allows its application to the diagnose molecular and it becomes indispensable to have these fundamental tools in the field of the Health Public for the detection precocious, pursuit of the treatment, the one predicts and the evolution of the patient hepatitis bearing virus technical.Use of molecular biology to increase the handling and the control of the patients with hepatitis B and C and to detect an adult numbers of positive cases by means of the training and integration of all the countries participating.Implement the technique of PCR to identify the virus of the hepatitis B and C,implement quantification methods and genotipification for these virus

  1. Piezosurgery in Modified Pterional Orbital Decompression Surgery in Graves Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauvogel, Juergen; Scheiwe, Christian; Masalha, Waseem; Jarc, Nadja; Grauvogel, Tanja; Beringer, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    Piezosurgery uses microvibrations to selectively cut bone, preserving the adjacent soft tissue. The present study evaluated the use of piezosurgery for bone removal in orbital decompression surgery in Graves disease via a modified pterional approach. A piezosurgical device (Piezosurgery medical) was used in 14 patients (20 orbits) with Graves disease who underwent orbital decompression surgery in additional to drills and rongeurs for bone removal of the lateral orbital wall and orbital roof. The practicability, benefits, and drawbacks of this technique in orbital decompression surgery were recorded. Piezosurgery was evaluated with respect to safety, preciseness of bone cutting, and preservation of the adjacent dura and periorbita. Preoperative and postoperative clinical outcome data were assessed. The orbital decompression surgery was successful in all 20 orbits, with good clinical outcomes and no postoperative complications. Piezosurgery proved to be a safe tool, allowing selective bone cutting with no damage to the surrounding soft tissue structures. However, there were disadvantages concerning the intraoperative handling in the narrow space and the efficiency of bone removal was limited in the orbital decompression surgery compared with drills. Piezosurgery proved to be a useful tool in bone removal for orbital decompression in Graves disease. It is safe and easy to perform, without any danger of damage to adjacent tissue because of its selective bone-cutting properties. Nonetheless, further development of the device is necessary to overcome the disadvantages in intraoperative handling and the reduced bone removal rate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Research on the Hydrophilic Modified of LDPE for the New Biological Suspended Filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Weijia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Urban sewage is one of the main pollution sources of the city, which pollute soil, deteriorate the water quality and increase the water shortages and urban load. LDPE is low cost and widely used as the basic material of wastewater treatment, but LDPE’s hydrophilic is not good enough to meet the need of suspended filler in wastewater treatment. In this paper the hydrophilic modified of LDPE for the new biological suspended filler was studied and the preparation and processing technique based on LDPE was researched. The hydrophilic and mechanic performance of the hydrophilic modified materials was tested. Results shown that the new type of hydrophilic modified materials has good hydrophilic and meets the demand of urban sewage treatment. The research on the new suspended filler materials has great meaning in solving the problem of urban sewage and recycling.

  3. Established and emerging biological activity markers of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O H; Vainer, B; Madsen, S M

    2000-01-01

    Assessment of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), i.e., ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), is done using clinical parameters and various biological disease markers. Ideally, a disease marker must: be able to identify individuals at risk of a given disorder......, be disease specific, mirror the disease activity and, finally, be easily applicable for routine clinical purposes. However, no such disease markers have yet been identified for IBD. In this article, classical disease markers including erythrocyte sedimentation rate, acute phase proteins (especially...... orosomucoid and CRP), leukocyte and platelet counts, albumin, neopterin, and beta2-microglobulin will be reviewed together with emerging disease markers such as antibodies of the ANCA/ASCA type, cytokines (e.g., IL-1, IL-2Ralpha, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-alpha, and TNF-alpha receptors) and with various adhesion...

  4. Established and emerging biological activity markers of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O H; Vainer, B; Madsen, S M

    2000-01-01

    orosomucoid and CRP), leukocyte and platelet counts, albumin, neopterin, and beta2-microglobulin will be reviewed together with emerging disease markers such as antibodies of the ANCA/ASCA type, cytokines (e.g., IL-1, IL-2Ralpha, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-alpha, and TNF-alpha receptors) and with various adhesion......Assessment of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), i.e., ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), is done using clinical parameters and various biological disease markers. Ideally, a disease marker must: be able to identify individuals at risk of a given disorder......, be disease specific, mirror the disease activity and, finally, be easily applicable for routine clinical purposes. However, no such disease markers have yet been identified for IBD. In this article, classical disease markers including erythrocyte sedimentation rate, acute phase proteins (especially...

  5. An Integrative Systems Biology Approach to Understanding Pulmonary Diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Auffray, Charles; Adcock, Ian M.; Chung, Kian Fan; Djukanovic, Ratko; Pison, Christophe; Sterk, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory pulmonary diseases such as COPD and asthma are highly prevalent and associated with a major health burden worldwide. Despite a wealth of biologic and clinical information on normal and pathologic airway structure and function, the primary causes and mechanisms of disease remain

  6. The DNA-damage response in human biology and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, Stephen P; Bartek, Jiri

    2009-01-01

    , signal its presence and mediate its repair. Such responses, which have an impact on a wide range of cellular events, are biologically significant because they prevent diverse human diseases. Our improving understanding of DNA-damage responses is providing new avenues for disease management....

  7. Molecular biology of human muscle disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunne, P.W.; Epstein, H.F. (Baylor Coll. of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States))

    1991-01-01

    The molecular revolution that is transforming the entire biomedical field has had far-reaching impact in its application to inherited human muscle disease. The gene for Duchenne muscular dystrophy was one of the first cloned without knowledge of the defective protein product. This success was based upon the availability of key chromosomal aberrations that provided molecular landmarks for the disease locus. Subsequent discoveries regarding the mode of expression for this gene, the structure and localization of its protein product dystrophin, and molecular diagnosis of affected and carrier individuals constitute a paradigm for investigation of human genetics. Finding the gene for myotonic muscular dystrophy is requiring the brute force approach of cloning several million bases of DNA, identifying expressed sequences, and characterizing candidate genes. The gene that causes hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has been found serendipitously to be one of the genetic markers on chromosome 14, the {beta} myosin heavy chain.

  8. Reduced or modified dietary fat for preventing cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Hooper

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Reduction and modification of dietary fats have differing effects on cardiovascular risk factors (such as serum cholesterol, but their effects on important health outcomes are less clear. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of reduction and/or modification of dietary fats on mortality, cardiovascular mortality, cardiovascular morbidity and individual outcomes including myocardial infarction, stroke and cancer diagnoses in randomised clinical trials of at least 6 months duration. METHODS: Search methods: For this review update, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, Medline and Embase, were searched through to June 2010. References of Included studies and reviews were also checked. Selection criteria: Trials fulfilled the following criteria: 1 randomized with appropriate control group, 2 intention to reduce or modify fat or cholesterol intake (excluding exclusively omega-3 fat interventions, 3 not multi factorial, 4 adult humans with or without cardiovascular disease, 5 intervention at least six months, 6 mortality or cardiovascular morbidity data available. Data collection and analysis: Participant numbers experiencing health outcomes in each arm were extracted independently in duplicate and random effects meta-analyses, meta-regression, sub-grouping, sensitivity analyses and funnel plots were performed. MAIN RESULTS: This updated review suggested that reducing saturated fat by reducing and/or modifying dietary fat reduced the risk of cardiovascular events by 14% (RR 0.86, 95% CI 0.77 to 0.96, 24 comparisons, 65,508 participants of whom 7% had a cardiovascular event, I2 50%. Subgrouping suggested that this reduction in cardiovascular events was seen in studies of fat modification (not reduction - which related directly to the degree of effect on serum total and LDL cholesterol and triglycerides, of at least two years duration and in studies of men (not of women. There were no clear effects of dietary fat

  9. Reduced or modified dietary fat for preventing cardiovascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Lee; Summerbell, Carolyn D; Thompson, Rachel; Sills, Deirdre; Roberts, Felicia G; Moore, Helen; Smith, George Davey

    2014-01-01

    Background Reduction and modification of dietary fats have differing effects on cardiovascular risk factors (such as serum cholesterol), but their effects on important health outcomes are less clear. Objectives To assess the effect of reduction and/or modification of dietary fats on mortality, cardiovascular mortality, cardiovascular morbidity and individual outcomes including myocardial infarction, stroke and cancer diagnoses in randomised clinical trials of at least 6 months duration. Search methods For this review update, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE and EMBASE, were searched through to June 2010. References of Included studies and reviews were also checked. Selection criteria Trials fulfilled the following criteria: 1) randomised with appropriate control group, 2) intention to reduce or modify fat or cholesterol intake (excluding exclusively omega-3 fat interventions), 3) not multi factorial, 4) adult humans with or without cardiovascular disease, 5) intervention at least six months, 6) mortality or cardiovascular morbidity data available. Data collection and analysis Participant numbers experiencing health outcomes in each arm were extracted independently in duplicate and random effects meta-analyses, meta-regression, sub-grouping, sensitivity analyses and funnel plots were performed. Main results This updated review suggested that reducing saturated fat by reducing and/or modifying dietary fat reduced the risk of cardiovascular events by 14% (RR 0.86, 95% CI 0.77 to 0.96, 24 comparisons, 65,508 participants of whom 7% had a cardiovascular event, I2 50%). Subgrouping suggested that this reduction in cardiovascular events was seen in studies of fat modification (not reduction - which related directly to the degree of effect on serum total and LDL cholesterol and triglycerides), of at least two years duration and in studies of men (not of women). There were no clear effects of dietary fat changes on total mortality (RR 0

  10. Biological markers of Alzheimer?s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Cruz de Souza

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The challenges for establishing an early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD have created a need for biomarkers that reflect the core pathology of the disease. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF levels of total Tau (T-tau, phosphorylated Tau (P-Tau and beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ42 reflect, respectively, neurofibrillary tangle and amyloid pathologies and are considered as surrogate markers of AD pathophysiology. The combination of low Aβ42 and high levels of T-tau and P-Tau can accurately identify patients with AD at early stages, even before the development of dementia. The combined analysis of the CSF biomarkers is also helpful for the differential diagnosis between AD and other degenerative dementias. The development of these CSF biomarkers has evolved to a novel diagnostic definition of the disease. The identification of a specific clinical phenotype combined with the in vivo evidence of pathophysiological markers offers the possibility to make a diagnosis of AD before the dementia stage with high specificity.

  11. Biologic agents therapy for Saudi children with rheumatic diseases: indications and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mayouf, Sulaiman M; Alenazi, Abdullatif; AlJasser, Hind

    2016-06-01

    To report the indications and safety of biologic agents in childhood rheumatic diseases at a tertiary hospital. Children with rheumatic diseases treated with biologic agents at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, from January 2001 to December 2011 were included. All patients were reviewed for: demographic characteristics, diagnosis, concomitant treatment and indications of using biologic agents, age at start of therapy and side effects during the treatment period. In all, 134 children (89 female) with various rheumatic diseases were treated with biologic agents. Mean age at starting biologic treatment was 9.3 (4.25-14) years and mean therapy duration was 14.7 (3-88) months. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) was the most frequent diagnosis (70.1%) followed by systemic lupus erythematosus (12.7%) and vasculitis (4.5%). All patients received concomitant therapy (corticosteroids and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs). In total, 273 treatments with biologic agents were used, (95 etanercept, 52 rituximab, 47 adalimumab, 37 infliximab, 23 anakinra, 10 tocilizumab and nine abatacept). Therapy was switched to another agent in 57 (42.5%) patients, mainly because of inefficacy (89.4%) or adverse event (10.6%). A total of 95 (34.8%) adverse events were notified; of these, the most frequent were infusion-related reactions (33.7%) followed by infections (24.2%) and autoantibody positivity (10.6%). One patient developed macrophage activation syndrome. Biologic agents were used in children with a range of rheumatic diseases. Of these, the most frequent was JIA. Off-label use of biologic agents in our cohort is common. These agents seem safe. However, they may associated with various adverse events. Sequential therapy seems well tolerated. However, this should be carefully balanced and considered on an individual basis. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Established and novel disease-modifying treatments in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, A H; Naismith, R T

    2014-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a presumed autoimmune disorder of the central nervous system, resulting in inflammatory demyelination and axonal and neuronal injury. New diagnostic criteria that incorporate magnetic resonance imaging have resulted in earlier and more accurate diagnosis of MS. Several immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive therapeutic agents are available for relapsing forms of MS, which allow individualized treatment based upon the benefits and risks. Disease-modifying therapies introduced in the 1990s, the beta-interferons and glatiramer acetate, have an established track record of efficacy and safety, although they require administration via injection. More recently, monoclonal antibodies have been engineered to act through specific mechanisms such as blocking alpha-4 integrin interactions (natalizumab) or lysing cells bearing specific markers, for example CD52 (alemtuzumab) or CD20 (ocrelizumab and ofatumumab). These agents can be highly efficacious, but sometimes have serious potential complications (natalizumab is associated with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy; alemtuzumab is associated with the development of new autoimmune disorders). Three new oral therapies (fingolimod, teriflunomide and dimethyl fumarate, approved for MS treatment from 2010 onwards) provide efficacy, tolerability and convenience; however, as yet, there are no long-term postmarketing efficacy and safety data in a general MS population. Because of this lack of long-term data, in some cases, therapy is currently initiated with the older, safer injectable medications, but patients are monitored closely with the plan to switch therapies if there is any indication of a suboptimal response or intolerance or lack of adherence to the initial therapy. For patients with MS who present with highly inflammatory and potentially aggressive disease, the benefit-to-risk ratio may support initiating therapy using a drug with greater potential efficacy despite greater risks (e

  13. Molecular Biology of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Baki Yokeş

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly. The disease, clinically characterized by a progressive decline in intellectual functions, becomes increasingly distressing for the patient and for his/her caregivers, since it is also associated with psychosis, depresion, agitation, anxiety and loss of personality. The two neuropathological hallmarks of AD are senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Following diagnosis, the course of AD varies considerably from a few years to over 20 years, with a mean survival of 2-8 years according to age of onset. A positive family history, previous head injury depression, atherosclerosis low education level are found to be risk factors for AD besides age, which is the most effective risk factor. AD usually onsets after age of 65 years and its prevalence increases with age. Late-onset AD occurs after the age of 65 and 70% of those cases are sporadic; 60 % of early-onset AD, occuring before 65 years are familial. In a small number of pedigrees, AD segregates with a fully penetrant autosomal dominant trait, which indicates that AD has a genetic ethiology. To date, three genes are identified that when mutated cause early-onset AD: β-amyloid precursor protein gene (APP, Presenilin 1 gene (PS1 and Presenilin 2 gene (PS2. Together these mutations, which are by themselves sufficient to cause early-onset AD, account for 2-10% of the whole AD population. The mutations located in the coding region of these genes, increase the production of Aβ42, thereby leading to an increased Aβ deposition, which is the major component of the senile plaques. Apolipoprotein E (APOE gene is an other indication for the genetic ethiology of AD. ApoE4 allele has been shown to be a risk factor for sporadic and familial AD in multiple populations. To date more than 100 genes, including the promoter regions of PS1, PS2 and APOE, have been considered to contribute to sporadic AD pathology; however the

  14. Glycogen storage disease type III: modified Atkins diet improves myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorandan, Sebene; Meyer, Uta; Hartmann, Hans; Das, Anibh Martin

    2014-11-28

    Frequent feeds with carbohydrate-rich meals or continuous enteral feeding has been the therapy of choice in glycogen storage disease (Glycogenosis) type III. Recent guidelines on diagnosis and management recommend frequent feedings with high complex carbohydrates or cornstarch avoiding fasting in children, while in adults a low-carb-high-protein-diet is recommended. While this regimen can prevent hypoglycaemia in children it does not improve skeletal and heart muscle function, which are compromised in patients with glycogenosis IIIa. Administration of carbohydrates may elicit reactive hyperinsulinism, resulting in suppression of lipolysis, ketogenesis, gluconeogenesis, and activation of glycogen synthesis. Thus, heart and skeletal muscle are depleted of energy substrates. Modified Atkins diet leads to increased blood levels of ketone bodies and fatty acids. We hypothesize that this health care intervention improves the energetic balance of muscles. We treated 2 boys with glycogenosis IIIa aged 9 and 11 years with a modified Atkins diet (10 g carbohydrate per day, protein and fatty acids ad libitum) over a period of 32 and 26 months, respectively. In both patients, creatine kinase levels in blood dropped in response to Atkins diet. When diet was withdrawn in one of the patients he complained of chest pain, reduced physical strength and creatine kinase levels rapidly increased. This was reversed when Atkins diet was reintroduced. One patient suffered from severe cardiomyopathy which significantly improved under diet. Patients with glycogenosis IIIa benefit from an improved energetic state of heart and skeletal muscle by introduction of Atkins diet both on a biochemical and clinical level. Apart from transient hypoglycaemia no serious adverse effects were observed.

  15. Analysis of the Threat of Genetically Modified Organisms for Biological Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    biological warfare. The primary focus of the framework are those aspects of the technology directly affecting humans by inducing virulent infectious disease...applications. Simple organisms such as fruit flies have been used to study the effects of genetic changes across generations. Transgenic mice are...Analysis * Multi-cell pathogens * Toxins (Chemical products of living cells.) * Fungi (Robust organism; no genetic manipulation needed

  16. Biological Control of Plant Disease Caused by Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triwidodo Arwiyanto

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial diseases in plants are difficult to control. The emphasis is on preventing the spread of the bacteria rather than curing the diseased plant. Integrated management measures for bacterial plant pathogens should be applied for successfull control. Biological control is one of the control measures viz. through the use of microorganisms to suppress the growth and development of bacterial plant pathogen and ultimately reduce the possibility of disease onset. The study of biological control of bacterial plant pathogen was just began compared with of fungal plant pathogen. The ecological nature of diverse bacterial plant pathogens has led scientists to apply different approach in the investigation of its biological control. The complex process of entrance to its host plant for certain soil-borne bacterial plant pathogens need special techniques and combination of more than one biological control agent. Problem and progress in controlling bacterial plant pathogens biologically will be discussed in more detail in the paper and some commercial products of biological control agents (biopesticides will be introduced.     Penyakit tumbuhan karena bakteri sulit dikendalikan. Penekanan pengendalian adalah pada pencegahan penyebaran bakteri patogen dan bukan pada penyembuhan tanaman yang sudah sakit. Untuk suksesnya pengendalian bakteri patogen tumbuhan diperlukan cara pengelolaan yang terpadu. Pengendalian secara biologi merupakan salah satu cara pengendalian dengan menggunakan mikroorganisme untuk menekan pertumbuhan dan perkembangan bakteri patogen tumbuhan dengan tujuan akhir menurunkan kemungkinan timbulnya penyakit. Sifat ekologi bakteri patogen tumbuhan yang berbeda-beda mengharuskan pendekatan yang berbeda pula dalam pengendaliannya secara biologi. Masalah dan perkembangan dalam pengendalian bakteri patogen tumbuhan secara biologi didiskusikan secara detail dalam makalah ini.

  17. CINRG: Systems Biology of Glucocorticoids in Muscle Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Contract W81XWH-09-1-0726 SYSTEMS BIOLOGY OF GLUCOCORTICOIDS IN MUSCLE DISEASE Introduction Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most... muscle and enable the development of better targeted and more effective therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy dynamically. This MDA grant...common and incurable muscular dystrophy of childhood. Muscle regeneration fails with advancing age, leading to considerable fibrosis. Corticosteroid

  18. Using biological networks to improve our understanding of infectious diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola J. Mulder

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Infectious diseases are the leading cause of death, particularly in developing countries. Although many drugs are available for treating the most common infectious diseases, in many cases the mechanism of action of these drugs or even their targets in the pathogen remain unknown. In addition, the key factors or processes in pathogens that facilitate infection and disease progression are often not well understood. Since proteins do not work in isolation, understanding biological systems requires a better understanding of the interconnectivity between proteins in different pathways and processes, which includes both physical and other functional interactions. Such biological networks can be generated within organisms or between organisms sharing a common environment using experimental data and computational predictions. Though different data sources provide different levels of accuracy, confidence in interactions can be measured using interaction scores. Connections between interacting proteins in biological networks can be represented as graphs and edges, and thus studied using existing algorithms and tools from graph theory. There are many different applications of biological networks, and here we discuss three such applications, specifically applied to the infectious disease tuberculosis, with its causative agent Mycobacterium tuberculosis and host, Homo sapiens. The applications include the use of the networks for function prediction, comparison of networks for evolutionary studies, and the generation and use of host–pathogen interaction networks.

  19. Looking through the Lens: Adapting and Modifying Photovoice Projects for Active Learning and Engagement in Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Karobi Moitra

    2016-01-01

    Photovoice projects traditionally include original visual imagery and minimal text to tell a powerful story. Photovoice student projects have been utilized in the health and social sciences to involve students with the local community and also in community-based projects to help at-risk youth call attention to their community problems, such as disease and drug use. The tool of the photovoice can be used in the biology classroom to engage students in the active learning process through communi...

  20. Top-down approach to biological therapy of Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschmann, Simon; Neurath, Markus F

    2017-03-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic, immune-mediated condition with a potentially disabling and destructive course. Despite growing data on when to use a therapeutic 'top-down' strategy, clinical management of this complex disorder is still challenging. Currently, the discussion of 'top-down' strategy in CD mostly includes biological therapy alone or in combination. Areas covered: This article is based on a review of existing literature regarding the use of biological therapy in a 'top-down' approach for the treatment of Crohn's disease. The authors reviewed all the major databases including MEDLINE as well as DDW and ECCO abstracts, respectively. Expert opinion: A 'top-down' therapeutic approach in Crohn's disease is strongly supported by existing data in patients with several risk factors for a severe course of disease. Moreover, there is an increasing amount of published data recommending a more individualised therapeutic strategy to identify candidates for 'top-down' treatment, based on enhanced diagnostics using biomarkers. Emerging therapeutic approaches besides existing therapy concepts using biologicals may possibly redefine the 'top-down' therapeutic strategy for Crohn's disease in the future.

  1. Systems Biology of Meridians, Acupoints, and Chinese Herbs in Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Ling Lin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Meridians, acupoints, and Chinese herbs are important components of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM. They have been used for disease treatment and prevention and as alternative and complementary therapies. Systems biology integrates omics data, such as transcriptional, proteomic, and metabolomics data, in order to obtain a more global and complete picture of biological activity. To further understand the existence and functions of the three components above, we reviewed relevant research in the systems biology literature and found many recent studies that indicate the value of acupuncture and Chinese herbs. Acupuncture is useful in pain moderation and relieves various symptoms arising from acute spinal cord injury and acute ischemic stroke. Moreover, Chinese herbal extracts have been linked to wound repair, the alleviation of postmenopausal osteoporosis severity, and anti-tumor effects, among others. Different acupoints, variations in treatment duration, and herbal extracts can be used to alleviate various symptoms and conditions and to regulate biological pathways by altering gene and protein expression. Our paper demonstrates how systems biology has helped to establish a platform for investigating the efficacy of TCM in treating different diseases and improving treatment strategies.

  2. Impaired Perception of Biological Motion in Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaywant, Abhishek; Shiffrar, Maggie; Roy, Serge; Cronin-Golomb, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Objective We examined biological motion perception in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Biological motion perception is related to one’s own motor function and depends on the integrity of brain areas affected in PD, including posterior superior temporal sulcus. If deficits in biological motion perception exist, they may be specific to perceiving natural/fast walking patterns that individuals with PD can no longer perform, and may correlate with disease-related motor dysfunction. Method 26 non-demented individuals with PD and 24 control participants viewed videos of point-light walkers and scrambled versions that served as foils, and indicated whether each video depicted a human walking. Point-light walkers varied by gait type (natural, parkinsonian) and speed (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 m/s). Participants also completed control tasks (object motion, coherent motion perception), a contrast sensitivity assessment, and a walking assessment. Results The PD group demonstrated significantly less sensitivity to biological motion than the control group (pperception (p=.02, Cohen’s d=.68). There was no group difference in coherent motion perception. Although individuals with PD had slower walking speed and shorter stride length than control participants, gait parameters did not correlate with biological motion perception. Contrast sensitivity and coherent motion perception also did not correlate with biological motion perception. Conclusion PD leads to a deficit in perceiving biological motion, which is independent of gait dysfunction and low-level vision changes, and may therefore arise from difficulty perceptually integrating form and motion cues in posterior superior temporal sulcus. PMID:26949927

  3. Discontinuing disease-modifying therapy in progressive multiple sclerosis: can we stop what we have started?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lonergan, Roisin

    2012-02-01

    Disease-modifying therapy is ineffective in disabled patients (Expanded Disability Status Scale [EDSS] > 6.5) with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) without relapses, or in primary progressive MS. Many patients with secondary progressive MS who initially had relapsing MS continue to use disease-modifying therapies. The enormous associated costs are a burden to health services. Regular assessment is recommended to guide discontinuation of disease-modifying therapies when no longer beneficial, but this is unavailable to many patients, particularly in rural areas. The objectives of this study are as follows: 1. To observe use of disease-modifying therapies in patients with progressive multiple sclerosis and EDSS > 6.5. 2. To examine approaches used by a group of international MS experts to stopping-disease modifying therapies in patients with secondary progressive MS without relapses. During an epidemiological study in three regions of Ireland (southeast Dublin city, and Wexford and Donegal Counties), we recorded details of disease-modifying therapies in patients with progressive MS and EDSS > 6.5. An e-questionnaire was sent to 26 neurologists with expert knowledge of MS, asking them to share their approach to stopping disease-modifying therapies in patients with secondary progressive MS. Three hundred and thirty-six patients were studied: 88 from southeast Dublin, 99 from Wexford and 149 from Donegal. Forty-four had EDSS > 6.5: 12 were still using disease-modifying therapies. Of the surveyed neurologists, 15 made efforts to stop disease-modifying therapies in progressive multiple sclerosis, but most did not insist. A significant proportion (12 of 44 patients with progressive MS and EDSS > 6.5) was considered to be receiving therapy without benefit. Eleven of the 12 were from rural counties, reflecting poorer access to neurology services. The costs of disease-modifying therapies in this group (>170,000 euro yearly) could be re-directed towards development

  4. Disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug use in pregnant women with rheumatic diseases: a systematic review of the risk of congenital malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Corisande; Avina-Zubieta, Antonio; Rai, Sharan K; Carruthers, Erin; De Vera, Mary A

    2016-01-01

    Despite the high incidence of rheumatic diseases during the reproductive years, little is known about the impact of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug (DMARD) use during pregnancy. Our objective was to systematically review and appraise evidence in women with rheumatic disease on the use of traditional and biologic DMARDs during pregnancy and the risk of congenital malformation outcomes. We conducted a systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and INTERNATIONAL PHARMACEUTICAL ABSTRACTS databases. Inclusion criteria were: 1) study sample including women with rheumatic disease; 2) use of traditional and/or biologic DMARDs during pregnancy; and 3) congenital malformation outcome(s) reported. We extracted information on study design, data source, number of exposed pregnancies, type of DMARD, number of live births, and number of congenital malformations. Altogether, we included 79 studies; the majority were based on designs that did not involve a comparison group, including 26 case reports, 17 case series, 20 cross-sectional studies, and 4 surveys. Studies that had a comparator group included 1 case control, 10 cohort studies, and 1 controlled trial. Hydroxychloroquine and azathioprine represent the most studied traditional DMARD exposures and, among biologics, most of the reports were on infliximab and etanercept. This is the first systematic review on the use of both traditional and biologic DMARDs during pregnancy among women with rheumatic diseases and congenital malformation outcomes, with a focus on study design and quality. Findings confirm the limited number of studies, as well as the need to improve study designs.

  5. ANALISIS ARGUMENTASI MAHASISWA PENDIDIKAN BIOLOGI PADA ISU SOSIOSAINFIK KONSUMSI GENETICALLY MODIFIED ORGANISM (GMO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Herlanti

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menganalisis argumentasi yang dikemukakan oleh mahasiswa pendidikan biologi terkait isu sosiosaintifik yaitu konsumsi pangan Genetically Modified Organism (GMO.  Penelitian menggunakan metode survei secara online.  Partisipan yang berasal dari semester III-VII Universitas Islam Negeri Jakarta yang secara sukarela mengisi kuisioner online yang diunggah pada weblog. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan isu sosiosaintifik GMO lebih banyak ditanggapi secara saintifik oleh partisipan.  Argumentasi sebagian besar berada pada level II, yaitu telah mampu mengungkapkan sebuah klaim disertai dengan alasan. Hanya sedikit yang sudah mampu memberikan argumen secara holistik (level IV, yaitu mampu mengungkapkan argumen dengan alasan yang kuat yang tidak mudah dibantah.  Umumnya argumentasi yang dikemukan partisipan berjenis argumentasi sederhana dan argumentasi tipe rantai.  Berdasarkan temuan ini, perlu dikembangkan sebuah model perkuliahan yang dapat meningkatkan keterampilan berargumentasi. This research aimed to analyze the argument for socioscientifik issue “Genetically Modified Organism (GMO Food Consumtion”.  This reseach used online survey.  Participant filled online questionaire that uploaded in weblog.  Participants are student of biology education in Jakarta Islamic State University. The result showed most participants gave scientific view in their argument.  Most of argumentations were in level II; participants gave a klaim within a warrant.  Only a few argument were in level IV, it’s a holistic argument that contained a klaim, a warrant, a backing, and a rebuttal.  Most of argument had simple type or chain type.  From this result, university must develop strategies of lecturing to improve argumentation skill.

  6. [The trend of developing new disease-modifying drugs in Alzheimer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Hiroyuki; Furukawa, Katsutoshi; Tomita, Naoki; Ishiki, Aiko; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Kudo, Yukitsuka

    2016-03-01

    Development of symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer s disease by cholinesterase inhibitors like donepezil was successful. However, it is a disappointment that development of disease-modifying drugs such as anti-amyloid drug based on amyloid-cascade theory has been interrupted or unsuccessful. Therefore, we have to be more cautious regarding inclusion criteria for clinical trials of new drugs. We agree that potentially curative drugs should be started before symptoms begin as a preemptive therapy or prevention trial. The concept of personalized medicine also is important when ApoE4-related amyloid reducing therapy is considered. Unfortunately, Japanese-ADNI has suffered a setback since 2014. However, Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare gave a final remark that there was nothing wrong in the data managing process in the J-ADNI data center. We should pay more attention to worldwide challenges of speeding up new drug development.

  7. Developing Disease-Modifying Treatments in Alzheimer's Disease - A Perspective from Roche and Genentech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doody, R

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disease for which no preventative or disease-modifying treatments currently exist. Pathological hallmarks include amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyper-phosphorylated tau protein. Evidence suggests that both pathologies are self-propagating once established. However, the lag time between neuropathological changes in the brain and the onset of even subtle clinical symptomatology means that patients are often diagnosed late when pathology, and neurodegeneration secondary to these changes, may have been established for several years. Complex pathological pathways associated with susceptibility to AD and changes that occur downstream of the neuropathologic process further contribute to the challenging endeavour of developing novel disease-modifying therapy. Recognising this complexity, effective management of AD must include reliable screening and early diagnosis in combination with effective therapeutic management of the pathological processes. Roche and Genentech are committed to addressing these unmet needs through developing a comprehensive portfolio of diagnostics and novel therapies. Beginning with the most scientifically supported targets, this approach includes two targeted amyloid-β monoclonal antibody therapies, crenezumab and gantenerumab, and an anti-tau monoclonal antibody, RO7105705, as well as a robust biomarker platform to aid in the early identification of people at risk or in the early stages of AD. Identification and implementation of diagnostic tools will support the enrolment of patients into clinical trials; furthermore, these tools should also support evaluation of the clinical efficacy and safety profile of the novel therapeutic agents tested in these trials. This review discusses the therapeutic agents currently under clinical development.

  8. Dissecting the Molecular Mechanisms of Neurodegenerative Diseases through Network Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose A. Santiago

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases are rarely caused by a mutation in a single gene but rather influenced by a combination of genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors. Emerging high-throughput technologies such as RNA sequencing have been instrumental in deciphering the molecular landscape of neurodegenerative diseases, however, the interpretation of such large amounts of data remains a challenge. Network biology has become a powerful platform to integrate multiple omics data to comprehensively explore the molecular networks in the context of health and disease. In this review article, we highlight recent advances in network biology approaches with an emphasis in brain-networks that have provided insights into the molecular mechanisms leading to the most prevalent neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s (AD, Parkinson’s (PD and Huntington’s diseases (HD. We discuss how integrative approaches using multi-omics data from different tissues have been valuable for identifying biomarkers and therapeutic targets. In addition, we discuss the challenges the field of network medicine faces toward the translation of network-based findings into clinically actionable tools for personalized medicine applications.

  9. New FDA-Approved Disease-Modifying Therapies for Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Clayton; Aloi, Joseph J

    2015-04-01

    Interferon injectables and glatiramer acetate have served as the primary disease-modifying treatments for multiple sclerosis (MS) since their introduction in the 1990s and are first-line treatments for relapsing-remitting forms of MS (RRMS). Many new drug therapies were launched since early 2010, expanding the drug treatment options considerably in a disease state that once had a limited treatment portfolio. The purpose of this review is to critically evaluate the safety profile and efficacy data of disease-modifying agents for MS approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) from 2010 to the present and provide cost and available pharmacoeconomic data about each new treatment. Peer-reviewed clinical trials, pharmacoeconomic studies, and relevant pharmacokinetic/pharmacologic studies were identified from MEDLINE (January 2000-December 2014) by using the search terms multiple sclerosis, fingolimod, teriflunomide, alemtuzumab, dimethyl fumarate, pegylated interferon, peginterferon beta-1a, glatiramer 3 times weekly, and pharmacoeconomics. Citations from available articles were also reviewed for additional references. The databases publically available at www.clinicaltrials.gov and www.fda.gov were searched for unpublished studies or studies currently in progress. A total of 5 new agents and 1 new dosage formulation were approved by the FDA for the treatment of RRMS since 2010. Peginterferon beta-1a and high-dose glatiramer acetate represent 2 new effective injectable options for MS that reduce burden of administration seen with traditional interferon and low-dose glatiramer acetate. Fingolimod, teriflunomide, and dimethyl fumarate represent new oral agents available for MS, and their efficacy in reducing annualized relapse rates is 48% to 55%, 22% to 36.3%, and 44% to 53%, respectively, compared with placebo. Alemtuzumab is a biologic given over a 2-year span that reduced annualized relapse rates by 55% in treatment-naive patients and by 49% in patients

  10. A new proposal for randomized start design to investigate disease-modifying therapies for Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Richard Y; Leon, Andrew C; Chuang-Stein, Christy; Romano, Steven J

    2011-02-01

    The increasing prevalence of Alzheimer disease (AD) and lack of effective agents to attenuate progression have accelerated research and development of disease modifying (DM) therapies. The traditional parallel group design and single time point analysis used in the support of past AD drug approvals address symptomatic benefit over relatively short treatment durations. More recent trials investigating disease modification are by necessity longer in duration and require larger sample sizes. Nevertheless, trial design and analysis remain mostly unchanged and may not be adequate to meet the objective of demonstrating disease modification. Randomized start design (RSD) has been proposed as an option to study DM effects, but its application in AD trials may have been hampered by certain methodological challenges. To address the methodological issues that have impeded more extensive use of RSD in AD trial and to encourage other researchers to develop novel design and analysis methodologies to better ascertain DM effects for the next generation of AD therapies, we propose a stepwise testing procedure to evaluate potential DM effects of novel AD therapies. Alzheimer Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Subscale (ADAS-cog) is used for illustration. We propose to test three hypotheses in a stepwise sequence. The three tests pertain to treatment difference at two separate time points and a difference in the rate of change. Estimation is facilitated by the Mixed-effects Model for Repeated Measures approach. The required sample size is estimated using Monte Carlo simulations and by modeling ADAS-cog data from prior longitudinal AD studies. The greatest advantage of the RSD proposed in this article is its ability to critically address the question on a DM effect. The AD trial using the new approach would be longer (12-month placebo period plus 12-month delay-start period; total 24-month duration) and require more subjects (about 1000 subjects per arm for the non-inferiority margin

  11. CT study of pancreatic diseases with modified dynamic scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Minghui; Zhu Guangying

    1990-01-01

    Experience of 20 cases modified dynamic CT scanning is presented. With a slight increased X-ray tube burden, it is possible to investigate tumor blood supply and find small pancreatic insulinoma with this method. The capsular sign typical for chronic traumatic pancreatic hematoma on CT is presented

  12. Surface chemical and biological characterization of flax fabrics modified with silver nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paladini, F.; Picca, R.A.; Sportelli, M.C.; Cioffi, N.; Sannino, A.; Pollini, M.

    2015-01-01

    Silver nanophases are increasingly used as effective antibacterial agent for biomedical applications and wound healing. This work aims to investigate the surface chemical composition and biological properties of silver nanoparticle-modified flax substrates. Silver coatings were deposited on textiles through the in situ photo-reduction of a silver solution, by means of a large-scale apparatus. The silver-coated materials were characterized through X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), to assess the surface elemental composition of the coatings, and the chemical speciation of both the substrate and the antibacterial nanophases. A detailed investigation of XPS high resolution regions outlined that silver is mainly present on nanophases' surface as Ag 2 O. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were also carried out, in order to visualize the distribution of silver particles on the fibers. The materials were also characterized from a biological point of view in terms of antibacterial capability and cytotoxicity. Agar diffusion tests and bacterial enumeration tests were performed on Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria, namely Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. In vitro cytotoxicity tests were performed through the extract method on murine fibroblasts in order to verify if the presence of the silver coating affected the cellular viability and proliferation. Durability of the coating was also assessed, thus confirming the successful scaling up of the process, which will be therefore available for large-scale production. - Highlights: • Silver nanophases are increasingly used as effective antibacterial agent for biomedical applications. • Silver coatings were deposited on textiles through the in situ photo-reduction of a silver solution. • Flax fabrics were characterized from a biological and surface chemical point of view. • Scaling up of the process was confirmed

  13. Denosumab for bone diseases: translating bone biology into targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsourdi, Elena; Rachner, Tilman D; Rauner, Martina; Hamann, Christine; Hofbauer, Lorenz C

    2011-12-01

    Signalling of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK) ligand (RANKL) through RANK is a critical pathway to regulate the differentiation and activity of osteoclasts and, hence, a master regulator of bone resorption. Increased RANKL activity has been demonstrated in diseases characterised by excessive bone loss such as osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis and osteolytic bone metastases. The development and approval of denosumab, a fully MAB against RANKL, has heralded a new era in the treatment of bone diseases by providing a potent, targeted and reversible inhibitor of bone resorption. This article summarises the molecular and cellular biology of the RANKL/RANK system and critically reviews preclinical and clinical studies that have established denosumab as a promising novel therapy for metabolic and malignant bone diseases. We will discuss the potential indications for denosumab along with a critical review of safety and analyse its potential within the concert of established therapies.

  14. Associations between Potentially Modifiable Risk Factors and Alzheimer Disease : A Mendelian Randomization Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ostergaard, Soren D.; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Sharp, Stephen J.; Proitsi, Petroula; Lotta, Luca A.; Day, Felix; Perry, John R. B.; Boehme, Kevin L.; Walter, Stefan; Kauwe, John S.; Gibbons, Laura E.; Larson, Eric B.; Powell, John F.; Langenberg, Claudia; Crane, Paul K.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Scott, Robert A.; van der Schouw, YT

    Background Potentially modifiable risk factors including obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and smoking are associated with Alzheimer disease (AD) and represent promising targets for intervention. However, the causality of these associations is unclear. We sought to assess the causal nature of these

  15. Biological Behavior of Osteoblast Cell and Apatite Forming Ability of the Surface Modified Ti Alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jingming; Hwang, K H; Choi, W S; Shin, S J; Lee, J K

    2016-02-01

    Titanium as one kind of biomaterials comes in direct contact with the body, making evaluation of biocompatibility an important aspect to biomaterials development. Surface chemistry of titanium plays an important role in osseointegration. Different surface modification alters the surface chemistry and result in different biological response. In this study, three kinds of mixed acid solutions were used to treat Ti specimens to induce Ca-P formation. Following a strong mixed acid activation process, Ca-P coating successfully formed on the Ti surfaces in simulated body fluid. Strong mixed acid increased the roughness of the metal surface, because the porous and rough surface allows better adhesion between Ca-P coatings and substrates. After modification of titanium surface by mixed acidic solution and subsequently H2O2/HCL treatment evaluation of biocompatibility was conducted from hydroxyapatite formation by biomimetic process and cell viability on modified titanium surface. Nano-scale modification of titanium surfaces can alter cellular and tissue responses, which may benefit osseointegration and dental implant therapy. Results from this study indicated that surface treatment methods affect the surface morphology, type of TiO2 layer formed and subsequent apatite deposition and biological responses. The thermo scientific alamarblue cell viability assay reagent is used to quantitatively measure the viability of mammalian cell lines, bacteria and fungi by incorporating a rapid, sensitive and reliable fluorometric/colorimetric growth indicator, without any toxic and side effect to cell line. In addition, mixed acid treatment uses a lower temperature and shorter time period than widely used alkali treatment.

  16. Epidemiology, classification, and modifiable risk factors of peripheral arterial disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas W Shammas

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Nicolas W ShammasMidwest Cardiovascular Research Foundation, Cardiovascular Medicine, PC, Davenport, IA, USAAbstract: Peripheral arterial disease (PAD is part of a global vascular problem of diffuse atherosclerosis. PAD patients die mostly of cardiac and cerebrovascular-related events and much less frequently due to obstructive disease of the lower extremities. Aggressive risk factors modification is needed to reduce cardiac mortality in PAD patients. These include smoking cessation, reduction of blood pressure to current guidelines, aggressive low density lipoprotein lowering, losing weight, controlling diabetes and the use of oral antiplatelet drugs such as aspirin or clopidogrel. In addition to quitting smoking and exercise, cilostazol and statins have been shown to reduce claudication in patients with PAD. Patients with critical rest limb ischemia or severe progressive claudication need to be treated with revascularization to minimize the chance of limb loss, reduce symptoms, and improve quality of life.Keywords: peripheral arterial disease, epidemiology, risk factors, classification

  17. Development of biologically modified anodes for energy harvesting using microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, James J.; Ganguli, Rahul; Chmelka, Brad

    2012-06-01

    Biological fuel cells hold promise as an alternative energy source to batteries for unattended ground sensor applications due to the fact that they can be extremely long lived. This lifetime can be extended over batteries by scavenging fuel from the deployed environment. Microbial fuel cells (MFC) are one class of such sources that produce usable energy from small organic compounds (i.e. sugars, alcohols, organic acids, and biopolymers) which can be easily containerized or scavenged from the environment. The use of microorganisms as the anodic catalysts is what makes these systems unique from other biofuel cell designs. One of the main drawbacks of engineering a sensor system powered by an MFC is that power densities and current flux are extremely low in currently reported systems. The power density is limited by the mass transfer of the fuel source to the catalyst, the metabolism of the microbial catalysts and the electron transfer from the organism to the anode. This presentation will focus on the development of a new style of microbially-modified anodes which will increase power density to a level where a practical power source can be engineered. This is being achieved by developing a three dimensional matrix as an artificial, conductive biofilm. These artificial biofilms will allow the capture of a consortium of microbes designed for efficient metabolism of the available fuel source. Also it will keep the microbes close to the electrode allowing ready access by fuel and providing a low resistance passage of the liberated electrons from fuel oxidation.

  18. Modelling biological control with wild-type and genetically modified baculoviruses in the Helicoverpa armigera-cotton system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, X.; Werf, van der W.; Bianchi, F.J.J.A.; Hu, Z.; Vlak, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    A comprehensive model was developed to simulate virus epizootics in a stage structured insect population and analyse scenarios for the biological control of cotton bollworm (CBW), Helicoverpa armigera, in cotton, using wild-type or genetically modified baculoviruses. In simulations on dosage and

  19. Differentially expressed genes distributed over chromosomes and implicated in certain biological processes for site insertion genetically modified rice Kemingdao.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi; Li, Yunhe; Zhao, Jie; Chen, Xiuping; Jian, Guiliang; Peng, Yufa; Qi, Fangjun

    2012-01-01

    Release of genetically modified (GM) plants has sparked off intensive debates worldwide partly because of concerns about potential adverse unintended effects of GM plants to the agro system and the safety of foods. In this study, with the aim of revealing the molecular basis for unintended effects of a single site insertion GM Kemingdao (KMD) rice transformed with a synthetic cry1Ab gene, and bridging unintended effects of KMD rice through clues of differentially expressed genes, comparative transcriptome analyses were performed for GM KMD rice and its parent rice of Xiushui11 (XS11). The results showed that 680 differentially expressed transcripts were identified from 30-day old seedlings of GM KMD rice. The absolute majority of these changed expression transcripts dispersed and located over all rice chromosomes, and existed physical distance on chromosome from the insertion site, while only two transcripts were found to be differentially expressed within the 21 genes located within 100 kb up and down-stream of the insertion site. Pathway and biology function analyses further revealed that differentially expressed transcripts of KMD rice were involved in certain biological processes, and mainly implicated in two types of pathways. One type was pathways implicated in plant stress/defense responses, which were considerably in coordination with the reported unintended effects of KMD rice, which were more susceptible to rice diseases compared to its parent rice XS11; the other type was pathways associated with amino acids metabolism. With this clue, new unintended effects for changes in amino acids synthesis of KMD rice leaves were successfully revealed. Such that an actual case was firstly provided for identification of unintended effects in GM plants by comparative transciptome analysis.

  20. The Neuroprotective Disease-Modifying Potential of Psychotropics in Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward C. Lauterbach

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroprotective treatments in Parkinson's disease (PD have remained elusive. Psychotropics are commonly prescribed in PD without regard to their pathobiological effects. The authors investigated the effects of psychotropics on pathobiological proteins, proteasomal activity, mitochondrial functions, apoptosis, neuroinflammation, trophic factors, stem cells, and neurogenesis. Only findings replicated in at least 2 studies were considered for these actions. Additionally, PD-related gene transcription, animal model, and human neuroprotective clinical trial data were reviewed. Results indicate that, from a PD pathobiology perspective, the safest drugs (i.e., drugs least likely to promote cellular neurodegenerative mechanisms balanced against their likelihood of promoting neuroprotective mechanisms include pramipexole, valproate, lithium, desipramine, escitalopram, and dextromethorphan. Fluoxetine favorably affects transcription of multiple genes (e.g., MAPT, GBA, CCDC62, HIP1R, although it and desipramine reduced MPTP mouse survival. Haloperidol is best avoided. The most promising neuroprotective investigative priorities will involve disease-modifying trials of the safest agents alone or in combination to capture salutary effects on H3 histone deacetylase, gene transcription, glycogen synthase kinase-3, α-synuclein, reactive oxygen species (ROS, reactive nitrogen species (RNS, apoptosis, inflammation, and trophic factors including GDNF and BDNF.

  1. Huperzine A: Is it an Effective Disease-Modifying Drug for Alzheimer's Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zhong Ming; Ke, Ya

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder for which there is no cure. Huperzine A (HupA) is a natural inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) derived from the Chinese folk medicine Huperzia serrata (Qian Ceng Ta). It is a licensed anti-AD drug in China and is available as a nutraceutical in the US. A growing body of evidence has demonstrated that HupA has multifaceted pharmacological effects. In addition to the symptomatic, cognitive-enhancing effect via inhibition of AChE, a number of recent studies have reported that this drug has "non-cholinergic" effects on AD. Most important among these is the protective effect of HupA on neurons against amyloid beta-induced oxidative injury and mitochondrial dysfunction as well as via the up-regulation of nerve growth factor and antagonizing N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors. The most recent discovery that HupA may reduce brain iron accumulation lends further support to the argument that HupA could serve as a potential disease-modifying agent for AD and also other neurodegenerative disorders by significantly slowing down the course of neuronal death.

  2. Huperzine A: Is it an Effective Disease-Modifying Drug for Alzheimer’s Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zhong Ming; Ke, Ya

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder for which there is no cure. Huperzine A (HupA) is a natural inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) derived from the Chinese folk medicine Huperzia serrata (Qian Ceng Ta). It is a licensed anti-AD drug in China and is available as a nutraceutical in the US. A growing body of evidence has demonstrated that HupA has multifaceted pharmacological effects. In addition to the symptomatic, cognitive-enhancing effect via inhibition of AChE, a number of recent studies have reported that this drug has “non-cholinergic” effects on AD. Most important among these is the protective effect of HupA on neurons against amyloid beta-induced oxidative injury and mitochondrial dysfunction as well as via the up-regulation of nerve growth factor and antagonizing N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors. The most recent discovery that HupA may reduce brain iron accumulation lends further support to the argument that HupA could serve as a potential disease-modifying agent for AD and also other neurodegenerative disorders by significantly slowing down the course of neuronal death. PMID:25191267

  3. Huperzine A: is it an effective disease-modifying drug for Alzheimer’s disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Ming eQian

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder for which there is no cure. Huperzine A (HupA is a natural inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase (AChE derived from the Chinese folk medicine Huperzia serrata (Qian Ceng Ta. It is a licensed anti-AD drug in China and is available as a nutraceutical in the US. A growing body of evidence has demonstrated that HupA has multifaceted pharmacological effects. In addition to the symptomatic, cognitive-enhancing effect via inhibition of AChE, a number of recent studies have reported that this drug has non-cholinergic effects on AD. Most important among these is the protective effect of HupA on neurons against amyloid beta-induced oxidative injury and mitochondrial dysfunction as well as via the up-regulation of nerve growth factor and antagonizing N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. The most recent discovery that HupA may reduce brain iron accumulation lends further support to the argument that HupA could serve as a potential disease-modifying agent for AD and also other neurodegenerative disorders by significantly slowing down the course of neuronal death.

  4. Applications of Genetically Modified Immunobiotics with High Immunoregulatory Capacity for Treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigemori, Suguru; Shimosato, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, are chronic inflammatory diseases characterized by dysregulated immune responses of the gastrointestinal tract. In recent years, the incidence of IBDs has increased in developed nations, but their prophylaxis/treatment is not yet established. Site-directed delivery of molecules showing anti-inflammatory properties using genetically modified (gm)-probiotics shows promise as a new strategy for the prevention and treatment of IBD. Advantages of gm-probiotics include (1) the ability to use bacteria as a delivery vehicle, enabling safe and long-term use by humans, (2) decreased risks of side effects, and (3) reduced costs. The intestinal delivery of anti-inflammatory proteins such as cytokines and enzymes using Lactococcus lactis has been shown to regulate host intestinal homeostasis depending on the delivered protein-specific machinery. Additionally, clinical experience using interleukin 10-secreting Lc. lactis has been shown to be safe and to facilitate biological containment in IBD therapy. On the other hand, some preclinical studies have demonstrated that gm-strains of immunobiotics (probiotic strains able to beneficially regulate the mucosal immunity) provide beneficial effects on intestinal inflammation as a result of the synergy between the immunoregulatory effects of the bacterium itself and the anti-inflammatory effects of the delivered recombinant proteins. In this review, we discuss the rapid progression in the development of strategies for the prophylaxis and treatment of IBD using gm-probiotics that exhibit immune regulation effects (gm-immunobiotics). In particular, we discuss the type of strains used as delivery agents.

  5. Modulation at Age of Onset in Tunisian Huntington Disease Patients: Implication of New Modifier Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorra Hmida-Ben Brahim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Huntington’s disease (HD is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder. The causative mutation is an expansion of more than 36 CAG repeats in the first exon of IT15 gene. Many studies have shown that the IT15 interacts with several modifier genes to regulate the age at onset (AO of HD. Our study aims to investigate the implication of CAG expansion and 9 modifiers in the age at onset variance of 15 HD Tunisian patients and to establish the correlation between these modifiers genes and the AO of this disease. Despite the small number of studied patients, this report consists of the first North African study in Huntington disease patients. Our results approve a specific effect of modifiers genes in each population.

  6. Vitamin D deficiency in patients with either rheumatic diseases or inflammatory bowel diseases on biologic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzzese, Vincenzo; Zullo, Angelo; Picchianti Diamanti, Andrea; Ridola, Lorenzo; Lorenzetti, Roberto; Marrese, Cinzia; Scolieri, Palma; De Francesco, Vincenzo; Hassan, Cesare; Migliore, Alberto; Laganà, Bruno

    2016-09-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has been reported in patients with chronic inflammatory conditions, such as rheumatic and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). We evaluated the role of biologic therapy on vitamin D, calcium and parathormone (PTH) levels. This cross-sectional study enrolled consecutive patients with either rheumatic diseases or IBD who underwent an ambulatory visit. Patients receiving vitamin D/calcium supplementation were excluded. Vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency was diagnosed when values were rheumatic disease (M/F 37/99; mean age 60.7 ± 12.9 years) and 64 with IBD (M/F 41/23; Mean age 49.6 ± 13.1 years) were enrolled. Vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency was detected in as many as 63.5 % patients, being 61.8 and 67.2 % in patients with either rheumatic diseases or IBD, respectively. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency was higher in those receiving biologics than other therapies (78.3 vs 43.2 %; p rheumatic diseases (78.7 vs 41 %; p rheumatic diseases or IBD receiving a biologic therapy.

  7. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in pregnancy - Current status and implications for the future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroom, Fokaline; de Walle, Hermien E. K.; van de Laar, Mart A. J. F.; Brouwers, Jacobus R. B. J.; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T. W.

    2006-01-01

    Drug use during pregnancy is sometimes unavoidable, especially in chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) often starts in the early stage of RA; therefore, women of reproductive age are at risk for exposure to a DMARD

  8. Gold Finger: Metal Jewellery as a Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Therapy!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hlaing

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyarticular psoriatic arthritis is a chronic, progressive and disabling auto-immune disease often affecting the small joints of the hands in a symmetrical fashion. The disease can progress rapidly causing joint swelling and damaging cartilage and bone around the joints resulting in severe deformities. We report a very unusual case of a 49-year-old woman who presented with polyarticular psoriatic arthritis affecting all proximal interphalangeal (PIP joints of both hands except the left ring finger PIP joint. On clinical examination there was no evidence of arthritis in the left ring finger PIP joint. We confirmed the paucity of joint damage in the PIP joint of the left ring finger using more modern imaging modalities such as musculoskeletal ultrasound and MRI scan of the small joints of the hands. All other PIP joints in both hands demonstrated advanced degrees of joint damage secondary to chronic psoriatic inflammatory arthritis. We postulated that wearing a gold wedding ring has helped protecting the PIP joint of the left ring finger from the damaging effect of inflammatory arthritis. The possible mechanisms by which metal jewellery (gold ring confer protection to adjacent joints was discussed.

  9. International biological engagement programs facilitate Newcastle disease epidemiological studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patti J. Miller

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Infections of poultry species with virulent strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV cause Newcastle disease (ND, one of the most economically significant and devastating diseases for poultry producers worldwide. Biological engagement programs (BEP between the Southeast Poultry Research Laboratory (SEPRL of the United States Department of Agriculture and laboratories from Russia, Pakistan, Ukraine, Kazakhstan and Indonesia collectively have produced a better understanding of the genetic diversity and evolution of the viruses responsible for ND, which is crucial for the control of the disease. The data from Kazakhstan, Russia and Ukraine identified possible migratory routes for birds that may carry both virulent NDV (vNDV and NDV of low virulence into Europe. In addition, related NDV strains were isolated from wild birds in Ukraine and Nigeria, and from birds in continental USA, Alaska, Russia, and Japan, identifying wild birds as a possible mechanism of intercontinental spread of NDV of low virulence. More recently, the detection of new sub-genotypes of vNDV suggests that a new, fifth, panzootic of ND has already originated in Southeast Asia, extended to the Middle East, and is now entering into Eastern Europe. Despite expected challenges when multiple independent laboratories interact, many scientists from the collaborating countries have successfully been trained by SEPRL on molecular diagnostics, best laboratory practices, and critical biosecurity protocols, providing our partners the capacity to further train other employees and to identify locally the viruses that cause this OIE listed disease. These and other collaborations with partners in Mexico, Bulgaria, Israel, and Tanzania have allowed SEPRL scientists to engage in field studies, to elucidate more aspects of ND epidemiology in endemic countries, and to understand the challenges that the scientists and field veterinarians in these countries face on a daily basis. Finally, new viral

  10. International Biological Engagement Programs Facilitate Newcastle Disease Epidemiological Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Patti J.; Dimitrov, Kiril M.; Williams-Coplin, Dawn; Peterson, Melanie P.; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary J.; Swayne, David E.; Suarez, David L.; Afonso, Claudio L.

    2015-01-01

    Infections of poultry species with virulent strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) cause Newcastle disease (ND), one of the most economically significant and devastating diseases for poultry producers worldwide. Biological engagement programs between the Southeast Poultry Research Laboratory (SEPRL) of the United States Department of Agriculture and laboratories from Russia, Pakistan, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, and Indonesia collectively have produced a better understanding of the genetic diversity and evolution of the viruses responsible for ND, which is crucial for the control of the disease. The data from Kazakhstan, Russia, and Ukraine identified possible migratory routes for birds that may carry both virulent NDV (vNDV) and NDV of low virulence into Europe. In addition, related NDV strains were isolated from wild birds in Ukraine and Nigeria, and from birds in continental USA, Alaska, Russia, and Japan, identifying wild birds as a possible mechanism of intercontinental spread of NDV of low virulence. More recently, the detection of new sub-genotypes of vNDV suggests that a new, fifth, panzootic of ND has already originated in Southeast Asia, extended to the Middle East, and is now entering into Eastern Europe. Despite expected challenges when multiple independent laboratories interact, many scientists from the collaborating countries have successfully been trained by SEPRL on molecular diagnostics, best laboratory practices, and critical biosecurity protocols, providing our partners the capacity to further train other employes and to identify locally the viruses that cause this OIE listed disease. These and other collaborations with partners in Mexico, Bulgaria, Israel, and Tanzania have allowed SEPRL scientists to engage in field studies, to elucidate more aspects of ND epidemiology in endemic countries, and to understand the challenges that the scientists and field veterinarians in these countries face on a daily basis. Finally, new viral characterization tools

  11. International Biological Engagement Programs Facilitate Newcastle Disease Epidemiological Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Patti J; Dimitrov, Kiril M; Williams-Coplin, Dawn; Peterson, Melanie P; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary J; Swayne, David E; Suarez, David L; Afonso, Claudio L

    2015-01-01

    Infections of poultry species with virulent strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) cause Newcastle disease (ND), one of the most economically significant and devastating diseases for poultry producers worldwide. Biological engagement programs between the Southeast Poultry Research Laboratory (SEPRL) of the United States Department of Agriculture and laboratories from Russia, Pakistan, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, and Indonesia collectively have produced a better understanding of the genetic diversity and evolution of the viruses responsible for ND, which is crucial for the control of the disease. The data from Kazakhstan, Russia, and Ukraine identified possible migratory routes for birds that may carry both virulent NDV (vNDV) and NDV of low virulence into Europe. In addition, related NDV strains were isolated from wild birds in Ukraine and Nigeria, and from birds in continental USA, Alaska, Russia, and Japan, identifying wild birds as a possible mechanism of intercontinental spread of NDV of low virulence. More recently, the detection of new sub-genotypes of vNDV suggests that a new, fifth, panzootic of ND has already originated in Southeast Asia, extended to the Middle East, and is now entering into Eastern Europe. Despite expected challenges when multiple independent laboratories interact, many scientists from the collaborating countries have successfully been trained by SEPRL on molecular diagnostics, best laboratory practices, and critical biosecurity protocols, providing our partners the capacity to further train other employes and to identify locally the viruses that cause this OIE listed disease. These and other collaborations with partners in Mexico, Bulgaria, Israel, and Tanzania have allowed SEPRL scientists to engage in field studies, to elucidate more aspects of ND epidemiology in endemic countries, and to understand the challenges that the scientists and field veterinarians in these countries face on a daily basis. Finally, new viral characterization tools

  12. Epstein-Barr Virus Sequence Variation—Biology and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzellos, Stelios; Farrell, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    Some key questions in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) biology center on whether naturally occurring sequence differences in the virus affect infection or EBV associated diseases. Understanding the pattern of EBV sequence variation is also important for possible development of EBV vaccines. At present EBV isolates worldwide can be grouped into Type 1 and Type 2, a classification based on the EBNA2 gene sequence. Type 1 EBV is the most prevalent worldwide but Type 2 is common in parts of Africa. Type 1 transforms human B cells into lymphoblastoid cell lines much more efficiently than Type 2 EBV. Molecular mechanisms that may account for this difference in cell transformation are now becoming clearer. Advances in sequencing technology will greatly increase the amount of whole EBV genome data for EBV isolated from different parts of the world. Study of regional variation of EBV strains independent of the Type 1/Type 2 classification and systematic investigation of the relationship between viral strains, infection and disease will become possible. The recent discovery that specific mutation of the EBV EBNA3B gene may be linked to development of diffuse large B cell lymphoma illustrates the importance that mutations in the virus genome may have in infection and human disease. PMID:25436768

  13. EOSINOPHILS: MULTIFACETED BIOLOGIC PROPERTIES AND ROLES IN HEALTH AND DISEASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Hirohito

    2011-01-01

    Summary Eosinophils are leukocytes resident in mucosal tissues. During Th2-type inflammation, eosinophils are recruited from bone marrow and blood to the sites of immune response. While eosinophils have been considered end-stage cells involved in host protection against parasite infection and immunopathology in hypersensitivity disease, recent studies changed this perspective. Eosinophils are now considered multifunctional leukocytes involved in tissue homeostasis, modulation of adaptive immune responses, and innate immunity to certain microbes. Eosinophils are capable of producing immunoregulatory cytokines and are actively involved in regulation of Th2-type immune responses. However, such new information does not preclude earlier observations showing that eosinophils, in particular human eosinophils, are also effector cells with pro-inflammatory and destructive capabilities. Eosinophils with activation phenotypes are observed in biological specimens from patients with disease, and deposition of eosinophil products is readily seen in the affected tissues from these patients. Therefore, it would be reasonable to consider the eosinophil a multifaceted leukocyte that contributes to various physiological and pathological processes depending on their location and activation status. This review summarizes the emerging concept of the multifaceted immunobiology of eosinophils and discusses the roles of eosinophils in health and disease and the challenges and perspectives in the field. PMID:21682744

  14. Modified Primers for the Identification of Nonpathogenic Fusarium oxysporum Isolates That Have Biological Control Potential against Fusarium Wilt of Cucumber in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chaojen; Lin, Yisheng; Lin, Yinghong; Chung, Wenhsin

    2013-01-01

    Previous investigations demonstrated that Fusarium oxysporum (Fo), which is not pathogenic to cucumbers, could serve as a biological control agent for managing Fusarium wilt of cucumber caused by Fo f. sp. cucumerinum (Foc) in Taiwan. However, thus far it has not been possible to separate the populations of pathogenic Fo from the nonpathogenic isolates that have biological control potential through their morphological characteristics. Although these two populations can be distinguished from one another using a bioassay, the work is laborious and time-consuming. In this study, a fragment of the intergenic spacer (IGS) region of ribosomal DNA from an Fo biological control agent, Fo366, was PCR-amplified with published general primers, FIGS11/FIGS12 and sequenced. A new primer, NPIGS-R, which was designed based on the IGS sequence, was paired with the FIGS11 primer. These primers were then evaluated for their specificity to amplify DNA from nonpathogenic Fo isolates that have biological control potential. The results showed that the modified primer pair, FIGS11/NPIGS-R, amplified a 500-bp DNA fragment from five of seven nonpathogenic Fo isolates. These five Fo isolates delayed symptom development of cucumber Fusarium wilt in greenhouse bioassay tests. Seventy-seven Fo isolates were obtained from the soil and plant tissues and then subjected to amplification using the modified primer pair; six samples showed positive amplification. These six isolates did not cause symptoms on cucumber seedlings when grown in peat moss infested with the isolates and delayed disease development when the same plants were subsequently inoculated with a virulent isolate of Foc. Therefore, the modified primer pair may prove useful for the identification of Fo isolates that are nonpathogenic to cucumber which can potentially act as biocontrol agents for Fusarium wilt of cucumber. PMID:23762289

  15. Older Americans' risk-benefit preferences for modifying the course of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauber, A Brett; Johnson, F Reed; Fillit, Howard; Mohamed, Ateesha F; Leibman, Christopher; Arrighi, H Michael; Grundman, Michael; Townsend, Raymond J

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a progressive, ultimately fatal neurodegenerative illness affecting millions of patients, families, and caregivers. Effective disease-modifying therapies for AD are desperately needed, but none currently exist on the market. Thus, accelerating the discovery, development, and approval of new disease-modifying drugs for AD is a high priority for individuals, physicians, and medical decision makers. Potentially disease-modifying drugs likely will have significant therapeutic benefits but also may have treatment-related risks. We quantified older Americans' treatment-related risk tolerance by eliciting their willingness to accept the risk of treatment-related death or permanent severe disability in exchange for modifying the course of AD. A stated-choice survey instrument was administered to 2146 American residents 60 years of age and older. On average, subjects were willing to accept a 1-year risk of treatment-related death or permanent severe disability from stroke of over 30% for a treatment that prevents AD from progressing beyond the mild stage. Thus, most people in this age cohort are willing to accept considerable risks in return for disease-modifying benefits of new AD drugs. These results are consistent with other studies indicating that individuals view AD as a serious, life threatening illness that imposes heavy burdens on both patients and caregivers.

  16. ECOLOGY OF PANTOEA AGGLOMERANS 2066-7 STRAIN: A BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF BACTERIA ONION DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumia Sadik

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The growth response of the biocontrol agent Pantoea agglomerans 2066-7 to change in water activity (aw, temperature, and pH was determined in vitro in basic medium. The minimum temperature at which 2066-7 was able to grow was 7°C, and the growth of 2066-7 did not change at varying pH levels (4–10.34. The best growth was obtained at a water activity of 0.98 in all media modified with the four solutes (glucose, glycerol, NaCl and polyethylene glycol. The solute used to reduce water activity had a great influence on bacterial growth, especially at unfavorable conditions (low temperature. This study has defined the range of environmental conditions (aw, pH, and temperature over which the bacteria may be developed for biological control of plant diseases.

  17. Biological therapy and development of neoplastic disease in patients with juvenile rheumatic disease: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Patricia L. Pereira

    Full Text Available Abstract Juvenile rheumatic diseases affect the musculoskeletal system and begin before the age of 18. These conditions have varied, identifiable or unknown etiologies, but those of an autoimmune inflammatory nature have been associated with an increased risk of development of cancer, regardless of treatment. This study aims to assess, through a systematic review of the literature according to Prisma (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses quality criteria, the risk of cancer in patients with juvenile rheumatic disease, and its association with biological agents. The criteria described by the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology initiative were used in order to assess the methodological quality of those individual items selected in this study. We analyzed nine publications, from a total of 251 papers initially selected. There was an increase in cancer risk in the population with juvenile rheumatic disease versus the general population. Most specified cancers were of a lymphoproliferative nature. Seven studies did not specify the treatment or not defined an association between treatment and cancer risk. Only one study has suggested this association; in it, their authors observed high risk in patients diagnosed in the last 20 years, a period of the advent of new therapies. One study found an increased risk in a population not treated with biological agents, suggesting a disease in its natural course, and not an adverse effect of therapy. Studies have shown an increased risk of malignancy associated with juvenile rheumatic disease, and this may be related to disease activity and not specifically to the treatment with biological agents.

  18. Total and phosphorylated tau protein as biological markers of Alzheimer's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hampel, Harald

    2012-02-01

    Advances in our understanding of tau-mediated neurodegeneration in Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD) are moving this disease pathway to center stage for the development of biomarkers and disease modifying drug discovery efforts. Immunoassays were developed detecting total (t-tau) and tau phosphorylated at specific epitopes (p-tauX) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), methods to analyse tau in blood are at the experimental beginning. Clinical research consistently demonstrated CSF t- and p-tau increased in AD compared to controls. Measuring these tau species proved informative for classifying AD from relevant differential diagnoses. Tau phosphorylated at threonine 231 (p-tau231) differentiated between AD and frontotemporal dementia, tau phosphorylated at serine 181 (p-tau181) enhanced classification between AD and dementia with Lewy bodies. T- and p-tau are considered "core" AD biomarkers that have been successfully validated by controlled large-scale multi-center studies. Tau biomarkers are implemented in clinical trials to reflect biological activity, mechanisms of action of compounds, support enrichment of target populations, provide endpoints for proof-of-concept and confirmatory trials on disease modification. World-wide quality control initiatives are underway to set required methodological and protocol standards. Discussions with regulatory authorities gain momentum defining the role of tau biomarkers for trial designs and how they may be further qualified for surrogate marker status.

  19. A modifier of Huntington's disease onset at the MLH1 locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Min; Chao, Michael J; Harold, Denise; Abu Elneel, Kawther; Gillis, Tammy; Holmans, Peter; Jones, Lesley; Orth, Michael; Myers, Richard H; Kwak, Seung; Wheeler, Vanessa C; MacDonald, Marcy E; Gusella, James F

    2017-10-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by an expanded CAG repeat in HTT. Many clinical characteristics of HD such as age at motor onset are determined largely by the size of HTT CAG repeat. However, emerging evidence strongly supports a role for other genetic factors in modifying the disease pathogenesis driven by mutant huntingtin. A recent genome-wide association analysis to discover genetic modifiers of HD onset age provided initial evidence for modifier loci on chromosomes 8 and 15 and suggestive evidence for a locus on chromosome 3. Here, genotyping of candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms in a cohort of 3,314 additional HD subjects yields independent confirmation of the former two loci and moves the third to genome-wide significance at MLH1, a locus whose mouse orthologue modifies CAG length-dependent phenotypes in a Htt-knock-in mouse model of HD. Both quantitative and dichotomous association analyses implicate a functional variant on ∼32% of chromosomes with the beneficial modifier effect that delays HD motor onset by 0.7 years/allele. Genomic DNA capture and sequencing of a modifier haplotype localize the functional variation to a 78 kb region spanning the 3'end of MLH1 and the 5'end of the neighboring LRRFIP2, and marked by an isoleucine-valine missense variant in MLH1. Analysis of expression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTLs) provides modest support for altered regulation of MLH1 and LRRFIP2, raising the possibility that the modifier affects regulation of both genes. Finally, polygenic modification score and heritability analyses suggest the existence of additional genetic modifiers, supporting expanded, comprehensive genetic analysis of larger HD datasets. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Developments on drug discovery and on new therapeutics: highly diluted tinctures act as biological response modifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Carolina C; Abud, Ana Paula R; de Oliveira, Simone M; Guimarães, Fernando de S F; de Andrade, Lucas F; Di Bernardi, Raffaello P; Coletto, Ediely L de O; Kuczera, Diogo; Da Lozzo, Eneida J; Gonçalves, Jenifer P; Trindade, Edvaldo da S; Buchi, Dorly de F

    2011-10-26

    In the search for new therapies novel drugs and medications are being discovered, developed and tested in laboratories. Highly diluted substances are intended to enhance immune system responses resulting in reduced frequency of various diseases, and often present no risk of serious side-effects due to its low toxicity. Over the past years our research group has been investigating the action of highly diluted substances and tinctures on cells from the immune system. We have developed and tested several highly diluted tinctures and here we describe the biological activity of M1, M2, and M8 both in vitro in immune cells from mice and human, and in vivo in mice. Cytotoxicity, cytokines released and NF-κB activation were determined after in vitro treatment. Cell viability, oxidative response, lipid peroxidation, bone marrow and lymph node cells immunophenotyping were accessed after mice in vivo treatment. None of the highly diluted tinctures tested were cytotoxic to macrophages or K562. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages treated with all highly diluted tinctures decreased tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) release and M1, and M8 decreased IFN-γ production. M1 has decreased NF-κB activity on TNF-α stimulated reporter cell line. In vivo treatment lead to a decrease in reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO) production was increased by M1, and M8, and lipid peroxidation was induced by M1, and M2. All compounds enhanced the innate immunity, but M1 also augmented acquired immunity and M2 diminished B lymphocytes, responsible to acquired immunity. Based on the results presented here, these highly diluted tinctures were shown to modulate immune responses. Even though further investigation is needed there is an indication that these highly diluted tinctures could be used as therapeutic interventions in disorders where the immune system is compromised.

  1. Developments on drug discovery and on new therapeutics: highly diluted tinctures act as biological response modifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Oliveira Carolina C

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the search for new therapies novel drugs and medications are being discovered, developed and tested in laboratories. Highly diluted substances are intended to enhance immune system responses resulting in reduced frequency of various diseases, and often present no risk of serious side-effects due to its low toxicity. Over the past years our research group has been investigating the action of highly diluted substances and tinctures on cells from the immune system. Methods We have developed and tested several highly diluted tinctures and here we describe the biological activity of M1, M2, and M8 both in vitro in immune cells from mice and human, and in vivo in mice. Cytotoxicity, cytokines released and NF-κB activation were determined after in vitro treatment. Cell viability, oxidative response, lipid peroxidation, bone marrow and lymph node cells immunophenotyping were accessed after mice in vivo treatment. Results None of the highly diluted tinctures tested were cytotoxic to macrophages or K562. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated macrophages treated with all highly diluted tinctures decreased tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α release and M1, and M8 decreased IFN-γ production. M1 has decreased NF-κB activity on TNF-α stimulated reporter cell line. In vivo treatment lead to a decrease in reactive oxygen species (ROS, nitric oxide (NO production was increased by M1, and M8, and lipid peroxidation was induced by M1, and M2. All compounds enhanced the innate immunity, but M1 also augmented acquired immunity and M2 diminished B lymphocytes, responsible to acquired immunity. Conclusions Based on the results presented here, these highly diluted tinctures were shown to modulate immune responses. Even though further investigation is needed there is an indication that these highly diluted tinctures could be used as therapeutic interventions in disorders where the immune system is compromised.

  2. CLC-2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) as potential modifiers of cystic fibrosis disease severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaisdell, Carol J; Howard, Timothy D; Stern, Augustus; Bamford, Penelope; Bleecker, Eugene R; Stine, O Colin

    2004-01-01

    Background Cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease manifest by impaired chloride secretion leads to eventual respiratory failure. Candidate genes that may modify CF lung disease severity include alternative chloride channels. The objectives of this study are to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the airway epithelial chloride channel, CLC-2, and correlate these polymorphisms with CF lung disease. Methods The CLC-2 promoter, intron 1 and exon 20 were examined for SNPs in adult CF dF508/dF508 homozygotes with mild and severe lung disease (forced expiratory volume at one second (FEV1) > 70% and < 40%). Results PCR amplification of genomic CLC-2 and sequence analysis revealed 1 polymorphism in the hClC -2 promoter, 4 in intron 1, and none in exon 20. Fisher's analysis within this data set, did not demonstrate a significant relationship between the severity of lung disease and SNPs in the CLC-2 gene. Conclusions CLC-2 is not a key modifier gene of CF lung phenotype. Further studies evaluating other phenotypes associated with CF may be useful in the future to assess the ability of CLC-2 to modify CF disease severity. PMID:15507145

  3. CLC-2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs as potential modifiers of cystic fibrosis disease severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bleecker Eugene R

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cystic fibrosis (CF lung disease manifest by impaired chloride secretion leads to eventual respiratory failure. Candidate genes that may modify CF lung disease severity include alternative chloride channels. The objectives of this study are to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the airway epithelial chloride channel, CLC-2, and correlate these polymorphisms with CF lung disease. Methods The CLC-2 promoter, intron 1 and exon 20 were examined for SNPs in adult CF dF508/dF508 homozygotes with mild and severe lung disease (forced expiratory volume at one second (FEV1 > 70% and Results PCR amplification of genomic CLC-2 and sequence analysis revealed 1 polymorphism in the hClC -2 promoter, 4 in intron 1, and none in exon 20. Fisher's analysis within this data set, did not demonstrate a significant relationship between the severity of lung disease and SNPs in the CLC-2 gene. Conclusions CLC-2 is not a key modifier gene of CF lung phenotype. Further studies evaluating other phenotypes associated with CF may be useful in the future to assess the ability of CLC-2 to modify CF disease severity.

  4. Use of modified cornstarch therapy to extend fasting in glycogen storage disease types Ia and Ib

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Correia, Catherine E.; Bhattacharya, Kaustuv; Lee, Philip J.; Shuster, Jonathan J.; Theriaque, Douglas W.; Shankar, Meena N.; Smit, G. Peter A.; Weinstein, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Type I glycogen storage disease (GSD) is caused by a deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase resulting in severe fasting hypoglycemia. Objective: We compared the efficacy of a new modified starch with the currently used cornstarch therapy in patients with type Ia and Ib GSD. Design: This was

  5. Perianal disease, small bowel disease, smoking, prior steroid or early azathioprine/biological therapy are predictors of disease behavior change in patients with Crohn’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Peter Laszlo; Czegledi, Zsofia; Szamosi, Tamas; Banai, Janos; David, Gyula; Zsigmond, Ferenc; Pandur, Tunde; Erdelyi, Zsuzsanna; Gemela, Orsolya; Papp, Janos; Lakatos, Laszlo

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To assess the combined effect of disease phenotype, smoking and medical therapy [steroid, azathioprine (AZA), AZA/biological therapy] on the probability of disease behavior change in a Caucasian cohort of patients with Crohn’s disease (CD). METHODS: Three hundred and forty well-characterized, unrelated, consecutive CD patients were analyzed (M/F: 155/185, duration: 9.4 ± 7.5 years) with a complete clinical follow-up. Medical records including disease phenotype according to the Montreal classification, extraintestinal manifestations, use of medications and surgical events were analyzed retrospectively. Patients were interviewed on their smoking habits at the time of diagnosis and during the regular follow-up visits. RESULTS: A change in disease behavior was observed in 30.8% of patients with an initially non-stricturing, non-penetrating disease behavior after a mean disease duration of 9.0 ± 7.2 years. In a logistic regression analysis corrected for disease duration, perianal disease, smoking, steroid use, early AZA or AZA/biological therapy use were independent predictors of disease behavior change. In a subsequent Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and a proportional Cox regression analysis, disease location (P = 0.001), presence of perianal disease (P < 0.001), prior steroid use (P = 0.006), early AZA (P = 0.005) or AZA/biological therapy (P = 0.002), or smoking (P = 0.032) were independent predictors of disease behavior change. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that perianal disease, small bowel disease, smoking, prior steroid use, early AZA or AZA/biological therapy are all predictors of disease behavior change in CD patients. PMID:19630105

  6. Perianal disease, small bowel disease, smoking, prior steroid or early azathioprine/biological therapy are predictors of disease behavior change in patients with Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Peter Laszlo; Czegledi, Zsofia; Szamosi, Tamas; Banai, Janos; David, Gyula; Zsigmond, Ferenc; Pandur, Tunde; Erdelyi, Zsuzsanna; Gemela, Orsolya; Papp, Janos; Lakatos, Laszlo

    2009-07-28

    To assess the combined effect of disease phenotype, smoking and medical therapy [steroid, azathioprine (AZA), AZA/biological therapy] on the probability of disease behavior change in a Caucasian cohort of patients with Crohn's disease (CD). Three hundred and forty well-characterized, unrelated, consecutive CD patients were analyzed (M/F: 155/185, duration: 9.4 +/- 7.5 years) with a complete clinical follow-up. Medical records including disease phenotype according to the Montreal classification, extraintestinal manifestations, use of medications and surgical events were analyzed retrospectively. Patients were interviewed on their smoking habits at the time of diagnosis and during the regular follow-up visits. A change in disease behavior was observed in 30.8% of patients with an initially non-stricturing, non-penetrating disease behavior after a mean disease duration of 9.0 +/- 7.2 years. In a logistic regression analysis corrected for disease duration, perianal disease, smoking, steroid use, early AZA or AZA/biological therapy use were independent predictors of disease behavior change. In a subsequent Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and a proportional Cox regression analysis, disease location (P = 0.001), presence of perianal disease (P < 0.001), prior steroid use (P = 0.006), early AZA (P = 0.005) or AZA/biological therapy (P = 0.002), or smoking (P = 0.032) were independent predictors of disease behavior change. Our data suggest that perianal disease, small bowel disease, smoking, prior steroid use, early AZA or AZA/biological therapy are all predictors of disease behavior change in CD patients.

  7. TaBoo SeArch Algorithm with a Modified Inverse Histogram for Reproducing Biologically Relevant Rare Events of Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Ryuhei; Takano, Yu; Shigeta, Yasuteru

    2016-05-10

    The TaBoo SeArch (TBSA) algorithm [ Harada et al. J. Comput. Chem. 2015 , 36 , 763 - 772 and Harada et al. Chem. Phys. Lett. 2015 , 630 , 68 - 75 ] was recently proposed as an enhanced conformational sampling method for reproducing biologically relevant rare events of a given protein. In TBSA, an inverse histogram of the original distribution, mapped onto a set of reaction coordinates, is constructed from trajectories obtained by multiple short-time molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Rarely occurring states of a given protein are statistically selected as new initial states based on the inverse histogram, and resampling is performed by restarting the MD simulations from the new initial states to promote the conformational transition. In this process, the definition of the inverse histogram, which characterizes the rarely occurring states, is crucial for the efficiency of TBSA. In this study, we propose a simple modification of the inverse histogram to further accelerate the convergence of TBSA. As demonstrations of the modified TBSA, we applied it to (a) hydrogen bonding rearrangements of Met-enkephalin, (b) large-amplitude domain motions of Glutamine-Binding Protein, and (c) folding processes of the B domain of Staphylococcus aureus Protein A. All demonstrations numerically proved that the modified TBSA reproduced these biologically relevant rare events with nanosecond-order simulation times, although a set of microsecond-order, canonical MD simulations failed to reproduce the rare events, indicating the high efficiency of the modified TBSA.

  8. Development and validation of modified disease activity scores in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Joshua F; Conaghan, Philip G; Smolen, Josef S

    2014-01-01

    -CDAI) were generated for each subject in the validation cohort. The M-DAS28, M-SDAI, and M-CDAI scores were compared to conventional scores of disease activity with regard to associations with MRI measures of synovitis and radiographic progression, assessed using Pearson's and Spearman's correlations, linear......OBJECTIVE: To develop and validate composite disease activity scores, based on widely available clinical measures, that would demonstrate improved correlation with detection of synovitis on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and radiographic progression, in comparison with conventional measures.......15 × SJC28 + 0.22 × EvGA + 1 and M-SDAI = CRP + SJC28 + EvGA. Both modified and conventional disease activity scores correlated significantly with MRI measures of synovitis. Modified scores showed superior correlation with synovitis, as compared to conventional scores, at all time points (P

  9. PSK, a biological response modifier, modifies p53 expression, mitosis and apoptosis in X-ray irradiated mouse embryos. Possible cellular mechanism of the anti-teratogenic effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagohashi, Yukiko; Naora, Hiroyuki; Otani, Hiroki

    2002-01-01

    We previously showed that PSK, a biological response modifier, suppressed X-ray irradiation induced ocular anomalies in mouse embryos. In the present study, in mouse embryos irradiated at E7.5, PSK, when administered immediately after irradiation, suppressed mitosis and increased apoptosis as compared with embryos not treated with PSK at 12 hrs after irradiation. In the irradiated embryos, p53, which is normally expressed at a high level in early embryos, increased at 6 hrs and decreased at 12 hrs after irradiation. In the irradiated and PSK-treated embryos, the p53 level did not change at 6 hrs, increased at 12 hrs and decreased at 24 hrs after irradiation. This timing of PSK-induced delayed increase of p53 coincided with that of the PSK-induced decrease in mitosis and increase in apoptosis. These results suggested that PSK modified the p53 level and affected cell proliferation and apoptosis, which might contribute to the suppression of teratogenesis. (author)

  10. Potential of chromatin modifying compounds for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagiannis, Tom C; Ververis, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a very common progressive neurodegenerative disorder affecting the learning and memory centers in the brain. The hallmarks of disease are the accumulation of β-amyloid neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles formed by abnormally phosphorylated tau protein. Alzheimer's disease is currently incurable and there is an intense interest in the development of new potential therapies. Chromatin modifying compounds such as sirtuin modulators and histone deacetylase inhibitors have been evaluated in models of Alzheimer's disease with some promising results. For example, the natural antioxidant and sirtuin 1 activator resveratrol has been shown to have beneficial effects in animal models of disease. Similarly, numerous histone deacetylase inhibitors including Trichostatin A, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, valproic acid and phenylbutyrate reduction have shown promising results in models of Alzheimer's disease. These beneficial effects include a reduction of β-amyloid production and stabilization of tau protein. In this review we provide an overview of the histone deacetylase enzymes, with a focus on enzymes that have been identified to have an important role in the pathobiology of Alzheimer's disease. Further, we discuss the potential for pharmacological intervention with chromatin modifying compounds that modulate histone deacetylase enzymes.

  11. Potential of chromatin modifying compounds for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom C. Karagiannis

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease is a very common progressive neurodegenerative disorder affecting the learning and memory centers in the brain. The hallmarks of disease are the accumulation of β-amyloid neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles formed by abnormally phosphorylated tau protein. Alzheimer's disease is currently incurable and there is an intense interest in the development of new potential therapies. Chromatin modifying compounds such as sirtuin modulators and histone deacetylase inhibitors have been evaluated in models of Alzheimer's disease with some promising results. For example, the natural antioxidant and sirtuin 1 activator resveratrol has been shown to have beneficial effects in animal models of disease. Similarly, numerous histone deacetylase inhibitors including Trichostatin A, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, valproic acid and phenylbutyrate reduction have shown promising results in models of Alzheimer's disease. These beneficial effects include a reduction of β-amyloid production and stabilization of tau protein. In this review we provide an overview of the histone deacetylase enzymes, with a focus on enzymes that have been identified to have an important role in the pathobiology of Alzheimer's disease. Further, we discuss the potential for pharmacological intervention with chromatin modifying compounds that modulate histone deacetylase enzymes.

  12. The biological age linked to oxidative stress modifies breast cancer aggressiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez-Freire, María Del Mar; Blanco-Gómez, Adrián; Castillo-Lluva, Sonia; Gómez-Vecino, Aurora; Galvis-Jiménez, Julie Milena; Martín-Seisdedos, Carmen; Isidoro-García, María; Hontecillas-Prieto, Lourdes; García-Cenador, María Begoña; García-Criado, Francisco Javier; Patino-Alonso, María Carmen; Galindo-Villardón, Purificación; Mao, Jian-Hua; Prieto, Carlos; Castellanos-Martín, Andrés; Kaderali, Lars; Pérez-Losada, Jesús

    2018-03-14

    The incidence of breast cancer increases with age until menopause, and breast cancer is more aggressive in younger women. The existence of epidemiological links between breast cancer and aging indicates that both processes share some common mechanisms of development. Oxidative stress is associated with both cancer susceptibility and aging. Here we observed that ERBB2-positive breast cancer, which developed in genetically heterogeneous ERBB2-positive transgenic mice generated by a backcross, is more aggressive in chronologically younger than in older mice (differentiated by the median survival of the cohort that was 79 weeks), similar to what occurs in humans. In this cohort, we estimated the oxidative biological age using a mathematical model that integrated several subphenotypes directly or indirectly related to oxidative stress. The model selected the serum levels of HDL-cholesterol and magnesium and total AKT1 and glutathione concentrations in the liver. The grade of aging was calculated as the difference between the predicted biological age and the chronological age. This comparison permitted the identification of biologically younger and older mice compared with their chronological age. Interestingly, biologically older mice developed more aggressive breast cancer than the biologically younger mice. Genomic regions on chromosomes 2 and 15 linked to the grade of oxidative aging were identified. The levels of expression of Zbp1 located on chromosome 2, a gene related to necroptosis and inflammation, positively correlated with the grade of aging and tumour aggressiveness. Moreover, the pattern of gene expression of genes linked to the inflammation and the response to infection pathways was enriched in the livers of biologically old mice. This study shows part of the complex interactions between breast cancer and aging. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mining tissue specificity, gene connectivity and disease association to reveal a set of genes that modify the action of disease causing genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reverter Antonio

    2008-09-01

    genes. Our guilt-by-association algorithm should be useful for the discovery of additional modifiers of genetic diseases, and more generally, for the ability to associate genes of unknown function to clusters of genes with defined functions allowing for novel biological inference that can be subsequently validated.

  14. The Spanish biology/disease initiative within the human proteome project: Application to rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Romero, Cristina; Calamia, Valentina; Albar, Juan Pablo; Casal, José Ignacio; Corrales, Fernando J; Fernández-Puente, Patricia; Gil, Concha; Mateos, Jesús; Vivanco, Fernando; Blanco, Francisco J

    2015-09-08

    The Spanish Chromosome 16 consortium is integrated in the global initiative Human Proteome Project, which aims to develop an entire map of the proteins encoded following a gene-centric strategy (C-HPP) in order to make progress in the understanding of human biology in health and disease (B/D-HPP). Chromosome 16 contains many genes encoding proteins involved in the development of a broad range of diseases, which have a significant impact on the health care system. The Spanish HPP consortium has developed a B/D platform with five programs focused on selected medical areas: cancer, obesity, cardiovascular, infectious and rheumatic diseases. Each of these areas has a clinical leader associated to a proteomic investigator with the responsibility to get a comprehensive understanding of the proteins encoded by Chromosome 16 genes. Proteomics strategies have enabled great advances in the area of rheumatic diseases, particularly in osteoarthritis, with studies performed on joint cells, tissues and fluids. In this manuscript we describe how the Spanish HPP-16 consortium has developed a B/D platform with five programs focused on selected medical areas: cancer, obesity, cardiovascular, infectious and rheumatic diseases. Each of these areas has a clinical leader associated to a proteomic investigator with the responsibility to get a comprehensive understanding of the proteins encoded by Chromosome 16 genes. We show how the Proteomic strategy has enabled great advances in the area of rheumatic diseases, particularly in osteoarthritis, with studies performed on joint cells, tissues and fluids. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: HUPO 2014. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The Method of Coating Fe₃O₄ with Carbon Nanoparticles to Modify Biological Properties of Oxide Measured in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemiec, Tomasz; Dudek, Mariusz; Dziekan, Natalia; Jaworski, Sławomir; Przewozik, Aleksandra; Soszka, Emilia; Koperkiewicz, Anna; Koczoń, Piotr

    2017-07-01

    The coating of nanoparticles on materials for medical application [e.g., the coating of Fe3O4 nanopowder (IONP) with a carbon nanolayer] serves to protect and modify the selected biological, physical, and chemical properties of the coated material. Increases in chemical stability, changes in biocompatibility, and a modified surface structure are examples of the effects caused by the formation of carbon coatings. In the current study, Fe3O4 nanoparticles were coated with a carbon nanolayer (IONP@C) in a plasmochemical reactor (using radio-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition methods) under various experimental conditions. Based on data from X-ray diffraction, Raman, and IR spectroscopy, the best processing parameters were determined in order to produce a carbon coating that would not change the structure of the IONP. The materials with the best cover, i.e., a uniform carbon nanolayer, were used in cytotoxic tests to investigate their biological properties using the human HepG2 hepatocarcinoma cell line and chicken embryo red blood cells as an in vitro model. The obtained results proved the low cytotoxicity of Fe3O4 micropowder and IONP in contrast to IONP@C, which reduced cell viability, increased hemolysis, and generally was more toxic than bare Fe3O4.

  16. Modified Harrington Procedure for Acetabular Insuficiency Due to Metastatic Malignant Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WI Faisham

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Extensive peri-acetabular osteolysis caused by malignant disease process is a major surgical challenge as conventional hip arthroplasty is not adequate. We describe a modified use of the Harrington procedure for acetabular insufficiency secondary to metastatic disease in twelve patients. The procedures include application of multiple threaded pins to bridge the acetabular columns, anti-protrusio cage and cemented acetabular cup. Eleven patients were able to walk pain free and achieved a mean Musculoskeletal Tumour Society Functional Score of 80 (range, 68 to 86.

  17. Biological control of banana black Sigatoka disease with Trichoderma

    OpenAIRE

    Poholl Adan Sagratzki Cavero; Rogério Eiji Hanada; Luadir Gasparotto; Rosalee Albuquerque Coelho Neto; Jorge Teodoro de Souza

    2015-01-01

    Black Sigatoka disease caused by Mycosphaerella fijiensis is the most severe banana disease worldwide. The pathogen is in an invasive phase in Brazil and is already present in most States of the country. The potential of 29 isolates of Trichoderma spp. was studied for the control of black Sigatoka disease under field conditions. Four isolates were able to significantly reduce disease severity and were further tested in a second field experiment. Isolate 2.047 showed the best results in both f...

  18. Modified vegetation indices for Ganoderma disease detection in oil palm from field spectroradiometer data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafri, Helmi Z. M.; Anuar, M. Izzuddin; Saripan, M. Iqbal

    2009-10-01

    High resolution field spectroradiometers are important for spectral analysis and mobile inspection of vegetation disease. The biggest challenges in using this technology for automated vegetation disease detection are in spectral signatures pre-processing, band selection and generating reflectance indices to improve the ability of hyperspectral data for early detection of disease. In this paper, new indices for oil palm Ganoderma disease detection were generated using band ratio and different band combination techniques. Unsupervised clustering method was used to cluster the values of each class resultant from each index. The wellness of band combinations was assessed by using Optimum Index Factor (OIF) while cluster validation was executed using Average Silhouette Width (ASW). 11 modified reflectance indices were generated in this study and the indices were ranked according to the values of their ASW. These modified indices were also compared to several existing and new indices. The results showed that the combination of spectral values at 610.5nm and 738nm was the best for clustering the three classes of infection levels in the determination of the best spectral index for early detection of Ganoderma disease.

  19. Biological control of botrytis cinerea growth on apples stored in modified atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dock, Lise Lotte; Nielsen, Per Væggemose; Floros, John D.

    1998-01-01

    The combined effect of modified-atmosphere packaging and theapplication of a bacterial antagonist (Erwinia sp.) on Botrytiscinerea growth on apples (cv. 'Golden Delicious') was investigated.Inoculated apples were stored in polyethylene bags at 5 degrees C. Theinitial gas composition in each bag...... by about 6days at low levels of CO2. However, at high CO2 levels, O2 had noeffect. The strongest antagonistic effect was observed under ambientconditions. Overall, results showed that high CO2 atmospheres can slowthe growth of B. cinerea and that Erwinia sp. was an effectiveantagonist against B. cinerea...

  20. Electrochemical Cathodic Polarization, a Simplified Method That Can Modified and Increase the Biological Activity of Titanium Surfaces: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Carlos Bernedo Alcazar

    Full Text Available The cathodic polarization seems to be an electrochemical method capable of modifying and coat biomolecules on titanium surfaces, improving the surface activity and promoting better biological responses.The aim of the systematic review is to assess the scientific literature to evaluate the cellular response produced by treatment of titanium surfaces by applying the cathodic polarization technique.The literature search was performed in several databases including PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, Science Direct, Scielo and EBSCO Host, until June 2016, with no limits used. Eligibility criteria were used and quality assessment was performed following slightly modified ARRIVE and SYRCLE guidelines for cellular studies and animal research.Thirteen studies accomplished the inclusion criteria and were considered in the review. The quality of reporting studies in animal models was low and for the in vitro studies it was high. The in vitro and in vivo results reported that the use of cathodic polarization promoted hydride surfaces, effective deposition, and adhesion of the coated biomolecules. In the experimental groups that used the electrochemical method, cellular viability, proliferation, adhesion, differentiation, or bone growth were better or comparable with the control groups.The use of the cathodic polarization method to modify titanium surfaces seems to be an interesting method that could produce active layers and consequently enhance cellular response, in vitro and in vivo animal model studies.

  1. Enhanced electrocatalytic oxidation of isoniazid at electrochemically modified rhodium electrode for biological and pharmaceutical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheemalapati, Srikanth; Chen, Shen-Ming; Ali, M Ajmal; Al-Hemaid, Fahad M A

    2014-09-01

    A simple and sensitive electrochemical method has been proposed for the determination of isoniazid (INZ). For the first time, rhodium (Rh) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) has been employed for the determination of INZ by linear sweep voltammetry technique (LSV). Compared with the unmodified electrode, the proposed Rh modified electrode provides strong electrocatalytic activity toward INZ with significant enhancement in the anodic peak current. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) results reveal the morphology of Rh particles. With the advantages of wide linearity (70-1300μM), good sensitivity (0.139μAμM(-1)cm(-2)) and low detection limit (13μM), this proposed sensor holds great potential for the determination of INZ in real samples. The practicality of the proposed electrode for the detection of INZ in human urine and blood plasma samples has been successfully demonstrated using LSV technique. Through the determination of INZ in commercially available pharmaceutical tablets, the practical applicability of the proposed method has been validated. The recovery results are found to be in good agreement with the labeled amounts of INZ in tablets, thus showing its great potential for use in clinical and pharmaceutical analysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Modifying Eating Behavior: Novel Approaches for Reducing Body Weight, Preventing Weight Regain, and Reducing Chronic Disease Risk123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gletsu-Miller, Nana; McCrory, Megan A

    2014-01-01

    This article is a summary of the symposium “Modifying Eating Behavior: Novel Approaches for Reducing Body Weight, Preventing Weight Regain, and Reducing Chronic Disease Risk” held 29 April 2014 at the ASN Scientific Sessions and Annual Meeting at Experimental Biology 2014 in San Diego, CA. In this symposium, novel approaches to modifying eating behavior were highlighted, including 1) alteration of meal timing and macronutrient composition and 2) retraining and provision of feedback about eating behavior. Dr. Ciampolini discussed a method for teaching individuals to recognize a decrease in blood glucose concentration, and therefore the need for energy, by learning the associated physical sensations (signifying hunger). Dr. Madar and Sigal Sofer presented their work on reducing hunger during energy reduction by feeding carbohydrate only in the evening. Dr. Hamilton-Shield reviewed studies on the Mandometer (Mikrodidakt), a device for training individuals to slow eating rate. Finally, Dr. Sazonov presented information on a wearable device, the Automatic Ingestion Monitor, which senses jaw motion and/or hand-to-mouth gestures to detect and characterize food intake. His goal is to use the instrument to prevent overeating by providing feedback to the user to stop ingestion at a predetermined limit. PMID:25398742

  3. Knowledge of modifiable risk factors of Coronary Atherosclerotic Heart Disease (CASHD among a sample in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ku Melvin

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of Coronary Atherosclerotic Heart Disease (CASHD is increasing in India. Several modifiable risk factors contribute directly to this disease burden. Public knowledge of such risk factors among the urban Indian population is largely unknown. This investigation attempts to quantify knowledge of modifiable risk factors of CASHD as sampled among an Indian population at a large metropolitan hospital. Methods A hospital-based, cross sectional study was conducted at All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS, a major tertiary care hospital in New Delhi, India. Participants (n = 217 recruited from patient waiting areas in the emergency room were provided with standardized questionnaires to assess their knowledge of modifiable risk factors of CASHD. The risk factors specifically included smoking, hypertension, elevated cholesterol levels, diabetes mellitus and obesity. Identifying 3 or less risk factors was regarded as a poor knowledge level, whereas identifying 4 or more risk factors was regarded as a good knowledge level. A multiple logistic regression model was used to isolate independent demographic markers predictive of a participant's level of knowledge. Results 41% of the sample surveyed had a good level of knowledge. 68%, 72%, 73% and 57% of the population identified smoking, obesity, hypertension, and high cholesterol correctly, respectively. 30% identified diabetes mellitus as a modifiable risk factor of CASHD. In multiple logistic regression analysis independent demographic predictors of a good knowledge level with a statistically significant (p Conclusion An Indian population in a hospital setting shows a lack of knowledge pertaining to modifiable risk factors of CASHD. By isolating demographic predictors of poor knowledge, such as current smokers and persons who do not exercise regularly, educational interventions can be effectively targeted and implemented as primary and secondary prevention strategies

  4. Can pharmaceutical co-crystals provide an opportunity to modify the biological properties of drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalpiaz, Alessandro; Pavan, Barbara; Ferretti, Valeria

    2017-08-01

    Poorly soluble and/or permeable molecules jeopardize the discovery and development of innovative medicines. Pharmaceutical co-crystals, formed by an active pharmaceutical substance (API) and a co-crystal former, can show enhanced dissolution and permeation values compared with those of the parent crystalline pure phases. It is currently assumed that co-crystallization with pharmaceutical excipients does not affect the pharmacological activity of an API or, indeed, might even improve physical properties such as solubility and permeability. However, as we highlight here, the biological behavior of co-crystals can differ drastically with respect to that of their parent physical mixtures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Modified Organosilica Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Stable pH Sensing in Biological Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Kye J; Huynh, Gabriel T; Kouskousis, Betty P; Fletcher, Nicholas L; Houston, Zachary H; Thurecht, Kristofer J; Corrie, Simon R

    2018-04-19

    Continuous monitoring using nanoparticle-based sensors has been successfully employed in complex biological systems, yet the sensors still suffer from poor long-term stability partially because of the scaffold materials chosen to date. Organosilica core-shell nanoparticles containing a mixture of covalently incorporated pH-sensitive (shell) and pH-insensitive (core) fluorophores is presented as a continuous pH sensor for application in biological media. In contrast to previous studies focusing on similar materials, we sought to investigate the sensor characteristics (dynamic range, sensitivity, response time, stability) as a function of material properties. The ratio of the fluorescence intensities at specific wavelengths was found to be highly sensitive to pH over a physiologically relevant range (4.5-8) with a response time of pH-specific signals when stored at room temperature for more than 80 days. Finally, we demonstrated that the nanosensors successfully monitored the pH of a bacterial culture over 15 h and that pH changes in the skin of mouse cadavers could also be observed via in vivo fluorescence imaging following subcutaneous injection. The understanding gained from linking sensor characteristics and material properties will inform the next generation of optical nanosensors for continuous-monitoring applications.

  6. Update and future perspectives of a thymic biological response modifier (Thymomodulin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzola, P; Mazzanti, P; Kouttab, N M

    1987-01-01

    Thymomodulin (Ellem Industria Farmaceutica spa, Milan, Italy) is a calf thymus acid lysate with immunomodulating activities. It is composed of several peptides with a molecular weight range of 1-10kD. Extensive studies in animal systems showed that Thymomodulin exhibited no, or very little toxicity even when used at high doses. Studies done in vitro and in vivo demonstrated that Thymomodulin is a biologically active compound which regulates the maturation of human and murine pre T lymphocytes, as well as modulate the functions of apparently mature human and animal B and T lymphocytes. It was observed that Thymomodulin can promote myelopoiesis as demonstrated by an increase of granulocyte-macrophage colonies in agar. Although additional studies to examine its target cell lineage are required, it appears that Thymomodulin exhibits specificity toward T cells. Therefore, enhancement of other cell lineage functions by Thymomodulin may be indirect, and mainly due to its effect on T cells. Of major importance is to note that Thymomodulin is prepared in a manner which allows it to maintain its biological activity when administered orally.

  7. Needle-free and microneedle drug delivery in children: a case for disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Utpal U; Roberts, Matthew; Orlu Gul, Mine; Tuleu, Catherine; Beresford, Michael W

    2011-09-15

    Parenteral routes of drug administration have poor acceptability and tolerability in children. Advances in transdermal drug delivery provide a potential alternative for improving drug administration in this patient group. Issues with parenteral delivery in children are highlighted and thus illustrate the scope for the application of needle-free and microneedle technologies. This mini-review discusses the opportunities and challenges for providing disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) currently prescribed to paediatric rheumatology patients using such technologies. The aim is to raise further awareness of the need for age-appropriate formulations and drug delivery systems and stimulate exploration of these options for DMARDs, and in particular, rapidly emerging biologics on the market. The ability of needle-free and microneedle technologies to deliver monoclonal antibodies and fusion proteins still remains largely untested. Such an understanding is crucial for future drug design opportunities. The bioavailability, safety and tolerance of delivering biologics into the viable epidermis also need to be studied. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Potentials of single-cell biology in identification and validation of disease biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Furong; Wang, Diane C; Lu, Jiapei; Wu, Wei; Wang, Xiangdong

    2016-09-01

    Single-cell biology is considered a new approach to identify and validate disease-specific biomarkers. However, the concern raised by clinicians is how to apply single-cell measurements for clinical practice, translate the message of single-cell systems biology into clinical phenotype or explain alterations of single-cell gene sequencing and function in patient response to therapies. This study is to address the importance and necessity of single-cell gene sequencing in the identification and development of disease-specific biomarkers, the definition and significance of single-cell biology and single-cell systems biology in the understanding of single-cell full picture, the development and establishment of whole-cell models in the validation of targeted biological function and the figure and meaning of single-molecule imaging in single cell to trace intra-single-cell molecule expression, signal, interaction and location. We headline the important role of single-cell biology in the discovery and development of disease-specific biomarkers with a special emphasis on understanding single-cell biological functions, e.g. mechanical phenotypes, single-cell biology, heterogeneity and organization of genome function. We have reason to believe that such multi-dimensional, multi-layer, multi-crossing and stereoscopic single-cell biology definitely benefits the discovery and development of disease-specific biomarkers. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  9. Enhancing biological control of basal stem rot disease (Ganoderma boninense) in oil palm plantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susanto, A; Sudharto, P S; Purba, R Y

    2005-01-01

    Basal Stem Rot (BSR) disease caused by Ganoderma boninense is the most destructive disease in oil palm, especially in Indonesia and Malaysia. The available control measures for BSR disease such as cultural practices and mechanical and chemical treatment have not proved satisfactory due to the fact that Ganoderma has various resting stages such as melanised mycelium, basidiospores and pseudosclerotia. Alternative control measures to overcome the Ganoderma problem are focused on the use of biological control agents and planting resistant material. Present studies conducted at Indonesian Oil Palm Research Institute (IOPRI) are focused on enhancing the use of biological control agents for Ganoderma. These activities include screening biological agents from the oil palm rhizosphere in order to evaluate their effectiveness as biological agents in glasshouse and field trials, testing their antagonistic activities in large scale experiments and eradicating potential disease inoculum with biological agents. Several promising biological agents have been isolated, mainly Trichoderma harzianum, T. viride, Gliocladium viride, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Bacillus sp. A glasshouse and field trial for Ganoderma control indicated that treatment with T. harzianum and G. viride was superior to Bacillus sp. A large scale trial showed that the disease incidence was lower in a field treated with biological agents than in untreated fields. In a short term programme, research activities at IOPRI are currently focusing on selecting fungi that can completely degrade plant material in order to eradicate inoculum. Digging holes around the palm bole and adding empty fruit bunches have been investigated as ways to stimulate biological agents.

  10. Insights into the structural biology of Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Laura; Mullin, Stephen; Schapira, Anthony H V

    2017-12-01

    Gaucher disease, the most common lysosomal storage disorder, is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the acid-β-glucosidase lysosomal hydrolase enzyme that cleaves glucocerebroside into glucose and ceramide. Reduced enzyme activity and impaired structural stability arise due to >300 known disease-causing mutations. Several of these mutations have also been associated with an increased risk of Parkinson disease (PD). Since the discovery of the acid-β-glucosidase X-ray structure, there have been major advances in our understanding of the structural properties of the protein. Analysis of specific residues has provided insight into their functional and structural importance and provided insight into the pathogenesis of Gaucher disease and the contribution to PD. Disease-causing mutations are positioned throughout the acid-β-glucosidase structure, with many located far from the active site and thus retaining some enzymatic activity however, thus far no clear relationship between mutation location and disease severity has been established. Here, we review the crystal structure of acid-β-glucosidase, while highlighting important structural aspects of the protein in detail. This review discusses the structural stability of acid-β-glucosidase, which can be altered by pH and glycosylation, and explores the relationship between known Gaucher disease and PD mutations, structural stability and disease severity. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Biological control of banana black Sigatoka disease with Trichoderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poholl Adan Sagratzki Cavero

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Black Sigatoka disease caused by Mycosphaerella fijiensis is the most severe banana disease worldwide. The pathogen is in an invasive phase in Brazil and is already present in most States of the country. The potential of 29 isolates of Trichoderma spp. was studied for the control of black Sigatoka disease under field conditions. Four isolates were able to significantly reduce disease severity and were further tested in a second field experiment. Isolate 2.047 showed the best results in both field experiments and was selected for fungicide sensitivity tests and mass production. This isolate was identified as Trichoderma atroviride by sequencing fragments of the ITS region of the rDNA and tef-1α of the RNA polymerase. Trichoderma atroviride was as effective as the fungicide Azoxystrobin, which is recommended for controlling black Sigatoka. This biocontrol agent has potential to control the disease and may be scaled-up for field applications on rice-based solid fermentation

  12. Diabetes and modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease: the prospective Million Women Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, Elizabeth A.; Pirie, Kirstin L.; Stevens, Richard J.; Beral, Valerie; Brown, Anna; Liu, Bette; Green, Jane; Reeves, Gillian K.

    2008-01-01

    To compare the effect of potentially modifiable lifestyle factors on the incidence of vascular disease in women with and without diabetes. In 1996-2001 over one million middle-aged women in the UK joined a prospective study, providing medical history, lifestyle and socio-demographic information. All participants were followed for hospital admissions and deaths using electronic record-linkage. Adjusted relative risks (RRs) and incidence rates were calculated to compare the incidence of coronary heart disease and stroke in women with and without diabetes and by lifestyle factors. At recruitment 25,915 women (2.1% of 1,242,338) reported current treatment for diabetes. During a mean follow-up of 6.1 years per woman, 21,928 had a first hospital admission or death from coronary heart disease (RR for women with versus without diabetes = 3.30, 95% CI 3.14-3.47) and 7,087 had a first stroke (RR = 2.47, 95% CI 2.24-2.74). Adjusted incidence rates of these conditions in women with diabetes increased with duration of diabetes, obesity, inactivity and smoking. The 5-year adjusted incidence rates for cardiovascular disease were 4.6 (95% CI 4.4-4.9) per 100 women aged 50-69 in non-smokers with diabetes, 5.9 (95% CI 4.6-7.6) in smokers with diabetes not using insulin and 11.0 (95% CI 8.3-14.7) in smokers with diabetes using insulin. Non-smoking women with diabetes who were not overweight or inactive still had threefold increased rate for coronary disease or stroke compared with women without diabetes. Of the modifiable factors examined in middle aged women with diabetes, smoking causes the greatest increase in cardiovascular disease, especially in those with insulin treated diabetes

  13. Metformin: A Novel Biological Modifier of Tumor Response to Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koritzinsky, Marianne, E-mail: mkoritzi@uhnresearch.ca

    2015-10-01

    Over the last decade, evidence has emerged to support a role for the antidiabetic drug metformin in the prevention and treatment of cancer. In particular, recent studies demonstrate that metformin enhances tumor response to radiation in experimental models, and retrospective analyses have shown that diabetic cancer patients treated with radiation therapy have improved outcomes if they take metformin to control their diabetes. Metformin may therefore be of utility for nondiabetic cancer patients treated with radiation therapy. The purpose of this review is to examine the data pertaining to an interaction between metformin and radiation, highlighting the essential steps needed to advance our current knowledge. There is also a focus on key biomarkers that should accompany prospective clinical trials in which metformin is being examined as a modifying agent with radiation therapy. Existing evidence supports that the mechanism underlying the ability of metformin to enhance radiation response is multifaceted, and includes direct radiosensitization as well as a reduction in tumor stem cell fraction, proliferation, and tumor hypoxia. Interestingly, metformin may enhance radiation response specifically in certain genetic backgrounds, such as in cells with loss of the tumor suppressors p53 and LKB1, giving rise to a therapeutic ratio and potential predictive biomarkers.

  14. Metformin: A Novel Biological Modifier of Tumor Response to Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koritzinsky, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, evidence has emerged to support a role for the antidiabetic drug metformin in the prevention and treatment of cancer. In particular, recent studies demonstrate that metformin enhances tumor response to radiation in experimental models, and retrospective analyses have shown that diabetic cancer patients treated with radiation therapy have improved outcomes if they take metformin to control their diabetes. Metformin may therefore be of utility for nondiabetic cancer patients treated with radiation therapy. The purpose of this review is to examine the data pertaining to an interaction between metformin and radiation, highlighting the essential steps needed to advance our current knowledge. There is also a focus on key biomarkers that should accompany prospective clinical trials in which metformin is being examined as a modifying agent with radiation therapy. Existing evidence supports that the mechanism underlying the ability of metformin to enhance radiation response is multifaceted, and includes direct radiosensitization as well as a reduction in tumor stem cell fraction, proliferation, and tumor hypoxia. Interestingly, metformin may enhance radiation response specifically in certain genetic backgrounds, such as in cells with loss of the tumor suppressors p53 and LKB1, giving rise to a therapeutic ratio and potential predictive biomarkers

  15. SQ grass sublingual allergy immunotherapy tablet for disease-modifying treatment of grass pollen allergic rhinoconjunctivitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Ronald; Roberts, Graham; de Blic, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Allergy immunotherapy is a treatment option for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (ARC). It is unique compared with pharmacotherapy in that it modifies the immunologic pathways that elicit an allergic response. The SQ Timothy grass sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) tablet is approved in North...... America and throughout Europe for the treatment of adults and children (≥5 years old) with grass pollen-induced ARC. OBJECTIVE: The clinical evidence for the use of SQ grass SLIT-tablet as a disease-modifying treatment for grass pollen ARC is discussed in this review. METHODS: The review included...... the suitability of SQ grass SLIT-tablet for patients with clinically relevant symptoms to multiple Pooideae grass species, single-season efficacy, safety, adherence, coseasonal initiation, and cost-effectiveness. The data from the long-term SQ grass SLIT-tablet clinical trial that evaluated a clinical effect 2...

  16. Tumour necrosis factor inhibitors versus combination intensive therapy with conventional disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs in established rheumatoid arthritis: TACIT non-inferiority randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, David L; Ibrahim, Fowzia; Farewell, Vern; O'Keeffe, Aidan G; Walker, David; Kelly, Clive; Birrell, Fraser; Chakravarty, Kuntal; Maddison, Peter; Heslin, Margaret; Patel, Anita; Kingsley, Gabrielle H

    2015-03-13

    To determine whether intensive combinations of synthetic disease modifying drugs can achieve similar clinical benefits at lower costs to high cost biologics such as tumour necrosis factor inhibitors in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis resistant to initial methotrexate and other synthetic disease modifying drugs. Open label pragmatic randomised multicentre two arm non-inferiority trial over 12 months. 24 rheumatology clinics in England. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis who were eligible for treatment with tumour necrosis factor inhibitors according to current English guidance were randomised to either the tumour necrosis factor inhibitor strategy or the combined disease modifying drug strategy. Biologic strategy: start tumour necrosis factor inhibitor; second biologic in six month for non-responders. Alternative strategy: start combination of disease modifying drugs; start tumour necrosis factor inhibitors after six months in non-responders. reduction in disability at 12 months measured with patient recorded heath assessment questionnaire (range 0.00-3.00) with a 0.22 non-inferiority margin for combination treatment versus the biologic strategy. quality of life, joint damage, disease activity, adverse events, and costs. Intention to treat analysis used multiple imputation methods for missing data. 432 patients were screened: 107 were randomised to tumour necrosis factor inhibitors and 101 started taking; 107 were randomised to the combined drug strategy and 104 started taking the drugs. Initial assessments were similar; 16 patients were lost to follow-up (seven with the tumour necrosis factor inhibitor strategy, nine with the combined drug strategy); 42 discontinued the intervention but were followed-up (19 and 23, respectively). The primary outcome showed mean falls in scores on the health assessment questionnaire of -0.30 with the tumour necrosis factor inhibitor strategy and -0.45 with the alternative combined drug strategy. The difference between

  17. Biological and phylogenetic characterization of a genotype VII Newcastle disease virus from Venezuela: Efficacy of vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here we describe the characterization a virulent genotype VII Newcastle disease virus (NDV) from Venezuela and evaluate the efficacy of heterologous genotype commercial vaccination under field and controlled rearing conditions. Biological pathotyping and molecular analysis were applied. Results sh...

  18. Optical force on diseased blood cells: Towards the optical sorting of biological matter

    KAUST Repository

    Gongora, J. S. Totero; Fratalocchi, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    By employing a series of massively parallel ab-initio simulations, we study how optical forces act on biological matter subject to morphological disease. As a representative case study, we here consider the case of Plasmodium falciparum on red blood

  19. c-reactive protein — biological functions, cardiovascular disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    disease and physical exercise. S J Semple (Dtech) ... measured within exercise studies to provide evidence that ... sociated with cellular injury and the release of pro-inflamma- .... reactive oxygen species.17 In addition, psychological stress,.

  20. Modifiable Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors in the Population Aged 20-49 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Carlos Valladares Mas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: evidence provided by the Framingham Heart Study established the critical role of risk factors in the development of coronary heart disease. Over half a century later, current detection and control are still inadequate. Objective: to identify modifiable risk factors of coronary heart disease in individuals aged 20 to 49 years. Methods: a descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in 276 individuals from the doctor’s office No. 1 of the Fabio di Celmo Community Teaching Polyclinic in Cienfuegos. Patients were examined in the clinic visit and/or whole family visit. The studied variables included age, sex, skin color, risk factors (excess weight/obesity, physical inactivity, smoking, hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia and psychosocial factors, which were obtained from the medical interview, physical examination, laboratory tests (total cholesterol and triglycerides and review of individual medical records and family history. Results: risk factors most frequently identified were excess weight/obesity (42.4 %, physical inactivity (34.4 % and smoking (20.3 %. Presence of these risk factors increased with age, showing differences in the distribution by sex and was associated with psychosocial factors. Their coexistence and progress with age was significant. Conclusion: prevalence of modifiable risk factors for coronary heart disease in a young population was high, with frequent association, predominating factors related to unhealthy lifestyles.

  1. Anomalous optical behavior of biological media: modifying the optical window of myocardial tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splinter, Robert; Raja, M. Yasin A.; Svenson, Robert H.

    1996-05-01

    In medical experimental and clinical treatment modalities of light, laser photocoagulation of ventricular tachycardia amongst others, the success of the application relies on whether or not the procedure operates in the optical window of the light-tissue interaction. The optical window of biological tissues can be determined by spectral scans of the optical properties. Optical anomalies may result from the irradiance, the wavelength, or from the tissue composition itself. The transmission of cw Nd:YAG laser light on myocardial tissue showed a nonlinearity in the transmission curve at approximately 3 kW/mm2 irradiance. The total attenuation coefficient dropped sharp from 1.03 plus or minus 0.04 mm-1 to 0.73 plus or minus 0.05 mm-1 at this point in the curve. On the other hand, aneurysm tissue has a highly organized fiber structure, which serves as light-guides, since the transmission of light along the length of the collagen fibers is approximately 50% higher than the transmission perpendicular to the fiber orientation. In addition, changes in optical properties due to tissue phase changes also influence the penetration depth. These phenomena can be utilized to manipulate the optical penetration to an advantage.

  2. A novel approach to delayed-start analyses for demonstrating disease-modifying effects in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Liu-Seifert

    Full Text Available One method for demonstrating disease modification is a delayed-start design, consisting of a placebo-controlled period followed by a delayed-start period wherein all patients receive active treatment. To address methodological issues in previous delayed-start approaches, we propose a new method that is robust across conditions of drug effect, discontinuation rates, and missing data mechanisms. We propose a modeling approach and test procedure to test the hypothesis of noninferiority, comparing the treatment difference at the end of the delayed-start period with that at the end of the placebo-controlled period. We conducted simulations to identify the optimal noninferiority testing procedure to ensure the method was robust across scenarios and assumptions, and to evaluate the appropriate modeling approach for analyzing the delayed-start period. We then applied this methodology to Phase 3 solanezumab clinical trial data for mild Alzheimer's disease patients. Simulation results showed a testing procedure using a proportional noninferiority margin was robust for detecting disease-modifying effects; conditions of high and moderate discontinuations; and with various missing data mechanisms. Using all data from all randomized patients in a single model over both the placebo-controlled and delayed-start study periods demonstrated good statistical performance. In analysis of solanezumab data using this methodology, the noninferiority criterion was met, indicating the treatment difference at the end of the placebo-controlled studies was preserved at the end of the delayed-start period within a pre-defined margin. The proposed noninferiority method for delayed-start analysis controls Type I error rate well and addresses many challenges posed by previous approaches. Delayed-start studies employing the proposed analysis approach could be used to provide evidence of a disease-modifying effect. This method has been communicated with FDA and has been

  3. Psychiatric and cognitive symptoms in Huntington's disease are modified by polymorphisms in catecholamine regulating enzyme genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther-Jensen, T; Nielsen, Troels Tolstrup; Budtz-Jørgensen, E

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorder characterized by motor, psychiatric, and cognitive manifestations. HD is caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the Huntingtin (HTT) gene but the exact pathogenesis remains unknown. Dopamine imbalance has......-described cohort of Danish HD gene-expansion carriers. We show that cognitive impairment and psychiatric symptoms in HD are modified by polymorphisms in the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) genes and by the 4p16.3 B haplotype. These results support the theory of dopamine imbalance...

  4. Critical appraisal of the guidelines for the management of ankylosing spondylitis: disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano, Enrique R; Clegg, Daniel O; Lisse, Jeffrey R

    2012-05-01

    Surprisingly, little data are available for the use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in ankylosing spondylitis. Sulfasalazine has been the best studied. Efficacy data for individual agents (including pamidronate) and combinations of agents are detailed in this review. Intriguingly, these agents continue to be used with some frequency, even in the absence of efficacy data. To answer these questions, additional systematic studies of these agents in ankylosing spondylitis are needed and will likely need to be done by interested collaborative groups such as SPARTAN.

  5. Beyond disease susceptibility-Leveraging genome-wide association studies for new insights into complex disease biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J C

    2017-12-01

    Genetic studies in complex diseases have been highly successful, but have also been largely one-dimensional: predominantly focusing on the genetic contribution to disease susceptibility. While this is undoubtedly important-indeed it is a pre-requisite for understanding the mechanisms underlying disease development-there are many other important aspects of disease biology that have received comparatively little attention. In this review, I will discuss how existing genetic data can be leveraged to provide new insights into other aspects of disease biology, why such insights could change the way we think about complex disease, and how this could provide opportunities for better therapies and/or facilitate personalised medicine. To do this, I will use the example of Crohn's disease-a chronic form of inflammatory bowel disease that has been one of the main success stories in complex disease genetics. Indeed, thanks to genetic studies, we now have a much more detailed understanding of the processes involved in Crohn's disease development, but still know relatively little about what determines the subsequent disease course (prognosis) and why this differs so considerably between individuals. I will discuss how we came to realise that genetic variation plays an important role in determining disease prognosis and how this has changed the way we think about Crohn's disease genetics. This will illustrate how phenotypic data can be used to leverage new insights from genetic data and will provide a broadly applicable framework that could yield new insights into the biology of multiple diseases. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Hydroxyapatite crystal deposition disease: imaging aspects and biological behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Aquino, Danilo Olavarria; Pinto, Alexandre de Lavra; Costa, Mauro Jose Brandao da; Fanelli, Vania A.; Abud, Lucas Giansante

    2005-01-01

    Objective: to demonstrate, using imaging methods (x-ray, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound (US), the phases of hydroxyapatite crystal deposition disease in joints, particularly in the shoulder, from the silent phase to the intra-osseous migration of calcifications and radiologic follow-up examinations showing complete remission after physical therapy. Material and method: we evaluated 27 joints (25 shoulders, one hip and one elbow) of patients followed-up with radiographs. Patients extremely symptomatic and refractory to treatment were referred to MRI or US. Results: total remission of calcifications was observed in 15 joints after treatment - 14 shoulders and one elbow. In two joint, migration of the calcification to bone was observed: one to the bursa subdeltoidea, one to biceps tendon, one to subcoracoid recess and one to the interior of the infra spinal muscle. In two cases MRI and CT scans showed a high inflammatory process triggered by the disease. Conclusion: hydroxyapatite crystal deposition disease affects multiple joints and can vary from asymptomatic to extremely symptomatic. Imaging methods show all phases of the disease, including the migratory phase. In general, the use of x-ray is enough for the diagnosis and follow-up. MRI and CT provide a more accurate diagnosis in the active phase of the disease. In this paper, remission was seen with physiotherapy (iontophoresis) in 55% of the cases. (author)

  7. Resorbable electrospun polydioxanone fibres modify the behaviour of cells from both healthy and diseased human tendons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Kendal

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Chronic tendinopathy in an active and ageing population represents an increasing burden to healthcare systems. Rotator cuff tendinopathy alone accounts for approximately 70 % of all shoulder pain. Tendinopathic tissue has a disorganised extracellular matrix, altered vasculature, and infiltration of fibroblasts and inflammatory cells. This altered biology may contribute to the limited success of surgical repair strategies. Electrospun resorbable scaffolds can potentially enhance endogenous repair mechanisms by influencing the tissue microenvironment. Polydioxanone (PDO has an established safety profile in patients. We compared the response of healthy and diseased human tendon cells to electrospun PDO fibres using live cell imaging, proliferation, flow cytometry, and gene expression studies. Within 4 h of initial contact with electrospun PDO, healthy tendon cells underwent a marked transformation; elongating along the fibres in a fibre density dependent manner. Diseased tendon cells initially responded at a slower rate, but ultimately underwent a similar morphological change. Electrospun fibres increased the proliferation rate of diseased tendon cells and increased the ratio of type I:IIIcollagenmRNA expression. Flow cytometry revealed decreased expression of CD106, a marker of mesenchymal stem cells, and increased expression of CD10 on healthy versus diseased tendon cells. PDO electrospun scaffolds further promoted CD106negCD10pos expression of healthy tendon cells. Despite their behavioural differences, both healthy and diseased human tendon cells responded to electrospun PDO fibres. This encourages further work establishing their efficacy in augmenting surgical repair of diseased tendons.

  8. Gaseous VOCs rapidly modify particulate matter and its biological effects - Part 1: Simple VOCs and model PM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebersviller, S.; Lichtveld, K.; Sexton, K. G.; Zavala, J.; Lin, Y.-H.; Jaspers, I.; Jeffries, H. E.

    2012-12-01

    This is the first of a three-part study designed to demonstrate dynamic entanglements among gaseous organic compounds (VOC), particulate matter (PM), and their subsequent potential biological effects. We study these entanglements in increasingly complex VOC and PM mixtures in urban-like conditions in a large outdoor chamber. To the traditional chemical and physical characterizations of gas and PM, we added new measurements of biological effects, using cultured human lung cells as model indicators. These biological effects are assessed here as increases in cellular damage or expressed irritation (i.e., cellular toxic effects) from cells exposed to chamber air relative to cells exposed to clean air. The exposure systems permit virtually gas-only- or PM-only-exposures from the same air stream containing both gases and PM in equilibria, i.e., there are no extractive operations prior to cell exposure. Our simple experiments in this part of the study were designed to eliminate many competing atmospheric processes to reduce ambiguity in our results. Simple volatile and semi-volatile organic gases that have inherent cellular toxic properties were tested individually for biological effect in the dark (at constant humidity). Airborne mixtures were then created with each compound to which we added PM that has no inherent cellular toxic properties for another cellular exposure. Acrolein and p-tolualdehyde were used as model VOCs and mineral oil aerosol (MOA) was selected as a surrogate for organic-containing PM. MOA is appropriately complex in composition to represent ambient PM, and exhibits no inherent cellular toxic effects and thus did not contribute any biological detrimental effects on its own. Chemical measurements, combined with the responses of our biological exposures, clearly demonstrate that gas-phase pollutants can modify the composition of PM (and its resulting detrimental effects on lung cells). We observed that, even if the gas-phase pollutants are not

  9. Analysis of recent failures of disease modifying therapies in Alzheimer's disease suggesting a new methodology for future studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanatkar, Hamid Reza; Papagiannopoulos, Bill; Grossberg, George Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Pharmaceutical companies and the NIH have invested heavily in a variety of potential disease-modifying therapies for Alzheimer's disease (AD) but unfortunately all double-blind placebo-controlled Phase III studies of these drugs have failed to show statistically significant results supporting their clinical efficacy on cognitive measures. These negative results are surprising as most of these medications have the capability to impact the biomarkers which are associated with progression of Alzheimer's disease. Areas covered: This contradiction prompted us to review all study phases of Intravenous Immunoglobulin (IVIG), Bapineuzumab, Solanezumab, Avagacestat and Dimebolin to shed more light on these recent failures. We critically analyzed these studies, recommending seven lessons from these failures which should not be overlooked. Expert commentary: We suggest a new methodology for future treatment research in Alzheimer's disease considering early intervention with more focus on cognitive decline as a screening tool, more sophisticated exclusion criteria with more reliance on biomarkers, stratification of subjects based on the rate of cognitive decline aiming less heterogeneity, and a longer study duration with periodic assessment of cognition and activities of daily living during the study and also after a washout period.

  10. Work-Family Conflict Modifies the Association of Smoking and Periodontal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, David S; Spencer, A John; Roberts-Thomson, Kaye F

    2017-02-01

    The aims of the study were to assess the association of periodontal loss of attachment with smoking and work-family conflict and assess whether work-family conflict modifies the association of smoking and periodontal disease. A random sample of 45-54 year olds from metropolitan Adelaide, South Australia, was surveyed by mailed self-complete questionnaire during 2004-2005. Oral examinations were performed on persons who responded to the questionnaire, providing an assessment of periodontal status. A total of 879 responded (participation rate = 43.8 %), with n = 709 oral examinations (completion rate = 80.7 %). Prevalence of periodontal loss of attachment (LOA) of 6+ mm was higher (p periodontal disease. Higher levels of work interfering with family were associated with higher levels of periodontal LOA for smokers compared with non-smokers.

  11. Development of criteria for evaluating clinical response in thyroid eye disease using a modified Delphi technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douglas, Raymond S; Tsirbas, Angelo; Gordon, Mark

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify components of a provisional clinical response index for thyroid eye disease using a modified Delphi technique. METHODS: The International Thyroid Eye Disease Society conducted a structured, 3-round Delphi exercise establishing consensus for a core set of measures for clinical...... parsed into 11 domains for the Delphi surveys. Eighty-four respondents participated in the Delphi 1 survey, providing 220 unique items. Ninety-two members (100% of the respondents from Delphi 1 plus 8 new participants) responded in Delphi 2 and rated the same 220 items. Sixty-four members (76......% of participants) rated 153 criteria in Delphi 3 (67 criteria were excluded because of redundancy). Criteria with a mean greater than 6 (1 = least appropriate to 9 = most appropriate) were further evaluated by the nominal group technique and provisional core measures were chosen. CONCLUSIONS: Using a Delphi...

  12. The Biology of Desire. Why Addiction Is Not a Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lewis, M.D.

    2015-01-01

    Through the vivid, true stories of five people who journeyed into and out of addiction, a renowned neuroscientist explains why the "disease model" of addiction is wrong and illuminates the path to recovery. The psychiatric establishment and rehab industry in the Western world have branded addiction

  13. Basics of Radiation Biology When Treating Hyperproliferative Benign Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz Rödel

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available For decades, low- and moderate-dose radiation therapy (RT has been shown to exert a beneficial therapeutic effect in a multitude of non-malignant conditions including painful degenerative muscoloskeletal and hyperproliferative disorders. Dupuytren and Ledderhose diseases are benign fibroproliferative diseases of the hand/foot with fibrotic nodules and fascial cords, which determine debilitating contractures and deformities of fingers/toes, while keloids are exuberant scar formations following burn damage, surgery, and trauma. Although RT has become an established and effective option in the management of these diseases, experimental studies to illustrate cellular composites and factors involved remain to be elucidated. More recent findings, however, indicate the involvement of radiation-sensitive targets like mitotic fibroblasts/myofibroblasts as well as inflammatory cells. Radiation-related molecular mechanisms affecting these target cells include the production of free radicals to hamper proliferative activity and interference with growth factors and cytokines. Moreover, an impairment of activated immune cells involved in both myofibroblast proliferative and inflammatory processes may further contribute to the clinical effects. We here aim at briefly describing mechanisms contributing to a modulation of proliferative and inflammatory processes and to summarize current concepts of treating hyperproliferative diseases by low and moderate doses of ionizing radiation.

  14. Memory in neurodegenerative disease: biological, cognitive, and clinical perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tröster, Alexander I

    1998-01-01

    ... disease: contributions from comparative neuropsychology  -    3 2 Nonprimate animal models of motor and cognitive dysfunction...

  15. Improved ability of biological and previous caries multimarkers to predict caries disease as revealed by multivariate PLS modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ericson Thorild

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dental caries is a chronic disease with plaque bacteria, diet and saliva modifying disease activity. Here we have used the PLS method to evaluate a multiplicity of such biological variables (n = 88 for ability to predict caries in a cross-sectional (baseline caries and prospective (2-year caries development setting. Methods Multivariate PLS modelling was used to associate the many biological variables with caries recorded in thirty 14-year-old children by measuring the numbers of incipient and manifest caries lesions at all surfaces. Results A wide but shallow gliding scale of one fifth caries promoting or protecting, and four fifths non-influential, variables occurred. The influential markers behaved in the order of plaque bacteria > diet > saliva, with previously known plaque bacteria/diet markers and a set of new protective diet markers. A differential variable patterning appeared for new versus progressing lesions. The influential biological multimarkers (n = 18 predicted baseline caries better (ROC area 0.96 than five markers (0.92 and a single lactobacilli marker (0.7 with sensitivity/specificity of 1.87, 1.78 and 1.13 at 1/3 of the subjects diagnosed sick, respectively. Moreover, biological multimarkers (n = 18 explained 2-year caries increment slightly better than reported before but predicted it poorly (ROC area 0.76. By contrast, multimarkers based on previous caries predicted alone (ROC area 0.88, or together with biological multimarkers (0.94, increment well with a sensitivity/specificity of 1.74 at 1/3 of the subjects diagnosed sick. Conclusion Multimarkers behave better than single-to-five markers but future multimarker strategies will require systematic searches for improved saliva and plaque bacteria markers.

  16. Disease-modifying treatments for early and advanced multiple sclerosis: a new treatment paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannoni, Gavin

    2018-06-01

    The treatment of multiple sclerosis is evolving rapidly with 11 classes of disease-modifying therapies (DMTs). This article provides an overview of a new classification system for DMTs and treatment paradigm for using these DMTs effectively and safely. A summary of research into the use of more active approaches to early and effective treatment of multiple sclerosis with defined treatment targets of no evident disease activity (NEDA). New insights are discussed that is allowing the field to begin to tackle more advanced multiple sclerosis, including people with multiple sclerosis using wheelchairs. However, the need to modify expectations of what can be achieved in more advanced multiple sclerosis are discussed; in particular, the focus on neuronal systems with reserve capacity, for example, upper limb, bulbar and visual function. The review describes a new more active way of managing multiple sclerosis and concludes with a call to action in solving the problem of slow adoption of innovations and the global problem of untreated, or undertreated, multiple sclerosis.

  17. Microbiome and metabolome modifying effects of several cardiovascular disease interventions in apo-E-/- mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Paul M; London, Lis E E; Bjorndahl, Trent C; Mandal, Rupasri; Murphy, Kiera; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Shanahan, Fergus; Ross, R Paul; Wishart, David S; Caplice, Noel M; Stanton, Catherine

    2017-03-13

    There is strong evidence indicating that gut microbiota have the potential to modify, or be modified by the drugs and nutritional interventions that we rely upon. This study aims to characterize the compositional and functional effects of several nutritional, neutraceutical, and pharmaceutical cardiovascular disease interventions on the gut microbiome, through metagenomic and metabolomic approaches. Apolipoprotein-E-deficient mice were fed for 24 weeks either high-fat/cholesterol diet alone (control, HFC) or high-fat/cholesterol in conjunction with one of three dietary interventions, as follows: plant sterol ester (PSE), oat β-glucan (OBG) and bile salt hydrolase-active Lactobacillus reuteri APC 2587 (BSH), or the drug atorvastatin (STAT). The gut microbiome composition was then investigated, in addition to the host fecal and serum metabolome. We observed major shifts in the composition of the gut microbiome of PSE mice, while OBG and BSH mice displayed more modest fluctuations, and STAT showed relatively few alterations. Interestingly, these compositional effects imparted by PSE were coupled with an increase in acetate and reduction in isovalerate (p metabolome, including alterations in several acylcarnitines previously associated with a state of metabolic dysfunction (p < 0.05). We observed functional alterations in microbial and host-derived metabolites, which may have important implications for systemic metabolic health, suggesting that cardiovascular disease interventions may have a significant impact on the microbiome composition and functionality. This study indicates that the gut microbiome-modifying effects of novel therapeutics should be considered, in addition to the direct host effects.

  18. Regulatory and biosafety issues in relation to transgenic animals in food and agriculture, feeds containing genetically modified organisms (GMO) and veterinary biologics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochhar, H.P.S.; Gifford, G.A.; Kahn, S.

    2005-01-01

    biotechnology must be shown to be pure, potent, safe and effective when used according to label recommendations. The Canadian regulatory system relies on the 'precautionary principle' in its approach to regulate the 'product' instead of the 'process'. The regulatory framework captures transgenic animals under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act (CEPA). Food from transgenic animals is assessed for safety by Health Canada under its Novel Foods Regulations of the Food and Drugs Act. Feed containing any genetically modified organism is considered Novel Feed under the Feeds Act and Regulations. The regulation of veterinary biologics, in an effort to prevent and diagnose infectious diseases of animals, relies on effective science-based regulatory controls under the Health of Animals Act and Regulations. The Canadian system of regulation for feeds, veterinary biologics and transgenic animals could be useful to developing countries in the process of establishing an effective framework for new regulations. (author)

  19. Genetic Diseases and Genetic Determinism Models in French Secondary School Biology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castera, Jeremy; Bruguiere, Catherine; Clement, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    The presentation of genetic diseases in French secondary school biology textbooks is analysed to determine the major conceptions taught in the field of human genetics. References to genetic diseases, and the processes by which they are explained (monogeny, polygeny, chromosomal anomaly and environmental influence) are studied in recent French…

  20. Prospects for biological soil-borne disease control: application of indigenous versus synthetic microbiomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biological disease control of soil-borne plant diseases has traditionally employed the biopesticide approach whereby single strains or strain mixtures are introduced into production systems through inundative/inoculative release. The approach has significant barriers that have long been recognized,...

  1. Functions of MicroRNAs in Cardiovascular Biology and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Akiko

    2015-01-01

    In 1993, lin-4 was discovered as a critical modulator of temporal development in Caenorhabditis elegans and, most notably, as the first in the class of small, single-stranded noncoding RNAs now defined as microRNAs (miRNAs). Another eight years elapsed before miRNA expression was detected in mammalian cells. Since then, explosive advancements in the field of miRNA biology have elucidated the basic mechanism of miRNA biogenesis, regulation, and gene-regulatory function. The discovery of this new class of small RNAs has augmented the complexity of gene-regulatory programs as well as the understanding of developmental and pathological processes in the cardiovascular system. Indeed, the contributions of miRNAs in cardiovascular development and function have been widely explored, revealing the extensive role of these small regulatory RNAs in cardiovascular physiology. PMID:23157557

  2. General introduction into the Ebola virus biology and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawilińska, Barbara; Kosz-Vnenchak, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Epidemic of Ebola hemorrhagic fever which appeared in the countries of West Africa in 2014, is the largest outbreak which occurred so far. The virus causing this epidemic, Zaire Ebolavirus (ZEBOV), along with four other species of Ebolaviruses is classified to the genus Ebolavirus in the family Filoviridae. ZEBOV is one of the most virulent pathogens among the viral haemorrhagic fevers, and case fatality rates up to 90% have been reported. Mortality is the result of multi-organ failure and severe bleeding complications. The aim of this review is to present the general characteristics of the virus and its biological properties, pathogenicity and epidemiology, with a focus on laboratory methods used in the diagnosis of these infections.

  3. Memory in neurodegenerative disease: biological, cognitive, and clinical perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tröster, Alexander I

    1998-01-01

    ... of memory dysfunction in neurodegenerative disease  . ,  . ,     .  100 6 Functional neuroimaging correlates...

  4. Adult Neurogenesis and Neurodegenerative Diseases: A Systems Biology Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horgusluoglu, Emrin; Nudelman, Kelly; Nho, Kwangsik; Saykin, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    New neurons are generated throughout adulthood in two regions of the brain, the olfactory bulb and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, and are incorporated into the hippocampal network circuitry; disruption of this process has been postulated to contribute to neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. Known modulators of adult neurogenesis include signal transduction pathways, the vascular and immune systems, metabolic factors, and epigenetic regulation. Multiple intrinsic and extrinsic factors such as neurotrophic factors, transcription factors, and cell cycle regulators control neural stem cell proliferation, maintenance in the adult neurogenic niche, and differentiation into mature neurons; these factors act in networks of signaling molecules that influence each other during construction and maintenance of neural circuits, and in turn contribute to learning and memory. The immune system and vascular system are necessary for neuronal formation and neural stem cell fate determination. Inflammatory cytokines regulate adult neurogenesis in response to immune system activation, whereas the vasculature regulates the neural stem cell niche. Vasculature, immune/support cell populations (microglia/astrocytes), adhesion molecules, growth factors, and the extracellular matrix also provide a homing environment for neural stem cells. Epigenetic changes during hippocampal neurogenesis also impact memory and learning. Some genetic variations in neurogenesis related genes may play important roles in the alteration of neural stem cells differentiation into new born neurons during adult neurogenesis, with important therapeutic implications. In this review, we discuss mechanisms of and interactions between these modulators of adult neurogenesis, as well as implications for neurodegenerative disease and current therapeutic research. PMID:26879907

  5. Clinical Trials for Disease-Modifying Therapies in Alzheimer's Disease: A Primer, Lessons Learned, and a Blueprint for the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Jeffrey; Ritter, Aaron; Zhong, Kate

    2018-03-16

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has no currently approved disease-modifying therapies (DMTs), and treatments to prevent, delay the onset, or slow the progression are urgently needed. A delay of 5 years if available by 2025 would decrease the total number of patients with AD by 50% in 2050. To meet the definition of DMT, an agent must produce an enduring change in the course of AD; clinical trials of DMTs have the goal of demonstrating this effect. AD drug discovery entails target identification followed by high throughput screening and lead optimization of drug-like compounds. Once an optimized agent is available and has been assessed for efficacy and toxicity in animals, it progresses through Phase I testing with healthy volunteers, Phase II learning trials to establish proof-of-mechanism and dose, and Phase III confirmatory trials to demonstrate efficacy and safety in larger populations. Phase III is followed by Food and Drug Administration review and, if appropriate, market access. Trial populations include cognitively normal at-risk participants in prevention trials, mildly impaired participants with biomarker evidence of AD in prodromal AD trials, and subjects with cognitive and functional impairment in AD dementia trials. Biomarkers are critical in trials of DMTs, assisting in participant characterization and diagnosis, target engagement and proof-of-pharmacology, demonstration of disease-modification, and monitoring side effects. Clinical trial designs include randomized, parallel group; delayed start; staggered withdrawal; and adaptive. Lessons learned from completed trials inform future trials and increase the likelihood of success.

  6. MSD-MAP: A Network-Based Systems Biology Platform for Predicting Disease-Metabolite Links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wathieu, Henri; Issa, Naiem T; Mohandoss, Manisha; Byers, Stephen W; Dakshanamurthy, Sivanesan

    2017-01-01

    Cancer-associated metabolites result from cell-wide mechanisms of dysregulation. The field of metabolomics has sought to identify these aberrant metabolites as disease biomarkers, clues to understanding disease mechanisms, or even as therapeutic agents. This study was undertaken to reliably predict metabolites associated with colorectal, esophageal, and prostate cancers. Metabolite and disease biological action networks were compared in a computational platform called MSD-MAP (Multi Scale Disease-Metabolite Association Platform). Using differential gene expression analysis with patient-based RNAseq data from The Cancer Genome Atlas, genes up- or down-regulated in cancer compared to normal tissue were identified. Relational databases were used to map biological entities including pathways, functions, and interacting proteins, to those differential disease genes. Similar relational maps were built for metabolites, stemming from known and in silico predicted metabolite-protein associations. The hypergeometric test was used to find statistically significant relationships between disease and metabolite biological signatures at each tier, and metabolites were assessed for multi-scale association with each cancer. Metabolite networks were also directly associated with various other diseases using a disease functional perturbation database. Our platform recapitulated metabolite-disease links that have been empirically verified in the scientific literature, with network-based mapping of jointly-associated biological activity also matching known disease mechanisms. This was true for colorectal, esophageal, and prostate cancers, using metabolite action networks stemming from both predicted and known functional protein associations. By employing systems biology concepts, MSD-MAP reliably predicted known cancermetabolite links, and may serve as a predictive tool to streamline conventional metabolomic profiling methodologies. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any

  7. [In vitro early detection of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease by Pittsburgh compound B-modified magnetic nanoparticles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, J Q; Wu, J Q; Li, M H; Wang, P J

    2017-11-07

    Objective: To construct magnetic nanoparticles targeting β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques, the pathological biomarker of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to study their binding capability in vitro . Methods: Superparamagnetic nanoparticles Mn(0.6)Zn(0.4)Fe(2)O(4) (MZF) were coated with amphiphilic star-block copolymeric micelles and modified with Aβ-specific probe Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) to construct a novel magnetic nanoparticle MZF-PiB, which specifically targeted amyloid plaques. Transmission electron microscope was used to study the morphological features of MZF-PiB. Superparamagnetism of MZF-PiB was assessed by its r(2) relaxation rate by using 3.0 T MRI scanner. Cytotoxic test was applied to determine biosafety of MZF-PiB nanoparticles in differentiated human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK). In vitro binding tests were conducted via immunohistochemistry on 6-month old AD mice brain sections. Differences of cell viability between groups were compared with one-way analysis of variance. Results: MZF-PiB nanoparticles were successfully constructed. Transmission electron microscope images showed that the nanoparticles were about 100 nm in size. The r(2) relaxation rate was 163.11 mMS(-1). No differences were found in cell viability of SH-SY5Y and MDCK incubated with MZF-PiB suspension for 24 h or 48 h when compared with those of untreated cells ( F =2.336, 2.539, 0.293, 1.493, all P >0.05). In vitro binding tests indicated that the MZF-PiB were specifically bound to amyloid plaques. The smallest size of detected plaques was 27 μm. Conclusion: PiB-modified nanoparticles targeting Aβ are biologically safe and highly superparamagnetic, possessing the capability to detect amyloid plaques early in vitro and the potential for early diagnosis of AD.

  8. Development of Voltammetric Double-Polymer-Modified Electrodes for Nanomolar Ion Detection for Environmental and Biological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yushin

    Qualitative and quantitative electrochemical methods for trace ion analysis of organic and inorganic species with environmental and biological attention have been developed and reported during past decades. The development of fast and accurate electrochemical methods is critical for field applications with various blocking contaminants. Voltammetric method is attractive not only to analyze selective ion species due to its characteristic based on ion lipophilicity, but also to lower the limit of detection by combining with stripping analysis. In my PhD work, I have developed and studied a highly selective and sensitive electrochemical method that can be used to characterize fundamental transport dynamics and to develop electrochemical sensors at liquid/liquid interfaces based on electrochemically-controlled ion transfer and recognition. The understanding of the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of the voltammetric ion transfer through polymer-modified ion-selective electrodes leads to realize the highly selective and sensitive analytical method. The ultrathin polymer membrane is used to maximize a current response by complete exhaustion of preconcentrated ions. Therefore, nanomolar detection is achieved and confirmed by a thermodynamic mechanism that controls the detection limit. It was also demonstrated experimentally and theoretically that more lipophilic ionic species gives a significantly lower detection limit. The voltammetric method was expanded into inexpensive and disposable applications based on pencil lead modified with the thin polymer membrane. In the other hand, micropipet/nanopipet voltammetry as an artificial cell membrane was used to study the interface between two immiscible solutions for environmental and biomedical applications. It is very useful to get quantitative kinetic and thermodynamic information by studying numerical simulations of ion transfer and diffusion. Molecular recognition and transport of heparin and low

  9. Original paper Influence of biologic therapy on growth in children with chronic inflammatory connective tissue diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Świdrowska

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Connective tissue diseases (CTD are a heterogeneous group of chronic inflammatory conditions. One of their complications in children is the inhibition of growth velocity. Due to direct inflammation within the musculoskeletal system as well as glucocorticoid therapy, this feature is the most essential and is mainly expressed in the course of juvenile spondyloarthropathies and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. Duration of the disease, but predominantly the activity of the inflammatory process, seems to have a significant impact on the abnormal growth profile in children. Effective biological therapy leads to improvement of the patient’s clinical condition and also, through the extinction of disease activity and reduction of daily doses of glucocorticosteroids (GCS, it gradually accelerates and normalizes the growth rate in children with CTD. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of biological therapy on growth in children with chronic inflammatory CTD. Material and methods: Data from 24 patients with CTD treated with tumor necrosis factor--blockers (etanercept, adalimumab, golimumab and an interleukin-6 receptor blocker (tocilizumab were reviewed at the time of disease onset, biological treatment initiation and at least 12 up to 24 months onwards. The rate of growth was correlated with the daily doses of GCS, and the type and duration of biological therapy. Results : Patient median height, measured as the change in height standard deviation score, was 0.36 ±1.07 at disease onset and –0.13 ±1.02 at biologic therapy initiation. The growth velocity accelerated in 17 patients (70.1% during the biological treatment. Mean height-SDS improvement between biological treatment initiation up to two years was 0.51 ±0.58. In 47% of patients daily doses of GCS were reduced to 0 mg/kg/day. Conclusions : In the treatment of CTD, biological agents restore growth velocity not only by inflammation inhibition, but also through limiting GCS

  10. Biological Control of Diseases of Vegetables Grown Hydroponically in Thailand: Challenge and Opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanjanamaneesathian, Mana

    2015-01-01

    In Thailand, yield loss due to plant diseases in vegetables grown hydroponically is very high as a result of the growers` lack of knowledge for controlling diseases and their un- willingness to invest in setting-up the proper hydroponic system from the beginning. Severe root rot disease caused by Pythium spp. is frequent and can be anticipated in the hot climate in Thailand. This review focuses on the diseases in temperate lettuces which have been produced hydroponically and have been attacked by plant pathogens, particularly Pythium spp. Biological control of vegetable diseases grown hydroponically has been investigated in Thailand. Research is being carried out to identify effective strains of the antagonists, formulating the applicable products and delivering them appropriately to control the disease. Products of Bacillus subtilis, Chaetomium globosom and Trichoderma harzianum have been recommended for use to control diseases in vegetables grown hydroponically. Control efficacy of these products is varied as the biological products have been used by the growers in the paradigm of using chemical fungicide for disease control in hydroponic production system, overlooking the intrinsic characteristics of the biological control products. The recent patent, which minimizes the effects of sunlight and heat on the nutrient solution without the use of an external energy for cooling the nutrient, should be applied in producing hydroponic vegetables to mitigate poor plant growth and root rot disease outbreak in Thailand.

  11. Biological therapy in inflammatory bowel diseases: Access in Central and Eastern Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rencz, Fanni; Péntek, Márta; Bortlik, Martin; Zagorowicz, Edyta; Hlavaty, Tibor; Śliwczyński, Andrzej; Diculescu, Mihai M; Kupcinskas, Limas; Gecse, Krisztina B; Gulácsi, László; Lakatos, Peter L

    2015-01-01

    Biological drugs opened up new horizons in the management of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). This study focuses on access to biological therapy in IBD patients across 9 selected Central and Eastern European (CEE) countries, namely Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Romania and Slovakia. Literature data on the epidemiology and disease burden of IBD in CEE countries was systematically reviewed. Moreover, we provide an estimation on prevalence of IBD as well as biological treatment rates. In all countries with the exception of Romania, lower biological treatment rates were observed in ulcerative colitis (UC) compared to Crohn’s disease despite the higher prevalence of UC. Great heterogeneity (up to 96-fold) was found in access to biologicals across the CEE countries. Poland, Bulgaria, Romania and the Baltic States are lagging behind Hungary, Slovakia and the Czech Republic in their access to biologicals. Variations of reimbursement policy may be one of the factors explaining the differences to a certain extent in Bulgaria, Latvia, Lithuania, and Poland, but association with other possible determinants (differences in prevalence and incidence, price of biologicals, total expenditure on health, geographical access, and cost-effectiveness results) was not proven. We assume, nevertheless, that health deterioration linked to IBD might be valued differently against other systemic inflammatory conditions in distinct countries and which may contribute to the immense diversity in the utilization of biological drugs for IBD. In conclusion, access to biologicals varies widely among CEE countries and this difference cannot be explained by epidemiological factors, drug prices or total health expenditure. Changes in reimbursement policy could contribute to better access to biologicals in some countries. PMID:25684937

  12. Age by Disease Biological Interactions: Implications for Late-Life Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon eMcKinney

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Onset of depressive symptoms after the age of 65, or late-life depression (LLD, is common and poses a significant burden on affected individuals, caretakers and society. Evidence suggests a unique biological basis for LLD, but current hypotheses do not account for its pathophysiological complexity. Here we propose a novel etiological framework for LLD, the age-by-disease biological interaction hypothesis, based on the observations that the subset of genes that undergoes lifelong progressive changes in expression is restricted to a specific set of biological processes, and that a disproportionate number of these age-dependent genes have been previously and similarly implicated in neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders, including depression. The age-by-disease biological interaction hypothesis posits that age-dependent biological processes (i are pushed in LLD-promoting directions by changes in gene expression naturally occurring during brain aging, which (ii directly contribute to pathophysiological mechanisms of LLD, and (iii that individual variability in rates of age-dependent changes determines risk or resiliency to develop age-related disorders, including LLD. We review observations supporting this hypothesis, including consistent and specific age-dependent changes in brain gene expression, and their overlap with neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disease pathways. We then review preliminary reports supporting the genetic component of this hypothesis. Other potential biological mediators of age-dependent gene changes are proposed. We speculate that studies examining the relative contribution of these mechanisms to age-dependent changes and related disease mechanisms will not only provide critical information on the biology of normal aging of the human brain, but will inform our understanding our age-dependent diseases, in time fostering the development of new interventions for prevention and treatment of age-dependent diseases

  13. How B cells influence bone biology in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Mark C; Fretz, Jackie A; Lorenzo, Joseph A

    2010-09-01

    It is now well established that important regulatory interactions occur between the cells in the hematopoietic, immune and skeletal systems (osteoimmunology). B lymphocytes (B cells) are responsible for the generation and production of antibodies or immunoglobulins in the body. Together with T cells these lymphocytes comprise the adaptive immune system, which allows an individual to develop specific responses to an infection and retain memory of that infection, allowing for a faster and more robust response if that same infection occurs again. In addition to this immune function, B cells have a close and multifaceted relationship with bone cells. B cells differentiate from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in supportive niches found on endosteal bone surfaces. Cells in the osteoblast lineage support HSC and B cell differentiation in these niches. B cell differentiation is regulated, at least in part, by a series of transcription factors that function in a temporal manner. While these transcription factors are required for B cell differentiation, their loss causes profound changes in the bone phenotype. This is due, in part, to the close relationship between macrophage/osteoclast and B cell differentiation. Cross talk between B cells and bone cells is reciprocal with defects in the RANKL-RANK, OPG signaling axis resulting in altered bone phenotypes. While the role of B cells during normal bone remodeling appears minimal, activated B cells play an important role in many inflammatory diseases with associated bony changes. This review examines the relationship between B cells and bone cells and how that relationship affects the skeleton and hematopoiesis during health and disease. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A conceptual framework for managing modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in Fiji.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witter, Trevor; Poudevigne, Melanie; Lambrick, Danielle M; Faulkner, James; Lucero, Adam A; Page, Rachel; Perry, Lane G; Tarrant, Michael A; Stoner, Lee

    2015-03-01

    The current review will look at modifiable lifestyle (physical inactivity, poor nutrition, risky alcohol behavior and cigarette smoking) and cardio-metabolic (obesity, diabetes mellitus, high cholesterol and high blood pressure) cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors among Indigenous-Fijian and Indo-Fijian subgroups. A framework for monitoring and managing these risk factors will be presented. National health surveys were identified where available. Electronic databases identified sources for filling missing data. The most relevant data were identified, organized and synthesized. Compared to Indo-Fijians, Indigenous-Fijians have higher rates of obesity (17% vs 11%) and hypertension (21% vs 16%), but lower rates of diabetes mellitus (12% vs 21%) and high cholesterol (33% vs 39%). Indigenous-Fijians report higher rates of prescribed physical activity (25% vs 21%), but poorer recommended vegetable intake (48% vs 56%), greater risky alcohol behavior (17% vs 15%) and a much greater prevalence of cigarette smoking (45% vs 24%). Both Indigenous-Fijians and Indo-Fijians report a low prevalence of recommended fruit intake (17% vs 15%). Fiji is progressing through demographic and epidemiological transitions, including a decline in infectious diseases and improved life expectancy. However, in concert with other developing nations, 'modernization' is accompanied by increased mortality from non-communicable diseases, with CVD being the most prevalent. This transition has been associated with changes to socio-cultural aspects of Fiji, including poor lifestyle choices that may contribute to a cluster of cardio-metabolic conditions which precede CVD. © Royal Society for Public Health 2013.

  15. Modified Hemocorrection in the Complex Treatment of Patients with Pyoinflammatory Lung Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Gavrikov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the efficiency of extracorporeal hemocorrection used in the complex therapy in patients with a pyoinflammatory process in the lung.Materials and methods: 62 patients, including 22 patients with lung abscess who underwent routine plasmapheresis and 40 patients with varying pyoinflammatory lung diseases who received modified hemocorrection — plasma exchange combined with laser extracorporeally washed-off cytomass irradiation, were examined and treated. The severity of their general condition was assessed by the SAPS scale and the severity of intoxication was evaluated by the content of low and medium-molecular weight substances (LMMWSs. The hemostatic system was studied by standardized studies.Results. Routine plasmapheresis was established to produce no impact on platelet functional activity within the first 24 hours and, three days later, promoted the progression of disseminated intravascular coagulation. A combination of plasma exchange and laser extracorporeally washed-off cytomass irradiation in patients with pyoinflam-matory lung diseases was attended by a lower blood coagulative activity and plasmin stabilization with attenuated throm-binemia. The plasma and erythrocytic levels of LMMWSs decreased and their urinary concentrations increased, which is indicative of the body’s detoxification block disorders irrespective of the severity of the disease.Conclusion. It is expedient to apply the plasma-exchanging technique in combination with laser extracorporeally washed-off cytomass irradiation to patients with the uncomplicated and complicated course of pulmonary pyoinflammatory processes without the signs of multiple organ dysfunction on admission to a specialized hospital. 

  16. [Application of Ischemia Modified Albumin for Acute Ischemic Heart Disease in Forensic Science].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P; Zhu, Z L; Zhu, N; Yu, H; Yue, Q; Wang, X L; Feng, C M; Wang, C L; Zhang, G H

    2017-10-01

    To explore the application value and forensic significance of ischemia modified albumin (IMA) in pericardial fluid to diagnose sudden cardiac death. IMA level in pericardial fluid was detected in acute ischemic heart disease group ( n =36), acute myocardial infarction group ( n =6), cardiomyopathy group ( n =4) and control group ( n =15) by albumin cobalt binding method. The levels of IMA were compared among these groups. The best cut-off IMA value was estimated and the sensitivity and specificity of acute myocardial ischemia group was distinguished from control group by receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve. The IMA level in acute ischemic heart disease group was significantly higher than that of control group ( P 0.05). The cut-off value for the identification of acute myocardial ischemia which obtained by ROC analysis was 40.65 U/mL. And the sensitivity and specificity for distinguishing acute ischemia cardiac disease was 60.0% and 80.5%, respectively. The IMA value in pericardial fluid can be a reference marker for the diagnosis of acute myocardial ischemia, which also can provide objective basis for the forensic identification of sudden cardiac death. Copyright© by the Editorial Department of Journal of Forensic Medicine

  17. The Role of Ischemia Modified Albumin as a Biomarker in Patients with Chronic Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prashanth Ashok; Subramanian, Kavitha

    2016-03-01

    Chronic Liver Disease (CLD) is characterised by gradual destruction of liver tissue over time. Ischemia Modified Albumin (IMA) is an upcoming biomarker shown to be elevated in conditions associated with ischemia and oxidative stress. Albumin levels are greatly reduced in patients with CLD and studying its alterations will provide essential information regarding the molecular changes occurring to it. The study aims to estimate IMA and IMA/Albumin ratio in patients with CLD and to correlate it with parameters assessing liver function and the Model for End Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score. The study consisted of 43 CLD patients as test subjects and 28 apparently healthy individuals as controls. Multiple parameters assessing liver function like albumin, bilirubin, aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), Gamma Glutamyl Transpeptidase (GGT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), Prothrombin Time (PT) INR and creatinine were estimated and the MELD score calculated. Serum IMA expressed as Absorbance Units (ABSU) was estimated using the Albumin Cobalt Binding test (ABT). Student's t-test and correlation coefficient was used for statistical analysis. Serum IMA was significantly higher in CLD patients (0.5320 ± 0.1677) as compared to the control group (0.3203 ± 0.1257) with a p-value of CLD compared to control group (0.0714 ± 0.0283) with a p-value of CLD could indicate a qualitative change and not merely a quantitative reduction of albumin. IMA can serve as a biomarker to assess the disease severity and prognosis of CLD patients.

  18. Modifiable risk factors for Alzheimer disease and subjective memory impairment across age groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen T Chen

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Previous research has identified modifiable risk factors for Alzheimer's disease (AD in older adults. Research is limited on the potential link between these risk factors and subjective memory impairment (SMI, which may precede AD and other dementias. Examination of these potential relationships may help identify those at risk for AD at a stage when interventions may delay or prevent further memory problems. The objective of this study was to determine whether risk factors for AD are associated with SMI among different age groups. METHOD: Trained interviewers conducted daily telephone surveys (Gallup-Healthways of a representative community sample of 18,614 U.S. respondents, including 4,425 younger (age 18 to 39 years, 6,365 middle-aged (40 to 59 years, and 7,824 older (60 to 99 years adults. The surveyors collected data on demographics, lifestyles, and medical information. Less education, smoking, hypertension, diabetes, less exercise, obesity and depression, and interactions among them, were examined for associations with SMI. Weighted logistic regressions and chi-square tests were used to calculate odds ratios and confidence intervals for SMI with each risk factor and pairwise interactions across age groups. RESULTS: Depression, less education, less exercise, and hypertension were significantly associated with SMI in all three age groups. Several interactions between risk factors were significant in younger and middle-aged adults and influenced their associations with SMI. Frequency of SMI increased with age and number of risk factors. Odds of having SMI increased significantly with just having one risk factor. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that modifiable risk factors for AD are also associated with SMI, suggesting that these relationships occur in a broad range of ages and may be targeted to mitigate further memory problems. Whether modifying these risk factors reduces SMI and the eventual incidence of AD and other

  19. Modifiable risk factors for Alzheimer disease and subjective memory impairment across age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Stephen T; Siddarth, Prabha; Ercoli, Linda M; Merrill, David A; Torres-Gil, Fernando; Small, Gary W

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has identified modifiable risk factors for Alzheimer's disease (AD) in older adults. Research is limited on the potential link between these risk factors and subjective memory impairment (SMI), which may precede AD and other dementias. Examination of these potential relationships may help identify those at risk for AD at a stage when interventions may delay or prevent further memory problems. The objective of this study was to determine whether risk factors for AD are associated with SMI among different age groups. Trained interviewers conducted daily telephone surveys (Gallup-Healthways) of a representative community sample of 18,614 U.S. respondents, including 4,425 younger (age 18 to 39 years), 6,365 middle-aged (40 to 59 years), and 7,824 older (60 to 99 years) adults. The surveyors collected data on demographics, lifestyles, and medical information. Less education, smoking, hypertension, diabetes, less exercise, obesity and depression, and interactions among them, were examined for associations with SMI. Weighted logistic regressions and chi-square tests were used to calculate odds ratios and confidence intervals for SMI with each risk factor and pairwise interactions across age groups. Depression, less education, less exercise, and hypertension were significantly associated with SMI in all three age groups. Several interactions between risk factors were significant in younger and middle-aged adults and influenced their associations with SMI. Frequency of SMI increased with age and number of risk factors. Odds of having SMI increased significantly with just having one risk factor. These results indicate that modifiable risk factors for AD are also associated with SMI, suggesting that these relationships occur in a broad range of ages and may be targeted to mitigate further memory problems. Whether modifying these risk factors reduces SMI and the eventual incidence of AD and other dementias later in life remains to be determined.

  20. Single-stage Modified Duhamel procedure for Hirschsprung′s disease : Our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paras R Kothari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Primary single-stage pull-through for Hirschsprung′s disease (HD has been reported to give comparable surgical outcomes to staged operations with less morbidity. Herein, we present our experience with single-stage Modified Duhamel procedure for management of HD. Patients and Methods: This was a review of 48 cases of HD who underwent single-stage Modified Duhamel procedure without a protective colostomy. Results: The age at surgery ranged from 6 months to 10 years (median - 9 months, mean - 2.3 years. The average weight of the child was 7.2 kg (range, 4.9-22 kg. 38 (79.2% patients had classical rectosigmoid HD, the rest being long segment HD (the proximal most level being the splenic flexure. The average duration of surgery was 175 minutes (range, 130-245 minutes. The average blood loss was 45 ml. The average hospital stay was 7.2 days (range: 6-10 days. The major postoperative complications (n=3 included postoperative adhesive intestinal obstruction, anastomotic leak and persistent constipation due to residual aganglionosis. Each required a re-exploration. Minor complications included surgical site infection (n=3 and post-operative enterocolitis (n=3, which were managed conservatively. Six patients had constipation for a limited period post-operatively. All patients have a satisfactory functional outcome and normal development and growth. Conclusions: For HD, we recommend that single-stage Modified Duhamel procedure should be the preferred approach in view of its low morbidity, satisfactory functional outcome and avoidance of stoma, multiple surgeries and economic benefit in view of decreased hospital stay.

  1. Synthesis of base-modified 2'-deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates and their use in enzymatic synthesis of modified DNA for applications in bioanalysis and chemical biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocek, Michal

    2014-11-07

    The synthesis of 2'-deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) either by classical triphosphorylation of nucleosides or by aqueous cross-coupling reactions of halogenated dNTPs is discussed. Different enzymatic methods for synthesis of modified oligonucleotides and DNA by polymerase incorporation of modified nucleotides are summarized, and the applications in redox or fluorescent labeling, as well as in bioconjugations and modulation of interactions of DNA with proteins, are outlined.

  2. Modifying effects of preexisting pulmonary fibrosis on biological responses of rats to inhaled 239PuO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundgren, D.L.; Mauderly, J.L.; Rebar, A.H.; Gillett, N.A.; Hahn, F.F.

    1991-01-01

    We investigated the modifying effects of preexisting, bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis on the deposition, retention, and biological effects of inhaled 239PuO2 in the rat. Among rats exposed to similar airborne concentrations of 239PuO2, initial lung burdens of 239Pu per kilogram body mass were similar whether or not pulmonary fibrosis was present. However, clearance of 239Pu from the lungs was significantly decreased in the rats with preexisting pulmonary fibrosis. The incidence of lung lesions (epithelial hyperplasia, diffuse macrophage increases and aggregation, and loose and dense connective tissue) was significantly greater among rats with preexisting pulmonary fibrosis than among the exposed controls. Rats with preexisting fibrosis had shorter life spans than 239PuO2-exposed control rats. When groups of rats with similar alpha doses to the lungs were compared, the incidences of neoplastic lesions in the lung, the times to death of rats with lung neoplasms, and the risk of lung tumors per unit of alpha dose to the lungs in rats with or without pulmonary fibrosis were similar. The results of this study suggest that humans with uncomplicated pulmonary fibrosis may not be more sensitive to the carcinogenic effects of inhaled 239PuO2 than are individuals with normal lungs, assuming that the total alpha doses to the lungs are similar

  3. Infections in patients with multiple sclerosis: Implications for disease-modifying therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celius, E G

    2017-11-01

    Patients with multiple sclerosis have an increased risk of infections compared to the general population. The increased risk has been described for decades and is not alone attributed to the use of disease-modifying drugs, but secondary to the disability. The introduction of more potent immunomodulatory drugs may cause an additional challenge, and depending on the mechanism of action, a treatment-induced increased risk of bacterial, viral, fungal or parasitic infections is observed. The choice of treatment in the individual patient with infections and multiple sclerosis must be guided by the drugs' specific mechanism of action, the drug-specific risk of infection and comorbidities. Increased monitoring and follow-up through treatment registries is warranted to increase our understanding and thereby improve management. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Patients’ satisfaction with and views about treatment with disease-modifying drugs in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Vieira Spessotto

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective The treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS with disease-modifying-drugs (DMDs is evolving and new drugs are reaching the market. Efficacy and safety aspects of the drugs are crucial, but the patients’ satisfaction with the treatment must be taken into consideration. Methods Individual interview with patients with MS regarding their satisfaction and points of view on the treatment with DMDs. Results One hundred and twenty eight patients attending specialized MS Units in five different cities were interviewed. Over 80% of patients were very satisfied with the drugs in use regarding convenience and perceived benefits. The only aspect scoring lesser values was tolerability. Conclusion Parameters for improving treatment in MS must include efficacy, safety, and patient satisfaction with the given DMD.

  5. [Validation of the Russian version of the modified Addenbrooke's cognitive examination for Alzheimer's disease diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, O S; Lavrov, A Yu; Lyashenko, Е А; Vasenina, E E; Trusova, N A; Datieva, V K; Makotrova, T A; Pilipenko, A Yu

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the validity of the Russian version of the modified Addenbrooke's cognitive examination (ACE-m) for Alzheimer's disease (AD) diagnosis. ACE-m and MMSE, as a comparison scale, were administered to 78 patients including 49 patients with AD and 29 healthy people. ACE-m demonstrated the high validity in the diagnosis of dementia in AD. Cronbach's alpha was 0.89. ACE-m is a brief and simple in use test that measures a wide spectrum of cognitive functions, gives a general impression about cognitive deficit and diagnoses dementia in AD with the greater validity compared to MMSE. This scale is useful not only in diagnosis of AD but also in differentiation with other causes of dementia.

  6. Early cost-utility analysis of general and cerebrospinal fluid-specific Alzheimer's disease biomarkers for hypothetical disease-modifying treatment decision in mild cognitive impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Handels, Ron L. H.; Joore, Manuela A.; Tran-Duy, An; Wimo, Anders; Wolfs, Claire A. G.; Verhey, Frans R. J.; Severens, Johan L.

    Introduction: The study aimed to determine the room for improvement of a perfect cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker and the societal incremental net monetary benefit of CSF in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) assuming a hypothetical disease-modifying Alzheimer's disease (AD) treatment.

  7. Proteome-wide Structural Analysis of PTM Hotspots Reveals Regulatory Elements Predicted to Impact Biological Function and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Matthew P; Dewhurst, Henry; Sundararaman, Niveda

    2016-11-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) regulate protein behavior through modulation of protein-protein interactions, enzymatic activity, and protein stability essential in the translation of genotype to phenotype in eukaryotes. Currently, less than 4% of all eukaryotic PTMs are reported to have biological function - a statistic that continues to decrease with an increasing rate of PTM detection. Previously, we developed SAPH-ire (Structural Analysis of PTM Hotspots) - a method for the prioritization of PTM function potential that has been used effectively to reveal novel PTM regulatory elements in discrete protein families (Dewhurst et al., 2015). Here, we apply SAPH-ire to the set of eukaryotic protein families containing experimental PTM and 3D structure data - capturing 1,325 protein families with 50,839 unique PTM sites organized into 31,747 modified alignment positions (MAPs), of which 2010 (∼6%) possess known biological function. Here, we show that using an artificial neural network model (SAPH-ire NN) trained to identify MAP hotspots with biological function results in prediction outcomes that far surpass the use of single hotspot features, including nearest neighbor PTM clustering methods. We find the greatest enhancement in prediction for positions with PTM counts of five or less, which represent 98% of all MAPs in the eukaryotic proteome and 90% of all MAPs found to have biological function. Analysis of the top 1092 MAP hotspots revealed 267 of truly unknown function (containing 5443 distinct PTMs). Of these, 165 hotspots could be mapped to human KEGG pathways for normal and/or disease physiology. Many high-ranking hotspots were also found to be disease-associated pathogenic sites of amino acid substitution despite the lack of observable PTM in the human protein family member. Taken together, these experiments demonstrate that the functional relevance of a PTM can be predicted very effectively by neural network models, revealing a large but testable

  8. A Systems Biology Approach to Infectious Disease Research: Innovating the Pathogen-Host Research Paradigm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aderem, Alan; Adkins, Joshua N.; Ansong, Charles; Galagan, James; Kaiser, Shari; Korth, Marcus J.; Law, G. L.; McDermott, Jason E.; Proll, Sean; Rosenberger, Carrie; Schoolnik, Gary; Katze, Michael G.

    2011-02-01

    The 20th century was marked by extraordinary advances in our understanding of microbes and infectious disease, but pandemics remain, food and water borne illnesses are frequent, multi-drug resistant microbes are on the rise, and the needed drugs and vaccines have not been developed. The scientific approaches of the past—including the intense focus on individual genes and proteins typical of molecular biology—have not been sufficient to address these challenges. The first decade of the 21st century has seen remarkable innovations in technology and computational methods. These new tools provide nearly comprehensive views of complex biological systems and can provide a correspondingly deeper understanding of pathogen-host interactions. To take full advantage of these innovations, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases recently initiated the Systems Biology Program for Infectious Disease Research. As participants of the Systems Biology Program we think that the time is at hand to redefine the pathogen-host research paradigm.

  9. Cognitive enhancers (Nootropics). Part 3: drugs interacting with targets other than receptors or enzymes. Disease-modifying drugs. Update 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froestl, Wolfgang; Pfeifer, Andrea; Muhs, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Scientists working in the field of Alzheimer's disease and, in particular, cognitive enhancers, are very productive. The review "Drugs interacting with Targets other than Receptors or Enzymes. Disease-modifying Drugs" was accepted in October 2012. In the last 20 months, new targets for the potential treatment of Alzheimer's disease were identified. Enormous progress was realized in the pharmacological characterization of natural products with cognitive enhancing properties. This review covers the evolution of research in this field through May 2014.

  10. Bacteriophage-based synthetic biology for the study of infectious diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Timothy K.

    2014-01-01

    Since their discovery, bacteriophages have contributed enormously to our understanding of molecular biology as model systems. Furthermore, bacteriophages have provided many tools that have advanced the fields of genetic engineering and synthetic biology. Here, we discuss bacteriophage-based technologies and their application to the study of infectious diseases. New strategies for engineering genomes have the potential to accelerate the design of novel phages as therapies, diagnostics, and tools. Though almost a century has elapsed since their discovery, bacteriophages continue to have a major impact on modern biological sciences, especially with the growth of multidrug-resistant bacteria and interest in the microbiome. PMID:24997401

  11. Clustering of modifiable biobehavioral risk factors for chronic disease in US adults: a latent class analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventhal, Adam M; Huh, Jimi; Dunton, Genevieve F

    2014-11-01

    Examining the co-occurrence patterns of modifiable biobehavioral risk factors for deadly chronic diseases (e.g. cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes) can elucidate the etiology of risk factors and guide disease-prevention programming. The aims of this study were to (1) identify latent classes based on the clustering of five key biobehavioral risk factors among US adults who reported at least one risk factor and (2) explore the demographic correlates of the identified latent classes. Participants were respondents of the National Epidemiologic Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions (2004-2005) with at least one of the following disease risk factors in the past year (N = 22,789), which were also the latent class indicators: (1) alcohol abuse/dependence, (2) drug abuse/dependence, (3) nicotine dependence, (4) obesity, and (5) physical inactivity. Housing sample units were selected to match the US National Census in location and demographic characteristics, with young adults oversampled. Participants were administered surveys by trained interviewers. Five latent classes were yielded: 'obese, active non-substance abusers' (23%); 'nicotine-dependent, active, and non-obese' (19%); 'active, non-obese alcohol abusers' (6%); 'inactive, non-substance abusers' (50%); and 'active, polysubstance abusers' (3.7%). Four classes were characterized by a 100% likelihood of having one risk factor coupled with a low or moderate likelihood of having the other four risk factors. The five classes exhibited unique demographic profiles. Risk factors may cluster together in a non-monotonic fashion, with the majority of the at-risk population of US adults expected to have a high likelihood of endorsing only one of these five risk factors. © Royal Society for Public Health 2013.

  12. PDZD7 is a modifier of retinal disease and a contributor to digenic Usher syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebermann, Inga; Phillips, Jennifer B.; Liebau, Max C.; Koenekoop, Robert K.; Schermer, Bernhard; Lopez, Irma; Schäfer, Ellen; Roux, Anne-Francoise; Dafinger, Claudia; Bernd, Antje; Zrenner, Eberhart; Claustres, Mireille; Blanco, Bernardo; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Ruland, Rebecca; Westerfield, Monte; Benzing, Thomas; Bolz, Hanno J.

    2010-01-01

    Usher syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous recessive disease characterized by hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). It frequently presents with unexplained, often intrafamilial, variability of the visual phenotype. Although 9 genes have been linked with Usher syndrome, many patients do not have mutations in any of these genes, suggesting that there are still unidentified genes involved in the syndrome. Here, we have determined that mutations in PDZ domain–containing 7 (PDZD7), which encodes a homolog of proteins mutated in Usher syndrome subtype 1C (USH1C) and USH2D, contribute to Usher syndrome. Mutations in PDZD7 were identified only in patients with mutations in other known Usher genes. In a set of sisters, each with a homozygous mutation in USH2A, a frame-shift mutation in PDZD7 was present in the sister with more severe RP and earlier disease onset. Further, heterozygous PDZD7 mutations were present in patients with truncating mutations in USH2A, G protein–coupled receptor 98 (GPR98; also known as USH2C), and an unidentified locus. We validated the human genotypes using zebrafish, and our findings were consistent with digenic inheritance of PDZD7 and GPR98, and with PDZD7 as a retinal disease modifier in patients with USH2A. Pdzd7 knockdown produced an Usher-like phenotype in zebrafish, exacerbated retinal cell death in combination with ush2a or gpr98, and reduced Gpr98 localization in the region of the photoreceptor connecting cilium. Our data challenge the view of Usher syndrome as a traditional Mendelian disorder and support the reclassification of Usher syndrome as an oligogenic disease. PMID:20440071

  13. PDZD7 is a modifier of retinal disease and a contributor to digenic Usher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebermann, Inga; Phillips, Jennifer B; Liebau, Max C; Koenekoop, Robert K; Schermer, Bernhard; Lopez, Irma; Schäfer, Ellen; Roux, Anne-Francoise; Dafinger, Claudia; Bernd, Antje; Zrenner, Eberhart; Claustres, Mireille; Blanco, Bernardo; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Ruland, Rebecca; Westerfield, Monte; Benzing, Thomas; Bolz, Hanno J

    2010-06-01

    Usher syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous recessive disease characterized by hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). It frequently presents with unexplained, often intrafamilial, variability of the visual phenotype. Although 9 genes have been linked with Usher syndrome, many patients do not have mutations in any of these genes, suggesting that there are still unidentified genes involved in the syndrome. Here, we have determined that mutations in PDZ domain-containing 7 (PDZD7), which encodes a homolog of proteins mutated in Usher syndrome subtype 1C (USH1C) and USH2D, contribute to Usher syndrome. Mutations in PDZD7 were identified only in patients with mutations in other known Usher genes. In a set of sisters, each with a homozygous mutation in USH2A, a frame-shift mutation in PDZD7 was present in the sister with more severe RP and earlier disease onset. Further, heterozygous PDZD7 mutations were present in patients with truncating mutations in USH2A, G protein-coupled receptor 98 (GPR98; also known as USH2C), and an unidentified locus. We validated the human genotypes using zebrafish, and our findings were consistent with digenic inheritance of PDZD7 and GPR98, and with PDZD7 as a retinal disease modifier in patients with USH2A. Pdzd7 knockdown produced an Usher-like phenotype in zebrafish, exacerbated retinal cell death in combination with ush2a or gpr98, and reduced Gpr98 localization in the region of the photoreceptor connecting cilium. Our data challenge the view of Usher syndrome as a traditional Mendelian disorder and support the reclassification of Usher syndrome as an oligogenic disease.

  14. Patient perspectives on switching disease-modifying therapies in the NARCOMS registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Amber R; Marrie, Ruth Ann; Agashivala, Neetu; Belletti, Daniel A; Kim, Edward; Cutter, Gary R; Cofield, Stacey S; Tyry, Tuula

    2014-01-01

    The evolving landscape of disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) for multiple sclerosis raises important questions about why patients change DMTs. Physicians and patients could benefit from a better understanding of the reasons for switching therapy. To investigate the reasons patients switch DMTs and identify characteristics associated with the decision to switch. The North American Research Committee on Multiple Sclerosis (NARCOMS) Registry conducted a supplemental survey among registry participants responding to the 2011 update survey. The supplemental survey investigated reasons for switching DMT, origin of the discussion of DMT change, and which factors influenced the decision. Chi-square tests, Fisher's exact tests, and logistic regression were used for the analyses. Of the 691 eligible candidates, 308 responded and met the inclusion criteria (relapsing disease course, switched DMT after September 2010). The responders were 83.4% female, on average 52 years old, with a median (interquartile range) Patient-Determined Disease Steps score of 4 (2-5). The most recent prior therapy included first-line injectables (74.5%), infusions (18.1%), an oral DMT (3.4%), and other DMTs (4.0%). The discussion to switch DMT was initiated almost equally by physicians and participants. The primary reason for choosing the new DMT was based most frequently on physician's recommendation (24.5%) and patient perception of efficacy (13.7%). Participants frequently initiated the discussion regarding changing DMT, although physician recommendations regarding the specific therapy were still weighed highly. Long-term follow-up of these participants will provide valuable information on their disease trajectory, satisfaction with, and effectiveness of their new medication.

  15. Adherence to Disease Modifying Drugs among Patients with Multiple Sclerosis in Germany: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Hansen

    Full Text Available Long-term therapies such as disease modifying therapy for Multiple Sclerosis (MS demand high levels of medication adherence in order to reach acceptable outcomes. The objective of this study was to describe adherence to four disease modifying drugs (DMDs among statutorily insured patients within two years following treatment initiation. These drugs were interferon beta-1a i.m. (Avonex, interferon beta-1a s.c. (Rebif, interferon beta-1b s.c. (Betaferon and glatiramer acetate s.c. (Copaxone.This retrospective cohort study used pharmacy claims data from the data warehouse of the German Institute for Drug Use Evaluation (DAPI from 2001 through 2009. New or renewed DMD prescriptions in the years 2002 to 2006 were identified and adherence was estimated during 730 days of follow-up by analyzing the medication possession ratio (MPR as proxy for compliance and persistence defined as number of days from initiation of DMD therapy until discontinuation or interruption.A total of 52,516 medication profiles or therapy cycles (11,891 Avonex, 14,060 Betaferon, 12,353 Copaxone and 14,212 Rebif from 50,057 patients were included into the analysis. Among the 4 cohorts, no clinically relevant differences were found in available covariates. The Medication Possession Ratio (MPR measured overall compliance, which was 39.9% with a threshold MPR≥0.8. There were small differences in the proportion of therapy cycles during which a patient was compliant for the following medications: Avonex (42.8%, Betaferon (40.6%, Rebif (39.2%, and Copaxone (37%. Overall persistence was 32.3% at the end of the 24 months observation period, i.e. during only one third of all included therapy cycles patients did not discontinue or interrupt DMD therapy. There were also small differences in the proportion of therapy cycles during which a patient was persistent as follows: Avonex (34.2%, Betaferon (33.4%, Rebif (31.7% and Copaxone (29.8%.Two years after initiating MS-modifying therapy, only

  16. From biological anthropology to applied public health: epidemiological approaches to the study of infectious disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albalak, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    This article describes two large, multisite infectious disease programs: the Tuberculosis Epidemiologic Studies Consortium (TBESC) and the Emerging Infections Programs (EIPs). The links between biological anthropology and applied public health are highlighted using these programs as examples. Funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the TBESC and EIPs conduct applied public health research to strengthen infectious disease prevention and control efforts in the United States. They involve collaborations among CDC, public health departments, and academic and clinical institutions. Their unique role in national infectious disease work, including their links to anthropology, shared elements, key differences, strengths and challenges, is discussed.

  17. Plague in Egypt: Disease biology, history and contemporary analysis: A minireview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wael M. Lotfy

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Plague is a zoonotic disease with a high mortality rate in humans. Unfortunately, it is still endemic in some parts of the world. Also, natural foci of the disease are still found in some countries. Thus, there may be a risk of global plague re-emergence. This work reviews plague biology, history of major outbreaks, and threats of disease re-emergence in Egypt. Based on the suspected presence of potential natural foci in the country, the global climate change, and the threat posed by some neighbouring countries disease re-emergence in Egypt should not be excluded. The country is in need for implementation of some preventive measures.

  18. “Gestaltomics”: Systems Biology Schemes for the Study of Neuropsychiatric Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora A. Gutierrez Najera

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The integration of different sources of biological information about what defines a behavioral phenotype is difficult to unify in an entity that reflects the arithmetic sum of its individual parts. In this sense, the challenge of Systems Biology for understanding the “psychiatric phenotype” is to provide an improved vision of the shape of the phenotype as it is visualized by “Gestalt” psychology, whose fundamental axiom is that the observed phenotype (behavior or mental disorder will be the result of the integrative composition of every part. Therefore, we propose the term “Gestaltomics” as a term from Systems Biology to integrate data coming from different sources of information (such as the genome, transcriptome, proteome, epigenome, metabolome, phenome, and microbiome. In addition to this biological complexity, the mind is integrated through multiple brain functions that receive and process complex information through channels and perception networks (i.e., sight, ear, smell, memory, and attention that in turn are programmed by genes and influenced by environmental processes (epigenetic. Today, the approach of medical research in human diseases is to isolate one disease for study; however, the presence of an additional disease (co-morbidity or more than one disease (multimorbidity adds complexity to the study of these conditions. This review will present the challenge of integrating psychiatric disorders at different levels of information (Gestaltomics. The implications of increasing the level of complexity, for example, studying the co-morbidity with another disease such as cancer, will also be discussed.

  19. Cigarette use and cardiovascular risk in chronic kidney disease: an unappreciated modifiable lifestyle risk factor.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stack, Austin G

    2012-01-31

    Tobacco use is a major modifiable cardiovascular risk factor in the general population and contributes to excess cardiovascular risk. Emerging evidence from large-scale observational studies suggests that continued tobacco use is also an independent cardiovascular risk factor among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The benefits of smoking cessation programs on improving the heath status of patients and reducing mortality are unequivocal in the general population. Despite this, there has been little effort in pursuing tobacco cessation programs in dialysis cohorts or those with lesser degrees of kidney impairment. Most of our attention to date has focused on the development of "kidney-specific" interventions that reduce rates of renal disease progression and improve dialysis outcomes. The purpose of this current review is to describe the epidemiology of tobacco use among patients with CKD, draw attention to its negative impact on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and finally highlight potential strategies for successful intervention. We hope that this study heightens the importance of tobacco use in CKD, stimulates renewed interest in the barriers and challenges that exist in achieving smoking cessation, and endorses the efficacy of intervention strategies and the immeasurable benefits of quitting on cardiovascular and noncardiovascular outcomes.

  20. Total oxidant status, total antioxidant capacity and ischemia modified albumin levels in children with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayar, Ersin; Özdem, Sebahat; Uzun, Gülbahar; İşlek, Ali; Yılmaz, Aygen; Artan, Reha

    2015-01-01

    In our study, we aimed to investigate ischemia modified albumin (IMA) as an oxidative stress marker, as well as other oxidant and antioxidant markers that have not been evaluated in children with celiac disease. A total of 37 pediatric patients who were diagnosed with celiac disease (CD) and 29 healthy children were enrolled in this prospective study. We evaluated the IMA, total oxidant status, total antioxidant capacity, sulfhydryl, and advanced oxidation protein products in all of the subjects. We also compared the levels at the time of the diagnosis, and following a gluten-free diet (GFD) in the children with CD. While the IMA and the other oxidant marker levels were significantly higher in the patient group compared to the control group, the antioxidant marker levels were found to be significantly lower in the patient group, compared to the control group. We also determined that the tissue transglutaminase IgA showed a highly positive correlation, and that the IMA showed a moderately positive correlation with the Marsh-Oberhuber histopathological stage. Additionally, the IMA and other oxidant marker levels were significantly lower, while the antioxidant marker levels were significantly higher after the GFD, compared to the pre-diet period. We detected that oxidative stress played a role in the pathogenesis of CD, and that this could be evaluated using oxidative stress markers, which would regress after the GFD. We also detected that IMA is a marker that shows a correlation with the histopathological stage, and may be used in the diagnosis.

  1. Fertility, pregnancy and childbirth in patients with multiple sclerosis: impact of disease-modifying drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Maria Pia; Portaccio, Emilio

    2015-03-01

    In recent decades, pregnancy-related issues in multiple sclerosis (MS) have received growing interest. MS is more frequent in women than in men and typically starts during child-bearing age. An increasing number of disease-modifying drugs (DMDs) for the treatment of MS are becoming available. Gathering information on their influences on pregnancy-related issues is of crucial importance for the counselling of MS patients. As for the immunomodulatory drugs (interferons and glatiramer acetate), accumulating evidence points to the relative safety of pregnancy exposure in terms of maternal and foetal outcomes. In case of higher clinical disease activity before pregnancy, these drugs could be continued until conception. As for the 'newer' drugs (fingolimod, natalizumab, teriflunomide, dimethyl fumarate and alemtuzumab), the information is more limited. Whereas fingolimod and teriflunomide are likely associated with an increased risk of foetal malformations, the effects of natalizumab, dimethyl fumarate and alemtuzumab still need to be ascertained. This article provides a review of the available information on the use of DMDs during pregnancy, with a specific focus on fertility, foetal development, delivery and breast-feeding.

  2. Design of fuzzy classifier for diabetes disease using Modified Artificial Bee Colony algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beloufa, Fayssal; Chikh, M A

    2013-10-01

    In this study, diagnosis of diabetes disease, which is one of the most important diseases, is conducted with artificial intelligence techniques. We have proposed a novel Artificial Bee Colony (ABC) algorithm in which a mutation operator is added to an Artificial Bee Colony for improving its performance. When the current best solution cannot be updated, a blended crossover operator (BLX-α) of genetic algorithm is applied, in order to enhance the diversity of ABC, without compromising with the solution quality. This modified version of ABC is used as a new tool to create and optimize automatically the membership functions and rules base directly from data. We take the diabetes dataset used in our work from the UCI machine learning repository. The performances of the proposed method are evaluated through classification rate, sensitivity and specificity values using 10-fold cross-validation method. The obtained classification rate of our method is 84.21% and it is very promising when compared with the previous research in the literature for the same problem. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Biologics for rheumatoid arthritis: an overview of Cochrane reviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Jasvinder A; Christensen, Robin; Wells, George A

    2010-01-01

    the biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are very effective in treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA), however there is a lack of head-to-head comparison studies.......the biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are very effective in treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA), however there is a lack of head-to-head comparison studies....

  4. Proteome-wide Structural Analysis of PTM Hotspots Reveals Regulatory Elements Predicted to Impact Biological Function and Disease*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewhurst, Henry; Sundararaman, Niveda

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) regulate protein behavior through modulation of protein-protein interactions, enzymatic activity, and protein stability essential in the translation of genotype to phenotype in eukaryotes. Currently, less than 4% of all eukaryotic PTMs are reported to have biological function - a statistic that continues to decrease with an increasing rate of PTM detection. Previously, we developed SAPH-ire (Structural Analysis of PTM Hotspots) - a method for the prioritization of PTM function potential that has been used effectively to reveal novel PTM regulatory elements in discrete protein families (Dewhurst et al., 2015). Here, we apply SAPH-ire to the set of eukaryotic protein families containing experimental PTM and 3D structure data - capturing 1,325 protein families with 50,839 unique PTM sites organized into 31,747 modified alignment positions (MAPs), of which 2010 (∼6%) possess known biological function. Here, we show that using an artificial neural network model (SAPH-ire NN) trained to identify MAP hotspots with biological function results in prediction outcomes that far surpass the use of single hotspot features, including nearest neighbor PTM clustering methods. We find the greatest enhancement in prediction for positions with PTM counts of five or less, which represent 98% of all MAPs in the eukaryotic proteome and 90% of all MAPs found to have biological function. Analysis of the top 1092 MAP hotspots revealed 267 of truly unknown function (containing 5443 distinct PTMs). Of these, 165 hotspots could be mapped to human KEGG pathways for normal and/or disease physiology. Many high-ranking hotspots were also found to be disease-associated pathogenic sites of amino acid substitution despite the lack of observable PTM in the human protein family member. Taken together, these experiments demonstrate that the functional relevance of a PTM can be predicted very effectively by neural network models, revealing a large but testable

  5. Synthesis of Base-Modified 2 '-Deoxyribonucleoside Triphosphates and Their Use in Enzymatic Synthesis of Modified DNA for Applications in Bioanalysis and Chemical Biology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hocek, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 21 (2014), s. 9914-9921 ISSN 0022-3263 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP206/12/G151; GA ČR GA14-04289S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : cross - coupling reactions * modified nucleoside triphosphates * nucleic acids Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.721, year: 2014

  6. Social-Biological Interactions in Oral Disease: A 'Cells to Society' View.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noha Gomaa

    Full Text Available Oral diseases constitute a major worldwide public health problem, with their burden concentrating in socially disadvantaged and less affluent groups of the population, resulting in significant oral health inequalities. Biomedical and behavioural approaches have proven relatively ineffective in reducing these inequalities, and have potentially increased the health gap between social groups. Some suggest this stems from a lack of understanding of how the social and psychosocial contexts in which behavioural and biological changes occur influence oral disease. To unravel the pathways through which social factors affect oral health outcomes, a better understanding is thus needed of how the social 'gets under the skin,' or becomes embodied, to alter the biological. In this paper, we present the current knowledge on the interplay between social and biological factors in oral disease. We first provide an overview of the process of embodiment in chronic disease and then evaluate the evidence on embodiment in oral disease by reviewing published studies in this area. Results show that, in periodontal disease, income, education and perceived stress are correlated with elevated levels of stress hormones, disrupted immune biomarkers and increased allostatic load. Similarly, socioeconomic position and increased financial stress are related to increased stress hormones and cariogenic bacterial counts in dental caries. Based on these results, we propose a dynamic model depicting social-biological interactions that illustrates potential interdependencies between social and biological factors that lead to poor oral health. This work and the proposed model may aid in developing a better understanding of the causes of oral health inequalities and implicate the importance of addressing the social determinants of oral health in innovating public health interventions.

  7. Biological effects of several extreme space flight factors (acceleration, magnetically activated water) on mouse natural or modified radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datsov, E.R.

    1979-01-01

    Irradiated and Adeturon-protected mice were used to assess biological effects of several static (magnetically-activated water - MW) and dynamic (acceleration) factors of space flight. The study shows that increased gravitation, 20 G, 5 min, generated by a small radius centrifuge, increases static ability to work, while the number of peripheral blood cells decreases. Continuous exposure of mice to MW induces a decrease in dynamic ability to work, in comparison with the physiological controls, without substantial changes in other indices. Extreme factors in space flight (acceleration MW, radiation, radiation protector), alone or in combination, decrease the animal's growth rate. After administration of 200 mg/kg Adeturone, mouse dynamic ability to work increases, while its capabilities for adaptation and training are lowered, and pronounced leucocytosis is observed. MW, acceleration, or Adeturone pre-treatment of mice increases their survival and dynamic ability to work, following exposure to 600 R, when compared to irradiated animals, but decreases their capabilities for adaptation and training. Acceleration and Adeturone protect peripheral blood from radiation injury, while MW alone intensifies radiation cytopenia. Irradiation does not significantly modify the static ability to work, upon preceding exposure to MW or acceleration. In this case, Adeturone exerts protective effect. ME and Adeturone combined action results in increased survival rate and mean duration of life of irradiated animals, as compared to their single administration. Acceleration reduces MW, Adeturone and MW + Adeturone effect on survival. Peripheral blood parameters do not correlate with survival rates. Combined pre-treatment with two or three of the factors studied increases dynamic ability to work following irradiation, and in many cases the static ability as well. The combination of Adeturone and MW was the only one with negative effect on the static ability to work. (A.B.)

  8. Relationships Between Essential Manganese Biology and Manganese Toxicity in Neurological Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfalzer, Anna C; Bowman, Aaron B

    2017-06-01

    Manganese (Mn) is critical for neurodevelopment but also has been implicated in the pathophysiology of several neurological diseases. We discuss how Mn requirements intersect with Mn biology and toxicity, and how these requirements may be altered in neurological disease. Furthermore, we discuss the emerging evidence that the level of Mn associated with optimal overall efficiency for Mn biology does not necessarily coincide with optimal cognitive outcomes. Studies have linked Mn exposures with urea cycle metabolism and autophagy, with evidence that exposures typically neurotoxic may be able to correct deficiencies in these processes at least short term. The line between Mn-dependent biology and toxicity is thus blurred. Further, new work suggests that Mn exposures correlating to optimal cognitive scores in children are associated with cognitive decline in adults. This review explores relationships between Mn-dependent neurobiology and Mn-dependent neurotoxicity. We propose the hypothesis that Mn levels/exposures that are toxic to some biological processes are beneficial for other biological processes and influenced by developmental stage and disease state.

  9. Subclinical chronic kidney disease modifies the diagnosis of experimental acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Succar, Lena; Pianta, Timothy J; Davidson, Trent; Pickering, John W; Endre, Zoltán H

    2017-09-01

    Extensive structural damage within the kidney must be present before serum creatinine increases. However, a subclinical phase of chronic kidney disease (CKD) usually goes undetected. Here we tested whether experimental subclinical CKD would modify functional and damage biomarker profiles of acute kidney injury (AKI). Subclinical CKD was induced in rats by adenine or aristolochic acid models but without increasing serum creatinine. After prolonged recovery (three to six weeks), AKI was induced with a subnephrotoxic dose of cisplatin. Urinary levels of kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), cytochrome C, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), clusterin, and interleukin-18 increased during CKD induction, without an increase in serum creatinine. After AKI in adenine-induced CKD, serum creatinine increased more rapidly, while increased urinary KIM-1, clusterin, and MCP-1 were delayed and reduced. Increased serum creatinine and biomarker excretion were associated with diffuse tubulointerstitial injury in the outer stripe of outer medulla coupled with over 50% cortical damage. Following AKI in aristolochic acid-induced CKD, increased serum creatinine, urinary KIM-1, clusterin, MCP-1, cytochrome C, and interleukin-18 concentrations and excretion were greater at day 21 than day 42 and inversely correlated with cortical injury. Subclinical CKD modified functional and damage biomarker profiles in diametrically opposite ways. Functional biomarker profiles were more sensitive, while damage biomarker diagnostic thresholds and increases were diminished and delayed. Damage biomarker concentrations and excretion were inversely linked to the extent of prior cortical damage. Thus, thresholds for AKI biomarkers may need to be lower or sampling delayed in the known presence of CKD. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Potentials of biological control of plant diseases in the tropics | Ofor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper highlights the various categories of biological control, which are employed in an Integrated Disease Management (IDM) scheme. These include conservation, classical biocontrol and augmentation. Also, the various types of biocontrol agents/agencies which are currently in use in various parts of the world like, ...

  11. Banking of biological fluids for studies of disease-associated protein biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Anne-Sofie Schrohl; Würtz, Sidse Ørnbjerg; Kohn, Elise

    2008-01-01

    With the increasing demand of providing personalized medicine the need for biobanking of biological material from individual patients has increased. Such samples are essential for molecular research aimed at characterizing diseases at several levels ranging from epidemiology and diagnostic and pr...

  12. Concise review: current status of stem cells and regenerative medicine in lung biology and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    Lung diseases remain a significant and devastating cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In contrast to many other major diseases, lung diseases notably chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPDs), including both asthma and emphysema, are increasing in prevalence and COPD is expected to become the third leading cause of disease mortality worldwide by 2020. New therapeutic options are desperately needed. A rapidly growing number of investigations of stem cells and cell therapies in lung biology and diseases as well as in ex vivo lung bioengineering have offered exciting new avenues for advancing knowledge of lung biology as well as providing novel potential therapeutic approaches for lung diseases. These initial observations have led to a growing exploration of endothelial progenitor cells and mesenchymal stem (stromal) cells in clinical trials of pulmonary hypertension and COPD with other clinical investigations planned. Ex vivo bioengineering of the trachea, larynx, diaphragm, and the lung itself with both biosynthetic constructs as well as decellularized tissues have been used to explore engineering both airway and vascular systems of the lung. Lung is thus a ripe organ for a variety of cell therapy and regenerative medicine approaches. Current state-of-the-art progress for each of the above areas will be presented as will discussion of current considerations for cell therapy-based clinical trials in lung diseases. © AlphaMed Press.

  13. Systems biology elucidates common pathogenic mechanisms between nonalcoholic and alcoholic-fatty liver disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Sookoian

    Full Text Available The abnormal accumulation of fat in the liver is often related either to metabolic risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome in the absence of alcohol consumption (nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, NAFLD or to chronic alcohol consumption (alcoholic fatty liver disease, AFLD. Clinical and histological studies suggest that NAFLD and AFLD share pathogenic mechanisms. Nevertheless, current data are still inconclusive as to whether the underlying biological process and disease pathways of NAFLD and AFLD are alike. Our primary aim was to integrate omics and physiological data to answer the question of whether NAFLD and AFLD share molecular processes that lead to disease development. We also explored the extent to which insulin resistance (IR is a distinctive feature of NAFLD. To answer these questions, we used systems biology approaches, such as gene enrichment analysis, protein-protein interaction networks, and gene prioritization, based on multi-level data extracted by computational data mining. We observed that the leading disease pathways associated with NAFLD did not significantly differ from those of AFLD. However, systems biology revealed the importance of each molecular process behind each of the two diseases, and dissected distinctive molecular NAFLD and AFLD-signatures. Comparative co-analysis of NAFLD and AFLD clarified the participation of NAFLD, but not AFLD, in cardiovascular disease, and showed that insulin signaling is impaired in fatty liver regardless of the noxa, but the putative regulatory mechanisms associated with NAFLD seem to encompass a complex network of genes and proteins, plausible of epigenetic modifications. Gene prioritization showed a cancer-related functional map that suggests that the fatty transformation of the liver tissue is regardless of the cause, an emerging mechanism of ubiquitous oncogenic activation. In conclusion, similar underlying disease mechanisms lead to NAFLD and AFLD, but specific ones depict a

  14. Constraints on Biological Mechanism from Disease Comorbidity Using Electronic Medical Records and Database of Genetic Variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven C Bagley

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Patterns of disease co-occurrence that deviate from statistical independence may represent important constraints on biological mechanism, which sometimes can be explained by shared genetics. In this work we study the relationship between disease co-occurrence and commonly shared genetic architecture of disease. Records of pairs of diseases were combined from two different electronic medical systems (Columbia, Stanford, and compared to a large database of published disease-associated genetic variants (VARIMED; data on 35 disorders were available across all three sources, which include medical records for over 1.2 million patients and variants from over 17,000 publications. Based on the sources in which they appeared, disease pairs were categorized as having predominant clinical, genetic, or both kinds of manifestations. Confounding effects of age on disease incidence were controlled for by only comparing diseases when they fall in the same cluster of similarly shaped incidence patterns. We find that disease pairs that are overrepresented in both electronic medical record systems and in VARIMED come from two main disease classes, autoimmune and neuropsychiatric. We furthermore identify specific genes that are shared within these disease groups.

  15. Patient perspectives on switching disease-modifying therapies in the NARCOMS registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salter AR

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Amber R Salter,1 Ruth Ann Marrie,2,3 Neetu Agashivala,4 Daniel A Belletti,4 Edward Kim,4 Gary R Cutter,1 Stacey S Cofield,1 Tuula Tyry51Department of Biostatistics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA; 2Department of Internal Medicine, 3Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada; 4Novartis Pharmaceutical Corporation, East Hanover, NJ, USA; 5Division of Neurology, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ, USAIntroduction: The evolving landscape of disease-modifying therapies (DMTs for multiple sclerosis raises important questions about why patients change DMTs. Physicians and patients could benefit from a better understanding of the reasons for switching therapy. Purpose: To investigate the reasons patients switch DMTs and identify characteristics associated with the decision to switch.Method: The North American Research Committee on Multiple Sclerosis (NARCOMS Registry conducted a supplemental survey among registry participants responding to the 2011 update survey. The supplemental survey investigated reasons for switching DMT, origin of the discussion of DMT change, and which factors influenced the decision. Chi-square tests, Fisher’s exact tests, and logistic regression were used for the analyses. Results: Of the 691 eligible candidates, 308 responded and met the inclusion criteria (relapsing disease course, switched DMT after September 2010. The responders were 83.4% female, on average 52 years old, with a median (interquartile range Patient-Determined Disease Steps score of 4 (2–5. The most recent prior therapy included first-line injectables (74.5%, infusions (18.1%, an oral DMT (3.4%, and other DMTs (4.0%. The discussion to switch DMT was initiated almost equally by physicians and participants. The primary reason for choosing the new DMT was based most frequently on physician’s recommendation (24.5% and patient perception of efficacy (13.7%. Conclusion

  16. Possibility of biological control of primocane fruiting raspberry disease caused by Fusarium sambucinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shternshis, Margarita V; Belyaev, Anatoly A; Matchenko, Nina S; Shpatova, Tatyana V; Lelyak, Anastasya A

    2015-10-01

    Biological control agents are a promising alternative to chemical pesticides for plant disease suppression. The main advantage of the natural biocontrol agents, such as antagonistic bacteria compared with chemicals, includes environmental pollution prevention and a decrease of chemical residues in fruits. This study is aimed to evaluate the impact of three Bacillus strains on disease of primocane fruiting raspberry canes caused by Fusarium sambucinum under controlled infection load and uncontrolled environmental factors. Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus licheniformis, and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens were used for biocontrol of plant disease in 2013 and 2014 which differed by environmental conditions. The test suspensions were 10(5) CFU/ml for each bacterial strain. To estimate the effect of biological agents on Fusarium disease, canes were cut at the end of vegetation, and the area of outer and internal lesions was measured. In addition to antagonistic effect, the strains revealed the ability to induce plant resistance comparable with chitosan-based formulation. Under variable ways of cane treatment by bacterial strains, the more effective were B. subtilis and B. licheniformis demonstrating dual biocontrol effect. However, environmental factors were shown to impact the strain biocontrol ability; changes in air temperature and humidity led to the enhanced activity of B. amyloliquefaciens. For the first time, the possibility of replacing chemicals with environmentally benign biological agents for ecologically safe control of the raspberry primocane fruiting disease was shown.

  17. The role of EMMPRIN in T cell biology and immunological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Jennifer Nancy; Kaushik, Deepak Kumar; Yong, V Wee

    2015-07-01

    EMMPRIN (CD147), originally described as an inducer of the expression of MMPs, has gained attention in its involvement in various immunologic diseases, such that anti-EMMPRIN antibodies are considered as potential therapeutic medications. Given that MMPs are involved in the pathogenesis of various disease states, it is relevant that targeting an upstream inducer would make for an effective therapeutic strategy. Additionally, EMMPRIN is now appreciated to have multiple roles apart from MMP induction, including in cellular functions, such as migration, adhesion, invasion, energy metabolism, as well as T cell activation and proliferation. Here, we review what is known about EMMPRIN in numerous immunologic/inflammatory disease conditions with a particular focus on its complex roles in T cell biology. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  18. Treatment patterns in disease-modifying therapy for patients with multiple sclerosis in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonafede, Machaon M; Johnson, Barbara H; Wenten, Madé; Watson, Crystal

    2013-10-01

    Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) whose disease activity is inadequately controlled with a platform therapy (interferon beta or glatiramer acetate [GA]) may switch to another platform therapy or escalate therapy to natalizumab or fingolimod, which were approved in the US in 2006 and 2010, respectively. The objective of this study was to describe treatment patterns in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) in the United States who were followed for 2 years after initiating a disease-modifying therapy (DMT). A retrospective observational cohort study was conducted to examine treatment patterns of initial DMT use (on initial therapy for 2 years with and without gaps of ≥ 60 days, medication switching, and discontinuation) among patients with MS who initiated a platform therapy (interferon-β or glatiramer acetate) or natalizumab between January 1, 2007, and September 30, 2009; the first DMT claim was the index. Eligible patients were identified in the MarketScan Commercial and Medicare Supplemental databases based on continuous enrollment for 6 months before (preindex period) and 24 months after their index date, with a diagnosis of MS and no claim for a previous DMT in the 6-month preindex period. Demographics at index and clinical characteristics during the preindex period were also analyzed. A total of 6181 MS patients were included, with 5735 (92.8%) starting on platform therapy. Natalizumab initiators were more likely to stay on index therapy (32.3% vs 16.9%, P treatment gaps of ≥ 60 days (44.8% vs 55.3%, P treatment (13.9% vs 19.1%, P = 0.007) and took longer to switch (400.9 days vs 330.7 days, P treatment gaps, and switch less than platform initiators in the 2 years after treatment initiation. Switching between platform therapies is common despite evidence that MS patients on platform therapy may benefit from switching to natalizumab. © 2013 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. ANALYSIS OF DISEASE MODIFYING DRUGS ADMINISTRATION FREGUENCY AND CAUSES OF THEIR WITHDRAWAL IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E V Pavlova

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of studdy: To assess the frequency of practical application of different basic drugs in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Material and methods: Tlxe study was conducted basing of questionner of pts and analysis of ycases by randomized sampling among 103 consequent pts (M:F= 13:90 with reliable RA (ARA, 1987 in rheumatologic department of Clinical Hospital Nol in Ekaterinburg. 74% of pts under study demonstrated systemic manifestations: anemia (in 47 pts, lymphadenopathy (in 34, rheumatoid nodules (in 15, Sjogren s syndrome (in 4, nephropathy (in 4, vascular disturbances including Raynaud s phenomenon, capillarites (by 1 pt. Results: In the course of disease basic therapy was prescribed to 88 out of103 (85.4% pts and one and the same patient could take different basic drugs. Aminochinoline drugs prevailed, after them more frequent were immunodepressants and gold preparations. More rarely pts had sulfasalazin, cuprenil and wobenzym. In general, in 133 out of 184 cases of prescribing basic drugs they were canceled. The reason for cancellation were: prevalently absence of the drug in the pharmaceutical stores (in 48 cases averagely in 8 months of taking the drug; then they insufficient efficacy (44 cases averagely in 1.3 year. In 18 cases pts themselves stopped treatment averagely in 3.5 months of drug taking. Conclusion: In the majority of cases of basic drugs cancellation in RA the cause is their absence in sail especially on free of charge prescription. Cases ofself-cancellation of the drug demonstrate the need of explaining to pts the necessity> of long-term taking disease-modifying drugs.

  20. A Systems Biology Approach Reveals Converging Molecular Mechanisms that Link Different POPs to Common Metabolic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Patricia; Perlina, Ally; Mumtaz, Moiz; Fowler, Bruce A

    2016-07-01

    A number of epidemiological studies have identified statistical associations between persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and metabolic diseases, but testable hypotheses regarding underlying molecular mechanisms to explain these linkages have not been published. We assessed the underlying mechanisms of POPs that have been associated with metabolic diseases; three well-known POPs [2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (TCDD), 2,2´,4,4´,5,5´-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 153), and 4,4´-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p´-DDE)] were studied. We used advanced database search tools to delineate testable hypotheses and to guide laboratory-based research studies into underlying mechanisms by which this POP mixture could produce or exacerbate metabolic diseases. For our searches, we used proprietary systems biology software (MetaCore™/MetaDrug™) to conduct advanced search queries for the underlying interactions database, followed by directional network construction to identify common mechanisms for these POPs within two or fewer interaction steps downstream of their primary targets. These common downstream pathways belong to various cytokine and chemokine families with experimentally well-documented causal associations with type 2 diabetes. Our systems biology approach allowed identification of converging pathways leading to activation of common downstream targets. To our knowledge, this is the first study to propose an integrated global set of step-by-step molecular mechanisms for a combination of three common POPs using a systems biology approach, which may link POP exposure to diseases. Experimental evaluation of the proposed pathways may lead to development of predictive biomarkers of the effects of POPs, which could translate into disease prevention and effective clinical treatment strategies. Ruiz P, Perlina A, Mumtaz M, Fowler BA. 2016. A systems biology approach reveals converging molecular mechanisms that link different POPs to common metabolic diseases. Environ

  1. Modifying Health Behavior to Prevent Cardiovascular Diseases: A Nationwide Survey among German Primary Care Physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Schneider

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases (CVD are a major public health concern as they are the leading cause of death in developed countries. Primary care is considered to be the ideal setting for CVD prevention. Therefore, more than 4,000 German primary care physicians (PCPs were asked about their attitudes towards and their activities regarding the prevention of CVD in the nationwide ÄSP-kardio Study. The focus of the study was on health behavior modification. Two thirds of the participating PCPs stated that they routinely provided brief inventions to assist patients in reducing both their tobacco (72% and alcohol (61% consumption, to encourage them to increase their levels of physical activity (72%, and to assist them in adjusting to a more healthy diet (66%, and in achieving a healthy body weight (69%. However, only between 23% (quitting smoking and 49% (diet modification of PCPs felt that they had been successful in helping patients modify their lifestyles. Insufficient reimbursement, cultural diversity and a lack of time were reported to be the most problematic barriers to successful intervention in the primary care setting. Despite these obstacles, the majority of German PCPs was engaged in prevention and health behavior intervention to reduce the incidence and progression of CVD.

  2. Baseline predictors of persistence to first disease-modifying treatment in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, U K; Schreiber, H; Bauer-Steinhusen, U; Glaser, T; Hechenbichler, K; Hecker, M

    2017-08-01

    Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) require lifelong therapy. However, success of disease-modifying therapies is dependent on patients' persistence and adherence to treatment schedules. In the setting of a large multicenter observational study, we aimed at assessing multiple parameters for their predictive power with respect to discontinuation of therapy. We analyzed 13 parameters to predict discontinuation of interferon beta-1b treatment during a 2-year follow-up period based on data from 395 patients with MS who were treatment-naïve at study onset. Besides clinical characteristics, patient-related psychosocial outcomes were assessed as well. Among patients without clinically relevant fatigue, males showed a higher persistence rate than females (80.3% vs 64.7%). Clinically relevant fatigue scores decreased the persistence rate in men and especially in women (71.4% and 51.2%). Besides gender and fatigue, univariable and multivariable analyses revealed further factors associated with interferon beta-1b therapy discontinuation, namely lower quality of life, depressiveness, and higher relapse rate before therapy initiation, while higher education, living without a partner, and higher age improved persistence. Patients with higher grades of fatigue and depressiveness are at higher risk to prematurely discontinue MS treatment; especially, women suffering from fatigue have an increased discontinuation rate. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. 10-minute delayed recall from the modified mini-mental state test predicts Alzheimer's disease pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyness, Scott A; Lee, Ae Young; Zarow, Chris; Teng, Evelyn L; Chui, Helena C

    2014-01-01

    We compared the sensitivity and specificity of two delayed recall scores from the Modified Mini-Mental State (3MS) test with consensus clinical diagnosis to differentiate cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer's disease (AD) versus non-AD pathologies. At a memory disorders clinic, 117 cognitively impaired patients were administered a baseline 3MS test and received a contemporaneous consensus clinical diagnosis. Their brains were examined after death about 5 years later. Using logistic regression with forward selection to predict pathologically defined AD versus non-AD, 10-min delayed recall entered first (p = 0.001), followed by clinical diagnosis (p = 0.02); 1-min delayed recall did not enter. 10-min delayed recall scores ≤4 (score range = 0-9) were 87% sensitive and 47% specific in predicting AD pathology; consensus clinical diagnosis was 82% sensitive and 45% specific. For the 57 patients whose initial Mini-Mental State Examination scores were ≥19 (the median), 3MS 10-min delayed recall scores ≤4 showed some loss of sensitivity (80%) but a substantial gain in specificity (77%). In conclusion, 10-min delayed recall score on the brief 3MS test distinguished between AD versus non-AD pathology about 5 years before death at least as well as consensus clinical diagnosis that requires much more comprehensive information and complex deliberation.

  4. Adherence to synthetic disease-modifying Antirheumatic Drugs in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Results of the OBSERVAR Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan Mas, Antonio; Castañeda, Santos; Cantero Santamaría, José I; Baquero, José L; Del Toro Santos, Francisco J

    2017-12-27

    Treatment compliance with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD) is essential to achieve the therapeutic goals in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, despite the need for good compliance, there is evidence that patients with RA frequently fail to use DMARD for the control of RA. Thus, the main objective of the OBSERVAR study is to evaluate the reasons for the lack of therapeutic adherence to synthetic DMARD in these patients. A Delphi process involving 18 randomly selected Spanish rheumatologists determined the level of agreement with 66 causes of noncompliance selected from the literature in relation to synthetic DMARD in RA. The reasons for noncompliance were consistent in 75.7%, although 3 reasons (4.5%) were highly consistent: 1) not knowing what to do in the case of an adverse event with DMARD; 2) not having undergone adherence screening by health personnel for early detection of "noncompliant patients"; and 3) not having undergone interventions or strategies that improve adherence. In order to improve adherence to RA treatment with synthetic DMARD, the patient should be adequately informed of each new treatment introduced, the patient's compliance profile should be incorporated into the clinical routine and the patient's motivation for therapeutic compliance be reinforced through the methods available to us. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  5. Perspectives and experiences of Dutch multiple sclerosis patients and multiple sclerosis-specialized neurologists on injectable disease-modifying treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Leo H.; Heerings, Marco A.; Jongen, Peter J.; van der Hiele, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Background: The adherence to treatment with injectable disease-modifying drugs (DMDs) in multiple sclerosis (MS) may benefit from adequate information provision and management of expectations. The communication between patients and physicians is very important in this respect. The current study

  6. Patients' considerations in the decision-making process of initiating disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nota, Ingrid; Drossaert, Constance H.C.; Taal, Erik; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore what considerations patients have when deciding about disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and what information patients need to participate in the decision-making process. Methods In-depth face-to-face interviews were conducted with 32 inflammatory arthritis

  7. Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis : Impact of Disease-Modifying Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongen, Peter Joseph

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) has a profound impact on health-related quality of life (HRQoL), a comprehensive subjective measure of the patient's health status. Assessment of HRQoL informs on the potential advantages and disadvantages of disease-modifying drugs (DMDs) beyond their effects on

  8. Relationship between Periodontal Diseases and Preterm Birth: Recent Epidemiological and Biological Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huck, O.; Tenenbaum, H.; Davideau, J.-L.

    2011-01-01

    For ten years, the incidence of preterm birth does not decrease in developed countries despite the promotion of public health programs. Many risk factors have been identified including ethnicity, age, tobacco, and infection. However, almost 50% of preterm birth causes remain unknown. The periodontal diseases are highly prevalent inflammatory and infectious diseases of tooth supporting tissues leading to an oral disability. They influence negatively general health worsening cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. Periodontal diseases have been also suspected to increase the rate of preterm birth, but data remain contradictory. The objective of this review is to present the principal results of epidemiological, biological, and interventional studies on the link between periodontal diseases and preterm birth. The conclusions of this work underline the importance for the physician/obstetrician to identify women at risk for preterm birth and to address these patients to dentist for periodontal examination and treatment in order to limit adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:22132334

  9. Relationship between Periodontal Diseases and Preterm Birth: Recent Epidemiological and Biological Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Huck

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available For ten years, the incidence of preterm birth does not decrease in developed countries despite the promotion of public health programs. Many risk factors have been identified including ethnicity, age, tobacco, and infection. However, almost 50% of preterm birth causes remain unknown. The periodontal diseases are highly prevalent inflammatory and infectious diseases of tooth supporting tissues leading to an oral disability. They influence negatively general health worsening cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. Periodontal diseases have been also suspected to increase the rate of preterm birth, but data remain contradictory. The objective of this review is to present the principal results of epidemiological, biological, and interventional studies on the link between periodontal diseases and preterm birth. The conclusions of this work underline the importance for the physician/obstetrician to identify women at risk for preterm birth and to address these patients to dentist for periodontal examination and treatment in order to limit adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  10. Adenosine A2B receptor: from cell biology to human diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ying; Huang, Pingbo

    2016-08-01

    Extracellular adenosine is a ubiquitous signaling molecule that modulates a wide array of biological processes. Recently, significant advances have been made in our understanding of A2B adenosine receptor (A2BAR). In this review, we first summarize some of the general characteristics of A2BAR, and then we describe the multiple binding partners of the receptor, such as newly identified α-actinin-1 and p105, and discuss how these associated proteins could modulate A2BAR’s functions, including certain seemingly paradoxical functions of the receptor. Growing evidence indicates a critical role of A2BAR in cancer, renal disease, and diabetes, in addition to its importance in the regulation of vascular diseases and lung disease. Here, we also discuss the role of A2BAR in cancer, renal disease, and diabetes and the potential of the receptor as a target for treating these three diseases.

  11. Knowlege of, attitudes toward, and acceptance of genetically modified organisms among prospective teachers of biology, home economics, and grade school in Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorgo, Andrej; Ambrožič-Dolinšek, Jana

    2010-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate knowledge, opinions, and attitudes toward, as well as readiness to accept genetically modified organisms (GMOs) among prospective primary and secondary Slovene teachers. Our findings are that prospective teachers want to take an active role in rejecting or supporting individual GMOs and are aware of the importance of education about genetically modified organism (GMO) items and their potential significance for society. Through cluster analysis, we recognized four clusters of GMOs, separated by degree of genetically modified acceptability. GM plants and microorganisms which are recognized as useful are accepted. They are undecided about organisms used in research or medicine and reject organisms used for food consumption and for fun. There are only weak correlations between knowledge and attitudes and knowledge and acceptance of GMOs, and a strong correlation between attitudes and acceptance. The appropriate strategies and actions for improving university courses in biotechnology are discussed. Copyright © 2010 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Biologic treatment or immunomodulation is not associated with postoperative anastomotic complications in abdominal surgery for Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Hussuna, Alaa Abdul-Hussein H; Andersen, Jens; Bisgaard, Thue

    2012-01-01

    There are concerns that biologic treatments or immunomodulation may negatively influence anastomotic healing. This study investigates the relationship between these treatments and anastomotic complications after surgery for Crohn's disease.......There are concerns that biologic treatments or immunomodulation may negatively influence anastomotic healing. This study investigates the relationship between these treatments and anastomotic complications after surgery for Crohn's disease....

  13. Carryover effect of postpartum inflammatory diseases on developmental biology and fertility in lactating dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, E S; Gomes, G; Greco, L F; Cerri, R L A; Vieira-Neto, A; Monteiro, P L J; Lima, F S; Bisinotto, R S; Thatcher, W W; Santos, J E P

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this series of studies was to investigate the effects of inflammatory diseases occurring before breeding on the developmental biology and reproductive responses in dairy cows. Data from 5 studies were used to investigate different questions associating health status before breeding and reproductive responses. Health information for all studies was composed of the incidence of retained fetal membranes, metritis, mastitis, lameness, and respiratory and digestive problems from parturition until the day of breeding. Retained placenta and metritis were grouped as uterine disease (UTD). Mastitis, lameness, digestive and respiratory problems were grouped as nonuterine diseases (NUTD). Study 1 evaluated the effect of disease before artificial insemination (AI), anovulation before synchronization of the estrous cycle, and low body condition score at AI on pregnancy per AI, as well as their potential interactions or additive effects. Study 2 investigated the effect of site of inflammation (UTD vs. NUTD) and time of occurrence relative to preantral or antral stages of ovulatory follicle development, and the effect of UTD and NUTD on fertility responses of cows bred by AI or by embryo transfer. Study 3 evaluated the effect of disease on fertilization and embryonic development to the morula stage. Study 4 evaluated the effect of disease on preimplantation conceptus development as well as secretion of IFN-τ and transcriptome. Study 5 investigated the effect of diseases before AI on the transcript expression of interferon-stimulated genes in peripheral blood leukocytes during peri-implantation stages of conceptus development after first AI postpartum. Altogether, these studies demonstrated that inflammatory disease before breeding reduced fertilization of oocytes and development to morula, and impaired early conceptus development to elongation stages and secretion of IFN-τ in the uterine lumen. Diseases caused inflammation-like changes in transcriptome of

  14. Role of biologics and biosimilars in inflammatory bowel disease: current trends and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rawla P

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Prashanth Rawla,1 Tagore Sunkara,2 Jeffrey Pradeep Raj3 1Department of Internal Medicine, Memorial Hospital of Martinsville and Henry County, Martinsville, VA, 2Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, The Brooklyn Hospital Center, Clinical Affiliate of The Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY, USA; 3Department of Pharmacology, St John’s Medical College, Bangalore, India Abstract: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is an idiopathic chronic inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal system. The spectrum is of predominantly two types, namely, ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. The incidence of IBD has been increasing steadily since 1990, and so the number of agents used in their treatment. Biologics that are derived partly or completely from living biological sources such as animals and humans have become widely available, which provide therapeutic benefits to the IBD patients. Currently, monoclonal antibodies against tumor necrosis factor-alpha (infliximab, adalimumab, certolizumab, and golimumab, integrins (vedolizumab and natalizumab, and interleukin (IL-12 and IL-23 antagonists (ustekinumab are approved for use in IBD. Biosimilars of infliximab and adalimumab are also available for the treatment of IBD. This review summarizes the clinical pharmacology, studies leading to their approval, overall indications and their use in IBD, usage in pregnancy and lactation, and the adverse effects of these agents. This review also summarizes the recent advances and future perspectives specific to biologics and biosimilars in IBD. Keywords: inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, biologics, biosimilars, tumor necrosis factor, integrin, interleukin, adalimumab, Humira®, certolizumab, Cimzia®, golimumab, Simponi®, infliximab, Remicade®, vedolizumab, Entyvio, natalizumab, Tysabri®, ustekinumab, Stelara® 

  15. LGscore: A method to identify disease-related genes using biological literature and Google data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeongwoo; Kim, Hyunjin; Yoon, Youngmi; Park, Sanghyun

    2015-04-01

    Since the genome project in 1990s, a number of studies associated with genes have been conducted and researchers have confirmed that genes are involved in disease. For this reason, the identification of the relationships between diseases and genes is important in biology. We propose a method called LGscore, which identifies disease-related genes using Google data and literature data. To implement this method, first, we construct a disease-related gene network using text-mining results. We then extract gene-gene interactions based on co-occurrences in abstract data obtained from PubMed, and calculate the weights of edges in the gene network by means of Z-scoring. The weights contain two values: the frequency and the Google search results. The frequency value is extracted from literature data, and the Google search result is obtained using Google. We assign a score to each gene through a network analysis. We assume that genes with a large number of links and numerous Google search results and frequency values are more likely to be involved in disease. For validation, we investigated the top 20 inferred genes for five different diseases using answer sets. The answer sets comprised six databases that contain information on disease-gene relationships. We identified a significant number of disease-related genes as well as candidate genes for Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, colon cancer, lung cancer, and prostate cancer. Our method was up to 40% more accurate than existing methods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Towards the concept of disease-modifier in post-stroke or vascular cognitive impairment: a consensus report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordet, Régis; Ihl, Ralf; Korczyn, Amos D; Lanza, Giuseppe; Jansa, Jelka; Hoerr, Robert; Guekht, Alla

    2017-05-24

    Vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) is a complex spectrum encompassing post-stroke cognitive impairment (PSCI) and small vessel disease-related cognitive impairment. Despite the growing health, social, and economic burden of VCI, to date, no specific treatment is available, prompting the introduction of the concept of a disease modifier. Within this clinical spectrum, VCI and PSCI remain advancing conditions as neurodegenerative diseases with progression of both vascular and degenerative lesions accounting for cognitive decline. Disease-modifying strategies should integrate both pharmacological and non-pharmacological multimodal approaches, with pleiotropic effects targeting (1) endothelial and brain-blood barrier dysfunction; (2) neuronal death and axonal loss; (3) cerebral plasticity and compensatory mechanisms; and (4) degenerative-related protein misfolding. Moreover, pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment in PSCI or VCI requires valid study designs clearly stating the definition of basic methodological issues, such as the instruments that should be used to measure eventual changes, the biomarker-based stratification of participants to be investigated, and statistical tests, as well as the inclusion and exclusion criteria that should be applied. A consensus emerged to propose the development of a disease-modifying strategy in VCI and PSCI based on pleiotropic pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches.

  17. Do Genetic Markers of Inflammation Modify the Relationship between Periodontitis and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease? Findings from the SHIP Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinkugbe, A A; Avery, C L; Barritt, A S; Cole, S R; Lerch, M; Mayerle, J; Offenbacher, S; Petersmann, A; Nauck, M; Völzke, H; Slade, G D; Heiss, G; Kocher, T; Holtfreter, B

    2017-11-01

    An association between periodontitis and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has been reported by experimental animal and epidemiologic studies. This study investigated whether circulating levels of serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and a weighted genetic CRP score representing markers of inflammatory burden modify the association between periodontitis and NAFLD. Data came from 2,481 participants of the Study of Health in Pomerania who attended baseline examination that occurred between 1997 and 2001. Periodontitis was defined as the percentage of sites (0%, 3 mg/L. Periodontitis was positively associated with higher prevalence odds of NAFLD, and this relationship was modified by serum CRP levels.

  18. Therapeutic compliance of first line disease-modifying therapies in patients with multiple sclerosis. COMPLIANCE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiz, A; Mora, S; Blanco, J

    2015-05-01

    Non-adherence to disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) in multiple sclerosis may be associated with reduced efficacy. We assessed compliance, the reasons for non-compliance, treatment satisfaction, and quality of life (QoL) of patients treated with first-line therapies. A cross-sectional, multicenter study was conducted that included relapsing multiple sclerosis patients. Compliance in the past month was assessed using Morisky-Green test. Seasonal compliance and reasons for non-compliance were assessed by an ad-hoc questionnaire. Treatment satisfaction and QoL were evaluated by means of TSQM and PRIMUS questionnaires. A total of 220 patients were evaluated (91% relapsing-remitting); the mean age was 39.1 years, 70% were female, and the average time under treatment was 5.4 years. Subcutaneous interferon (IFN) β-1b was used in 23% of the patients, intramuscular IFN β-1a in 21%, subcutaneous IFN β-1a in 37%, and with glatiramer acetate in 19%. The overall compliance was 75%, with no significant differences related to the therapy, and 81% did not report any seasonal variation. Compliant patients had significantly lower disability scores and time of diagnosis, and greater satisfaction with treatment and its effectiveness. Discomfort and flu-like symptoms were the most frequent reasons for non-compliance. The satisfaction and QoL were associated with less disability and number of therapeutic switches. The rate of compliance, satisfaction and QoL in multiple sclerosis patients under DMTs is high, especially for those newly diagnosed, less disabled, and with fewer therapeutic switches. Discomfort and flu-like symptoms associated with injected therapies significantly affect adherence. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Functional paraoxonase 1 variants modify the risk of Parkinson's disease due to organophosphate exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pei-Chen; Rhodes, Shannon L; Sinsheimer, Janet S; Bronstein, Jeff; Ritz, Beate

    2013-06-01

    We previously demonstrated that carriers of the "slower metabolizer" MM genotype of paraoxonase (PON1) who were also exposed to ambient organophosphate (OP) pesticides at their residences were at increased risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD). Here, with a larger sample size, we extend our previous investigation to consider additional sources of ambient exposure and examined two additional functional PON1 variants. From 2001 to 2011, we enrolled incident cases of idiopathic PD and population controls living in central California. We genotyped three well-known functional PON1 SNPs: two exonic polymorphisms (PON1L55M and PON1Q192R) and the promoter region variant (PON1C-108T). Ambient exposures to diazinon, chlorpyrifos, and parathion at residential and workplace addresses were assessed using a validated geographic information system-based model incorporating records of agricultural pesticide applications in California. The odds ratio (OR) for Caucasians exposed to OPs at either residential or workplace addresses varied by PON1 genotype; for exposed carriers of the "faster" metabolizer genotypes, ML or LL, we estimated lower odds ratios (range, 1.20-1.39) than for exposed carriers of the "slower" metabolizer genotype MM (range, 1.78-2.45) relative to unexposed carriers of the faster genotypes. We observed similarly increased ORs for exposure across PON1Q192R genotypes, but no differences across PON1C-108T genotypes. The largest ORs were estimated for exposed carriers of both PON1192QQ and PON155MM (OR range, 2.84-3.57). Several functional PON1 variants may act together to modify PD risk for ambient OP exposures. While either PON1L55M or PON1Q192R may be sufficient to identify increased susceptibility, carriers of both slow metabolizer variants seem most susceptible to OP exposures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Environmental enrichment imparts disease-modifying and transgenerational effects on genetically-determined epilepsy and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezsi, Gabi; Ozturk, Ezgi; Salzberg, Michael R; Morris, Margaret; O'Brien, Terence J; Jones, Nigel C

    2016-09-01

    The absence epilepsies are presumed to be caused by genetic factors, but the influence of environmental exposures on epilepsy development and severity, and whether this influence is transmitted to subsequent generations, is not well known. We assessed the effects of environmental enrichment on epilepsy and anxiety outcomes in multiple generations of GAERS - a genetic rat model of absence epilepsy that manifests comorbid elevated anxiety-like behaviour. GAERS were exposed to environmental enrichment or standard housing beginning either prior to, or after epilepsy onset, and underwent EEG recordings and anxiety testing. Then, we exposed male GAERS to early enrichment or standard housing and generated F1 progeny, which also underwent EEG recordings. Hippocampal CRH mRNA expression and DNA methylation were assessed using RT-PCR and pyrosequencing, respectively. Early environmental enrichment delayed the onset of epilepsy in GAERS, and resulted in fewer seizures in adulthood, compared with standard housed GAERS. Enrichment also reduced the frequency of seizures when initiated in adulthood. Anxiety levels were reduced by enrichment, and these anti-epileptogenic and anxiolytic effects were heritable into the next generation. We also found reduced expression of CRH mRNA in GAERS exposed to enrichment, but this was not due to changes in DNA methylation. Environmental enrichment produces disease-modifying effects on genetically determined absence epilepsy and anxiety, and these beneficial effects are transferable to the subsequent generation. Reduced CRH expression was associated with these phenotypic improvements. Environmental stimulation holds promise as a naturalistic therapy for genetically determined epilepsy which may benefit subsequent generations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Does Caffeine Consumption Modify Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid-β Levels in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travassos, Maria; Santana, Isabel; Baldeiras, Inês; Tsolaki, Magda; Gkatzima, Olymbia; Sermin, Genc; Yener, Görsev G; Simonsen, Anja; Hasselbalch, Steen G; Kapaki, Elisabeth; Mara, Bourbouli; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Agostinho, Paula; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Mendes, Vera M; Manadas, Bruno; de Mendon, Alexandreça

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine may be protective against Alzheimer's disease (AD) by modulating amyloid-β (Aβ) metabolic pathways. The present work aimed to study a possible association of caffeine consumption with the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, particularly Aβ. The study included 88 patients with AD or mild cognitive impairment. The consumption of caffeine and theobromine was evaluated using a validated food questionnaire. Quantification of caffeine and main active metabolites was performed with liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. The levels of A(1-42), total tau, and phosphorylated tau in the CSF were determined using sandwich ELISA methods and other Aβ species, Aβ(X-38), Aβ(X-40), and Aβ(X-42), with the MSD Aβ Triplex assay. The concentration of caffeine was 0.79±1.15 μg/mL in the CSF and 1.20±1.88 μg/mL in the plasma. No correlation was found between caffeine consumption and Aβ42 in the CSF. However, a significant positive correlation was found between the concentrations of theobromine, both in the CSF and in the plasma, with Aβ42 in the CSF. Theobromine in the CSF was positively correlated with the levels of other xanthines in the CSF, but not in the plasma, suggesting that it may be formed by central metabolic pathways. In conclusion, caffeine consumption does not modify the levels of CSF biomarkers, and does not require to be controlled for when measuring CSF biomarkers in a clinical setting. Since theobromine is associated with a favorable Aβ profile in the CSF, the possibility that it might have a protective role in AD should be further investigated.

  2. The Burden of Cardiovascular Disease Attributable to Major Modifiable Risk Factors in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Akhtar Hussain

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Indonesia, coronary heart disease (CHD and stroke are estimated to cause more than 470 000 deaths annually. In order to inform primary prevention policies, we estimated the sex- and age-specific burden of CHD and stroke attributable to five major and modifiable vascular risk factors: cigarette smoking, hypertension, diabetes, elevated total cholesterol, and excess body weight. Methods: Population attributable risks for CHD and stroke attributable to these risk factors individually were calculated using summary statistics obtained for prevalence of each risk factor specific to sex and to two age categories (<55 and ≥55 years from a national survey in Indonesia. Age- and sex-specific relative risks for CHD and stroke associated with each of the five risk factors were derived from prospective data from the Asia-Pacific region. Results: Hypertension was the leading vascular risk factor, explaining 20%–25% of all CHD and 36%–42% of all strokes in both sexes and approximately one-third of all CHD and half of all strokes across younger and older age groups alike. Smoking in men explained a substantial proportion of vascular events (25% of CHD and 17% of strokes. However, given that these risk factors are likely to be strongly correlated, these population attributable risk proportions are likely to be overestimates and require verification from future studies that are able to take into account correlation between risk factors. Conclusions: Implementation of effective population-based prevention strategies aimed at reducing levels of major cardiovascular risk factors, especially blood pressure, total cholesterol, and smoking prevalence among men, could reduce the growing burden of CVD in the Indonesian population.

  3. Disease modifying and antiangiogenic activity of 2-Methoxyestradiol in a murine model of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore Elizabeth G

    2009-05-01

    study parameters and prevented neovascularization into the joint. Examination of gene expression on dissected hind limbs from mice treated for 5 or 14 days with 2ME2 showed inhibition of inflammatory cytokine message for IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-17, as well as the angiogenic cytokines, VEGF and FGF-2. Conclusion These data demonstrate that in the CAIA mouse model of RA, 2ME2 has disease modifying activity that is at least partially attributable to the inhibition of neovascular development. Further, the data suggests new mechanistic points of intervention for 2ME2 in RA, specifically inhibition of inflammatory mediators and osteoclast activity.

  4. Optical force on diseased blood cells: Towards the optical sorting of biological matter

    KAUST Repository

    Gongora, J. S. Totero

    2015-05-01

    By employing a series of massively parallel ab-initio simulations, we study how optical forces act on biological matter subject to morphological disease. As a representative case study, we here consider the case of Plasmodium falciparum on red blood cells (RBC) illuminated by a monochromatic plane wave. Realistic parameters for the geometry and the refractive index are then taken from published experiments. In our theoretical campaign, we study the dependence of the optical force on the disease stage for different incident wavelengths. We show that optical forces change significantly with the disease, with amplitude variation in the hundreds of pN range. Our results open up new avenues for the design of new optical systems for the treatment of human disease. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Selective biologics for ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease – clinical utility of vedolizumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petkau JM

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Jill MV Petkau, Bertus Eksteen Snyder Institute for Chronic Diseases, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada Abstract: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD encompasses a cluster of different disease phenotypes which are broadly classified into ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Disease pathogenesis is driven by abnormal host immune responses to their resident gut microbiome in genetically susceptible individuals. Clinical disease features and outcomes are heterogenous and not unexpected as over 163 genetic loci are associated with disease susceptibility, and there are great variability in environmental exposures. Despite this variability, there has been relatively few efficacious therapies for particularly moderate-to-severe IBD. Treatment has been dominated by antitumor necrosis alpha agents with significant success but equally potentially serious adverse events. Therapeutic targeting of leucocyte trafficking has emerged as a viable alternative therapy, with vedolizumab being the lead compound. This review focuses primarily on its biological function as a selective gut immunotherapy, its safety and efficacy, and its emerging role as a mainstream therapy in managing IBD. Keywords: adhesion molecule antagonist, anti-α4β7 integrin, inflammatory bowel disease, leukocyte trafficking, monoclonal antibody, selective gut immunotherapy, tumor necrosis factor alpha

  6. Pathway reconstruction of airway remodeling in chronic lung diseases: a systems biology approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Najafi

    Full Text Available Airway remodeling is a pathophysiologic process at the clinical, cellular, and molecular level relating to chronic obstructive airway diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, asthma and mustard lung. These diseases are associated with the dysregulation of multiple molecular pathways in the airway cells. Little progress has so far been made in discovering the molecular causes of complex disease in a holistic systems manner. Therefore, pathway and network reconstruction is an essential part of a systems biology approach to solve this challenging problem. In this paper, multiple data sources were used to construct the molecular process of airway remodeling pathway in mustard lung as a model of airway disease. We first compiled a master list of genes that change with airway remodeling in the mustard lung disease and then reconstructed the pathway by generating and merging the protein-protein interaction and the gene regulatory networks. Experimental observations and literature mining were used to identify and validate the master list. The outcome of this paper can provide valuable information about closely related chronic obstructive airway diseases which are of great importance for biologists and their future research. Reconstructing the airway remodeling interactome provides a starting point and reference for the future experimental study of mustard lung, and further analysis and development of these maps will be critical to understanding airway diseases in patients.

  7. The role of bacillus-based biological control agents in integrated pest management systems: plant diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, B J; Zidack, N K; Larson, B J

    2004-11-01

    ABSTRACT Bacillus-based biological control agents (BCAs) have great potential in integrated pest management (IPM) systems; however, relatively little work has been published on integration with other IPM management tools. Unfortunately, most research has focused on BCAs as alternatives to synthetic chemical fungicides or bactericides and not as part of an integrated management system. IPM has had many definitions and this review will use the national coalition for IPM definition: "A sustainable approach to managing pests by combining biological, cultural, physical and chemical tools in a way that minimizes economic, health and environmental risks." This review will examine the integrated use of Bacillus-based BCAs with disease management tools, including resistant cultivars, fungicides or bactericides, or other BCAs. This integration is important because the consistency and degree of disease control by Bacillus-based BCAs is rarely equal to the control afforded by the best fungicides or bactericides. In theory, integration of several tools brings stability to disease management programs. Integration of BCAs with other disease management tools often provides broader crop adaptation and both more efficacious and consistent levels of disease control. This review will also discuss the use of Bacillus-based BCAs in fungicide resistance management. Work with Bacillus thuringiensis and insect pest management is the exception to the relative paucity of reports but will not be the focus of this review.

  8. Systems Biology-Based Platforms to Accelerate Research of Emerging Infectious Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Soo Jin; Choi, Young Ki; Shin, Ok Sarah

    2018-03-01

    Emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) pose a major threat to public health and security. Given the dynamic nature and significant impact of EIDs, the most effective way to prevent and protect against them is to develop vaccines in advance. Systems biology approaches provide an integrative way to understand the complex immune response to pathogens. They can lead to a greater understanding of EID pathogenesis and facilitate the evaluation of newly developed vaccine-induced immunity in a timely manner. In recent years, advances in high throughput technologies have enabled researchers to successfully apply systems biology methods to analyze immune responses to a variety of pathogens and vaccines. Despite recent advances, computational and biological challenges impede wider application of systems biology approaches. This review highlights recent advances in the fields of systems immunology and vaccinology, and presents ways that systems biology-based platforms can be applied to accelerate a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms of immunity against EIDs. © Copyright: Yonsei University College of Medicine 2018.

  9. MMP-2 is a disease-modifying gene in primary sclerosing cholangitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korkmaz, Kerem Sebib; de Rooij, Bert-Jan F.; van Hoek, Bart; Janse, Marcel; Coenraad, Minneke J.; van der Reijden, Johan J.; Weersma, Rinse K.; Porte, Robert J.; Voorneveld, Philip W.; Baranski, Andrzej G.; Verspaget, Hein W.

    BackgroundPrimary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the bile ducts, frequently necessitating orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT), often accompanied by inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are associated with fibrotic diseases caused by

  10. A SNP in the HTT promoter alters NF-κB binding and is a bidirectional genetic modifier of Huntington disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bečanović, Kristina; Nørremølle, Anne; Neal, Scott J

    2015-01-01

    Cis-regulatory variants that alter gene expression can modify disease expressivity, but none have previously been identified in Huntington disease (HD). Here we provide in vivo evidence in HD patients that cis-regulatory variants in the HTT promoter are bidirectional modifiers of HD age of onset....

  11. Regulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes in infectious and inflammatory disease: implications for biologics-small molecule drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Pankajini; Taneja, Guncha; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Ghose, Romi

    2017-06-01

    Drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) are primarily down-regulated during infectious and inflammatory diseases, leading to disruption in the metabolism of small molecule drugs (smds), which are increasingly being prescribed therapeutically in combination with biologics for a number of chronic diseases. The biologics may exert pro- or anti-inflammatory effect, which may in turn affect the expression/activity of DMEs. Thus, patients with infectious/inflammatory diseases undergoing biologic/smd treatment can have complex changes in DMEs due to combined effects of the disease and treatment. Areas covered: We will discuss clinical biologics-SMD interaction and regulation of DMEs during infection and inflammatory diseases. Mechanistic studies will be discussed and consequences on biologic-small molecule combination therapy on disease outcome due to changes in drug metabolism will be highlighted. Expert opinion: The involvement of immunomodulatory mediators in biologic-SMDs is well known. Regulatory guidelines recommend appropriate in vitro or in vivo assessments for possible interactions. The role of cytokines in biologic-SMDs has been documented. However, the mechanisms of drug-drug interactions is much more complex, and is probably multi-factorial. Studies aimed at understanding the mechanism by which biologics effect the DMEs during inflammation/infection are clinically important.

  12. Physical Activity and Telomere Biology: Exploring the Link with Aging-Related Disease Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew T. Ludlow

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity is associated with reduced risk of several age-related diseases as well as with increased longevity in both rodents and humans. Though these associations are well established, evidence of the molecular and cellular factors associated with reduced disease risk and increased longevity resulting from physical activity is sparse. A long-standing hypothesis of aging is the telomere hypothesis: as a cell divides, telomeres shorten resulting eventually in replicative senescence and an aged phenotype. Several reports have recently associated telomeres and telomere-related proteins to diseases associated with physical inactivity and aging including cardiovascular disease, insulin resistance, and hypertension. Interestingly several reports have also shown that longer telomeres are associated with higher physical activity levels, indicating a potential mechanistic link between physical activity, reduced age-related disease risk, and longevity. The primary purpose of this review is to discuss the potential importance of physical activity in telomere biology in the context of inactivity- and age-related diseases. A secondary purpose is to explore potential mechanisms and important avenues for future research in the field of telomeres and diseases associated with physical inactivity and aging.

  13. Comparison of renal dynamic imaging and modified MDRD equation in determining the stage of chronic kidney disease patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Peng; Liu Xiaomei; Huang Jianmin; Zhang Fang; Pan Liping; Wu Weijie; Gao Jianqing

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the accuracy of 99 Tc m -diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid ( 99 Tc m -DTPA) renal dynamic imaging and modified modification of diet in renal disease trail (MDRD) equation in determining the stage of the chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients in clinical practice. Methods: A total of 169 patients were enrolled whose glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were determined simultaneously by 3 methods: dual plasma sample clearance method, renal dynamic imaging and modified MDRD equation. The dual plasma sample clearance method was employed as the reference method. The accuracy of the other methods in determining the stage of CKD patients was compared and the comparison was repeated based on the different stages. Results: The accuracy of renal dynamic imaging and modified MDRD equation was 56.80% and 68.64%, respectively (P=0.019<0.05). And only in the stage of uremia, the difference of the above-mentioned two method reached statistical significance (P=0.012<0.05), while in other stages they showed similar performance (P=0.180, 0.424, 0.629 and 0.754, all P>0.05). Conclusion: Modified MDRD equation showed better performance than renal dynamic imaging or as good as the second one in determining the stage of CKD patients and the former one should be the first choice in clinical practice because of its simplicity and economy. (authors)

  14. Genetic Factors Interact With Tobacco Smoke to Modify Risk for Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Humans and Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yadav, Pankaj; Ellinghaus, David; Rémy, Gaëlle

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: The role of tobacco smoke in the etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is unclear. We investigated interactions between genes and smoking (gene-smoking interactions) that affect risk for Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) in a case-only study of patients...... chamber, or ambient air (controls). Intestines were collected and analyzed histologically and by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: We identified 64 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for which the association between the SNP and IBD were modified by smoking behavior (meta...... to smoke. CONCLUSIONS: In an analysis of 55 Immunochip-wide datasets, we identified 64 SNPs whose association with risk for IBD is modified by tobacco smoking. Gene-smoking interactions were confirmed in mice with disruption of Il10 and Nod2-variants of these genes have been associated with risk for IBD...

  15. Disease-modifying effect of atipamezole in a model of post-traumatic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissinen, Jari; Andrade, Pedro; Natunen, Teemu; Hiltunen, Mikko; Malm, Tarja; Kanninen, Katja; Soares, Joana I; Shatillo, Olena; Sallinen, Jukka; Ndode-Ekane, Xavier Ekolle; Pitkänen, Asla

    2017-10-01

    Treatment of TBI remains a major unmet medical need, with 2.5 million new cases of traumatic brain injury (TBI) each year in Europe and 1.5 million in the USA. This single-center proof-of-concept preclinical study tested the hypothesis that pharmacologic neurostimulation with proconvulsants, either atipamezole, a selective α 2 -adrenoceptor antagonist, or the cannabinoid receptor 1 antagonist SR141716A, as monotherapy would improve functional recovery after TBI. A total of 404 adult Sprague-Dawley male rats were randomized into two groups: sham-injured or lateral fluid-percussion-induced TBI. The rats were treated with atipamezole (started at 30min or 7 d after TBI) or SR141716A (2min or 30min post-TBI) for up to 9 wk. Total follow-up time was 14 wk after treatment initiation. Outcome measures included motor (composite neuroscore, beam-walking) and cognitive performance (Morris water-maze), seizure susceptibility, spontaneous seizures, and cortical and hippocampal pathology. All injured rats exhibited similar impairment in the neuroscore and beam-walking tests at 2 d post-TBI. Atipamezole treatment initiated at either 30min or 7 d post-TBI and continued for 9 wk via subcutaneous osmotic minipumps improved performance in both the neuroscore and beam-walking tests, but not in the Morris water-maze spatial learning and memory test. Atipamezole treatment initiated at 7 d post-TBI also reduced seizure susceptibility in the pentylenetetrazol test 14 wk after treatment initiation, although it did not prevent the development of epilepsy. SR141716A administered as a single dose at 2min post-TBI or initiated at 30min post-TBI and continued for 9 wk had no recovery-enhancing or antiepileptogenic effects. Mechanistic studies to assess the α 2 -adrenoceptor subtype specificity of the disease-modifying effects of atipametzole revealed that genetic ablation of α 2A -noradrenergic receptor function in Adra2A mice carrying an N79P point mutation had antiepileptogenic effects

  16. Associations between Potentially Modifiable Risk Factors and Alzheimer Disease: A Mendelian Randomization Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren D Østergaard

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Potentially modifiable risk factors including obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and smoking are associated with Alzheimer disease (AD and represent promising targets for intervention. However, the causality of these associations is unclear. We sought to assess the causal nature of these associations using Mendelian randomization (MR.We used SNPs associated with each risk factor as instrumental variables in MR analyses. We considered type 2 diabetes (T2D, NSNPs = 49, fasting glucose (NSNPs = 36, insulin resistance (NSNPs = 10, body mass index (BMI, NSNPs = 32, total cholesterol (NSNPs = 73, HDL-cholesterol (NSNPs = 71, LDL-cholesterol (NSNPs = 57, triglycerides (NSNPs = 39, systolic blood pressure (SBP, NSNPs = 24, smoking initiation (NSNPs = 1, smoking quantity (NSNPs = 3, university completion (NSNPs = 2, and years of education (NSNPs = 1. We calculated MR estimates of associations between each exposure and AD risk using an inverse-variance weighted approach, with summary statistics of SNP-AD associations from the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project, comprising a total of 17,008 individuals with AD and 37,154 cognitively normal elderly controls. We found that genetically predicted higher SBP was associated with lower AD risk (odds ratio [OR] per standard deviation [15.4 mm Hg] of SBP [95% CI]: 0.75 [0.62-0.91]; p = 3.4 × 10(-3. Genetically predicted higher SBP was also associated with a higher probability of taking antihypertensive medication (p = 6.7 × 10(-8. Genetically predicted smoking quantity was associated with lower AD risk (OR per ten cigarettes per day [95% CI]: 0.67 [0.51-0.89]; p = 6.5 × 10(-3, although we were unable to stratify by smoking history; genetically predicted smoking initiation was not associated with AD risk (OR = 0.70 [0.37, 1.33]; p = 0.28. We saw no evidence of causal associations between glycemic traits, T2D, BMI, or educational attainment and risk of AD (all p > 0.1. Potential limitations of this study

  17. Associations between Potentially Modifiable Risk Factors and Alzheimer Disease: A Mendelian Randomization Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østergaard, Søren D; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Sharp, Stephen J; Proitsi, Petroula; Lotta, Luca A; Day, Felix; Perry, John R B; Boehme, Kevin L; Walter, Stefan; Kauwe, John S; Gibbons, Laura E; Larson, Eric B; Powell, John F; Langenberg, Claudia; Crane, Paul K; Wareham, Nicholas J; Scott, Robert A

    2015-06-01

    Potentially modifiable risk factors including obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and smoking are associated with Alzheimer disease (AD) and represent promising targets for intervention. However, the causality of these associations is unclear. We sought to assess the causal nature of these associations using Mendelian randomization (MR). We used SNPs associated with each risk factor as instrumental variables in MR analyses. We considered type 2 diabetes (T2D, NSNPs = 49), fasting glucose (NSNPs = 36), insulin resistance (NSNPs = 10), body mass index (BMI, NSNPs = 32), total cholesterol (NSNPs = 73), HDL-cholesterol (NSNPs = 71), LDL-cholesterol (NSNPs = 57), triglycerides (NSNPs = 39), systolic blood pressure (SBP, NSNPs = 24), smoking initiation (NSNPs = 1), smoking quantity (NSNPs = 3), university completion (NSNPs = 2), and years of education (NSNPs = 1). We calculated MR estimates of associations between each exposure and AD risk using an inverse-variance weighted approach, with summary statistics of SNP-AD associations from the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project, comprising a total of 17,008 individuals with AD and 37,154 cognitively normal elderly controls. We found that genetically predicted higher SBP was associated with lower AD risk (odds ratio [OR] per standard deviation [15.4 mm Hg] of SBP [95% CI]: 0.75 [0.62-0.91]; p = 3.4 × 10(-3)). Genetically predicted higher SBP was also associated with a higher probability of taking antihypertensive medication (p = 6.7 × 10(-8)). Genetically predicted smoking quantity was associated with lower AD risk (OR per ten cigarettes per day [95% CI]: 0.67 [0.51-0.89]; p = 6.5 × 10(-3)), although we were unable to stratify by smoking history; genetically predicted smoking initiation was not associated with AD risk (OR = 0.70 [0.37, 1.33]; p = 0.28). We saw no evidence of causal associations between glycemic traits, T2D, BMI, or educational attainment and risk of AD (all p > 0.1). Potential limitations of this

  18. Perspectives of a systems biology of the brain: the big data conundrum understanding psychiatric diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewes, H W

    2013-05-01

    Psychiatric diseases provoke human tragedies. Asocial behaviour, mood imbalance, uncontrolled affect, and cognitive malfunction are the price for the biological and social complexity of neurobiology. To understand the etiology and to influence the onset and progress of mental diseases remains of upmost importance, but despite the much improved care for the patients, more then 100 years of research have not succeeded to understand the basic disease mechanisms and enabling rationale treatment. With the advent of the genome based technologies, much hope has been created to join the various dimension of -omics data to uncover the secrets of mental illness. Big Data as generated by -omics do not come with explanations. In this essay, I will discuss the inherent, not well understood methodological foundations and problems that seriously obstacle in striving for a quick success and may render lucky strikes impossible. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Multi-agent systems in epidemiology: a first step for computational biology in the study of vector-borne disease transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guégan Jean-François

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computational biology is often associated with genetic or genomic studies only. However, thanks to the increase of computational resources, computational models are appreciated as useful tools in many other scientific fields. Such modeling systems are particularly relevant for the study of complex systems, like the epidemiology of emerging infectious diseases. So far, mathematical models remain the main tool for the epidemiological and ecological analysis of infectious diseases, with SIR models could be seen as an implicit standard in epidemiology. Unfortunately, these models are based on differential equations and, therefore, can become very rapidly unmanageable due to the too many parameters which need to be taken into consideration. For instance, in the case of zoonotic and vector-borne diseases in wildlife many different potential host species could be involved in the life-cycle of disease transmission, and SIR models might not be the most suitable tool to truly capture the overall disease circulation within that environment. This limitation underlines the necessity to develop a standard spatial model that can cope with the transmission of disease in realistic ecosystems. Results Computational biology may prove to be flexible enough to take into account the natural complexity observed in both natural and man-made ecosystems. In this paper, we propose a new computational model to study the transmission of infectious diseases in a spatially explicit context. We developed a multi-agent system model for vector-borne disease transmission in a realistic spatial environment. Conclusion Here we describe in detail the general behavior of this model that we hope will become a standard reference for the study of vector-borne disease transmission in wildlife. To conclude, we show how this simple model could be easily adapted and modified to be used as a common framework for further research developments in this field.

  20. Effects of Immunomodulators and Biologic Agents on Sexual Health in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanar, Ozdemir; Berry, Andrew C; Nakshabendi, Rahman; Lee, Ann Joo; Aldridge, Petra; Myers, Travis; Eid, Emely

    2017-01-01

    Although much knowledge has been gained regarding the medical and surgical management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a paucity of information is available on the psychosexual issues related to IBD. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sexual health of patients with IBD who were taking immunomodulators and/or biologic agents vs patients with IBD who were not on that medication regimen. All study participants completed a validated sexual health questionnaire, the Female Sexual Function Index or the International Index of Erectile Function, to assess their subjective perception of the effect of IBD on the different domains of sexual function during the prior 1-month time period. No statistically significant differences in any baseline demographic variables were found for either sex between the group taking immunomodulators/biologic agents and the nontreatment group. Among females and males, individual question responses, domain scores, and total scores showed no statistically significant differences between the 2 treatment groups. Our data suggest that the use of immunomodulators or biologic agents does not affect female or male sexual health. However, treatment of patients with IBD must be individualized based on the aggressive nature of the disease, treatment goals, and the tolerability of various medications.

  1. Infectious diseases, parasites, and biological toxins in sea ducks: Chapter 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollmén, Tuula E.; Franson, J. Christian

    2015-01-01

    This chapter addresses disease agents in the broad sense, including viruses, bacteria, fungi, protozoan and helminth parasites, and biological toxins. Some of these agents are known to cause mortality in sea ducks, some are thought to be incidental findings, and the significance of others is yet poorly understood. Although the focus of the chapter is on free-living sea ducks, the study of disease in this taxonomic group has been relatively limited and examples from captive sea ducks and other wild waterfowl are used to illustrate the pathogenicity of certain diseases. Much of the early work in sea ducks consisted of anecdotal and descriptive reports of parasites, but it was soon recognized that diseases such as avian cholera, renal coccidiosis, and intestinal infections with acanthocephalans were causes of mortality in wild populations. More recently, adenoviruses, reoviruses, and the newly emergent Wellfleet Bay virus, for example, also have been linked to die-offs of sea ducks. Declining populations of animals are particularly vulnerable to the threats posed by disease and it is important that we improve our understanding of the significance of disease in sea ducks. To conclude, we offer our recommendations for future directions in this field.

  2. Biology and therapy of inherited retinal degenerative disease: insights from mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veleri, Shobi; Lazar, Csilla H.; Chang, Bo; Sieving, Paul A.; Banin, Eyal; Swaroop, Anand

    2015-01-01

    Retinal neurodegeneration associated with the dysfunction or death of photoreceptors is a major cause of incurable vision loss. Tremendous progress has been made over the last two decades in discovering genes and genetic defects that lead to retinal diseases. The primary focus has now shifted to uncovering disease mechanisms and designing treatment strategies, especially inspired by the successful application of gene therapy in some forms of congenital blindness in humans. Both spontaneous and laboratory-generated mouse mutants have been valuable for providing fundamental insights into normal retinal development and for deciphering disease pathology. Here, we provide a review of mouse models of human retinal degeneration, with a primary focus on diseases affecting photoreceptor function. We also describe models associated with retinal pigment epithelium dysfunction or synaptic abnormalities. Furthermore, we highlight the crucial role of mouse models in elucidating retinal and photoreceptor biology in health and disease, and in the assessment of novel therapeutic modalities, including gene- and stem-cell-based therapies, for retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:25650393

  3. Biology and therapy of inherited retinal degenerative disease: insights from mouse models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shobi Veleri

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Retinal neurodegeneration associated with the dysfunction or death of photoreceptors is a major cause of incurable vision loss. Tremendous progress has been made over the last two decades in discovering genes and genetic defects that lead to retinal diseases. The primary focus has now shifted to uncovering disease mechanisms and designing treatment strategies, especially inspired by the successful application of gene therapy in some forms of congenital blindness in humans. Both spontaneous and laboratory-generated mouse mutants have been valuable for providing fundamental insights into normal retinal development and for deciphering disease pathology. Here, we provide a review of mouse models of human retinal degeneration, with a primary focus on diseases affecting photoreceptor function. We also describe models associated with retinal pigment epithelium dysfunction or synaptic abnormalities. Furthermore, we highlight the crucial role of mouse models in elucidating retinal and photoreceptor biology in health and disease, and in the assessment of novel therapeutic modalities, including gene- and stem-cell-based therapies, for retinal degenerative diseases.

  4. Laccase on Black Pearl 2000 modified glassy carbon electrode: Characterization of direct electron transfer and biological sensing properties for pyrocatechol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Kunqi; Tang Juan; Zhang Zuoming; Gao Ying; Chen Gang

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Laccase can complete direct electron transfer process on BP2000 matrices. ► Laccase immobilized on BP2000 matrices has catalytic oxidation effect to pyrocatechol. ► A pyrocatechol biosensor has constructed been using Nafion/Lac-BP2000/GC electrode. ► Detection limit and linear range of the biosensor are 0.003 mM and 0.003–5.555 mM. - Abstract: In this paper, it was found that Laccase (Lac) could be stably immobilized on the glassy carbon electrode modified with Black Pearl 2000 (BP2000) and Nafion by a simple technique. The adsorption behavior of Lac immobilized on BP2000 matrix was characterized by environment scanning electron microscope (ESEM), ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), which demonstrated that BP2000 could facilitate the electron exchange between the active center of Lac and modified electrode. The direct electrochemistry and electrocatalysis behavior of Lac on the modified electrode were characterized by cyclic voltammogram (CV) which indicated that Lac immobilized on the modified electrode displayed a direct, nearly reversible and surface-controlled redox reaction with an enhanced electron-transfer rate constant of 1.940 s −1 at the scan rate of 100 mV s −1 in 0.1 M phosphate buffer solution (PBS) (pH 7.0). Furthermore, it was also discovered that, in the presence of O 2 , Lac immobilized on the modified electrode exhibited the electrocatalytic response to pyrocatechol, and the kinetic apparent Michaelis-constant (K M app ) obtained from the Lineweaver–Burk equation was 1.79 mM. The detection limit, linear range and sensitivity of the Lac biosensor were 0.003 mM, 0.003–5.555 mM and 99.84 μA mM −1 cm −2 , respectively.

  5. Screening prior to biological therapy in Crohn's disease: adherence to guidelines and prevalence of infections. Results from a multicentre retrospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Have, Mike; Belderbos, Tim D. G.; Fidder, Herma H.; Leenders, Max; Dijkstra, Gerard; Peters, Charlotte P.; Eshuis, Emma J.; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; Siersema, Peter D.; van Oijen, Martijn G. H.; Oldenburg, Bas

    2014-01-01

    Screening for opportunistic infections prior to starting biological therapy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease is recommended. To assess adherence to screening for opportunistic infections prior to starting biological therapy in Crohn's disease patients and its yield. A multicentre

  6. Screening prior to biological therapy in Crohn's disease : Adherence to guidelines and prevalence of infections. Results from a multicentre retrospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Have, Mike; Belderbos, Tim D. G.; Fidder, Herma H.; Leenders, Max; Dijkstra, Gerard; Peters, Charlotte P.; Eshuis, Emma J.; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; Siersema, Peter D.; van Oijen, Martijn G. H.; Oldenburg, Bas

    2014-01-01

    Background: Screening for opportunistic infections prior to starting biological therapy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease is recommended. Aims: To assess adherence to screening for opportunistic infections prior to starting biological therapy in Crohn's disease patients and its yield.

  7. Evaluation of a Modified Italian European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition Food Frequency Questionnaire for Individuals with Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzeo, Teresa; Roncoroni, Leda; Lombardo, Vincenza; Tomba, Carolina; Elli, Luca; Sieri, Sabina; Grioni, Sara; Bardella, Maria T; Agostoni, Carlo; Doneda, Luisa; Brighenti, Furio; Pellegrini, Nicoletta

    2016-11-01

    To date, it is unclear whether individuals with celiac disease following a gluten-free (GF) diet for several years have adequate intake of all recommended nutrients. Lack of a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) for individuals with celiac disease could be partly responsible for this still-debated issue. The aim of the study is to evaluate the performance of a modified European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) FFQ in estimating nutrient and food intake in a celiac population. In a cross-sectional study, the dietary habits of individuals with celiac disease were reported using a modified Italian EPIC FFQ and were compared to a 7-day weighed food record as a reference method. A total of 200 individuals with histologically confirmed celiac disease were enrolled in the study between October 2012 and August 2014 at the Center for Prevention and Diagnosis of Celiac Disease (Milan, Italy). Nutrient and food category intake were calculated by 7-day weighed food record using an Italian food database integrated with the nutrient composition of 60 GF foods and the modified EPIC FFQ, in which 24 foods were substituted with GF foods comparable for energy and carbohydrate content. An evaluation of the modified FFQ compared to 7-day weighed food record in assessing the reported intake of nutrient and food groups was conducted using Spearman's correlation coefficients and weighted κ. One hundred individuals completed the study. The Spearman's correlation coefficients of FFQ and 7-day weighed food record ranged from .13 to .73 for nutrients and from .23 to .75 for food groups. A moderate agreement, which was defined as a weighted κ value of .40 to .60, was obtained for 30% of the analyzed nutrients, and 40% of the nutrients showed values between .30 and .40. The weighted κ exceeded .40 for 60% of the 15 analyzed food groups. The modified EPIC FFQ demonstrated moderate congruence with a weighed food record in ranking individuals by dietary intakes

  8. Phenotypic charactheristics of fluorescent pseudomonss, biological control agent of lincat disease of temanggung tobacco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NINING NURUL AZIZAH

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent pseudomonass isolated from local plants-rishosphere in temanggung controlled lincat disease of tobacco. This report describe phenotypic charactheristics of the bacteria in order to be used as a base for the development of the bacteria as a biological control agent of lincat disease. Phenotypic charactheristics of six isolates of fluorescent Pseudomonass which controlled lincat disease in the field were determined in the laboratory of Plant Bacteriology, Faculty of Agriculture, Gadjah Mada University. Plant pathogenicity tests were conducted by hypersensitive reaction into tobacco leaf and inoculation to tobacco plants. Antagonism test between fluorescent Pseudomonass and other candidate of biological control agents were also conducted. The results indicated that the bacteria were rod shape, Gram negative, positive reaction in catalase and oxidase tests. Nitrate reduce to nitrite, arginine was hydrolysed, fluorescent pigment were produced on King’s B medium, levan formation positive and all bacteria denitrifiy. The bacteria used urea, tween 80 and amylum were not hydrolised, poly--hydroxybutyrate was not accumulated in the cells. Negative reactions were observed for lysine decarboxylation, indol production, VP/MR reaction, and gelatn liquefation. Some compounds could be used as solely carbon sources. All isolates grew on the medium containing 2% NaCl. The best pH for growth was 6-7 and all isolates grew at 20-41C. Negative result were obtained for hypersensitive reaction and pathogenicity tests.

  9. Safety and effectiveness of collagenase clostridium histolyticum in the treatment of Peyronie's disease using a new modified shortened protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Raheem, Amr; Capece, Marco; Kalejaiye, Odunayo; Abdel-Raheem, Tarek; Falcone, Marco; Johnson, Mark; Ralph, Oliver G; Garaffa, Giulio; Christopher, Andrew N; Ralph, David J

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of collagenase clostridium histolyticum (CCH; Xiapex ® , Xiaflex ® ) in the treatment of Peyronie's disease (PD) using a new modified treatment protocol that aims at reducing the number of injections needed and reducing patient visits, thus reducing the duration and cost of treatment. A prospective study of 53 patients with PD who had treatment with CCH at a single centre using a new modified protocol. The angle of curvature assessment after an intracavernosal injection of prostaglandin E1, the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) and Peyronie's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ) were completed at baseline and at week 12 (4 weeks after the last injection). The Global Assessment of Peyronie's disease (GAPD) questionnaire was completed at week 12. Under a penile block of 10 mL plain lignocaine 1%, a total of three intralesional injections of CCH (0.9 mg) were given at 4-weekly intervals using a new modified injection technique. In between injections patients used a combination of home modelling, stretching and a vacuum device on a daily basis to mechanically stretch the plaque. Investigator modelling was not performed. The mean (range) penile curvature at baseline was 54 (30-90)°. Of the 53 patients in the study, 51 patients (96.2%) had an improvement in the angel of curvature by a mean (range) of 17.36 (0-40)° or 31.4 (0-57)% from baseline after three CCH injections. The final mean (range) curvature was 36.9 (12-75)° (P effective, and cost efficient. The results of using only three CCH injections according to this modified protocol are comparable to those of the clinical trials that used eight CCH injections. © 2017 The Authors BJU International © 2017 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Systems biology from micro-organisms to human metabolic diseases: the role of detailed kinetic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Barbara M; van Eunen, Karen; Jeneson, Jeroen A L; van Riel, Natal A W; Bruggeman, Frank J; Teusink, Bas

    2010-10-01

    Human metabolic diseases are typically network diseases. This holds not only for multifactorial diseases, such as metabolic syndrome or Type 2 diabetes, but even when a single gene defect is the primary cause, where the adaptive response of the entire network determines the severity of disease. The latter may differ between individuals carrying the same mutation. Understanding the adaptive responses of human metabolism naturally requires a systems biology approach. Modelling of metabolic pathways in micro-organisms and some mammalian tissues has yielded many insights, qualitative as well as quantitative, into their control and regulation. Yet, even for a well-known pathway such as glycolysis, precise predictions of metabolite dynamics from experimentally determined enzyme kinetics have been only moderately successful. In the present review, we compare kinetic models of glycolysis in three cell types (African trypanosomes, yeast and skeletal muscle), evaluate their predictive power and identify limitations in our understanding. Although each of these models has its own merits and shortcomings, they also share common features. For example, in each case independently measured enzyme kinetic parameters were used as input. Based on these 'lessons from glycolysis', we will discuss how to make best use of kinetic computer models to advance our understanding of human metabolic diseases.

  11. Biological control agents for suppression of post-harvest diseases of potatoes: strategies on discovery and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    As used in plant pathology, the term "biological control" or its short form “biocontrol” commonly refers to the decrease in the inoculum or the disease-producing activity of a pathogen accomplished through one or more organisms, including the host plant but excluding man. Biological control of plant...

  12. Global Association of Air Pollution and Cardiorespiratory Diseases: A Systematic Review, Meta-Analysis, and Investigation of Modifier Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Matthew D.; Arain, Altaf; Papatheodorou, Stefania; Koutrakis, Petros; Mahmoud, Moataz

    2018-01-01

    Background. Little is known about the health risks of air pollution and cardiorespiratory diseases, globally, across regions and populations, which may differ because of external factors. Objectives. We systematically reviewed the evidence on the association between air pollution and cardiorespiratory diseases (hospital admissions and mortality), including variability by energy, transportation, socioeconomic status, and air quality. Search Methods. We conducted a literature search (PubMed and Web of Science) for studies published between 2006 and May 11, 2016. Selection Criteria. We included studies if they met all of the following criteria: (1) considered at least 1 of these air pollutants: carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, or particulate matter (PM2.5 or PM10); (2) reported risk for hospital admissions, mortality, or both; (3) presented individual results for respiratory diseases, cardiovascular diseases, or both; (4) considered the age groups younger than 5 years, older than 65 years, or all ages; and (5) did not segregate the analysis by gender. Data Collection and Analysis. We extracted data from each study, including location, health outcome, and risk estimates. We performed a meta-analysis to estimate the overall effect and to account for both within- and between-study heterogeneity. Then, we applied a model selection (least absolute shrinkage and selection operator) to assess the modifier variables, and, lastly, we performed meta-regression analyses to evaluate the modifier variables contributing to heterogeneity among studies. Main Results. We assessed 2183 studies, of which we selected 529 for in-depth review, and 70 articles fulfilled our study inclusion criteria. The 70 studies selected for meta-analysis encompass more than 30 million events across 28 countries. We found positive associations between cardiorespiratory diseases and different air pollutants. For example, when we considered only the association between PM2.5 and

  13. Paving the way of systems biology and precision medicine in allergic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bousquet, J; Anto, J M; Akdis, M

    2016-01-01

    or severity of allergic diseases. Environmental exposures are relevant for the development of allergy-related diseases. To complement the population-based studies in children, MeDALL included mechanistic experimental animal studies and in vitro studies in humans. The integration of multimorbidities......MeDALL (Mechanisms of the Development of ALLergy; EU FP7-CP-IP; Project No: 261357; 2010-2015) has proposed an innovative approach to develop early indicators for the prediction, diagnosis, prevention and targets for therapy. MeDALL has linked epidemiological, clinical and basic research using...... a stepwise, large-scale and integrative approach: MeDALL data of precisely phenotyped children followed in 14 birth cohorts spread across Europe were combined with systems biology (omics, IgE measurement using microarrays) and environmental data. Multimorbidity in the same child is more common than expected...

  14. Periodontal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease: emerging epidemiologic and biologic evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agossa, K; Dendooven, A; Dubuquoy, L; Gower-Rousseau, C; Delcourt-Debruyne, E; Capron, M

    2017-06-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease and periodontitis are both described as a disproportionate mucosal inflammatory response to a microbial environment in susceptible patients. Moreover, these two conditions share major environmental and lifestyle-related risk factors. Despite this intriguing pathogenic parallel, large-scale studies and basic research have only recently considered periodontal outcomes as relevant data. There are mounting and consistent arguments, from recent epidemiologic studies and animal models, that these two conditions might be related. This article is a comprehensive and critical up-to-date review of the current evidence and future prospects in understanding the biologic and epidemiologic relationships between periodontal status and inflammatory bowel disease. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Biology, diversity and strategies for the monitoring and control of triatomines--Chagas disease vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Jane; Lorenzo, Marcelo

    2009-07-01

    Despite the relevant achievements in the control of the main Chagas disease vectors Triatoma infestans and Rhodnius prolixus, several factors still promote the risk of infection. The disease is a real threat to the poor rural regions of several countries in Latin America. The current situation in Brazil requires renewed attention due to its high diversity of triatomine species and to the rapid and drastic environmental changes that are occurring. Using the biology, behaviour and diversity of triatomines as a basis for new strategies for monitoring and controlling the vectorial transmission are discussed here. The importance of ongoing long-term monitoring activities for house infestations by T. infestans, Triatoma brasiliensis, Panstrongylus megistus, Triatoma rubrovaria and R. prolixus is also stressed, as well as understanding the invasion by sylvatic species. Moreover, the insecticide resistance is analysed. Strong efforts to sustain and improve surveillance procedures are crucial, especially when the vectorial transmission is considered interrupted in many endemic areas.

  16. Employment of modified Fe3 O4 nanoparticles using thermo-sensitive polymer for extraction and pre-concentration of cefexime in biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghibi, Saman; Sahebi, Hamed

    2018-02-01

    Cefexime is a useful antibiotic that can be prescribed to treat bacterial infections. Nanoparticles have been widely marketed as a universal solution among scientists. Many studies have been performed to modify nanoparticles to make them functional as extraction and pre-concentration agents and drug carriers. Temperature-sensitive polymers belong to a group of substances that undergo a major change in their physical features in response to temperature. Recently developed polymers can be used in many different areas, including modification of nanoparticles. In order to modify this nanoparticle, grafting copolymerization of Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles was performed using poly (N-vinylcaprolactam) and 3-allyloxy-1,2-propanediol. The optimum conditions for pre-concentration of cefexime were studied. Under these optimum conditions, extraction recovery of biological samples in the range of 71-89% was obtained. The limit of detection and precision of proposed method were 4.5 × 10 -4  μg mL -1 and analysis of cefexime, in biological samples using the proposed method, the ability of this method to extract and pre-concentrate cefexime was confirmed. Also, satisfactory results from an in vitro study on drug release in simulated intestine media were obtained. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. A Systematic Review of the Cost-Effectiveness of Biologics for the Treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saara Huoponen

    Full Text Available Biologics are used for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases, Crohn´s disease and ulcerative colitis refractory to conventional treatment. In order to allocate healthcare spending efficiently, costly biologics for inflammatory bowel diseases are an important target for cost-effectiveness analyses. The aim of this study was to systemically review all published literature on the cost-effectiveness of biologics for inflammatory bowel diseases and to evaluate the methodological quality of cost-effectiveness analyses.A literature search was performed using Medline (Ovid, Cochrane Library, and SCOPUS. All cost-utility analyses comparing biologics with conventional medical treatment, another biologic treatment, placebo, or surgery for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases in adults were included in this review. All costs were converted to the 2014 euro. The methodological quality of the included studies was assessed by Drummond's, Philips', and the Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards checklist.Altogether, 25 studies were included in the review. Among the patients refractory to conventional medical treatment, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio ranged from dominance to 549,335 €/Quality-Adjusted Life Year compared to the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio associated with conventional medical treatment. When comparing biologics with another biologic treatment, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio ranged from dominance to 24,012,483 €/Quality-Adjusted Life Year. A study including both direct and indirect costs produced more favorable incremental cost-effectiveness ratios than those produced by studies including only direct costs.With a threshold of 35,000 €/Quality-Adjusted Life Year, biologics seem to be cost-effective for the induction treatment of active and severe inflammatory bowel disease. Between biologics, the cost-effectiveness remains unclear.

  18. Modifiable Risk Factors for Common Ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia Allergy and Disease in Children: A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maureen Agnew

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Ragweed allergy is a major public health concern. Within Europe, ragweed is an introduced species and research has indicated that the amounts of ragweed pollen are likely to increase over Europe due to climate change, with corresponding increases in ragweed allergy. To address this threat, improving our understanding of predisposing factors for allergic sensitisation to ragweed and disease is necessary, specifically focusing upon factors that are potentially modifiable (i.e., environmental. In this study, a total of 4013 children aged 2–13 years were recruited across Croatia to undergo skin prick tests to determine sensitisation to ragweed and other aeroallergens. A parental questionnaire collected home environment, lifestyle, family and personal medical history, and socioeconomic information. Environmental variables were obtained using Geographical Information Systems and data from nearby pollen, weather, and air pollution stations. Logistic regression was performed (clustered on school focusing on risk factors for allergic sensitisation and disease. Ragweed sensitisation was strongly associated with ragweed pollen at levels over 5000 grains m–3 year−1 and, above these levels, the risk of sensitisation was 12–16 times greater than in low pollen areas with about 400 grains m–3 year−1. Genetic factors were strongly associated with sensitisation but nearly all potentially modifiable factors were insignificant. This included measures of local land use and proximity to potential sources of ragweed pollen. Rural residence was protective (odds ratio (OR 0.73, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.55–0.98, but the factors underlying this association were unclear. Being sensitised to ragweed doubled (OR 2.17, 95% CI 1.59–2.96 the risk of rhinoconjunctivitis. No other potentially modifiable risk factors were associated with rhinoconjunctivitis. Ragweed sensitisation was strongly associated with ragweed pollen, and sensitisation was significantly

  19. [Temperature that modifies the effect of air pollution on emergency room visits for circulatory and respiratory diseases in Beijing, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L L; Zhang, Q; Bai, R H; Mi, B B; Yan, H

    2017-08-10

    Objective: To analyze the temperature modification effect on emergency room visits for circulatory and respiratory diseases caused by air pollution, in Beijing. Methods: Data on both circulatory and respiratory diseases in 2010 and 2011 were collected, Both meteorological and air pollutants related data were obtained from the National Scientific Data Sharing Platform for Population and Health. By using the stratified time-series models, we analyzed the effects of air pollution on emergency room visits for circulatory and respiratory diseases under different temperature zones, from 2010 to 2011, in Beijing. Results: Low temperature (daily average temperatureeffect of air pollution index (API) on emergency room visits for circulatory diseases, Under 10 units of API, the relative risks and confidence interval appeared as 1.067 (1.054-1.080). However, high (daily average temperature between 24.4 ℃ and 28.5 ℃) and extra-high temperature (daily average temperature >28.5 ℃) could enhance the effect of API on emergency room visits for respiratory diseases, Under 10 units of API, the relative risks and confidence interval were 1.021 (1.015-1.028) and 1.006 (1.003-1.008), respectively. Conclusion: Temperature seemed to have modified the association between air pollution and both circulatory and respiratory diseases.

  20. Mortality in patients with interstitial lung disease treated with rituximab or TNFi as a first biologic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druce, Katie L; Iqbal, Kundan; Watson, Kath D; Symmons, Deborah P M; Hyrich, Kimme L; Kelly, Clive

    2017-01-01

    Guidelines cautioned prescribing of tumour necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi) to patients with rheumatoid arthritis and interstitial lung disease (RA-ILD) after reports of new or worsening of ILD. Less is known about outcomes among patients with RA-ILD who receive rituximab (RTX). This study compares mortality in patients with RA-ILD who received RTX or TNFi as their first biologic. Participants with RA-ILD recruited to the British Society for Rheumatology Biologics Register for RA were included. Death rates were calculated and risk comparisons were made using Cox regression. Causes of death, including the frequency in which ILD was recorded on death certificates were examined. 43 patients on RTX and 309 on TNFi were included. RTX recipients had shorter disease duration and less disability. Death rates were 94.8 (95%CI: 74.4 to 118.7) and 53.0 (22.9 to 104.6) per 1000 person years, respectively. The adjusted mortality risk was halved in the RTX cohort, but the difference was not statistically significant (HR 0.53, 95% CI: 0.26 to 1.10). ILD was the underlying cause of death in 1 of 7 RTX deaths (14%) and 12 of 76 TNFi deaths (16%). Patients with RA-ILD who received RTX had lower mortality rates compared to TNFi. The absence of information on ILD severity or subtype prevents conclusions of which drug represents the best choice in patients with RA-ILD and active arthritis.

  1. Systems-based biological concordance and predictive reproducibility of gene set discovery methods in cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuaje, Francisco; Zheng, Huiru; Camargo, Anyela; Wang, Haiying

    2011-08-01

    The discovery of novel disease biomarkers is a crucial challenge for translational bioinformatics. Demonstration of both their classification power and reproducibility across independent datasets are essential requirements to assess their potential clinical relevance. Small datasets and multiplicity of putative biomarker sets may explain lack of predictive reproducibility. Studies based on pathway-driven discovery approaches have suggested that, despite such discrepancies, the resulting putative biomarkers tend to be implicated in common biological processes. Investigations of this problem have been mainly focused on datasets derived from cancer research. We investigated the predictive and functional concordance of five methods for discovering putative biomarkers in four independently-generated datasets from the cardiovascular disease domain. A diversity of biosignatures was identified by the different methods. However, we found strong biological process concordance between them, especially in the case of methods based on gene set analysis. With a few exceptions, we observed lack of classification reproducibility using independent datasets. Partial overlaps between our putative sets of biomarkers and the primary studies exist. Despite the observed limitations, pathway-driven or gene set analysis can predict potentially novel biomarkers and can jointly point to biomedically-relevant underlying molecular mechanisms. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Nature and Consequences of Biological Reductionism for the Immunological Study of Infectious Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel L. Rivas

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Evolution has conserved “economic” systems that perform many functions, faster or better, with less. For example, three to five leukocyte types protect from thousands of pathogens. To achieve so much with so little, biological systems combine their limited elements, creating complex structures. Yet, the prevalent research paradigm is reductionist. Focusing on infectious diseases, reductionist and non-reductionist views are here described. The literature indicates that reductionism is associated with information loss and errors, while non-reductionist operations can extract more information from the same data. When designed to capture one-to-many/many-to-one interactions—including the use of arrows that connect pairs of consecutive observations—non-reductionist (spatial–temporal constructs eliminate data variability from all dimensions, except along one line, while arrows describe the directionality of temporal changes that occur along the line. To validate the patterns detected by non-reductionist operations, reductionist procedures are needed. Integrated (non-reductionist and reductionist methods can (i distinguish data subsets that differ immunologically and statistically; (ii differentiate false-negative from -positive errors; (iii discriminate disease stages; (iv capture in vivo, multilevel interactions that consider the patient, the microbe, and antibiotic-mediated responses; and (v assess dynamics. Integrated methods provide repeatable and biologically interpretable information.

  3. Biological Treatments in Behçet’s Disease: Beyond Anti-TNF Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Caso

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Behçet’s disease (BD is universally recognized as a multisystemic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology with chronic course and unpredictable exacerbations: its clinical spectrum varies from pure vasculitic manifestations with thrombotic complications to protean inflammatory involvement of multiple organs and tissues. Treatment has been revolutionized by the progressed knowledge in the pathogenetic mechanisms of BD, involving dysfunction and oversecretion of multiple proinflammatory molecules, chiefly tumor necrosis factor- (TNF- α, interleukin- (IL- 1β, and IL-6. However, although biological treatment with anti-TNF-α agents has been largely demonstrated to be effective in BD, not all patients are definite responders, and this beneficial response might drop off over time. Therefore, additional therapies for a subset of refractory patients with BD are inevitably needed. Different agents targeting various cytokines and their receptors or cell surface molecules have been studied: the IL-1 receptor has been targeted by anakinra, the IL-1 by canakinumab and gevokizumab, the IL-6 receptor by tocilizumab, the IL12/23 receptor by ustekinumab, and the B-lymphocyte antigen CD-20 by rituximab. The aim of this review is to summarize all current experiences and the most recent evidence regarding these novel approaches with biological drugs other than TNF-α blockers in BD, providing a valuable addition to the actually available therapeutic armamentarium.

  4. Biological treatments in Behçet's disease: beyond anti-TNF therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caso, Francesco; Costa, Luisa; Rigante, Donato; Lucherini, Orso Maria; Caso, Paolo; Bascherini, Vittoria; Frediani, Bruno; Cimaz, Rolando; Marrani, Edoardo; Nieves-Martín, Laura; Atteno, Mariangela; Raffaele, Carmela G L; Tarantino, Giusyda; Galeazzi, Mauro; Punzi, Leonardo; Cantarini, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is universally recognized as a multisystemic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology with chronic course and unpredictable exacerbations: its clinical spectrum varies from pure vasculitic manifestations with thrombotic complications to protean inflammatory involvement of multiple organs and tissues. Treatment has been revolutionized by the progressed knowledge in the pathogenetic mechanisms of BD, involving dysfunction and oversecretion of multiple proinflammatory molecules, chiefly tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α, interleukin- (IL-) 1β, and IL-6. However, although biological treatment with anti-TNF-α agents has been largely demonstrated to be effective in BD, not all patients are definite responders, and this beneficial response might drop off over time. Therefore, additional therapies for a subset of refractory patients with BD are inevitably needed. Different agents targeting various cytokines and their receptors or cell surface molecules have been studied: the IL-1 receptor has been targeted by anakinra, the IL-1 by canakinumab and gevokizumab, the IL-6 receptor by tocilizumab, the IL12/23 receptor by ustekinumab, and the B-lymphocyte antigen CD-20 by rituximab. The aim of this review is to summarize all current experiences and the most recent evidence regarding these novel approaches with biological drugs other than TNF-α blockers in BD, providing a valuable addition to the actually available therapeutic armamentarium.

  5. Screening of chitinolytic actinomycetes for biological control of Sclerotium rolfsii stem rot disease of chilli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranee Pattanapipitpaisal

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Two hundred and eighty three strains were isolated from rhizoshere-associated soils, from Ubon Ratchathani andSrisaket province, using Enrichment Media for isolation of Chitinase-producing Actinomycetes agar (EMCA agar. All strainswere screened for chitinolytic activity and sixty eight strains gave significant clear zone on EMCA agar plates. The selectedchitinolytic strains were assayed for in vitro antagonism against Sclerotium rolfsii using cornmeal agar (CMA agar assayprocedure and the result showed that thirteen isolates have remarkable inhibiting the growth of the fungus and the top fiveantagonistic actinomycetes were PACCH 277, PACCH129, PACCH225, PACCH24 and PACCH246, respectively. The resultindicated that these actinomycetes produce chitinase which catalyze the degradation of chitin, resulting in inhibition of S.rolfsii growth. Their abilities to control the disease development were tested for in vivo biocontrol assay on chilli seedlings.Two out of thirteen candidate, PACCH24 and PACCH225, antagonists reduced the disease development at 90%. It wassuggested that the ability to inhibit the growth of pathogen in vitro was not related to the disease reduction in vivo. Thestrain PACCH24 was further identified as Streptomyces hygroscopicus according to morphological characteristic, cell walland cellular sugar analysis and 16S rDNA sequencing. The study implies a novel chitinolytic actinomycete which could bedeveloped to be a biological agent which would be included as a complement with organic fertilizers in order to control stemrot disease and promote growth of chilli.

  6. Oleanolic Acid and Its Derivatives: Biological Activities and Therapeutic Potential in Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taiwo Betty Ayeleso

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demand for natural products as an alternative therapy for chronic diseases has encouraged research into the pharmacological importance of bioactive compounds from plants. Recently, there has been a surge of interest in the therapeutic potential of oleanolic acid (OA in the prevention and management of chronic diseases. Oleanolic acid is a pentacyclic triterpenoid widely found in plants, including fruits and vegetables with different techniques and chromatography platforms being employed in its extraction and isolation. Several studies have demonstrated the potential therapeutic effects of OA on different diseases and their symptoms. Furthermore, oleanolic acid also serves as a framework for the development of novel semi-synthetic triterpenoids that could prove vital in finding therapeutic modalities for various ailments. There are recent advances in the design and synthesis of chemical derivatives of OA to enhance its solubility, bioavailability and potency. Some of these derivatives have also been therapeutic candidates in a number of clinical trials. This review consolidates and expands on recent reports on the biological effects of oleanolic acid from different plant sources and its synthetic derivatives as well as their mechanisms of action in in vitro and in vivo study models. This review suggests that oleanolic acid and its derivatives are important candidates in the search for alternative therapy in the treatment and management of chronic diseases.

  7. Does wheat genetically modified for disease resistance affect root-colonizing pseudomonads and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi?

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Joana Beatrice; Song-Wilson, Yi; Foetzki, Andrea; Luginbühl, Carolin; Winzeler, Michael; Kneubühler, Yvan; Matasci, Caterina; Mascher-Frutschi, Fabio; Kalinina, Olena; Boller, Thomas; Keel, Christoph; Maurhofer, Monika

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of genetically modified (GM) wheat with introduced pm3b mildew resistance transgene, on two types of root-colonizing microorganisms, namely pseudomonads and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Our investigations were carried out in field trials over three field seasons and at two locations. Serial dilution in selective King's B medium and microscopy were used to assess the abundance of cultivable pseudomonads and AMF, respectively. We developed a denatu...

  8. Overexpression of a modified plant thionin enhances disease resistance to citrus canker and Huanglongbing (HLB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huanglongbing (HLB or citrus greening disease) caused by Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) is a great threat to the United States citrus industry. There are no proven strategies to eliminate HLB disease and no cultivar has been identified with strong HLB resistance. Citrus canker is also an ec...

  9. Discovery of novel propargylamine-modified 4-aminoalkyl imidazole substituted pyrimidinylthiourea derivatives as multifunctional agents for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yi-Xiang; Wang, Huan; Li, Xiao-Kang; Dong, Sheng-Nan; Liu, Wen-Wen; Gong, Qi; Wang, Tian-Duan-Yi; Tang, Yun; Zhu, Jin; Li, Jian; Zhang, Hai-Yan; Mao, Fei

    2018-01-01

    A series of novel propargylamine-modified pyrimidinylthiourea derivatives (1-3) were designed and synthesized as multifunctional agents for Alzheimer's disease (AD) therapy, and their potential was evaluated through various biological experiments. Among these derivatives, compound 1b displayed good selective inhibitory activity against AChE (vs BuChE, IC 50  = 0.324 μM, SI > 123) and MAO-B (vs MAO-A, IC 50  = 1.427 μM, SI > 35). Molecular docking study showed that the pyrimidinylthiourea moiety of 1b could bind to the catalytic active site (CAS) of AChE, and the propargylamine moiety interacted directly with the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) of MAO-B. Moreover, 1b demonstrated mild antioxidant ability, good copper chelating property, effective inhibitory activity against Cu 2+ -induced Aβ 1-42 aggregation, moderate neuroprotection, low cytotoxicity, and appropriate blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability in vitro and was capable of ameliorating scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment in mice. These results indicated that 1b has the potential to be a multifunctional candidate for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Disease control by chemical and biological fungicides in cultivated mushrooms: button mushroom, oyster mushroom and shiitake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Potočnik

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The most commonly cultivated basidiomycetes worldwide and in Serbia are button mushroom (Agaricus bisporus, oyster mushroom (Pleurotus sp. and shiitake (Lentinus edodes. Production of their fruiting bodies is severely afflicted by fungal, bacterial, and viral pathogens that are able to cause diseases which affect yield and quality. Major A. bisporus fungal pathogens include Mycogone perniciosa, Lecanicillium fungicola, and Cladobotryum spp., the causal agents of dry bubble, wet bubble, and cobweb disease, respectively. Various Trichoderma species, the causal agents of green mould, also affect all three kinds of edible mushrooms. Over the past two decades, green mould caused by T. aggressivum has been the most serious disease of button mushroom. Oyster mushroom is susceptible to T. pleurotum and shiitake to T. harzianum. The bacterial brawn blotch disease, caused by Pseudomonas tolaasii, is distributed globally. Disease control on mushroom farms worldwide is commonly based on the use of fungicides. However, evolution of pathogen resistance to fungicides after frequent application, and host sensitivity to fungicides are serious problems. Only a few fungicides are officially recommended in mushroom production: chlorothalonil and thiabendazol in North America and prochloraz in the EU and some other countries. Even though decreased sensitivity levels of L. fungicola and Cladobotryum mycophilum to prochloraz have been detected, disease control is still mainly provided by that chemical fungicide. Considering such resistance evolution, harmful impact to the environment and human health, special attention should be focused on biofungicides, both microbiological products based on Bacillus species and various natural substances of biological origin, together with good programs of hygiene. Introduction of biofungicides has created new possibilities for crop protection with reduced application of chemicals.

  11. Modifiable life style associated risk factors for non communicable diseases among students of pre-university college of Udupi taluk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shradha S Parsekar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Non-communicable diseases are diseases of longer period and are increasing. This study was intended to find out the proportion of adolescents having modifiable life style associated risk factors. Materials and methods A cross sectional study was carried out in 15 pre-university colleges (PUC of Udupi taluk, which were randomly selected, a class from each PUC was randomly chosen. WHO stepwise approach was used to collect data. A total of 838 adolescents in the age group 15 to 19 years were included. Data was analysed using SPSS software version 15. Chi square test was used to find the association. Results Current smoking was found in 1.67% of the participants. Nearly 16.94% participants were exposed to second hand smoke. About 2.15% of the participants were current alcohol drinkers. Junk food consumption was found in 64.08% of the participants. About 89.86% of the participants were physically inactive. Nearly 31.98% of the participants reported adding extra salt to the diet. Conclusion The behavioural risk factors investigated in the present study are potentially modifiable; identifying subgroups having one or multiple risk factors at an early age is of extreme importance for preventing risk of acquiring chronic diseases in adult life.

  12. Validation of Alzheimer's disease CSF and plasma biological markers: the multicentre reliability study of the pilot European Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (E-ADNI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buerger, Katharina; Frisoni, Giovanni; Uspenskaya, Olga

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiatives ("ADNI") aim to validate neuroimaging and biochemical markers of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Data of the pilot European-ADNI (E-ADNI) biological marker programme of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma candidate biomarkers are reported. METHO...

  13. Mast cells are important modifiers of autoimmune disease: With so much evidence, why is there controversy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Ann Brown

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available There is abundant evidence that mast cells are active participants in events that mediate tissue damage in autoimmune disease. Disease-associated increases in mast cell numbers accompanied by mast cell degranulation and elaboration of numerous mast cell mediators at sites of inflammation are commonly observed in many human autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and bullous pemphigoid. In animal models, treatment with mast cell stabilizing drugs or mast cell ablation can result in diminished disease. A variety of receptors including those engaged by antibody, complement, pathogens and intrinsic danger signals are implicated in mast cell activation in disease. Similar to their role as first responders in infection settings, mast cells likely orchestrate early recruitment of immune cells, including neutrophils, to the sites of autoimmune destruction. This co-localization promotes cellular crosstalk and activation and results in the amplification of the local inflammatory response thereby promoting and sustaining tissue damage. Despite the evidence, there is still a debate regarding the relative role of mast cells in these processes. However, by definition, mast cells can only act as accessory cells to the self-reactive T and/or antibody driven autoimmune responses. Thus, when evaluating mast cell involvement using existing and somewhat imperfect animal models of disease, their importance is sometimes obscured. However, these potent immune cells are undoubtedly major contributors to autoimmunity and should be considered as important targets for therapeutic disease intervention.

  14. Microglial TNF and IL-1 as early disease-modifiers in Alzheimer's-like disease in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilkjær, Laura; Babcock, Alicia; Finsen, Bente

    2015-01-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD) signs of microglial activation is evident already in prodromal and early AD. This and other evidence suggest that neuroinflammation contributes to the progression of the early disease development in AD. Microglial cells have the capacity to produce cytokines such as TNF...... in the APPswe/PS1DE9 mouse model of AD. In these mice, cortical As plaque load shows a sigmoidal trajectory with age, as it does in AD. At 12 months of age, when As pathology is welldeveloped, TNF and IL-1s are produced in significantly higher proportions of microglia in the APPswe/PS1DE9 mice, than in wildtype...

  15. New-onset vitiligo and progression of pre-existing vitiligo during treatment with biological agents in chronic inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méry-Bossard, L; Bagny, K; Chaby, G; Khemis, A; Maccari, F; Marotte, H; Perrot, J L; Reguiai, Z; Sigal, M L; Avenel-Audran, M; Boyé, T; Grasland, A; Gillard, J; Jullien, D; Toussirot, E

    2017-01-01

    The development of vitiligo during treatment with biological agents is an unusual event and only a few isolated cases have been reported. To describe the clinical characteristics and evolution of patients developing new-onset vitiligo following initiation of a biological agent for chronic inflammatory disease; and also to report the clinical course of pre-existing vitiligo under biological therapy. This nationwide multicentre, retrospective study, carried out between July 2013 and January 2015, describes the characteristics of a large series of 18 patients (psoriasis N = 8, inflammatory rheumatic diseases N = 8, ulcerative colitis N = 1, uveitis N = 1) who developed new-onset vitiligo while receiving a biological agent. TNFα inhibitors were the most common biological agent involved (13/18) while anti-IL-12/23 and anti-IL-17 agents or abatacept were less common (4/18 and 1/18 respectively). Mean duration of biological agent exposure before vitiligo onset was 13.9 ± 16.5 months. Outcome was favourable for most patients (15/17) while maintaining the biological agent. Data were also collected for 18 patients (psoriasis N = 5, inflammatory rheumatic diseases N = 10, inflammatory bowel diseases N = 2, SAPHO N = 1) who had pre-existing vitiligo when treatment with a biological agent started (TNFα inhibitors N = 15, ustekinumab N = 1, rituximab N = 1, tocilizumab N = 1). Vitiligo progressed in seven patients and was stable or improved in eight cases. Vitiligo may thus emerge and/or progress during treatment with various biological agents, mainly TNFα inhibitors and could be a new paradoxical skin reaction. De novo vitiligo displays a favourable outcome when maintaining the biological agent, whereas the prognosis seems worse in cases of pre-existing vitiligo. © 2016 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  16. Biological and mechanical properties of an experimental glass-ionomer cement modified by partial replacement of CaO with MgO or ZnO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Ae KIM

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractSome weaknesses of conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC as dental materials, for instance the lack of bioactive potential and poor mechanical properties, remain unsolved.Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the partial replacement of CaO with MgO or ZnO on the mechanical and biological properties of the experimental glass ionomer cements.Material and Methods Calcium fluoro-alumino-silicate glass was prepared for an experimental glass ionomer cement by melt quenching technique. The glass composition was modified by partial replacement (10 mol% of CaO with MgO or ZnO. Net setting time, compressive and flexural properties, and in vitrorat dental pulp stem cells (rDPSCs viability were examined for the prepared GICs and compared to a commercial GIC.Results The experimental GICs set more slowly than the commercial product, but their extended setting times are still within the maximum limit (8 min specified in ISO 9917-1. Compressive strength of the experimental GIC was not increased by the partial substitution of CaO with either MgO or ZnO, but was comparable to the commercial control. For flexural properties, although there was no significance between the base and the modified glass, all prepared GICs marked a statistically higher flexural strength (p<0.05 and comparable modulus to control. The modified cements showed increased cell viability for rDPSCs.Conclusions The experimental GICs modified with MgO or ZnO can be considered bioactive dental materials.

  17. Biological and mechanical properties of an experimental glass-ionomer cement modified by partial replacement of CaO with MgO or ZnO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong-Ae, KIM; Hany, ABO-MOSALLAM; Hye-Young, LEE; Jung-Hwan, LEE; Hae-Won, KIM; Hae-Hyoung, LEE

    2015-01-01

    Some weaknesses of conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC) as dental materials, for instance the lack of bioactive potential and poor mechanical properties, remain unsolved. Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the partial replacement of CaO with MgO or ZnO on the mechanical and biological properties of the experimental glass ionomer cements. Material and Methods Calcium fluoro-alumino-silicate glass was prepared for an experimental glass ionomer cement by melt quenching technique. The glass composition was modified by partial replacement (10 mol%) of CaO with MgO or ZnO. Net setting time, compressive and flexural properties, and in vitro rat dental pulp stem cells (rDPSCs) viability were examined for the prepared GICs and compared to a commercial GIC. Results The experimental GICs set more slowly than the commercial product, but their extended setting times are still within the maximum limit (8 min) specified in ISO 9917-1. Compressive strength of the experimental GIC was not increased by the partial substitution of CaO with either MgO or ZnO, but was comparable to the commercial control. For flexural properties, although there was no significance between the base and the modified glass, all prepared GICs marked a statistically higher flexural strength (p<0.05) and comparable modulus to control. The modified cements showed increased cell viability for rDPSCs. Conclusions The experimental GICs modified with MgO or ZnO can be considered bioactive dental materials. PMID:26398508

  18. [An approach to the patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) : a new biologic response modifier, canakinumab].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Shumpei; Kikuchi, Masako; Nozawa, Tomo; Kizawa, Toshiatsu; Kanetaka, Taichi; Miyamae, Takako; Mori, Masa-aki; Nishikomori, Ryohta; Takata, Hidetoshi; Heike, Toshio; Hara, Toshiro; Imagawa, Tomoyuki

    2012-01-01

    Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) comprises a group of rare, but severe, autoinflammatory syndrome, and includes 3 distinct conditions, familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS), and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease (MONID). These syndromes are characterized by urticarial-like rash, periodic fever, central nervous system inflammation, an arthropathy, and the risk of amyloidosis. About 20% die by age 20 years in the most severe cases. The disease is associated with mutations in the NLRP3 gene that encodes for the protein cryopyrin, a component of the inflammasome complex that regulates the production and secretion of IL-1β. Canakinumab is a human IgG monoclonal antibody targeting IL-1β. The clinical trials of canakinumab for patients with CAPS in both western countries and Japan were well-tolerated in most patients, and provided significant advantages over existing competitive therapies. Although no serious adverse effects have been reported, the frequencies of common infectious diseases including nasopharyngitis, upper respiratory tract infections, and gastroenteritis were reported presumably due to the blockade of proinflammatory cytokine, IL-1β. For us pediatrician, it will be important to be more careful for infectious diseases to provide the maximum safety of canakinumab for these patients.

  19. Disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs til behandling af ankyloserende spondylitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ole Rintek; Egsmose, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is an inflammatory disorder affecting the axial skeleton, peripheral joints, entheses and extra-articular sites. Patients with early disease, a higher level of erythrocyte sedimentation rate and/or peripheral arthritis might benefit from sulfasalazine. Otherwise...

  20. Gastric cancer: a primer on the epidemiology and biology of the disease and an overview of the medical management of advanced disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Manish A; Kelsen, David P

    2010-04-01

    Gastric cancer is a cause of significant morbidity and cancer-related mortality worldwide. Despite recent advances in targeted therapy and understanding of the biology and development of the malignancy, progress in the treatment of gastric cancer has been limited. Most newly diagnosed patients will present with incurable disease, and have a median survival of less than 1 year. Although the disease has widespread ethnic and epidemiologic differences, medical management of gastric cancer does not distinguish among the various disease subtypes. The recent report of the ToGA phase III study has validated Her2 as a molecular target in this disease, supporting the concept that a greater understanding of the biology of gastric cancer subsets may improve treatment selection and overall outcome of individual patients. This article summarizes the epidemiology and ethnic variation of this disease to crystalize subtypes of gastric cancer in the context of current and future medical management of advanced disease.

  1. Mycobacterium avium subsp. Paratuberculosis (MAP) as a modifying factor in Crohn's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sibartie, Shomik

    2010-02-01

    Crohn\\'s disease (CD) is a multifactorial syndrome with genetic and environmental contributions. Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) has been frequently isolated from mucosal tissues of patients with CD but the cellular immune response to this bacterium has been poorly described. Our aim was to examine the influence of MAP on T-cell proliferation and cytokine responses in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

  2. Grunting in genetically modified minipig animal model for Huntington ´s disease - a pilot experiment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tykalová, T.; Hlavnička, J.; Mačáková, Monika; Baxa, Monika; Cmejla, R.; Motlík, Jan; Klempíř, J.; Rusz, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 78, Suppl 2 (2015), s. 12-13 ISSN 1210-7859. [Conference on Animal Models for neurodegenerative Diseases /3./. 08.11.2015-10.11.2015, Liblice] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0124; GA MŠk(CZ) 7F14308 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : Huntington ´s disease * mitochondria * DNA damage Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  3. Sequencing of disease-modifying therapies for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: a theoretical approach to optimizing treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grand'Maison, Francois; Yeung, Michael; Morrow, Sarah A; Lee, Liesly; Emond, Francois; Ward, Brian J; Laneuville, Pierre; Schecter, Robyn

    2018-04-18

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease which usually begins in young adulthood and is a lifelong condition. Individuals with MS experience physical and cognitive disability resulting from inflammation and demyelination in the central nervous system. Over the past decade, several disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) have been approved for the management of relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), which is the most prevalent phenotype. The chronic nature of the disease and the multiple treatment options make benefit-risk-based sequencing of therapy essential to ensure optimal care. The efficacy and short- and long-term risks of treatment differ for each DMT due to their different mechanism of action on the immune system. While transitioning between DMTs, in addition to immune system effects, factors such as age, disease duration and severity, disability status, monitoring requirements, preference for the route of administration, and family planning play an important role. Determining a treatment strategy is therefore challenging as it requires careful consideration of the differences in efficacy, safety and tolerability, while at the same time minimizing risks of immune modulation. In this review, we discuss a sequencing approach for treating RRMS, with importance given to the long-term risks and individual preference when devising a treatment plan. Evidence-based strategies to counter breakthrough disease are also addressed.

  4. Hdac6 knock-out increases tubulin acetylation but does not modify disease progression in the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Bobrowska

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder for which there is no effective disease modifying treatment. Following-on from studies in HD animal models, histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibition has emerged as an attractive therapeutic option. In parallel, several reports have demonstrated a role for histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6 in the modulation of the toxicity caused by the accumulation of misfolded proteins, including that of expanded polyglutamine in an N-terminal huntingtin fragment. An important role for HDAC6 in kinesin-1 dependent transport of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF from the cortex to the striatum has also been demonstrated. To elucidate the role that HDAC6 plays in HD progression, we evaluated the effects of the genetic depletion of HDAC6 in the R6/2 mouse model of HD. Loss of HDAC6 resulted in a marked increase in tubulin acetylation throughout the brain. Despite this, there was no effect on the onset and progression of a wide range of behavioural, physiological, molecular and pathological HD-related phenotypes. We observed no change in the aggregate load or in the levels of soluble mutant exon 1 transprotein. HDAC6 genetic depletion did not affect the efficiency of BDNF transport from the cortex to the striatum. Therefore, we conclude that HDAC6 inhibition does not modify disease progression in R6/2 mice and HDAC6 should not be prioritized as a therapeutic target for HD.

  5. Natural biological variation of white matter microstructure is accentuated in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Sarah; Crawford, Helen; Seunarine, Kiran; Leavitt, Blair; Durr, Alexandra; Roos, Raymund A C; Scahill, Rachael I; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Rees, Geraint; Langbehn, Douglas; Orth, Michael

    2018-04-22

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a monogenic neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG-repeat expansion in the Huntingtin gene. Presence of this expansion signifies certainty of disease onset, but only partly explains age at which onset occurs. Genome-wide association studies have shown that naturally occurring genetic variability influences HD pathogenesis and disease onset. Investigating the influence of biological traits in the normal population, such as variability in white matter properties, on HD pathogenesis could provide a complementary approach to understanding disease modification. We have previously shown that while white matter diffusivity patterns in the left sensorimotor network were similar in controls and HD gene-carriers, they were more extreme in the HD group. We hypothesized that the influence of natural variation in diffusivity on effects of HD pathogenesis on white matter is not limited to the sensorimotor network but extends to cognitive, limbic, and visual networks. Using tractography, we investigated 32 bilateral pathways within HD-related networks, including motor, cognitive, and limbic, and examined diffusivity metrics using principal components analysis. We identified three independent patterns of diffusivity common to controls and HD gene-carriers that predicted HD status. The first pattern involved almost all tracts, the second was limited to sensorimotor tracts, and the third encompassed cognitive network tracts. Each diffusivity pattern was associated with network specific performance. The consistency in diffusivity patterns across both groups coupled with their association with disease status and task performance indicates that naturally-occurring patterns of diffusivity can become accentuated in the presence of the HD gene mutation to influence clinical brain function. © 2018 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Coronary artery disease reporting and data system (CAD-RADSTM): Inter-observer agreement for assessment categories and modifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroules, Christopher D; Hamilton-Craig, Christian; Branch, Kelley; Lee, James; Cury, Roberto C; Maurovich-Horvat, Pál; Rubinshtein, Ronen; Thomas, Dustin; Williams, Michelle; Guo, Yanshu; Cury, Ricardo C

    The Coronary Artery Disease Reporting and Data System (CAD-RADS) provides a lexicon and standardized reporting system for coronary CT angiography. To evaluate inter-observer agreement of the CAD-RADS among an panel of early career and expert readers. Four early career and four expert cardiac imaging readers prospectively and independently evaluated 50 coronary CT angiography cases using the CAD-RADS lexicon. All readers assessed image quality using a five-point Likert scale, with mean Likert score ≥4 designating high image quality, and CAD-RADS assessment categories and modifiers were assessed using intra-class correlation (ICC) and Fleiss' Kappa (κ).The impact of reader experience and image quality on inter-observer agreement was also examined. Inter-observer agreement for CAD-RADS assessment categories was excellent (ICC 0.958, 95% CI 0.938-0.974, p CAD-RADS assessment categories and modifiers is excellent, except for high-risk plaque (modifier V) which demonstrates fair agreement. These results suggest CAD-RADS is feasible for clinical implementation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Protective glove use and hygiene habits modify the associations of specific pesticides with Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlong, Melissa; Tanner, Caroline M; Goldman, Samuel M; Bhudhikanok, Grace S.; Blair, Aaron; Chade, Anabel; Comyns, Kathleen; Hoppin, Jane A.; Kasten, Meike; Korell, Monica; Langston, J William; Marras, Connie; Meng, Cheryl; Richards, Marie; Ross, G Webster; Umbach, David M; Sandler, Dale P; Kamel, Freya

    2014-01-01

    Pesticides have been associated with Parkinson’s disease (PD), and protective gloves and workplace hygiene can reduce pesticide exposure. We assessed whether use of gloves and workplace hygiene modified associations between pesticides and PD. The Farming and Movement Evaluation (FAME) Study is a nested case-control study within the Agricultural Health Study. Use of protective gloves, other PPE, and hygiene practices were determined by questionnaire (69 cases and 237 controls were included). We considered interactions of gloves and hygiene with ever-use of pesticides for all pesticides with ≥ 5 exposed and unexposed cases and controls in each glove-use stratum (paraquat, permethrin, rotenone, and trifluralin). 61% of respondents consistently used protective gloves and 87% consistently used ≥ 2 hygiene practices. Protective glove use modified the associations of paraquat and permethrin with PD: neither pesticide was associated with PD among protective glove users, while both pesticides were associated with PD among non-users (paraquat OR 3.9 [95% CI 1.3, 11.7], interaction p=0.15; permethrin OR 4.3 [95% CI 1.2, 15.6] interaction p=0.05). Rotenone was associated with PD regardless of glove use. Trifluralin was associated with PD among people who used glove use and hygiene practices appeared to be important modifiers of the association between pesticides and PD and may reduce risk of PD associated with certain pesticides. PMID:25461423

  8. Interstitial Lung Disease in Rheumatoid Arthritis in the Era of Biologics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Picchianti Diamanti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial lung disease (ILD represents a severe manifestation in connective tissue diseases (CTD, with an overall incidence of 15%, and it is still a challenge for clinicians evaluation and management. ILD is the most common manifestation of lung involvement in Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA, observed in up to 80% of biopsies, 50% of chest Computed Tomography (CT and only 5% of chest radiographs. Histopatological patterns of ILD in RA may present with different patterns, such as: usual interstitial pneumonia, non specific interstitial pneumonia, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, organizing pneumonia, and eosinophilic infiltration. The incidence of ILD in RA patients is not only related to the disease itself, many drugs may be in fact associated with the development of pulmonary damage. Some reports suggest a causative role for TNFα inhibitors in RA-ILD development/worsening, anyway, no definitive statement can be drawn thus data are incomplete and affected by several variables. A tight control (pulmonary function tests and/or HRCT is mandatory in patients with preexisting ILD, but it should be also performed in those presenting risk factors for ILD and mild respiratory symptoms. Biologic therapy should be interrupted, and, after excluding triggering infections, corticosteroids should be administered.

  9. Molecular Elucidation of Disease Biomarkers at the Interface of Chemistry and Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liqin; Wan, Shuo; Jiang, Ying; Wang, Yanyue; Fu, Ting; Liu, Qiaoling; Cao, Zhijuan; Qiu, Liping; Tan, Weihong

    2017-02-22

    Disease-related biomarkers are objectively measurable molecular signatures of physiological status that can serve as disease indicators or drug targets in clinical diagnosis and therapy, thus acting as a tool in support of personalized medicine. For example, the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) biomarker is now widely used to screen patients for prostate cancer. However, few such biomarkers are currently available, and the process of biomarker identification and validation is prolonged and complicated by inefficient methods of discovery and few reliable analytical platforms. Therefore, in this Perspective, we look at the advanced chemistry of aptamer molecules and their significant role as molecular probes in biomarker studies. As a special class of functional nucleic acids evolved from an iterative technology termed Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX), these single-stranded oligonucleotides can recognize their respective targets with selectivity and affinity comparable to those of protein antibodies. Because of their fast turnaround time and exceptional chemical properties, aptamer probes can serve as novel molecular tools for biomarker investigations, particularly in assisting identification of new disease-related biomarkers. More importantly, aptamers are able to recognize biomarkers from complex biological environments such as blood serum and cell surfaces, which can provide direct evidence for further clinical applications. This Perspective highlights several major advancements of aptamer-based biomarker discovery strategies and their potential contribution to the practice of precision medicine.

  10. SCLC extensive disease – treatment guidance by extent or/and biology of response?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckert, Franziska; Müller, Arndt-Christian

    2008-01-01

    In extensive disease of small cell lung cancer a doubling of the one-year-survival rate was reported in August 2007 by prophylactic cranial irradiation applied to patients who experienced any response to initial chemotherapy. We discuss the treatment concept of extensive disease in the face of the latest results and older studies with additional thoracic irradiation in this subgroup. A randomized trial with prophylactic cranial irradiation published in 1999 demonstrated an improvement of 5-year-overall-survival for complete responders (at least at distant levels) receiving additional thoracic radiochemotherapy compared to chemotherapy alone (9.1% vs. 3.7%). But, these results were almost neglected and thoracic radiotherapy was not further investigated for good responders of extensive disease. However, in the light of current advances by prophylactic cranial irradiation these findings are noteworthy on all accounts. Considering both, a possible interpretation of these data could be a survival benefit of local control by simultaneous thoracic radiochemotherapy in the case of improved distant control due to chemotherapy and prophylactic cranial irradiation. Furthermore the question arises whether the tumor biology indicated by the response to chemotherapy should be integrated in the present classification

  11. The Mouse Genome Database (MGD): facilitating mouse as a model for human biology and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Bult, Carol J; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2015-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD, http://www.informatics.jax.org) serves the international biomedical research community as the central resource for integrated genomic, genetic and biological data on the laboratory mouse. To facilitate use of mouse as a model in translational studies, MGD maintains a core of high-quality curated data and integrates experimentally and computationally generated data sets. MGD maintains a unified catalog of genes and genome features, including functional RNAs, QTL and phenotypic loci. MGD curates and provides functional and phenotype annotations for mouse genes using the Gene Ontology and Mammalian Phenotype Ontology. MGD integrates phenotype data and associates mouse genotypes to human diseases, providing critical mouse-human relationships and access to repositories holding mouse models. MGD is the authoritative source of nomenclature for genes, genome features, alleles and strains following guidelines of the International Committee on Standardized Genetic Nomenclature for Mice. A new addition to MGD, the Human-Mouse: Disease Connection, allows users to explore gene-phenotype-disease relationships between human and mouse. MGD has also updated search paradigms for phenotypic allele attributes, incorporated incidental mutation data, added a module for display and exploration of genes and microRNA interactions and adopted the JBrowse genome browser. MGD resources are freely available to the scientific community. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Endothelin 1 gene is not a major modifier of chronic kidney disease advancement among the autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annapareddy Shiva Nagendra Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is characterized by the presence of numerous cysts in the kidney and manifest with various renal and extra-renal complications leading to ESRD. Endothelin may contribute to various renal and extra-renal manifestations pointing to genetic and environmental modifying factors that alter the risk of developing chronic kidney disease (CKD in ADPKD. In the present study we investigated six genes coding for endothelin 1 (EDN1 tagging-single nucleotide polymorphisms (tag-SNPs to unravel the EDN1 gene modifier effect for renal disease progression in ADPKD. Materials and Methods: The tag-SNPs were genotyped using FRET-based KASPar method in 108 ADPKD patients and 119 healthy subjects. Cochran-Armitage trend test was used to determine the association between ADPKD and EDN1 tag-SNPs. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the effect of tag-SNPs on CKD progression. The relationship between different CKD stages and hypertension and their interaction Mantel-Haenszel stratified analysis was performed. Results: All loci are polymorphic and followed Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Distribution of EDN1 genotypes and haplotypes in control and ADPKD is not statistically significant. Five SNPs covering 3.4 kb forming single LD block, but the LD was not strong between SNPs. The EDN1 genotypes are not contributing to the CKD advancement among the ADPKD patients. Conclusion: These results suggest that the EDN1 gene is not a major modifier of CKD advancement among ADPKD patients.

  13. Identification of DNA polymerase molecules repairing DNA irradiated damage and molecular biological study on modified factors of mutation rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Koichi; Inoue, Shuji [National Inst. of Healthand Nutrition, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-02-01

    DNA repairing polymerase has not been identified in human culture cells because the specificities of enzyme inhibitors used in previous studies were not so high. In this study, anti-sense oligonucleotides were transfected into human fibroblast cells by electroporation and several clones selected by geneticin treatment were found to express the RNA of the incorporated DNA. However, the expression was not significant and its reproducibility was poor. Then, a study on repairing mechanism was made using XP30 RO and XP 115 LO cells which are variant cells of xeroderma pigmentosum, a human hereditary disease aiming to identify the DNA polymerase related to the disease. There were abnormalities in DNA polymerase subunit {delta} or {epsilon} which consists DNA replication complex. Thus, it was suggested that the DNA replication of these mutant cells might terminate at the site containing such abnormality. (M.N.)

  14. Treating respiratory viral diseases with chemically modified, second generation intranasal siRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Sailen

    2009-01-01

    Chemically synthesized short interfering RNA (siRNA) of pre-determined sequence has ushered a new era in the application of RNA interference (RNAi) against viral genes. We have paid particular attention to respiratory viruses that wreak heavy morbidity and mortality worldwide. The clinically significant ones include respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), parainfluenza virus (PIV) and influenza virus. As the infection by these viruses is clinically restricted to the respiratory tissues, mainly the lungs, the logical route for the application of the siRNA was also the same, i.e., via the nasal route. Following the initial success of intranasal siRNA against RSV, second-generation siRNAs were made against the viral polymerase large subunit (L) that were chemically modified and screened for improved stability, activity and pharmacokinetics. 2'-O-methyl (2'-O-Me) and 2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro (2'-F) substitutions in the ribose ring were incorporated in different positions of the sense and antisense strands and the resultant siRNAs were tested with various transfection reagents intranasally against RSV. Based on these results, we propose the following consensus for designing intranasal antiviral siRNAs: (i) modified 19-27 nt long double-stranded siRNAs are functional in the lung, (ii) excessive 2'-OMe and 2'-F modifications in either or both strands of these siRNAs reduce efficacy, and (iii) limited modifications in the sense strand are beneficial, although their precise efficacy may be position-dependent.

  15. Nutritional Systems Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kasper

    and network biology has the potential to increase our understanding of how small molecules affect metabolic pathways and homeostasis, how this perturbation changes at the disease state, and to what extent individual genotypes contribute to this. A fruitful strategy in approaching and exploring the field...... biology research. The paper also shows as a proof-of-concept that a systems biology approach to diet is meaningful and demonstrates some basic principles on how to work with diet systematic. The second chapter of this thesis we developed the resource NutriChem v1.0. A foodchemical database linking...... sites of diet on the disease pathway. We propose a framework for interrogating the critical targets in colon cancer process and identifying plant-based dietary interventions as important modifiers using a systems chemical biology approach. The fifth chapter of the thesis is on discovering of novel anti...

  16. Social exclusion modifies climate and deforestation impacts on a vector-borne disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Luis Fernando; Cohen, Justin M; Pascual, Mercedes; Wilson, Mark L

    2008-02-06

    The emergence of American Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (ACL) has been associated with changes in the relationship between people and forests, leading to the view that forest ecosystems increase infection risk and subsequent proposal that deforestation could reduce re-emergence of this disease. We analyzed county-level incidence rates of ACL in Costa Rica (1996-2000) as a function of social and environmental variables relevant to transmission ecology with statistical models that incorporate breakpoints. Once social marginality was taken into account, the effect of living close to a forest on infection risk was small, and diminished exponentially above a breakpoint. Forest cover was associated with the modulation of temporal effects of El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) at small spatial scales, revealing an additional complex interplay of environmental forces and disease patterns. Social factors, which previously have not been evaluated rigorously together with environmental and climatic factors, appear to play a critical role that may ultimately determine disease risk.

  17. Evidence for a modifier of onset age in Huntington disease linked to the HD gene in 4p16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djoussé, Luc; Knowlton, Beth; Hayden, Michael R.; Almqvist, Elisabeth W.; Brinkman, Ryan R.; Ross, Christopher A.; Margolis, Russel L.; Rosenblatt, Adam; Durr, Alexandra; Dode, Catherine; Morrison, Patrick J.; Novelletto, Andrea; Frontali, Marina; Trent, Ronald J. A.; McCusker, Elizabeth; Gómez-Tortosa, Estrella; Mayo Cabrero, David; Jones, Randi; Zanko, Andrea; Nance, Martha; Abramson, Ruth K.; Suchowersky, Oksana; Paulsen, Jane S.; Harrison, Madaline B.; Yang, Qiong; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Mysore, Jayalakshmi; Gusella, James F.; MacDonald, Marcy E.

    2007-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by the abnormal expansion of CAG repeats in the HD gene on chromosome 4p16.3. A recent genome scan for genetic modifiers of age at onset of motor symptoms (AO) in HD suggests that one modifier may reside in the region close to the HD gene itself. We used data from 535 HD participants of the New England Huntington cohort and the HD MAPS cohort to assess whether AO was influenced by any of the three markers in the 4p16 region: MSX1 (Drosophila homeo box homologue 1, formerly known as homeo box 7, HOX7), Δ2642 (within the HD coding sequence), and BJ56 (D4S127). Suggestive evidence for an association was seen between MSX1 alleles and AO, after adjustment for normal CAG repeat, expanded repeat, and their product term (model P value 0.079). Of the variance of AO that was not accounted for by HD and normal CAG repeats, 0.8% could be attributed to the MSX1 genotype. Individuals with MSX1 genotype 3/3 tended to have younger AO. No association was found between Δ2642 (P=0.44) and BJ56 (P=0.73) and AO. This study supports previous studies suggesting that there may be a significant genetic modifier for AO in HD in the 4p16 region. Furthermore, the modifier may be present on both HD and normal chromosomes bearing the 3 allele of the MSX1 marker. PMID:15029481

  18. Using of ants and earthworm to modify of soil biological quality and its effect on cocoa seedlings growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilowasid, Laode Muhammad Harjoni; Budianto, Wayan; Syaf, Hasbullah; Tufaila, Muhammad; Safuan, La Ode

    2015-09-01

    Ant and earthworm can act as soil ecosystem engineers. Ant and earthworm are very dominant in smallholder cocoa plantation. The first experiment aimed to study the effect of the abundance of ants and earthworms on soil microbial activity and microfauna, and the second experiment to analyse the effect of soil modified by ants and earthworms on the cocoa seedlings growth. Ant (Ponera sp.) and earthworm (Pontoscolex sp.) collected from smallholder cocoa plantation, and kept in a container up to applied. In the first experiment, nine combinations of the abundance of ants and earthworms applied to each pot containing 3 kg of soil from smallholder cocoa plantation, and each combination of the abundance was repeated five times in a completely randomized design. After the soil was incubated for thirty days, ants and earthworms removed from the soil using hand sorting techniques. Soil from each pot was analysed for soil microbial activity, abundance of flagellates and nematodes. In the second experiment, the soil in each pot was planted with cocoa seedlings and maintained up to ninety days. The results showed the FDA hydrolytic activity of microbes, the abundance of flagellates and nematodes between the combination of the abundance of ants and earthworms have been significantly different. Dry weight of root, shoot and seedling cacao have been significantly different between the combination of the abundance of ants and earthworms. It was concluded that the combination of the abundance of ants and earthworms can be used in ecological engineering to improve soil quality.

  19. A modified Wright-Fisher model that incorporates Ne: A variant of the standard model with increased biological realism and reduced computational complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Gossmann, Toni I; Waxman, David

    2016-03-21

    The Wright-Fisher model is an important model in evolutionary biology and population genetics. It has been applied in numerous analyses of finite populations with discrete generations. It is recognised that real populations can behave, in some key aspects, as though their size that is not the census size, N, but rather a smaller size, namely the effective population size, Ne. However, in the Wright-Fisher model, there is no distinction between the effective and census population sizes. Equivalently, we can say that in this model, Ne coincides with N. The Wright-Fisher model therefore lacks an important aspect of biological realism. Here, we present a method that allows Ne to be directly incorporated into the Wright-Fisher model. The modified model involves matrices whose size is determined by Ne. Thus apart from increased biological realism, the modified model also has reduced computational complexity, particularly so when Ne⪡N. For complex problems, it may be hard or impossible to numerically analyse the most commonly-used approximation of the Wright-Fisher model that incorporates Ne, namely the diffusion approximation. An alternative approach is simulation. However, the simulations need to be sufficiently detailed that they yield an effective size that is different to the census size. Simulations may also be time consuming and have attendant statistical errors. The method presented in this work may then be the only alternative to simulations, when Ne differs from N. We illustrate the straightforward application of the method to some problems involving allele fixation and the determination of the equilibrium site frequency spectrum. We then apply the method to the problem of fixation when three alleles are segregating in a population. This latter problem is significantly more complex than a two allele problem and since the diffusion equation cannot be numerically solved, the only other way Ne can be incorporated into the analysis is by simulation. We have

  20. Biological markers of amyloid beta-related mechanisms in Alzheimer's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hampel, Harald

    2012-02-01

    Recent research progress has given detailed knowledge on the molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD), which has been translated into an intense, ongoing development of disease-modifying treatments. Most new drug candidates are targeted on inhibiting amyloid beta (Abeta) production and aggregation. In drug development, it is important to co-develop biomarkers for Abeta-related mechanisms to enable early diagnosis and patient stratification in clinical trials, and to serve as tools to identify and monitor the biochemical effect of the drug directly in patients. Biomarkers are also requested by regulatory authorities to serve as safety measurements. Molecular aberrations in the AD brain are reflected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Core CSF biomarkers include Abeta isoforms (Abeta40\\/Abeta42), soluble APP isoforms, Abeta oligomers and beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1). This article reviews recent research advances on core candidate CSF and plasma Abeta-related biomarkers, and gives a conceptual review on how to implement biomarkers in clinical trials in AD.

  1. Biological markers of amyloid beta-related mechanisms in Alzheimer's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hampel, Harald

    2010-06-01

    Recent research progress has given detailed knowledge on the molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD), which has been translated into an intense, ongoing development of disease-modifying treatments. Most new drug candidates are targeted on inhibiting amyloid beta (Abeta) production and aggregation. In drug development, it is important to co-develop biomarkers for Abeta-related mechanisms to enable early diagnosis and patient stratification in clinical trials, and to serve as tools to identify and monitor the biochemical effect of the drug directly in patients. Biomarkers are also requested by regulatory authorities to serve as safety measurements. Molecular aberrations in the AD brain are reflected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Core CSF biomarkers include Abeta isoforms (Abeta40\\/Abeta42), soluble APP isoforms, Abeta oligomers and beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1). This article reviews recent research advances on core candidate CSF and plasma Abeta-related biomarkers, and gives a conceptual review on how to implement biomarkers in clinical trials in AD.

  2. A New Generation Fiber Optic Probe: Characterization of Biological Fluids, Protein Crystals and Ophthalmic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Suh, Kwang I.

    1996-01-01

    A new fiber optic probe developed for determining transport properties of sub-micron particles in fluids experiments in a microgravity environment has been applied to characterize particulate dispersions/suspensions in various challenging environments which have been hitherto impossible. The probe positioned in front of a sample delivers a low power light (few nW - 3mW) from a laser and guides the light which is back scattered by the suspended particles through a receiving optical fiber to a photo detector and to a digital correlator. The probe provides rapid determination of macromolecular diffusivities and their respective size distributions. It has been applied to characterize various biological fluids, protein crystals, and ophthalmic diseases.

  3. Sialoglycans in protozoal diseases: their detection, modes of acquisition and emerging biological roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chava, Anil K; Bandyopadhyay, Sumi; Chatterjee, Mitali; Mandal, Chitra

    2004-01-01

    Protozoan parasites including Plasmodia, Leishmania, Trypanosoma, Entamoeba, Trichomonas and others cause diseases in humans and domestic livestock having far-reaching socio-economic implications. They show remarkable propensity to survive within hostile environments encountered during their life cycle, and the identification of molecules that enable them to survive in such milieu is a subject of intense research. Currently available knowledge of the parasite cell surface architecture and biochemistry indicates that sialic acid and its principle derivatives are major components of the glycocalyx and assist the parasite to interact with its external environment through functions ranging from parasite survival, infectivity and host-cell recognition. This review highlights the present state of knowledge with regard to parasite sialobiology with an emphasis on its mode(s) of acquisition and their emerging biological roles, notably as an anti-recognition molecule thereby aiding the pathogen to evade host defense mechanisms.

  4. [Serum anticholinergic activity: relationship with clinical symptoms in Alzheimer's disease and proposal of new biological marker].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Koji; Konishi, Kimiko; Hachisu, Mitsugu

    2011-06-01

    We reviewed the importance of measuring serum anticholinergic activity (SAA) in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Since Tune and Coyle reported a simple method for assessing SAA using radioreceptor-binding assay, SAA is assumed to be the cumulative activity of parent medications and their metabolites and its relationship with delirium and cognitive functions has been debated. However, we evaluated the SAA in AD patients and SAA was correlated with prescription of antipsychotic medications, cognitive dysfunctions, severity of AD and psychotic symptoms, especially, with delusion and diurnal rhythm disturbance. From these results, we should not only pay attention to avoiding the prescription of medications with anticholinergic activity but also we speculated that AA appeared endogenously in AD and accelerated AD pathology. Moreover, there might be the possibility that SAA has predictive value for assessing the progressiveness of AD and as a biological marker for AD.

  5. [Molecular biology of renal cancer: bases for genetic directed therapy in advanced disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroto Rey, José Pablo; Cillán Narvaez, Elena

    2013-06-01

    There has been expansion of therapeutic options in the management of metastatic renal cell carcinoma due to a better knowledge of the molecular biology of kidney cancers. There are different tumors grouped under the term renal cell carcinoma, being clear cell cancer the most frequent and accounting for 80% of kidney tumors. Mutations in the Von Hippel-Lindau gene can be identified in up to 80% of sporadic clear cell cancer, linking a genetically inheritable disease where vascular tumors are frequent, with renal cell cancer. Other histologic types present specific alterations in molecular pathways, like c-MET in papillary type I tumors, and Fumarase Hydratase in papillary type II tumors. Identification of the molecular alteration for a specific tumor may offer an opportunity for treatment selection based on biomarkers, and, in the future, for developing an engineering designed genetic treatment.

  6. Emotional management and biological markers of dietetic regimen in chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Carlo; Aceto, Paola; Luciani, Massimiliano; Fazzari, Erika; Cesari, Valerio; Luciano, Stella; Fortini, Antonio; Berloco, Desiderata; Canulla, Francesco; Bruzzese, Vincenzo; Lai, Silvia

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the association between psychological characteristics and biological markers of adherence in chronic kidney disease patients receiving conservative therapy, hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis (PD), or kidney transplantation. Seventy-nine adult patients were asked to complete the following questionnaires: Toronto Alexithymia scale, Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale, and Short Form Health Survey. Biological markers of adherence to treatment were measured. Peritoneal dialysis patients showed a lower capacity to feel pleasure from sensorial experience (p = .011) and a higher values of phosphorus compared to the other patients' groups (p = .0001). The inability to communicate emotions was negatively correlated with hemoglobin levels (r = -(0).69; p = .001) and positively correlated with phosphorus values in the PD patients (r = .45; p = .050). Findings showed higher psychological impairments and a lower adherence to the treatment in PD patients and suggest the implication of emotional competence in adherence to treatment.

  7. Performance of a modified multi-stage bubble column reactor for lead(II) and biological oxygen demand removal from wastewater using activated rice husk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahu, J.N.; Agarwal, S.; Meikap, B.C.; Biswas, M.N.

    2009-01-01

    The excessive release of wastewater into the environment is a major concern worldwide. Adsorption is the one of the most effective technique for treatment of wastewater. In this work activated carbon prepared from rice husk has been used as an adsorbent. In the present investigation a three phase modified multi-stage bubble column reactor (MMBCR) has been designed to remove lead and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) from wastewater by means of its adsorption onto the surface of activated rice husk. The multi-staging has been achieved by hydrodynamically induced continuous bubble generation, breakup and regeneration. Under optimum conditions, maximum lead and BOD reduction achieved using activated rice husk was 77.15% and 19.05%, respectively. Results showed MMBCR offered appreciated potential benefits for lead removal from wastewater and BOD removal, even this extent of removal is encouraging and the MMBCR can be used a pretreatment unit before subjecting the wastewater to biological treatment

  8. Performance of a modified multi-stage bubble column reactor for lead(II) and biological oxygen demand removal from wastewater using activated rice husk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, J N; Agarwal, S; Meikap, B C; Biswas, M N

    2009-01-15

    The excessive release of wastewater into the environment is a major concern worldwide. Adsorption is the one of the most effective technique for treatment of wastewater. In this work activated carbon prepared from rice husk has been used as an adsorbent. In the present investigation a three phase modified multi-stage bubble column reactor (MMBCR) has been designed to remove lead and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) from wastewater by means of its adsorption onto the surface of activated rice husk. The multi-staging has been achieved by hydrodynamically induced continuous bubble generation, breakup and regeneration. Under optimum conditions, maximum lead and BOD reduction achieved using activated rice husk was 77.15% and 19.05%, respectively. Results showed MMBCR offered appreciated potential benefits for lead removal from wastewater and BOD removal, even this extent of removal is encouraging and the MMBCR can be used a pretreatment unit before subjecting the wastewater to biological treatment.

  9. Alemtuzumab for patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis after disease-modifying therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coles, Alasdair J; Twyman, Cary L; Arnold, Douglas L

    2012-01-01

    The anti-CD52 monoclonal antibody alemtuzumab reduces disease activity in previously untreated patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. We aimed to assess efficacy and safety of alemtuzumab compared with interferon beta 1a in patients who have relapsed despite first-line treatment....

  10. 4p16.3 haplotype modifying age at onset of Huntington disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørremølle, A; Budtz-Jørgensen, E; Fenger, K

    2009-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is caused by an expanded CAG repeat sequence in the HD gene. Although the age at onset is correlated to the CAG repeat length, this correlation only explains approximately half of the variation in onset age. Less variation between siblings indicates that the variation is, ...

  11. Human apolipoprotein E genotypes differentially modify house dust mite-induced airway disease in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, Xianglan; Dai, Cuilian; Fredriksson, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is an endogenous negative regulator of airway hyperreactivity (AHR) and mucous cell metaplasia in experimental models of house dust mite (HDM)-induced airway disease. The gene encoding human apoE is polymorphic, with three common alleles (e2, e3, and e4) reflecting single ...

  12. Epigenetic histone acetylation modifiers in vascular remodelling : New targets for therapy in cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pons, D.; Vries, F.R. de; Elsen, P.J. van den; Heijmans, B.T.; Quax, P.H.A.; Jukema, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in the clinical management of a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Nevertheless, the therapeutic efficacy of the current treatment modalities for atherosclerosis and restenosis is not fully sufficient in a large proportion of patients. One of the major

  13. Using redescription mining to relate clinical and biological characteristics of cognitively impaired and Alzheimer's disease patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matej Mihelčić

    Full Text Available Based on a set of subjects and a collection of attributes obtained from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative database, we used redescription mining to find interpretable rules revealing associations between those determinants that provide insights about the Alzheimer's disease (AD. We extended the CLUS-RM redescription mining algorithm to a constraint-based redescription mining (CBRM setting, which enables several modes of targeted exploration of specific, user-constrained associations. Redescription mining enabled finding specific constructs of clinical and biological attributes that describe many groups of subjects of different size, homogeneity and levels of cognitive impairment. We confirmed some previously known findings. However, in some instances, as with the attributes: testosterone, ciliary neurotrophic factor, brain natriuretic peptide, Fas ligand, the imaging attribute Spatial Pattern of Abnormalities for Recognition of Early AD, as well as the levels of leptin and angiopoietin-2 in plasma, we corroborated previously debatable findings or provided additional information about these variables and their association with AD pathogenesis. Moreover, applying redescription mining on ADNI data resulted with the discovery of one largely unknown attribute: the Pregnancy-Associated Protein-A (PAPP-A, which we found highly associated with cognitive impairment in AD. Statistically significant correlations (p ≤ 0.01 were found between PAPP-A and clinical tests: Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale, Clinical Dementia Rating Sum of Boxes, Mini Mental State Examination, etc. The high importance of this finding lies in the fact that PAPP-A is a metalloproteinase, known to cleave insulin-like growth factor binding proteins. Since it also shares similar substrates with A Disintegrin and the Metalloproteinase family of enzymes that act as α-secretase to physiologically cleave amyloid precursor protein (APP in the non-amyloidogenic pathway

  14. Systems Biology and Ratio-Based, Real-Time Disease Surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fair, J M; Rivas, A L

    2015-08-01

    Most infectious disease surveillance methods are not well fit for early detection. To address such limitation, here we evaluated a ratio- and Systems Biology-based method that does not require prior knowledge on the identity of an infective agent. Using a reference group of birds experimentally infected with West Nile virus (WNV) and a problem group of unknown health status (except that they were WNV-negative and displayed inflammation), both groups were followed over 22 days and tested with a system that analyses blood leucocyte ratios. To test the ability of the method to discriminate small data sets, both the reference group (n = 5) and the problem group (n = 4) were small. The questions of interest were as follows: (i) whether individuals presenting inflammation (disease-positive or D+) can be distinguished from non-inflamed (disease-negative or D-) birds, (ii) whether two or more D+ stages can be detected and (iii) whether sample size influences detection. Within the problem group, the ratio-based method distinguished the following: (i) three (one D- and two D+) data classes; (ii) two (early and late) inflammatory stages; (iii) fast versus regular or slow responders; and (iv) individuals that recovered from those that remained inflamed. Because ratios differed in larger magnitudes (up to 48 times larger) than percentages, it is suggested that data patterns are likely to be recognized when disease surveillance methods are designed to measure inflammation and utilize ratios. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  15. Using redescription mining to relate clinical and biological characteristics of cognitively impaired and Alzheimer's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihelčić, Matej; Šimić, Goran; Babić Leko, Mirjana; Lavrač, Nada; Džeroski, Sašo; Šmuc, Tomislav

    2017-01-01

    Based on a set of subjects and a collection of attributes obtained from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative database, we used redescription mining to find interpretable rules revealing associations between those determinants that provide insights about the Alzheimer's disease (AD). We extended the CLUS-RM redescription mining algorithm to a constraint-based redescription mining (CBRM) setting, which enables several modes of targeted exploration of specific, user-constrained associations. Redescription mining enabled finding specific constructs of clinical and biological attributes that describe many groups of subjects of different size, homogeneity and levels of cognitive impairment. We confirmed some previously known findings. However, in some instances, as with the attributes: testosterone, ciliary neurotrophic factor, brain natriuretic peptide, Fas ligand, the imaging attribute Spatial Pattern of Abnormalities for Recognition of Early AD, as well as the levels of leptin and angiopoietin-2 in plasma, we corroborated previously debatable findings or provided additional information about these variables and their association with AD pathogenesis. Moreover, applying redescription mining on ADNI data resulted with the discovery of one largely unknown attribute: the Pregnancy-Associated Protein-A (PAPP-A), which we found highly associated with cognitive impairment in AD. Statistically significant correlations (p ≤ 0.01) were found between PAPP-A and clinical tests: Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale, Clinical Dementia Rating Sum of Boxes, Mini Mental State Examination, etc. The high importance of this finding lies in the fact that PAPP-A is a metalloproteinase, known to cleave insulin-like growth factor binding proteins. Since it also shares similar substrates with A Disintegrin and the Metalloproteinase family of enzymes that act as α-secretase to physiologically cleave amyloid precursor protein (APP) in the non-amyloidogenic pathway, it could be

  16. Baricitinib in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and an Inadequate Response to Conventional Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs in United States and Rest of World: A Subset Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Alvin F; Greenwald, Maria; Bradley, John D; Alam, Jahangir; Arora, Vipin; Kartman, Cynthia E

    2018-06-01

    This article evaluates the efficacy and safety of baricitinib 4 mg versus placebo in United States including Puerto Rico (US) and rest of the world (ROW) subpopulations using data pooled from RA-BEAM and RA-BUILD, which enrolled patients with moderate-to-severe adult-onset rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In RA-BEAM, patients with an inadequate response (IR) to methotrexate, at least one X-ray erosion, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) ≥ 6 mg/L were randomized to placebo or orally administered baricitinib 4 mg daily or subcutaneously administered adalimumab 40 mg every other week. In RA-BUILD, patients with an IR to at least one conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (csDMARD) and with hsCRP ≥ 3.6 mg/L were randomized to placebo or baricitinib 2 or 4 mg daily. Patients in both trials were biologic naive. In this post hoc analysis, data from both studies were pooled (714 baricitinib 4 mg-treated, 716 placebo-treated patients). Overall, 188 US and 1242 ROW patients were included. Subgroups differed in baseline characteristics including race, weight, age, time since RA diagnosis, current corticosteroid use, and previous csDMARD use. At weeks 12 and 24, baricitinib-treated patients had larger responses compared to placebo-treated patients for multiple efficacy outcomes: American College of Rheumatology 20/50/70 response, low disease activity, remission, Disease Activity Score 28-C-reactive protein, and Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index. Overall, similar efficacy was observed in US and ROW subgroups with no notable safety differences between subgroups at weeks 12 or 24. Baricitinib 4 mg was efficacious compared to placebo in US and ROW subpopulations. Safety was similar between subgroups. Eli Lilly & Company and Incyte Corporation. ClinicalTrials.gov identifiers, NCT01721057; NCT01710358.

  17. Biological Evaluation of Double Point Modified Analogues of 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D2 as Potential Anti-Leukemic Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoife Corcoran

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Structurally similar double-point modified analogues of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D2 (1,25D2 were screened in vitro for their pro-differentiating activity against the promyeloid cell line HL60. Their affinities towards human full length vitamin D receptor (VDR and metabolic stability against human vitamin D 24-hydroxylase (CYP24A1 were also tested. The analogues (PRI-1730, PRI-1731, PRI-1732, PRI-1733 and PRI-1734 contained 5,6-trans modification of the A-ring and of the triene system, additional hydroxyl or unsaturation at C-22 in the side chain and reversed absolute configuration (24-epi at C-24 of 1,25D2. As presented in this paper, introduction of selected structural modifications simultaneously in two distinct parts of the vitamin D molecule resulted in a divergent group of analogues. Analogues showed lower VDR affinity in comparison to that of the parent hormones, 1,25D2 and 1,25D3, and they caused effective HL60 cell differentiation only at high concentrations of 100 nM and above. Unexpectedly, introducing of a 5,6-trans modification combined with C-22 hydroxyl and 24-epi configuration switched off entirely the cell differentiation activity of the analogue (PRI-1734. However, this analogue remained a moderate substrate for CYP24A1, as it was metabolized at 22%, compared to 35% for 1,25D2. Other analogues from this series were either less (12% for PRI-1731 and PRI-1733 or more (52% for PRI-1732 resistant to the enzymatic deactivation. Although the inactive analogue PRI-1734 failed to show VDR antagonism, when tested in HL60 cells, its structure might be a good starting point for our design of a vitamin D antagonist.

  18. Plant species modifies the functional response of Phytoseiulus persimilis (Acari: Phytoseiidae) to Tetranychus urticae (Acari: Tetranychidae): implications for biological control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skirvin, D J; Fenlon, J S

    2001-02-01

    The functional response of the predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis Athias-Henriot to eggs of its prey, the spider mite Tetranychus urticae Koch was examined on three plant species. Experiments were done to determine whether differences in the functional response on the three plant species were due to the morphological features of the crop directly on the predator or through an effect of the plant species on the prey. The results show that crop morphology is the only factor influencing the predatory ability of P. persimilis on the three plant species. Fewer eggs were eaten on Ceanothus thyrsiflorus var. 'Autumnal Blue', the plant species with hairy leaves, and greater numbers of prey consumed on Choisya ternata, a species with smooth leaves. However, similarly few eggs were eaten on the smooth, but waxy leaved Euonymus japonicus as on Ceanothus thyrsiflorus, demonstrating that morphological characters of leaves other than the possession of hairs and trichomes may affect the rates of predation. The implications of these results for the tritrophic interactions between plant, predator and prey, and the development of suitable biological control strategies are discussed.

  19. Design of a multi-dopamine-modified polymer ligand optimally suited for interfacing magnetic nanoparticles with biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wentao; Ji, Xin; Na, Hyon Bin; Safi, Malak; Smith, Alexandra; Palui, Goutam; Perez, J Manuel; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2014-06-03

    We have designed a set of multifunctional and multicoordinating polymer ligands that are optimally suited for surface functionalizing iron oxide and potentially other magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) and promoting their integration into biological systems. The amphiphilic polymers are prepared by coupling (via nucleophilic addition) several amine-terminated dopamine anchoring groups, poly(ethylene glycol) moieties, and reactive groups onto a poly(isobutylene-alt-maleic anhydride) (PIMA) chain. This design greatly benefits from the highly efficient and reagent-free one-step reaction of maleic anhydride groups with amine-containing molecules. The availability of several dopamine groups in the same ligand greatly enhances the ligand affinity, via multiple coordination, to the magnetic NPs, while the hydrophilic and reactive groups promote colloidal stability in buffer media and allow subsequent conjugation with target biomolecules. Iron oxide nanoparticles ligand exchanged with these polymer ligands have a compact hydrodynamic size and exhibit enhanced long-term colloidal stability over the pH range of 4-12 and in the presence of excess electrolytes. Nanoparticles ligated with terminally reactive polymers have been easily coupled to target dyes and tested in live cell imaging with no measurable cytotoxicity. Finally, the resulting hydrophilic nanoparticles exhibit large and size-dependent r2 relaxivity values.

  20. Evaluation of a genetically modified foot-and-mouth disease virus vaccine candidate generated by reverse genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is the most economically important and highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals worldwide. Control of the disease has been mainly based on large-scale vaccinations with whole-virus inactivated vaccines. In recent years, a series of outbreaks of type O FMD occurred in China (including Chinese Taipei, Chinese Hong Kong) posed a tremendous threat to Chinese animal husbandry. Its causative agent, type O FMDV, has evolved into three topotypes (East–South Asia (ME-SA), Southeast Asia (SEA), Cathay (CHY)) in these regions, which represents an important obstacle to disease control. The available FMD vaccine in China shows generally good protection against ME-SA and SEA topotype viruses infection, but affords insufficient protection against some variants of the CHY topotype. Therefore, the choice of a new vaccine strain is of fundamental importance. Results The present study describes the generation of a full-length infectious cDNA clone of FMDV vaccine strain and a genetically modified virus with some amino acid substitutions in antigenic sites 1, 3, and 4, based on the established infectious clone. The recombinant viruses had similar growth properties to the wild O/HN/CHA/93 virus. All swine immunized with inactivated vaccine prepared from the O/HN/CHA/93 were fully protected from challenge with the viruses of ME-SA and SEA topotypes and partially protected against challenge with the virus of CHY topotype at 28 days post-immunization. In contrast, the swine inoculated with the genetically modified vaccine were completely protected from the infection of viruses of the three topotypes. Conclusions Some amino acid substitutions in the FMDV vaccine strain genome did not have an effect on the ability of viral replication in vitro. The vaccine prepared from genetically modified FMDV by reverse genetics significantly improved the protective efficacy to the variant of the CHY topotype, compared with the wild O/HN/CHA/93 virus

  1. Evaluation of a genetically modified foot-and-mouth disease virus vaccine candidate generated by reverse genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Pinghua

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD is the most economically important and highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals worldwide. Control of the disease has been mainly based on large-scale vaccinations with whole-virus inactivated vaccines. In recent years, a series of outbreaks of type O FMD occurred in China (including Chinese Taipei, Chinese Hong Kong posed a tremendous threat to Chinese animal husbandry. Its causative agent, type O FMDV, has evolved into three topotypes (East–South Asia (ME-SA, Southeast Asia (SEA, Cathay (CHY in these regions, which represents an important obstacle to disease control. The available FMD vaccine in China shows generally good protection against ME-SA and SEA topotype viruses infection, but affords insufficient protection against some variants of the CHY topotype. Therefore, the choice of a new vaccine strain is of fundamental importance. Results The present study describes the generation of a full-length infectious cDNA clone of FMDV vaccine strain and a genetically modified virus with some amino acid substitutions in antigenic sites 1, 3, and 4, based on the established infectious clone. The recombinant viruses had similar growth properties to the wild O/HN/CHA/93 virus. All swine immunized with inactivated vaccine prepared from the O/HN/CHA/93 were fully protected from challenge with the viruses of ME-SA and SEA topotypes and partially protected against challenge with the virus of CHY topotype at 28 days post-immunization. In contrast, the swine inoculated with the genetically modified vaccine were completely protected from the infection of viruses of the three topotypes. Conclusions Some amino acid substitutions in the FMDV vaccine strain genome did not have an effect on the ability of viral replication in vitro. The vaccine prepared from genetically modified FMDV by reverse genetics significantly improved the protective efficacy to the variant of the CHY topotype, compared with the

  2. Human procollagen type I surface-modified PHB-based non-woven textile scaffolds for cell growth: preparation and short-term biological tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawalec, Michał; Sobota, Michał; Kurcok, Piotr; Sitkowska, Anna; Sieroń, Aleksander L; Komar, Patrycja

    2014-01-01

    3D fine porous structures obtained by electrospinning a poly[(R,S)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (aPHB)/ poly[(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (PHB) (85/15 w/w) blend were successfully modified with human procollagen type I by simple immersion of the polyester scaffold in an aqueous solution of the protein. Effective modification of the scaffold with human procollagen I was confirmed by an immunodetection test, which revealed the presence of the procollagen type I as an outer layer even on inner structures of the porous matrixes. Biological tests of 3D fabrics made of the PHB blend provide support for the adhesion and proliferation of human fibroblasts, while their modification with procollagen type I increased the biocompatibility of the final scaffolds significantly, as shown by the notable increase in the number of attached cells during the early hours of their incubation. Based on these findings, human procollagen type I surface-modified aPHB/PHB scaffolds should be considered a promising material in regenerative medicine. (paper)

  3. Implementation of a Tool to Modify Behavior in a Chronic Disease Management Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole D. Gillespie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic diseases like diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia continue to be a significant burden on the US health care system. As a result, many healthcare providers are implementing strategies to prevent the incidence of heart disease and other chronic conditions. Among these strategies are proper drug therapy and lifestyle modifications. Behavior change is often the rate-limiting step in the prevention and maintenance of lifestyle modifications. The purpose of this paper is to describe a tool used to guide the progression and assess the effectiveness of a cardiovascular risk reduction program. The tool uses the Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change to determine the readiness and confidence to change specific lifestyle behaviors pertinent to cardiovascular health. The tool aids the practitioner in developing a patient-centered plan to implement and maintain lifestyle changes and can be tailored to use in any situation requiring a behavior change on the part of the patient.

  4. Lifestyle modifies obesity-associated risk of cardiovascular disease in a genetically homogeneous population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Marit E; Borch-Johnsen, Knut; Bjerregaard, Peter

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The association between obesity and cardiovascular disease risk differs across populations. Whether such differences in obesity-related risk factors exist within population groups of the same genetic origin but with differences in lifestyle remains to be determined. OBJECTIVE: The aim...... was to analyze whether obesity was associated with the same degree of metabolic disturbances in 2 groups of genetically homogeneous Inuit who were exposed to considerable differences in lifestyle. DESIGN: We studied obesity and cardiovascular disease risk factors in a cross-sectional population survey of 2311...... Inuit living in Denmark (n = 995) or Greenland (n = 1316). The participants received an oral-glucose-tolerance test. Blood tests were supplemented by structured interviews and anthropometric and blood pressure measurements. RESULTS: The trend in the association between obesity and metabolic effects...

  5. Disease modifying therapies in type 1 diabetes: Where have we been, and where are we going?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Sandra; Greenbaum, Carla J

    2015-08-01

    With more than four decades of clinical research and 25 years of clinical trials, much is known about the natural history of T1D before and after clinical diagnosis. We know that autoimmunity occurs early in life, that islet autoimmunity inevitably leads to clinically overt disease, and that some immune therapies can alter the disease course. In the future, we will likely conduct trials to more deeply explore mechanisms of disease and response to therapy, employ combinations of agents including those aimed at supporting beta cells, consider the use of chronic, intermittent therapy, focus studies on preventing progression from islet autoimmunity, and consider the potential benefits of studying children independently from adults. Much of this work will depend upon clinical trial networks such as Diabetes TrialNet. Such networks not only have the expertise to conduct studies but their sharing of data and samples also allows for discovery work by multiple investigators, laying the groundwork for the future. Working with patients, families, funders and industry, such collaborative networks can accelerate the translation of science to clinical practice to improve the lives of those living with T1D. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Modified Lipids and Lipoproteins in Chronic Kidney Disease: A New Class of Uremic Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nans Florens

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is associated with an enhanced oxidative stress and deep modifications in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. First, many oxidized lipids accumulate in CKD and were shown to exert toxic effects on cells and tissues. These lipids are known to interfere with many cell functions and to be pro-apoptotic and pro-inflammatory, especially in the cardiovascular system. Some, like F2-isoprostanes, are directly correlated with CKD progression. Their accumulation, added to their noxious effects, rendered their nomination as uremic toxins credible. Similarly, lipoproteins are deeply altered by CKD modifications, either in their metabolism or composition. These impairments lead to impaired effects of HDL on their normal effectors and may strongly participate in accelerated atherosclerosis and failure of statins in end-stage renal disease patients. This review describes the impact of oxidized lipids and other modifications in the natural history of CKD and its complications. Moreover, this review focuses on the modifications of lipoproteins and their impact on the emergence of cardiovascular diseases in CKD as well as the appropriateness of considering them as actual mediators of uremic toxicity.

  7. DISEASE MODIFYING THERAPY AND OUTCOME OF RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS: RETROSPECTIVE ASSESSMENT OF LONG-TERM RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Karateyev

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: To investigate the relation between patterns of basic treatment and the outcome of disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Material and methods: We studied retrospectively two groups of patients with RA (1987 ACR criteria: 1 main group - died (72 patients, mean duration of disease from the onset to death 12.8±0.9 years; 2 control group - alive to 1999 with duration of disease at least 15 years (90 patients, mean follow-up period 19.4±0.47 years. Results: Some patterns of basic treatment were observed: 1 "passive ” strategy - only hydroxychloroquine or sulphasalazine during many years; 2 "inteirupted " treatment - early treatment gold or cytotoxics, but when improvement occurred, therapy with DMARD was interrupted for 1-2 years or more, after that re-started etc.; 3 “emergency” strategy’ - 7-10years of "passive" treatment, after that se\\>ere destruction and/or amyloidosis appeared, and cytotoxics started; 4 typical "pyramid " strategy; 5 "active " strategy - early start of treatment with active DMARD (melotrexate, gold with consecutive change of DMARDs without interruption of basic treatment (very close to "sawtooth ” strategy. The most of died patients were treated with "passive ” and "interrupted" strategies, but the most of patients in control group were treated with "pyramid” and "active" strategies. Conclusion: active strategy of basic treatment has a positive influence on the survival ofpatients with R.A.

  8. Modified Lipids and Lipoproteins in Chronic Kidney Disease: A New Class of Uremic Toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florens, Nans; Calzada, Catherine; Lyasko, Egor; Juillard, Laurent; Soulage, Christophe O

    2016-12-16

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with an enhanced oxidative stress and deep modifications in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. First, many oxidized lipids accumulate in CKD and were shown to exert toxic effects on cells and tissues. These lipids are known to interfere with many cell functions and to be pro-apoptotic and pro-inflammatory, especially in the cardiovascular system. Some, like F2-isoprostanes, are directly correlated with CKD progression. Their accumulation, added to their noxious effects, rendered their nomination as uremic toxins credible. Similarly, lipoproteins are deeply altered by CKD modifications, either in their metabolism or composition. These impairments lead to impaired effects of HDL on their normal effectors and may strongly participate in accelerated atherosclerosis and failure of statins in end-stage renal disease patients. This review describes the impact of oxidized lipids and other modifications in the natural history of CKD and its complications. Moreover, this review focuses on the modifications of lipoproteins and their impact on the emergence of cardiovascular diseases in CKD as well as the appropriateness of considering them as actual mediators of uremic toxicity.

  9. Smoking modifies the associated increased risk of future cardiovascular disease by genetic variation on chromosome 9p21.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Hamrefors

    Full Text Available AIMS: Genetic predisposition for cardiovascular disease (CVD is likely to be modified by environmental exposures. We tested if the associated risk of CVD and CVD-mortality by the single nucleotide polymorphism rs4977574 on chromosome 9p21 is modified by life-style factors. METHODS AND RESULTS: A total of 24,944 middle-aged subjects (62% females from the population-based Malmö-Diet-and-Cancer-Cohort were genotyped. Smoking, education and physical activity-levels were recorded. Subjects were followed for 15 years for incidence of coronary artery disease (CAD; N = 2309, ischemic stroke (N = 1253 and CVD-mortality (N = 1156. Multiplicative interactions between rs4977574 and life-style factors on endpoints were tested in Cox-regression-models. We observed an interaction between rs4977574 and smoking on incident CAD (P = 0.035 and CVD-mortality (P = 0.012. The hazard ratios (HR per risk allele of rs4977574 were highest in never smokers (N = 9642 for CAD (HR = 1.26; 95% CI 1.13-1.40; P<0.001 and for CVD-mortality (HR = 1.40; 95% CI 1.20-1.63; P<0.001, whereas the risk increase by rs4977574 was attenuated in current smokers (N = 7000 for both CAD (HR = 1.05; 95%CI 0.95-1.16; P = 0.326 and CVD-mortality (HR = 1.08; 95%CI 0.94-1.23; P = 0.270. A meta-analysis supported the finding that the associated increased risk of CAD by the risk-allele was attenuated in smokers. Neither education nor physical activity-levels modified the associated risk of CAD, ischemic stroke and CVD mortality conferred by rs4977574. CONCLUSION: Smoking may modify the associated risk of CAD and CVD-mortality conferred by genetic variation on chromosome 9p21. Whether the observed attenuation of the genetic risk reflects a pathophysiological mechanism or is a result of smoking being such a strong risk-factor that it may eliminate the associated genetic effect, requires further investigation.

  10. Multiwall carbon nanotubes chemically modified carbon paste electrodes for determination of gentamicin sulfate in pharmaceutical preparations and biological fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, M M; Abed El-Aziz, G M

    2016-02-01

    This article focused on the construction and characteristics of novel and sensitive gentamicin carbon paste electrodes which are based on the incorporation of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) which improve the characteristics of the electrodes. The electrodes were constructed based on gentamicin-phosphotungstate (GNS-PTA) called CPE1, gentamicin-phosphomolybdate (GNS-PMA) called CPE2, GNS-PTA+ MWMCNTs called MWCPE1, and GNS-PMA+ MWMCNTs called MWCPE2. The constructed electrodes, at optimum paste composition, exhibited good Nernstian response for determination of gentamicin sulfate (GNS) over a linear concentration range from 2.5×10(-6) to 1×10(-2), 3.0×10(-6) to 1×10(-2), 4.9×10(-7) to 1×10(-2) and 5.0×10(-7) to 1×10(-2)molL(-1), with lower detection limit 1×10(-6), 1×10(-6), 1.9×10(-7) and 2.2×10(-7)molL(-1), and with slope values of 29.0±0.4, 29.2±0.7, 31.2±0.5 and 31.0±0.6mV/decade for CPE1, CPE2, MWCPE1 and MWCPE2, respectively. The response of electrodes is not affected by pH in the range 3-8 for CPE1 and CPE2 and in the range 2.5-8.5 for MWCPE1 and MWCPE2. The results showed fast dynamic response time (about 8-5s) and long lifetime (more than 2months) for all electrodes. The sensors showed high selectivity for gentamicin sulfate (GNS) with respect to a large number of interfering species. The constructed electrodes were successfully applied for determination of GNS in pure form, its pharmaceutical preparations and biological fluids using standard addition and potentiometric titration methods with high accuracy and precision. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Global Foot-and-Mouth Disease Research Update and Gap Analysis: 7 - Pathogenesis and Molecular Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, L; Knight-Jones, T J D; Charleston, B; Rodriguez, L L; Gay, C G; Sumption, K J; Vosloo, W

    2016-06-01

    We assessed research knowledge gaps in the fields of FMDV (foot-and-mouth disease virus) pathogenesis and molecular biology by performing a literature review (2011-15) and collecting research updates (2014) from 33 institutes from across the world. Findings were used to identify priority areas for future research. There have been important advances in FMDV pathogenesis; FMDV remains in lymph nodes of many recovered animals that otherwise do not appear persistently infected, even in species previously not associated with the carrier state. Whether virus retention helps maintain host immunity and/or virus survival is not known. Studies of FMDV pathogenesis in wildlife have provided insights into disease epidemiology, in endemic and epidemic settings. Many aspects of FMDV infection and virus entry remain unknown; however, at the cellular level, we know that expression level and availability of integrins (that permit viral entry), rate of clearance of infected cells and strength of anti-viral type I IFN (interferon) response are key determinants of tissue tropism. Extending findings to improved understanding of transmission requires a standardized approach and adoption of natural routes of infection during experimental study. There has been recognition of the importance of autophagosomes for FMDV entry into the cytoplasm following cell surface receptor binding, and that distinct internal cellular membranes are exploited for viral replication and immune evasion. New roles for viral proteins in blocking type I IFN production and downstream signalling have been identified facilitating research in anti-viral therapeutics. We know more about how infection affects cell protein expression, and research into molecular determinants of capsid stability has aided the development of stable vaccines. We have an expanding knowledge of viral and host molecular determinates of virulence and infectiousness, and of how phylogenetics may be used to estimate vaccine match and strain

  12. Biology, etiology, and control of virus diseases of banana and plantain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P Lava; Selvarajan, Ramasamy; Iskra-Caruana, Marie-Line; Chabannes, Matthieu; Hanna, Rachid

    2015-01-01

    Banana and plantain (Musa spp.), produced in 10.3 million ha in the tropics, are among the world's top 10 food crops. They are vegetatively propagated using suckers or tissue culture plants and grown almost as perennial plantations. These are prone to the accumulation of pests and pathogens, especially viruses which contribute to yield reduction and are also barriers to the international exchange of germplasm. The most economically important viruses of banana and plantain are Banana bunchy top virus (BBTV), a complex of banana streak viruses (BSVs) and Banana bract mosaic virus (BBrMV). BBTV is known to cause the most serious economic losses in the "Old World," contributing to a yield reduction of up to 100% and responsible for a dramatic reduction in cropping area. The BSVs exist as episomal and endogenous forms are known to be worldwide in distribution. In India and the Philippines, BBrMV is known to be economically important but recently the virus was discovered in Colombia and Costa Rica, thus signaling its spread into the "New World." Banana and plantain are also known to be susceptible to five other viruses of minor significance, such as Abaca mosaic virus, Abaca bunchy top virus, Banana mild mosaic virus, Banana virus X, and Cucumber mosaic virus. Studies over the past 100 years have contributed to important knowledge on disease biology, distribution, and spread. Research during the last 25 years have led to a better understanding of the virus-vector-host interactions, virus diversity, disease etiology, and epidemiology. In addition, new diagnostic tools were developed which were used for surveillance and the certification of planting material. Due to a lack of durable host resistance in the Musa spp., phytosanitary measures and the use of virus-free planting material are the major methods of virus control. The state of knowledge on BBTV, BBrMV, and BSVs, and other minor viruses, disease spread, and control are summarized in this review. © 2015 Elsevier Inc

  13. Interferon and biologic signatures in dermatomyositis skin: specificity and heterogeneity across diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Wong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dermatomyositis (DM is an autoimmune disease that mainly affects the skin, muscle, and lung. The pathogenesis of skin inflammation in DM is not well understood. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: We analyzed genome-wide expression data in DM skin and compared them to those from healthy controls. We observed a robust upregulation of interferon (IFN-inducible genes in DM skin, as well as several other gene modules pertaining to inflammation, complement activation, and epidermal activation and differentiation. The interferon (IFN-inducible genes within the DM signature were present not only in DM and lupus, but also cutaneous herpes simplex-2 infection and to a lesser degree, psoriasis. This IFN signature was absent or weakly present in atopic dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, acne vulgaris, systemic sclerosis, and localized scleroderma/morphea. We observed that the IFN signature in DM skin appears to be more closely related to type I than type II IFN based on in vitro IFN stimulation expression signatures. However, quantitation of IFN mRNAs in DM skin shows that the majority of known type I IFNs, as well as IFN g, are overexpressed in DM skin. In addition, both IFN-beta and IFN-gamma (but not other type I IFN transcript levels were highly correlated with the degree of the in vivo IFN transcriptional response in DM skin. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: As in the blood and muscle, DM skin is characterized by an overwhelming presence of an IFN signature, although it is difficult to conclusively define this response as type I or type II. Understanding the significance of the IFN signature in this wide array of inflammatory diseases will be furthered by identification of the nature of the cells that both produce and respond to IFN, as well as which IFN subtype is biologically active in each diseased tissue.

  14. Thermodynamic perspectives on genetic instructions, the laws of biology and diseased states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevors, Jack T; Saier, Milton H

    2011-01-01

    This article examines in a broad perspective entropy and some examples of its relationship to evolution, genetic instructions and how we view diseases. Living organisms are programmed by functional genetic instructions (FGI), through cellular communication pathways, to grow and reproduce by maintaining a variety of hemistable, ordered structures (low entropy). Living organisms are far from equilibrium with their surrounding environmental systems, which tends towards increasing disorder (increasing entropy). Organisms free themselves from high entropy (high disorder) to maintain their cellular structures for a period of time sufficient to allow reproduction and the resultant offspring to reach reproductive ages. This time interval varies for different species. Bacteria, for example need no sexual parents; dividing cells are nearly identical to the previous generation of cells, and can begin a new cell cycle without delay under appropriate conditions. By contrast, human infants require years of care before they can reproduce. Living organisms maintain order in spite of their changing surrounding environment that decreases order according to the second law of thermodynamics. These events actually work together since living organisms create ordered biological structures by increasing local entropy. From a disease perspective, viruses and other disease agents interrupt the normal functioning of cells. The pressure for survival may result in mechanisms that allow organisms to resist attacks by viruses, other pathogens, destructive chemicals and physical agents such as radiation. However, when the attack is successful, the organism can be damaged until the cell, tissue, organ or entire organism is no longer functional and entropy increases. Copyright © 2010 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Thermodynamic perspectives on genetic instructions, the laws of biology, diseased states and human population control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saier, M. H.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines in a broad perspective entropy and some examples of its relationship to evolution, genetic instructions and how we view diseases. Many knowledge gaps abound, hence our understanding is still fragmented and incomplete. Living organisms are programmed by functional genetic instructions (FGI), through cellular communication pathways, to grow and reproduce by maintaining a variety of hemistable, ordered structures (low entropy). Living organisms are far from equilibrium with their surrounding environmental systems, which tends towards increasing disorder (increasing entropy). Organisms must free themselves from high entropy (high disorder) to maintain their cellular structures for a period of time sufficient enough to allow reproduction and the resultant offspring to reach reproductive ages. This time interval varies for different species. Bacteria, for example need no sexual parents; dividing cells are nearly identical to the previous generation of cells, and can begin a new cell cycle without delay under appropriate conditions. By contrast, human infants require years of care before they can reproduce. Living organisms maintain order in spite of their changing surrounding environment, that decreases order according to the second law of thermodynamics. These events actually work together since living organisms create ordered biological structures by increasing local entropy. From a disease perspective, viruses and other disease agents interrupt the normal functioning of cells. The pressure for survival may result in mechanisms that allow organisms to resist attacks by viruses, other pathogens, destructive chemicals and physical agents such as radiation. However, when the attack is successful, the organism can be damaged until the cell, tissue, organ or entire organism is no longer functional and entropy increases. PMID:21262480

  16. Radiographic assessment of disease progression in rheumatoid arthritis patients undergoing early disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wick, M.C.

    2002-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common systemic disease predominantly involving the joints. Since the pathogenesis, etiology and pathophysiological mechanisms of RA have only been partially elucidated, a definitive therapy has not been established. Precise diagnosis and follow-up therapy requires objective quantification, and radiological analyses are considered to be the most appropriate method. The aim of this study was to retrospectively determine the time-dependent progression of joint damage in patients with pharmacologically-treated RA, and to determine which therapeutic agents demonstrate the highest efficacy. Outpatient records, laboratory values, therapy schemes and radiographs from hands and feet of 150 RA patients were collected, analyzed and statistically evaluated. Radiographs were quantified using the Larsen score and supportively using the 'RheumaCoach-Rheumatology' computer software. Our observations reveal that radiologically-detectable damage is most pronounced during the first year of disease, while mitigated and generally progressing linearly thereafter. Overall Larsen scores linearly increased from year 0 to 10 (r=0.853), during which the mean Larsen score increased 7.93 ± 0.76 per year. During the first year, RA progression was similar regardless of the medication administered (gold-compounds, AU; chloroquine, CQ; methotrexate, MTX; sulfasalazine SSZ). While MTX and CQ treatment showed no difference when examined as mean 5-year increment of Larsen score, AU and SSZ showed up to 3 fold higher RA progression compared with MTX. The Larsen score in year 1 did not correlate with that of years 2 to 5. In contrast, Larsen scores in year 2 were linearly related to each of the subsequent 3 years. Despite similar ESR values in various medication groups, cumulative ESR correlated with RA progression, and its reduction with therapeutic efficacy. In conclusion, this study found that, (i) early DMARD-treated RA progressed more rapidly during the first than

  17. Synthetic oligonucleotide antigens modified with locked nucleic acids detect disease specific antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samuelsen, Simone V; Solov'yov, Ilia A.; Balboni, Imelda M.

    2016-01-01

    New techniques to detect and quantify antibodies to nucleic acids would provide a significant advance over current methods, which often lack specificity. We investigate the potential of novel antigens containing locked nucleic acids (LNAs) as targets for antibodies. Particularly, employing...... molecular dynamics we predict optimal nucleotide composition for targeting DNA-binding antibodies. As a proof of concept, we address a problem of detecting anti-DNA antibodies that are characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus, a chronic autoimmune disease with multiple manifestations. We test the best...... that the novel method is a promising tool to create antigens for research and point-of-care monitoring of anti-DNA antibodies....

  18. Coronary Heart Disease Alters Intercellular Communication by Modifying Microparticle-Mediated MicroRNA Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Nnenna A.; Eapen, Danny; Manocha, Pankaj; Kassem, Hatem Al; Lassegue, Bernard; Ghasemzadeh, Nima; Quyyumi, Arshed; Searles, Charles D.

    2013-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is characterized by abnormal intercellular communication and circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) are likely involved in this process. Here, we show that CHD was associated with changes in the transport of circulating miRNA, particularly decreased miRNA enrichment in microparticles (MPs). Additionally, MPs from CHD patients were less efficient at transferring miRNA to cultured HUVECs, which correlated with their diminished capacity to bind developmental endothelial locus-1 (Del-1). In summary, CHD was associated with distinct changes in circulating miRNA transport and these changes may contribute to the abnormal intercellular communication that underlies CHD initiation and progression. PMID:24042051

  19. SAT2 Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Structurally Modified for Increased Thermostability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Katherine A; Kotecha, Abhay; Seago, Julian; Ren, Jingshan; Fry, Elizabeth E; Stuart, David I; Charleston, Bryan; Maree, Francois F

    2017-05-15

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), particularly strains of the O and SAT serotypes, is notoriously unstable. Consequently, vaccines derived from heat-labile SAT viruses have been linked to the induction of immunity with a poor duration and hence require more frequent vaccinations to ensure protection. In silico calculations predicted residue substitutions that would increase interactions at the interpentamer interface, supporting increased stability. We assessed the stability of the 18 recombinant mutant viruses in regard to their growth kinetics, antigenicity, plaque morphology, genetic stability, and temperature, ionic, and pH stability by using Thermofluor and inactivation assays in order to evaluate potential SAT2 vaccine candidates with improved stability. The most stable mutant for temperature and pH stability was the S2093Y single mutant, while other promising mutants were the E3198A, L2094V, and S2093H single mutants and the F2062Y-H2087M-H3143V triple mutant. Although the S2093Y mutant had the greatest stability, it exhibited smaller plaques, a reduced growth rate, a change in monoclonal antibody footprint, and poor genetic stability properties compared to those of the wild-type virus. However, these factors affecting production can be overcome. The addition of 1 M NaCl was found to further increase the stability of the SAT2 panel of viruses. The S2093Y and S2093H mutants were selected for future use in stabilizing SAT2 vaccines. IMPORTANCE Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes a highly contagious acute vesicular disease in cloven-hoofed livestock and wildlife. The control of the disease by vaccination is essential, especially at livestock-wildlife interfaces. The instability of some serotypes, such as SAT2, affects the quality of vaccines and therefore the duration of immunity. We have shown that we can improve the stability of SAT2 viruses by mutating residues at the capsid interface through predictive modeling. This is an important finding for

  20. Harnessing the Power of Integrated Mitochondrial Biology and Physiology: A Special Report on the NHLBI Mitochondria in Heart Diseases Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Peipei; Gustafsson, Åsa B; Bers, Don M; Blatter, Lothar A; Cai, Hua; Jahangir, Arshad; Kelly, Daniel; Muoio, Deborah; O'Rourke, Brian; Rabinovitch, Peter; Trayanova, Natalia; Van Eyk, Jennifer; Weiss, James N; Wong, Renee; Schwartz Longacre, Lisa

    2015-07-17

    Mitochondrial biology is the sum of diverse phenomena from molecular profiles to physiological functions. A mechanistic understanding of mitochondria in disease development, and hence the future prospect of clinical translations, relies on a systems-level integration of expertise from multiple fields of investigation. Upon the successful conclusion of a recent National Institutes of Health, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute initiative on integrative mitochondrial biology in cardiovascular diseases, we reflect on the accomplishments made possible by this unique interdisciplinary collaboration effort and exciting new fronts on the study of these remarkable organelles. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Development of criteria for evaluating clinical response in thyroid eye disease (CRI-TED) using a modified Delphi technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Raymond S.; Tsirbas, Angelo; Gordon, Mark; Lee, Diana; Khadavi, Nicole; Garneau, Helene Chokron; Goldberg, Robert A.; Cahill, Kenneth; Dolman, Peter J.; Elner, Victor; Feldon, Steve; Lucarelli, Mark; Uddin, Jimmy; Kazim, Michael; Smith, Terry J.; Khanna, Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    To identify components of a provisional clinical response index for thyroid eye disease (CRI-TED) using a modified Delphi technique. The International Thyroid Eye Disease Society (ITEDS) conducted a structured, 3-round Delphi exercise establishing consensus for a core set of measures for clinical trials in TED. The steering committee discussed the results in a face-to-face meeting (nominal group technique) and evaluated each criterion with respect to its feasibility, reliability, redundancy, and validity. Redundant measures were consolidated or excluded. Criteria were parsed into 11 domains for the Delphi surveys. Eighty four respondents participated in the Delphi-1 survey, providing 220 unique items. Ninety- two members (100% of the respondents from Delphi 1 plus eight new participants) responded in Delphi-2 and rated the same 220 items. Sixty-four members (76% of participants) rated 153 criteria in Delphi-3 (67 criteria were excluded due to redundancy). Criteria with a mean greater than 6 (1 least appropriate to 9 most appropriate) were further evaluated by the nominal group technique and provisional core measures were chosen. Using a Delphi exercise, we developed provisional core measures for assessing disease activity and severity in clinical trials of therapies for TED. These measures will be iteratively refined for use in multicenter clinical trials. PMID:19752424

  2. Does wheat genetically modified for disease resistance affect root-colonizing pseudomonads and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Joana Beatrice; Song-Wilson, Yi; Foetzki, Andrea; Luginbühl, Carolin; Winzeler, Michael; Kneubühler, Yvan; Matasci, Caterina; Mascher-Frutschi, Fabio; Kalinina, Olena; Boller, Thomas; Keel, Christoph; Maurhofer, Monika

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of genetically modified (GM) wheat with introduced pm3b mildew resistance transgene, on two types of root-colonizing microorganisms, namely pseudomonads and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Our investigations were carried out in field trials over three field seasons and at two locations. Serial dilution in selective King's B medium and microscopy were used to assess the abundance of cultivable pseudomonads and AMF, respectively. We developed a denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) method to characterize the diversity of the pqqC gene, which is involved in Pseudomonas phosphate solubilization. A major result was that in the first field season Pseudomonas abundances and diversity on roots of GM pm3b lines, but also on non-GM sister lines were different from those of the parental lines and conventional wheat cultivars. This indicates a strong effect of the procedures by which these plants were created, as GM and sister lines were generated via tissue cultures and propagated in the greenhouse. Moreover, Pseudomonas population sizes and DGGE profiles varied considerably between individual GM lines with different genomic locations of the pm3b transgene. At individual time points, differences in Pseudomonas and AMF accumulation between GM and control lines were detected, but they were not consistent and much less pronounced than differences detected between young and old plants, different conventional wheat cultivars or at different locations and field seasons. Thus, we conclude that impacts of GM wheat on plant-beneficial root-colonizing microorganisms are minor and not of ecological importance. The cultivation-independent pqqC-DGGE approach proved to be a useful tool for monitoring the dynamics of Pseudomonas populations in a wheat field and even sensitive enough for detecting population responses to altered plant physiology.

  3. Does wheat genetically modified for disease resistance affect root-colonizing pseudomonads and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Beatrice Meyer

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the impact of genetically modified (GM wheat with introduced pm3b mildew resistance transgene, on two types of root-colonizing microorganisms, namely pseudomonads and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF. Our investigations were carried out in field trials over three field seasons and at two locations. Serial dilution in selective King's B medium and microscopy were used to assess the abundance of cultivable pseudomonads and AMF, respectively. We developed a denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE method to characterize the diversity of the pqqC gene, which is involved in Pseudomonas phosphate solubilization. A major result was that in the first field season Pseudomonas abundances and diversity on roots of GM pm3b lines, but also on non-GM sister lines were different from those of the parental lines and conventional wheat cultivars. This indicates a strong effect of the procedures by which these plants were created, as GM and sister lines were generated via tissue cultures and propagated in the greenhouse. Moreover, Pseudomonas population sizes and DGGE profiles varied considerably between individual GM lines with different genomic locations of the pm3b transgene. At individual time points, differences in Pseudomonas and AMF accumulation between GM and control lines were detected, but they were not consistent and much less pronounced than differences detected between young and old plants, different conventional wheat cultivars or at different locations and field seasons. Thus, we conclude that impacts of GM wheat on plant-beneficial root-colonizing microorganisms are minor and not of ecological importance. The cultivation-independent pqqC-DGGE approach proved to be a useful tool for monitoring the dynamics of Pseudomonas populations in a wheat field and even sensitive enough for detecting population responses to altered plant physiology.

  4. A modified elliptical formula to estimate kidney collagen content in a model of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Jake A; Zhu, Janice; Duan, Bin; Li, Jingsong; Zhou, Ping; Paka, Latha; Yamin, Michael A; Goldberg, Itzhak D; Narayan, Prakash

    2018-01-01

    The extent of scarring or renal interstitial collagen deposition in chronic kidney disease (CKD) can only be ascertained by highly invasive, painful and sometimes risky, tissue biopsy. Interestingly, while CKD-related abnormalities in kidney size can often be visualized using ultrasound, not only does the ellipsoid formula used today underestimate true renal size, but the calculated renal size does not inform tubulointerstitial collagen content. We used coronal kidney sections from healthy mice and mice with kidney disease to develop a new formula for estimating renal parenchymal area. While treating the kidney as an ellipse with the major axis (a) the polar distance, this technique involves extending the minor axis (b) into the renal pelvis to obtain a new minor axis, be. The calculated renal parenchymal area is remarkably similar to the true or measured area. Biochemically determined kidney collagen content revealed a strong and positive correlation with the calculated renal parenchymal area. Picrosirius red staining for tubulointerstitial collagen also correlated with calculated renal parenchymal area. The extent of renal scarring, i.e. kidney interstitial collagen content, can now be computed by making just two axial measurements which can easily be accomplished via noninvasive imaging of this organ.

  5. Oxidatively modified glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and Alzheimer's disease: many pathways to neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, D Allan; Hardas, Sarita S; Lange, Miranda L Bader

    2010-01-01

    Recently, the oxidoreductase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), has become a subject of interest as more and more studies reveal a surfeit of diverse GAPDH functions, extending beyond traditional aerobic metabolism of glucose. As a result of multiple isoforms and cellular locales, GAPDH is able to come in contact with a variety of small molecules, proteins, membranes, etc., that play important roles in normal and pathologic cell function. Specifically, GAPDH has been shown to interact with neurodegenerative disease-associated proteins, including the amyloid-beta protein precursor (AbetaPP). Studies from our laboratory have shown significant inhibition of GAPDH dehydrogenase activity in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain due to oxidative modification. Although oxidative stress and damage is a common phenomenon in the AD brain, it would seem that inhibition of glycolytic enzyme activity is merely one avenue in which AD pathology affects neuronal cell development and survival, as oxidative modification can also impart a toxic gain-of-function to many proteins, including GAPDH. In this review, we examine the many functions of GAPDH with respect to AD brain; in particular, the apparent role(s) of GAPDH in AD-related apoptotic cell death is emphasized.

  6. Multiwall carbon nanotubes chemically modified carbon paste electrodes for determination of gentamicin sulfate in pharmaceutical preparations and biological fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, M.M., E-mail: magdy_mmagdy@yahoo.com; Abed El-aziz, G.M., E-mail: Gamal_abedelaziz@yahoo.com

    2016-02-01

    This article focused on the construction and characteristics of novel and sensitive gentamicin carbon paste electrodes which are based on the incorporation of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) which improve the characteristics of the electrodes. The electrodes were constructed based on gentamicin-phosphotungstate (GNS-PTA) called CPE{sub 1}, gentamicin-phosphomolybdate (GNS-PMA) called CPE{sub 2}, GNS-PTA + MWMCNTs called MWCPE{sub 1}, and GNS-PMA + MWMCNTs called MWCPE{sub 2}. The constructed electrodes, at optimum paste composition, exhibited good Nernstian response for determination of gentamicin sulfate (GNS) over a linear concentration range from 2.5 × 10{sup −6} to 1 × 10{sup −2}, 3.0 × 10{sup −6} to 1 × 10{sup −2}, 4.9 × 10{sup −7} to 1 × 10{sup −2} and 5.0 × 10{sup −7} to 1 × 10{sup −2} mol L{sup −1}, with lower detection limit 1 × 10{sup −6}, 1 × 10{sup −6}, 1.9 × 10{sup −7} and 2.2 × 10{sup −7} mol L{sup −1}, and with slope values of 29.0 ± 0.4, 29.2 ± 0.7, 31.2 ± 0.5 and 31.0 ± 0.6 mV/decade for CPE{sub 1}, CPE{sub 2}, MWCPE{sub 1} and MWCPE{sub 2}, respectively. The response of electrodes is not affected by pH in the range 3–8 for CPE{sub 1} and CPE{sub 2} and in the range 2.5–8.5 for MWCPE{sub 1} and MWCPE{sub 2}. The results showed fast dynamic response time (about 8–5 s) and long lifetime (more than 2 months) for all electrodes. The sensors showed high selectivity for gentamicin sulfate (GNS) with respect to a large number of interfering species. The constructed electrodes were successfully applied for determination of GNS in pure form, its pharmaceutical preparations and biological fluids using standard addition and potentiometric titration methods with high accuracy and precision. - Graphical abstract: The incorporation of MWCNTs in paste composition improves the characteristics of the MWCPE electrodes which show better responses in terms of sensitivity, Nernstian slope, linear range, faster

  7. Re-evaluating concepts of biological function in clinical medicine: towards a new naturalistic theory of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin-Yee, Benjamin; Upshur, Ross E G

    2017-08-01

    Naturalistic theories of disease appeal to concepts of biological function, and use the notion of dysfunction as the basis of their definitions. Debates in the philosophy of biology demonstrate how attributing functions in organisms and establishing the function-dysfunction distinction is by no means straightforward. This problematization of functional ascription has undermined naturalistic theories and led some authors to abandon the concept of dysfunction, favoring instead definitions based in normative criteria or phenomenological approaches. Although this work has enhanced our understanding of disease and illness, we need not necessarily abandon naturalistic concepts of function and dysfunction in the disease debate. This article attempts to move towards a new naturalistic theory of disease that overcomes the limitations of previous definitions and offers advantages in the clinical setting. Our approach involves a re-evaluation of concepts of biological function employed by naturalistic theories. Drawing on recent insights from the philosophy of biology, we develop a contextual and evaluative account of function that is better suited to clinical medicine and remains consistent with contemporary naturalism. We also show how an updated naturalistic view shares important affinities with normativist and phenomenological positions, suggesting a possibility for consilience in the disease debate.

  8. NIA-AA Research Framework: Toward a biological definition of Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Clifford R.; Bennett, David A.; Blennow, Kaj; Carrillo, Maria C.; Dunn, Billy; Haeberlein, Samantha Budd; Holtzman, David M.; Jagust, William; Jessen, Frank; Karlawish, Jason; Liu, Enchi; Molinuevo, Jose Luis; Montine, Thomas; Phelps, Creighton; Rankin, Katherine P.; Rowe, Christopher C.; Scheltens, Philip; Siemers, Eric; Snyder, Heather M.; Sperling, Reisa

    2018-01-01

    In 2011, the National Institute on Aging and Alzheimer’s Association created separate diagnostic recommendations for the preclinical, mild cognitive impairment, and dementia stages of Alzheimer’s disease. Scientific progress in the interim led to an initiative by the National Institute on Aging and Alzheimer’s Association to update and unify the 2011 guidelines. This unifying update is labeled a “research framework” because its intended use is for observational and interventional research, not routine clinical care. In the National Institute on Aging and Alzheimer’s Association Research Framework, Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is defined by its underlying pathologic processes that can be documented by postmortem examination or in vivo by biomarkers. The diagnosis is not based on the clinical consequences of the disease (i.e., symptoms/signs) in this research framework, which shifts the definition of AD in living people from a syndromal to a biological construct. The research framework focuses on the diagnosis of AD with biomarkers in living persons. Biomarkers are grouped into those of β amyloid deposition, pathologic tau, and neurodegeneration [AT(N)]. This ATN classification system groups different biomarkers (imaging and biofluids) by the pathologic process each measures. The AT(N) system is flexible in that new biomarkers can be added to the three existing AT(N) groups, and new biomarker groups beyond AT(N) can be added when they become available. We focus on AD as a continuum, and cognitive staging may be accomplished using continuous measures. However, we also outline two different categorical cognitive schemes for staging the severity of cognitive impairment: a scheme using three traditional syndromal categories and a six-stage numeric scheme. It is important to stress that this framework seeks to create a common language with which investigators can generate and test hypotheses about the interactions among different pathologic processes (denoted

  9. NIA-AA Research Framework: Toward a biological definition of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Clifford R; Bennett, David A; Blennow, Kaj; Carrillo, Maria C; Dunn, Billy; Haeberlein, Samantha Budd; Holtzman, David M; Jagust, William; Jessen, Frank; Karlawish, Jason; Liu, Enchi; Molinuevo, Jose Luis; Montine, Thomas; Phelps, Creighton; Rankin, Katherine P; Rowe, Christopher C; Scheltens, Philip; Siemers, Eric; Snyder, Heather M; Sperling, Reisa

    2018-04-01

    In 2011, the National Institute on Aging and Alzheimer's Association created separate diagnostic recommendations for the preclinical, mild cognitive impairment, and dementia stages of Alzheimer's disease. Scientific progress in the interim led to an initiative by the National Institute on Aging and Alzheimer's Association to update and unify the 2011 guidelines. This unifying update is labeled a "research framework" because its intended use is for observational and interventional research, not routine clinical care. In the National Institute on Aging and Alzheimer's Association Research Framework, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is defined by its underlying pathologic processes that can be documented by postmortem examination or in vivo by biomarkers. The diagnosis is not based on the clinical consequences of the disease (i.e., symptoms/signs) in this research framework, which shifts the definition of AD in living people from a syndromal to a biological construct. The research framework focuses on the diagnosis of AD with biomarkers in living persons. Biomarkers are grouped into those of β amyloid deposition, pathologic tau, and neurodegeneration [AT(N)]. This ATN classification system groups different biomarkers (imaging and biofluids) by the pathologic process each measures. The AT(N) system is flexible in that new biomarkers can be added to the three existing AT(N) groups, and new biomarker groups beyond AT(N) can be added when they become available. We focus on AD as a continuum, and cognitive staging may be accomplished using continuous measures. However, we also outline two different categorical cognitive schemes for staging the severity of cognitive impairment: a scheme using three traditional syndromal categories and a six-stage numeric scheme. It is important to stress that this framework seeks to create a common language with which investigators can generate and test hypotheses about the interactions among different pathologic processes (denoted by biomarkers

  10. Does influence at work modify the relation between high occupational physical activity and risk of heart disease in women?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allesøe, Karen; Holtermann, Andreas; Rugulies, Reiner

    2017-01-01

    .6 years by individual linkage to incident IHD in the Danish National Patient Registry. Information on OPA, influence at work, other occupational factors and known risk factors for IHD was collected by self-report in 1993. Results: During follow-up 869 nurses were hospitalised with incident IHD. Nurses......Purpose: To investigate whether influence at work modifies the association between demanding and strenuous occupational physical activity (OPA) and risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD). Methods: A sample of 12,093 nurses aged 45–64 years from the Danish Nurse Cohort Study was followed for 20...... exposed to strenuous OPA and low influence at work had a 46% increased risk of IHD [hazard ratio (HR) 1.46 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02–2.09)] compared to the reference group of nurses with moderate OPA and high influence at work. Nurses exposed to strenuous OPA and high influence at work were...

  11. Efficacy of VX-509 (decernotinib) in combination with a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genovese, Mark C.; Yang, Fang; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess early effects on joint structures of VX-509 in combination with stable disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) therapy using MRI in adults with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods This phase II, placebo-controlled, double-blind, dose-ranging study randomised patients with RA......), and the RA MRI scoring (RAMRIS) system. Results ACR20 response at week 12 was 63.6%, 60.0% and 60.0% in the VX-509 100-mg, 200-mg and 300-mg groups, respectively, compared with 25.0% in the placebo group. DAS28-CRP scores decreased in a dose-dependent manner with increasing VX-509 doses. Decreases in RAMRIS...... to a DMARD alone. MRI responses were detected at week 12. Treatment was generally well tolerated. Trial registration number NCT01754935; results....

  12. Sex modifies the APOE-related risk of developing Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Andre; Tian, Lu; Henderson, Victor W; Greicius, Michael D

    2014-04-01

    The APOE4 allele is the strongest genetic risk factor for sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD). Case-control studies suggest the APOE4 link to AD is stronger in women. We examined the APOE4-by-sex interaction in conversion risk (from healthy aging to mild cognitive impairment (MCI)/AD or from MCI to AD) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker levels. Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to compute hazard ratios (HRs) for an APOE-by-sex interaction on conversion in controls (n = 5,496) and MCI patients (n = 2,588). The interaction was also tested in CSF biomarker levels of 980 subjects from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. Among controls, male and female carriers were more likely to convert to MCI/AD, but the effect was stronger in women (HR = 1.81 for women; HR = 1.27 for men; interaction: p = 0.011). The interaction remained significant in a predefined subanalysis restricted to APOE3/3 and APOE3/4 genotypes. Among MCI patients, both male and female APOE4 carriers were more likely to convert to AD (HR = 2.16 for women; HR = 1.64 for men); the interaction was not significant (p = 0.14). In the subanalysis restricted to APOE3/3 and APOE3/4 genotypes, the interaction was significant (p = 0.02; HR = 2.17 for women; HR = 1.51 for men). The APOE4-by-sex interaction on biomarker levels was significant for MCI patients for total tau and the tau-to-Aβ ratio (p = 0.009 and p = 0.02, respectively; more AD-like in women). APOE4 confers greater AD risk in women. Biomarker results suggest that increased APOE-related risk in women may be associated with tau pathology. These findings have important clinical implications and suggest novel research approaches into AD pathogenesis. © 2014 American Neurological Association.

  13. Alternative Splicing and Tissue-specific Elastin Misassembly Act as Biological Modifiers of Human Elastin Gene Frameshift Mutations Associated with Dominant Cutis Laxa*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugitani, Hideki; Hirano, Eiichi; Knutsen, Russell H.; Shifren, Adrian; Wagenseil, Jessica E.; Ciliberto, Christopher; Kozel, Beth A.; Urban, Zsolt; Davis, Elaine C.; Broekelmann, Thomas J.; Mecham, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    Elastin is the extracellular matrix protein in vertebrates that provides elastic recoil to blood vessels, the lung, and skin. Because the elastin gene has undergone significant changes in the primate lineage, modeling elastin diseases in non-human animals can be problematic. To investigate the pathophysiology underlying a class of elastin gene mutations leading to autosomal dominant cutis laxa, we engineered a cutis laxa mutation (single base deletion) into the human elastin gene contained in a bacterial artificial chromosome. When expressed as a transgene in mice, mutant elastin was incorporated into elastic fibers in the skin and lung with adverse effects on tissue function. In contrast, only low levels of mutant protein incorporated into aortic elastin, which explains why the vasculature is relatively unaffected in this disease. RNA stability studies found that alternative exon splicing acts as a modifier of disease severity by influencing the spectrum of mutant transcripts that survive nonsense-mediated decay. Our results confirm the critical role of the C-terminal region of tropoelastin in elastic fiber assembly and suggest tissue-specific differences in the elastin assembly pathway. PMID:22573328

  14. Allosteric regulation of epigenetic modifying enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucconi, Beth E; Cole, Philip A

    2017-08-01

    Epigenetic enzymes including histone modifying enzymes are key regulators of gene expression in normal and disease processes. Many drug development strategies to target histone modifying enzymes have focused on ligands that bind to enzyme active sites, but allosteric pockets offer potentially attractive opportunities for therapeutic development. Recent biochemical studies have revealed roles for small molecule and peptide ligands binding outside of the active sites in modulating the catalytic activities of histone modifying enzymes. Here we highlight several examples of allosteric regulation of epigenetic enzymes and discuss the biological significance of these findings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A computational systems biology software platform for multiscale modeling and simulation: Integrating whole-body physiology, disease biology, and molecular reaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eEissing

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Today, in silico studies and trial simulations already complement experimental approaches in pharmaceutical R&D and have become indispensable tools for decision making and communication with regulatory agencies. While biology is multi-scale by nature, project work and software tools usually focus on isolated aspects of drug action, such as pharmacokinetics at the organism scale or pharmacodynamic interaction on the molecular level. We present a modeling and simulation software platform consisting of PK-Sim® and MoBi® capable of building and simulating models that integrate across biological scales. A prototypical multiscale model for the progression of a pancreatic tumor and its response to pharmacotherapy is constructed and virtual patients are treated with a prodrug activated by hepatic metabolization. Tumor growth is driven by signal transduction leading to cell cycle transition and proliferation. Free tumor concentrations of the active metabolite inhibit Raf kinase in the signaling cascade and thereby cell cycle progression. In a virtual clinical study, the individual therapeutic outcome of the chemotherapeutic intervention is simulated for a large population with heterogeneous genomic background. Thereby, the platform allows efficient model building and integration of biological knowledge and prior data from all biological scales. Experimental in vitro model systems can be linked with observations in animal experiments and clinical trials. The interplay between patients, diseases, and drugs and topics with high clinical relevance such as the role of pharmacogenomics, drug-drug or drug-metabolite interactions can be addressed using this mechanistic, insight driven multiscale modeling approach.

  16. Feasibility of a Modified E-PASS and POSSUM System for Postoperative Risk Assessment in Patients with Spinal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Dong Hyun; Kim, Do Young; Choi, Sun Kyu; Shin, Dong Ah; Ha, Yoon; Kim, Keung Nyun; Yoon, Do Heum; Yi, Seong

    2018-04-01

    This retrospective case control study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of using Estimation of Physiological Ability and Surgical Stress (E-PASS) and Physiological and Operative Severity Score for the enumeration of Mortality and Morbidity (POSSUM) systems in patients undergoing spinal surgical procedures. Degenerative spine disease has increased in incidence in aging societies, as has the number of older adult patients undergoing spinal surgery. Many older adults are at a high surgical risk because of comorbidity and poor general health. We retrospectively reviewed 217 patients who had undergone spinal surgery at a single tertiary care. We investigated complications within 1 month after surgery. Criteria for both skin incision in E-PASS and operation magnitude in the POSSUM system were modified to fit spine surgery. We calculated the E-PASS and POSSUM scores for enrolled patients, and investigated the relationship between postoperative complications and both surgical risk scoring systems. To reinforce the predictive ability of the E-PASS system, we adjusted equations and developed modified E-PASS systems. The overall complication rate for spinal surgery was 22.6%. Forty-nine patients experienced 58 postoperative complications. Nineteen major complications, including hematoma, deep infection, pleural effusion, progression of weakness, pulmonary edema, esophageal injury, myocardial infarction, pneumonia, reoperation, renal failure, sepsis, and death, occurred in 17 patients. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for predicted postoperative complications after spine surgery was 0.588 for E-PASS and 0.721 for POSSUM. For predicted major postoperative complications, the AUC increased to 0.619 for E-PASS and 0.842 for POSSUM. The AUC of the E-PASS system increased from 0.588 to 0.694 with the Modified E-PASS equation. The POSSUM system may be more useful than the E-PASS system for estimating postoperative surgical risk in patients undergoing

  17. Long-Term Outcomes in Puerto Ricans with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Receiving Early Treatment with Disease-Modifying Anti-Rheumatic Drugs using the American College of Rheumatology Definition of Early RA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela-Rosario, Noemí; Arroyo-Ávila, Mariangelí; Fred-Jiménez, Ruth M; Díaz-Correa, Leyda M; Pérez-Ríos, Naydi; Rodríguez, Noelia; Ríos, Grissel; Vilá, Luis M

    2017-01-01

    Early treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) results in better long-term outcomes. However, the optimal therapeutic window has not been clearly established. To determine the clinical outcome of Puerto Ricans with RA receiving early treatment with conventional and/or biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) based on the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) definition of early RA. A cross-sectional study was performed in a cohort of Puerto Ricans with RA. Demographic features, clinical manifestations, disease activity, functional status, and pharmacotherapy were determined. Early treatment was defined as the initiation of DMARDs (conventional and/or biologic) in less than 6 months from the onset of symptoms attributable to RA. Patients who received early (disease duration was 14.9 years and 337 (87.0%) patients were women. One hundred and twenty one (31.3%) patients received early treatment. In the multivariate analysis adjusted for age and sex, early treatment was associated with better functional status, lower probability of joint deformities, intra-articular injections and joint replacement surgeries, and lower scores in the physician's assessments of global health, functional impairment and physical damage of patients. Using the ACR definition of early RA, this group of patients treated with DMARDs within 6 months of disease had better long-term outcomes with less physical damage and functional impairment.

  18. Light and heavy touch reduces postural sway and modifies axial tone in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzén, Erika; Paquette, Caroline; Gurfinkel, Victor; Horak, Fay

    2012-10-01

    Light touch with a stable object reduces postural sway by increasing axial postural tone in healthy subjects. However, it is unknown whether subjects with Parkinson's disease (PD), who have more postural sway and higher axial postural tone than healthy subjects, can benefit from haptic touch. To investigate the effect of light and heavy touch on postural stability and hip tone in subjects with PD. Fourteen subjects with mid-stage PD and 14 healthy control subjects were evaluated during quiet standing with eyes closed with their arms (a) crossed, (b) lightly touching a fixed rigid bar in front of them, and (c) firmly gripping the bar. Postural sway was measured with a forceplate, and axial hip tone was quantified using a unique device that measures the resistance of the hips to yaw rotation while maintaining active stance. Subjects with PD significantly decreased their postural sway with light or heavy touch (P touch, hip tone was larger in PD subjects. With touch, however, tone values were similar in both groups. This change in hip tone with touch was highly correlated with the initial amount of tone (PD, r = -.72 to -.95; controls, r = -.74 to -.85). The authors showed, for the first time, that subjects with PD benefit from touch similarly to control subjects and that despite higher axial postural tone, PD subjects are able to modulate their tone with touch. Future studies should investigate the complex relationship between touch and postural tone.

  19. Does Caffeine Consumption Modify Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid-β Levels in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Travassos, Maria; Santana, Isabel; Baldeiras, Inês

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine may be protective against Alzheimer's disease (AD) by modulating amyloid-β (Aβ) metabolic pathways. The present work aimed to study a possible association of caffeine consumption with the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, particularly Aβ. The study included 88 patients with AD or mild...... cognitive impairment. The consumption of caffeine and theobromine was evaluated using a validated food questionnaire. Quantification of caffeine and main active metabolites was performed with liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. The levels of A(1-42), total tau, and phosphorylated tau...... in the CSF were determined using sandwich ELISA methods and other Aβ species, Aβ(X-38), Aβ(X-40), and Aβ(X-42), with the MSD Aβ Triplex assay. The concentration of caffeine was 0.79±1.15 μg/mL in the CSF and 1.20±1.88 μg/mL in the plasma. No correlation was found between caffeine consumption and Aβ42...

  20. Potential genetic modifiers of disease risk and age at onset in patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration and GRN mutations: a genome-wide association study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottier, Cyril; Zhou, Xiaolai; Perkerson, Ralph B; Baker, Matt; Jenkins, Gregory D; Serie, Daniel J; Ghidoni, Roberta; Benussi, Luisa; Binetti, Giuliano; López de Munain, Adolfo; Zulaica, Miren; Moreno, Fermin; Le Ber, Isabelle; Pasquier, Florence; Hannequin, Didier; Sánchez-Valle, Raquel; Antonell, Anna; Lladó, Albert; Parsons, Tammee M; Finch, NiCole A; Finger, Elizabeth C; Lippa, Carol F; Huey, Edward D; Neumann, Manuela; Heutink, Peter; Synofzik, Matthis; Wilke, Carlo; Rissman, Robert A; Slawek, Jaroslaw; Sitek, Emilia; Johannsen, Peter; Nielsen, Jørgen E; Ren, Yingxue; van Blitterswijk, Marka; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Christopher, Elizabeth; Murray, Melissa E; Bieniek, Kevin F; Evers, Bret M; Ferrari, Camilla; Rollinson, Sara; Richardson, Anna; Scarpini, Elio; Fumagalli, Giorgio G; Padovani, Alessandro; Hardy, John; Momeni, Parastoo; Ferrari, Raffaele; Frangipane, Francesca; Maletta, Raffaele; Anfossi, Maria; Gallo, Maura; Petrucelli, Leonard; Suh, EunRan; Lopez, Oscar L; Wong, Tsz H; van Rooij, Jeroen G J; Seelaar, Harro; Mead, Simon; Caselli, Richard J; Reiman, Eric M; Noel Sabbagh, Marwan; Kjolby, Mads; Nykjaer, Anders; Karydas, Anna M; Boxer, Adam L; Grinberg, Lea T; Grafman, Jordan; Spina, Salvatore; Oblak, Adrian; Mesulam, M-Marsel; Weintraub, Sandra; Geula, Changiz; Hodges, John R; Piguet, Olivier; Brooks, William S; Irwin, David J; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Edward B; Josephs, Keith A; Parisi, Joseph E; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer; Knopman, David S; Nacmias, Benedetta; Piaceri, Irene; Bagnoli, Silvia; Sorbi, Sandro; Gearing, Marla; Glass, Jonathan; Beach, Thomas G; Black, Sandra E; Masellis, Mario; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Vonsattel, Jean-Paul; Honig, Lawrence S; Kofler, Julia; Bruni, Amalia C; Snowden, Julie; Mann, David; Pickering-Brown, Stuart; Diehl-Schmid, Janine; Winkelmann, Juliane; Galimberti, Daniela; Graff, Caroline; Öijerstedt, Linn; Troakes, Claire; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Cruchaga, Carlos; Cairns, Nigel J; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Halliday, Glenda M; Kwok, John B; van Swieten, John C; White, Charles L; Ghetti, Bernardino; Murell, Jill R; Mackenzie, Ian R A; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek R; Borroni, Barbara; Rossi, Giacomina; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Petersen, Ronald C; Bigio, Eileen H; Grossman, Murray; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Seeley, William W; Miller, Bruce L; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Boeve, Bradley F; Dickson, Dennis W; Biernacka, Joanna M; Rademakers, Rosa

    2018-06-01

    from 26 sites, 20 of which overlapped with the discovery stage. No genome-wide significant association with age at onset was identified in the discovery or replication stages, or in the meta-analysis. However, in the case-control analysis, we replicated the previously reported TMEM106B association (rs1990622 meta-analysis odds ratio [OR] 0·54, 95% CI 0·46-0·63; p=3·54 × 10 -16 ), and identified a novel genome-wide significant locus at GFRA2 on chromosome 8p21.3 associated with disease risk (rs36196656 meta-analysis OR 1·49, 95% CI 1·30-1·71; p=1·58 × 10 -8 ). Expression analyses showed that the risk-associated allele at rs36196656 decreased GFRA2 mRNA concentrations in cerebellar tissue (p=0·04). No effect of rs36196656 on plasma and CSF progranulin concentrations was detected by ELISA; however, co-immunoprecipitation experiments in HEK293T cells did suggest a direct binding of progranulin and GFRA2. TMEM106B-related and GFRA2-related pathways might be future targets for treatments for FTLD, but the biological interaction between progranulin and these potential disease modifiers requires further study. TMEM106B and GFRA2 might also provide opportunities to select and stratify patients for future clinical trials and, when more is known about their potential effects, to inform genetic counselling, especially for asymptomatic individuals. National Institute on Aging, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Italian Ministry of Health, UK National Institute for Health Research, National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia, and the French National Research Agency. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Impact of biological therapy on body composition of patients with Chron's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julianne Campos dos Santos

    Full Text Available Summary Introduction: Protein-energy malnutrition in Crohn's disease (CD has been reported in 20 to 92% of patients, and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality and higher costs for the health system. Anti-TNF drugs are a landmark in the clinical management, promoting prolonged remission in patients with CD. It is believed that the remission of this disease leads to nutritional recovery. The effect of biological therapy on body composition and nutritional status is unclear. Method: Prospective study of body assessment by bioelectrical impedance method in patients with moderate to severe CD undergoing treatment with infliximab. The main outcome was the body composition before and after 6 months of anti-TNF therapy. Results: There was a predominance of females (52% with a mean age of 42±12 years. Most patients were eutrophic at baseline and remained so. There was an increase in all parameters of body composition after anti-TNF treatment: BMI (22.9±3.2 versus 25±3.8; p=0.005, waist circumference (88.1±6.7 versus 93.9±7.7; p=0.002, lean mass index (17.5±2.2 versus 18.2±2.3; p=0.000 and fat mass index (5.5±2.3 versus 6.8±2.3; p=0.000. Phase angle remained unchanged (6.2 versus 6.8; p=0.94. Conclusion: After therapy with IFX, all components of body composition increased, except for phase angle. The substantial increase in fat mass index and waist circumference led to concern regarding cardiovascular risk and, thus, to the need for further studies.

  2. Quality of Life Philosophy III. Towards a New Biology: Understanding the Biological Connection between Quality of Life, Disease, and Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soren Ventegodt

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses (in a philosophical way the complex and enigmatic interface between matter, life, and consciousness in modern medical science. The problem today in understanding living matter is not at the molecular level, but at the macro level where all molecular activities in the individual cell are coordinated, and especially at a higher level, where the activities of all the organism’s cells are coordinated. Although we understand very much of the body’s chemistry, we have only just started to get the gist of the tremendous organization of living matter. We are just beginning to acknowledge the enormous flow of information that is needed to make everything function in a healthy organism, including consciousness, where every cell does exactly what it has to do to make the organs function.A concept that seems to be able to bridge the scientifically very different domains of matter, life, and consciousness seems to be “biological information”. If a cell is seen as a liquid crystal in which the cell’s molecules constantly connect in firm mutual relationships only to dissolve again and become fluid and free, whenever the cell needs it, the backbone of the cell seems to be the information that organizes the cell. For example, in cell motion a cell is able to crawl with the help of a skeleton of fibers that can be created guided by biological information, whenever the cell needs the solidity provided by the fibers. The moment it has finished crawling or intends to crawl in another direction, these fibers will dissolve again. The fibers are made of millions of molecules that connect in an arranged pattern, and they dissolve when these molecules again let go of each other. How the cell precisely regulates such processes is today a complete mystery. How cells cocreate consciousness is also an enigma. All we can do is describe the cell and the organisms arising from its cells as filled with energy and information as well as an

  3. Light and heavy touch reduces postural sway and modifies axial tone in Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzén, Erika; Paquette, Caroline; Gurfinkel, Victor; Horak, Fay

    2014-01-01

    Background Light touch with a stable object reduces postural sway by increasing axial postural tone in healthy subjects. However, it is unknown whether subjects with Parkinson’s disease (PD), who have more postural sway and higher axial postural tone than healthy subjects, can benefit from haptic touch. Objective To investigate the effect of light and heavy touch on postural stability and hip tone in subjects with PD. Methods Fourteen subjects with mid-stage PD, and 14 healthy control subjects were evaluated during quiet standing with eyes closed with their arms: 1) crossed, 2) lightly touching a fixed rigid bar in front of them and 3) firmly gripping the bar. Postural sway was measured with a forceplate and axial hip tone was quantified using a unique device that measures the resistance of the hips to yaw rotation while maintaining active stance. Results Subjects with PD significantly decreased their postural sway with light or heavy touch (ptouch, hip tone was larger in PD subjects. With touch, however, tone values were similar in both groups. This change in hip tone with touch was highly correlated with the initial amount of tone (PD: r=− 0.72 to −0.95 and controls: r=−0.74 to−0.85). Conclusions We showed, for the first time, that subjects with PD benefit from touch similarly to control subjects and that despite higher axial postural tone, PD subjects are able to modulate their tone with touch. Future studies should investigate the complex relationship between touch and postural tone. PMID:22415944

  4. Psychosocial predictors of patient adherence to disease-modifying therapies for multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alosaimi FD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Fahad D Alosaimi,1 Alaa AlMulhem,2 Hanan AlShalan,2 Mohammad Alqazlan,3 Abdulgader Aldaif,4 Matthew Kowgier,5 Janooshsheya Balasundaram,6 Sanjeev Sockalingam6,7 1Department of Psychiatry, 2College of Medicine, King Saud University, 3Department of Mental Health, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, 4Department of Neurology, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 5Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, 6Centre for Mental Health, University Health Network, 7Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Objectives: Our aim was to identify the impact of psychosocial predictors, specifically relationship style, depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, cognitive impairment, and culture-specific disease beliefs, on treatment adherence for multiple sclerosis (MS patients.Methods: In this cross-sectional observational study, patients from two MS clinics in Saudi Arabia completed self-reported questionnaires focused on MS treatment adherence, physical symptom burden, relationship style, cultural beliefs, depressive symptoms, anxiety, and cognitive impairment.Results: A total of 163 MS patients participated, 81.6% of them were female, and the mean age of the patients was 31.6 years. Mean patient-reported adherence to their MS treatment regimen was 79.47%±25.26%. Multivariate linear regression analysis only identified patients’ belief that their MS was due to “supernatural” forces as being significantly negatively associated with MS medication adherence.Conclusion: This study demonstrates the importance of cultural interpretations to MS medication adherence in comparison to psychosocial factors. Education and family involvement in the treatment planning may address this issue and warrant further research. Keywords: multiple sclerosis, adherence, depression, attachment style, culture

  5. Modified impact of emotion on temporal discrimination in a transgenic rat model of Huntington disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis eFaure

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Huntington’s disease (HD is characterized by triad of motor, cognitive and emotional symptoms along with neuropathology in fronto-striatal circuit and limbic system including amygdala. Emotional alterations, which have a negative impact on patient well-being, represent some of the earliest symptoms of HD and might be related to the onset of the neurodegenerative process. In the transgenic rat model (tgHD rats, evidence suggest emotional alterations at the symptomatic stage along with neuropathology of the central nucleus of amygdala (CE. Studies in humans and animals demonstrate that emotion can modulate time perception. The impact of emotion on time perception has never been tested in HD, nor is it known if that impact could be part of the presymptomatic emotional phenotype of the pathology. The aim of this paper was to characterize the effect of emotion on temporal discrimination in presymptomatic tgHD animals. In the first experiment, we characterized the acute effect of an emotion (fear conditioned stimulus on temporal discrimination using a bisection procedure, and tested its dependency upon an intact central amygdala. The second experiment was aimed at comparing presymptomatic homozygous transgenic animals at 7-months of age and their wild-type littermates (WT in their performance on the modulation of temporal discrimination by emotion. Our principal findings show that (1 a fear cue produces a short-lived decrease of temporal precision after its termination, and (2 animals with medial CE lesion and presymptomatic tgHD animals demonstrate an alteration of this emotion-evoked temporal distortion. The results contribute to our knowledge about the presymptomatic phenotype of this HD rat model, showing susceptibility to emotion that may be related to dysfunction of the central nucleus of amygdala.

  6. Messina: a novel analysis tool to identify biologically relevant molecules in disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Pinese

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Morphologically similar cancers display heterogeneous patterns of molecular aberrations and follow substantially different clinical courses. This diversity has become the basis for the definition of molecular phenotypes, with significant implications for therapy. Microarray or proteomic expression profiling is conventionally employed to identify disease-associated genes, however, traditional approaches for the analysis of profiling experiments may miss molecular aberrations which define biologically relevant subtypes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we present Messina, a method that can identify those genes that only sometimes show aberrant expression in cancer. We demonstrate with simulated data that Messina is highly sensitive and specific when used to identify genes which are aberrantly expressed in only a proportion of cancers, and compare Messina to contemporary analysis techniques. We illustrate Messina by using it to detect the aberrant expression of a gene that may play an important role in pancreatic cancer. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Messina allows the detection of genes with profiles typical of markers of molecular subtype, and complements existing methods to assist the identification of such markers. Messina is applicable to any global expression profiling data, and to allow its easy application has been packaged into a freely-available stand-alone software package.

  7. Genomic and biological characterization of Newcastle disease viruses isolated from migratory mallards (Anas platyrhynchos).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Momena; Yaqub, Tahir; Nazir, Jawad; Shehzad, Wasim; Aziz-Ul-Rahman; Sohail, Tayyebah; Mukhtar, Nadia; Mehboob, Arsalan; Munir, Muhammad; Shabbir, Muhammad Zubair

    2018-04-30

    Given the global evolutionary dynamics of Newcastle disease viruses (NDVs), it is imperative to continue extensive surveillance, routine monitoring and characterization of isolates originating from natural reservoirs (waterfowls). In this report, we isolated and characterized two virulent NDV strains from clinically healthy mallard (Anas platyrhynchos). Both isolates had a genome of 15,192 nucleotides encoding six genes in an order of 3´-NP-P-M-F-HN-L-5´. The biological characteristics (mean death time: 49.5-50 hr, EID 50 10 8.5  ml -1 ) and presence of a typical cleavage site in the fusion (F) protein (112R-R-Q-K-R↓F117) confirmed the velogenic nature of these isolates. Phylogenetic analysis classified both isolates as members of genotype VII within class-II. Furthermore, based upon the hypervariable region of the F gene (375 nt), isolates showed clustering within sub-genotype VIIi. Similarity index and parallel comparison revealed a higher nucleotide divergence from commonly used vaccine strains; LaSota (21%) and Mukteswar (17%). A comparative residues analysis with representative strains of different genotypes, including vaccine strains, revealed a number of substitutions at important structural and functional domains within the F and hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) proteins. Together, the results highlight consistent evolution among circulating NDVs supporting extensive surveillance of the virus in waterfowl to better elucidate epidemiology, evolutionary relationships and their impacts on commercial and backyard poultry.

  8. Is the Alzheimer's disease cortical thickness signature a biological marker for memory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busovaca, Edgar; Zimmerman, Molly E; Meier, Irene B; Griffith, Erica Y; Grieve, Stuart M; Korgaonkar, Mayuresh S; Williams, Leanne M; Brickman, Adam M

    2016-06-01

    Recent work suggests that analysis of the cortical thickness in key brain regions can be used to identify individuals at greatest risk for development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). It is unclear to what extent this "signature" is a biological marker of normal memory function - the primary cognitive domain affected by AD. We examined the relationship between the AD signature biomarker and memory functioning in a group of neurologically healthy young and older adults. Cortical thickness measurements and neuropsychological evaluations were obtained in 110 adults (age range 21-78, mean = 46) drawn from the Brain Resource International Database. The cohort was divided into young adult (n = 64, age 21-50) and older adult (n = 46, age 51-78) groups. Cortical thickness analysis was performed with FreeSurfer, and the average cortical thickness extracted from the eight regions that comprise the AD signature. Mean AD-signature cortical thickness was positively associated with performance on the delayed free recall trial of a list learning task and this relationship did not differ between younger and older adults. Mean AD-signature cortical thickness was not associated with performance on a test of psychomotor speed, as a control task, in either group. The results suggest that the AD signature cortical thickness is a marker for memory functioning across the adult lifespan.

  9. Pregnancy and the Use of Disease-Modifying Therapies in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis: Benefits versus Risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raed Alroughani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The burden of multiple sclerosis (MS in women of childbearing potential is increasing, with peak incidence around the age of 30 years, increasing incidence and prevalence, and growing female : male ratio. Guidelines recommend early use of disease-modifying therapies (DMTs, which are contraindicated or recommended with considerable caution, during pregnancy/breastfeeding. Many physicians are reluctant to prescribe them for a woman who is/is planning to be pregnant. Interferons are not absolutely contraindicated during pregnancy, since interferon-β appears to lack serious adverse effects in pregnancy, despite a warning in its labelling concerning risk of spontaneous abortion. Glatiramer acetate, natalizumab, and alemtuzumab also may not induce adverse pregnancy outcomes, although natalizumab may induce haematologic abnormalities in newborns. An accelerated elimination procedure is needed for teriflunomide if pregnancy occurs on treatment or if pregnancy is planned. Current evidence supports the contraindication for fingolimod during pregnancy; data on other DMTs remains limited. Increased relapse rates following withdrawal of some DMTs in pregnancy are concerning and require further research. The postpartum period brings increased risk of disease reactivation that needs to be carefully addressed through effective communication between treating physicians and mothers intending to breastfeed. We address the potential for use of the first- and second-line DMTs in pregnancy and lactation.

  10. Cognitive enhancers (nootropics). Part 3: drugs interacting with targets other than receptors or enzymes. disease-modifying drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froestl, Wolfgang; Pfeifer, Andrea; Muhs, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive enhancers (nootropics) are drugs to treat cognition deficits in patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, stroke, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or aging. Cognition refers to a capacity for information processing, applying knowledge, and changing preferences. It involves memory, attention, executive functions, perception, language, and psychomotor functions. The term nootropics was coined in 1972 when memory enhancing properties of piracetam were observed in clinical trials. In the meantime, hundreds of drugs have been evaluated in clinical trials or in preclinical experiments. To classify the compounds, a concept is proposed assigning drugs to 19 categories according to their mechanism(s) of action, in particular drugs interacting with receptors, enzymes, ion channels, nerve growth factors, re-uptake transporters, antioxidants, metal chelators, and disease modifying drugs, meaning small molecules, vaccines, and monoclonal antibodies interacting with amyloid-β and tau. For drugs, whose mechanism of action is not known, they are either classified according to structure, e.g., peptides, or their origin, e.g., natural products. The review covers the evolution of research in this field over the last 25 years.

  11. UKPDS 59: hyperglycemia and other potentially modifiable risk factors for peripheral vascular disease in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Amanda I; Stevens, Richard J; Neil, Andrew; Stratton, Irene M; Boulton, Andrew J M; Holman, Rury R

    2002-05-01

    To determine the role of hyperglycemia in prospective analyses of peripheral vascular disease (PVD) in type 2 diabetes, taking into account other potential risk factors. Potential risk factors for the development of PVD were examined in 3,834 of 5,102 individuals enrolled in the U.K. Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) without PVD at diagnosis of diabetes, followed for 6 years, and for whom relevant data were available. PVD was defined as two of the following: ankle-arm blood pressure index < 0.8, absence of both dorsalis pedis and posterior tibial pulses to palpation in one or both legs, and intermittent claudication. Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between potential risk factors measured 3-4 months after diagnosis of diabetes and incident PVD. The prevalence of PVD at 3-year intervals to 18 years was determined. Hyperglycemia, assessed as HbA(1c), was associated with an increased risk for incident PVD, independent of other risk factors including age, increased systolic blood pressure, reduced HDL cholesterol, smoking, prior cardiovascular disease, peripheral sensory neuropathy, and retinopathy. Each 1% increase in HbA(1c) was associated with a 28% increased risk of PVD (95% CI 12-46), and each 10-mmHg increase in systolic blood pressure with a 25% increase in risk (95% CI 10-43). Hyperglycemia, as well as smoking, dyslipidemia, and blood pressure are potentially modifiable risk factors for the development of PVD.

  12. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) assessment test scores corresponding to modified Medical Research Council grades among COPD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Jinwoo; Park, Young Sik; Lee, Sang-Min; Yim, Jae-Joon; Kim, Young Whan; Han, Sung Koo; Yoo, Chul-Gyu

    2015-09-01

    In assigning patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) to subgroups according to the updated guidelines of the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease, discrepancies have been noted between the COPD assessment test (CAT) criteria and modified Medical Research Council (mMRC) criteria. We investigated the determinants of symptom and risk groups and sought to identify a better CAT criterion. This retrospective study included COPD patients seen between June 20, 2012, and December 5, 2012. The CAT score that can accurately predict an mMRC grade ≥ 2 versus COPD patients, the percentages of patients classified into subgroups A, B, C, and D were 24.5%, 47.2%, 4.2%, and 24.1% based on CAT criteria and 49.3%, 22.4%, 8.9%, and 19.4% based on mMRC criteria, respectively. More than 90% of the patients who met the mMRC criteria for the 'more symptoms group' also met the CAT criteria. AUROC and CART analyses suggested that a CAT score ≥ 15 predicted an mMRC grade ≥ 2 more accurately than the current CAT score criterion. During follow-up, patients with CAT scores of 10 to 14 did not have a different risk of exacerbation versus those with CAT scores COPD patients.

  13. Modifiable lifestyle and social factors affect chronic kidney disease in high-risk individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkler, Daniela; Kohl, Maria; Heinze, Georg; Teo, Koon K; Rosengren, Annika; Pogue, Janice; Gao, Peggy; Gerstein, Hertzel; Yusuf, Salim; Oberbauer, Rainer; Mann, Johannes F E

    2015-04-01

    This observational study examined the association between modifiable lifestyle and social factors on the incidence and progression of early chronic kidney disease (CKD) among those with type 2 diabetes. All 6972 people from the Ongoing Telmisartan Alone and in Combination with Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial (ONTARGET) with diabetes but without macroalbuminuria were studied. CKD progression was defined as decline in GFR of more than 5% per year, progression to end-stage renal disease, microalbuminuria, or macroalbuminuria at 5.5 years. Lifestyle/social factors included tobacco and alcohol use, physical activity, stress, financial worries, the size of the social network and education. Adjustments were made for known risks such as age, diabetes duration, GFR, albuminuria, gender, body mass index, blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin-receptor blockers use. Competing risk of death was considered. At study end, 31% developed CKD and 15% had died. The social network score (SNS) was a significant independent risk factor of CKD and death, reducing the risk by 11 and 22% when comparing the third to the first tertile of the SNS (odds ratios of CKD 0.89 and death 0.78). Education showed a significant association with CKD but stress and financial worries did not. Those with moderate alcohol consumption had a significantly decreased CKD risk compared with nonusers. Regular physical activity significantly decreased the risk of CKD. Thus, lifestyle is a determinant of kidney health in people at high cardiovascular risk with diabetes.

  14. Oral disease-modifying therapies for multiple sclerosis in the Middle Eastern and North African (MENA) region: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deleu, Dirk; Mesraoua, Boulenouar; Canibaño, Beatriz; Melikyan, Gayane; Al Hail, Hassan; El-Sheikh, Lubna; Ali, Musab; Al Hussein, Hassan; Ibrahim, Faiza; Hanssens, Yolande

    2018-06-18

    The introduction of new disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) for remitting-relapsing multiple sclerosis (RRMS) has considerably transformed the landscape of therapeutic opportunities for this chronic disabling disease. Unlike injectable drugs, oral DMTs promote patient satisfaction and increase therapeutic adherence. This article reviews the salient features about the mode of action, efficacy, safety, and tolerability profile of approved oral DMTs in RRMS, and reviews their place in clinical algorithms in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. A systematic review was conducted using a comprehensive search of MEDLINE, PubMed, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (period January 1, 1995-January 31, 2018). Additional searches of the American Academy of Neurology and European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis abstracts from 2012-2017 were performed, in addition to searches of the Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency websites, to obtain relevant safety information on these DMTs. Four oral DMTs: fingolimod, teriflunomide, dimethyl fumarate, and cladribine have been approved by the regulatory agencies. Based on the number needed to treat (NNT), the potential role of these DMTs in the management of active and highly active or rapidly evolving RRMS is assessed. Finally, the place of the oral DMTs in clinical algorithms in the MENA region is reviewed.

  15. The impact of adjusted work conditions and disease-modifying drugs on work ability in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickström, Anne; Fagerström, Maria; Wickström, Lucas; Granåsen, Gabriel; Dahle, Charlotte; Vrethem, Magnus; Sundström, Peter

    2017-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neurological disorder that causes significantly reduced ability to work, and the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) is one of the main predictors for reduced work ability. To investigate how work requirements, flexible work conditions and disease-modifying drugs (DMDs) influence the work ability in relation to different EDSS grades in two MS populations. Work ability was studied in two MS populations: one in the southern and one in the northern part of Sweden, both demographically similar. In the latter population, more active work-promoting interventions have been practised and second-generation DMDs have been widely used from the onset of disease for several years. The proportion of MS patients who participated in the workforce or studied was significantly higher in the northern compared with the southern population ( p work conditions and were able to work more hours per week. Higher EDSS was associated with lower reduction in number of worked hours per week in the northern population ( p = 0.042). Our data indicated that treatment strategy and adjusted work conditions have impact on work ability in MS.

  16. How do patients with inflammatory bowel disease want their biological therapy administered?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Hannah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infliximab is usually administered by two monthly intravenous (iv infusions, therefore requiring visits to hospital. Adalimumab is administered by self subcutaneous (sc injections every other week. Both of these anti-TNF drugs appear to be equally efficacious in the treatment of Crohn's Disease and therefore the decision regarding which drug to choose will depend to some extent on patient choice, which may be based on the mode of administration. The aims of this study were to compare preferences in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD patients for two currently available anti-TNF agents and the reasons for their choices. Methods An anonymous questionnaire was distributed to IBD patients who had attended the Gastroenterology service (Ulster Hospital, Dundonald, Belfast, N. Ireland. UK between January 2007 and December 2007. The patients were asked in a hypothetical situation if the following administering methods of anti-TNF drugs (intravenous or subcutaneous were available, which drug route of administration would they choose. Results One hundred and twenty-five patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were issued questionnaires, of these 78 questionnaires were returned (62 percent response. The mean age of respondent was 44 years. Of the total number of respondents, 33 patients (42 percent preferred infliximab and 19 patients (24 percent preferred adalimumab (p = 0.07. Twenty-six patients (33 percent did not indicate a preference for either biological therapy and were not included in the final analysis. The commonest reason cited for those who chose infliximab (iv was: "I do not like the idea of self-injecting," (67 percent. For those patients who preferred adalimumab (sc the commonest reason cited was: "I prefer the convenience of injecting at home," (79 percent. Of those patients who had previously been treated with an anti-TNF therapy (n = 10, all infliximab six patients stated that they would prefer infliximab if given

  17. Simultaneous Response in Several Domains in Patients with Psoriatic Disease Treated with Etanercept as Monotherapy or in Combination with Conventional Synthetic Disease-modifying Antirheumatic Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Frank; Meier, Lothar; Prinz, Jörg C; Jobst, Jürgen; Lippe, Ralph; Löschmann, Peter-Andreas; Lorenz, Hanns-Martin

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) receiving etanercept (ETN) monotherapy or ETN plus conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (csDMARD) to determine the proportion achieving a clinically meaningful response in arthritis, psoriasis, and quality of life simultaneously. A prospective, multicenter, 52-week observational study in patients with active PsA evaluated treatment with ETN in clinical practice (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00293722). This analysis assessed simultaneous achievement of 3 treatment targets: low disease activity (LDA) based on 28-joint count Disease Activity Score (DAS28); body surface area (BSA) involvement ≤ 3%; and a score > 45 on the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-12 (SF-12) physical component summary. Of 579 patients, 380 received ETN monotherapy and 199 received combination ETN plus csDMARD. At 52 weeks, data for all 3 disease domains were available for 251 patients receiving monotherapy and 151 receiving combination therapy. In the monotherapy and combination therapy groups, 61 (24.3%) and 37 (24.5%) patients, respectively, achieved all 3 treatment targets simultaneously. A significantly greater proportion of patients receiving monotherapy versus combination therapy achieved SF-12 > 45 (43.0% vs 31.8%; p < 0.05) and DAS28 LDA (72.5% vs 62.3%; p < 0.05). Conversely, BSA ≤ 3% was reached by a significantly greater proportion receiving combination therapy (75.5% vs 56.6%; p < 0.001). However, baseline BSA involvement was higher for the monotherapy group. While nearly half the patients achieved arthritis and psoriasis treatment targets simultaneously and one-fourth reached all 3 treatment targets, combining ETN and csDMARD did not substantially improve clinical response compared with ETN monotherapy in this real-world PsA patient population.

  18. Absorption of CO2 from modified flue gases of power generation Tarahan chemically using NaOH and Na2CO3 and biologically using microalgae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purba, Elida; Agustina, Dewi; Putri Pertama, Finka; Senja, Fita

    2018-03-01

    This research was carried out on the absorption of CO2 from the modified flue gases of power generation Tarahan using NaOH (sodium hydroxide) and Na2CO3 (sodium carbonate). The operation was conducted in a packed column absorber and then the output gases from the packed column was fed into photo-bioreactor for biological absorption. In the photo-bioreactor, two species of microalgae, N. occulata and T. chuii, were cultivated to both absorb CO2 gas and to produce biomass for algal oil. The aims of this research were, first, to determine the effect of absorbent flow rate on the reduction of CO2 and on the decrease of output gas temperature, second, to determine the characteristics of methyl ester obtained from biological absorption process. Flow rates of the absorbent were varied as 1, 2, and 3 l/min. The concentrations of NaOH and Na2CO3 were 1 M at a constant gas flow rate of 6 l/min. The output concentrations of CO2 from the absorber was analyzed using Gas Chromatography 2014-AT SHIMADZU Corp 08128. The results show that both of the absorbents give different trends. From the absorption using NaOH, it can be concluded that the higher the flow rate, the higher the absorption rate obtained. The highest flow rate achieved maximum absorption of 100%. On the other hand, absorption with Na2CO3 revealed the opposite trend where the higher the flow rates the lower the absorption rate. The highest absorption using Na2CO3 was obtained with the lowest flow rate, 1 l/min, that was 45,5%. As the effect of flow rate on output gas temperature, the temperature decreased with increasing flow rates for both absorbents. The output gas temperature for NaOH and Na2CO3 were consecutively 35 °C and 31 °C with inlet gas temperature of 50°C. Absorption of CO2 biologically resulted a reduction of CO2 up to 60% from the input gas concentration. Algal oil was extracted with mixed hexane and chloroform to obtain algal oil. Extracted oil was transesterified to methyl ester using sodium

  19. Validation and reliability of a modified sphygmomanometer for the assessment of handgrip strength in Parkinson´s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraia M. Silva

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Handgrip strength is currently considered a predictor of overall muscle strength and functional capacity. Therefore, it is important to find reliable and affordable instruments for this analysis, such as the modified sphygmomanometer test (MST. OBJECTIVES: To assess the concurrent criterion validity of the MST, to compare the MST with the Jamar dynamometer, and to analyze the reproducibility (i.e. reliability and agreement of the MST in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD. METHOD: The authors recruited 50 subjects, 24 with PD (65.5±6.2 years of age and 26 healthy elderly subjects (63.4±7.2 years of age. The handgrip strength was measured using the Jamar dynamometer and modified sphygmomanometer. The concurrent criterion validity was analyzed using Pearson's correlation coefficient and a simple linear regression test. The reproducibility of the MST was evaluated with the coefficient of intra-class correlation (ICC2,1, the standard error of measurement (SEM, the minimal detectable change (MDC, and the Bland-Altman plot. For all of the analyses, α≤0.05 was considered a risk. RESULTS: There was a significant correlation of moderate magnitude (r≥0.45 between the MST and the Jamar dynamometer. The MST had excellent reliability (ICC2,1≥0.7. The SEM and the MDC were adequate; however, the Bland-Altman plot indicated an unsatisfactory interrater agreement. CONCLUSIONS: The MST exhibited adequate validity and excellent reliability and is, therefore, suitable for monitoring the handgrip strength in PD. However, if the goal is to compare the measurements between examiners, the authors recommend that the data be interpreted with caution.

  20. Magnesium modifies the association between serum phosphate and the risk of progression to end-stage kidney disease in patients with non-diabetic chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Yusuke; Iwatani, Hirotsugu; Hamano, Takayuki; Tomida, Kodo; Kawabata, Hiroaki; Kusunoki, Yasuo; Shimomura, Akihiro; Matsui, Isao; Hayashi, Terumasa; Tsubakihara, Yoshiharu; Isaka, Yoshitaka; Rakugi, Hiromi

    2015-10-01

    It is known that magnesium antagonizes phosphate-induced apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells and prevents vascular calcification. Here we tested whether magnesium can also counteract other pathological conditions where phosphate toxicity is involved, such as progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). We explored how the link between the risk of CKD progression and hyperphosphatemia is modified by magnesium status. A post hoc analysis was run in 311 non-diabetic CKD patients who were divided into four groups according to the median values of serum magnesium and phosphate. During a median follow-up of 44 months, 135 patients developed end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). After adjustment for relevant clinical factors, patients in the lower magnesium-higher phosphate group were at a 2.07-fold (95% CI: 1.23-3.48) risk for incident ESKD and had a significantly faster decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate compared with those in the higher magnesium-higher phosphate group. There were no significant differences in the risk of these renal outcomes among the higher magnesium-higher phosphate group and both lower phosphate groups. Incubation of tubular epithelial cells in high phosphate and low magnesium medium in vitro increased apoptosis and the expression levels of profibrotic and proinflammatory cytokine; these changes were significantly suppressed by increasing magnesium concentration. Thus, magnesium may act protectively against phosphate-induced kidney injury.

  1. Is the efficacy of biological control against plant diseases likely to be more durable than that of chemical pesticides?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc eBardin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The durability of a control method for plant protection is defined as the persistence of its efficacy in space and time. It depends on (i the selection pressure exerted by it on populations of plant pathogens and (ii on the capacity of these pathogens to adapt to the control method. Erosion of effectiveness of conventional plant protection methods has been widely studied in the past. For example, apparition of resistance to chemical pesticides in plant pathogens or pests has been extensively documented. The durability of biological control has often been assumed to be higher than that of chemical control. Results concerning pest management in agricultural systems have shown that this assumption may not always be justified. Resistance of various pests to one or several toxins of Bacillus thuringensis and apparition of resistance of the codling moth Cydia pomonella to the Cydia pomonella granulovirus have, for example, been described. In contrast with the situation for pests, the durability of biological control of plant diseases has hardly been studied and no scientific reports proving the loss of efficiency of biological control agents against plant pathogens in practice has been published so far. Knowledge concerning the possible erosion of effectiveness of biological control is essential to ensure a durable efficacy of biological control agents on target plant pathogens. This knowledge will result in identifying risk factors that can foster the selection of strains of plant pathogens resistant to biological control agents. It will also result in identifying types of biological control agents with lower risk of efficacy loss i.e. modes of action of biological control agents that does not favor the selection of resistant isolates in natural populations of plant pathogens. An analysis of the scientific literature was then conducted to assess the potential for plant pathogens to become resistant to biological control agents.

  2. Validation of a model to investigate the effects of modifying cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors on the burden of CVD: the rotterdam ischemic heart disease and stroke computer simulation (RISC) model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kempen, Bob J. H.; Ferket, Bart S.; Hofman, Albert; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Colkesen, Ersen B.; Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Hunink, M. G. Myriam

    2012-01-01

    Background: We developed a Monte Carlo Markov model designed to investigate the effects of modifying cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors on the burden of CVD. Internal, predictive, and external validity of the model have not yet been established. Methods: The Rotterdam Ischemic Heart Disease

  3. Bacillus spp as a biological control agent against panama disease in banana

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gumede, WHN

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The decreased productivity levels in crop production as a consequence of disease infection have been a great concern amongst agricultural communities. A similar threat is facing the banana-cultivating community due to Panama disease. Panama disease...

  4. Biological therapeutics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Greenstein, Ben; Brook, Daniel A

    2011-01-01

    This introductory textbook covers all the main categories of biological medicines, including vaccines, hormonal preparations, drugs for rheumatoid arthritis and other connective tissue diseases, drugs...

  5. Cerivastatin Nano-Liposome as a Potential Disease Modifying Approach for the Treatment of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young; Pai, S Balakrishna; Bellamkonda, Ravi V; Thompson, David H; Singh, Jaipal

    2018-04-25

    In this study, we have investigated nano-liposome as an approach to tailor the pharmacology of cerivastatin as a disease modifying drug for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Cerivastatin encapsulated liposomes with an average diameter of 98±27 nm were generated by thin film and freeze-thaw process. The nano-liposomes demonstrated sustained drug release kinetics in vitro and inhibited proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells with significantly less cellular cytotoxicity as compared to free cerivastatin. When delivered by inhalation to a rat model of monocrotalin induced PAH, cerivastatin significantly reduced pulmonary artery pressure from 55.13±9.82 mmHg to 35.56±6.59 mmHg (P < 0.001) and diminished pulmonary artery wall thickening. Echocardiography showed that cerivastatin significantly reduced right ventricle thickening (0.34±0.02 cm monocrotalin vs. 0.26±0.02 cm cerivastatin; P < 0.001) and increased pulmonary artery acceleration time (13.98±1.14 ms monocrotalin vs. 21.07±2.80 ms cerivastatin; P < 0.001). Nano-liposomal cerivastatin was equally effective or slightly better than cerivastatin in reducing pulmonary artery pressure (67.06±13.64 mmHg monocrotalin; 46.31±7.64 mmHg cerivastatin vs. 37.32±9.50 mmHg liposomal cerivastatin) and improving parameters of right ventricular function as measured by increasing pulmonary artery acceleration time (24.68±3.92 ms monocrotalin; 32.59±6.10 ms cerivastatin vs. 34.96±7.51 ms liposomal cerivastatin). More importantly, the rate and magnitude of toxic cerivastatin metabolite lactone generation from the intratracheally administered nano-liposomes was significantly lower as compared to intravenously administered free cerivastatin. These studies show that nano-liposome encapsulation improved in vitro and in vivo pharmacological and safety profile of cerivastatin and may represent a safer approach as a disease modifying therapy for PAH. The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental

  6. How do patients with inflammatory bowel disease want their biological therapy administered?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Allen, Patrick B

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infliximab is usually administered by two monthly intravenous (iv) infusions, therefore requiring visits to hospital. Adalimumab is administered by self subcutaneous (sc) injections every other week. Both of these anti-TNF drugs appear to be equally efficacious in the treatment of Crohn\\'s Disease and therefore the decision regarding which drug to choose will depend to some extent on patient choice, which may be based on the mode of administration.The aims of this study were to compare preferences in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) patients for two currently available anti-TNF agents and the reasons for their choices. METHODS: An anonymous questionnaire was distributed to IBD patients who had attended the Gastroenterology service (Ulster Hospital, Dundonald, Belfast, N. Ireland. UK) between January 2007 and December 2007. The patients were asked in a hypothetical situation if the following administering methods of anti-TNF drugs (intravenous or subcutaneous) were available, which drug route of administration would they choose. RESULTS: One hundred and twenty-five patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were issued questionnaires, of these 78 questionnaires were returned (62 percent response). The mean age of respondent was 44 years. Of the total number of respondents, 33 patients (42 percent) preferred infliximab and 19 patients (24 percent) preferred adalimumab (p = 0.07). Twenty-six patients (33 percent) did not indicate a preference for either biological therapy and were not included in the final analysis. The commonest reason cited for those who chose infliximab (iv) was: "I do not like the idea of self-injecting," (67 percent). For those patients who preferred adalimumab (sc) the commonest reason cited was: "I prefer the convenience of injecting at home," (79 percent). Of those patients who had previously been treated with an anti-TNF therapy (n = 10, all infliximab) six patients stated that they would prefer infliximab if given the choice

  7. Surgery, Crohn's disease, and the biological era: has there been an impact?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Slattery, Eoin

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: The management of Crohn\\'s disease (CD) has changed considerably over the last 20 years. Immunomodulators and biological therapies now play a role in treating patients with CD, but little is known of their influence on surgical rates. AIM: To review the surgery rates for CD in an Irish university hospital over a 20-year period and to determine whether newer therapies had an impact on surgical rates. METHOD: Seven hundred twenty-two patients attending St Vincent\\'s University Hospital, Dublin, with CD over a 20-year period (January 1986 to December 2005) were identified. The patients were divided into quartiles. Resection rates were determined in all the quartiles, at both 1 and 3 years from diagnosis. RESULTS: A decline in surgery, 3 years from diagnosis, was noted between the first quartile (72 patients, 40%) and the second quartile (58 patients, 32%; P=0.03). No significant change in surgical rates at 3 years occurred between the other 3 quartiles (32%, 30%, and 35%, respectively; P=NS). The patients who required a resection within 3 years were diagnosed at a younger age in later years. There was a similar predominance of 60% of female patients requiring surgery in all groups. The patients requiring surgery were twice as likely to be ex-smokers or current smokers in all groups. Use of infliximab, within 3 years from diagnosis, increased from 0, 0, and 16 patients (8.8%) to 40 patients (22.1%) in the last quartile. The majority of patients were treated with infliximab on an "on demand" basis. Use of infliximab earlier within the course of the disease was seen in later quartiles (ie, within 1 y of diagnosis): 0, 0, 6, and 21 patients. CONCLUSION: Despite the introduction of infliximab over the past 10 years, no demonstrable difference has been seen in the rates of patients requiring resection surgery within 3 years of diagnosis. The reasons for this are unclear, but may relate to episodic treatment, rather than regular maintenance treatment. Female

  8. Clinical indications and biological mechanisms of splenic irradiation in autoimmune diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinmann, M.; Becker, G.; Einsele, H.; Bamberg, M.

    2001-01-01

    Background: Splenic irradiation (SI) is a fairly unknown treatment modality in autoimmune disorders like autoimmune thrombocytopenia (AIT) or autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), which may provide an effective, low toxic and cost-effective treatment for selected patients. Patients, Materials and Methods: This article reviews the limited experiences on splenic irradiation in autoimmune thrombocytopenia by analyzing the current studies including 71 patients and some preliminary reports on splenic irradiation in autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Results: In autoimmune thrombocytopenia between 40 and 90% of all patients responded, but most of them relapsed within 4 to 6 months after splenic irradiation. Between 10 and 20% of all patients had a sustained response. The efficacy of splenic irradiation in HIV-associated cases of thrombocytopenia is probably lower than in other forms of autoimmune thrombocytopenia, but especially in this group immunosuppressive drug treatment of autoimmune thrombocytopenia exposes some problems. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia there are some case reports about efficacy of splenic irradiation. Toxicity of splenic irradiation in both diseases was very moderate. Conclusions: For HIV patients, for elderly patients or patients at high risk for complications following splenectomy splenic irradiation might be a treatment option. Splenic irradiation as preoperative treatment in patients not responding to or not suitable for immunosuppressive drugs prior to splenectomy may be a promising new application of splenic irradiation to reduce adverse effects of splenectomy in thrombocytopenic patients. A further analysis of the biological mechanisms underlying splenic irradiation may help to improve patient selection, to optimize dose concepts and treatment schedules and will improve understanding of radiotherapy as an immunomodulatory treatment modality. (orig.) [de

  9. Characteristics of leachate in Foot and Mouth Disease Carcass Disposal using Molecular Biology Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, E. J.; Kim, B. J.; Wi, D. W.; Choi, N. C.; Lee, S. J.; Min, J. E.; Park, C. Y.

    2012-04-01

    The Leachate from Foot and Mouth Disease(FMD) carcass disposal by is one of the types of high-concentration contaminated wastewater with the greatest environmental impact. This is due to its pollutants: nitrate nitrogen (NO3--N) and pathogenic microorganisms. Satisfactory treatment of leachate is not an easy task for its high concentrations of nitrate nitrogen and pathogenic microorganisms. Therefore suitable FMD leachate treatment processes should be adopted to improve treatment performance and to reduce overall running costs. The objective of this study was to determine the leachate characteristics through environmental analysis and molecular biology method (bacteria identification and Polymerase Chain Reaction) using FMD leachate samples for optimal FMD leachate treatment processes. The Sixteen FMD leachate samples was obtained from carcass disposal regions in Korea. Results of environmental analysis showed that pH and Eh was observed from 5.57 to 7.40, -134~358mV. This data was exhibited typical early carcass disposal (Neutral pH and Reducing Environment by abundant organic matter). TOC and nitrate nitrogen high concentrations in FMD leachate showed a large variability from 2.3 to 38,730 mg/L(mean - 6,821.93mg/L) and 0.335 ~231.998mg/L(mean - 37.46mg/L), respectively. The result of bacteria identification was observed Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas putida, Acinetobacter ursingii, Aeromonas hydrophila, Serratia liquefaciens, Brevundimonas naejangsanensis, Serratia liquefaciens, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter ursingii. The results of Polymerase Chain Reaction(PCR) using EzTaxon server data revealed Pseudoclavibacter helvolus, Pseudochrobactrum saccharolyticum, Corynebacterium callunae, Paenibacillus lautus, Paenibacillus sp., Bacillus arvi, Brevundimonas bullata, Acinetobacter ursingii, Lysinibacillus sphaericus, Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus sphaericus, Bacillus psychrodurans, Pseudomonas sp.

  10. Analysis of preplate splitting and early cortical development illuminates the biology of neurological disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C Olson

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of the layered cerebral cortex starts with a process called preplate splitting. Preplate splitting involves the establishment of prospective cortical layer 6 (L6 neurons within a plexus of pioneer neurons called the preplate. The forming layer 6 splits the preplate into a superficial layer of pioneer neurons called the marginal zone and a deeper layer of pioneer neurons called the subplate. Disruptions of this early developmental event by toxin exposure or mutation are associated with neurological disease including severe intellectual disability. This review explores recent findings that reveal the dynamism of gene expression and morphological differentiation during this early developmental period. Over 1000 genes show expression increases of ≥ 2 fold during this period in differentiating mouse L6 neurons. Surprisingly, 88% of previously identified non-syndromic intellectual disability (NS-ID genes are expressed at this time and show an average expression increase of 1.6 fold in these differentiating L6 neurons. This changing genetic program must, in part, support the dramatic cellular reorganizations that occur during preplate splitting. While different models have been proposed for the formation of a layer of L6 cortical neurons within the preplate, original histological studies and more recent work exploiting transgenic mice suggest that the process is largely driven by the coordinated polarization and coalescence of L6 neurons rather than by cellular translocation or migration. The observation that genes associated with forms of NS-ID are expressed during very early cortical development raises the possibility of studying the relevant biological events at a time point when the cortex is small, contains relatively few cell types, and few functional circuits. This review then outlines how explant models may prove particularly useful in studying the consequence of toxin and mutation on the etiology of some forms of NS-ID.

  11. The V471A polymorphism in autophagy-related gene ATG7 modifies age at onset specifically in Italian Huntington disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metzger, Silke; Walter, Carolin; Riess, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    The cause of Huntington disease (HD) is a polyglutamine repeat expansion of more than 36 units in the huntingtin protein, which is inversely correlated with the age at onset of the disease. However, additional genetic factors are believed to modify the course and the age at onset of HD. Recently......, we identified the V471A polymorphism in the autophagy-related gene ATG7, a key component of the autophagy pathway that plays an important role in HD pathogenesis, to be associated with the age at onset in a large group of European Huntington disease patients. To confirm this association in a second...... independent patient cohort, we analysed the ATG7 V471A polymorphism in additional 1,464 European HD patients of the "REGISTRY" cohort from the European Huntington Disease Network (EHDN). In the entire REGISTRY cohort we could not confirm a modifying effect of the ATG7 V471A polymorphism. However, analysing...

  12. New perspectives on Mars and Venus: unravelling the role of androgens in gender differences in cardiovascular biology and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Martin K C

    2007-06-01

    There are substantial gender differences in the pattern, severity and clinical outcomes of coronary heart disease independent of environmental risk factor exposure. As a consequence, there has been considerable interest in the potential role of sex hormones in atherogenesis, particularly the potential protective effects of oestrogen. However, the failure of the recent clinical randomised trials to show a cardioprotective effect for oestrogen coupled with a growing interest in androgen replacement therapy in elderly men has refocused interest on the role of androgens in cardiovascular biology and disease. Over the last decade, compelling evidence has emerged that sex differences in vascular biology are not only determined by gender-related differences in sex steroid levels but also by gender-specific tissue and cellular characteristics which mediate sex-specific responses to a variety of stimuli. In the vasculature, androgens often act in a gender-specific manner, with differential effects in male and female cells. This gender-dependent regulation may have important implications for understanding the basis of the gender gap in atherosclerosis and may eventually lead to the development of sex-specific treatments for cardiovascular disease. This review will summarise the current data for the role of androgens in gender differences in coronary heart disease and cardiovascular biology.

  13. Proteins Encoded in Genomic Regions Associated with Immune-Mediated Disease Physically Interact and Suggest Underlying Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Hansen, Kasper Lage; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have defined over 150 genomic regions unequivocally containing variation predisposing to immune-mediated disease. Inferring disease biology from these observations, however, hinges on our ability to discover the molecular processes being perturbed by these r......Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have defined over 150 genomic regions unequivocally containing variation predisposing to immune-mediated disease. Inferring disease biology from these observations, however, hinges on our ability to discover the molecular processes being perturbed...... in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and Crohn's disease (CD) GWAS, we build protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks for genes within associated loci and find abundant physical interactions between protein products of associated genes. We apply multiple permutation approaches to show that these networks are more...... that the RA and CD networks have predictive power by demonstrating that proteins in these networks, not encoded in the confirmed list of disease associated loci, are significantly enriched for association to the phenotypes in question in extended GWAS analysis. Finally, we test our method in 3 non...

  14. Tofacitinib in Combination With Conventional Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs in Patients With Active Rheumatoid Arthritis: Patient-Reported Outcomes From a Phase III Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Vibeke; Kremer, Joel M; Gruben, David; Krishnaswami, Sriram; Zwillich, Samuel H; Wallenstein, Gene V

    2017-04-01

    Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We compared patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in patients with RA treated with tofacitinib or placebo in combination with conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). In a 12-month, phase III randomized controlled trial (ORAL Sync), patients (n = 795) with active RA and previous inadequate response to therapy with ≥1 conventional or biologic DMARD were randomized 4:4:1:1 to tofacitinib 5 mg twice daily (BID), tofacitinib 10 mg BID, placebo advanced to 5 mg BID, or placebo to 10 mg BID, in combination with stable background DMARD therapy. PROs included patient global assessment of arthritis (PtGA), patient assessment of arthritis pain (Pain), physical function (Health Assessment Questionnaire disability index [HAQ DI]), health-related quality of life (Short Form 36 health survey [SF-36]), fatigue (Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue [FACIT-F]), and sleep (Medical Outcomes Study Sleep [MOS Sleep]). At month 3, statistically significant improvements from baseline versus placebo were reported in PtGA, Pain, HAQ DI, all 8 SF-36 domains, FACIT-F, and MOS Sleep with tofacitinib 10 mg BID, and in PtGA, Pain, HAQ DI, 7 SF-36 domains, FACIT-F, and MOS Sleep with tofacitinib 5 mg BID. Improvements were sustained to month 12. Significantly more tofacitinib-treated patients reported improvements of greater than or equal to the minimum clinically important differences at month 3 versus placebo in all PROs, except the SF-36 role-emotional domain (significant for tofacitinib 10 mg BID). Patients with active RA treated with tofacitinib combined with background conventional DMARD therapy reported sustained, significant, and clinically meaningful improvements in PROs versus placebo. © 2016, The Authors. Arthritis Care & Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American College of Rheumatology.

  15. Clinically isolated syndrome. Prognostic markers for conversion to multiple sclerosis and initiation of disease-modifying therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohriyama, Tatsuo

    2011-01-01

    Eighty-five percent of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) initially present with a single demyelinating event, referred to as a clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) of the optic nerves, brainstem, or spinal cord. Following the onset of CIS, 38 to 68% of patients develop clinically definite MS (CDMS). Clinically silent brain lesions are seen on MRI in 50 to 80% of patients with CIS at first clinical presentation and 56 to 88% of CIS patients with abnormal MRI are at high risk of conversion to CDMS. Axonal damage, that is considered to underlie the development of persistent disability in MS, occurs in the CIS stage. Treatment with disease-modifying therapies (DMTs), that might prevent axonal damage and result in slowing the progression of disability, should be initiated early during the disease course. Clinical trials demonstrated that early treatment of CIS patients with the standard dose of interferon beta (IFNβ) significantly reduced the risk of progression to CDMS by 44 to 50%. After 5 years of follow-up, the results of the IFNβ treatment extension studies confirmed that the risk of conversion to CDMS was significantly reduced by 35 to 37% in patients receiving early treatment compared to that in those receiving delayed treatment. However, not every patient with CIS will progress to CDMS; the IFNβ treatment is appropriately indicated for CIS patients who are diagnosed with MS by McDonald diagnostic criteria based on MRI findings of dissemination in space and time and are at high risk for conversion to CDMS. Development of more reliable prognostic markers will enable DMTs to be targeted for those who are most likely to benefit. (author)

  16. Association between perfluoroalkyl substance exposure and asthma and allergic disease in children as modified by MMR vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermann, Clara Amalie Gade; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben; Jensen, Tina Kold; Osuna, Christa Elyse; Petersen, Maria Skaalum; Steuerwald, Ulrike; Nielsen, Flemming; Poulsen, Lars K; Weihe, Pál; Grandjean, Philippe

    2017-12-01

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are highly persistent chemicals that might be associated with asthma and allergy, but the associations remain unclear. Therefore, this study examined whether pre- and postnatal PFAS exposure was associated with childhood asthma and allergy. Measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccination in early life may have a protective effect against asthma and allergy, and MMR vaccination is therefore taken into account when evaluating these associations. In a cohort of Faroese children whose mothers were recruited during pregnancy, serum concentrations of five PFASs - Perfluorohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS), perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), and perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA) - were measured at three timepoints (maternal serum in pregnancy week 34-36 and child serum at ages 5 and 13 years) and their association with immunoglobulin E (IgE) (cord blood and at age 7 years) and asthma/allergic diseases (questionnaires at ages 5 and 13 years and skin prick test at age 13 years) was determined. A total of 559 children were included in the analyses. Interactions with MMR vaccination were evaluated. Among 22 MMR-unvaccinated children, higher levels of the five PFASs at age 5 years were associated with increased odds of asthma at ages 5 and 13. The associations were reversed among MMR-vaccinated children. Prenatal PFAS exposure was not associated with childhood asthma or allergic diseases regardless of MMR vaccination status. In conclusion, PFAS exposure at age 5 was associated with increased risk of asthma among a small subgroup of MMR-unvaccinated children but not among MMR-vaccinated children. While PFAS exposure may impact immune system functions, this study suggests that MMR vaccination might be a potential effect-modifier.

  17. Biological soil disinfestation : a safe and effective approach for controlling soilborne pests and diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, J.G.; Wanten, P.J.; Blok, W.J.

    2004-01-01

    Biological soil disinfestation (bsd) is an environmentally friendly method to disinfest the soil from soilborne fungi and nematodes. With biological soil disinfestation a green manure crop (40 tonnes per ha) or other green biomass is homogeneously incorporated into the soil layer that has to be

  18. Biology, diagnosis and management of Heterobasidion Root Disease of southern pines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler J. Dreaden; Jason A.  Smith; Michelle M. Cram; David R   Coyle

    2016-01-01

    Heterobasidion root disease (previously called annosum, annosus, or Fomes root disease / root rot) is one of the most economically damaging forest diseases in the Northern Hemisphere. Heterobasidion root disease (HRD) in the southeastern U.S. is caused by the pathogen Heterobasidion irregulare, which infects loblolly, longleaf, pitch, shortleaf, slash, Virginia, and...

  19. Preoperative biological therapy and short-term outcomes of abdominal surgery in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, Matti; Xu, Wei; Dinani, Amreen; Steinhart, A Hillary; Croitoru, Kenneth; Nguyen, Geoffrey C; McLeod, Robin S; Greenberg, Gordon R; Cohen, Zane; Silverberg, Mark S

    2013-03-01

    Previous investigations of short-term outcomes after preoperative exposure to biological therapy in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) were conflicting. The authors aimed to assess postoperative outcomes in patients who underwent abdominal surgery with recent exposure to anti-tumour necrosis factor therapy. A retrospective case-control study with detailed matching was performed for subjects with IBD with and without exposure to biologics within 180 days of abdominal surgery. Postoperative outcomes were compared between the groups. 473 procedures were reviewed consisting of 195 patients with exposure to biologics and 278 matched controls. There were no significant differences in most postoperative outcomes such as: length of stay, fever (≥ 38.5°C), urinary tract infection, pneumonia, bacteraemia, readmission, reoperations and mortality. On univariate analysis, procedures on biologics had more wound infections compared with controls (19% vs 11%; p=0.008), but this was not significant in multivariate analysis. Concomitant therapy with biologics and thiopurines was associated with increased frequencies of urinary tract infections (p=0.0007) and wound infections (p=0.0045). Operations performed ≤ 14 days from last biologic dose had similar rates of infections and other outcomes when compared with those performed within 15-30 days or 31-180 days. Patients with detectable preoperative infliximab levels had similar rates of wound infection compared with those with undetectable levels (3/10 vs 0/9; p=0.21). Preoperative treatment with TNF-α antagonists in patients with IBD is not associated with most early postoperative complications. A shorter time interval from last biological dose is not associated with increased postoperative complications. In most cases, surgery should not be delayed, and appropriate biological therapy may be continued perioperatively.

  20. A Modified ELISA Accurately Measures Secretion of High Molecular Weight Hyaluronan (HA) by Graves' Disease Orbital Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Christine C.

    2014-01-01

    Excess production of hyaluronan (hyaluronic acid [HA]) in the retro-orbital space is a major component of Graves' ophthalmopathy, and regulation of HA production by orbital cells is a major research area. In most previous studies, HA was measured by ELISAs that used HA-binding proteins for detection and rooster comb HA as standards. We show that the binding efficiency of HA-binding protein in the ELISA is a function of HA polymer size. Using gel electrophoresis, we show that HA secreted from orbital cells is primarily comprised of polymers more than 500 000. We modified a commercially available ELISA by using 1 million molecular weight HA as standard to accurately measure HA of this size. We demonstrated that IL-1β-stimulated HA secretion is at least 2-fold greater than previously reported, and activation of the TSH receptor by an activating antibody M22 from a patient with Graves' disease led to more than 3-fold increase in HA production in both fibroblasts/preadipocytes and adipocytes. These effects were not consistently detected with the commercial ELISA using rooster comb HA as standard and suggest that fibroblasts/preadipocytes may play a more prominent role in HA remodeling in Graves' ophthalmopathy than previously appreciated. PMID:24302624

  1. Long-term changes in ADAS-cog: what is clinically relevant for disease modifying trials in Alzheimer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellas, B; Andrieu, S; Cantet, C; Dartigues, J F; Gauthier, S

    2007-01-01

    With the development of long-term disease modifying trials, changes in ADAS-Cog at 18 months will rise certainly many questions. We decided to look in the Real.fr study at the links between changes in cognition, ADAS-Cog and function. A total of 346 Alzheimer's patients with ADAS-cog at entry and at 18 months. were eligible for this analysis. These patients were on average 77.44 years old and 254 (72.36%) were women. The great majority lived at home and about 93% were treated with a cholinesterase inhibitor at baseline. Thirty three patients (9%) had a gain of more than 2 points at the ADAS-cog at 18 months (Group I, improvement); 130 (38%) were considered as stable, the reference group (Group II ) characterized by a stability at the ADAS-cog: decline of 2 points to gain of 2 points, 112 subjects (32%) had a moderate decline between 2 and 7 at the ADAScog (Group III) and finally 71 subjects (21%) had a severe impairment more than seven points at the ADAS-cog. A loss of one Basic ADL is certainly highly relevant, and such a change was found at 18 months in more than half of the subjects, which is not surprising for a long-term evolution in mild to moderate AD. An impairment of more than 7 points at the ADAS-cog was found in 21% of the subjects at 18 months and was associated with loss.

  2. Antidepressant Drug Treatment in Association with Multiple Sclerosis Disease-Modifying Therapy: Using Explorys in the MS Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsky, Matthew M; Marrie, Ruth Ann; Rae-Grant, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Explorys Enterprise Performance Management (EPM) database contains de-identified clinical data for 50 million patients. Multiple sclerosis (MS) disease-modifying therapies (DMTs), specifically interferon beta (IFNβ) treatments, may potentiate depression. Conflicting data have emerged, and a large-scale claims-based study by Patten et al. did not support such an association. This study compares the results of Patten et al. with those using the EPM database. Methods: "Power searches" were built to test the relationship between antidepressant drug use and DMT in the MS population. Searches were built to produce a cohort of individuals diagnosed as having MS in the past 3 years taking a specific DMT who were then given any antidepressant drug. The antidepressant drug therapy prevalence was tested in the MS population on the following DMTs: IFNβ-1a, IFNβ-1b, combined IFNβ, glatiramer acetate, natalizumab, fingolimod, and dimethyl fumarate. Results: In patients with MS, the rate of antidepressant drug use in those receiving DMTs was 40.60% to 44.57%. The rate of antidepressant drug use for combined IFNβ DMTs was 41.61% (males: 31.25%-39.62%; females: 43.10%-47.33%). Antidepressant drug use peaked in the group aged 45 to 54 years for five of six DMTs. Conclusions: We found no association between IFNβ treatment and antidepressant drug use in the MS population compared with other DMTs. The EPM database has been validated against the Patten et al. data for future use in the MS population.

  3. Anakinra as first-line disease-modifying therapy in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis: report of forty-six patients from an international multicenter series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nigrovic, Peter A.; Mannion, Melissa; Prince, Femke H. M.; Zeft, Andrew; Rabinovich, C. Egla; van Rossum, Marion A. J.; Cortis, Elisabetta; Pardeo, Manuela; Miettunen, Paivi M.; Janow, Ginger; Birmingham, James; Eggebeen, Aaron; Janssen, Erin; Shulman, Andrew I.; Son, Mary Beth; Hong, Sandy; Jones, Karla; Ilowite, Norman T.; Cron, Randy Q.; Higgins, Gloria C.

    2011-01-01

    To examine the safety and efficacy of the interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor antagonist anakinra as first-line therapy for systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Patients with systemic JIA receiving anakinra as part of initial disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) therapy were identified

  4. Active ingredients of ginger as potential candidates in the prevention and treatment of diseases via modulation of biological activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Arshad H; shabrmi, Fahad M Al; Aly, Salah M

    2014-01-01

    The current mode of treatment based on synthetic drugs is expensive and also causes genetic and metabolic alterations. However, safe and sound mode of treatment is needed to control the diseases development and progression. In this regards, medicinal plant and its constituents play an important role in diseases management via modulation of biological activities. Ginger, the rhizome of the Zingiber officinale, has shown therapeutic role in the health management since ancient time and considered as potential chemopreventive agent. Numerous studies based on clinical trials and animal model has shown that ginger and its constituents shows significant role in the prevention of diseases via modulation of genetic and metabolic activities. In this review, we focused on the therapeutics effects of ginger and its constituents in the diseases management, and its impact on genetic and metabolic activities. PMID:25057339

  5. Gene expression of hematoregulatory cytokines is elevated endogenously after sublethal gamma irradiation and is differentially enhanced by therapeutic administration of biologic response modifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, V.M.; Adamovicz, J.J.; Madonna, G.S.; Gause, W.C.; Elliott, T.B.; Moore, M.M.; Ledney, G.D.; Jackson, W.E. III

    1994-01-01

    Prompt, cytokine-mediated restoration of hematopoiesis is a prerequisite for survival after irradiation. Therapy with biologic response modifiers (BRMs), such as LPS, 3D monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), and synthetic trehalose dicrynomycolate (S-TDCM) presumably accelerates hematopoietic recovery after irradiation are poorly defined. One hour after sublethal (7.0 Gy) 60 Co gamma irradiation, B6D2F1/J female mice received a single i.p. injection of LPS, MPL, S-TDCM, an extract from Serratia marcescens (Sm-BRM), or Tween 80 in saline (TS). Five hours later, a quantitative reverse transcription-PCR assay demonstrated marked splenic gene expression for IL-1β, IL-3, IL-6, and granulocyte-CSF (G-CSF). Enhanced gene expression for TNF-α, macrophage-CSF (M-CSF), and stem cell factor (SCF) was not detected. Injection of any BRM further enhanced cytokine gene expression and plasma levels of CSF activity within 24 h after irradiation and hastened bone marrow recovery. Mice injected with S-TDCM or Sm-BRM sustained expression of the IL-6 gene for at least 24 h after irradiation. Sm-BRM-treated mice exhibited greater gene expression for IL-1β, IL-3, TNF-α, and G-CSF at day 1 than any other BRM. When challenged with 2 LD 50/30 of Klebsiella pneumoniae 4 days after irradiation, 100% of Sm-BRM-treated mice and 70% of S-TDCM-treated mice survived, whereas ≤30% of mice treated with LPS, MPL, or TS survived. Thus, sublethal irradiation induces transient, splenic cytokine gene expression that can be differentially amplified and prolonged by BRMs. BRMs that sustained and/or enhanced irradiation-induced expression of specific cytokine genes improved survival after experimental infection. 67 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  6. Application of novel Modified Biological Aerated Filter (MBAF) as a promising post-treatment for water reuse: Modification in configuration and backwashing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikoonahad, Ali; Ghaneian, Mohammad Taghi; Mahvi, Amir Hossein; Ehrampoush, Mohammad Hassan; Ebrahimi, Ali Asghar; Lotfi, Mohammad Hassan; Salamehnejad, Sima

    2017-12-01

    Biological Aerated Filter (BAF) reactors due to their plentiful biomass, high shockability, high efficiency, good filtration, availability and lack of need for large land areas, are enjoying from great importance in advanced wastewater treatment. Therefore, in this study, Polystyrene Coated by Sand (PCS) was produced as a novel media and its application in a modified down-flow BAF structure for advanced wastewater treatment was assessed in two steps. In step one, the backwash effluent did not return to the system, while in step two backwash effluent returned to increase the water reuse efficiency. The backwash process was also studied through three methods of Top Backwashing (TB), Bottom Backwashing (BB), as well as Top and Bottom Backwashing Simultaneously (TBBS). The results showed that return of backwash effluent had no significant effect on the BAF effluent quality. In the second step similar to the first one with slight differences, the residual average concentrations of TSS, BOD 5 , and COD at the effluent were about 2.5, 8.2, and 25.5 mg/L, respectively. Additionally, in step two, the mean volume of disposal sludge/volume of treated water (v ds /v tw ) decreased a large extent to about 0.088%. In other words, the water reuse has increased to more than 99.91%. The backwash time in methods of TB and BB were 65 and 35 min, respectively; however, it decreased in TBBS methods to 25 min. The concentrations of most effluent parameters in this system are in concordance with the 2012 EPA Agriculture Standards, even for irrigation of Non-processed agricultural crops and livestock water consumption. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Aberrant Free Radical Biology Is a Unifying Theme in the Etiology and Pathogenesis of Major Human Diseases