WorldWideScience

Sample records for bioinspired electron-transfer reactions

  1. Electron transfer reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Cannon, R D

    2013-01-01

    Electron Transfer Reactions deals with the mechanisms of electron transfer reactions between metal ions in solution, as well as the electron exchange between atoms or molecules in either the gaseous or solid state. The book is divided into three parts. Part 1 covers the electron transfer between atoms and molecules in the gas state. Part 2 tackles the reaction paths of oxidation states and binuclear intermediates, as well as the mechanisms of electron transfer. Part 3 discusses the theories and models of the electron transfer process; theories and experiments involving bridged electron transfe

  2. Recent Developments in Electron Transfer Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Marcus, Rudolph A.

    1987-01-01

    Earlier results and more recent developments in electron transfer reactions are reviewed. The more recent results include inverted behavior, electronic orientation effects on reaction rates, solvent dynamics, early steps in photosynthesis, and light emission from metal electrodes.

  3. Quantifying electron transfer reactions in biological systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjulstok, Emil Sjulstok; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Solov'yov, Ilia A

    2015-01-01

    Various biological processes involve the conversion of energy into forms that are usable for chemical transformations and are quantum mechanical in nature. Such processes involve light absorption, excited electronic states formation, excitation energy transfer, electrons and protons tunnelling...... which for example occur in photosynthesis, cellular respiration, DNA repair, and possibly magnetic field sensing. Quantum biology uses computation to model biological interactions in light of quantum mechanical effects and has primarily developed over the past decade as a result of convergence between...... quantum physics and biology. In this paper we consider electron transfer in biological processes, from a theoretical view-point; namely in terms of quantum mechanical and semi-classical models. We systematically characterize the interactions between the moving electron and its biological environment...

  4. Marcus Electron Transfer Reactions with Bulk Metallic Catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Widom, A; Srivastava, Y N

    2015-01-01

    Electron transfer organic reaction rates are considered employing the classic physical picture of Marcus wherein the heats of reaction are deposited as the energy of low frequency mechanical oscillations of reconfigured molecular positions. If such electron transfer chemical reaction events occur in the neighborhood of metallic plates, then electrodynamic interface fields must also be considered in addition to mechanical oscillations. Such electrodynamic interfacial electric fields in principle strongly effect the chemical reaction rates. The thermodynamic states of the metal are unchanged by the reaction which implies that metallic plates are purely catalytic chemical agents.

  5. Potential Energy Diagrams: A Conceptual Tool in the Study of Electron Transfer Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Nita A.

    1980-01-01

    Describes how the potential energy diagram may be used to theoretically describe the processes involved in a system undergoing electron transfer. Examines factors important in electron transfer reactions and discusses several classes of electron transfer reactions. (CS)

  6. Reactant-Product Quantum Coherence in Electron Transfer Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kominis, I K

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the physical meaning of quantum superposition states between reactants and products in electron transfer reactions. We show that such superpositions are strongly suppressed and to leading orders of perturbation theory do not pertain in electron transfer reactions. This is because of the intermediate manifold of states separating the reactants from the products. We provide an intuitive description of these considerations with Feynman diagrams. We also discuss the relation of such quantum coherences to understanding the fundamental quantum dynamics of spin-selective radical-ion-pair reactions.

  7. Mechanisms for control of biological electron transfer reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Heather R; Dow, Brian A; Davidson, Victor L

    2014-12-01

    Electron transfer (ET) through and between proteins is a fundamental biological process. The rates and mechanisms of these ET reactions are controlled by the proteins in which the redox centers that donate and accept electrons reside. The protein influences the magnitudes of the ET parameters, the electronic coupling and reorganization energy that are associated with the ET reaction. The protein can regulate the rates of the ET reaction by requiring reaction steps to optimize the system for ET, leading to kinetic mechanisms of gated or coupled ET. Amino acid residues in the segment of the protein through which long range ET occurs can also modulate the ET rate by serving as staging points for hopping mechanisms of ET. Specific examples are presented to illustrate these mechanisms by which proteins control rates of ET reactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Electron Transfer Reactions: Generalized Spin-Boson Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Merkli, Marco

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a mathematically rigorous analysis of a generalized spin-boson system for the treatment of a donor-acceptor (reactant-product) quantum system coupled to a thermal quantum noise. The donor/acceptor probability dynamics describes transport reactions in chemical processes in presence of a noisy environment -- such as the electron transfer in a photosynthetic reaction center. Besides being rigorous, our analysis has the advantages over previous ones that (1) we include a general, non energy-conserving system-environment interaction, and that (2) we allow for the donor or acceptor to consist of multiple energy levels lying closely together. We establish explicit expressions for the rates and the efficiency (final donor-acceptor population difference) of the reaction. In particular, we show that the rate increases for a multi-level acceptor, but the efficiency does not.

  9. Electron transfer pathway analysis in bacterial photosynthetic reaction center

    CERN Document Server

    Kitoh-Nishioka, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    A new computational scheme to analyze electron transfer (ET) pathways in large biomolecules is presented with applications to ETs in bacterial photosynthetic reaction center. It consists of a linear combination of fragment molecular orbitals and an electron tunneling current analysis, which enables an efficient first-principles analysis of ET pathways in large biomolecules. The scheme has been applied to the ET from menaquinone to ubiquinone via nonheme iron complex in bacterial photosynthetic reaction center. It has revealed that not only the central Fe$^{2+}$ ion but also particular histidine ligands are involved in the ET pathways in such a way to mitigate perturbations that can be caused by metal ion substitution and depletion, which elucidates the experimentally observed insensitivity of the ET rate to these perturbations.

  10. Electron transfer reactions of macrocyclic compounds of cobalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heckman, R.A.

    1978-08-01

    The kinetics and mechanisms of reduction of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, Br/sub 2/, and I/sub 2/ by various macrocyclic tetraaza complexes of cobalt(II), including Vitamin B/sub 12r/, were studied. The synthetic macrocycles studied were all 14-membered rings which varied in the degree of unsaturation,substitution of methyl groups on the periphery of the ring, and substitution within the ring itself. Scavenging experiments demonstrated that the reductions of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ produce free hydroxyl radicals only in the case of Co((14)ane)/sup 2 +/ but with none of the others. In the latter instances apparently H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ simultaneously oxidizes the metal center and the ligand. The reductions of Br/sub 2/ and I/sub 2/ produce an aquohalocobalt(III) product for all reductants (except B/sub 12r/ + Br/sub 2/, which was complicated by bromination of the corrin ring). The mechanism of halogen reduction was found to involve rate-limiting inner-sphere electron transfer from cobalt to halogen to produce a dihalide anion coordinated to the cobalt center. This intermediate subsequently decomposes in rapid reactions to halocobalt(III) and halogen atom species or reacts with another cobalt(II) center to give two molecules of halocobalt(III). The reductions of halomethylcobaloximes and related compounds and diamminecobaloxime by Cr/sup 2 +/ were also studied. The reaction was found to be biphasic in all cases with the reaction products being halomethane (for the halomethylcobaloximes), Co/sup 2 +/ (in less than 100 percent yield), a Cr(III)-dimethylglyoxime species, a small amount of free dmgH/sub 2/, and a highly-charged species containing both cobalt and chromium. The first-stage reaction occurs with a stoichiometry of 1:1 producing an intermediate with an absorption maximum at 460 nm for all starting reagents. The results were interpreted in terms of inner-sphere coordination of the cobaloxime to the Cr(II) and electron transfer through the oxime N-O bond.

  11. Vibrational control of electron-transfer reactions: a feasibility study for the fast coherent transfer regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, P; Ma, Z; Zhang, P; Beratan, D N; Skourtis, S S

    2015-12-14

    Molecular vibrations and electron-vibrational interactions are central to the control of biomolecular electron and energy-transfer rates. The vibrational control of molecular electron-transfer reactions by infrared pulses may enable the precise probing of electronic-vibrational interactions and of their roles in determining electron-transfer mechanisms. This type of electron-transfer rate control is advantageous because it does not alter the electronic state of the molecular electron-transfer system or irreversibly change its molecular structure. For bridge-mediated electron-transfer reactions, infrared (vibrational) excitation of the bridge linking the electron donor to the electron acceptor was suggested as being capable of influencing the electron-transfer rate by modulating the bridge-mediated donor-to-acceptor electronic coupling. This kind of electron-transfer experiment has been realized, demonstrating that bridge-mediated electron-transfer rates can be changed by exciting vibrational modes of the bridge. Here, we use simple models and ab initio computations to explore the physical constraints on one's ability to vibrationally perturb electron-transfer rates using infrared excitation. These constraints stem from the nature of molecular vibrational spectra, the strengths of the electron-vibrational coupling, and the interaction between molecular vibrations and infrared radiation. With these constraints in mind, we suggest parameter regimes and molecular architectures that may enhance the vibrational control of electron transfer for fast coherent electron-transfer reactions.

  12. Stereoselectivity in electron-transfer reactions in chiral media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmstead, Deborah; Hua, Xaio; Osvath, Peter; Lappin, A Graham

    2010-02-07

    The oxidation of [Co(edta)](2-) by [IrCl(6)](2-) proceeds by both inner-sphere and outer-sphere electron-transfer pathways. In the presence of added [Co(en)(3)](3+), the outer-sphere pathway is enhanced. When optically active [Co(en)(3)](3+) is used, the [Co(edta)](-) formed is optically active, reflecting a 1.5% DeltaLambda selectivity. It is proposed that the selectivity arises from preferential formation and reactivity of the DeltaLambda ion pair, {[Co(edta)](2-),[Co(en)(3)](3+)}. Direct reaction of [Co(edta)](-) with [Co(en)(3)](2+) has also been investigated in the optically active solvent, (S)-(-)-1,2-propylene carbonate. The induction is small, forming 0.75% Delta-[Co(en)(3)](3+), consistent with the important role for hydrogen bonding in determining the precursor stereoselectivity to the exclusion of solvent.

  13. A unified diabatic description for electron transfer reactions, isomerization reactions, proton transfer reactions, and aromaticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, Jeffrey R; McKemmish, Laura K; McKenzie, Ross H; Hush, Noel S

    2015-10-14

    While diabatic approaches are ubiquitous for the understanding of electron-transfer reactions and have been mooted as being of general relevance, alternate applications have not been able to unify the same wide range of observed spectroscopic and kinetic properties. The cause of this is identified as the fundamentally different orbital configurations involved: charge-transfer phenomena involve typically either 1 or 3 electrons in two orbitals whereas most reactions are typically closed shell. As a result, two vibrationally coupled electronic states depict charge-transfer scenarios whereas three coupled states arise for closed-shell reactions of non-degenerate molecules and seven states for the reactions implicated in the aromaticity of benzene. Previous diabatic treatments of closed-shell processes have considered only two arbitrarily chosen states as being critical, mapping these states to those for electron transfer. We show that such effective two-state diabatic models are feasible but involve renormalized electronic coupling and vibrational coupling parameters, with this renormalization being property dependent. With this caveat, diabatic models are shown to provide excellent descriptions of the spectroscopy and kinetics of the ammonia inversion reaction, proton transfer in N2H7(+), and aromaticity in benzene. This allows for the development of a single simple theory that can semi-quantitatively describe all of these chemical phenomena, as well as of course electron-transfer reactions. It forms a basis for understanding many technologically relevant aspects of chemical reactions, condensed-matter physics, chemical quantum entanglement, nanotechnology, and natural or artificial solar energy capture and conversion.

  14. Theoretical aspects of electron transfer reactions of complex molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A. M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2001-01-01

    Features of electron transfer involving complex molecules are discussed. This notion presently refers to molecular reactants where charge transfer is accompanied by large molecular reorganization, and commonly used displaced harmonic oscillator models do not apply. It is shown that comprehensive ...... vibrational frequency changes, local mode anharmonicity, and rotational reorganization, in both diabatic and adiabatic limits. Systems for which this formalism is appropriate are discussed....

  15. Photoinduced electron transfer reactions of ruthenium(II)-complexes containing amino acid with quinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eswaran, Rajkumar; Kalayar, Swarnalatha; Paulpandian, Muthu Mareeswaran; Seenivasan, Rajagopal

    2014-05-01

    With the aim of mimicking, at basic level the photoinduced electron transfer process in the reaction center of photosystem II, ruthenium(II)-polypyridyl complexes, carrying amino acids were synthesized and studied their photoinduced electron transfer reactions with quinones by steady state and time resolved measurements. The reaction of quinones with excited state of ruthenium(II)-complexes, I-V in acetonitrile has been studied by luminescence quenching technique and the rate constant, k(q), values are close to the diffusion controlled rate. The detection of the semiquinone anion radical in this system using time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy confirms the electron transfer nature of the reaction. The semiclassical theory of electron transfer has been successfully applied to the photoluminescence quenching of Ru(II)-complexes with quinones.

  16. Studies on electron transfer reactions of Keggin-type mixed addenda heteropolytungstovanadophosphates with NADH

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ponnusamy Sami; Kasi Rajasekaran

    2009-03-01

    The coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) undergoes facile electron transfer reaction with vanadium (V) substituted Keggin-type heteropolyanions (HPA) [PVVW11O40]4- (PV1) and [PV$^{V}_{2}$W10O40]5- (PV2) in aqueous phosphate buffer of pH 6 at ambient temperature. Electrochemical and optical studies show that the stoichiometry of the reaction is 1 : 2 (NADH : HPA). EPR and optical studies show that HPA act as one electron acceptor and the products of electron transfer reactions are one electron reduced heteropoly blues (HPB), viz. [PVIVW11O40]5- and [PVIVVVW10O40]6-. Oxygraph measurements show that there is no uptake of molecular oxygen during the course of reaction. The reaction proceeds through multi-step electron-proton-electron transfer mechanism, with rate limiting initial one electron transfer from NADH to HPA by outer sphere electron transfer process. Bimolecular rate constant for electron transfer reaction between NADH and PV2 in phosphate buffer of pH = 6 has been determined spectrophotometrically.

  17. Controlling an electron-transfer reaction at a metal surface by manipulating reactant motion and orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Nils; Krüger, Bastian C; Auerbach, Daniel J; Wodtke, Alec M; Schäfer, Tim

    2014-12-08

    The loss or gain of vibrational energy in collisions of an NO molecule with the surface of a gold single crystal proceeds by electron transfer. With the advent of new optical pumping and orientation methods, we can now control all molecular degrees of freedom important to this electron-transfer-mediated process, providing the most detailed look yet into the inner workings of an electron-transfer reaction and showing how to control its outcome. We find the probability of electron transfer increases with increasing translational and vibrational energy as well as with proper orientation of the reactant. However, as the vibrational energy increases, translational excitation becomes unimportant and proper orientation becomes less critical. One can understand the interplay of all three control parameters from simple model potentials. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Real-time electron dynamics simulation of two-electron transfer reactions induced by nuclear motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yasumitsu; Yamashita, Koichi

    2012-04-01

    Real-time electron dynamics of two-electron transfer reactions induced by nuclear motion is calculated by three methods: the numerically exact propagation method, the time-dependent Hartree (TDH) method and the Ehrenfest method. We find that, as long as the nuclei move as localized wave packets, the TDH and Ehrenfest methods can reproduce the exact electron dynamics of a simple charge transfer reaction model containing two electrons qualitatively well, even when nonadiabatic transitions between adiabatic states occur. In particular, both methods can reproduce the cases where a complete two-electron transfer reaction occurs and those where it does not occur.

  19. 9,10-Diphenylanthracene as a matrix for MALDI-MS electron transfer secondary reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutaghou, M Nazim; Cole, Richard B

    2012-08-01

    The most common secondary-ionization mechanism in positive ion matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) involves a proton transfer reaction to ionize the analyte. Peptides and proteins are molecules that have basic (and acidic) sites that make them susceptible to proton transfer. However, non-polar, aprotic compounds that lack basic sites are more difficult to protonate, and creating charged forms of this type of analyte can pose a problem when conventional MALDI matrices are employed. In this case, forming a radical molecular ion through electron transfer is a viable alternative, and certain matrices may facilitate the process. In this work, we investigate the performance of a newly developed electron-transfer secondary reaction matrix: 9,10-diphenylanthracene (9,10-DPA). The use of 9,10-DPA as matrix for MALDI analysis has been tested using several model compounds. It appears to promote ionization through electron transfer in a highly efficient manner as compared to other potential matrices. Thermodynamic aspects of the observed electron transfers in secondary-ionization reactions were also considered, as was the possibility for kinetically controlled/endothermic, electron-transfer reactions in the MALDI plume.

  20. A semiclassical theory of electron transfer reactions in Condon approximation and beyond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A. M.; Sokolov, V. V.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2001-01-01

    The effect of the modulation of the electronic wave functions by configurational fluctuations of the molecular environment on the kinetic parameters of electron transfer reactions is discussed. A self-consistent algorithm for the calculation of the potential profile along the reaction coordinate...

  1. New Oxime Ligand with Potential for Proton-Coupled Electron-Transfer Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deville, Claire; Sundberg, Jonas; McKenzie, Christine Joy

    Proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) is found in a range of oxidation-reduction reactions in biology.1 This mechanism is of interest for applications in energy conversion processes. The PCET reaction has been shown to be facilitated when the proton is transferred to an intramolecular basic sit...

  2. A Novel Micro-hole Electrode Used to Investigate Electron Transfer Reactions at ITIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A novel micro-hole electrode was fabricated to investigate the electron transfer reaction at the interface between two immiscible electrolyte solutions (ITIES). The electron transfer reaction between ferro/ferricyanide in aqueous phase (W) and ferrocene in 1, 2-dichloroethane (O) phase was studied as a test experiment. The results showed that the diffusion coefficient obtained from the micro-hole electrode was consistent with that obtained at macro-interface. Due to its simplicity and the very small IR drop it will be a useful tool for the study of ITIES systems.

  3. A Novel Micro—hole Electrode Used to Investigate Electron Transfer Reactions at ITIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DongPingZHAN; BingLiangWU

    2002-01-01

    A novel micro-hole electrode was fabricated to investigate the electron transfer reaction at the interface between two immiscible electrolyte solutions (ITIES). The electron transfer reaction between feero/ferricyanide in aqueous phase(W) and ferrocene in 1,2-dichloroethane (O) phase was studied as a test experiment. The results showed that the diffusion coefficient obtained from the micro-hole electrode was consistent with that obtained at macro-interface. Due to its simplicity and the very small IR drop it will be a useful tool for the study of ITIES systems.

  4. Photoinduced Electron Transfer Reaction between Poly-guanylic Acid (5`) with Anthraquinone-2-sulfonate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The electron transfer reaction between triplet anthraquinone-2-sulfonate with poly-guanylic acid (5) (poly[G]) in acetonitrile-H2O has been investigated by 248 nm laser flash photolysis. The transient absorption spectra of radical cation of poly[G] and radical anion of anthraqunione-2-sulfonate(AQS) arising from electron transfer reaction has been observed simultaneously for the first time. The formation processes of radical cation of poly[G] and radical anion of anthraquinone-2-sulfonate as well as the decay processes of triplet anthraquinone-2-sulfonate have also been observed, the apparent rate constants for the formation and decay of transient species have been determined. The free energy changes in the process of the electron transfer was also calculated.

  5. Phthalimides as exceptionally efficient single electron transfer acceptors in reductive coupling reactions promoted by samarium diiodide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacas, Tatiana; Alvarez, Eleuterio; Chiara, Jose Luis

    2007-12-20

    Experimental and theoretical evidence shows that phthalimides are highly efficient single electron transfer acceptors in reactions promoted by samarium diiodide, affording ketyl radical anion intermediates, which participate in high-yielding inter- and intramolecular reductive coupling processes with different radicophiles including imides, oxime ethers, nitrones, and Michael acceptors.

  6. Marcus Theory: Thermodynamics CAN Control the Kinetics of Electron Transfer Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Todd P.

    2012-01-01

    Although it is generally true that thermodynamics do not influence kinetics, this is NOT the case for electron transfer reactions in solution. Marcus Theory explains why this is so, using straightforward physical chemical principles such as transition state theory, Arrhenius' Law, and the Franck-Condon Principle. Here the background and…

  7. Theoretical Study on the Kinetics of Electron Transfer for Bond-breaking Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XING,Yu-Mei(邢玉梅); ZHOU,Zheng-Yu(周正宇); GAO,Hong-Wei(高洪伟)

    2002-01-01

    To test the theory of dissociative electron transfer, a simple model describing the kinetics of electron transfer bond-breaking reactions was used. The Hamiltonian of the system was given.The homogeneous and heterogeneous kinetic data fit reasonably well with an activation-driving force relatiobship derived from the Marcus quadratic theory. In the heterogeneous case, there is a good agreement between the theoretical calculation amd the experimental result, while in the homogeneous case, a good a greement is only observed for the tertiary halides. This is due to the stability of tertiary radical resulting from the sterical effect.

  8. Mechanism of electron transfer reaction for xanthene dye-sensitized formation of methyl viologen radical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usui, Y.; Misawa, H.; Sakuragi, H.; Tokumaru, K.

    1987-05-01

    Sensitized reduction of methyl viologen, MV/sup 2 +/, occurs efficiently through electron transfer from triplet xanthene dyes to MV/sup 2 +/ followed by electron transfer to the resulting semioxidized dyes from a reductant like triethanolamine. Unreactive ion pair complexes between these dyes and MV/sup 2 +/ are formed (formation constant: 1.2 x 10/sup 3/ M/sup -1/ for Eosine Y and MV/sup 2 +/ in 50% aqueous ethanol solution). The quantum yield for the reduced methyl viologen radical depends on the concentrations of MV/sup 2 +/ and the amine and on the ionic strength of solution. The efficiency of the electron transfer from triplet dyes to MV/sup 2 +/ is increased by addition of alcohol, and solvent effects on the reaction mechanism are discussed. 38 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  9. Transient W-band EPR study of sequential electron transfer in photosynthetic bacterial reaction centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, J.; Utschig, L.M.; Poluektov, O.; Thurnauer, M.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.

    1999-06-17

    The key reaction of photosynthetic solar energy conversion involves the photoexcitation of a primary donor (P) followed by rapid, sequential electron transfer to a series of acceptors resulting in charge separation. Electron-spin polarized (ESP) EPR spectra at W-band (95 GHz) were obtained for deuterated Fe-removed/Zn-substituted photosynthetic bacterial reaction centers (RCs) to investigate the influence of the rate of charge separation on the observed P{sup +}Q{sub A}{sup {minus}} charge separated state. Temperature dependent ESP EPR spectra for kinetically characterized Zn-substituted RCs from Rb. sphaeroides R-26 having different rates (k{sub Q}) of the electron transfer from the bacteriopheophytin to the quinone acceptor were obtained. The Zn-RCs exhibited either the native fast (200 ps){sup {minus}1} k{sub Q} or a slow (3--6 ns){sup {minus}1} k{sub Q} at 298 K as determined from transient optical measurements. Sequential electron-transfer polarization modeling of the polarized W-band EPR spectra obtained with these samples was used to address the reason for the differences in the electron-transfer rates. Here, the authors report the k{sub Q} rate constant, the temperature dependence of k{sub Q}, and the reorganization energy for the P{sup +}H{sup {minus}}Q{sub A} and P{sup +}HQ{sub A}{sup {minus}} electron-transfer step determined from SETP modeling of the experimental spectra. The reorganization energy for the electron-transfer process between P{sup +}H{sup {minus}}Q{sub A} and P{sup +}HQ{sub A}{sup {minus}}, and not structural changes in the donor or acceptor, was found to be the dominant factor that is altered during Fe-removal procedures.

  10. Diagnostic criteria for the characterization of quasireversible electron transfer reactions by cyclic square wave voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Megan A; Helfrick, John C; Bottomley, Lawrence A

    2014-08-19

    Theory for cyclic square wave voltammetry of quasireversible electron transfer reactions is presented and experimentally verified. The impact of empirical parameters on the shape of the current-voltage curve is examined. From the trends, diagnostic criteria enabling the use of this waveform as a tool for mechanistic analysis of electrode reaction processes are presented. These criteria were experimentally confirmed using Eu(3+)/Eu(2+), a well-established quasireversible analyte. Using cyclic square wave voltammetry, both the electron transfer coefficient and rate were calculated for this analyte and found to be in excellent agreement with literature. When properly applied, these criteria will enable nonexperts in voltammetry to assign the electrode reaction mechanism and accurately measure electrode reaction kinetics.

  11. Theoretical Study on the NO2 + NO2- Electron Transfer Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU,Zheng-Yu(周正宇); GAO,Hong-Wei(高洪伟); XING,Yu-Mei(邢玉梅); GUO,Li(郭丽); QU,Yu-Hui(曲玉辉)

    2002-01-01

    The NO2 + NO2- electron transfer reaction was studied with DFT-B3LYP method at 6-311 + G* basis set level for the eight selected structures: four species favor the strucure of "head to head". The geometry of transition state was obtained by the linear coordinate method. Three parameters, non-adiahatic activation energy (Ead), coupling matrix element (Hif) and reorganization energy (λ) for electron transfer reaction can be calculated. According to the reorganization energy of the ET reaction, the values obtained from George-Griffith-Marcus (GGM) method (the contribution only from diagonal elements of force constant matrix) are larger than those obtained from Hessian matrix method (including the contribution from both diagonal and off-diagonal elements), which suggests that the coupling interactions between different vibrational modes are important to the inner-sphere reogrganization energy for the ET reactions in gaseous phase. The value of rate constant was obtained by using above three activation parameters.

  12. Quantifying electron transfer reactions in biological systems: what interactions play the major role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjulstok, Emil; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Solov'yov, Ilia A

    2015-12-22

    Various biological processes involve the conversion of energy into forms that are usable for chemical transformations and are quantum mechanical in nature. Such processes involve light absorption, excited electronic states formation, excitation energy transfer, electrons and protons tunnelling which for example occur in photosynthesis, cellular respiration, DNA repair, and possibly magnetic field sensing. Quantum biology uses computation to model biological interactions in light of quantum mechanical effects and has primarily developed over the past decade as a result of convergence between quantum physics and biology. In this paper we consider electron transfer in biological processes, from a theoretical view-point; namely in terms of quantum mechanical and semi-classical models. We systematically characterize the interactions between the moving electron and its biological environment to deduce the driving force for the electron transfer reaction and to establish those interactions that play the major role in propelling the electron. The suggested approach is seen as a general recipe to treat electron transfer events in biological systems computationally, and we utilize it to describe specifically the electron transfer reactions in Arabidopsis thaliana cryptochrome-a signaling photoreceptor protein that became attractive recently due to its possible function as a biological magnetoreceptor.

  13. Quantifying electron transfer reactions in biological systems: what interactions play the major role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjulstok, Emil; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Solov'Yov, Ilia A.

    2015-12-01

    Various biological processes involve the conversion of energy into forms that are usable for chemical transformations and are quantum mechanical in nature. Such processes involve light absorption, excited electronic states formation, excitation energy transfer, electrons and protons tunnelling which for example occur in photosynthesis, cellular respiration, DNA repair, and possibly magnetic field sensing. Quantum biology uses computation to model biological interactions in light of quantum mechanical effects and has primarily developed over the past decade as a result of convergence between quantum physics and biology. In this paper we consider electron transfer in biological processes, from a theoretical view-point; namely in terms of quantum mechanical and semi-classical models. We systematically characterize the interactions between the moving electron and its biological environment to deduce the driving force for the electron transfer reaction and to establish those interactions that play the major role in propelling the electron. The suggested approach is seen as a general recipe to treat electron transfer events in biological systems computationally, and we utilize it to describe specifically the electron transfer reactions in Arabidopsis thaliana cryptochrome-a signaling photoreceptor protein that became attractive recently due to its possible function as a biological magnetoreceptor.

  14. Thermodynamics of electron transfer in oxygenic photosynthetic reaction centers: volume change, enthalpy, and entropy of electron-transfer reactions in manganese-depleted photosystem II core complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, J M; Boichenko, V A; Diner, B A; Mauzerall, D

    2001-06-19

    We have previously reported the thermodynamic data of electron transfer in photosystem I using pulsed time-resolved photoacoustics [Hou et al. (2001) Biochemistry 40, 7109-7116]. In the present work, using preparations of purified manganese-depleted photosystem II (PS II) core complexes from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, we have measured the DeltaV, DeltaH, and estimated TDeltaS of electron transfer on the time scale of 1 micros. At pH 6.0, the volume contraction of PS II was determined to be -9 +/- 1 A3. The thermal efficiency was found to be 52 +/- 5%, which corresponds to an enthalpy change of -0.9 +/- 0.1 eV for the formation of the state P680+Q(A-) from P680*. An unexpected volume expansion on pulse saturation of PS II was observed, which is reversible in the dark. At pH 9.0, the volume contraction, the thermal efficiency, and the enthalpy change were -3.4 +/- 0.5 A3, 37 +/- 7%, and -1.15 +/- 0.13 eV, respectively. The DeltaV of PS II, smaller than that of PS I and bacterial centers, is assigned to electrostriction and analyzed using the Drude-Nernst equation. To explain the small DeltaV for the formation of P680+Q(A-) or Y(Z*)Q(A-), we propose that fast proton transfer into a polar region is involved in this reaction. Taking the free energy of charge separation of PS II as the difference between the energy of the excited-state P680* and the difference in the redox potentials of the donor and acceptor, the apparent entropy change (TDeltaS) for charge separation of PS II is calculated to be negative, -0.1 +/- 0.1 eV at pH 6.0 (P680+Q(A-)) and -0.2 +/- 0.15 eV at pH 9.0 (Y(Z*)Q(A-)). The thermodynamic properties of electron transfer in PS II core reaction centers thus differ considerably from those of bacterial and PS I reaction centers, which have DeltaV of approximately -27 A3, DeltaH of approximately -0.4 eV, and TDeltaS of approximately +0.4 eV.

  15. The kinetics of electron transfer reaction of methylene green and titanium trichloride in different solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Rehana; Nadeem, Syed Muhammad Saqib

    2016-06-01

    The kinetics of the electron transfer reaction of methylene green and titanium trichloride was investigated in different solvents by spectrophotometry at different temperatures. The the reaction rate was determined by monitoring the absorbance as a function of time at λmax 655 nm. The reaction is pseudo-first order, dependent only on the concentration of titanium trichloride at a fixed concentration of methylene green. The effect of an aqueous alcoholic solvent was studied in the acidic range of pH from 4 to 7. It was observed that the reaction rate increased with an increase in polarity of the reaction medium. The the reaction rate was high in acidic conditions and decreased with a further increase in acidity. The increase in temperature increased the rate of the electron transfer reaction of methylene green and titanium trichloride. The activation energy ( E a) was calculated by the Arrhenius relation. The absence of any reaction intermediate was confirmed by spectroscopic and kinetic investigations. A plausible mechanism for the reaction in line with outer-sphere reaction pathway has been proposed. Thermodynamic parameters such as the activation energy ( E a), enthalpy change (Δ H), free energy change (Δ G), and entropy change (Δ S) were also evaluated

  16. Promotion of multi-electron transfer for enhanced photocatalysis: A review focused on oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changhua; Zhang, Xintong; Liu, Yichun

    2015-12-01

    Semiconductor photocatalysis has attracted significant interest for solar light induced environmental remediation and solar fuel generation. As is well known, photocatalytic performance is determined by three steps: photoexcitation, separation and transport of photogenerated charge carriers, and surface reactions. To achieve higher efficiency, significant efforts have been made on improvement of efficiency of above first two steps, which have been well documented in recent review articles. In contrast, this review intends to focus on strategies moving onto the third step of improvement for enhanced photocatalysis wherein active oxygen species including superoxide radical, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical are in situ detected. Particularly, surface electron-transfer reduction of oxygen over single component photocatalysts is reviewed and systems enabling multi-electron transfer induced oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are highlighted. It is expected this review could provide a guideline for readers to better understand the critical role of ORR over photocatalyst in charge carrier separation and transfer and obtain reliable results for enhanced aerobic photocatalysis.

  17. Adiabatic criteria for outer-sphere bimolecular electron-transfer reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onuchic, Jose Nelson; Beratan, David N.

    1988-01-01

    A model is presented for outer-sphere bimolecular electron-transfer reactions which is correct in the adiabatic, nonadiabatic, and intermediate dynamical regimes for an overdamped solvent coordinate. From this model, the conditions for the transfer to be adiabatic or nonadiabatic are deduced. The time-scale separations needed to adequately describe the process as an average over (distant dependent) unimolecular rates are described.

  18. Solvent Effects on Simple Electron Transfer Reactions. A Comparison of Results for Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    Electroanalytical Chemistry Department of Chemistry University of California . Davis, CA 95616 \\ JUN2 0 1989 May 1, 1989 C2 E Reproduction in whole or in...0541 Davis, CA 95616 . O 0 Office of Naval Research 800 N. Quincy Arlington, VA 22217-5000 Prepared for Publication in: Journal of Electroanalytical ... Chemistry 1& A (U fm M Solvent effects on the rate constants for both homogeneous and hetero- geneous electron transfer reactions have been analyzed on

  19. On the theory of electron transfer reactions at semiconductor electrode/liquid interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yi Qin; Georgievskii, Yuri; Marcus, R. A.

    2000-02-01

    Electron transfer reaction rate constants at semiconductor/liquid interfaces are calculated using the Fermi Golden Rule and a tight-binding model for the semiconductors. The slab method and a z-transform method are employed in obtaining the electronic structures of semiconductors with surfaces and are compared. The maximum electron transfer rate constants at Si/viologen2+/+ and InP/Me2Fc+/0 interfaces are computed using the tight-binding type calculations for the solid and the extended-Hückel for the coupling to the redox agent at the interface. These results for the bulk states are compared with the experimentally measured values of Lewis and co-workers, and are in reasonable agreement, without adjusting parameters. In the case of InP/liquid interface, the unusual current vs applied potential behavior is additionally interpreted, in part, by the presence of surface states.

  20. Electronic shift register memory based on molecular electron-transfer reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopfield, J. J.; Onuchic, Jose Nelson; Beratan, David N.

    1989-01-01

    The design of a shift register memory at the molecular level is described in detail. The memory elements are based on a chain of electron-transfer molecules incorporated on a very large scale integrated (VLSI) substrate, and the information is shifted by photoinduced electron-transfer reactions. The design requirements for such a system are discussed, and several realistic strategies for synthesizing these systems are presented. The immediate advantage of such a hybrid molecular/VLSI device would arise from the possible information storage density. The prospect of considerable savings of energy per bit processed also exists. This molecular shift register memory element design solves the conceptual problems associated with integrating molecular size components with larger (micron) size features on a chip.

  1. Electron transfer reactions of osmium(II) complexes with phenols and phenolic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeswari, Angusamy; Ramdass, Arumugam; Muthu Mareeswaran, Paulpandian; Velayudham, Murugesan; Rajagopal, Seenivasan

    2016-07-01

    Three [Os(NN)3]2+ complexes (NN = polypyridine) with ligands of varying hydrophobicity were synthesized and characterized by NMR spectral techniques. The geometry of the molecules are optimized by DFT calculations. The interaction between [Os(NN)3]2+ complexes and phenolate ion in ground state is confirmed by absorption spectral study and the binding constant values are in the range of 3-740 M-1. The photoinduced electron transfer reaction of these [Os(NN)3]2+ complexes with phenols and phenolic acids at pH 12.5 leads to the formation of phenoxyl radical confirmed through transient absorption spectral study. Binding constants and electron transfer rate constants within the [Os(NN)3]2+-phenolate ion adduct account for the change for the overall quenching constant with the change of structure of reactants.

  2. Cathodic Aromatic C,C Cross-Coupling Reaction via Single Electron Transfer Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yang; Tateno, Hiroyuki; Matsumura, Yoshimasa; Kashiwagi, Tsuneo; Atobe, Mahito

    2017-03-07

    We have successfully developed a novel cathodic cross-coupling reaction of aryl halides with arenes. Utilization of the cathodic single electron transfer (SET) mechanism for activation of aryl halides enables the cross-coupling reaction to proceed without the need for any transition metal catalysts or single electron donors in a mild condition. The SET from a cathode to an aryl halide initiates a radical chain by giving an anion radical of the aryl halide. The following propagation cycle also consists entirely of anion radical intermediates.

  3. Cathodic Aromatic C,C Cross-Coupling Reaction via Single Electron Transfer Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Qu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We have successfully developed a novel cathodic cross-coupling reaction of aryl halides with arenes. Utilization of the cathodic single electron transfer (SET mechanism for activation of aryl halides enables the cross-coupling reaction to proceed without the need for any transition metal catalysts or single electron donors in a mild condition. The SET from a cathode to an aryl halide initiates a radical chain by giving an anion radical of the aryl halide. The following propagation cycle also consists entirely of anion radical intermediates.

  4. Photochemical Hydrogen Abstraction and Electron Transfer Reactions of Tetrachlorobenzoquinone with Pyrimidine Nucleobases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kun-hui Liu; Li-dan Wu; Xiao-ran Zou; Wen Yang; Qian Du; Hong-mei Su

    2011-01-01

    Pentachlorophenol,a widespread environmental pollutant that is possibly carcinogenic to humans,is metabolically oxidized to tetrachloroquinone (TCBQ) which can result in DNA damage.We have investigated the photochemical reaction dynamics of TCBQ with two pyrimidine type nucleobases (thymine and uracil) upon UVA (355 nm) excitation using the technique of nanosecond time-resolved laser flash photolysis.It has been found that 355 nm excitation populates TCBQ molecules to their triplet state 3TCBQ*,which are highly reactive towards thymine or uracil and undergo two parallel reactions,the hydrogen abstraction and electron transfer,leading to the observed photoproducts of TCBQH.and TCBQ.- in transient absorption spectra.The concomitantly produced nucleobase radicals and radical cations are expected to induce a series of oxidative or strand cleavage damage to DNA afterwards.By characterizing the photochemical hydrogen abstraction and electron transfer reactions,our results provide potentially important molecular reaction mechanisms for understanding the carcinogenic effects of pentachlorophenol and its metabolites TCBQ.

  5. Beyond frontier molecular orbital theory: a systematic electron transfer model (ETM) for polar bimolecular organic reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Katharine J; Johnson, Richard P

    2013-03-01

    Polar bimolecular reactions often begin as charge-transfer complexes and may proceed with a high degree of electron transfer character. Frontier molecular orbital (FMO) theory is predicated in part on this concept. We have developed an electron transfer model (ETM) in which we systematically transfer one electron between reactants and then use density functional methods to model the resultant radical or radical ion intermediates. Sites of higher reactivity are revealed by a composite spin density map (SDM) of odd electron character on the electron density surface, assuming that a new two-electron bond would occur preferentially at these sites. ETM correctly predicts regio- and stereoselectivity for a broad array of reactions, including Diels-Alder, dipolar and ketene cycloadditions, Birch reduction, many types of nucleophilic additions, and electrophilic addition to aromatic rings and polyenes. Conformational analysis of radical ions is often necessary to predict reaction stereochemistry. The electronic and geometric changes due to one-electron oxidation or reduction parallel the reaction coordinate for electrophilic or nucleophilic addition, respectively. The effect is more dramatic for one-electron reduction.

  6. On the ultrafast kinetics of the energy and electron transfer reactions in photosystem I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slavov, Chavdar Lyubomirov

    2009-07-09

    The subject of the current work is one of the main participants in the light-dependent phase of oxygenic photosynthesis, Photosystem I (PS I). This complex carries an immense number of cofactors: chlorophylls (Chl), carotenoids, quinones, etc, which together with the protein entity exhibit several exceptional properties. First, PS I has an ultrafast light energy trapping kinetics with a nearly 100% quantum efficiency. Secondly, both of the electron transfer branches in the reaction center are suggested to be active. Thirdly, there are some so called 'red' Chls in the antenna system of PS I, absorbing light with longer wavelengths than the reaction center. These 'red' Chls significantly modify the trapping kinetics of PS I. The purpose of this thesis is to obtain better understanding of the above-mentioned, specific features of PS I. This will not merely cast more light on the mechanisms of energy and electron transfer in the complex, but also will contribute to the future developments of optimized artificial light-harvesting systems. In the current work, a number of PS I complexes isolated from different organisms (Thermosynechococcus elongatus, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Arabidopsis thaliana) and possessing distinctive features (different macroorganisation, monomers, trimers, monomers with a semibelt of peripheral antenna attached; presence of 'red' Chls) is investigated. The studies are primarily focused on the electron transfer kinetics in each of the cofactor branches in the PS I reaction center, as well as on the effect of the antenna size and the presence of 'red' Chls on the trapping kinetics of PS I. These aspects are explored with the help of several ultrafast optical spectroscopy methods: (i) time-resolved fluorescence ? single photon counting and synchroscan streak camera; and (ii) ultrafast transient absorption. Physically meaningful information about the molecular mechanisms of the energy trapping in PS I is

  7. Studies on electron transfer reactions: Reduction of heteropoly 10-tungstodivanadophosphate by thioglycolic acid in aqueous medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ponnusamy Sami; Natarajan Mariselvi; Kandasamy Venkateshwari; Arunachalam Sarathi; Kasi Rajasekaran

    2010-05-01

    Rates of electron transfer reaction of thioglycolic acid with vanadium(V) substituted Keggintype heteropolyanion, [PVVVVW10O40]5-, in acetate-acetic acid buffers have been measured spectrophotometrically at 25°C. The order of the reaction with respect to substrate and oxidant is unity. The reaction shows simple second order kinetics at constant pH. The rate of the reaction increases with increase of pH of the medium. The mono-anion HSCH2COO- and di-anion -SCH2COO- are found to be the reactive species. Rate constants for mono-anion and di-anion are evaluated from rate law derived from the mechanism. By applying Rehm-Weller relationship, self exchange rate constant for the -SCH2COO-/S$^{\\bullet}$ CH2COO- couple was evaluated as 3.3 × 103 dm3 mol-1 s-1 at 25°C.

  8. In situ Regeneration of NADH via Lipoamide Dehydrogenase-catalyzed Electron Transfer Reaction Evidenced by Spectroelectrochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tam, Tsz Kin; Chen, Baowei; Lei, Chenghong; Liu, Jun

    2012-08-01

    NAD/NADH is a coenzyme found in all living cells, carrying electrons from one reaction to another. We report on characterizations of in situ regeneration of NADH via lipoamide dehydrogenase (LD)-catalyzed electron transfer reaction to regenerate NADH using UV-vis spectroelectrochemistry. The Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) and maximum velocity (Vmax) of NADH regeneration were measured as 0.80 {+-} 0.15 mM and 1.91 {+-} 0.09 {micro}M s-1 in a 1-mm thin-layer spectroelectrochemical cell using gold gauze as the working electrode at the applied potential -0.75 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). The electrocatalytic reduction of the NAD system was further coupled with the enzymatic conversion of pyruvate to lactate by lactate dehydrogenase to examine the coenzymatic activity of the regenerated NADH. Although the reproducible electrocatalytic reduction of NAD into NADH is known to be difficult compared to the electrocatalytic oxidation of NADH, our spectroelectrochemical results indicate that the in situ regeneration of NADH via LD-catalyzed electron transfer reaction is fast and sustainable and can be potentially applied to many NAD/NADH-dependent enzyme systems.

  9. Monitoring Chemical and Biological Electron Transfer Reactions with a Fluorogenic Vitamin K Analogue Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belzile, Mei-Ni; Godin, Robert; Durantini, Andrés M; Cosa, Gonzalo

    2016-12-21

    We report herein the design, synthesis, and characterization of a two-segment fluorogenic analogue of vitamin K, B-VKQ, prepared by coupling vitamin K3, also known as menadione (a quinone redox center), to a boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) fluorophore (a lipophilic reporter segment). Oxidation-reduction reactions, spectroelectrochemical studies, and enzymatic assays conducted in the presence of DT-diaphorase illustrate that the new probe shows reversible redox behavior on par with that of vitamin K, provides a high-sensitivity fluorescence signal, and is compatible with biological conditions, opening the door to monitor remotely (i.e., via imaging) redox processes in real time. In its oxidized form, B-VKQ is non-emissive, while upon reduction to the hydroquinone form, B-VKQH2, BODIPY fluorescence is restored, with emission quantum yield values of ca. 0.54 in toluene. Density functional theory studies validate a photoinduced electron transfer intramolecular switching mechanism, active in the non-emissive quinone form and deactivated upon reduction to the emissive dihydroquinone form. Our results highlight the potential of B-VKQ as a fluorogenic probe to study electron transfer and transport in model systems and biological structures with optimal sensitivity and desirable chemical specificity. Use of such a probe may enable a better understanding of the role that vitamin K plays in biological redox reactions ubiquitous in key cellular processes, and help elucidate the mechanism and pathological significance of these reactions in biological systems.

  10. Mechanism of electron transfer reaction of ternary dipicolinatochromium(III) complex involving oxalate as secondary ligand

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hassan Amroun Ewais; Iqbal Mohamed Ibrhium Ismail

    2013-09-01

    Mechanism of electron transfer reaction of ternary Mechanism of the oxidation of [CrIII(DPA)(OX)(H2O)]− (DPA = dipicolinate and OX = oxalate) by periodate in aqueous acidic medium has been studied spectrophotometrically over the pH range of 4.45-5.57 at different temperatures. The reaction is first order with respect to both [IO$^{−}_{4}$] and the complex concentration, and it obeys the following rate law: $$d[{\\text Cr}^{\\text{VI}}]/dt = k_6K_4K_6[{\\text IO}^−_4][{\\text{Cr}}^{\\text{III}}]_{\\text{T}}/\\{([H^+] + K_4) + (K_5[H+] + K_6K_4)[{\\text{IO}}^{−}_{4}]\\}.$$ The rate of the reaction increases with increasing pH due to the deprotonation equilibria of the complex. The experimental rate law is consistent with a mechanism in which the deprotonated form [CrIII(DPA)(OX)(OH)]2− is more reactive than the conjugated acid. It is proposed that electron transfer proceeds through an inner-sphere mechanism via coordination of IO$^{−}_{4}$ to chromium(III). Thermodynamic activation parameters were calculated using the transition state theory equation.dipicolinatochromium(III) complex involving oxalate as secondary ligand

  11. pH-dependent electron transfer reaction and direct bioelectrocatalysis of the quinohemoprotein pyranose dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Kouta [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Matsumura, Hirotoshi; Ishida, Takuya [Department of Biomaterial Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Yoshida, Makoto [Department of Environmental and Natural Resource Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Samejima, Masahiro [Department of Biomaterial Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Ohno, Hiroyuki [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Nakamura, Nobuhumi, E-mail: nobu1@cc.tuat.ac.jp [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)

    2016-08-26

    A pyranose dehydrogenase from Coprinopsis cinerea (CcPDH) is an extracellular quinohemoeprotein, which consists a b-type cytochrome domain, a pyrroloquinoline-quinone (PQQ) domain, and a family 1-type carbohydrate-binding module. The electron transfer reaction of CcPDH was studied using some electron acceptors and a carbon electrode at various pH levels. Phenazine methosulfate (PMS) reacted directly at the PQQ domain, whereas cytochrome c (cyt c) reacted via the cytochrome domain of intact CcPDH. Thus, electrons are transferred from reduced PQQ in the catalytic domain of CcPDH to heme b in the N-terminal cytochrome domain, which acts as a built-in mediator and transfers electron to a heterogenous electron transfer protein. The optimal pH values of the PMS reduction (pH 6.5) and the cyt c reduction (pH 8.5) differ. The catalytic currents for the oxidation of L-fucose were observed within a range of pH 4.5 to 11. Bioelectrocatalysis of CcPDH based on direct electron transfer demonstrated that the pH profile of the biocatalytic current was similar to the reduction activity of cyt c characters. - Highlights: • pH dependencies of activity were different for the reduction of cyt c and DCPIP. • DET-based bioelectrocatalysis of CcPDH was observed. • The similar pH-dependent profile was found with cyt c and electrode. • The present results suggested that IET reaction of CcPDH shows pH dependence.

  12. The electron-transfer reaction between azurin and the cytochrome c oxidase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, S R; Barber, D; Greenwood, C; Brunori, M

    1977-11-01

    A stopped-flow investigation of the electron-transfer reaction between oxidized azurin and reduced Pseudomonas aeruginosa cytochrome c-551 oxidase and between reduced azurin and oxidized Ps. aeruginosa cytochrome c-551 oxidase was performed. Electrons leave and enter the oxidase molecule via its haem c component, with the oxidation and reduction of the haem d1 occurring by internal electron transfer. The reaction mechanism in both directions is complex. In the direction of oxidase oxidation, two phases assigned on the basis of difference spectra to haem c proceed with rate constants of 3.2 X 10(5)M-1-S-1 and 2.0 X 10(4)M-1-S-1, whereas the haem d1 oxidation occurs at 0.35 +/- 0.1S-1. Addition of CO to the reduced enzyme profoundly modifies the rate of haem c oxidation, with the faster process tending towards a rate limit of 200S-1. Reduction of the oxidase was similarly complex, with a fast haem c phase tending to a rate limit of 120S-1, and a slower phase with a second-order rate of 1.5 X 10(4)M-1-S-1; the internal transfer rate in this direction was o.25 +/- 0.1S-1. These results have been applied to a kinetic model originally developed from temperature-jump studies.

  13. A molecular Debye-Hückel approach to the reorganization energy of electron transfer reactions in an electric cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Tiejun; Song, Xueyu

    2014-10-07

    Electron transfer near an electrode immersed in ionic fluids is studied using the linear response approximation, namely, mean value of the vertical energy gap can be used to evaluate the reorganization energy, and hence any linear response model that can treat Coulomb interactions successfully can be used for the reorganization energy calculation. Specifically, a molecular Debye-Hückel theory is used to calculate the reorganization energy of electron transfer reactions in an electric cell. Applications to electron transfer near an electrode in molten salts show that the reorganization energies from our molecular Debye-Hückel theory agree well with the results from MD simulations.

  14. The Electron Transfer Reaction between p-Nitrobenzoates and β-N, N-Dimethylaminonaphthalene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A few of p-nitrobenzoates were synthesized, and the electron transfer of them with β-N, N-dimethylaminonaphthalene (DMAN) in methanol solution was studied. Steady-state fluore-scence results showed the cyclodextrin moiety in p-nitrobenzoyl-β-cyclodextrin would block the electron transfer pathway from DMAN compared with other electron acceptors, thus, reduced the electron transfer efficiency.

  15. Characterization of ferritin core on redox reactions as a nanocomposite for electron transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Kwang Min [Center for Bio-Artificial Muscle and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Watt, Richard K.; Watt, Gerald D. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Choi, Sang H. [Advanced Materials and Processing Branch, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23681 (United States); Kim, Hyug-Han [Department of Chemistry, School of Advanced Science, Dankook University, Chonan 330-180 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sun I. [Center for Bio-Artificial Muscle and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seon Jeong, E-mail: sjk@hanyang.ac.k [Center for Bio-Artificial Muscle and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-01

    The kinetics of the change in mass related to the release from and deposition onto the cavities of a ferritin in the SWCNT nanocomposite by electrochemical redox reactions, and the effects of the SWCNT on the kinetics of the variation in mass of the ferritin nanocomposite were characterized using an electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance. The change in mass of reconstituted ferritin in the SWCNT nanocomposite shows reversible variation and stability of the ferritin/SWCNT nanocomposite on redox reactions was confirmed by using a coreless apoferritin and a Fe{sup 2+} chelating agent. The ferritin/SWCNT nanocomposite is a good candidate for applications based on electron transfer, such as biosensor, biobatteries and electrodes for biofuel cell.

  16. A Langevin equation approach to electron transfer reactions in the diabatic basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, XiaoGeng; Wang, Haobin; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2008-10-14

    A linear Langevin equation that governs the population dynamics of electron transfer reactions is derived. The noise in the Langevin equation is eliminated by treating the diabatic population fluctuations as the relevant variables, leaving only the memory kernel responsible for the population relaxation. Within the memory kernel, the diabatic coupling is treated perturbatively and a second order expansion is found to give a simple closed form expression for the kernel. The accuracy of the second order truncation is maximized by performing a fixed rotation of the diabatic electronic states that minimizes the first order free energy of the system and thus minimizes the effect of the perturbation on the thermodynamics. The resulting two-hop Langevin equation (THLE) is then validated by applying it to a simple spin-boson model, where exact results exist. Excellent agreement is found in a wide parameter range, even where the perturbation is moderately strong. Results obtained in the rotated electronic basis are found to be consistently more accurate than those from the unrotated basis. These benchmark calculations also allow us to demonstrate the advantage of treating the population fluctuations instead of the populations as the relevant variables, as only the former lead to reliable results at long time. Thus, the THLE appears to provide a viable alternative to established methods--such as Ehrenfest dynamics or surface hopping--for the treatment of nonadiabatic effects in electron transfer simulations.

  17. Residual Water Modulates QA−-to-QB Electron Transfer in Bacterial Reaction Centers Embedded in Trehalose Amorphous Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Francesco; Palazzo, Gerardo; Mallardi, Antonia; Cordone, Lorenzo; Venturoli, Giovanni

    2003-01-01

    The role of protein dynamics in the electron transfer from the reduced primary quinone, QA−, to the secondary quinone, QB, was studied at room temperature in isolated reaction centers (RC) from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides by incorporating the protein in trehalose water systems of different trehalose/water ratios. The effects of dehydration on the reaction kinetics were examined by analyzing charge recombination after different regimes of RC photoexcitation (single laser pulse, double flash, and continuous light) as well as by monitoring flash-induced electrochromic effects in the near infrared spectral region. Independent approaches show that dehydration of RC-containing matrices causes reversible, inhomogeneous inhibition of QA−-to-QB electron transfer, involving two subpopulations of RCs. In one of these populations (i.e., active), the electron transfer to QB is slowed but still successfully competing with P+QA− recombination, even in the driest samples; in the other (i.e., inactive), electron transfer to QB after a laser pulse is hindered, inasmuch as only recombination of the P+QA− state is observed. Small residual water variations (∼7 wt %) modulate fully the relative fraction of the two populations, with the active one decreasing to zero in the driest samples. Analysis of charge recombination after continuous illumination indicates that, in the inactive subpopulation, the conformational changes that rate-limit electron transfer can be slowed by >4 orders of magnitude. The reported effects are consistent with conformational gating of the reaction and demonstrate that the conformational dynamics controlling electron transfer to QB is strongly enslaved to the structure and dynamics of the surrounding medium. Comparing the effects of dehydration on P+QA−→PQA recombination and QA−QB→QAQB− electron transfer suggests that conformational changes gating the latter process are distinct from those stabilizing the primary

  18. Study of the Ne(^3P_2) + CH_3F Electron Transfer Reaction below 1 Kelvin

    CERN Document Server

    Jankunas, Justin; Osterwalder, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the dynamics of electron transfer reactions at low collision energy. We present a study of Penning ionization of ground state methyl fluoride molecules by electronically excited neon atoms in the 13 $\\mu$eV--4.8 meV (150 mK--56 K) collision energy range, using a neutral-neutral merged beam setup. Relative cross sections have been measured for three Ne($^3P_2$)+ CH$_3$F reaction channels by counting the number of CH$_3$F$^+$, CH$_2$F$^+$, and CH$_3^+$ product ions, as a function of relative velocity between the neon and methyl fluoride molecular beams. Experimental cross sections markedly deviate from the Langevin capture model at collision energies above 20 K. The branching ratios are constant. In other words, the chemical shape of the CH$_3$F molecule, as seen by Ne($^3P_2$) atom, appears not to change as the collision energy is varied, in contrast to related Ne($^3P_J$) + CH$_3$X (X=Cl and Br) reactions at higher collision energies.

  19. Conformational gating of the electron transfer reaction QA−⋅QB → QAQB−⋅ in bacterial reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides determined by a driving force assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graige, M. S.; Feher, G.; Okamura, M. Y.

    1998-01-01

    The mechanism of the electron transfer reaction, QA−⋅QB → QAQB−⋅, was studied in isolated reaction centers from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides by replacing the native Q10 in the QA binding site with quinones having different redox potentials. These substitutions are expected to change the intrinsic electron transfer rate by changing the redox free energy (i.e., driving force) for electron transfer without affecting other events that may be associated with the electron transfer (e.g., protein dynamics or protonation). The electron transfer from QA−⋅ to QB was measured by three independent methods: a functional assay involving cytochrome c2 to measure the rate of QA−⋅ oxidation, optical kinetic spectroscopy to measure changes in semiquinone absorption, and kinetic near-IR spectroscopy to measure electrochromic shifts that occur in response to electron transfer. The results show that the rate of the observed electron transfer from QA−⋅ to QB does not change as the redox free energy for electron transfer is varied over a range of 150 meV. The strong temperature dependence of the observed rate rules out the possibility that the reaction is activationless. We conclude, therefore, that the independence of the observed rate on the driving force for electron transfer is due to conformational gating, that is, the rate limiting step is a conformational change required before electron transfer. This change is proposed to be the movement, controlled kinetically either by protein dynamics or intermolecular interactions, of QB by ≈5 Å as observed in the x-ray studies of Stowell et al. [Stowell, M. H. B., McPhillips, T. M., Rees, D. C., Soltis, S. M., Abresch, E. & Feher, G. (1997) Science 276, 812–816]. PMID:9751725

  20. A single residue controls electron transfer gating in photosynthetic reaction centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlyk, Oksana; Samish, Ilan; Matěnová, Martina; Dulebo, Alexander; Poláková, Helena; Kaftan, David; Scherz, Avigdor

    2017-03-01

    Interquinone QA- → QB electron-transfer (ET) in isolated photosystem II reaction centers (PSII-RC) is protein-gated. The temperature-dependent gating frequency “k” is described by the Eyring equation till levelling off at T ≥ 240 °K. Although central to photosynthesis, the gating mechanism has not been resolved and due to experimental limitations, could not be explored in vivo. Here we mimic the temperature dependency of “k” by enlarging VD1-208, the volume of a single residue at the crossing point of the D1 and D2 PSII-RC subunits in Synechocystis 6803 whole cells. By controlling the interactions of the D1/D2 subunits, VD1-208 (or 1/T) determines the frequency of attaining an ET-active conformation. Decelerated ET, impaired photosynthesis, D1 repair rate and overall cell physiology upon increasing VD1-208 to above 130 Å3, rationalize the >99% conservation of small residues at D1-208 and its homologous motif in non-oxygenic bacteria. The experimental means and resolved mechanism are relevant for numerous transmembrane protein-gated reactions.

  1. Peroxyl Radical Reactions in Water Solution: A Gym for Proton-Coupled Electron-Transfer Theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorati, Riccardo; Baschieri, Andrea; Morroni, Gloria; Gambino, Rossana; Valgimigli, Luca

    2016-06-01

    The reactions of alkylperoxyl radicals with phenols have remained difficult to investigate in water. We describe herein a simple and reliable method based on the inhibited autoxidation of water/THF mixtures, which we calibrated against pulse radiolysis. With this method we measured the rate constants kinh for the reactions of 2-tetrahydrofuranylperoxyl radicals with reference compounds: urate, ascorbate, ferrocenes, 2,2,5,7,8-pentamethyl-6-chromanol, Trolox, 6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-acetic acid, 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methoxyphenol, 4-methoxyphenol, catechol and 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol. The role of pH was investigated: the value of kinh for Trolox and 4-methoxyphenol increased 11- and 50-fold from pH 2.1 to 12, respectively, which indicate the occurrence of a SPLET-like mechanism. H(D) kinetic isotope effects combined with pH and solvent effects suggest that different types of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) mechanisms are involved in water: less electron-rich phenols react at low pH by concerted electron-proton transfer (EPT) to the peroxyl radical, whereas more electron-rich phenols and phenoxide anions react by multi-site EPT in which water acts as proton relay.

  2. A single residue controls electron transfer gating in photosynthetic reaction centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlyk, Oksana; Samish, Ilan; Matěnová, Martina; Dulebo, Alexander; Poláková, Helena; Kaftan, David; Scherz, Avigdor

    2017-01-01

    Interquinone QA− → QB electron-transfer (ET) in isolated photosystem II reaction centers (PSII-RC) is protein-gated. The temperature-dependent gating frequency “k” is described by the Eyring equation till levelling off at T ≥ 240 °K. Although central to photosynthesis, the gating mechanism has not been resolved and due to experimental limitations, could not be explored in vivo. Here we mimic the temperature dependency of “k” by enlarging VD1-208, the volume of a single residue at the crossing point of the D1 and D2 PSII-RC subunits in Synechocystis 6803 whole cells. By controlling the interactions of the D1/D2 subunits, VD1-208 (or 1/T) determines the frequency of attaining an ET-active conformation. Decelerated ET, impaired photosynthesis, D1 repair rate and overall cell physiology upon increasing VD1-208 to above 130 Å3, rationalize the >99% conservation of small residues at D1-208 and its homologous motif in non-oxygenic bacteria. The experimental means and resolved mechanism are relevant for numerous transmembrane protein-gated reactions. PMID:28300167

  3. Deceleration of the electron transfer reaction in the photosynthetic reaction centre as a manifestation of its structure fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knox P. P.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To extract information on the nature of protein structural relaxation from the kinetics of electron transfer reaction in the photosynthetic reaction centre (RC. Methods. The kinetic curves obtained by absorption spectroscopy are processed by a maximum entropy method to get the spectrum of relaxation times. Results. A series of distinctive peaks of this spectrum in the interval from 0.1 s to hundreds of seconds is revealed. With the time of exposure of the sample to actinic light increasing, the positions of the peak maxima grow linearly. Conclusions. Theoretical analysis of these results reveals the formation of several structural states of the RC protein. Remarkably, in each of these states the slow reaction kinetics follow the same fractional power law that reflects the glass-like properties of the protein.

  4. Structural and dynamical control of the reaction rate in protein electron transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balabin, Ilya A.

    Electron transfer (ET) reactions in proteins are key steps in many vital bioenergetic processes, and the reaction rate is known to be highly sensitive to the protein structure in some cases. For most bioenergetic reactions, as described by the Fermi Golden rule, the rate is proportional to a product of the average square of the effective electronic donor to acceptor coupling and a Franck-Condon factor, which accounts for the nuclear control of the energy gap. The nuclear factor is reasonably well described in Marcus theory and its modifications, and this work is focused on the mechanisms that control the effective coupling. About ten years ago, the Pathways model described for the first time how protein environment may control the effective coupling. In this work, a novel theoretical approach is developed to explore the mechanisms of structural and dynamical control beyond the qualitative level of the Pathways model. In Chapter 1, the assumptions of the Pathways model, its limitations and effects of the structure and the electronic Hamiltonian are investigated for model chain-like bridges using the Dyson's equations. In Chapter II, the framework to explore the sensitivity of the effective coupling to quality of the electronic Hamiltonian, the interference among the dominant pathways and the bridge dynamics is presented. This analysis employs the Green's function technique and includes combined molecular dynamics and electronic structure calculations. Finally, in Chapter III, this framework is tested on the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center, and the mechanisms of the structural and dynamical control for different ET steps are discussed.

  5. A Short Account of RRKM Theory of Unimolecular Reactions and of Marcus Theory of Electron Transfer in a Historical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giacomo, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The RRKM Theory of Unimolecular Reactions and Marcus Theory of Electron Transfer are here briefly discussed in a historical perspective. In the final section, after a general discussion on the educational usefulness of teaching chemistry in a historical framework, hints are given on how some characteristics of Marcus' work could be introduced in…

  6. A Short Account of RRKM Theory of Unimolecular Reactions and of Marcus Theory of Electron Transfer in a Historical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giacomo, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The RRKM Theory of Unimolecular Reactions and Marcus Theory of Electron Transfer are here briefly discussed in a historical perspective. In the final section, after a general discussion on the educational usefulness of teaching chemistry in a historical framework, hints are given on how some characteristics of Marcus' work could be introduced in…

  7. A simple approach to the solvent reorganisation Gibbs free energy in electron transfer reactions of redox metalloproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulstrup, Jens

    1999-01-01

    We discuss a simple model for the environmental reorganisation Gibbs free energy, E-r, in electron transfer between a metalloprotein and a small reaction partner. The protein is represented as a dielectric globule with low dielectric constant, the metal centres as conducting spheres, all embedded...

  8. Dielectric image effects in environmental reorganization free energies and inter-reactant work terms of metalloprotein electron transfer reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharkats, Yurij I.; Ulstrup, Jens

    1990-02-01

    Kinetics of electron transfer between redox metalloproteins and small inorganic reaction partners has become a powerful tool for investigations of protein electron transport. We introduce here a model for metalloprotein electron transfer which incorporates essential features omitted in previous approaches to metalloprotein electron transfer data analysis. The protein is represented by a spherical region of low dielectric constant, with a conducting sphere excentrically located inside the protein simulating the metal centre. A conducting sphere outside the protein represents the small reaction partners, and the whole system is embedded in a dielectric solvent. The inter-reactant work terms and overall protein and solvent reorganization free energy for this model have been calculated. It appears that dielectric image interactions for multiply charged small reactants are important and comparable to interactions with both the protein surface charges and the solvent. The character of work terms and reorganization free energies for proteins is thus different from those of small ionic reactants. Cross relations and other frames where these features are disregarded should therefore be used with care for protein electron transfer.

  9. Digallane with redox-active diimine ligand: dualism of electron-transfer reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedushkin, Igor L; Skatova, Alexandra A; Dodonov, Vladimir A; Chudakova, Valentina A; Bazyakina, Natalia L; Piskunov, Alexander V; Demeshko, Serhiy V; Fukin, Georgy K

    2014-05-19

    The reactivity of digallane (dpp-Bian)Ga-Ga(dpp-Bian) (1), which consists of redox-active ligand 1,2-bis[(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imino]acenaphthene (dpp-Bian), has been studied. The reaction of 1 with I2 proceeds via one-electron oxidation of each of two dpp-Bian ligands to a radical-anionic state and affords complex (dpp-Bian)IGa-GaI(dpp-Bian) (2). Dissolution of complex 2 in pyridine (Py) gives monomeric compound (dpp-Bian)GaI(Py) (3) as a result of a solvent-induced intramolecular electron transfer from the metal-metal bond to the dpp-Bian ligands. Treatment of compound 3 with B(C6F5)3 leads to removal of pyridine and restores compound 2. The reaction of compound 1 with 3,6-di-tert-butyl-ortho-benzoquinone (3,6-Q) proceeds with oxidation of all the redox-active centers in 1 (the Ga-Ga bond and two dpp-Bian dianions) and results in mononuclear catecholate (dpp-Bian)Ga(Cat) (4) (Cat = [3,6-Q](2-)). Treatment of 4 with AgBF4 gives a mixture of [(dpp-Bian)2Ag][BF4] (5) and (dpp-Bian)GaF(Cat) (6), which both consist of neutral dpp-Bian ligands. The reduction of benzylideneacetone (BA) with 1 generates the BA radical-anions, which dimerize, affording (dpp-Bian)Ga-(BA-BA)-Ga(dpp-Bian) (7). In this case the Ga-Ga bond remains unchanged. Within 10 min at 95 °C in solution compound 7 undergoes transformation to paramagnetic complex (dpp-Bian)Ga(BA-BA) (8) and metal-free compound C36H40N2 (9). The latter is a product of intramolecular addition of the C-H bond of one of the iPr groups to the C═N bond in dpp-Bian. Diamagnetic compounds 3, 5, 6, and 9 have been characterized by NMR spectroscopy, and paramagnetic complexes 2, 4, 7, and 8 by ESR spectroscopy. Molecular structures of 2-7 and 9 have been established by single-crystal X-ray analysis.

  10. Eddy covariance flux measurements of ammonia by electron transfer reaction-mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sintermann

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A system for fast ammonia (NH3 measurements based on a commercial Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometer is presented. It uses electron transfer reaction (eTR as ionisation pathway and features a drift tube of polyetheretherketone (PEEK and silica-coated steel. Heating the instrumental inlet and the drift tube to 180° C enabled an effective time resolution of ~1 s and made it possible to apply the eTR-MS for eddy covariance (EC measurements. EC fluxes of NH3 were measured over two agricultural fields in Oensingen, Switzerland, following fertilisations with cattle slurry. Air was aspirated close to a sonic anemometer at a flow of 100 STP L min−1 and was directed through a 23 m long 1/2" PFA tube heated to 150°C to an air-conditioned trailer where the eTR-MS sub-sampled from the large bypass stream. This setup minimised damping of fast NH3 concentration changes between the sampling point and the actual measurement. High-frequency attenuation loss of the NH3 fluxes of 20 to 40% was quantified and corrected for using an empirical ogive method. The instrumental NH3 background signal showed a minor interference with H2O which was characterised in the laboratory. The resulting correction of the NH3 flux after slurry spreading was less than 1‰. The flux detection limit of the EC system was about 5 ng m−2 s−1 while the accuracy of individual flux measurements was estimated 16% for the high-flux regime during these experiments. The NH3 emissions after broad spreading of the slurry showed an initial maximum of 150 μg m2 s−1 with a fast decline in the following hours.

  11. Electron Transfer Chain Catalysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ Electron-transfer chain (ETC) catalysis belongs to the family of chain reactions where the electron is the catalyst. The ETC mechanism could be initiated by chemical activation, electrochemistry, or photolysis. If this pathway is applied to the preparation of organometallic complexes, it utilizes the greatly enhanced reactivity of organometallic 17e and 19e radicals. The chemical propagation is followed by the cross electron-transfer while the electron-transfer step is also followed by the chemical propagation, creating a loop in which reactants are facilely transformed into products. Interestingly the overall reaction is without any net redox change.

  12. Electron Transfer Chain Catalysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; LingKang

    2001-01-01

    Electron-transfer chain (ETC) catalysis belongs to the family of chain reactions where the electron is the catalyst. The ETC mechanism could be initiated by chemical activation, electrochemistry, or photolysis. If this pathway is applied to the preparation of organometallic complexes, it utilizes the greatly enhanced reactivity of organometallic 17e and 19e radicals. The chemical propagation is followed by the cross electron-transfer while the electron-transfer step is also followed by the chemical propagation, creating a loop in which reactants are facilely transformed into products. Interestingly the overall reaction is without any net redox change.  ……

  13. Bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) ytterbium: Electron-transfer reactions with organotransition metal complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsunaga, Phillip Thomas [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-11-01

    The divalent lanthanide complex, (Me5C5)2Yb, reacts with methylcopper to produce the base-free, ytterbium-methyl complex, (Me5C5)2YbMe. This product forms a asymmetric, methyl-bridged dimer in the solid state. The bulky alkyl complex, (Me5C5)2YbCH(SiMe3)2, displays similar chemistry to (Me5C5)2YbMe, but at a reduced reaction rate due to the limited accessibility of the metal in (Me5C5)3YbCH(SiMe5)2. Copper and silver halide salts react with (Me5C5)2V to produce the trivalent halide derivatives, (Me5C5)2VX (X + F, Cl, Br, I). The chloride complex, (Me5C5)2VCl, reacts with lithium reagents to form the phenyl and borohydride species. Nitrous oxide transfers an oxygen atom to (Me5C5)2V producing the vanadium-oxo complex, (Me5Ce5)2VO. The trivalent titanium species, (Me5C5)2TiX (X = Cl, Br, Me, BH4), form bimetallic coordination complexes with (Me5C5)2Yb. The magnetic behavior of the products indicates that electron transfer has not occurred. The solid state structures of the chloride and bromide complexes show unusual bend angles for the halide bridges between ytterbium and titanium. A model based on frontier orbital theory has been proposed to account for the bending behavior in these species. The bimetallic methyl complex contains a linear methyl bridge between ytterbium and titanium.

  14. Bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) ytterbium: Electron-transfer reactions with organotransition metal complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsunaga, P.T.

    1991-11-01

    The divalent lanthanide complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}Yb, reacts with methylcopper to produce the base-free, ytterbium-methyl complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}YbMe. This product forms a asymmetric, methyl-bridged dimer in the solid state. The bulky alkyl complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}YbCH(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}, displays similar chemistry to (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}YbMe, but at a reduced reaction rate due to the limited accessibility of the metal in (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}YbCH(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}. Copper and silver halide salts react with (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}V to produce the trivalent halide derivatives, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}VX (X + F, Cl, Br, I). The chloride complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}VCl, reacts with lithium reagents to form the phenyl and borohydride species. Nitrous oxide transfers an oxygen atom to (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}V producing the vanadium-oxo complex, (Me{sub 5}Ce{sub 5}){sub 2}VO. The trivalent titanium species, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}TiX (X = Cl, Br, Me, BH{sub 4}), form bimetallic coordination complexes with (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}Yb. The magnetic behavior of the products indicates that electron transfer has not occurred. The solid state structures of the chloride and bromide complexes show unusual bend angles for the halide bridges between ytterbium and titanium. A model based on frontier orbital theory has been proposed to account for the bending behavior in these species. The bimetallic methyl complex contains a linear methyl bridge between ytterbium and titanium.

  15. Electron transfer in proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1991-01-01

    Electron migration between and within proteins is one of the most prevalent forms of biological energy conversion processes. Electron transfer reactions take place between active centers such as transition metal ions or organic cofactors over considerable distances at fast rates and with remarkable...... specificity. The electron transfer is attained through weak electronic interaction between the active sites, so that considerable research efforts are centered on resolving the factors that control the rates of long-distance electron transfer reactions in proteins. These factors include (in addition......-containing proteins. These proteins serve almost exclusively in electron transfer reactions, and as it turns out, their metal coordination sites are endowed with properties uniquely optimized for their function....

  16. Experimental exploration of the Mulliken-Hush relationship for intramolecular electron transfer reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Tamal; Ito, Naoki; Gould, Ian R

    2011-03-17

    The Mulliken-Hush (M-H) relationship provides the critical link between optical and thermal electron transfer processes, and yet very little direct experimental support for its applicability has been provided. Dicyanovinylazaadamantane (DCVA) represents a simple two-state (neutral/charge-transfer) intramolecular electron transfer system that exhibits charge-transfer absorption and emission spectra that are readily measurable in solvents with a wide range of polarities. In this regard it represents an ideal model system for studying the factors that control both optical charge separation (absorption) and recombination (emission) processes in solution. Here we explore the applicability of the M-H relation to quantitative descriptions of the optical charge-transfer processes in DCVA. For DCVA, the measured radiative rate constants exhibit a linear dependence on transition energy, and transition dipole moments exhibit an inverse dependence on transition energy, consistent with the M-H relationship.

  17. Proton-coupled electron transfer in tyrosine and a β-hairpin maquette: reaction dynamics on the picosecond time scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagba, Cynthia V; Chi, San-Hui; Perry, Joseph; Barry, Bridgette A

    2015-02-12

    In proteins, proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) can involve the transient oxidation and reduction of the aromatic amino acid tyrosine. Due to the short life time of tyrosyl radical intermediates, transient absorption spectroscopy provides an important tool in deciphering electron-transfer mechanisms. In this report, the photoionization of solution tyrosine and tyrosinate was investigated using transient, picosecond absorption spectroscopy. The results were compared to data acquired from a tyrosine-containing β-hairpin peptide. This maquette, peptide A, is an 18-mer that exhibits π-π interaction between tyrosine (Y5) and histidine (H14). Y5 and H14 carry out an orthogonal PCET reaction when Y5 is oxidized in the mid-pH range. Photolysis of all samples (280 nm, instrument response: 360 fs) generated a solvated electron signal within 3 ps. A signal from the S1 state and a 410 nm signal from the neutral tyrosyl radical were also formed in 3 ps. Fits to S1 and tyrosyl radical decay profiles revealed biphasic kinetics with time constants of 10-50 and 400-1300 ps. The PCET reaction at pH 9 was associated with a significant decrease in the rate of tyrosyl radical and S1 decay compared to electron transfer (ET) alone (pH 11). This pH dependence was observed both in solution and peptide samples. The pH 9 reaction may occur with a sequential electron-transfer, proton-transfer (ETPT) mechanism. Alternatively, the pH 9 reaction may occur by coupled proton and electron transfer (CPET). CPET would be associated with a reorganization energy larger than that of the pH 11 reaction. Significantly, the decay kinetics of S1 and the tyrosyl radical were accelerated in peptide A compared to solution samples at both pH values. These data suggest either an increase in electronic coupling or a specific, sequence-dependent interaction, which facilitates ET and PCET in the β hairpin.

  18. Excited states in electron-transfer reaction products: ultrafast relaxation dynamics of an isolated acceptor radical anion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horke, Daniel A; Roberts, Gareth M; Verlet, Jan R R

    2011-08-04

    The spectroscopy and ultrafast relaxation dynamics of excited states of the radical anion of a representative charge-transfer acceptor molecule, 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane, have been studied in the gas phase using time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. The photoelectron spectra reveal that at least two anion excited states are bound. Time-resolved studies show that both excited states are very short-lived and internally convert to the anion ground state, with the lower energy state relaxing within 200 fs and a near-threshold valence-excited state relaxing on a 60 fs time scale. These excited states, and in particular the valence-excited state, present efficient pathways for electron-transfer reactions in the highly exergonic inverted region which commonly displays rates exceeding predictions from electron-transfer theory.

  19. Reaction dynamics and proton coupled electron transfer: studies of tyrosine-based charge transfer in natural and biomimetic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Bridgette A

    2015-01-01

    In bioenergetic reactions, electrons are transferred long distances via a hopping mechanism. In photosynthesis and DNA synthesis, the aromatic amino acid residue, tyrosine, functions as an intermediate that is transiently oxidized and reduced during long distance electron transfer. At physiological pH values, oxidation of tyrosine is associated with a deprotonation of the phenolic oxygen, giving rise to a proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) reaction. Tyrosine-based PCET reactions are important in photosystem II, which carries out the light-induced oxidation of water, and in ribonucleotide reductase, which reduces ribonucleotides to form deoxynucleotides. Photosystem II contains two redox-active tyrosines, YD (Y160 in the D2 polypeptide) and YZ (Y161 in the D1 polypeptide). YD forms a light-induced stable radical, while YZ functions as an essential charge relay, oxidizing the catalytic Mn₄CaO₅ cluster on each of four photo-oxidation reactions. In Escherichia coli class 1a RNR, the β2 subunit contains the radical initiator, Y122O•, which is reversibly reduced and oxidized in long range electron transfer with the α2 subunit. In the isolated E. coli β2 subunit, Y122O• is a stable radical, but Y122O• is activated for rapid PCET in an α2β2 substrate/effector complex. Recent results concerning the structure and function of YD, YZ, and Y122 are reviewed here. Comparison is made to recent results derived from bioengineered proteins and biomimetic compounds, in which tyrosine-based charge transfer mechanisms have been investigated. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vibrational spectroscopies and bioenergetic systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Real-time observation of intersystem crossing induced by charge recombination during bimolecular electron transfer reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Alsam, Amani Abdu

    2016-09-21

    Real-time probing of intersystem crossing (ISC) and triplet-state formation after photoinduced electron transfer (ET) is a particularly challenging task that can be achieved by time-resolved spectroscopy with broadband capability. Here, we examine the mechanism of charge separation (CS), charge recombination (CR) and ISC of bimolecular photoinduced electron transfer (PET) between poly[(9,9-di(3,3′-N,N’-trimethyl-ammonium) propyl fluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-alt-co-(9,9-dioctyl-fluorenyl-2,7-diyl)] diiodide salt (PFN) and dicyanobenzene (DCB) using time-resolved spectroscopy. PET from PFN to DCB is confirmed by monitoring the transient absorption (TA) and infrared spectroscopic signatures for the radical ion pair (DCB─•-PFN+•). In addition, our time-resolved results clearly demonstrate that CS takes place within picoseconds followed by CR within nanoseconds. The ns-TA data exhibit the clear spectroscopic signature of PFN triplet-triplet absorption, induced by the CR of the radical ion pairs (DCB─•-PFN+•). As a result, the triplet state of PFN (3PFN*) forms and subsequently, the ground singlet state is replenished within microseconds. © 2016

  1. Final Report: The Impact of Carbonate on Surface Protonation, Electron Transfer and Crystallization Reactions in Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and Colloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, David Adams [The University of Alabama

    2013-07-02

    This project addresses key issues of importance in the geochemical behavior of iron oxides and in the geochemical cycling of carbon and iron. For Fe, we are specifically studying the influence of carbonate on electron transfer reactions, solid phase transformations, and the binding of carbonate to reactive sites on the edges of particles. The emphasis on carbonate arises because it is widely present in the natural environment, is known to bind strongly to oxide surfaces, is reactive on the time scales of interest, and has a speciation driven by acid-base reactions. The geochemical behavior of carbonate strongly influences global climate change and CO{sub 2} sequestration technologies. Our goal is to answer key questions with regards to specific site binding, electron transfer reactions, and crystallization reactions of iron oxides that impact both the geochemical cycling of iron and CO{sub 2} species. Our work is focused on the molecular level description of carbonate chemistry in solution including the prediction of isotope fractionation factors. We have also done work on critical atmospheric species.

  2. Separation of electron-transfer and coupled chemical reaction components of biocatalytic processes using Fourier transform ac voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Barry D; Zhang, Jie; Bond, Alan M; Bell, Stephen G; Wong, Luet-Lok

    2005-06-01

    The underlying electron-transfer and coupled chemical processes associated with biologically important catalytic reactions can be resolved using a combination of Fourier transform ac voltammetry with an analysis of the separated dc and ac components. This outcome can be achieved because the response associated with generation of the catalytic current is essentially confined to the steady-state dc component, whereas the electron-transfer step is dominant in the fundamental and higher harmonics. For the mediated oxidation of glucose with glucose oxidase, it was found that the underlying reversible redox chemistry of the mediator, ferrocenemonocarboxylic acid, as detected in the third and higher harmonics, was totally unaffected by introduction of the catalytic process. In contrast, for the catalytic reduction of molecular oxygen by cytochrome P450, slight changes in the P450 redox process were detected when the catalytic reaction was present. Simulations of a simple catalytic reaction scheme support the fidelity of this novel FT ac voltammetric approach for examining mechanistic nuances of catalytic forms of electrochemical reaction schemes.

  3. Oxidative catalysis using the stoichiometric oxidant as a reagent: an efficient strategy for single-electron-transfer-induced tandem anion-radical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafka, František; Holan, Martin; Hidasová, Denisa; Pohl, Radek; Císařová, Ivana; Klepetářová, Blanka; Jahn, Ullrich

    2014-09-01

    Oxidative single-electron transfer-catalyzed tandem reactions consisting of a conjugate addition and a radical cyclization are reported, which incorporate the mandatory terminal oxidant as a functionality into the product.

  4. A simple approach to the solvent reorganization Gibbs free energy in electron transfer reactions of redox metalloproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharkats, Yurij I.; Ulstrup, Jens

    1999-04-01

    We discuss a simple model for the environmental reorganisation Gibbs free energy, Er, in electron transfer between a metalloprotein and a small reaction partner. The protein is represented as a dielectric globule with low dielectric constant, the metal centres as conducting spheres, all embedded in a continuous solvent with high dielectric constant. This model has previously reproduced thermodynamic metalloprotein properties. Er takes an analytic form expressed by a continuous image charge distribution, and depends weakly on the globular radius, indicating that repolarisation at the globule/solvent interface contributes less to these effects than to the work terms and driving force.

  5. Electron transfer in peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Afzal; Adhikari, Bimalendu; Martic, Sanela; Munir, Azeema; Shahzad, Suniya; Ahmad, Khurshid; Kraatz, Heinz-Bernhard

    2015-02-21

    In this review, we discuss the factors that influence electron transfer in peptides. We summarize experimental results from solution and surface studies and highlight the ongoing debate on the mechanistic aspects of this fundamental reaction. Here, we provide a balanced approach that remains unbiased and does not favor one mechanistic view over another. Support for a putative hopping mechanism in which an electron transfers in a stepwise manner is contrasted with experimental results that support electron tunneling or even some form of ballistic transfer or a pathway transfer for an electron between donor and acceptor sites. In some cases, experimental evidence suggests that a change in the electron transfer mechanism occurs as a result of donor-acceptor separation. However, this common understanding of the switch between tunneling and hopping as a function of chain length is not sufficient for explaining electron transfer in peptides. Apart from chain length, several other factors such as the extent of the secondary structure, backbone conformation, dipole orientation, the presence of special amino acids, hydrogen bonding, and the dynamic properties of a peptide also influence the rate and mode of electron transfer in peptides. Electron transfer plays a key role in physical, chemical and biological systems, so its control is a fundamental task in bioelectrochemical systems, the design of peptide based sensors and molecular junctions. Therefore, this topic is at the heart of a number of biological and technological processes and thus remains of vital interest.

  6. A kinetic study of the electron-transfer in the reaction of tribenzylchlorotin with [COW12O40]5-

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fatemeh F. Bamoharram; Mohammad M. Heravi; Touran Ardalan; Pouran Ardalan

    2009-01-01

    A kinetic study of the electron-transfer in the reaction of tribenzylchlorotin with potassium 12-tungsto cobalt (Ⅲ) ate ion, K5[CoW12O40], abbreviated as Co(Ⅲ)W, has been performed in different solvents. The studies were carried out in methanol, ethanol, acetonitrile and acetic acid/water. The rate constants, reaction rates and activation parameters were calculated. Our findings show that the rate of disappearance of the Co(Ⅲ) is pseudo-first order. The kinetic data is strongly affected by used solvents. The maximum and minimum rate constants were achieved in the ethanol and acetic acid/water (70/30) as a solvent, respectively. In all of the used solvents, negative value of activation entropies was observed, but negative activation enthalpies are observed in methanol, ethanol and acetonitrile. The reaction rate is increased with increase of Co(Ⅲ) concentration.

  7. The citric acid-Mn III,IVO 2(birnessite) reaction. Electron transfer, complex formation, and autocatalytic feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun; Stone, Alan T.

    2006-09-01

    Citrate released by plants, bacteria, and fungi into soils is subject to abiotic oxidation by MnO 2(birnessite), yielding 3-ketoglutarate, acetoacetate, and Mn II. Citrate loss and generation of products as a function of time all yield S-shaped curves, indicating autocatalysis. Increasing the citrate concentration decreases the induction period. The maximum rate ( rmax) along the reaction coordinate follows a Langmuir-Hinshelwood dependence on citrate concentration. Increases in pH decrease rmax and increase the induction time. Adding Mn II, Zn II, orthophosphate, or pyrophosphate at the onset of reaction decreases rmax. Mn II addition eliminates the induction period, while orthophosphate and pyrophosphate addition increase the induction period. These findings indicate that two parallel processes are responsible. The first, relatively slow process involves the oxidation of free citrate by surface-bound Mn III,IV, yielding Mn II and citrate oxidation products. The second process, which is subject to strong positive feedback, involves electron transfer from Mn II-citrate complexes to surface-bound Mn III,IV, generating Mn III-citrate and Mn II. Subsequent intramolecular electron transfer converts Mn III-citrate into Mn II and citrate oxidation products.

  8. Golden rule kinetics of transfer reactions in condensed phase: The microscopic model of electron transfer reactions in disordered solid matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basilevsky, M. V.; Mitina, E. A. [Photochemistry Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, 7a, Novatorov ul., Moscow (Russian Federation); Odinokov, A. V. [Photochemistry Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, 7a, Novatorov ul., Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI,” 31, Kashirskoye shosse, Moscow (Russian Federation); Titov, S. V. [Karpov Institute of Physical Chemistry, 3-1/12, Building 6, Obuha pereulok, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-21

    The algorithm for a theoretical calculation of transfer reaction rates for light quantum particles (i.e., the electron and H-atom transfers) in non-polar solid matrices is formulated and justified. The mechanism postulated involves a local mode (an either intra- or inter-molecular one) serving as a mediator which accomplishes the energy exchange between the reacting high-frequency quantum mode and the phonon modes belonging to the environment. This approach uses as a background the Fermi golden rule beyond the usually applied spin-boson approximation. The dynamical treatment rests on the one-dimensional version of the standard quantum relaxation equation for the reduced density matrix, which describes the frequency fluctuation spectrum for the local mode under consideration. The temperature dependence of a reaction rate is controlled by the dimensionless parameter ξ{sub 0}=ℏω{sub 0}/k{sub B}T where ω{sub 0} is the frequency of the local mode and T is the temperature. The realization of the computational scheme is different for the high/intermediate (ξ{sub 0} < 1 − 3) and for low (ξ{sub 0}≫ 1) temperature ranges. For the first (quasi-classical) kinetic regime, the Redfield approximation to the solution of the relaxation equation proved to be sufficient and efficient in practical applications. The study of the essentially quantum-mechanical low-temperature kinetic regime in its asymptotic limit requires the implementation of the exact relaxation equation. The coherent mechanism providing a non-vanishing reaction rate has been revealed when T→ 0. An accurate computational methodology for the cross-over kinetic regime needs a further elaboration. The original model of the hopping mechanism for electronic conduction in photosensitive organic materials is considered, based on the above techniques. The electron transfer (ET) in active centers of such systems proceeds via local intra- and intermolecular modes. The active modes, as a rule, operate beyond the

  9. Diagnostic Criteria for the Characterization of Electrode Reactions with Chemically Coupled Reactions Preceding the Electron Transfer by Cyclic Square Wave Voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfrick, John C; Mann, Megan A; Bottomley, Lawrence A

    2016-08-18

    Theory for cyclic square wave voltammetry of electrode reactions with chemical reactions preceding the electron transfer is presented. Theoretical voltammograms were calculated following systematic variation of empirical parameters to assess their impact on the shape of the voltammogram. From the trends obtained, diagnostic criteria for this mechanism were deduced. When properly applied, these criteria will enable non-experts in voltammetry to assign the electrode reaction mechanism and accurately measure reaction kinetics. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Cyclic voltammetry and scanning electrochemical microscopy studies of the heterogeneous electron transfer reaction of some nitrosoaromatic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bollo, S.; Finger, S.; Sturm, J.C.; Nunez-Vergara, L.J.; Squella, J.A. [Bioelectrochemistry Laboratory, Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences Faculty, University of Chile, P.O. Box 233, Santiago 1 (Chile)

    2007-04-20

    The heterogeneous electron transfer reaction for the reduction of some nitroso aromatic derivatives in aqueous-alcoholic medium was studied on both mercury and glassy carbon electrodes (GCE) by using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and scanning electrochemical microscopy techniques (SECM). The nitrosoaromatic derivatives followed a two-electron two-proton mechanism producing a quasi-reversible overall process. This strongly pH dependent mechanism varied from ECCE mechanism at pH < 8.5 to ECEC mechanism at pH > 8.5. The apparent heterogeneous rate constant for the reduction of the nitroso derivatives was calculated using CV or SECM. The rate constant for the electron transfer process depends on the nature of the electrode material. The heterogeneous rate constant on the GCE is almost two orders of magnitude smaller than that on mercury electrode i.e. (3.4 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -3} cm s{sup -1} on Hg and (7.0 {+-} 1.0) x 10{sup -5} cm s{sup -1} on GCE, for the same nitroso compound and pH. The heterogeneous rate constant values were checked by comparison between experimental and simulated cyclic voltammograms. (author)

  11. Energy, Electron Transfer and Photocatalytic Reactions of Visible Light Absorbing Transition Metal Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmehl, Russell H. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (United States)

    2016-03-02

    This is the final technical report for a project carried out at Tulane University of New Orleans that describes the development of light induced (solar) reactions geared toward decomposing water into its component elements : hydrogen and oxygen. Much of the work involved optimizing systems for absorbing visible light and undergoing light promoted reactions to generate very strong reducing agents that are capable of reacting with water to produce hydrogen. Additional portions of the research were collaborative efforts to put the strong reducing agents to work in reaction with hydrogen generation catalysts prepared elsewhere. Time resolved laser spectroscopic methods were used to evaluate the light induced reactions and characterize very reactive intermediate substances formed during the reactions.

  12. Transient kinetics of electron transfer reactions of flavodoxin: ionic strength dependence of semiquinone oxidation by cytochrome c, ferricyanide, and ferric ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and computer modeling of reaction complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simondsen, R P; Weber, P C; Salemme, F R; Tollin, G

    1982-12-07

    Electron transfer reactions between Clostridum pasteurianum flavodoxin semiquinone and various oxidants [horse heart cytochrome c, ferricyanide, and ferric ethylenediaminetetraacetic [horse heart cytochrome c, ferricyanide, and ferric ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)] have been studied as a function of ionic strength by using stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The cytochrome c reaction is complicated by the existence of two cytochrome species which react at different rates and whose relative concentrations are ionic strength dependent. Only the faster of these two reactions is considered here. At low ionic strength, complex formation between cytochrome c and flavodoxin is indicated by a leveling off of the pseudo-first-order rate constant at high cytochrome c concentration. This is not observed for either ferricyanide or ferric EDTA. For cytochrome c, the rate and association constants for complex formation were found to increase with decreasing ionic strength, consistent with negative charges on flavodoxin interacting with the positively charged cytochrome electron transfer site. Both ferricyanide and ferric EDTA are negatively charged oxidants, and the rate data respond to ionic strength changes as would be predicted for reactants of the same charge sign. These results demonstrate that electrostatic interactions involving negatively charged groups are important in orienting flavodoxin with respect to oxidants during electron transfer. We have also carried out computer modeling studies of putative complexes of flavodoxin with cytochrome c and ferricyanide, which relate their structural properties to both the observed kinetic behavior and some more general features of physiological electron transfer processes. The results of this study are consistent with the ionic strength behavior described above.

  13. Conformational changes of active site of copper zinc superoxide dismutase can be detected sensitively by electron-transfer reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    舒占永

    1996-01-01

    The electron-transfer (ET) reaction between Fe(CN)64- and copper zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD) occurs at the active site of the enzyme. The ET parameters which are sensitive to the denaturation have been used to determine the conformational changes of the active site induced by guanidine hydrochloride and thermal denaturation. The decreases of ET rates for all the denatured enzyme samples reflect the collapse of the active cavity of enzyme in the unfolding processes. The interesting changes of ET amplitude for the enzyme denatured at different pH values suggest that electrostatic interaction plays an important role in the conformational changes of active site. From the results of the kinetic analyses, it is concluded that the conformational changes of the active site are parallel with the inactivation.

  14. ELECTRON-TRANSFER REACTIONS OF CROSSLINKED POLY(1-PYRIDINIOMETHYL)STYRENE CHLORIDE 2. REDUCTION OF NITRO-COMPOUNDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NI Yushan; SHAO Yunglin; XU Jiping

    1984-01-01

    Continuing the study of electron transfer reactions of polypyridiniomethylstyrene chloride (PSPyCl), the reduction of nitro-compounds by the PSPyCl-Zn system was investigated. In general azoxy compounds were obtained as chief intermediate product of reduction. Reduction of nitrobenzo-15-crown-5 and its homologues give a new class of bis-crown ether compounds--azoxy-bisbenzocrown ethers. Azoxybisbenzocrown ethers undergo photoinduced trans-cis isomerization,which is reversible on irradiation with UV and on storage in darkness, similar to the case of azobiscrown ethers. Investigation of solvent extraction of various cations by azobiscrown ether isomers shows that cis-azoxybisbenzo-15-crown-5 exhibit good selectivity toward Nd3+ from other rare earth cations.

  15. Cyclic Square Wave Voltammetry of Surface-Confined Quasireversible Electron Transfer Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Megan A; Bottomley, Lawrence A

    2015-09-01

    The theory for cyclic square wave voltammetry of surface-confined quasireversible electrode reactions is presented and experimentally verified. Theoretical voltammograms were calculated following systematic variation of empirical parameters to assess their impact on the shape of the voltammogram. From the trends obtained, diagnostic criteria for this mechanism were deduced. These criteria were experimentally confirmed using two well-established surface-confined analytes. When properly applied, these criteria will enable non-experts in voltammetry to assign the electrode reaction mechanism and accurately measure electrode reaction kinetics.

  16. Electron transfer reactions, cyanide and O2 binding of truncated hemoglobin from Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez, Esther; Larsson, Jonas T.; McLean, Kirsty J.

    2013-01-01

    in trHb-Bs shifted −59 mV per pH unit at pH higher than 7, consistently with a 1e−/1 H+ – transfer reaction. The heterogeneous rate constant ks for a quasi-reversible 1e− – 1H+ – transfer reaction between graphite and trHb-Bs was 10.1 ± 2.3 s−1. Upon reversible cyanide binding the ks doubled, while...

  17. Protein structure, electron transfer and evolution of prokaryotic photosynthetic reaction centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenship, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers from a variety of organisms have been isolated and characterized. The groups of prokaryotic photosynthetic organisms include the purple bacteria, the filamentous green bacteria, the green sulfur bacteria and the heliobacteria as anoxygenic representatives as well as the cyanobacteria and prochlorophytes as oxygenic representatives. This review focuses on structural and functional comparisons of the various groups of photosynthetic reaction centers and considers possible evolutionary scenarios to explain the diversity of existing photosynthetic organisms.

  18. Protein structure, electron transfer and evolution of prokaryotic photosynthetic reaction centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenship, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers from a variety of organisms have been isolated and characterized. The groups of prokaryotic photosynthetic organisms include the purple bacteria, the filamentous green bacteria, the green sulfur bacteria and the heliobacteria as anoxygenic representatives as well as the cyanobacteria and prochlorophytes as oxygenic representatives. This review focuses on structural and functional comparisons of the various groups of photosynthetic reaction centers and considers possible evolutionary scenarios to explain the diversity of existing photosynthetic organisms.

  19. An analysis of model proton-coupled electron transfer reactions via the mixed quantum-classical Liouville approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakib, Farnaz A; Hanna, Gabriel

    2014-07-28

    The nonadiabatic dynamics of model proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions is investigated for the first time using a surface-hopping algorithm based on the solution of the mixed quantum-classical Liouville equation (QCLE). This method provides a rigorous treatment of quantum coherence/decoherence effects in the dynamics of mixed quantum-classical systems, which is lacking in the molecular dynamics with quantum transitions surface-hopping approach commonly used for simulating PCET reactions. Within this approach, the protonic and electronic coordinates are treated quantum mechanically and the solvent coordinate evolves classically on both single adiabatic surfaces and on coherently coupled pairs of adiabatic surfaces. Both concerted and sequential PCET reactions are studied in detail under various subsystem-bath coupling conditions and insights into the dynamical principles underlying PCET reactions are gained. Notably, an examination of the trajectories reveals that the system spends the majority of its time on the average of two coherently coupled adiabatic surfaces, during which a phase enters into the calculation of an observable. In general, the results of this paper demonstrate the applicability of QCLE-based surface-hopping dynamics to the study of PCET and emphasize the importance of mean surface evolution and decoherence effects in the calculation of PCET rate constants.

  20. The effect of intramolecular quantum modes on free energy relationships for electron transfer reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulstrup, Jens; Jortner, Joshua

    1975-01-01

    -frequency intramolecular degrees of feedom on the free energy relationship for series of closely related reactions was investigated for various model systems involving displacement of potential energy surfaces, frequency shift, and anharmonicity effects. The free energy plots are generally found to pass through a maximum...... and to be asymmetric with a slower decrease in the transition probability with increasing energy of reaction. For high-frequency intramolecular modes this provides a rationalization of the experimental observation of ''activationless'' regions. Isotope effects are discussed as also are the oscillatory free energy...

  1. Dynamic Solvent Effects in Alcohol Solutions for Electron Transfer Reactions Involving the Metallocenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-05-15

    Transfer Reactions Involving the Metallocenes by W.R. Fawcett and C.A. Foss, Jr. Prepared for Presentation at The Electrochemical Society Meeting...Technical 800 N. Quincy Arlington, VA 22217-5000 &UL OWaep "W" Prepared for presentation at The" Electrochemical Society Meeting, Montreal Canada, tlay...Extended Abstract must be submitted with the 75-Ward Abstract by December 1, 1969 Montreal, Quebec, Canada-May 6-11, 1990 Submit to: The Electrochemical

  2. First half-reaction mechanism of nitric oxide synthase: the role of proton and oxygen coupled electron transfer in the reaction by quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyung-Bin; Carvajal, Maria Angels; Shaik, Sason

    2009-01-08

    The first half-reaction of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) is investigated by means of quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations. An energetically feasible arginine hydroxylation path was found only when the iron-oxy complex accepted one proton from an external source. The so formed species has not been considered in heme chemistry; it is described as Por(+*)Fe(III)-OOH and is characterized by the same molecular constituency as the more known ferric-hydroperoxide species, compound 0, but has a cation-radical porphyrin moiety. The reaction itself is found to involve proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) and oxygen coupled electron transfer (OCET) steps en route to the formation of compound I and the ultimate monooxygenation of arginine. The cofactor H(4)B turns out to be a key player in the mechanism acting alternatively as an electron donor (when neutral) and an electron sink (when in its radical-cation state) and, thereby, providing the electron transfer component in the various coupled proton and oxygen transfer steps (see Scheme 4 ). The various pieces of this mechanism account for many of the experimental observations, such as the following: (a) the origins of the second proton supplied to the heme, (b) the elusiveness of compound I, (c) the inactivity of peroxide-shunt pathways in NOS first half-reaction, (d) the inhibition of the H(4)B analogue 4-amino-H(4)B due to protonation at the N3 position, (e) the roles of Trp188 (iNOS numbering) and the crystal water at the active site (W115), and so on. Alternative mechanistic hypotheses are tested and excluded, and a new mechanism for the NOS second half-reaction is proposed.

  3. Experimental Approaches to Studying Biological Electron Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Robert A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Provides an overview on biological electron-transfer reactions, summarizing what is known about how distance, spatial organization, medium, and other factors affect electron transfer. Experimental approaches, including studies of bimolecular electron transfer reactions (electrostatic effects and precursor complexes), are considered. (JN)

  4. The thermodynamics of charge transfer in DNA photolyase: using thermodynamic integration calculations to analyse the kinetics of electron transfer reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapf, Sebastian; Koslowski, Thorsten; Steinbrecher, Thomas

    2010-08-28

    DNA Photolyases are light sensitive oxidoreductases present in many organisms that participate in the repair of photodamaged DNA. They are capable of electron transfer between a bound cofactor and a chain of tryptophan amino acid residues. Due to their unique mechanism and important function, photolyases have been subject to intense study in recent times, with both experimental and computational efforts. In this work, we present a novel application of classical molecular dynamics based free energy calculations, combined with quantum mechanical computations, to biomolecular charge transfer. Our approach allows for the determination of all reaction parameters in Marcus' theory of charge transport. We were able to calculate the free energy profile for the movement of a positive charge along protein sidechains involved in the biomolecule's function as well as charge-transfer rates that are in good agreement with experimental results. Our approach to simulate charge-transfer reactions explicitly includes the influence of protein flexibility and solvent dynamics on charge-transfer energetics. As applied here to a biomolecular system of considerable scientific interest, we believe the method to be easily adaptable to the study of charge-transfer phenomena in biochemistry and other fields.

  5. Teaching the fundamentals of electron transfer reactions in mitochondria and the production and detection of reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailloux, Ryan J

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria fulfill a number of biological functions which inherently depend on ATP and O2(-•)/H2O2 production. Both ATP and O2(-•)/H2O2 are generated by electron transfer reactions. ATP is the product of oxidative phosphorylation whereas O2(-•) is generated by singlet electron reduction of di-oxygen (O2). O2(-•) is then rapidly dismutated by superoxide dismutase (SOD) producing H2O2. O2(-•)/H2O2 were once viewed as unfortunately by-products of aerobic respiration. This characterization is fitting considering over production of O2(-•)/H2O2 by mitochondria is associated with range of pathological conditions and aging. However, O2(-•)/H2O2 are only dangerous in large quantities. If produced in a controlled fashion and maintained at a low concentration, cells can benefit greatly from the redox properties of O2(-•)/H2O2. Indeed, low rates of O2(-•)/H2O2 production are required for intrinsic mitochondrial signaling (e.g. modulation of mitochondrial processes) and communication with the rest of the cell. O2(-•)/H2O2 levels are kept in check by anti-oxidant defense systems that sequester O2(-•)/H2O2 with extreme efficiency. Given the importance of O2(-•)/H2O2 in cellular function, it is imperative to consider how mitochondria produce O2(-•)/H2O2 and how O2(-•)/H2O2 genesis is regulated in conjunction with fluctuations in nutritional and redox states. Here, I discuss the fundamentals of electron transfer reactions in mitochondria and emerging knowledge on the 11 potential sources of mitochondrial O2(-•)/H2O2 in tandem with their significance in contributing to overall O2(-•)/H2O2 emission in health and disease. The potential for classifying these different sites in isopotential groups, which is essentially defined by the redox properties of electron donator involved in O2(-•)/H2O2 production, as originally suggested by Brand and colleagues is also surveyed in detail. In addition, redox signaling mechanisms that control O2(-•)/H2O2

  6. Teaching the fundamentals of electron transfer reactions in mitochondria and the production and detection of reactive oxygen species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan J. Mailloux

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria fulfill a number of biological functions which inherently depend on ATP and O2−•/H2O2 production. Both ATP and O2−•/H2O2 are generated by electron transfer reactions. ATP is the product of oxidative phosphorylation whereas O2−• is generated by singlet electron reduction of di-oxygen (O2. O2−• is then rapidly dismutated by superoxide dismutase (SOD producing H2O2. O2−•/H2O2 were once viewed as unfortunately by-products of aerobic respiration. This characterization is fitting considering over production of O2−•/H2O2 by mitochondria is associated with range of pathological conditions and aging. However, O2−•/H2O2 are only dangerous in large quantities. If produced in a controlled fashion and maintained at a low concentration, cells can benefit greatly from the redox properties of O2−•/H2O2. Indeed, low rates of O2−•/H2O2 production are required for intrinsic mitochondrial signaling (e.g. modulation of mitochondrial processes and communication with the rest of the cell. O2−•/H2O2 levels are kept in check by anti-oxidant defense systems that sequester O2−•/H2O2 with extreme efficiency. Given the importance of O2−•/H2O2 in cellular function, it is imperative to consider how mitochondria produce O2−•/H2O2 and how O2−•/H2O2 genesis is regulated in conjunction with fluctuations in nutritional and redox states. Here, I discuss the fundamentals of electron transfer reactions in mitochondria and emerging knowledge on the 11 potential sources of mitochondrial O2−•/H2O2 in tandem with their significance in contributing to overall O2−•/H2O2 emission in health and disease. The potential for classifying these different sites in isopotential groups, which is essentially defined by the redox properties of electron donator involved in O2−•/H2O2 production, as originally suggested by Brand and colleagues is also surveyed in detail. In addition, redox signaling mechanisms that control O2

  7. Transition Metal Donor-Peptide-Acceptor Complexes: From Intramolecular Electron Transfer Reactions to the Study of Reactive Intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isied, Stephan S.

    2003-03-11

    The trans-polyproline (PII) oligomers (Figure 1) are unusually rigid peptide structures which have been extensively studied by our group for peptide mediated intramolecular electron transfer (ET) at long distances. We have previously studied ET across a series of metal ion donor (D) acceptor (A) oligoproline peptides with different distances, driving forces and reorganizational energies. The majority of these experiments involve generating the ET intermediate using pulse radiolysis methods, although more recently photochemical methods are also used. Results of these studies showed that ET across peptides can vary by more than twelve orders of magnitude. Using ruthenium bipyridine donors, ET reaction rate constants across several proline residues (n = 4 - 9) occurred in the millisecond (ms) to {micro}s timescale, thus limiting the proline peptide conformational motions to only minor changes (far smaller than the large changes that occur on the ms to sec timescale, such as trans to cis proline isomerization). The present report describes our large data base of experimental results for D-peptide-A complexes in terms of a model where the involvement of both superexchange and hopping (hole and electron) mechanisms account for the long range ET rate constants observed. Our data shows that the change from superexchange to hopping mechanisms occurs at different distances depending on the type of D and A and their interactions with the peptides. Our model is also consistent with generalized models for superexchange and hopping which have been put forward by a number of theoretical groups to account for long range ET phenomena.

  8. Heterogeneous electron transfer and oxygen reduction reaction at nanostructured iron(II) phthalocyanine and its MWCNTs nanocomposites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mamuru, SA

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Electron transfer and oxygen reduction dynamics at nanostructured iron(II) phthalocyanine/multi-walled carbon nanotubes composite supported on an edge plane pyrolytic graphite electrode (EPPGE-MWCNT-nanoFePc) platform have been reported. All...

  9. Electron transfer kinetics in purified reaction centers from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum studied by multiple-flash excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumoto, N; Sétif, P; Brettel, K; Seo, D; Sakurai, H

    1999-09-14

    Reaction center preparations from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum, which contain monoheme cytochrome c, were studied by flash-absorption spectroscopy in the near-UV, visible, and near-infrared regions. The decay kinetics of the photooxidized primary donor P840(+), together with the amount of photooxidized cytochrome c, were analyzed along a series of four flashes spaced by 1 ms: 95% of the P840(+) was reduced by cytochrome c with a t(1/2) of approximately 65 micros after the first flash, 80% with a t(1/2) of approximately 100 micros after the second flash, and 23% with a t(1/2) of approximately 100 micros after the third flash; after the fourth flash, almost no cytochrome c oxidation occurred. The observed rates, the establishment of redox equilibrium after each flash, and the total amount of photooxidizable cytochrome c are consistent with the presence of two equivalent cytochrome c molecules per photooxidizable P840. The data are well fitted assuming a standard free energy change DeltaG degrees of -53 meV for electron transfer from one cytochrome c to P840(+), DeltaG degrees being independent of the oxidation state of the other cytochrome c. These observations support a model with two monoheme cytochromes c which are symmetrically arranged around the reaction center core. From the ratio of menaquinone-7 to the bacteriochlorophyll pigment absorbing at 663 nm, it was estimated that our preparations contain 0.6-1.2 menaquinone-7 molecules per reaction center. However, no transient signal due to menaquinone could be observed between 360 and 450 nm in the time window from 10 ns to 4 micros. No recombination reaction between the primary partners P840(+) and A(0)(-) could be detected under normal conditions. Such a recombination was observed (t(1/2) approximately 19 ns) under highly reducing conditions or after accumulation of three electrons on the acceptor side during a series of flashes, showing that the secondary acceptors can stabilize three electrons

  10. Thermodynamics of electron transfer in oxygenic photosynthetic reaction centers: volume change, enthalpy, and entropy of electron-transfer reactions in the intact cells of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boichenko, V A; Hou, J M; Mauzerall, D

    2001-06-19

    The volume and enthalpy changes for charge transfer in the 0.1-10 micros time window in photosynthetic reaction centers of the intact cells of Synechocystis PCC 6803 were determined using pulsed, time-resolved photoacoustics. This required invention of a method to correct for the cell artifact at the temperature of maximum density of water caused by the heterogeneous system. Cells grown under either white or red light had different PS I/PS II molar ratios, approximately 3 and approximately 1.7, respectively, but invariable action spectra and effective antenna sizes of the photosystems. In both cultures, the photoacoustic measurements revealed that their thermodynamic parameters differed strongly in the spectral regions of predominant excitation of PS I (680 nm) and PS II (625 nm). On correcting for contribution of the two photosystems at these wavelengths, the volume change was determined to be -27 +/- 3 and -2 +/- 3 A3 for PS I and PS II, respectively. The energy storage on the approximately 1 micros time scale was estimated to be 80 +/- 15% and 45 +/- 10% per trap in PS I and PS II, respectively. These correspond to enthalpies of -0.33 +/- 0.2 and -1 +/- 0.2 eV for the assumed formation of ion radical pairs P700+F(AB-) and Y(Z*)P680Q(A-), respectively. Taking the free energy of the above reactions as the differences of their redox potentials in situ, apparent entropy changes were estimated to be +0.4 +/- 0.2 and -0.2 +/- 0.2 eV for PS I and PS II, respectively. These values are similar to that obtained in vitro for the purified reaction center complexes on the microsecond time scale [Hou et al. (2001) Biochemistry 40, 7109-7116, 7117-7125]. The constancy of these thermodynamic values over a 2-fold change of the ratio of PS I/PS II is support for this method of in vivo analysis. Our pulsed PA method can correct the "cell" or heterogeneous artifact and thus opens a new route for studying the thermodynamics of electron transfer in vivo.

  11. Light induced EPR spectra of reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides at 80K: Evidence for reduction of QB by B-branch electron transfer in native reaction centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paddock, M. L; Isaacson, R. A.; Abresch, E. C.; Okamura, M. Y.

    2006-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides capture solar energy by electron transfer from primary donor, D, to quinone acceptor, QB, through the active A-branch of electron acceptors, but not the inactive B-branch. The light induced EPR spectrum from native RCs that had Fe2+ replaced by Zn2+ was investigated at cryogenic temperature (80K, 35 GHz). In addition to the light induced signal due to formation of D+•QA−• observed previously, a small fraction (~5%) of the signal displayed very different characteristics: (1) The signal was absent in RCs in which the QB was displaced by the inhibitor stigmatellin. (2) Its decay time (τ=6 s) was the same as observed for D+•QB−• in mutant RCs lacking QA, which is significantly slower than for D+•QA−• (τ=30 ms). (3) Its EPR spectrum was identical to that of D+•QB−•. (4) The quantum efficiency for forming the major component of the signal was the same as that found for mutant RCs lacking QA (Φ =0.2%) and was temperature independent. These results are explained by direct photochemical reduction of QB via B-branch electron transfer in a small fraction of native RCs. PMID:18163156

  12. "Abnormal" salt and solvent effects on anion/cation electron-transfer reactions: an interpretation based on Marcus-Hush treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Fernandez, E; Prado-Gotor, R; Sanchez, F

    2005-08-11

    Salt and solvent effects on the kinetics of the reactions [Fe(CN)6]3- + [Ru(NH3)5pz](2+) right arrow over left arrow [Fe(CN)6]4- + [Ru(NH3)5pz]3+ (pz = pyrazine) have been studied through T-jump measurements. The forward and reverse reactions show different behaviors: "abnormal" salt and solvent effects in the first case and normal effects in the second one. These facts imply an asymmetric behavior of anion/cation reactions depending on the charge of the oxidant. The results can be rationalized by using the Marcus-Hush treatment for electron-transfer reactions.

  13. Kinetic performance and energy profile in a roller coaster electron transfer chain: a study of modified tetraheme-reaction center constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alric, Jean; Lavergne, Jérôme; Rappaport, Fabrice; Verméglio, André; Matsuura, Katsumi; Shimada, Keizo; Nagashima, Kenji V P

    2006-03-29

    In many electron-transfer proteins, the arrangement of cofactors implies a succession of uphill and downhill steps. The kinetic implications of such arrangements are examined in the present work, based on a study of chimeric photosynthetic reaction centers obtained by expressing the tetraheme subunit from Blastochloris viridis in another purple bacterium, Rubrivivax gelatinosus. Site-directed mutations of the environment of heme c559, which is the immediate electron donor to the primary donor P, induced modifications of this heme's midpoint potential over a range of 400 mV. This resulted in shifts of the apparent midpoint potentials of the neighboring carriers, yielding estimates of the interactions between redox centers. At both extremities of the explored range, the energy profile of the electron-transfer chain presented an additional uphill step, either downstream or upstream from c559. These modifications caused conspicuous changes of the electron-transfer rate across the tetraheme subunit, which became approximately 100-fold slower in the mutants where the midpoint potential of c559 was lowest. A theoretical analysis of the kinetics is presented, predicting a displacement of the rate-limiting step when lowering the potential of c559. A reasonable agreement with the data was obtained when combining this treatment with the rates predicted by electron transfer theory for the individual rate constants.

  14. Study of Electron Transfer Reactions Between a Water/1,2-Dichloroethane Interface by Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Quan LU; Li Na HU; Xiao Qiang WANG; Jing CHEN

    2004-01-01

    Electron transfer (ET) from ascorbic acid (AA) in aqueous to ferrocene (Fc) in 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE) was probed by the scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). The rate constants were extracted from the dependence of the steady-state current at ultramicro- electrode (UME, tip) on the distance between the tip and the phase boundary by comparison to theoretical working cures.

  15. The rate of second electron transfer to QB(-) in bacterial reaction center of impaired proton delivery shows hydrogen-isotope effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maróti, Ágnes; Wraight, Colin A; Maróti, Péter

    2015-02-01

    The 2nd electron transfer in reaction center of photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides is a two step process in which protonation of QB(-) precedes interquinone electron transfer. The thermal activation and pH dependence of the overall rate constants of different RC variants were measured and compared in solvents of water (H2O) and heavy water (D2O). The electron transfer variants where the electron transfer is rate limiting (wild type and M17DN, L210DN and H173EQ mutants) do not show solvent isotope effect and the significant decrease of the rate constant of the second electron transfer in these mutants is due to lowering the operational pKa of QB(-)/QBH: 4.5 (native), 3.9 (L210DN), 3.7 (M17DN) and 3.1 (H173EQ) at pH7. On the other hand, the proton transfer variants where the proton transfer is rate limiting demonstrate solvent isotope effect of pH-independent moderate magnitude (2.11±0.26 (WT+Ni(2+)), 2.16±0.35 (WT+Cd(2+)) and 2.34±0.44 (L210DN/M17DN)) or pH-dependent large magnitude (5.7 at pH4 (L213DN)). Upon deuteration, the free energy and the enthalpy of activation increase in all proton transfer variants by about 1 kcal/mol and the entropy of activation becomes negligible in L210DN/M17DN mutant. The results are interpreted as manifestation of equilibrium and kinetic solvent isotope effects and the structural, energetic and kinetic possibility of alternate proton delivery pathways are discussed.

  16. Golden rule kinetics of transfer reactions in condensed phase: The microscopic model of electron transfer reactions in disordered solid matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basilevsky, M. V.; Odinokov, A. V.; Titov, S. V.; Mitina, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    The algorithm for a theoretical calculation of transfer reaction rates for light quantum particles (i.e., the electron and H-atom transfers) in non-polar solid matrices is formulated and justified. The mechanism postulated involves a local mode (an either intra- or inter-molecular one) serving as a mediator which accomplishes the energy exchange between the reacting high-frequency quantum mode and the phonon modes belonging to the environment. This approach uses as a background the Fermi golden rule beyond the usually applied spin-boson approximation. The dynamical treatment rests on the one-dimensional version of the standard quantum relaxation equation for the reduced density matrix, which describes the frequency fluctuation spectrum for the local mode under consideration. The temperature dependence of a reaction rate is controlled by the dimensionless parameter ξ0 = ℏω0/kBT where ω0 is the frequency of the local mode and T is the temperature. The realization of the computational scheme is different for the high/intermediate (ξ0 Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR, Ser. Fiz. Khim. 124, 213 (1959); J. Ulstrup, Charge Transfer in Condensed Media (Springer, Berlin, 1979); M. Bixon and J. Jortner, Adv. Chem. Phys. 106, 35 (1999)] underlying it is discussed and illustrated by the results of computations for practically important target systems.

  17. The roles of polycarboxylates in Cr(VI)/sulfite reaction system: Involvement of reactive oxygen species and intramolecular electron transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Bo, E-mail: bjiang86upc@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum, Qingdao 266580, Shandong (China); School of Environmental and Municipal Engineering, Qingdao University of Technology, Qingdao 266033 (China); Wang, Xianli; Liu, Yukun [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum, Qingdao 266580, Shandong (China); Wang, Zhaohui [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Southern Cross GeoScience, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW 2480 (Australia); Zheng, Jingtang, E-mail: jtzheng03@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum, Qingdao 266580, Shandong (China); Wu, Mingbo, E-mail: wumb@upc.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum, Qingdao 266580, Shandong (China)

    2016-03-05

    Highlights: • The formations of SO{sub 4}·{sup −} and OH·, involve in Cr(VI) reduction induced by S(IV). • Affinity of polycarboxylate to Cr(VI) accelerates Cr(VI) reduction rate. • Polycarboxylates can act as electron donors for Cr(VI) reduction retrenching S(IV). • Only oxalate can enhance the formations of SO{sub 4}·{sup −} and OH· in Cr(VI)/S(IV) system. - Abstract: In this study, the effects of polycarboxylates on both Cr(VI) reduction and S(IV) consumption in Cr(VI)/S(IV) system was investigated in acidic solution. Under aerobic condition, the productions of reactive oxygen species (ROS), i.e., SO{sub 4}·{sup −} and OH·, have been confirmed in S(IV) reducing Cr(VI) process by using electron spin resonance and fluorescence spectrum techniques, leading to the excess consumption of S(IV). However, when polycarboxylates (oxalic, citric, malic and tartaric acid) were present in Cr(VI)/S(IV) system, the affinity of polycarboxylates to CrSO{sub 6}{sup 2−} can greatly promote the reduction of Cr(VI) via expanding the coordination of Cr(VI) species from tetrahedron to hexahedron. Besides, as alternatives to S(IV), these polycarboxylates can also act as electron donors for Cr(VI) reduction via intramolecular electron transfer reaction, which is dependent on the energies of the highest occupied molecular orbital of these polycarboxylates. Notably, the variant electron donating capacity of these polycarboxylates resulted in different yield of ROS and therefore the oxidation efficiencies of other pollutants, e.g., rhodamine B and As(III). Generally, this study does not only shed light on the mechanism of S(IV) reducing Cr(VI) process mediated by polycarboxylates, but also provides an escalated, cost-effective and green strategy for the remediation of Cr(VI) using sulfite as a reductant.

  18. Kinetic studies on the single electron transfer reaction between 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine oxoammonium ions and phenothiazines: the application of Marcus theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴隆民; 郭霞; 王隽; 郭庆祥; 刘中立; 刘有成

    1999-01-01

    Electron transfer reactions take place readily between 2, 2, 6, 6-tetramethylpiperidine oxoammonium ions (1a, 1b) and phenothiazines (2a—2g), giving corresponding nitroxides (3a, 3b) and phenothiazine radical cations (4a—4g). The rate constants for the electron self-exchange reactions between 1 and 3, as well as between 2 and 4, are determined by EPR and ~1H NMR line-broadening effect in acetonitrile. By application of the Marcus theory, the kinetics of the cross-exchange reactions between 1 and 2 is studied.

  19. Electron Transfer Reaction between M-C6H6 and M+-C6H6 Complexes in the Gas Phase: Density Functional Theory Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    DFT/BLYP method is used to theoretically investigate the electron transfer (ET) reactions between M (Li, Na, Mg)-C6H6 and M+-C6H6 complexes in the gas phase. The geometry optimization of the precursor complexes and the transition state in the process of ET reaction was performed at 6-31G basis set level. The activation energy, the coupling matrix element and the rate constant of the ET reaction are calculated at semi-quantitative level.

  20. Advances in electron transfer chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Mariano, Patrick S

    1995-01-01

    Advances in Electron Transfer Chemistry, Volume 4 presents the reaction mechanisms involving the movement of single electrons. This book discusses the electron transfer reactions in organic, biochemical, organometallic, and excited state systems. Organized into four chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the photochemical behavior of two classes of sulfonium salt derivatives. This text then examines the parameters that control the efficiencies for radical ion pair formation. Other chapters consider the progress in the development of parameters that control the dynamics and reaction p

  1. Tailored-waveform Collisional Activation of Peptide Ion Electron Transfer Survivor Ions in Cation Transmission Mode Ion/Ion Reaction Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hongling; Londry, Frank A.; Erickson, David E.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Broad-band resonance excitation via a tailored waveform in a high pressure collision cell (Q2) on a hybrid quadrupole/time-of-flight (QqTOF) tandem mass spectrometer has been implemented for cation transmission mode electron transfer ion/ion reactions of tryptic polypeptides. The frequency components in the broadband waveform were defined to excite the first generation intact electron transfer products for relatively large tryptic peptides. The optimum amplitude of the arbitrary waveform applied has been determined empirically to be 3.0 Vp-p, which is effective for relatively high mass-to-charge (m/z) ratio precursor ions with little elimination of sequence information for low m/z ions. The application of broadband activation during the transmission mode ion/ion reaction obviates frequency and amplitude tuning normally associated with ion trap collision induced dissociation (CID). This approach has been demonstrated with triply and doubly charged tryptic peptides with and without post-translational modifications. Enhanced structural information was achieved by production of a larger number of informative c- and z-type fragments using the tailored waveform on unmodified and modified (phosphorylated and glycosylated) peptides when the first generation intact electron transfer products fell into the defined frequency range. This approach can be applied to a wide range of tryptic peptide ions, making it attractive as a rapid and general approach for ETD LC-MS/MS of tryptic peptides in a QqTOF instrument. PMID:19305916

  2. Effect of cationic plastoquinone SkQ1 on electron transfer reactions in chloroplasts and mitochondria from pea seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuilov, V D; Kiselevsky, D B

    2015-04-01

    Plastoquinone bound with decyltriphenylphosphonium cation (SkQ1) penetrating through the membrane in nanomolar concentrations inhibited H2O2 generation in cells of epidermis of pea seedling leaves that was detected by the fluorescence of 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein. Photosynthetic electron transfer in chloroplasts isolated from pea leaves is suppressed by SkQ1 at micromolar concentrations: the electron transfer in chloroplasts under the action of photosystem II or I (with silicomolybdate or methyl viologen as electron acceptors, respectively) is more sensitive to SkQ1 than under the action of photosystem II + I (with ferricyanide or p-benzoquinone as electron acceptors). SkQ1 reduced by borohydride is oxidized by ferricyanide, p-benzoquinone, and, to a lesser extent, by silicomolybdate, but not by methyl viologen. SkQ1 is not effective as an electron acceptor supporting O2 evolution from water in illuminated chloroplasts. The data on suppression of photosynthetic O2 evolution or consumption show that SkQ1, similarly to phenazine methosulfate, causes conversion of the chloroplast redox-chain from non-cyclic electron transfer mode to the cyclic mode without O2 evolution. Oxidation of NADH or succinate in mitochondria isolated from pea roots is stimulated by SkQ1.

  3. Spectroscopic investigation on kinetics, thermodynamics and mechanism for electron transfer reaction of iron(III) complex with sulphur centered radical in stimulated biological system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepalakshmi, S; Sivalingam, A; Kannadasan, T; Subramaniam, P; Sivakumar, P; Brahadeesh, S T

    2014-04-24

    Electron transfer reactions of biological organic sulphides with several metal ions to generate sulphide radical cations are a great concern in biochemical process. To understand the mechanism, a stimulated biological system having model compounds, iron(III)-bipyridyl complex with thio-diglycolic acid (TDGA) was investigated. Spectroscopic study reveals the kinetics and thermodynamics of the reaction in aqueous perchloric acid medium. The reaction follows first and fractional order of 0.412 with respect to [Fe(bpy)3](3+) and TDGA, respectively. The oxidation is insensitive to variation in [H(+)] but slightly decreases with increase in ionic strength ([I]). Addition of acrylamide, a radical scavenger has no effect on the rate of the reaction. The high negative value of ΔS(#) (-74.3±1.09 J K(-1) mol(-1)) indicates the complex formed has a definite orientation higher than the reactants. Based on the above results, a suitable reaction mechanism for this reaction is proposed.

  4. Semiclassical study of quantum coherence and isotope effects in ultrafast electron transfer reactions coupled to a proton and a phonon bath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataraman, Charulatha

    2011-11-28

    The linearized semiclassical initial value representation is employed to describe ultrafast electron transfer processes coupled to a phonon bath and weakly coupled to a proton mode. The goal of our theoretical investigation is to understand the influence of the proton on the electronic dynamics in various bath relaxation regimes. More specifically, we study the impact of the proton on coherences and analyze if the coupling to the proton is revealed in the form of an isotope effect. This will be important in distinguishing reactions in which the proton does not undergo significant rearrangement from those in which the electron transfer is accompanied by proton transfer. Unlike other methodologies widely employed to describe nonadiabatic electron transfer, this approach treats the electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom consistently. However, due to the linearized approximation, quantum interference effects are not captured accurately. Our study shows that at small phonon bath reorganization energies, coherent oscillations and isotope effect are observed in both slow and fast bath regimes. The coherences are more substantially damped by deuterium in comparison to the proton. Further, in contrast to the dynamics of the spin-boson model, the coherences are not long-lived. At large bath reorganization energies, the decay is incoherent in the slow and fast bath regimes. In this case, the extent of the isotope effect depends on the relative relaxation timescales of the proton mode and the phonon bath. The isotope effect is magnified for baths that relax on picosecond timescales in contrast to baths that relax in femtoseconds.

  5. Electron Transfer Reaction Between Desoxyadenosine and Triplet 2-Methyl-1,4-naphthaquinone: A Laser Photolysis Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Introduction Electron transfer oxidation of DNA by triplet artificial photonuclease reveals a bright prospect of its application in biology and medicine. Both molecular orbital calculation and laser experiments have indicated that the homo guanine sequence should be the final localization site of photoexcited hole via long range migration within DNA[1-3]. However, the direct observation of the produced ion pairs of biomolecules especially the stabilized radical cation DNA or its components is hampered by the overwhelming transient absorption of protonated radical anion of photosensitizers, such as 2-methyl-1,4-naphthaguinonel (MQ).

  6. Density Functional Studies of the Reaction of Ytterbium Monocation with Fluoromethane: C-F Bond Activation and Electron-Transfer Reactivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The potential energy surface and reaction mechanism corresponding to the reaction of ytterbium monocation with fluoromethane,which represents a prototype of the activation of C-F bond in fluorohydrocarbons by bare lanthanide cations,have been investigated for the first time by using density functional theory.A direct fluorine abstraction mechanism was revealed,and the related thermochemistry data were determined.The electron-transfer reactivity of the reaction was analyzed using the two-state model,and a strongly avoided crossing behavior on the transition state region was shown.The present results support the reaction mechanism inferred from early experimental data and the related thermochemistry data can provide a guide for further experimental researches.

  7. Electron-transfer-initiated benzoin- and Stetter-like reactions in packed-bed reactors for process intensification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Zaghi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A convenient heterogeneous continuous-flow procedure for the polarity reversal of aromatic α-diketones is presented. Propaedeutic batch experiments have been initially performed to select the optimal supported base capable to initiate the two electron-transfer process from the carbamoyl anion of the N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF solvent to the α-diketone and generate the corresponding enediolate active species. After having identified the 2-tert-butylimino-2-diethylamino-1,3-dimethylperhydro-1,3,2-diazaphosphorine on polystyrene (PS-BEMP as the suitable base, packed-bed microreactors (pressure-resistant stainless-steel columns have been fabricated and operated to accomplish the chemoselective synthesis of aroylated α-hydroxy ketones and 2-benzoyl-1,4-diones (benzoin- and Stetter-like products, respectively with a good level of efficiency and with a long-term stability of the packing material (up to five days.

  8. Electron-transfer-initiated benzoin- and Stetter-like reactions in packed-bed reactors for process intensification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaghi, Anna; Ragno, Daniele; Di Carmine, Graziano; De Risi, Carmela; Bortolini, Olga; Giovannini, Pier Paolo; Fantin, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    A convenient heterogeneous continuous-flow procedure for the polarity reversal of aromatic α-diketones is presented. Propaedeutic batch experiments have been initially performed to select the optimal supported base capable to initiate the two electron-transfer process from the carbamoyl anion of the N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) solvent to the α-diketone and generate the corresponding enediolate active species. After having identified the 2-tert-butylimino-2-diethylamino-1,3-dimethylperhydro-1,3,2-diazaphosphorine on polystyrene (PS-BEMP) as the suitable base, packed-bed microreactors (pressure-resistant stainless-steel columns) have been fabricated and operated to accomplish the chemoselective synthesis of aroylated α-hydroxy ketones and 2-benzoyl-1,4-diones (benzoin- and Stetter-like products, respectively) with a good level of efficiency and with a long-term stability of the packing material (up to five days). PMID:28144342

  9. Trapped Conformational States of Semiquinone (D+•QB−•) Formed by B-Branch Electron Transfer at Low Temperature in Rhodobacter sphaeroides Reaction Centers‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paddock, M. L.; Flores, M.; Isaacson, R.; Chang, C.; Abresch, E. C.; Selvaduray, P.; Okamura, M.Y.

    2006-01-01

    The reaction center (RC) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides captures light energy by electron transfer between quinones QA and QB, involving a conformational gating step. In this work, conformational states of D+•QB−• were trapped (80K) and studied using EPR spectroscopy in mutant RCs that lack QA in which QB was reduced by the bacteriopheophytin along the B-branch. In mutant RCs frozen in the dark, a light induced EPR signal due to D+•QB−• formed in 30% of the sample with low quantum yield (0.2%–20%) and decayed in 6 s. A small signal with similar characteristics was also observed in native RCs. In contrast, the EPR signal due to D+QB− in mutant RCs illuminated while freezing formed in ~ 95% of the sample that did not decay (τ >107s) at 80K. In all samples, the observed g-values were the same (g=2.0026) indicating that all active QB−• was located in a proximal conformation coupled with the non-heme Fe2+. We propose that before electron transfer at 80K, the majority (~70%) of QB, structurally located in the distal site, cannot be stably reduced, while the minor (~30%) active configurations are in the proximal site. The large difference in the lifetimes of the un-relaxed and relaxed D+•QB−• states is attributed to relaxation of protein residues and internal water molecules that stabilize D+•QB−•. These results demonstrate energetically significant conformational changes involved in stabilizing the D+•QB−• state. The unrelaxed and relaxed states can be considered to be the initial and final states along the reaction coordinate for conformationally-gated electron transfer. PMID:17115698

  10. Trapped conformational states of semiquinone (D+*QB-*) formed by B-branch electron transfer at low temperature in Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paddock, M L; Flores, M; Isaacson, R; Chang, C; Abresch, E C; Selvaduray, P; Okamura, M Y

    2006-11-28

    The reaction center (RC) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides captures light energy by electron transfer between quinones QA and QB, involving a conformational gating step. In this work, conformational states of D+*QB-* were trapped (80 K) and studied using EPR spectroscopy in native and mutant RCs that lack QA in which QB was reduced by the bacteriopheophytin along the B-branch. In mutant RCs frozen in the dark, a light induced EPR signal due to D+*QB-* formed in 30% of the sample with low quantum yield (0.2%-20%) and decayed in 6 s. A small signal with similar characteristics was also observed in native RCs. In contrast, the EPR signal due to D+*QB-* in mutant RCs illuminated while freezing formed in approximately 95% of the sample did not decay (tau >107 s) at 80 K (also observed in the native RC). In all samples, the observed g-values were the same (g = 2.0026), indicating that all active QB-*'s were located in a proximal conformation coupled with the nonheme Fe2+. We propose that before electron transfer at 80 K, the majority (approximately 70%) of QB, structurally located in the distal site, was not stably reducible, whereas the minority (approximately 30%) of active configurations was in the proximal site. The large difference in the lifetimes of the unrelaxed and relaxed D+*QB-* states is attributed to the relaxation of protein residues and internal water molecules that stabilize D+*QB-*. These results demonstrate energetically significant conformational changes involved in stabilizing the D+*QB-* state. The unrelaxed and relaxed states can be considered to be the initial and final states along the reaction coordinate for conformationally gated electron transfer.

  11. Time-resolved kinetic study of the electron-transfer reactions between ring-substituted cumyloxyl radicals and alkylferrocenes. Evidence for an inner-sphere mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bietti, Massimo; DiLabio, Gino A; Lanzalunga, Osvaldo; Salamone, Michela

    2011-03-18

    A time-resolved kinetic study of the reactions of ring-substituted cumyloxyl radicals (4-X-CumO(•): X = OMe, t-Bu, Me, Cl, CF(3)) with methylferrocenes (Me(n)Fc: n = 2, 8, 10) has been carried out in acetonitrile solution. Evidence for an electron transfer (ET) process has been obtained for all radicals and an increase in reactivity has been observed on decreasing the oxidation potential of the ferrocene donor and on going from electron-releasing to electron-withdrawing ring substituents. Computations predict the formation of strongly bound π-stacked 4-X-CumO(•)/DcMFc complexes, characterized by intracomplex π-π distances around 4 Å. These findings point toward a (nonbonded) inner-sphere ET mechanism for the reactions of the 4-X-CumO(•)/Me(n)Fc couples.

  12. Effects of viscosity and temperature on the kinetics of the electron-transfer reaction between the triplet state of zinc cytochrome c and cupriplastocyanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivković-Jensen, M M; Kostić, N M

    1997-07-01

    This is a study of the effects of viscosity (in the range of 0.8-790 cP), of temperature (in the range of 260.7-307.7 K), and of ionic strength (in the range of 2.5-20.0 mM) on the kinetics of photoinduced electron-transfer reaction 3Zncyt/pc(II) --> Zncyt+/pc(I) within the electrostatic complex of zinc cytochrome c and cupriplastocyanin at pH 7.0. The unimolecular rate constant is kF. The apparent activation parameters DeltaH*, DeltaS*, and DeltaG* for this reaction were obtained in experiments with aqueous glycerol solutions having a constant composition. The interpolation of kF values obtained at the constant composition into the dependence of kF on temperature at constant viscosity gave the proper activation parameters, which agree with those obtained in experiments with solutions having a constant viscosity. This agreement validates the latter method, which is more efficient than the former, for determining activation parameters of processes that are modulated by viscosity. The smooth change in kF is governed by the change in viscosity, not in other properties of the solvent, and it does not depend on the choice of the viscosigen. Donor/acceptor electronic coupling (HAB) and reorganizational energy (lambda), obtained by fitting of the temperature dependence of kF to the Marcus equation, are consistent with true electron transfer and with electron transfer that is coupled to, or gated by, a preceding structural rearrangement of the diprotein complex 3Zncyt/pc(II). The fact that at very high viscosity kF approaches zero shows that the reaction is probably gated throughout the investigated range of viscosity. Kinetic effects and noneffects of ionic strength, viscosity, and thermodynamic driving force indicate, but do not prove, that the reaction under consideration is gated. The kinetic effect of viscosity is analyzed in terms of two models. Because ln kF is a nonlinear function of ln eta, protein friction has to be considered in the analysis of viscosity effects

  13. Redox control and hydrogen bonding networks: proton-coupled electron transfer reactions and tyrosine Z in the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keough, James M; Zuniga, Ashley N; Jenson, David L; Barry, Bridgette A

    2013-02-07

    In photosynthetic oxygen evolution, redox active tyrosine Z (YZ) plays an essential role in proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions. Four sequential photooxidation reactions are necessary to produce oxygen at a Mn(4)CaO(5) cluster. The sequentially oxidized states of this oxygen-evolving cluster (OEC) are called the S(n) states, where n refers to the number of oxidizing equivalents stored. The neutral radical, YZ•, is generated and then acts as an electron transfer intermediate during each S state transition. In the X-ray structure, YZ, Tyr161 of the D1 subunit, is involved in an extensive hydrogen bonding network, which includes calcium-bound water. In electron paramagnetic resonance experiments, we measured the YZ• recombination rate, in the presence of an intact Mn(4)CaO(5) cluster. We compared the S(0) and S(2) states, which differ in Mn oxidation state, and found a significant difference in the YZ• decay rate (t(1/2) = 3.3 ± 0.3 s in S(0); t(1/2) = 2.1 ± 0.3 s in S(2)) and in the solvent isotope effect (SIE) on the reaction (1.3 ± 0.3 in S(0); 2.1 ± 0.3 in S(2)). Although the YZ site is known to be solvent accessible, the recombination rate and SIE were pH independent in both S states. To define the origin of these effects, we measured the YZ• recombination rate in the presence of ammonia, which inhibits oxygen evolution and disrupts the hydrogen bond network. We report that ammonia dramatically slowed the YZ• recombination rate in the S(2) state but had a smaller effect in the S(0) state. In contrast, ammonia had no significant effect on YD•, the stable tyrosyl radical. Therefore, the alterations in YZ• decay, observed with S state advancement, are attributed to alterations in OEC hydrogen bonding and consequent differences in the YZ midpoint potential/pK(a). These changes may be caused by activation of metal-bound water molecules, which hydrogen bond to YZ. These observations document the importance of redox control in proton

  14. Formation of P{sup +}Q{sub B}{sup -} via B-branch electron transfer in mutant reaction centers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laible, P. D.

    1998-08-14

    The crystallographic observation of two symmetry-related branches of electron transfer cofactors in the structure of the bacterial reaction center (RC) 13 years ago [1] remains an enigma in light of experimental observations that show that only the A branch is active in the initial electron transfer steps in wild-type RCs. Unidirectional electron flow has been attributed to localized asymmetries between the A and B branches that lead to differences in: (1) the electronic couplings of the cofactors [2]; (2) the relative electrostatic environments of the cofactors, caused by amino acid differences which modulate the free energies of their charge-separated states [3] and/or create a higher dielectric constant on the active side, resulting in a stronger static field for stabilizing A-branch charge transfer states [4,5]. Some photo-induced bleaching of H{sub B} has been observed, in wild-type RCs following trapping of HA{sub A}{sup {minus}}[6], and in ''hybrid'' RCs where the redox potentials of cofactors were manipulated by pigment exchange [7] or mutagenesis [8]. Transient bleaching of the 530-nm band of H{sub B} was more easily observed in the hybrid RCs because the H{sub A} transition at 545 nm was shifted to {approximately}600 nm due to incorporation of a bacteriochlorophyll, designated ''{beta}'', at the H{sub A} site. No experiments to detect further electron transfer to Q{sub B} were done with either type of modified RCs. Many site-specific mutagenesis experiments have given us insight into the nature and magnitude of the effects that amino acid side chains can exert in tuning the relative energy levels of the cofactors to optimize the balance between forward and reverse reactions, and the large distances through which some of these effects are manifested. In this paper, we show that in mutant RCs of Rhodobacter capsulatus, P{sup +}Q{sub B}{sup {minus}} can be formed in the absence of prior formation of P{sup +}Q{sub A

  15. On the Theory of Oxidation-Reduction Reactions Involving Electron Transfer. V. Comparison and Properties of Electrochemical and Chemical Rate Constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, R. A.

    1962-01-01

    Using a theory of electron transfers which takes cognizance of reorganization of the medium outside the inner coordination shell and of changes of bond lengths inside it, relations between electrochemical and related chemical rate constants are deduced and compared with the experimental data. A correlation is found, without the use of arbitrary parameters. Effects of weak complexes with added electrolytes are included under specified conditions. The deductions offer a way of coordinating a variety of data in the two fields, internally as well as with each those in another. For example, the rate of oxidation or reduction of a series of related reactants by one reagent is correlated with that of another and with that of the corresponding electrochemical oxidation-reduction reaction, under certain specified conditions. These correlations may also provide a test for distinguishing an electron from an atom transfer mechanism. (auth)

  16. Photosynthetic reaction center functionalized nano-composite films: effective strategies for probing and exploiting the photo-induced electron transfer of photosensitive membrane protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yidong; Xu, Jingjing; Liu, Baohong; Kong, Jilie

    2007-02-15

    Photosynthetic reaction center (RC), a robust transmembrane pigment-protein complex, works as the crucial component participating the primary event of the photo-electrochemical conversion in bacteria. Sparked by the high photo-induced charge separation yield (ca. 100%) of RC, great interests have been aroused to fabricate versatile RC-functionalized nano-composite films for exploring the initial photosynthetic electron transfer (ET) of RC, and thus exploiting well-designed bio-photoelectric converters. In this review, we classify and summarize the current status about the concepts and methods of constructing RC-immobilized nano-composite films or devices for probing the photo-induced ET, and applying to novel bioelectronics if it is possible.

  17. Modification of quinone electrochemistry by the proteins in the biological electron transfer chains: examples from photosynthetic reaction centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunner, M. R.; Madeo, Jennifer; Zhu, Zhenyu

    2009-01-01

    Quinones such as ubiquinone are the lipid soluble electron and proton carriers in the membranes of mitochondria, chloroplasts and oxygenic bacteria. Quinones undergo controlled redox reactions bound to specific sites in integral membrane proteins such as the cytochrome bc1 oxidoreductase. The quinone reactions in bacterial photosynthesis are amongst the best characterized, presenting a model to understand how proteins modulate cofactor chemistry. The free energy of ubiquinone redox reactions in aqueous solution and in the QA and QB sites of the bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) are compared. In the primary QA site ubiquinone is reduced only to the anionic semiquinone (Q•−) while in the secondary QB site the product is the doubly reduced, doubly protonated quinol (QH2). The ways in which the protein modifies the relative energy of each reduced and protonated intermediate are described. For example, the protein stabilizes Q•− while destabilizing Q= relative to aqueous solution through electrostatic interactions. In addition, kinetic and thermodynamic mechanisms for stabilizing the intermediate semiquinones are compared. Evidence for the protein sequestering anionic compounds by slowing both on and off rates as well as by binding the anion more tightly is reviewed. PMID:18979192

  18. Quinone (QB) reduction by B-branch electron transfer in mutant bacterial reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides: quantum efficiency and X-ray structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paddock, M L; Chang, C; Xu, Q; Abresch, E C; Axelrod, H L; Feher, G; Okamura, M Y

    2005-05-10

    The photosynthetic reaction center (RC) from purple bacteria converts light into chemical energy. Although the RC shows two nearly structurally symmetric branches, A and B, light-induced electron transfer in the native RC occurs almost exclusively along the A-branch to a primary quinone electron acceptor Q(A). Subsequent electron and proton transfer to a mobile quinone molecule Q(B) converts it to a quinol, Q(B)H(2). We report the construction and characterization of a series of mutants in Rhodobacter sphaeroides designed to reduce Q(B) via the B-branch. The quantum efficiency to Q(B) via the B-branch Phi(B) ranged from 0.4% in an RC containing the single mutation Ala-M260 --> Trp to 5% in a quintuple mutant which includes in addition three mutations to inhibit transfer along the A-branch (Gly-M203 --> Asp, Tyr-M210 --> Phe, Leu-M214 --> His) and one to promote transfer along the B-branch (Phe-L181 --> Tyr). Comparing the value of 0.4% for Phi(B) obtained in the AW(M260) mutant, which lacks Q(A), to the 100% quantum efficiency for Phi(A) along the A-branch in the native RC, we obtain a ratio for A-branch to B-branch electron transfer of 250:1. We determined the structure of the most effective (quintuple) mutant RC at 2.25 A (R-factor = 19.6%). The Q(A) site did not contain a quinone but was occupied by the side chain of Trp-M260 and a Cl(-). In this structure a nonfunctional quinone was found to occupy a new site near M258 and M268. The implications of this work to trap intermediate states are discussed.

  19. Theoretical studies on the influence of molecular interactions on the mechanism of electron transfer in photosynthetic reaction center of Rps. viridis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐红; 张汝波; 屈正旺; 张兴康; 张启元

    2002-01-01

    Based on the QM/MM optimized X-ray crystal structure of the photosynthetic reaction center (PRC) of purple bacteria Rhodopseudomonas (Rps.) viridis, quantum chemistry density functional method (DFT, B3LYP/6-31G) has been performed to study the interactions between the pigment molecules and either the surrounded amino acid residues or water molecules that are either axially coordinated or hydrogen bonded with the pigment molecules, leading to an explanation of the mechanism of the primary electron-transfer (ET) reactions in the PRC. Results show that the axial coordination of amino acid residues greatly raises the ELUMO of pigment molecules and it is important for the possibility of ET to take place. Different hydrogen bonds between amino acid residues, water molecules and pigment molecules decrease the ELUMO of the pigment molecules to different extents. It is crucial for the ET taking place from excited P along L branch and sustains that the ET is a one-step reaction without through accessory bacteriochlorophyll (ABChl b). It is insufficient to treat the whole protein surrounding as a homogeneous dielectric medium.

  20. Field-controlled electron transfer and reaction kinetics of the biological catalytic system of microperoxidase-11 and hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongki Choi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Controlled reaction kinetics of the bio-catalytic system of microperoxidase-11 and hydrogen peroxide has been achieved using an electrostatic technique. The technique allowed independent control of 1 the thermodynamics of the system using electrochemical setup and 2 the quantum mechanical tunneling at the interface between microperoxidase-11 and the working electrode by applying a gating voltage to the electrode. The cathodic currents of electrodes immobilized with microperoxidase-11 showed a dependence on the gating voltage in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, indicating a controllable reduction reaction. The measured kinetic parameters of the bio-catalytic reduction showed nonlinear dependences on the gating voltage as the result of modified interfacial electron tunnel due to the field induced at the microperoxidase-11-electrode interface. Our results indicate that the kinetics of the reduction of hydrogen peroxide can be controlled by a gating voltage and illustrate the operation of a field-effect bio-catalytic transistor, whose current-generating mechanism is the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water with the current being controlled by the gating voltage.

  1. Complex mechanism of the gas phase reaction between formic acid and hydroxyl radical. Proton coupled electron transfer versus radical hydrogen abstraction mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglada, Josep M

    2004-08-11

    The gas phase reaction between formic acid and hydroxyl radical has been investigated with high level quantum mechanical calculations using DFT-B3LYP, MP2, CASSCF, QCISD, and CCSD(T) theoretical approaches in connection with the 6-311+G(2df,2p) and aug-cc-pVTZ basis sets. The reaction has a very complex mechanism involving several elementary processes, which begin with the formation of a reactant complex before the hydrogen abstraction by hydroxyl radical. The results obtained in this investigation explain the unexpected experimental fact that hydroxyl radical extracts predominantly the acidic hydrogen of formic acid. This is due to a mechanism involving a proton coupled electron-transfer process. The calculations show also that the abstraction of formyl hydrogen has an increased contribution at higher temperatures, which is due to a conventional hydrogen abstraction radical type mechanism. The overall rate constant computed at 298 K is 6.24 x 10(-13) cm3 molecules(-1) s(-1), and compares quite well with the range from 3.2 +/- 1 to 4.9 +/- 1.2 x 10(-13) cm3 molecules(-1) s(-1), reported experimentally.

  2. Photoreactivity of ZnO nanoparticles in visible light: Effect of surface states on electron transfer reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruah, Sunandan; Sinha, Sudarson Sekhar; Ghosh, Barnali; Pal, Samir Kumar; Raychaudhuri, A. K.; Dutta, Joydeep

    2009-04-01

    Wide band gap metal oxide semiconductors such as zinc oxide (ZnO) show visible band photolysis that has been employed, among others, to degrade harmful organic contaminants into harmless mineral acids. Metal oxides show enhanced photocatalytic activity with the increase in electronic defects in the crystallites. By introducing defects into the crystal lattice of ZnO nanoparticles, we observe a redshift in the optical absorption shifting from the ultraviolet region to the visible region (400-700 nm), which is due to the creation of intermediate defect states that inhibit the electron hole recombination process. The defects were introduced by fast nucleation and growth of the nanoparticles by rapid heating using microwave irradiation and subsequent quenching during the precipitation reaction. To elucidate the nature of the photodegradation process, picosecond resolved time correlated single photon count (TCSPC) spectroscopy was carried out to record the electronic transitions resulting from the de-excitation of the electrons to their stable states. Photodegradation and TCSPC studies showed that defect engineered ZnO nanoparticles obtained through fast crystallization during growth lead to a faster initial degradation rate of methylene blue as compared to the conventionally synthesized nanoparticles.

  3. Supramolecular electron transfer by anion binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Ohkubo, Kei; D'Souza, Francis; Sessler, Jonathan L

    2012-10-11

    Anion binding has emerged as an attractive strategy to construct supramolecular electron donor-acceptor complexes. In recent years, the level of sophistication in the design of these systems has advanced to the point where it is possible to create ensembles that mimic key aspects of the photoinduced electron-transfer events operative in the photosynthetic reaction centre. Although anion binding is a reversible process, kinetic studies on anion binding and dissociation processes, as well as photoinduced electron-transfer and back electron-transfer reactions in supramolecular electron donor-acceptor complexes formed by anion binding, have revealed that photoinduced electron transfer and back electron transfer occur at time scales much faster than those associated with anion binding and dissociation. This difference in rates ensures that the linkage between electron donor and acceptor moieties is maintained over the course of most forward and back electron-transfer processes. A particular example of this principle is illustrated by electron-transfer ensembles based on tetrathiafulvalene calix[4]pyrroles (TTF-C4Ps). In these ensembles, the TTF-C4Ps act as donors, transferring electrons to various electron acceptors after anion binding. Competition with non-redox active substrates is also observed. Anion binding to the pyrrole amine groups of an oxoporphyrinogen unit within various supramolecular complexes formed with fullerenes also results in acceleration of the photoinduced electron-transfer process but deceleration of the back electron transfer; again, this is ascribed to favourable structural and electronic changes. Anion binding also plays a role in stabilizing supramolecular complexes between sulphonated tetraphenylporphyrin anions ([MTPPS](4-): M = H(2) and Zn) and a lithium ion encapsulated C(60) (Li(+)@C(60)); the resulting ensemble produces long-lived charge-separated states upon photoexcitation of the porphyrins.

  4. Competitive Substitution and Electron Transfer in Reactions between Haloamminegold(III) and Halocyanoaurate(III) Complexes and Thiocyanate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmroth, Sofi K. C.; Elding, Lars I.

    1996-04-10

    Kinetics for reactions between thiocyanate and trans-Au(CN)(2)Cl(2)(-), trans-Au(CN)(2)Br(2)(-), and trans-Au(NH(3))(2)Cl(2)(+) in an acidic, 1.00 M perchlorate aqueous medium have been studied by use of conventional and diode-array UV/vis spectroscopy and high-pressure and sequential-mixing stopped-flow spectrophotometry. Initial, rapid formation of mixed halide-thiocyanate complexes of gold(III) is followed by slower reduction to Au(CN)(2)(-) and Au(NH(3))(2)(+), respectively. This is an intermolecular process, involving attack on the complex by outer-sphere thiocyanate. Second-order rate constants at 25.0 degrees C for reduction of trans-Au(CN)(2)XSCN(-) are (6.9 +/- 1.1) x 10(4) M(-)(1) s(-)(1) for X = Cl and (3.1 +/- 0.7) x 10(3) M(-)(1) s(-)(1) for X = Br. For reduction of trans-Au(CN)(2)(SCN)(2)(-) the second-order rate constant at 25.0 degrees C is (3.1 +/- 0.1) x 10(2) M(-)(1) s(-)(1) and the activation parameters are DeltaH() = (55 +/- 3) x 10(2) kJ mol(-)(1), DeltaS() = (-17.8 +/- 0.8) J K(-)(1) mol(-)(1), and DeltaV() = (-4.6 +/- 0.5) cm(3) mol(-)(1). The activation volume for substitution of one chloride on trans-Au(NH(3))(2)Cl(2)(+) is (-4.5 +/- 0.5) cm(3) mol(-)(1), and that for reduction of trans-Au(NH(3))(2)(SCN)(2)(+) (4.6 +/- 0.9) cm(3) mol(-)(1). The presence of pi-back-bonding cyanide ligands stabilizes the transition states for both substitution and reductive elimination reactions compared to ammine. In particular, complexes trans-Au(CN)(2)XSCN(-) with an unsymmetric electron distribution along the X-Au-SCN axis are reduced rapidly. The observed entropies and volumes of activation reflect large differences in the transition states for the reductive elimination and substitution processes, respectively, the former being more loosely bound, more sensitive to solvational changes, and probably not involving any large changes in the inner coordination sphere. A transition state with an S-S interaction between attacking and coordinated thiocyanate is

  5. Modulation of the excited state intramolecular electron transfer reaction and dual fluorescence of crystal violet lactone in room temperature ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhosh, Kotni; Samanta, Anunay

    2010-07-22

    The influence of polarity, viscosity, and hydrogen bond donating ability of the medium on the fluorescence behavior of crystal violet lactone (CVL), which undergoes excited state electron transfer reaction and exhibits dual fluorescence from two different electronic states, termed as CT(A) and CT(B), has been studied in six different room temperature ionic liquids (ILs) using steady state and time-resolved emission techniques. It is shown that the excited state CT(A) --> CT(B) transformation and dual fluorescence of CVL can be controlled by appropriate choice of the ILs. While dual fluorescence of CVL is clearly observed in pyrrolidinium IL, the molecule exhibits a single fluorescence band in ammonium IL. While the second emission from the CT(B) state can barely be seen in 1,3-dialkylimidazolium ILs, dual fluorescence is quite prominent in 1-butyl-2,3-dimethylimidazolium IL, [bmMim][Tf(2)N]. These contrasting results have been explained taking into account the hydrogen bonding interactions of the 1,3-dialkylimidazolium ions (mediated through the C(2)-hydrogen) with CVL and the viscosity of the ILs. The excited state CT(A) --> CT(B) reaction kinetics has been studied in IL by monitoring the time-evolution of the CT(B) emission in [bmMim][Tf(2)N]. The solvation dynamics in this IL has been studied by following the dynamic fluorescence Stokes shift of C153, which is used as a probe molecule. A comparison of the excited state reaction time and solvation time suggests that the rate of the CT(A) --> CT(B) reaction in moderately viscous ILs is primarily dictated by the rate of solvation. Very little or negligible excitation wavelength dependence of the emission behavior of CVL can be observed in these ILs.

  6. Rate-determining electron-transfer reactions in highly aqueous alcohol-water mixtures. A quantitative analysis of solvent effects on the oxidation of 4-methoxyphenylacetate by potassium 12-tungstocobaltate(III)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bietti, M.; Baciocchi, E.; Engberts, J.B.F.N.

    1996-01-01

    Kinetic solvent effects on the rate-determining outer-sphere electron-transfer reaction between 4-methoxy-phenylacetate and potassium 12-tungstocobaltate(III) in highly aqueous alcohol-water mixtures are quantitatively analysed in terms of pairwise Gibbs energy parameters for interaction of the init

  7. Metalloprotein complexes for the study of electron-transfer reactions. Characterization of diprotein complexes obtained by covalent cross-linking of cytochrome c and plastocyanin with a carbodiimide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, J S; Brothers, H M; Neddersen, J P; Peerey, L M; Cotton, T M; Kostić, N M

    1992-01-01

    Cytochrome c (cyt) and zinc cytochrome c (Zncyt) are separately cross-linked to plastocyanin (pc) by the carbodiimide EDC according to a published method. The changes in the protein reduction potentials indicate the presence of approximately two amide cross-links. Chromatography of the diprotein complexes cyt/pc and Zncyt/pc on CM-52 resin yields multiple fractions, whose numbers depend on the eluent. UV-vis, EPR, CD, MCD, resonance Raman, and surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectra show that cross-linking does not significantly perturb the heme and blue copper active sites. Degrees of heme exposure show that plastocyanin covers most of the accessible heme edge in cytochrome c. Impossibility of cross-linking cytochrome c to a plastocyanin derivative whose acidic patch had been blocked by chemical modification shows that it is the acidic patch that abuts the heme edge in the covalent complex. The chromatographic fractions of the covalent diprotein complex are structurally similar to one another and to the electrostatic diprotein complex. Isoelectric points show that the fractions differ from one another in the number and distribution of N-acylurea groups, byproducts of the reaction with the carbodiimide. Cytochrome c and plastocyanin are also tethered to each other via lysine residues by N-hydroxysuccinimide diesters. Tethers, unlike direct amide bonds, allow mobility of the cross-linked molecules. Laser-flash-photolysis experiments show that, nonetheless, the intracomplex electron-transfer reaction cyt(II)/pc(II)----cyt(III)/pc(I) is undetectable in complexes of either type. Only the electrostatic diprotein complex, in which protein rearrangement from the docking configuration to the reactive configuration is unrestricted, undergoes this intracomplex reaction at a measurable rate.

  8. Systems approach to excitation-energy and electron transfer reaction networks in photosystem II complex: model studies for chlorophyll a fluorescence induction kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Takeshi; Tanaka, Shigenori; Ebina, Kuniyoshi

    2015-09-07

    Photosystem II (PS II) is a protein complex which evolves oxygen and drives charge separation for photosynthesis employing electron and excitation-energy transfer processes over a wide timescale range from picoseconds to milliseconds. While the fluorescence emitted by the antenna pigments of this complex is known as an important indicator of the activity of photosynthesis, its interpretation was difficult because of the complexity of PS II. In this study, an extensive kinetic model which describes the complex and multi-timescale characteristics of PS II is analyzed through the use of the hierarchical coarse-graining method proposed in the authors׳ earlier work. In this coarse-grained analysis, the reaction center (RC) is described by two states, open and closed RCs, both of which consist of oxidized and neutral special pairs being in quasi-equilibrium states. Besides, the PS II model at millisecond scale with three-state RC, which was studied previously, could be derived by suitably adjusting the kinetic parameters of electron transfer between tyrosine and RC. Our novel coarse-grained model of PS II can appropriately explain the light-intensity dependent change of the characteristic patterns of fluorescence induction kinetics from O-J-I-P, which shows two inflection points, J and I, between initial point O and peak point P, to O-J-D-I-P, which shows a dip D between J and I inflection points.

  9. Calculation of electronic coupling matrix elements for ground and excited state electron transfer reactions: Comparison of the generalized Mulliken-Hush and block diagonalization methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cave, Robert J.; Newton, Marshall D.

    1997-06-01

    Two independent methods are presented for the nonperturbative calculation of the electronic coupling matrix element (Hab) for electron transfer reactions using ab initio electronic structure theory. The first is based on the generalized Mulliken-Hush (GMH) model, a multistate generalization of the Mulliken Hush formalism for the electronic coupling. The second is based on the block diagonalization (BD) approach of Cederbaum, Domcke, and co-workers. Detailed quantitative comparisons of the two methods are carried out based on results for (a) several states of the system Zn2OH2+ and (b) the low-lying states of the benzene-Cl atom complex and its contact ion pair. Generally good agreement between the two methods is obtained over a range of geometries. Either method can be applied at an arbitrary nuclear geometry and, as a result, may be used to test the validity of the Condon approximation. Examples of nonmonotonic behavior of the electronic coupling as a function of nuclear coordinates are observed for Zn2OH2+. Both methods also yield a natural definition of the effective distance (rDA) between donor (D) and acceptor (A) sites, in contrast to earlier approaches which required independent estimates of rDA, generally based on molecular structure data.

  10. Improvement of chlorophyll identification in foodstuffs by MALDI ToF/ToF mass spectrometry using 1,5-diaminonaphthalene electron transfer secondary reaction matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvano, Cosima Damiana; Ventura, Giovanni; Cataldi, Tommaso R I; Palmisano, Francesco

    2015-08-01

    Chlorophylls (Chls) are important pigments responsible for the characteristic green color of chloroplasts in algae and plants. In this study, 1,5-diaminonaphthalene (DAN) was introduced as an electron transfer secondary reaction matrix for the identification of intact chlorophylls and their derivatives, by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS). DAN was proved to drastically outperform conventional matrices such as α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnnamic acid, dithranol, antracene, and even terthiophene, since loss of the metal ion and fragmentation of the phytol-ester linkage are negligible. Absence of significant fragmentation of radical cations of Chls a and b at m/z 892.529 and 906.513, respectively, makes MALDI MS capable of following natural degradation of intact porphyrin-based pigments whose initial steps are just represented by demetalation and dephytylation. Chl by-products, such as pyropheophytins, have been identified in dried tea leaves showing the potential of MALDI MS to follow chlorophyll biotransformation occurring in processed foodstuffs. Finally, preliminary results show the potential of MALDI MS to detect illegal vegetable oil re-greening practices.

  11. Electron transfer number control of the oxygen reduction reaction on nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxides for the air electrodes of zinc-air batteries and organic degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Sheng-Hui; Li, Po-Chieh; Hu, Chi-Chang, E-mail: cchu@che.nthu.edu.tw

    2016-11-01

    The mean electron transfer number (n) of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) is controlled by nitrogen doping for the air electrodes of Zn-air batteries and electrochemical organic degradation. Melamine and pyrrole are employed as the nitrogen sources for fabricating N-doped rGO (N-rGO) by microwave-assisted hydrothermal synthesis (MAHS). The n value of the ORR is determined by the rotating ring-disk electrode (RRDE) voltammetry and is successfully controlled from 2.34 to 3.93 by preparation variables. The N-doped structures are examined by the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) analysis. The morphology and the defect degree of N-rGOs are characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. N-rGOs with high and low n values are employed as the air electrode catalysts of zinc-air batteries and in-situ hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) generation, respectively. The highest discharge cell voltage of 1.235 V for a Zn-air battery is obtained at 2 mA cm{sup −2} meanwhile the current efficiency of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generation in 1-h electrolysis at 0 V (vs. RHE) reaches 43%. The electrocatalytic degradation of orange G (OG), analyzed by UV-VIS absorption spectra, reveals a high decoloration degree from the relative absorbance of 0.38 for the azo π-conjugation structure of OG. - Highlights: • The mean electron transfer number (n) is controlled by nitrogen doping. • Melamine and pyrrole are used as the nitrogen sources for fabricating N-rGO. • The n value is successfully controlled from 2.34 to 3.93 by preparation variables. • The highest discharge cell voltage of 1.235 V for a Zn-air battery. • The current efficiency of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generation 1-h electrolysis reaches 43%.

  12. Nitrite Reduction to Nitrous Oxide and Ammonia by TiO2 Electrons in a Colloid Solution via Consecutive One-Electron Transfer Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Sara; Behar, David; Rajh, Tijana; Rabani, Joseph

    2016-04-21

    The mechanism of nitrite reduction by excess electrons on TiO2 nanoparticles (eTiO2(-)) was studied under anaerobic conditions. TiO2 was loaded with up to 75 electrons per particle, induced by γ-irradiation of acidic TiO2 colloid solutions containing 2-propanol. Time-resolved kinetics and material analysis were performed, mostly at 1.66 g L(-1) TiO2. At relatively low nitrite concentrations (R = [eTiO2(-)]o/[nitrite]o > 1.5), eTiO2(-) decays via two consecutive processes; at higher concentrations, only one decay step is observed. The stoichiometric ratio Δ[eTiO2(-)]/[nitrite]o of the faster process is about 2. This process involves the one-electron reduction of nitrite, forming the nitrite radical (k1 = (2.0 ± 0.2) × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1)), which further reacts with eTiO2(-) (k2) in competition with its dehydration to nitric oxide (NO) (k3). The ratios k2/k3 = (3.0 ± 0.5) × 10(3) M(-1) and k2 > 1 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1) were derived from kinetic simulations and product analysis. The major product of this process is NO. The slower stage of the kinetics involves the reduction of NO by eTiO2(-), and the detailed mechanism of this process has been discussed in our earlier publication. The results reported in this study suggest that several intermediates, including NO and NH2OH, are adsorbed on the titanium nanoparticles and give rise to inverse dependency of the respective reaction rates on the TiO2 concentration. It is demonstrated that the reduction of nitrite by eTiO2(-) yields mainly N2O and NH3 via consecutive one-electron transfer reactions.

  13. Bio-inspired multinuclear copper complexes covalently immobilized on reduced graphene oxide as efficient electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Yue-Ting; Wei, Ping-Jie; Wang, Ru-Chun; Liu, Jin-Gang

    2015-05-01

    Inspired by the multicopper active site of laccase, which efficiently catalyzes the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), herein we report a novel bio-inspired ORR catalyst composed of a multinuclear copper complex that was immobilized on the surface of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) via the covalently grafted triazole-dipyridine (TADPy) dinucleating ligand. This rGO-TADPyCu catalyst exhibited high ORR activity and superior long-term stability compared to Pt/C in alkaline media.

  14. Electron transfer properties of alkoxyl radicals. A time-resolved kinetic study of the reactions of the tert-butoxyl, cumyloxyl, and benzyloxyl radicals with alkyl ferrocenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bietti, Massimo; DiLabio, Gino A; Lanzalunga, Osvaldo; Salamone, Michela

    2010-09-03

    A time-resolved kinetic study on the reactions of the tert-butoxyl (t-BuO*), cumyloxyl (CumO*), and benzyloxyl (BnO*) radicals with alkylferrocenes has been carried out in MeCN solution. With all radicals, clear evidence for an electron transfer (ET) process has been obtained, and with the same ferrocene donor, the reactivity has been observed to increase in the order t-BuO* < CumO* < BnO*, with the difference in reactivity approaching 3 orders of magnitude on going from t-BuO* to BnO*. With BnO*, an excellent fit to the Marcus equation has been obtained, from which a value of the reduction potential of BnO* (E degrees(BnO*/BnO(-)) = 0.54 V/SCE) has been derived. The latter value appears, however, to be significantly higher than the previously determined reduction potential values for alkoxyl radicals and in contrast with the differences in the computed solution-phase electron affinities determined for t-BuO*, CumO*, and BnO*, indicating that the reaction of BnO* with ferrocene donors may not be described in terms of a straightforward outer sphere ET mechanism. From these data, and taking into account the available value of the reduction potential for CumO*, a value of E degrees (BnO*/BnO(-)) = -0.10 V/SCE has been estimated. On the basis of computational evidence for the formation of a pi-stacked prereaction complex in the reaction between BnO* and DcMFc, an alternative ET mechanism is proposed for the reactions of both CumO* and BnO*. In these cases, the delocalized nature of the unpaired electron allows for the aromatic ring to act as an electron relay by mediating the ET from the ferrocene donor to the formal oxygen radical center. This hypothesis is also in line with the observation that both BnO* and CumO* react with the ferrocene donors with rate constants that are in all cases at least 2 orders of magnitude higher than those measured for t-BuO*, wherein the radical is well-localized.

  15. Application of Electron-Transfer Theory to Several Systems of Biological Interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, R. A.; Sutin, N.

    1985-03-23

    Electron-transfer reaction rates are compared with theoretically calculated values for several reactions in the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center. A second aspect of the theory, the cross-relation, is illustrated using protein-protein electron transfers.

  16. Electron-Transfer Secondary Reaction Matrices for MALDI MS Analysis of Bacteriochlorophyll a in Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Its Zinc and Copper Analogue Pigments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvano, Cosima Damiana; Ventura, Giovanni; Trotta, Massimo; Bianco, Giuliana; Cataldi, Tommaso R I; Palmisano, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a), a photosynthetic pigment performing the same functions of chlorophylls in plants, features a bacteriochlorin macrocycle ring (18 π electrons) with two reduced pyrrole rings along with a hydrophobic terpenoid side chain (i.e., the phytol residue). Chlorophylls analysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) is not so straightforward since pheophytinization (i.e., release of the central metal ion) and cleavage of the phytol-ester linkage are invariably observed by employing protonating matrices such as 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, sinapinic acid, and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid. Using BChl a from Rhodobacter sphaeroides R26 strain as a model system, different electron-transfer (ET) secondary reaction matrices, leading to the formation of almost stable radical ions in both positive ([M](+•)) and negative ([M](-•)) ionization modes at m/z 910.55, were evaluated. Compared with ET matrices such as trans-2-[3-(4-t-butyl-phenyl)-2-methyl-2-propenylidene]malononitrile (DCTB), 2,2':5',2''-terthiophene (TER), anthracene (ANT), and 9,10-diphenylanthracene (DP-ANT), 1,5-diaminonaphthalene (DAN) was found to provide the highest ionization yield with a negligible fragmentation. DAN also displayed excellent ionization properties for two metal ion-substituted bacteriochlorophylls, (i.e., Zn- and Cu-BChl a at m/z 950.49 and 949.49), respectively. MALDI MS/MS of both radical charged molecular species provide complementary information, thus making analyte identification more straightforward. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  17. Nanostructured Ti(0.7)Mo(0.3)O2 support enhances electron transfer to Pt: high-performance catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Van Thi Thanh; Pan, Chun-Jern; Rick, John; Su, Wei-Nien; Hwang, Bing-Joe

    2011-08-03

    The slow rate of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the instability of Pt-based catalysts are two of the most important issues that must be solved in order to make proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) a reality. Additionally, the serious carbon corrosion on the cathode side is a critical problem with respect to the durability of catalyst that limits its wide application. Here, we present a new approach by exploring robust noncarbon Ti(0.7)Mo(0.3)O(2) used as a novel functionalized cocatalytic support for Pt. This approach is based on the novel nanostructure Ti(0.7)Mo(0.3)O(2) support with "electronic transfer mechanism" from Ti(0.7)Mo(0.3)O(2) to Pt that can modify the surface electronic structure of Pt, owing to a shift in the d-band center of the surface Pt atoms. Furthermore, another benefit of Ti(0.7)Mo(0.3)O(2) is the extremely high stability of Pt/Ti(0.7)Mo(0.3)O(2) during potential cycling, which is attributable to the strong metal/support interaction (SMSI) between Pt and Ti(0.7)Mo(0.3)O(2). This also enhances the inherent structural and chemical stability and the corrosion resistance of the TiO(2)-based oxide in acidic and oxidative environments. We also demonstrate that the ORR current densities generated using cocatalytic Pt/Ti(0.7)Mo(0.3)O(2) are respectively ~7- and 2.6-fold higher than those of commercial Pt/C and PtCo/C catalysts with the same Pt loading. This new approach opens a reliable path to the discovery advanced concept in designing new catalysts that can replace the traditional catalytic structure and motivate further research in the field.

  18. Electron-Transfer Secondary Reaction Matrices for MALDI MS Analysis of Bacteriochlorophyll a in Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Its Zinc and Copper Analogue Pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvano, Cosima Damiana; Ventura, Giovanni; Trotta, Massimo; Bianco, Giuliana; Cataldi, Tommaso R. I.; Palmisano, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Bacteriochlorophyll a ( BChl a), a photosynthetic pigment performing the same functions of chlorophylls in plants, features a bacteriochlorin macrocycle ring (18 π electrons) with two reduced pyrrole rings along with a hydrophobic terpenoid side chain (i.e., the phytol residue). Chlorophylls analysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) is not so straightforward since pheophytinization (i.e., release of the central metal ion) and cleavage of the phytol-ester linkage are invariably observed by employing protonating matrices such as 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, sinapinic acid, and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid. Using BChl a from Rhodobacter sphaeroides R26 strain as a model system, different electron-transfer (ET) secondary reaction matrices, leading to the formation of almost stable radical ions in both positive ([M]+•) and negative ([M]-•) ionization modes at m/z 910.55, were evaluated. Compared with ET matrices such as trans-2-[3-(4-t-butyl-phenyl)-2-methyl-2-propenylidene]malononitrile (DCTB), 2,2':5',2''-terthiophene (TER), anthracene (ANT), and 9,10-diphenylanthracene (DP-ANT), 1,5-diaminonaphthalene (DAN) was found to provide the highest ionization yield with a negligible fragmentation. DAN also displayed excellent ionization properties for two metal ion-substituted bacteriochlorophylls, (i.e., Zn- and Cu-BChl a at m/z 950.49 and 949.49), respectively. MALDI MS/MS of both radical charged molecular species provide complementary information, thus making analyte identification more straightforward.

  19. Theoretical analysis of the two-electron transfer reaction and experimental studies with surface-confined cytochrome c peroxidase using large-amplitude Fourier transformed AC voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Gareth P; Lee, Chong-Yong; Kennedy, Gareth F; Parkin, Alison; Baker, Ruth E; Gillow, Kathryn; Armstrong, Fraser A; Gavaghan, David J; Bond, Alan M

    2012-06-26

    A detailed analysis of the cooperative two-electron transfer of surface-confined cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) in contact with pH 6.0 phosphate buffer solution has been undertaken. This investigation is prompted by the prospect of achieving a richer understanding of this biologically important system via the employment of kinetically sensitive, but background devoid, higher harmonic components available in the large-amplitude Fourier transform ac voltammetric method. Data obtained from the conventional dc cyclic voltammetric method are also provided for comparison. Theoretical considerations based on both ac and dc approaches are presented for cases where reversible or quasi-reversible cooperative two-electron transfer involves variation in the separation of their reversible potentials, including potential inversion (as described previously for solution phase studies), and reversibility of the electrode processes. Comparison is also made with respect to the case of a simultaneous two-electron transfer process that is unlikely to occur in the physiological situation. Theoretical analysis confirms that the ac higher harmonic components provide greater sensitivity to the various mechanistic nuances that can arise in two-electron surface-confined processes. Experimentally, the ac perturbation with amplitude and frequency of 200 mV and 3.88 Hz, respectively, was employed to detect the electron transfer when CcP is confined to the surface of a graphite electrode. Simulations based on cooperative two-electron transfer with the employment of reversible potentials of 0.745 ± 0.010 V, heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants of between 3 and 10 s(-1) and charge transfer coefficients of 0.5 for both processes fitted experimental data for the fifth to eighth ac harmonics. Imperfections in theory-experiment comparison are consistent with kinetic and thermodynamic dispersion and other nonidealities not included in the theory used to model the voltammetry of surface

  20. Enthalpy/entropy driven activation of the first interquinone electron transfer in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers embedded in vesicles of physiologically important phospholipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Francesco; Dorogi, Márta; Szebényi, Kornélia; Nagy, László; Maróti, Péter; Váró, György; Giotta, Livia; Agostiano, Angela; Trotta, Massimo

    2007-01-01

    The thermodynamics and kinetics of light-induced electron transfer in bacterial photosynthetic RCs are sensitive to physiologically important lipids (phosphatidylcholine, cardiolipin and phosphatidylglycerol) in the environment. The analysis of the temperature-dependence of the rate of the P(+)Q(A)(-)Q(B)-->P(+)Q(A)Q(B)(-) interquinone electron transfer revealed high enthalpy change of activation in zwitterionic or neutral micelles and vesicles and low enthalpy change of activation in vesicles constituted of negatively charged phospholipids. The entropy change of activation was compensated by the changes of enthalpy, thus the free energy change of activation ( approximately 500 meV) did not show large variation in vesicles of different lipids.

  1. Advances in electron transfer chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Mariano, Patrick S

    1993-01-01

    Advances in Electron Transfer Chemistry, Volume 3 presents studies that discuss findings in the various aspects of electron chemistry. The book is comprised of four chapters; each chapter reviews a work that tackles an issue in electron transfer chemistry. Chapter 1 discusses the photoinduced electron transfer in flexible biaryl donor-acceptor molecules. Chapter 2 tackles light-induced electron transfer in inorganic systems in homogeneous and heterogeneous phases. The book also covers internal geometry relaxation effects on electron transfer rates of amino-centered systems. The sequential elec

  2. Retardation of Protein Dynamics by Trehalose in Dehydrated Systems of Photosynthetic Reaction Centers. Insights from Electron Transfer and Thermal Denaturation Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malferrari, Marco; Francia, Francesco; Venturoli, Giovanni

    2015-10-29

    Conformational protein dynamics is known to be hampered in amorphous matrixes upon dehydration, both in the absence and in the presence of glass forming disaccharides, like trehalose, resulting in enhanced protein thermal stability. To shed light on such matrix effects, we have compared the retardation of protein dynamics in photosynthetic bacterial reaction centers (RC) dehydrated at controlled relative humidity in the absence (RC films) or in the presence of trehalose (RC-trehalose glasses). Small scale RC dynamics, associated with the relaxation from the dark-adapted to the light-adapted conformation, have been probed up to the second time scale by analyzing the kinetics of electron transfer from the photoreduced quinone acceptor (QA(-)) to the photoxidized primary donor (P(+)) as a function of the duration of photoexcitation from 7 ns (laser pulse) to 20 s. A more severe inhibition of dynamics is found in RC-trehalose glasses than in RC films: only in the latter system does a complete relaxation to the light-adapted conformation occur even at extreme dehydration, although strongly retarded. To gain insight into the large scale RC dynamics up to the time scale of days, the kinetics of thermal denaturation have been studied at 44 °C by spectral analysis of the Qx and Qy bands of the RC bacteriochlorin cofactors, as a function of the sugar/protein molar ratio, m, varied between 0 and 10(4). Upon increasing m, denaturation is slowed progressively, and above m ∼ 500 the RC is stable at least for several days. The stronger retardation of RC relaxation and dynamics induced by trehalose is discussed in the light of a recent molecular dynamics simulation study performed in matrixes of the model protein lysozyme with and without trehalose. We suggest that the efficiency of trehalose in retarding RC dynamics and preventing thermal denaturation stems mainly from its propensity to form and stabilize extended networks of hydrogen bonds involving sugar, residual water, and

  3. Ultrafast Photoinduced Electron Transfer from Peroxide Dianion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Bryce L; Maher, Andrew G; Nava, Matthew; Lopez, Nazario; Cummins, Christopher C; Nocera, Daniel G

    2015-06-18

    The encapsulation of peroxide dianion by hexacarboxamide cryptand provides a platform for the study of electron transfer of isolated peroxide anion. Photoinitiated electron transfer (ET) between freely diffusing Ru(bpy)3(2+) and the peroxide dianion occurs with a rate constant of 2.0 × 10(10) M(-1) s(-1). A competing electron transfer quenching pathway is observed within an ion pair. Picosecond transient spectroscopy furnishes a rate constant of 1.1 × 10(10) s(-1) for this first-order process. A driving force dependence for the ET rate within the ion pair using a series of Ru(bpy)3(2+) derivatives allows for the electronic coupling and reorganization energies to be assessed. The ET reaction is nonadiabatic and dominated by a large inner-sphere reorganization energy, in accordance with that expected for the change in bond distance accompanying the conversion of peroxide dianion to superoxide anion.

  4. Electron-transfer reactions of cobalt(III) complexes. 1. The kinetic investigation of the reduction of various surfactant cobalt(III) complexes by iron(II) in surface active ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Karuppiah; Senthil Murugan, Krishnan; Thangamuniyandi, Pilavadi; Sakthinathan, Subramanian

    2015-05-15

    The kinetics of outer sphere electron transfer reaction of surfactant cobalt(III) complex ions, cis-[Co(en)2(C12H25NH2)2](3+) (1), cis-[Co(dp)2(C12H25NH2)2](3+) (2), cis-[Co(trien)(C12H25NH2)2](3+) (3), cis-[Co(bpy)2(C12H25NH2)2](3+) (4) and cis-[Co(phen)2(C12H25NH2)2](3+) (5) (en: ethylenediamine, dp: diaminopropane, trien : triethylenetetramine, bpy: 2,2'-bipyridyl, phen: 1,10-phenanthroline and C12H25NH2 : dodecylamine) have been interrogated by Fe(2+) ion in ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-methylimidazoliumbromide) medium at different temperatures (298, 303, 308, 313, 318 and 323K) by the spectrophotometry method under pseudo first order conditions using an excess of the reductant. Experimentally the reactions were found to be of second order and the electron transfer as outer sphere. The second order rate constant for the electron transfer reaction in ionic liquids was found to increase with increase in the concentration of all these surfactant cobalt(III) complexes. Among these complexes (from en to phen ligand), complex containing the phenanthroline ligand rate is higher compared to other complexes. By assuming the outer sphere mechanism, the results have been explained based on the presence of aggregated structures containing cobalt(III) complexes at the surface of ionic liquids formed by the surfactant cobalt(III) complexes in the reaction medium. The activation parameters (enthalpy of activation ΔH(‡) and entropy of activation ΔS(‡)) of the reaction have been calculated which substantiate the kinetics of the reaction.

  5. Electron Transfer Pathways in Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Yan Liu

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of the electron salvation process data indicates that the electron transfer between the electron donor and acceptor is hindered by the electron salvation process. It is proposed that the electron transfer in the cell environment must be assisted by intermediate messenger called the “transport protein”.

  6. Bromite ion catalysis of the disproportionation of chlorine dioxide with nucleophile assistance of electron-transfer reactions between ClO(2) and BrO(2) in basic solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Nicoson, Jeffrey S; Huff Hartz, Kara E; Francisco, Joseph S; Margerum, Dale W

    2002-01-14

    The rate of ClO(2) conversion to ClO(2)(-) and ClO(3)(-) is accelerated by BrO(2)(-), repressed by ClO(2)(-), and greatly assisted by many nucleophiles (Br(-) > PO(4)(3-) > HPO(4)(2-) > CO(3)(2-) > Cl(-) approximately OH(-) > CH(3)COO(-) approximately SO(4)(2-) approximately C(5)H(5)N > H(2)O). The kinetics (at p[H(+)] = 9.3-12.9) show that the first step of the mechanism is an electron transfer between ClO(2) and BrO(2)(-) (k(1) = 36 M(-1) s(-1)) to give ClO(2)(-) and BrO(2). This highly reversible reaction (k(1)/k(-1) = 1 x 10(-6)) accounts for the observed inhibition by ClO(2)(-). The second step is an electron transfer between ClO(2) and BrO(2) to regenerate BrO(2)(-) and form ClO(3)(-). A novel aspect of the second step is the large kinetic contribution from nucleophiles (k(Nu)) that assist the electron transfer between ClO(2) and BrO(2). The k(Nu) (M(-2) s(-1)) values at 25.0 degrees C vary from 2.89 x 10(8) for Br(-) to 2.0 x 10(4) for H(2)O.

  7. THE KINETICS AND MECHANISM OF THE HOMOGENEOUS ELECTRON TRANSFER REACTION BETWEEN FERRIC PORPHYRIN AND ASCORBIC ACID%卟啉铁与抗坏血酸均相电子转移反应的动力学和机理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张红霞; 任建国

    2001-01-01

    采用电子吸收光谱和光谱-电化学方法研究了中位-四(邻硝基苯基)四苯并卟啉的Fe(Ⅲ)配合物与抗坏血酸在DMF溶液中的均相电子转移反应的动力学和机理。结果表明此电子转移反应来源于抗坏血酸与铁卟啉中心铁离子的轴向配位作用,并将一个电子转移至铁离子。反应速率对铁卟啉和抗坏血酸均为一级,并与抗坏血酸的离解有关。%The kinetics and mechanism of the homogeneous electron transfer reaction between ascorbic acid and Fe(Ⅲ) coordination compound of meso-tetra (o-nitrophenyl) tetrabenzoporphyrin (abbr.Fe(Ⅲ)P) were studied by electron absorption spectrum and electrochemistry-spectrum.The results suggest that the electron transfer reaction between ascorbic acid and Fe(Ⅲ)P is associated with an axial coordination of ascorbic acid to the ionic iron in the Fe(Ⅲ)P,during which one electron transfers from ascorbic ion to ionic iron.The reaction orders with respect to both Fe(Ⅲ)P and ascorbic acid are unit,and the reaction rate is influenced by the ascorbic acid dissociation.

  8. Ultrafast proton coupled electron transfer (PCET dynamics in 9-anthranol-aliphatic amine system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nibbering Erik T. J.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond infrared absorption studies strongly suggest that photoexcited 9-anthranol takes part in an ultrafast electron transfer (ET reaction in electron-donating triethylamine solvent, but that ultrafast proton coupled electron transfer (PCET occurs in diethylamine solvent.

  9. INVERSE ELECTRON TRANSFER IN PEROXYOXALATE CHEMIEXCITATION USING EASILY REDUCIBLE ACTIVATORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartoloni, Fernando Heering; Monteiro Leite Ciscato, Luiz Francisco; Augusto, Felipe Alberto; Baader, Wilhelm Josef

    2010-01-01

    INVERSE ELECTRON TRANSFER IN PEROXYOXALATE CHEMIEXCITATION USING EASILY REDUCIBLE ACTIVATORS. Chemiluminescence properties of the peroxyoxalate reaction in the presence of activators bearing electron withdrawing substituents were studied, to evaluate the possible occurrence of an inverse electron tr

  10. INVERSE ELECTRON TRANSFER IN PEROXYOXALATE CHEMIEXCITATION USING EASILY REDUCIBLE ACTIVATORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartoloni, Fernando Heering; Monteiro Leite Ciscato, Luiz Francisco; Augusto, Felipe Alberto; Baader, Wilhelm Josef

    2010-01-01

    INVERSE ELECTRON TRANSFER IN PEROXYOXALATE CHEMIEXCITATION USING EASILY REDUCIBLE ACTIVATORS. Chemiluminescence properties of the peroxyoxalate reaction in the presence of activators bearing electron withdrawing substituents were studied, to evaluate the possible occurrence of an inverse electron tr

  11. INVERSE ELECTRON TRANSFER IN PEROXYOXALATE CHEMIEXCITATION USING EASILY REDUCIBLE ACTIVATORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartoloni, Fernando Heering; Monteiro Leite Ciscato, Luiz Francisco; Augusto, Felipe Alberto; Baader, Wilhelm Josef

    2010-01-01

    INVERSE ELECTRON TRANSFER IN PEROXYOXALATE CHEMIEXCITATION USING EASILY REDUCIBLE ACTIVATORS. Chemiluminescence properties of the peroxyoxalate reaction in the presence of activators bearing electron withdrawing substituents were studied, to evaluate the possible occurrence of an inverse electron

  12. Electron transfer in acetohydroxy acid synthase as a side reaction of catalysis. Implications for the reactivity and partitioning of the carbanion/enamine form of (alpha-hydroxyethyl)thiamin diphosphate in a "nonredox" flavoenzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittmann, Kai; Schröder, Kathrin; Golbik, Ralph; McCourt, Jennifer; Kaplun, Alexander; Duggleby, Ronald G; Barak, Ze'ev; Chipman, David M; Hübner, Gerhard

    2004-07-13

    Acetohydroxy acid synthases (AHAS) are thiamin diphosphate- (ThDP-) and FAD-dependent enzymes that catalyze the first common step of branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis in plants, bacteria, and fungi. Although the flavin cofactor is not chemically involved in the physiological reaction of AHAS, it has been shown to be essential for the structural integrity and activity of the enzyme. Here, we report that the enzyme-bound FAD in AHAS is reduced in the course of catalysis in a side reaction. The reduction of the enzyme-bound flavin during turnover of different substrates under aerobic and anaerobic conditions was characterized by stopped-flow kinetics using the intrinsic FAD absorbance. Reduction of enzyme-bound FAD proceeds with a net rate constant of k' = 0.2 s(-1) in the presence of oxygen and approximately 1 s(-1) under anaerobic conditions. No transient flavin radicals are detectable during the reduction process while time-resolved absorbance spectra are recorded. Reconstitution of the binary enzyme-FAD complex with the chemically synthesized intermediate 2-(hydroxyethyl)-ThDP also results in a reduction of the flavin. These data provide evidence for the first time that the key catalytic intermediate 2-(hydroxyethyl)-ThDP in the carbanionic/enamine form is not only subject to covalent addition of 2-keto acids and an oxygenase side reaction but also transfers electrons to the adjacent FAD in an intramolecular redox reaction yielding 2-acetyl-ThDP and reduced FAD. The detection of the electron transfer supports the idea of a common ancestor of acetohydroxy acid synthase and pyruvate oxidase, a homologous ThDP- and FAD-dependent enzyme that, in contrast to AHASs, catalyzes a reaction that relies on intercofactor electron transfer.

  13. Electronic coupling calculation and pathway analysis of electron transfer reaction using ab initio fragment-based method. I. FMO-LCMO approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, Hirotaka; Ando, Koji

    2011-05-28

    By making use of an ab initio fragment-based electronic structure method, fragment molecular orbital-linear combination of MOs of the fragments (FMO-LCMO), developed by Tsuneyuki et al. [Chem. Phys. Lett. 476, 104 (2009)], we propose a novel approach to describe long-distance electron transfer (ET) in large system. The FMO-LCMO method produces one-electron Hamiltonian of whole system using the output of the FMO calculation with computational cost much lower than conventional all-electron calculations. Diagonalizing the FMO-LCMO Hamiltonian matrix, the molecular orbitals (MOs) of the whole system can be described by the LCMOs. In our approach, electronic coupling T(DA) of ET is calculated from the energy splitting of the frontier MOs of whole system or perturbation method in terms of the FMO-LCMO Hamiltonian matrix. Moreover, taking into account only the valence MOs of the fragments, we can considerably reduce computational cost to evaluate T(DA). Our approach was tested on four different kinds of model ET systems with non-covalent stacks of methane, non-covalent stacks of benzene, trans-alkanes, and alanine polypeptides as their bridge molecules, respectively. As a result, it reproduced reasonable T(DA) for all cases compared to the reference all-electron calculations. Furthermore, the tunneling pathway at fragment-based resolution was obtained from the tunneling current method with the FMO-LCMO Hamiltonian matrix.

  14. Biotechnological Aspects of Microbial Extracellular Electron Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Souichiro

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular electron transfer (EET) is a type of microbial respiration that enables electron transfer between microbial cells and extracellular solid materials, including naturally-occurring metal compounds and artificial electrodes. Microorganisms harboring EET abilities have received considerable attention for their various biotechnological applications, in addition to their contribution to global energy and material cycles. In this review, current knowledge on microbial EET and its application to diverse biotechnologies, including the bioremediation of toxic metals, recovery of useful metals, biocorrosion, and microbial electrochemical systems (microbial fuel cells and microbial electrosynthesis), were introduced. Two potential biotechnologies based on microbial EET, namely the electrochemical control of microbial metabolism and electrochemical stimulation of microbial symbiotic reactions (electric syntrophy), were also discussed. PMID:26004795

  15. What determines the rate of excited-state intramolecular electron-transfer reaction of 4-(N,N'-dimethylamino)benzonitrile in room temperature ionic liquids? A study in [bmim][PF6].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhosh, Kotni; Samanta, Anunay

    2012-05-14

    The kinetics of excited-state intramolecular electron-transfer reaction and dynamics of solvation of the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) state of 4-(N,N'-dimethylamino)benzonitrile (DMABN) was studied in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazloium hexafluorophosphate, [bmim][PF(6)], by monitoring the dual fluorescence of the system. The picosecond time-resolved emission spectra (TRES) of DMABN exhibit decay of the locally excited (LE) emission intensity and shift of the ICT emission peak position with time, thus capturing the kinetics of evolution of the ICT state from the LE state and solvent relaxation of the ICT state. These results show that the LE→ICT transformation rate is determined not by the slow dynamics of solvation in ionic liquid, but is controlled mainly by the rate of structural reorganization of the molecule, which accompanies the electron-transfer process in this polar viscous medium. Even though both solvent reorganization around photo-excited DMABN and structural rearrangement of the molecule are dependent on the viscosity of the medium, it is the latter process that contributes to the viscosity dependence of the LE→ICT transformation.

  16. Mediated Electron Transfer at Redox Active Monolayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E.G. Lyons

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical model describing the transport and kinetic processes involved in heterogeneous redox catalysis of solution phase reactants at electrode surfaces coated with redox active monolayers is presented. Although the analysis presented has quite general applicability, a specific focus of the paper is concerned with the idea that redox active monolayers can be used to model an ensemble of individual molecular nanoelectrodes. Three possible rate determining steps are considered: heterogeneous electron transfer between immobilized mediator and support electrode ; bimolecular chemical reaction between redox mediator and reactant species in the solution phase, and diffusional mass transport of reactant in solution. A general expression for the steady state reaction flux is derived which is valid for any degree of reversibility of both the heterogeneous electron transfer reaction involving immobilized mediator species and of the bimolecular cross exchange reaction between immobilized mediator and solution phase reactant. The influence of reactant transport in solution is also specifically considered. Simplified analytical expressions for the net reaction flux are derived for experimentally reasonable situations and a kinetic case diagram is constructed outlining the relationships between the various approximate solutions. The theory enables simple diagnostic plots to be constructed which can be used to analyse experimental data.

  17. Combining UV photodissociation with electron transfer for peptide structure analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Christopher J; Marek, Ales; Pepin, Robert; Slovakova, Kristina; Turecek, Frantisek

    2015-03-01

    The combination of near-UV photodissociation with electron transfer and collisional activation provides a new tool for structure investigation of isolated peptide ions and reactive intermediates. Two new types of pulse experiments are reported. In the first one called UV/Vis photodissociation-electron transfer dissociation (UVPD-ETD), diazirine-labeled peptide ions are shown to undergo photodissociation in the gas phase to form new covalent bonds, guided by the ion conformation, and the products are analyzed by electron transfer dissociation. In the second experiment, called ETD-UVPD wherein synthetic labels are not necessary, electron transfer forms new cation-peptide radical chromophores that absorb at 355 nm and undergo specific backbone photodissociation reactions. The new method is applied to distinguish isomeric ions produced by ETD of arginine containing peptides. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Switching off electron transfer reactions in confined media: reduction of [Co(dipic)2]- and [Co(edta)]- by hexacyanoferrate(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michael D; Lorenz, Bret B; Wilkins, Patricia C; Lemons, Brant G; Baruah, Bharat; Lamborn, Nathan; Stahla, Michelle; Chatterjee, Pabitra B; Richens, David T; Crans, Debbie C

    2012-03-01

    The kinetics of reduction of two cobalt(III) complexes with similar redox potentials by hexacyanoferrate(II) were investigated in water and in reverse micelle (RM) microemulsions. The RMs were composed of water, surfactant [(sodium(bis(2-ethylhexylsulfosuccinate)), NaAOT], and isooctane. Compared to the reaction in water, the reduction rates of (ethylenediaminetetraacetato)cobaltate(III) by hexacyanoferrate(II) were dramatically suppressed in RM microemulsions whereas a slight rate increase was observed for reduction of bis-(2,6-dipicolinato)cobaltate(III). For example, the ferrocyanide reduction of [Co(dipic)(2)](-) increased from 55 M(-1) s(-1)in aqueous media to 85 M(-1) s(-1) in a w(o) = 20 RM. The one-dimensional (1-D) and two-dimensional (2-D) (1)H NMR and FT-IR studies are consistent with the reduction rate constants of these two complexes being affected by their location within the RM. Since reduction of [Co(edta)](-) is switched off, in contrast to [Co(dipic)(2)](-), these observations are attributed to the penetration of the [Co(edta)](-) into the interfacial region of the RM whereas [Co(dipic)(2)](-) is in a region highly accessible to the water pool and thus hexacyanoferrate(II). These results demonstrated that compartmentalization completely turns off a redox reaction in a dynamic microemulsion system by either reactant separation or alteration of the redox potentials of the reactants.

  19. Influence of cyclopentadienyl ring-tilt on electron-transfer reactions: redox-induced reactivity of strained [2] and [3]ruthenocenophanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Andrew D; Gilroy, Joe B; Lam, Kevin; Haddow, Mairi F; Harvey, Jeremy N; Geiger, William E; Manners, Ian

    2014-12-01

    In contrast to ruthenocene [Ru(η(5) -C5 H5 )2 ] and dimethylruthenocene [Ru(η(5) -C5 H4 Me)2 ] (7), chemical oxidation of highly strained, ring-tilted [2]ruthenocenophane [Ru(η(5) -C5 H4 )2 (CH2 )2 ] (5) and slightly strained [3]ruthenocenophane [Ru(η(5) -C5 H4 )2 (CH2 )3 ] (6) with cationic oxidants containing the non-coordinating [B(C6 F5 )4 ](-) anion was found to afford stable and isolable metalmetal bonded dicationic dimer salts [Ru(η(5) -C5 H4 )2 (CH2 )2 ]2 [B(C6 F5 )4 ]2 (8) and [Ru(η(5) -C5 H4 )2 (CH2 )3 ]2 [B(C6 F5 )4 ]2 (17), respectively. Cyclic voltammetry and DFT studies indicated that the oxidation potential, propensity for dimerization, and strength of the resulting RuRu bond is strongly dependent on the degree of tilt present in 5 and 6 and thereby degree of exposure of the Ru center. Cleavage of the RuRu bond in 8 was achieved through reaction with the radical source [(CH3 )2 NC(S)SSC(S)N(CH3 )2 ] (thiram), affording unusual dimer [(CH3 )2 NCS2 Ru(η(5) -C5 H4 )(η(3) -C5 H4 )C2 H4 ]2 [B(C6 F5 )4 ]2 (9) through a haptotropic η(5) -η(3) ring-slippage followed by an apparent [2+2] cyclodimerization of the cyclopentadienyl ligand. Analogs of possible intermediates in the reaction pathway [C6 H5 ERu(η(5) -C5 H4 )2 C2 H4 ][B(C6 F5 )4 ] [E=S (15) or Se (16)] were synthesized through reaction of 8 with C6 H5 EEC6 H5 (E=S or Se).

  20. Kinetics and Mechanism of Electron Transfer Reaction: Oxidation of Sulfanilic Acid by N-Chloro-p-Toluene Sulfonamide in Acid Perchlorate Medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sailani, Riya; Bhasin, Meneka; Khandelwal, C. L.; Sharma, P. D. [Univ. of Rajasthan, Jaipur (India)

    2014-01-15

    The kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of sulfanilic acid by N-chloro-p-toluene sulfonamide (chloramine-T) have been studied in acid medium. The species of chloramine-T were analysed on the basis of experimental observations and predominantly reactive species was taken into account for proposition of most plausible reaction mechanism. The derived rate law (1) conforms to such a mechanism. All kinetic parameters were evaluated. Activation parameters such as energy and entropy of activation were calculated to be (61.67 ± 0.47) kJ mol{sup -1} and (-62.71 ± 2.48) JK{sup -1}mol{sup -1} respectively employing Eyring equation.

  1. Variable Electron Transfer Pathways in an Amphibian Cryptochrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biskup, Till; Paulus, Bernd; Okafuji, Asako; Hitomi, Kenichi; Getzoff, Elizabeth D.; Weber, Stefan; Schleicher, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Electron transfer reactions play vital roles in many biological processes. Very often the transfer of charge(s) proceeds stepwise over large distances involving several amino acid residues. By using time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance and optical spectroscopy, we have studied the mechanism of light-induced reduction of the FAD cofactor of cryptochrome/photolyase family proteins. In this study, we demonstrate that electron abstraction from a nearby amino acid by the excited FAD triggers further electron transfer steps even if the conserved chain of three tryptophans, known to be an effective electron transfer pathway in these proteins, is blocked. Furthermore, we were able to characterize this secondary electron transfer pathway and identify the amino acid partner of the resulting flavin-amino acid radical pair as a tyrosine located at the protein surface. This alternative electron transfer pathway could explain why interrupting the conserved tryptophan triad does not necessarily alter photoreactions of cryptochromes in vivo. Taken together, our results demonstrate that light-induced electron transfer is a robust property of cryptochromes and more intricate than commonly anticipated. PMID:23430261

  2. A time-resolved iron-specific X-ray absorption experiment yields no evidence for an Fe2+ --> Fe3+ transition during QA- --> QB electron transfer in the photosynthetic reaction center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermes, Sabine; Bremm, Oliver; Garczarek, Florian; Derrien, Valerie; Liebisch, Peter; Loja, Paola; Sebban, Pierre; Gerwert, Klaus; Haumann, Michael

    2006-01-17

    Previous time-resolved FTIR measurements suggested the involvement of an intermediary component in the electron transfer step Q(A)- --> Q(B) in the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides [Remy and Gerwert (2003) Nat. Struct. Biol. 10, 637]. By a kinetic X-ray absorption experiment at the Fe K-edge we investigated whether oxidation occurs at the ferric non-heme iron located between the two quinones. In isolated reaction centers with a high content of functional Q(B), at a time resolution of 30 micros and at room temperature, no evidence for transient oxidation of Fe was obtained. However, small X-ray transients occurred, in a similar micro- to millisecond time range as in the IR experiments, which may point to changes in the Fe ligand environment due to the charges on Q(A)- and Q(B)-. In addition, VIS measurements agree with the IR data and do not exclude an intermediate in the Q(A)- --> Q(B) transition.

  3. Electron Transfer Dissociation of Doubly Sodiated Glycerophosphocholine Lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaorong; Liu, Jian; LeBlanc, Yves; Covey, Tom; Ptak, A. Celeste; Brenna, J. Thomas; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2009-01-01

    The ability to generate gaseous doubly charged cations of glycerophosphocholine (GPC) lipids via electrospray ionization has made possible the evaluation of electron transfer dissociation (ETD) for their structural characterization. Doubly sodiated GPC cations have been reacted with azobenzene radical anions in a linear ion trap mass spectrometer. The ion/ion reactions proceed through sodium transfer, electron transfer, and complex formation. Electron transfer reactions are shown to give rise to cleavage at each ester linkage with the subsequent loss of a neutral quaternary nitrogen moiety. Electron transfer without dissociation produces [M+2Na]+• radical cations, which undergo collision-induced dissociation (CID) to give products that arise from bond cleavage of each fatty acid chain. The CID of the complex ions yields products similar to those produced directly from the electron transfer reactions of doubly sodiated GPC, although with different relative abundances. These findings indicate that the analysis of GPC lipids by ETD in conjunction with CID can provide some structural information, such as the number of carbons, degree of unsaturation for each fatty acid substituent, and the positions of the fatty acid substituents; some information about the location of the double bonds may be present in low intensity CID product ions. PMID:17719238

  4. Ligand design for enhanced stereoselectivity in the electron-transfer reactions between nickel(IV) bis(oxime-imine) complexes and (Co(edta))/sup 2 -/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martone, D.P.; Osvath, P.; Lappin, A.G.

    1987-09-23

    A number of derivatives of the sexidentate bis(oxime-imine) ligand 3,14-dimethyl-4,7,10,13-tetraazahexadeca-3,13-diene-2,15-dione dioxime, Me/sub 2/L(1)H/sub 2/, have been prepared in which the methyl groups on the oxime-imine chromophores are replaced by more bulky phenyl groups, MePhL(1)H/sub 2/ and PhMeL(1)H/sub 2/, or chiral (S) methyl (L(2)) and benzyl (L(3)) groups are attached on the amine backbone at the 5- and 12-positions. Nickel(II) complexes of the ligands can be oxidized to the corresponding nickel(III) and nickel(IV) derivatives, and the effect of changing ligand structure on the reduction potentials of the complexes is small. Self-exchange rate constants for the nickel(IV)/nickel(III) change have been estimated from the rates of the cross-reactions between (Ni/sup III/MePhL(1))/sup +/ and (Ni/sup III/PhMeL(1))/sup +/ and their chiral (5S, 12S)-dimethyl nickel(IV) derivatives to be 8 x 10/sup 5/ and 4 x 10/sup 6/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/, respectively, at 25/sup 0/C and 0.1 M ionic strength. The kinetics and mechanisms of reduction of (Ni/sup IV/MePhL(1))/sup 2 +/ and (Ni/sup IV/PhMeL(1))/sup 2 +/ and (Co(edta))/sup 2 -/ have also been investigated. Stereoselectivity in the oxidation of (Co(edta))/sup 2 -/ by nickel(IV) has been investigated by using these chiral complexes, and in all cases the preferred isomer of the product (Co(edta))/sup -/ is ..delta.. with enantiomeric excesses of 7%, 21%, 22%, and 46% for the complexes (Ni/sup IV/PhMeL(2))/sup 2 +/, (Nk/sup IV/MePhL(2))/sup 2 +/, (Ni/sup IV/Me/sub 2/L(3))/sup 2 +/, and (Ni/sup IV/MePhL(3))/sup 2 +/, respectively. 32 references, 5 figures, 4 tables.

  5. REFLECTIONS ON THE TWO-STATE ELECTRON TRANSFER MODEL.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunschwig, B.S.

    2000-01-12

    There is general agreement that the two most important factors determining electron transfer rates in solution are the degree of electronic interaction between the donor and acceptor sites, and the changes in the nuclear configurations of the donor, acceptor, and surrounding medium that occur upon the gain or loss of an electron Ll-51. The electronic interaction of the sites will be very weak, and the electron transfer slow, when the sites are far apart or their interaction is symmetry or spin forbidden. Since electron motion is much faster than nuclear motion, energy conservation requires that, prior to the actual electron transfer, the nuclear configurations of the reactants and the surrounding medium adjust from their equilibrium values to a configuration (generally) intermediate between that of the reactants and products. In the case of electron transfer between , two metal complexes in a polar solvent, the nuclear configuration changes involve adjustments in the metal-ligand and intraligand bond lengths and angles, and changes in the orientations of the surrounding solvent molecules. In common with ordinary chemical reactions, an electron transfer reaction can then be described in terms of the motion of the system on an energy surface from the reactant equilibrium configuration (initial state) to the product equilibrium configuration (final state) via the activated complex (transition state) configuration.

  6. Energy-Storage Applications for a pH Gradient between Two Benzimidazole-Ligated Ruthenium Complexes That Engage in Proton-Coupled Electron-Transfer Reactions in Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoyama, Daisuke; Yoshikawa, Kai; Ozawa, Hiroaki; Tadokoro, Makoto; Haga, Masa-Aki

    2017-06-05

    The judicious selection of pairs of benzimidazole-ligated ruthenium complexes allowed the construction of a rechargeable proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET)-type redox battery. A series of ruthenium(II) and -(III) complexes were synthesized that contain substituted benzimidazoles that engage in PCET reactions. The formation of intramolecular Ru-C cyclometalation bonds stabilized the resulting ruthenium(III) complexes, in which pKa values of the imino N-H protons on the benzimidazoles are usually lower than those for the corresponding ruthenium(II) complexes. As a proof-of-concept study for a solution redox battery based on such PCET reactions, the charging/discharging cycles of several pairs of ruthenium complexes were examined by chronopotentiometry in an H-type device with half-cells separated by a Nafion membrane in unbuffered CH3CN/H2O (1/1, v/v) containing 0.1 M NaCl. During the charging/discharging cycles, the pH value of the solution gradually changed accompanied by a change of the open-circuit potential (OCP). The changes for the OCP and pH value of the solution in the anodic and cathodic half-cells were in good agreement with the predicted values from the Pourbaix diagrams for the pairs of ruthenium complexes used. Accordingly, the careful selection of pairs of ruthenium complexes with a sufficient potential gradient and a suitably large pKa difference is crucial: the charge generated between the two ruthenium complexes changes the OCP and the pH difference between the two cells in an unbuffered solution, given that the PCET reactions occur at both electrodes and that discharging leads to the original state. Because the electric energy is stored as a pH gradient between the half-cells, new possibilities for PCET-type rocking-chair redox batteries arise.

  7. Ruthenium(II) coordination chemistry of a fused donor-acceptor ligand: synthesis, characterization, and photoinduced electron-transfer reactions of [{Ru(bpy)2}(n)(TTF-ppb)](PF6)(2n) (n = 1, 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goze, Christine; Dupont, Nathalie; Beitler, Elvira; Leiggener, Claudia; Jia, Hongpeng; Monbaron, Philippe; Liu, Shi-Xia; Neels, Antonia; Hauser, Andreas; Decurtins, Silvio

    2008-12-01

    A pi-extended, redox-active bridging ligand 4',5'-bis(propylthio)tetrathiafulvenyl[i]dipyrido[2,3-a:3',2'-c]phenazine (L) was prepared via direct Schiff-base condensation of the corresponding diamine-tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) precursor with 4,7-phenanthroline-5,6-dione. Reactions of L with [Ru(bpy)(2)Cl(2)] afforded its stable mono- and dinuclear ruthenium(II) complexes 1 and 2. They have been fully characterized, and their photophysical and electrochemical properties are reported together with those of [Ru(bpy)(2)(ppb)](2+) and [Ru(bpy)(2)(mu-ppb)Ru(bpy)(2)](4+) (ppb = dipyrido[2,3-a:3',2'-c]phenazine) for comparison. In all cases, the first excited state corresponds to an intramolecular TTF --> ppb charge-transfer state. Both ruthenium(II) complexes show two strong and well-separated metal-to-ligand charge-transfer (MLCT) absorption bands, whereas the (3)MLCT luminescence is strongly quenched via electron transfer from the TTF subunit. Clearly, the transient absorption spectra illustrate the role of the TTF fragment as an electron donor, which induces a triplet intraligand charge-transfer state ((3)ILCT) with lifetimes of approximately 200 and 50 ns for mono- and dinuclear ruthenium(II) complexes, respectively.

  8. Lewis Acid Coupled Electron Transfer of Metal-Oxygen Intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Ohkubo, Kei; Lee, Yong-Min; Nam, Wonwoo

    2015-12-01

    Redox-inactive metal ions and Brønsted acids that function as Lewis acids play pivotal roles in modulating the redox reactivity of metal-oxygen intermediates, such as metal-oxo and metal-peroxo complexes. The mechanisms of the oxidative CH bond cleavage of toluene derivatives, sulfoxidation of thioanisole derivatives, and epoxidation of styrene derivatives by mononuclear nonheme iron(IV)-oxo complexes in the presence of triflic acid (HOTf) and Sc(OTf)3 have been unified as rate-determining electron transfer coupled with binding of Lewis acids (HOTf and Sc(OTf)3 ) by iron(III)-oxo complexes. All logarithms of the observed second-order rate constants of Lewis acid-promoted oxidative CH bond cleavage, sulfoxidation, and epoxidation reactions of iron(IV)-oxo complexes exhibit remarkably unified correlations with the driving forces of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and metal ion-coupled electron transfer (MCET) in light of the Marcus theory of electron transfer when the differences in the formation constants of precursor complexes were taken into account. The binding of HOTf and Sc(OTf)3 to the metal-oxo moiety has been confirmed for Mn(IV) -oxo complexes. The enhancement of the electron-transfer reactivity of metal-oxo complexes by binding of Lewis acids increases with increasing the Lewis acidity of redox-inactive metal ions. Metal ions can also bind to mononuclear nonheme iron(III)-peroxo complexes, resulting in acceleration of the electron-transfer reduction but deceleration of the electron-transfer oxidation. Such a control on the reactivity of metal-oxygen intermediates by binding of Lewis acids provides valuable insight into the role of Ca(2+) in the oxidation of water to dioxygen by the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Two-Electron Transfer Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiaxing; Balamurugan, D; Zhang, Peng; Skourtis, Spiros S; Beratan, David N

    2015-06-18

    The frontiers of electron-transfer chemistry demand that we develop theoretical frameworks to describe the delivery of multiple electrons, atoms, and ions in molecular systems. When electrons move over long distances through high barriers, where the probability for thermal population of oxidized or reduced bridge-localized states is very small, the electrons will tunnel from the donor (D) to acceptor (A), facilitated by bridge-mediated superexchange interactions. If the stable donor and acceptor redox states on D and A differ by two electrons, it is possible that the electrons will propagate coherently from D to A. While structure-function relations for single-electron superexchange in molecules are well established, strategies to manipulate the coherent flow of multiple electrons are largely unknown. In contrast to one-electron superexchange, two-electron superexchange involves both one- and two-electron virtual intermediate states, the number of virtual intermediates increases very rapidly with system size, and multiple classes of pathways interfere with one another. In the study described here, we developed simple superexchange models for two-electron transfer. We explored how the bridge structure and energetics influence multielectron superexchange, and we compared two-electron superexchange interactions to single-electron superexchange. Multielectron superexchange introduces interference between singly and doubly oxidized (or reduced) bridge virtual states, so that even simple linear donor-bridge-acceptor systems have pathway topologies that resemble those seen for one-electron superexchange through bridges with multiple parallel pathways. The simple model systems studied here exhibit a richness that is amenable to experimental exploration by manipulating the multiple pathways, pathway crosstalk, and changes in the number of donor and acceptor species. The features that emerge from these studies may assist in developing new strategies to deliver multiple

  10. Electron transfer in pH-sensitive nitroxide radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbon, Antonio; Bortolus, Marco; Isse, Abdirisak A.; Reznikov, Vladimir A.; Weiner, Lev

    2016-11-01

    Two pH-sensitive stable nitroxide radicals are characterized by EPR spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry in aqueous solution at different pH values. The rates of the photochemically-induced electron transfer reactions from the protonated and deprotonated forms of the radicals to a ruthenium complex are determined.

  11. A molecular shift register based on electron transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopfield, J. J.; Onuchic, Josenelson; Beratan, David N.

    1988-01-01

    An electronic shift-register memory at the molecular level is described. The memory elements are based on a chain of electron-transfer molecules and the information is shifted by photoinduced electron-transfer reactions. This device integrates designed electronic molecules onto a very large scale integrated (silicon microelectronic) substrate, providing an example of a 'molecular electronic device' that could actually be made. The design requirements for such a device and possible synthetic strategies are discussed. Devices along these lines should have lower energy usage and enhanced storage density.

  12. Photoinduced electron transfer in singly labeled thiouredopyrenetrisulfonate azurin derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borovok, N; Kotlyar, A B; Pecht, I;

    1999-01-01

    efficiency. TUPS derivatives of azurin, singly labeled at specific lysine residues, were prepared and purified to homogeneity by ion exchange HPLC. Transient absorption spectroscopy was used to directly monitor the rates of the electron transfer reaction from the photoexcited triplet state of TUPS to Cu...... of the crystal structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin and molecular structure calculation of the TUPS modified proteins, electron transfer pathways were calculated. Analysis of the results revealed a good correlation between separation distance from donor to Cu ligating atom (His-N or Cys-S) and the observed...

  13. Flavin Charge Transfer Transitions Assist DNA Photolyase Electron Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    This contribution describes molecular dynamics, semi-empirical and ab-initio studies of the primary photo-induced electron transfer reaction in DNA photolyase. DNA photolyases are FADH−-containing proteins that repair UV-damaged DNA by photo-induced electron transfer. A DNA photolyase recognizes and binds to cyclobutatne pyrimidine dimer lesions of DNA. The protein repairs a bound lesion by transferring an electron to the lesion from FADH−, upon photo-excitation of FADH− with 350–450 nm light...

  14. Nitração aromática: substituição eletrofílica ou reação com transferência de elétrons? Aromatic nitration: electrophilic substitution or reaction with electron transfer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Pressentin Cardoso

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic nitration is one of the most relevant class of reactions in organic chemistry. It has been intensively studied by both experimental, including works in the condensed as well as in the gas phase, and theoretical procedures. However, the published results do not seem to converge to an unique mechanism. Electrophilic substitution and electron transfer, in an exclusive way, are both proposed as the main mechanism for the reaction. We review these proposals and discuss the most recent findings.

  15. Hierarchical control of electron-transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerhoff, Hans V.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Egger, Louis;

    1997-01-01

    In this chapter the role of electron transfer in determining the behaviour of the ATP synthesising enzyme in E. coli is analysed. It is concluded that the latter enzyme lacks control because of special properties of the electron transfer components. These properties range from absence of a strong...... back pressure by the protonmotive force on the rate of electron transfer to hierarchical regulation of the expression of the gens that encode the electron transfer proteins as a response to changes in the bioenergetic properties of the cell.The discussion uses Hierarchical Control Analysis...

  16. Protein dynamics modulated electron transfer kinetics in early stage photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Prasanta; Dua, Arti

    2013-01-28

    A recent experiment has probed the electron transfer kinetics in the early stage of photosynthesis in Rhodobacter sphaeroides for the reaction center of wild type and different mutants [Science 316, 747 (2007)]. By monitoring the changes in the transient absorption of the donor-acceptor pair at 280 and 930 nm, both of which show non-exponential temporal decay, the experiment has provided a strong evidence that the initial electron transfer kinetics is modulated by the dynamics of protein backbone. In this work, we present a model where the electron transfer kinetics of the donor-acceptor pair is described along the reaction coordinate associated with the distance fluctuations in a protein backbone. The stochastic evolution of the reaction coordinate is described in terms of a non-Markovian generalized Langevin equation with a memory kernel and Gaussian colored noise, both of which are completely described in terms of the microscopics of the protein normal modes. This model provides excellent fits to the transient absorption signals at 280 and 930 nm associated with protein distance fluctuations and protein dynamics modulated electron transfer reaction, respectively. In contrast to previous models, the present work explains the microscopic origins of the non-exponential decay of the transient absorption curve at 280 nm in terms of multiple time scales of relaxation of the protein normal modes. Dynamic disorder in the reaction pathway due to protein conformational fluctuations which occur on time scales slower than or comparable to the electron transfer kinetics explains the microscopic origin of the non-exponential nature of the transient absorption decay at 930 nm. The theoretical estimates for the relative driving force for five different mutants are in close agreement with the experimental estimates obtained using electrochemical measurements.

  17. Photoinitiated electron transfer in multichromophoric species: Synthetic tetrads and pentads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-03-01

    This project involves the design, synthesis and study of molecules which mimic some of the important aspects of photosynthetic electron and energy transfer. This research project is leading to a better understanding of the energy conserving steps of photosynthesis via the study of synthetic model systems which abstract features of the natural photosynthetic apparatus. The knowledge gained from these studies will aid in the design of artificial photosynthetic reaction centers which employ the basic chemistry and physics of photosynthesis to help meet mankind`s energy needs. The approach to artificial photosynthesis employed in this project is to use synthetic pigments, electron donors, and electron acceptors similar to those found in biological reaction centers, but to replace the protein component with covalent bonds. These chemical linkages determine the electronic coupling between the various moieties by controlling separation, relative orientation, and overlap of electronic orbitals. The model systems are designed to mimic the following aspects of natural photosynthetic electron transfer: electron donation from a tetrapyrrole excited single state, electron transfer between tetrapyrroles, electron transfer from tetrapyrroles to quinones, and electron transfer between quinones with different redox properties. In addition, they mimic carotenoid antenna function in photosynthesis (singlet-singlet energy transfer from carotenoid polyenes to chlorophyll) and carotenoid photoprotection from singlet oxygen damage (triplet-triplet energy transfer from chlorophyll to carotenoids).

  18. A molecularly based theory for electron transfer reorganization energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, Bilin; Wang, Zhen-Gang, E-mail: zgw@cheme.caltech.edu [Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2015-12-14

    Using field-theoretic techniques, we develop a molecularly based dipolar self-consistent-field theory (DSCFT) for charge solvation in pure solvents under equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions and apply it to the reorganization energy of electron transfer reactions. The DSCFT uses a set of molecular parameters, such as the solvent molecule’s permanent dipole moment and polarizability, thus avoiding approximations that are inherent in treating the solvent as a linear dielectric medium. A simple, analytical expression for the free energy is obtained in terms of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium electrostatic potential profiles and electric susceptibilities, which are obtained by solving a set of self-consistent equations. With no adjustable parameters, the DSCFT predicts activation energies and reorganization energies in good agreement with previous experiments and calculations for the electron transfer between metallic ions. Because the DSCFT is able to describe the properties of the solvent in the immediate vicinity of the charges, it is unnecessary to distinguish between the inner-sphere and outer-sphere solvent molecules in the calculation of the reorganization energy as in previous work. Furthermore, examining the nonequilibrium free energy surfaces of electron transfer, we find that the nonequilibrium free energy is well approximated by a double parabola for self-exchange reactions, but the curvature of the nonequilibrium free energy surface depends on the charges of the electron-transferring species, contrary to the prediction by the linear dielectric theory.

  19. ATP-induced electron transfer by redox-selective partner recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Sandra E; Goetzl, Sebastian; Jeoung, Jae-Hun; Bommer, Martin; Lendzian, Friedhelm; Hildebrandt, Peter; Dobbek, Holger

    2014-08-11

    Thermodynamically unfavourable electron transfers are enabled by coupling to an energy-supplying reaction. How the energy is transduced from the exergonic to the endergonic process is largely unknown. Here we provide the structural basis for an energy transduction process in the reductive activation of B12-dependent methyltransferases. The transfer of one electron from an activating enzyme to the cobalamin cofactor is energetically uphill and relies on coupling to an ATPase reaction. Our results demonstrate that the key to coupling is, besides the oxidation state-dependent complex formation, the conformational gating of the electron transfer. Complex formation induces a substitution of the ligand at the electron-accepting Co ion. Addition of ATP initiates electron transfer by provoking conformational changes that destabilize the complex. We show how remodelling of the electron-accepting Co(2+) promotes ATP-dependent electron transfer; an efficient strategy not seen in other electron-transferring ATPases.

  20. Pulse radiolytic studies of electron transfer processes and applications to solar photochemistry. Progress report, [March 1992--March 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neta, P.

    1993-04-01

    Electron transfer and other reactions of various short-lived intermediates have been studied by pulse radiolysis and laser flash photolysis. Highlights of results during the past year are summarized under two main sections: Metalloporphyrin electron transfer and associated reactions, and solvent effects on reactions of inorganic radicals and organic peroxyl radicals.

  1. Pulse radiolytic studies of electron transfer processes and applications to solar photochemistry. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neta, P.

    1995-02-01

    The pulse radiolysis technique is applied to the study of electron transfer processes in a variety of chemical systems. Reactive intermediates are produced in solution by electron pulse irradiation and the kinetics of their reactions are followed by time resolved absorption spectrophotometry. Complementary experiments are carried out with excimer laser flash photolysis. These studies are concerned with mechanisms, kinetics, and thermodynamics of reactions of organic and inorganic radicals and unstable oxidation states of metal ions. Reactions are studied in both aqueous and non-aqueous solutions. The studies focus on the unique ability of pulse radiolysis to provide absolute rate constants for reactions of many inorganic radicals and organic peroxyl radicals, species that are key intermediates in many chemical processes. A special concern of this work is the study of electron transfer reactions of metalloporphyrins, which permits evaluation of these molecules as intermediates in solar energy conversion. Metalloporphyrins react with free radicals via electron transfer, involving the ligand or the metal center, or via bonding to the metal, leading to a variety of chemical species whose behavior is also investigated. The highlights of the results during the past three years are summarized below under the following sections: (a) electron transfer reactions of peroxyl radicals, concentrating on the characterization of new peroxyl radicals derived from vinyl, phenyl, other aryl, and pyridyl; (b) solvent effects on electron transfer reactions of inorganic and organic peroxyl radicals, including reactions with porphyrins, and (c) electron transfer and alkylation reactions of metalloporphyrins and other complexes.

  2. Alternative ground states enable pathway switching in biological electron transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abriata, Luciano A.; Álvarez-Paggi, Damián; Ledesma, Gabriela N.; Blackburn, Ninian J.; Vila, Alejandro J.; Murgida, Daniel H.

    2012-01-01

    Electron transfer is the simplest chemical reaction and constitutes the basis of a large variety of biological processes, such as photosynthesis and cellular respiration. Nature has evolved specific proteins and cofactors for these functions. The mechanisms optimizing biological electron transfer have been matter of intense debate, such as the role of the protein milieu between donor and acceptor sites. Here we propose a mechanism regulating long-range electron transfer in proteins. Specifically, we report a spectroscopic, electrochemical, and theoretical study on WT and single-mutant CuA redox centers from Thermus thermophilus, which shows that thermal fluctuations may populate two alternative ground-state electronic wave functions optimized for electron entry and exit, respectively, through two different and nearly perpendicular pathways. These findings suggest a unique role for alternative or “invisible” electronic ground states in directional electron transfer. Moreover, it is shown that this energy gap and, therefore, the equilibrium between ground states can be fine-tuned by minor perturbations, suggesting alternative ways through which protein–protein interactions and membrane potential may optimize and regulate electron–proton energy transduction. PMID:23054836

  3. Exocellular electron transfer in anaerobic microbial communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stams, A.J.M.; Bok, de F.A.M.; Plugge, C.M.; Eekert, van M.H.A.; Dolfing, J.; Schraa, G.

    2006-01-01

    Exocellular electron transfer plays an important role in anaerobic microbial communities that degrade organic matter. Interspecies hydrogen transfer between microorganisms is the driving force for complete biodegradation in methanogenic environments. Many organic compounds are degraded by obligatory

  4. Exocellular electron transfer in anaerobic microbial communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stams, A.J.M.; Bok, de F.A.M.; Plugge, C.M.; Eekert, van M.H.A.; Dolfing, J.; Schraa, G.

    2006-01-01

    Exocellular electron transfer plays an important role in anaerobic microbial communities that degrade organic matter. Interspecies hydrogen transfer between microorganisms is the driving force for complete biodegradation in methanogenic environments. Many organic compounds are degraded by obligatory

  5. Marcus wins nobel prize in chemistry for electron transfer theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levi, B.G.

    1993-01-01

    This article describes the work of Rudolf Marcus of Caltech leading to his receipt of the 1992 Nobel Prize in Chemistry [open quotes]for his contributions to the theory of electron transfer reactions in chemical systems.[close quotes] Applications of Marcus' theory include such diverse phenomena as photosynthesis, electrically conducting polymers, chemiluminescence, and corrosion. Historical aspects of his career are given. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Hetero-cycloreversions Mediated by Photoinduced Electron Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez Ruiz, Raul; Jiménez Molero, María Consuelo; Miranda Alonso, Miguel Ángel

    2014-01-01

    Discovered more than eight decades ago, the Diels-Alder (DA) cycloaddition (CA) remains one of the most versatile tools in synthetic organic chemistry. Hetero-DA processes are powerful methods for the synthesis of densely functionalized six-membered heterocycles, ubiquitous substructures found in natural products and bioactive compounds. These reactions frequently employ azadienes and oxadienes, but only a few groups have reported DA processes with thiadienes. The electron transfer (ET) versi...

  7. Advances in electron transfer chemistry, v.6

    CERN Document Server

    Mariano, PS

    1999-01-01

    It is clear that electron transfer chemisty is now one of the most active areas of chemical study. Advances in Electron Transfer Chemistry has been designed to allow scientists who are developing new knowledge in this rapidly expanding area to describe their most recent research findings. This volume will serve those interested in learning about current breakthroughs in this rapidly expanding area of chemical research.

  8. Design of a Molecular Memory Device: The Electron Transfer Shift Register Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beratan, D.

    1993-01-01

    A molecular shift register memory at the molecular level is described. The memory elements consist of molecules can exit in either an oxidized or reduced state and the bits are shifted between the cells with photoinduced electron transfer reactions.

  9. Ultrafast Electron Transfer Between Dye and Catalyst on a Mesoporous NiO Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Allison M; Antila, Liisa J; Mirmohades, Mohammad; Pullen, Sonja; Ott, Sascha; Hammarström, Leif

    2016-07-01

    The combination of molecular dyes and catalysts with semiconductors into dye-sensitized solar fuel devices (DSSFDs) requires control of efficient interfacial and surface charge transfer between the components. The present study reports on the light-induced electron transfer processes of p-type NiO films cosensitized with coumarin C343 and a bioinspired proton reduction catalyst, [FeFe](mcbdt)(CO)6 (mcbdt = 3-carboxybenzene-1,2-dithiolate). By transient optical spectroscopy we find that ultrafast interfacial electron transfer (τ ≈ 200 fs) from NiO to the excited C343 ("hole injection") is followed by rapid (t1/2 ≈ 10 ps) and efficient surface electron transfer from C343(-) to the coadsorbed [FeFe](mcbdt)(CO)6. The reduced catalyst has a clear spectroscopic signature that persists for several tens of microseconds, before charge recombination with NiO holes occurs. The demonstration of rapid surface electron transfer from dye to catalyst on NiO, and the relatively long lifetime of the resulting charge separated state, suggests the possibility to use these systems for photocathodes on DSSFDs.

  10. Resolution of two distinct electron transfer sites on azurin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Blatt, Y; Pecht, I

    1982-01-01

    reaction rates of the Cr(III)-modified protein are attenuated. This decreased reactivity of Cr(III)-labeled azurin toward one of its physiological partners suggests the involvement of the labeled region in the electron transfer reaction with cytochrome c551. Furthermore, the presence of a second active...... in the redox system of the bacterium. The Pseudomonas cytochrome oxidase catalyzed oxidation of reduced native and Cr(III)-labeled azurin by O2 was found to be unaffected by the modification. The kinetics of the electron exchange reaction between native or Cr(III)-labeled azurin and cytochrome c551 were...

  11. Direct electron transfer from glucose oxidase immobilized on a nano-porous glassy carbon electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haghighi, Behzad, E-mail: haghighi@iasbs.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, P.O. Box 45195-1159, Gava Zang, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tabrizi, Mahmoud Amouzadeh [Department of Chemistry, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, P.O. Box 45195-1159, Gava Zang, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-11-30

    Highlights: > A direct electron transfer reaction of glucose oxidase was observed on the surface of a nano-porous glassy carbon electrode. > A pair of well-defined and reversible redox peaks was observed at the formal potential of approximately -0.439 V. > The apparent electron transfer rate constant was measured to be 5.27 s{sup -1}. > A mechanism for the observed direct electron transfer reaction was proposed, which consists of a two-electron and a two-proton transfer. - Abstract: A pair of well-defined and reversible redox peaks was observed for the direct electron transfer (DET) reaction of an immobilized glucose oxidase (GOx) on the surface of a nano-porous glassy carbon electrode at the formal potential (E{sup o}') of -0.439 V versus Ag/AgCl/saturated KCl. The electron transfer rate constant (k{sub s}) was calculated to be 5.27 s{sup -1}. The dependence of E{sup o}' on pH indicated that the direct electron transfer of the GOx was a two-electron transfer process, coupled with two-proton transfer. The results clearly demonstrate that the nano-porous glassy carbon electrode is a cost-effective and ready-to-use scaffold for the fabrication of a glucose biosensor.

  12. First investigation at elevated pressures to confirm the exact nature of the gated electron-transfer systems: volume profiles of the gated reduction reaction and nongated reverse oxidation reaction involving a [Cu(dmp)2(solvent)]2+/[Cu(dmp)2]+ couple (dmp = 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Sumitaka; Noda, Kyoko; Yamane, Ryouhei; Kishikawa, Nobuyuki; Takagi, Hideo D

    2007-02-19

    Redox reactions involving the [Cu(dmp)2]2+/+ couple (dmp = 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline) in acetonitrile were examined at elevated pressures up to 200 MPa. Activation volumes were determined as -8.8 and -6.3 cm3 mol-1 for the reduction cross-reaction by [Co(bipy)3]2+ (bipy = 2,2'-bipyridine) and for the oxidation cross-reaction by [Ni(tacn)2]3+ (tacn = 1,4,7-triazacyclononane), respectively. The activation volume for the hypothetical gated mode of the self-exchange reaction estimated from the reduction cross-reaction was -13.9 cm3 mol-1, indicating extensive electrostrictive rearrangement of solvent molecules around the CuII complex during the change in the coordination geometry before the electron-transfer step. On the other hand, the activation volume for the self-exchange reaction estimated from the oxidation cross-reaction was -2.7 +/- 1.5 cm3 mol-1. Although this value was within the range that can be interpreted by the concept of the ordinary concerted process, from theoretical considerations it was concluded that the reverse (oxidation) cross-reaction of the gated reduction reaction of the [Cu(dmp)2(CH3CN)]2+/[Cu(dmp)2]+ couple proceeds through the product excited state while the direct self-exchange reaction between [Cu(dmp)2(CH3CN)]2+ and [Cu(dmp)2]+ proceeds through an ordinary concerted process.

  13. N-(ω-三甲基硅烷基醚)马来酰亚胺的光诱导单电子转移反应%Photoinduced Single Electron Transfer Reactions of N-(ω-Trimethylsilylether)maleimides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄益慧; 张晓媛; 谭广慧; 刘岩; 魏树权; 曲凤玉; 岳群峰; 金英学

    2011-01-01

    合成了两个N-(ω-三甲基硅烷基醚)马来酰亚胺衍生物(2a,2b),并以2a,2b为光反应底物在HCN,MeOH,30%H2O-HCN,丙酮等溶剂中进行了光反应.结果显示,化合物2a在强的亲硅性溶剂MeOH,30%H2O-MeOH,30%H2O-HCN中经单电子转移反应以很高的产率和区域选择性生成环胺醇产物3,在HCN、丙酮等弱的亲硅性溶剂中发生[2+2]环加成副反应生成双分子偶合产物5;2b无论是在强的亲硅性溶剂,还是在弱的亲硅性溶剂HCN、丙酮中,都发生分子内单电子转移反应,生成分子内双离子自由基中间体8.一部分8发生脱三甲基硅烷基反应生成环化物4的前体分子内双自由基9,多数8发生特殊的分子间偶合反应得到不对称双分子偶合产物6.所有新化合物均经NMR和质谱验证.%Two N-(ω-trimethylsilylether)maleimides (2a, 2b) were synthesized and their photoreaction procedures in different solvents, such as HCN, MeOH, 30% H2O-MeOH, 30% H2O-HCN and acetone, were investigated respectively.The results showed that, 2a occurred intramolecular single electron transfer (SET) to provide cyclic amidol 3 with highly yield and highly regioselectivity in silophiles such as MeOH, 30% H2O-MeOH, 30% H2O-MeCN, and occurred side reaction to produce [2+2]dimerization product 5 in the weak silophiles HCN and acetone.2b occurred intramolecular SET to provide intermediate zwitterionic radicals 8 in all the highly and weak silophiles.A few of 8 occurred desilylation to produce intramolecular biradicals 9 which is the precursor of the cyclic amidol 4.Most of 8 occurred intermolecular radicals coupling to produce cyclic asymmetric dimerization compound 6.Structures of all compounds were characterized by MS (EI), NMR data.

  14. A Comparison of Electron-Transfer Dynamics inIonic Liquids and Neutral Solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wishart J. F.; Lee, H.Y.; Issa, J.B.; Isied, S.S.; Castner, Jr., E.W.; Pan, Y.; Hussey, C.L.; Lee, K.S.

    2012-03-01

    The effect of ionic liquids on photoinduced electron-transfer reactions in a donor-bridge-acceptor system is examined for two ionic liquid solvents, 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide and tributylmethylammonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide. The results are compared with those for the same system in methanol and acetonitrile solution. Electron-transfer rates were measured using time-resolved fluorescence quenching for the donor-bridge-acceptor system comprising a 1-N,1-N-dimethylbenzene-1,4-diamine donor, a proline bridge, and a coumarin 343 acceptor. The photoinduced electron-transfer processes are in the inverted regime (-{Delta}G > {lambda}) in all four solvents, with driving forces of -1.6 to -1.9 eV and estimated reorganization energies of about 1.0 eV. The observed electron-transfer kinetics have broadly distributed rates that are generally slower in the ionic liquids compared to the neutral solvents, which also have narrower rate distributions. To describe the broad distributions of electron-transfer kinetics, we use two different models: a distribution of exponential lifetimes and a discrete sum of exponential lifetimes. Analysis of the donor-acceptor electronic coupling shows that for ionic liquids this intramolecular electron-transfer reaction should be treated using a solvent-controlled electron-transfer model.

  15. Electronic Correlations in Electron Transfer Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulla, Ralf; Tornow, Sabine; Anders, Frithjof

    Electron transfer processes play a central role in many chemical and biological systems. Already the transfer of a single electron from the donor to the acceptor can be viewed as a complicated many-body problem, due to the coupling of the electron to the infinitely many environmental degrees of freedom, realized by density fluctuations of the solvent or molecular vibrations of the protein matrix. We focus on the quantum mechanical modelling of two-electron transfer processes whose dynamics is governed by the Coulomb interaction between the electrons as well as the environmental degrees of freedoms represented by a bosonic bath. We identify the regime of parameters in which concerted transfer of the two electrons occurs and discuss the influence of the Coulomb repulsion and the coupling strength to the environment on the electron transfer rate. Calculations are performed using the non-perturbative numerical renormalization group approach for both equilibrium and non-equilibrium properties.

  16. Intramolecular electron transfer in cytochrome cd(1) nitrite reductase from Pseudomonas stutzeri; kinetics and thermodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Kroneck, Peter M H; Zumft, Walter G

    2002-01-01

    , internal electron transfer between these sites is an inherent element in the catalytic cycle of this enzyme. We have investigated the internal electron transfer reaction employing pulse radiolytically produced N-methyl nicotinamide radicals as reductant which reacts solely with the heme-c in an essentially...... diffusion controlled process. Following this initial step, the reduction equivalent is equilibrating between the c and d(1) heme sites in a unimolecular process (k=23 s(-1), 298 K, pH 7.0) and an equilibrium constant of 1.0. The temperature dependence of this internal electron transfer process has been...

  17. Electron transfer in ion-atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, C D

    1979-01-01

    Recent theoretical development in the understanding of electron transfer processes is reviewed. K-K electron transfer processes are studied for projectiles (nuclear charge Z/sub B/) and targets (nuclear charge Z/sub A/) in which Z/sub A/ and Z/sub B/ range from Z/sub A/ much greater than Z/sub B/ to Z/sub A/ approx. = Z/sub B/, over the energy range 0.1 < v/v/sub e/ < 2. (GHT)

  18. Effects of Low to Intermediate Water Concentrations on Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer (PCET) Reactions of Flavins in Aprotic Solvents and a Comparison with the PCET Reactions of Quinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Serena L J; Novianti, Maria L; Webster, Richard D

    2015-11-05

    The electrochemical reduction mechanisms of 2 synthesized flavins (Flox) were examined in detail in deoxygenated solutions of DMSO containing varying amounts of water, utilizing variable scan rate cyclic voltammetry (ν = 0.1-20 V s(-1)), controlled-potential bulk electrolysis, and UV-vis spectroscopy. Flavin 1, which contains a hydrogen atom at N(3), is capable of donating its proton to other reduced flavin species. After 1e(-) reduction, the initially formed Fl(•-) receives a proton from another Flox to form FlH(•) (and concomitantly produce the deprotonated flavin, Fl(-)), although the equilibrium constant for this process favors the back reaction. Any FlH(•) formed at the electrode surface immediately undergoes another 1e(-) reduction to form FlH(-), which reacts with Fl(-) to form 2 molecules of Fl(•-). Further 1e(-) reduction of Fl(•-) at more negative potentials produces the dianion, Fl(2-), which can also be protonated by another Flox to form FlH(-) and Fl(-). Flavin 2, which is methylated at N(3) (and therefore has no acidic proton), undergoes a simple chemically reversible 1e(-) reduction process in DMSO provided the water content is low (solvents results in protonation of the anion radical species, Fl(•-), for both flavins, causing an increase in the amount of FlH(-) in solution. This behavior contrasts with what is observed for quinones, which are also reduced in two 1e(-) steps in aprotic organic solvents to form the radical anions and dianions, but are able to exist in hydrogen-bonded forms (with trace or added water) without undergoing protonation.

  19. Hardwiring microbes via direct interspecies electron transfer: mechanisms and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qiwen; Call, Douglas F

    2016-08-10

    Multicellular microbial communities are important catalysts in engineered systems designed to treat wastewater, remediate contaminated sediments, and produce energy from biomass. Understanding the interspecies interactions within them is therefore essential to design effective processes. The flow of electrons within these communities is especially important in the determination of reaction possibilities (thermodynamics) and rates (kinetics). Conventional models of electron transfer incorporate the diffusion of metabolites generated by one organism and consumed by a second, frequently referred to as mediated interspecies electron transfer (MIET). Evidence has emerged in the last decade that another method, called direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET), may occur between organisms or in conjunction with electrically conductive materials. Recent research has suggested that DIET can be stimulated in engineered systems to improve desired treatment goals and energy recovery in systems such as anaerobic digesters and microbial electrochemical technologies. In this review, we summarize the latest understanding of DIET mechanisms, the associated microorganisms, and the underlying thermodynamics. We also critically examine approaches to stimulate DIET in engineered systems and assess their effectiveness. We find that in most cases attempts to promote DIET in mixed culture systems do not yield the improvements expected based on defined culture studies. Uncertainties of other processes that may be co-occurring in real systems, such as contaminant sorption and biofilm promotion, need to be further investigated. We conclude by identifying areas of future research related to DIET and its application in biological treatment processes.

  20. Plugging in or going wireless: strategies for interspecies electron transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena

    2014-01-01

    Interspecies exchange of electrons enables a diversity of microbial communities to gain energy from reactions that no one microbe can catalyze. The first recognized strategies for interspecies electron transfer were those that relied on chemical intermediates that are recycled through oxidized and reduced forms. Well-studied examples are interspecies H2 transfer and the cycling of sulfur intermediates in anaerobic photosynthetic communities. Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) in which two species establish electrical contact is an alternative. Electrical contacts documented to date include electrically conductive pili, as well as conductive iron minerals and conductive carbon moieties such as activated carbon and biochar. Interspecies electron transfer is central to the functioning of methane-producing microbial communities. The importance of interspecies H2 transfer in many methanogenic communities is clear, but under some circumstances DIET predominates. It is expected that further mechanistic studies and broadening investigations to a wider range of environments will help elucidate the factors that favor specific forms of interspecies electron exchange under different environmental conditions. PMID:24904551

  1. Plugging in or Going Wireless: Strategies for Interspecies Electron Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravin Malla Shrestha

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Interspecies exchange of electrons enables a diversity of microbial communities to gain energy from reactions that no one microbe can catalyze. The first recognized strategies for interspecies electron transfer were those that relied on chemical intermediates that are recycled through oxidized and reduced forms. Well-studied examples are interspecies H2 transfer and the cycling of sulfur intermediates in anaerobic photosynthetic communities. Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET in which two species establish electrical contacts is an alternative. Electrical contacts documented to date include electrically conductive pili, as well as conductive iron minerals and conductive carbon moieties such as activated carbon and biochar. It seems likely that there are additional alternative strategies for interspecies electrical connections that have yet to be discovered. Interspecies electron transfer is central to the functioning of methane-producing microbial communities. The importance of interspecies H2 transfer in many methanogenic communities is clear, but under some circumstances DIET predominates. It is expected that further mechanistic studies and broadening investigations to a wider range of environments will help elucidate the factors that favor specific forms of interspecies electron exchange under different environmental conditions.

  2. Hetero-cycloreversions mediated by photoinduced electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Ruiz, Raúl; Jiménez, M Consuelo; Miranda, Miguel A

    2014-04-15

    Discovered more than eight decades ago, the Diels-Alder (DA) cycloaddition (CA) remains one of the most versatile tools in synthetic organic chemistry. Hetero-DA processes are powerful methods for the synthesis of densely functionalized six-membered heterocycles, ubiquitous substructures found in natural products and bioactive compounds. These reactions frequently employ azadienes and oxadienes, but only a few groups have reported DA processes with thiadienes. The electron transfer (ET) version of the DA reaction, though less investigated, has emerged as a subject of increasing interest. In the last two decades, researchers have paid closer attention to radical ionic hetero-cycloreversions, mainly in connection with their possible involvement in the repair of pyrimidine(6-4)pyrimidone photolesions in DNA by photolyases. In biological systems, these reactions likely occur through a reductive photosensitization mechanism. In addition, photooxidation can lead to cycloreversion (CR) reactions, and researchers can exploit this strategy for DNA repair therapies. In this Account, we discuss electron-transfer (ET) mediated hetero-CR reactions. We focus on the oxidative and reductive ET splitting of oxetanes, azetidines, and thietanes. Photoinduced electron transfer facilitates the splitting of a variety of four-membered heterocycles. In this context, researchers have commonly examined oxetanes, both experimentally and theoretically. Although a few studies have reported the cycloreversion of azetidines and thietanes carried out under electron transfer conditions, the number of examples remains limited. In general, the cleavage of the ionized four-membered rings appears to occur via a nonconcerted two-step mechanism. The trapping of the intermediate 1,4-radical ions and transient absorption spectroscopy data support this hypothesis, and it explains the observed loss of stereochemistry in the products. In the initial step, either C-C or C-X bond breaking may occur, and the

  3. Electron Transfer Studies of Ruthenium(II) Complexes with Biologically Important Phenolic Acids and Tyrosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeswari, Angusamy; Ramdass, Arumugam; Muthu Mareeswaran, Paulpandian; Rajagopal, Seenivasan

    2016-03-01

    The ruthenium(II) complexes having 2,2'-bipyridine and phenanthroline derivatives are synthesized and characterized. The photophysical properties of these complexes at pH 12.5 are studied. The electron transfer reaction of biologically important phenolic acids and tyrosine are studied using absorption, emission and transient absorption spectral techniques. Semiclassical theory is applied to calculate the rate of electron transfer between ruthenium(II) complexes and biologically important phenolic acids.

  4. Electron transfer across a thermal gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, Galen T; Nitzan, Abraham

    2016-08-23

    Charge transfer is a fundamental process that underlies a multitude of phenomena in chemistry and biology. Recent advances in observing and manipulating charge and heat transport at the nanoscale, and recently developed techniques for monitoring temperature at high temporal and spatial resolution, imply the need for considering electron transfer across thermal gradients. Here, a theory is developed for the rate of electron transfer and the associated heat transport between donor-acceptor pairs located at sites of different temperatures. To this end, through application of a generalized multidimensional transition state theory, the traditional Arrhenius picture of activation energy as a single point on a free energy surface is replaced with a bithermal property that is derived from statistical weighting over all configurations where the reactant and product states are equienergetic. The flow of energy associated with the electron transfer process is also examined, leading to relations between the rate of heat exchange among the donor and acceptor sites as functions of the temperature difference and the electronic driving bias. In particular, we find that an open electron transfer channel contributes to enhanced heat transport between sites even when they are in electronic equilibrium. The presented results provide a unified theory for charge transport and the associated heat conduction between sites at different temperatures.

  5. Unusual distance dependences of electron transfer rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuss-Petermann, Martin; Wenger, Oliver S

    2016-07-28

    Usually the rates for electron transfer (kET) decrease with increasing donor-acceptor distance, but Marcus theory predicts a regime in which kET is expected to increase when the transfer distance gets longer. Until recently, experimental evidence for such counter-intuitive behavior had been very limited, and consequently this effect is much less well-known than the Gaussian free energy dependence of electron transfer rates leading to the so-called inverted driving-force effect. This article presents the theoretical concepts that lead to the prediction of electron transfer rate maxima at large donor-acceptor distances, and it discusses conditions that are expected to favor experimental observations of such behavior. It continues with a consideration of specific recent examples in which electron transfer rates were observed to increase with increasing donor-acceptor distance, and it closes with a discussion of the importance of this effect in the context of light-to-chemical energy conversion.

  6. Theoretical study on electron transfer in biological systems (Ⅲ)——Intramolecular electron transfer in metal-containing spiro π-electron system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翟宇峰; 蒋华良; 朱维良; 顾健德; 陈建忠; 陈凯先; 嵇汝运

    1999-01-01

    Intramolecular electron transfer of metal-containing spiro π-electron system was studied by AM1 method in the MOPAC-ET program developed by the present group. The results indicated that with the increasing of the outer electric field F, the activation energy of the reaction decreased. When F reaches a certain threshold value, the activation energy barrier becomes zero and the rate of reaction achieves the largest value. The results also indicated that electron transfer matrix elements VAB and reorganization energy λ were not obviously affected by outer electric field while the exothermicity ΔE was directly proportional to it.

  7. Controlling time scales for electron transfer through proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scot Wherland

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Electron transfer processes within proteins constitute key elements in biological energy conversion processes as well as in a wide variety of biochemical transformations. Pursuit of the parameters that control the rates of these processes is driven by the great interest in the latter reactions. Here, we review a considerable body of results emerging from investigation of intramolecular electron transfer (ET reactions in two types of proteins, all done by the use of the pulse-radiolysis method: first are described results of extensive studies of a model system, the bacterial electron mediating protein azurin, where an internal ET between the disulfide radical ion and the Cu(II is induced. Impact of specific structural changes introduced into azurin on the reaction rates and the parameters controlling it are discussed. Then, the presentation is extended to results of investigations of intra-protein ET reactions that are part of catalytic cycles of multi-copper containing enzymes. Again, the rates and the parameters controlling them are presented and discussed in the context of their efficacy and possible constraints set on their evolution.

  8. Photoinduced electron transfer from semiconductor quantum dots to metal oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tvrdy, Kevin; Frantsuzov, Pavel A; Kamat, Prashant V

    2011-01-04

    Quantum dot-metal oxide junctions are an integral part of next-generation solar cells, light emitting diodes, and nanostructured electronic arrays. Here we present a comprehensive examination of electron transfer at these junctions, using a series of CdSe quantum dot donors (sizes 2.8, 3.3, 4.0, and 4.2 nm in diameter) and metal oxide nanoparticle acceptors (SnO(2), TiO(2), and ZnO). Apparent electron transfer rate constants showed strong dependence on change in system free energy, exhibiting a sharp rise at small driving forces followed by a modest rise further away from the characteristic reorganization energy. The observed trend mimics the predicted behavior of electron transfer from a single quantum state to a continuum of electron accepting states, such as those present in the conduction band of a metal oxide nanoparticle. In contrast with dye-sensitized metal oxide electron transfer studies, our systems did not exhibit unthermalized hot-electron injection due to relatively large ratios of electron cooling rate to electron transfer rate. To investigate the implications of these findings in photovoltaic cells, quantum dot-metal oxide working electrodes were constructed in an identical fashion to the films used for the electron transfer portion of the study. Interestingly, the films which exhibited the fastest electron transfer rates (SnO(2)) were not the same as those which showed the highest photocurrent (TiO(2)). These findings suggest that, in addition to electron transfer at the quantum dot-metal oxide interface, other electron transfer reactions play key roles in the determination of overall device efficiency.

  9. MD studies of electron transfer at ambient and elevated pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Alex; Spooner, Jacob; Weinberg, Noham

    2013-06-01

    The effect of pressure on the rate constants of outer-sphere electron transfer reactions has often been described using the Marcus-Hush theory. This theory agrees well with experiment when internal reorganization of the ionic system is negligible, however it does not offer a recipe for calculation of the effects that result from significant solute restructuring. We have recently developed a molecular dynamics technique that accurately describes structural dependence of molecular volumes in non-polar and weakly polar systems. We are now extending this approach to the case of highly polar ionic systems where both solvent and solute restructuring components are important. For this purpose we construct pressure-dependent two-dimensional surfaces for electron transfer reactions in coordinate system composed of interionic distance and Marcus-type solvent polarization coordinate, and use these surfaces to describe pressure effects on reaction kinetics. R.A. Marcus. J. Chem. Phys. 24, 966 (1956); 24, 979 (1956); 26, 867 (1957). Discuss. Faraday Soc. 29, 21 (1960). Faraday Discuss. Chem. Soc. 74, 7 (1982); N.S. Hush. Trans. Faraday Soc. 57, 557 (1961).

  10. Electron Transfer for Large Molecules through Delocalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuhauser, D.; Reslan, R.; Hernandez, S.; Arnsen, C.; Lopata, K.; Govind, N.; Gao, Y.; Tolbert, S.; Schwartz, B.; Rubin, Y.; Nardes, A.; Kopidakis, N.

    2012-01-01

    Electron transfer for large molecules lies in between a Marcus-Theory two-state transfer and a Landauer description. We discuss a delocalization formalism which,through the introduction of artificial electric fields which emulate bulk dipole fields, allows calculation between a pair of identical molecules (A+A- (R)A-+A) with several open states. Dynamical electron polarization effects can be inserted with TDDFT and are crucial for large separations.

  11. Facile Interfacial Electron Transfer of Hemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhai Fan

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: We herein describe a method of depositing hemoglobin (Hb and sulfonated polyaniline (SPAN on GC electrodes that facilitate interfacial protein electron transfer. Well-defined, reproducible, chemically reversible peaks of Hb and SPAN can be obtained in our experiments. We also observed enhanced peroxidase activity of Hb in SPAN films. These results clearly showed that SPAN worked as molecular wires and effectively exchanged electrons between Hb and electrodes.Mediated by Conjugated Polymers

  12. Photoselected electron transfer pathways in DNA photolyase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prytkova, Tatiana R; Beratan, David N; Skourtis, Spiros S

    2007-01-16

    Cyclobutane dimer photolyases are proteins that bind to UV-damaged DNA containing cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer lesions. They repair these lesions by photo-induced electron transfer. The electron donor cofactor of a photolyase is a two-electron-reduced flavin adenine dinucleotide (FADH(-)). When FADH(-) is photo-excited, it transfers an electron from an excited pi --> pi* singlet state to the pyrimidine dimer lesion of DNA. We compute the lowest excited singlet states of FADH(-) using ab initio (time-dependent density functional theory and time-dependent Hartree-Fock), and semiempirical (INDO/S configuration interaction) methods. The calculations show that the two lowest pi --> pi* singlet states of FADH(-) are localized on the side of the flavin ring that is proximal to the dimer lesion of DNA. For the lowest-energy donor excited state of FADH(-), we compute the conformationally averaged electronic coupling to acceptor states of the thymine dimer. The coupling calculations are performed at the INDO/S level, on donor-acceptor cofactor conformations obtained from molecular dynamics simulations of the solvated protein with a thymine dimer docked in its active site. These calculations demonstrate that the localization of the (1)FADH(-)* donor state on the flavin ring enhances the electronic coupling between the flavin and the dimer by permitting shorter electron-transfer pathways to the dimer that have single through-space jumps. Therefore, in photolyase, the photo-excitation itself enhances the electron transfer rate by moving the electron towards the dimer.

  13. Insights into Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer from Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provorse, Makenzie R.

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is utilized throughout Nature to facilitate essential biological processes, such as photosynthesis, cellular respiration, and DNA replication and repair. The general approach to studying PCET processes is based on a two-dimensional More O'Ferrall-Jencks diagram in which electron transfer (ET) and proton transfer (PT) occur in a sequential or concerted fashion. Experimentally, it is difficult to discern the contributing factors of concerted PCET mechanisms. Several theoretical approaches have arisen to qualitatively and quantitatively investigate these reactions. Here, we present a multistate density functional theory (MSDFT) method to efficiently and accurately model PCET mechanisms. The MSDFT method is validated against experimental and computational data previously reported on an isoelectronic series of small molecule self-exchange hydrogen atom transfer reactions and a model complex specifically designed to study long-range ET through a hydrogen-bonded salt-bridge interface. Further application of this method to the hydrogen atom abstraction of ascorbate by a nitroxyl radical demonstrates the sensitivity of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties to solvent effects. In particular, the origin of the unusual kinetic isotope effect is investigated. Lastly, the MSDFT is employed in a combined quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) approach to explicitly model PCET in condensed phases.

  14. Synthesis of Heteronitrogen Cyclic Proline Peptides by Photoinduced Single Electron Transfer Reactions%光诱导单电子转移反应合成氮杂环脯氨酸肽

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘岩; 谭广慧; 魏树权; 曲凤玉; 王进军; 王天赤; 岳群峰; 金英学

    2011-01-01

    以脯氨酸为起始原料合成了四个光反应底物N-(末端三甲基硅苄基脯氨酸肽链)邻苯二甲酰亚胺(4),并在甲醇溶剂中进行了光反应.结果表明,4的光致激发态分子内发生单电子转移反应,生成双离子自由基8,电子沿着化学键在给电子杂原子问转移,达到共振平衡,离去基团离去使平衡向末端杂原子方向移动,高选择性地生成分子内端位双自由基9,自由基偶合生成标题化合物5.此反应产率较好,区域选择性高,所有新化合物结构均经NMR和质谱验证.%Four photoreactants N-(amidosilane terminated polyproline peptide chain) phthalimide (4a~4d) were synthesized by using proline as the starting material, and were irradiated in methanol.The results confirmed that photoinduced excited states of 4a~4d were observed to promote formation of zwitterion biradical (8) by single electron transfer in the molecule.In this process, intrachain SET (ISET) happened among electron donors and an equation of resonant appeared.Intermolecular biradicals (9) were formed in high selectivity by shuck off the leaving group of 1,ω-zwitterionic biradicals (8).The biradicals 9 copulated to give the title compound cyclopeptides 5 in high yield and high regioselectivity.Structures of all compounds were characterized by FAB-MS, NMR techniques.

  15. Electrostatic effect on electron transfer between cytochrome b5 and cytochrome c

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The binding and electron transfer between wild type, E44A, E56A, E44/56A, E44/48/56A/D60Aand F35Y variants of cytochrome b5 and cytochrome c were studied. When mixed with cytochrome c, the cytochrome b5E44/48/56A/D60A did not show the typical UV-vis difference spectrum of absorption, indicating that the alteration ofthe surface electrostatic potential obviously influenced the spectrum. The electron transfer rates of wild type cytochromeb5, its variants and cytochrome e at different temperature and ionic strength exhibited an order of F35Y > wild type >E56A > E44A > E44/48/56A/D60A. The enthalpy and entropy of the reaction did not change obviously, suggestingthat the mutation did not significantly disturb the electron transfer conformation. The investigation of electron transfer rateconstants at different ionic strength demonstrated that electrostatic interaction obviously affected the electron transfer pro-cess. The significant difference of Cyt b5 F35Y and E44/48/56A/D60A from the wild type protein further confirmed thegreat importance of the electrostatic interaction in the protein electron transfer.

  16. Electron transfer and catalysis with high-valent metal-oxo complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2015-04-21

    High-valent metal-oxo complexes are produced by reductive activation of dioxygen via reduction of metal complexes with reductants and dioxygen. Photoinduced electron transfer from substrates to metal complexes with dioxygen also leads to the generation of high-valent metal-oxo complexes that can oxygenate substrates. In such a case metal complexes act as a photocatalyst to oxygenate substrates with dioxygen. High-valent metal-oxo complexes are also produced by proton-coupled electron-transfer oxidation of metal complexes by one-electron oxidants with water, oxygenating substrates to regenerate metal complexes. In such a case metal complexes act as a catalyst for electron-transfer oxygenation of substrates by one-electron oxidants with water that acts as an oxygen source. The one-electron oxidants which can oxidize metal complexes can be replaced by much weaker oxidants by a combination of redox photocatalysts and metal complexes. Thus, photocatalytic oxygenation of substrates proceeds via photoinduced electron transfer from a photocatalyst to reductants followed by proton-coupled electron transfer oxidation of metal complexes with the oxidized photocatalyst to produce high-valent metal-oxo complexes that oxygenate substrates. Thermal and photoinduced electron-transfer catalytic reactions of high-valent metal-oxo complexes for oxygenation of substrates using water or dioxygen as an oxygen source are summarized in this perspective.

  17. Flavin Charge Transfer Transitions Assist DNA Photolyase Electron Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skourtis, Spiros S.; Prytkova, Tatiana; Beratan, David N.

    2007-12-01

    This contribution describes molecular dynamics, semi-empirical and ab-initio studies of the primary photo-induced electron transfer reaction in DNA photolyase. DNA photolyases are FADH--containing proteins that repair UV-damaged DNA by photo-induced electron transfer. A DNA photolyase recognizes and binds to cyclobutatne pyrimidine dimer lesions of DNA. The protein repairs a bound lesion by transferring an electron to the lesion from FADH-, upon photo-excitation of FADH- with 350-450 nm light. We compute the lowest singlet excited states of FADH- in DNA photolyase using INDO/S configuration interaction, time-dependent density-functional, and time-dependent Hartree-Fock methods. The calculations identify the lowest singlet excited state of FADH- that is populated after photo-excitation and that acts as the electron donor. For this donor state we compute conformationally-averaged tunneling matrix elements to empty electron-acceptor states of a thymine dimer bound to photolyase. The conformational averaging involves different FADH--thymine dimer confromations obtained from molecular dynamics simulations of the solvated protein with a thymine dimer docked in its active site. The tunneling matrix element computations use INDO/S-level Green's function, energy splitting, and Generalized Mulliken-Hush methods. These calculations indicate that photo-excitation of FADH- causes a π→π* charge-transfer transition that shifts electron density to the side of the flavin isoalloxazine ring that is adjacent to the docked thymine dimer. This shift in electron density enhances the FADH--to-dimer electronic coupling, thus inducing rapid electron transfer.

  18. Flavin Charge Transfer Transitions Assist DNA Photolyase Electron Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skourtis, Spiros S.; Prytkova, Tatiana; Beratan, David N.

    2012-01-01

    This contribution describes molecular dynamics, semi-empirical and ab-initio studies of the primary photo-induced electron transfer reaction in DNA photolyase. DNA photolyases are FADH−-containing proteins that repair UV-damaged DNA by photo-induced electron transfer. A DNA photolyase recognizes and binds to cyclobutatne pyrimidine dimer lesions of DNA. The protein repairs a bound lesion by transferring an electron to the lesion from FADH−, upon photo-excitation of FADH− with 350–450 nm light. We compute the lowest singlet excited states of FADH− in DNA photolyase using INDO/S configuration interaction, time-dependent density-functional, and time-dependent Hartree-Fock methods. The calculations identify the lowest singlet excited state of FADH− that is populated after photo-excitation and that acts as the electron donor. For this donor state we compute conformationally-averaged tunneling matrix elements to empty electron- acceptor states of a thymine dimer bound to photolyase. The conformational averaging involves different FADH− - thymine dimer confromations obtained from molecular dynamics simulations of the solvated protein with a thymine dimer docked in its active site. The tunneling matrix element computations use INDO/S-level Green’s function, energy splitting, and Generalized Mulliken-Hush methods. These calculations indicate that photo-excitation of FADH− causes a π → π* charge-transfer transition that shifts electron density to the side of the flavin isoalloxazine ring that is adjacent to the docked thymine dimer. This shift in electron density enhances the FADH− - to - dimer electronic coupling, thus inducing rapid electron transfer. PMID:23226907

  19. Part I. Evaluation of thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for electron transfer and following chemical reaction from a global analysis of current-potential-time data. Part II. Electro-catalytic detection in high-performance liquid chromatography of vitamin B[sub 12] and other molecules of biological and environmental interest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, V.T.

    1992-01-01

    Simultaneous evaluation of electron transfer rate constant, k[sup 0], following chemical reaction rate constant, k[sub f], electron transfer coefficient, [alpha] and standard potential, E[sup 0][prime] for an electrochemical reaction following the EC mechanism is described. A mathematical model for the current response to a potential step is developed, starting with the Butler-Volmer equation for electrode kinetics and concentration expressions for the redox couple. The resulting integral equations are solved numerically via the Step Function method. Current-potential and current-time curves are simulated and tested under limiting conditions. The four parameters of the system are evaluated by fitting simulated current-voltage-time (i-E-t) surface to the theoretical equation. The method is applied to study an important biological molecule, viz., methyl cobalamin, in DMSO. Included in the discussion part is the use of kinetic zone diagrams to depict chronoamperometric current response as a function of dimensionless rate constants for the EC reaction scheme. This compact display of the influence of the two rate constants on current in all time windows can be used to select the best data for analysis. Theoretical limits of measurable rate constants can be estimated from the zone diagram. The development of a dropping mercury electrode detector for High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) and its application to analysis of B[sub 12] and other vitamins is described. This EC detector is able to achieve high levels of sensitivity by exploiting the catalytic hydrogen evolution undergone by many nitrogenous organic molecules. Vitamin B[sub 12], thiamine, riboflavin and niacinamide were analyzed individually and in mixtures on reverse phase C18 column. Preliminary results from the analysis of commercial multivitamin preparations are also discussed.

  20. Nonlocal bacterial electron transfer to hematite surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, Kevin M.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Gorby, Yuri A.; Smith, Steven C.

    2003-03-01

    Mechanisms by which dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria utilize iron and manganese oxide minerals as terminal electron acceptors for respiration are poorly understood. In the absence of exogenous electron shuttle compounds, extracellular electron transfer is generally thought to occur through the interfacial contact area between mineral surfaces and attached cells. Possible alternative reduction pathways have been proposed based on the discovery of a link between an excreted quinone and dissimilatory reduction. In this study, we utilize a novel experimental approach to demonstrate that Shewanella putrefaciens reduces the surface of crystalline iron oxides at spatial locations that are distinct from points of attachment.

  1. The electron transfer system of syntrophically grown Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, C.B.; He, Z.; Yang, Z.K.; Ringbauer, Jr., J.A.; He, Q.; Zhou, J.; Voordouw, G.; Wall, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.; Hazen, T.C.; Stolyar, S.; Stahl, D.A.

    2009-05-01

    Interspecies hydrogen transfer between organisms producing and consuming hydrogen promotes the decomposition of organic matter in most anoxic environments. Although syntrophic couplings between hydrogen producers and consumers are a major feature of the carbon cycle, mechanisms for energy recovery at the extremely low free energies of reactions typical of these anaerobic communities have not been established. In this study, comparative transcriptional analysis of a model sulfate-reducing microbe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, suggested the use of alternative electron transfer systems dependent upon growth modality. During syntrophic growth on lactate with a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, D. vulgaris up-regulated numerous genes involved in electron transfer and energy generation when compared with sulfate-limited monocultures. In particular, genes coding for the putative membrane-bound Coo hydrogenase, two periplasmic hydrogenases (Hyd and Hyn) and the well-characterized high-molecular weight cytochrome (Hmc) were among the most highly expressed and up-regulated. Additionally, a predicted operon coding for genes involved in lactate transport and oxidation exhibited up-regulation, further suggesting an alternative pathway for electrons derived from lactate oxidation during syntrophic growth. Mutations in a subset of genes coding for Coo, Hmc, Hyd and Hyn impaired or severely limited syntrophic growth but had little affect on growth via sulfate-respiration. These results demonstrate that syntrophic growth and sulfate-respiration use largely independent energy generation pathways and imply that understanding of microbial processes sustaining nutrient cycling must consider lifestyles not captured in pure culture.

  2. The Electron Transfer System of Syntrophically Grown Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PBD; ENIGMA; GTL; VIMSS; Walker, Christopher B.; He, Zhili; Yang, Zamin K.; Ringbauer Jr., Joseph A.; He, Qiang; Zhou, Jizhong; Voordouw, Gerrit; Wall, Judy D.; Arkin, Adam P.; Hazen, Terry C.; Stolyar, Sergey; Stahl, David A.

    2009-06-22

    Interspecies hydrogen transfer between organisms producing and consuming hydrogen promotes the decomposition of organic matter in most anoxic environments. Although syntrophic couplings between hydrogen producers and consumers are a major feature of the carbon cycle, mechanisms for energy recovery at the extremely low free energies of reactions typical of these anaerobic communities have not been established. In this study, comparative transcriptional analysis of a model sulfate-reducing microbe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, suggested the use of alternative electron transfer systems dependent upon growth modality. During syntrophic growth on lactate with a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, D. vulgaris up-regulated numerous genes involved in electron transfer and energy generation when compared with sulfate-limited monocultures. In particular, genes coding for the putative membrane-bound Coo hydrogenase, two periplasmic hydrogenases (Hyd and Hyn) and the well-characterized high-molecular weight cytochrome (Hmc) were among the most highly expressed and up-regulated. Additionally, a predicted operon coding for genes involved in lactate transport and oxidation exhibited up-regulation, further suggesting an alternative pathway for electrons derived from lactate oxidation during syntrophic growth. Mutations in a subset of genes coding for Coo, Hmc, Hyd and Hyn impaired or severely limited syntrophic growth but had little affect on growth via sulfate-respiration. These results demonstrate that syntrophic growth and sulfate-respiration use largely independent energy generation pathways and imply that understanding of microbial processes sustaining nutrient cycling must consider lifestyles not captured in pure culture.

  3. Electron transfer pathways in microbial oxygen biocathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freguia, Stefano, E-mail: stefano@kais.kyoto-u.ac.j [Bio-analytical and Physical Chemistry Laboratory, Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8205 (Japan); Tsujimura, Seiya, E-mail: seiya@kais.kyoto-u.ac.j [Bio-analytical and Physical Chemistry Laboratory, Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8205 (Japan); Kano, Kenji, E-mail: kkano@kais.kyoto-u.ac.j [Bio-analytical and Physical Chemistry Laboratory, Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8205 (Japan)

    2010-01-01

    The ability of some bacteria to enhance the rate of cathodic oxygen reduction to water has been recently discovered, opening the way to an entirely renewable and environmentally friendly concept of biocathode. In this study we reveal that several mechanisms may induce catalytic effects by bacteria. These comprise mechanisms that are putatively beneficial to the bacteria as well as mechanisms which are merely side effects, including quinone autoxidation and direct O{sub 2} reduction by heme compounds. Here we showed that 1 muM of ACNQ is able to generate a significant catalytic wave for oxygen reduction, with onset at approximately 0 V vs. SHE. Similarly, adsorption of hemin on a carbon surface catalyses O{sub 2} reduction to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with an onset of +0.2 V vs. SHE. To evaluate the catalytic pathways of live cells on cathodic oxygen reduction, two species of electrochemically active bacteria were selected as pure cultures, namely Acinetobacter calcoaceticus and Shewanella putrefaciens. The former appears to exploit a self-excreted redox compound with redox characteristics matching those of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) for extracellular electron transfer. The latter appears to utilise outer membrane-bound redox compounds. Interaction of quinones and cytochromes with the membrane-bound electron transfer chain is yet to be proven.

  4. Electron transfer NO2++NO→NO2+NO+ in aromatic nitration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李象远; 何福城

    1997-01-01

    A simple model for computing the electron transfer rate constant of a cross-reaction has been proposed in the framework of semiclassical theory and employed to investigate the electron transfer system NO2+/NO.The encounter complex of electron transfer NO2++NO→NO2+NO+has been optimized at the level of UHF/6-31G.In the construction of diabatic potential energy surfaces the linear coordinate was used and the kinetic quantities,such as the activation energies and the electron transfer matrix elements,have been obtained.For comparison,the related self-exchange reation systems NO2+/NO2 and NO+/NO were kinetically investigated.The calculated activation energies for the electron transfer reactions of systems NO2+/NO,NO2+/NO2,and NO+/NO are 81 4,128.8,and 39.8kJ mol-1,respectively With the solvent effect taken into account,the contribution of solvent reorganization to the activation energy has been estimated according to the geometric parameters of the transition states.The obtained rate constants show that the

  5. Promoting Interspecies Electron Transfer with Biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shanshan; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Malvankar, Nikhil S.; Liu, Fanghua; Fan, Wei; Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2014-01-01

    Biochar, a charcoal-like product of the incomplete combustion of organic materials, is an increasingly popular soil amendment designed to improve soil fertility. We investigated the possibility that biochar could promote direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) in a manner similar to that previously reported for granular activated carbon (GAC). Although the biochars investigated were 1000 times less conductive than GAC, they stimulated DIET in co-cultures of Geobacter metallireducens with Geobacter sulfurreducens or Methanosarcina barkeri in which ethanol was the electron donor. Cells were attached to the biochar, yet not in close contact, suggesting that electrons were likely conducted through the biochar, rather than biological electrical connections. The finding that biochar can stimulate DIET may be an important consideration when amending soils with biochar and can help explain why biochar may enhance methane production from organic wastes under anaerobic conditions. PMID:24846283

  6. Promoting interspecies electron transfer with biochar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Shanshan; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin Malla

    2014-01-01

    Biochar, a charcoal-like product of the incomplete combustion of organic materials, is an increasingly popular soil amendment designed to improve soil fertility. We investigated the possibility that biochar could promote direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) in a manner similar...... to that previously reported for granular activated carbon (GAC). Although the biochars investigated were 1000 times less conductive than GAC, they stimulated DIET in co-cultures of Geobacter metallireducens with Geobacter sulfurreducens or Methanosarcina barkeri in which ethanol was the electron donor. Cells were...... attached to the biochar, yet not in close contact, suggesting that electrons were likely conducted through the biochar, rather than biological electrical connections. The finding that biochar can stimulate DIET may be an important consideration when amending soils with biochar and can help explain why...

  7. GPU-accelerated computation of electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfinger, Siegfried; Acocella, Angela; Pop, Sergiu C; Narumi, Tetsu; Yasuoka, Kenji; Beu, Titus; Zerbetto, Francesco

    2012-11-05

    Electron transfer is a fundamental process that can be studied with the help of computer simulation. The underlying quantum mechanical description renders the problem a computationally intensive application. In this study, we probe the graphics processing unit (GPU) for suitability to this type of problem. Time-critical components are identified via profiling of an existing implementation and several different variants are tested involving the GPU at increasing levels of abstraction. A publicly available library supporting basic linear algebra operations on the GPU turns out to accelerate the computation approximately 50-fold with minor dependence on actual problem size. The performance gain does not compromise numerical accuracy and is of significant value for practical purposes. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Education and solar conversion. Demonstrating electron transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smestad, Greg P. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, ICP-2, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, EPFL, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1998-07-23

    A simplified solar cell fabrication procedure is presented that uses natural anthocyanin or chlorophyll dyes extracted from plants. This procedure illustrates how interdisciplinary science can be taught at lower division university and upper division high school levels for an understanding of renewable energy as well as basic science concepts. Electron transfer occurs on the Earth in the mitochondrial membranes found in living cells, and in the thylakoid membranes found in the photosynthetic cells of green plants. Since we depend on the results of this electron and energy transfer, e.g. in our use of petroleum and agricultural products, it is desirable to understand and communicate how the electron transfer works. The simplified solar cell fabrication procedure, based on nanocrystalline dye-sensitized solar cells, has therefore been developed so that it can be inexpensively reproduced and utilized in the teaching of basic principles in biology, chemistry, physics, and environmental science. A water-based solution of commercial nanocrystalline titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) powder is used to deposit a highly porous semiconductor electron acceptor. This acceptor couples the light-driven processes occurring at an organic dye to the macroscopic world and an external electrical circuit. Materials science and semiconductor physics are emphasized during the deposition of the sintered TiO{sub 2} nanocrystalline ceramic film. Chelation, complexation and molecular self-assembly are demonstrated during the attachment of the dye molecule to the surface of the TiO{sub 2} semiconductor particles. Environmental chemistry and energy conversion can be linked to these concepts via the regenerative oxidation and reduction cycle found in the cell. The resulting device, made in under 3 h, can be used as a light detector or power generator that produces 0.4-0.5 V at open circuit, and 1-2 mA per square cm under solar illumination

  9. A polaron model for electron transfer in globular proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuev, G N; Lakhno, V D

    1993-07-07

    Polaron models have been considered for the electron states in protein globules existing in a solvent. These models account for two fundamental effects, viz, polarization interaction of an electron with the conformational vibrations and the heterogeneity of the medium. Equations have been derived to determine the electron state in a protein globule. The parameters of this state show that it is an extended state with an energy of 2 eV. The electron transfer rate for cyt C self-exchange reaction has been calculated in the polaron model. Reorganization energy, tunneling matrix element and the rate constant have also been estimated. The results are compared with experimental data. The influence of model parameters on the significance of the data obtained has been studied. The potentialities of the model are discussed.

  10. Noise-assisted quantum electron transfer in photosynthetic complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Nesterov, Alexander I; Martínez, José Manuel Sánchez; Sayre, Richard T

    2013-01-01

    Electron transfer (ET) between primary electron donors and acceptors is modeled in the photosystem II reaction center (RC). Our model includes (i) two discrete energy levels associated with donor and acceptor, interacting through a dipole-type matrix element and (ii) two continuum manifolds of electron energy levels ("sinks"), which interact directly with the donor and acceptor. Namely, two discrete energy levels of the donor and acceptor are embedded in their independent sinks through the corresponding interaction matrix elements. We also introduce classical (external) noise which acts simultaneously on the donor and acceptor (collective interaction). We derive a closed system of integro-differential equations which describes the non-Markovian quantum dynamics of the ET. A region of parameters is found in which the ET dynamics can be simplified, and described by coupled ordinary differential equations. Using these simplified equations, both sharp and flat redox potentials are analyzed. We analytically and nu...

  11. Catalytic Olefin Hydroamidation Enabled by Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David C; Choi, Gilbert J; Orbe, Hudson S; Knowles, Robert R

    2015-10-28

    Here we report a ternary catalyst system for the intramolecular hydroamidation of unactivated olefins using simple N-aryl amide derivatives. Amide activation in these reactions occurs via concerted proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) mediated by an excited state iridium complex and weak phosphate base to furnish a reactive amidyl radical that readily adds to pendant alkenes. A series of H-atom, electron, and proton transfer events with a thiophenol cocatalyst furnish the product and regenerate the active forms of the photocatalyst and base. Mechanistic studies indicate that the amide substrate can be selectively homolyzed via PCET in the presence of the thiophenol, despite a large difference in bond dissociation free energies between these functional groups.

  12. Electron transfer rates and equilibrium within cytochrome c oxidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Einarsdóttir, O; Pecht, I

    2000-01-01

    identical within experimental error and independent of the enzyme concentration. This demonstrates that a fast intramolecular electron equilibration is taking place between CuA and heme a. The rate constants for CuA --> heme a ET and the reverse (heme a --> CuA) process were found to be 13 000 s-1 and 3700......Intramolecular electron transfer (ET) between the CuA center and heme a in bovine cytochrome c oxidase was investigated by pulse radiolysis. CuA, the initial electron acceptor, was reduced by 1-methyl nicotinamide radicals in a diffusion-controlled reaction, as monitored by absorption changes...... at 830 nm. After the initial reduction phase, the 830 nm absorption was partially restored, corresponding to reoxidation of the CuA center. Concomitantly, the absorption at 445 nm and 605 nm increased, indicating reduction of heme a. The rate constants for heme a reduction and CuA reoxidation were...

  13. N-(末端三丁基锡取代基)酰亚胺的光诱导单电子转移成环反应%Photoinduced Single Electron Transfer Cyclization Reactions of N-(Trimethylstannyl terminated substituent group)imide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金英学; 王欣; 曲凤玉; 谭广慧; 岳群峰

    2012-01-01

    合成了两种新的分子内给受电子体系N-[2-(2-三丁基锡甲硫基)乙基]邻苯二甲酰亚胺(1a)和N-(3-三丁基锡丙基)马来酰亚胺(1b),并在甲醇、乙腈-30%水、乙腈中进行了光诱导单电子转移反应.化合物1a在光诱导下发生分子内单电子转移反应,以很高的产率和区域选择性生成环胺醇2.化合物1b在光诱导下发生分子内单电子转移反应生成环胺醇3,同时有[2+2]环加成副反应产物4生成.以上所有新化合物的结构经质谱和核磁共振谱验证.%Two novel intramolecularly electronical donor-acceptor systemes Ar-[2-(2-tributylstannylmethyl-sulfenyl)-ethyljphthalimide (la) and iV-(3-tributylstanylpropyl)maleimide (lb), were synthesized, and their photoinduced single electron transfer (SET) reactions in MeOH, CH3CN-30% H2O and pure CH3CN were carried out, respectively. Compound la occurred intramolecular SET to provide cyclic amidol 2 with highly yield and high regioselectivity. Compound lb occurred intramolecular single electron transfer (SET) to provide cyclic amidol 3 with small amount of photoinduced [2+2] dimerization product 4. Structures of all new compounds were characterized by MS (FAB) and NMR data.

  14. Photoinduced electron transfer processes in oligothiophene/C60 composite films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, R.A.J.; Christiaans, M.P.T.; Pakbaz, K.; Moses, D.; Hummelen, Jan C.; Sariciftci, N.S.

    1995-01-01

    We present near steady-state photoinduced absorption (PIA) spectroscopy and steady-state light-induced electron spin resonance (LESR) studies on photoinduced electron transfer reactions in composite films of well defined α-oligothiophenes (Tn, n=6, 7, 9, and 11) as electron donor with

  15. Photoinduced electron transfer processes in oligothiophene/C60 composite films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, R.A.J.; Christiaans, M.P.T.; Pakbaz, K.; Moses, D.; Hummelen, Jan C.; Sariciftci, N.S.

    1995-01-01

    We present near steady-state photoinduced absorption (PIA) spectroscopy and steady-state light-induced electron spin resonance (LESR) studies on photoinduced electron transfer reactions in composite films of well defined α-oligothiophenes (Tn, n=6, 7, 9, and 11) as electron donor with buckminsterful

  16. Enhanced Performance of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells with Nanostructure Graphene Electron Transfer Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hung Hsu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of nanostructure graphene thin films as electron transfer layer in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs was demonstrated. The effect of a nanostructure graphene thin film in DSSC structure was examined. The nanostructure graphene thin films provides a great electron transfer channel for the photogenerated electrons from TiO2 to indium tin oxide (ITO glass. Obvious improvements in short-circuit current density of the DSSCs were observed by using the graphene electron transport layer modified photoelectrode. The graphene electron transport layer reduces effectively the back reaction in the interface between the ITO transparent conductive film and the electrolyte in the DSSC.

  17. Superexchange coupling and electron transfer in globular proteins via polaron excitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuev, G N; Lakhno, V D; Ustitnin, M N

    2000-06-01

    The polaron approach is used to treat long-range electron transfersbetween globular proteins. A rate expression for the polaron transfer model is given along with a description of appropriate conditions forits use. Assuming that electrons transfer via a superexchange couplingdue to a polaron excitation, we have estimated the distance dependenceof the rate constant for the self-exchange reactions between globularproteins in solutions. The distance dependence of the polaron coupling andsolvent reorganization energy are provided as a basis forunderstanding and interpreting a long-range electron transfer experiment.The difficulties and problems of the polaron treatment of long-rangeelectron transfers are discussed, and suggestions for new experimentsare made.

  18. Kinetic pathway for interfacial electron transfer from a semiconductor to a molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ke; Blair, Amber D.; Piechota, Eric J.; Schauer, Phil A.; Sampaio, Renato N.; Parlane, Fraser G. L.; Meyer, Gerald J.; Berlinguette, Curtis P.

    2016-09-01

    Molecular approaches to solar-energy conversion require a kinetic optimization of light-induced electron-transfer reactions. At molecular-semiconductor interfaces, this optimization has previously been accomplished through control of the distance between the semiconductor donor and the molecular acceptor and/or the free energy that accompanies electron transfer. Here we show that a kinetic pathway for electron transfer from a semiconductor to a molecular acceptor also exists and provides an alternative method for the control of interfacial kinetics. The pathway was identified by the rational design of molecules in which the distance and the driving force were held near parity and only the geometric torsion about a xylyl- or phenylthiophene bridge was varied. Electronic coupling through the phenyl bridge was a factor of ten greater than that through the xylyl bridge. Comparative studies revealed a significant bridge dependence for electron transfer that could not be rationalized by a change in distance or driving force. Instead, the data indicate an interfacial electron-transfer pathway that utilizes the aromatic bridge orbitals.

  19. Intramolecular electron transfer in cytochrome cd(1) nitrite reductase from Pseudomonas stutzeri; kinetics and thermodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Kroneck, Peter M H; Zumft, Walter G

    2002-01-01

    , internal electron transfer between these sites is an inherent element in the catalytic cycle of this enzyme. We have investigated the internal electron transfer reaction employing pulse radiolytically produced N-methyl nicotinamide radicals as reductant which reacts solely with the heme-c in an essentially...... diffusion controlled process. Following this initial step, the reduction equivalent is equilibrating between the c and d(1) heme sites in a unimolecular process (k=23 s(-1), 298 K, pH 7.0) and an equilibrium constant of 1.0. The temperature dependence of this internal electron transfer process has been......Cytochrome cd(1) nitrite reductase from Pseudomonas stutzeri catalyzes the one electron reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide. It is a homodimer, each monomer containing one heme-c and one heme-d(1), the former being the electron uptake site while the latter is the nitrite reduction site. Hence...

  20. Direct electron transfer from electrode to electrochemically active bacteria in a bioelectrochemical dechlorination system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ding; Lei, Lecheng; Yang, Bin; Yu, Qingni; Li, Zhongjian

    2013-11-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) was dechlorinated by electrochemically active bacteria using an electrode as the direct electron donor. Dechlorination efficiency and coulombic efficiency (CE) were investigated. When hydrogen evolution reaction was eliminated by controlling the potential, both dechlorination efficiency and CE increase as the potential decreases, which implied the dechlorination was stimulated by electric current rather than hydrogen gas. Further investigation of the cyclic voltammetry characterization of the medium revealed nearly no redox mediator secreted by the bacteria. Moreover, the comparison of dechlorination experiments carried out with filtered and unfiltered medium provided convincible evidence that the dominating electron transfer mechanism for the dechlorination is direct electron transfer. Additionally, 454 pyrosequencing technique was employed to gain a comprehensive understanding of the biocathodic microbial community. The results showed Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes were the three predominant groups. This paper demonstrated the direct electron transfer mechanism could be involved in PCP dechlorination with a biocathode. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Theory and experiment on the cuprous-cupric electron transfer rate at a copper electrode.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halley, J. W.; Smith, B. B.; Walbran, S.; Curtiss, L. A.; Rigney, R. O.; Sutjianto, A.; Hung, N. C.; Yonco, R. M.; Nagy, Z.; Univ. of Minnesota; NREL

    1999-04-01

    We describe results of experiment and theory of the cuprous-cupric electron transfer rate in an aqueous solution at a copper electrode. The methods are similar to those we reported earlier for the ferrous-ferric rate. The comparison strongly suggests that, in marked distinction to the ferrous-ferric case, the electron transfer reaction is adiabatic. The model shows that the activation barrier is dominated by the energy required for the ion to approach the electrode, rather than by the energy required for rearrangement of the solvation shell, also in sharp distinction to the case of the ferric-ferrous electron transfer at a gold electrode. Calculated activation barriers based on this image agree with the experimental results reported here.

  2. Theory and experiment on the cuprous{endash}cupric electron transfer rate at a copper electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halley, J.W. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Smith, B.B. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado (United States); Walbran, S. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Curtiss, L.A.; Rigney, R.O.; Sutjianto, A.; Hung, N.C.; Yonco, R.M.; Nagy, Z. [Argonne National Laboratory, Divisions of Materials Science, Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Argonne, Illinois 60439-4837 (United States)

    1999-04-01

    We describe results of experiment and theory of the cuprous{endash}cupric electron transfer rate in an aqueous solution at a copper electrode. The methods are similar to those we reported earlier for the ferrous{endash}ferric rate. The comparison strongly suggests that, in marked distinction to the ferrous{endash}ferric case, the electron transfer reaction is adiabatic. The model shows that the activation barrier is dominated by the energy required for the ion to approach the electrode, rather than by the energy required for rearrangement of the solvation shell, also in sharp distinction to the case of the ferric{endash}ferrous electron transfer at a gold electrode. Calculated activation barriers based on this image agree with the experimental results reported here. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. High throughput electron transfer from carbon dots to chloroplast: a rationale of enhanced photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Sourov; Pradhan, Saheli; Mitra, Shouvik; Patra, Prasun; Bhattacharya, Ankita; Pramanik, Panchanan; Goswami, Arunava

    2014-04-07

    A biocompatible amine functionalized fluorescent carbon dots were developed and isolated for gram scale applications. Such carbogenic quantum dots can strongly conjugate over the surface of the chloroplast and due to that strong interaction the former can easily transfer electrons towards the latter by assistance of absorbed light or photons. An exceptionally high electron transfer from carbon dots to the chloroplast can directly effect the whole chain electron transfer pathway in a light reaction of photosynthesis, where electron carriers play an important role in modulating the system. As a result, carbon dots can promote photosynthesis by modulating the electron transfer process as they are capable of fastening the conversion of light energy to the electrical energy and finally to the chemical energy as assimilatory power (ATP and NADPH).

  4. Concerted proton-coupled electron transfer from a metal-hydride complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourrez, Marc; Steinmetz, Romain; Ott, Sascha; Gloaguen, Frederic; Hammarström, Leif

    2014-02-01

    Metal hydrides are key intermediates in the catalytic reduction of protons and CO2 as well as in the oxidation of H2. In these reactions, electrons and protons are transferred to or from separate acceptors or donors in bidirectional protoncoupled electron transfer (PCET) steps. The mechanistic interpretation of PCET reactions of metal hydrides has focused on the stepwise transfer of electrons and protons. A concerted transfer may, however, occur with a lower reaction barrier and therefore proceed at higher catalytic rates. Here we investigate the feasibility of such a reaction by studying the oxidation–deprotonation reactions of a tungsten hydride complex. The rate dependence on the driving force for both electron transfer and proton transfer—employing different combinations of oxidants and bases—was used to establish experimentally the concerted, bidirectional PCET of a metal-hydride species. Consideration of the findings presented here in future catalyst designs may lead to more-efficient catalysts.

  5. Electron transfer and interfacial behavior of redox proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent progress in the electron transfer and interfacial behavior of redox proteins. Significant achievements in the relevant fields are summarized including the direct electron transfer between proteins and electrodes, the thermodynamic and kinetic properties, catalytic activities and activity regulation of the redox proteins. It has been demonstrated that the electrochemical technique is an effective tool for protein studies, especially for probing into the electron transfer and interfacial behavior of redox proteins.

  6. Revisiting direct electron transfer in nanostructured carbon laccase oxygen cathodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Catherine; Scodeller, Pablo; Grattieri, Matteo; Villalba, Matías; Calvo, Ernesto J

    2016-06-01

    The biocatalytic electroreduction of oxygen has been studied on large surface area graphite and Vulcan® carbon electrodes with adsorbed Trametes trogii laccase. The electrokinetics of the O2 reduction reaction (ORR) was studied at different electrode potentials, O2 partial pressures and concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. Even though the overpotential at 0.25 mA·cm(-2) for the ORR at T1Cu of the adsorbed laccase on carbon is 0.8 V lower than for Pt of similar geometric area, the rate of the reaction and thus the operative current density is limited by the enzyme reaction rate at the T2/T3 cluster site for the adsorbed enzyme. The transition potential for the rate determining step from the direct electron transfer (DET) to the enzyme reaction shifts to higher potentials at higher oxygen partial pressure. Hydrogen peroxide produced by the ORR on bare carbon support participates in an inhibition mechanism, with uncompetitive predominance at high H2O2 concentration, non-competitive contribution can be detected at low inhibitor concentration.

  7. Electrochemical Electron Transfer and Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Effects of Double Layer and Ionic Environment on Solvent Reorganization Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Soumya; Soudackov, Alexander; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2016-06-14

    Electron transfer and proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions at electrochemical interfaces play an essential role in a broad range of energy conversion processes. The reorganization energy, which is a measure of the free energy change associated with solute and solvent rearrangements, is a key quantity for calculating rate constants for these reactions. We present a computational method for including the effects of the double layer and ionic environment of the diffuse layer in calculations of electrochemical solvent reorganization energies. This approach incorporates an accurate electronic charge distribution of the solute within a molecular-shaped cavity in conjunction with a dielectric continuum treatment of the solvent, ions, and electrode using the integral equations formalism polarizable continuum model. The molecule-solvent boundary is treated explicitly, but the effects of the electrode-double layer and double layer-diffuse layer boundaries, as well as the effects of the ionic strength of the solvent, are included through an external Green’s function. The calculated total reorganization energies agree well with experimentally measured values for a series of electrochemical systems, and the effects of including both the double layer and ionic environment are found to be very small. This general approach was also extended to electrochemical PCET and produced total reorganization energies in close agreement with experimental values for two experimentally studied PCET systems. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  8. Catalytic electron-transfer oxygenation of substrates with water as an oxygen source using manganese porphyrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Mizuno, Takuya; Ojiri, Tetsuya

    2012-12-03

    Manganese(V)-oxo-porphyrins are produced by the electron-transfer oxidation of manganese-porphyrins with tris(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium(III) ([Ru(bpy)(3)](3+); 2 equiv) in acetonitrile (CH(3)CN) containing water. The rate constants of the electron-transfer oxidation of manganese-porphyrins have been determined and evaluated in light of the Marcus theory of electron transfer. Addition of [Ru(bpy)(3)](3+) to a solution of olefins (styrene and cyclohexene) in CH(3)CN containing water in the presence of a catalytic amount of manganese-porphyrins afforded epoxides, diols, and aldehydes efficiently. Epoxides were converted to the corresponding diols by hydrolysis, and were further oxidized to the corresponding aldehydes. The turnover numbers vary significantly depending on the type of manganese-porphyrin used owing to the difference in their oxidation potentials and the steric bulkiness of the ligand. Ethylbenzene was also oxidized to 1-phenylethanol using manganese-porphyrins as electron-transfer catalysts. The oxygen source in the substrate oxygenation was confirmed to be water by using (18)O-labeled water. The rate constant of the reaction of the manganese(V)-oxo species with cyclohexene was determined directly under single-turnover conditions by monitoring the increase in absorbance attributable to the manganese(III) species produced in the reaction with cyclohexene. It has been shown that the rate-determining step in the catalytic electron-transfer oxygenation of cyclohexene is electron transfer from [Ru(bpy)(3)](3+) to the manganese-porphyrins.

  9. High throughput electron transfer from carbon dots to chloroplast: a rationale of enhanced photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Sourov; Pradhan, Saheli; Mitra, Shouvik; Patra, Prasun; Bhattacharya, Ankita; Pramanik, Panchanan; Goswami, Arunava

    2014-03-01

    A biocompatible amine functionalized fluorescent carbon dots were developed and isolated for gram scale applications. Such carbogenic quantum dots can strongly conjugate over the surface of the chloroplast and due to that strong interaction the former can easily transfer electrons towards the latter by assistance of absorbed light or photons. An exceptionally high electron transfer from carbon dots to the chloroplast can directly effect the whole chain electron transfer pathway in a light reaction of photosynthesis, where electron carriers play an important role in modulating the system. As a result, carbon dots can promote photosynthesis by modulating the electron transfer process as they are capable of fastening the conversion of light energy to the electrical energy and finally to the chemical energy as assimilatory power (ATP and NADPH).A biocompatible amine functionalized fluorescent carbon dots were developed and isolated for gram scale applications. Such carbogenic quantum dots can strongly conjugate over the surface of the chloroplast and due to that strong interaction the former can easily transfer electrons towards the latter by assistance of absorbed light or photons. An exceptionally high electron transfer from carbon dots to the chloroplast can directly effect the whole chain electron transfer pathway in a light reaction of photosynthesis, where electron carriers play an important role in modulating the system. As a result, carbon dots can promote photosynthesis by modulating the electron transfer process as they are capable of fastening the conversion of light energy to the electrical energy and finally to the chemical energy as assimilatory power (ATP and NADPH). Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr06079a

  10. Molecular Models for Conductance in Junctions and Electrochemical Electron Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazinani, Shobeir Khezr Seddigh

    This thesis develops molecular models for electron transport in molecular junctions and intra-molecular electron transfer. The goal is to identify molecular descriptors that afford a substantial simplification of these electronic processes. First, the connection between static molecular polarizability and the molecular conductance is examined. A correlation emerges whereby the measured conductance of a tunneling junction decreases as a function of the calculated molecular polarizability for several systems, a result consistent with the idea of a molecule as a polarizable dielectric. A model based on a macroscopic extension of the Clausius-Mossotti equation to the molecular domain and Simmon's tunneling model is developed to explain this correlation. Despite the simplicity of the theory, it paves the way for further experimental, conceptual and theoretical developments in the use of molecular descriptors to describe both conductance and electron transfer. Second, the conductance of several biologically relevant, weakly bonded, hydrogen-bonded systems is systematically investigated. While there is no correlation between hydrogen bond strength and conductance, the results indicate a relation between the conductance and atomic polarizability of the hydrogen bond acceptor atom. The relevance of these results to electron transfer in biological systems is discussed. Hydrogen production and oxidation using catalysts inspired by hydrogenases provides a more sustainable alternative to the use of precious metals. To understand electrochemical and spectroscopic properties of a collection of Fe and Ni mimics of hydrogenases, high-level density functional theory calculations are described. The results, based on a detailed analysis of the energies, charges and molecular orbitals of these metal complexes, indicate the importance of geometric constraints imposed by the ligand on molecular properties such as acidity and electrocatalytic activity. Based on model calculations of

  11. Electron transfer-induced four-membered cyclic intermediate formation: Olefin cross-coupling vs. olefin cross-metathesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Yohei [Department of Applied Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-5-8 Saiwai-cho, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Chiba, Kazuhiro, E-mail: chiba@cc.tuat.ac.j [Department of Applied Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-5-8 Saiwai-cho, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan)

    2011-01-01

    An electron transfer-induced four-membered cyclic intermediate, formed between a radical cation of an enol ether and an unactivated olefin, played a key role in the pathway toward either cross-coupling or cross-metathesis. The presence of an alkoxy group on the phenyl ring of the olefin entirely determined the synthetic outcome of the reaction, which mirrored the efficiency of the intramolecular electron transfer.

  12. Real Time Quantification of Ultrafast Photoinduced Bimolecular Electron Transfer Rate: Direct Probing of the Transient Intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Puspal; Biswas, Somnath; Sen, Pratik

    2015-08-27

    Fluorescence quenching studies through steady-state and time-resolved measurements are inadequate to quantify the bimolecular electron transfer rate in bulk homogeneous solution due to constraints from diffusion. To nullify the effect of diffusion, direct evaluation of the rate of formation of a transient intermediate produced upon the electron transfer is essential. Methyl viologen, a well-known electron acceptor, produces a radical cation after accepting an electron, which has a characteristic strong and broad absorption band centered at 600 nm. Hence it is a good choice to evaluate the rate of photoinduced electron transfer reaction employing femtosecond broadband transient absorption spectroscopy. The time constant of the aforementioned process between pyrene and methyl viologen in methanol has been estimated to be 2.5 ± 0.4 ps using the same technique. The time constant for the backward reaction was found to be 14 ± 1 ps. These values did not change with variation of concentration of quencher, i.e., methyl viologen. Hence, we can infer that diffusion has no contribution in the estimation of rate constants. However, on changing the solvent from methanol to ethanol, the time constant of the electron transfer reaction has been found to increase and has accounted for the change in solvent reorganization energy.

  13. Bioinspired Poly(2-oxazolines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Schlaad

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Poly(2-oxazolines are regarded as pseudopeptides, thus bioinspired polymers, due to their structural relationship to polypeptides. Materials and solution properties can be tuned by varying the side-chain (hydrophilic-hydrophobic, chiral, bioorganic, etc., opening the way to advanced stimulus-responsive materials and complex colloidal structures. The bioinspired “smart” solution and aggregation behavior of poly(2-oxazolines in aqueous environments are discussed in this review.

  14. Designing Bioinspired Robots Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Moriconi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This IJARS issue is dedicated to a new international conference series, which has been promoted by ENEA and IARP (International Advanced Robotics Programme. The first conference, entitled Bio-inspired Robotics, was held on 14th-15th May 2014 at the ENEA’s Frascati Centre. The conference was dedicated to young researchers and scholars with promising ideas, methods and products for innovation and technology transfer in the field of service robots with bio-inspired design and operation.

  15. Bioinspired Syntheses of Dimeric Hydroxycinnamic Acids (Lignans and Hybrids, Using Phenol Oxidative Coupling as Key Reaction, and Medicinal Significance Thereof

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George E. Magoulas

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Lignans are mainly dimers of 4-hydroxycinnamic acids (HCAs and reduced analogs thereof which are produced in Nature through phenol oxidative coupling (POC as the primary C-C or C-O bond-forming reaction under the action of the enzymes peroxidases and laccases. They present a large structural variety and particularly interesting biological activities, therefore, significant efforts has been devoted to the development of efficient methodologies for the synthesis of lignans isolated from natural sources, analogs and hybrids with other biologically interesting small molecules. We summarize in the present review those methods which mimic Nature for the assembly of the most common lignan skeleta by using either enzymes or one-electron inorganic oxidants to effect POC of HCAs and derivatives, such as esters and amides, or cross-POC of pairs of HCAs or HCAs with 4-hydrocycinnamyl alcohols. We, furthermore, provide outlines of mechanistic schemes accounting for the formation of the coupled products and, where applicable, indicate their potential application in medicine.

  16. Mitochondrial nitric oxide production supported by reverse electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombicino, Silvina S; Iglesias, Darío E; Zaobornyj, Tamara; Boveris, Alberto; Valdez, Laura B

    2016-10-01

    Heart phosphorylating electron transfer particles (ETPH) produced NO at 1.2 ± 0.1 nmol NO. min(-1) mg protein(-1) by the mtNOS catalyzed reaction. These particles showed a NAD(+) reductase activity of 64 ± 3 nmol min(-1) mg protein(-1) sustained by reverse electron transfer (RET) at expenses of ATP and succinate. The same particles, without NADPH and in conditions of RET produced 0.97 ± 0.07 nmol NO. min(-1) mg protein(-1). Rotenone inhibited NO production supported by RET measured in ETPH and in coupled mitochondria, but did not reduce the activity of recombinant nNOS, indicating that the inhibitory effect of rotenone on NO production is due to an electron flow inhibition and not to a direct action on mtNOS structure. NO production sustained by RET corresponds to 20% of the total amount of NO released from heart coupled mitochondria. A mitochondrial fraction enriched in complex I produced 1.7 ± 0.2 nmol NO. min(-1) mg protein(-1) and reacted with anti-75 kDa complex I subunit and anti-nNOS antibodies, suggesting that complex I and mtNOS are located contiguously. These data show that mitochondrial NO production can be supported by RET, and suggest that mtNOS is next to complex I, reaffirming the idea of a functional association between these proteins.

  17. Electron transfer at sensitized semiconductor electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitler, M.T.

    1977-03-01

    Electron transfer from the excited state of sensitizing dyes to the conduction band of semiconductors has been studied through photoelectrochemical techniques. Two systems were analyzed in detail: rhodamine B on ZnO and rose bengal on TiO/sub 2/. Prior to electrochemical experimentation, the adsorption characteristics of these dyes were investigated using ZnO, ZnS, and TiO/sub 2/ single crystals as substrates. Absorbance measurements of the adsorbed dye were taken as a function of the solution concentration of the dye. Adsorption isotherms heats of adsorption were also established; they were similar to literature data reported for adsorption of these dyes on powdered substrates. Using the absorbance data, the quantum efficiency for photoinjection of electrons from rhodamine B into a ZnO electrode was determined to be 2.7 x 10/sup -2/. This value was independent of the dye surface concentration down to 50% coverage of the electrode. With the assumption that not all of the rhodamine B adsorbed on the electrode has the same rate of electron injection, a kinetic model for the time decay of the photocurrent was developed; data were analyzed according to this theory. A rate constant for photoreduction of the adsorbed dye was determined for the reducing agents. 86 references.

  18. Facile electrochemical co-deposition of a graphene-cobalt nanocomposite for highly efficient water oxidation in alkaline media: direct detection of underlying electron transfer reactions under catalytic turnover conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Si-Xuan; Liu, Yuping; Bond, Alan M; Zhang, Jie; Esakki Karthik, P; Maheshwaran, I; Senthil Kumar, S; Phani, K L N

    2014-09-21

    A facile electrochemical co-deposition method has been developed for the fabrication of graphene-cobalt nanocomposite modified electrodes that achieve exceptionally efficient water oxidation in highly alkaline media. In the method reported, a graphene-cobalt nanocomposite film was deposited electrochemically from a medium containing 1 mg ml(-1) graphene oxide, 0.8 mM cobalt nitrate and 0.05 M phytic acid (pH 7). The formation of the nanocomposite film was confirmed using electrochemical, Raman spectroscopic and scanning electron microscopic techniques. The nanocomposite film exhibits excellent activity and stability towards water oxidation to generate oxygen in 1 M NaOH aqueous electrolyte media. A turn over frequency of 34 s(-1) at an overpotential of 0.59 V and a faradaic efficiency of 97.7% were deduced from analysis of data obtained by rotating ring disk electrode voltammetry. Controlled potential electrolysis data suggests that the graphene supported catalyst exhibits excellent stability under these harsh conditions. Phytate anion acts as stabilizer for the electrochemical formation of cobalt nanoparticles. Fourier transformed ac voltammetry allowed the redox chemistry associated with catalysis to be detected directly under catalytic turnover conditions. Estimates of formal reversible potentials obtained from this method and derived from the overall reactions 3Co(OH)2 + 2OH(-) ⇌ Co3O4 + 4H2O + 2e(-), Co3O4 + OH(-) ⇌ 3CoOOH + e(-) and CoOOH + OH(-) ⇌ CoO2 + H2O + e(-) are 0.10, 0.44 and 0.59 V vs. Ag/AgCl, respectively.

  19. Parallel Architectures and Bioinspired Algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez, José; Lanchares, Juan

    2012-01-01

    This monograph presents examples of best practices when combining bioinspired algorithms with parallel architectures. The book includes recent work by leading researchers in the field and offers a map with the main paths already explored and new ways towards the future. Parallel Architectures and Bioinspired Algorithms will be of value to both specialists in Bioinspired Algorithms, Parallel and Distributed Computing, as well as computer science students trying to understand the present and the future of Parallel Architectures and Bioinspired Algorithms.

  20. Soliton-like Solutions and Electron Transfer in DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhno, V D

    2000-06-01

    We consider various mechanisms of long-range electron transfer in DNAwhich enable us to explain recent controversial experiments. We show thatcontinuous super-exchange theory can explain the values of electron rateconstants in short fragments of DNA. The soliton-type electron transfer inlong segments of DNA is also dealt with.

  1. Soliton-like Solutions and Electron Transfer in DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Lakhno, V.D.

    2000-01-01

    We consider various mechanisms of long-range electron transfer in DNAwhich enable us to explain recent controversial experiments. We show thatcontinuous super-exchange theory can explain the values of electron rateconstants in short fragments of DNA. The soliton-type electron transfer inlong segments of DNA is also dealt with.

  2. Time-resolved EPR identifies unexpected electron transfer in cryptochrome**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biskup, Till; Hitomi, Kenichi; Getzoff, Elizabeth D.; Krapf, Sebastian; Koslowski, Thorsten; Schleicher, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Tuning photoinduced electron transfer: Subtle differences in local sequence and conformation can produce diversity and specificity in electron transfer (ET) in proteins, despite high structural conservation of redox partners. For individual ET steps, distance is not necessarily the decisive parameter; orientation and solvent accessibility of ET partners, and therefore, stabilization of charge-separated states contribute substantially. PMID:22086606

  3. Rapidly Alternating Transmission Mode Electron Transfer Dissociation and Collisional Activation for the Characterization of Polypeptide Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hongling; Xia, Yu; Yang, Min; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2009-01-01

    Cation transmission/electron transfer reagent anion storage mode electron transfer ion/ion reactions and beam-type collisional activation of the polypeptide ions are performed in rapid succession in the high pressure collision cell (Q2) of a quadrupole/time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometer (QqTOF), where the electron transfer reagent anions are accumulated. Duty cycles for both electron transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments are improved relative to ion trapping approaches since there are no discrete ion storage and reaction steps for ETD experiments and no discrete ion storage step and frequency tuning for CID experiments. For this technique, moderately high resolution and mass accuracy are also obtained due to mass analysis via the TOF analyzer. This relatively simple approach has been demonstrated with a triply charged tryptic peptide, a triply charged tryptic phosphopeptide, and a triply charged tryptic N-linked glycopeptide. For the tryptic peptide, the sequence is identified with more certainty than would be available from a single method alone due to the complementary information provided by these two dissociation methods. Because of the complementary information derived from both ETD and CID dissociation methods, peptide sequence and post-translational modification (PTM) sites for the phosphopeptide are identified. This combined ETD and CID approach is particularly useful for characterizing glycopeptides because ETD generates information about both peptide sequence and locations of the glycosylation sites while CID provides information about the glycan structure. PMID:18396915

  4. Kinetics of electron transfer from photoexcited superlattice electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nozik, A.J.; Turner, J.A.; Peterson, M.W.

    1988-05-05

    A kinetic model has been developed that quantitatively describes electron transfer from photoexcited superlattice electrodes into liquid solutions. The model permits electron transfer from all quantum levels as well as from surface states; it also takes into account recombination in the bulk, space charge layer, and surfaces states, and band-edge movement. The model calculations define the values of the rate constants for heterogeneous electron transfer and hot electron thermalization among the various energy levels in the supperlattice quantum wells that are necessary to achieve hot electron transfer from excited quantum states. The question of whether hot electron transfer is manifested by a dependence of the photocurrent action spectra on acceptor redox potential is examined in detail.

  5. Heme electron transfer in peroxidases: the propionate e-pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guallar, Victor

    2008-10-23

    Computational modeling offers a new insight about the electron transfer pathway in heme peroxidases. Available crystal structures have revealed an intriguing arrangement of the heme propionate side chains in heme-heme and heme-substrate complexes. By means of mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics calculations, we study the involvement of these propionate groups into the substrate oxidation in ascorbate peroxidase and into the heme to heme electron transfer in bacterial cytochrome c peroxidase. By selectively turning on/off different quantum regions, we obtain the electron transfer pathway which directly involves the porphyrin ring and the heme propionates. Furthermore, in ascorbate peroxidase the presence of the substrate appears to be crucial for the activation of the electron transfer channel. The results might represent a general motif for electron transfer from/to the heme group and change our view for the propionate side chains as simple electrostatic binding anchors. We name the new mechanism "the propionate e-pathway".

  6. Electron transfer precedes ATP hydrolysis during nitrogenase catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Simon; Danyal, Karamatullah; Shaw, Sudipta; Lytle, Anna K.; Dean, Dennis R.; Hoffman, Brian M.; Antony, Edwin; Seefeldt, Lance C.

    2013-01-01

    The biological reduction of N2 to NH3 catalyzed by Mo-dependent nitrogenase requires at least eight rounds of a complex cycle of events associated with ATP-driven electron transfer (ET) from the Fe protein to the catalytic MoFe protein, with each ET coupled to the hydrolysis of two ATP molecules. Although steps within this cycle have been studied for decades, the nature of the coupling between ATP hydrolysis and ET, in particular the order of ET and ATP hydrolysis, has been elusive. Here, we have measured first-order rate constants for each key step in the reaction sequence, including direct measurement of the ATP hydrolysis rate constant: kATP = 70 s−1, 25 °C. Comparison of the rate constants establishes that the reaction sequence involves four sequential steps: (i) conformationally gated ET (kET = 140 s−1, 25 °C), (ii) ATP hydrolysis (kATP = 70 s−1, 25 °C), (iii) Phosphate release (kPi = 16 s−1, 25 °C), and (iv) Fe protein dissociation from the MoFe protein (kdiss = 6 s−1, 25 °C). These findings allow completion of the thermodynamic cycle undergone by the Fe protein, showing that the energy of ATP binding and protein–protein association drive ET, with subsequent ATP hydrolysis and Pi release causing dissociation of the complex between the Feox(ADP)2 protein and the reduced MoFe protein. PMID:24062462

  7. Carboxylate shifts steer interquinone electron transfer in photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernev, Petko; Zaharieva, Ivelina; Dau, Holger; Haumann, Michael

    2011-02-18

    Understanding the mechanisms of electron transfer (ET) in photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) may inspire novel catalysts for sunlight-driven fuel production. The electron exit pathway of type II RCs comprises two quinone molecules working in series and in between a non-heme iron atom with a carboxyl ligand (bicarbonate in photosystem II (PSII), glutamate in bacterial RCs). For decades, the functional role of the iron has remained enigmatic. We tracked the iron site using microsecond-resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy after laser-flash excitation of PSII. After formation of the reduced primary quinone, Q(A)(-), the x-ray spectral changes revealed a transition (t½ ≈ 150 μs) from a bidentate to a monodentate coordination of the bicarbonate at the Fe(II) (carboxylate shift), which reverted concomitantly with the slower ET to the secondary quinone Q(B). A redox change of the iron during the ET was excluded. Density-functional theory calculations corroborated the carboxylate shift both in PSII and bacterial RCs and disclosed underlying changes in electronic configuration. We propose that the iron-carboxyl complex facilitates the first interquinone ET by optimizing charge distribution and hydrogen bonding within the Q(A)FeQ(B) triad for high yield Q(B) reduction. Formation of a specific priming intermediate by nuclear rearrangements, setting the stage for subsequent ET, may be a common motif in reactions of biological redox cofactors.

  8. The role of protein dynamics and thermal fluctuations in regulating cytochrome c/cytochrome c oxidase electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Paggi, Damian; Zitare, Ulises; Murgida, Daniel H

    2014-07-01

    In this overview we present recent combined electrochemical, spectroelectrochemical, spectroscopic and computational studies from our group on the electron transfer reactions of cytochrome c and of the primary electron acceptor of cytochrome c oxidase, the CuA site, in biomimetic complexes. Based on these results, we discuss how protein dynamics and thermal fluctuations may impact on protein ET reactions, comment on the possible physiological relevance of these results, and finally propose a regulatory mechanism that may operate in the Cyt/CcO electron transfer reaction in vivo. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 18th European Bioenergetic Conference.

  9. Vibrationally Resolved Electron Transfer Rates in Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spears, Kenneth G.

    2002-03-01

    We have re-examined our earlier report of electron transfer in the [Co(Cp)_2|V(CO)_6] radical-pair using ultrafast infrared transient absorption spectroscopy in room temperature solutions. The radical-pair is created from the [Co(Cp)_2^+|V(CO)_6^-] ion-pair by ultrafast visible charge-transfer excitation. Transient absorption experiments with ps time constants. A small ET component with a 75 ps time constant is due to some separation and reformation of the radical-pairs. Transient absorption experiments monitoring the recovery of the ion-pair state shows that both fast components are due to ET rather than some other vibrational relaxation (VR) process in the radical state. We analyze the visible charge-transfer band and assign the two fast ET decay times to two ion-pair contact geometries with absorption origins different by about 1250 ± 350 cm-1. For excitation at 800 and 700 nm the 700 fs ET lifetime depends on the vibrational quantum state of the nontotally symmetric CO stretch in the V(CO)6 radical, where the lifetime decreases by 10% for the first vibrational quantum and 45% for the second quantum. There is no quantum effect for the second ion-pair geometry with a 5 ps ET lifetime. Standard ET rate models cannot explain the rate dependence upon vibrational quantum state for a nontotally symmetric vibration, and it may arise from a breakdown of the Condon approximation. We also report rates for IVR of CO stretching modes and for VR of low frequency vibrations. At excitation wavelengths of 620 and 555 nm there is sufficient internal vibrational energy in low-frequency vibrations to cause geometric inter-conversion between energetically similar Jahn-Teller geometries in the V(CO)6 radical. This process creates a 200 fs rise time for the V(CO)6 radical species to assume a stable geometry, which requires VR of low frequency vibrations to the solvent. These results demonstrate that earlier ET measurements from our group on the same molecule had insufficient time

  10. Nanoantioxidant-driven plasmon enhanced proton-coupled electron transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiriou, Georgios A.; Blattmann, Christoph O.; Deligiannakis, Yiannis

    2015-12-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions involve the transfer of a proton and an electron and play an important role in a number of chemical and biological processes. Here, we describe a novel phenomenon, plasmon-enhanced PCET, which is manifested using SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles functionalized with gallic acid (GA), a natural antioxidant molecule that can perform PCET. These GA-functionalized nanoparticles show enhanced plasmonic response at near-IR wavelengths, due to particle agglomeration caused by the GA molecules. Near-IR laser irradiation induces strong local hot-spots on the SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles, as evidenced by surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This leads to plasmon energy transfer to the grafted GA molecules that lowers the GA-OH bond dissociation enthalpy by at least 2 kcal mol-1 and therefore facilitates PCET. The nanoparticle-driven plasmon-enhancement of PCET brings together the so far unrelated research domains of nanoplasmonics and electron/proton translocation with significant impact on applications based on interfacial electron/proton transfer.Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions involve the transfer of a proton and an electron and play an important role in a number of chemical and biological processes. Here, we describe a novel phenomenon, plasmon-enhanced PCET, which is manifested using SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles functionalized with gallic acid (GA), a natural antioxidant molecule that can perform PCET. These GA-functionalized nanoparticles show enhanced plasmonic response at near-IR wavelengths, due to particle agglomeration caused by the GA molecules. Near-IR laser irradiation induces strong local hot-spots on the SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles, as evidenced by surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This leads to plasmon energy transfer to the grafted GA molecules that lowers the GA-OH bond dissociation enthalpy by at least 2 kcal mol-1 and therefore facilitates PCET. The nanoparticle-driven plasmon

  11. Transcriptomic and genetic analysis of direct interspecies electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Summers, Zarath M

    2013-01-01

    The possibility that metatranscriptomic analysis could distinguish between direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) and H2 interspecies transfer (HIT) in anaerobic communities was investigated by comparing gene transcript abundance in cocultures in which Geobacter sulfurreducens was the elect......The possibility that metatranscriptomic analysis could distinguish between direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) and H2 interspecies transfer (HIT) in anaerobic communities was investigated by comparing gene transcript abundance in cocultures in which Geobacter sulfurreducens....... These results demonstrate that there are unique gene expression patterns that distinguish DIET from HIT and suggest that metatranscriptomics may be a promising route to investigate interspecies electron transfer pathways in more-complex environments....

  12. Intermolecular and intramolecular electron transfer from eosin ester to viologen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丰雷; 张曼华; 沈涛

    1996-01-01

    The covalently -(CH2)10- linked eosin-butylviologen compound has been synthesized. The photoinduced electron transfer of eosin ester and butylviologen as well as the influence of addition of cyclodextrin or amylose into the solution of linked compound on the system have been studied by the absorption spectra, fluorescence spectra and fluorescence lifetime. The results indicated that the intramolecular electron transfer is much more efficient than the intermolecular one. Due to the formation of inclusion complex, the process of intramolecular electron transfer was changed after adding cydodextrin or amylose.

  13. Single-element Electron-transfer Optical Detector System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An optical detector system includes an electrically resistive screen that is substantially transparent to radiation energy having a wavelength of interest. An electron transfer element (e.g., a low work function photoactive material or a carbon nanotube (CNT)-based element) has a first end and a second end with its first end spaced apart from the screen by an evacuated gap. When radiation energy passes through the screen with a bias voltage being applied thereto, transfer of electrons through the electron transfer element is induced from its first to its second end such that a quantity indicative of the electrons transferred can be detected.

  14. Electron transfer by excited benzoquinone anions: slow rates for two-electron transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamadar, Matibur; Cook, Andrew R; Lewandowska-Andralojc, Anna; Holroyd, Richard; Jiang, Yan; Bikalis, Jin; Miller, John R

    2013-09-05

    Electron transfer (ET) rate constants from the lowest excited state of the radical anion of benzoquinone, BQ(-•)*, were measured in THF solution. Rate constants for bimolecular electron transfer reactions typically reach the diffusion-controlled limit when the free-energy change, ΔG°, reaches -0.3 eV. The rate constants for ET from BQ(-•)* are one-to-two decades smaller at this energy and do not reach the diffusion-controlled limit until -ΔG° is 1.5-2.0 eV. The rates are so slow probably because a second electron must also undergo a transition to make use of the energy of the excited state. Similarly, ET, from solvated electrons to neutral BQ to form the lowest excited state, is slow, while fast ET is observed at a higher excited state, which can be populated in a transition involving only one electron. A simple picture based on perturbation theory can roughly account for the control of electron transfer by the need for transition of a second electron. The picture also explains how extra driving force (-ΔG°) can restore fast rates of electron transfer.

  15. Marcus Bell-Shaped Electron Transfer Kinetics Observed in an Arrhenius Plot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waskasi, Morteza M; Kodis, Gerdenis; Moore, Ana L; Moore, Thomas A; Gust, Devens; Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2016-07-27

    The Marcus theory of electron transfer predicts a bell-shaped dependence of the reaction rate on the reaction free energy. The top of the "inverted parabola" corresponds to zero activation barrier when the electron-transfer reorganization energy and the reaction free energy add up to zero. Although this point has traditionally been reached by altering the chemical structures of donors and acceptors, the theory suggests that it can also be reached by varying other parameters of the system including temperature. We find here dramatic evidence of this phenomenon from experiments on a fullerene-porphyrin dyad. Following photoinduced electron transfer, the rate of charge recombination shows a bell-shaped dependence on the inverse temperature, first increasing with cooling and then decreasing at still lower temperatures. This non-Arrhenius rate law is a result of a strong, approximately hyperbolic temperature variation of the reorganization energy and the reaction free energy. Our results provide potentially the cleanest confirmation of the Marcus energy gap law so far since no modification of the chemical structure is involved.

  16. Improved thermally conducting electron transfer polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, R. K.; Byrd, N. R.; Lister, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Development of polymers with improved heat transfer coefficients for use in encapsulating electronic modules is discussed. Chemical reactions for synthesizing the polymers are described and thermodynamic and physical properties are analyzed.

  17. K-shell Analysis Reveals Distinct Functional Parts in an Electron Transfer Network and Its Implications for Extracellular Electron Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Dewu; Li, Ling; Shu, Chuanjun; Sun, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is capable of extracellular electron transfer (EET) and hence has attracted considerable attention. The EET pathways mainly consist of c-type cytochromes, along with some other proteins involved in electron transfer processes. By whole genome study and protein interactions inquisition, we constructed a large-scale electron transfer network containing 2276 interactions among 454 electron transfer related proteins in S. oneidensis MR-1. Using the k-shell decomposition method, we identified and analyzed distinct parts of the electron transfer network. We found that there was a negative correlation between the ks (k-shell values) and the average DR_100 (disordered regions per 100 amino acids) in every shell, which suggested that disordered regions of proteins played an important role during the formation and extension of the electron transfer network. Furthermore, proteins in the top three shells of the network are mainly located in the cytoplasm and inner membrane; these proteins can be responsible for transfer of electrons into the quinone pool in a wide variety of environmental conditions. In most of the other shells, proteins are broadly located throughout the five cellular compartments (cytoplasm, inner membrane, periplasm, outer membrane, and extracellular), which ensures the important EET ability of S. oneidensis MR-1. Specifically, the fourth shell was responsible for EET and the c-type cytochromes in the remaining shells of the electron transfer network were involved in aiding EET. Taken together, these results show that there are distinct functional parts in the electron transfer network of S. oneidensis MR-1, and the EET processes could achieve high efficiency through cooperation through such an electron transfer network. PMID:27148219

  18. Semiclassical Green's functions and an instanton formulation of electron-transfer rates in the nonadiabatic limit

    CERN Document Server

    Richardson, Jeremy O; Thoss, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We present semiclassical approximations to Green's functions of multidimensional systems, extending Gutzwiller's work to the classically forbidden region. Based on steepest-descent integrals over these functions, we derive an instanton method for computing the rate of nonadiabatic reactions, such as electron transfer, in the weak-coupling limit, where Fermi's golden-rule can be employed. This generalizes Marcus theory to systems for which the environment free-energy curves are not harmonic and where nuclear tunnelling plays a role. The derivation avoids using the Im F method or short-time approximations to real-time correlation functions. A clear physical interpretation of the nuclear tunnelling processes involved in an electron-transfer reaction is thus provided. In the following paper, we discuss numerical evaluation of the formulae.

  19. Semiclassical Green's functions and an instanton formulation of electron-transfer rates in the nonadiabatic limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jeremy O.; Bauer, Rainer; Thoss, Michael

    2015-10-01

    We present semiclassical approximations to Green's functions of multidimensional systems, extending Gutzwiller's work to the classically forbidden region. Based on steepest-descent integrals over these functions, we derive an instanton method for computing the rate of nonadiabatic reactions, such as electron transfer, in the weak-coupling limit, where Fermi's golden-rule can be employed. This generalizes Marcus theory to systems for which the environment free-energy curves are not harmonic and where nuclear tunnelling plays a role. The derivation avoids using the Im F method or short-time approximations to real-time correlation functions. A clear physical interpretation of the nuclear tunnelling processes involved in an electron-transfer reaction is thus provided. In Paper II [J. O. Richardson, J. Chem. Phys. 143, 134116 (2015)], we discuss numerical evaluation of the formulae.

  20. Simulation study of the ferrous ferric electron transfer at a metal--aqueous electrolyte interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, B.B.; Halley, J.W. (School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States))

    1994-12-15

    We report a new simulation study of the rate of ferrous--ferric electron transfer at a metal electrolyte interface. In contrast with earlier work, new features in our study include a detailed account of the effects of the field associated with the charging of the electrode, inclusion of entropic effects in the calculated free energy barriers, and a study of the dependence of the relevant free energy surfaces on the distance of the ion from the electrode. The qualitative picture of the reaction mechanism which emerges is significantly more detailed than that in earlier work. The dominant factors in determining the rate and mechanisms of electron transfer are the distance dependence of the work function of the metal, the redox species concentration profile, and the electronic matrix element. Calculated free energy barriers are consistent with experimentally measured ones. We also estimate the equilibrium potential for this reaction from the model, and find it to be consistent with the experimental equilibrium potential.

  1. Modulation of electron transfer kinetics by protein conformational fluctuations during early-stage photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Srabanti; Cherayil, Binny J

    2007-10-14

    The kinetics of electron transfer during the early stages of the photosynthetic reaction cycle has recently been shown in transient absorption experiments carried out by Wang et al. [Science 316, 747 (2007)] to be strongly influenced by fluctuations in the conformation of the surrounding protein. A model of electron transfer rates in polar solvents developed by Sumi and Marcus using a reaction-diffusion formalism [J. Chem. Phys. 84, 4894 (1986)] was found to be successful in fitting the experimental absorption curves over a roughly 200 ps time interval. The fits were achieved using an empirically determined time-dependent function that described protein conformational relaxation. In the present paper, a microscopic model of this function is suggested, and it is shown that the function can be identified with the dynamic autocorrelation function of intersegment distance fluctuations that occur in a harmonic potential of mean force under the action of fractional Gaussian noise.

  2. Photoinduced Bimolecular Electron Transfer from Cyano Anions in Ionic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Boning; Liang, Min; Maroncelli, Mark; Castner, Edward W

    2015-11-19

    Ionic liquids with electron-donating anions are used to investigate rates and mechanisms of photoinduced bimolecular electron transfer to the photoexcited acceptor 9,10-dicyanoanthracene (9,10-DCNA). The set of five cyano anion ILs studied comprises the 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium cation paired with each of these five anions: selenocyanate, thiocyanate, dicyanamide, tricyanomethanide, and tetracyanoborate. Measurements with these anions dilute in acetonitrile and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide show that the selenocyanate and tricyanomethanide anions are strong quenchers of the 9,10-DCNA fluorescence, thiocyanate is a moderately strong quencher, dicyanamide is a weak quencher, and no quenching is observed for tetracyanoborate. Quenching rates are obtained from both time-resolved fluorescence transients and time-integrated spectra. Application of a Smoluchowski diffusion-and-reaction model showed that the complex kinetics observed can be fit using only two adjustable parameters, D and V0, where D is the relative diffusion coefficient between donor and acceptor and V0 is the value of the electronic coupling at donor-acceptor contact.

  3. Nanoantioxidant-driven plasmon enhanced proton-coupled electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiriou, Georgios A; Blattmann, Christoph O; Deligiannakis, Yiannis

    2016-01-14

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions involve the transfer of a proton and an electron and play an important role in a number of chemical and biological processes. Here, we describe a novel phenomenon, plasmon-enhanced PCET, which is manifested using SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles functionalized with gallic acid (GA), a natural antioxidant molecule that can perform PCET. These GA-functionalized nanoparticles show enhanced plasmonic response at near-IR wavelengths, due to particle agglomeration caused by the GA molecules. Near-IR laser irradiation induces strong local hot-spots on the SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles, as evidenced by surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This leads to plasmon energy transfer to the grafted GA molecules that lowers the GA-OH bond dissociation enthalpy by at least 2 kcal mol(-1) and therefore facilitates PCET. The nanoparticle-driven plasmon-enhancement of PCET brings together the so far unrelated research domains of nanoplasmonics and electron/proton translocation with significant impact on applications based on interfacial electron/proton transfer.

  4. Effects of quantum coherence in metalloprotein electron transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorner, Ross; Goold, John; Heaney, Libby; Farrow, Tristan; Vedral, Vlatko

    2012-09-01

    Many intramolecular electron transfer (ET) reactions in biology are mediated by metal centers in proteins. This process is commonly described by a model of diffusive hopping according to the semiclassical theories of Marcus and Hopfield. However, recent studies have raised the possibility that nontrivial quantum mechanical effects play a functioning role in certain biomolecular processes. Here, we investigate the potential effects of quantum coherence in biological ET by extending the semiclassical model to allow for the possibility of quantum coherent phenomena using a quantum master equation based on the Holstein Hamiltonian. We test the model on the structurally defined chain of seven iron-sulfur clusters in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide plus hydrogen:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I), a crucial respiratory enzyme and one of the longest chains of metal centers in biology. Using experimental parameters where possible, we find that, in limited circumstances, a small quantum mechanical contribution can provide a marked increase in the ET rate above the semiclassical diffusive-hopping rate. Under typical biological conditions, our model reduces to well-known diffusive behavior.

  5. Photoinduced electron transfer between benzyloxy dendrimer phthalocyanine and benzoquinone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tiantian; Ma, Dongdong; Pan, Sujuan; Wu, Shijun; Jiang, Yufeng; Zeng, Di; Yang, Hongqin; Peng, Yiru

    2016-10-01

    Photo-induced electron transfer (PET) is an important and fundamental process in natural photosynthesis. To mimic such interesting PET process, a suitable donor and acceptor couple were properly chosen. Dendrimer phthalocyanines and their derivatives have emerged as promising materials for artificial photosynthesis systems. In this paper, the electron transfer between the light harvest dendrimer phthalocyanine (donor) and the 1,4-benzoquinone (acceptor) was studied by UV/Vis and fluorescence spectroscopic methods. It was found that fluorescence of phthalocyanine was quenched by benzoquinone (BQ) via excited state electron transfer, from the phthalocyanine to the BQ upon excitation at 610 nm. The Stern-Volmer constant (KSV) of electron transfer was calculated. Our study suggests that this dendritic phthalocyanine is an effective new electron donor and transmission complex and could be used as a potential artificial photosynthesis system.

  6. Blocking layer modeling for temperature analysis of electron transfer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blocking layer modeling for temperature analysis of electron transfer rate in quantum dot sensitized solar cells. ... Journal of Fundamental and Applied Sciences ... of the quantum dots and free energy of system and finally the Marcus equation.

  7. Promotion of the Direct Electron Transfer of Hemoglobin by the Carbon Nanotube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing CHEN; Chen Xin CAI

    2004-01-01

    It is reported that the direct electron transfer of hemoglobin (Hb) can be effectively promoted by carbon nanotubes when Hb was immobilized on the surface of the carbon nanotubes modified electrode. The results indicated that the conversion of Hb-Fe(III)/Hb-Fe(II) is a one-electron coupled one-proton reaction process. The method presented can be easily extended to study the direct electrochemistry of other proteins or enzymes.

  8. Long-distance electron transfer by cable bacteria in aquifer sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Hubert; BOSCH, Julian; Griebler, Christian; Damgaard, Lars Riis; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Lueders, Tillmann; Meckenstock, Rainer U.

    2016-01-01

    The biodegradation of organic pollutants in aquifers is often restricted to the fringes of contaminant plumes where steep countergradients of electron donors and acceptors are separated by limited dispersive mixing. However, long-distance electron transfer (LDET) by filamentous ‘cable bacteria' has recently been discovered in marine sediments to couple spatially separated redox half reactions over centimeter scales. Here we provide primary evidence that such sulfur-oxidizing cable bacteria ca...

  9. [Electron transfer between globular proteins. Evaluation of a matrix element].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhno, V D; Chuev, G N; Ustinin, M N

    1998-01-01

    The dependence of the matrix element of the probability of interprotein electron transfer on the mutual orientation of the donor and acceptor centers and the distance between them was calculated. The calculations were made under the assumption that electron transfer proceeds mainly by a collective excitation of polaron nature, like a solvated electron state. The results obtained are consistent with experimental data and indicate the nonexponential behavior of this dependence in the case when the distance transfer is less than 20 A.

  10. Electron transfer between excited states of some sulfonated phtha-locyanines and tyrosine as well as trptophan in homogeneous aqueous solution and aqueous micellar media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张先付; 许慧君; 沈涛

    1995-01-01

    Rate constants for electron transfer between excited states of several tetrasulfonated phthalocyanines (MTSPC, M = H2, Zn, ClAl, ClGa) and tyrosine or trptophan have been measured in homogeneous aqueous and aqueous micellar media. Cationic micelles formed by surfactant cetyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (CTAC) promote the electron transfer reaction, whereas neutral micelles formed by Triton X-100 depress this process. The calculated free energy change shows that phthalocyanines act as electron donors in the electron transfer reaction of its excited singlet states with tyrosine or trptophan (Type Is), whereas they act as electron acceptors in the reaction of its excited triplet states with tyrosine or trptophan (type IT). The two different electron transfer processes involving singlet and triplet of sensitizer respectively compete with each other and form different intermediates which may induce the formation of different products. Factors that govern the importance of Type Is in the whole reaction includ

  11. Redox induced electron transfer in doublet azo-anion diradical rhenium(II) complexes. Characterization of complete electron transfer series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Nandadulal; Samanta, Subhas; Goswami, Sreebrata

    2010-03-15

    Reactions of dirhenium decacarbonyl with the two azoaromatic ligands, L(a) = (2-phenylazo)pyridine and L(b) = (4-chloro-2-phenylazo)pyridine (general abbreviation of the ligands is L) afford paramagnetic rhenium(II) complexes, [Re(II)(L(*-))(2)(CO)(2)] (1) (S = 1/2 ground state) with two one-electron reduced azo-anion radical ligands in an octahedral geometrical arrangement. At room temperature (300 K) the complexes 1a-b, showed magnetic moments (mu(eff)) close to 1.94 mu(B), which is suggestive of the existence of strong antiferromagnetic interactions in the complexes. The results of magnetic measurements on one of the complexes, 1b, in the temperature range 2-300 K are reported. The above complexes showed two cathodic and two anodic responses in cyclic voltammetry where one-electron oxidation leads to an unusual redox event involving simultaneous reduction of the rhenium(II) and oxidation of the second ligand via intramolecular electron transfer. The oxidized complexes 1a(+) and 1b(+) are air stable and were isolated as crystalline solids as their tri-iodide (I(3)(-)) salts. The structures of the two representative complexes, 1b and [1b]I(3), as determined by X-ray crystallography, are compared. The anionic complexes, [1](-) and [1](2-) were characterized in solution by their spectral properties.

  12. Punicalagin and catechins contain polyphenolic substructures that influence cell viability and can be monitored by radical chemosensors sensitive to electron transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Carreras, Anna; Mateos-Martín, María Luisa; Velázquez-Palenzuela, Amado; Brillas, Enric; Cascante, Marta; Juliá, Lluís; Torres, Josep Lluís

    2012-01-01

    Plant polyphenols may be free radical scavengers or generators, depending on their nature and concentration. This dual effect, mediated by electron transfer reactions, may contribute to their influence on cell viability. This study used two stable radicals (tris(2,3,5,6-tetrachloro-4-nitrophenyl)methyl (TNPTM) and tris(2,4,6-trichloro-3,5-dinitrophenyl)methyl (HNTTM)) sensitive only to electron transfer reduction reactions to monitor the redox properties of polyphenols (punicalagin and catech...

  13. Intraprotein electron transfer between tyrosine and tryptophan in DNA photolyase from Anacystis nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, C; Mathis, P; Eker, A P; Brettel, K

    1999-05-11

    Light-induced electron transfer reactions leading to the fully reduced, catalytically competent state of the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor have been studied by flash absorption spectroscopy in DNA photolyase from Anacystis nidulans. The protein, overproduced in Escherichia coli, was devoid of the antenna cofactor, and the FAD chromophore was present in the semireduced form, FADH., which is inactive for DNA repair. We show that after selective excitation of FADH. by a 7-ns laser flash, fully reduced FAD (FADH-) is formed in less than 500 ns by electron abstraction from a tryptophan residue. Subsequently, a tyrosine residue is oxidized by the tryptophanyl radical with t(1)/(2) = 50 microseconds. The amino acid radicals were identified by their characteristic absorption spectra, with maxima at 520 nm for Trp. and 410 nm for TyrO. The newly discovered electron transfer between tyrosine and tryptophan occurred for approximately 40% of the tryptophanyl radicals, whereas 60% decayed by charge recombination with FADH- (t(1)/(2) = 1 ms). The tyrosyl radical can also recombine with FADH- but at a much slower rate (t(1)/(2) = 76 ms) than Trp. In the presence of an external electron donor, however, TyrO. is rereduced efficiently in a bimolecular reaction that leaves FAD in the fully reduced state FADH-. These results show that electron transfer from tyrosine to Trp. is an essential step in the process leading to the active form of photolyase. They provide direct evidence that electron transfer between tyrosine and tryptophan occurs in a native biological reaction.

  14. Linear energy relationships in ground state proton transfer and excited state proton-coupled electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamiz-Hernandez, Ana P; Magomedov, Artiom; Hummer, Gerhard; Kaila, Ville R I

    2015-02-12

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) processes are elementary chemical reactions involved in a broad range of radical and redox reactions. Elucidating fundamental PCET reaction mechanisms are thus of central importance for chemical and biochemical research. Here we use quantum chemical density functional theory (DFT), time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), and the algebraic diagrammatic-construction through second-order (ADC(2)) to study the mechanism, thermodynamic driving force effects, and reaction barriers of both ground state proton transfer (pT) and photoinduced proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) between nitrosylated phenyl-phenol compounds and hydrogen-bonded t-butylamine as an external base. We show that the obtained reaction barriers for the ground state pT reactions depend linearly on the thermodynamic driving force, with a Brønsted slope of 1 or 0. Photoexcitation leads to a PCET reaction, for which we find that the excited state reaction barrier depends on the thermodynamic driving force with a Brønsted slope of 1/2. To support the mechanistic picture arising from the static potential energy surfaces, we perform additional molecular dynamics simulations on the excited state energy surface, in which we observe a spontaneous PCET between the donor and the acceptor groups. Our findings suggest that a Brønsted analysis may distinguish the ground state pT and excited state PCET processes.

  15. Experimental studies of fundamental issues in electron transfer through nanometer scale devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hiromichi

    Electron transfer reactions constitute many of the primary events in materials science, chemistry, physics, and biochemistry, e.g. the electron transport properties and photoexcited processes in solids and molecules, chemical reactions, corrosion, photosynthesis, respiration, and so forth. A self-assembled monolayer (SAM) film provides us with a unique environment not only to understand and manipulate the surface electronic properties of a solid, but also to control electron transfer processes at the interface. The first topic in this thesis describes the structure and electron tunneling characterization of alkanethiol SAMs on InP(100). Angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterize the bonding of alkanethiols to n-InP surfaces and to measure the monolayer thickness. The results showed that the sulfur binds to In atoms on the surface, and provided film thicknesses of 6.4 A for C8H17SH, 11.1 A for C12H25SH, and 14.9 A for C16H 33SH, resulting in an average tilt angle of 55°. The analysis indicated that super-exchange coupling between the alkane chains plays an important role in defining electron tunneling barriers, especially for highly tilted chains. The second topic describes studies of cytochrome c bound to pure and mixed SAMs of o-terminated alkanethiol (terminated with pyridine, imidazole or nitrile groups) and alkanethiol on gold. Electrochemical methods are used to determine electron transfer rate constants of cytochrome c, and scanning tunneling microscopy to observe the cytochrome c on the SAM. Detailed analysis revealed direct association of the heme of cytochrome c with the terminal groups of the SAMs and a 'turning-over' of the electron transfer of cytochrome c from adiabatic to non-adiabatic regime. The third topic describes studies of oxidation and reduction of cytochrome c in solution through eleven different self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold electrodes by cyclic voltammetry. Electron transfer rate constants of

  16. Proton-coupled electron transfers: pH-dependent driving forces? Fundamentals and artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, Julien; Costentin, Cyrille; Robert, Marc; Routier, Mathilde; Savéant, Jean-Michel

    2013-09-25

    Besides its own interest, tryptophan oxidation by photogenerated Ru complexes is one of the several examples where concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET) to water as proton acceptor endowed with a pH-dependent driving force has been invoked to explain the data. Since this notion is contrary to the very basic principles of chemical physics, it was interesting to attempt uncovering the source of this contradiction with an easily accessible substrate. Careful examination of the oxidation of the tryptophan (ethyl ester derivative) bearing a NH3(+)/NH2 group showed that there is no trace of such an unconventional H2O-CPET with a pH-dependent driving force. The reaction mechanism simply consists, with both the NH3(+) acid and NH2 basic forms of the tryptophan derivative, in a rate-determining electron-transfer step followed by deprotonation steps. The same is true with the ethyl ester-methyl amide derivative of tryptophan, whose behavior is even simpler since the molecule does not bear an acid-base group. No such unconventional H2O-CPET was found with phenol, another easily accessible substrate. It may thus be inferred that the same applies to less easily available systems in which electron transfer occurs intramolecularly. These observations help to rid the road of such artificial obstacles and improve present models of H2O-CPET reactions, a landmark towards the understanding of the role of water chains in natural systems.

  17. Bidirectional microbial electron transfer: Switching an acetate oxidizing biofilm to nitrate reducing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pous, Narcís; Carmona-Martínez, Alessandro A; Vilajeliu-Pons, Anna; Fiset, Erika; Bañeras, Lluis; Trably, Eric; Balaguer, M Dolors; Colprim, Jesús; Bernet, Nicolas; Puig, Sebastià

    2016-01-15

    Up to date a few electroactive bacteria embedded in biofilms are described to catalyze both anodic and cathodic reactions in bioelectrochemical systems (i.e. bidirectional electron transfer). How these bacteria transfer electrons to or from the electrode is still uncertain. In this study the extracellular electron transfer mechanism of bacteria within an electroactive biofilm was investigated by using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). First, a mature anodic electroactive biofilm was developed from an activated sludge sample (inoculum), acetate as electron donor and a poised electrode (+397mV vs. SHE). Later, this biofilm was "switched" to biocathodic conditions by feeding it with a medium containing nitrates and poising the electrode at -303mV vs. SHE. The electrochemical characterization indicated that both, acetate oxidation and nitrate reduction took place at a similar formal potential of -175±05 and -175±34mV vs. SHE, respectively. The biofilm was predominantly composed by Geobacter sp. at both experimental conditions. Taken together, the results indicated that both processes could be catalyzed by using the same electron conduit, and most likely by the same bacterial consortium. Hence, this study suggests that electroactive bacteria within biofilms could use the same electron transfer conduit for catalyzing anodic and cathodic reactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Rapid electron transfer by the carbon matrix in natural pyrogenic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tianran; Levin, Barnaby D. A.; Guzman, Juan J. L.; Enders, Akio; Muller, David A.; Angenent, Largus T.; Lehmann, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Surface functional groups constitute major electroactive components in pyrogenic carbon. However, the electrochemical properties of pyrogenic carbon matrices and the kinetic preference of functional groups or carbon matrices for electron transfer remain unknown. Here we show that environmentally relevant pyrogenic carbon with average H/C and O/C ratios of less than 0.35 and 0.09 can directly transfer electrons more than three times faster than the charging and discharging cycles of surface functional groups and have a 1.5 V potential range for biogeochemical reactions that invoke electron transfer processes. Surface functional groups contribute to the overall electron flux of pyrogenic carbon to a lesser extent with greater pyrolysis temperature due to lower charging and discharging capacities, although the charging and discharging kinetics remain unchanged. This study could spur the development of a new generation of biogeochemical electron flux models that focus on the bacteria–carbon–mineral conductive network. PMID:28361882

  19. Large electron transfer rate effects from the Duschinsky mixing of vibrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sando, Gerald M.; Spears, Kenneth G; Hupp, Joseph T

    2001-01-01

    We systematically test how the Duschinsky mixing of normal coordinate vibrations affects transition rates for electron transfer (ET). We find that ET rates in the inverted region can increase many orders of magnitude from Duschinsky mixing, and both totally symmetric and nontotally symmetric...... of magnitude for inverted electron transfer reactions and modest mixing. The peak location in a rate vs energy gap plot can depend on the degree of Duschinsky mixing, and therefore it corresponds to a sum of solvent and an effective vibrational reorganization energy that is not predictable by simple models...... vibrations are very important. The Duschinsky effect arises when two electronic states have vibrational normal mode coordinate systems that are rotated and translated relative to each other. We use a conventional quantum rate model for ET, and the examples include 6-8 vibrations, where two vibrational modes...

  20. Large electron transfer rate effects from the Duschinsky mixing of vibrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sando, Gerald M.; Spears, Kenneth G; Hupp, Joseph T

    2001-01-01

    We systematically test how the Duschinsky mixing of normal coordinate vibrations affects transition rates for electron transfer (ET). We find that ET rates in the inverted region can increase many orders of magnitude from Duschinsky mixing, and both totally symmetric and nontotally symmetric...... are mixed with different amounts of coordinate rotation. The multidimensional Franck-Condon factors (FCF) are computed with standard algorithms and recently developed recursion relations. When displaced, totally symmetric modes are involved, rates with Duschinsky mixing can increase several orders...... of magnitude for inverted electron transfer reactions and modest mixing. The peak location in a rate vs energy gap plot can depend on the degree of Duschinsky mixing, and therefore it corresponds to a sum of solvent and an effective vibrational reorganization energy that is not predictable by simple models...

  1. Electron transfer catalysis with monolayer protected Au25 clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonello, Sabrina; Hesari, Mahdi; Polo, Federico; Maran, Flavio

    2012-08-01

    Au25L18 (L = S(CH2)2Ph) clusters were prepared and characterized. The resulting monodisperse clusters were reacted with bis(pentafluorobenzoyl) peroxide in dichloromethane to form Au25L18+ quantitatively. The kinetics and thermodynamics of the corresponding electron transfer (ET) reactions were characterized via electrochemistry and thermochemical calculations. Au25L18+ was used in homogeneous redox catalysis experiments with a series of sym-substituted benzoyl peroxides, including the above peroxide, bis(para-cyanobenzoyl) peroxide, dibenzoyl peroxide, and bis(para-methoxybenzoyl) peroxide. Peroxide dissociative ET was catalyzed using both the Au25L18/Au25L18- and the Au25L18+/Au25L18 redox couples as redox mediators. Simulation of the CV curves led to determination of the ET rate constant (kET) values for concerted dissociative ET to the peroxides. The ET free energy ΔG° could be estimated for all donor-acceptor combinations, leading to observation of a nice activation-driving force (log kETvs. ΔG°) relationship. Comparison with the kET obtained using a ferrocene-type donor with a formal potential similar to that of Au25L18/Au25L18- showed that the presence of the capping monolayer affects the ET rate rather significantly, which is attributed to the intrinsic nonadiabaticity of peroxide acceptors.Au25L18 (L = S(CH2)2Ph) clusters were prepared and characterized. The resulting monodisperse clusters were reacted with bis(pentafluorobenzoyl) peroxide in dichloromethane to form Au25L18+ quantitatively. The kinetics and thermodynamics of the corresponding electron transfer (ET) reactions were characterized via electrochemistry and thermochemical calculations. Au25L18+ was used in homogeneous redox catalysis experiments with a series of sym-substituted benzoyl peroxides, including the above peroxide, bis(para-cyanobenzoyl) peroxide, dibenzoyl peroxide, and bis(para-methoxybenzoyl) peroxide. Peroxide dissociative ET was catalyzed using both the Au25L18/Au25L18- and

  2. Marked detergents effects on safranine T-mediated photo-induced electron transfer in cytochrome P-450 1A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, R; Konami, H; Sato, H; Ito, O; Shimizu, T

    1995-10-25

    Cytochrome P-450 accepts electrons from electron transfer proteins to facilitate monooxidation reactions. It is suggested that basic amino acids such as Lys and Arg on the P-450 molecular surface interact with acidic amino acids such as Glu and Asp of the electron transfer protein. Safranine T is a basic compound which mediates electron transfer with illumination. It was found with flash photolysis that an electron from photo-reduced safranine T quickly reaches the heme iron of cytochrome P-450 1A2 (P-450 1A2). The photo-induced reduction kinetics of P-450 1A2 were analyzed by the Runge-Kutta method on the second order assumption. The electron-transfer rate constant from safranine T to P-450 1A2 was 2.1 x 10(6) M-1s-1. The rate constant was remarkably increased up to 3.1 x 10(8) M-1s-1 by adding cholic acid, while that was drastically reduced down to 3.5 x 10(4) M-1s-1 by adding Emulgen 913. The electron-transfer rate of a His163-Glu mutant, which has a 40 mV lower redox potential than that of the wild type, was the same as that of the wild type in the absence of the detergents, although the reduced fraction of the mutant was 30% lower than that of the wild type. The electron-transfer rate of the mutant also changed significantly by adding the detergents in the same way as the wild type. Based on these results, together with optical absorbance and fluorescence data, we discuss the inter- and intramolecular electron-transfer mechanism of P-450 1A2.

  3. Studies on photooxidation (VIII)——Electron transfer photooxygenation mechanism of acenaphthenone as electron donor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴树屏; 刘继峰; 江致勤

    1996-01-01

    The photooxidation and its electron transfer (ET) mechanism of acenaphthenone (ANO) sensitized by 9,10-dicyanoanthracence (DCA) are investigated. It has been found that the reaction with a stepwise manner led to the formation of 1,8- (3’-hydroxy)-β-naphthalene lactone and 1,8-naphthalenedicarboxylic anhydride. By cyclic voltammetry, fluorescence quenching, exciplex emission, co-sensitbation of biphenyl/DCA as well as CIDNP studies, it is verified that ANO can behave as an electron donor to undergo ET reaction with singlet DCA which is a thermodynamically-favored process.

  4. Vibrationally Assisted Electron Transfer Mechanism of Olfaction: Myth or Reality?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Chang, Po-Yao; Schulten, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    to this suggestion an olfactory receptor is activated by electron transfer assisted through odorant vibrational excitation. The hundreds to thousands of different olfactory receptors in an animal recognize odorants over a discriminant landscape with surface properties and vibrational frequencies as the two major......, thereby, recent experiments performed on Drosophila melanogaster. Our demonstration is based on known physical properties of biological electron transfer and on ab initio calculations on odorants carried out for the purpose of the present study. We identify a range of physical characteristics which...... olfactory receptors and odorants must obey for the vibrationally assisted electron transfer mechanism to function. We argue that the stated characteristics are feasible for realistic olfactory receptors, noting, though, that the receptor structure presently is still unknown, but can be studied through...

  5. Electron transfer in proteins: theory, applications and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saen-Oon, Suwipa; Lucas, Maria Fatima; Guallar, Victor

    2013-10-07

    The study of electron transfer (ET) by means of computational techniques has experienced a great development in the last few decades. In particular, understanding the atomic details of its mechanism in complex biological systems is currently possible with a large range of different in silico modelling tools. We review here some theories and representative major contributions to this development. We also underline some of our group's main inputs, focusing on long range and protein-protein electron transfer, and analyse future perspectives. At the end of the article, we emphasize the importance of the basic electron transfer knowledge in the frame of medical and bioengineering applications: mitochondrial therapeutic targets, bioengineering for clean energy, and biosensors.

  6. Engineered electron-transfer chain in photosystem 1 based photocathodes outperforms electron-transfer rates in natural photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothe, Tim; Pöller, Sascha; Zhao, Fangyuan; Fortgang, Philippe; Rögner, Matthias; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Plumeré, Nicolas

    2014-08-25

    Photosystem 1 (PS1) triggers the most energetic light-induced charge-separation step in nature and the in vivo electron-transfer rates approach 50 e(-)  s(-1)  PS1(-1). Photoelectrochemical devices based on this building block have to date underperformed with respect to their semiconductor counterparts or to natural photosynthesis in terms of electron-transfer rates. We present a rational design of a redox hydrogel film to contact PS1 to an electrode for photocurrent generation. We exploit the pH-dependent properties of a poly(vinyl)imidazole Os(bispyridine)2Cl polymer to tune the redox hydrogel film for maximum electron-transfer rates under optimal conditions for PS1 activity. The PS1-containing redox hydrogel film displays electron-transfer rates of up to 335±14 e(-)  s(-1)  PS1(-1), which considerably exceeds the rates observed in natural photosynthesis or in other semiartificial systems. Under O2 supersaturation, photocurrents of 322±19 μA cm(-2) were achieved. The photocurrents are only limited by mass transport of the terminal electron acceptor (O2). This implies that even higher electron-transfer rates may be achieved with PS1-based systems in general. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Elucidating thermodynamic parameters for electron transfer proteins using isothermal titration calorimetry: application to the nitrogenase Fe protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørlie, Morten; Chan, Jeannine M; Wang, Haijang; Seefeldt, Lance C; Parker, Vernon D

    2003-05-01

    Establishing thermodynamic parameters for electron transfer reactions involving redox proteins is essential for a complete description of these important reactions. While various methods have been developed for measuring the Gibbs free energy change (Delta G(HR) or E(m)) for the protein half-reactions, deconvolution of the respective contributions of enthalpy (Delta H(HR)) and entropy (Delta S(HR)) changes is much more challenging. In the present work, an approach is developed using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) that allows accurate determination of all of these thermodynamic parameters for protein electron transfer half-reactions. The approach was validated for essentially irreversible and reversible electron transfer reactions between well-characterized mediators and between mediators and the protein cytochrome c. In all cases, the measured thermodynamic parameters were in excellent agreement with parameters determined by electrochemical methods. Finally, the calorimetry approach was used to determine thermodynamic parameters for electron transfer reactions of the nitrogenase Fe protein [4Fe-4S](2+/+) couple in the absence or presence of MgADP or MgATP. The E(m) value was found to change from -290 mV in the absence of nucleotides to -381 mV with MgATP and -423 mV with MgADP, consistent with earlier values. For the first time, the enthalpy (Delta H(HR)) and entropy (Delta S(HR)) contributions for each case were established, revealing shifts in the contribution of each thermodynamic parameter induced by nucleotide binding. The results are discussed in the context of current models for electron transfer in nitrogenase.

  8. Density matrix theory for reductive electron transfer in DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinekathoefer, Ulrich [Institut fuer Physik, Technische Universitaet Chemnitz, 09107 Chemnitz (Germany)]. E-mail: kleinekathoefer@physik.tu-chemnitz.de; Li Guangqi [Institut fuer Physik, Technische Universitaet Chemnitz, 09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Schreiber, Michael [Institut fuer Physik, Technische Universitaet Chemnitz, 09107 Chemnitz (Germany)

    2006-07-15

    Reductive electron transfer in DNA is investigated using the reduced density matrix formalism. For reductive electron transfer in DNA an electron donor is attached to the DNA. The photo-excitation of this donor by ultrashort laser pulses is described explicitly in the current investigation, as well as the transfer of the electron from the donor to the acceptor. In addition, the effect of an additional bridge molecule is studied. All these studies are performed using three different quantum master equations: a Markovian one and two non-Markovian ones derived from either a time-local or a time-nonlocal formalism. The deviations caused by these three different approaches are discussed.

  9. Interfacial Electron Transfer and Transient Photoconductivity Studied with Terahertz Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milot, Rebecca Lee

    the porphyrin ring and degree of fluorination of ring substituents were analyzed. Due to the high reduction potentials of these sensitizers, injection into TiO2 was generally not observed. Injection timescales from the porphyrins into SnO2 depended strongly on the identity of the central substituent and were affected by competition with excited-state deactivation processes. The carboxylate anchoring group is commonly used to bind DSSC sensitizers to metal oxide surfaces but is typically not stable under the aqueous and oxidative conditions required for water oxidation. Electron injection efficiency and water stability of several alternative anchoring groups, including phosphonic acid, hydroxamic acid, acerylacetone, and boronic acid, were evaluated. While all of the anchoring groups exhibited water stability superior to carboxylate, the hydroxamate anchor had the best combination of ease of handling and electron injection efficiency. The effects on photoconductivity due to metal oxide morphology and the addition of dopants were also analyzed. Mixtures of anatase and rutile TiO 2 nanoparticles are known to exhibit cooperative effects which increase the efficiency of DSSCs and photocatalysis relative to the pure-phase materials. Through analysis of TRTS measurements, the mechanism of this synergistic effect was found to involve electron transfer from the lower-mobility, higher surface area rutile nanoparticles to anatase particles, resulting in a higher charge collection efficiency. In addition to morphology, doping has been investigated as a means of expanding the spectral range of visible absorption of photocatalysts. Doping ZnO nanowires with manganese(II) was found to significantly decrease the electron mobility, and doping with cobalt(II) increased the timescale for electron trapping. These differences can be understood by considering the changes to the band structure of ZnO effected by the dopants. Preliminary analyses of the solvent and electrolyte dependence on

  10. Electron transfer processes occurring on platinum neural stimulating electrodes: a tutorial on the i(V e) profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumsa, Doe W.; Bhadra, Narendra; Hudak, Eric M.; Kelley, Shawn C.; Untereker, Darrel F.; Mortimer, J. Thomas

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this tutorial is to encourage members of the neuroprosthesis community to incorporate electron transfer processes into their thinking and provide them with the tools to do so when they design and work with neurostimulating devices. The focus of this article is on platinum because it is the most used electrode metal for devices in commercial use. The i(V e) profile or cyclic voltammogram contains information about electron transfer processes that can occur when the electrode-electrolyte interface, V e, is at a specific potential, and assumed to be near steady-state conditions. For the engineer/designer this means that if the potential is not in the range of a specific electron transfer process, that process cannot occur. An i(V e) profile, recorded at sweep rates greater than 0.1 mVs-1, approximates steady-state conditions. Rapid transient potential excursions, like that seen with neural stimulation pulses, may be too fast for the reaction to occur, however, this means that if the potential is in the range of a specific electron transfer process it may occur and should be considered. The approach described here can be used to describe the thermodynamic electron transfer processes on other candidate electrode metals, e.g. stainless steel, iridium, carbon-based, etc.

  11. Sustaining reactivity of Fe(0) for nitrate reduction via electron transfer between dissolved Fe(2+) and surface iron oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Luchao; yang, Li; Wang, Haibo; Hu, Xuexiang; Chen, Zhan; Hu, Chun

    2016-05-05

    The mechanism of the effects of Fe(2+)(aq) on the reduction of NO3(-) by Fe(0) was investigated. The effects of initial pH on the rate of NO3(-) reduction and the Fe(0) surface characteristics revealed Fe(2+)(aq) and the characteristics of minerals on the surface of Fe(0) played an important role in NO3(-) reduction. Both NO3(-) reduction and the decrease of Fe(2+)(aq) exhibited similar kinetics and were promoted by each other. This promotion was associated with the types of the surface iron oxides of Fe(0). Additionally, further reduction of NO3(-) produced more surface iron oxides, supplying more active sites for Fe(2+)(aq), resulting in more electron transfer between Fe(2+) and surface iron oxides and a higher reaction rate. Using the isotope specificity of (57)Fe Mossbauer spectroscopy, it was verified that the Fe(2+)(aq) was continuously converted into Fe(3+) oxides on the surface of Fe(0) and then converted into Fe3O4 via electron transfer between Fe(2+) and the pre-existing surface Fe(3+) oxides. Electrochemistry measurements confirmed that the spontaneous electron transfer between the Fe(2+) and structural Fe(3+) species accelerated the interfacial electron transfer between the Fe species and NO3(-). This study provides a new insight into the interaction between Fe species and contaminants and interface electron transfer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Electron transfer processes occurring on platinum neural stimulating electrodes: a tutorial on the i(V e) profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumsa, Doe W; Bhadra, Narendra; Hudak, Eric M; Kelley, Shawn C; Untereker, Darrel F; Mortimer, J Thomas

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this tutorial is to encourage members of the neuroprosthesis community to incorporate electron transfer processes into their thinking and provide them with the tools to do so when they design and work with neurostimulating devices. The focus of this article is on platinum because it is the most used electrode metal for devices in commercial use. The i(V e) profile or cyclic voltammogram contains information about electron transfer processes that can occur when the electrode-electrolyte interface, V e, is at a specific potential, and assumed to be near steady-state conditions. For the engineer/designer this means that if the potential is not in the range of a specific electron transfer process, that process cannot occur. An i(V e) profile, recorded at sweep rates greater than 0.1 mVs(-1), approximates steady-state conditions. Rapid transient potential excursions, like that seen with neural stimulation pulses, may be too fast for the reaction to occur, however, this means that if the potential is in the range of a specific electron transfer process it may occur and should be considered. The approach described here can be used to describe the thermodynamic electron transfer processes on other candidate electrode metals, e.g. stainless steel, iridium, carbon-based, etc.

  13. Proton-coupled electron transfer dynamics in the catalytic mechanism of a [NiFe]-hydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Brandon L; Wu, Chang-Hao; McTernan, Patrick M; Adams, Michael W W; Dyer, R Brian

    2015-04-08

    The movement of protons and electrons is common to the synthesis of all chemical fuels such as H2. Hydrogenases, which catalyze the reversible reduction of protons, necessitate transport and reactivity between protons and electrons, but a detailed mechanism has thus far been elusive. Here, we use a phototriggered chemical potential jump method to rapidly initiate the proton reduction activity of a [NiFe] hydrogenase. Coupling the photochemical initiation approach to nanosecond transient infrared and visible absorbance spectroscopy afforded direct observation of interfacial electron transfer and active site chemistry. Tuning of intramolecular proton transport by pH and isotopic substitution revealed distinct concerted and stepwise proton-coupled electron transfer mechanisms in catalysis. The observed heterogeneity in the two sequential proton-associated reduction processes suggests a highly engineered protein environment modulating catalysis and implicates three new reaction intermediates; Nia-I, Nia-D, and Nia-SR(-). The results establish an elementary mechanistic understanding of catalysis in a [NiFe] hydrogenase with implications in enzymatic proton-coupled electron transfer and biomimetic catalyst design.

  14. Analysis of the role of intraprotein electron transfer in photoreactivation by DNA photolyase in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavakli, I Halil; Sancar, Aziz

    2004-12-07

    Escherichia coli DNA photolyase contains FADH(-) as the catalytic cofactor. The cofactor becomes oxidized to the FADH(*) blue neutral radical during purification. The E-FADH(*) form of the enzyme is catalytically inert but can be converted to the active E-FADH(-) form by a photoreduction reaction that involves intraprotein electron transfer from Trp306. It is thought that the E-FADH(*) form is also transiently generated during pyrimidine dimer repair by photoinduced electron transfer, and it has been suggested that the FADH(*) that is generated after each round of catalysis must be photoreduced before the enzyme can engage in subsequent rounds of repair. In this study, we introduced the Trp306Phe mutation into the chromosomal gene and tested the non-photoreducible W306F mutant for photorepair in vivo. We find that both wild-type and W306F mutant photolyases carry out at least 25 rounds of photorepair at the same rate. We conclude that photoreduction by intraprotein electron transfer is not part of the photolyase photocycle under physiological conditions.

  15. Folic acid bio-inspired route for facile synthesis of AuPt nanodendrites as enhanced electrocatalysts for methanol and ethanol oxidation reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ai-Jun; Ju, Ke-Jian; Zhang, Qian-Li; Song, Pei; Wei, Jie; Feng, Jiu-Ju

    2016-09-01

    Folic acid (FA), as an important biomolecule in cell division and growth, is firstly employed as the structure director and stabilizing agent for controlled synthesis of uniform Au65Pt35 nanodendrites (NDs) by a one-pot wet-chemical bio-inspired route at room temperature. No pre-seed, template, organic solvent, polymer, surfactant or complex instrument is involved. The products are mainly characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The architectures have enlarged electrochemically active surface area (60.6 m2 gPt-1), enhanced catalytic activity and durability for methanol and ethanol oxidation in contrast with commercial Pt black and the other AuPt alloys by tuning the molar ratios of Au to Pt (e.g., Au31Pt69 and Au82Pt18 nanoparticles). This strategy would be applied to fabricate other bimetallic nanocatalysts in fuel cells.

  16. Electron transfer reduction of nitriles using SmI2-Et3N-H2O: synthetic utility and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szostak, Michal; Sautier, Brice; Spain, Malcolm; Procter, David J

    2014-02-21

    The first general reduction of nitriles to primary amines under single electron transfer conditions is demonstrated using SmI2 (Kagan's reagent) activated with Lewis bases. The reaction features excellent functional group tolerance and represents an attractive alternative to the use of pyrophoric alkali metal hydrides. Notably, the electron transfer from Sm(II) to CN functional groups generates imidoyl-type radicals from bench stable nitrile precursors.

  17. C-type cytochromes in the photosynthetic electron transfer pathways in green sulfur bacteria and heliobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azai, Chihiro; Tsukatani, Yusuke; Itoh, Shigeru; Oh-oka, Hirozo

    2010-06-01

    Green sulfur bacteria and heliobacteria are strictly anaerobic phototrophs that have homodimeric type 1 reaction center complexes. Within these complexes, highly reducing substances are produced through an initial charge separation followed by electron transfer reactions driven by light energy absorption. In order to attain efficient energy conversion, it is important for the photooxidized reaction center to be rapidly rereduced. Green sulfur bacteria utilize reduced inorganic sulfur compounds (sulfide, thiosulfate, and/or sulfur) as electron sources for their anoxygenic photosynthetic growth. Membrane-bound and soluble cytochromes c play essential roles in the supply of electrons from sulfur oxidation pathways to the P840 reaction center. In the case of gram-positive heliobacteria, the photooxidized P800 reaction center is rereduced by cytochrome c-553 (PetJ) whose N-terminal cysteine residue is modified with fatty acid chains anchored to the cytoplasmic membrane.

  18. Polymer glass transitions switch electron transfer in individual molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siekierzycka, J.R.; Hippius, C.; Würthner, F.; Williams, R.M.; Brouwer, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Essentially complete photoinduced electron transfer quenching of the fluorescence of a perylene−calixarene compound occurs in poly(methyl acrylate) and poly(vinyl acetate) above their glass transition temperatures (T-g), but the fluorescence is completely recovered upon cooling the polymer matrix to

  19. Electron transfer flavoprotein deficiency: Functional and molecular aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiff, M; Froissart, R; Olsen, Rikke Katrine Jentoft

    2006-01-01

    Multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD) is a recessively inherited metabolic disorder that can be due to a deficiency of electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) or its dehydrogenase (ETF-ubiquinone oxidoreductase). ETF is a mitochondrial matrix protein consisting of alpha- (30kDa) and beta...

  20. Direct interspecies electron transfer between Geobacter metallireducens and Methanosarcina barkeri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Liu, Fanghua;

    2014-01-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) is potentially an effective form of syntrophy in methanogenic communities, but little is known about the diversity of methanogens capable of DIET. The ability of Methanosarcina barkeri, to participate in DIET was evaluated in co-culture with Geobacter...

  1. Adsorption and Interfacial Electron Transfer of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Allan Glargaard; Boisen, Anja; Nielsen, Jens Ulrik

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the adsorption and electron-transfer dynamics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) iso-l-cytochrome c adsorbed on Au(lll) electrodes in aqueous phosphate buffer media. This cytochrome possesses a thiol group dos e to the protein surface (Cysl02) suitable for linking the protein...

  2. Solvent-Controlled Acceleration of Electron Transfer in Binary Mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pugžlys, Audrius; Hartog, Harald P. den; Baltuška, Andrius; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Umapathy, Siva; Wiersma, Douwe A.

    2001-01-01

    We report a 5-fold acceleration of the backward intermolecular electron transfer between a rhodamine 800 dye molecule and N,N-dimethylaniline (DMA). This effect results from the controlled variation of the solvent dynamical properties in binary mixtures of DMA and acetonitrile. The observed

  3. Dimers of Azurin as model systems for electron transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongh, Thyra Estrid de

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes the investigation of crosslinked complexes of the blue copper protein azurin by means of spectroscopic techniques such as Uv-Vis and NMR as well as by X-ray crystallography. These non-physiological dimers serve as model systems for interprotein electron transfer (ET) and allow

  4. Electron transfer in syntrophic communities of anaerobic bacteria and archaea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stams, A.J.M.; Plugge, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    Interspecies electron transfer is a key process in methanogenic and sulphate-reducing environments. Bacteria and archaea that live in syntrophic communities take advantage of the metabolic abilities of their syntrophic partner to overcome energy barriers and break down compounds that they cannot dig

  5. The intramolecular electron transfer between copper sites of nitrite reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Eady, R R; Abraham, Z H

    1998-01-01

    The intramolecular electron transfer (ET) between the type 1 Cu(I) and the type 2 Cu(II) sites of Alcaligenes xylosoxidans dissimilatory nitrite reductase (AxNiR) has been studied in order to compare it with the analogous process taking place in ascorbate oxidase (AO). This internal process...

  6. Cation-modulated electron-transfer channel: H-atom transfer vs proton-coupled electron transfer with a variable electron-transfer channel in acylamide units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaohua; Bu, Yuxiang

    2007-08-08

    The mechanism of proton transfer (PT)/electron transfer (ET) in acylamide units was explored theoretically using density functional theory in a representative model (a cyclic coupling mode between formamide and the N-dehydrogenated formamidic radical, FF). In FF, PT/ET normally occurs via a seven-center cyclic proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) mechanism with a N-->N PT and an O-->O ET. However, when different hydrated metal ions are bound to the two oxygen sites of FF, the PT/ET mechanism may significantly change. In addition to their inhibition of PT/ET rate, the hydrated metal ions can effectively regulate the FF PT/ET cooperative mechanism to produce a single pathway hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) or a flexible proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) mechanism by changing the ET channel. The regulation essentially originates from the change in the O...O bond strength in the transition state, subject to the binding ability of the hydrated metal ions. In general, the high valent metal ions and those with large binding energies can promote HAT, and the low valent metal ions and those with small binding energies favor PCET. Hydration may reduce the Lewis acidity of cations, and thus favor PCET. Good correlations among the binding energies, barrier heights, spin density distributions, O...O contacts, and hydrated metal ion properties have been found, which can be used to interpret the transition in the PT/ET mechanism. These findings regarding the modulation of the PT/ET pathway via hydrated metal ions may provide useful information for a greater understanding of PT/ET cooperative mechanisms, and a possible method for switching conductance in nanoelectronic devices.

  7. Sub-Tc electron transfer at the Hg-HTSC/liquid-electrolyte interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Stephen J; Le-Poul, Nicolas; Edwards, Peter P; Peacock, Graeme

    2003-04-02

    The cyclic voltammetry of ferrocene (CpFeCp) adsorbed as a monolayer of CpFeCpCO2(CH2)8SH, self-assembled onto the Hg-based high-temperature superconductor Hg0.8Re0.2Ba2Ca2Cu3O10 (Tc = 134 K), via an ultrathin (3.1 nm) Ag film, has been performed in liquid electrolyte (16:7:1 EtCl/THF/2-MeTHF; 0.2 M LiBF4) at a range of temperatures spanning the superconducting transition. Kinetic analysis based on the Marcus density-of-states theory affords standard heterogeneous rate constants, k degrees , for the ferrocene/ferricinium electron-transfer reaction. Casting these data in Arrhenius form yields a value of k degrees (273 K) = 357 s-1, which is 10-fold lower than that previously reported for the same reaction at a metal electrode in a similar electrolyte, while the reorganizational energy of 0.92 eV for the superconductor interface is very close to that for the related metal interface of 0.95 eV. There is, however, no effect of the onset of superconductivity on the electron-transfer rate for this system; the Arrhenius plot is linear through Tc. This is the first sub-Tc electrochemistry of any kind on a Hg-based superconductor and demonstrates the ease with which kinetic data can be obtained for these very high-Tc materials, opening the way for the routine study of a range of electron-transfer reactions as novel probes of the superconducting state.

  8. Charge-dependent dissociation of insulin cations via ion/ion electron transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Gunawardena, Harsha P.; Huang, Teng-Yi; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2008-10-01

    The dissociation reactions of various charge states of insulin cations obtained directly from nano-electrospray were investigated as a result of ion/ion electron transfer from azobenzene anions. Data were collected with and without simultaneous ion trap collisional excitation of the first generation charge-reduced product during the ion/ion reaction period. Neither separation of the two constituent chains nor cleavages within the loop defined by the disulfide bridges were observed under normal electron transfer dissociation (ETD) conditions for any of the charge states studied. However, substantial sequence coverage (exocyclic region: 82.6%; entire protein: 38.8%) outside the ring structure was obtained for insulin +6, while only limited coverage (exocyclic: 43.5%; entire protein: 20.4%) was observed for insulin +5 and no dissociation, aside from low abundance side-chain losses, was noted for insulin +4 and +3 in the normal ETD spectra. When the first generation charge-reduced precursor ions were subjected to collisional activation during the ion/ion reaction period, higher sequence coverages were obtained for both insulin +5 (entire protein: 34.7%) and +4 (entire protein: 20.4%) with backbone cleavages occurring within the loop defined by the disulfide bonds. Dissociation of insulin +3 was not significantly improved by the additional activation. Separation of the two constituent chains resulting from cleavages of both of the two disulfide bridges that link the chains was observed for insulin +6, +5, and +4 when the charge-reduced species were activated. The dissociation of disulfide linkages in this study suggests that as the charge state decreases, disulfide bond cleavages dominate over N-C[alpha] bond cleavages in the electron transfer dissociation process.

  9. Electrochemical evaluation of electron transfer kinetics of high and low redox potential laccases on gold electrode surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frasconi, Marco [Department of Chemistry and Drug Technologies, Sapienza University of Rome, P.le Aldo Moro, 5 00185 Rome (Italy); Boer, Harry; Koivula, Anu [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Mazzei, Franco, E-mail: franco.mazzei@uniroma1.i [Department of Chemistry and Drug Technologies, Sapienza University of Rome, P.le Aldo Moro, 5 00185 Rome (Italy)

    2010-12-30

    Laccases and other multicopper oxidases are reported to be able to carry out direct electron transfer reactions when immobilized onto electrode surface. This allows detailed research of their electron transfer mechanisms. We have recently characterized the kinetic properties of four laccases in homogenous solution and immobilized onto an electrode surface with respect to a set of different redox mediators. In this paper we report the direct electron transfer of four purified laccases from Trametes hirsuta (ThL), Trametes versicolor (TvL), Melanocarpus albomyces (r-MaL) and Rhus vernicifera (RvL), by trapping the proteins within an electrochemically inert polymer of tributylmethyl phosphonium chloride coating a gold electrode surface. In particular, we have characterized the steps involved in the laccases electron transfer mechanism as well as the factors limiting each step. During the voltammetric experiments, non-turnover Faradic signals with midpoint potential of about 790 and 400 mV were observed for high potential laccases, ThL and TvL, corresponding to redox transformations of the T1 site and the T2/T3 cluster of the enzyme, respectively, whereas low redox potential laccases r-MaL and RvL shown a redox couple with a midpoint potential around 400 mV. The electrocatalytic properties of these laccase modified electrodes for the reduction of oxygen have been evaluated demonstrating significative direct electron transfer kinetics. The biocatalytic activity of laccases was also monitored in the presence of a well known inhibitor, sodium azide. On the basis of the experimental results, a hypothesis about the electronic pathway for intramolecular electron transfer characterizing laccases has been proposed.

  10. The Role of Microbial Electron Transfer in the Coevolution of the Biosphere and Geosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelen, Benjamin I; Giovannelli, Donato; Falkowski, Paul G

    2016-09-01

    All life on Earth is dependent on biologically mediated electron transfer (i.e., redox) reactions that are far from thermodynamic equilibrium. Biological redox reactions originally evolved in prokaryotes and ultimately, over the first ∼2.5 billion years of Earth's history, formed a global electronic circuit. To maintain the circuit on a global scale requires that oxidants and reductants be transported; the two major planetary wires that connect global metabolism are geophysical fluids-the atmosphere and the oceans. Because all organisms exchange gases with the environment, the evolution of redox reactions has been a major force in modifying the chemistry at Earth's surface. Here we briefly review the discovery and consequences of redox reactions in microbes with a specific focus on the coevolution of life and geochemical phenomena.

  11. On the Hopping Efficiency of Nanoparticles in the Electron Transfer across Self‐Assembled Monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Feng; Khan, Kamran; Liang, Jing‐Hong

    2013-01-01

    Redox reactions of solvated molecular species at gold‐electrode surfaces modified by electrochemically inactive self‐assembled molecular monolayers (SAMs) are found to be activated by introducing Au nanoparticles (NPs) covalently bound to the SAM to form a reactive Au–alkanedithiol–NP–molecule hy......Redox reactions of solvated molecular species at gold‐electrode surfaces modified by electrochemically inactive self‐assembled molecular monolayers (SAMs) are found to be activated by introducing Au nanoparticles (NPs) covalently bound to the SAM to form a reactive Au......–alkanedithiol–NP–molecule hybrid entity. The NP appears to relay long‐range electron transfer (ET) so that the rate of the redox reaction may be as efficient as directly on a bare Au electrode, even though the ET distance is increased by several nanometers. In this study, we have employed a fast redox reaction of surface...

  12. Electron transfer reactivity of the Arabidopsis thaliana sulfhydryl oxidase AtErv1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Vitu, Elvira; Wherland, Scot

    2009-01-01

    transfer from the active site disulfide radical. The semiquinone and the remaining disulfide radicals then reacted by much slower, 40 ms to 40 s, inter-homodimer electron transfer reactions, culminating in reduced flavin and dithiols. The dithiols were then subject to oxidation by enzyme molecules via...... to yield disulfide radicals, RSS*R-. Rates and absorption changes due to formation or decay of RSS*R- and the flavin quinone, semiquinone, and hydroquinone were measured and analyzed. During the first 100 micros following the pulse, the flavin was reduced to the semiquinone by intramolecular electron...

  13. Preferred sites and pathways for electron transfer in blue copper proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1988-01-01

    Long-range electron transfer reactions proceed within and between metalloproteins at relatively fast rates and with marked specificities. The blue single copper proteins are well known electron carriers with their redox center being of limited accessibility to solvent and solutes. The question......, E.T. proceeds via an extended imidazole ring system, and in plastocyanin and stellacyanin via a weakly coupled pi-system. Therefore, a case emerges for suggesting that this is the common feature of the long-distance intramolecular E.T. in this class of metalloproteins. These pathways are most...

  14. Bioinspired swimming simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Michel; Iollo, Angelo

    2016-10-01

    We present a method to simulate the flow past bioinspired swimmers starting from pictures of an actual fish. The overall approach requires i) a skeleton graph generation to get a level-set function from pictures; ii) optimal transportation to obtain the velocity on the body surface; iii) flow simulations realized with a Cartesian method based on penalization. This technique can be used to automate modeling swimming motion from data collected by biologists. We illustrate this paradigm by simulating the swimming of a mackerel fish.

  15. Designing bioinspired superoleophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Philip S.; Bhushan, Bharat

    2016-01-01

    Nature provides a range of functional surfaces, for example, water-repellent or superhydrophobic surfaces, most common among them the lotus leaf. While water-repellency is widespread in nature, oil-repellency is typically limited to surfaces submerged in water, such as fish scales. To achieve oleophobicity in air, inspiration must be taken from natural structures and chemistries that are not readily available in nature need to be introduced. Researchers usually turn to fluorinated materials to provide the low surface energy that, when combined with bioinspired surface topography, is the key to unlocking oil-repellency. This review presents the state-of-the-art in the fabrication of superoleophobic surfaces.

  16. Combining Bio-inspired Sensing with Bio-inspired Locomotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaikh, Danish; Hallam, John; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob

    In this paper we present a preliminary Braitenberg vehicle–like approach to combine bio-inspired audition with bio-inspired quadruped locomotion in simulation. Locomotion gaits of the salamander–like robot Salamandra robotica are modified by a lizard’s peripheral auditory system model that modula......In this paper we present a preliminary Braitenberg vehicle–like approach to combine bio-inspired audition with bio-inspired quadruped locomotion in simulation. Locomotion gaits of the salamander–like robot Salamandra robotica are modified by a lizard’s peripheral auditory system model...... that modulates the parameters of the locomotor central pattern generators. We present phonotactic performance results of the simulated lizard-salamander hybrid robot....

  17. Combining Bio-inspired Sensing with Bio-inspired Locomotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaikh, Danish; Hallam, John; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob

    In this paper we present a preliminary Braitenberg vehicle–like approach to combine bio-inspired audition with bio-inspired quadruped locomotion in simulation. Locomotion gaits of the salamander–like robot Salamandra robotica are modified by a lizard’s peripheral auditory system model that modula......In this paper we present a preliminary Braitenberg vehicle–like approach to combine bio-inspired audition with bio-inspired quadruped locomotion in simulation. Locomotion gaits of the salamander–like robot Salamandra robotica are modified by a lizard’s peripheral auditory system model...... that modulates the parameters of the locomotor central pattern generators. We present phonotactic performance results of the simulated lizard-salamander hybrid robot....

  18. Synthetic Applications of Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, Emily C; Knowles, Robert R

    2016-08-16

    Redox events in which an electron and proton are exchanged in a concerted elementary step are commonly referred to as proton-coupled electron transfers (PCETs). PCETs are known to operate in numerous important biological redox processes, as well as recent inorganic technologies for small molecule activation. These studies suggest that PCET catalysis might also function as a general mode of substrate activation in organic synthesis. Over the past three years, our group has worked to advance this hypothesis and to demonstrate the synthetic utility of PCET through the development of novel catalytic radical chemistries. The central aim of these efforts has been to demonstrate the ability of PCET to homolytically activate a wide variety of common organic functional groups that are energetically inaccessible using known molecular H atom transfer catalysts. To do so, we made use of a simple formalism first introduced by Mayer and co-workers that allowed us to predict the thermodynamic capacity of any oxidant/base or reductant/acid pair to formally add or remove H· from a given substrate. With this insight, we were able to rationally select catalyst combinations thermodynamically competent to homolyze the extraordinarily strong E-H σ-bonds found in many common protic functional groups (BDFEs > 100 kcal/mol) or to form unusually weak bonds to hydrogen via the reductive action of common organic π-systems (BDFEs < 35 kcal/mol). These ideas were reduced to practice through the development of new catalyst systems for reductive PCET activations of ketones and oxidative PCET activation of amide N-H bonds to directly furnish reactive ketyl and amidyl radicals, respectively. In both systems, the reaction outcomes were found to be successfully predicted using the effective bond strength formalism, suggesting that these simple thermochemical considerations can provide useful and actionable insights into PCET reaction design. The ability of PCET catalysis to control

  19. Conduction mechanism studies on electron transfer of disordered system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐慧; 宋祎璞; 李新梅

    2002-01-01

    Using the negative eigenvalue theory and the infinite order perturbation theory, a new method was developed to solve the eigenvectors of disordered systems. The result shows that eigenvectors change from the extended state to the localized state with the increase of the site points and the disordered degree of the system. When electric field is exerted, the electrons transfer from one localized state to another one. The conductivity is induced by the electron transfer. The authors derive the formula of electron conductivity and find the electron hops between localized states whose energies are close to each other, whereas localized positions differ from each other greatly. At low temperature the disordered system has the character of the negative differential dependence of resistivity and temperature.

  20. Aza-heterocyclic Receptors for Direct Electron Transfer Hemoglobin Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinay; Kashyap, D. M. Nikhila; Hebbar, Suraj; Swetha, R.; Prasad, Sujay; Kamala, T.; Srikanta, S. S.; Krishnaswamy, P. R.; Bhat, Navakanta

    2017-01-01

    Direct Electron Transfer biosensors, facilitating direct communication between the biomolecule of interest and electrode surface, are preferable compared to enzymatic and mediator based sensors. Although hemoglobin (Hb) contains four redox active iron centres, direct detection is not possible due to inaccessibility of iron centres and formation of dimers, blocking electron transfer. Through the coordination of iron with aza-heterocyclic receptors - pyridine and imidazole - we report a cost effective, highly sensitive and simple electrochemical Hb sensor using cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The receptor can be either in the form of liquid micro-droplet mixed with blood or dry chemistry embedded in paper membrane on top of screen printed carbon electrodes. We demonstrate excellent linearity and robustness against interference using clinical samples. A truly point of care technology is demonstrated by integrating disposable test strips with handheld reader, enabling finger prick to result in less than a minute. PMID:28169325

  1. Multi-Element Electron-Transfer Optical Detector System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A multi-element optical detector system includes an electrically resistive screen that is substantially transparent to radiation energy having a wavelength of interest. A plurality of electron transfer elements (e.g., a low work function photoactive material or a carbon nanotube (CNT)-based element) are provided with each having a first end and a second end. The first end of each element is spaced apart from the screen by an evacuated gap. When the radiation energy passes through the screen with a bias voltage applied thereto, transfer of electrons through each element is induced from the first end to the second end such that a quantity indicative of the electrons transferred through each element can be detected.

  2. Direct interspecies electron transfer between Geobacter metallireducens and Methanosarcina barkeri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Liu, Fanghua

    2014-01-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) is potentially an effective form of syntrophy in methanogenic communities, but little is known about the diversity of methanogens capable of DIET. The ability of Methanosarcina barkeri, to participate in DIET was evaluated in co-culture with Geobacter...... metallireducens. Co-cultures formed aggregates that shared electrons via DIET during the stoichiometric conversion of ethanol to methane. Co-cultures could not be initiated with a pilin-deficient G. metallireducens, suggesting that long-range electron transfer along pili was important for DIET. Amendments...... physical contact was not necessary for interspecies H2 transfer. M. barkeri is the second methanogen found to accept electrons via DIET and the first methanogen known to be capable of using either H2 or electrons derived from DIET for CO2 reduction. Furthermore, M. barkeri is genetically tractable, making...

  3. Aza-heterocyclic Receptors for Direct Electron Transfer Hemoglobin Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinay; Kashyap, D. M. Nikhila; Hebbar, Suraj; Swetha, R.; Prasad, Sujay; Kamala, T.; Srikanta, S. S.; Krishnaswamy, P. R.; Bhat, Navakanta

    2017-02-01

    Direct Electron Transfer biosensors, facilitating direct communication between the biomolecule of interest and electrode surface, are preferable compared to enzymatic and mediator based sensors. Although hemoglobin (Hb) contains four redox active iron centres, direct detection is not possible due to inaccessibility of iron centres and formation of dimers, blocking electron transfer. Through the coordination of iron with aza-heterocyclic receptors - pyridine and imidazole - we report a cost effective, highly sensitive and simple electrochemical Hb sensor using cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The receptor can be either in the form of liquid micro-droplet mixed with blood or dry chemistry embedded in paper membrane on top of screen printed carbon electrodes. We demonstrate excellent linearity and robustness against interference using clinical samples. A truly point of care technology is demonstrated by integrating disposable test strips with handheld reader, enabling finger prick to result in less than a minute.

  4. Photoinduced Reductive Electron Transfer in LNA:DNA Hybrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenge, Ulrike; Wengel, Jesper; Wagenknecht, Hans-Achim

    2012-01-01

    Lock it, but not too much: LNA units (locked or bridging nucleic acids) in LNA:DNA hybrids lead to a negative effect on electron transfer (ET), but they also force the nucleic acid structure in the A-type double helix, which allows a better base stacking than the normal B-type and thus positively...... influences the ET. This result is significant for the design of nucleic acids of molecular electronics....

  5. Nanoscale and single-molecule interfacial electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Allan Glargaard; Wackerbarth, Hainer; Nielsen, Jens Ulrik

    2003-01-01

    Electrochemical science and technology in the 21st century have reached high levels of sophistication. A fundamental quantum mechanical theoretical frame for interfacial electrochemical electron transfer (ET) was introduced by Revaz Dogonadze. This frame has remained for four decades as a basis...... scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and single-electron tunneling (SET, or Coulomb blockade) in electrochemical. systems directly in aqueous electrolyte solution and at room temperature. We illustrate the new theoretical formalism and its perspectives by recent cases of electrochemical SET, negative...

  6. Quantum Mechanical Hysteresis and the Electron Transfer Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Etchegoin, P G

    2004-01-01

    We study a simple quantum mechanical symmetric donor-acceptor model for electron transfer (ET) with coupling to internal deformations. The model contains several basic properties found in biological ET in enzymes and photosynthetic centers; it produces tunnelling with hysteresis thus providing a simple explanation for the slowness of the reversed rate and the near 100% efficiency of ET in many biological systems. The model also provides a conceptual framework for the development of molecular electronics memory elements based on electrostatic architectures.

  7. Dissipative two-electron transfer: A numerical renormalization group study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornow, Sabine; Bulla, Ralf; Anders, Frithjof B.; Nitzan, Abraham

    2008-07-01

    We investigate nonequilibrium two-electron transfer in a model redox system represented by a two-site extended Hubbard model and embedded in a dissipative environment. The influence of the electron-electron interactions and the coupling to a dissipative bosonic bath on the electron transfer is studied in different temperature regimes. At high temperatures, Marcus transfer rates are evaluated, and at low temperatures, we calculate equilibrium and nonequilibrium population probabilities of the donor and acceptor with the nonperturbative numerical renormalization group approach. We obtain the nonequilibrium dynamics of the system prepared in an initial state of two electrons at the donor site and identify conditions under which the electron transfer involves one concerted two-electron step or two sequential single-electron steps. The rates of the sequential transfer depend nonmonotonically on the difference between the intersite and on-site Coulomb interaction, which become renormalized in the presence of the bosonic bath. If this difference is much larger than the hopping matrix element, the temperature as well as the reorganization energy, simultaneous transfer of both electrons between donor and acceptor can be observed.

  8. Electron transfer statistics and thermal fluctuations in molecular junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Himangshu Prabal; Harbola, Upendra

    2015-02-28

    We derive analytical expressions for probability distribution function (PDF) for electron transport in a simple model of quantum junction in presence of thermal fluctuations. Our approach is based on the large deviation theory combined with the generating function method. For large number of electrons transferred, the PDF is found to decay exponentially in the tails with different rates due to applied bias. This asymmetry in the PDF is related to the fluctuation theorem. Statistics of fluctuations are analyzed in terms of the Fano factor. Thermal fluctuations play a quantitative role in determining the statistics of electron transfer; they tend to suppress the average current while enhancing the fluctuations in particle transfer. This gives rise to both bunching and antibunching phenomena as determined by the Fano factor. The thermal fluctuations and shot noise compete with each other and determine the net (effective) statistics of particle transfer. Exact analytical expression is obtained for delay time distribution. The optimal values of the delay time between successive electron transfers can be lowered below the corresponding shot noise values by tuning the thermal effects.

  9. Spintronic Nanodevices for Bioinspired Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grollier, Julie; Querlioz, Damien; Stiles, Mark D

    2016-10-01

    Bioinspired hardware holds the promise of low-energy, intelligent, and highly adaptable computing systems. Applications span from automatic classification for big data management, through unmanned vehicle control, to control for biomedical prosthesis. However, one of the major challenges of fabricating bioinspired hardware is building ultra-high-density networks out of complex processing units interlinked by tunable connections. Nanometer-scale devices exploiting spin electronics (or spintronics) can be a key technology in this context. In particular, magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) are well suited for this purpose because of their multiple tunable functionalities. One such functionality, non-volatile memory, can provide massive embedded memory in unconventional circuits, thus escaping the von-Neumann bottleneck arising when memory and processors are located separately. Other features of spintronic devices that could be beneficial for bioinspired computing include tunable fast nonlinear dynamics, controlled stochasticity, and the ability of single devices to change functions in different operating conditions. Large networks of interacting spintronic nanodevices can have their interactions tuned to induce complex dynamics such as synchronization, chaos, soliton diffusion, phase transitions, criticality, and convergence to multiple metastable states. A number of groups have recently proposed bioinspired architectures that include one or several types of spintronic nanodevices. In this paper, we show how spintronics can be used for bioinspired computing. We review the different approaches that have been proposed, the recent advances in this direction, and the challenges toward fully integrated spintronics complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) bioinspired hardware.

  10. DNA repair mechanism by photolyase: electron transfer path from the photolyase catalytic cofactor FADH(-) to DNA thymine dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, D; Stuchebrukhov, A A

    2001-05-21

    Photolyase is an enzyme that catalyses photorepair of thymine dimers in UV damaged DNA by electron transfer reaction. The structure of the photolyase/DNA complex is unknown at present. Using crystal structure coordinates of the substrate-free enzyme from E. coli, we have recently built a computer molecular model of a thymine dimer docked to photolyase catalytic site and studied molecular dynamics of the system. In this paper, we present analysis of the electronic coupling and electron transfer pathway between the catalytic cofactor FADH(-) and the pyrimidine dimer by the method of interatomic tunneling currents. Electronic structure is treated in the extended Hückel approximation. The root mean square transfer matrix element is about 6 cm(-1), which is consistent with the experimentally determined rate of transfer. We find that electron transfer mechanism responsible for the repair utilizes an unusual folded conformation of FADH(-) in photolyases, in which the isoalloxazine ring of the flavin and the adenine are in close proximity, and the peculiar features of the docked orientation of the dimer. The tunneling currents show explicitly that despite of the close proximity between the donor and acceptor complexes, the electron transfer mechanism between the flavin and the thymine bases is not direct, but indirect, with the adenine acting as an intermediate. These calculations confirm the previously made conclusion based on an indirect evidence for such mechanism.

  11. Enantioselective Cu-II-Catalyzed Diels-Alder and Michael Addition Reactions in Water Using Bio-Inspired Triazacyclophane-Based Ligands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albada, H. Bauke; Rosati, Fiora; Coquiere, David; Roelfes, Gerard; Liskamp, Rob M. J.

    2011-01-01

    A triazacyclophane (TAC) scaffold decorated with three histidine amino acid residues was used as a tridentate ligand in asymmetric copper(II)-catalysed Diels-Alder and Michael addition reactions in water. Enantiomeric excesses up to 55% were obtained in Diels-Alder reactions using ligands in which t

  12. Enantioselective Cu-II-Catalyzed Diels-Alder and Michael Addition Reactions in Water Using Bio-Inspired Triazacyclophane-Based Ligands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albada, H. Bauke; Rosati, Fiora; Coquiere, David; Roelfes, Gerard; Liskamp, Rob M. J.

    A triazacyclophane (TAC) scaffold decorated with three histidine amino acid residues was used as a tridentate ligand in asymmetric copper(II)-catalysed Diels-Alder and Michael addition reactions in water. Enantiomeric excesses up to 55% were obtained in Diels-Alder reactions using ligands in which

  13. Photochemistry between a ruthenium(II) pyridylimidazole complex and benzoquinone: simple electron transfer versus proton-coupled electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hönes, Roland; Kuss-Petermann, Martin; Wenger, Oliver S

    2013-02-01

    A ruthenium(II) complex with two 4,4'-bis(trifluoromethyl)-2,2'-bipyridine chelates and a 2-(2'-pyridyl)imidazole ligand was synthesized and characterized by electrochemical and optical spectroscopic means. The respective complex has the potential to act as a combined electron-proton donor when promoted to its long-lived (3)MLCT excited state with visible light. The possibility of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) between the ruthenium(II) complex and 1,4-benzoquinone as an electron/proton acceptor was explored by steady-state and time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy, as well as by transient absorption spectroscopy in the nanosecond time regime. Excited-state deactivation is found to occur predominantly via simple oxidative quenching involving no proton motion, but a minor fraction of the photoexcited complex appears to react via PCET since there is spectral evidence for semiquinone as a photoproduct. Presumably, PCET is not kinetically competitive with simple electron transfer because the latter process is sufficiently exergonic and because there is little thermodynamic benefit from coupling proton transfer to the photoinduced electron transfer.

  14. Electron transfer in N-butylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate ionic liquid by pulse radiolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU HaiYing; XING ZhaoGuo; CAO XiYan; WU GuoZhong

    2013-01-01

    The radiolysis behavior of neat pyridinium ionic liquids (ILs) and their aqueous solutions was investigated using nanosecond pulse radiolysis techniques.Radiolysis of the ionic liquids,such as N-butylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate (BuPyBF4),resulted in the formation of solvated electrons and organic radicals.Solvated electrons reacted with the pyridinium moiety to produce a pyridinyl radical,which can transfer electrons to various acceptors.The electron-transfer rate constants of the solvent-derived butylpyridinyl radicals in BuPyBF4 and in several compounds (for example,duroquinone,4,4'-pyridine,benzophenone,and 1,1'-dimethyl-4,4'-bypyridinium dichloride) (k of the order 108 L/(mol s) were lower than those measured in water and in i-PrOH but were significantly higher than the diffusion-controlled rate constants estimated based on viscosity.The electron-transfer rate constants in neat BuPyBF4 were one order of magnitude faster than the diffusion-controlled values.This finding suggests that BuPyBF4 acts not only as solvent but also as active solute,such as in solvent-mediated reactions.These reactions result in electrons reaching their final destinations via intervening pyridinium groups without requiring the diffusion of a specific radical.

  15. Solvent Reorganization Energy of Intramolecular Electron Transfer in Peptides Involving Tryptophan and Tyrosine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Ying-Yi; MA Jian-Yi; ZHAO Xiao-Jun; LI Xiang-Yuan

    2008-01-01

    Intramolecular electron transfer(ET)from tyrosine to tryptophan within peptide Trp-(Pro),-Tyr(n=1,2)has been investigated by ab initio calculation associated with a proper consideration of solvent effect by a continuum model.After geometry optimizations of the charge-localized reactant and product,double-well potentials have been constructed by adopting the linear reaction coordinate.The transition state has been determined by finding the crossing point of the potential energy curves.The realistic ET reaction was found complicated in polar solvent,hence the solvent reorganization energy of the electron transfer has received especial attention in this work.Apply-ing the nonequilibrium solvation procedure implemented based on the polarizable continuum model by the authors,the solvent reorganization energy was estimated to be 87.36 kJ/mol for the ET in Trp-Pro-Tyr system and 105.80 kJ/mol for Trp-(Pro)2-Tyr.

  16. Proton coupled electron transfer from the excited state of a ruthenium(II) pyridylimidazole complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannwitz, Andrea; Wenger, Oliver S

    2016-04-28

    Proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) from the excited state of [Ru(bpy)2pyimH](2+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine; pyimH = 2-(2'-pyridyl)imidazole) to N-methyl-4,4'-bipyridinium (monoquat, MQ(+)) was studied. While this complex has been investigated previously, our study is the first to show that the formal bond dissociation free energy (BDFE) of the imidazole-N-H bond decreases from (91 ± 1) kcal mol(-1) in the electronic ground state to (43 ± 5) kcal mol(-1) in the lowest-energetic (3)MLCT excited state. This makes the [Ru(bpy)2pyimH](2+) complex a very strong (formal) hydrogen atom donor even when compared to metal hydride complexes, and this is interesting for light-driven (formal) hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions with a variety of different substrates. Mechanistically, formal HAT between (3)MLCT excited [Ru(bpy)2pyimH](2+) and monoquat in buffered 1 : 1 (v : v) CH3CN/H2O was found to occur via a sequence of reaction steps involving electron transfer from Ru(ii) to MQ(+) coupled to release of the N-H proton to buffer base, followed by protonation of reduced MQ(+) by buffer acid. Our study is relevant in the larger contexts of photoredox catalysis and light-to-chemical energy conversion.

  17. ELECTRON TRANSFER MECHANISM AT THE SOLID-LIQUID INTERFACE OF PHYLLOSILICATES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interfacial electron transfer processes on clay minerals have significant impact in natural environments and geochemical systems. Nitrobenzene was used as molecular probes to study the electron transfer mechanism at the solid-water interfaces of Fe-containing phyllosicates. For...

  18. Direct observation of the ultrafast electron transfer process in a polymer/fullerene blend

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cerullo, G.; Lanzani, G.; Silvestri, S. De; Brabec, Ch.J.; Zerza, G.; Sariciftci, N.S.; Hummelen, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer in organic molecules is an extensively investigated topic both because of fundamental interest in the photophysics and for applications to artificial photosynthesis. Highly efficient ultrafast electron transfer from photoexcited conjugated polymers to C60 has been

  19. Ultrafast forward and backward electron transfer dynamics of coumarin 337 in hydrogen-bonded anilines as studied with femtosecond UV-pump/IR-probe spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Hirendra N; Verma, Sandeep; Nibbering, Erik T J

    2011-02-10

    Femtosecond infrared spectroscopy is used to study both forward and backward electron transfer (ET) dynamics between coumarin 337 (C337) and the aromatic amine solvents aniline (AN), N-methylaniline (MAN), and N,N-dimethylaniline (DMAN), where all the aniline solvents can donate an electron but only AN and MAN can form hydrogen bonds with C337. The formation of a hydrogen bond with AN and MAN is confirmed with steady state FT-IR spectroscopy, where the C═O stretching vibration is a direct marker mode for hydrogen bond formation. Transient IR absorption measurements in all solvents show an absorption band at 2166 cm(-1), which has been attributed to the C≡N stretching vibration of the C337 radical anion formed after ET. Forward electron transfer dynamics is found to be biexponential with time constants τ(ET)(1) = 500 fs, τ(ET)(2) = 7 ps in all solvents. Despite the presence of hydrogen bonds of C337 with the solvents AN and MAN, no effect has been found on the forward electron transfer step. Because of the absence of an H/D isotope effect on the forward electron transfer reaction of C337 in AN, hydrogen bonds are understood to play a minor role in mediating electron transfer. In contrast, direct π-orbital overlap between C337 and the aromatic amine solvents causes ultrafast forward electron transfer dynamics. Backward electron transfer dynamics, in contrast, is dependent on the solvent used. Standard Marcus theory explains the observed backward electron transfer rates.

  20. Electron-transfer acceleration investigated by time resolved infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlček, Antonín; Kvapilová, Hana; Towrie, Michael; Záliš, Stanislav

    2015-03-17

    Ultrafast electron transfer (ET) processes are important primary steps in natural and artificial photosynthesis, as well as in molecular electronic/photonic devices. In biological systems, ET often occurs surprisingly fast over long distances of several tens of angströms. Laser-pulse irradiation is conveniently used to generate strongly oxidizing (or reducing) excited states whose reactions are then studied by time-resolved spectroscopic techniques. While photoluminescence decay and UV-vis absorption supply precise kinetics data, time-resolved infrared absorption (TRIR) and Raman-based spectroscopies have the advantage of providing additional structural information and monitoring vibrational energy flows and dissipation, as well as medium relaxation, that accompany ultrafast ET. We will discuss three cases of photoinduced ET involving the Re(I)(CO)3(N,N) moiety (N,N = polypyridine) that occur much faster than would be expected from ET theories. [Re(4-N-methylpyridinium-pyridine)(CO)3(N,N)](2+) represents a case of excited-state picosecond ET between two different ligands that remains ultrafast even in slow-relaxing solvents, beating the adiabatic limit. This is caused by vibrational/solvational excitation of the precursor state and participation of high-frequency quantum modes in barrier crossing. The case of Re-tryptophan assemblies demonstrates that excited-state Trp → *Re(II) ET is accelerated from nanoseconds to picoseconds when the Re(I)(CO)3(N,N) chromophore is appended to a protein, close to a tryptophan residue. TRIR in combination with DFT calculations and structural studies reveals an interaction between the N,N ligand and the tryptophan indole. It results in partial electronic delocalization in the precursor excited state and likely contributes to the ultrafast ET rate. Long-lived vibrational/solvational excitation of the protein Re(I)(CO)3(N,N)···Trp moiety, documented by dynamic IR band shifts, could be another accelerating factor. The last

  1. Spectroscopic characterization of photoaccumulated radical anions: a litmus test to evaluate the efficiency of photoinduced electron transfer (PET processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Fagnoni

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Steady-state irradiation in neat acetonitrile of some aromatic nitriles, imides and esters (10−5–10−3 M solution in the presence of tertiary amines allowed the accumulation of the corresponding radical anions, up to quantitative yield for polysubstituted benzenes and partially with naphthalene and anthracene derivatives. The condition for such an accumulation was that the donor radical cation underwent further evolution that precluded back electron transfer and any chemical reaction with the radical anion. In fact, no accumulation occurred with 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO, for which this condition is not possible. The radical anions were produced from benzene polyesters too, but decomposition began early. Ipso substitution was one of the paths with secondary amines and the only reaction with tetrabutylstannane. The results fully support the previously proposed mechanism for electron transfer (ET mediated photochemical alkylation of aromatic acceptors via radical ions and radical intermediates.

  2. Semiclassical Green’s functions and an instanton formulation of electron-transfer rates in the nonadiabatic limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, Jeremy O., E-mail: jeremy.richardson@fau.de; Bauer, Rainer; Thoss, Michael [Institut für Theoretische Physik und Interdisziplinäres Zentrum für Molekulare Materialien, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), Staudtstraße 7/B2, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-10-07

    We present semiclassical approximations to Green’s functions of multidimensional systems, extending Gutzwiller’s work to the classically forbidden region. Based on steepest-descent integrals over these functions, we derive an instanton method for computing the rate of nonadiabatic reactions, such as electron transfer, in the weak-coupling limit, where Fermi’s golden-rule can be employed. This generalizes Marcus theory to systems for which the environment free-energy curves are not harmonic and where nuclear tunnelling plays a role. The derivation avoids using the Im F method or short-time approximations to real-time correlation functions. A clear physical interpretation of the nuclear tunnelling processes involved in an electron-transfer reaction is thus provided. In Paper II [J. O. Richardson, J. Chem. Phys. 143, 134116 (2015)], we discuss numerical evaluation of the formulae.

  3. Designing bioinspired superoleophobic surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip S. Brown

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nature provides a range of functional surfaces, for example, water-repellent or superhydrophobic surfaces, most common among them the lotus leaf. While water-repellency is widespread in nature, oil-repellency is typically limited to surfaces submerged in water, such as fish scales. To achieve oleophobicity in air, inspiration must be taken from natural structures and chemistries that are not readily available in nature need to be introduced. Researchers usually turn to fluorinated materials to provide the low surface energy that, when combined with bioinspired surface topography, is the key to unlocking oil-repellency. This review presents the state-of-the-art in the fabrication of superoleophobic surfaces.

  4. Syntrophic Growth via Quinone-Mediated Interspecies Electron Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A Smith

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which microbial species exchange electrons are of interest because interspecies electron transfer can expand the metabolic capabilities of microbial communities. Previous studies with the humic substance analog anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS suggested that quinone-mediated interspecies electron transfer (QUIET is feasible, but it was not determined if sufficient energy is available from QUIET to support the growth of both species. Furthermore, there have been no previous studies on the mechanisms for the oxidation of anthrahydroquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AHQDS. A co-culture of Geobacter metallireducens and Geobacter sulfurreducens metabolized ethanol with the reduction of fumarate much faster in the presence of AQDS, and there was an increase in cell protein. G. sulfurreducens was more abundant, consistent with G. sulfurreducens obtaining electrons from acetate that G. metallireducens produced from ethanol, as well as from AHQDS. Cocultures initiated with a citrate synthase-deficient strain of G. sulfurreducens that was unable to use acetate as an electron donor also metabolized ethanol with the reduction of fumarate and cell growth, but acetate accumulated over time. G. sulfurreducens and G. metallireducens were equally abundant in these co-cultures reflecting the inability of the citrate synthase-deficient strain of G. sulfurreducens to metabolize acetate. Evaluation of the mechanisms by which G. sulfurreducens accepts electrons from AHQDS demonstrated that a strain deficient in outer-surface c-type cytochromes that are required for AQDS reduction was as effective at QUIET as the wild-type strain. Deletion of additional genes previously implicated in extracellular electron transfer also had no impact on QUIET. These results demonstrate that QUIET can yield sufficient energy to support the growth of both syntrophic partners, but that the mechanisms by which electrons are derived from extracellular hydroquinones require

  5. Extracellular electron transfer mechanisms between microorganisms and minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Liang; Dong, Hailiang; Reguera, Gemma; Beyenal, Haluk; Lu, Anhuai; Liu, Juan; Yu, Han-Qing; Fredrickson, James K.

    2016-08-30

    Electrons can be transferred from microorganisms to multivalent metal ions that are associated with minerals and vice versa. As the microbial cell envelope is neither physically permeable to minerals nor electrically conductive, microorganisms have evolved strategies to exchange electrons with extracellular minerals. In this Review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms that underlie the ability of microorganisms to exchange electrons, such as c-type cytochromes and microbial nanowires, with extracellular minerals and with microorganisms of the same or different species. Microorganisms that have extracellular electron transfer capability can be used for biotechnological applications, including bioremediation, biomining and the production of biofuels and nanomaterials.

  6. Dynamics of Electron Transfer for a Nonsuperexchange Coherent Mechanism. I

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-10-13

    numerically. One rough but simple analytical result for the latter is also given. tPresent address: Departmento de Quimica , Facultad de Ciencias...With the change of coordinates from (q,, q21, q3) to (x, y, z) it is seen from eqs. (2.9) - (2.11) that the x-motion is identical for all H,’s and so...the geometrical changes . The calculation of the dynamics of the electron transfer starting from electronic configuration 1, i.e., from D*BA, now

  7. Photoinduced electron transfer of chlorophyll in lipid bilayer system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D K Lee; K W Seo; Y S Kang

    2002-12-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer from chlorophyll- through the interface of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) headgroup of the lipid bilayers was studied with electron magnetic resonance (EMR). The photoproduced radicals were identified with electron spin resonance (ESR) and radical yields of chlorophyll- were determined by double integration ESR spectra. The formation of vesicles was identified by changes in measured max values from diethyl ether solutions to vesicles solutions indirectly, and observed directly with SEM and TEM images. The efficiency of photosynthesis in model system was determined by measuring the amount of chlorophyll-a radical yields which were obtained from integration of ESR spectra.

  8. Human ceruloplasmin. Intramolecular electron transfer kinetics and equilibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Bendahl, L; Skov, L K

    1999-01-01

    Pulse radiolytic reduction of disulfide bridges in ceruloplasmin yielding RSSR(-) radicals induces a cascade of intramolecular electron transfer (ET) processes. Based on the three-dimensional structure of ceruloplasmin identification of individual kinetically active disulfide groups and type 1 (T1...... and indeed electron equilibration between T1A and the trinuclear copper center in the domain 1-6 interface takes place with a rate constant of 2.9 +/- 0.6 s(-1). The equilibrium constant is 0.17. Following reduction of T1A Cu(II), another ET process takes place between RSSR(-) and T1B copper(II) of domain 4...

  9. Promoting direct interspecies electron transfer with activated carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Fanghua; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin M.

    2012-01-01

    of methanogenesis might be to facilitate direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) between bacteria and methanogens. Metabolism was substantially accelerated when GAC was added to co-cultures of Geobacter metallireducens and Geobacter sulfurreducens grown under conditions previously shown to require DIET. Cells...... were attached to GAC, but did not aggregate as they do when making biological electrical connections between cells. Studies with a series of gene deletion mutants eliminated the possibility that GAC promoted electron exchange via interspecies hydrogen or formate transfer and demonstrated that DIET...

  10. High-pressure effects on intramolecular electron transfer compounds

    CERN Document Server

    He Li Ming; Li Hong; Zhang Bao Wen; Li Yi; Yang Guo Qiang

    2002-01-01

    We explore the effect of pressure on the fluorescence spectra of the intramolecular electron transfer compound N-(1-pyrenylmethyl), N-methyl-4-methoxyaniline (Py-Am) and its model version, with poly(methyl methacrylate) blended in, at high pressure up to 7 GPa. The emission properties of Py-Am and pyrene show distinct difference with the increase of pressure. This difference indicates the strength of the charge transfer interaction resulting from the adjusting of the conformation of Py-Am with increase of pressure. The relationship between the electronic state of the molecule and pressure is discussed.

  11. Adsorption and Interfacial Electron Transfer of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thanulov

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the adsorption and electron-transfer dynamics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) iso-l-cytochrome c adsorbed on Au(lll) electrodes in aqueous phosphate buffer media. This cytochrome possesses a thiol group dos e to the protein surface (Cysl02) suitable for linking the protein...... negative ofthe equilibrium potential of YCC, where the protein is electrochemically functional. The MCS data show tensile differential stress signals when YCC is adsorbed on a gold-coate d MCS, with distinguishable adsorption phases in the time range from

  12. Beyond Vibrationally Mediated Electron Transfer: Coherent Phenomena Induced by Ultrafast Charge Separation

    CERN Document Server

    Huber, Robert; Moser, Jacques E; Grätzel, Michael; Wachtveitl, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Wave packet propagation succeeding electron transfer (ET) from alizarin dye molecules into the nanocrystalline TiO2 semiconductor has been studied by ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy. Due to the ultrafast time scale of the ET reaction of about 6 fs the system shows substantial differences to molecular ET systems. We show that the ET process is not mediated by molecular vibrations and therefore classical ET theories lose their applicability. Here the ET reaction itself prepares a vibrational wave packet and not the electromagnetic excitation by the laser pulse. Furthermore, the generation of phonons during polaron formation in the TiO2 lattice is observed in real time for this system. The presented investigations enable an unambiguous assignment of the involved photoinduced mechanisms and can contribute to a corresponding extension of molecular ET theories to ultrafast ET systems like alizarin/TiO2.

  13. Electron-transfer-mediated binding of optically active cobalt(III) complexes to horse heart cytochrome c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholten, Ulrich; Merchán, Alejandro Castillejo; Bernauer, Klaus

    2005-03-22

    Optically active cobalt(II) complexes are used as reducing agents in the electron-transfer reaction involving horse heart cytochrome c. Analysis of the circular dichroism (CD) spectra of reaction products indicates that the corresponding cobalt(III) species of both enantiomers of [CoII(alamp)] (H2alamp=N,N'-[(pyridine-2,6-diyl)bis(methylene)]-bis[alanine]) are partly attached to the protein during electron transfer by coordination to an imidazole unit of one of the histidine residues. His-26 and His-33 are both solvent exposed, and the results suggest that one of these histidine residues acts as a bridge in the electron transfer to and from the haem iron of cytochrome c. The reaction is enantioselective: the ratio of the relative reactivity at 15 degrees C is 2.9 in favour of the R,R-enantiomer. A small induced CD activity in the haem chromophore reveals that some structural changes in the protein occur consecutively with the binding of the cobalt(III) complex.

  14. Constraint-Based Modeling of Carbon Fixation and the Energetics of Electron Transfer in Geobacter metallireducens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feist, AM; Nagarajan, H; Rotaru, AE; Tremblay, PL; Zhang, T; Nevin, KP; Lovley, DR; Zengler, K

    2014-04-24

    Geobacter species are of great interest for environmental and biotechnology applications as they can carry out direct electron transfer to insoluble metals or other microorganisms and have the ability to assimilate inorganic carbon. Here, we report on the capability and key enabling metabolic machinery of Geobacter metallireducens GS-15 to carry out CO2 fixation and direct electron transfer to iron. An updated metabolic reconstruction was generated, growth screens on targeted conditions of interest were performed, and constraint-based analysis was utilized to characterize and evaluate critical pathways and reactions in G. metallireducens. The novel capability of G. metallireducens to grow autotrophically with formate and Fe(III) was predicted and subsequently validated in vivo. Additionally, the energetic cost of transferring electrons to an external electron acceptor was determined through analysis of growth experiments carried out using three different electron acceptors (Fe(III), nitrate, and fumarate) by systematically isolating and examining different parts of the electron transport chain. The updated reconstruction will serve as a knowledgebase for understanding and engineering Geobacter and similar species. Author Summary The ability of microorganisms to exchange electrons directly with their environment has large implications for our knowledge of industrial and environmental processes. For decades, it has been known that microbes can use electrodes as electron acceptors in microbial fuel cell settings. Geobacter metallireducens has been one of the model organisms for characterizing microbe-electrode interactions as well as environmental processes such as bioremediation. Here, we significantly expand the knowledge of metabolism and energetics of this model organism by employing constraint-based metabolic modeling. Through this analysis, we build the metabolic pathways necessary for carbon fixation, a desirable property for industrial chemical production. We

  15. Constraint-based modeling of carbon fixation and the energetics of electron transfer in Geobacter metallireducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feist, Adam M; Nagarajan, Harish; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Zhang, Tian; Nevin, Kelly P; Lovley, Derek R; Zengler, Karsten

    2014-04-01

    Geobacter species are of great interest for environmental and biotechnology applications as they can carry out direct electron transfer to insoluble metals or other microorganisms and have the ability to assimilate inorganic carbon. Here, we report on the capability and key enabling metabolic machinery of Geobacter metallireducens GS-15 to carry out CO2 fixation and direct electron transfer to iron. An updated metabolic reconstruction was generated, growth screens on targeted conditions of interest were performed, and constraint-based analysis was utilized to characterize and evaluate critical pathways and reactions in G. metallireducens. The novel capability of G. metallireducens to grow autotrophically with formate and Fe(III) was predicted and subsequently validated in vivo. Additionally, the energetic cost of transferring electrons to an external electron acceptor was determined through analysis of growth experiments carried out using three different electron acceptors (Fe(III), nitrate, and fumarate) by systematically isolating and examining different parts of the electron transport chain. The updated reconstruction will serve as a knowledgebase for understanding and engineering Geobacter and similar species.

  16. Constraint-based modeling of carbon fixation and the energetics of electron transfer in Geobacter metallireducens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam M Feist

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Geobacter species are of great interest for environmental and biotechnology applications as they can carry out direct electron transfer to insoluble metals or other microorganisms and have the ability to assimilate inorganic carbon. Here, we report on the capability and key enabling metabolic machinery of Geobacter metallireducens GS-15 to carry out CO2 fixation and direct electron transfer to iron. An updated metabolic reconstruction was generated, growth screens on targeted conditions of interest were performed, and constraint-based analysis was utilized to characterize and evaluate critical pathways and reactions in G. metallireducens. The novel capability of G. metallireducens to grow autotrophically with formate and Fe(III was predicted and subsequently validated in vivo. Additionally, the energetic cost of transferring electrons to an external electron acceptor was determined through analysis of growth experiments carried out using three different electron acceptors (Fe(III, nitrate, and fumarate by systematically isolating and examining different parts of the electron transport chain. The updated reconstruction will serve as a knowledgebase for understanding and engineering Geobacter and similar species.

  17. Tyrosine oxidation in heme oxygenase: examination of long-range proton-coupled electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Valeriy V; Roth, Justine P

    2014-10-01

    Heme oxygenase is responsible for the degradation of a histidine-ligated ferric protoporphyrin IX (Por) to biliverdin, CO, and the free ferrous ion. Described here are studies of tyrosyl radical formation reactions that occur after oxidizing Fe(III)(Por) to Fe(IV)=O(Por(·+)) in human heme oxygenase isoform-1 (hHO-1) and the structurally homologous protein from Corynebacterium diphtheriae (cdHO). Site-directed mutagenesis on hHO-1 probes the reduction of Fe(IV)=O(Por(·+)) by tyrosine residues within 11 Å of the prosthetic group. In hHO-1, Y58· is implicated as the most likely site of oxidation, based on the pH and pD dependent kinetics. The absence of solvent deuterium isotope effects in basic solutions of hHO-1 and cdHO contrasts with the behavior of these proteins in the acidic solution, suggesting that long-range proton-coupled electron transfer predominates over electron transfer.

  18. Metabolic transistor strategy for controlling electron transfer chain activity in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hui; Tuli, Leepika; Bennett, George N; San, Ka-Yiu

    2015-03-01

    A novel strategy to finely control a large metabolic flux by using a "metabolic transistor" approach was established. In this approach a small change in the level or availability of an essential component for the process is controlled by adding a competitive reaction that affects a precursor or an intermediate in its biosynthetic pathway. The change of the basal level of the essential component, considered as a base current in a transistor, has a large effect on the flux through the major pathway. In this way, the fine-tuning of a large flux can be accomplished. The "metabolic transistor" strategy was applied to control electron transfer chain function by manipulation of the quinone synthesis pathway in Escherichia coli. The achievement of a theoretical yield of lactate production under aerobic conditions via this strategy upon manipulation of the biosynthetic pathway of the key participant, ubiquinone-8 (Q8), in an E. coli strain provides an in vivo, genetically tunable means to control the activity of the electron transfer chain and manipulate the production of reduced products while limiting consumption of oxygen to a defined amount.

  19. Photosynthetical electron transfer and biomass formation in selected evolutionary wheat types

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, H.

    1980-01-01

    The primary photosynthetical reactions, which are responsible for the absorption of light energy and its fixing as chemical energy, represent the first part of a chain of metabolic processes occurring in the green plant, which ends with the production of organic material. In principle, the synthesis of reserve substances and their deposition in economically profitable storage organs also bases on the supply with energy and reduction equivalents due to the photosynthetical electron transfer, although this production is also determined and influenced by other processes, whose regulative connections are not yet completely known. The formation of biomasses (vegetative organs) however, has a close connection with the capacity of the photosynthetic electron transfer, because there are numerous possibilities of an indirect usage of ATP and NADPH/sub 2/ in the protein and lipid metabolisms besides the synthesis of carbohydrates, which is limited by the CO/sub 2/ supply at the carboxylation site. Consequently, a high degree of functional capacity should correlate with the capacity of intensive growth and result to be a selective advantage in evolution. It was the intention of this study to examine the above-mentioned suppositions on selected species of the genera triticum and aegilops, each of which represents a certain step in the evolution from wild grasses to cultured wheat.

  20. Temperature and detection-wavelength dependence of the electron transfer rates in initial stages of photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzynski, Michal; Chelminiak, Przemyslaw

    2013-10-17

    Unusual temperature behavior, observed in the initial electron transfer stages in the photosynthetic reaction centers of the purple bacteria, and a strong probing pulse wavelength dependence of transfer rates, determined in transient absorption spectroscopy, can easily be explained on assuming that the transfer takes place from dynamically unrelaxed states of protein environment. The transitions from the primary special pair (P) to a single bacteriochlorophyll (B) and next to a bacteriopheophytin (H) are controlled by diffusion down the energy value of underdamped vibrational modes of frequency 200 K, probably determining distances between the succeeding cofactors. The subsequent transition to the quinone A (Q) is controlled by diffusion in the position value of an overdamped conformational mode, probably corresponding to the local polarization. From the fit of available experimental data to simple theoretical formulas, the important physical conclusion arises that the very electronic transitions are fast as compared to the relaxation processes and, in the first approximation, only the latter contribute to the overall times of the initial electron transfer stages in photosynthesis.

  1. Long-distance electron transfer by cable bacteria in aquifer sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Hubert; Bosch, Julian; Griebler, Christian; Damgaard, Lars Riis; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Lueders, Tillmann; Meckenstock, Rainer U

    2016-08-01

    The biodegradation of organic pollutants in aquifers is often restricted to the fringes of contaminant plumes where steep countergradients of electron donors and acceptors are separated by limited dispersive mixing. However, long-distance electron transfer (LDET) by filamentous 'cable bacteria' has recently been discovered in marine sediments to couple spatially separated redox half reactions over centimeter scales. Here we provide primary evidence that such sulfur-oxidizing cable bacteria can also be found at oxic-anoxic interfaces in aquifer sediments, where they provide a means for the direct recycling of sulfate by electron transfer over 1-2-cm distance. Sediments were taken from a hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer, amended with iron sulfide and saturated with water, leaving the sediment surface exposed to air. Steep geochemical gradients developed in the upper 3 cm, showing a spatial separation of oxygen and sulfide by 9 mm together with a pH profile characteristic for sulfur oxidation by LDET. Bacterial filaments, which were highly abundant in the suboxic zone, were identified by sequencing of 16S rRNA genes and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) as cable bacteria belonging to the Desulfobulbaceae. The detection of similar Desulfobulbaceae at the oxic-anoxic interface of fresh sediment cores taken at a contaminated aquifer suggests that LDET may indeed be active at the capillary fringe in situ.

  2. Herbicides affect fluorescence and electron transfer activity of spinach chloroplasts, thylakoid membranes and isolated Photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventrella, Andrea; Catucci, Lucia; Agostiano, Angela

    2010-08-01

    In this work, studies on the effects produced by atrazine, terbutryn or diuron onto spinach photosynthetic materials were performed by observing changes in fluorescence emission and in electron transfer activities of the bio-samples in the presence of such herbicides; chloroplasts, thylakoids, Photosystem II-enriched thylakoids (BBYs) and isolated Photosystem II (PSII) were employed. This approach evidenced differences in the herbicide-photosynthetic material interactions going up-down from chloroplasts to proteins. Rapid emission increments were detected for chloroplasts and thylakoids, in particular in the presence of terbutryn; no remarkable emission increment was recorded when BBYs or PSII were used for this assay. The dependences of the chloroplast and thylakoid emission intensities upon herbicide concentration were investigated with responses even at concentrations below 10(-7)M. The influence of lowering the temperature was also tested, and the stabilizing effects on the resistances of the bio-samples against herbicides were recorded. Furthermore, Hill Reaction-based colorimetric assays were performed to monitor the electron transfer activities of the bio-samples in the presence of herbicides, after brief incubations. As a result, chloroplasts and thylakoids resulted to be sensitive tools in responding to concentrations even lower than 10(-7)M of most herbicides; nevertheless, an interesting sensitivity to herbicides was also observed for PSII. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF EXTRACELLULAR ELECTRON TRANSFER IN BIOFILMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Schenk, Jim; Ivory, Cornelius; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-09-12

    Electrochemically active biofilms have a unique form of respiration in which they utilize solid external materials as terminal electron acceptors for their metabolism. Currently, two primary mechanisms have been identified for long-range extracellular electron transfer (EET): a diffusion- and a conduction-based mechanism. Evidence in the literature suggests that some biofilms, particularly Shewanella oneidensis, produce the requisite components for both mechanisms. In this study, a generic model is presented that incorporates the diffusion- and the conduction-based mechanisms and allows electrochemically active biofilms to utilize both simultaneously. The model was applied to S. oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms using experimentally generated data found in the literature. Our simulation results show that 1) biofilms having both mechanisms available, especially if they can interact, may have a metabolic advantage over biofilms that can use only a single mechanism; 2) the thickness of G. sulfurreducens biofilms is likely not limited by conductivity; 3) accurate intrabiofilm diffusion coefficient values are critical for current generation predictions; and 4) the local biofilm potential and redox potential are two distinct parameters and cannot be assumed to have identical values. Finally, we determined that simulated cyclic and squarewave voltammetry based on our model are currently not capable of determining the specific percentages of extracellular electron transfer mechanisms in a biofilm. The developed model will be a critical tool for designing experiments to explain EET mechanisms.

  4. Syntrophic anaerobic photosynthesis via direct interspecies electron transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Phuc T.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Shi, Liang; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Fredrickson, James K.; Madigan, Michael T.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2017-01-09

    Microbial phototrophs are key primary producers on Earth. Currently known electron donors for microbial photosynthesis include H2O, H2, H2S and other reduced inorganic compounds. We describe a new form of metabolism linking anoxygenic photosynthesis to anaerobic respiration, or “syntrophic anoxygenic photosynthesis.” We show that photoautotrophy in green sulfur bacterium Prosthecochloris aestaurii can be driven not only by electrons from a graphite electrode, but also by acetate oxidation via interspecies electron transfer from heterotrophic partner bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens. P. aestuarii photosynthetic growth using reductant provided by either an electrode or syntrophy was robust and light-dependent. By contrast, P. aestuarii did not grow in co-culture with a G. sulfurreducens mutant lacking a trans-outer membrane porin-cytochrome protein complex required for direct intercellular electron transfer,. This syntrophic interaction suggests revisitation of global carbon cycling in anoxic environments and lays a foundation for further engineering of phototrophic microbial communities for biotechnological applications, such as waste treatment and bioenergy production.

  5. Direct interspecies electron transfer between Geobacter metallireducens and Methanosarcina barkeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Liu, Fanghua; Markovaite, Beatrice; Chen, Shanshan; Nevin, Kelly P; Lovley, Derek R

    2014-08-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) is potentially an effective form of syntrophy in methanogenic communities, but little is known about the diversity of methanogens capable of DIET. The ability of Methanosarcina barkeri to participate in DIET was evaluated in coculture with Geobacter metallireducens. Cocultures formed aggregates that shared electrons via DIET during the stoichiometric conversion of ethanol to methane. Cocultures could not be initiated with a pilin-deficient G. metallireducens strain, suggesting that long-range electron transfer along pili was important for DIET. Amendments of granular activated carbon permitted the pilin-deficient G. metallireducens isolates to share electrons with M. barkeri, demonstrating that this conductive material could substitute for pili in promoting DIET. When M. barkeri was grown in coculture with the H2-producing Pelobacter carbinolicus, incapable of DIET, M. barkeri utilized H2 as an electron donor but metabolized little of the acetate that P.carbinolicus produced. This suggested that H2, but not electrons derived from DIET, inhibited acetate metabolism. P. carbinolicus-M. barkeri cocultures did not aggregate, demonstrating that, unlike DIET, close physical contact was not necessary for interspecies H2 transfer. M. barkeri is the second methanogen found to accept electrons via DIET and the first methanogen known to be capable of using either H2 or electrons derived from DIET for CO2 reduction. Furthermore, M. barkeri is genetically tractable,making it a model organism for elucidating mechanisms by which methanogens make biological electrical connections with other cells.

  6. Modeling biofilms with dual extracellular electron transfer mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renslow, Ryan; Babauta, Jerome; Kuprat, Andrew; Schenk, Jim; Ivory, Cornelius; Fredrickson, Jim; Beyenal, Haluk

    2013-01-01

    Electrochemically active biofilms have a unique form of respiration in which they utilize solid external materials as terminal electron acceptors for their metabolism. Currently, two primary mechanisms have been identified for long-range extracellular electron transfer (EET): a diffusion- and a conduction-based mechanism. Evidence in the literature suggests that some biofilms, particularly Shewanella oneidensis, produce the requisite components for both mechanisms. In this study, a generic model is presented that incorporates the diffusion- and the conduction-based mechanisms and allows electrochemically active biofilms to utilize both simultaneously. The model was applied to S. oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms using experimentally generated data found in the literature. Our simulation results show that 1) biofilms having both mechanisms available, especially if they can interact, may have a metabolic advantage over biofilms that can use only a single mechanism; 2) the thickness of G. sulfurreducens biofilms is likely not limited by conductivity; 3) accurate intrabiofilm diffusion coefficient values are critical for current generation predictions; and 4) the local biofilm potential and redox potential are two distinct parameters and cannot be assumed to have identical values. Finally, we determined that simulated cyclic and squarewave voltammetry based on our model are currently not capable of determining the specific percentages of extracellular electron transfer mechanisms in a biofilm. The developed model will be a critical tool for designing experiments to explain EET mechanisms. PMID:24113651

  7. Microbial extracellular electron transfer and its relevance to iron corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Souichiro

    2016-03-01

    Extracellular electron transfer (EET) is a microbial metabolism that enables efficient electron transfer between microbial cells and extracellular solid materials. Microorganisms harbouring EET abilities have received considerable attention for their various biotechnological applications, including bioleaching and bioelectrochemical systems. On the other hand, recent research revealed that microbial EET potentially induces corrosion of iron structures. It has been well known that corrosion of iron occurring under anoxic conditions is mostly caused by microbial activities, which is termed as microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). Among diverse MIC mechanisms, microbial EET activity that enhances corrosion via direct uptake of electrons from metallic iron, specifically termed as electrical MIC (EMIC), has been regarded as one of the major causative factors. The EMIC-inducing microorganisms initially identified were certain sulfate-reducing bacteria and methanogenic archaea isolated from marine environments. Subsequently, abilities to induce EMIC were also demonstrated in diverse anaerobic microorganisms in freshwater environments and oil fields, including acetogenic bacteria and nitrate-reducing bacteria. Abilities of EET and EMIC are now regarded as microbial traits more widespread among diverse microbial clades than was thought previously. In this review, basic understandings of microbial EET and recent progresses in the EMIC research are introduced.

  8. Electromicrobiology: Electron Transfer via Biowires in Nature and Practical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovley Derek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most exciting developments in the field of electromicrobiology has been the discovery of electrically conductive pili (e-pili in Geobacter species that transport electrons with a metallic-like mechanism. The e-pili are essential for extracellular electron transport to Fe(III oxides and longrange electron transport through the conductive biofilms that form on the anodes of microbial fuel cells. The e-pili also facilitate direct interspecies electron transfer between Geobacter and Methanosaeta or Methanosarcina species. Metatranscriptomic studies have demonstrated that Geobacter/Methanosaeta DIET is an important process in anaerobic digesters converting brewery wastes to methane. Increasing e-pili expression through genetic modification of regulatory systems or adaptive evolution yields strains with enhanced rates of extracellular electron transfer. Measurement of the conductivity of individual e-pili has demonstrated that they have conductivities higher than those of a number of synthetic conducting organic polymers. Multiple lines of evidence have demonstrated that aromatic amino acids play an important role in the electron transport along e-pili, suggesting opportunities to tune e-pili conductivity via genetic manipulation of the amino acid composition of e-pili. It is expected that e-pili will be harnessed to improve microbe-electrode processes such as microbial electrosynthesis and for the development of novel biosensors. Also, e-pili show promise as a sustainable ‘green’ replacement for electronic materials that contain toxic components and/or are produced with harsh chemicals.

  9. Vibrational dynamics in photoinduced electron transfer. Progress report, December 1, 1992--November 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spears, K.G.

    1993-09-08

    Objective is to perform a new type of measurement for optically excited electron transfer processes that can provide unique experimental insight into the molecular mechanism of electron transfer. Measurements of optically excited electron transfer are done with picosecond infrared (IR) absorption spectroscopy to monitor the vibrational motions of the molecules immediately after electron transfer. Theory and experiment suggest that molecular vibrations and distortions are important controlling elements for electron transfer, and direct information has yet to be obtained on these elements of electron transfer mechanisms. The second period of funding has been dedicated to finishing technique development and performing studies of electron transfer in ion pair systems to identify if vibrational dependent electron transfer rates are present in this system. We have succeeded in measuring, for the first time, electron transfer rates as a function of vibrational state in an ion pair complex in solution. In a different area of electron transfer research we have proposed a new mechanism of solvent gated electron transfer.

  10. Electron Transfer as a Probe of the Interfacial Quantum Dot-Organic Molecule Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Mark D.

    This dissertation describes a set of experimental and theoretical studies of the interaction between small organic molecules and the surfaces of semiconductor nanoparticles, also called quantum dots (QDs). Chapter 1 reviews the literature on the influence of ligands on exciton relaxation dynamics following photoexcitation of semiconductor QDs, and describes how ligands promote or inhibit processes such as emission, nonradiative relaxation, and charge transfer to redox active adsorbates. Chapter 2 investigates the specific interaction of alkylcarboxylated viologen derivatives with CdS QDs, and shows how a combination of steady-state photoluminescence (PL) and transient absorption (TA) experiments can be used to reveal the specific binding geometry of redox active organic molecules on QD surfaces. Chapter 3 expands on Chapter 2 by using PL and TA to provide information about the mechanisms through which methyl viologen (MV 2+) associates with CdS QDs to form a stable QD/MV2+ complex, suggesting two chemically distinct reactions. We use our understanding of the QD/molecule interaction to design a drug delivery system in Chapter 4, which employs PL and TA experiments to show that conformational changes in a redox active adsorbate may follow electron transfer, "activating" a biologically inert Schiff base to a protein inhibitor form. The protein inhibitor limits cell motility and may be used to prevent tumor metastasis in cancer patients. Chapter 5 discusses future applications of QD/molecule redox couples with an emphasis on efficient multiple charge-transfer reactions -- a process facilitated by the high degeneracy of band-edge states in QDs. These multiple charge-transfer reactions may potentially increase the thermodynamic efficiency of solar cells, and may also facilitate the splitting of water into fuel. Multiple exciton generation procedures, multi-electron transfer experiments, and future directions are discussed.

  11. Ultrafast Photoinduced Electron Transfer in Bimolecular Donor-Acceptor Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Alsulami, Qana A.

    2016-11-30

    The efficiency of photoconversion systems, such as organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells, is largely controlled by a series of fundamental photophysical processes occurring at the interface before carrier collection. A profound understanding of ultrafast interfacial charge transfer (CT), charge separation (CS), and charge recombination (CR) is the key determinant to improving the overall performances of photovoltaic devices. The discussion in this dissertation primarily focuses on the relevant parameters that are involved in photon absorption, exciton separation, carrier transport, carrier recombination and carrier collection in organic photovoltaic devices. A combination of steady-state and femtosecond broadband transient spectroscopies was used to investigate the photoinduced charge carrier dynamics in various donor-acceptor systems. Furthermore, this study was extended to investigate some important factors that influence charge transfer in donor-acceptor systems, such as the morphology, energy band alignment, electronic properties and chemical structure. Interestingly, clear correlations among the steady-state measurements, time-resolved spectroscopy results, grain alignment of the electron transporting layer (ETL), carrier mobility, and device performance are found. In this thesis, we explored the significant impacts of ultrafast charge separation and charge recombination at donor/acceptor (D/A) interfaces on the performance of a conjugated polymer PTB7-Th device with three fullerene acceptors: PC71BM, PC61BM and IC60BA. Time-resolved laser spectroscopy and high-resolution electron microscopy can illustrate the basis for fabricating solar cell devices with improved performances. In addition, we studied the effects of the incorporation of heavy metals into π-conjugated chromophores on electron transfer by monitoring the triplet state lifetime of the oligomer using transient absorption spectroscopy, as understanding the mechanisms controlling intersystem crossing and

  12. Model system-bath Hamiltonian and nonadiabatic rate constants for proton-coupled electron transfer at electrode-solution interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navrotskaya, Irina; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2008-06-28

    An extension of the Anderson-Newns-Schmickler model for electrochemical proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is presented. This model describes reactions in which electron transfer between a solute complex in solution and an electrode is coupled to proton transfer within the solute complex. The model Hamiltonian is derived in a basis of electron-proton vibronic states defined within a double adiabatic approximation for the electrons, transferring proton, and bath modes. The interaction term responsible for electronic transitions between the solute complex and the electrode depends on the proton donor-acceptor vibrational mode within the solute complex. This model Hamiltonian is used to derive the anodic and cathodic rate constants for nonadiabatic electrochemical PCET. The derivation is based on the master equations for the reduced density matrix of the electron-proton subsystem, which includes the electrons of the solute complex and the electrode, as well as the transferring proton. The rate constant expressions differ from analogous expressions for electrochemical electron transfer because of the summation over electron-proton vibronic states and the dependence of the couplings on the proton donor-acceptor vibrational motion. These differences lead to additional contributions to the total reorganization energy, an additional exponential temperature-dependent prefactor, and a temperature-dependent term in the effective activation energy that has different signs for the anodic and cathodic processes. This model can be generalized to describe both nonadiabatic and adiabatic electrochemical PCET reactions and provides the framework for the inclusion of additional effects, such as the breaking and forming of other chemical bonds.

  13. Electron-transfer reduction of dinuclear copper peroxo and bis-μ-oxo complexes leading to the catalytic four-electron reduction of dioxygen to water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahsini, Laleh; Kotani, Hiroaki; Lee, Yong-Min; Cho, Jaeheung; Nam, Wonwoo; Karlin, Kenneth D; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2012-01-23

    The four-electron reduction of dioxygen by decamethylferrocene (Fc*) to water is efficiently catalyzed by a binuclear copper(II) complex (1) and a mononuclear copper(II) complex (2) in the presence of trifluoroacetic acid in acetone at 298 K. Fast electron transfer from Fc* to 1 and 2 affords the corresponding Cu(I) complexes, which react at low temperature (193 K) with dioxygen to afford the η(2):η(2)-peroxo dicopper(II) (3) and bis-μ-oxo dicopper(III) (4) intermediates, respectively. The rate constants for electron transfer from Fc* and octamethylferrocene (Me(8)Fc) to 1 as well as electron transfer from Fc* and Me(8)Fc to 3 were determined at various temperatures, leading to activation enthalpies and entropies. The activation entropies of electron transfer from Fc* and Me(8)Fc to 1 were determined to be close to zero, as expected for outer-sphere electron-transfer reactions without formation of any intermediates. For electron transfer from Fc* and Me(8)Fc to 3, the activation entropies were also found to be close to zero. Such agreement indicates that the η(2):η(2)-peroxo complex (3) is directly reduced by Fc* rather than via the conversion to the corresponding bis-μ-oxo complex, followed by the electron-transfer reduction by Fc* leading to the four-electron reduction of dioxygen to water. The bis-μ-oxo species (4) is reduced by Fc* with a much faster rate than the η(2):η(2)-peroxo complex (3), but this also leads to the four-electron reduction of dioxygen to water. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. [Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions]. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    Fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom and ion-ion collisions are studied. Attention is focussed on one- and two-electron systems and, more recently, quasi-one-electron systems whose electron-target-ion core can be accurately modeled by one-electron potentials. The basic computational approaches can then be taken with few, if any, approximations, and the underlying collisional mechanisms can be more clearly revealed. At intermediate collision energies (e.g., proton energies for p-He{sup +} collisions on the order of 100 kilo-electron volts), many electronic states are strongly coupled during the collision, a coupled-state approach, such as a coupled-Sturmian-pseudostate approach, is appropriate. At higher collision energies (million electron-volt energies) the coupling is weaker with, however, many more states being coupled together, so that high-order perturbation theory is essential.

  15. Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winter, T.G.; Alston, S.G.

    1992-01-01

    The research being carried out at Penn State by Winter and Alston addresses the fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom (and ion-ion) collisions. The focus is on intermediate- and higher-energy collisions, corresponding to proton energies of about 25 kilo-electron-volts (keV) or larger. At intermediate energies, where the transition probabilities are not small, many states must be coupled in a large calculation, while at higher energies, perturbative approaches may be used. Several studies have been carried out in the current three-year period; most of these treat systems with only one or two electrons, so that fewer approximations need be made and the basic collisional mechanisms can be more clearly described.

  16. Thylakoid-Inspired Multishell g-C3N4 Nanocapsules with Enhanced Visible-Light Harvesting and Electron Transfer Properties for High-Efficiency Photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Zhenwei; Yang, Dong; Li, Zhen; Nan, Yanhu; Ding, Fei; Shen, Yichun; Jiang, Zhongyi

    2017-01-24

    Inspired by the orderly stacked nanostructure and highly integrated function of thylakoids in a natural photosynthesis system, multishell g-C3N4 (MSCN) nanocapsule photocatalysts have been prepared by SiO2 hard template with different shell layers. The resultant triple-shell g-C3N4 (TSCN) nanocapsules display superior photocatalysis performance to single-shell and double-shell counterparts owing to excellent visible-light harvesting and electron transfer properties. Specially, with the increase of the shell layer number, light harvesting is greatly enhanced. There is an increase of the entire visible range absorption arising from the multiple scattering and reflection of the incident light within multishell nanoarchitectures as well as the light transmission within the porous thin shells, and an increase of absorption edge arising from the decreased quantum size effect. The electron transfer is greatly accelerated by the mesopores in the thin shells as nanoconduits and the high specific surface area of TSCN (310.7 m(2) g(-1)). With the tailored hierarchical nanostructure features, TSCN exhibits a superior visible-light H2-generation activity of 630 μmol h(-1) g(-1) (λ > 420 nm), which is among one of the most efficient metal-free g-C3N4 photocatalysts. This study demonstrates a bioinspired approach to the rational design of high-performance nanostructured visible-light photocatalysts.

  17. A New Bioinspired Perchlorate Reduction Catalyst with Significantly Enhanced Stability via Rational Tuning of Rhenium Coordination Chemistry and Heterogeneous Reaction Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinyong; Han, Mengwei; Wu, Dimao; Chen, Xi; Choe, Jong Kwon; Werth, Charles J; Strathmann, Timothy J

    2016-06-01

    Rapid reduction of aqueous ClO4(-) to Cl(-) by H2 has been realized by a heterogeneous Re(hoz)2-Pd/C catalyst integrating Re(O)(hoz)2Cl complex (hoz = oxazolinyl-phenolato bidentate ligand) and Pd nanoparticles on carbon support, but ClOx(-) intermediates formed during reactions with concentrated ClO4(-) promote irreversible Re complex decomposition and catalyst deactivation. The original catalyst design mimics the microbial ClO4(-) reductase, which integrates Mo(MGD)2 complex (MGD = molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide) for oxygen atom transfer (OAT). Perchlorate-reducing microorganisms employ a separate enzyme, chlorite dismutase, to prevent accumulation of the destructive ClO2(-) intermediate. The structural intricacy of MGD ligand and the two-enzyme mechanism for microbial ClO4(-) reduction inspired us to improve catalyst stability by rationally tuning Re ligand structure and adding a ClOx(-) scavenger. Two new Re complexes, Re(O)(htz)2Cl and Re(O)(hoz)(htz)Cl (htz = thiazolinyl-phenolato bidentate ligand), significantly mitigate Re complex decomposition by slightly lowering the OAT activity when immobilized in Pd/C. Further stability enhancement is then obtained by switching the nanoparticles from Pd to Rh, which exhibits high reactivity with ClOx(-) intermediates and thus prevents their deactivating reaction with the Re complex. Compared to Re(hoz)2-Pd/C, the new Re(hoz)(htz)-Rh/C catalyst exhibits similar ClO4(-) reduction activity but superior stability, evidenced by a decrease of Re leaching from 37% to 0.25% and stability of surface Re speciation following the treatment of a concentrated "challenge" solution containing 1000 ppm of ClO4(-). This work demonstrates the pivotal roles of coordination chemistry control and tuning of individual catalyst components for achieving both high activity and stability in environmental catalyst applications.

  18. A general exit strategy of monoheme cytochromes c and c2 in electron transfer complexes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De March, Matteo; Brancatelli, Giovanna; Demitri, Nicola; De Zorzi, Rita; Hickey, Neal; Geremia, Silvano

    2015-09-01

    Using our previously reported maps of the electrostatic surface of horse heart ferri- and ferro-cyt c, comparisons were made between the complementary electrostatic surfaces of three cyt c peroxidase-cyt c complexes and the photosynthetic reaction center-cyt c complex, considering both iron oxidation states. The results obtained were consistent with a sliding mechanism for the electron shuttle on the surface of the protein complexes, promoted by the change in iron oxidation state. This mechanism was found to be in agreement with theoretical and NMR studies reported in the literature. Importantly, the analysis also provided a rationale for recognition of nonproductive associations. As we have previously reported the same conclusion on examination of redox partners of cyt c in the mitochondrial respiratory pathway, our hypothesis is that the proposed mechanism could represent a general exit strategy of monoheme cyts c and c2 in electron transfer complexes. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  19. Interfacial electron transfer of Shewanella putrefaciens enhanced by nanoflaky nickel oxide array in microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Yan; Wu, Xiao-Shuai; Li, Chang Ming

    2014-11-01

    A uniform nanoflaky nickel oxide (NiO) array is constructed on carbon cloth via optimized conditions, and further employed as an anode in Shewanella putrefaciens (S. putrefaciens) microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Results indicate that the NiO nanoflakes/carbon cloth anode significantly improves the MFC performance in comparison to the unmodified carbon cloth, delivering about three times higher power density. This attributes to an enhanced interfacial electron transfer rate between bacteria cell and nanoflaky NiO array-modified carbon fiber and improved adhesion of bacteria cells on the modified carbon fiber for more active reaction centers. Considering the facile synthesis process, low cost and long discharging lifetime, this NiO/carbon cloth anode could be very promising to be applied for high performance, large scale MFCs.

  20. Interaction between in vivo bioluminescence and extracellular electron transfer in Shewanella woodyi via charge and discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiaochun; Zhao, Feng; You, Lexing; Wu, Xuee; Zheng, Zhiyong; Wu, Ranran; Jiang, Yanxia; Sun, Shigang

    2017-01-18

    Extracellular electron transfer (EET) and bioluminescence are both important for microbial growth and metabolism, but the mechanism of interaction between EET and bioluminescence is poorly understood. Herein, we demonstrate an exclusively respiratory luminous bacterium, Shewanella woodyi, which possesses EET ability and electron communication at the interface of S. woodyi and solid substrates via charge and discharge methods. Using an electro-chemiluminescence apparatus, our results confirmed that the FMN/FMNH2 content and the redox status of cytochrome c conjointly regulated the bioluminescence intensity when the potential of an indium-tin oxide electrode was changed. More importantly, this work revealed that there is an interaction between the redox reaction of single cells and bioluminescence of group communication via the EET pathway.

  1. Investigation of electron transfer across the ice/liquid interface by scanning electro-chemical microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The study of interfacial electron transfer (ET) reaction between ferricinium (Fc+) produced in situ in 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE) and ferrocyanide in ice matrix under low temperatures by the scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) is reported. Tetrabutylammonium (TBA+) is used as the common ion (potential-determining ion) in both phases to control the interfacial potential difference. The potential drop across the liquid/liquid interface can be quantitatively adjusted by changing the ratio of concentrations of TBA+ between the two phases. The apparent heterogeneous rate constants for Fc+ reduction by at the interface under different temperatures have been obtained by a best-fit analysis, where the experimental approach curves are fitted to the theoretical simulated curves. A sharp change has been observed for heterogeneous rate constants around the freezing point of the aqueous phase, which reflects the phase transition process.

  2. Long-distance electron transfer by cable bacteria in aquifer sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Hubert; Bosch, Julian; Griebler, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The biodegradation of organic pollutants in aquifers is often restricted to the fringes of contaminant plumes where steep countergradients of electron donors and acceptors are separated by limited dispersive mixing. However, long-distance electron transfer (LDET) by filamentous ‘cable bacteria’ has...... recently been discovered in marine sediments to couple spatially separated redox half reactions over centimeter scales. Here we provide primary evidence that such sulfur-oxidizing cable bacteria can also be found at oxic–anoxic interfaces in aquifer sediments, where they provide a means for the direct...... of oxygen and sulfide by 9 mm together with a pH profile characteristic for sulfur oxidation by LDET. Bacterial filaments, which were highly abundant in the suboxic zone, were identified by sequencing of 16S rRNA genes and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) as cable bacteria belonging...

  3. A one-compartment fructose/air biological fuel cell based on direct electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xuee; Zhao, Feng; Varcoe, John R; Thumser, Alfred E; Avignone-Rossa, Claudio; Slade, Robert C T

    2009-10-15

    The construction and characterization of a one-compartment fructose/air biological fuel cell (BFC) based on direct electron transfer is reported. The BFC employs bilirubin oxidase and d-fructose dehydrogenase adsorbed on a cellulose-multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) matrix, reconstituted with an ionic liquid, as the biocathode and the bioanode for oxygen reduction and fructose oxidation reactions, respectively. The performance of the bioelectrode was investigated by chronoamperometric and cyclic voltammetric techniques in a standard three-electrode cell, and the polarization and long-term stability of the BFC was tested by potentiostatic discharge. An open circuit voltage of 663 mV and a maximum power density of 126 microWcm(-2) were obtained in buffer at pH 5.0. Using this regenerated cellulose-MWCNT matrix as the immobilization platform, this BFC has shown a relatively high performance and long-term stability compared with previous studies.

  4. Polyoxometalate-mediated electron transfer-oxygen transfer oxidation of cellulose and hemicellulose to synthesis gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Bidyut Bikash; Neumann, Ronny

    2014-08-01

    Terrestrial plants contain ~70% hemicellulose and cellulose that are a significant renewable bioresource with potential as an alternative to petroleum feedstock for carbon-based fuels. The efficient and selective deconstruction of carbohydrates to their basic components, carbon monoxide and hydrogen, so called synthesis gas, is an important key step towards the realization of this potential, because the formation of liquid hydrocarbon fuels from synthesis gas are known technologies. Here we show that by using a polyoxometalate as an electron transfer-oxygen transfer catalyst, carbon monoxide is formed by cleavage of all the carbon-carbon bonds through dehydration of initially formed formic acid. In this oxidation-reduction reaction, the hydrogen atoms are stored on the polyoxometalate as protons and electrons, and can be electrochemically released from the polyoxometalate as hydrogen. Together, synthesis gas is formed. In a hydrogen economy scenario, this method can also be used to convert carbon monoxide to hydrogen.

  5. Ring-polymer instanton theory of electron transfer in the nonadiabatic limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, Jeremy O., E-mail: jeremy.richardson@fau.de [Institut für Theoretische Physik und Interdisziplinäres Zentrum für Molekulare Materialien, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), Staudtstraße 7/B2, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-10-07

    We take the golden-rule instanton method derived in the previous paper [J. O. Richardson, R. Bauer, and M. Thoss, J. Chem. Phys. 143, 134115 (2015)] and reformulate it using a ring-polymer instanton approach. This gives equations which can be used to compute the rates of electron-transfer reactions in the nonadiabatic (golden-rule) limit numerically within a semiclassical approximation. The multidimensional ring-polymer instanton trajectories are obtained efficiently by minimization of the action. In this form, comparison with Wolynes’ quantum instanton method [P. G. Wolynes, J. Chem. Phys. 87, 6559 (1987)] is possible and we show that our semiclassical approach is the steepest-descent limit of this method. We discuss advantages and disadvantages of both methods and give examples of where the new approach is more accurate.

  6. Long-distance electron transfer by cable bacteria in aquifer sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Lars Riis; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2016-01-01

    The biodegradation of organic pollutants in aquifers is often restricted to the fringes of contaminant plumes where steep countergradients of electron donors and acceptors are separated by limited dispersive mixing. However, long-distance electron transfer (LDET) by filamentous ‘cable bacteria’ has...... recently been discovered in marine sediments to couple spatially separated redox half reactions over centimeter scales. Here we provide primary evidence that such sulfur-oxidizing cable bacteria can also be found at oxic–anoxic interfaces in aquifer sediments, where they provide a means for the direct...... of oxygen and sulfide by 9 mm together with a pH profile characteristic for sulfur oxidation by LDET. Bacterial filaments, which were highly abundant in the suboxic zone, were identified by sequencing of 16S rRNA genes and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) as cable bacteria belonging...

  7. Study of interaction of proflavin with triethylamine in homogeneous and micellar media: Photoinduced electron transfer probed by magnetic field effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Brotati; Basu, Samita

    2009-08-01

    Interaction of triethylamine (TEA) with cationic proflavin (PF +) in homogeneous and micellar media is studied using absorption spectroscopy, steady-state as well as time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and laser flash photolysis in conjunction with an external magnetic field. The two prime phenomena that have been highlighted in this study are photoinduced electron transfer (PET) and ground-state complex formation. This study shows that it is the medium which determines the reaction pathways to be followed. Magnetic field effect (MFE) helps to elucidate the reaction mechanism involved and this work also highlights the distance dependence factor associated with MFE.

  8. Kinetics and thermodynamics of electron transfer in Debye solvents: an analytical and nonperturbative reduced density matrix theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ping; Xu, Rui-Xue; Li, Baiqing; Xu, Jian; Cui, Ping; Mo, Yan; Yan, Yijing

    2006-06-15

    A nonperturbative electron transfer rate theory is developed on the basis of reduced density matrix dynamics, which can be evaluated readily for the Debye solvent model without further approximation. Not only does it recover for reaction rates the celebrated Marcus' inversion and Kramers' turnover behaviors, but the present theory also predicts reaction thermodynamics, such as equilibrium Gibbs free energy and entropy, some interesting solvent-dependent features that are calling for experimental verification. Moreover, a continued fraction Green's function formalism is also constructed, which can be used together with the Dyson equation technique for efficient evaluation of nonperturbative reduced density matrix dynamics.

  9. Conformational changes of the NADPH-dependent cytochrome P450 reductase in the course of electron transfer to cytochromes P450

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Tomas; Jensen, Kenneth; Møller, Birger Lindberg

    2011-01-01

    The NADPH-dependent cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) is a key electron donor to eucaryotic cytochromes P450 (CYPs). CPR shuttles electrons from NADPH through the FAD and FMN-coenzymes into the iron of the prosthetic heme-group of the CYP. In the course of these electron transfer reactions, CPR...

  10. Microfluidic Lithography of Bioinspired Helical Micromotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yunru; Shang, Luoran; Gao, Wei; Zhao, Ze; Wang, Huan; Zhao, Yuanjin

    2017-07-29

    Considerable efforts have been devoted to developing artificial micro/nanomotors that can convert energy into movement. A flow lithography integrated microfluidic spinning and spiraling system is developed for the continuous generation of bioinspired helical micromotors. Because the generation processes could be precisely tuned by adjusting the flow rates and the illuminating frequency, the length, diameter, and pitch of the helical micromotors were highly controllable. Benefiting from the fast online gelation and polymerization, the resultant helical micromotors could be imparted with Janus, triplex, and core-shell cross-sectional structures that have never been achieved by other methods. Owing to the spatially controlled encapsulation of functional nanoparticles in the microstructures, the helical micromotors can perform locomotion not only by magnetically actuated rotation or corkscrew motion but also through chemically powered catalytic reaction. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Identification of the specific electron transfer proteins, ferredoxin, and ferredoxin reductase, for CYP105D7 in Streptomyces avermitilis MA4680.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Bishnu Prasad; Lee, Nahum; Choi, Kwon-Young; Kim, Ji-Nu; Kim, Eun-Jung; Kim, Byung-Gee

    2014-06-01

    It was previously proposed that regiospecific hydroxylation of daidzein at 3'-position is mediated by cytochrome P450 hydroxylase (CYP105D7) in the presence of putidaredoxin (CamB) and putidaredoxin reductase (CamA) as electron transfer proteins from Pseudomonas putida. The genome sequence of Streptomyces avermitilis MA4680 revealed 33 P450 (CYPs) with 6 ferredoxin reductases (Fprs) and 9 ferredoxins (Fdxs) as their putative electron transfer partner proteins. To identify right endogenous electron transfer proteins for CYP105D7 activity, in vitro reconstitution, gene disruption, and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) mRNA expression profile analysis were examined. The most effective electron transfer proteins for CYP105D7 appear to be FdxH (SAV7470), which is located downstream to CYP105D7 as a cluster, and FprD (SAV5675). Throughout our overall analysis, we proposed that the primary electron transfer pathway for CYP105D7 follows as such NAD(P)H→FdxH→FprD→CYP105D7.

  12. The mechanism by which oxygen and cytochrome c increase the rate of electron transfer from cytochrome a to cytochrome a3 of cytochrome c oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickar, D; Turrens, J F; Lehninger, A L

    1986-11-05

    When cytochrome c oxidase is isolated from mitochondria, the purified enzyme requires both cytochrome c and O2 to achieve its maximum rate of internal electron transfer from cytochrome a to cytochrome a3. When reductants other than cytochrome c are used, the rate of internal electron transfer is very slow. In this paper we offer an explanation for the slow reduction of cytochrome a3 when reductants other than cytochrome c are used and for the apparent allosteric effects of cytochrome c and O2. Our model is based on the conventional understanding of cytochrome oxidase mechanism (i.e. electron transfer from cytochrome a/CuA to cytochrome a3/CuB), but assumes a relatively rapid two-electron transfer between cytochrome a/CuA and cytochrome a3/CuB and a thermodynamic equilibrium in the "resting" enzyme (the enzyme as isolated) which favors reduced cytochrome a and oxidized cytochrome a3. Using the kinetic constants that are known for this reaction, we find that the activating effects of O2 and cytochrome c on the rate of electron transfer from cytochrome a to cytochrome a3 conform to the predictions of the model and so provide no evidence of any allosteric effects or control of cytochrome c oxidase by O2 or cytochrome c.

  13. Photoinduced electron transfer across molecular bridges: electron- and hole-transfer superexchange pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natali, Mirco; Campagna, Sebastiano; Scandola, Franco

    2014-06-21

    Photoinduced electron transfer plays key roles in many areas of chemistry. Superexchange is an effective model to rationalize photoinduced electron transfer, particularly when molecular bridges between donor and acceptor subunits are present. In this tutorial review we discuss, within a superexchange framework, the complex role played by the bridge, with an emphasis on differences between thermal and photoinduced electron transfer, oxidative and reductive photoinduced processes, charge separation and charge recombination. Modular bridges are also considered, with specific attention to the distance dependence of donor-acceptor electronic coupling and electron transfer rate constants. The possibility of transition, depending on the bridge energetics, from coherent donor-acceptor electron transfer to incoherent charge injection and hopping through the bridge is also discussed. Finally, conceptual analogies between bridge effects in photoinduced electron transfer and optical intervalence transfer are outlined. Selected experimental examples, instrumental to illustration of the principles, are discussed.

  14. Bio-inspired vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posch, C.

    2012-01-01

    Nature still outperforms the most powerful computers in routine functions involving perception, sensing and actuation like vision, audition, and motion control, and is, most strikingly, orders of magnitude more energy-efficient than its artificial competitors. The reasons for the superior performance of biological systems are subject to diverse investigations, but it is clear that the form of hardware and the style of computation in nervous systems are fundamentally different from what is used in artificial synchronous information processing systems. Very generally speaking, biological neural systems rely on a large number of relatively simple, slow and unreliable processing elements and obtain performance and robustness from a massively parallel principle of operation and a high level of redundancy where the failure of single elements usually does not induce any observable system performance degradation. In the late 1980`s, Carver Mead demonstrated that silicon VLSI technology can be employed in implementing ``neuromorphic'' circuits that mimic neural functions and fabricating building blocks that work like their biological role models. Neuromorphic systems, as the biological systems they model, are adaptive, fault-tolerant and scalable, and process information using energy-efficient, asynchronous, event-driven methods. In this paper, some basics of neuromorphic electronic engineering and its impact on recent developments in optical sensing and artificial vision are presented. It is demonstrated that bio-inspired vision systems have the potential to outperform conventional, frame-based vision acquisition and processing systems in many application fields and to establish new benchmarks in terms of redundancy suppression/data compression, dynamic range, temporal resolution and power efficiency to realize advanced functionality like 3D vision, object tracking, motor control, visual feedback loops, etc. in real-time. It is argued that future artificial vision systems

  15. Mtr Extracellular Electron Transfer Pathways in Fe(III)-reducing or Fe(II)-oxidizing Bacteria: A Genomic Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Liang; Rosso, Kevin M.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2012-12-01

    Originally discovered in the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (MR-1), the Mtr (i.e., metal-reducing) pathway exists in all characterized strains of metal-reducing Shewanella. The protein components identified to date for the Mtr pathway of MR-1 include four multi-heme c-type cytochromes (c-Cyts), CymA, MtrA, MtrC and OmcA, and a porin-like, outer membrane protein MtrB. They are strategically positioned along the width of the MR-1 cell envelope to mediate electron transfer from the quinone/quinol pool in the inner-membrane to the Fe(III)-containing minerals external to the bacterial cells. A survey of microbial genomes revealed homologues of the Mtr pathway in other dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, including Aeromonas hydrophila, Ferrimonas balearica and Rhodoferax ferrireducens, and in the Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria Dechloromonas aromatica RCB, Gallionella capsiferriformans ES-2 and Sideroxydans lithotrophicus ES-1. The widespread distribution of Mtr pathways in Fe(III)-reducing or Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria emphasizes the importance of this type of extracellular electron transfer pathway in microbial redox transformation of Fe. Their distribution in these two different functional groups of bacteria also emphasizes the bi-directional nature of electron transfer reactions carried out by the Mtr pathways. The characteristics of the Mtr pathways may be shared by other pathways used by microorganisms for exchanging electrons with their extracellular environments.

  16. Ab initio study of long-range electron transfer between biphenyl anion radical and naphthalene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李象远; 肖顺清; 何福城

    1999-01-01

    After the separation of the donor, the aeceptor, and the σ-type bridge from the π-σ-π system, the geometries of biphenyl, biphenyl anion radical, naphthalene, and naphthalene anion radical are optimized, and then the reorganization energy for the intermolecular electron transfer (ET) at the levels of HF/4-31G and HF/DZP is calculated. The ET matrix elements of the self-exchange reactions of the π-σ-π systems have been calculated by means of both the direct calculation based on the variational principle, and the transition energy between the molecular orbitals at the linear coordinate R=0.5. For the cross reactions, the ET matrix element and the geometry of the transition state are determined by searching the minimum energy splitting △min along the reaction coordinate. In the evaluation of the solvent reorganization energy of the ET in solution, the Marcus’ two-sphere model has been invoked. A few of ET rate constants for the intramolecular ET reactions for the π-σ-π systems, which contain

  17. A hybrid approach to simulation of electron transfer in complex molecular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubař, Tomáš; Elstner, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Electron transfer (ET) reactions in biomolecular systems represent an important class of processes at the interface of physics, chemistry and biology. The theoretical description of these reactions constitutes a huge challenge because extensive systems require a quantum-mechanical treatment and a broad range of time scales are involved. Thus, only small model systems may be investigated with the modern density functional theory techniques combined with non-adiabatic dynamics algorithms. On the other hand, model calculations based on Marcus's seminal theory describe the ET involving several assumptions that may not always be met. We review a multi-scale method that combines a non-adiabatic propagation scheme and a linear scaling quantum-chemical method with a molecular mechanics force field in such a way that an unbiased description of the dynamics of excess electron is achieved and the number of degrees of freedom is reduced effectively at the same time. ET reactions taking nanoseconds in systems with hundreds of quantum atoms can be simulated, bridging the gap between non-adiabatic ab initio simulations and model approaches such as the Marcus theory. A major recent application is hole transfer in DNA, which represents an archetypal ET reaction in a polarizable medium. Ongoing work focuses on hole transfer in proteins, peptides and organic semi-conductors. PMID:23883952

  18. Beyond vibrationally mediated electron transfer: interfacial charge injection on a sub-10-fs time scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Robert; Moser, Jacques E.; Gratzel, Michael; Wachtveitl, Josef L.

    2003-12-01

    The electron transfer (ET) from organic dye molecules to semiconductor-colloidal systems is characterized by a special energetic situation with a charge transfer reaction from a system of discrete donor levels to a continuum of acceptor states. If these systems show a strong electronic coupling they are amongst the fastest known ET systems with transfer times of less than 10 fs. In the first part a detailed discussion of the direct observation of an ET reaction with a time constant of about 6 fs will be given, with an accompanying argumentation concerning possible artifacts or other interfering signal contributions. In a second part we will try to give a simple picture for the scenario of such superfast ET reactions and one main focus will be the discussion of electronic dephasing and its consequences for the ET reaction. The actual ET process can be understood as a kind of dispersion process of the initially located electron into the colloid representing a real motion of charge density from the alizarin to the colloid.

  19. A mechanistic study of electron transfer from the distal termini of electrode-bound, single-stranded DNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzawa, Takanori; Cheng, Ryan R.; White, Ryan J.; Makarov, Dmitrii E.; Plaxco, Kevin W

    2010-01-01

    Electrode-bound, redox-reporter-modified oligonucleotides play roles in the functioning of a number of electrochemical biosensors, and thus the question of electron transfer through or from such molecules has proven of significant interest. In response, we have experimentally characterized the rate with which electrons are transferred between a methylene blue on the distal end of a short, single-stranded polythymine DNAs to a monolayer-coated gold electrode to which the other end of the DNA is site-specifically attached. We find that this rate scales with oligonucleotide length to the −1.16±0.09 power. This weak, approximately inverse length dependence differs dramatically from the much stronger dependencies observed for the rates of end-to-end collisions in single-stranded DNA and through-oligonucleotide electron hopping. It instead coincides with the expected length dependence of a reaction-limited process in which the overall rate is proportional to the equilibrium probability that the end of the oligonucleotide chain approaches the surface. Studies of the ionic strength and viscosity dependencies of electron transfer further support this “chain-flexibility” mechanism, and studies of the electron transfer rate of methylene blue attached to the hexanethiol monolayer suggest that heterogeneous electron transfer through the monolayer is rate limiting. Thus, under the circumstances we have employed, the flexibility (i.e., the equilibrium statistical properties) of the oligonucleotide chain defines the rate with which an attached redox reporter transfers electrons to an underlying electrode, an observation that may be of utility in the design of new biosensor architectures. PMID:20964337

  20. Effects of soluble flavin on heterogeneous electron transfer between surface-exposed bacterial cytochromes and iron oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheming; Shi, Zhi; Shi, Liang; White, Gaye F.; Richardson, David J.; Clarke, Thomas A.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.

    2015-08-01

    Dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria can utilize insoluble Fe(Mn)-oxides as a terminal electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions. For Shewanella species specifically, evidence suggests that iron reduction is associated with the secretion of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and riboflavin. However, the exact mechanism of flavin involvement is unclear; while some indicate that flavins mediate electron transfer (Marsili et al., 2008), others point to flavin serving as co-factors to outer membrane proteins (Okamoto et al., 2013). In this work, we used methyl viologen (MVrad +)-encapsulated, porin-cytochrome complex (MtrCAB) embedded liposomes (MELs) as a synthetic model of the Shewanella outer membrane to investigate the proposed mediating behavior of microbially produced flavins. The reduction kinetics of goethite, hematite and lepidocrocite (200 μM) by MELs ([MVrad +] ∼ 40 μM and MtrABC ⩽ 1 nM) were determined in the presence FMN at pH 7.0 in N2 atmosphere by monitoring the concentrations of MVrad + and FMN through their characteristic UV-visible absorption spectra. Experiments were performed where (i) FMN and Fe(III)-oxide were mixed and then reacted with the reduced MELs and (ii) FMN was reacted with the reduced MELs followed by addition of Fe(III)-oxide. The redox reactions proceeded in two steps: a fast step that was completed in a few seconds, and a slower one lasting over 400 s. For all three Fe(III)-oxides, the initial reaction rate in the presence of a low concentration of FMN (⩽1 μM) was at least a factor of five faster than those with MELs alone, and orders of magnitude faster than those by FMNH2, suggesting that FMN may serve as a co-factor that enhances electron transfer from outer-membrane c-cytochromes to Fe(III)-oxides. The rate and extent of the initial reaction followed the order of lepidocrocite > hematite > goethite, the same as their reduction potentials, implying thermodynamic control on reaction rate. For LEP, with the highest reduction

  1. Distance dependence of bidirectional concerted proton-electron transfer in phenol-Ru(2,2'-bipyridine)3(2+) dyads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Kuss-Petermann, Martin; Wenger, Oliver S

    2014-04-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) was investigated in three covalent donor-bridge-acceptor molecules with different bridge lengths. Upon photoexcitation of their Ru(bpy)3(2+) (bpy=2,2'-bipyridine) photosensitizer in acetonitrile, intramolecular long-range electron transfer from a phenolic unit to Ru(bpy)3(2+) occurs in concert with release of the phenolic proton to pyrrolidine base. The kinetics of this bidirectional concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET) reaction were studied as a function of phenol-Ru(bpy)3(2+) distance by increasing the number of bridging p-xylene units. A distance decay constant (β) of 0.67±0.23 Å(-1) was determined. The distance dependence of the rates for CPET is thus not significantly steeper than that for ordinary (i.e., not proton coupled) electron transfer across the same bridges, despite the concerted motion of oppositely charged particles into different directions. Long-range bidirectional CPET is an important reaction in many proteins and plays a key role in photosynthesis; our results are relevant in the context of photoinduced separation of protons and electrons as a means of light-to-chemical energy conversion. This is the first determination of β for a bidirectional CPET reaction.

  2. Elucidating the design principles of photosynthetic electron-transfer proteins by site-directed spin labeling EPR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishara Silva, K; Jagannathan, Bharat; Golbeck, John H; Lakshmi, K V

    2016-05-01

    Site-directed spin labeling electron paramagnetic resonance (SDSL EPR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool to determine solvent accessibility, side-chain dynamics, and inter-spin distances at specific sites in biological macromolecules. This information provides important insights into the structure and dynamics of both natural and designed proteins and protein complexes. Here, we discuss the application of SDSL EPR spectroscopy in probing the charge-transfer cofactors in photosynthetic reaction centers (RC) such as photosystem I (PSI) and the bacterial reaction center (bRC). Photosynthetic RCs are large multi-subunit proteins (molecular weight≥300 kDa) that perform light-driven charge transfer reactions in photosynthesis. These reactions are carried out by cofactors that are paramagnetic in one of their oxidation states. This renders the RCs unsuitable for conventional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy investigations. However, the presence of native paramagnetic centers and the ability to covalently attach site-directed spin labels in RCs makes them ideally suited for the application of SDSL EPR spectroscopy. The paramagnetic centers serve as probes of conformational changes, dynamics of subunit assembly, and the relative motion of cofactors and peptide subunits. In this review, we describe novel applications of SDSL EPR spectroscopy for elucidating the effects of local structure and dynamics on the electron-transfer cofactors of photosynthetic RCs. Because SDSL EPR Spectroscopy is uniquely suited to provide dynamic information on protein motion, it is a particularly useful method in the engineering and analysis of designed electron transfer proteins and protein networks. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Catalytic alkylation of remote C-H bonds enabled by proton-coupled electron transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Gilbert J.; Zhu, Qilei; Miller, David C.; Gu, Carol J.; Knowles, Robert R.

    2016-11-01

    Despite advances in hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) catalysis, there are currently no molecular HAT catalysts that are capable of homolysing the strong nitrogen-hydrogen (N-H) bonds of N-alkyl amides. The motivation to develop amide homolysis protocols stems from the utility of the resultant amidyl radicals, which are involved in various synthetically useful transformations, including olefin amination and directed carbon-hydrogen (C-H) bond functionalization. In the latter process—a subset of the classical Hofmann-Löffler-Freytag reaction—amidyl radicals remove hydrogen atoms from unactivated aliphatic C-H bonds. Although powerful, these transformations typically require oxidative N-prefunctionalization of the amide starting materials to achieve efficient amidyl generation. Moreover, because these N-activating groups are often incorporated into the final products, these methods are generally not amenable to the direct construction of carbon-carbon (C-C) bonds. Here we report an approach that overcomes these limitations by homolysing the N-H bonds of N-alkyl amides via proton-coupled electron transfer. In this protocol, an excited-state iridium photocatalyst and a weak phosphate base cooperatively serve to remove both a proton and an electron from an amide substrate in a concerted elementary step. The resultant amidyl radical intermediates are shown to promote subsequent C-H abstraction and radical alkylation steps. This C-H alkylation represents a catalytic variant of the Hofmann-Löffler-Freytag reaction, using simple, unfunctionalized amides to direct the formation of new C-C bonds. Given the prevalence of amides in pharmaceuticals and natural products, we anticipate that this method will simplify the synthesis and structural elaboration of amine-containing targets. Moreover, this study demonstrates that concerted proton-coupled electron transfer can enable homolytic activation of common organic functional groups that are energetically inaccessible using

  4. Electromagnetic field generation by ATP-induced reverse electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Richard H

    2003-03-01

    This paper describes a mechanism to explain low-level light emission in biology. A biological analog of the electrical circuitry, modeled on the parallel plate capacitor, traversed by a helical structure, required to generate electromagnetic radiation in the optical spectral range, is described. The charge carrier required for the emissions is determined to be an accelerating electron driven by an ATP-induced reverse electron transfer. The radial velocity component, the emission trajectory, of the moving charges traversing helical protein structures in a cyclotron-type mechanism is proposed to be imposed by the ferromagnetic field components of the iron in the iron-sulfur proteins. The redox systems NADH, riboflavin, and chlorophyll were examined with their long-wavelength absorption maxima determining the energetic parameters for the calculations. Potentials calculated from the axial velocity components for the riboflavin and NADH systems were found to equal the standard redox potentials of these systems as measured electrochemically and enzymatically. The mechanics for the three systems determined the magnetic moments, the angular momenta, and the orbital magnetic fluxes to be adiabatic invariant parameters. The De Broglie dual wave-particle equation, the fundamental equation of wave mechanics, and the key idea of quantum mechanics, establishes the wavelengths for accelerating electrons which, divided into a given radial velocity, gives its respective emission frequency. Electrons propelled through helical structures, traversed by biologically available electric and magnetic fields, make accessible to the internal environment the optical spectral frequency range that the solar spectrum provides to the external environment.

  5. Enhanced electron transfer dissociation through fixed charge derivatization of cysteines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasicek, Lisa; Brodbelt, Jennifer S

    2009-10-01

    Electron transfer dissociation (ETD) has proven to be a promising new ion activation method for proteomics applications due to its ability to generate c- and z-type fragment ions in comparison to the y- and b-type ions produced upon the more conventional collisional activation of peptides. However, low precursor charge states hinder the success of electron-based activation methods due to competition from nondissociative charge reduction and incomplete sequence coverage. In the present report, the reduction and alkylation of disulfide bonds prior to ETD analysis is evaluated by comparison of three derivatization reagents: iodoacetamide (IAM), N,N-dimethyl-2-chloro-ethylamine (DML), and (3-acrylamidopropyl)-trimethyl ammonium chloride (APTA). While both the DML and APTA modifications lead to an increase in the charge states of peptides, the APTA-peptides provided the most significant improvement in percent fragmentation and sequence coverage for all peptides upon ETD, including formation of diagnostic ions that allow characterization of both the C- and N-termini. In addition, the formation of product ions in multiple charge states upon ETD is minimized for the APTA-modified peptides.

  6. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Moving Together and Charging Forward

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-07-22

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is ubiquitous throughout chemistry and biology. This Perspective discusses recent advances and current challenges in the field of PCET, with an emphasis on the role of theory and computation. The fundamental theoretical concepts are summarized, and expressions for rate constants and kinetic isotope effects are provided. Computational methods for calculating reduction potentials and pKa’s for molecular electrocatalysts, as well as methods for simulating the nonadiabatic dynamics of photoinduced processes, are also described. Representative applications to PCET in solution, proteins, electrochemistry, and photoinduced processes are presented, highlighting the interplay between theoretical and experimental studies. The current challenges and suggested future directions are outlined for each type of application, concluding with an overall view to the future. The work described herein was supported by National Science Foundation Grant CHE-13-61293 (theory development), National Institutes of Health Grant GM056207 (soybean lipoxygenase), Center for Chemical Innovation of the National Science Foundation Solar Fuels Grant CHE-1305124 (cobalt catalysts), Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (nickel catalysts), and Air Force Office of Scientific Research Award No. FA9550-14-1-0295 (photoinduced PCET).

  7. Intramolecular electron transfer in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cd(1) nitrite reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Brunori, Maurizio; Cutruzzolà, Francesca

    2009-01-01

    nitrite reductase has been determined in both fully oxidized and reduced states. Intramolecular electron transfer (ET), between c and d(1) hemes is an essential step in the catalytic cycle. In earlier studies of the Pseudomonas stutzeri enzyme, we observed that a marked negative cooperativity......The cd(1) nitrite reductases, which catalyze the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide, are homodimers of 60 kDa subunits, each containing one heme-c and one heme-d(1). Heme-c is the electron entry site, whereas heme-d(1) constitutes the catalytic center. The 3D structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa......-controlled bimolecular process, followed by unimolecular electron equilibration between the c and d(1) hemes (k(ET) = 4.3 s(-1) and K = 1.4 at 298 K, pH 7.0). In the case of the mutant, the latter ET rate was faster by almost one order of magnitude. Moreover, the internal ET rate dropped (by approximately 30-fold...

  8. First-Principles Calculations of Electron Transfer in Organic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Ranjit; Karna, Shashi P.

    2000-03-01

    Suitably tailored organic structures are considered potential candidates as components in molecular electronic devices. A common molecular architecture for electronics consists of an electron donor (D) and an electron acceptor (A) moiety bonded together by a chemically inert bridging moiety, called spacer (S). The D-S-A combination constitutes the basic component equivalent of a solid state capacitor. A useful physical property that determines the applicability of molecular structures in moletronics is the electron transfer (ET) rate, which is related, in a two-state approximation, to the coupling matrix between the two electronic states representing the localization of electrons. In an effort to model potential organic structures, we have calculated the ET coupling matrix elements in a number of D-, S-, and A-type organic molecules with the use of ab initio Hartree-Fock method and two different basis sets, namely an STO-3G and a double zeta plus polarization (DZP). A number of important findings have emerged from this study: (i) The ET coupling matrix strongly depends upon the geometrical arrangement of the molecular fragment(s) in the architecture. (ii) In an oligomeric chain, the ET matrix decreases exponentially with molecular length (number of monomer units). (iii) In cyclic alkanes, the magnitude of the ET coupling matrix decreases with increasing size of fused rings.

  9. Promoting direct interspecies electron transfer with activated carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Fanghua; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin M.

    2012-01-01

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) is added to methanogenic digesters to enhance conversion of wastes to methane, but the mechanism(s) for GAC’s stimulatory effect are poorly understood. GAC has high electrical conductivity and thus it was hypothesized that one mechanism for GAC stimulation of metha......Granular activated carbon (GAC) is added to methanogenic digesters to enhance conversion of wastes to methane, but the mechanism(s) for GAC’s stimulatory effect are poorly understood. GAC has high electrical conductivity and thus it was hypothesized that one mechanism for GAC stimulation...... of methanogenesis might be to facilitate direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) between bacteria and methanogens. Metabolism was substantially accelerated when GAC was added to co-cultures of Geobacter metallireducens and Geobacter sulfurreducens grown under conditions previously shown to require DIET. Cells...... were attached to GAC, but did not aggregate as they do when making biological electrical connections between cells. Studies with a series of gene deletion mutants eliminated the possibility that GAC promoted electron exchange via interspecies hydrogen or formate transfer and demonstrated that DIET...

  10. Mechanically Controlled Electron Transfer in a Single-Polypeptide Transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheu, Sheh-Yi; Yang, Dah-Yen

    2017-01-01

    Proteins are of interest in nano-bio electronic devices due to their versatile structures, exquisite functionality and specificity. However, quantum transport measurements produce conflicting results due to technical limitations whereby it is difficult to precisely determine molecular orientation, the nature of the moieties, the presence of the surroundings and the temperature; in such circumstances a better understanding of the protein electron transfer (ET) pathway and the mechanism remains a considerable challenge. Here, we report an approach to mechanically drive polypeptide flip-flop motion to achieve a logic gate with ON and OFF states during protein ET. We have calculated the transmission spectra of the peptide-based molecular junctions and observed the hallmarks of electrical current and conductance. The results indicate that peptide ET follows an NC asymmetric process and depends on the amino acid chirality and α-helical handedness. Electron transmission decreases as the number of water molecules increases, and the ET efficiency and its pathway depend on the type of water-bridged H-bonds. Our results provide a rational mechanism for peptide ET and new perspectives on polypeptides as potential candidates in logic nano devices.

  11. Bioinspired synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, Anand [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles has long been an area of active research. Magnetic nanoparticles can be used in a wide variety of applications such as magnetic inks, magnetic memory devices, drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, and pathogen detection in foods. In applications such as MRI, particle uniformity is particularly crucial, as is the magnetic response of the particles. Uniform magnetic particles with good magnetic properties are therefore required. One particularly effective technique for synthesizing nanoparticles involves biomineralization, which is a naturally occurring process that can produce highly complex nanostructures. Also, the technique involves mild conditions (ambient temperature and close to neutral pH) that make this approach suitable for a wide variety of materials. The term 'bioinspired' is important because biomineralization research is inspired by the naturally occurring process, which occurs in certain microorganisms called 'magnetotactic bacteria'. Magnetotactic bacteria use biomineralization proteins to produce magnetite crystals having very good uniformity in size and morphology. The bacteria use these magnetic particles to navigate according to external magnetic fields. Because these bacteria synthesize high quality crystals, research has focused on imitating aspects of this biomineralization in vitro. In particular, a biomineralization iron-binding protein found in a certain species of magnetotactic bacteria, magnetospirillum magneticum, AMB-1, has been extracted and used for in vitro magnetite synthesis; Pluronic F127 gel was used to increase the viscosity of the reaction medium to better mimic the conditions in the bacteria. It was shown that the biomineralization protein mms6 was able to facilitate uniform magnetite synthesis. In addition, a similar biomineralization process using mms6 and a shorter version of this protein, C25, has been used to synthesize cobalt ferrite

  12. Photoinduced electron transfer and interfacial photocatalysis behaviour of ZnS/CdS binary co-colloid system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈德文; 刘延秋; 田秋; 徐广智

    1999-01-01

    The interfacial photoinduced electron transfer and related secondary photochemical behaviour in the system of ZnS/CdS co-colloid superfine particles were studied by means of ESR and fluorescence spectroscopy techniques. The photoinduced charge-separation and the radical intermediates produced in the secondary redox reactions initiated via charge separation, as well as the mechanism of reaction processes, were investigated in detail through simultaneous excitation of two colloid components or only one of them. Research results indicated that, as Eg(ZnS)>Eλ>Eg(CdS), only CdS in co-colloid system might be excited. The transfer process of electron from the conduction band of CdS to the conduction band of ZnS is forbidden, and under the excitation wavelength range used, the electron transfer of cocolloid system was impossible, thus the photo redox reactions of the substrate in co-colloid system had no obvious difference from those reactions happening in single colloid system. While the excitation wav

  13. Ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulation of electron transfer process: fractional electron approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiancheng; Hu, Hao; Hu, Xiangqian; Cohen, Aron J; Yang, Weitao

    2008-03-28

    Electron transfer (ET) reactions are one of the most important processes in chemistry and biology. Because of the quantum nature of the processes and the complicated roles of the solvent, theoretical study of ET processes is challenging. To simulate ET processes at the electronic level, we have developed an efficient density functional theory (DFT) quantum mechanical (QM)/molecular mechanical (MM) approach that uses the fractional number of electrons as the order parameter to calculate the redox free energy of ET reactions in solution. We applied this method to study the ET reactions of the aqueous metal complexes Fe(H(2)O)(6)(2+/3+) and Ru(H(2)O)(6)(2+/3+). The calculated oxidation potentials, 5.82 eV for Fe(II/III) and 5.14 eV for Ru(II/III), agree well with the experimental data, 5.50 and 4.96 eV, for iron and ruthenium, respectively. Furthermore, we have constructed the diabatic free energy surfaces from histogram analysis based on the molecular dynamics trajectories. The resulting reorganization energy and the diabatic activation energy also show good agreement with experimental data. Our calculations show that using the fractional number of electrons (FNE) as the order parameter in the thermodynamic integration process leads to efficient sampling and validate the ab initio QM/MM approach in the calculation of redox free energies.

  14. DFT and time-resolved IR investigation of electron transfer between photogenerated 17- and 19-electron organometallic radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahoon, James B.; Kling, Matthias F.; Sawyer, Karma R.; Andersen, Lars K.; Harris, Charles B.

    2008-04-30

    The photochemical disproportionation mechanism of [CpW(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2} in the presence of Lewis bases PR{sub 3} was investigated on the nano- and microsecond time-scales with Step-Scan FTIR time-resolved infrared spectroscopy. 532 nm laser excitation was used to homolytically cleave the W-W bond, forming the 17-electron radicals CpW(CO){sub 3} and initiating the reaction. With the Lewis base PPh{sub 3}, disproportionation to form the ionic products CpW(CO){sub 3}PPh{sub 3}{sup +} and CpW(CO){sub 3}{sup -} was directly monitored on the microsecond time-scale. Detailed examination of the kinetics and concentration dependence of this reaction indicates that disproportionation proceeds by electron transfer from the 19-electron species CpW(CO){sub 3}PPh{sub 3} to the 17-electron species CpW(CO){sub 3}. This result is contrary to the currently accepted disproportionation mechanism which predicts electron transfer from the 19-electron species to the dimer [CpW(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2}. With the Lewis base P(OMe){sub 3} on the other hand, ligand substitution to form the product [CpW(CO){sub 2}P(OMe){sub 3}]{sub 2} is the primary reaction on the microsecond time-scale. Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations support the experimental results and suggest that the differences in the reactivity between P(OMe){sub 3} and PPh{sub 3} are due to steric effects. The results indicate that radical-to-radical electron transfer is a previously unknown but important process for the formation of ionic products with the organometallic dimer [CpW(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2} and may also be applicable to the entire class of organometallic dimers containing a single metal-metal bond.

  15. Enzymatic cellulose oxidation is linked to lignin by long-range electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westereng, Bjorge; Cannella, David; Wittrup Agger, Jane;

    2015-01-01

    cell walls. Electron transfer was confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy showing that LPMO activity on cellulose changes the level of unpaired electrons in the lignin. The discovery of a long-range electron transfer mechanism links the biodegradation of cellulose and lignin and sheds...... new light on how oxidative enzymes present in plant degraders may act in concert....

  16. Enzymatic cellulose oxidation is linked to lignin by long-range electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westereng, Bjorge; Cannella, David; Wittrup Agger, Jane;

    2015-01-01

    cell walls. Electron transfer was confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy showing that LPMO activity on cellulose changes the level of unpaired electrons in the lignin. The discovery of a long-range electron transfer mechanism links the biodegradation of cellulose and lignin and sheds...

  17. ELECTRON TRANSFER COLLISION OF NEON IONS WITH Ne IN A RF ION TRAP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    满宝元; 王象泰; 等

    1995-01-01

    The pulsed electron beam rf ion stroage system is used to study neon ions electron transfer,The rate coefficients for electron transfer of the neon ions with the neon gas are measured.the results are better than those in other ion storage system.

  18. Interaction of fluorescence dyes with 5-fluorouracil: A photoinduced electron transfer study in bulk and biologically relevant water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchlyan, Jagannath; Banik, Debasis; Kundu, Niloy; Roy, Arpita; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2014-10-01

    The interactions of widely used chemotherapeutic drug, 5-fluorouracil (5FU) with coumarin dyes have been investigated for the first time using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic measurements. The fluorescence quenching along with the decrease in lifetimes of excited state of coumarin derivatives with gradual addition of 5FU is explained by photoinduced electron transfer (PET) mechanism. Our studies were performed in bulk water and confined water of AOT (aerosol OT) reverse micelle to investigate the effect of confinement on PET dynamics. The feasibility of PET reaction for coumarin-5FU systems is investigated calculating the standard free energy changes using the Rehm-Weller equation.

  19. Autonomous UAV persistent surveillance using bio-inspired strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burman, Jerry; Hespanha, Joao; Madhow, Upamanyu; Isaacs, Jason; Venkateswaran, Sriram; Pham, Tien

    2012-06-01

    A team consisting of Teledyne Scientific Company, the University of California at Santa Barbara, the Army Research Laboratory, the Engineer Research and Development Center, and IBM UK is developing technologies in support of automated data exfiltration from heterogeneous battlefield sensor networks to enhance situational awareness for dismounts and command echelons. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) provide an effective means to autonomously collect data from a sparse network of unattended ground sensors (UGSs) that cannot communicate with each other. UAVs are used to reduce the system reaction time by generating autonomous collection routes that are data-driven. Bioinspired techniques for autonomous search provide a novel strategy to detect, capture and fuse data from heterogeneous sensor networks. The bio-inspired algorithm is based on chemotaxis or the motion of bacteria seeking nutrients in their environment. Field tests of a bio-inspired system that routed UAVs were conducted in June 2011 at Camp Roberts, CA. The field test results showed that such a system can autonomously detect and locate the source of terrestrial events with very high accuracy and visually verify the event. In June 2011, field tests of the system were completed and include the use of multiple autonomously controlled UAVs, detection and disambiguation of multiple acoustic events occurring in short time frames, optimal sensor placement based on local phenomenology and the use of the International Technology Alliance (ITA) Sensor Network Fabric. The system demonstrated TRL 6 performance in the field at Camp Roberts.

  20. Applications of Optical Spectroscopy in Studies on Energy & Electron Transfer and Solvation Effects in Nanoscale and Molecular Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Megan H. J.

    This thesis describes three investigations, ranging in subject matters, all of which relating to systems capable of photoinduced reactions involving energy or electron transfer. The phenomenon and the effects of environment in the various systems are explored using different methodologies of optical spectroscopy. As the chapters progress, different investigations introduce and build on fundamental concepts encountered and in complexity of the methodologies used to explore the systems. The first chapter introduces the preparation of water-soluble CdSe nanocrystal clusters. The clusters, created using a protein, are 3-D close-packed self-assemblies of nanocrystals. Due to this close-packed nature, electronic interactions between the nanocrystals allow for energy migration within the cluster. The structural and optical properties of the clusters were described. Then using steady-state spectroscopy, properties of the original nanocrystals were compared to that of the cluster to determine the consequence of nanocrystal coupling interactions and their potential use toward the development of artificial light-harvesting systems. In the second chapter, CdSe nanocrystals are functionalized with a unique electro-active polymer, and the electron transfer between the nanocrystal and the electro-active polymer adsorbate is investigated. Using fluorescence decay measurements, the electron transfer reaction inherent to the system with respect to a comprehensive range of dielectric solvents was explored. The study illustrates the high complexity of seemingly typical nanocrystal-based systems and provides general awareness of what factors need to be considered when dealing with such systems. The final chapter starts with an informal review of ultrafast nonlinear spectroscopy, focusing on two methods, three-pulse photon echo peak shift (3PEPS) and two-dimensional photon echo (2DPE) electronic spectroscopy, and how they are related. A straightforward approach for extracting 3PEPS data

  1. Group IB organometallic Chemistry XXIII. Reaction of Ar4Cu2Li2 with RhI complexes; Synthesis of 2-[(dimethylamino)methyl] phenylrhodium dicarbon monoxide and electron-transfer induced selective formation of diarylketones ArC(O)Ar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koten, G. van; Jastrzebski, J.T.B.H.; Noltes, J.G.

    1978-01-01

    The 1/1 reaction of (2-Me{2}NCH{2}C{6}H{4}){4}M{2}Li{2} (M = Cu or Au) with (CO){2}ClRh-dimer affords (2-Me{2}NCH{2}C{6}H{4}M){n} and the novel 2-Me{2}NCH{2}C{6}H{4}Rh(CO){2}. In contrast, the reaction of (x-tolyl){4}M{2}Li{2} (x = 2, M = Cu or Au) under a CO atmosphere results in the formation of

  2. Ultrafast fluorescence quenching dynamics of Atto655 in the presence of N-acetyltyrosine and N-acetyltryptophan in aqueous solution: proton-coupled electron transfer versus electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Yuan, Shuwei; Lu, Rong; Yu, Anchi

    2013-06-20

    We studied the ultrafast fluorescence quenching dynamics of Atto655 in the presence of N-acetyltyrosine (AcTyr) and N-acetyltryptophan (AcTrp) in aqueous solution with femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. We found that the charge-transfer rate between Atto655 and AcTyr is about 240 times smaller than that between Atto655 and AcTrp. The pH value and D2O dependences of the excited-state decay kinetics of Atto655 in the presence of AcTyr and AcTrp reveal that the quenching of Atto655 fluorescence by AcTyr in aqueous solution is via a proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) process and that the quenching of Atto655 fluorescence by AcTrp in aqueous solution is via an electron-transfer process. With the version of the semiclassical Marcus ET theory, we derived that the electronic coupling constant for the PCET reaction between Atto655 and AcTyr in aqueous solution is 8.3 cm(-1), indicating that the PCET reaction between Atto655 and AcTyr in aqueous solution is nonadiabatic.

  3. Communication: Microsecond dynamics of the protein and water affect electron transfer in a bacterial bc{sub 1} complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V., E-mail: dmitrym@asu.edu [Department of Physics and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, P.O. Box 871504, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

    2015-04-28

    Cross-membrane electron transport between cofactors localized in proteins of mitochondrial respiration and bacterial photosynthesis is the source of all biological energy. The statistics and dynamics of nuclear fluctuations in these protein/membrane/water heterogeneous systems are critical for their energetic efficiency. The results of 13 μs of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the membrane-bound bc{sub 1} bacterial complex are analyzed here. The reaction is affected by a broad spectrum of nuclear modes, with the slowest dynamics in the range of time-scales ∼0.1-1.6 μs contributing half of the reaction reorganization energy. Two reorganization energies are required to describe protein electron transfer due to dynamical arrest of protein conformations on the observation window. This mechanistic distinction allows significant lowering of activation barriers for reactions in proteins.

  4. Theoretical Study of Electron Transfer in Bimolecular System of NH3 and H2O

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Mulliken, NPA, MK and CHelpG population analyses have been accomplished at the level of MP2/6-31G(d,p) for the title system. The variations of four kinds of charges on NH3 with intermolecular distance infer that electron transfers from NH3 to H2O. MK and CHelpG population analyses indicate more electron transfer than Mulliken and NPA ones. The atomic charges resulted from MK and CHelpG schemes infer that electron transfers from N in NH3 to H in H2O, which confirms that this bimolecular complex possesses linear structure as H3N…HOH.

  5. Efficiency of intramolecular electron transfer from the second excited state of the donor in molecular triads D-A1-A2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feskov, S. V.; Ivanov, A. I.

    2016-01-01

    It is found that intramolecular and intermolecular electron transfer from the second singlet excited state of the donor in all molecular dyads studied up to now is accompanied by ultrafast recombination into the first excited state, resulting in a low quantum yield of the thermalized state with separated charges. The ultrafast photoinduced intramolecular charge transfer in donor‒acceptor 1‒acceptor 2 molecular triads is studied to ascertain the possibilities of increasing the quantum yield of ionic state. It is demonstrated that nonthermal (hot) electron transfer from the primary acceptor to the secondary acceptor can, in parallel with relaxation of a polar solvent, efficiently suppress the ultrafast recombination of charges into the first excited state of the donor and increase the yield of the ionic state. It is established that the angle between the directions of reaction coordinates corresponding to the electron transfer from the donor to the primary acceptor and from the primary acceptor to the secondary acceptor play the most important role in describing these processes. It is concluded that the value of this angle is governed by the ratio between the reorganization energies of the three possible electron transfers in the triad and can vary within wide limits. The parametric regions with maximum quantum yield of the thermalized ionic state are revealed. The strong effect the geometry of a studied triad has on charge separation efficiency is observed.

  6. Direct electron transfer at a glucose oxidase-chitosan-modified Vulcan carbon paste electrode for electrochemical biosensing of glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutyala, Sankararao; Mathiyarasu, Jayaraman

    2014-02-01

    This article describes the investigation of direct electron transfer (DET) between glucose oxidase (GOD) and the electrode materials in an enzyme-catalyzed reaction for the development of improved bioelectrocatalytic system. The GOD pedestal electrochemical reaction takes place by means of DET in a tailored Vulcan carbon paste electrode surfaces with GOD and chitosan (CS), allowing efficient electron transfer between the electrode and enzyme. The key understanding of the stability, biocatalytic activity, selectivity, and redox properties of these enzyme-based glucose biosensors is studied without using any reagents, and the properties are characterized using electrochemical techniques like cyclic voltammogram, amperometry, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Furthermore, the interaction between the enzyme and the electrode surface is studied using ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The present glucose biosensor exhibited better linearity, limit of detection (LOD = 0.37 ± 0.02 mol/L) and a Michaelis-Menten constant of 0.40 ± 0.01 mol/L. The proposed enzyme electrode exhibited excellent sensitivity, selectivity, reproducibility, and stability. This provides a simple "reagent-less" approach and efficient platform for the direct electrochemistry of GOD and developing novel bioelectrocatalytic systems.

  7. Theoretical Study on Electron Transfer Matrix Element in Oxidation of a-Amino Carbon-Centered Radical by O2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU,Ji-Feng(刘继凤); ZHU,Quan(朱权); LI,Xiang-Yuan(李象远); YANG,Sheng-Yong(杨胜勇)

    2002-01-01

    As a successive work of our previous paper, 1 the electron transfer matrix element ( Vrp) in the oxidation of the simplified model molecule of α-amino carbon-centered radical by O2 has been investigated with ab initio calculation at the level of UHF/6-31 + + G * * . Based on the optimized geometries of the reactant and the ion-pair complex obtained previously, the reaction heat and the inner reorganization energy have been obrained by constructing the potential energy curves of reactant and product states considering the solvent effect with the conductor-like screening model (COSMO). The solvent reorganization energy has been estimated using Lippert-Mataga relationship. The calculated results show that the value of Vrp is several times larger than that of RT, which means that the model reaction is an adiabatic one. Theoretical investigation indicates that the solvent effect on the direct electron transfer (ET) process of oxidation of α-amino carbon-centered radical by oxygen is remarkable.

  8. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer and a Tyrosine-Histidine Pair in a Photosystem II-Inspired β-Hairpin Maquette: Kinetics on the Picosecond Time Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagba, Cynthia V; McCaslin, Tyler G; Chi, San-Hui; Perry, Joseph W; Barry, Bridgette A

    2016-02-25

    Photosystem II (PSII) and ribonucleotide reductase employ oxidation and reduction of the tyrosine aromatic ring in radical transport pathways. Tyrosine-based reactions involve either proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) or electron transfer (ET) alone, depending on the pH and the pKa of tyrosine's phenolic oxygen. In PSII, a subset of the PCET reactions are mediated by a tyrosine-histidine redox-driven proton relay, YD-His189. Peptide A is a PSII-inspired β-hairpin, which contains a single tyrosine (Y5) and histidine (H14). Previous electrochemical characterization indicated that Peptide A conducts a net PCET reaction between Y5 and H14, which have a cross-strand π-π interaction. The kinetic impact of H14 has not yet been explored. Here, we address this question through time-resolved absorption spectroscopy and 280-nm photolysis, which generates a neutral tyrosyl radical. The formation and decay of the neutral tyrosyl radical at 410 nm were monitored in Peptide A and its variant, Peptide C, in which H14 is replaced by cyclohexylalanine (Cha14). Significantly, both electron transfer (ET, pL 11, L = lyonium) and PCET (pL 9) were accelerated in Peptide A and C, compared to model tyrosinate or tyrosine at the same pL. Increased electronic coupling, mediated by the peptide backbone, can account for this rate acceleration. Deuterium exchange gave no significant solvent isotope effect in the peptides. At pL 9, but not at pL 11, the reaction rate decreased when H14 was mutated to Cha14. This decrease in rate is attributed to an increase in reorganization energy in the Cha14 mutant. The Y5-H14 mechanism in Peptide A is reminiscent of proton- and electron-transfer events involving YD-H189 in PSII. These results document a mechanism by which proton donors and acceptors can regulate the rate of PCET reactions.

  9. Effects of soluble flavin on heterogeneous electron transfer between surface-exposed bacterial cytochromes and iron oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zheming; Shi, Zhi; Shi, Liang; White, Gaye F.; Richardson, David J.; Clarke, Thomas A.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.

    2015-08-25

    Dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria can utilize insoluble Fe(Mn)-oxides as a terminal electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions. For Shewanella species specifically, some evidence suggests that iron reduction is associated with the secretion of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and riboflavin that are proposed to mediate electron transfer (Marsili et al., 2008). In this work, we used methyl viologen (MV•+)-encapsulated, porin-cytochrome complex (MtrCAB) embedded liposomes (MELs) as a synthetic model of the Shewanella outer membrane to investigate the proposed mediating behavior of secreted flavins. The reduction kinetics of goethite, hematite and lepidocrocite (200 µM) by MELs ([MV•+] ~ 42 µM and MtrABC ≤ 1 nM) were determined in the presence FMN at pH 7.0 in N2 atmosphere by monitoring the concentrations of MV•+ and FMN through their characteristic UV-visible absorption spectra. Experiments were performed where i) FMN and Fe(III)-oxide were mixed and then reacted with the reduced MELs and ii) FMN was reacted with the reduced MELs followed by addition of Fe(III)-oxide. The redox reactions proceeded in two steps: a fast step that was completed in a few seconds, and a slower one lasting over 400 seconds. For all three Fe(III)-oxides, the initial reaction rate in the presence of a low concentration of FMN (≤ 1 µM) was at least a factor of five faster than those with MELs alone, and orders of magnitude faster than those by FMNH2, suggesting that FMN may serve as a co-factor that enhances electron transfer from outer-membrane c-cytochromes to Fe(III)-oxides. The rate and extent of the initial reaction followed the order of lepidocrocite > hematite > goethite, the same as their reduction potentials, implying thermodynamic control on reaction rate. However, at higher FMN concentrations (> 1 µM), the reaction rates for both steps decreased and varied inversely with FMN concentration, indicating that FMN inhibited the MEL to Fe(III)-oxide electron transfer

  10. Bio-Inspired Molecular Catalysts for Hydrogen Oxidation and Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Ming-Hsun; Chen, Shentan; Rousseau, Roger J.; Dupuis, Michel; Bullock, R. Morris; Raugei, Simone

    2013-06-03

    Recent advances in Ni-based bio-inspired catalysts obtained in the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center (EFRC) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, demonstrated the possibility of cleaving H2 or generating H2 heterolytically with turnover frequencies comparable or superior to those of hydrogenase enzymes. In these catalysts the transformation between H2 and protons proceeds via an interplay between proton, hydride and electron transfer steps and involves the interaction of a dihydrogen molecule with both a Ni(II) center and with pendant amine bases incorporated in a six-membered ring, which act as proton relays. These catalytic platforms are well designed in that when protons are correctly positioned (endo) toward the Raugei-ACS-Books.docxPrinted 12/18/12 2 metal center, catalysis proceeds at very high rates. We will show that the proton removal (for H2 oxidation) and proton delivery (for H2 production) are often the rate determining steps. Furthermore, the presence of multiple protonation sites gives rise to reaction intermediates with protons not correctly positioned (exo relative to the metal center). These isomers are easily accessible kinetically and are detrimental to catalysis because of the slow isomerization processes necessary to convert them to the catalytically competent endo isomers. In this chapter we will review the major findings of our computational investigation on the role of proton relays for H2 chemistry and provide guidelines for the design of new catalysts. This research was carried out in the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated for the U.S. Department of Energy by Battelle. Computational resources were provided at W. R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory (EMSL), a Raugei-Bio-Inspired Molecular-Catalysts-for-Hydrogen- Oxidation

  11. Molecular Choreography of Isomerization and Electron Transfer Using One and Two Dimensional Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, David Paul

    Chemical reactions are defined by the change in the relative positions and bonding of nuclei in molecules. I have used femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) to probe these transformations with structural specificity and high time precision revealing the mechanisms of two important classes of reactions; isomerization about an N=N bond and interfacial/intermolecular electron transfer. Isomerization about a double bond is one of the simplest, yet most important, photochemical reactions. In contrast to carbon double bonds, nitrogen double bonds can react via two possible mechanisms; rotation or inversion. To determine which pathway is predominant, I studied an azobenzene derivative using both FSRS and impulsive stimulated Raman spectroscopy (ISRS). The FSRS experiments demonstrated that the photochemical reaction occurs concomitantly with the 700 fs non-radiative decay of the excited state; because no major change in N=N stretching frequency was measured, I surmised that the reaction proceeds through an inversion pathway. My subsequent ISRS experiments confirmed this hypothesis; I observed a highly displaced, low frequency, inversion-like mode, indicating that initial movement out of the Franck-Condon region proceeds along an inversion coordinate. To probe which nuclear motions facilitate electron transfer and charge recombination, I used FSRS and the newly developed 2D-FSRS techniques to study two model systems, triphenylamine dyes bound to TiO2 nanoparticles and a molecular charge transfer (CT) dimer. In the dye-nanoparticle system I discovered that charge separation persists much longer (> 100 ps) than previously thought by using the juxtaposition of the FSRS and transient absorption data to separate the dynamics of the dye from that of the injected electron. Additionally, I discovered that dye constructs with an added vinyl group were susceptible to quenching via isomerization. The CT dimer offered an opportunity to study a system in which charge

  12. Bio-inspired computation in telecommunications

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Xin-She; Ting, TO

    2015-01-01

    Bio-inspired computation, especially those based on swarm intelligence, has become increasingly popular in the last decade. Bio-Inspired Computation in Telecommunications reviews the latest developments in bio-inspired computation from both theory and application as they relate to telecommunications and image processing, providing a complete resource that analyzes and discusses the latest and future trends in research directions. Written by recognized experts, this is a must-have guide for researchers, telecommunication engineers, computer scientists and PhD students.

  13. Rational engineering of Geobacter sulfurreducens electron transfer components: a foundation for building improved Geobacter-based bioelectrochemical technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana M Dantas

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Multiheme cytochromes have been implicated in Geobacter sulfurreducens (Gs extracellular electron transfer (EET. These proteins are potential targets to improve EET and enhance bioremediation and electrical current production by Gs. However, the functional characterization of multiheme cytochromes is particularly complex due to the co-existence of several microstates in solution, connecting the fully reduced and fully oxidized states. Over the last decade, new strategies have been developed to characterize multiheme redox proteins functionally and structurally. These strategies were used to reveal the functional mechanism of Gs multiheme cytochromes and also to identify key residues in these proteins for EET. In previous studies, we set the foundations for enhancement of the EET abilities of Gs by characterizing a family of five triheme cytochromes (PpcA-E. These periplasmic cytochromes are implicated in electron transfer between the oxidative reactions of metabolism in the cytoplasm and the reduction of extracellular terminal electron acceptors at the cell’s outer surface. The results obtained suggested that PpcA can couple e-/H+ transfer, a property that might contribute to the proton electrochemical gradient across the cytoplasmic membrane for metabolic energy production. The structural and functional properties of PpcA were characterized in detail and used for rational design of a family of 23 single site PpcA mutants. In this review, we summarize the functional characterization of the native and mutant proteins. Mutants that retain the mechanistic features of PpcA and adopt preferential e-/H+ transfer pathways at lower reduction potential values compared to the wild-type protein were selected for in vivo studies as the best candidates to increase the electron transfer rate of Gs. For the first time Gs strains have been manipulated by the introduction of mutant forms of essential proteins with the aim to develop and improve

  14. From charge transfer to electron transfer in halogen-bonded complexes of electrophilic bromocarbons with halide anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosokha, Sergiy V; Traversa, Alfredo

    2015-02-21

    Experimental and computational studies of the halogen-bonded complexes, [R-Br, X(-)], of bromosubstituted electrophiles, R-Br, and halide anions, X(-), revealed that decrease of a gap between the frontier orbitals of interacting species led to reduction of the energy of the optical charge-transfer transition and to increase in the ground-state charge transfer (X(-) → R-Br) in their associates. These variations were accompanied by weakening of the intramolecular, C-Br, and strengthening of the intermolecular, BrX(-), bonds. In the limit of the strongest electron donor-acceptor pairs, formation of the halogen-bonded complexes was followed by the oxidation of iodide to triiodide, which took place despite the fact that the I(-) → R-Br electron-transfer step was highly endergonic and the calculated outer-sphere rate constant was negligibly small. However, the calculated barrier for the inner-sphere electron transfer accompanied by the halogen transfer, R-BrI(-) → R˙Br-I(-)˙, was nearly 24 kcal mol(-1) lower as compared to that calculated for the outer-sphere process and the rate constant of such reaction was consistent with the experimental kinetics. A dramatic decrease of the electron-transfer barriers (leading to 18-orders of magnitude increase of the rate constant) was related to the strong electronic coupling of the donor and acceptor within the halogen-bonded precursor complex, as well as to the lower solvent reorganization energy and the successor-complex stabilization.

  15. Rational engineering of Geobacter sulfurreducens electron transfer components: a foundation for building improved Geobacter-based bioelectrochemical technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Joana M; Morgado, Leonor; Aklujkar, Muktak; Bruix, Marta; Londer, Yuri Y; Schiffer, Marianne; Pokkuluri, P Raj; Salgueiro, Carlos A

    2015-01-01

    Multiheme cytochromes have been implicated in Geobacter sulfurreducens extracellular electron transfer (EET). These proteins are potential targets to improve EET and enhance bioremediation and electrical current production by G. sulfurreducens. However, the functional characterization of multiheme cytochromes is particularly complex due to the co-existence of several microstates in solution, connecting the fully reduced and fully oxidized states. Over the last decade, new strategies have been developed to characterize multiheme redox proteins functionally and structurally. These strategies were used to reveal the functional mechanism of G. sulfurreducens multiheme cytochromes and also to identify key residues in these proteins for EET. In previous studies, we set the foundations for enhancement of the EET abilities of G. sulfurreducens by characterizing a family of five triheme cytochromes (PpcA-E). These periplasmic cytochromes are implicated in electron transfer between the oxidative reactions of metabolism in the cytoplasm and the reduction of extracellular terminal electron acceptors at the cell's outer surface. The results obtained suggested that PpcA can couple e(-)/H(+) transfer, a property that might contribute to the proton electrochemical gradient across the cytoplasmic membrane for metabolic energy production. The structural and functional properties of PpcA were characterized in detail and used for rational design of a family of 23 single site PpcA mutants. In this review, we summarize the functional characterization of the native and mutant proteins. Mutants that retain the mechanistic features of PpcA and adopt preferential e(-)/H(+) transfer pathways at lower reduction potential values compared to the wild-type protein were selected for in vivo studies as the best candidates to increase the electron transfer rate of G. sulfurreducens. For the first time G. sulfurreducens strains have been manipulated by the introduction of mutant forms of essential

  16. Rational engineering of Geobacter sulfurreducens electron transfer components: a foundation for building improved Geobacter-based bioelectrochemical technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Joana M.; Morgado, Leonor; Aklujkar, Muktak; Bruix, Marta; Londer, Yuri Y.; Schiffer, Marianne; Pokkuluri, P. Raj; Salgueiro, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    Multiheme cytochromes have been implicated in Geobacter sulfurreducens extracellular electron transfer (EET). These proteins are potential targets to improve EET and enhance bioremediation and electrical current production by G. sulfurreducens. However, the functional characterization of multiheme cytochromes is particularly complex due to the co-existence of several microstates in solution, connecting the fully reduced and fully oxidized states. Over the last decade, new strategies have been developed to characterize multiheme redox proteins functionally and structurally. These strategies were used to reveal the functional mechanism of G. sulfurreducens multiheme cytochromes and also to identify key residues in these proteins for EET. In previous studies, we set the foundations for enhancement of the EET abilities of G. sulfurreducens by characterizing a family of five triheme cytochromes (PpcA-E). These periplasmic cytochromes are implicated in electron transfer between the oxidative reactions of metabolism in the cytoplasm and the reduction of extracellular terminal electron acceptors at the cell's outer surface. The results obtained suggested that PpcA can couple e−/H+ transfer, a property that might contribute to the proton electrochemical gradient across the cytoplasmic membrane for metabolic energy production. The structural and functional properties of PpcA were characterized in detail and used for rational design of a family of 23 single site PpcA mutants. In this review, we summarize the functional characterization of the native and mutant proteins. Mutants that retain the mechanistic features of PpcA and adopt preferential e−/H+ transfer pathways at lower reduction potential values compared to the wild-type protein were selected for in vivo studies as the best candidates to increase the electron transfer rate of G. sulfurreducens. For the first time G. sulfurreducens strains have been manipulated by the introduction of mutant forms of essential

  17. Probing the nature of electron transfer in metalloproteins on graphene-family materials as nanobiocatalytic scaffold using electrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sanju; Irihamye, Aline

    2015-03-01

    Graphene-based nanomaterials have shown great promise not only in nanoelectronics due to ultrahigh electron mobility but also as biocatalytic scaffolds owing to irreversible protein surface adsorption and facilitating direct electron transfer. In this work, we synthesized stable dispersions of graphene using liquid-phase exfoliation approach based on non-covalent interactions between graphene and 1-pyrenesulfonic acid sodium salt (Py-1SO3), 1-pyrenemethylamine salt (Py - Me-NH2) and Pluronic® P-123 surfactant using only water as solvent compatible with biomolecules. The resulting graphene nanoplatelets (Gr_LPE) are characterized by a combination of analytical (microscopy and spectroscopy) techniques revealing mono- to few-layer graphene displaying that the exfoliation efficiency strongly depends upon the type of pyrene-based salts and organic surfactants. Moreover being completely water-based approach, we build robust nanoscaffolds of graphene-family nanomaterials (GFNs) namely, monolayer graphene, Gr_LPE (the one prepared with Pluronic® P-123), graphene oxide (GO) and its reduced form (rGO) on glassy carbon electrode surface with three important metalloproteins include cytochrome c (Cyt c) [for electron transfer], myoglobin (Mb) [for oxygen storage] and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) [for catalyzing the biochemical reaction]. In order to demonstrate the nanobiocatalytical activity of these proteins, we used electrochemical interfacial direct electron transfer (DET) kinetics and attempt to determine the rate constant (kET) using two different analytical approaches namely, linear sweep voltammetry and Laviron's theory. We elucidated that all of the metalloproteins retain their structural integrity (secondary structure) upon forming mixtures with GFNs confirmed through optical and vibrational spectroscopy and biological activity using electrochemistry. Among the GFNs studied, Gr-LPE, GO and rGO support the efficient electrical wiring of the redox centers (with an

  18. Proton coupled electron transfer and redox-active tyrosine Z in the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keough, James M; Jenson, David L; Zuniga, Ashley N; Barry, Bridgette A

    2011-07-27

    Proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions play an essential role in many enzymatic processes. In PCET, redox-active tyrosines may be involved as intermediates when the oxidized phenolic side chain deprotonates. Photosystem II (PSII) is an excellent framework for studying PCET reactions, because it contains two redox-active tyrosines, YD and YZ, with different roles in catalysis. One of the redox-active tyrosines, YZ, is essential for oxygen evolution and is rapidly reduced by the manganese-catalytic site. In this report, we investigate the mechanism of YZ PCET in oxygen-evolving PSII. To isolate YZ(•) reactions, but retain the manganese-calcium cluster, low temperatures were used to block the oxidation of the metal cluster, high microwave powers were used to saturate the YD(•) EPR signal, and YZ(•) decay kinetics were measured with EPR spectroscopy. Analysis of the pH and solvent isotope dependence was performed. The rate of YZ(•) decay exhibited a significant solvent isotope effect, and the rate of recombination and the solvent isotope effect were pH independent from pH 5.0 to 7.5. These results are consistent with a rate-limiting, coupled proton electron transfer (CPET) reaction and are contrasted to results obtained for YD(•) decay kinetics at low pH. This effect may be mediated by an extensive hydrogen-bond network around YZ. These experiments imply that PCET reactions distinguish the two PSII redox-active tyrosines.

  19. A viability assay for Candida albicans based on the electron transfer mediator 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Rabeay Y A; Bilitewski, Ursula

    2011-12-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen with comparably high respiratory activity. Thus, we established a viability test based on 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol (DCIP), a membrane-permeable electron transfer agent. NADH dehydrogenases catalyze the reduction of DCIP by NADH, and the enzymatic activity can be determined either electrochemically via oxidation reactions of DCIP or photometrically. Among the specific respiratory chain inhibitors, only the complex I inhibitor rotenone decreased the DCIP signal from C. albicans, leaving residual activity of approximately 30%. Thus, the DCIP-reducing activity of C. albicans was largely dependent on complex I activity. C. albicans is closely related to the complex I-negative yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which had previously been used in DCIP viability assays. Via comparative studies, in which we included the pathogenic complex I-negative yeast Candida glabrata, we could define assay conditions that allow a distinction of complex I-negative and -positive organisms. Basal levels of DCIP turnover by S.cerevisiae and C. glabrata were only 30% of those obtained from C. albicans but could be increased to the C. albicans level by adding glucose. No significant increases were observed with galactose. DCIP reduction rates from C. albicans were not further increased by any carbon source.

  20. Cobamide-mediated enzymatic reductive dehalogenation via long-range electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunze, Cindy; Bommer, Martin; Hagen, Wilfred R; Uksa, Marie; Dobbek, Holger; Schubert, Torsten; Diekert, Gabriele

    2017-07-03

    The capacity of metal-containing porphyrinoids to mediate reductive dehalogenation is implemented in cobamide-containing reductive dehalogenases (RDases), which serve as terminal reductases in organohalide-respiring microbes. RDases allow for the exploitation of halogenated compounds as electron acceptors. Their reaction mechanism is under debate. Here we report on substrate-enzyme interactions in a tetrachloroethene RDase (PceA) that also converts aryl halides. The shape of PceA's highly apolar active site directs binding of bromophenols at some distance from the cobalt and with the hydroxyl substituent towards the metal. A close cobalt-substrate interaction is not observed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Nonetheless, a halogen substituent para to the hydroxyl group is reductively eliminated and the path of the leaving halide is traced in the structure. Based on these findings, an enzymatic mechanism relying on a long-range electron transfer is concluded, which is without parallel in vitamin B12-dependent biochemistry and represents an effective mode of RDase catalysis.

  1. Effects of electron transfer mediators on the bioreduction of lepidocrocite ({gamma}-FeOOH).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Loughlin, E. J.; Biosciences Division

    2008-08-20

    Electron transfer mediators (ETMs) such as low-molecular-mass quinones (e.g., juglone and lawsone) and humic substances are believed to play a role in many redox reactions involved in contaminant transformations and the biogeochemical cycling of many redox-active elements (e.g., Fe and Mn) in aquatic and terrestrial environments. This study examines the effects of a series of compounds representing major classes of natural and synthetic organic ETMs, including low-molecular-mass quinones, humic substances, phenazines, phenoxazines, phenothiazines, and indigo derivatives, on the bioreduction of lepidocrocite ({gamma}-FeOOH) by the dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens CN32. Although S. putrefaciens CN32 was able to reduce lepidocrocite in the absence of exogenous ETMs, the addition of exogenous ETMs enhanced the bioreduction of lepidocrocite. In general, the rate of Fe(II) production correlated well with the reduction potentials of the ETMs. The addition of humic acids or unfractionated natural organic matter at concentrations of 10 mg organic C L{sup -1} resulted in, at best, a minimal enhancement of lepidocrocite bioreduction. This observation suggests that electron shuttling by humic substances is not likely to play a major role in Fe(III) bioreduction in oligotrophic environments such as subsurface sediments with low organic C contents.

  2. Xanthine oxidase/laponite nanoparticles immobilized on glassy carbon electrode: direct electron transfer and multielectrocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Dan; Wang, Yan-Na; Xue, Huai-Guo; Cosnier, Serge; Ding, Shou-Nian

    2009-08-15

    In this work, colloidal laponite nanoparticles were further expanded into the design of the third-generation biosensor. Direct electrochemistry of the complex molybdoenzyme xanthine oxidase (XnOx) immobilized on glassy carbon electrode (GCE) by laponite nanoparticles was investigated for the first time. XnOx/laponite thin film modified electrode showed only one pair of well defined and reversible cyclic voltammetric peaks attributed to XnOx-FAD cofactor at about -0.370 V vs. SCE (pH 5). The formal potential of XnOx-FAD/FADH(2) couple varied linearly with the increase of pH in the range of 4.0-8.0 with a slope of -54.3 mV pH(-1), which indicated that two-proton transfer was accompanied with two-electron transfer in the electrochemical reaction. More interestingly, the immobilized XnOx retained its biological activity well and displayed an excellent electrocatalytic performance to both the oxidation of xanthine and the reduction of nitrate. The electrocatalytic response showed a linear dependence on the xanthine concentration ranging from 3.9 x 10(-8) to 2.1 x 10(-5)M with a detection limit of 1.0 x 10(-8)M based on S/N=3.

  3. Non-Hermitian approach for modeling of noise-assisted quantum electron transfer in photosynthetic complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Nesterov, Alexander I; Bishop, Alan R

    2012-01-01

    We model the quantum electron transfer (ET) in the photosynthetic reaction center (RC), using a non-Hermitian Hamiltonian approach. Our model includes (i) two protein cofactors, donor and acceptor, with discrete energy levels and (ii) a third protein pigment (sink) which has a continuous energy spectrum. Interactions are introduced between the donor and acceptor, and between the acceptor and the sink, with noise acting between the donor and acceptor. The noise is considered classically (as an external random force), and it is described by an ensemble of two-level systems (random fluctuators). Each fluctuator has two independent parameters, an amplitude and a switching rate. We represent the noise by a set of fluctuators with fitting parameters (boundaries of switching rates), which allows us to build a desired spectral density of noise in a wide range of frequencies. We analyze the quantum dynamics and the efficiency of the ET as a function of (i) the energy gap between the donor and acceptor, (ii) the streng...

  4. Dynamic Study of the Electron Transfer Reaction for Non-metal Redox Couples of 0/1-Type%非金属氧化-还原对MO2/MO-2(M=N, S, Cl)的电子转移反应动力学

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张冬菊; 庄炳游; 刘永军; 胡海泉; 刘成卜

    2001-01-01

    以Marcus-Hush电子转移理论为基础, 提出了用量子化学密度泛函方法研究自交换和异交换电子转移反应的理论方案. 在DFT B3LYP/6-311+G(2D)水平上研究了溶液中NO2/NO-2, SO2/SO-2和ClO2/ClO-2等3个氧化-还原对的自交换以及它们之间的6个交叉电子转移反应的动力学性质, 获得了与实验较为一致的结果.%A theoretical scheme is presented to study the dynamics of the self-exchange reactions and cross-reactions for the several bent triatomic species of 0/1-type (NO2/NO-2, SO2/SO-2, ClO2/ClO-2). The values of the inner-sphere reorganization energy and activation energy are calculated by using Nelson′s reoganization model with the results of density functional calculations. The values of the solvent reorganization energy are obtained by the dielectric continuum model of the Marcus Thery and by requesting a gas-phase molecular volume calculation in Gaussian 94 program package. The rate constants of the three self-exchange reactions (NO2/NO-2, SO2/SO-2, ClO2/ClO-2) and six cross-reactions (NO2/SO-2, NO-2/SO2, SO-2/ClO-2, SO2/ClO-2, NO2/ClO-2, NO-2/ClO2) are obtained by the relative and absolute Marcus-Hush theories. The theoretical results are compared with the experimental findings or the values from literature and better agreements are fornd.

  5. Dynamics and mechanisms of interfacial photoinduced electron transfer processes of third generation photovoltaics and photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Christophe; Teuscher, Joël; Brauer, Jan C; Punzi, Angela; Marchioro, Arianna; Ghadiri, Elham; De Jonghe, Jelissa; Wielopolski, Mateusz; Banerji, Natalie; Moser, Jacques E

    2011-01-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer (PET) across molecular/bulk interfaces has gained attention only recently and is still poorly understood. These interfaces offer an excellent case study, pertinent to a variety of photovoltaic systems, photo- and electrochemistry, molecular electronics, analytical detection, photography, and quantum confinement devices. They play in particular a key role in the emerging fields of third-generation photovoltaic energy converters and artificial photosynthetic systems aimed at the production of solar fuels, creating a need for a better understanding and theoretical treatment of the dynamics and mechanisms of interfacial PET processes. We aim to achieve a fundamental understanding of these phenomena by designing experiments that can be used to test and alter modern theory and computational modeling. One example illustrating recent investigations into the details of the ultrafast processes that form the basis for photoinduced charge separation at a molecular/bulk interface relevant to dye-sensitized solar cells is briefly presented here: Kinetics of interfacial PET and charge recombination processes were measured by fs and ns transient spectroscopy in a heterogeneous donor-bridge-acceptor (D-B-A) system, where D is a Ru(II)(terpyridyl-PO3)(NCS)3 complex, B an oligo-p-phenylene bridge, and A nanocrystalline TiO2. The forward ET reaction was found to be faster than vibrational relaxation of the vibronic excited state of the donor. Instead, the back ET occurred on the micros time scale and involved fully thermalized species. The D-A distance dependence of the electron transfer rate was studied by varying the number of p-phenylene units contained in the bridge moiety. The remarkably low damping factor beta = 0.16 angstroms(-1) observed for the ultrafast charge injection from the dye excited state into the conduction band of TiO2 is attributed to the coupling of electron tunneling with nonequilibrium vibrations redistributed on the bridge

  6. Where Does the Electron Go? Stable and Metastable Peptide Cation Radicals Formed by Electron Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepin, Robert; Layton, Erik D.; Liu, Yang; Afonso, Carlos; Tureček, František

    2017-01-01

    Electron transfer to doubly and triply charged heptapeptide ions containing polar residues Arg, Lys, and Asp in combination with nonpolar Gly, Ala, and Pro or Leu generates stable and metastable charge-reduced ions, (M + 2H)+●, in addition to standard electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) fragment ions. The metastable (M + 2H)+● ions spontaneously dissociate upon resonant ejection from the linear ion trap, giving irregularly shaped peaks with offset m/ z values. The fractions of stable and metastable (M + 2H)+● ions and their mass shifts depend on the presence of Pro-4 and Leu-4 residues in the peptides, with the Pro-4 sequences giving larger fractions of the stable ions while showing smaller mass shifts for the metastables. Conversion of the Asp and C-terminal carboxyl groups to methyl esters further lowers the charge-reduced ion stability. Collisional activation and photodissociation at 355 nm of mass-selected (M + 2H)+● results in different dissociations that give sequence specific MS3 spectra. With a single exception of charge-reduced (LKGLADR + 2H)+●, the MS3 spectra do not produce ETD sequence fragments of the c and z type. Hence, these (M + 2H)+● ions are covalent radicals, not ion-molecule complexes, undergoing dramatically different dissociations in the ground and excited electronic states. The increased stability of the Pro-4 containing (M + 2H)+● ions is attributed to radicals formed by opening of the Pro ring and undergoing further stabilization by hydrogen atom migrations. UV-VIS photodissociation action spectroscopy and time-dependent density functional theory calculations are used in a case in point study of the stable (LKGPADR + 2H)+● ion produced by ETD. In contrast to singly-reduced peptide ions, doubly reduced (M + 3H)+ ions are stable only when formed from the Pro-4 precursors and show all characteristics of even electron ions regarding no photon absorption at 355 nm or ion-molecule reactions, and exhibiting proton driven

  7. 77 FR 34127 - Financial Management Service; Proposed Collection of Information: Electronic Transfer Account...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    ... Fiscal Service Financial Management Service; Proposed Collection of Information: Electronic Transfer Account (ETA) Financial Agency Agreement AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Treasury. ACTION: Notice and Request for comments. SUMMARY: The Financial Management Service, as part of its...

  8. DETERMINATION OF HETEROGENEOUS ELECTRON TRANSFER RATE CONSTANTS AT MICROFABRICATED IRIDIUM ELECTRODES. (R825511C022)

    Science.gov (United States)

    There has been an increasing use of both solid metal and microfabricated iridium electrodes as substrates for various types of electroanalysis. However, investigations to determine heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants on iridium, especially at an electron beam evapor...

  9. ElectronTransfer Induced Ring Opening of α-Epoxyketones: Spirodioxolane Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Nikpour

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Stereospecific formation of spirodioxolanes has been observed on electron transfer induced ring opening of α-epoxyketones by 2,4,6-triphenylpyrylium tetrafluoroborate in the presence of cyclohexanone

  10. [Theory of long-distance electron transfer in nanoscale biological structures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasil'nikov, P M

    2011-01-01

    Macromolecular biological systems accomplishing the directed electron transfer are nano-sized structures. The distance between carrier molecules (cofactors), which represent practically isolated electron localization centers, reaches tens of angstroms. The electron transfer theory based on the concept of delocalized electron states, which is conventionally used in biophysics, is unable to adequately interpret the results of concrete observations in many cases. On the basis of the theory of electronic transitions in the case of localized states, developed in the physics of disorder matter, a mechanism of long distance electron transfer in biological systems is suggested. The molecular relaxation of the microenvironment of electron localization centers that accompanies the electron transfer process is also considered.

  11. Electronic Coupling Dependence of Ultrafast Interfacial Electron Transfer on Nanocrystalline Thin Films and Single Crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lian, Tianquan

    2014-04-22

    The long-term goal of the proposed research is to understand electron transfer dynamics in nanoparticle/liquid interface. This knowledge is essential to many semiconductor nanoparticle based devices, including photocatalytic waste degradation and dye sensitized solar cells.

  12. DETERMINATION OF HETEROGENEOUS ELECTRON TRANSFER RATE CONSTANTS AT MICROFABRICATED IRIDIUM ELECTRODES. (R825511C022)

    Science.gov (United States)

    There has been an increasing use of both solid metal and microfabricated iridium electrodes as substrates for various types of electroanalysis. However, investigations to determine heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants on iridium, especially at an electron beam evapor...

  13. Heterogeneous electron transfer kinetics and electrocatalytic behaviour of mixed self-assembled ferrocenes and SWCNT layers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nkosi, D

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The electron transfer dynamics and electrocatalytic behaviour of ferrocene-terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), co-adsorbed with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on a gold electrode, have been interrogated for the first time...

  14. Control of Electron Transfer from Lead-Salt Nanocrystals to TiO 2

    KAUST Repository

    Hyun, Byung-Ryool

    2011-05-11

    The roles of solvent reorganization energy and electronic coupling strength on the transfer of photoexcited electrons from PbS nanocrystals to TiO 2 nanoparticles are investigated. We find that the electron transfer depends only weakly on the solvent, in contrast to the strong dependence in the nanocrystal-molecule system. This is ascribed to the larger size of the acceptor in this system, and is accounted for by Marcus theory. The electronic coupling of the PbS and TiO 2 is varied by changing the length, aliphatic and aromatic structure, and anchor groups of the linker molecules. Shorter linker molecules consistently lead to faster electron transfer. Surprisingly, linker molecules of the same length but distinct chemical structures yield similar electron transfer rates. In contrast, the electron transfer rate can vary dramatically with different anchor groups. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  15. Characterization and modelling of interspecies electron transfer mechanisms and microbial community dynamics of a syntrophic association

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagarajan, Harish; Embree, Mallory; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena

    2013-01-01

    Syntrophic associations are central to microbial communities and thus have a fundamental role in the global carbon cycle. Despite biochemical approaches describing the physiological activity of these communities, there has been a lack of a mechanistic understanding of the relationship between...... metallireducens and Geobacter sulfurreducens. Genome-scale modelling of direct interspecies electron transfer reveals insights into the energetics of electron transfer mechanisms. While G. sulfurreducens adapts to rapid syntrophic growth by changes at the genomic and transcriptomic level, G. metallireducens...

  16. Electron Donor-Acceptor Quenching and Photoinduced Electron Transfer for Coumarin Dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-10-31

    Mechanism of cousarin photodegradation . Ithe behavior of eoiuma dyes is water ad In aqueous detergent media,. and the effsects of medism aud, additives on...D-i36 345 ELECTRON DONOR-ACCEPTOR UENCHING AND PHOTOINDUCED i/i Ai ELECTRON TRANSFER FOR COUMARIN DYES (U) BOSTON UNIY MR DEPT OF CHEMISTRY G JONES...TYPE OF REPORT & PEIOD COVERED Electron Donor-acceptor Quenching and Photo- Technical, 1/1/82-10/31/82 induced Electron Transfer for Coumarin Dyes S

  17. Enhanced ionization of embedded clusters by Electron Transfer Mediated Decay in helium nanodroplets

    CERN Document Server

    LaForge, A C; Gokhberg, K; von Vangerow, J; Kryzhevoi, N; O'Keeffe, P; Ciavardini, A; Krishnan, S R; Coreno, M; Prince, K C; Richter, R; Moshammer, R; Pfeifer, T; Cederbaum, L; Stienkemeier, F; Mudrich, M

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the observation of electron transfer mediated decay For Mg clusters embedded in He nanodroplets. The process is mediated by the initial ionization of helium followed by an autoionization process by electron transfer in the Mg clusters. The photoelectron spectrum (PES) reveal a low energy ETMD peak. For Mg clusters larger than 7 atoms, we observe the formation of stable doubly ionized clusters. The process is shown to be the primamry ionization mechanism for embedded clusters.

  18. Modular electron transfer circuits for synthetic biology: Insulation of an engineered biohydrogen pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Agapakis, Christina M; Silver, Pamela A

    2010-01-01

    Electron transfer is central to a wide range of essential metabolic pathways, from photosynthesis to fermentation. The evolutionary diversity and conservation of proteins that transfer electrons makes these pathways a valuable platform for engineered metabolic circuits in synthetic biology. Rational engineering of electron transfer pathways containing hydrogenases has the potential to lead to industrial scale production of hydrogen as an alternative source of clean fuel and experimental assay...

  19. Single-sphere model for solvent reorganization energy and its application to electron transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In this work, the authors give detailed deductions and develop the single-sphere model of solvent reorganization energy in electron transfer with point dipole approximation. At the level of DFT/6- 31++G**, the electron transfer between 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane and its anion has been investigated. Using the novel single-sphere model, the authors evaluate the solvent reorganization energy of this system, and the computational result proves rational in comparison with the experimental estimations.

  20. Pathways of electron transfer in Escherichia coli DNA photolyase: Trp306 to FADH.

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    We describe the results of a series of theoretical calculations of electron transfer pathways between Trp306 and *FADH. in the Escherichia coli DNA photolyase molecule, using the method of interatomic tunneling currents. It is found that there are two conformationally orthogonal tryptophans, Trp359 and Trp382, between donor and acceptor that play a crucial role in the pathways of the electron transfer process. The pathways depend vitally on the aromaticity of tryptophans and the flavin molecu...