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  1. Bioinformatics analysis of RNA-seq data revealed critical genes in colon adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, W-D; Liu, Y-J; Sun, X-B; Shan, J; Yi, L; Zhang, T-T

    2017-07-01

    RNA-seq data of colon adenocarcinoma (COAD) were analyzed with bioinformatics tools to discover critical genes in the disease. Relevant small molecule drugs, transcription factors (TFs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) were also investigated. RNA-seq data of COAD were downloaded from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Differential analysis was performed with package edgeR. False positive discovery (FDR) 1 were set as the cut-offs to screen out differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Gene coexpression network was constructed with package Ebcoexpress. GO enrichment analysis was performed for the DEGs in the gene coexpression network with DAVID. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment analysis was also performed for the genes with KOBASS 2.0. Modules were identified with MCODE of Cytoscape. Relevant small molecules drugs were predicted by Connectivity map. Relevant miRNAs and TFs were searched by WebGestalt. A total of 457 DEGs, including 255 up-regulated and 202 down-regulated genes, were identified from 437 COAD and 39 control samples. A gene coexpression network was constructed containing 40 DEGs and 101 edges. The genes were mainly associated with collagen fibril organization, extracellular matrix organization and translation. Two modules were identified from the gene coexpression network, which were implicated in muscle contraction and extracellular matrix organization, respectively. Several critical genes were disclosed, such as MYH11, COL5A2 and ribosomal proteins. Nine relevant small molecule drugs were identified, such as scriptaid and STOCK1N-35874. Accordingly, a total of 17 TFs and 10 miRNAs related to COAD were acquired, such as ETS2, NFAT, AP4, miR-124A, MiR-9, miR-96 and let-7. Several critical genes and relevant drugs, TFs and miRNAs were revealed in COAD. These findings could advance the understanding of the disease and benefit therapy development.

  2. Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals Genes Involved in the Pathogenesis of Ameloblastoma and Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Eliane Macedo Sobrinho; Santos, Hércules Otacílio; Dos Santos Dias, Ivoneth; Santos, Sérgio Henrique; Batista de Paula, Alfredo Maurício; Feltenberger, John David; Sena Guimarães, André Luiz; Farias, Lucyana Conceição

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenesis of odontogenic tumors is not well known. It is important to identify genetic deregulations and molecular alterations. This study aimed to investigate, through bioinformatic analysis, the possible genes involved in the pathogenesis of ameloblastoma (AM) and keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT). Genes involved in the pathogenesis of AM and KCOT were identified in GeneCards. Gene list was expanded, and the gene interactions network was mapped using the STRING software. "Weighted number of links" (WNL) was calculated to identify "leader genes" (highest WNL). Genes were ranked by K-means method and Kruskal-Wallis test was used (Preview data was used to corroborate the bioinformatics data. CDK1 was identified as leader gene for AM. In KCOT group, results show PCNA and TP53 . Both tumors exhibit a power law behavior. Our topological analysis suggested leader genes possibly important in the pathogenesis of AM and KCOT, by clustering coefficient calculated for both odontogenic tumors (0.028 for AM, zero for KCOT). The results obtained in the scatter diagram suggest an important relationship of these genes with the molecular processes involved in AM and KCOT. Ontological analysis for both AM and KCOT demonstrated different mechanisms. Bioinformatics analyzes were confirmed through literature review. These results may suggest the involvement of promising genes for a better understanding of the pathogenesis of AM and KCOT.

  3. Integrated bioinformatics analysis reveals key candidate genes and pathways in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuzhi; Zhang, Yi; Huang, Qian; Li, Chengwen

    2018-04-19

    Breast cancer (BC) is the leading malignancy in women worldwide, yet relatively little is known about the genes and signaling pathways involved in BC tumorigenesis and progression. The present study aimed to elucidate potential key candidate genes and pathways in BC. Five gene expression profile data sets (GSE22035, GSE3744, GSE5764, GSE21422 and GSE26910) were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database, which included data from 113 tumorous and 38 adjacent non‑tumorous tissue samples. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified using t‑tests in the limma R package. These DEGs were subsequently investigated by pathway enrichment analysis and a protein‑protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed. The most significant module from the PPI network was selected for pathway enrichment analysis. In total, 227 DEGs were identified, of which 82 were upregulated and 145 were downregulated. Pathway enrichment analysis results revealed that the upregulated DEGs were mainly enriched in 'cell division', the 'proteinaceous extracellular matrix (ECM)', 'ECM structural constituents' and 'ECM‑receptor interaction', whereas downregulated genes were mainly enriched in 'response to drugs', 'extracellular space', 'transcriptional activator activity' and the 'peroxisome proliferator‑activated receptor signaling pathway'. The PPI network contained 174 nodes and 1,257 edges. DNA topoisomerase 2‑a, baculoviral inhibitor of apoptosis repeat‑containing protein 5, cyclin‑dependent kinase 1, G2/mitotic‑specific cyclin‑B1 and kinetochore protein NDC80 homolog were identified as the top 5 hub genes. Furthermore, the genes in the most significant module were predominantly involved in 'mitotic nuclear division', 'mid‑body', 'protein binding' and 'cell cycle'. In conclusion, the DEGs, relative pathways and hub genes identified in the present study may aid in understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying BC progression and provide

  4. Bioinformatic Analysis Reveals Archaeal tRNATyr and tRNATrp Identities in Bacteria

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    Takahito Mukai

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The tRNA identity elements for some amino acids are distinct between the bacterial and archaeal domains. Searching in recent genomic and metagenomic sequence data, we found some candidate phyla radiation (CPR bacteria with archaeal tRNA identity for Tyr-tRNA and Trp-tRNA synthesis. These bacteria possess genes for tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS and tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS predicted to be derived from DPANN superphylum archaea, while the cognate tRNATyr and tRNATrp genes reveal bacterial or archaeal origins. We identified a trace of domain fusion and swapping in the archaeal-type TyrRS gene of a bacterial lineage, suggesting that CPR bacteria may have used this mechanism to create diverse proteins. Archaeal-type TrpRS of bacteria and a few TrpRS species of DPANN archaea represent a new phylogenetic clade (named TrpRS-A. The TrpRS-A open reading frames (ORFs are always associated with another ORF (named ORF1 encoding an unknown protein without global sequence identity to any known protein. However, our protein structure prediction identified a putative HIGH-motif and KMSKS-motif as well as many α-helices that are characteristic of class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (aaRS homologs. These results provide another example of the diversity of molecular components that implement the genetic code and provide a clue to the early evolution of life and the genetic code.

  5. Bioinformatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldi, Pierre; Brunak, Søren

    , and medicine will be particularly affected by the new results and the increased understanding of life at the molecular level. Bioinformatics is the development and application of computer methods for analysis, interpretation, and prediction, as well as for the design of experiments. It has emerged...

  6. The Cytotoxicity Mechanism of 6-Shogaol-Treated HeLa Human Cervical Cancer Cells Revealed by Label-Free Shotgun Proteomics and Bioinformatics Analysis

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    Qun Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers among women in the world. 6-Shogaol is a natural compound isolated from the rhizome of ginger (Zingiber officinale. In this paper, we demonstrated that 6-shogaol induced apoptosis and G2/M phase arrest in human cervical cancer HeLa cells. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitochondrial pathway were involved in 6-shogaol-mediated apoptosis. Proteomic analysis based on label-free strategy by liquid chromatography chip quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry was subsequently proposed to identify, in a non-target-biased manner, the molecular changes in cellular proteins in response to 6-shogaol treatment. A total of 287 proteins were differentially expressed in response to 24 h treatment with 15 μM 6-shogaol in HeLa cells. Significantly changed proteins were subjected to functional pathway analysis by multiple analyzing software. Ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA suggested that 14-3-3 signaling is a predominant canonical pathway involved in networks which may be significantly associated with the process of apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle arrest induced by 6-shogaol. In conclusion, this work developed an unbiased protein analysis strategy by shotgun proteomics and bioinformatics analysis. Data observed provide a comprehensive analysis of the 6-shogaol-treated HeLa cell proteome and reveal protein alterations that are associated with its anticancer mechanism.

  7. A Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals a Group of MocR Bacterial Transcriptional Regulators Linked to a Family of Genes Coding for Membrane Proteins

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    Teresa Milano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The MocR bacterial transcriptional regulators are characterized by an N-terminal domain, 60 residues long on average, possessing the winged-helix-turn-helix (wHTH architecture responsible for DNA recognition and binding, linked to a large C-terminal domain (350 residues on average that is homologous to fold type-I pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP dependent enzymes like aspartate aminotransferase (AAT. These regulators are involved in the expression of genes taking part in several metabolic pathways directly or indirectly connected to PLP chemistry, many of which are still uncharacterized. A bioinformatics analysis is here reported that studied the features of a distinct group of MocR regulators predicted to be functionally linked to a family of homologous genes coding for integral membrane proteins of unknown function. This group occurs mainly in the Actinobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria phyla. An analysis of the multiple sequence alignments of their wHTH and AAT domains suggested the presence of specificity-determining positions (SDPs. Mapping of SDPs onto a homology model of the AAT domain hinted at possible structural/functional roles in effector recognition. Likewise, SDPs in wHTH domain suggested the basis of specificity of Transcription Factor Binding Site recognition. The results reported represent a framework for rational design of experiments and for bioinformatics analysis of other MocR subgroups.

  8. Integrative cluster analysis in bioinformatics

    CERN Document Server

    Abu-Jamous, Basel; Nandi, Asoke K

    2015-01-01

    Clustering techniques are increasingly being put to use in the analysis of high-throughput biological datasets. Novel computational techniques to analyse high throughput data in the form of sequences, gene and protein expressions, pathways, and images are becoming vital for understanding diseases and future drug discovery. This book details the complete pathway of cluster analysis, from the basics of molecular biology to the generation of biological knowledge. The book also presents the latest clustering methods and clustering validation, thereby offering the reader a comprehensive review o

  9. Bioinformatic Analysis of Strawberry GSTF12 Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiran; Jiang, Leiyu; Tang, Haoru

    2018-01-01

    GSTF12 has always been known as a key factor of proanthocyanins accumulate in plant testa. Through bioinformatics analysis of the nucleotide and encoded protein sequence of GSTF12, it is more advantageous to the study of genes related to anthocyanin biosynthesis accumulation pathway. Therefore, we chosen GSTF12 gene of 11 kinds species, downloaded their nucleotide and protein sequence from NCBI as the research object, found strawberry GSTF12 gene via bioinformation analyse, constructed phylogenetic tree. At the same time, we analysed the strawberry GSTF12 gene of physical and chemical properties and its protein structure and so on. The phylogenetic tree showed that Strawberry and petunia were closest relative. By the protein prediction, we found that the protein owed one proper signal peptide without obvious transmembrane regions.

  10. Bioinformatics functional analysis of let-7a, miR-34a, and miR-199a/b reveals novel insights into immune system pathways and cancer hallmarks for hepatocellular carcinoma.

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    Soliman, Bangly; Salem, Ahmed; Ghazy, Mohamed; Abu-Shahba, Nourhan; El Hefnawi, Mahmoud

    2018-05-01

    Let-7a, miR-34a, and miR-199 a/b have gained a great attention as master regulators for cellular processes. In particular, these three micro-RNAs act as potential onco-suppressors for hepatocellular carcinoma. Bioinformatics can reveal the functionality of these micro-RNAs through target prediction and functional annotation analysis. In the current study, in silico analysis using innovative servers (miRror Suite, DAVID, miRGator V3.0, GeneTrail) has demonstrated the combinatorial and the individual target genes of these micro-RNAs and further explored their roles in hepatocellular carcinoma progression. There were 87 common target messenger RNAs (p ≤ 0.05) that were predicted to be regulated by the three micro-RNAs using miRror 2.0 target prediction tool. In addition, the functional enrichment analysis of these targets that was performed by DAVID functional annotation and REACTOME tools revealed two major immune-related pathways, eight hepatocellular carcinoma hallmarks-linked pathways, and two pathways that mediate interconnected processes between immune system and hepatocellular carcinoma hallmarks. Moreover, protein-protein interaction network for the predicted common targets was obtained by using STRING database. The individual analysis of target genes and pathways for the three micro-RNAs of interest using miRGator V3.0 and GeneTrail servers revealed some novel predicted target oncogenes such as SOX4, which we validated experimentally, in addition to some regulated pathways of immune system and hepatocarcinogenesis such as insulin signaling pathway and adipocytokine signaling pathway. In general, our results demonstrate that let-7a, miR-34a, and miR-199 a/b have novel interactions in different immune system pathways and major hepatocellular carcinoma hallmarks. Thus, our findings shed more light on the roles of these miRNAs as cancer silencers.

  11. Bioinformatic approaches reveal metagenomic characterization of soil microbial community.

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    Zhuofei Xu

    Full Text Available As is well known, soil is a complex ecosystem harboring the most prokaryotic biodiversity on the Earth. In recent years, the advent of high-throughput sequencing techniques has greatly facilitated the progress of soil ecological studies. However, how to effectively understand the underlying biological features of large-scale sequencing data is a new challenge. In the present study, we used 33 publicly available metagenomes from diverse soil sites (i.e. grassland, forest soil, desert, Arctic soil, and mangrove sediment and integrated some state-of-the-art computational tools to explore the phylogenetic and functional characterizations of the microbial communities in soil. Microbial composition and metabolic potential in soils were comprehensively illustrated at the metagenomic level. A spectrum of metagenomic biomarkers containing 46 taxa and 33 metabolic modules were detected to be significantly differential that could be used as indicators to distinguish at least one of five soil communities. The co-occurrence associations between complex microbial compositions and functions were inferred by network-based approaches. Our results together with the established bioinformatic pipelines should provide a foundation for future research into the relation between soil biodiversity and ecosystem function.

  12. Bioinformatic Analysis of Plasma Apolipoproteins A-I and A-II Revealed Unique Features of A-I/A-II HDL Particles in Human Plasma

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    Kido, Toshimi; Kurata, Hideaki; Kondo, Kazuo; Itakura, Hiroshige; Okazaki, Mitsuyo; Urata, Takeyoshi; Yokoyama, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Plasma concentration of apoA-I, apoA-II and apoA-II-unassociated apoA-I was analyzed in 314 Japanese subjects (177 males and 137 females), including one (male) homozygote and 37 (20 males and 17 females) heterozygotes of genetic CETP deficiency. ApoA-I unassociated with apoA-II markedly and linearly increased with HDL-cholesterol, while apoA-II increased only very slightly and the ratio of apoA-II-associated apoA-I to apoA-II stayed constant at 2 in molar ratio throughout the increase of HDL-cholesterol, among the wild type and heterozygous CETP deficiency. Thus, overall HDL concentration almost exclusively depends on HDL with apoA-I without apoA-II (LpAI) while concentration of HDL containing apoA-I and apoA-II (LpAI:AII) is constant having a fixed molar ratio of 2 : 1 regardless of total HDL and apoA-I concentration. Distribution of apoA-I between LpAI and LpAI:AII is consistent with a model of statistical partitioning regardless of sex and CETP genotype. The analysis also indicated that LpA-I accommodates on average 4 apoA-I molecules and has a clearance rate indistinguishable from LpAI:AII. Independent evidence indicated LpAI:A-II has a diameter 20% smaller than LpAI, consistent with a model having two apoA-I and one apoA-II. The functional contribution of these particles is to be investigated. PMID:27526664

  13. DNA mimic proteins: functions, structures, and bioinformatic analysis.

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    Wang, Hao-Ching; Ho, Chun-Han; Hsu, Kai-Cheng; Yang, Jinn-Moon; Wang, Andrew H-J

    2014-05-13

    DNA mimic proteins have DNA-like negative surface charge distributions, and they function by occupying the DNA binding sites of DNA binding proteins to prevent these sites from being accessed by DNA. DNA mimic proteins control the activities of a variety of DNA binding proteins and are involved in a wide range of cellular mechanisms such as chromatin assembly, DNA repair, transcription regulation, and gene recombination. However, the sequences and structures of DNA mimic proteins are diverse, making them difficult to predict by bioinformatic search. To date, only a few DNA mimic proteins have been reported. These DNA mimics were not found by searching for functional motifs in their sequences but were revealed only by structural analysis of their charge distribution. This review highlights the biological roles and structures of 16 reported DNA mimic proteins. We also discuss approaches that might be used to discover new DNA mimic proteins.

  14. In-depth analysis of the adipocyte proteome by mass spectrometry and bioinformatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adachi, Jun; Kumar, Chanchal; Zhang, Yanling

    2007-01-01

    , mitochondria, membrane, and cytosol of 3T3-L1 adipocytes. We identified 3,287 proteins while essentially eliminating false positives, making this one of the largest high confidence proteomes reported to date. Comprehensive bioinformatics analysis revealed that the adipocyte proteome, despite its specialized...

  15. Rapid cloning and bioinformatic analysis of spinach Y chromosome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rapid cloning and bioinformatic analysis of spinach Y chromosome- specific EST sequences. Chuan-Liang Deng, Wei-Li Zhang, Ying Cao, Shao-Jing Wang, ... Arabidopsis thaliana mRNA for mitochondrial half-ABC transporter (STA1 gene). 389 2.31E-13. 98.96. SP3−12. Betula pendula histidine kinase 3 (HK3) mRNA, ...

  16. Biochip microsystem for bioinformatics recognition and analysis

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    Lue, Jaw-Chyng (Inventor); Fang, Wai-Chi (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A system with applications in pattern recognition, or classification, of DNA assay samples. Because DNA reference and sample material in wells of an assay may be caused to fluoresce depending upon dye added to the material, the resulting light may be imaged onto an embodiment comprising an array of photodetectors and an adaptive neural network, with applications to DNA analysis. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  17. Bioinformatics analysis of disordered proteins in prokaryotes

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    Malkov Saša N

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A significant number of proteins have been shown to be intrinsically disordered, meaning that they lack a fixed 3 D structure or contain regions that do not posses a well defined 3 D structure. It has also been proven that a protein's disorder content is related to its function. We have performed an exhaustive analysis and comparison of the disorder content of proteins from prokaryotic organisms (i.e., superkingdoms Archaea and Bacteria with respect to functional categories they belong to, i.e., Clusters of Orthologous Groups of proteins (COGs and groups of COGs-Cellular processes (Cp, Information storage and processing (Isp, Metabolism (Me and Poorly characterized (Pc. We also analyzed the disorder content of proteins with respect to various genomic, metabolic and ecological characteristics of the organism they belong to. We used correlations and association rule mining in order to identify the most confident associations between specific modalities of the characteristics considered and disorder content. Results Bacteria are shown to have a somewhat higher level of protein disorder than archaea, except for proteins in the Me functional group. It is demonstrated that the Isp and Cp functional groups in particular (L-repair function and N-cell motility and secretion COGs of proteins in specific possess the highest disorder content, while Me proteins, in general, posses the lowest. Disorder fractions have been confirmed to have the lowest level for the so-called order-promoting amino acids and the highest level for the so-called disorder promoters. For each pair of organism characteristics, specific modalities are identified with the maximum disorder proteins in the corresponding organisms, e.g., high genome size-high GC content organisms, facultative anaerobic-low GC content organisms, aerobic-high genome size organisms, etc. Maximum disorder in archaea is observed for high GC content-low genome size organisms, high GC content

  18. Bioinformatics and Microarray Data Analysis on the Cloud.

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    Calabrese, Barbara; Cannataro, Mario

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput platforms such as microarray, mass spectrometry, and next-generation sequencing are producing an increasing volume of omics data that needs large data storage and computing power. Cloud computing offers massive scalable computing and storage, data sharing, on-demand anytime and anywhere access to resources and applications, and thus, it may represent the key technology for facing those issues. In fact, in the recent years it has been adopted for the deployment of different bioinformatics solutions and services both in academia and in the industry. Although this, cloud computing presents several issues regarding the security and privacy of data, that are particularly important when analyzing patients data, such as in personalized medicine. This chapter reviews main academic and industrial cloud-based bioinformatics solutions; with a special focus on microarray data analysis solutions and underlines main issues and problems related to the use of such platforms for the storage and analysis of patients data.

  19. Bioinformatics analysis and detection of gelatinase encoded gene in Lysinibacillussphaericus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repin, Rul Aisyah Mat; Mutalib, Sahilah Abdul; Shahimi, Safiyyah; Khalid, Rozida Mohd.; Ayob, Mohd. Khan; Bakar, Mohd. Faizal Abu; Isa, Mohd Noor Mat

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we performed bioinformatics analysis toward genome sequence of Lysinibacillussphaericus (L. sphaericus) to determine gene encoded for gelatinase. L. sphaericus was isolated from soil and gelatinase species-specific bacterium to porcine and bovine gelatin. This bacterium offers the possibility of enzymes production which is specific to both species of meat, respectively. The main focus of this research is to identify the gelatinase encoded gene within the bacteria of L. Sphaericus using bioinformatics analysis of partially sequence genome. From the research study, three candidate gene were identified which was, gelatinase candidate gene 1 (P1), NODE_71_length_93919_cov_158.931839_21 which containing 1563 base pair (bp) in size with 520 amino acids sequence; Secondly, gelatinase candidate gene 2 (P2), NODE_23_length_52851_cov_190.061386_17 which containing 1776 bp in size with 591 amino acids sequence; and Thirdly, gelatinase candidate gene 3 (P3), NODE_106_length_32943_cov_169.147919_8 containing 1701 bp in size with 566 amino acids sequence. Three pairs of oligonucleotide primers were designed and namely as, F1, R1, F2, R2, F3 and R3 were targeted short sequences of cDNA by PCR. The amplicons were reliably results in 1563 bp in size for candidate gene P1 and 1701 bp in size for candidate gene P3. Therefore, the results of bioinformatics analysis of L. Sphaericus resulting in gene encoded gelatinase were identified.

  20. 5th HUPO BPP Bioinformatics Meeting at the European Bioinformatics Institute in Hinxton, UK--Setting the analysis frame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Christian; Hamacher, Michael; Blüggel, Martin; Körting, Gerhard; Chamrad, Daniel; Scheer, Christian; Marcus, Katrin; Reidegeld, Kai A; Lohaus, Christiane; Schäfer, Heike; Martens, Lennart; Jones, Philip; Müller, Michael; Auyeung, Kevin; Taylor, Chris; Binz, Pierre-Alain; Thiele, Herbert; Parkinson, David; Meyer, Helmut E; Apweiler, Rolf

    2005-09-01

    The Bioinformatics Committee of the HUPO Brain Proteome Project (HUPO BPP) meets regularly to execute the post-lab analyses of the data produced in the HUPO BPP pilot studies. On July 7, 2005 the members came together for the 5th time at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) in Hinxton, UK, hosted by Rolf Apweiler. As a main result, the parameter set of the semi-automated data re-analysis of MS/MS spectra has been elaborated and the subsequent work steps have been defined.

  1. Video Bioinformatics Analysis of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Colony Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sabrina; Fonteno, Shawn; Satish, Shruthi; Bhanu, Bir; Talbot, Prue

    2010-01-01

    Because video data are complex and are comprised of many images, mining information from video material is difficult to do without the aid of computer software. Video bioinformatics is a powerful quantitative approach for extracting spatio-temporal data from video images using computer software to perform dating mining and analysis. In this article, we introduce a video bioinformatics method for quantifying the growth of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) by analyzing time-lapse videos collected in a Nikon BioStation CT incubator equipped with a camera for video imaging. In our experiments, hESC colonies that were attached to Matrigel were filmed for 48 hours in the BioStation CT. To determine the rate of growth of these colonies, recipes were developed using CL-Quant software which enables users to extract various types of data from video images. To accurately evaluate colony growth, three recipes were created. The first segmented the image into the colony and background, the second enhanced the image to define colonies throughout the video sequence accurately, and the third measured the number of pixels in the colony over time. The three recipes were run in sequence on video data collected in a BioStation CT to analyze the rate of growth of individual hESC colonies over 48 hours. To verify the truthfulness of the CL-Quant recipes, the same data were analyzed manually using Adobe Photoshop software. When the data obtained using the CL-Quant recipes and Photoshop were compared, results were virtually identical, indicating the CL-Quant recipes were truthful. The method described here could be applied to any video data to measure growth rates of hESC or other cells that grow in colonies. In addition, other video bioinformatics recipes can be developed in the future for other cell processes such as migration, apoptosis, and cell adhesion. PMID:20495527

  2. ISEV position paper: extracellular vesicle RNA analysis and bioinformatics

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    Andrew F. Hill

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs are the collective term for the various vesicles that are released by cells into the extracellular space. Such vesicles include exosomes and microvesicles, which vary by their size and/or protein and genetic cargo. With the discovery that EVs contain genetic material in the form of RNA (evRNA has come the increased interest in these vesicles for their potential use as sources of disease biomarkers and potential therapeutic agents. Rapid developments in the availability of deep sequencing technologies have enabled the study of EV-related RNA in detail. In October 2012, the International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV held a workshop on “evRNA analysis and bioinformatics.” Here, we report the conclusions of one of the roundtable discussions where we discussed evRNA analysis technologies and provide some guidelines to researchers in the field to consider when performing such analysis.

  3. Novel approaches for bioinformatic analysis of salivary RNA sequencing data for development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczor-Urbanowicz, Karolina Elzbieta; Kim, Yong; Li, Feng; Galeev, Timur; Kitchen, Rob R; Gerstein, Mark; Koyano, Kikuye; Jeong, Sung-Hee; Wang, Xiaoyan; Elashoff, David; Kang, So Young; Kim, Su Mi; Kim, Kyoung; Kim, Sung; Chia, David; Xiao, Xinshu; Rozowsky, Joel; Wong, David T W

    2018-01-01

    Analysis of RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) data in human saliva is challenging. Lack of standardization and unification of the bioinformatic procedures undermines saliva's diagnostic potential. Thus, it motivated us to perform this study. We applied principal pipelines for bioinformatic analysis of small RNA-Seq data of saliva of 98 healthy Korean volunteers including either direct or indirect mapping of the reads to the human genome using Bowtie1. Analysis of alignments to exogenous genomes by another pipeline revealed that almost all of the reads map to bacterial genomes. Thus, salivary exRNA has fundamental properties that warrant the design of unique additional steps while performing the bioinformatic analysis. Our pipelines can serve as potential guidelines for processing of RNA-Seq data of human saliva. Processing and analysis results of the experimental data generated by the exceRpt (v4.6.3) small RNA-seq pipeline (github.gersteinlab.org/exceRpt) are available from exRNA atlas (exrna-atlas.org). Alignment to exogenous genomes and their quantification results were used in this paper for the analyses of small RNAs of exogenous origin. dtww@ucla.edu. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  4. Agonist Binding to Chemosensory Receptors: A Systematic Bioinformatics Analysis

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    Fabrizio Fierro

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Human G-protein coupled receptors (hGPCRs constitute a large and highly pharmaceutically relevant membrane receptor superfamily. About half of the hGPCRs' family members are chemosensory receptors, involved in bitter taste and olfaction, along with a variety of other physiological processes. Hence these receptors constitute promising targets for pharmaceutical intervention. Molecular modeling has been so far the most important tool to get insights on agonist binding and receptor activation. Here we investigate both aspects by bioinformatics-based predictions across all bitter taste and odorant receptors for which site-directed mutagenesis data are available. First, we observe that state-of-the-art homology modeling combined with previously used docking procedures turned out to reproduce only a limited fraction of ligand/receptor interactions inferred by experiments. This is most probably caused by the low sequence identity with available structural templates, which limits the accuracy of the protein model and in particular of the side-chains' orientations. Methods which transcend the limited sampling of the conformational space of docking may improve the predictions. As an example corroborating this, we review here multi-scale simulations from our lab and show that, for the three complexes studied so far, they significantly enhance the predictive power of the computational approach. Second, our bioinformatics analysis provides support to previous claims that several residues, including those at positions 1.50, 2.50, and 7.52, are involved in receptor activation.

  5. Bioinformatics analysis of Brucella vaccines and vaccine targets using VIOLIN.

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    He, Yongqun; Xiang, Zuoshuang

    2010-09-27

    Brucella spp. are Gram-negative, facultative intracellular bacteria that cause brucellosis, one of the commonest zoonotic diseases found worldwide in humans and a variety of animal species. While several animal vaccines are available, there is no effective and safe vaccine for prevention of brucellosis in humans. VIOLIN (http://www.violinet.org) is a web-based vaccine database and analysis system that curates, stores, and analyzes published data of commercialized vaccines, and vaccines in clinical trials or in research. VIOLIN contains information for 454 vaccines or vaccine candidates for 73 pathogens. VIOLIN also contains many bioinformatics tools for vaccine data analysis, data integration, and vaccine target prediction. To demonstrate the applicability of VIOLIN for vaccine research, VIOLIN was used for bioinformatics analysis of existing Brucella vaccines and prediction of new Brucella vaccine targets. VIOLIN contains many literature mining programs (e.g., Vaxmesh) that provide in-depth analysis of Brucella vaccine literature. As a result of manual literature curation, VIOLIN contains information for 38 Brucella vaccines or vaccine candidates, 14 protective Brucella antigens, and 68 host response studies to Brucella vaccines from 97 peer-reviewed articles. These Brucella vaccines are classified in the Vaccine Ontology (VO) system and used for different ontological applications. The web-based VIOLIN vaccine target prediction program Vaxign was used to predict new Brucella vaccine targets. Vaxign identified 14 outer membrane proteins that are conserved in six virulent strains from B. abortus, B. melitensis, and B. suis that are pathogenic in humans. Of the 14 membrane proteins, two proteins (Omp2b and Omp31-1) are not present in B. ovis, a Brucella species that is not pathogenic in humans. Brucella vaccine data stored in VIOLIN were compared and analyzed using the VIOLIN query system. Bioinformatics curation and ontological representation of Brucella vaccines

  6. Bioinformatics approaches to single-cell analysis in developmental biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcin, Dicle; Hakguder, Zeynep M; Otu, Hasan H

    2016-03-01

    Individual cells within the same population show various degrees of heterogeneity, which may be better handled with single-cell analysis to address biological and clinical questions. Single-cell analysis is especially important in developmental biology as subtle spatial and temporal differences in cells have significant associations with cell fate decisions during differentiation and with the description of a particular state of a cell exhibiting an aberrant phenotype. Biotechnological advances, especially in the area of microfluidics, have led to a robust, massively parallel and multi-dimensional capturing, sorting, and lysis of single-cells and amplification of related macromolecules, which have enabled the use of imaging and omics techniques on single cells. There have been improvements in computational single-cell image analysis in developmental biology regarding feature extraction, segmentation, image enhancement and machine learning, handling limitations of optical resolution to gain new perspectives from the raw microscopy images. Omics approaches, such as transcriptomics, genomics and epigenomics, targeting gene and small RNA expression, single nucleotide and structural variations and methylation and histone modifications, rely heavily on high-throughput sequencing technologies. Although there are well-established bioinformatics methods for analysis of sequence data, there are limited bioinformatics approaches which address experimental design, sample size considerations, amplification bias, normalization, differential expression, coverage, clustering and classification issues, specifically applied at the single-cell level. In this review, we summarize biological and technological advancements, discuss challenges faced in the aforementioned data acquisition and analysis issues and present future prospects for application of single-cell analyses to developmental biology. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European

  7. Bioinformatics Database Tools in Analysis of Genetics of Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dibyashree Mallik

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Bioinformatics tools are recently used in various sectors of biology. Many questions regarding Neurodevelopmental disorder which arises as a major health issue recently can be solved by using various bioinformatics databases. Schizophrenia is such a mental disorder which is now arises as a major threat in young age people because it is mostly seen in case of people during their late adolescence or early adulthood period. Databases like DISGENET, GWAS, PHARMGKB, and DRUGBANK have huge repository of genes associated with schizophrenia. We found a lot of genes are being associated with schizophrenia, but approximately 200 genes are found to be present in any of these databases. After further screening out process 20 genes are found to be highly associated with each other and are also a common genes in many other diseases also. It is also found that they all are serves as a common targeting gene in many antipsychotic drugs. After analysis of various biological properties, molecular function it is found that these 20 genes are mostly involved in biological regulation process and are having receptor activity. They are belonging mainly to receptor protein class. Among these 20 genes CYP2C9, CYP3A4, DRD2, HTR1A, HTR2A are shown to be a main targeting genes of most of the antipsychotic drugs and are associated with  more than 40% diseases. The basic findings of the present study enumerated that a suitable combined drug can be design by targeting these genes which can be used for the better treatment of schizophrenia.

  8. In silico cloning and bioinformatic analysis of PEPCK gene in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), a critical gluconeogenic enzyme, catalyzes the first committed step in the diversion of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates toward gluconeogenesis. According to the relative conservation of homologous gene, a bioinformatics strategy was applied to clone Fusarium ...

  9. PATRIC, the bacterial bioinformatics database and analysis resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattam, Alice R.; Abraham, David; Dalay, Oral; Disz, Terry L.; Driscoll, Timothy; Gabbard, Joseph L.; Gillespie, Joseph J.; Gough, Roger; Hix, Deborah; Kenyon, Ronald; Machi, Dustin; Mao, Chunhong; Nordberg, Eric K.; Olson, Robert; Overbeek, Ross; Pusch, Gordon D.; Shukla, Maulik; Schulman, Julie; Stevens, Rick L.; Sullivan, Daniel E.; Vonstein, Veronika; Warren, Andrew; Will, Rebecca; Wilson, Meredith J.C.; Yoo, Hyun Seung; Zhang, Chengdong; Zhang, Yan; Sobral, Bruno W.

    2014-01-01

    The Pathosystems Resource Integration Center (PATRIC) is the all-bacterial Bioinformatics Resource Center (BRC) (http://www.patricbrc.org). A joint effort by two of the original National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases-funded BRCs, PATRIC provides researchers with an online resource that stores and integrates a variety of data types [e.g. genomics, transcriptomics, protein–protein interactions (PPIs), three-dimensional protein structures and sequence typing data] and associated metadata. Datatypes are summarized for individual genomes and across taxonomic levels. All genomes in PATRIC, currently more than 10 000, are consistently annotated using RAST, the Rapid Annotations using Subsystems Technology. Summaries of different data types are also provided for individual genes, where comparisons of different annotations are available, and also include available transcriptomic data. PATRIC provides a variety of ways for researchers to find data of interest and a private workspace where they can store both genomic and gene associations, and their own private data. Both private and public data can be analyzed together using a suite of tools to perform comparative genomic or transcriptomic analysis. PATRIC also includes integrated information related to disease and PPIs. All the data and integrated analysis and visualization tools are freely available. This manuscript describes updates to the PATRIC since its initial report in the 2007 NAR Database Issue. PMID:24225323

  10. Bioinformatics Analysis of MAPKKK Family Genes in Medicago truncatula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mitogen‐activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK is a component of the MAPK cascade pathway that plays an important role in plant growth, development, and response to abiotic stress, the functions of which have been well characterized in several plant species, such as Arabidopsis, rice, and maize. In this study, we performed genome‐wide and systemic bioinformatics analysis of MAPKKK family genes in Medicago truncatula. In total, there were 73 MAPKKK family members identified by search of homologs, and they were classified into three subfamilies, MEKK, ZIK, and RAF. Based on the genomic duplication function, 72 MtMAPKKK genes were located throughout all chromosomes, but they cluster in different chromosomes. Using microarray data and high‐throughput sequencing‐data, we assessed their expression profiles in growth and development processes; these results provided evidence for exploring their important functions in developmental regulation, especially in the nodulation process. Furthermore, we investigated their expression in abiotic stresses by RNA‐seq, which confirmed their critical roles in signal transduction and regulation processes under stress. In summary, our genome‐wide, systemic characterization and expressional analysis of MtMAPKKK genes will provide insights that will be useful for characterizing the molecular functions of these genes in M. truncatula.

  11. PATRIC, the bacterial bioinformatics database and analysis resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattam, Alice R; Abraham, David; Dalay, Oral; Disz, Terry L; Driscoll, Timothy; Gabbard, Joseph L; Gillespie, Joseph J; Gough, Roger; Hix, Deborah; Kenyon, Ronald; Machi, Dustin; Mao, Chunhong; Nordberg, Eric K; Olson, Robert; Overbeek, Ross; Pusch, Gordon D; Shukla, Maulik; Schulman, Julie; Stevens, Rick L; Sullivan, Daniel E; Vonstein, Veronika; Warren, Andrew; Will, Rebecca; Wilson, Meredith J C; Yoo, Hyun Seung; Zhang, Chengdong; Zhang, Yan; Sobral, Bruno W

    2014-01-01

    The Pathosystems Resource Integration Center (PATRIC) is the all-bacterial Bioinformatics Resource Center (BRC) (http://www.patricbrc.org). A joint effort by two of the original National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases-funded BRCs, PATRIC provides researchers with an online resource that stores and integrates a variety of data types [e.g. genomics, transcriptomics, protein-protein interactions (PPIs), three-dimensional protein structures and sequence typing data] and associated metadata. Datatypes are summarized for individual genomes and across taxonomic levels. All genomes in PATRIC, currently more than 10,000, are consistently annotated using RAST, the Rapid Annotations using Subsystems Technology. Summaries of different data types are also provided for individual genes, where comparisons of different annotations are available, and also include available transcriptomic data. PATRIC provides a variety of ways for researchers to find data of interest and a private workspace where they can store both genomic and gene associations, and their own private data. Both private and public data can be analyzed together using a suite of tools to perform comparative genomic or transcriptomic analysis. PATRIC also includes integrated information related to disease and PPIs. All the data and integrated analysis and visualization tools are freely available. This manuscript describes updates to the PATRIC since its initial report in the 2007 NAR Database Issue.

  12. ZBIT Bioinformatics Toolbox: A Web-Platform for Systems Biology and Expression Data Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Römer, Michael; Eichner, Johannes; Dräger, Andreas; Wrzodek, Clemens; Wrzodek, Finja; Zell, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Bioinformatics analysis has become an integral part of research in biology. However, installation and use of scientific software can be difficult and often requires technical expert knowledge. Reasons are dependencies on certain operating systems or required third-party libraries, missing graphical user interfaces and documentation, or nonstandard input and output formats. In order to make bioinformatics software easily accessible to researchers, we here present a web-based platform. The Center for Bioinformatics Tuebingen (ZBIT) Bioinformatics Toolbox provides web-based access to a collection of bioinformatics tools developed for systems biology, protein sequence annotation, and expression data analysis. Currently, the collection encompasses software for conversion and processing of community standards SBML and BioPAX, transcription factor analysis, and analysis of microarray data from transcriptomics and proteomics studies. All tools are hosted on a customized Galaxy instance and run on a dedicated computation cluster. Users only need a web browser and an active internet connection in order to benefit from this service. The web platform is designed to facilitate the usage of the bioinformatics tools for researchers without advanced technical background. Users can combine tools for complex analyses or use predefined, customizable workflows. All results are stored persistently and reproducible. For each tool, we provide documentation, tutorials, and example data to maximize usability. The ZBIT Bioinformatics Toolbox is freely available at https://webservices.cs.uni-tuebingen.de/.

  13. Identification of differentially expressed genes and signaling pathways in ovarian cancer by integrated bioinformatics analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang X

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Xiao Yang,1 Shaoming Zhu,2 Li Li,3 Li Zhang,1 Shu Xian,1 Yanqing Wang,1 Yanxiang Cheng1 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2Department of Urology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, 3Department of Pharmacology, Wuhan University Health Science Center, Wuhan, Hubei, People’s Republic of China Background: The mortality rate associated with ovarian cancer ranks the highest among gynecological malignancies. However, the cause and underlying molecular events of ovarian cancer are not clear. Here, we applied integrated bioinformatics to identify key pathogenic genes involved in ovarian cancer and reveal potential molecular mechanisms. Results: The expression profiles of GDS3592, GSE54388, and GSE66957 were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO database, which contained 115 samples, including 85 cases of ovarian cancer samples and 30 cases of normal ovarian samples. The three microarray datasets were integrated to obtain differentially expressed genes (DEGs and were deeply analyzed by bioinformatics methods. The gene ontology (GO and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathway enrichments of DEGs were performed by DAVID and KOBAS online analyses, respectively. The protein–protein interaction (PPI networks of the DEGs were constructed from the STRING database. A total of 190 DEGs were identified in the three GEO datasets, of which 99 genes were upregulated and 91 genes were downregulated. GO analysis showed that the biological functions of DEGs focused primarily on regulating cell proliferation, adhesion, and differentiation and intracellular signal cascades. The main cellular components include cell membranes, exosomes, the cytoskeleton, and the extracellular matrix. The molecular functions include growth factor activity, protein kinase regulation, DNA binding, and oxygen transport activity. KEGG pathway analysis showed that these DEGs were mainly involved in the Wnt signaling pathway, amino acid metabolism, and the

  14. Buying in to bioinformatics: an introduction to commercial sequence analysis software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David Roy

    2015-07-01

    Advancements in high-throughput nucleotide sequencing techniques have brought with them state-of-the-art bioinformatics programs and software packages. Given the importance of molecular sequence data in contemporary life science research, these software suites are becoming an essential component of many labs and classrooms, and as such are frequently designed for non-computer specialists and marketed as one-stop bioinformatics toolkits. Although beautifully designed and powerful, user-friendly bioinformatics packages can be expensive and, as more arrive on the market each year, it can be difficult for researchers, teachers and students to choose the right software for their needs, especially if they do not have a bioinformatics background. This review highlights some of the currently available and most popular commercial bioinformatics packages, discussing their prices, usability, features and suitability for teaching. Although several commercial bioinformatics programs are arguably overpriced and overhyped, many are well designed, sophisticated and, in my opinion, worth the investment. If you are just beginning your foray into molecular sequence analysis or an experienced genomicist, I encourage you to explore proprietary software bundles. They have the potential to streamline your research, increase your productivity, energize your classroom and, if anything, add a bit of zest to the often dry detached world of bioinformatics. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  15. Bioinformatic analysis of Msx1 and Msx2 involved in craniofacial development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jiewen; Mou, Zhifang; Shen, Shunyao; Dong, Yuefu; Yang, Tong; Shen, Steve Guofang

    2014-01-01

    Msx1 and Msx2 were revealed to be candidate genes for some craniofacial deformities, such as cleft lip with/without cleft palate (CL/P) and craniosynostosis. Many other genes were demonstrated to have a cross-talk with MSX genes in causing these defects. However, there is no systematic evaluation for these MSX gene-related factors. In this study, we performed systematic bioinformatic analysis for MSX genes by combining using GeneDecks, DAVID, and STRING database, and the results showed that there were numerous genes related to MSX genes, such as Irf6, TP63, Dlx2, Dlx5, Pax3, Pax9, Bmp4, Tgf-beta2, and Tgf-beta3 that have been demonstrated to be involved in CL/P, and Fgfr2, Fgfr1, Fgfr3, and Twist1 that were involved in craniosynostosis. Many of these genes could be enriched into different gene groups involved in different signaling ways, different craniofacial deformities, and different biological process. These findings could make us analyze the function of MSX gens in a gene network. In addition, our findings showed that Sumo, a novel gene whose polymorphisms were demonstrated to be associated with nonsyndromic CL/P by genome-wide association study, has protein-protein interaction with MSX1, which may offer us an alternative method to perform bioinformatic analysis for genes found by genome-wide association study and can make us predict the disrupted protein function due to the mutation in a gene DNA sequence. These findings may guide us to perform further functional studies in the future.

  16. A gene network bioinformatics analysis for pemphigoid autoimmune blistering diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Antonio; Toti, Paolo; Giuca, Maria Rita; Derchi, Giacomo; Covani, Ugo

    2015-07-01

    In this theoretical study, a text mining search and clustering analysis of data related to genes potentially involved in human pemphigoid autoimmune blistering diseases (PAIBD) was performed using web tools to create a gene/protein interaction network. The Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/Proteins (STRING) database was employed to identify a final set of PAIBD-involved genes and to calculate the overall significant interactions among genes: for each gene, the weighted number of links, or WNL, was registered and a clustering procedure was performed using the WNL analysis. Genes were ranked in class (leader, B, C, D and so on, up to orphans). An ontological analysis was performed for the set of 'leader' genes. Using the above-mentioned data network, 115 genes represented the final set; leader genes numbered 7 (intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), interferon gamma (IFNG), interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)), class B genes were 13, whereas the orphans were 24. The ontological analysis attested that the molecular action was focused on extracellular space and cell surface, whereas the activation and regulation of the immunity system was widely involved. Despite the limited knowledge of the present pathologic phenomenon, attested by the presence of 24 genes revealing no protein-protein direct or indirect interactions, the network showed significant pathways gathered in several subgroups: cellular components, molecular functions, biological processes and the pathologic phenomenon obtained from the Kyoto Encyclopaedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database. The molecular basis for PAIBD was summarised and expanded, which will perhaps give researchers promising directions for the identification of new therapeutic targets.

  17. Analysis of requirements for teaching materials based on the course bioinformatics for plant metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balqis, Widodo, Lukiati, Betty; Amin, Mohamad

    2017-05-01

    A way to improve the quality of learning in the course of Plant Metabolism in the Department of Biology, State University of Malang, is to develop teaching materials. This research evaluates the needs of bioinformatics-based teaching material in the course Plant Metabolism by the Analyze, Design, Develop, Implement, and Evaluate (ADDIE) development model. Data were collected through questionnaires distributed to the students in the Plant Metabolism course of the Department of Biology, University of Malang, and analysis of the plan of lectures semester (RPS). Learning gains of this course show that it is not yet integrated into the field of bioinformatics. All respondents stated that plant metabolism books do not include bioinformatics and fail to explain the metabolism of a chemical compound of a local plant in Indonesia. Respondents thought that bioinformatics can explain examples and metabolism of a secondary metabolite analysis techniques and discuss potential medicinal compounds from local plants. As many as 65% of the respondents said that the existing metabolism book could not be used to understand secondary metabolism in lectures of plant metabolism. Therefore, the development of teaching materials including plant metabolism-based bioinformatics is important to improve the understanding of the lecture material in plant metabolism.

  18. Structural, Bioinformatic, and In Vivo Analyses of Two Treponema pallidum Lipoproteins Reveal a Unique TRAP Transporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Goldberg, Martin; Schuck, Peter; Tomchick, Diana R.; Norgard, Michael V. (NIH); (UTSMC)

    2012-05-25

    Treponema pallidum, the bacterial agent of syphilis, is predicted to encode one tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic transporter (TRAP-T). TRAP-Ts typically employ a periplasmic substrate-binding protein (SBP) to deliver the cognate ligand to the transmembrane symporter. Herein, we demonstrate that the genes encoding the putative TRAP-T components from T. pallidum, tp0957 (the SBP), and tp0958 (the symporter), are in an operon with an uncharacterized third gene, tp0956. We determined the crystal structure of recombinant Tp0956; the protein is trimeric and perforated by a pore. Part of Tp0956 forms an assembly similar to those of 'tetratricopeptide repeat' (TPR) motifs. The crystal structure of recombinant Tp0957 was also determined; like the SBPs of other TRAP-Ts, there are two lobes separated by a cleft. In these other SBPs, the cleft binds a negatively charged ligand. However, the cleft of Tp0957 has a strikingly hydrophobic chemical composition, indicating that its ligand may be substantially different and likely hydrophobic. Analytical ultracentrifugation of the recombinant versions of Tp0956 and Tp0957 established that these proteins associate avidly. This unprecedented interaction was confirmed for the native molecules using in vivo cross-linking experiments. Finally, bioinformatic analyses suggested that this transporter exemplifies a new subfamily of TPATs (TPR-protein-associated TRAP-Ts) that require the action of a TPR-containing accessory protein for the periplasmic transport of a potentially hydrophobic ligand(s).

  19. In Silico Identification, Phylogenetic and Bioinformatic Analysis of Argonaute Genes in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Mirzaei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Argonaute protein family is the key players in pathways of gene silencing and small regulatory RNAs in different organisms. Argonaute proteins can bind small noncoding RNAs and control protein synthesis, affect messenger RNA stability, and even participate in the production of new forms of small RNAs. The aim of this study was to characterize and perform bioinformatic analysis of Argonaute proteins in 32 plant species that their genome was sequenced. A total of 437 Argonaute genes were identified and were analyzed based on lengths, gene structure, and protein structure. Results showed that Argonaute proteins were highly conserved across plant kingdom. Phylogenic analysis divided plant Argonautes into three classes. Argonaute proteins have three conserved domains PAZ, MID and PIWI. In addition to three conserved domains namely, PAZ, MID, and PIWI, we identified few more domains in AGO of some plant species. Expression profile analysis of Argonaute proteins showed that expression of these genes varies in most of tissues, which means that these proteins are involved in regulation of most pathways of the plant system. Numbers of alternative transcripts of Argonaute genes were highly variable among the plants. A thorough analysis of large number of putative Argonaute genes revealed several interesting aspects associated with this protein and brought novel information with promising usefulness for both basic and biotechnological applications.

  20. [BIOINFORMATIC SEARCH AND PHYLOGENETIC ANALYSIS OF THE CELLULOSE SYNTHASE GENES OF FLAX (LINUM USITATISSIMUM)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pydiura, N A; Bayer, G Ya; Galinousky, D V; Yemets, A I; Pirko, Ya V; Podvitski, T A; Anisimova, N V; Khotyleva, L V; Kilchevsky, A V; Blume, Ya B

    2015-01-01

    A bioinformatic search of sequences encoding cellulose synthase genes in the flax genome, and their comparison to dicots orthologs was carried out. The analysis revealed 32 cellulose synthase gene candidates, 16 of which are highly likely to encode cellulose synthases, and the remaining 16--cellulose synthase-like proteins (Csl). Phylogenetic analysis of gene products of cellulose synthase genes allowed distinguishing 6 groups of cellulose synthase genes of different classes: CesA1/10, CesA3, CesA4, CesA5/6/2/9, CesA7 and CesA8. Paralogous sequences within classes CesA1/10 and CesA5/6/2/9 which are associated with the primary cell wall formation are characterized by a greater similarity within these classes than orthologous sequences. Whereas the genes controlling the biosynthesis of secondary cell wall cellulose form distinct clades: CesA4, CesA7, and CesA8. The analysis of 16 identified flax cellulose synthase gene candidates shows the presence of at least 12 different cellulose synthase gene variants in flax genome which are represented in all six clades of cellulose synthase genes. Thus, at this point genes of all ten known cellulose synthase classes are identify in flax genome, but their correct classification requires additional research.

  1. Structural and Phylogenetic Analysis of Laccases from Trichoderma: A Bioinformatic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cázares-García, Saila Viridiana; Vázquez-Garcidueñas, Ma. Soledad; Vázquez-Marrufo, Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    The genus Trichoderma includes species of great biotechnological value, both for their mycoparasitic activities and for their ability to produce extracellular hydrolytic enzymes. Although activity of extracellular laccase has previously been reported in Trichoderma spp., the possible number of isoenzymes is still unknown, as are the structural and functional characteristics of both the genes and the putative proteins. In this study, the system of laccases sensu stricto in the Trichoderma species, the genomes of which are publicly available, were analyzed using bioinformatic tools. The intron/exon structure of the genes and the identification of specific motifs in the sequence of amino acids of the proteins generated in silico allow for clear differentiation between extracellular and intracellular enzymes. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that the common ancestor of the genus possessed a functional gene for each one of these enzymes, which is a characteristic preserved in T. atroviride and T. virens. This analysis also reveals that T. harzianum and T. reesei only retained the intracellular activity, whereas T. asperellum added an extracellular isoenzyme acquired through horizontal gene transfer during the mycoparasitic process. The evolutionary analysis shows that in general, extracellular laccases are subjected to purifying selection, and intracellular laccases show neutral evolution. The data provided by the present study will enable the generation of experimental approximations to better understand the physiological role of laccases in the genus Trichoderma and to increase their biotechnological potential. PMID:23383142

  2. Bioinformatics analysis identifies several intrinsically disordered human E3 ubiquitin-protein ligases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boomsma, Wouter Krogh; Nielsen, Sofie Vincents; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten

    2016-01-01

    conduct a bioinformatics analysis to examine >600 human and S. cerevisiae E3 ligases to identify enzymes that are similar to San1 in terms of function and/or mechanism of substrate recognition. An initial sequence-based database search was found to detect candidates primarily based on the homology...

  3. Molecular and bioinformatic analysis of the FB-NOF transposable element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badal, Martí; Portela, Anna; Xamena, Noel; Cabré, Oriol

    2006-04-12

    The Drosophila melanogaster transposable element FB-NOF is known to play a role in genome plasticity through the generation of all sort of genomic rearrangements. Moreover, several insertional mutants due to FB mobilizations have been reported. Its structure and sequence, however, have been poorly studied mainly as a consequence of the long, complex and repetitive sequence of FB inverted repeats. This repetitive region is composed of several 154 bp blocks, each with five almost identical repeats. In this paper, we report the sequencing process of 2 kb long FB inverted repeats of a complete FB-NOF element, with high precision and reliability. This achievement has been possible using a new map of the FB repetitive region, which identifies unambiguously each repeat with new features that can be used as landmarks. With this new vision of the element, a list of FB-NOF in the D. melanogaster genomic clones has been done, improving previous works that used only bioinformatic algorithms. The availability of many FB and FB-NOF sequences allowed an analysis of the FB insertion sequences that showed no sequence specificity, but a preference for A/T rich sequences. The position of NOF into FB is also studied, revealing that it is always located after a second repeat in a random block. With the results of this analysis, we propose a model of transposition in which NOF jumps from FB to FB, using an unidentified transposase enzyme that should specifically recognize the second repeat end of the FB blocks.

  4. Bioinformatics analysis of transcriptome dynamics during growth in angus cattle longissimus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisá, Sonia J; Shike, Daniel W; Graugnard, Daniel E; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L; Everts, Robin E; Lewin, Harris A; Faulkner, Dan B; Berger, Larry L; Loor, Juan J

    2013-01-01

    Transcriptome dynamics in the longissimus muscle (LM) of young Angus cattle were evaluated at 0, 60, 120, and 220 days from early-weaning. Bioinformatic analysis was performed using the dynamic impact approach (DIA) by means of Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) and Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) databases. Between 0 to 120 days (growing phase) most of the highly-impacted pathways (eg, ascorbate and aldarate metabolism, drug metabolism, cytochrome P450 and Retinol metabolism) were inhibited. The phase between 120 to 220 days (finishing phase) was characterized by the most striking differences with 3,784 differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Analysis of those DEGs revealed that the most impacted KEGG canonical pathway was glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor biosynthesis, which was inhibited. Furthermore, inhibition of calpastatin and activation of tyrosine aminotransferase ubiquitination at 220 days promotes proteasomal degradation, while the concurrent activation of ribosomal proteins promotes protein synthesis. Therefore, the balance of these processes likely results in a steady-state of protein turnover during the finishing phase. Results underscore the importance of transcriptome dynamics in LM during growth.

  5. BATMAN-TCM: a Bioinformatics Analysis Tool for Molecular mechANism of Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongyang; Guo, Feifei; Wang, Yong; Li, Chun; Zhang, Xinlei; Li, Honglei; Diao, Lihong; Gu, Jiangyong; Wang, Wei; Li, Dong; He, Fuchu

    2016-02-01

    Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), with a history of thousands of years of clinical practice, is gaining more and more attention and application worldwide. And TCM-based new drug development, especially for the treatment of complex diseases is promising. However, owing to the TCM’s diverse ingredients and their complex interaction with human body, it is still quite difficult to uncover its molecular mechanism, which greatly hinders the TCM modernization and internationalization. Here we developed the first online Bioinformatics Analysis Tool for Molecular mechANism of TCM (BATMAN-TCM). Its main functions include 1) TCM ingredients’ target prediction; 2) functional analyses of targets including biological pathway, Gene Ontology functional term and disease enrichment analyses; 3) the visualization of ingredient-target-pathway/disease association network and KEGG biological pathway with highlighted targets; 4) comparison analysis of multiple TCMs. Finally, we applied BATMAN-TCM to Qishen Yiqi dripping Pill (QSYQ) and combined with subsequent experimental validation to reveal the functions of renin-angiotensin system responsible for QSYQ’s cardioprotective effects for the first time. BATMAN-TCM will contribute to the understanding of the “multi-component, multi-target and multi-pathway” combinational therapeutic mechanism of TCM, and provide valuable clues for subsequent experimental validation, accelerating the elucidation of TCM’s molecular mechanism. BATMAN-TCM is available at http://bionet.ncpsb.org/batman-tcm.

  6. The Revolution in Viral Genomics as Exemplified by the Bioinformatic Analysis of Human Adenoviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Torres

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 30 years, genomic and bioinformatic analysis of human adenoviruses has been achieved using a variety of DNA sequencing methods; initially with the use of restriction enzymes and more currently with the use of the GS FLX pyrosequencing technology. Following the conception of DNA sequencing in the 1970s, analysis of adenoviruses has evolved from 100 base pair mRNA fragments to entire genomes. Comparative genomics of adenoviruses made its debut in 1984 when nucleotides and amino acids of coding sequences within the hexon genes of two human adenoviruses (HAdV, HAdV–C2 and HAdV–C5, were compared and analyzed. It was determined that there were three different zones (1-393, 394-1410, 1411-2910 within the hexon gene, of which HAdV–C2 and HAdV–C5 shared zones 1 and 3 with 95% and 89.5% nucleotide identity, respectively. In 1992, HAdV-C5 became the first adenovirus genome to be fully sequenced using the Sanger method. Over the next seven years, whole genome analysis and characterization was completed using bioinformatic tools such as blastn, tblastx, ClustalV and FASTA, in order to determine key proteins in species HAdV-A through HAdV-F. The bioinformatic revolution was initiated with the introduction of a novel species, HAdV-G, that was typed and named by the use of whole genome sequencing and phylogenetics as opposed to traditional serology. HAdV bioinformatics will continue to advance as the latest sequencing technology enables scientists to add to and expand the resource databases. As a result of these advancements, how novel HAdVs are typed has changed. Bioinformatic analysis has become the revolutionary tool that has significantly accelerated the in-depth study of HAdV microevolution through comparative genomics.

  7. Workflows in bioinformatics: meta-analysis and prototype implementation of a workflow generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thoraval Samuel

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computational methods for problem solving need to interleave information access and algorithm execution in a problem-specific workflow. The structures of these workflows are defined by a scaffold of syntactic, semantic and algebraic objects capable of representing them. Despite the proliferation of GUIs (Graphic User Interfaces in bioinformatics, only some of them provide workflow capabilities; surprisingly, no meta-analysis of workflow operators and components in bioinformatics has been reported. Results We present a set of syntactic components and algebraic operators capable of representing analytical workflows in bioinformatics. Iteration, recursion, the use of conditional statements, and management of suspend/resume tasks have traditionally been implemented on an ad hoc basis and hard-coded; by having these operators properly defined it is possible to use and parameterize them as generic re-usable components. To illustrate how these operations can be orchestrated, we present GPIPE, a prototype graphic pipeline generator for PISE that allows the definition of a pipeline, parameterization of its component methods, and storage of metadata in XML formats. This implementation goes beyond the macro capacities currently in PISE. As the entire analysis protocol is defined in XML, a complete bioinformatic experiment (linked sets of methods, parameters and results can be reproduced or shared among users. Availability: http://if-web1.imb.uq.edu.au/Pise/5.a/gpipe.html (interactive, ftp://ftp.pasteur.fr/pub/GenSoft/unix/misc/Pise/ (download. Conclusion From our meta-analysis we have identified syntactic structures and algebraic operators common to many workflows in bioinformatics. The workflow components and algebraic operators can be assimilated into re-usable software components. GPIPE, a prototype implementation of this framework, provides a GUI builder to facilitate the generation of workflows and integration of heterogeneous

  8. Identification of Missense Mutation (I12T in the BSND Gene and Bioinformatics Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hina Iqbal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonsyndromic hearing loss is a paradigm of genetic heterogeneity with 85 loci and 39 nuclear disease genes reported so far. Mutations of BSND have been shown to cause Bartter syndrome type IV, characterized by significant renal abnormalities and deafness and nonsyndromic nearing loss. We studied a Pakistani consanguineous family. Clinical examinations of affected individuals did not reveal the presence of any associated signs, which are hallmarks of the Bartter syndrome type IV. Linkage analysis identified an area of 18.36 Mb shared by all affected individuals between markers D1S2706 and D1S1596. A maximum two-point LOD score of 2.55 with markers D1S2700 and multipoint LOD score of 3.42 with marker D1S1661 were obtained. BSND mutation, that is, p.I12T, cosegregated in all extant members of our pedigree. BSND mutations can cause nonsyndromic hearing loss, and it is a second report for this mutation. The respected protein, that is, BSND, was first modeled, and then, the identified mutation was further analyzed by using different bioinformatics tools; finally, this protein and its mutant was docked with CLCNKB and REN, interactions of BSND, respectively.

  9. Consensus strategy in genes prioritization and combined bioinformatics analysis for preeclampsia pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejera, Eduardo; Cruz-Monteagudo, Maykel; Burgos, Germán; Sánchez, María-Eugenia; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Aminael; Pérez-Castillo, Yunierkis; Borges, Fernanda; Cordeiro, Maria Natália Dias Soeiro; Paz-Y-Miño, César; Rebelo, Irene

    2017-08-08

    Preeclampsia is a multifactorial disease with unknown pathogenesis. Even when recent studies explored this disease using several bioinformatics tools, the main objective was not directed to pathogenesis. Additionally, consensus prioritization was proved to be highly efficient in the recognition of genes-disease association. However, not information is available about the consensus ability to early recognize genes directly involved in pathogenesis. Therefore our aim in this study is to apply several theoretical approaches to explore preeclampsia; specifically those genes directly involved in the pathogenesis. We firstly evaluated the consensus between 12 prioritization strategies to early recognize pathogenic genes related to preeclampsia. A communality analysis in the protein-protein interaction network of previously selected genes was done including further enrichment analysis. The enrichment analysis includes metabolic pathways as well as gene ontology. Microarray data was also collected and used in order to confirm our results or as a strategy to weight the previously enriched pathways. The consensus prioritized gene list was rationally filtered to 476 genes using several criteria. The communality analysis showed an enrichment of communities connected with VEGF-signaling pathway. This pathway is also enriched considering the microarray data. Our result point to VEGF, FLT1 and KDR as relevant pathogenic genes, as well as those connected with NO metabolism. Our results revealed that consensus strategy improve the detection and initial enrichment of pathogenic genes, at least in preeclampsia condition. Moreover the combination of the first percent of the prioritized genes with protein-protein interaction network followed by communality analysis reduces the gene space. This approach actually identifies well known genes related with pathogenesis. However, genes like HSP90, PAK2, CD247 and others included in the first 1% of the prioritized list need to be further

  10. Bioinformatic analysis to discover putative drug targets against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    /

    2012-01-26

    Jan 26, 2012 ... JVIRTUAL GEL. GELBANK was available from the NCBI FTP server. This website incorporates only completed genomes and information pertinent to 2-DE. Link is available at www.gelbank.anl.gov. JVirGel is a software for the simulation and analysis of proteomics data (http://www.jvirgel.de/). The Java TM.

  11. Bioinformatics analysis and genetic diversity of the poliovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanhan; Ma, Tengfei; Liu, Jianzhu; Zhao, Xiaona; Cheng, Ziqiang; Guo, Huijun; Wang, Shujing; Xu, Ruixue

    2014-12-01

    Poliomyelitis, a disease which can manifest as muscle paralysis, is caused by the poliovirus, which is a human enterovirus and member of the family Picornaviridae that usually transmits by the faecal-oral route. The viruses of the OPV (oral poliovirus attenuated-live vaccine) strains can mutate in the human intestine during replication and some of these mutations can lead to the recovery of serious neurovirulence. Informatics research of the poliovirus genome can be used to explain further the characteristics of this virus. In this study, sequences from 100 poliovirus isolates were acquired from GenBank. To determine the evolutionary relationship between the strains, we compared and analysed the sequences of the complete poliovirus genome and the VP1 region. The reconstructed phylogenetic trees for the complete sequences and the VP1 sequences were both divided into two branches, indicating that the genetic relationships of the whole poliovirus genome and the VP1 sequences are very similar. This branching indicates that the virulence and pathogenicity of poliomyelitis may be associated with the VP1 region. Sequence alignment of the VP1 region revealed numerous mutation sites in which mutation rates of >30 % were detected. In a group of strains recorded in the USA, mutation sites and mutation types were the same and this may be associated with their distribution in the evolutionary tree and their genetic relationship. In conclusion, the genetic evolutionary relationships of poliovirus isolate sequences are determined to a great extent by the VP1 protein, and poliovirus strains located on the same branch of the phylogenetic tree contain the same mutation spots and mutation types. Hence, the genetic characteristics of the VP1 region in the poliovirus genome should be analysed to identify the transmission route of poliovirus and provide the basis of viral immunity development. © 2014 The Authors.

  12. Bioinformatics and biomarker discovery "Omic" data analysis for personalized medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Azuaje, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    This book is designed to introduce biologists, clinicians and computational researchers to fundamental data analysis principles, techniques and tools for supporting the discovery of biomarkers and the implementation of diagnostic/prognostic systems. The focus of the book is on how fundamental statistical and data mining approaches can support biomarker discovery and evaluation, emphasising applications based on different types of "omic" data. The book also discusses design factors, requirements and techniques for disease screening, diagnostic and prognostic applications. Readers are provided w

  13. Bioinformatic analysis of Entamoeba histolytica SINE1 elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butcher Sarah A

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Invasive amoebiasis, caused by infection with the human parasite Entamoeba histolytica remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in some less-developed countries. Genetically E. histolytica exhibits a number of unusual features including having approximately 20% of its genome comprised of repetitive elements. These include a number of families of SINEs - non-autonomous elements which can, however, move with the help of partner LINEs. In many eukaryotes SINE mobility has had a profound effect on gene expression; in this study we concentrated on one such element - EhSINE1, looking in particular for evidence of recent transposition. Results EhSINE1s were detected in the newly reassembled E. histolytica genome by searching with a Hidden Markov Model developed to encapsulate the key features of this element; 393 were detected. Examination of their sequences revealed that some had an internal structure showing one to four 26-27 nt repeats. Members of the different classes differ in a number of ways and in particular those with two internal repeats show the properties expected of fairly recently transposed SINEs - they are the most homogeneous in length and sequence, they have the longest (i.e. the least decayed target site duplications and are the most likely to show evidence (in a cDNA library of active transcription. Furthermore we were able to identify 15 EhSINE1s (6 pairs and one triplet which appeared to be identical or very nearly so but inserted into different sites in the genome; these provide good evidence that if mobility has now ceased it has only done so very recently. Conclusions Of the many families of repetitive elements present in the genome of E. histolytica we have examined in detail just one - EhSINE1. We have shown that there is evidence for waves of transposition at different points in the past and no evidence that mobility has entirely ceased. There are many aspects of the biology of this parasite which

  14. Analysis of Ribosome Inactivating Protein (RIP): A Bioinformatics Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jothi, G. Edward Gnana; Majilla, G. Sahaya Jose; Subhashini, D.; Deivasigamani, B.

    2012-10-01

    In spite of the medical advances in recent years, the world is in need of different sources to encounter certain health issues.Ribosome Inactivating Proteins (RIPs) were found to be one among them. In order to get easy access about RIPs, there is a need to analyse RIPs towards constructing a database on RIPs. Also, multiple sequence alignment was done towards screening for homologues of significant RIPs from rare sources against RIPs from easily available sources in terms of similarity. Protein sequences were retrieved from SWISS-PROT and are further analysed using pair wise and multiple sequence alignment.Analysis shows that, 151 RIPs have been characterized to date. Amongst them, there are 87 type I, 37 type II, 1 type III and 25 unknown RIPs. The sequence length information of various RIPs about the availability of full or partial sequence was also found. The multiple sequence alignment of 37 type I RIP using the online server Multalin, indicates the presence of 20 conserved residues. Pairwise alignment and multiple sequence alignment of certain selected RIPs in two groups namely Group I and Group II were carried out and the consensus level was found to be 98%, 98% and 90% respectively.

  15. A Brief Review of Bioinformatics Tools for Glycosylation Analysis by Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Tsai, Pei-Lun; Chen, Sung-Fang

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide updated information regarding bioinformatic software for the use in the characterization of glycosylated structures since 2013. A comprehensive review by Woodin et al. Analyst 138: 2793?2803, 2013 (ref. 1) described two main approaches that are introduced for starting researchers in this area; analysis of released glycans and the identification of glycopeptide in enzymatic digests, respectively. Complementary to that report, this review focuses on m...

  16. NMR spectroscopic and bioinformatic analyses of the LTBP1 C-terminus reveal a highly dynamic domain organisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian B Robertson

    Full Text Available Proteins from the LTBP/fibrillin family perform key structural and functional roles in connective tissues. LTBP1 forms the large latent complex with TGFβ and its propeptide LAP, and sequesters the latent growth factor to the extracellular matrix. Bioinformatics studies suggest the main structural features of the LTBP1 C-terminus are conserved through evolution. NMR studies were carried out on three overlapping C-terminal fragments of LTBP1, comprising four domains with characterised homologues, cbEGF14, TB3, EGF3 and cbEGF15, and three regions with no homology to known structures. The NMR data reveal that the four domains adopt canonical folds, but largely lack the interdomain interactions observed with homologous fibrillin domains; the exception is the EGF3-cbEGF15 domain pair which has a well-defined interdomain interface. (15N relaxation studies further demonstrate that the three interdomain regions act as flexible linkers, allowing a wide range of motion between the well-structured domains. This work is consistent with the LTBP1 C-terminus adopting a flexible "knotted rope" structure, which may facilitate cell matrix interactions, and the accessibility to proteases or other factors that could contribute to TGFβ activation.

  17. Generalized Centroid Estimators in Bioinformatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Michiaki; Kiryu, Hisanori; Iwasaki, Wataru; Asai, Kiyoshi

    2011-01-01

    In a number of estimation problems in bioinformatics, accuracy measures of the target problem are usually given, and it is important to design estimators that are suitable to those accuracy measures. However, there is often a discrepancy between an employed estimator and a given accuracy measure of the problem. In this study, we introduce a general class of efficient estimators for estimation problems on high-dimensional binary spaces, which represent many fundamental problems in bioinformatics. Theoretical analysis reveals that the proposed estimators generally fit with commonly-used accuracy measures (e.g. sensitivity, PPV, MCC and F-score) as well as it can be computed efficiently in many cases, and cover a wide range of problems in bioinformatics from the viewpoint of the principle of maximum expected accuracy (MEA). It is also shown that some important algorithms in bioinformatics can be interpreted in a unified manner. Not only the concept presented in this paper gives a useful framework to design MEA-based estimators but also it is highly extendable and sheds new light on many problems in bioinformatics. PMID:21365017

  18. Genetic and bioinformatics analysis of four novel GCK missense variants detected in Caucasian families with GCK-MODY phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, S; Malerba, G; Contreas, G; Corradi, M; Marin Vargas, S P; Giorgetti, A; Maffeis, C

    2015-05-01

    Heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in the glucokinase (GCK) gene cause maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) subtype GCK (GCK-MODY/MODY2). GCK sequencing revealed 16 distinct mutations (13 missense, 1 nonsense, 1 splice site, and 1 frameshift-deletion) co-segregating with hyperglycaemia in 23 GCK-MODY families. Four missense substitutions (c.718A>G/p.Asn240Asp, c.757G>T/p.Val253Phe, c.872A>C/p.Lys291Thr, and c.1151C>T/p.Ala384Val) were novel and a founder effect for the nonsense mutation (c.76C>T/p.Gln26*) was supposed. We tested whether an accurate bioinformatics approach could strengthen family-genetic evidence for missense variant pathogenicity in routine diagnostics, where wet-lab functional assays are generally unviable. In silico analyses of the novel missense variants, including orthologous sequence conservation, amino acid substitution (AAS)-pathogenicity predictors, structural modeling and splicing predictors, suggested that the AASs and/or the underlying nucleotide changes are likely to be pathogenic. This study shows how a careful bioinformatics analysis could provide effective suggestions to help molecular-genetic diagnosis in absence of wet-lab validations. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Bioinformatics, interaction network analysis, and neural networks to characterize gene expression of radicular cyst and periapical granuloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poswar, Fabiano de Oliveira; Farias, Lucyana Conceição; Fraga, Carlos Alberto de Carvalho; Bambirra, Wilson; Brito-Júnior, Manoel; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damião; Santos, Sérgio Henrique Souza; de Paula, Alfredo Maurício Batista; D'Angelo, Marcos Flávio Silveira Vasconcelos; Guimarães, André Luiz Sena

    2015-06-01

    Bioinformatics has emerged as an important tool to analyze the large amount of data generated by research in different diseases. In this study, gene expression for radicular cysts (RCs) and periapical granulomas (PGs) was characterized based on a leader gene approach. A validated bioinformatics algorithm was applied to identify leader genes for RCs and PGs. Genes related to RCs and PGs were first identified in PubMed, GenBank, GeneAtlas, and GeneCards databases. The Web-available STRING software (The European Molecular Biology Laboratory [EMBL], Heidelberg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany) was used in order to build the interaction map among the identified genes by a significance score named weighted number of links. Based on the weighted number of links, genes were clustered using k-means. The genes in the highest cluster were considered leader genes. Multilayer perceptron neural network analysis was used as a complementary supplement for gene classification. For RCs, the suggested leader genes were TP53 and EP300, whereas PGs were associated with IL2RG, CCL2, CCL4, CCL5, CCR1, CCR3, and CCR5 genes. Our data revealed different gene expression for RCs and PGs, suggesting that not only the inflammatory nature but also other biological processes might differentiate RCs and PGs. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Secretome Analysis of Lipid-Induced Insulin Resistance in Skeletal Muscle Cells by a Combined Experimental and Bioinformatics Workflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deshmukh, Atul S; Cox, Juergen; Jensen, Lars Juhl

    2015-01-01

    , in principle, allows an unbiased and comprehensive analysis of cellular secretomes; however, the distinction of bona fide secreted proteins from proteins released upon lysis of a small fraction of dying cells remains challenging. Here we applied highly sensitive MS and streamlined bioinformatics to analyze......-resistant conditions. Our study demonstrates an efficient combined experimental and bioinformatics workflow to identify putative secreted proteins from insulin-resistant skeletal muscle cells, which could easily be adapted to other cellular models....

  1. Applying Instructional Design Theories to Bioinformatics Education in Microarray Analysis and Primer Design Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shachak, Aviv; Ophir, Ron; Rubin, Eitan

    2005-01-01

    The need to support bioinformatics training has been widely recognized by scientists, industry, and government institutions. However, the discussion of instructional methods for teaching bioinformatics is only beginning. Here we report on a systematic attempt to design two bioinformatics workshops for graduate biology students on the basis of…

  2. Expression and Bioinformatic Analysis of Ornithine Aminotransferase 
in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danfei ZHOU

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It has been proven that ornithine aminotransferase (OAT might play an important role in the oncogenesis and progression of numerous malignant tumors. The aim of this study is to detect the mRNA and protein expression of OAT in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, as well as to analyze the bioinformatic features and binary interactions. Methods OAT mRNA expression was detected in A549 and 16HBE cell lines by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. OAT protein expression was determined in 55 cases of NSCLC and 17 cases of adjacent non-tumor lung tissues by immunohistochemical staining. The bioinformatic features and binary interactions of OAT were analyzed. Gene ontology annotation and signal pathway analysis were performed. Results OAT mRNA expression in A549 cells was 2.85-fold lower than that in 16HBE cells. OAT protein expression was significantly higher in NSCLC tissues than that in adjacent non-tumor lung tissues. A significant difference of OAT protein expression was existed between squamous cell lung cancer and adenocarcinoma (P<0.05, but was not correlated with the gender, age, lymph node metastasis, tumor size, and TNM stages. Bioinformatic analysis suggested that OAT was a highly homologous and stable protein located in the mitochondria. An aminotran-3 domain and several sites of phosphorylation, which may function in signal transduction, gene transcription, and molecular transit, were found. In the 54 selected binary interactions of OAT, TNF and TRAF6 play roles in the NF-κB pathway. Conclusion OAT may play an important role in the oncogenesis and progression of NSCLC. Thus, OAT may be a novel biomarker for the diagnosis of NSCLC or a new target for its treatment.

  3. Bioinformatics analysis identifies several intrinsically disordered human E3 ubiquitin-protein ligases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter Boomsma

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin-proteasome system targets misfolded proteins for degradation. Since the accumulation of such proteins is potentially harmful for the cell, their prompt removal is important. E3 ubiquitin-protein ligases mediate substrate ubiquitination by bringing together the substrate with an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, which transfers ubiquitin to the substrate. For misfolded proteins, substrate recognition is generally delegated to molecular chaperones that subsequently interact with specific E3 ligases. An important exception is San1, a yeast E3 ligase. San1 harbors extensive regions of intrinsic disorder, which provide both conformational flexibility and sites for direct recognition of misfolded targets of vastly different conformations. So far, no mammalian ortholog of San1 is known, nor is it clear whether other E3 ligases utilize disordered regions for substrate recognition. Here, we conduct a bioinformatics analysis to examine >600 human and S. cerevisiae E3 ligases to identify enzymes that are similar to San1 in terms of function and/or mechanism of substrate recognition. An initial sequence-based database search was found to detect candidates primarily based on the homology of their ordered regions, and did not capture the unique disorder patterns that encode the functional mechanism of San1. However, by searching specifically for key features of the San1 sequence, such as long regions of intrinsic disorder embedded with short stretches predicted to be suitable for substrate interaction, we identified several E3 ligases with these characteristics. Our initial analysis revealed that another remarkable trait of San1 is shared with several candidate E3 ligases: long stretches of complete lysine suppression, which in San1 limits auto-ubiquitination. We encode these characteristic features into a San1 similarity-score, and present a set of proteins that are plausible candidates as San1 counterparts in humans. In conclusion, our work

  4. MEDICAL DIAGNOSTICS BY MICROSTRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF BIOLOGICAL LIQUID DRIED PATTERNS AS A PROBLEM OF BIOINFORMATICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Vladimirovich Lebedev-Stepanov, Dr.

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Motivation: It is important to develop the high-precision computerized methods for medical rapid diagnostic which is generalizing the unique clinical experience obtained in the past decade as specialized solutions for diagnostic problems of control of specific diseases and, potentially, for a wide health monitoring of virtually healthy population, identify the reserves of human health and take the actions to prevent of these reserves depletion. In this work we present one of the new directions in bioinformatics, i.e. medical diagnostics by automated expert system on basis of morphology analysis of digital image of biological liquid dried pattern. Results: Proposed method is combination of bioinformatics and biochemistry approaches for obtaining diagnostic information from a morphological analysis of standardized dried patterns of biological liquid sessile drop. We have carried out own research in collaboration with medical diagnostic centers and formed the electronic database for recognition the following types of diseases: candidiasis; neoplasms; diabetes mellitus; diseases of the circulatory system; cerebrovascular disease; diseases of the digestive system; diseases of the genitourinary system; infectious diseases; factors relevant to the work; factors associated with environmental pollution; factors related to lifestyle. The laboratory setup for diagnostics of the human body in pathology states is developed. The diagnostic results are considered. Availability: Access to testing the software can be obtained on request to the contact email below.

  5. BioGPS descriptors for rational engineering of enzyme promiscuity and structure based bioinformatic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio Ferrario

    Full Text Available A new bioinformatic methodology was developed founded on the Unsupervised Pattern Cognition Analysis of GRID-based BioGPS descriptors (Global Positioning System in Biological Space. The procedure relies entirely on three-dimensional structure analysis of enzymes and does not stem from sequence or structure alignment. The BioGPS descriptors account for chemical, geometrical and physical-chemical features of enzymes and are able to describe comprehensively the active site of enzymes in terms of "pre-organized environment" able to stabilize the transition state of a given reaction. The efficiency of this new bioinformatic strategy was demonstrated by the consistent clustering of four different Ser hydrolases classes, which are characterized by the same active site organization but able to catalyze different reactions. The method was validated by considering, as a case study, the engineering of amidase activity into the scaffold of a lipase. The BioGPS tool predicted correctly the properties of lipase variants, as demonstrated by the projection of mutants inside the BioGPS "roadmap".

  6. Importance of databases of nucleic acids for bioinformatic analysis focused to genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Gutierrez, L. R.; Barrios-Hernández, C. J.; Pedraza-Ferreira, G. R.; Vera-Cala, L.; Martinez-Perez, F.

    2016-08-01

    Recently, bioinformatics has become a new field of science, indispensable in the analysis of millions of nucleic acids sequences, which are currently deposited in international databases (public or private); these databases contain information of genes, RNA, ORF, proteins, intergenic regions, including entire genomes from some species. The analysis of this information requires computer programs; which were renewed in the use of new mathematical methods, and the introduction of the use of artificial intelligence. In addition to the constant creation of supercomputing units trained to withstand the heavy workload of sequence analysis. However, it is still necessary the innovation on platforms that allow genomic analyses, faster and more effectively, with a technological understanding of all biological processes.

  7. Galaxy Workflows for Web-based Bioinformatics Analysis of Aptamer High-throughput Sequencing Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William H Thiel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of RNA and DNA aptamers for diagnostic and therapeutic applications is a rapidly growing field. Aptamers are identified through iterative rounds of selection in a process termed SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment. High-throughput sequencing (HTS revolutionized the modern SELEX process by identifying millions of aptamer sequences across multiple rounds of aptamer selection. However, these vast aptamer HTS datasets necessitated bioinformatics techniques. Herein, we describe a semiautomated approach to analyze aptamer HTS datasets using the Galaxy Project, a web-based open source collection of bioinformatics tools that were originally developed to analyze genome, exome, and transcriptome HTS data. Using a series of Workflows created in the Galaxy webserver, we demonstrate efficient processing of aptamer HTS data and compilation of a database of unique aptamer sequences. Additional Workflows were created to characterize the abundance and persistence of aptamer sequences within a selection and to filter sequences based on these parameters. A key advantage of this approach is that the online nature of the Galaxy webserver and its graphical interface allow for the analysis of HTS data without the need to compile code or install multiple programs.

  8. BioMaS: a modular pipeline for Bioinformatic analysis of Metagenomic AmpliconS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosso, Bruno; Santamaria, Monica; Marzano, Marinella; Alonso-Alemany, Daniel; Valiente, Gabriel; Donvito, Giacinto; Monaco, Alfonso; Notarangelo, Pasquale; Pesole, Graziano

    2015-07-01

    Substantial advances in microbiology, molecular evolution and biodiversity have been carried out in recent years thanks to Metagenomics, which allows to unveil the composition and functions of mixed microbial communities in any environmental niche. If the investigation is aimed only at the microbiome taxonomic structure, a target-based metagenomic approach, here also referred as Meta-barcoding, is generally applied. This approach commonly involves the selective amplification of a species-specific genetic marker (DNA meta-barcode) in the whole taxonomic range of interest and the exploration of its taxon-related variants through High-Throughput Sequencing (HTS) technologies. The accessibility to proper computational systems for the large-scale bioinformatic analysis of HTS data represents, currently, one of the major challenges in advanced Meta-barcoding projects. BioMaS (Bioinformatic analysis of Metagenomic AmpliconS) is a new bioinformatic pipeline designed to support biomolecular researchers involved in taxonomic studies of environmental microbial communities by a completely automated workflow, comprehensive of all the fundamental steps, from raw sequence data upload and cleaning to final taxonomic identification, that are absolutely required in an appropriately designed Meta-barcoding HTS-based experiment. In its current version, BioMaS allows the analysis of both bacterial and fungal environments starting directly from the raw sequencing data from either Roche 454 or Illumina HTS platforms, following two alternative paths, respectively. BioMaS is implemented into a public web service available at https://recasgateway.ba.infn.it/ and is also available in Galaxy at http://galaxy.cloud.ba.infn.it:8080 (only for Illumina data). BioMaS is a friendly pipeline for Meta-barcoding HTS data analysis specifically designed for users without particular computing skills. A comparative benchmark, carried out by using a simulated dataset suitably designed to broadly represent

  9. Bioinformatics analysis of the phytoene synthase gene in cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bo; Jiang, Min; Xue, Shengling; Zheng, Aihong; Zhang, Fen; Tang, Haoru

    2018-04-01

    Phytoene Synthase (PSY) is an important enzyme in carotenoid biosynthesis. Here, the Brassica oleracea var. capitata PSY (BocPSY) gene sequences were obtained from Brassica database (BRAD), and preformed for bioinformatics analysis. The BocPSY1, BocPSY2 and BocPSY3 genes mapped to chromosomes 2,3 and 9, and contains an open reading frame of 1,248 bp, 1,266 bp and 1,275 bp that encodes a 415, 421, 424 amino acid protein, respectively. Subcellular localization predicted all BocPSY genes were in the chloroplast. The conserved domain of the BocPSY protein is PLN02632. Homology analysis indicates that the levels of identity among BocPSYs were all more than 85%, and the PSY protein is apparently conserved during plant evolution. The findings of the present study provide a molecular basis for the elucidation of PSY gene function in cabbage.

  10. OPTSDNA: Performance evaluation of an efficient distributed bioinformatics system for DNA sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad Ibrahim; Sheel, Chotan

    2013-01-01

    Storage of sequence data is a big concern as the amount of data generated is exponential in nature at several locations. Therefore, there is a need to develop techniques to store data using compression algorithm. Here we describe optimal storage algorithm (OPTSDNA) for storing large amount of DNA sequences of varying length. This paper provides performance analysis of optimal storage algorithm (OPTSDNA) of a distributed bioinformatics computing system for analysis of DNA sequences. OPTSDNA algorithm is used for storing various sizes of DNA sequences into database. DNA sequences of different lengths were stored by using this algorithm. These input DNA sequences are varied in size from very small to very large. Storage size is calculated by this algorithm. Response time is also calculated in this work. The efficiency and performance of the algorithm is high (in size calculation with percentage) when compared with other known with sequential approach.

  11. Adaptation of a Bioinformatics Microarray Analysis Workflow for a Toxicogenomic Study in Rainbow Trout.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Depiereux

    Full Text Available Sex steroids play a key role in triggering sex differentiation in fish, the use of exogenous hormone treatment leading to partial or complete sex reversal. This phenomenon has attracted attention since the discovery that even low environmental doses of exogenous steroids can adversely affect gonad morphology (ovotestis development and induce reproductive failure. Modern genomic-based technologies have enhanced opportunities to find out mechanisms of actions (MOA and identify biomarkers related to the toxic action of a compound. However, high throughput data interpretation relies on statistical analysis, species genomic resources, and bioinformatics tools. The goals of this study are to improve the knowledge of feminisation in fish, by the analysis of molecular responses in the gonads of rainbow trout fry after chronic exposure to several doses (0.01, 0.1, 1 and 10 μg/L of ethynylestradiol (EE2 and to offer target genes as potential biomarkers of ovotestis development. We successfully adapted a bioinformatics microarray analysis workflow elaborated on human data to a toxicogenomic study using rainbow trout, a fish species lacking accurate functional annotation and genomic resources. The workflow allowed to obtain lists of genes supposed to be enriched in true positive differentially expressed genes (DEGs, which were subjected to over-representation analysis methods (ORA. Several pathways and ontologies, mostly related to cell division and metabolism, sexual reproduction and steroid production, were found significantly enriched in our analyses. Moreover, two sets of potential ovotestis biomarkers were selected using several criteria. The first group displayed specific potential biomarkers belonging to pathways/ontologies highlighted in the experiment. Among them, the early ovarian differentiation gene foxl2a was overexpressed. The second group, which was highly sensitive but not specific, included the DEGs presenting the highest fold change and

  12. Bioinformatics and Phylogenetic Analysis of Mitochondrial COX3 Gene in Iranian Camelus Dromedaries and Camelus Bactrianus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tooba Abbassi-Daloii

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Camels belong to the family of Camelidae, suborder of Tylopoda, order of artiodactyla and class of mammalians. The family Camelidae has two old world species, double-humped camel (CAMELUS BACTRIANUS and single-humped camel (CAMELUS DROMEDARIES and four new world (tribe Lamini species, guanaco (LAMA GUANICOE, llama (LAMA GLAMA, alpaca (LAMA PACOS and vicuna (LAMA VICUGNA or VICUGNA VICUGNA at present time. The single-humped camel inhabits Afro-Arabia, Ethiopia and west Central Asia while the double-humped inhabits eastern Central Asia and China. Camel has been historically and economically an important species worldwide especially in the Africa and Asia. Camel has unique characteristics enable it to adapt its desert environment. The total worldwide camel population at present estimated to be about 23 million in the world. Somalia and Sudan together hold approximately 50% of the whole camel population. In the last 40 years, the number of camels has increased by almost 45%. Iranian native species are considered as part of the national capital so their preservation is so important. Due to severe decrease in their population in some areas, more attention to conservation genetics perspective of these species is very important. The aim of this study was to bioinformatics and phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial sequence of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 3 (COX3 in Iranian Camelus dromedaries and Camelus bactrianus. Materials and Methods For this purpose 10 blood samples were collected from each species (totally 20 samples. After DNA extraction, the fragment with 979 bp length from mitochondrial DNA was amplified using polymerase chain reaction. Sequencing was performed by automated Sanger methods then the obtained sequences were compared with sequences from other studies. The nucleotide sequences obtained were edited using the PHRED software (http://www.phrap.org /phredphrapconsed.html. After editing, basic local alignment search tool

  13. Identification of the intestinal type gastric adenocarcinoma transcriptomic markers using bioinformatic and gene expression analysis

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    V. V. Volkomorov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Searching for specific and sensitive molecular tumor markers is one of the important tasks of modern oncology. These markers can be used for early tumor diagnosis and prognosis as well as for prediction of therapeutic response, estimation of tumor volume or to assess disease recurrence through monitoring. Gene expression data base mining followed by experimental validation of results obtained is one of the promising approaches for searching of that kind.Objective: to identify several membrane proteins which can be used for serum diagnosis of intestinal type of gastric adenocarcinoma.Materials and methods. We used bioinformatic-driven search using Gene Ontology and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA data to identify mRNA up-regulated in gastric cancer (GC. Then, the expression levels of the mRNAs in 55 pare clinical specimens were investigated using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.Results. Comparative analysis of the mRNA levels in normal and tumor tissues using a new bioinformatics algorithm allowed to identify 3 high-copy transcripts (SULF1, PMEPA1 and SPARC, intracellular content of which markedly increased in GC. Expression analysis of these genes in clinical specimens showed significantly higher mRNA levels of PMEPA1 and SPARC in tumor as compared to normal gastric tissue. Interestingly more than twofold increase in expression level of these genes was observed in 75 % of intestinal-type GC. The same results were found only in 25 and 38 % of diffuse-type GC respectively.Conclusions. As a result of original bioinforamtic analysis using TCGA data base two genes (PMEPA1 and SPARC were shown to be significantly upregulated in intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma. The findings show the importance of further investigation to clarify the clinical value of their expression level in stomach tumors as well as their role in carcinogenesis.

  14. Identification of new serum markers of pathological states by bioinformatic tools for the analysis of serum proteomics expression profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malorni, A.; Facchiano, A.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed new bioinformatic tools and strategies, aimed to the identification and characterization of proteins as markers of pathological states, for the analysis of data derived from protein expression profiles obtained by mass spectrometry techniques, for the study of structural and functional properties of the proteins, and for the analysis of data from omics approaches

  15. Cloning and bioinformatic analysis of lovastatin biosynthesis regulatory gene lovE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xin; Li, Hao-ming

    2009-08-05

    Lovastatin is an effective drug for treatment of hyperlipidemia. This study aimed to clone lovastatin biosynthesis regulatory gene lovE and analyze the structure and function of its encoding protein. According to the lovastatin synthase gene sequence from genebank, primers were designed to amplify and clone the lovastatin biosynthesis regulatory gene lovE from Aspergillus terrus genomic DNA. Bioinformatic analysis of lovE and its encoding animo acid sequence was performed through internet resources and software like DNAMAN. Target fragment lovE, almost 1500 bp in length, was amplified from Aspergillus terrus genomic DNA and the secondary and three-dimensional structures of LovE protein were predicted. In the lovastatin biosynthesis process lovE is a regulatory gene and LovE protein is a GAL4-like transcriptional factor.

  16. Bioinformatics analysis of breast cancer bone metastasis related gene-CXCR4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heng-Wei Zhang; Xian-Fu Sun; Ya-Ning He; Jun-Tao Li; Xu-Hui Guo; Hui Liu

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To analyze breast cancer bone metastasis related gene-CXCR4. Methods: This research screened breast cancer bone metastasis related genes by high-flux gene chip. Results:It was found that the expressions of 396 genes were different including 165 up-regulations and 231 down-regulations. The expression of chemokine receptor CXCR4 was obviously up-regulated in the tissue with breast cancer bone metastasis. Compared with the tissue without bone metastasis, there was significant difference, which indicated that CXCR4 played a vital role in breast cancer bone metastasis. Conclusions: The bioinformatics analysis of CXCR4 can provide a certain basis for the occurrence and diagnosis of breast cancer bone metastasis, target gene therapy and evaluation of prognosis.

  17. Experimental Design and Bioinformatics Analysis for the Application of Metagenomics in Environmental Sciences and Biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Feng; Zhang, Tong

    2015-11-03

    Recent advances in DNA sequencing technologies have prompted the widespread application of metagenomics for the investigation of novel bioresources (e.g., industrial enzymes and bioactive molecules) and unknown biohazards (e.g., pathogens and antibiotic resistance genes) in natural and engineered microbial systems across multiple disciplines. This review discusses the rigorous experimental design and sample preparation in the context of applying metagenomics in environmental sciences and biotechnology. Moreover, this review summarizes the principles, methodologies, and state-of-the-art bioinformatics procedures, tools and database resources for metagenomics applications and discusses two popular strategies (analysis of unassembled reads versus assembled contigs/draft genomes) for quantitative or qualitative insights of microbial community structure and functions. Overall, this review aims to facilitate more extensive application of metagenomics in the investigation of uncultured microorganisms, novel enzymes, microbe-environment interactions, and biohazards in biotechnological applications where microbial communities are engineered for bioenergy production, wastewater treatment, and bioremediation.

  18. GENEASE: Real time bioinformatics tool for multi-omics and disease ontology exploration, analysis and visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghandikota, Sudhir; Hershey, Gurjit K Khurana; Mersha, Tesfaye B

    2018-03-24

    Advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies have made it possible to generate multiple omics data at an unprecedented rate and scale. The accumulation of these omics data far outpaces the rate at which biologists can mine and generate new hypothesis to test experimentally. There is an urgent need to develop a myriad of powerful tools to efficiently and effectively search and filter these resources to address specific post-GWAS functional genomics questions. However, to date, these resources are scattered across several databases and often lack a unified portal for data annotation and analytics. In addition, existing tools to analyze and visualize these databases are highly fragmented, resulting researchers to access multiple applications and manual interventions for each gene or variant in an ad hoc fashion until all the questions are answered. In this study, we present GENEASE, a web-based one-stop bioinformatics tool designed to not only query and explore multi-omics and phenotype databases (e.g., GTEx, ClinVar, dbGaP, GWAS Catalog, ENCODE, Roadmap Epigenomics, KEGG, Reactome, Gene and Phenotype Ontology) in a single web interface but also to perform seamless post genome-wide association downstream functional and overlap analysis for non-coding regulatory variants. GENEASE accesses over 50 different databases in public domain including model organism-specific databases to facilitate gene/variant and disease exploration, enrichment and overlap analysis in real time. It is a user-friendly tool with point-and-click interface containing links for support information including user manual and examples. GENEASE can be accessed freely at http://research.cchmc.org/mershalab/genease_new/login.html. Tesfaye.Mersha@cchmc.org, Sudhir.Ghandikota@cchmc.org. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  19. Integrative Bioinformatic Analysis of Transcriptomic Data Identifies Conserved Molecular Pathways Underlying Ionizing Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects (RIBE

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    Constantinos Yeles

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE encompass a number of effects with potential for a plethora of damages in adjacent non-irradiated tissue. The cascade of molecular events is initiated in response to the exposure to ionizing radiation (IR, something that may occur during diagnostic or therapeutic medical applications. In order to better investigate these complex response mechanisms, we employed a unified framework integrating statistical microarray analysis, signal normalization, and translational bioinformatics functional analysis techniques. This approach was applied to several microarray datasets from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO related to RIBE. The analysis produced lists of differentially expressed genes, contrasting bystander and irradiated samples versus sham-irradiated controls. Furthermore, comparative molecular analysis through BioInfoMiner, which integrates advanced statistical enrichment and prioritization methodologies, revealed discrete biological processes, at the cellular level. For example, the negative regulation of growth, cellular response to Zn2+-Cd2+, and Wnt and NIK/NF-kappaB signaling, thus refining the description of the phenotypic landscape of RIBE. Our results provide a more solid understanding of RIBE cell-specific response patterns, especially in the case of high-LET radiations, like α-particles and carbon-ions.

  20. Bioinformatics analysis identify novel OB fold protein coding genes in C. elegans.

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    Daryanaz Dargahi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The C. elegans genome has been extensively annotated by the WormBase consortium that uses state of the art bioinformatics pipelines, functional genomics and manual curation approaches. As a result, the identification of novel genes in silico in this model organism is becoming more challenging requiring new approaches. The Oligonucleotide-oligosaccharide binding (OB fold is a highly divergent protein family, in which protein sequences, in spite of having the same fold, share very little sequence identity (5-25%. Therefore, evidence from sequence-based annotation may not be sufficient to identify all the members of this family. In C. elegans, the number of OB-fold proteins reported is remarkably low (n=46 compared to other evolutionary-related eukaryotes, such as yeast S. cerevisiae (n=344 or fruit fly D. melanogaster (n=84. Gene loss during evolution or differences in the level of annotation for this protein family, may explain these discrepancies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study examines the possibility that novel OB-fold coding genes exist in the worm. We developed a bioinformatics approach that uses the most sensitive sequence-sequence, sequence-profile and profile-profile similarity search methods followed by 3D-structure prediction as a filtering step to eliminate false positive candidate sequences. We have predicted 18 coding genes containing the OB-fold that have remarkably partially been characterized in C. elegans. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study raises the possibility that the annotation of highly divergent protein fold families can be improved in C. elegans. Similar strategies could be implemented for large scale analysis by the WormBase consortium when novel versions of the genome sequence of C. elegans, or other evolutionary related species are being released. This approach is of general interest to the scientific community since it can be used to annotate any genome.

  1. Molecular Cloning, Bioinformatic Analysis, and Expression of Bombyx mori Lebocin 5 Gene Related to Beauveria bassiana Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Dingding; Hou, Chengxiang; Qin, Guangxing; Gao, Kun; Chen, Tian; Guo, Xijie

    2017-01-01

    A full-length cDNA of lebocin 5 (BmLeb5) was first cloned from silkworm, Bombyx mori , by rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The BmLeb5 gene is 808 bp in length and the open reading frame encodes a 179-amino acid hydroxyproline-rich peptide. Bioinformatic analysis results showed that BmLeb5 owns an O-glycosylation site and four RXXR motifs as other lebocins. Sequence similarity and phylogenic analysis results indicated that lebocins form a multiple gene family in silkworm as cecropins. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that BmLeb5 was highest expressed in the fat body. In the silkworm larvae infected by Beauveria bassiana , the expression level of BmLeb5 was upregulated in the fat body and hemolymph which are the most important immune tissues in silkworm. The recombinant protein of BmLeb5 was for the first time successfully expressed with prokaryotic expression system and purified. There are no reports so far that the expression of lebocins could be induced by entomopathogenic fungus. Our study suggested that BmLeb5 might play an important role in the immune response of silkworm to defend B. bassiana infection. The results also provided helpful information for further studying the lebocin family functioned in antifungal immune response in the silkworm.

  2. Bioinformatics Approach Based Research of Profile Protein Carbonic Anhydrase II Analysis as a Potential Candidate Cause Autism for The Variation of Learning Subjects Biotechnology

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    Dian Eka A. F. Ningrum

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the needs of learning variations on Biotechnology courses using bioinformatics approaches. One example of applied use of bioinformatics in biotechnology course is the analysis of protein profiles carbonic anhydrase II as a potential cause of autism candidate. This research is a qualitative descriptive study consisted of two phases. The first phase of the data obtained from observations of learning, student questionnaires, and questionnaires lecturer. Results from the first phase, namely the need for variations learning in Biotechnology course using bioinformatics. Collecting data on the second stage uses three webserver to predict the target protein and scientific articles. Visualization of proteins using PyMOL software. 3 based webserver which is used, the candidate of target proteins associated with autism is carbonic anhydrase II. The survey results revealed that the protein carbonic anhydrase II as a potential candidate for the cause of autism classified metaloenzim are able to bind with heavy metals. The content of heavy metals in autistic patients high that affect metabolism. This prediction of protein candidate cause autism is applied use to solve the problem in society, so that can achieve the learning outcome in biotechnology course.

  3. Entropy-based analysis and bioinformatics-inspired integration of global economic information transfer.

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    Jinkyu Kim

    Full Text Available The assessment of information transfer in the global economic network helps to understand the current environment and the outlook of an economy. Most approaches on global networks extract information transfer based mainly on a single variable. This paper establishes an entirely new bioinformatics-inspired approach to integrating information transfer derived from multiple variables and develops an international economic network accordingly. In the proposed methodology, we first construct the transfer entropies (TEs between various intra- and inter-country pairs of economic time series variables, test their significances, and then use a weighted sum approach to aggregate information captured in each TE. Through a simulation study, the new method is shown to deliver better information integration compared to existing integration methods in that it can be applied even when intra-country variables are correlated. Empirical investigation with the real world data reveals that Western countries are more influential in the global economic network and that Japan has become less influential following the Asian currency crisis.

  4. Entropy-based analysis and bioinformatics-inspired integration of global economic information transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinkyu; Kim, Gunn; An, Sungbae; Kwon, Young-Kyun; Yoon, Sungroh

    2013-01-01

    The assessment of information transfer in the global economic network helps to understand the current environment and the outlook of an economy. Most approaches on global networks extract information transfer based mainly on a single variable. This paper establishes an entirely new bioinformatics-inspired approach to integrating information transfer derived from multiple variables and develops an international economic network accordingly. In the proposed methodology, we first construct the transfer entropies (TEs) between various intra- and inter-country pairs of economic time series variables, test their significances, and then use a weighted sum approach to aggregate information captured in each TE. Through a simulation study, the new method is shown to deliver better information integration compared to existing integration methods in that it can be applied even when intra-country variables are correlated. Empirical investigation with the real world data reveals that Western countries are more influential in the global economic network and that Japan has become less influential following the Asian currency crisis.

  5. Bioinformatics and moonlighting proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio eHernández

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Multitasking or moonlighting is the capability of some proteins to execute two or more biochemical functions. Usually, moonlighting proteins are experimentally revealed by serendipity. For this reason, it would be helpful that Bioinformatics could predict this multifunctionality, especially because of the large amounts of sequences from genome projects. In the present work, we analyse and describe several approaches that use sequences, structures, interactomics and current bioinformatics algorithms and programs to try to overcome this problem. Among these approaches are: a remote homology searches using Psi-Blast, b detection of functional motifs and domains, c analysis of data from protein-protein interaction databases (PPIs, d match the query protein sequence to 3D databases (i.e., algorithms as PISITE, e mutation correlation analysis between amino acids by algorithms as MISTIC. Programs designed to identify functional motif/domains detect mainly the canonical function but usually fail in the detection of the moonlighting one, Pfam and ProDom being the best methods. Remote homology search by Psi-Blast combined with data from interactomics databases (PPIs have the best performance. Structural information and mutation correlation analysis can help us to map the functional sites. Mutation correlation analysis can only be used in very specific situations –it requires the existence of multialigned family protein sequences - but can suggest how the evolutionary process of second function acquisition took place. The multitasking protein database MultitaskProtDB (http://wallace.uab.es/multitask/, previously published by our group, has been used as a benchmark for the all of the analyses.

  6. Analysis of microRNA profile of Anopheles sinensis by deep sequencing and bioinformatic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xinyu; Zhou, Xiaojian; Zhou, Shuisen; Wang, Jingwen; Hu, Wei

    2018-03-12

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs widely identified in many mosquitoes. They are reported to play important roles in development, differentiation and innate immunity. However, miRNAs in Anopheles sinensis, one of the Chinese malaria mosquitoes, remain largely unknown. We investigated the global miRNA expression profile of An. sinensis using Illumina Hiseq 2000 sequencing. Meanwhile, we applied a bioinformatic approach to identify potential miRNAs in An. sinensis. The identified miRNA profiles were compared and analyzed by two approaches. The selected miRNAs from the sequencing result and the bioinformatic approach were confirmed with qRT-PCR. Moreover, target prediction, GO annotation and pathway analysis were carried out to understand the role of miRNAs in An. sinensis. We identified 49 conserved miRNAs and 12 novel miRNAs by next-generation high-throughput sequencing technology. In contrast, 43 miRNAs were predicted by the bioinformatic approach, of which two were assigned as novel. Comparative analysis of miRNA profiles by two approaches showed that 21 miRNAs were shared between them. Twelve novel miRNAs did not match any known miRNAs of any organism, indicating that they are possibly species-specific. Forty miRNAs were found in many mosquito species, indicating that these miRNAs are evolutionally conserved and may have critical roles in the process of life. Both the selected known and novel miRNAs (asi-miR-281, asi-miR-184, asi-miR-14, asi-miR-nov5, asi-miR-nov4, asi-miR-9383, and asi-miR-2a) could be detected by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) in the sequenced sample, and the expression patterns of these miRNAs measured by qRT-PCR were in concordance with the original miRNA sequencing data. The predicted targets for the known and the novel miRNAs covered many important biological roles and pathways indicating the diversity of miRNA functions. We also found 21 conserved miRNAs and eight counterparts of target immune pathway genes in An. sinensis

  7. [Comparison of gut microbiotal compositional analysis of patients with irritable bowel syndrome through different bioinformatics pipelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, S W; Liu, Z J; Li, M; Zhu, H Q; Duan, L P

    2018-04-18

    To assess whether the same biological conclusion, diagnostic or curative effects regarding microbial composition of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients could be reached through different bioinformatics pipelines, we used two common bioinformatics pipelines (Uparse V2.0 and Mothur V1.39.5)to analyze the same fecal microbial 16S rRNA high-throughput sequencing data. The two pipelines were used to analyze the diversity and richness of fecal microbial 16S rRNA high-throughput sequencing data of 27 samples, including 9 healthy controls (HC group), 9 diarrhea IBS patients before (IBS group) and after Rifaximin treatment (IBS-treatment, IBSt group). Analyses such as microbial diversity, principal co-ordinates analysis (PCoA), nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) and linear discriminant analysis effect size (LEfSe) were used to find out the microbial differences among HC group vs. IBS group and IBS group vs. IBSt group. (1) Microbial composition comparison of the 27 samples in the two pipelines showed significant variations at both family and genera levels while no significant variations at phylum level; (2) There was no significant difference in the comparison of HC vs. IBS or IBS vs. IBSt (Uparse: HC vs. IBS, F=0.98, P=0.445; IBS vs. IBSt, F=0.47,P=0.926; Mothur: HC vs.IBS, F=0.82, P=0.646; IBS vs. IBSt, F=0.37, P=0.961). The Shannon index was significantly decreased in IBSt; (3) Both workshops distinguished the significantly enriched genera between HC and IBS groups. For example, Nitrosomonas and Paraprevotella increased while Pseudoalteromonadaceae and Anaerotruncus decreased in HC group through Uparse pipeline, nevertheless Roseburia 62 increased while Butyricicoccus and Moraxellaceae decreased in HC group through Mothur pipeline.Only Uparse pipeline could pick out significant genera between IBS and IBSt, such as Pseudobutyricibrio, Clostridiaceae 1 and Clostridiumsensustricto 1. There were taxonomic and phylogenetic diversity differences between the two

  8. Bioinformatics analysis of differentially expressed proteins in prostate cancer based on proteomics data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen C

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chen Chen,1 Li-Guo Zhang,1 Jian Liu,1 Hui Han,1 Ning Chen,1 An-Liang Yao,1 Shao-San Kang,1 Wei-Xing Gao,1 Hong Shen,2 Long-Jun Zhang,1 Ya-Peng Li,1 Feng-Hong Cao,1 Zhi-Guo Li3 1Department of Urology, North China University of Science and Technology Affiliated Hospital, 2Department of Modern Technology and Education Center, 3Department of Medical Research Center, International Science and Technology Cooperation Base of Geriatric Medicine, North China University of Science and Technology, Tangshan, People’s Republic of China Abstract: We mined the literature for proteomics data to examine the occurrence and metastasis of prostate cancer (PCa through a bioinformatics analysis. We divided the differentially expressed proteins (DEPs into two groups: the group consisting of PCa and benign tissues (P&b and the group presenting both high and low PCa metastatic tendencies (H&L. In the P&b group, we found 320 DEPs, 20 of which were reported more than three times, and DES was the most commonly reported. Among these DEPs, the expression levels of FGG, GSN, SERPINC1, TPM1, and TUBB4B have not yet been correlated with PCa. In the H&L group, we identified 353 DEPs, 13 of which were reported more than three times. Among these DEPs, MDH2 and MYH9 have not yet been correlated with PCa metastasis. We further confirmed that DES was differentially expressed between 30 cancer and 30 benign tissues. In addition, DEPs associated with protein transport, regulation of actin cytoskeleton, and the extracellular matrix (ECM–receptor interaction pathway were prevalent in the H&L group and have not yet been studied in detail in this context. Proteins related to homeostasis, the wound-healing response, focal adhesions, and the complement and coagulation pathways were overrepresented in both groups. Our findings suggest that the repeatedly reported DEPs in the two groups may function as potential biomarkers for detecting PCa and predicting its aggressiveness. Furthermore

  9. Bioinformatics analysis of the ς-carotene desaturase gene in cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bo; Zheng, Aihong; Jiang, Min; Xue, Shengling; Zhang, Fen; Tang, Haoru

    2018-04-01

    ς-carotene desaturase (ZDS) is an important enzyme in carotenoid biosynthesis. Here, the Brassica oleracea var. capitata ZDS (BocZDS) gene sequences were obtained from Brassica database (BRAD), and preformed for bioinformatics analysis. The BocZDS gene mapped to Scaffold000363, and contains an open reading frame of 1,686 bp that encodes a 561-amino acid protein with a calculated molecular mass of 62.00 kD and an isoelectric point (pI) of 8.2. Subcellular localization predicted the BocZDS gene was in the chloroplast. The conserved domain of the BocZDS protein is PLN02487, indicating that it belongs the member of zeta-carotene desaturase. Homology analysis indicates that the ZDS protein is apparently conserved during plant evolution and is most closely related to B. oleracea var. oleracea, B. napus, and B. rapa. The findings of the present study provide a molecular basis for the elucidation of ZDS gene function in cabbage.

  10. Bioinformatics tools for quantitative and functional metagenome and metatranscriptome data analysis in microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Sheng-Yong; Yang, Jinyu; McDermaid, Adam; Zhao, Jing; Kang, Yu; Ma, Qin

    2017-05-08

    Metagenomic and metatranscriptomic sequencing approaches are more frequently being used to link microbiota to important diseases and ecological changes. Many analyses have been used to compare the taxonomic and functional profiles of microbiota across habitats or individuals. While a large portion of metagenomic analyses focus on species-level profiling, some studies use strain-level metagenomic analyses to investigate the relationship between specific strains and certain circumstances. Metatranscriptomic analysis provides another important insight into activities of genes by examining gene expression levels of microbiota. Hence, combining metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses will help understand the activity or enrichment of a given gene set, such as drug-resistant genes among microbiome samples. Here, we summarize existing bioinformatics tools of metagenomic and metatranscriptomic data analysis, the purpose of which is to assist researchers in deciding the appropriate tools for their microbiome studies. Additionally, we propose an Integrated Meta-Function mapping pipeline to incorporate various reference databases and accelerate functional gene mapping procedures for both metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Improvements to PATRIC, the all-bacterial Bioinformatics Database and Analysis Resource Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattam, Alice R.; Davis, James J.; Assaf, Rida; Boisvert, Sébastien; Brettin, Thomas; Bun, Christopher; Conrad, Neal; Dietrich, Emily M.; Disz, Terry; Gabbard, Joseph L.; Gerdes, Svetlana; Henry, Christopher S.; Kenyon, Ronald W.; Machi, Dustin; Mao, Chunhong; Nordberg, Eric K.; Olsen, Gary J.; Murphy-Olson, Daniel E.; Olson, Robert; Overbeek, Ross; Parrello, Bruce; Pusch, Gordon D.; Shukla, Maulik; Vonstein, Veronika; Warren, Andrew; Xia, Fangfang; Yoo, Hyunseung; Stevens, Rick L.

    2017-01-01

    The Pathosystems Resource Integration Center (PATRIC) is the bacterial Bioinformatics Resource Center (https://www.patricbrc.org). Recent changes to PATRIC include a redesign of the web interface and some new services that provide users with a platform that takes them from raw reads to an integrated analysis experience. The redesigned interface allows researchers direct access to tools and data, and the emphasis has changed to user-created genome-groups, with detailed summaries and views of the data that researchers have selected. Perhaps the biggest change has been the enhanced capability for researchers to analyze their private data and compare it to the available public data. Researchers can assemble their raw sequence reads and annotate the contigs using RASTtk. PATRIC also provides services for RNA-Seq, variation, model reconstruction and differential expression analysis, all delivered through an updated private workspace. Private data can be compared by ‘virtual integration’ to any of PATRIC's public data. The number of genomes available for comparison in PATRIC has expanded to over 80 000, with a special emphasis on genomes with antimicrobial resistance data. PATRIC uses this data to improve both subsystem annotation and k-mer classification, and tags new genomes as having signatures that indicate susceptibility or resistance to specific antibiotics. PMID:27899627

  12. Bioinformatic analysis of phage AB3, a phiKMV-like virus infecting Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Liu, X; Li, X-J

    2015-01-16

    The phages of Acinetobacter baumannii has drawn increasing attention because of the multi-drug resistance of A. baumanni. The aim of this study was to sequence Acinetobacter baumannii phage AB3 and conduct bioinformatic analysis to lay a foundation for genome remodeling and phage therapy. We isolated and sequenced A. baumannii phage AB3 and attempted to annotate and analyze its genome. The results showed that the genome is a double-stranded DNA with a total length of 31,185 base pairs (bp) and 97 open reading frames greater than 100 bp. The genome includes 28 predicted genes, of which 24 are homologous to phage AB1. The entire coding sequence is located on the negative strand, representing 90.8% of the total length. The G+C mol% was 39.18%, without areas of high G+C content over 200 bp in length. No GC island, tRNA gene, or repeated sequence was identified. Gene lengths were 120-3099 bp, with an average of 1011 bp. Six genes were found to be greater than 2000 bp in length. Genomic alignment and phylogenetic analysis of the RNA polymerase gene showed that similar to phage AB1, phage AB3 is a phiKMV-like virus in the T7 phage family.

  13. Aligning experimental design with bioinformatics analysis to meet discovery research objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Michael D

    2002-01-01

    The utility of genomic technology and bioinformatic analytical support to provide new and needed insight into the molecular basis of disease, development, and diversity continues to grow as more research model systems and populations are investigated. Yet deriving results that meet a specific set of research objectives requires aligning or coordinating the design of the experiment, the laboratory techniques, and the data analysis. The following paragraphs describe several important interdependent factors that need to be considered to generate high quality data from the microarray platform. These factors include aligning oligonucleotide probe design with the sample labeling strategy if oligonucleotide probes are employed, recognizing that compromises are inherent in different sample procurement methods, normalizing 2-color microarray raw data, and distinguishing the difference between gene clustering and sample clustering. These factors do not represent an exhaustive list of technical variables in microarray-based research, but this list highlights those variables that span both experimental execution and data analysis. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Molecular cloing and bioinformatics analysis of lactate dehydrogenase from Taenia multiceps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Cheng; Wang, Yu; Huang, Xing; Wang, Ning; Yan, Ming; He, Ran; Gu, Xiaobin; Xie, Yue; Lai, Weimin; Jing, Bo; Peng, Xuerong; Yang, Guangyou

    2017-10-01

    Coenurus cerebralis, the larval stage (metacestode or coenurus) of Taenia multiceps, parasitizes sheep, goats, and other ruminants and causes coenurosis. In this study, we isolated and characterized complementary DNAs that encode lactate dehydrogenase A (Tm-LDHA) and B (Tm-LDHB) from the transcriptome of T. multiceps and expressed recombinant Tm-LDHB (rTm-LDHB) in Escherichia coli. Bioinformatic analysis showed that both Tm-LDH genes (LDHA and LDHB) contain a 996-bp open reading frame and encode a protein of 331 amino acids. After determination of the immunogenicity of the recombinant Tm-LDHB, an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed for preliminary evaluation of the serodiagnostic potential of rTm-LDHB in goats. However, the rTm-LDHB-based indirect ELISA developed here exhibited specificity of only 71.42% (10/14) and sensitivity of 1:3200 in detection of goats infected with T. multiceps in the field. This study is the first to describe LDHA and LDHB of T. multiceps; meanwhile, our results indicate that rTm-LDHB is not a specific antigen candidate for immunodiagnosis of T. multiceps infection in goats.

  15. Effect of Wnt3a on Keratinocytes Utilizing in Vitro and Bioinformatics Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Suk Nam

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Wingless-type (Wnt signaling proteins participate in various cell developmental processes. A suppressive role of Wnt5a on keratinocyte growth has already been observed. However, the role of other Wnt proteins in proliferation and differentiation of keratinocytes remains unknown. Here, we investigated the effects of the Wnt ligand, Wnt3a, on proliferation and differentiation of keratinocytes. Keratinocytes from normal human skin were cultured and treated with recombinant Wnt3a alone or in combination with the inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα. Furthermore, using bioinformatics, we analyzed the biochemical parameters, molecular evolution, and protein–protein interaction network for the Wnt family. Application of recombinant Wnt3a showed an anti-proliferative effect on keratinocytes in a dose-dependent manner. After treatment with TNFα, Wnt3a still demonstrated an anti-proliferative effect on human keratinocytes. Exogenous treatment of Wnt3a was unable to alter mRNA expression of differentiation markers of keratinocytes, whereas an altered expression was observed in TNFα-stimulated keratinocytes. In silico phylogenetic, biochemical, and protein–protein interaction analysis showed several close relationships among the family members of the Wnt family. Moreover, a close phylogenetic and biochemical similarity was observed between Wnt3a and Wnt5a. Finally, we proposed a hypothetical mechanism to illustrate how the Wnt3a protein may inhibit the process of proliferation in keratinocytes, which would be useful for future researchers.

  16. Prokaryotic Expression of Rice Ospgip1 Gene and Bioinformatic Analysis of Encoded Product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-jun CHEN

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Using the reference sequences of pgip genes in GenBank, a fragment of 930 bp covering the open reading frame (ORF of rice Ospgip1 (Oryza sativa polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein 1 was amplified. The prokaryotic expression product of the gene inhibited the growth of Rhizoctonia solani, the causal agent of rice sheath blight, and reduced its polygalacturonase activity. Bioinformatic analysis showed that OsPGIP1 is a hydrophobic protein with a molecular weight of 32.8 kDa and an isoelectric point (pI of 7.26. The protein is mainly located in the cell wall of rice, and its signal peptide cleavage site is located between the 17th and 18th amino acids. There are four cysteines in both the N- and C-termini of the deduced protein, which can form three disulfide bonds (between the 56th and 63rd, the 278th and 298th, and the 300th and 308th amino acids. The protein has a typical leucine-rich repeat (LRR domain, and its secondary structure comprises α-helices, β-sheets and irregular coils. Compared with polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs from other plants, the 7th LRR is absent in OsPGIP1. The nine LRRs could form a cleft that might associate with proteins from pathogenic fungi, such as polygalacturonase.

  17. COMPARISON OF POPULAR BIOINFORMATICS DATABASES

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulganiyu Abdu Yusuf; Zahraddeen Sufyanu; Kabir Yusuf Mamman; Abubakar Umar Suleiman

    2016-01-01

    Bioinformatics is the application of computational tools to capture and interpret biological data. It has wide applications in drug development, crop improvement, agricultural biotechnology and forensic DNA analysis. There are various databases available to researchers in bioinformatics. These databases are customized for a specific need and are ranged in size, scope, and purpose. The main drawbacks of bioinformatics databases include redundant information, constant change, data spread over m...

  18. Is there room for ethics within bioinformatics education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneri, Bahar

    2011-07-01

    When bioinformatics education is considered, several issues are addressed. At the undergraduate level, the main issue revolves around conveying information from two main and different fields: biology and computer science. At the graduate level, the main issue is bridging the gap between biology students and computer science students. However, there is an educational component that is rarely addressed within the context of bioinformatics education: the ethics component. Here, a different perspective is provided on bioinformatics education, and the current status of ethics is analyzed within the existing bioinformatics programs. Analysis of the existing undergraduate and graduate programs, in both Europe and the United States, reveals the minimal attention given to ethics within bioinformatics education. Given that bioinformaticians speedily and effectively shape the biomedical sciences and hence their implications for society, here redesigning of the bioinformatics curricula is suggested in order to integrate the necessary ethics education. Unique ethical problems awaiting bioinformaticians and bioinformatics ethics as a separate field of study are discussed. In addition, a template for an "Ethics in Bioinformatics" course is provided.

  19. [Gene cloning and bioinformatics analysis of SABATH methyltransferase in Lonicera japonica var. chinensis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao-Dan; Jiang, Chao; Huang, Lu-Qi; Qin, Shuang-Shuang; Zeng, Xiang-Mei; Chen, Ping; Yuan, Yuan

    2013-08-01

    To clone SABATH methyltransferase (rLjSABATHMT) gene in Lonicera japonica var. chinensis, and compare the gene expression and intron sequence of SABATH methyltransferase orthologous in L. japonica with L. japonica var. chinensis. It provide a basis for gene regulate the formation of L. japonica floral scents. The cDNA and genome sequences of LjSABATHMT from L. japonica var. chinensis were cloned according to the gene fragments in cDNA library. The LjSABATHMT protein was characterized by bioinformatics analysis. SABATH family phylogenetic tree were built by MEGA 5.0. The transcripted level of SABATHMT orthologous were analyzed in different organs and different flower periods of L. japonica and L. japonica var. chinensis using RT-PCR analysis. Intron sequences of SABATHMT orthologous were also analyzied. The cDNA of LjSABATHMT was 1 251 bp, had a complete coding frame with 365 amino acids. The protein had the conservative SABATHMT domain, and phylogenetic tree showed that it may be a salicylic acid/benzoic acid methyltransferase. Higher expression of SABATH methyltransferase orthologous was found in flower. The intron sequence of L. japonica and L. japonica var. chinensis had rich polymorphism, and two SNP are unique genotype of L. japonica var. chinensis. The motif elements in two orthologous genes were significant differences. The intron difference of SABATH methyltransferase orthologous could be inducing to difference of gene expression between L. japonica and L. japonica var. chinensis. These results will provide important base on regulating active compounds of L. japonica.

  20. ANLN functions as a key candidate gene in cervical cancer as determined by integrated bioinformatic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia L

    2018-04-01

    DEGs PPI network complex, contained 305 nodes and 4,962 edges, and 8 clusters were calculated according to k-core =2. Among them, cluster 1, which had 65 nodes and 1,780 edges, had the highest score in these clusters. In coexpression analysis, there were 86 hubgenes from the Brown modules that were chosen for further analysis. Sixty-one key genes were identified as the intersecting genes of the Brown module of WGCNA and DEGs. In survival analysis, only ANLN was a prognostic factor, and the survival was significantly better in the low-expression ANLN group.Conclusion: Our study suggested that ANLN may be a potential tumor oncogene and could serve as a biomarker for predicting the prognosis of cervical cancer patients. Keywords: bioinformatics analysis, cervical cancer, WGCNA, ANLN 

  1. Introduction to bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Tolga

    2014-01-01

    Bioinformatics is an interdisciplinary field mainly involving molecular biology and genetics, computer science, mathematics, and statistics. Data intensive, large-scale biological problems are addressed from a computational point of view. The most common problems are modeling biological processes at the molecular level and making inferences from collected data. A bioinformatics solution usually involves the following steps: Collect statistics from biological data. Build a computational model. Solve a computational modeling problem. Test and evaluate a computational algorithm. This chapter gives a brief introduction to bioinformatics by first providing an introduction to biological terminology and then discussing some classical bioinformatics problems organized by the types of data sources. Sequence analysis is the analysis of DNA and protein sequences for clues regarding function and includes subproblems such as identification of homologs, multiple sequence alignment, searching sequence patterns, and evolutionary analyses. Protein structures are three-dimensional data and the associated problems are structure prediction (secondary and tertiary), analysis of protein structures for clues regarding function, and structural alignment. Gene expression data is usually represented as matrices and analysis of microarray data mostly involves statistics analysis, classification, and clustering approaches. Biological networks such as gene regulatory networks, metabolic pathways, and protein-protein interaction networks are usually modeled as graphs and graph theoretic approaches are used to solve associated problems such as construction and analysis of large-scale networks.

  2. Identification of microRNAs from Eugenia uniflora by high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Frank; Almerão, Mauricio P; Körbes, Ana P; Loss-Morais, Guilherme; Margis, Rogerio

    2012-01-01

    microRNAs or miRNAs are small non-coding regulatory RNAs that play important functions in the regulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level by targeting mRNAs for degradation or inhibiting protein translation. Eugenia uniflora is a plant native to tropical America with pharmacological and ecological importance, and there have been no previous studies concerning its gene expression and regulation. To date, no miRNAs have been reported in Myrtaceae species. Small RNA and RNA-seq libraries were constructed to identify miRNAs and pre-miRNAs in Eugenia uniflora. Solexa technology was used to perform high throughput sequencing of the library, and the data obtained were analyzed using bioinformatics tools. From 14,489,131 small RNA clean reads, we obtained 1,852,722 mature miRNA sequences representing 45 conserved families that have been identified in other plant species. Further analysis using contigs assembled from RNA-seq allowed the prediction of secondary structures of 25 known and 17 novel pre-miRNAs. The expression of twenty-seven identified miRNAs was also validated using RT-PCR assays. Potential targets were predicted for the most abundant mature miRNAs in the identified pre-miRNAs based on sequence homology. This study is the first large scale identification of miRNAs and their potential targets from a species of the Myrtaceae family without genomic sequence resources. Our study provides more information about the evolutionary conservation of the regulatory network of miRNAs in plants and highlights species-specific miRNAs.

  3. Bioinformatic analysis of functional differences between the immunoproteasome and the constitutive proteasome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesmir, Can; van Noort, V.; de Boer, R.J.

    2003-01-01

    not yet been quantified how different the specificity of two forms of the proteasome are. The main question, which still lacks direct evidence, is whether the immunoproteasome generates more MHC ligands. Here we use bioinformatics tools to quantify these differences and show that the immunoproteasome...

  4. A Critical Analysis of Assessment Quality in Genomics and Bioinformatics Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Chad E.; Nehm, Ross H.

    2013-01-01

    The growing importance of genomics and bioinformatics methods and paradigms in biology has been accompanied by an explosion of new curricula and pedagogies. An important question to ask about these educational innovations is whether they are having a meaningful impact on students' knowledge, attitudes, or skills. Although assessments are…

  5. Genome-wide analysis of regulatory proteases sequences identified through bioinformatics data mining in Taenia solium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hong-Bin; Lou, Zhong-Zi; Li, Li; Brindley, Paul J; Zheng, Yadong; Luo, Xuenong; Hou, Junling; Guo, Aijiang; Jia, Wan-Zhong; Cai, Xuepeng

    2014-06-04

    Cysticercosis remains a major neglected tropical disease of humanity in many regions, especially in sub-Saharan Africa, Central America and elsewhere. Owing to the emerging drug resistance and the inability of current drugs to prevent re-infection, identification of novel vaccines and chemotherapeutic agents against Taenia solium and related helminth pathogens is a public health priority. The T. solium genome and the predicted proteome were reported recently, providing a wealth of information from which new interventional targets might be identified. In order to characterize and classify the entire repertoire of protease-encoding genes of T. solium, which act fundamental biological roles in all life processes, we analyzed the predicted proteins of this cestode through a combination of bioinformatics tools. Functional annotation was performed to yield insights into the signaling processes relevant to the complex developmental cycle of this tapeworm and to highlight a suite of the proteases as potential intervention targets. Within the genome of this helminth parasite, we identified 200 open reading frames encoding proteases from five clans, which correspond to 1.68% of the 11,902 protein-encoding genes predicted to be present in its genome. These proteases include calpains, cytosolic, mitochondrial signal peptidases, ubiquitylation related proteins, and others. Many not only show significant similarity to proteases in the Conserved Domain Database but have conserved active sites and catalytic domains. KEGG Automatic Annotation Server (KAAS) analysis indicated that ~60% of these proteases share strong sequence identities with proteins of the KEGG database, which are involved in human disease, metabolic pathways, genetic information processes, cellular processes, environmental information processes and organismal systems. Also, we identified signal peptides and transmembrane helices through comparative analysis with classes of important regulatory proteases

  6. PipeCraft: Flexible open-source toolkit for bioinformatics analysis of custom high-throughput amplicon sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anslan, Sten; Bahram, Mohammad; Hiiesalu, Indrek; Tedersoo, Leho

    2017-11-01

    High-throughput sequencing methods have become a routine analysis tool in environmental sciences as well as in public and private sector. These methods provide vast amount of data, which need to be analysed in several steps. Although the bioinformatics may be applied using several public tools, many analytical pipelines allow too few options for the optimal analysis for more complicated or customized designs. Here, we introduce PipeCraft, a flexible and handy bioinformatics pipeline with a user-friendly graphical interface that links several public tools for analysing amplicon sequencing data. Users are able to customize the pipeline by selecting the most suitable tools and options to process raw sequences from Illumina, Pacific Biosciences, Ion Torrent and Roche 454 sequencing platforms. We described the design and options of PipeCraft and evaluated its performance by analysing the data sets from three different sequencing platforms. We demonstrated that PipeCraft is able to process large data sets within 24 hr. The graphical user interface and the automated links between various bioinformatics tools enable easy customization of the workflow. All analytical steps and options are recorded in log files and are easily traceable. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Bioinformatics for cancer immunotherapy target discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lars Rønn; Campos, Benito; Barnkob, Mike Stein

    2014-01-01

    therapy target discovery in a bioinformatics analysis pipeline. We describe specialized bioinformatics tools and databases for three main bottlenecks in immunotherapy target discovery: the cataloging of potentially antigenic proteins, the identification of potential HLA binders, and the selection epitopes...

  8. Gene expression profile analysis of colorectal cancer to investigate potential mechanisms using bioinformatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kou YB

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Yubin Kou,1,2* Suya Zhang,3* Xiaoping Chen,2 Sanyuan Hu1 1Department of General Surgery, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of General Surgery, 3Department of Neurology, Shuguang Hospital Baoshan Branch, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: This study aimed to explore the underlying molecular mechanisms of colorectal cancer (CRC using bioinformatics analysis. Using GSE4107 datasets downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus, the differentially expressed genes (DEGs were screened by comparing the RNA expression from the colonic mucosa between 12 CRC patients and ten healthy controls using a paired t-test. The Gene Ontology (GO functional and pathway enrichment analyses of DEGs were performed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID software followed by the construction of a protein–protein interaction (PPI network. In addition, hub gene identification and GO functional and pathway enrichment analyses of the modules were performed. A total of 612 up- and 639 downregulated genes were identified. The upregulated DEGs were mainly involved in the regulation of cell growth, migration, and the MAPK signaling pathway. The downregulated DEGs were significantly associated with oxidative phosphorylation, Alzheimer’s disease, and Parkinson’s disease. Moreover, FOS, FN1, PPP1CC, and CYP2B6 were selected as hub genes in the PPI networks. Two modules (up-A and up-B in the upregulated PPI network and three modules (d-A, d-B, and d-C in the downregulated PPI were identified with the threshold of Molecular Complex Detection (MCODE Molecular Complex Detection (MCODE score ≥4 and nodes ≥6. The genes in module up-A were significantly enriched in neuroactive ligand–receptor interactions and the calcium signaling pathway. The genes in module d-A were enriched in four pathways, including oxidative

  9. Planning bioinformatics workflows using an expert system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoling; Chang, Jeffrey T.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Motivation: Bioinformatic analyses are becoming formidably more complex due to the increasing number of steps required to process the data, as well as the proliferation of methods that can be used in each step. To alleviate this difficulty, pipelines are commonly employed. However, pipelines are typically implemented to automate a specific analysis, and thus are difficult to use for exploratory analyses requiring systematic changes to the software or parameters used. Results: To automate the development of pipelines, we have investigated expert systems. We created the Bioinformatics ExperT SYstem (BETSY) that includes a knowledge base where the capabilities of bioinformatics software is explicitly and formally encoded. BETSY is a backwards-chaining rule-based expert system comprised of a data model that can capture the richness of biological data, and an inference engine that reasons on the knowledge base to produce workflows. Currently, the knowledge base is populated with rules to analyze microarray and next generation sequencing data. We evaluated BETSY and found that it could generate workflows that reproduce and go beyond previously published bioinformatics results. Finally, a meta-investigation of the workflows generated from the knowledge base produced a quantitative measure of the technical burden imposed by each step of bioinformatics analyses, revealing the large number of steps devoted to the pre-processing of data. In sum, an expert system approach can facilitate exploratory bioinformatic analysis by automating the development of workflows, a task that requires significant domain expertise. Availability and Implementation: https://github.com/jefftc/changlab Contact: jeffrey.t.chang@uth.tmc.edu PMID:28052928

  10. [Bioinformatics Analysis of Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats in the Genomes of Shigella].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengfei; Wang, Yingfang; Duan, Guangcai; Xue, Zerun; Wang, Linlin; Guo, Xiangjiao; Yang, Haiyan; Xi, Yuanlin

    2015-04-01

    This study was aimed to explore the features of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) structures in Shigella by using bioinformatics. We used bioinformatics methods, including BLAST, alignment and RNA structure prediction, to analyze the CRISPR structures of Shigella genomes. The results showed that the CRISPRs existed in the four groups of Shigella, and the flanking sequences of upstream CRISPRs could be classified into the same group with those of the downstream. We also found some relatively conserved palindromic motifs in the leader sequences. Repeat sequences had the same group with corresponding flanking sequences, and could be classified into two different types by their RNA secondary structures, which contain "stem" and "ring". Some spacers were found to homologize with part sequences of plasmids or phages. The study indicated that there were correlations between repeat sequences and flanking sequences, and the repeats might act as a kind of recognition mechanism to mediate the interaction between foreign genetic elements and Cas proteins.

  11. Bioinformatic Analysis of Potential Biomarkers for Spinal Cord Injured Patients With Intractable Neuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yimin; Ye, Fang; Huang, Chanyan; Xue, Faling; Li, Yingyuan; Gao, Shaowei; Qiu, Zeting; Li, Si; Chen, Qinchang; Zhou, Huaqiang; Song, Yiyan; Huang, Wenqi; Tan, Wulin; Wang, Zhongxing

    2018-03-15

    Neuropathic pain is one of the common complications after spinal cord injury (SCI), affecting patients' life quality. The molecular mechanism for neuropathic pain after SCI is still unclear. We aimed to discover potential genes and MicroRNAs(miRNAs) related to neuropathic pain by bioinformatics method. Microarray data of GSE69901 were obtained from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database. Peripheral blood samples from patients with or without neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury (SCI) were collected. 12 samples with neuropathic pain and 13 samples without pain as control were included in the downloaded microarray. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between neuropathic pain group and control group were detected using GEO2R online tool. Functional enrichment analysis of DEGs was performed using DAVID database. Protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed from STRING database. MiRNAs targeting these DEGs were obtained from miRNet database. A merged miRNA-DEG network was constructed and analyzed with Cytoscape software. Total 1134 DEGs were identified between patients with or without neuropathic pain(case and control) and 454 biological processes were enriched. We identified 4 targeted miRNAs, including mir-204-5p, mir-519d-3p, mir-20b-5p, mir-6838-5p, which may be the potential biomarker for SCI patients. Protein modification and regulation biological process of central nervous system may be a risk factor of in SCI patients. Certain genes and miRNAs may be potential biomarkers for the prediction of and potential targets for prevention and treatment of neuropathic pain after SCI.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal. http

  12. Towards understanding the lifespan extension by reduced insulin signaling: bioinformatics analysis of DAF-16/FOXO direct targets in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-Hui; Zhang, Gai-Gai

    2016-04-12

    DAF-16, the C. elegans FOXO transcription factor, is an important determinant in aging and longevity. In this work, we manually curated FOXODB http://lyh.pkmu.cn/foxodb/, a database of FOXO direct targets. It now covers 208 genes. Bioinformatics analysis on 109 DAF-16 direct targets in C. elegans found interesting results. (i) DAF-16 and transcription factor PQM-1 co-regulate some targets. (ii) Seventeen targets directly regulate lifespan. (iii) Four targets are involved in lifespan extension induced by dietary restriction. And (iv) DAF-16 direct targets might play global roles in lifespan regulation.

  13. MLH1 Promoter Methylation and Prediction/Prognosis of Gastric Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta and Bioinformatic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Shixuan; Chen, Xiaohui; Li, Hao; Sun, Liping; Yuan, Yuan

    2018-01-01

    Background: The promoter methylation of MLH1 gene and gastric cancer (GC)has been investigated previously. To get a more credible conclusion, we performed a systematic review and meta and bioinformatic analysis to clarify the role of MLH1 methylation in the prediction and prognosis of GC. Methods: Eligible studies were targeted after searching the PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, BIOSIS, CNKI and Wanfang Data to collect the information of MLH1 methylation and GC. The link strength between the two was estimated by odds ratio with its 95% confidence interval. The Newcastle-Ottawa scale was used for quantity assessment . Subgroup and sensitivity analysis were conducted to explore sources of heterogeneity. The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were employed for bioinformatics analysis on the correlation between MLH1 methylation and GC risk, clinicopathological behavior as well as prognosis. Results: 2365 GC and 1563 controls were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled OR of MLH1 methylation in GC was 4.895 (95% CI: 3.149-7.611, PMLH1 methylation enhanced GC risk but might not related with GC clinicopathological features and prognosis. Conclusion: MLH1 methylation is an alive biomarker for the prediction of GC and it might not affect GC behavior. Further study could be conducted to verify the impact of MLH1 methylation on GC prognosis.

  14. When process mining meets bioinformatics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jagadeesh Chandra Bose, R.P.; Aalst, van der W.M.P.; Nurcan, S.

    2011-01-01

    Process mining techniques can be used to extract non-trivial process related knowledge and thus generate interesting insights from event logs. Similarly, bioinformatics aims at increasing the understanding of biological processes through the analysis of information associated with biological

  15. Design and bioinformatics analysis of novel biomimetic peptides as nanocarriers for gene transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asia Majidi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: The introduction of nucleic acids into cells for therapeutic objectives is significantly hindered by the size and charge of these molecules and therefore requires efficient vectors that assist cellular uptake. For several years great efforts have been devoted to the study of development of recombinant vectors based on biological domains with potential applications in gene therapy. Such vectors have been synthesized in genetically engineered approach, resulting in biomacromolecules with new properties that are not present in nature. Materials and Methods: In this study, we have designed new peptides using homology modeling with the purpose of overcoming the cell barriers for successful gene delivery through Bioinformatics tools. Three different carriers were designed and one of those with better score through Bioinformatics tools was cloned, expressed and its affinity for pDNA was monitored. Results: The resultszz demonstrated that the vector can effectively condense pDNAinto nanoparticles with the average sizes about 100 nm. Conclusion: We hope these peptides can overcome the biological barriers associated with gene transfer, and mediate efficient gene delivery.

  16. A Critical Analysis of Assessment Quality in Genomics and Bioinformatics Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Chad E.; Nehm, Ross H.

    2013-01-01

    The growing importance of genomics and bioinformatics methods and paradigms in biology has been accompanied by an explosion of new curricula and pedagogies. An important question to ask about these educational innovations is whether they are having a meaningful impact on students’ knowledge, attitudes, or skills. Although assessments are necessary tools for answering this question, their outputs are dependent on their quality. Our study 1) reviews the central importance of reliability and construct validity evidence in the development and evaluation of science assessments and 2) examines the extent to which published assessments in genomics and bioinformatics education (GBE) have been developed using such evidence. We identified 95 GBE articles (out of 226) that contained claims of knowledge increases, affective changes, or skill acquisition. We found that 1) the purpose of most of these studies was to assess summative learning gains associated with curricular change at the undergraduate level, and 2) a minority (<10%) of studies provided any reliability or validity evidence, and only one study out of the 95 sampled mentioned both validity and reliability. Our findings raise concerns about the quality of evidence derived from these instruments. We end with recommendations for improving assessment quality in GBE. PMID:24006400

  17. BioQueue: a novel pipeline framework to accelerate bioinformatics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Li; Wang, Heming; Song, Yuanyuan; Sui, Guangchao

    2017-10-15

    With the rapid development of Next-Generation Sequencing, a large amount of data is now available for bioinformatics research. Meanwhile, the presence of many pipeline frameworks makes it possible to analyse these data. However, these tools concentrate mainly on their syntax and design paradigms, and dispatch jobs based on users' experience about the resources needed by the execution of a certain step in a protocol. As a result, it is difficult for these tools to maximize the potential of computing resources, and avoid errors caused by overload, such as memory overflow. Here, we have developed BioQueue, a web-based framework that contains a checkpoint before each step to automatically estimate the system resources (CPU, memory and disk) needed by the step and then dispatch jobs accordingly. BioQueue possesses a shell command-like syntax instead of implementing a new script language, which means most biologists without computer programming background can access the efficient queue system with ease. BioQueue is freely available at https://github.com/liyao001/BioQueue. The extensive documentation can be found at http://bioqueue.readthedocs.io. li_yao@outlook.com or gcsui@nefu.edu.cn. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  18. GProX, a User-Friendly Platform for Bioinformatics Analysis and Visualization of Quantitative Proteomics Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rigbolt, Kristoffer T G; Vanselow, Jens T; Blagoev, Blagoy

    2011-01-01

    -friendly platform for comprehensive analysis, inspection and visualization of quantitative proteomics data we developed the Graphical Proteomics Data Explorer (GProX)(1). The program requires no special bioinformatics training, as all functions of GProX are accessible within its graphical user-friendly interface...... such as database querying, clustering based on abundance ratios, feature enrichment tests for e.g. GO terms and pathway analysis tools. A number of plotting options for visualization of quantitative proteomics data is available and most analysis functions in GProX create customizable high quality graphical...... displays in both vector and bitmap formats. The generic import requirements allow data originating from essentially all mass spectrometry platforms, quantitation strategies and software to be analyzed in the program. GProX represents a powerful approach to proteomics data analysis providing proteomics...

  19. Bioinformatics analysis of the predicted polyprenol reductase genes in higher plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basyuni, M.; Wati, R.

    2018-03-01

    The present study evaluates the bioinformatics methods to analyze twenty-four predicted polyprenol reductase genes from higher plants on GenBank as well as predicted the structure, composition, similarity, subcellular localization, and phylogenetic. The physicochemical properties of plant polyprenol showed diversity among the observed genes. The percentage of the secondary structure of plant polyprenol genes followed the ratio order of α helix > random coil > extended chain structure. The values of chloroplast but not signal peptide were too low, indicated that few chloroplast transit peptide in plant polyprenol reductase genes. The possibility of the potential transit peptide showed variation among the plant polyprenol reductase, suggested the importance of understanding the variety of peptide components of plant polyprenol genes. To clarify this finding, a phylogenetic tree was drawn. The phylogenetic tree shows several branches in the tree, suggested that plant polyprenol reductase genes grouped into divergent clusters in the tree.

  20. GProX, a user-friendly platform for bioinformatics analysis and visualization of quantitative proteomics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigbolt, Kristoffer T G; Vanselow, Jens T; Blagoev, Blagoy

    2011-08-01

    Recent technological advances have made it possible to identify and quantify thousands of proteins in a single proteomics experiment. As a result of these developments, the analysis of data has become the bottleneck of proteomics experiment. To provide the proteomics community with a user-friendly platform for comprehensive analysis, inspection and visualization of quantitative proteomics data we developed the Graphical Proteomics Data Explorer (GProX)(1). The program requires no special bioinformatics training, as all functions of GProX are accessible within its graphical user-friendly interface which will be intuitive to most users. Basic features facilitate the uncomplicated management and organization of large data sets and complex experimental setups as well as the inspection and graphical plotting of quantitative data. These are complemented by readily available high-level analysis options such as database querying, clustering based on abundance ratios, feature enrichment tests for e.g. GO terms and pathway analysis tools. A number of plotting options for visualization of quantitative proteomics data is available and most analysis functions in GProX create customizable high quality graphical displays in both vector and bitmap formats. The generic import requirements allow data originating from essentially all mass spectrometry platforms, quantitation strategies and software to be analyzed in the program. GProX represents a powerful approach to proteomics data analysis providing proteomics experimenters with a toolbox for bioinformatics analysis of quantitative proteomics data. The program is released as open-source and can be freely downloaded from the project webpage at http://gprox.sourceforge.net.

  1. Bioinformatic analysis of cis-regulatory interactions between progesterone and estrogen receptors in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matloob Khushi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin factors interact with each other in a cell and sequence-specific manner in order to regulate transcription and a wealth of publically available datasets exists describing the genomic locations of these interactions. Our recently published BiSA (Binding Sites Analyser database contains transcription factor binding locations and epigenetic modifications collected from published studies and provides tools to analyse stored and imported data. Using BiSA we investigated the overlapping cis-regulatory role of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα and progesterone receptor (PR in the T-47D breast cancer cell line. We found that ERα binding sites overlap with a subset of PR binding sites. To investigate further, we re-analysed raw data to remove any biases introduced by the use of distinct tools in the original publications. We identified 22,152 PR and 18,560 ERα binding sites (<5% false discovery rate with 4,358 overlapping regions among the two datasets. BiSA statistical analysis revealed a non-significant overall overlap correlation between the two factors, suggesting that ERα and PR are not partner factors and do not require each other for binding to occur. However, Monte Carlo simulation by Binary Interval Search (BITS, Relevant Distance, Absolute Distance, Jaccard and Projection tests by Genometricorr revealed a statistically significant spatial correlation of binding regions on chromosome between the two factors. Motif analysis revealed that the shared binding regions were enriched with binding motifs for ERα, PR and a number of other transcription and pioneer factors. Some of these factors are known to co-locate with ERα and PR binding. Therefore spatially close proximity of ERα binding sites with PR binding sites suggests that ERα and PR, in general function independently at the molecular level, but that their activities converge on a specific subset of transcriptional targets.

  2. Bioinformatic analysis of xenobiotic reactive metabolite target proteins and their interacting partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanzlik Robert P

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein covalent binding by reactive metabolites of drugs, chemicals and natural products can lead to acute cytotoxicity. Recent rapid progress in reactive metabolite target protein identification has shown that adduction is surprisingly selective and inspired the hope that analysis of target proteins might reveal protein factors that differentiate target- vs. non-target proteins and illuminate mechanisms connecting covalent binding to cytotoxicity. Results Sorting 171 known reactive metabolite target proteins revealed a number of GO categories and KEGG pathways to be significantly enriched in targets, but in most cases the classes were too large, and the "percent coverage" too small, to allow meaningful conclusions about mechanisms of toxicity. However, a similar analysis of the directlyinteracting partners of 28 common targets of multiple reactive metabolites revealed highly significant enrichments in terms likely to be highly relevant to cytotoxicity (e.g., MAP kinase pathways, apoptosis, response to unfolded protein. Machine learning was used to rank the contribution of 211 computed protein features to determining protein susceptibility to adduction. Protein lysine (but not cysteine content and protein instability index (i.e., rate of turnover in vivo were among the features most important to determining susceptibility. Conclusion As yet there is no good explanation for why some low-abundance proteins become heavily adducted while some abundant proteins become only lightly adducted in vivo. Analyzing the directly interacting partners of target proteins appears to yield greater insight into mechanisms of toxicity than analyzing target proteins per se. The insights provided can readily be formulated as hypotheses to test in future experimental studies.

  3. Investigating the Mechanisms of Action of Depside Salt from Salvia miltiorrhiza Using Bioinformatic Analysis

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    Hua Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Salvia miltiorrhiza is a traditional Chinese medicinal herb used for treating cardiovascular diseases. Depside salt from S. miltiorrhiza (DSSM contains the following active components: magnesium lithospermate B, lithospermic acid, and rosmarinic acid. This study aimed to reveal the mechanisms of action of DSSM. After searching for DSSM-associated genes in GeneCards, Search Tool for Interacting Chemicals, SuperTarget, PubChem, and Comparative Toxicogenomics Database, they were subjected to enrichment analysis using Multifaceted Analysis Tool for Human Transcriptome. A protein-protein interaction (PPI network was visualised; module analysis was conducted using the Cytoscape software. Finally, a transcriptional regulatory network was constructed using the TRRUST database and Cytoscape. Seventy-three DSSM-associated genes were identified. JUN, TNF, NFKB1, and FOS were hub nodes in the PPI network. Modules 1 and 2 were identified from the PPI network, with pathway enrichment analysis, showing that the presence of NFKB1 and BCL2 in module 1 was indicative of a particular association with the NF-κB signalling pathway. JUN, TNF, NFKB1, FOS, and BCL2 exhibited notable interactions among themselves in the PPI network. Several regulatory relationships (such as JUN → TNF/FOS, FOS → NFKB1 and NFKB1 → BCL2/TNF were also found in the regulatory network. Thus, DSSM exerts effects against cardiovascular diseases by targeting JUN, TNF, NFKB1, FOS, and BCL2.

  4. Molecular structure, bioinformatics analysis, expression and bioactivity of BAFF (TNF13B) in dog (Canis familiaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yuefen; Wang, Shule; Ai, Hongxin; Min, Cui; Chen, Yuqing; Zhang, Shuangquan

    2011-07-15

    B cell activating factor (BAFF), belonging to the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family, plays an important role in B cell survival, proliferation and differentiation. In the present study, we amplified the cDNA of dog (Canis familiaris) BAFF (designated doBAFF) from spleen by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) strategies. The open reading frame (ORF) of doBAFF covers 879 bp encoding 292 amino acids, with a 152-aa mature peptide. The soluble mature part of doBAFF (dosBAFF) shares 91.5%, 72.1%, 96.7%, 94.0% and 91.5% identity with the human, mouse, cattle, pig and rabbit counterparts, respectively. The predicted three-dimensional (3D) structural analysis of dosBAFF analyzed by "comparative protein modeling" revealed that it was very similar to its human counterpart. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis revealed that doBAFF was mainly expressed in spleen. Two fusion proteins SUMO-dosBAFF and GFP/dosBAFF were efficiently expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and purified using metal chelate affinity chromatography (Ni-NTA). Laser scanning confocal microscopy analysis showed that GFP/dosBAFF could bind to the mouse splenic B-cell. In vitro, SUMO-dosBAFF and GFP/dosBAFF were able to promote the survival/proliferation of dog lymphocytes or mouse splenic B cells with/without anti-IgM. Therefore, BAFF may be a potential immunologic factor for enhancing immunological efficacy in dog. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Functional and bioinformatics analysis of an exopolysaccharide-related gene (epsN) from Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens ZW3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingrui; Tang, Wei; Zheng, Yongna; Xing, Zhuqing; Wang, Yanping

    2016-09-01

    A novel lactic acid bacteria strain Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens ZW3 exhibited the characteristics of high production of exopolysaccharide (EPS). The epsN gene, located in the eps gene cluster of this strain, is associated with EPS biosynthesis. Bioinformatics analysis of this gene was performed. The conserved domain analysis showed that the EpsN protein contained MATE-Wzx-like domains. Then the epsN gene was amplified to construct the recombinant expression vector pMG36e-epsN. The results showed that the EPS yields of the recombinants were significantly improved. By determining the yields of EPS and intracellular polysaccharide, it was considered that epsN gene could play its Wzx flippase role in the EPS biosynthesis. This is the first time to prove the effect of EpsN on L. kefiranofaciens EPS biosynthesis and further prove its functional property.

  6. The Alcohol Dehydrogenase Gene Family in Melon (Cucumis melo L.: Bioinformatic Analysis and Expression Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazhong eJin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH, encoded by multigene family in plants, play a critical role in plant growth, development, adaptation, fruit ripening and aroma production. Thirteen ADH genes were identified in melon genome, including 12 ADHs and one formaldehyde dehydrogenease (FDH, designated CmADH1-12 and CmFDH1, in which CmADH1 and CmADH2 have been isolated in Cantaloupe. ADH genes shared a lower identity with each other at the protein level and had different intron-exon structure at nucleotide level. No typical signal peptides were found in all CmADHs, and CmADH proteins might locate in the cytoplasm. The phylogenetic tree revealed that 13 ADH genes were divided into 3 groups respectively, namely long-, medium- and short-chain ADH subfamily, and CmADH1,3-11, which belongs to the medium-chain ADH subfamily, fell into 6 medium-chain ADH subgroups. CmADH12 may belong to the long-chain ADH subfamily, while CmFDH1 may be a Class III ADH and serve as an ancestral ADH in melon. Expression profiling revealed that CmADH1, CmADH2, CmADH10 and CmFDH1 were moderately or strongly expressed in different vegetative tissues and fruit at medium and late developmental stages, while CmADH8 and CmADH12 were highly expressed in fruit after 20 days. CmADH3 showed preferential expression in young tissues. CmADH4 only had slight expression in root. Promoter analysis revealed several motifs of CmADH genes involved in the gene expression modulated by various hormones, and the response pattern of CmADH genes to ABA, IAA and ethylene were different. These CmADHs were divided into ethylene-sensitive and –insensitive groups, and the functions of CmADHs were discussed.

  7. Bioinformatic analysis of microRNA biogenesis and function related proteins in eleven animal genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiuying; Luo, GuanZheng; Bai, Xiujuan; Wang, Xiu-Jie

    2009-10-01

    MicroRNAs are approximately 22 nt long small non-coding RNAs that play important regulatory roles in eukaryotes. The biogenesis and functional processes of microRNAs require the participation of many proteins, of which, the well studied ones are Dicer, Drosha, Argonaute and Exportin 5. To systematically study these four protein families, we screened 11 animal genomes to search for genes encoding above mentioned proteins, and identified some new members for each family. Domain analysis results revealed that most proteins within the same family share identical or similar domains. Alternative spliced transcript variants were found for some proteins. We also examined the expression patterns of these proteins in different human tissues and identified other proteins that could potentially interact with these proteins. These findings provided systematic information on the four key proteins involved in microRNA biogenesis and functional pathways in animals, and will shed light on further functional studies of these proteins.

  8. Crowdsourcing for bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Benjamin M; Su, Andrew I

    2013-08-15

    Bioinformatics is faced with a variety of problems that require human involvement. Tasks like genome annotation, image analysis, knowledge-base population and protein structure determination all benefit from human input. In some cases, people are needed in vast quantities, whereas in others, we need just a few with rare abilities. Crowdsourcing encompasses an emerging collection of approaches for harnessing such distributed human intelligence. Recently, the bioinformatics community has begun to apply crowdsourcing in a variety of contexts, yet few resources are available that describe how these human-powered systems work and how to use them effectively in scientific domains. Here, we provide a framework for understanding and applying several different types of crowdsourcing. The framework considers two broad classes: systems for solving large-volume 'microtasks' and systems for solving high-difficulty 'megatasks'. Within these classes, we discuss system types, including volunteer labor, games with a purpose, microtask markets and open innovation contests. We illustrate each system type with successful examples in bioinformatics and conclude with a guide for matching problems to crowdsourcing solutions that highlights the positives and negatives of different approaches.

  9. Bioinformatic analysis reveals high diversity of bacterial genes for laccase-like enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luka Ausec

    Full Text Available Fungal laccases have been used in various fields ranging from processes in wood and paper industries to environmental applications. Although a few bacterial laccases have been characterized in recent years, prokaryotes have largely been neglected as a source of novel enzymes, in part due to the lack of knowledge about the diversity and distribution of laccases within Bacteria. In this work genes for laccase-like enzymes were searched for in over 2,200 complete and draft bacterial genomes and four metagenomic datasets, using the custom profile Hidden Markov Models for two- and three-domain laccases. More than 1,200 putative genes for laccase-like enzymes were retrieved from chromosomes and plasmids of diverse bacteria. In 76% of the genes, signal peptides were predicted, indicating that these bacterial laccases may be exported from the cytoplasm, which contrasts with the current belief. Moreover, several examples of putatively horizontally transferred bacterial laccase genes were described. Many metagenomic sequences encoding fragments of laccase-like enzymes could not be phylogenetically assigned, indicating considerable novelty. Laccase-like genes were also found in anaerobic bacteria, autotrophs and alkaliphiles, thus opening new hypotheses regarding their ecological functions. Bacteria identified as carrying laccase genes represent potential sources for future biotechnological applications.

  10. Bioinformatics analysis of the oxidosqualene cyclase gene and the amino acid sequence in mangrove plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basyuni, M.; Wati, R.

    2017-01-01

    This study described the bioinformatics methods to analyze seven oxidosqualene cyclase (OSC) genes from mangrove plants on DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank as well as predicted the structure, composition, similarity, subcellular localization and phylogenetic. The physical and chemical properties of seven mangrove OSC showed variation among the genes. The percentage of the secondary structure of seven mangrove OSC genes followed the order of a helix > random coil > extended chain structure. The values of chloroplast or signal peptide were too low, indicated that no chloroplast transit peptide or signal peptide of secretion pathway in mangrove OSC genes. The target peptide value of mitochondria varied from 0.163 to 0.430, indicated it was possible to exist. These results suggested the importance of understanding the diversity and functional of properties of the different amino acids in mangrove OSC genes. To clarify the relationship among the mangrove OSC gene, a phylogenetic tree was constructed. The phylogenetic tree shows that there are three clusters, Kandelia KcMS join with Bruguiera BgLUS, Rhizophora RsM1 was close to Bruguiera BgbAS, and Rhizophora RcCAS join with Kandelia KcCAS. The present study, therefore, supported the previous results that plant OSC genes form distinct clusters in the tree.

  11. Phylogenetic and bioinformatic analysis of gap junction-related proteins, innexins, pannexins and connexins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fushiki, Daisuke; Hamada, Yasuo; Yoshimura, Ryoichi; Endo, Yasuhisa

    2010-04-01

    All multi-cellular animals, including hydra, insects and vertebrates, develop gap junctions, which communicate directly with neighboring cells. Gap junctions consist of protein families called connexins in vertebrates and innexins in invertebrates. Connexins and innexins have no homology in their amino acid sequence, but both are thought to have some similar characteristics, such as a tetra-membrane-spanning structure, formation of a channel by hexamer, and transmission of small molecules (e.g. ions) to neighboring cells. Pannexins were recently identified as a homolog of innexins in vertebrate genomes. Although pannexins are thought to share the function of intercellular communication with connexins and innexins, there is little information about the relationship among these three protein families of gap junctions. We phylgenetically and bioinformatically examined these protein families and other tetra-membrane-spanning proteins using a database and three analytical softwares. The clades formed by pannexin families do not belong to the species classification but do to paralogs of each member of pannexins. Amino acid sequences of pannexins are closely related to those of innexins but less to those of connexins. These data suggest that innexins and pannexins have a common origin, but the relationship between innexins/pannexins and connexins is as slight as that of other tetra-membrane-spanning members.

  12. Bioinformatics analysis and construction of phylogenetic tree of aquaporins from Echinococcus granulosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fen; Ye, Bin

    2016-09-01

    Cyst echinococcosis caused by the matacestodal larvae of Echinococcus granulosus (Eg), is a chronic, worldwide, and severe zoonotic parasitosis. The treatment of cyst echinococcosis is still difficult since surgery cannot fit the needs of all patients, and drugs can lead to serious adverse events as well as resistance. The screen of target proteins interacted with new anti-hydatidosis drugs is urgently needed to meet the prevailing challenges. Here, we analyzed the sequences and structure properties, and constructed a phylogenetic tree by bioinformatics methods. The MIP family signature and Protein kinase C phosphorylation sites were predicted in all nine EgAQPs. α-helix and random coil were the main secondary structures of EgAQPs. The numbers of transmembrane regions were three to six, which indicated that EgAQPs contained multiple hydrophobic regions. A neighbor-joining tree indicated that EgAQPs were divided into two branches, seven EgAQPs formed a clade with AQP1 from human, a "strict" aquaporins, other two EgAQPs formed a clade with AQP9 from human, an aquaglyceroporins. Unfortunately, homology modeling of EgAQPs was aborted. These results provide a foundation for understanding and researches of the biological function of E. granulosus.

  13. Novel SINEs families in Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus: bioinformatic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadzalski, Marek; Sakowicz, Tomasz

    2011-07-01

    Although short interspersed elements (SINEs) were discovered nearly 30 years ago, the studies of these genomic repeats were mostly limited to animal genomes. Very little is known about SINEs in legumes--one of the most important plant families. Here we report identification, genomic distribution and molecular features of six novel SINE elements in Lotus japonicus (named LJ_SINE-1, -2, -3) and Medicago truncatula (MT_SINE-1, -2, -3), model species of legume. They possess all the structural features commonly found in short interspersed elements including RNA polymerase III promoter, polyA tail and flanking repeats. SINEs described here are present in low to moderate copy numbers from 150 to 3000. Bioinformatic analyses were used to searched public databases, we have shown that three of new SINE elements from M. truncatula seem to be characteristic of Medicago and Trifolium genera. Two SINE families have been found in L. japonicus and one is present in both M. truncatula and L. japonicus. In addition, we are discussing potential activities of the described elements. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Deep Artificial Neural Networks and Neuromorphic Chips for Big Data Analysis: Pharmaceutical and Bioinformatics Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastur-Romay, Lucas Antón; Cedrón, Francisco; Pazos, Alejandro; Porto-Pazos, Ana Belén

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, Deep Artificial Neural Networks (DNNs) have become the state-of-the-art algorithms in Machine Learning (ML), speech recognition, computer vision, natural language processing and many other tasks. This was made possible by the advancement in Big Data, Deep Learning (DL) and drastically increased chip processing abilities, especially general-purpose graphical processing units (GPGPUs). All this has created a growing interest in making the most of the potential offered by DNNs in almost every field. An overview of the main architectures of DNNs, and their usefulness in Pharmacology and Bioinformatics are presented in this work. The featured applications are: drug design, virtual screening (VS), Quantitative Structure–Activity Relationship (QSAR) research, protein structure prediction and genomics (and other omics) data mining. The future need of neuromorphic hardware for DNNs is also discussed, and the two most advanced chips are reviewed: IBM TrueNorth and SpiNNaker. In addition, this review points out the importance of considering not only neurons, as DNNs and neuromorphic chips should also include glial cells, given the proven importance of astrocytes, a type of glial cell which contributes to information processing in the brain. The Deep Artificial Neuron–Astrocyte Networks (DANAN) could overcome the difficulties in architecture design, learning process and scalability of the current ML methods. PMID:27529225

  15. Deep Artificial Neural Networks and Neuromorphic Chips for Big Data Analysis: Pharmaceutical and Bioinformatics Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastur-Romay, Lucas Antón; Cedrón, Francisco; Pazos, Alejandro; Porto-Pazos, Ana Belén

    2016-08-11

    Over the past decade, Deep Artificial Neural Networks (DNNs) have become the state-of-the-art algorithms in Machine Learning (ML), speech recognition, computer vision, natural language processing and many other tasks. This was made possible by the advancement in Big Data, Deep Learning (DL) and drastically increased chip processing abilities, especially general-purpose graphical processing units (GPGPUs). All this has created a growing interest in making the most of the potential offered by DNNs in almost every field. An overview of the main architectures of DNNs, and their usefulness in Pharmacology and Bioinformatics are presented in this work. The featured applications are: drug design, virtual screening (VS), Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) research, protein structure prediction and genomics (and other omics) data mining. The future need of neuromorphic hardware for DNNs is also discussed, and the two most advanced chips are reviewed: IBM TrueNorth and SpiNNaker. In addition, this review points out the importance of considering not only neurons, as DNNs and neuromorphic chips should also include glial cells, given the proven importance of astrocytes, a type of glial cell which contributes to information processing in the brain. The Deep Artificial Neuron-Astrocyte Networks (DANAN) could overcome the difficulties in architecture design, learning process and scalability of the current ML methods.

  16. Deep Artificial Neural Networks and Neuromorphic Chips for Big Data Analysis: Pharmaceutical and Bioinformatics Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Antón Pastur-Romay

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, Deep Artificial Neural Networks (DNNs have become the state-of-the-art algorithms in Machine Learning (ML, speech recognition, computer vision, natural language processing and many other tasks. This was made possible by the advancement in Big Data, Deep Learning (DL and drastically increased chip processing abilities, especially general-purpose graphical processing units (GPGPUs. All this has created a growing interest in making the most of the potential offered by DNNs in almost every field. An overview of the main architectures of DNNs, and their usefulness in Pharmacology and Bioinformatics are presented in this work. The featured applications are: drug design, virtual screening (VS, Quantitative Structure–Activity Relationship (QSAR research, protein structure prediction and genomics (and other omics data mining. The future need of neuromorphic hardware for DNNs is also discussed, and the two most advanced chips are reviewed: IBM TrueNorth and SpiNNaker. In addition, this review points out the importance of considering not only neurons, as DNNs and neuromorphic chips should also include glial cells, given the proven importance of astrocytes, a type of glial cell which contributes to information processing in the brain. The Deep Artificial Neuron–Astrocyte Networks (DANAN could overcome the difficulties in architecture design, learning process and scalability of the current ML methods.

  17. Bioinformatics analysis for structure and function of CPR of Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhigang; Zhang, Lingmin; Yan, Guogang; Wu, Qiang; Gan, Xiufeng; Zhong, Saifeng; Lin, Guifen

    2011-02-01

    To analyse the structure and function of NADPH-cytochrome p450 reductase (CYPOR or CPR) from Plasmodium falciparum (Pf), and to predict its' drug target and vaccine target. The structure, function, drug target and vaccine target of CPR from Plasmodium falciparum were analyzed and predicted by bioinformatics methods. PfCPR, which was older CPR, had close relationship with the CPR from other Plasmodium species, but it was distant from its hosts, such as Homo sapiens and Anopheles. PfCPR was located in the cellular nucleus of Plasmodium falciparum. 335aa-352aa and 591aa - 608aa were inserted the interior side of the nuclear membrane, while 151aa-265aa was located in the nucleolus organizer regions. PfCPR had 40 function sites and 44 protein-protein binding sites in amino acid sequence. The teriary structure of 1aa-700aa was forcep-shaped with wings. 15 segments of PfCPR had no homology with Homo sapien CPR and most were exposed on the surface of the protein. These segments had 25 protein-protein binding sites. While 13 other segments all possessed function sites. The evolution or genesis of Plasmodium falciparum is earlier than those of Homo sapiens. PfCPR is a possible resistance site of antimalarial drug and may involve immune evasion, which is associated with parasite of sporozoite in hepatocytes. PfCPR is unsuitable as vaccine target, but it has at least 13 ideal drug targets. Copyright © 2011 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Decoding options and accuracy of translation of developmentally regulated UUA codon in Streptomyces: bioinformatic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokytskyy, Ihor; Koshla, Oksana; Fedorenko, Victor; Ostash, Bohdan

    2016-01-01

    The gene bldA for leucyl [Formula: see text] is known for almost 30 years as a key regulator of morphogenesis and secondary metabolism in genus Streptomyces. Codon UUA is the rarest one in Streptomyces genomes and is present exclusively in genes with auxiliary functions. Delayed accumulation of translation-competent [Formula: see text] is believed to confine the expression of UUA-containing transcripts to stationary phase. Implicit to the regulatory function of UUA codon is the assumption about high accuracy of its translation, e.g. the latter should not occur in the absence of cognate [Formula: see text]. However, a growing body of facts points to the possibility of mistranslation of UUA-containing transcripts in the bldA-deficient mutants. It is not known what type of near-cognate tRNA(s) may decode UUA in the absence of cognate tRNA in Streptomyces, and whether UUA possesses certain inherent properties (such as increased/decreased accuracy of decoding) that would favor its use for regulatory purposes. Here we took bioinformatic approach to address these questions. We catalogued the entire complement of tRNA genes from several relevant Streptomyces and identified genes for posttranscriptional modifications of tRNA that might be involved in UUA decoding by cognate and near-cognate tRNAs. Based on tRNA gene content in Streptomyces genomes, we propose possible scenarios of UUA codon mistranslation. UUA is not associated with an increased rate of missense errors as compared to other leucyl codons, contrasting general belief that low-abundant codons are more error-prone than the high-abundant ones.

  19. Bioinformatic analysis suggests that the Cypovirus 1 major core protein cistron harbours an overlapping gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atkins John F

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Members of the genus Cypovirus (family Reoviridae are common pathogens of insects. These viruses have linear dsRNA genomes divided into 10–11 segments, which have generally been assumed to be monocistronic. Here, bioinformatic evidence is presented for a short overlapping coding sequence (CDS in the cypovirus genome segment encoding the major core capsid protein VP1, overlapping the 5'-terminal region of the VP1 ORF in the +1 reading frame. In Cypovirus type 1 (CPV-1, a 62-codon AUG-initiated open reading frame (hereafter ORFX is present in all four available segment 1 sequences. The pattern of base variations across the sequence alignment indicates that ORFX is subject to functional constraints at the amino acid level (even when the constraints due to coding in the overlapping VP1 reading frame are taken into account; MLOGD software. In fact the translated ORFX shows greater amino acid conservation than the overlapping region of VP1. The genomic location of ORFX is consistent with translation via leaky scanning. A 62–64 codon AUG-initiated ORF is present in a corresponding location and reading frame in other available cypovirus sequences (2 CPV-14, 1 CPV-15 and an 87-codon ORFX homologue may also be present in Aedes pseudoscutellaris reovirus. The ORFX amino acid sequences are hydrophilic and basic, with between 12 and 16 Arg/Lys residues in each though, at 7.5–10.2 kDa, the putative ORFX product is too small to appear on typical published protein gels.

  20. A Bioinformatic Strategy for the Detection, Classification and Analysis of Bacterial Autotransporters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Nermin; Webb, Chaille T.; Leyton, Denisse L.; Holt, Kathryn E.; Heinz, Eva; Gorrell, Rebecca; Kwok, Terry; Naderer, Thomas; Strugnell, Richard A.; Speed, Terence P.; Teasdale, Rohan D.; Likić, Vladimir A.; Lithgow, Trevor

    2012-01-01

    Autotransporters are secreted proteins that are assembled into the outer membrane of bacterial cells. The passenger domains of autotransporters are crucial for bacterial pathogenesis, with some remaining attached to the bacterial surface while others are released by proteolysis. An enigma remains as to whether autotransporters should be considered a class of secretion system, or simply a class of substrate with peculiar requirements for their secretion. We sought to establish a sensitive search protocol that could identify and characterize diverse autotransporters from bacterial genome sequence data. The new sequence analysis pipeline identified more than 1500 autotransporter sequences from diverse bacteria, including numerous species of Chlamydiales and Fusobacteria as well as all classes of Proteobacteria. Interrogation of the proteins revealed that there are numerous classes of passenger domains beyond the known proteases, adhesins and esterases. In addition the barrel-domain-a characteristic feature of autotransporters-was found to be composed from seven conserved sequence segments that can be arranged in multiple ways in the tertiary structure of the assembled autotransporter. One of these conserved motifs overlays the targeting information required for autotransporters to reach the outer membrane. Another conserved and diagnostic motif maps to the linker region between the passenger domain and barrel-domain, indicating it as an important feature in the assembly of autotransporters. PMID:22905239

  1. Bioinformatic and Comparative Localization of Rab Proteins Reveals Functional Insights into the Uncharacterized GTPases Ypt10p and Ypt11p†

    OpenAIRE

    Buvelot Frei, Stéphanie; Rahl, Peter B.; Nussbaum, Maria; Briggs, Benjamin J.; Calero, Monica; Janeczko, Stephanie; Regan, Andrew D.; Chen, Catherine Z.; Barral, Yves; Whittaker, Gary R.; Collins, Ruth N.

    2006-01-01

    A striking characteristic of a Rab protein is its steady-state localization to the cytosolic surface of a particular subcellular membrane. In this study, we have undertaken a combined bioinformatic and experimental approach to examine the evolutionary conservation of Rab protein localization. A comprehensive primary sequence classification shows that 10 out of the 11 Rab proteins identified in the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) genome can be grouped within a major subclass, each comprising ...

  2. Web-based bioinformatics workflows for end-to-end RNA-seq data computation and analysis in agricultural animal species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remarkable advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, bioinformatics algorithms, and computational technologies have significantly accelerated genomic research. However, complicated NGS data analysis still remains as a major bottleneck. RNA-seq, as one of the major area in the NGS fi...

  3. Taking Bioinformatics to Systems Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kampen, Antoine H C; Moerland, Perry D

    2016-01-01

    Systems medicine promotes a range of approaches and strategies to study human health and disease at a systems level with the aim of improving the overall well-being of (healthy) individuals, and preventing, diagnosing, or curing disease. In this chapter we discuss how bioinformatics critically contributes to systems medicine. First, we explain the role of bioinformatics in the management and analysis of data. In particular we show the importance of publicly available biological and clinical repositories to support systems medicine studies. Second, we discuss how the integration and analysis of multiple types of omics data through integrative bioinformatics may facilitate the determination of more predictive and robust disease signatures, lead to a better understanding of (patho)physiological molecular mechanisms, and facilitate personalized medicine. Third, we focus on network analysis and discuss how gene networks can be constructed from omics data and how these networks can be decomposed into smaller modules. We discuss how the resulting modules can be used to generate experimentally testable hypotheses, provide insight into disease mechanisms, and lead to predictive models. Throughout, we provide several examples demonstrating how bioinformatics contributes to systems medicine and discuss future challenges in bioinformatics that need to be addressed to enable the advancement of systems medicine.

  4. Identification of key genes and pathways associated with neuropathic pain in uninjured dorsal root ganglion by using bioinformatic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen CJ

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Chao-Jin Chen,* De-Zhao Liu,* Wei-Feng Yao, Yu Gu, Fei Huang, Zi-Qing Hei, Xiang Li Department of Anesthesiology, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: Neuropathic pain is a complex chronic condition occurring post-nervous system damage. The transcriptional reprogramming of injured dorsal root ganglia (DRGs drives neuropathic pain. However, few comparative analyses using high-throughput platforms have investigated uninjured DRG in neuropathic pain, and potential interactions among differentially expressed genes (DEGs and pathways were not taken into consideration. The aim of this study was to identify changes in genes and pathways associated with neuropathic pain in uninjured L4 DRG after L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL by using bioinformatic analysis.Materials and methods: The microarray profile GSE24982 was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database to identify DEGs between DRGs in SNL and sham rats. The prioritization for these DEGs was performed using the Toppgene database followed by gene ontology and pathway enrichment analyses. The relationships among DEGs from the protein interactive perspective were analyzed using protein–protein interaction (PPI network and module analysis. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR and Western blotting were used to confirm the expression of DEGs in the rodent neuropathic pain model.Results: A total of 206 DEGs that might play a role in neuropathic pain were identified in L4 DRG, of which 75 were upregulated and 131 were downregulated. The upregulated DEGs were enriched in biological processes related to transcription regulation and molecular functions such as DNA binding, cell cycle, and the FoxO signaling pathway. Ctnnb1 protein had the highest connectivity degrees in the PPI network. The in vivo studies also validated that mRNA and protein levels of Ctnnb1 were

  5. A Reference Viral Database (RVDB) To Enhance Bioinformatics Analysis of High-Throughput Sequencing for Novel Virus Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodacre, Norman; Aljanahi, Aisha; Nandakumar, Subhiksha; Mikailov, Mike; Khan, Arifa S

    2018-01-01

    Detection of distantly related viruses by high-throughput sequencing (HTS) is bioinformatically challenging because of the lack of a public database containing all viral sequences, without abundant nonviral sequences, which can extend runtime and obscure viral hits. Our reference viral database (RVDB) includes all viral, virus-related, and virus-like nucleotide sequences (excluding bacterial viruses), regardless of length, and with overall reduced cellular sequences. Semantic selection criteria (SEM-I) were used to select viral sequences from GenBank, resulting in a first-generation viral database (VDB). This database was manually and computationally reviewed, resulting in refined, semantic selection criteria (SEM-R), which were applied to a new download of updated GenBank sequences to create a second-generation VDB. Viral entries in the latter were clustered at 98% by CD-HIT-EST to reduce redundancy while retaining high viral sequence diversity. The viral identity of the clustered representative sequences (creps) was confirmed by BLAST searches in NCBI databases and HMMER searches in PFAM and DFAM databases. The resulting RVDB contained a broad representation of viral families, sequence diversity, and a reduced cellular content; it includes full-length and partial sequences and endogenous nonretroviral elements, endogenous retroviruses, and retrotransposons. Testing of RVDBv10.2, with an in-house HTS transcriptomic data set indicated a significantly faster run for virus detection than interrogating the entirety of the NCBI nonredundant nucleotide database, which contains all viral sequences but also nonviral sequences. RVDB is publically available for facilitating HTS analysis, particularly for novel virus detection. It is meant to be updated on a regular basis to include new viral sequences added to GenBank. IMPORTANCE To facilitate bioinformatics analysis of high-throughput sequencing (HTS) data for the detection of both known and novel viruses, we have

  6. [Expression profiles and bioinformatic analysis of miRNA in human dental pulp cells during endothelial differentiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Qimei; Jiang, Hongwei; Wang, Jinming; Ling, Junqi

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the differential expression profile and bioinformatic analysis of microRNA (miRNA) in human dental pulp cells (DPC) during endothelial differentiation. DPC were cultured in endothelial induction medium (50 µg/L vascular endothelial growth factor, 10 µg/L basic fibroblast growth factor and 2% fetal calf serum) for 7 days. Meanwhile non-induced DPC were used as control.Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) was applied to detect vascular endothelial marker genes [CD31, von Willebrand factor (vWF) and vascular endothelial-cadherin (VE-cadherin)] and in vitro tube formation on matrigel was used to analyze the angiogenic ability of differentiated cells. And then miRNA expression profiles of DPC were examined using miRNA microarray and then the differentially expressed miRNA were validated by qRT-PCR. Furthermore, bioinformatic analysis was employed to predict the target genes of miRNA and to analyze the possible biological functions and signaling pathways that were involved in DPC after induction. The relative mRNA level of CD31, vWF and VE-cadherin in the control group were (3.48 ± 0.22) ×10(-4), (3.13 ± 0.31) ×10(-4) and (39.60 ± 2.36) ×10(-4), and (19.57 ± 2.20) ×10(-4), (48.13 ± 0.54) ×10(-4) and (228.00 ± 8.89) ×10(-4) in the induced group. The expressions of CD31, vWF and VE-cadherin were increased significantly in endothelial induced DPC compared to the control group (P functions, such as the regulation of transcription, cell motion, blood vessel morphogenesis, angiogenesis and cytoskeletal protein, and signaling pathways including the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and the Wnt signaling pathway. The differential miRNA expression identified in this study may be involved in governing DPC endothelial differentiation, thus contributing to the future research on regulatory mechanisms in dental pulp angiogenesis.

  7. Bioinformatics tools for the analysis of NMR metabolomics studies focused on the identification of clinically relevant biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchades-Carrasco, Leonor; Palomino-Schätzlein, Martina; Pérez-Rambla, Clara; Pineda-Lucena, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    Metabolomics, a systems biology approach focused on the global study of the metabolome, offers a tremendous potential in the analysis of clinical samples. Among other applications, metabolomics enables mapping of biochemical alterations involved in the pathogenesis of diseases, and offers the opportunity to noninvasively identify diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers that could translate into early therapeutic interventions. Particularly, metabolomics by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) has the ability to simultaneously detect and structurally characterize an abundance of metabolic components, even when their identities are unknown. Analysis of the data generated using this experimental approach requires the application of statistical and bioinformatics tools for the correct interpretation of the results. This review focuses on the different steps involved in the metabolomics characterization of biofluids for clinical applications, ranging from the design of the study to the biological interpretation of the results. Particular emphasis is devoted to the specific procedures required for the processing and interpretation of NMR data with a focus on the identification of clinically relevant biomarkers. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Identification of Differentially Expressed Genes Induced by Aberrant Methylation in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas Using Integrated Bioinformatic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqi Zhang

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC is a malignant disease. Methylation plays a key role in the etiology and pathogenesis of OSCC. The goal of this study was to identify aberrantly methylated differentially expressed genes (DEGs in OSCCs, and to explore the underlying mechanisms of tumorigenesis by using integrated bioinformatic analysis. Gene expression profiles (GSE30784 and GSE38532 were analyzed using the R software to obtain aberrantly methylated DEGs. Functional enrichment analysis of screened genes was performed using the DAVID software. Protein–protein interaction (PPI networks were constructed using the STRING database. The cBioPortal software was used to exhibit the alterations of genes. Lastly, we validated the results with the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA data. Twenty-eight upregulated hypomethylated genes and 24 downregulated hypermethylated genes were identified. These genes were enriched in the biological process of regulation in immune response, and were mainly involved in the PI3K-AKT and EMT pathways. Additionally, three upregulated hypomethylated oncogenes and four downregulated hypermethylated tumor suppressor genes (TSGs were identified. In conclusion, our study indicated possible aberrantly methylated DEGs and pathways in OSCCs, which could improve the understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms. Aberrantly methylated oncogenes and TSGs may also serve as biomarkers and therapeutic targets for the precise diagnosis and treatment of OSCCs in the future.

  9. Cloning and bioinformatics analysis of an ubiquitin gene of the rice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subcellular localization analysis showed that CsUB protein of cytoplasm, cell nucleus, mitochondrion, cell skeleton and plasma membrane occupied about 47.80, 26.10, 17.40, 4.30 and 4.30%, respectively. Sequence, homology and structural analysis confirmed that CsUB gene was highly conserved during evolution and ...

  10. Bioinformatics-Aided Venomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin Kaas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Venomics is a modern approach that combines transcriptomics and proteomics to explore the toxin content of venoms. This review will give an overview of computational approaches that have been created to classify and consolidate venomics data, as well as algorithms that have helped discovery and analysis of toxin nucleic acid and protein sequences, toxin three-dimensional structures and toxin functions. Bioinformatics is used to tackle specific challenges associated with the identification and annotations of toxins. Recognizing toxin transcript sequences among second generation sequencing data cannot rely only on basic sequence similarity because toxins are highly divergent. Mass spectrometry sequencing of mature toxins is challenging because toxins can display a large number of post-translational modifications. Identifying the mature toxin region in toxin precursor sequences requires the prediction of the cleavage sites of proprotein convertases, most of which are unknown or not well characterized. Tracing the evolutionary relationships between toxins should consider specific mechanisms of rapid evolution as well as interactions between predatory animals and prey. Rapidly determining the activity of toxins is the main bottleneck in venomics discovery, but some recent bioinformatics and molecular modeling approaches give hope that accurate predictions of toxin specificity could be made in the near future.

  11. Genetic and bioinformatic analysis of 41C and the 2R heterochromatin of Drosophila melanogaster: a window on the heterochromatin-euchromatin junction.

    OpenAIRE

    Myster, Steven H; Wang, Fei; Cavallo, Robert; Christian, Whitney; Bhotika, Seema; Anderson, Charles T; Peifer, Mark

    2004-01-01

    Genomic sequences provide powerful new tools in genetic analysis, making it possible to combine classical genetics with genomics to characterize the genes in a particular chromosome region. These approaches have been applied successfully to the euchromatin, but analysis of the heterochromatin has lagged somewhat behind. We describe a combined genetic and bioinformatics approach to the base of the right arm of the Drosophila melanogaster second chromosome, at the boundary between pericentric h...

  12. Bioinformatics Analysis for the Antirheumatic Effects of Huang-Lian-Jie-Du-Tang from a Network Perspective

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    Haiyang Fang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Huang-Lian-Jie-Du-Tang (HLJDT is a classic TCM formula to clear “heat” and “poison” that exhibits antirheumatic activity. Here we investigated the therapeutic mechanisms of HLJDT at protein network level using bioinformatics approach. It was found that HLJDT shares 5 target proteins with 3 types of anti-RA drugs, and several pathways in immune system and bone formation are significantly regulated by HLJDT’s components, suggesting the therapeutic effect of HLJDT on RA. By defining an antirheumatic effect score to quantitatively measure the therapeutic effect, we found that the score of each HLJDT’s component is very low, while the whole HLJDT achieves a much higher effect score, suggesting a synergistic effect of HLJDT achieved by its multiple components acting on multiple targets. At last, topological analysis on the RA-associated PPI network was conducted to illustrate key roles of HLJDT’s target proteins on this network. Integrating our findings with TCM theory suggests that HLJDT targets on hub nodes and main pathway in the Hot ZENG network, and thus it could be applied as adjuvant treatment for Hot-ZENG-related RA. This study may facilitate our understanding of antirheumatic effect of HLJDT and it may suggest new approach for the study of TCM pharmacology.

  13. Systematic Identification and Bioinformatic Analysis of MicroRNAs in Response to Infections of Coxsackievirus A16 and Enterovirus 71.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zheng; Qi, Yuhua; Fan, Huan; Cui, Lunbiao; Shi, Zhiyang

    2016-01-01

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD), mainly caused by coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16) and enterovirus 71 (EV71) infections, remains a serious public health issue with thousands of newly diagnostic cases each year since 2008 in China. The mechanisms underlying viral infection, however, are elusive to date. In the present study, we systematically investigated the host cellular microRNA (miRNA) expression patterns in response to CVA16 and EV71 infections. Through microarray examination, 27 miRNAs (15 upregulated and 12 downregulated) were found to be coassociated with the replication process of two viruses, while the expression levels of 15 and 5 miRNAs were significantly changed in CVA16- and EV71-infected cells, respectively. A great number of target genes of 27 common differentially expressed miRNAs were predicted by combined use of two computational target prediction algorithms, TargetScan and MiRanda. Comprehensive bioinformatic analysis of target genes in GO categories and KEGG pathways indicated the involvement of diverse biological functions and signaling pathways during viral infection. These results provide an overview of the roles of miRNAs in virus-host interaction, which will contribute to further understanding of HFMD pathological mechanisms.

  14. Transcriptomic and bioinformatics analysis of the early time-course of the response to prostaglandin F2 alpha in the bovine corpus luteum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Talbott

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available RNA expression analysis was performed on the corpus luteum tissue at five time points after prostaglandin F2 alpha treatment of midcycle cows using an Affymetrix Bovine Gene v1 Array. The normalized linear microarray data was uploaded to the NCBI GEO repository (GSE94069. Subsequent statistical analysis determined differentially expressed transcripts ± 1.5-fold change from saline control with P ≤ 0.05. Gene ontology of differentially expressed transcripts was annotated by DAVID and Panther. Physiological characteristics of the study animals are presented in a figure. Bioinformatic analysis by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis was curated, compiled, and presented in tables. A dataset comparison with similar microarray analyses was performed and bioinformatics analysis by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, DAVID, Panther, and String of differentially expressed genes from each dataset as well as the differentially expressed genes common to all three datasets were curated, compiled, and presented in tables. Finally, a table comparing four bioinformatics tools’ predictions of functions associated with genes common to all three datasets is presented. These data have been further analyzed and interpreted in the companion article “Early transcriptome responses of the bovine mid-cycle corpus luteum to prostaglandin F2 alpha includes cytokine signaling” [1].

  15. Cloning and bioinformatics analysis of an ubiquitin gene of the rice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-05

    Oct 5, 2011 ... 2Institute of Plant Protection, Anhui Academy of Agricultural ... localization analysis showed that CsUB protein of cytoplasm, cell ... and plasma membrane occupied about 47.80, 26.10, 17.40, 4.30 and 4.30%, respectively.

  16. Bioinformatic evaluation of L-arginine catabolic pathways in 24 cyanobacteria and transcriptional analysis of genes encoding enzymes of L-arginine catabolism in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pistorius Elfriede K

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background So far very limited knowledge exists on L-arginine catabolism in cyanobacteria, although six major L-arginine-degrading pathways have been described for prokaryotes. Thus, we have performed a bioinformatic analysis of possible L-arginine-degrading pathways in cyanobacteria. Further, we chose Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 for a more detailed bioinformatic analysis and for validation of the bioinformatic predictions on L-arginine catabolism with a transcript analysis. Results We have evaluated 24 cyanobacterial genomes of freshwater or marine strains for the presence of putative L-arginine-degrading enzymes. We identified an L-arginine decarboxylase pathway in all 24 strains. In addition, cyanobacteria have one or two further pathways representing either an arginase pathway or L-arginine deiminase pathway or an L-arginine oxidase/dehydrogenase pathway. An L-arginine amidinotransferase pathway as a major L-arginine-degrading pathway is not likely but can not be entirely excluded. A rather unusual finding was that the cyanobacterial L-arginine deiminases are substantially larger than the enzymes in non-photosynthetic bacteria and that they are membrane-bound. A more detailed bioinformatic analysis of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 revealed that three different L-arginine-degrading pathways may in principle be functional in this cyanobacterium. These are (i an L-arginine decarboxylase pathway, (ii an L-arginine deiminase pathway, and (iii an L-arginine oxidase/dehydrogenase pathway. A transcript analysis of cells grown either with nitrate or L-arginine as sole N-source and with an illumination of 50 μmol photons m-2 s-1 showed that the transcripts for the first enzyme(s of all three pathways were present, but that the transcript levels for the L-arginine deiminase and the L-arginine oxidase/dehydrogenase were substantially higher than that of the three isoenzymes of L-arginine decarboxylase. Conclusion The evaluation of 24

  17. Closha: bioinformatics workflow system for the analysis of massive sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, GunHwan; Kim, Pan-Gyu; Yoon, Jongcheol; Han, Gukhee; Park, Seong-Jin; Song, Wangho; Lee, Byungwook

    2018-02-19

    While next-generation sequencing (NGS) costs have fallen in recent years, the cost and complexity of computation remain substantial obstacles to the use of NGS in bio-medical care and genomic research. The rapidly increasing amounts of data available from the new high-throughput methods have made data processing infeasible without automated pipelines. The integration of data and analytic resources into workflow systems provides a solution to the problem by simplifying the task of data analysis. To address this challenge, we developed a cloud-based workflow management system, Closha, to provide fast and cost-effective analysis of massive genomic data. We implemented complex workflows making optimal use of high-performance computing clusters. Closha allows users to create multi-step analyses using drag and drop functionality and to modify the parameters of pipeline tools. Users can also import the Galaxy pipelines into Closha. Closha is a hybrid system that enables users to use both analysis programs providing traditional tools and MapReduce-based big data analysis programs simultaneously in a single pipeline. Thus, the execution of analytics algorithms can be parallelized, speeding up the whole process. We also developed a high-speed data transmission solution, KoDS, to transmit a large amount of data at a fast rate. KoDS has a file transfer speed of up to 10 times that of normal FTP and HTTP. The computer hardware for Closha is 660 CPU cores and 800 TB of disk storage, enabling 500 jobs to run at the same time. Closha is a scalable, cost-effective, and publicly available web service for large-scale genomic data analysis. Closha supports the reliable and highly scalable execution of sequencing analysis workflows in a fully automated manner. Closha provides a user-friendly interface to all genomic scientists to try to derive accurate results from NGS platform data. The Closha cloud server is freely available for use from http://closha.kobic.re.kr/ .

  18. Bioinformatics and the Undergraduate Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Mark; Parker, Jeffrey; LeBlanc, Mark; Woodard, Craig T.; Glackin, Mary; Hanrahan, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances involving high-throughput techniques for data generation and analysis have made familiarity with basic bioinformatics concepts and programs a necessity in the biological sciences. Undergraduate students increasingly need training in methods related to finding and retrieving information stored in vast databases. The rapid rise of…

  19. Identification of Key Pathways and Genes in Advanced Coronary Atherosclerosis Using Bioinformatics Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowen Tan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Coronary artery atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease. This study aimed to identify the key changes of gene expression between early and advanced carotid atherosclerotic plaque in human. Methods. Gene expression dataset GSE28829 was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO, including 16 advanced and 13 early stage atherosclerotic plaque samples from human carotid. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs were analyzed. Results. 42,450 genes were obtained from the dataset. Top 100 up- and downregulated DEGs were listed. Functional enrichment analysis and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG identification were performed. The result of functional and pathway enrichment analysis indicted that the immune system process played a critical role in the progression of carotid atherosclerotic plaque. Protein-protein interaction (PPI networks were performed either. Top 10 hub genes were identified from PPI network and top 6 modules were inferred. These genes were mainly involved in chemokine signaling pathway, cell cycle, B cell receptor signaling pathway, focal adhesion, and regulation of actin cytoskeleton. Conclusion. The present study indicated that analysis of DEGs would make a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms of atherosclerosis development and they might be used as molecular targets and diagnostic biomarkers for the treatment of atherosclerosis.

  20. MiR-139 in digestive system tumor diagnosis and detection: Bioinformatics and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Hui; Ji, Jia; Weng, Hong; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Wang, Fu-Bing

    2018-06-05

    Accumulating evidence has indicated that microRNAs play important roles in the initiation and progression of digestive system tumors. However, previous studies suggest that the accuracy of miRNA detection in digestive system tumors was inconsistent. The candidate miRNAs were obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the diagnostic value of these miRNAs in digestive system tumors. Furthermore, the potential target genes of the miRNAs were predicted and assessed with functional analysis. According to TCGA data, miR-139 was a common biomarker of digestive system tumors. It was markedly reduced in tumor tissues as compared with non-cancerous tissues in digestive system tumors. In the meta-analysis, the pooled diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) and AUC was 57.51 (95% CI: 14.25-232.04) and 0.96 (95% CI: 0.94-0.97), respectively. Furthermore, the overall sensitivity and specificity was 0.89 (95% CI: 0.73-0.96) and 0.91 (95% CI: 0.75-0.97), respectively. The diagnostic value of tissue miR-139 was higher than the diagnostic value of blood miR-139. In particular, miR-139 was a superior marker for distinguishing colorectal cancer. miR-139 could be a potential biomarker for diagnosis of digestive system tumors especially colorectal cancer. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Strategic Integration of Multiple Bioinformatics Resources for System Level Analysis of Biological Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Mark; Sulakhe, Dinanath; Wang, Sheng; Xie, Bing; Hashemifar, Somaye; Taylor, Andrew; Dubchak, Inna; Conrad Gilliam, T; Maltsev, Natalia

    2017-01-01

    Recent technological advances in genomics allow the production of biological data at unprecedented tera- and petabyte scales. Efficient mining of these vast and complex datasets for the needs of biomedical research critically depends on a seamless integration of the clinical, genomic, and experimental information with prior knowledge about genotype-phenotype relationships. Such experimental data accumulated in publicly available databases should be accessible to a variety of algorithms and analytical pipelines that drive computational analysis and data mining.We present an integrated computational platform Lynx (Sulakhe et al., Nucleic Acids Res 44:D882-D887, 2016) ( http://lynx.cri.uchicago.edu ), a web-based database and knowledge extraction engine. It provides advanced search capabilities and a variety of algorithms for enrichment analysis and network-based gene prioritization. It gives public access to the Lynx integrated knowledge base (LynxKB) and its analytical tools via user-friendly web services and interfaces. The Lynx service-oriented architecture supports annotation and analysis of high-throughput experimental data. Lynx tools assist the user in extracting meaningful knowledge from LynxKB and experimental data, and in the generation of weighted hypotheses regarding the genes and molecular mechanisms contributing to human phenotypes or conditions of interest. The goal of this integrated platform is to support the end-to-end analytical needs of various translational projects.

  2. [Cloning and bioinformatics analysis of abscisic acid 8'-hydroxylase from Pseudostellariae Radix].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Long, Deng-Kai; Zhou, Tao; Ding, Ling; Zheng, Wei; Jiang, Wei-Ke

    2016-07-01

    Abscisic acid 8'-hydroxylase was one of key enzymes genes in the metabolism of abscisic acid (ABA). Seven menbers of abscisic acid 8'-hydroxylase were identified from Pseudostellaria heterophylla transcriptome sequencing results by using sequence homology. The expression profiles of these genes were analyzed by transcriptome data. The coding sequence of ABA8ox1 was cloned and analyzed by informational technology. The full-length cDNA of ABA8ox1 was 1 401 bp,with 480 encoded amino acids. The predicated isoelectric point (pI) and relative molecular mass (MW) were 8.55 and 53 kDa,respectively. Transmembrane structure analysis showed that there were 21 amino acids in-side and 445 amino acids out-side. High level of transcripts can detect in bark of root and fibrous root. Multi-alignment and phylogenetic analysis both show that ABA8ox1 had a high similarity with the CYP707As from other plants,especially with AtCYP707A1 and AtCYP707A3 in Arabidopsis thaliana. These results lay a foundation for molecular mechanism of tuberous root expanding and response to adversity stress. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  3. Bioinformatics Analysis of NBS-LRR Encoding Resistance Genes in Setaria italica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Weng, Qiaoyun; Song, Jinhui; Ma, Hailian; Yuan, Jincheng; Dong, Zhiping; Liu, Yinghui

    2016-06-01

    In plants, resistance (R) genes are involved in pathogen recognition and subsequent activation of innate immune responses. The nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) genes family forms the largest R-gene family among plant genomes and play an important role in plant disease resistance. In this paper, comprehensive analysis of NBS-encoding genes is performed in the whole Setaria italica genome. A total of 96 NBS-LRR genes are identified, and comprehensive overview of the NBS-LRR genes is undertaken, including phylogenetic analysis, chromosome locations, conserved motifs of proteins, and gene expression. Based on the domain, these genes are divided into two groups and distributed in all Setaria italica chromosomes. Most NBS-LRR genes are located at the distal tip of the long arms of the chromosomes. Setaria italica NBS-LRR proteins share at least one nucleotide-biding domain and one leucine-rich repeat domain. Our results also show the duplication of NBS-LRR genes in Setaria italica is related to their gene structure.

  4. Bioinformatics analysis of the structural and evolutionary characteristics for toll-like receptor 15

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinlan Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLRs play important role in the innate immune system. TLR15 is reported to have a unique role in defense against pathogens, but its structural and evolution characterizations are still poorly understood. In this study, we identified 57 completed TLR15 genes from avian and reptilian genomes. TLR15 clustered into an individual clade and was closely related to family 1 on the phylogenetic tree. Unlike the TLRs in family 1 with the broken asparagine ladders in the middle, TLR15 ectodomain had an intact asparagine ladder that is critical to maintain the overall shape of ectodomain. The conservation analysis found that TLR15 ectodomain had a highly evolutionarily conserved region on the convex surface of LRR11 module, which is probably involved in TLR15 activation process. Furthermore, the protein–protein docking analysis indicated that TLR15 TIR domains have the potential to form homodimers, the predicted interaction interface of TIR dimer was formed mainly by residues from the BB-loops and αC-helixes. Although TLR15 mainly underwent purifying selection, we detected 27 sites under positive selection for TLR15, 24 of which are located on its ectodomain. Our observations suggest the structural features of TLR15 which may be relevant to its function, but which requires further experimental validation.

  5. [Genome-wide identification and bioinformatic analysis of PPR gene family in tomato].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Anming; Li, Ling; Qu, Xu; Sun, Tingting; Chen, Yaqiong; Zong, Peng; Li, Zunqiang; Gong, Daping; Sun, Yuhe

    2014-01-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeats (PPRs) genes constitute one of the largest gene families in plants, which play a broad and essential role in plant growth and development. In this study, the protein sequences annotated by the tomato (S. lycopersicum L.) genome project were screened with the Pfam PPR sequences. A total of 471 putative PPR-encoding genes were identified. Based on the motifs defined in A. thaliana L., protein structure and conserved sequences for each tomato motif were analyzed. We also analyzed phylogenetic relationship, subcellular localization, expression and GO analysis of the identified gene sequences. Our results demonstrate that tomato PPR gene family contains two subfamilies, P and PLS, each accounting for half of the family. PLS subfamily can be divided into four subclasses i.e., PLS, E, E+ and DYW. Each subclass of sequences forms a clade in the phylogenetic tree. The PPR motifs were found highly conserved among plants. The tomato PPR genes were distributed over 12 chromosomes and most of them lack introns. The majority of PPR proteins harbor mitochondrial or chloroplast localization sequences, whereas GO analysis showed that most PPR proteins participate in RNA-related biological processes.

  6. Bioinformatics analysis on molecular mechanism of rheum officinale in treatment of jaundice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Si; Tu, Jun; Nie, Peng; Yan, Xiaojun

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To study the molecular mechanism of Rheum officinale in the treatment of Jaundice by building molecular networks and comparing canonical pathways. Methods: Target proteins of Rheum officinale and related genes of Jaundice were searched from Pubchem and Gene databases online respectively. Molecular networks and canonical pathways comparison analyses were performed by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). Results: The molecular networks of Rheum officinale and Jaundice were complex and multifunctional. The 40 target proteins of Rheum officinale and 33 Homo sapiens genes of Jaundice were found in databases. There were 19 common pathways both related networks. Rheum officinale could regulate endothelial differentiation, Interleukin-1B (IL-1B) and Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) in these pathways. Conclusions: Rheum officinale treat Jaundice by regulating many effective nodes of Apoptotic pathway and cellular immunity related pathways.

  7. Carbohydrate-active enzymes in Trichoderma harzianum: a bioinformatic analysis bioprospecting for key enzymes for the biofuels industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira Filho, Jaire Alves; Horta, Maria Augusta Crivelente; Beloti, Lilian Luzia; Dos Santos, Clelton Aparecido; de Souza, Anete Pereira

    2017-10-12

    Trichoderma harzianum is used in biotechnology applications due to its ability to produce powerful enzymes for the conversion of lignocellulosic substrates into soluble sugars. Active enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism are defined as carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes), and the most abundant family in the CAZy database is the glycoside hydrolases. The enzymes of this family play a fundamental role in the decomposition of plant biomass. In this study, the CAZymes of T. harzianum were identified and classified using bioinformatic approaches after which the expression profiles of all annotated CAZymes were assessed via RNA-Seq, and a phylogenetic analysis was performed. A total of 430 CAZymes (3.7% of the total proteins for this organism) were annotated in T. harzianum, including 259 glycoside hydrolases (GHs), 101 glycosyl transferases (GTs), 6 polysaccharide lyases (PLs), 22 carbohydrate esterases (CEs), 42 auxiliary activities (AAs) and 46 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs). Among the identified T. harzianum CAZymes, 47% were predicted to harbor a signal peptide sequence and were therefore classified as secreted proteins. The GH families were the CAZyme class with the greatest number of expressed genes, including GH18 (23 genes), GH3 (17 genes), GH16 (16 genes), GH2 (13 genes) and GH5 (12 genes). A phylogenetic analysis of the proteins in the AA9/GH61, CE5 and GH55 families showed high functional variation among the proteins. Identifying the main proteins used by T. harzianum for biomass degradation can ensure new advances in the biofuel production field. Herein, we annotated and characterized the expression levels of all of the CAZymes from T. harzianum, which may contribute to future studies focusing on the functional and structural characterization of the identified proteins.

  8. General Approach to Identifying Potential Targets for Cancer Imaging by Integrated Bioinformatics Analysis of Publicly Available Genomic Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongliang Yang

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging has moved to the forefront of drug development and biomedical research. The identification of appropriate imaging targets has become the touchstone for the accurate diagnosis and prognosis of human cancer. Particularly, cell surface- or membrane-bound proteins are attractive imaging targets for their aberrant expression, easily accessible location, and unique biochemical functions in tumor cells. Previously, we published a literature mining of potential targets for our in-house enzyme-mediated cancer imaging and therapy technology. Here we present a simple and integrated bioinformatics analysis approach that assembles a public cancer microarray database with a pathway knowledge base for ascertaining and prioritizing upregulated genes encoding cell surface- or membrane-bound proteins, which could serve imaging targets. As examples, we obtained lists of potential hits for six common and lethal human tumors in the prostate, breast, lung, colon, ovary, and pancreas. As control tests, a number of well-known cancer imaging targets were detected and confirmed by our study. Further, by consulting gene-disease and protein-disease databases, we suggest a number of significantly upregulated genes as promising imaging targets, including cell surface-associated mucin-1, prostate-specific membrane antigen, hepsin, urokinase plasminogen activator receptor, and folate receptors. By integrating pathway analysis, we are able to organize and map “focused” interaction networks derived from significantly dysregulated entity pairs to reflect important cellular functions in disease processes. We provide herein an example of identifying a tumor cell growth and proliferation subnetwork for prostate cancer. This systematic mining approach can be broadly applied to identify imaging or therapeutic targets for other human diseases.

  9. Toward the Replacement of Animal Experiments through the Bioinformatics-driven Analysis of 'Omics' Data from Human Cell Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grafström, Roland C; Nymark, Penny; Hongisto, Vesa; Spjuth, Ola; Ceder, Rebecca; Willighagen, Egon; Hardy, Barry; Kaski, Samuel; Kohonen, Pekka

    2015-11-01

    This paper outlines the work for which Roland Grafström and Pekka Kohonen were awarded the 2014 Lush Science Prize. The research activities of the Grafström laboratory have, for many years, covered cancer biology studies, as well as the development and application of toxicity-predictive in vitro models to determine chemical safety. Through the integration of in silico analyses of diverse types of genomics data (transcriptomic and proteomic), their efforts have proved to fit well into the recently-developed Adverse Outcome Pathway paradigm. Genomics analysis within state-of-the-art cancer biology research and Toxicology in the 21st Century concepts share many technological tools. A key category within the Three Rs paradigm is the Replacement of animals in toxicity testing with alternative methods, such as bioinformatics-driven analyses of data obtained from human cell cultures exposed to diverse toxicants. This work was recently expanded within the pan-European SEURAT-1 project (Safety Evaluation Ultimately Replacing Animal Testing), to replace repeat-dose toxicity testing with data-rich analyses of sophisticated cell culture models. The aims and objectives of the SEURAT project have been to guide the application, analysis, interpretation and storage of 'omics' technology-derived data within the service-oriented sub-project, ToxBank. Particularly addressing the Lush Science Prize focus on the relevance of toxicity pathways, a 'data warehouse' that is under continuous expansion, coupled with the development of novel data storage and management methods for toxicology, serve to address data integration across multiple 'omics' technologies. The prize winners' guiding principles and concepts for modern knowledge management of toxicological data are summarised. The translation of basic discovery results ranged from chemical-testing and material-testing data, to information relevant to human health and environmental safety. 2015 FRAME.

  10. Bioinformatics Identification of Modules of Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Alzheimer's Disease-Related Genes by In Silico Promoter Analysis and Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Augustin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms and genetic risk factors underlying Alzheimer's disease (AD pathogenesis are only partly understood. To identify new factors, which may contribute to AD, different approaches are taken including proteomics, genetics, and functional genomics. Here, we used a bioinformatics approach and found that distinct AD-related genes share modules of transcription factor binding sites, suggesting a transcriptional coregulation. To detect additional coregulated genes, which may potentially contribute to AD, we established a new bioinformatics workflow with known multivariate methods like support vector machines, biclustering, and predicted transcription factor binding site modules by using in silico analysis and over 400 expression arrays from human and mouse. Two significant modules are composed of three transcription factor families: CTCF, SP1F, and EGRF/ZBPF, which are conserved between human and mouse APP promoter sequences. The specific combination of in silico promoter and multivariate analysis can identify regulation mechanisms of genes involved in multifactorial diseases.

  11. Microbiological and bioinformatics analysis of primary Sjogren's syndrome patients with normal salivation§

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    Huma Siddiqui

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reduced salivation is considered a major clinical feature of most but not all cases of primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS. Reduced saliva flow may lead to changes in the salivary microbiota. These changes have mainly been studied with culture that typically recovers only 65% of the bacteria present. Objective: This study was to use high throughput sequencing, covering both cultivated and not-yet-cultivated bacteria, to assess the bacterial microbiota of whole saliva in pSS patients with normal salivation. Methods: Bacteria of whole unstimulated saliva from nine pSS patients with normal salivation flow and from nine healthy controls were examined by high throughput sequencing of the hypervariable region V1V2 of 16S rRNA using the 454 GS Junior system. Raw sequence reads were subjected to a species-level, reference-based taxonomy assignment pipeline specially designed for studying the human oral microbial community. Each of the sequence reads was BLASTN-searched against a database consisting of reference sequences representing 1,156 oral and 12,013 non-oral species. Unassigned reads were then screened for high-quality non-chimeras and subjected to de novo species-level operational taxonomy unit (OTU calling for potential novel species. Downstream analyses, including alpha and beta diversities, were analyzed using the Quantitative Insights into Microbial Ecology (QIIME pipeline. To reveal significant differences between the microbiota of control saliva and Sjögren's saliva, a statistical method introduced in Metastats www.metastats.cbcb.umd.edu was used. Results: Saliva of pSS patients with normal salivation had a significantly higher frequency of Firmicutes compared with controls (p=0.004. Two other major phyla, Synergistetes and Spirochaetes, were significantly depleted in pSS (p=0.001 for both. In addition, we saw a nearly 17% decrease in the number of genera in pSS (25 vs. 30. While Prevotella was almost equally abundant in both

  12. Integrated bioinformatic analysis unveils significant genes and pathways in the pathogenesis of supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang G

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Guang-Yu Wang,1,* Ling Li,2,* Bo Liu,1 Xiao Han,1 Chun-Hua Wang,1 Ji-Wen Wang3 1Department of Neurosurgery, 2Department of Pediatrics, Qilu Children’s Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, 3Department of Neurology, Shanghai Children’s Medical Center, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Pudong New District, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: This study aimed to explore significant genes and pathways involved in the pathogenesis of supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumor (sPNET. Materials and methods: Gene expression profile of GSE14295 was downloaded from publicly available Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO database. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs were screened out in primary sPNET samples compared with normal fetal and adult brain reference samples (sPNET vs fetal brain and sPNET vs adult brain. Pathway enrichment analysis of these DEGs was conducted, followed by protein–protein interaction (PPI network construction and significant module selection. Additionally, transcription factors (TFs regulating the common DEGs in the two comparison groups were identified, and the regulatory network was constructed. Results: In total, 526 DEGs (99 up- and 427 downregulated in sPNET vs fetal brain and 815 DEGs (200 up- and 615 downregulated in sPNET vs adult brain were identified. DEGs in sPNET vs fetal brain and sPNET vs adult brain were associated with calcium signaling pathway, cell cycle, and p53 signaling pathway. CDK1, CDC20, BUB1B, and BUB1 were hub nodes in the PPI networks of DEGs in sPNET vs fetal brain and sPNET vs adult brain. Significant modules were extracted from the PPI networks. In addition, 64 upregulated and 200 downregulated overlapping DEGs were identified in both sPNET vs fetal brain and sPNET vs adult brain. The genes involved in the regulatory network upon overlapping DEGs and the TFs were correlated with calcium signaling pathway

  13. Flux Analysis of the Trypanosoma brucei Glycolysis Based on a Multiobjective-Criteria Bioinformatic Approach

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    Amine Ghozlane

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei is a protozoan parasite of major of interest in discovering new genes for drug targets. This parasite alternates its life cycle between the mammal host(s (bloodstream form and the insect vector (procyclic form, with two divergent glucose metabolism amenable to in vitro culture. While the metabolic network of the bloodstream forms has been well characterized, the flux distribution between the different branches of the glucose metabolic network in the procyclic form has not been addressed so far. We present a computational analysis (called Metaboflux that exploits the metabolic topology of the procyclic form, and allows the incorporation of multipurpose experimental data to increase the biological relevance of the model. The alternatives resulting from the structural complexity of networks are formulated as an optimization problem solved by a metaheuristic where experimental data are modeled in a multiobjective function. Our results show that the current metabolic model is in agreement with experimental data and confirms the observed high metabolic flexibility of glucose metabolism. In addition, Metaboflux offers a rational explanation for the high flexibility in the ratio between final products from glucose metabolism, thsat is, flux redistribution through the malic enzyme steps.

  14. Cloning and bioinformatics analysis of CcPILS gene of Hickory (Carya cathayensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wenbin; Yuan, Huwei; Gao, Liuxiao; Guo, Haipeng; Qiu, Lingling; Xu, Dongbin; Yan, Daoliang; Zheng, Bingsong

    2017-04-01

    PILS is a key auxin efflux carrier protein in the auxin signal transduction. A CcPILS gene related to hickory (Carya carthayensis) grafting process was obtained by RACE techniques. The full length of CcPILS gene was1541bp contained a 1263bp length open reading flame (ORF). The CcPILS encoded 294 amino acids with molecular weight of 46 kDa, PI 5.38 and localized at endoplasmic reticulum membrane. The gene contained a central hydrophilic loop separating two hydrophobic domains of about five transmembrane regions each. The gene of CcPILS belonged to Clade III sub-family of PILS and its sequence had high homology with Arabidopsis. Real Time RT-PCR analysis showed that the gene expressions were weakly induced in bud, inflorescence, fruit, leaf and stem, while strongly in root. The expression levels were strongly induced and reached a peak at the third day of grafting in scion and rootstock of hickory, which were 1.45 and 3.45 times higher, respectively, compared to that of control. The results indicated that CcPILS may be involved in regulating the expression of genes related to auxin signal transduction during hickory graft process.

  15. Genomic Analysis of a Marine Bacterium: Bioinformatics for Comparison, Evaluation, and Interpretation of DNA Sequences

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    Bhagwan N. Rekadwad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of five highly related strains of an unidentified marine bacterium were analyzed through their short genome sequences (AM260709–AM260713. Genome-to-Genome Distance (GGDC showed high similarity to Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis (X67024. The generated unique Quick Response (QR codes indicated no identity to other microbial species or gene sequences. Chaos Game Representation (CGR showed the number of bases concentrated in the area. Guanine residues were highest in number followed by cytosine. Frequency of Chaos Game Representation (FCGR indicated that CC and GG blocks have higher frequency in the sequence from the evaluated marine bacterium strains. Maximum GC content for the marine bacterium strains ranged 53-54%. The use of QR codes, CGR, FCGR, and GC dataset helped in identifying and interpreting short genome sequences from specific isolates. A phylogenetic tree was constructed with the bootstrap test (1000 replicates using MEGA6 software. Principal Component Analysis (PCA was carried out using EMBL-EBI MUSCLE program. Thus, generated genomic data are of great assistance for hierarchical classification in Bacterial Systematics which combined with phenotypic features represents a basic procedure for a polyphasic approach on unambiguous bacterial isolate taxonomic classification.

  16. Biggest challenges in bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Jonathan C; Khoueiry, Pierre; Dinkel, Holger; Forslund, Kristoffer; Stamatakis, Alexandros; Barry, Joseph; Budd, Aidan; Soldatos, Theodoros G; Linssen, Katja; Rajput, Abdul Mateen

    2013-04-01

    The third Heidelberg Unseminars in Bioinformatics (HUB) was held on 18th October 2012, at Heidelberg University, Germany. HUB brought together around 40 bioinformaticians from academia and industry to discuss the 'Biggest Challenges in Bioinformatics' in a 'World Café' style event.

  17. Biggest challenges in bioinformatics

    OpenAIRE

    Fuller, Jonathan C; Khoueiry, Pierre; Dinkel, Holger; Forslund, Kristoffer; Stamatakis, Alexandros; Barry, Joseph; Budd, Aidan; Soldatos, Theodoros G; Linssen, Katja; Rajput, Abdul Mateen

    2013-01-01

    The third Heidelberg Unseminars in Bioinformatics (HUB) was held in October at Heidelberg University in Germany. HUB brought together around 40 bioinformaticians from academia and industry to discuss the ‘Biggest Challenges in Bioinformatics' in a ‘World Café' style event.

  18. Bioinformatics analysis of the factors controlling type I IFN gene expression in autoimmune disease and virus-induced immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di eFeng

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and Sjögren's syndrome (SS display increased levels of type I IFN-induced genes. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDCs are natural interferon producing cells and considered to be a primary source of IFN-α in these two diseases. Differential expression patterns of type I IFN inducible transcripts can be found in different immune cell subsets and in patients with both active and inactive autoimmune disease. A type I IFN gene signature generally consists of three groups of IFN-induced genes - those regulated in response to virus-induced type I IFN, those regulated by the IFN-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK pathway, and those by the IFN-induced phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI-3K pathway. These three groups of type I IFN-regulated genes control important cellular processes such as apoptosis, survival, adhesion, and chemotaxis, that when dysregulated, contribute to autoimmunity. With the recent generation of large datasets in the public domain from next-generation sequencing and DNA microarray experiments, one can perform detailed analyses of cell type-specific gene signatures as well as identify distinct transcription factors that differentially regulate these gene signatures. We have performed bioinformatics analysis of data in the public domain and experimental data from our lab to gain insight into the regulation of type I IFN gene expression. We have found that the genetic landscape of the IFNA and IFNB genes are occupied by transcription factors, such as insulators CTCF and cohesin, that negatively regulate transcription, as well as IRF5 and IRF7, that positively and distinctly regulate IFNA subtypes. A detailed understanding of the factors controlling type I IFN gene transcription will significantly aid in the identification and development of new therapeutic strategies targeting the IFN pathway in autoimmune disease.

  19. A bioinformatics potpourri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönbach, Christian; Li, Jinyan; Ma, Lan; Horton, Paul; Sjaugi, Muhammad Farhan; Ranganathan, Shoba

    2018-01-19

    The 16th International Conference on Bioinformatics (InCoB) was held at Tsinghua University, Shenzhen from September 20 to 22, 2017. The annual conference of the Asia-Pacific Bioinformatics Network featured six keynotes, two invited talks, a panel discussion on big data driven bioinformatics and precision medicine, and 66 oral presentations of accepted research articles or posters. Fifty-seven articles comprising a topic assortment of algorithms, biomolecular networks, cancer and disease informatics, drug-target interactions and drug efficacy, gene regulation and expression, imaging, immunoinformatics, metagenomics, next generation sequencing for genomics and transcriptomics, ontologies, post-translational modification, and structural bioinformatics are the subject of this editorial for the InCoB2017 supplement issues in BMC Genomics, BMC Bioinformatics, BMC Systems Biology and BMC Medical Genomics. New Delhi will be the location of InCoB2018, scheduled for September 26-28, 2018.

  20. Bioinformatics clouds for big data manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Lin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As advances in life sciences and information technology bring profound influences on bioinformatics due to its interdisciplinary nature, bioinformatics is experiencing a new leap-forward from in-house computing infrastructure into utility-supplied cloud computing delivered over the Internet, in order to handle the vast quantities of biological data generated by high-throughput experimental technologies. Albeit relatively new, cloud computing promises to address big data storage and analysis issues in the bioinformatics field. Here we review extant cloud-based services in bioinformatics, classify them into Data as a Service (DaaS, Software as a Service (SaaS, Platform as a Service (PaaS, and Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS, and present our perspectives on the adoption of cloud computing in bioinformatics. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Frank Eisenhaber, Igor Zhulin, and Sandor Pongor.

  1. Bioinformatics clouds for big data manipulation

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Lin

    2012-11-28

    As advances in life sciences and information technology bring profound influences on bioinformatics due to its interdisciplinary nature, bioinformatics is experiencing a new leap-forward from in-house computing infrastructure into utility-supplied cloud computing delivered over the Internet, in order to handle the vast quantities of biological data generated by high-throughput experimental technologies. Albeit relatively new, cloud computing promises to address big data storage and analysis issues in the bioinformatics field. Here we review extant cloud-based services in bioinformatics, classify them into Data as a Service (DaaS), Software as a Service (SaaS), Platform as a Service (PaaS), and Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), and present our perspectives on the adoption of cloud computing in bioinformatics.This article was reviewed by Frank Eisenhaber, Igor Zhulin, and Sandor Pongor. 2012 Dai et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  2. Bioinformatics clouds for big data manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lin; Gao, Xin; Guo, Yan; Xiao, Jingfa; Zhang, Zhang

    2012-11-28

    As advances in life sciences and information technology bring profound influences on bioinformatics due to its interdisciplinary nature, bioinformatics is experiencing a new leap-forward from in-house computing infrastructure into utility-supplied cloud computing delivered over the Internet, in order to handle the vast quantities of biological data generated by high-throughput experimental technologies. Albeit relatively new, cloud computing promises to address big data storage and analysis issues in the bioinformatics field. Here we review extant cloud-based services in bioinformatics, classify them into Data as a Service (DaaS), Software as a Service (SaaS), Platform as a Service (PaaS), and Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), and present our perspectives on the adoption of cloud computing in bioinformatics. This article was reviewed by Frank Eisenhaber, Igor Zhulin, and Sandor Pongor.

  3. Evaluation of simultaneous nutrient and COD removal with polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) accumulation using mixed microbial consortia under anoxic condition and their bioinformatics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, Jyotsnarani; Kumar, Ravindra; Dixit, Anshuman; Pandey, Sony; Das, Trupti

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous nitrate-N, phosphate and COD removal was evaluated from synthetic waste water using mixed microbial consortia in an anoxic environment under various initial carbon load (ICL) in a batch scale reactor system. Within 6 hours of incubation, enriched DNPAOs (Denitrifying Polyphosphate Accumulating Microorganisms) were able to remove maximum COD (87%) at 2 g/L of ICL whereas maximum nitrate-N (97%) and phosphate (87%) removal along with PHB accumulation (49 mg/L) was achieved at 8 g/L of ICL. Exhaustion of nitrate-N, beyond 6 hours of incubation, had a detrimental effect on COD and phosphate removal rate. Fresh supply of nitrate-N to the reaction medium, beyond 6 hours, helped revive the removal rates of both COD and phosphate. Therefore, it was apparent that in spite of a high carbon load, maximum COD and nutrient removal can be maintained, with adequate nitrate-N availability. Denitrifying condition in the medium was evident from an increasing pH trend. PHB accumulation by the mixed culture was directly proportional to ICL; however the time taken for accumulation at higher ICL was more. Unlike conventional EBPR, PHB depletion did not support phosphate accumulation in this case. The unique aspect of all the batch studies were PHB accumulation was observed along with phosphate uptake and nitrate reduction under anoxic conditions. Bioinformatics analysis followed by pyrosequencing of the mixed culture DNA from the seed sludge revealed the dominance of denitrifying population, such as Corynebacterium, Rhodocyclus and Paraccocus (Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria). Rarefaction curve indicated complete bacterial population and corresponding number of OTUs through sequence analysis. Chao1 and Shannon index (H') was used to study the diversity of sampling. "UCI95" and "LCI95" indicated 95% confidence level of upper and lower values of Chao1 for each distance. Values of Chao1 index supported the results of rarefaction curve.

  4. Evaluation of simultaneous nutrient and COD removal with polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB accumulation using mixed microbial consortia under anoxic condition and their bioinformatics analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotsnarani Jena

    Full Text Available Simultaneous nitrate-N, phosphate and COD removal was evaluated from synthetic waste water using mixed microbial consortia in an anoxic environment under various initial carbon load (ICL in a batch scale reactor system. Within 6 hours of incubation, enriched DNPAOs (Denitrifying Polyphosphate Accumulating Microorganisms were able to remove maximum COD (87% at 2 g/L of ICL whereas maximum nitrate-N (97% and phosphate (87% removal along with PHB accumulation (49 mg/L was achieved at 8 g/L of ICL. Exhaustion of nitrate-N, beyond 6 hours of incubation, had a detrimental effect on COD and phosphate removal rate. Fresh supply of nitrate-N to the reaction medium, beyond 6 hours, helped revive the removal rates of both COD and phosphate. Therefore, it was apparent that in spite of a high carbon load, maximum COD and nutrient removal can be maintained, with adequate nitrate-N availability. Denitrifying condition in the medium was evident from an increasing pH trend. PHB accumulation by the mixed culture was directly proportional to ICL; however the time taken for accumulation at higher ICL was more. Unlike conventional EBPR, PHB depletion did not support phosphate accumulation in this case. The unique aspect of all the batch studies were PHB accumulation was observed along with phosphate uptake and nitrate reduction under anoxic conditions. Bioinformatics analysis followed by pyrosequencing of the mixed culture DNA from the seed sludge revealed the dominance of denitrifying population, such as Corynebacterium, Rhodocyclus and Paraccocus (Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria. Rarefaction curve indicated complete bacterial population and corresponding number of OTUs through sequence analysis. Chao1 and Shannon index (H' was used to study the diversity of sampling. "UCI95" and "LCI95" indicated 95% confidence level of upper and lower values of Chao1 for each distance. Values of Chao1 index supported the results of rarefaction curve.

  5. Bioinformatics for Genome Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary J. Olsen

    2005-06-30

    Nesbo, Boucher and Doolittle (2001) used phylogenetic trees of four taxa to assess whether euryarchaeal genes share a common history. They have suggested that of the 521 genes examined, each of the three possible tree topologies relating the four taxa was supported essentially equal numbers of times. They suggest that this might be the result of numerous horizontal gene transfer events, essentially randomizing the relationships between gene histories (as inferred in the 521 gene trees) and organismal relationships (which would be a single underlying tree). Motivated by the fact that the order in which sequences are added to a multiple sequence alignment influences the alignment, and ultimately inferred tree, they were interested in the extent to which the variations among inferred trees might be due to variations in the alignment order. This bears directly on their efforts to evaluate and improve upon methods of multiple sequence alignment. They set out to analyze the influence of alignment order on the tree inferred for 43 genes shared among these same 4 taxa. Because alignments produced by CLUSTALW are directed by a rooted guide tree (the denderogram), there are 15 possible alignment orders of 4 taxa. For each gene they tested all 15 alignment orders, and as a 16th option, allowed CLUSTALW to generate its own guide tree. If we supply all 15 possible rooted guide trees, they expected that at least one of them should be as good at CLUSTAL's own guide tree, but most of the time they differed (sometimes being better than CLUSTAL's default tree and sometimes being worse). The difference seems to be that the user-supplied tree is not given meaningful branch lengths, which effect the assumed probability of amino acid changes. They examined the practicality of modifying CLUSTALW to improve its treatment of user-supplied guide trees. This work became ever increasing bogged down in finding and repairing minor bugs in the CLUSTALW code. This effort was put on hold as we feel that our other proposed approaches will ultimately be better.

  6. Bioinformatic and Comparative Localization of Rab Proteins Reveals Functional Insights into the Uncharacterized GTPases Ypt10p and Ypt11p†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buvelot Frei, Stéphanie; Rahl, Peter B.; Nussbaum, Maria; Briggs, Benjamin J.; Calero, Monica; Janeczko, Stephanie; Regan, Andrew D.; Chen, Catherine Z.; Barral, Yves; Whittaker, Gary R.; Collins, Ruth N.

    2006-01-01

    A striking characteristic of a Rab protein is its steady-state localization to the cytosolic surface of a particular subcellular membrane. In this study, we have undertaken a combined bioinformatic and experimental approach to examine the evolutionary conservation of Rab protein localization. A comprehensive primary sequence classification shows that 10 out of the 11 Rab proteins identified in the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) genome can be grouped within a major subclass, each comprising multiple Rab orthologs from diverse species. We compared the locations of individual yeast Rab proteins with their localizations following ectopic expression in mammalian cells. Our results suggest that green fluorescent protein-tagged Rab proteins maintain localizations across large evolutionary distances and that the major known player in the Rab localization pathway, mammalian Rab-GDI, is able to function in yeast. These findings enable us to provide insight into novel gene functions and classify the uncharacterized Rab proteins Ypt10p (YBR264C) as being involved in endocytic function and Ypt11p (YNL304W) as being localized to the endoplasmic reticulum, where we demonstrate it is required for organelle inheritance. PMID:16980630

  7. Application of machine learning methods in bioinformatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haoyu; An, Zheng; Zhou, Haotian; Hou, Yawen

    2018-05-01

    Faced with the development of bioinformatics, high-throughput genomic technology have enabled biology to enter the era of big data. [1] Bioinformatics is an interdisciplinary, including the acquisition, management, analysis, interpretation and application of biological information, etc. It derives from the Human Genome Project. The field of machine learning, which aims to develop computer algorithms that improve with experience, holds promise to enable computers to assist humans in the analysis of large, complex data sets.[2]. This paper analyzes and compares various algorithms of machine learning and their applications in bioinformatics.

  8. Modern bioinformatics meets traditional Chinese medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Peiqin; Chen, Huajun

    2014-11-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is gaining increasing attention with the emergence of integrative medicine and personalized medicine, characterized by pattern differentiation on individual variance and treatments based on natural herbal synergism. Investigating the effectiveness and safety of the potential mechanisms of TCM and the combination principles of drug therapies will bridge the cultural gap with Western medicine and improve the development of integrative medicine. Dealing with rapidly growing amounts of biomedical data and their heterogeneous nature are two important tasks among modern biomedical communities. Bioinformatics, as an emerging interdisciplinary field of computer science and biology, has become a useful tool for easing the data deluge pressure by automating the computation processes with informatics methods. Using these methods to retrieve, store and analyze the biomedical data can effectively reveal the associated knowledge hidden in the data, and thus promote the discovery of integrated information. Recently, these techniques of bioinformatics have been used for facilitating the interactional effects of both Western medicine and TCM. The analysis of TCM data using computational technologies provides biological evidence for the basic understanding of TCM mechanisms, safety and efficacy of TCM treatments. At the same time, the carrier and targets associated with TCM remedies can inspire the rethinking of modern drug development. This review summarizes the significant achievements of applying bioinformatics techniques to many aspects of the research in TCM, such as analysis of TCM-related '-omics' data and techniques for analyzing biological processes and pharmaceutical mechanisms of TCM, which have shown certain potential of bringing new thoughts to both sides. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. RNA Sequencing and Bioinformatics Analysis Implicate the Regulatory Role of a Long Noncoding RNA-mRNA Network in Hepatic Stellate Cell Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Can-Jie; Xiao, Xiao; Sheng, Li; Chen, Lili; Zhong, Wei; Li, Hai; Hua, Jing; Ma, Xiong

    2017-01-01

    To analyze the long noncoding (lncRNA)-mRNA expression network and potential roles in rat hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) during activation. LncRNA expression was analyzed in quiescent and culture-activated HSCs by RNA sequencing, and differentially expressed lncRNAs verified by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) were subjected to bioinformatics analysis. In vivo analyses of differential lncRNA-mRNA expression were performed on a rat model of liver fibrosis. We identified upregulation of 12 lncRNAs and 155 mRNAs and downregulation of 12 lncRNAs and 374 mRNAs in activated HSCs. Additionally, we identified the differential expression of upregulated lncRNAs (NONRATT012636.2, NONRATT016788.2, and NONRATT021402.2) and downregulated lncRNAs (NONRATT007863.2, NONRATT019720.2, and NONRATT024061.2) in activated HSCs relative to levels observed in quiescent HSCs, and Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analyses showed that changes in lncRNAs associated with HSC activation revealed 11 significantly enriched pathways according to their predicted targets. Moreover, based on the predicted co-expression network, the relative dynamic levels of NONRATT013819.2 and lysyl oxidase (Lox) were compared during HSC activation both in vitro and in vivo. Our results confirmed the upregulation of lncRNA NONRATT013819.2 and Lox mRNA associated with the extracellular matrix (ECM)-related signaling pathway in HSCs and fibrotic livers. Our results detailing a dysregulated lncRNA-mRNA network might provide new treatment strategies for hepatic fibrosis based on findings indicating potentially critical roles for NONRATT013819.2 and Lox in ECM remodeling during HSC activation. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Bioinformatics and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers take on challenges and opportunities to mine "Big Data" for answers to complex biological questions. Learn how bioinformatics uses advanced computing, mathematics, and technological platforms to store, manage, analyze, and understand data.

  11. Deep learning in bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Seonwoo; Lee, Byunghan; Yoon, Sungroh

    2017-09-01

    In the era of big data, transformation of biomedical big data into valuable knowledge has been one of the most important challenges in bioinformatics. Deep learning has advanced rapidly since the early 2000s and now demonstrates state-of-the-art performance in various fields. Accordingly, application of deep learning in bioinformatics to gain insight from data has been emphasized in both academia and industry. Here, we review deep learning in bioinformatics, presenting examples of current research. To provide a useful and comprehensive perspective, we categorize research both by the bioinformatics domain (i.e. omics, biomedical imaging, biomedical signal processing) and deep learning architecture (i.e. deep neural networks, convolutional neural networks, recurrent neural networks, emergent architectures) and present brief descriptions of each study. Additionally, we discuss theoretical and practical issues of deep learning in bioinformatics and suggest future research directions. We believe that this review will provide valuable insights and serve as a starting point for researchers to apply deep learning approaches in their bioinformatics studies. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Temporal dynamics of soil microbial communities under different moisture regimes: high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, Mikhail; Zhuravleva, Anna; Semenov, Vyacheslav; Yevdokimov, Ilya; Larionova, Alla

    2017-04-01

    Recent climate scenarios predict not only continued global warming but also an increased frequency and intensity of extreme climatic events such as strong changes in temperature and precipitation regimes. Microorganisms are well known to be more sensitive to changes in environmental conditions than to other soil chemical and physical parameters. In this study, we determined the shifts in soil microbial community structure as well as indicative taxa in soils under three moisture regimes using high-throughput Illumina sequencing and range of bioinformatics approaches for the assessment of sequence data. Incubation experiments were performed in soil-filled (Greyic Phaeozems Albic) rhizoboxes with maize and without plants. Three contrasting moisture regimes were being simulated: 1) optimal wetting (OW), a watering 2-3 times per week to maintain soil moisture of 20-25% by weight; 2) periodic wetting (PW), with alternating periods of wetting and drought; and 3) constant insufficient wetting (IW), while soil moisture of 12% by weight was permanently maintained. Sampled fresh soils were homogenized, and the total DNA of three replicates was extracted using the FastDNA® SPIN kit for Soil. DNA replicates were combined in a pooled sample and the DNA was used for PCR with specific primers for the 16S V3 and V4 regions. In order to compare variability between different samples and replicates within a single sample, some DNA replicates treated separately. The products were purified and submitted to Illumina MiSeq sequencing. Sequence data were evaluated by alpha-diversity (Chao1 and Shannon H' diversity indexes), beta-diversity (UniFrac and Bray-Curtis dissimilarity), heatmap, tagcloud, and plot-bar analyses using the MiSeq Reporter Metagenomics Workflow and R packages (phyloseq, vegan, tagcloud). Shannon index varied in a rather narrow range (4.4-4.9) with the lowest values for microbial communities under PW treatment. Chao1 index varied from 385 to 480, being a more flexible

  13. A Bioinformatics Facility for NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweighofer, Karl; Pohorille, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Building on an existing prototype, we have fielded a facility with bioinformatics technologies that will help NASA meet its unique requirements for biological research. This facility consists of a cluster of computers capable of performing computationally intensive tasks, software tools, databases and knowledge management systems. Novel computational technologies for analyzing and integrating new biological data and already existing knowledge have been developed. With continued development and support, the facility will fulfill strategic NASA s bioinformatics needs in astrobiology and space exploration. . As a demonstration of these capabilities, we will present a detailed analysis of how spaceflight factors impact gene expression in the liver and kidney for mice flown aboard shuttle flight STS-108. We have found that many genes involved in signal transduction, cell cycle, and development respond to changes in microgravity, but that most metabolic pathways appear unchanged.

  14. Microbial bioinformatics 2020.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallen, Mark J

    2016-09-01

    Microbial bioinformatics in 2020 will remain a vibrant, creative discipline, adding value to the ever-growing flood of new sequence data, while embracing novel technologies and fresh approaches. Databases and search strategies will struggle to cope and manual curation will not be sustainable during the scale-up to the million-microbial-genome era. Microbial taxonomy will have to adapt to a situation in which most microorganisms are discovered and characterised through the analysis of sequences. Genome sequencing will become a routine approach in clinical and research laboratories, with fresh demands for interpretable user-friendly outputs. The "internet of things" will penetrate healthcare systems, so that even a piece of hospital plumbing might have its own IP address that can be integrated with pathogen genome sequences. Microbiome mania will continue, but the tide will turn from molecular barcoding towards metagenomics. Crowd-sourced analyses will collide with cloud computing, but eternal vigilance will be the price of preventing the misinterpretation and overselling of microbial sequence data. Output from hand-held sequencers will be analysed on mobile devices. Open-source training materials will address the need for the development of a skilled labour force. As we boldly go into the third decade of the twenty-first century, microbial sequence space will remain the final frontier! © 2016 The Author. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. The Use of Next Generation Sequencing and Junction Sequence Analysis Bioinformatics to Achieve Molecular Characterization of Crops Improved Through Modern Biotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Kovalic

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of genetically modified (GM crops for regulatory approval currently requires a detailed molecular characterization of the DNA sequence and integrity of the transgene locus. In addition, molecular characterization is a critical component of event selection and advancement during product development. Typically, molecular characterization has relied on Southern blot analysis to establish locus and copy number along with targeted sequencing of polymerase chain reaction products spanning any inserted DNA to complete the characterization process. Here we describe the use of next generation (NexGen sequencing and junction sequence analysis bioinformatics in a new method for achieving full molecular characterization of a GM event without the need for Southern blot analysis. In this study, we examine a typical GM soybean [ (L. Merr.] line and demonstrate that this new method provides molecular characterization equivalent to the current Southern blot-based method. We also examine an event containing in vivo DNA rearrangement of multiple transfer DNA inserts to demonstrate that the new method is effective at identifying complex cases. Next generation sequencing and bioinformatics offers certain advantages over current approaches, most notably the simplicity, efficiency, and consistency of the method, and provides a viable alternative for efficiently and robustly achieving molecular characterization of GM crops.

  16. Identification of microRNAs from Amur grape (Vitis amurensis Rupr.) by deep sequencing and analysis of microRNA variations with bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen; Han, Jian; Liu, Chonghuai; Kibet, Korir Nicholas; Kayesh, Emrul; Shangguan, Lingfei; Li, Xiaoying; Fang, Jinggui

    2012-03-29

    MicroRNA (miRNA) is a class of functional non-coding small RNA with 19-25 nucleotides in length while Amur grape (Vitis amurensis Rupr.) is an important wild fruit crop with the strongest cold resistance among the Vitis species, is used as an excellent breeding parent for grapevine, and has elicited growing interest in wine production. To date, there is a relatively large number of grapevine miRNAs (vv-miRNAs) from cultivated grapevine varieties such as Vitis vinifera L. and hybrids of V. vinifera and V. labrusca, but there is no report on miRNAs from Vitis amurensis Rupr, a wild grapevine species. A small RNA library from Amur grape was constructed and Solexa technology used to perform deep sequencing of the library followed by subsequent bioinformatics analysis to identify new miRNAs. In total, 126 conserved miRNAs belonging to 27 miRNA families were identified, and 34 known but non-conserved miRNAs were also found. Significantly, 72 new potential Amur grape-specific miRNAs were discovered. The sequences of these new potential va-miRNAs were further validated through miR-RACE, and accumulation of 18 new va-miRNAs in seven tissues of grapevines confirmed by real time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis. The expression levels of va-miRNAs in flowers and berries were found to be basically consistent in identity to those from deep sequenced sRNAs libraries of combined corresponding tissues. We also describe the conservation and variation of va-miRNAs using miR-SNPs and miR-LDs during plant evolution based on comparison of orthologous sequences, and further reveal that the number and sites of miR-SNP in diverse miRNA families exhibit distinct divergence. Finally, 346 target genes for the new miRNAs were predicted and they include a number of Amur grape stress tolerance genes and many genes regulating anthocyanin synthesis and sugar metabolism. Deep sequencing of short RNAs from Amur grape flowers and berries identified 72 new potential miRNAs and 34 known but non-conserved mi

  17. Identification of microRNAs from Amur grape (vitis amurensis Rupr. by deep sequencing and analysis of microRNA variations with bioinformatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Chen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNA (miRNA is a class of functional non-coding small RNA with 19-25 nucleotides in length while Amur grape (Vitis amurensis Rupr. is an important wild fruit crop with the strongest cold resistance among the Vitis species, is used as an excellent breeding parent for grapevine, and has elicited growing interest in wine production. To date, there is a relatively large number of grapevine miRNAs (vv-miRNAs from cultivated grapevine varieties such as Vitis vinifera L. and hybrids of V. vinifera and V. labrusca, but there is no report on miRNAs from Vitis amurensis Rupr, a wild grapevine species. Results A small RNA library from Amur grape was constructed and Solexa technology used to perform deep sequencing of the library followed by subsequent bioinformatics analysis to identify new miRNAs. In total, 126 conserved miRNAs belonging to 27 miRNA families were identified, and 34 known but non-conserved miRNAs were also found. Significantly, 72 new potential Amur grape-specific miRNAs were discovered. The sequences of these new potential va-miRNAs were further validated through miR-RACE, and accumulation of 18 new va-miRNAs in seven tissues of grapevines confirmed by real time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR analysis. The expression levels of va-miRNAs in flowers and berries were found to be basically consistent in identity to those from deep sequenced sRNAs libraries of combined corresponding tissues. We also describe the conservation and variation of va-miRNAs using miR-SNPs and miR-LDs during plant evolution based on comparison of orthologous sequences, and further reveal that the number and sites of miR-SNP in diverse miRNA families exhibit distinct divergence. Finally, 346 target genes for the new miRNAs were predicted and they include a number of Amur grape stress tolerance genes and many genes regulating anthocyanin synthesis and sugar metabolism. Conclusions Deep sequencing of short RNAs from Amur grape flowers and berries identified 72

  18. Phosphoproteome analysis of functional mitochondria isolated from resting human muscle reveals extensive phosphorylation of inner membrane protein complexes and enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Xiaolu; Leon, Ileana R; Bak, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    . In skeletal muscle, mitochondrial dysfunction is linked to insulin resistance in humans with obesity and type 2 diabetes. We performed a phosphoproteomic study of functional mitochondria isolated from human muscle biopsies with the aim to obtain a comprehensive overview of mitochondrial phosphoproteins...... in insulin resistance. We also assigned phosphorylation sites in mitochondrial proteins involved in amino acid degradation, importers and transporters, calcium homeostasis, and apoptosis. Bioinformatics analysis of kinase motifs revealed that many of these mitochondrial phosphoproteins are substrates....... Future comparative phosphoproteome analysis of mitochondria from healthy and diseased individuals will provide insights into the role of abnormal phosphorylation in pathologies, such as type 2 diabetes....

  19. pocketZebra: a web-server for automated selection and classification of subfamily-specific binding sites by bioinformatic analysis of diverse protein families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suplatov, Dmitry; Kirilin, Eugeny; Arbatsky, Mikhail; Takhaveev, Vakil; Svedas, Vytas

    2014-07-01

    The new web-server pocketZebra implements the power of bioinformatics and geometry-based structural approaches to identify and rank subfamily-specific binding sites in proteins by functional significance, and select particular positions in the structure that determine selective accommodation of ligands. A new scoring function has been developed to annotate binding sites by the presence of the subfamily-specific positions in diverse protein families. pocketZebra web-server has multiple input modes to meet the needs of users with different experience in bioinformatics. The server provides on-site visualization of the results as well as off-line version of the output in annotated text format and as PyMol sessions ready for structural analysis. pocketZebra can be used to study structure-function relationship and regulation in large protein superfamilies, classify functionally important binding sites and annotate proteins with unknown function. The server can be used to engineer ligand-binding sites and allosteric regulation of enzymes, or implemented in a drug discovery process to search for potential molecular targets and novel selective inhibitors/effectors. The server, documentation and examples are freely available at http://biokinet.belozersky.msu.ru/pocketzebra and there are no login requirements. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Development of Bioinformatics Infrastructure for Genomics Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Nicola J; Adebiyi, Ezekiel; Adebiyi, Marion; Adeyemi, Seun; Ahmed, Azza; Ahmed, Rehab; Akanle, Bola; Alibi, Mohamed; Armstrong, Don L; Aron, Shaun; Ashano, Efejiro; Baichoo, Shakuntala; Benkahla, Alia; Brown, David K; Chimusa, Emile R; Fadlelmola, Faisal M; Falola, Dare; Fatumo, Segun; Ghedira, Kais; Ghouila, Amel; Hazelhurst, Scott; Isewon, Itunuoluwa; Jung, Segun; Kassim, Samar Kamal; Kayondo, Jonathan K; Mbiyavanga, Mamana; Meintjes, Ayton; Mohammed, Somia; Mosaku, Abayomi; Moussa, Ahmed; Muhammd, Mustafa; Mungloo-Dilmohamud, Zahra; Nashiru, Oyekanmi; Odia, Trust; Okafor, Adaobi; Oladipo, Olaleye; Osamor, Victor; Oyelade, Jellili; Sadki, Khalid; Salifu, Samson Pandam; Soyemi, Jumoke; Panji, Sumir; Radouani, Fouzia; Souiai, Oussama; Tastan Bishop, Özlem

    2017-06-01

    Although pockets of bioinformatics excellence have developed in Africa, generally, large-scale genomic data analysis has been limited by the availability of expertise and infrastructure. H3ABioNet, a pan-African bioinformatics network, was established to build capacity specifically to enable H3Africa (Human Heredity and Health in Africa) researchers to analyze their data in Africa. Since the inception of the H3Africa initiative, H3ABioNet's role has evolved in response to changing needs from the consortium and the African bioinformatics community. H3ABioNet set out to develop core bioinformatics infrastructure and capacity for genomics research in various aspects of data collection, transfer, storage, and analysis. Various resources have been developed to address genomic data management and analysis needs of H3Africa researchers and other scientific communities on the continent. NetMap was developed and used to build an accurate picture of network performance within Africa and between Africa and the rest of the world, and Globus Online has been rolled out to facilitate data transfer. A participant recruitment database was developed to monitor participant enrollment, and data is being harmonized through the use of ontologies and controlled vocabularies. The standardized metadata will be integrated to provide a search facility for H3Africa data and biospecimens. Because H3Africa projects are generating large-scale genomic data, facilities for analysis and interpretation are critical. H3ABioNet is implementing several data analysis platforms that provide a large range of bioinformatics tools or workflows, such as Galaxy, the Job Management System, and eBiokits. A set of reproducible, portable, and cloud-scalable pipelines to support the multiple H3Africa data types are also being developed and dockerized to enable execution on multiple computing infrastructures. In addition, new tools have been developed for analysis of the uniquely divergent African data and for

  1. Prenatal alcohol exposure alters gene expression in the rat brain: Experimental design and bioinformatic analysis of microarray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre A. Lussier

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We previously identified gene expression changes in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of rats prenatally exposed to alcohol under both steady-state and challenge conditions (Lussier et al., 2015, Alcohol.: Clin. Exp. Res., 39, 251–261. In this study, adult female rats from three prenatal treatment groups (ad libitum-fed control, pair-fed, and ethanol-fed were injected with physiological saline solution or complete Freund׳s adjuvant (CFA to induce arthritis (adjuvant-induced arthritis, AA. The prefrontal cortex and hippocampus were collected 16 days (peak of arthritis or 39 days (during recovery following injection, and whole genome gene expression was assayed using Illumina׳s RatRef-12 expression microarray. Here, we provide additional metadata, detailed explanations of data pre-processing steps and quality control, as well as a basic framework for the bioinformatic analyses performed. The datasets from this study are publicly available on the GEO repository (accession number GSE63561.

  2. Bioinformatic Analysis of Deleterious Non-Synonymous Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (nsSNPs in the Coding Regions of Human Prion Protein Gene (PRNP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kourosh Bamdad

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Single nucleotide polymorphisms are the cause of genetic variation to living organisms. Single nucleotide polymorphisms alter residues in the protein sequence. In this investigation, the relationship between prion protein gene polymorphisms and its relevance to pathogenicity was studied. Material & Method: Amino acid sequence of the main isoform from the human prion protein gene (PRNP was extracted from UniProt database and evaluated by FoldAmyloid and AmylPred servers. All non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs from SNP database (dbSNP were further analyzed by bioinformatics servers including SIFT, PolyPhen-2, I-Mutant-3.0, PANTHER, SNPs & GO, PHD-SNP, Meta-SNP, and MutPred to determine the most damaging nsSNPs. Results: The results of the first structure analyses by FoldAmyloid and AmylPerd servers implied that regions including 5-15, 174-178, 180-184, 211-217, and 240-252 were the most sensitive parts of the protein sequence to amyloidosis. Screening all nsSNPs of the main protein isoform using bioinformatic servers revealed that substitution of Aspartic acid with Valine at position 178 (ID code: rs11538766 was the most deleterious nsSNP in the protein structure. Conclusion:  Substitution of the Aspartic acid with Valine at position 178 (D178V was the most pathogenic mutation in the human prion protein gene. Analyses from the MutPred server also showed that beta-sheets’ increment in the secondary structure was the main reason behind the molecular mechanism of the prion protein aggregation.

  3. Bioinformatics for Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kathy A.

    2006-01-01

    For the purpose of this paper, bioinformatics is defined as the application of computer technology to the management of biological information. It can be thought of as the science of developing computer databases and algorithms to facilitate and expedite biological research. This is a crosscutting capability that supports nearly all human health areas ranging from computational modeling, to pharmacodynamics research projects, to decision support systems within autonomous medical care. Bioinformatics serves to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of the life sciences research program. It provides data, information, and knowledge capture which further supports management of the bioastronautics research roadmap - identifying gaps that still remain and enabling the determination of which risks have been addressed.

  4. Novel C16orf57 mutations in patients with Poikiloderma with Neutropenia: bioinformatic analysis of the protein and predicted effects of all reported mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colombo Elisa A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poikiloderma with Neutropenia (PN is a rare autosomal recessive genodermatosis caused by C16orf57 mutations. To date 17 mutations have been identified in 31 PN patients. Results We characterize six PN patients expanding the clinical phenotype of the syndrome and the mutational repertoire of the gene. We detect the two novel C16orf57 mutations, c.232C>T and c.265+2T>G, as well as the already reported c.179delC, c.531delA and c.693+1G>T mutations. cDNA analysis evidences the presence of aberrant transcripts, and bioinformatic prediction of C16orf57 protein structure gauges the mutations effects on the folded protein chain. Computational analysis of the C16orf57 protein shows two conserved H-X-S/T-X tetrapeptide motifs marking the active site of a two-fold pseudosymmetric structure recalling the 2H phosphoesterase superfamily. Based on this model C16orf57 is likely a 2H-active site enzyme functioning in RNA processing, as a presumptive RNA ligase. According to bioinformatic prediction, all known C16orf57 mutations, including the novel mutations herein described, impair the protein structure by either removing one or both tetrapeptide motifs or by destroying the symmetry of the native folding. Finally, we analyse the geographical distribution of the recurrent mutations that depicts clusters featuring a founder effect. Conclusions In cohorts of patients clinically affected by genodermatoses with overlapping symptoms, the molecular screening of C16orf57 gene seems the proper way to address the correct diagnosis of PN, enabling the syndrome-specific oncosurveillance. The bioinformatic prediction of the C16orf57 protein structure denotes a very basic enzymatic function consistent with a housekeeping function. Detection of aberrant transcripts, also in cells from PN patients carrying early truncated mutations, suggests they might be translatable. Tissue-specific sensitivity to the lack of functionally correct protein accounts for the

  5. Advance in structural bioinformatics

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Dongqing; Zhao, Tangzhen; Dai, Hao

    2014-01-01

    This text examines in detail mathematical and physical modeling, computational methods and systems for obtaining and analyzing biological structures, using pioneering research cases as examples. As such, it emphasizes programming and problem-solving skills. It provides information on structure bioinformatics at various levels, with individual chapters covering introductory to advanced aspects, from fundamental methods and guidelines on acquiring and analyzing genomics and proteomics sequences, the structures of protein, DNA and RNA, to the basics of physical simulations and methods for conform

  6. Phylogenetic trees in bioinformatics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burr, Tom L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Genetic data is often used to infer evolutionary relationships among a collection of viruses, bacteria, animal or plant species, or other operational taxonomic units (OTU). A phylogenetic tree depicts such relationships and provides a visual representation of the estimated branching order of the OTUs. Tree estimation is unique for several reasons, including: the types of data used to represent each OTU; the use ofprobabilistic nucleotide substitution models; the inference goals involving both tree topology and branch length, and the huge number of possible trees for a given sample of a very modest number of OTUs, which implies that fmding the best tree(s) to describe the genetic data for each OTU is computationally demanding. Bioinformatics is too large a field to review here. We focus on that aspect of bioinformatics that includes study of similarities in genetic data from multiple OTUs. Although research questions are diverse, a common underlying challenge is to estimate the evolutionary history of the OTUs. Therefore, this paper reviews the role of phylogenetic tree estimation in bioinformatics, available methods and software, and identifies areas for additional research and development.

  7. Data mining for bioinformatics applications

    CERN Document Server

    Zengyou, He

    2015-01-01

    Data Mining for Bioinformatics Applications provides valuable information on the data mining methods have been widely used for solving real bioinformatics problems, including problem definition, data collection, data preprocessing, modeling, and validation. The text uses an example-based method to illustrate how to apply data mining techniques to solve real bioinformatics problems, containing 45 bioinformatics problems that have been investigated in recent research. For each example, the entire data mining process is described, ranging from data preprocessing to modeling and result validation. Provides valuable information on the data mining methods have been widely used for solving real bioinformatics problems Uses an example-based method to illustrate how to apply data mining techniques to solve real bioinformatics problems Contains 45 bioinformatics problems that have been investigated in recent research.

  8. Bioinformatic Analysis Reveals Conservation of Intrinsic Disorder in the Linker Sequences of Prokaryotic Dual-family Immunophilin Chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Sailen

    2018-01-01

    The two classical immunophilin families, found essentially in all living cells, are: cyclophilin (CYN) and FK506-binding protein (FKBP). We previously reported a novel class of immunophilins that are natural chimera of these two, which we named dual-family immunophilin (DFI). The DFIs were found in either of two conformations: CYN-linker-FKBP (CFBP) or FKBP-3TPR-CYN (FCBP). While the 3TPR domain can serve as a flexible linker between the FKBP and CYN modules in the FCBP-type DFI, the linker sequences in the CFBP-type DFIs are relatively short, diverse in sequence, and contain no discernible motif or signature. Here, I present several lines of computational evidence that, regardless of their primary structure, these CFBP linkers are intrinsically disordered. This report provides the first molecular foundation for the model that the CFBP linker acts as an unstructured, flexible loop, allowing the two flanking chaperone modules function independently while linked in cis , likely to assist in the folding of multisubunit client complexes.

  9. Somatic mutation profiles of MSI and MSS colorectal cancer identified by whole exome next generation sequencing and bioinformatics analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Timmermann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC is with approximately 1 million cases the third most common cancer worldwide. Extensive research is ongoing to decipher the underlying genetic patterns with the hope to improve early cancer diagnosis and treatment. In this direction, the recent progress in next generation sequencing technologies has revolutionized the field of cancer genomics. However, one caveat of these studies remains the large amount of genetic variations identified and their interpretation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we present the first work on whole exome NGS of primary colon cancers. We performed 454 whole exome pyrosequencing of tumor as well as adjacent not affected normal colonic tissue from microsatellite stable (MSS and microsatellite instable (MSI colon cancer patients and identified more than 50,000 small nucleotide variations for each tissue. According to predictions based on MSS and MSI pathomechanisms we identified eight times more somatic non-synonymous variations in MSI cancers than in MSS and we were able to reproduce the result in four additional CRCs. Our bioinformatics filtering approach narrowed down the rate of most significant mutations to 359 for MSI and 45 for MSS CRCs with predicted altered protein functions. In both CRCs, MSI and MSS, we found somatic mutations in the intracellular kinase domain of bone morphogenetic protein receptor 1A, BMPR1A, a gene where so far germline mutations are associated with juvenile polyposis syndrome, and show that the mutations functionally impair the protein function. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that with deep sequencing of tumor exomes one may be able to predict the microsatellite status of CRC and in addition identify potentially clinically relevant mutations.

  10. Massively parallel signature sequencing and bioinformatics analysis identifies up-regulation of TGFBI and SOX4 in human glioblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biaoyang Lin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A comprehensive network-based understanding of molecular pathways abnormally altered in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is essential for developing effective therapeutic approaches for this deadly disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Applying a next generation sequencing technology, massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS, we identified a total of 4535 genes that are differentially expressed between normal brain and GBM tissue. The expression changes of three up-regulated genes, CHI3L1, CHI3L2, and FOXM1, and two down-regulated genes, neurogranin and L1CAM, were confirmed by quantitative PCR. Pathway analysis revealed that TGF- beta pathway related genes were significantly up-regulated in GBM tumor samples. An integrative pathway analysis of the TGF beta signaling network identified two alternative TGF-beta signaling pathways mediated by SOX4 (sex determining region Y-box 4 and TGFBI (Transforming growth factor beta induced. Quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry staining demonstrated that SOX4 and TGFBI expression is elevated in GBM tissues compared with normal brain tissues at both the RNA and protein levels. In vitro functional studies confirmed that TGFBI and SOX4 expression is increased by TGF-beta stimulation and decreased by a specific inhibitor of TGF-beta receptor 1 kinase. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our MPSS database for GBM and normal brain tissues provides a useful resource for the scientific community. The identification of non-SMAD mediated TGF-beta signaling pathways acting through SOX4 and TGFBI (GENE ID:7045 in GBM indicates that these alternative pathways should be considered, in addition to the canonical SMAD mediated pathway, in the development of new therapeutic strategies targeting TGF-beta signaling in GBM. Finally, the construction of an extended TGF-beta signaling network with overlaid gene expression changes between GBM and normal brain extends our understanding of the biology of GBM.

  11. Bioinformatic analysis of the nucleotide binding site-encoding disease-resistance genes in foxtail millet (Setaria italica (L.) Beauv.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y B; Xie, X Q; Li, Z Y; Bai, H; Dong, L; Dong, Z P; Dong, J G

    2014-08-28

    The nucleotide-binding site (NBS) disease-resistance genes are the largest category of plant disease-resistance gene analogs. The complete set of disease-resistant candidate genes, which encode the NBS sequence, was filtered in the genomes of two varieties of foxtail millet (Yugu1 and 'Zhang gu'). This study investigated a number of characteristics of the putative NBS genes, such as structural diversity and phylogenetic relationships. A total of 269 and 281 NBS-coding sequences were identified in Yugu1 and 'Zhang gu', respectively. When the two databases were compared, 72 genes were found to be identical and 164 genes showed more than 90% similarity. Physical positioning and gene family analysis of the NBS disease-resistance genes in the genome revealed that the number of genes on each chromosome was similar in both varieties. The eighth chromosome contained the largest number of genes and the ninth chromosome contained the lowest number of genes. Exactly 34 gene clusters containing the 161 genes were found in the Yugu1 genome, with each cluster containing 4.7 genes on average. In comparison, the 'Zhang gu' genome possessed 28 gene clusters, which had 151 genes, with an average of 5.4 genes in each cluster. The largest gene cluster, located on the eighth chromosome, contained 12 genes in the Yugu1 database, whereas it contained 16 genes in the 'Zhang gu' database. The classification results showed that the CC-NBS-LRR gene made up the largest part of each chromosome in the two databases. Two TIR-NBS genes were also found in the Yugu1 genome.

  12. Data-Independent Acquisition-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis Reveals Potential Biomarkers of Kidney Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yimeng; Zhong, Lijun; Zhou, Juntuo; Lu, Min; Xing, Tianying; Ma, Lulin; Shen, Jing

    2017-12-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a malignant and metastatic cancer with 95% mortality, and clear cell RCC (ccRCC) is the most observed among the five major subtypes of RCC. Specific biomarkers that can distinguish cancer tissues from adjacent normal tissues should be developed to diagnose this disease in early stages and conduct a reliable prognostic evaluation. Data-independent acquisition (DIA) strategy has been widely employed in proteomic analysis because of various advantages, including enhanced protein coverage and reliable data acquisition. In this study, a DIA workflow is constructed on a quadrupole-Orbitrap LC-MS platform to reveal dysregulated proteins between ccRCC and adjacent normal tissues. More than 4000 proteins are identified, 436 of these proteins are dysregulated in ccRCC tissues. Bioinformatic analysis reveals that multiple pathways and Gene Ontology items are strongly associated with ccRCC. The expression levels of L-lactate dehydrogenase A chain, annexin A4, nicotinamide N-methyltransferase, and perilipin-2 examined through RT-qPCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry confirm the validity of the proteomic analysis results. The proposed DIA workflow yields optimum time efficiency and data reliability and provides a good choice for proteomic analysis in biological and clinical studies, and these dysregulated proteins might be potential biomarkers for ccRCC diagnosis. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Bioinformatics and its application in animal health: a review | Soetan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bioinformatics is an interdisciplinary subject, which uses computer application, statistics, mathematics and engineering for the analysis and management of biological information. It has become an important tool for basic and applied research in veterinary sciences. Bioinformatics has brought about advancements into ...

  14. LXtoo: an integrated live Linux distribution for the bioinformatics community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guangchuang; Wang, Li-Gen; Meng, Xiao-Hua; He, Qing-Yu

    2012-07-19

    Recent advances in high-throughput technologies dramatically increase biological data generation. However, many research groups lack computing facilities and specialists. This is an obstacle that remains to be addressed. Here, we present a Linux distribution, LXtoo, to provide a flexible computing platform for bioinformatics analysis. Unlike most of the existing live Linux distributions for bioinformatics limiting their usage to sequence analysis and protein structure prediction, LXtoo incorporates a comprehensive collection of bioinformatics software, including data mining tools for microarray and proteomics, protein-protein interaction analysis, and computationally complex tasks like molecular dynamics. Moreover, most of the programs have been configured and optimized for high performance computing. LXtoo aims to provide well-supported computing environment tailored for bioinformatics research, reducing duplication of efforts in building computing infrastructure. LXtoo is distributed as a Live DVD and freely available at http://bioinformatics.jnu.edu.cn/LXtoo.

  15. Revisiting Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica, Causative Agent of Tularemia in Germany With Bioinformatics: New Insights in Genome Structure, DNA Methylation and Comparative Phylogenetic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Busch

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Francisella (F. tularensis is a highly virulent, Gram-negative bacterial pathogen and the causative agent of the zoonotic disease tularemia. Here, we generated, analyzed and characterized a high quality circular genome sequence of the F. tularensis subsp. holarctica strain 12T0050 that caused fatal tularemia in a hare. Besides the genomic structure, we focused on the analysis of oriC, unique to the Francisella genus and regulating replication in and outside hosts and the first report on genomic DNA methylation of a Francisella strain. The high quality genome was used to establish and evaluate a diagnostic whole genome sequencing pipeline. A genotyping strategy for F. tularensis was developed using various bioinformatics tools for genotyping. Additionally, whole genome sequences of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica isolates isolated in the years 2008–2015 in Germany were generated. A phylogenetic analysis allowed to determine the genetic relatedness of these isolates and confirmed the highly conserved nature of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica.

  16. Emergent Computation Emphasizing Bioinformatics

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, Matthew

    2005-01-01

    Emergent Computation is concerned with recent applications of Mathematical Linguistics or Automata Theory. This subject has a primary focus upon "Bioinformatics" (the Genome and arising interest in the Proteome), but the closing chapter also examines applications in Biology, Medicine, Anthropology, etc. The book is composed of an organized examination of DNA, RNA, and the assembly of amino acids into proteins. Rather than examine these areas from a purely mathematical viewpoint (that excludes much of the biochemical reality), the author uses scientific papers written mostly by biochemists based upon their laboratory observations. Thus while DNA may exist in its double stranded form, triple stranded forms are not excluded. Similarly, while bases exist in Watson-Crick complements, mismatched bases and abasic pairs are not excluded, nor are Hoogsteen bonds. Just as there are four bases naturally found in DNA, the existence of additional bases is not ignored, nor amino acids in addition to the usual complement of...

  17. Large scale aggregate microarray analysis reveals three distinct molecular subclasses of human preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavey, Katherine; Bainbridge, Shannon A; Cox, Brian J

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a life-threatening hypertensive pathology of pregnancy affecting 3-5% of all pregnancies. To date, PE has no cure, early detection markers, or effective treatments short of the removal of what is thought to be the causative organ, the placenta, which may necessitate a preterm delivery. Additionally, numerous small placental microarray studies attempting to identify "PE-specific" genes have yielded inconsistent results. We therefore hypothesize that preeclampsia is a multifactorial disease encompassing several pathology subclasses, and that large cohort placental gene expression analysis will reveal these groups. To address our hypothesis, we utilized known bioinformatic methods to aggregate 7 microarray data sets across multiple platforms in order to generate a large data set of 173 patient samples, including 77 with preeclampsia. Unsupervised clustering of these patient samples revealed three distinct molecular subclasses of PE. This included a "canonical" PE subclass demonstrating elevated expression of known PE markers and genes associated with poor oxygenation and increased secretion, as well as two other subclasses potentially representing a poor maternal response to pregnancy and an immunological presentation of preeclampsia. Our analysis sheds new light on the heterogeneity of PE patients, and offers up additional avenues for future investigation. Hopefully, our subclassification of preeclampsia based on molecular diversity will finally lead to the development of robust diagnostics and patient-based treatments for this disorder.

  18. Analyzing the field of bioinformatics with the multi-faceted topic modeling technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Go Eun; Kang, Keun Young; Song, Min; Lee, Jeong-Hoon

    2017-05-31

    Bioinformatics is an interdisciplinary field at the intersection of molecular biology and computing technology. To characterize the field as convergent domain, researchers have used bibliometrics, augmented with text-mining techniques for content analysis. In previous studies, Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) was the most representative topic modeling technique for identifying topic structure of subject areas. However, as opposed to revealing the topic structure in relation to metadata such as authors, publication date, and journals, LDA only displays the simple topic structure. In this paper, we adopt the Tang et al.'s Author-Conference-Topic (ACT) model to study the field of bioinformatics from the perspective of keyphrases, authors, and journals. The ACT model is capable of incorporating the paper, author, and conference into the topic distribution simultaneously. To obtain more meaningful results, we use journals and keyphrases instead of conferences and bag-of-words.. For analysis, we use PubMed to collected forty-six bioinformatics journals from the MEDLINE database. We conducted time series topic analysis over four periods from 1996 to 2015 to further examine the interdisciplinary nature of bioinformatics. We analyze the ACT Model results in each period. Additionally, for further integrated analysis, we conduct a time series analysis among the top-ranked keyphrases, journals, and authors according to their frequency. We also examine the patterns in the top journals by simultaneously identifying the topical probability in each period, as well as the top authors and keyphrases. The results indicate that in recent years diversified topics have become more prevalent and convergent topics have become more clearly represented. The results of our analysis implies that overtime the field of bioinformatics becomes more interdisciplinary where there is a steady increase in peripheral fields such as conceptual, mathematical, and system biology. These results are

  19. Interdisciplinary Introductory Course in Bioinformatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortsarts, Yana; Morris, Robert W.; Utell, Janine M.

    2010-01-01

    Bioinformatics is a relatively new interdisciplinary field that integrates computer science, mathematics, biology, and information technology to manage, analyze, and understand biological, biochemical and biophysical information. We present our experience in teaching an interdisciplinary course, Introduction to Bioinformatics, which was developed…

  20. Virtual Bioinformatics Distance Learning Suite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolvanen, Martti; Vihinen, Mauno

    2004-01-01

    Distance learning as a computer-aided concept allows students to take courses from anywhere at any time. In bioinformatics, computers are needed to collect, store, process, and analyze massive amounts of biological and biomedical data. We have applied the concept of distance learning in virtual bioinformatics to provide university course material…

  1. Bioinformatics analysis for evaluation of the diagnostic potentialities of miR-19b, -125b and -205 as liquid biopsy markers of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryzgunova, O. E.; Lekchnov, E. A.; Zaripov, M. M.; Yurchenko, Yu. B.; Yarmoschuk, S. V.; Pashkovskaya, O. A.; Rykova, E. Yu.; Zheravin, A. A.; Laktionov, P. P.

    2017-09-01

    Presence of tumor-derived cell-free miRNA in biological fluids as well as simplicity and robustness of cell-free miRNA quantification makes them suitable markers for cancer diagnostics. Based on previously published data demonstrating diagnostic potentialities of miR-205 in blood and miR-19b as well as miR-125b in urine of prostate cancer patients, bioinformatics analysis was carried out to follow their involvement in prostate cancer development and select additional miRNA-markers for prostate cancer diagnostics. Studied miRNAs are involved in different signaling pathways and regulate a number of genes involved in cancer development. Five of their targets (CCND1, BRAF, CCNE1, CCNE2, RAF1), according to the STRING database, act as part of the same signaling pathway. RAF1 is regulated by miR-19b and miR-125b, and it was shown to be involved in prostate cancer development by DIANA and STRING databases. Thus, other microRNAs regulating RAF1 expression such as miR-16, -195, -497, and -7 (suggested by DIANA, TargetScan, MiRTarBase and miRDB databases) can potentially be regarded as prostate cancer markers.

  2. Bioinformatics analysis to assess potential risks of allergenicity and toxicity of HRAP and PFLP proteins in genetically modified bananas resistant to Xanthomonas wilt disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yuan; Goodman, Richard E; Tetteh, Afua O; Lu, Mei; Tripathi, Leena

    2017-11-01

    Banana Xanthomonas wilt (BXW) disease threatens banana production and food security throughout East Africa. Natural resistance is lacking among common cultivars. Genetically modified (GM) bananas resistant to BXW disease were developed by inserting the hypersensitive response-assisting protein (Hrap) or/and the plant ferredoxin-like protein (Pflp) gene(s) from sweet pepper (Capsicum annuum). Several of these GM banana events showed 100% resistance to BXW disease under field conditions in Uganda. The current study evaluated the potential allergenicity and toxicity of the expressed proteins HRAP and PFLP based on evaluation of published information on the history of safe use of the natural source of the proteins as well as established bioinformatics sequence comparison methods to known allergens (www.AllergenOnline.org and NCBI Protein) and toxins (NCBI Protein). The results did not identify potential risks of allergy and toxicity to either HRAP or PFLP proteins expressed in the GM bananas that might suggest potential health risks to humans. We recognize that additional tests including stability of these proteins in pepsin assay, nutrient analysis and possibly an acute rodent toxicity assay may be required by national regulatory authorities. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. The utility of optical detection system (qPCR) and bioinformatics methods in reference gene expression analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarzyńska, Agnieszka; Pawełkowicz, Magdalena; PlÄ der, Wojciech; Przybecki, Zbigniew

    2016-09-01

    Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction is consider as the most reliable method for gene expression studies. However, the expression of target gene could be misinterpreted due to improper normalization. Therefore, the crucial step for analysing of qPCR data is selection of suitable reference genes, which should be validated experimentally. In order to choice the gene with stable expression in the designed experiment, we performed reference gene expression analysis. In this study genes described in the literature and novel genes predicted as control genes, based on the in silico analysis of transcriptome data were used. Analysis with geNorm and NormFinder algorithms allow to create the ranking of candidate genes and indicate the best reference for flower morphogenesis study. According to the results, genes CACS and CYCL were characterised the most stable expression, but the least suitable genes were TUA and EF.

  4. The early asthmatic response is associated with glycolysis, calcium binding and mitochondria activity as revealed by proteomic analysis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Yu-Dong

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The inhalation of allergens by allergic asthmatics results in the early asthmatic response (EAR, which is characterized by acute airway obstruction beginning within a few minutes. The EAR is the earliest indicator of the pathological progression of allergic asthma. Because the molecular mechanism underlying the EAR is not fully defined, this study will contribute to a better understanding of asthma. Methods In order to gain insight into the molecular basis of the EAR, we examined changes in protein expression patterns in the lung tissue of asthmatic rats during the EAR using 2-DE/MS-based proteomic techniques. Bioinformatic analysis of the proteomic data was then performed using PPI Spider and KEGG Spider to investigate the underlying molecular mechanism. Results In total, 44 differentially expressed protein spots were detected in the 2-DE gels. Of these 44 protein spots, 42 corresponded to 36 unique proteins successfully identified using mass spectrometry. During subsequent bioinformatic analysis, the gene ontology classification, the protein-protein interaction networking and the biological pathway exploration demonstrated that the identified proteins were mainly involved in glycolysis, calcium binding and mitochondrial activity. Using western blot and semi-quantitative RT-PCR, we confirmed the changes in expression of five selected proteins, which further supports our proteomic and bioinformatic analyses. Conclusions Our results reveal that the allergen-induced EAR in asthmatic rats is associated with glycolysis, calcium binding and mitochondrial activity, which could establish a functional network in which calcium binding may play a central role in promoting the progression of asthma.

  5. Systematic Analysis of the Association between Gut Flora and Obesity through High-Throughput Sequencing and Bioinformatics Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Min Chiu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Eighty-one stool samples from Taiwanese were collected for analysis of the association between the gut flora and obesity. The supervised analysis showed that the most, abundant genera of bacteria in normal samples (from people with a body mass index (BMI ≤ 24 were Bacteroides (27.7%, Prevotella (19.4%, Escherichia (12%, Phascolarctobacterium (3.9%, and Eubacterium (3.5%. The most abundant genera of bacteria in case samples (with a BMI ≥ 27 were Bacteroides (29%, Prevotella (21%, Escherichia (7.4%, Megamonas (5.1%, and Phascolarctobacterium (3.8%. A principal coordinate analysis (PCoA demonstrated that normal samples were clustered more compactly than case samples. An unsupervised analysis demonstrated that bacterial communities in the gut were clustered into two main groups: N-like and OB-like groups. Remarkably, most normal samples (78% were clustered in the N-like group, and most case samples (81% were clustered in the OB-like group (Fisher’s P  value=1.61E-07. The results showed that bacterial communities in the gut were highly associated with obesity. This is the first study in Taiwan to investigate the association between human gut flora and obesity, and the results provide new insights into the correlation of bacteria with the rising trend in obesity.

  6. Exercise-associated DNA methylation change in skeletal muscle and the importance of imprinted genes: a bioinformatics meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, William M

    2015-12-01

    Epigenetics is the study of processes--beyond DNA sequence alteration--producing heritable characteristics. For example, DNA methylation modifies gene expression without altering the nucleotide sequence. A well-studied DNA methylation-based phenomenon is genomic imprinting (ie, genotype-independent parent-of-origin effects). We aimed to elucidate: (1) the effect of exercise on DNA methylation and (2) the role of imprinted genes in skeletal muscle gene networks (ie, gene group functional profiling analyses). Gene ontology (ie, gene product elucidation)/meta-analysis. 26 skeletal muscle and 86 imprinted genes were subjected to g:Profiler ontology analysis. Meta-analysis assessed exercise-associated DNA methylation change. g:Profiler found four muscle gene networks with imprinted loci. Meta-analysis identified 16 articles (387 genes/1580 individuals) associated with exercise. Age, method, sample size, sex and tissue variation could elevate effect size bias. Only skeletal muscle gene networks including imprinted genes were reported. Exercise-associated effect sizes were calculated by gene. Age, method, sample size, sex and tissue variation were moderators. Six imprinted loci (RB1, MEG3, UBE3A, PLAGL1, SGCE, INS) were important for muscle gene networks, while meta-analysis uncovered five exercise-associated imprinted loci (KCNQ1, MEG3, GRB10, L3MBTL1, PLAGL1). DNA methylation decreased with exercise (60% of loci). Exercise-associated DNA methylation change was stronger among older people (ie, age accounted for 30% of the variation). Among older people, genes exhibiting DNA methylation decreases were part of a microRNA-regulated gene network functioning to suppress cancer. Imprinted genes were identified in skeletal muscle gene networks and exercise-associated DNA methylation change. Exercise-associated DNA methylation modification could rewind the 'epigenetic clock' as we age. CRD42014009800. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where

  7. Microarray-based bioinformatics analysis of the combined effects of SiNPs and PbAc on cardiovascular system in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hejing; Zhang, Yannan; Shi, Yanfeng; Feng, Lin; Duan, Junchao; Sun, Zhiwei

    2017-10-01

    With rapid development of nanotechnology and growing environmental pollution, the combined toxic effects of SiNPs and pollutants of heavy metals like lead have received global attentions. The aim of this study was to explore the cardiovascular effects of the co-exposure of SiNPs and lead acetate (PbAc) in zebrafish using microarray and bioinformatics analysis. Although there was no other obvious cardiovascular malformation except bleeding phenotype, bradycardia, angiogenesis inhibition and declined cardiac output in zebrafish co-exposed of SiNPs and PbAc at NOAEL level, significant changes were observed in mRNA and microRNA (miRNA) expression patterns. STC-GO analysis indicated that the co-exposure might have more toxic effects on cardiovascular system than that exposure alone. Key differentially expressed genes were discerned out based on the Dynamic-gene-network, including stxbp1a, ndfip2, celf4 and gsk3b. Furthermore, several miRNAs obtained from the miRNA-Gene-Network might play crucial roles in cardiovascular disease, such as dre-miR-93, dre-miR-34a, dre-miR-181c, dre-miR-7145, dre-miR-730, dre-miR-129-5p, dre-miR-19d, dre-miR-218b, dre-miR-221. Besides, the analysis of miRNA-pathway-network indicated that the zebrafish were stimulated by the co-exposure of SiNPs and PbAc, which might cause the disturbance of calcium homeostasis and endoplasmic reticulum stress. As a result, cardiac muscle contraction might be deteriorated. In general, our data provide abundant fundamental research clues to the combined toxicity of environmental pollutants and further in-depth verifications are needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. RADARS, a bioinformatics solution that automates proteome mass spectral analysis, optimises protein identification, and archives data in a relational database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Helen I; Fenyö, David; Beavis, Ronald C

    2002-01-01

    RADARS, a rapid, automated, data archiving and retrieval software system for high-throughput proteomic mass spectral data processing and storage, is described. The majority of mass spectrometer data files are compatible with RADARS, for consistent processing. The system automatically takes unprocessed data files, identifies proteins via in silico database searching, then stores the processed data and search results in a relational database suitable for customized reporting. The system is robust, used in 24/7 operation, accessible to multiple users of an intranet through a web browser, may be monitored by Virtual Private Network, and is secure. RADARS is scalable for use on one or many computers, and is suited to multiple processor systems. It can incorporate any local database in FASTA format, and can search protein and DNA databases online. A key feature is a suite of visualisation tools (many available gratis), allowing facile manipulation of spectra, by hand annotation, reanalysis, and access to all procedures. We also described the use of Sonar MS/MS, a novel, rapid search engine requiring 40 MB RAM per process for searches against a genomic or EST database translated in all six reading frames. RADARS reduces the cost of analysis by its efficient algorithms: Sonar MS/MS can identifiy proteins without accurate knowledge of the parent ion mass and without protein tags. Statistical scoring methods provide close-to-expert accuracy and brings robust data analysis to the non-expert user.

  9. MicroRNAs and cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase-2 in human myocardial infarction: expression and bioinformatic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boštjančič, Emanuela; Zidar, Nina; Glavač, Damjan

    2012-10-15

    Cardiac sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum calcium ATPase-2 (SERCA2) plays one of the central roles in myocardial contractility. Both, SERCA2 mRNA and protein are reduced in myocardial infarction (MI), but the correlation has not been always observed. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) act by targeting 3'-UTR mRNA, causing translational repression in physiological and pathological conditions, including cardiovascular diseases. One of the aims of our study was to identify miRNAs that could influence SERCA2 expression in human MI. The protein SERCA2 was decreased and 43 miRNAs were deregulated in infarcted myocardium compared to corresponding remote myocardium, analyzed by western blot and microRNA microarrays, respectively. All the samples were stored as FFPE tissue and in RNAlater. miRNAs binding prediction to SERCA2 including four prediction algorithms (TargetScan, PicTar, miRanda and mirTarget2) identified 213 putative miRNAs. TAM and miRNApath annotation of deregulated miRNAs identified 18 functional and 21 diseased states related to heart diseases, and association of the half of the deregulated miRNAs to SERCA2. Free-energy of binding and flanking regions (RNA22, RNAfold) was calculated for 10 up-regulated miRNAs from microarray analysis (miR-122, miR-320a/b/c/d, miR-574-3p/-5p, miR-199a, miR-140, and miR-483), and nine miRNAs deregulated from microarray analysis were used for validation with qPCR (miR-21, miR-122, miR-126, miR-1, miR-133, miR-125a/b, and miR-98). Based on qPCR results, the comparison between FFPE and RNAlater stored tissue samples, between Sybr Green and TaqMan approaches, as well as between different reference genes were also performed. Combing all the results, we identified certain miRNAs as potential regulators of SERCA2; however, further functional studies are needed for verification. Using qPCR, we confirmed deregulation of nine miRNAs in human MI, and show that qPCR normalization strategy is important for the outcome of miRNA expression analysis in human MI.

  10. Genome analysis of Excretory/Secretory proteins in Taenia solium reveals their Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Sandra; Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Palafox-Fonseca, Hector; Cantu-Robles, Vito Adrian; Soberón, Xavier; Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis; Bobes, Raúl J; Laclette, Juan P; Yauner, Luis del Pozo; Ochoa-Leyva, Adrián

    2015-05-19

    Excretory/Secretory (ES) proteins play an important role in the host-parasite interactions. Experimental identification of ES proteins is time-consuming and expensive. Alternative bioinformatics approaches are cost-effective and can be used to prioritize the experimental analysis of therapeutic targets for parasitic diseases. Here we predicted and functionally annotated the ES proteins in T. solium genome using an integration of bioinformatics tools. Additionally, we developed a novel measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of T. solium secretome using sequence length and number of antigenic regions of ES proteins. This measurement was formalized as the Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR) value. AAR value for secretome showed a similar value to that obtained for a set of experimentally determined antigenic proteins and was different to the calculated value for the non-ES proteins of T. solium genome. Furthermore, we calculated the AAR values for known helminth secretomes and they were similar to that obtained for T. solium. The results reveal the utility of AAR value as a novel genomic measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of secretomes. This comprehensive analysis of T. solium secretome provides functional information for future experimental studies, including the identification of novel ES proteins of therapeutic, diagnosis and immunological interest.

  11. The haloarchaeal MCM proteins: bioinformatic analysis and targeted mutagenesis of the β7-β8 and β9-β10 hairpin loops and conserved zinc binding domain cysteines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Tatjana P; Maria Cherian, Reeja; Gray, Fiona C; MacNeill, Stuart A

    2014-01-01

    The hexameric MCM complex is the catalytic core of the replicative helicase in eukaryotic and archaeal cells. Here we describe the first in vivo analysis of archaeal MCM protein structure and function relationships using the genetically tractable haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii as a model system. Hfx. volcanii encodes a single MCM protein that is part of the previously identified core group of haloarchaeal MCM proteins. Three structural features of the N-terminal domain of the Hfx. volcanii MCM protein were targeted for mutagenesis: the β7-β8 and β9-β10 β-hairpin loops and putative zinc binding domain. Five strains carrying single point mutations in the β7-β8 β-hairpin loop were constructed, none of which displayed impaired cell growth under normal conditions or when treated with the DNA damaging agent mitomycin C. However, short sequence deletions within the β7-β8 β-hairpin were not tolerated and neither was replacement of the highly conserved residue glutamate 187 with alanine. Six strains carrying paired alanine substitutions within the β9-β10 β-hairpin loop were constructed, leading to the conclusion that no individual amino acid within that hairpin loop is absolutely required for MCM function, although one of the mutant strains displays greatly enhanced sensitivity to mitomycin C. Deletions of two or four amino acids from the β9-β10 β-hairpin were tolerated but mutants carrying larger deletions were inviable. Similarly, it was not possible to construct mutants in which any of the conserved zinc binding cysteines was replaced with alanine, underlining the likely importance of zinc binding for MCM function. The results of these studies demonstrate the feasibility of using Hfx. volcanii as a model system for reverse genetic analysis of archaeal MCM protein function and provide important confirmation of the in vivo importance of conserved structural features identified by previous bioinformatic, biochemical and structural studies.

  12. The haloarchaeal MCM proteins: bioinformatic analysis and targeted mutagenesis of the β7-β8 and β9-β10 hairpin loops and conserved zinc binding domain cysteines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana P Kristensen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The hexameric MCM complex is the catalytic core of the replicative helicase in eukaryotic and archaeal cells. Here we describe the first in vivo analysis of archaeal MCM protein structure and function relationships using the genetically tractable haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii as a model system. Hfx. volcanii encodes a single MCM protein that is part of the previously identified core group of haloarchaeal MCM proteins. Three structural features of the N-terminal domain of the Hfx. volcanii MCM protein were targeted for mutagenesis: the β7-β8 and β9-β10 β-hairpin loops and putative zinc binding domain. Five strains carrying single point mutations in the β7-β8 β-hairpin loop were constructed, none of which displayed impaired cell growth under normal conditions or when treated with the DNA damaging agent mitomycin C. However, short sequence deletions within the β7-β8 β-hairpin were not tolerated and neither was replacement of the highly conserved residue glutamate 187 with alanine. Six strains carrying paired alanine substitutions within the β9-β10 β-hairpin loop were constructed, leading to the conclusion that no individual amino acid within that hairpin loop is absolutely required for MCM function, although one of the mutant strains displays greatly enhanced sensitivity to mitomycin C. Deletions of two or four amino acids from the β9-β10 β-hairpin were tolerated but mutants carrying larger deletions were inviable. Similarly, it was not possible to construct mutants in which any of the conserved zinc binding cysteines was replaced with alanine, underlining the likely importance of zinc binding for MCM function. The results of these studies demonstrate the feasibility of using Hfx. volcanii as a model system for reverse genetic analysis of archaeal MCM protein function and provide important confirmation of the in vivo importance of conserved structural features identified by previous bioinformatic, biochemical and structural

  13. Engineering bioinformatics: building reliability, performance and productivity into bioinformatics software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawlor, Brendan; Walsh, Paul

    2015-01-01

    There is a lack of software engineering skills in bioinformatic contexts. We discuss the consequences of this lack, examine existing explanations and remedies to the problem, point out their shortcomings, and propose alternatives. Previous analyses of the problem have tended to treat the use of software in scientific contexts as categorically different from the general application of software engineering in commercial settings. In contrast, we describe bioinformatic software engineering as a specialization of general software engineering, and examine how it should be practiced. Specifically, we highlight the difference between programming and software engineering, list elements of the latter and present the results of a survey of bioinformatic practitioners which quantifies the extent to which those elements are employed in bioinformatics. We propose that the ideal way to bring engineering values into research projects is to bring engineers themselves. We identify the role of Bioinformatic Engineer and describe how such a role would work within bioinformatic research teams. We conclude by recommending an educational emphasis on cross-training software engineers into life sciences, and propose research on Domain Specific Languages to facilitate collaboration between engineers and bioinformaticians.

  14. Engineering bioinformatics: building reliability, performance and productivity into bioinformatics software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawlor, Brendan; Walsh, Paul

    2015-01-01

    There is a lack of software engineering skills in bioinformatic contexts. We discuss the consequences of this lack, examine existing explanations and remedies to the problem, point out their shortcomings, and propose alternatives. Previous analyses of the problem have tended to treat the use of software in scientific contexts as categorically different from the general application of software engineering in commercial settings. In contrast, we describe bioinformatic software engineering as a specialization of general software engineering, and examine how it should be practiced. Specifically, we highlight the difference between programming and software engineering, list elements of the latter and present the results of a survey of bioinformatic practitioners which quantifies the extent to which those elements are employed in bioinformatics. We propose that the ideal way to bring engineering values into research projects is to bring engineers themselves. We identify the role of Bioinformatic Engineer and describe how such a role would work within bioinformatic research teams. We conclude by recommending an educational emphasis on cross-training software engineers into life sciences, and propose research on Domain Specific Languages to facilitate collaboration between engineers and bioinformaticians. PMID:25996054

  15. Single-Cell Transcriptomics Bioinformatics and Computational Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lana Garmire

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The emerging single-cell RNA-Seq (scRNA-Seq technology holds the promise to revolutionize our understanding of diseases and associated biological processes at an unprecedented resolution. It opens the door to reveal the intercellular heterogeneity and has been employed to a variety of applications, ranging from characterizing cancer cells subpopulations to elucidating tumor resistance mechanisms. Parallel to improving experimental protocols to deal with technological issues, deriving new analytical methods to reveal the complexity in scRNA-Seq data is just as challenging. Here we review the current state-of-the-art bioinformatics tools and methods for scRNA-Seq analysis, as well as addressing some critical analytical challenges that the field faces.

  16. Evaluation of Bioinformatics Approaches for Next-Generation Sequencing Analysis of microRNAs with a Toxicogenomics Study Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halil Bisgin

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are key post-transcriptional regulators that affect protein translation by targeting mRNAs. Their role in disease etiology and toxicity are well recognized. Given the rapid advancement of next-generation sequencing techniques, miRNA profiling has been increasingly conducted with RNA-seq, namely miRNA-seq. Analysis of miRNA-seq data requires several steps: (1 mapping the reads to miRBase, (2 considering mismatches during the hairpin alignment (windowing, and (3 counting the reads (quantification. The choice made in each step with respect to the parameter settings could affect miRNA quantification, differentially expressed miRNAs (DEMs detection and novel miRNA identification. Furthermore, these parameters do not act in isolation and their joint effects impact miRNA-seq results and interpretation. In toxicogenomics, the variation associated with parameter setting should not overpower the treatment effect (such as the dose/time-dependent effect. In this study, four commonly used miRNA-seq analysis tools (i.e., miRDeep2, miRExpress, miRNAkey, sRNAbench were comparatively evaluated with a standard toxicogenomics study design. We tested 30 different parameter settings on miRNA-seq data generated from thioacetamide-treated rat liver samples for three dose levels across four time points, followed by four normalization options. Because both miRExpress and miRNAkey yielded larger variation than that of the treatment effects across multiple parameter settings, our analyses mainly focused on the side-by-side comparison between miRDeep2 and sRNAbench. While the number of miRNAs detected by miRDeep2 was almost the subset of those detected by sRNAbench, the number of DEMs identified by both tools was comparable under the same parameter settings and normalization method. Change in the number of nucleotides out of the mature sequence in the hairpin alignment (window option yielded the largest variation for miRNA quantification and DEMs

  17. Bioinformatic analysis of the distribution of inorganic carbon transporters and prospective targets for bioengineering to increase Ci uptake by cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudana, Sandeep B; Zarzycki, Jan; Moparthi, Vamsi K; Kerfeld, Cheryl A

    2015-10-01

    Cyanobacteria have evolved a carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM) which has enabled them to inhabit diverse environments encompassing a range of inorganic carbon (Ci: [Formula: see text] and CO2) concentrations. Several uptake systems facilitate inorganic carbon accumulation in the cell, which can in turn be fixed by ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. Here we survey the distribution of genes encoding known Ci uptake systems in cyanobacterial genomes and, using a pfam- and gene context-based approach, identify in the marine (alpha) cyanobacteria a heretofore unrecognized number of putative counterparts to the well-known Ci transporters of beta cyanobacteria. In addition, our analysis shows that there is a huge repertoire of transport systems in cyanobacteria of unknown function, many with homology to characterized Ci transporters. These can be viewed as prospective targets for conversion into ancillary Ci transporters through bioengineering. Increasing intracellular Ci concentration coupled with efforts to increase carbon fixation will be beneficial for the downstream conversion of fixed carbon into value-added products including biofuels. In addition to CCM transporter homologs, we also survey the occurrence of rhodopsin homologs in cyanobacteria, including bacteriorhodopsin, a class of retinal-binding, light-activated proton pumps. Because they are light driven and because of the apparent ease of altering their ion selectivity, we use this as an example of re-purposing an endogenous transporter for the augmentation of Ci uptake by cyanobacteria and potentially chloroplasts.

  18. Large-scale analysis by SAGE reveals new mechanisms of v-erbA oncogene action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faure Claudine

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: The v-erbA oncogene, carried by the Avian Erythroblastosis Virus, derives from the c-erbAα proto-oncogene that encodes the nuclear receptor for triiodothyronine (T3R. v-ErbA transforms erythroid progenitors in vitro by blocking their differentiation, supposedly by interference with T3R and RAR (Retinoic Acid Receptor. However, v-ErbA target genes involved in its transforming activity still remain to be identified. Results: By using Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE, we identified 110 genes deregulated by v-ErbA and potentially implicated in the transformation process. Bioinformatic analysis of promoter sequence and transcriptional assays point out a potential role of c-Myb in the v-ErbA effect. Furthermore, grouping of newly identified target genes by function revealed both expected (chromatin/transcription and unexpected (protein metabolism functions potentially deregulated by v-ErbA. We then focused our study on 15 of the new v-ErbA target genes and demonstrated by real time PCR that in majority their expression was activated neither by T3, nor RA, nor during differentiation. This was unexpected based upon the previously known role of v-ErbA. Conclusion: This paper suggests the involvement of a wealth of new unanticipated mechanisms of v-ErbA action.

  19. Designing XML schemas for bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhn, Russel Elton; Burton, Philip John

    2003-06-01

    Data interchange bioinformatics databases will, in the future, most likely take place using extensible markup language (XML). The document structure will be described by an XML Schema rather than a document type definition (DTD). To ensure flexibility, the XML Schema must incorporate aspects of Object-Oriented Modeling. This impinges on the choice of the data model, which, in turn, is based on the organization of bioinformatics data by biologists. Thus, there is a need for the general bioinformatics community to be aware of the design issues relating to XML Schema. This paper, which is aimed at a general bioinformatics audience, uses examples to describe the differences between a DTD and an XML Schema and indicates how Unified Modeling Language diagrams may be used to incorporate Object-Oriented Modeling in the design of schema.

  20. Distinct Biological Potential of Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus sanguinis Revealed by Comparative Genome Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Wenning; Tan, Mui Fern; Old, Lesley A.; Paterson, Ian C.; Jakubovics, Nicholas S.; Choo, Siew Woh

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus sanguinis are pioneer colonizers of dental plaque and important agents of bacterial infective endocarditis (IE). To gain a greater understanding of these two closely related species, we performed comparative analyses on 14 new S. gordonii and 5 S. sanguinis strains using various bioinformatics approaches. We revealed S. gordonii and S. sanguinis harbor open pan-genomes and share generally high sequence homology and number of core genes including virule...

  1. A Survey of Scholarly Literature Describing the Field of Bioinformatics Education and Bioinformatics Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magana, Alejandra J.; Taleyarkhan, Manaz; Alvarado, Daniela Rivera; Kane, Michael; Springer, John; Clase, Kari

    2014-01-01

    Bioinformatics education can be broadly defined as the teaching and learning of the use of computer and information technology, along with mathematical and statistical analysis for gathering, storing, analyzing, interpreting, and integrating data to solve biological problems. The recent surge of genomics, proteomics, and structural biology in the…

  2. Bioinformatic analysis of neurotropic HIV envelope sequences identifies polymorphisms in the gp120 bridging sheet that increase macrophage-tropism through enhanced interactions with CCR5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mefford, Megan E.; Kunstman, Kevin; Wolinsky, Steven M.; Gabuzda, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages express low levels of the CD4 receptor compared to T-cells. Macrophage-tropic HIV strains replicating in brain of untreated patients with HIV-associated dementia (HAD) express Envs that are adapted to overcome this restriction through mechanisms that are poorly understood. Here, bioinformatic analysis of env sequence datasets together with functional studies identified polymorphisms in the β3 strand of the HIV gp120 bridging sheet that increase M-tropism. D197, which results in loss of an N-glycan located near the HIV Env trimer apex, was detected in brain in some HAD patients, while position 200 was estimated to be under positive selection. D197 and T/V200 increased fusion and infection of cells expressing low CD4 by enhancing gp120 binding to CCR5. These results identify polymorphisms in the HIV gp120 bridging sheet that overcome the restriction to macrophage infection imposed by low CD4 through enhanced gp120–CCR5 interactions, thereby promoting infection of brain and other macrophage-rich tissues. - Highlights: • We analyze HIV Env sequences and identify amino acids in beta 3 of the gp120 bridging sheet that enhance macrophage tropism. • These amino acids at positions 197 and 200 are present in brain of some patients with HIV-associated dementia. • D197 results in loss of a glycan near the HIV Env trimer apex, which may increase exposure of V3. • These variants may promote infection of macrophages in the brain by enhancing gp120–CCR5 interactions

  3. LegumeDB1 bioinformatics resource: comparative genomic analysis and novel cross-genera marker identification in lupin and pasture legume species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moolhuijzen, P; Cakir, M; Hunter, A; Schibeci, D; Macgregor, A; Smith, C; Francki, M; Jones, M G K; Appels, R; Bellgard, M

    2006-06-01

    The identification of markers in legume pasture crops, which can be associated with traits such as protein and lipid production, disease resistance, and reduced pod shattering, is generally accepted as an important strategy for improving the agronomic performance of these crops. It has been demonstrated that many quantitative trait loci (QTLs) identified in one species can be found in other plant species. Detailed legume comparative genomic analyses can characterize the genome organization between model legume species (e.g., Medicago truncatula, Lotus japonicus) and economically important crops such as soybean (Glycine max), pea (Pisum sativum), chickpea (Cicer arietinum), and lupin (Lupinus angustifolius), thereby identifying candidate gene markers that can be used to track QTLs in lupin and pasture legume breeding. LegumeDB is a Web-based bioinformatics resource for legume researchers. LegumeDB analysis of Medicago truncatula expressed sequence tags (ESTs) has identified novel simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers (16 tested), some of which have been putatively linked to symbiosome membrane proteins in root nodules and cell-wall proteins important in plant-pathogen defence mechanisms. These novel markers by preliminary PCR assays have been detected in Medicago truncatula and detected in at least one other legume species, Lotus japonicus, Glycine max, Cicer arietinum, and (or) Lupinus angustifolius (15/16 tested). Ongoing research has validated some of these markers to map them in a range of legume species that can then be used to compile composite genetic and physical maps. In this paper, we outline the features and capabilities of LegumeDB as an interactive application that provides legume genetic and physical comparative maps, and the efficient feature identification and annotation of the vast tracks of model legume sequences for convenient data integration and visualization. LegumeDB has been used to identify potential novel cross-genera polymorphic legume

  4. Bioinformatic analysis of neurotropic HIV envelope sequences identifies polymorphisms in the gp120 bridging sheet that increase macrophage-tropism through enhanced interactions with CCR5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mefford, Megan E., E-mail: megan_mefford@hms.harvard.edu [Department of Cancer Immunology and AIDS, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Kunstman, Kevin, E-mail: kunstman@northwestern.edu [Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States); Wolinsky, Steven M., E-mail: s-wolinsky@northwestern.edu [Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States); Gabuzda, Dana, E-mail: dana_gabuzda@dfci.harvard.edu [Department of Cancer Immunology and AIDS, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Neurology (Microbiology and Immunobiology), Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Macrophages express low levels of the CD4 receptor compared to T-cells. Macrophage-tropic HIV strains replicating in brain of untreated patients with HIV-associated dementia (HAD) express Envs that are adapted to overcome this restriction through mechanisms that are poorly understood. Here, bioinformatic analysis of env sequence datasets together with functional studies identified polymorphisms in the β3 strand of the HIV gp120 bridging sheet that increase M-tropism. D197, which results in loss of an N-glycan located near the HIV Env trimer apex, was detected in brain in some HAD patients, while position 200 was estimated to be under positive selection. D197 and T/V200 increased fusion and infection of cells expressing low CD4 by enhancing gp120 binding to CCR5. These results identify polymorphisms in the HIV gp120 bridging sheet that overcome the restriction to macrophage infection imposed by low CD4 through enhanced gp120–CCR5 interactions, thereby promoting infection of brain and other macrophage-rich tissues. - Highlights: • We analyze HIV Env sequences and identify amino acids in beta 3 of the gp120 bridging sheet that enhance macrophage tropism. • These amino acids at positions 197 and 200 are present in brain of some patients with HIV-associated dementia. • D197 results in loss of a glycan near the HIV Env trimer apex, which may increase exposure of V3. • These variants may promote infection of macrophages in the brain by enhancing gp120–CCR5 interactions.

  5. Residue analysis of a CTL epitope of SARS-CoV spike protein by IFN-gamma production and bioinformatics prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Jun

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS is an emerging infectious disease caused by the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV. The T cell epitopes of the SARS CoV spike protein are well known, but no systematic evaluation of the functional and structural roles of each residue has been reported for these antigenic epitopes. Analysis of the functional importance of side-chains by mutational study may exaggerate the effect by imposing a structural disturbance or an unusual steric, electrostatic or hydrophobic interaction. Results We demonstrated that N50 could induce significant IFN-gamma response from SARS-CoV S DNA immunized mice splenocytes by the means of ELISA, ELISPOT and FACS. Moreover, S366-374 was predicted to be an optimal epitope by bioinformatics tools: ANN, SMM, ARB and BIMAS, and confirmed by IFN-gamma response induced by a series of S358-374-derived peptides. Furthermore, each of S366-374 was replaced by alanine (A, lysine (K or aspartic acid (D, respectively. ANN was used to estimate the binding affinity of single S366-374 mutants to H-2 Kd. Y367 and L374 were predicated to possess the most important role in peptide binding. Additionally, these one residue mutated peptides were synthesized, and IFN-gamma production induced by G368, V369, A371, T372 and K373 mutated S366-374 were decreased obviously. Conclusions We demonstrated that S366-374 is an optimal H-2 Kd CTL epitope in the SARS CoV S protein. Moreover, Y367, S370, and L374 are anchors in the epitope, while C366, G368, V369, A371, T372, and K373 may directly interact with TCR on the surface of CD8-T cells.

  6. An Overview of Bioinformatics Tools and Resources in Allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zhiyan; Lin, Jing

    2017-01-01

    The rapidly increasing number of characterized allergens has created huge demands for advanced information storage, retrieval, and analysis. Bioinformatics and machine learning approaches provide useful tools for the study of allergens and epitopes prediction, which greatly complement traditional laboratory techniques. The specific applications mainly include identification of B- and T-cell epitopes, and assessment of allergenicity and cross-reactivity. In order to facilitate the work of clinical and basic researchers who are not familiar with bioinformatics, we review in this chapter the most important databases, bioinformatic tools, and methods with relevance to the study of allergens.

  7. Bioinformatics of cardiovascular miRNA biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Meik; Xiao, Ke; Liang, Chunguang; Viereck, Janika; Pachel, Christina; Frantz, Stefan; Thum, Thomas; Dandekar, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small ~22 nucleotide non-coding RNAs and are highly conserved among species. Moreover, miRNAs regulate gene expression of a large number of genes associated with important biological functions and signaling pathways. Recently, several miRNAs have been found to be associated with cardiovascular diseases. Thus, investigating the complex regulatory effect of miRNAs may lead to a better understanding of their functional role in the heart. To achieve this, bioinformatics approaches have to be coupled with validation and screening experiments to understand the complex interactions of miRNAs with the genome. This will boost the subsequent development of diagnostic markers and our understanding of the physiological and therapeutic role of miRNAs in cardiac remodeling. In this review, we focus on and explain different bioinformatics strategies and algorithms for the identification and analysis of miRNAs and their regulatory elements to better understand cardiac miRNA biology. Starting with the biogenesis of miRNAs, we present approaches such as LocARNA and miRBase for combining sequence and structure analysis including phylogenetic comparisons as well as detailed analysis of RNA folding patterns, functional target prediction, signaling pathway as well as functional analysis. We also show how far bioinformatics helps to tackle the unprecedented level of complexity and systemic effects by miRNA, underlining the strong therapeutic potential of miRNA and miRNA target structures in cardiovascular disease. In addition, we discuss drawbacks and limitations of bioinformatics algorithms and the necessity of experimental approaches for miRNA target identification. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Non-coding RNAs'. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Bioinformatics tools and database resources for systems genetics analysis in mice-a short review and an evaluation of future needs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Durrant, Caroline; Swertz, Morris A.; Alberts, Rudi; Arends, Danny; Moeller, Steffen; Mott, Richard; Prins, Pjotr; van der Velde, K. Joeri; Jansen, Ritsert C.; Schughart, Klaus

    During a meeting of the SYSGENET working group 'Bioinformatics', currently available software tools and databases for systems genetics in mice were reviewed and the needs for future developments discussed. The group evaluated interoperability and performed initial feasibility studies. To aid future

  9. Bioinformatics resource manager v2.3: an integrated software environment for systems biology with microRNA and cross-species analysis tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilton Susan C

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are noncoding RNAs that direct post-transcriptional regulation of protein coding genes. Recent studies have shown miRNAs are important for controlling many biological processes, including nervous system development, and are highly conserved across species. Given their importance, computational tools are necessary for analysis, interpretation and integration of high-throughput (HTP miRNA data in an increasing number of model species. The Bioinformatics Resource Manager (BRM v2.3 is a software environment for data management, mining, integration and functional annotation of HTP biological data. In this study, we report recent updates to BRM for miRNA data analysis and cross-species comparisons across datasets. Results BRM v2.3 has the capability to query predicted miRNA targets from multiple databases, retrieve potential regulatory miRNAs for known genes, integrate experimentally derived miRNA and mRNA datasets, perform ortholog mapping across species, and retrieve annotation and cross-reference identifiers for an expanded number of species. Here we use BRM to show that developmental exposure of zebrafish to 30 uM nicotine from 6–48 hours post fertilization (hpf results in behavioral hyperactivity in larval zebrafish and alteration of putative miRNA gene targets in whole embryos at developmental stages that encompass early neurogenesis. We show typical workflows for using BRM to integrate experimental zebrafish miRNA and mRNA microarray datasets with example retrievals for zebrafish, including pathway annotation and mapping to human ortholog. Functional analysis of differentially regulated (p Conclusions BRM provides the ability to mine complex data for identification of candidate miRNAs or pathways that drive phenotypic outcome and, therefore, is a useful hypothesis generation tool for systems biology. The miRNA workflow in BRM allows for efficient processing of multiple miRNA and mRNA datasets in a single

  10. Bioinformatics resource manager v2.3: an integrated software environment for systems biology with microRNA and cross-species analysis tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are noncoding RNAs that direct post-transcriptional regulation of protein coding genes. Recent studies have shown miRNAs are important for controlling many biological processes, including nervous system development, and are highly conserved across species. Given their importance, computational tools are necessary for analysis, interpretation and integration of high-throughput (HTP) miRNA data in an increasing number of model species. The Bioinformatics Resource Manager (BRM) v2.3 is a software environment for data management, mining, integration and functional annotation of HTP biological data. In this study, we report recent updates to BRM for miRNA data analysis and cross-species comparisons across datasets. Results BRM v2.3 has the capability to query predicted miRNA targets from multiple databases, retrieve potential regulatory miRNAs for known genes, integrate experimentally derived miRNA and mRNA datasets, perform ortholog mapping across species, and retrieve annotation and cross-reference identifiers for an expanded number of species. Here we use BRM to show that developmental exposure of zebrafish to 30 uM nicotine from 6–48 hours post fertilization (hpf) results in behavioral hyperactivity in larval zebrafish and alteration of putative miRNA gene targets in whole embryos at developmental stages that encompass early neurogenesis. We show typical workflows for using BRM to integrate experimental zebrafish miRNA and mRNA microarray datasets with example retrievals for zebrafish, including pathway annotation and mapping to human ortholog. Functional analysis of differentially regulated (p<0.05) gene targets in BRM indicates that nicotine exposure disrupts genes involved in neurogenesis, possibly through misregulation of nicotine-sensitive miRNAs. Conclusions BRM provides the ability to mine complex data for identification of candidate miRNAs or pathways that drive phenotypic outcome and, therefore, is a useful hypothesis

  11. Adapting bioinformatics curricula for big data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Anna C; Giffin, Kristine A; Greene, Casey S; Moore, Jason H

    2016-01-01

    Modern technologies are capable of generating enormous amounts of data that measure complex biological systems. Computational biologists and bioinformatics scientists are increasingly being asked to use these data to reveal key systems-level properties. We review the extent to which curricula are changing in the era of big data. We identify key competencies that scientists dealing with big data are expected to possess across fields, and we use this information to propose courses to meet these growing needs. While bioinformatics programs have traditionally trained students in data-intensive science, we identify areas of particular biological, computational and statistical emphasis important for this era that can be incorporated into existing curricula. For each area, we propose a course structured around these topics, which can be adapted in whole or in parts into existing curricula. In summary, specific challenges associated with big data provide an important opportunity to update existing curricula, but we do not foresee a wholesale redesign of bioinformatics training programs. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  12. Adapting bioinformatics curricula for big data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Anna C.; Giffin, Kristine A.; Greene, Casey S.

    2016-01-01

    Modern technologies are capable of generating enormous amounts of data that measure complex biological systems. Computational biologists and bioinformatics scientists are increasingly being asked to use these data to reveal key systems-level properties. We review the extent to which curricula are changing in the era of big data. We identify key competencies that scientists dealing with big data are expected to possess across fields, and we use this information to propose courses to meet these growing needs. While bioinformatics programs have traditionally trained students in data-intensive science, we identify areas of particular biological, computational and statistical emphasis important for this era that can be incorporated into existing curricula. For each area, we propose a course structured around these topics, which can be adapted in whole or in parts into existing curricula. In summary, specific challenges associated with big data provide an important opportunity to update existing curricula, but we do not foresee a wholesale redesign of bioinformatics training programs. PMID:25829469

  13. Bioinformatic analysis of the nucleolus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leung, Anthony K L; Andersen, Jens S; Mann, Matthias

    2003-01-01

    The nucleolus is a plurifunctional, nuclear organelle, which is responsible for ribosome biogenesis and many other functions in eukaryotes, including RNA processing, viral replication and tumour suppression. Our knowledge of the human nucleolar proteome has been expanded dramatically by the two r...

  14. Multifunctionality and diversity of GDSL esterase/lipase gene family in rice (Oryza sativa L. japonica genome: new insights from bioinformatics analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chepyshko Hanna

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background GDSL esterases/lipases are a newly discovered subclass of lipolytic enzymes that are very important and attractive research subjects because of their multifunctional properties, such as broad substrate specificity and regiospecificity. Compared with the current knowledge regarding these enzymes in bacteria, our understanding of the plant GDSL enzymes is very limited, although the GDSL gene family in plant species include numerous members in many fully sequenced plant genomes. Only two genes from a large rice GDSL esterase/lipase gene family were previously characterised, and the majority of the members remain unknown. In the present study, we describe the rice OsGELP (Oryza sativa GDSL esterase/lipase protein gene family at the genomic and proteomic levels, and use this knowledge to provide insights into the multifunctionality of the rice OsGELP enzymes. Results In this study, an extensive bioinformatics analysis identified 114 genes in the rice OsGELP gene family. A complete overview of this family in rice is presented, including the chromosome locations, gene structures, phylogeny, and protein motifs. Among the OsGELPs and the plant GDSL esterase/lipase proteins of known functions, 41 motifs were found that represent the core secondary structure elements or appear specifically in different phylogenetic subclades. The specification and distribution of identified putative conserved clade-common and -specific peptide motifs, and their location on the predicted protein three dimensional structure may possibly signify their functional roles. Potentially important regions for substrate specificity are highlighted, in accordance with protein three-dimensional model and location of the phylogenetic specific conserved motifs. The differential expression of some representative genes were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. The phylogenetic analysis, together with protein motif architectures, and the expression profiling were

  15. Short-term arginine deprivation results in large-scale modulation of hepatic gene expression in both normal and tumor cells: microarray bioinformatic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabo Edmond

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have reported arginine-sensitive regulation of LAT1 amino acid transporter (SLC 7A5 in normal rodent hepatic cells with loss of arginine sensitivity and high level constitutive expression in tumor cells. We hypothesized that liver cell gene expression is highly sensitive to alterations in the amino acid microenvironment and that tumor cells may differ substantially in gene sets sensitive to amino acid availability. To assess the potential number and classes of hepatic genes sensitive to arginine availability at the RNA level and compare these between normal and tumor cells, we used an Affymetrix microarray approach, a paired in vitro model of normal rat hepatic cells and a tumorigenic derivative with triplicate independent replicates. Cells were exposed to arginine-deficient or control conditions for 18 hours in medium formulated to maintain differentiated function. Results Initial two-way analysis with a p-value of 0.05 identified 1419 genes in normal cells versus 2175 in tumor cells whose expression was altered in arginine-deficient conditions relative to controls, representing 9–14% of the rat genome. More stringent bioinformatic analysis with 9-way comparisons and a minimum of 2-fold variation narrowed this set to 56 arginine-responsive genes in normal liver cells and 162 in tumor cells. Approximately half the arginine-responsive genes in normal cells overlap with those in tumor cells. Of these, the majority was increased in expression and included multiple growth, survival, and stress-related genes. GADD45, TA1/LAT1, and caspases 11 and 12 were among this group. Previously known amino acid regulated genes were among the pool in both cell types. Available cDNA probes allowed independent validation of microarray data for multiple genes. Among genes downregulated under arginine-deficient conditions were multiple genes involved in cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism. Expression of low-density lipoprotein receptor was

  16. Bioinformatic Analysis of Chlamydia trachomatis Polymorphic Membrane Proteins PmpE, PmpF, PmpG and PmpH as Potential Vaccine Antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Nunes

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis is the most important infectious cause of infertility in women with important implications in public health and for which a vaccine is urgently needed. Recent immunoproteomic vaccine studies found that four polymorphic membrane proteins (PmpE, PmpF, PmpG and PmpH are immunodominant, recognized by various MHC class II haplotypes and protective in mouse models. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate genetic and protein features of Pmps (focusing on the N-terminal 600 amino acids where MHC class II epitopes were mapped in order to understand antigen variation that may emerge following vaccine induced immune selection. We used several bioinformatics platforms to study: i Pmps' phylogeny and genetic polymorphism; ii the location and distribution of protein features (GGA(I, L/FxxN motifs and cysteine residues that may impact pathogen-host interactions and protein conformation; and iii the existence of phase variation mechanisms that may impact Pmps' expression. We used a well-characterized collection of 53 fully-sequenced strains that represent the C. trachomatis serovars associated with the three disease groups: ocular (N=8, epithelial-genital (N=25 and lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV (N=20. We observed that PmpF and PmpE are highly polymorphic between LGV and epithelial-genital strains, and also within populations of the latter. We also found heterogeneous representation among strains for GGA(I, L/FxxN motifs and cysteine residues, suggesting possible alterations in adhesion properties, tissue specificity and immunogenicity. PmpG and, to a lesser extent, PmpH revealed low polymorphism and high conservation of protein features among the genital strains (including the LGV group. Uniquely among the four Pmps, pmpG has regulatory sequences suggestive of phase variation. In aggregate, the results suggest that PmpG may be the lead vaccine candidate because of sequence conservation but may need to be paired with another protective

  17. Distinct Biological Potential of Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus sanguinis Revealed by Comparative Genome Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wenning; Tan, Mui Fern; Old, Lesley A; Paterson, Ian C; Jakubovics, Nicholas S; Choo, Siew Woh

    2017-06-07

    Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus sanguinis are pioneer colonizers of dental plaque and important agents of bacterial infective endocarditis (IE). To gain a greater understanding of these two closely related species, we performed comparative analyses on 14 new S. gordonii and 5 S. sanguinis strains using various bioinformatics approaches. We revealed S. gordonii and S. sanguinis harbor open pan-genomes and share generally high sequence homology and number of core genes including virulence genes. However, we observed subtle differences in genomic islands and prophages between the species. Comparative pathogenomics analysis identified S. sanguinis strains have genes encoding IgA proteases, mitogenic factor deoxyribonucleases, nickel/cobalt uptake and cobalamin biosynthesis. On the contrary, genomic islands of S. gordonii strains contain additional copies of comCDE quorum-sensing system components involved in genetic competence. Two distinct polysaccharide locus architectures were identified, one of which was exclusively present in S. gordonii strains. The first evidence of genes encoding the CylA and CylB system by the α-haemolytic S. gordonii is presented. This study provides new insights into the genetic distinctions between S. gordonii and S. sanguinis, which yields understanding of tooth surfaces colonization and contributions to dental plaque formation, as well as their potential roles in the pathogenesis of IE.

  18. Characteristics of the tomato chromoplast revealed by proteomic analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Barsan, Cristina; Sanchez-Bel, Paloma; Rombaldi, César Valmor; Egea, Isabel; Rossignol, Michel; Kuntz, Marcel; Zouine, Mohamed; Latché, Alain; Bouzayen, Mondher; Pech, Jean-Claude

    2010-01-01

    Chromoplasts are non-photosynthetic specialized plastids that are important in ripening tomato fruit (Solanum lycopersicum) since, among other functions, they are the site of accumulation of coloured compounds. Analysis of the proteome of red fruit chromoplasts revealed the presence of 988 proteins corresponding to 802 Arabidopsis unigenes, among which 209 had not been listed so far in plastidial databanks. These data revealed several features of the chromoplast. Proteins of lipid metabolism ...

  19. Application of Bioinformatics in Chronobiology Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robson da Silva Lopes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioinformatics and other well-established sciences, such as molecular biology, genetics, and biochemistry, provide a scientific approach for the analysis of data generated through “omics” projects that may be used in studies of chronobiology. The results of studies that apply these techniques demonstrate how they significantly aided the understanding of chronobiology. However, bioinformatics tools alone cannot eliminate the need for an understanding of the field of research or the data to be considered, nor can such tools replace analysts and researchers. It is often necessary to conduct an evaluation of the results of a data mining effort to determine the degree of reliability. To this end, familiarity with the field of investigation is necessary. It is evident that the knowledge that has been accumulated through chronobiology and the use of tools derived from bioinformatics has contributed to the recognition and understanding of the patterns and biological rhythms found in living organisms. The current work aims to develop new and important applications in the near future through chronobiology research.

  20. Bringing Web 2.0 to bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhang; Cheung, Kei-Hoi; Townsend, Jeffrey P

    2009-01-01

    Enabling deft data integration from numerous, voluminous and heterogeneous data sources is a major bioinformatic challenge. Several approaches have been proposed to address this challenge, including data warehousing and federated databasing. Yet despite the rise of these approaches, integration of data from multiple sources remains problematic and toilsome. These two approaches follow a user-to-computer communication model for data exchange, and do not facilitate a broader concept of data sharing or collaboration among users. In this report, we discuss the potential of Web 2.0 technologies to transcend this model and enhance bioinformatics research. We propose a Web 2.0-based Scientific Social Community (SSC) model for the implementation of these technologies. By establishing a social, collective and collaborative platform for data creation, sharing and integration, we promote a web services-based pipeline featuring web services for computer-to-computer data exchange as users add value. This pipeline aims to simplify data integration and creation, to realize automatic analysis, and to facilitate reuse and sharing of data. SSC can foster collaboration and harness collective intelligence to create and discover new knowledge. In addition to its research potential, we also describe its potential role as an e-learning platform in education. We discuss lessons from information technology, predict the next generation of Web (Web 3.0), and describe its potential impact on the future of bioinformatics studies.

  1. Bioinformatics in translational drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooller, Sarah K; Benstead-Hume, Graeme; Chen, Xiangrong; Ali, Yusuf; Pearl, Frances M G

    2017-08-31

    Bioinformatics approaches are becoming ever more essential in translational drug discovery both in academia and within the pharmaceutical industry. Computational exploitation of the increasing volumes of data generated during all phases of drug discovery is enabling key challenges of the process to be addressed. Here, we highlight some of the areas in which bioinformatics resources and methods are being developed to support the drug discovery pipeline. These include the creation of large data warehouses, bioinformatics algorithms to analyse 'big data' that identify novel drug targets and/or biomarkers, programs to assess the tractability of targets, and prediction of repositioning opportunities that use licensed drugs to treat additional indications. © 2017 The Author(s).

  2. The growing need for microservices in bioinformatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher L Williams

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Within the information technology (IT industry, best practices and standards are constantly evolving and being refined. In contrast, computer technology utilized within the healthcare industry often evolves at a glacial pace, with reduced opportunities for justified innovation. Although the use of timely technology refreshes within an enterprise′s overall technology stack can be costly, thoughtful adoption of select technologies with a demonstrated return on investment can be very effective in increasing productivity and at the same time, reducing the burden of maintenance often associated with older and legacy systems. In this brief technical communication, we introduce the concept of microservices as applied to the ecosystem of data analysis pipelines. Microservice architecture is a framework for dividing complex systems into easily managed parts. Each individual service is limited in functional scope, thereby conferring a higher measure of functional isolation and reliability to the collective solution. Moreover, maintenance challenges are greatly simplified by virtue of the reduced architectural complexity of each constitutive module. This fact notwithstanding, rendered overall solutions utilizing a microservices-based approach provide equal or greater levels of functionality as compared to conventional programming approaches. Bioinformatics, with its ever-increasing demand for performance and new testing algorithms, is the perfect use-case for such a solution. Moreover, if promulgated within the greater development community as an open-source solution, such an approach holds potential to be transformative to current bioinformatics software development. Context: Bioinformatics relies on nimble IT framework which can adapt to changing requirements. Aims: To present a well-established software design and deployment strategy as a solution for current challenges within bioinformatics Conclusions: Use of the microservices framework

  3. The growing need for microservices in bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Christopher L; Sica, Jeffrey C; Killen, Robert T; Balis, Ulysses G J

    2016-01-01

    Within the information technology (IT) industry, best practices and standards are constantly evolving and being refined. In contrast, computer technology utilized within the healthcare industry often evolves at a glacial pace, with reduced opportunities for justified innovation. Although the use of timely technology refreshes within an enterprise's overall technology stack can be costly, thoughtful adoption of select technologies with a demonstrated return on investment can be very effective in increasing productivity and at the same time, reducing the burden of maintenance often associated with older and legacy systems. In this brief technical communication, we introduce the concept of microservices as applied to the ecosystem of data analysis pipelines. Microservice architecture is a framework for dividing complex systems into easily managed parts. Each individual service is limited in functional scope, thereby conferring a higher measure of functional isolation and reliability to the collective solution. Moreover, maintenance challenges are greatly simplified by virtue of the reduced architectural complexity of each constitutive module. This fact notwithstanding, rendered overall solutions utilizing a microservices-based approach provide equal or greater levels of functionality as compared to conventional programming approaches. Bioinformatics, with its ever-increasing demand for performance and new testing algorithms, is the perfect use-case for such a solution. Moreover, if promulgated within the greater development community as an open-source solution, such an approach holds potential to be transformative to current bioinformatics software development. Bioinformatics relies on nimble IT framework which can adapt to changing requirements. To present a well-established software design and deployment strategy as a solution for current challenges within bioinformatics. Use of the microservices framework is an effective methodology for the fabrication and

  4. The growing need for microservices in bioinformatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Christopher L.; Sica, Jeffrey C.; Killen, Robert T.; Balis, Ulysses G. J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Within the information technology (IT) industry, best practices and standards are constantly evolving and being refined. In contrast, computer technology utilized within the healthcare industry often evolves at a glacial pace, with reduced opportunities for justified innovation. Although the use of timely technology refreshes within an enterprise's overall technology stack can be costly, thoughtful adoption of select technologies with a demonstrated return on investment can be very effective in increasing productivity and at the same time, reducing the burden of maintenance often associated with older and legacy systems. In this brief technical communication, we introduce the concept of microservices as applied to the ecosystem of data analysis pipelines. Microservice architecture is a framework for dividing complex systems into easily managed parts. Each individual service is limited in functional scope, thereby conferring a higher measure of functional isolation and reliability to the collective solution. Moreover, maintenance challenges are greatly simplified by virtue of the reduced architectural complexity of each constitutive module. This fact notwithstanding, rendered overall solutions utilizing a microservices-based approach provide equal or greater levels of functionality as compared to conventional programming approaches. Bioinformatics, with its ever-increasing demand for performance and new testing algorithms, is the perfect use-case for such a solution. Moreover, if promulgated within the greater development community as an open-source solution, such an approach holds potential to be transformative to current bioinformatics software development. Context: Bioinformatics relies on nimble IT framework which can adapt to changing requirements. Aims: To present a well-established software design and deployment strategy as a solution for current challenges within bioinformatics Conclusions: Use of the microservices framework is an effective

  5. Bioinformatics Training Network (BTN): a community resource for bioinformatics trainers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Maria V.; Walter, Peter; Blatter, Marie-Claude

    2012-01-01

    and clearly tagged in relation to target audiences, learning objectives, etc. Ideally, they would also be peer reviewed, and easily and efficiently accessible for downloading. Here, we present the Bioinformatics Training Network (BTN), a new enterprise that has been initiated to address these needs and review...

  6. Robust Bioinformatics Recognition with VLSI Biochip Microsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lue, Jaw-Chyng L.; Fang, Wai-Chi

    2006-01-01

    A microsystem architecture for real-time, on-site, robust bioinformatic patterns recognition and analysis has been proposed. This system is compatible with on-chip DNA analysis means such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR)amplification. A corresponding novel artificial neural network (ANN) learning algorithm using new sigmoid-logarithmic transfer function based on error backpropagation (EBP) algorithm is invented. Our results show the trained new ANN can recognize low fluorescence patterns better than the conventional sigmoidal ANN does. A differential logarithmic imaging chip is designed for calculating logarithm of relative intensities of fluorescence signals. The single-rail logarithmic circuit and a prototype ANN chip are designed, fabricated and characterized.

  7. Peer Mentoring for Bioinformatics presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Budd, Aidan

    2014-01-01

    A handout used in a HUB (Heidelberg Unseminars in Bioinformatics) meeting focused on career development for bioinformaticians. It describes an activity for use to help introduce the idea of peer mentoring, potnetially acting as an opportunity to create peer-mentoring groups.

  8. Reproducible Bioinformatics Research for Biologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    This book chapter describes the current Big Data problem in Bioinformatics and the resulting issues with performing reproducible computational research. The core of the chapter provides guidelines and summaries of current tools/techniques that a noncomputational researcher would need to learn to pe...

  9. Taking Bioinformatics to Systems Medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kampen, Antoine H. C.; Moerland, Perry D.

    2016-01-01

    Systems medicine promotes a range of approaches and strategies to study human health and disease at a systems level with the aim of improving the overall well-being of (healthy) individuals, and preventing, diagnosing, or curing disease. In this chapter we discuss how bioinformatics critically

  10. Bioinformatics of genomic association mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaez Barzani, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis we present an overview of bioinformatics-based approaches for genomic association mapping, with emphasis on human quantitative traits and their contribution to complex diseases. We aim to provide a comprehensive walk-through of the classic steps of genomic association mapping

  11. An innovative approach for testing bioinformatics programs using metamorphic testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Huai

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent advances in experimental and computational technologies have fueled the development of many sophisticated bioinformatics programs. The correctness of such programs is crucial as incorrectly computed results may lead to wrong biological conclusion or misguide downstream experimentation. Common software testing procedures involve executing the target program with a set of test inputs and then verifying the correctness of the test outputs. However, due to the complexity of many bioinformatics programs, it is often difficult to verify the correctness of the test outputs. Therefore our ability to perform systematic software testing is greatly hindered. Results We propose to use a novel software testing technique, metamorphic testing (MT, to test a range of bioinformatics programs. Instead of requiring a mechanism to verify whether an individual test output is correct, the MT technique verifies whether a pair of test outputs conform to a set of domain specific properties, called metamorphic relations (MRs, thus greatly increases the number and variety of test cases that can be applied. To demonstrate how MT is used in practice, we applied MT to test two open-source bioinformatics programs, namely GNLab and SeqMap. In particular we show that MT is simple to implement, and is effective in detecting faults in a real-life program and some artificially fault-seeded programs. Further, we discuss how MT can be applied to test programs from various domains of bioinformatics. Conclusion This paper describes the application of a simple, effective and automated technique to systematically test a range of bioinformatics programs. We show how MT can be implemented in practice through two real-life case studies. Since many bioinformatics programs, particularly those for large scale simulation and data analysis, are hard to test systematically, their developers may benefit from using MT as part of the testing strategy. Therefore our work

  12. EURASIP journal on bioinformatics & systems biology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2006-01-01

    "The overall aim of "EURASIP Journal on Bioinformatics and Systems Biology" is to publish research results related to signal processing and bioinformatics theories and techniques relevant to a wide...

  13. Bioinformatics decoding the genome

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Deutsch, Sam; Michielin, Olivier; Thomas, Arthur; Descombes, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    Extracting the fundamental genomic sequence from the DNA From Genome to Sequence : Biology in the early 21st century has been radically transformed by the availability of the full genome sequences of an ever increasing number of life forms, from bacteria to major crop plants and to humans. The lecture will concentrate on the computational challenges associated with the production, storage and analysis of genome sequence data, with an emphasis on mammalian genomes. The quality and usability of genome sequences is increasingly conditioned by the careful integration of strategies for data collection and computational analysis, from the construction of maps and libraries to the assembly of raw data into sequence contigs and chromosome-sized scaffolds. Once the sequence is assembled, a major challenge is the mapping of biologically relevant information onto this sequence: promoters, introns and exons of protein-encoding genes, regulatory elements, functional RNAs, pseudogenes, transposons, etc. The methodological ...

  14. Big data bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Casey S; Tan, Jie; Ung, Matthew; Moore, Jason H; Cheng, Chao

    2014-12-01

    Recent technological advances allow for high throughput profiling of biological systems in a cost-efficient manner. The low cost of data generation is leading us to the "big data" era. The availability of big data provides unprecedented opportunities but also raises new challenges for data mining and analysis. In this review, we introduce key concepts in the analysis of big data, including both "machine learning" algorithms as well as "unsupervised" and "supervised" examples of each. We note packages for the R programming language that are available to perform machine learning analyses. In addition to programming based solutions, we review webservers that allow users with limited or no programming background to perform these analyses on large data compendia. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Preface to Introduction to Structural Bioinformatics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feenstra, K. Anton; Abeln, Sanne

    2018-01-01

    While many good textbooks are available on Protein Structure, Molecular Simulations, Thermodynamics and Bioinformatics methods in general, there is no good introductory level book for the field of Structural Bioinformatics. This book aims to give an introduction into Structural Bioinformatics, which

  16. Metagenomic Analysis of the Sponge Discodermia Reveals the Production of the Cyanobacterial Natural Product Kasumigamide by 'Entotheonella'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Yu; Egami, Yoko; Kimura, Miki; Wakimoto, Toshiyuki; Abe, Ikuro

    2016-01-01

    Sponge metagenomes are a useful platform to mine cryptic biosynthetic gene clusters responsible for production of natural products involved in the sponge-microbe association. Since numerous sponge-derived bioactive metabolites are biosynthesized by the symbiotic bacteria, this strategy may concurrently reveal sponge-symbiont produced compounds. Accordingly, a metagenomic analysis of the Japanese marine sponge Discodermia calyx has resulted in the identification of a hybrid type I polyketide synthase-nonribosomal peptide synthetase gene (kas). Bioinformatic analysis of the gene product suggested its involvement in the biosynthesis of kasumigamide, a tetrapeptide originally isolated from freshwater free-living cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa NIES-87. Subsequent investigation of the sponge metabolic profile revealed the presence of kasumigamide in the sponge extract. The kasumigamide producing bacterium was identified as an 'Entotheonella' sp. Moreover, an in silico analysis of kas gene homologs uncovered the presence of kas family genes in two additional bacteria from different phyla. The production of kasumigamide by distantly related multiple bacterial strains implicates horizontal gene transfer and raises the potential for a wider distribution across other bacterial groups.

  17. Bcl2-associated Athanogene 3 Interactome Analysis Reveals a New Role in Modulating Proteasome Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Yang, Li-Na; Cheng, Li; Tu, Shun; Guo, Shu-Juan; Le, Huang-Ying; Xiong, Qian; Mo, Ran; Li, Chong-Yang; Jeong, Jun-Seop; Jiang, Lizhi; Blackshaw, Seth; Bi, Li-Jun; Zhu, Heng; Tao, Sheng-Ce; Ge, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Bcl2-associated athanogene 3 (BAG3), a member of the BAG family of co-chaperones, plays a critical role in regulating apoptosis, development, cell motility, autophagy, and tumor metastasis and in mediating cell adaptive responses to stressful stimuli. BAG3 carries a BAG domain, a WW domain, and a proline-rich repeat (PXXP), all of which mediate binding to different partners. To elucidate BAG3's interaction network at the molecular level, we employed quantitative immunoprecipitation combined with knockdown and human proteome microarrays to comprehensively profile the BAG3 interactome in humans. We identified a total of 382 BAG3-interacting proteins with diverse functions, including transferase activity, nucleic acid binding, transcription factors, proteases, and chaperones, suggesting that BAG3 is a critical regulator of diverse cellular functions. In addition, we characterized interactions between BAG3 and some of its newly identified partners in greater detail. In particular, bioinformatic analysis revealed that the BAG3 interactome is strongly enriched in proteins functioning within the proteasome-ubiquitination process and that compose the proteasome complex itself, suggesting that a critical biological function of BAG3 is associated with the proteasome. Functional studies demonstrated that BAG3 indeed interacts with the proteasome and modulates its activity, sustaining cell survival and underlying resistance to therapy through the down-modulation of apoptosis. Taken as a whole, this study expands our knowledge of the BAG3 interactome, provides a valuable resource for understanding how BAG3 affects different cellular functions, and demonstrates that biologically relevant data can be harvested using this kind of integrated approach. PMID:23824909

  18. Bioinformatic Prediction of WSSV-Host Protein-Protein Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available WSSV is one of the most dangerous pathogens in shrimp aquaculture. However, the molecular mechanism of how WSSV interacts with shrimp is still not very clear. In the present study, bioinformatic approaches were used to predict interactions between proteins from WSSV and shrimp. The genome data of WSSV (NC_003225.1 and the constructed transcriptome data of F. chinensis were used to screen potentially interacting proteins by searching in protein interaction databases, including STRING, Reactome, and DIP. Forty-four pairs of proteins were suggested to have interactions between WSSV and the shrimp. Gene ontology analysis revealed that 6 pairs of these interacting proteins were classified into “extracellular region” or “receptor complex” GO-terms. KEGG pathway analysis showed that they were involved in the “ECM-receptor interaction pathway.” In the 6 pairs of interacting proteins, an envelope protein called “collagen-like protein” (WSSV-CLP encoded by an early virus gene “wsv001” in WSSV interacted with 6 deduced proteins from the shrimp, including three integrin alpha (ITGA, two integrin beta (ITGB, and one syndecan (SDC. Sequence analysis on WSSV-CLP, ITGA, ITGB, and SDC revealed that they possessed the sequence features for protein-protein interactions. This study might provide new insights into the interaction mechanisms between WSSV and shrimp.

  19. Establishing bioinformatics research in the Asia Pacific

    OpenAIRE

    Ranganathan, Shoba; Tammi, Martti; Gribskov, Michael; Tan, Tin Wee

    2006-01-01

    Abstract In 1998, the Asia Pacific Bioinformatics Network (APBioNet), Asia's oldest bioinformatics organisation was set up to champion the advancement of bioinformatics in the Asia Pacific. By 2002, APBioNet was able to gain sufficient critical mass to initiate the first International Conference on Bioinformatics (InCoB) bringing together scientists working in the field of bioinformatics in the region. This year, the InCoB2006 Conference was organized as the 5th annual conference of the Asia-...

  20. Bioinformatics programs are 31-fold over-represented among the highest impact scientific papers of the past two decades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wren, Jonathan D

    2016-09-01

    To analyze the relative proportion of bioinformatics papers and their non-bioinformatics counterparts in the top 20 most cited papers annually for the past two decades. When defining bioinformatics papers as encompassing both those that provide software for data analysis or methods underlying data analysis software, we find that over the past two decades, more than a third (34%) of the most cited papers in science were bioinformatics papers, which is approximately a 31-fold enrichment relative to the total number of bioinformatics papers published. More than half of the most cited papers during this span were bioinformatics papers. Yet, the average 5-year JIF of top 20 bioinformatics papers was 7.7, whereas the average JIF for top 20 non-bioinformatics papers was 25.8, significantly higher (P papers, bioinformatics journals tended to have higher Gini coefficients, suggesting that development of novel bioinformatics resources may be somewhat 'hit or miss'. That is, relative to other fields, bioinformatics produces some programs that are extremely widely adopted and cited, yet there are fewer of intermediate success. jdwren@gmail.com Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Bioinformatics Methods for Interpreting Toxicogenomics Data: The Role of Text-Mining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hettne, K.M.; Kleinjans, J.; Stierum, R.H.; Boorsma, A.; Kors, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter concerns the application of bioinformatics methods to the analysis of toxicogenomics data. The chapter starts with an introduction covering how bioinformatics has been applied in toxicogenomics data analysis, and continues with a description of the foundations of a specific

  2. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Regulation of Gene Expression for Lipid Catabolism in Young Broilers by Butyrate Glycerides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Fugui; Yu, Hai; Lepp, Dion; Shi, Xuejiang; Yang, Xiaojian; Hu, Jielun; Leeson, Steve; Yang, Chengbo; Nie, Shaoping; Hou, Yongqing; Gong, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    indicated that dietary BG intervention induced 79 and 205 characterized DEGs in the jejunum and liver, respectively. In addition, 255 and 165 TSEGs were detected in the liver and jejunum of BG-fed group, while 162 and 211 TSEGs genes were observed in the liver and jejunum of BD-fed birds, respectively. Bioinformatic analysis with both IPA and DAVID-BR further revealed a significant enrichment of DEGs and TSEGs in the biological processes for reducing the synthesis, storage, transportation and secretion of lipids in the jejunum, while those in the liver were for enhancing the oxidation of ingested lipids and fatty acids. In particular, transcriptional regulators of THRSP and EGR-1 as well as several DEGs involved in the PPAR-α signaling pathway were significantly induced by dietary BG intervention for lipid catabolism. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that BG reduces body fat deposition via regulation of gene expression, which is involved in the biological events relating to the reduction of synthesis, storage, transportation and secretion, and improvement of oxidation of lipids and fatty acids. PMID:27508934

  3. Compare the Difference of B-cell Epitopes of EgAgB1 and EgAgB3 Proteins Selected through Bioinformatic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Mengting; Zhang, Fengbo; Zhu, Yuejie; Zhao, Xiao; Ding, Jianbing

    2018-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis, as a zoonosis, seriously endangers humans and animals, so early diagnosis of this disease is particularly important. Therefore, this study is to predict B-cell epitopes of EgAgB1 and EgAgB3 proteins by bioinformatics software. B-cell epitopes of EgAgB1 and EgAgB3 proteins are predicted using DNAStar and IEDB software. The results suggest that there are two potential B-cell epitopes in EgAgB1, which located in the 8-15 and 31-37 amino acid residue segments. And two potential B-cell epitopes in EgAgB2, located in the 20∼27 and 47∼53 amino acid residue segments. This study predicted the B-cell epitopes of EgAgB1 and EgAgB3 proteins, which laid the foundation for the early diagnosis of Cystic echinococcosis.

  4. Combining multiple decisions: applications to bioinformatics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yukinawa, N; Ishii, S; Takenouchi, T; Oba, S

    2008-01-01

    Multi-class classification is one of the fundamental tasks in bioinformatics and typically arises in cancer diagnosis studies by gene expression profiling. This article reviews two recent approaches to multi-class classification by combining multiple binary classifiers, which are formulated based on a unified framework of error-correcting output coding (ECOC). The first approach is to construct a multi-class classifier in which each binary classifier to be aggregated has a weight value to be optimally tuned based on the observed data. In the second approach, misclassification of each binary classifier is formulated as a bit inversion error with a probabilistic model by making an analogy to the context of information transmission theory. Experimental studies using various real-world datasets including cancer classification problems reveal that both of the new methods are superior or comparable to other multi-class classification methods

  5. Genetic Markers Analyses and Bioinformatic Approaches to Distinguish Between Olive Tree (Olea europaea L.) Cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Ayed, Rayda; Ben Hassen, Hanen; Ennouri, Karim; Rebai, Ahmed

    2016-12-01

    The genetic diversity of 22 olive tree cultivars (Olea europaea L.) sampled from different Mediterranean countries was assessed using 5 SNP markers (FAD2.1; FAD2.3; CALC; SOD and ANTHO3) located in four different genes. The genotyping analysis of the 22 cultivars with 5 SNP loci revealed 11 alleles (average 2.2 per allele). The dendrogram based on cultivar genotypes revealed three clusters consistent with the cultivars classification. Besides, the results obtained with the five SNPs were compared to those obtained with the SSR markers using bioinformatic analyses and by computing a cophenetic correlation coefficient, indicating the usefulness of the UPGMA method for clustering plant genotypes. Based on principal coordinate analysis using a similarity matrix, the first two coordinates, revealed 54.94 % of the total variance. This work provides a more comprehensive explanation of the diversity available in Tunisia olive cultivars, and an important contribution for olive breeding and olive oil authenticity.

  6. GOBLET: the Global Organisation for Bioinformatics Learning, Education and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attwood, Teresa K; Atwood, Teresa K; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik; Brazas, Michelle E; Corpas, Manuel; Gaudet, Pascale; Lewitter, Fran; Mulder, Nicola; Palagi, Patricia M; Schneider, Maria Victoria; van Gelder, Celia W G

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, high-throughput technologies have brought big data to the life sciences. The march of progress has been rapid, leaving in its wake a demand for courses in data analysis, data stewardship, computing fundamentals, etc., a need that universities have not yet been able to satisfy--paradoxically, many are actually closing "niche" bioinformatics courses at a time of critical need. The impact of this is being felt across continents, as many students and early-stage researchers are being left without appropriate skills to manage, analyse, and interpret their data with confidence. This situation has galvanised a group of scientists to address the problems on an international scale. For the first time, bioinformatics educators and trainers across the globe have come together to address common needs, rising above institutional and international boundaries to cooperate in sharing bioinformatics training expertise, experience, and resources, aiming to put ad hoc training practices on a more professional footing for the benefit of all.

  7. The Screening of Genes Sensitive to Long-Term, Low-Level Microwave Exposure and Bioinformatic Analysis of Potential Correlations to Learning and Memory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Ya Li; LI Ying Xian; MA Hong Bo; LI Dong; LI Hai Liang; JIANG Rui; KAN Guang Han; YANG Zhen Zhong; HUANG Zeng Xin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To gain a better understanding of gene expression changes in the brain following microwave exposure in mice. This study hopes to reveal mechanisms contributing to microwave-induced learning and memory dysfunction. Methods Mice were exposed to whole body 2100 MHz microwaves with specific absorption rates (SARs) of 0.45 W/kg, 1.8 W/kg, and 3.6 W/kg for 1 hour daily for 8 weeks. Differentially expressing genes in the brains were screened using high-density oligonucleotide arrays, with genes showing more significant differences further confirmed by RT-PCR. Results The gene chip results demonstrated that 41 genes (0.45 W/kg group), 29 genes (1.8 W/kg group), and 219 genes (3.6 W/kg group) were differentially expressed. GO analysis revealed that these differentially expressed genes were primarily involved in metabolic processes, cellular metabolic processes, regulation of biological processes, macromolecular metabolic processes, biosynthetic processes, cellular protein metabolic processes, transport, developmental processes, cellular component organization, etc. KEGG pathway analysis showed that these genes are mainly involved in pathways related to ribosome, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, long-term potentiation, Huntington's disease, and Neurotrophin signaling. Construction of a protein interaction network identified several important regulatory genes including synbindin (sbdn), Crystallin (CryaB), PPP1CA, Ywhaq, Psap, Psmb1, Pcbp2, etc., which play important roles in the processes of learning and memory. Conclusion Long-term, low-level microwave exposure may inhibit learning and memory by affecting protein and energy metabolic processes and signaling pathways relating to neurological functions or diseases.

  8. The Screening of Genes Sensitive to Long-Term, Low-Level Microwave Exposure and Bioinformatic Analysis of Potential Correlations to Learning and Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ya Li; Li, Ying Xian; Ma, Hong Bo; Li, Dong; Li, Hai Liang; Jiang, Rui; Kan, Guang Han; Yang, Zhen Zhong; Huang, Zeng Xin

    2015-08-01

    To gain a better understanding of gene expression changes in the brain following microwave exposure in mice. This study hopes to reveal mechanisms contributing to microwave-induced learning and memory dysfunction. Mice were exposed to whole body 2100 MHz microwaves with specific absorption rates (SARs) of 0.45 W/kg, 1.8 W/kg, and 3.6 W/kg for 1 hour daily for 8 weeks. Differentially expressing genes in the brains were screened using high-density oligonucleotide arrays, with genes showing more significant differences further confirmed by RT-PCR. The gene chip results demonstrated that 41 genes (0.45 W/kg group), 29 genes (1.8 W/kg group), and 219 genes (3.6 W/kg group) were differentially expressed. GO analysis revealed that these differentially expressed genes were primarily involved in metabolic processes, cellular metabolic processes, regulation of biological processes, macromolecular metabolic processes, biosynthetic processes, cellular protein metabolic processes, transport, developmental processes, cellular component organization, etc. KEGG pathway analysis showed that these genes are mainly involved in pathways related to ribosome, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, long-term potentiation, Huntington's disease, and Neurotrophin signaling. Construction of a protein interaction network identified several important regulatory genes including synbindin (sbdn), Crystallin (CryaB), PPP1CA, Ywhaq, Psap, Psmb1, Pcbp2, etc., which play important roles in the processes of learning and memorye. Long-term, low-level microwave exposure may inhibit learning and memory by affecting protein and energy metabolic processes and signaling pathways relating to neurological functions or diseases. Copyright © 2015 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  9. Genomics and bioinformatics resources for translational science in Rosaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sook; Main, Dorrie

    2014-01-01

    Recent technological advances in biology promise unprecedented opportunities for rapid and sustainable advancement of crop quality. Following this trend, the Rosaceae research community continues to generate large amounts of genomic, genetic and breeding data. These include annotated whole genome sequences, transcriptome and expression data, proteomic and metabolomic data, genotypic and phenotypic data, and genetic and physical maps. Analysis, storage, integration and dissemination of these data using bioinformatics tools and databases are essential to provide utility of the data for basic, translational and applied research. This review discusses the currently available genomics and bioinformatics resources for the Rosaceae family.

  10. Green Fluorescent Protein-Focused Bioinformatics Laboratory Experiment Suitable for Undergraduates in Biochemistry Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Laura

    2017-01-01

    An introductory bioinformatics laboratory experiment focused on protein analysis has been developed that is suitable for undergraduate students in introductory biochemistry courses. The laboratory experiment is designed to be potentially used as a "stand-alone" activity in which students are introduced to basic bioinformatics tools and…

  11. Bioinformatics for Next Generation Sequencing Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Magi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of next-generation sequencing (NGS platforms imposes increasing demands on statistical methods and bioinformatic tools for the analysis and the management of the huge amounts of data generated by these technologies. Even at the early stages of their commercial availability, a large number of softwares already exist for analyzing NGS data. These tools can be fit into many general categories including alignment of sequence reads to a reference, base-calling and/or polymorphism detection, de novo assembly from paired or unpaired reads, structural variant detection and genome browsing. This manuscript aims to guide readers in the choice of the available computational tools that can be used to face the several steps of the data analysis workflow.

  12. Genomic analysis of primordial dwarfism reveals novel disease genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Ranad; Faqeih, Eissa; Ansari, Shinu; Abdel-Salam, Ghada; Al-Hassnan, Zuhair N; Al-Shidi, Tarfa; Alomar, Rana; Sogaty, Sameera; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2014-02-01

    Primordial dwarfism (PD) is a disease in which severely impaired fetal growth persists throughout postnatal development and results in stunted adult size. The condition is highly heterogeneous clinically, but the use of certain phenotypic aspects such as head circumference and facial appearance has proven helpful in defining clinical subgroups. In this study, we present the results of clinical and genomic characterization of 16 new patients in whom a broad definition of PD was used (e.g., 3M syndrome was included). We report a novel PD syndrome with distinct facies in two unrelated patients, each with a different homozygous truncating mutation in CRIPT. Our analysis also reveals, in addition to mutations in known PD disease genes, the first instance of biallelic truncating BRCA2 mutation causing PD with normal bone marrow analysis. In addition, we have identified a novel locus for Seckel syndrome based on a consanguineous multiplex family and identified a homozygous truncating mutation in DNA2 as the likely cause. An additional novel PD disease candidate gene XRCC4 was identified by autozygome/exome analysis, and the knockout mouse phenotype is highly compatible with PD. Thus, we add a number of novel genes to the growing list of PD-linked genes, including one which we show to be linked to a novel PD syndrome with a distinct facial appearance. PD is extremely heterogeneous genetically and clinically, and genomic tools are often required to reach a molecular diagnosis.

  13. Comprehensive analysis of the N-glycan biosynthetic pathway using bioinformatics to generate UniCorn: A theoretical N-glycan structure database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akune, Yukie; Lin, Chi-Hung; Abrahams, Jodie L; Zhang, Jingyu; Packer, Nicolle H; Aoki-Kinoshita, Kiyoko F; Campbell, Matthew P

    2016-08-05

    Glycan structures attached to proteins are comprised of diverse monosaccharide sequences and linkages that are produced from precursor nucleotide-sugars by a series of glycosyltransferases. Databases of these structures are an essential resource for the interpretation of analytical data and the development of bioinformatics tools. However, with no template to predict what structures are possible the human glycan structure databases are incomplete and rely heavily on the curation of published, experimentally determined, glycan structure data. In this work, a library of 45 human glycosyltransferases was used to generate a theoretical database of N-glycan structures comprised of 15 or less monosaccharide residues. Enzyme specificities were sourced from major online databases including Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) Glycan, Consortium for Functional Glycomics (CFG), Carbohydrate-Active enZymes (CAZy), GlycoGene DataBase (GGDB) and BRENDA. Based on the known activities, more than 1.1 million theoretical structures and 4.7 million synthetic reactions were generated and stored in our database called UniCorn. Furthermore, we analyzed the differences between the predicted glycan structures in UniCorn and those contained in UniCarbKB (www.unicarbkb.org), a database which stores experimentally described glycan structures reported in the literature, and demonstrate that UniCorn can be used to aid in the assignment of ambiguous structures whilst also serving as a discovery database. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Bicycle: a bioinformatics pipeline to analyze bisulfite sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graña, Osvaldo; López-Fernández, Hugo; Fdez-Riverola, Florentino; González Pisano, David; Glez-Peña, Daniel

    2018-04-15

    High-throughput sequencing of bisulfite-converted DNA is a technique used to measure DNA methylation levels. Although a considerable number of computational pipelines have been developed to analyze such data, none of them tackles all the peculiarities of the analysis together, revealing limitations that can force the user to manually perform additional steps needed for a complete processing of the data. This article presents bicycle, an integrated, flexible analysis pipeline for bisulfite sequencing data. Bicycle analyzes whole genome bisulfite sequencing data, targeted bisulfite sequencing data and hydroxymethylation data. To show how bicycle overtakes other available pipelines, we compared them on a defined number of features that are summarized in a table. We also tested bicycle with both simulated and real datasets, to show its level of performance, and compared it to different state-of-the-art methylation analysis pipelines. Bicycle is publicly available under GNU LGPL v3.0 license at http://www.sing-group.org/bicycle. Users can also download a customized Ubuntu LiveCD including bicycle and other bisulfite sequencing data pipelines compared here. In addition, a docker image with bicycle and its dependencies, which allows a straightforward use of bicycle in any platform (e.g. Linux, OS X or Windows), is also available. ograna@cnio.es or dgpena@uvigo.es. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  15. Intrageneric Primer Design: Bringing Bioinformatics Tools to the Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Andre O. S.; Garces, Sergio P. S.

    2006-01-01

    Bioinformatics is one of the fastest growing scientific areas over the last decade. It focuses on the use of informatics tools for the organization and analysis of biological data. An example of their importance is the availability nowadays of dozens of software programs for genomic and proteomic studies. Thus, there is a growing field (private…

  16. Establishing bioinformatics research in the Asia Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tammi Martti

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In 1998, the Asia Pacific Bioinformatics Network (APBioNet, Asia's oldest bioinformatics organisation was set up to champion the advancement of bioinformatics in the Asia Pacific. By 2002, APBioNet was able to gain sufficient critical mass to initiate the first International Conference on Bioinformatics (InCoB bringing together scientists working in the field of bioinformatics in the region. This year, the InCoB2006 Conference was organized as the 5th annual conference of the Asia-Pacific Bioinformatics Network, on Dec. 18–20, 2006 in New Delhi, India, following a series of successful events in Bangkok (Thailand, Penang (Malaysia, Auckland (New Zealand and Busan (South Korea. This Introduction provides a brief overview of the peer-reviewed manuscripts accepted for publication in this Supplement. It exemplifies a typical snapshot of the growing research excellence in bioinformatics of the region as we embark on a trajectory of establishing a solid bioinformatics research culture in the Asia Pacific that is able to contribute fully to the global bioinformatics community.

  17. Emerging strengths in Asia Pacific bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Shoba; Hsu, Wen-Lian; Yang, Ueng-Cheng; Tan, Tin Wee

    2008-12-12

    The 2008 annual conference of the Asia Pacific Bioinformatics Network (APBioNet), Asia's oldest bioinformatics organisation set up in 1998, was organized as the 7th International Conference on Bioinformatics (InCoB), jointly with the Bioinformatics and Systems Biology in Taiwan (BIT 2008) Conference, Oct. 20-23, 2008 at Taipei, Taiwan. Besides bringing together scientists from the field of bioinformatics in this region, InCoB is actively involving researchers from the area of systems biology, to facilitate greater synergy between these two groups. Marking the 10th Anniversary of APBioNet, this InCoB 2008 meeting followed on from a series of successful annual events in Bangkok (Thailand), Penang (Malaysia), Auckland (New Zealand), Busan (South Korea), New Delhi (India) and Hong Kong. Additionally, tutorials and the Workshop on Education in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (WEBCB) immediately prior to the 20th Federation of Asian and Oceanian Biochemists and Molecular Biologists (FAOBMB) Taipei Conference provided ample opportunity for inducting mainstream biochemists and molecular biologists from the region into a greater level of awareness of the importance of bioinformatics in their craft. In this editorial, we provide a brief overview of the peer-reviewed manuscripts accepted for publication herein, grouped into thematic areas. As the regional research expertise in bioinformatics matures, the papers fall into thematic areas, illustrating the specific contributions made by APBioNet to global bioinformatics efforts.

  18. Differential Expression of Proteins Associated with the Hair Follicle Cycle - Proteomics and Bioinformatics Analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wang

    Full Text Available Hair follicle cycling can be divided into the following three stages: anagen, catagen, and telogen. The molecular signals that orchestrate the follicular transition between phases are still unknown. To better understand the detailed protein networks controlling this process, proteomics and bioinformatics analyses were performed to construct comparative protein profiles of mouse skin at specific time points (0, 8, and 20 days. Ninety-five differentially expressed protein spots were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF as 44 proteins, which were found to change during hair follicle cycle transition. Proteomics analysis revealed that these changes in protein expression are involved in Ca2+-regulated biological processes, migration, and regulation of signal transduction, among other processes. Subsequently, three proteins were selected to validate the reliability of expression patterns using western blotting. Cluster analysis revealed three expression patterns, and each pattern correlated with specific cell processes that occur during the hair cycle. Furthermore, bioinformatics analysis indicated that the differentially expressed proteins impacted multiple biological networks, after which detailed functional analyses were performed. Taken together, the above data may provide insight into the three stages of mouse hair follicle morphogenesis and provide a solid basis for potential therapeutic molecular targets for this hair disease.

  19. Clinical value and potential pathways of miR-183-5p in bladder cancer: A study based on miRNA-seq data and bioinformatics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jia-Min; Huang, Lin-Zhen; Huang, Zhi-Guang; He, Rong-Quan

    2018-04-01

    The clinicopathological value and exploration of the potential molecular mechanism of microRNA-183-5p (miR-183-5p) have been investigated in various cancers; however, to the best of the author's knowledge, no similar research has been reported for bladder cancer. In the present study, it was revealed that the expression level of miR-183-5p was notably increased in bladder cancer tissues compared with adjacent non-cancerous tissues (P=0.001) and was markedly increased in the tissue samples of papillary, pathological T stage (T0-T2) and pathological stage (I-II) compared with tissue samples of their counterparts (P=0.05), according to data from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed the robust diagnostic value of miR-183-5p for distinguishing bladder cancer from non-cancerous bladder tissues (area under curve=0.948; 95% confidence interval: 0.919-0.977). Amplification and deep deletion of miR-183-5p were indicated by cBioPortal, accounting for 1% (4/412) of bladder cancer cases. Data from YM500v3 demonstrated that compared with other cancers, bladder cancer exhibited high expression levels of miR-183-5p, and miR-183-5p expression in primary solid tumors was much higher compared with solid normal tissues. A meta-analysis indicated that miR-183-5p was more highly expressed in bladder cancer samples compared with normal counterparts. A total of 88 potential target genes of miR-183-5p were identified, 13 of which were discerned as hub genes by protein-protein interaction. The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition pathway was the most significantly enriched pathway by FunRich (P=0.0001). In summary, miR-183-5p may participate in the tumorigenesis and development of bladder cancer via certain signaling pathways, particularly the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition pathway. However, the exact molecular mechanism of miR-183-5p in bladder cancer must be validated by in vitro and in vivo experiments.

  20. Analysis reveals potential rangeland impacts if Williamson Act eliminated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C. Wetzel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available California budget cuts have resulted in dramatic reductions in state funding for the Williamson Act, a land protection program that reduces property taxes for the owners of 15 million acres of California farms and rangeland. With state reimbursements to counties eliminated, the decision to continue Williamson Act contracts lies with individual counties. We investigated the consequences of eliminating the Williamson Act, using a geospatial analysis and a mail questionnaire asking ranchers for plans under a hypothetical elimination scenario. The geospatial analysis revealed that 72% of rangeland parcels enrolled in Williamson Act contracts contained habitat important for statewide conservation goals. Presented with the elimination scenario, survey respondents reported an intention to sell 20% of their total 496,889 acres. The tendency of survey participants to respond that they would sell land was highest among full-time ranchers with low household incomes and without off-ranch employment. A majority (76% of the ranchers who reported that they would sell land predicted that the buyers would develop it for nonagricultural uses, suggesting substantial changes to California's landscape in a future without the Williamson Act.

  1. Multilocus analysis reveals three candidate genes for Chinese migraine susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, X-K; Fang, J; Yu, Z-Z; Lin, Q; Lu, C-X; Qu, H-L; Ma, Q-L

    2017-08-01

    Several genome-wide association studies (GWASs) in Caucasian populations have identified 12 loci that are significantly associated with migraine. More evidence suggests that serotonin receptors are also involved in migraine pathophysiology. In the present study, a case-control study was conducted in a cohort of 581 migraine cases and 533 ethnically matched controls among a Chinese population. Eighteen polymorphisms from serotonin receptors and GWASs were selected, and genotyping was performed using a Sequenom MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry iPLEX platform. The genotypic and allelic distributions of MEF2D rs2274316 and ASTN2 rs6478241 were significantly different between migraine patients and controls. Univariate and multivariate analysis revealed significant associations of polymorphisms in the MEF2D and ASTN2 genes with migraine susceptibility. MEF2D, PRDM16 and ASTN2 were also found to be associated with migraine without aura (MO) and migraine with family history. And, MEF2D and ASTN2 also served as genetic risk factors for the migraine without family history. The generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis identified that MEF2D and HTR2E constituted the two-factor interaction model. Our study suggests that the MEF2D, PRDM16 and ASTN2 genes from GWAS are associated with migraine susceptibility, especially MO, among Chinese patients. It appears that there is no association with serotonin receptor related genes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Comparative analysis reveals the underlying mechanism of vertebrate seasonal reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegami, Keisuke; Yoshimura, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    Animals utilize photoperiodic changes as a calendar to regulate seasonal reproduction. Birds have highly sophisticated photoperiodic mechanisms and functional genomics analysis in quail uncovered the signal transduction pathway regulating avian seasonal reproduction. Birds detect light with deep brain photoreceptors. Long day (LD) stimulus induces secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) from the pars tuberalis (PT) of the pituitary gland. PT-derived TSH locally activates thyroid hormone (TH) in the hypothalamus, which induces gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and hence gonadotropin secretion. However, during winter, low temperatures increase serum TH for adaptive thermogenesis, which accelerates germ cell apoptosis by activating the genes involved in metamorphosis. Therefore, TH has a dual role in the regulation of seasonal reproduction. Studies using TSH receptor knockout mice confirmed the involvement of PT-derived TSH in mammalian seasonal reproduction. In addition, studies in mice revealed that the tissue-specific glycosylation of TSH diversifies its function in the circulation to avoid crosstalk. In contrast to birds and mammals, one of the molecular machineries necessary for the seasonal reproduction of fish are localized in the saccus vasculosus from the photoreceptor to the neuroendocrine output. Thus, comparative analysis is a powerful tool to uncover the universality and diversity of fundamental properties in various organisms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparative Bioinformatics Analysis of Transcription Factor Genes Indicates Conservation of Key Regulatory Domains among Babesia bovis, Babesia microti, and Theileria equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzan, Heba F; Knowles, Donald P; Suarez, Carlos E

    2016-11-01

    Apicomplexa tick-borne hemoparasites, including Babesia bovis, Babesia microti, and Theileria equi are responsible for bovine and human babesiosis and equine theileriosis, respectively. These parasites of vast medical, epidemiological, and economic impact have complex life cycles in their vertebrate and tick hosts. Large gaps in knowledge concerning the mechanisms used by these parasites for gene regulation remain. Regulatory genes coding for DNA binding proteins such as members of the Api-AP2, HMG, and Myb families are known to play crucial roles as transcription factors. Although the repertoire of Api-AP2 has been defined and a HMG gene was previously identified in the B. bovis genome, these regulatory genes have not been described in detail in B. microti and T. equi. In this study, comparative bioinformatics was used to: (i) identify and map genes encoding for these transcription factors among three parasites' genomes; (ii) identify a previously unreported HMG gene in B. microti; (iii) define a repertoire of eight conserved Myb genes; and (iv) identify AP2 correlates among B. bovis and the better-studied Plasmodium parasites. Searching the available transcriptome of B. bovis defined patterns of transcription of these three gene families in B. bovis erythrocyte stage parasites. Sequence comparisons show conservation of functional domains and general architecture in the AP2, Myb, and HMG proteins, which may be significant for the regulation of common critical parasite life cycle transitions in B. bovis, B. microti, and T. equi. A detailed understanding of the role of gene families encoding DNA binding proteins will provide new tools for unraveling regulatory mechanisms involved in B. bovis, B. microti, and T. equi life cycles and environmental adaptive responses and potentially contributes to the development of novel convergent strategies for improved control of babesiosis and equine piroplasmosis.

  4. Comparative Bioinformatics Analysis of Transcription Factor Genes Indicates Conservation of Key Regulatory Domains among Babesia bovis, Babesia microti, and Theileria equi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heba F Alzan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Apicomplexa tick-borne hemoparasites, including Babesia bovis, Babesia microti, and Theileria equi are responsible for bovine and human babesiosis and equine theileriosis, respectively. These parasites of vast medical, epidemiological, and economic impact have complex life cycles in their vertebrate and tick hosts. Large gaps in knowledge concerning the mechanisms used by these parasites for gene regulation remain. Regulatory genes coding for DNA binding proteins such as members of the Api-AP2, HMG, and Myb families are known to play crucial roles as transcription factors. Although the repertoire of Api-AP2 has been defined and a HMG gene was previously identified in the B. bovis genome, these regulatory genes have not been described in detail in B. microti and T. equi. In this study, comparative bioinformatics was used to: (i identify and map genes encoding for these transcription factors among three parasites' genomes; (ii identify a previously unreported HMG gene in B. microti; (iii define a repertoire of eight conserved Myb genes; and (iv identify AP2 correlates among B. bovis and the better-studied Plasmodium parasites. Searching the available transcriptome of B. bovis defined patterns of transcription of these three gene families in B. bovis erythrocyte stage parasites. Sequence comparisons show conservation of functional domains and general architecture in the AP2, Myb, and HMG proteins, which may be significant for the regulation of common critical parasite life cycle transitions in B. bovis, B. microti, and T. equi. A detailed understanding of the role of gene families encoding DNA binding proteins will provide new tools for unraveling regulatory mechanisms involved in B. bovis, B. microti, and T. equi life cycles and environmental adaptive responses and potentially contributes to the development of novel convergent strategies for improved control of babesiosis and equine piroplasmosis.

  5. Bioinformatic analysis of patient-derived ASPS gene expressions and ASPL-TFE3 fusion transcript levels identify potential therapeutic targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G Covell

    Full Text Available Gene expression data, collected from ASPS tumors of seven different patients and from one immortalized ASPS cell line (ASPS-1, was analyzed jointly with patient ASPL-TFE3 (t(X;17(p11;q25 fusion transcript data to identify disease-specific pathways and their component genes. Data analysis of the pooled patient and ASPS-1 gene expression data, using conventional clustering methods, revealed a relatively small set of pathways and genes characterizing the biology of ASPS. These results could be largely recapitulated using only the gene expression data collected from patient tumor samples. The concordance between expression measures derived from ASPS-1 and both pooled and individual patient tumor data provided a rationale for extending the analysis to include patient ASPL-TFE3 fusion transcript data. A novel linear model was exploited to link gene expressions to fusion transcript data and used to identify a small set of ASPS-specific pathways and their gene expression. Cellular pathways that appear aberrantly regulated in response to the t(X;17(p11;q25 translocation include the cell cycle and cell adhesion. The identification of pathways and gene subsets characteristic of ASPS support current therapeutic strategies that target the FLT1 and MET, while also proposing additional targeting of genes found in pathways involved in the cell cycle (CHK1, cell adhesion (ARHGD1A, cell division (CDC6, control of meiosis (RAD51L3 and mitosis (BIRC5, and chemokine-related protein tyrosine kinase activity (CCL4.

  6. Bioinformatical Analysis of Organ-Related (Heart, Brain, Liver, and Kidney and Serum Proteomic Data to Identify Protein Regulation Patterns and Potential Sepsis Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Hohn

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last years, proteomic studies have revealed several interesting findings in experimental sepsis models and septic patients. However, most studies investigated protein alterations only in single organs or in whole blood. To identify possible sepsis biomarkers and to evaluate the relationship between protein alteration in sepsis affected organs and blood, proteomics data from the heart, brain, liver, kidney, and serum were analysed. Using functional network analyses in combination with hierarchical cluster analysis, we found that protein regulation patterns in organ tissues as well as in serum are highly dynamic. In the tissue proteome, the main functions and pathways affected were the oxidoreductive activity, cell energy generation, or metabolism, whereas in the serum proteome, functions were associated with lipoproteins metabolism and, to a minor extent, with coagulation, inflammatory response, and organ regeneration. Proteins from network analyses of organ tissue did not correlate with statistically significantly regulated serum proteins or with predicted proteins of serum functions. In this study, the combination of proteomic network analyses with cluster analyses is introduced as an approach to deal with high-throughput proteomics data to evaluate the dynamics of protein regulation during sepsis.

  7. Association of mRNA expression of TP53 and the TP53 codon 72 Arg/Pro gene polymorphism with colorectal cancer risk in Asian population: a bioinformatics analysis and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhiyong; Zheng, Longzhi; Liu, Weimin; Wang, Cunchuan

    2018-01-01

    The relationship between TP53 codon 72 Pro/Arg gene polymorphism and colorectal cancer risk in Asians is still controversial, and this bioinformatics analysis and meta-analysis was performed to assess the associations. The association studies were identified from PubMed, and eligible reports were included. RevMan 5.3.1 software, Oncolnc, cBioPortal, and Oncomine online tools were used for statistical analysis. A random/fixed effects model was used in meta-analysis. The data were reported as risk ratios or mean differences with corresponding 95% CI. We confirmed that TP53 was associated with colorectal cancer, the alteration frequency of TP53 was 53% mutation and 7% deep deletion, and TP53 mRNA expression was different in different types of colorectal cancer based on The Cancer Genome Atlas database. Then, 18 studies were included that examine the association of TP53 codon 72 gene polymorphism with colorectal cancer risk in Asians. The meta-analysis indicated that TP53 Pro allele and Pro/Pro genotype were associated with colorectal cancer risk in Asian population, but Arg/Arg genotype was not (Pro allele: odds ratios [OR]=1.20, 95% CI: 1.06 to 1.35, P =0.003; Pro/Pro genotype: OR=1.39, 95% CI: 1.15 to 1.69, P =0.0007; Arg/Arg genotype: OR=0.86, 95% CI: 0.74 to 1.00, P =0.05). Interestingly, in the meta-analysis of the controls from the population-based studies, we found that TP53 codon 72 Pro/Arg gene polymorphism was associated with colorectal cancer risk (Pro allele: OR=1.33, 95% CI: 1.15 to 1.55, P =0.0002; Pro/Pro genotype: OR=1.61, 95% CI: 1.28 to 2.02, P colorectal cancer, but the different value levels of mRNA expression were not associated with survival rate of colon and rectal cancer. TP53 Pro allele and Pro/Pro genotype were associated with colorectal cancer risk in Asians.

  8. The secondary metabolite bioinformatics portal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Tilmann; Kim, Hyun Uk

    2016-01-01

    . In this context, this review gives a summary of tools and databases that currently are available to mine, identify and characterize natural product biosynthesis pathways and their producers based on ‘omics data. A web portal called Secondary Metabolite Bioinformatics Portal (SMBP at http...... analytical and chemical methods gave access to this group of compounds, nowadays genomics-based methods offer complementary approaches to find, identify and characterize such molecules. This paradigm shift also resulted in a high demand for computational tools to assist researchers in their daily work......Natural products are among the most important sources of lead molecules for drug discovery. With the development of affordable whole-genome sequencing technologies and other ‘omics tools, the field of natural products research is currently undergoing a shift in paradigms. While, for decades, mainly...

  9. Biology in 'silico': The Bioinformatics Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Explains the Human Genome Project (HGP) and efforts to sequence the human genome. Describes the role of bioinformatics in the project and considers it the genetics Swiss Army Knife, which has many different uses, for use in forensic science, medicine, agriculture, and environmental sciences. Discusses the use of bioinformatics in the high school…

  10. Using "Arabidopsis" Genetic Sequences to Teach Bioinformatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaorong

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a new approach to teaching bioinformatics using "Arabidopsis" genetic sequences. Several open-ended and inquiry-based laboratory exercises have been designed to help students grasp key concepts and gain practical skills in bioinformatics, using "Arabidopsis" leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase (LRR…

  11. A Mathematical Optimization Problem in Bioinformatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyer, Laurie J.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the sequence alignment problem in bioinformatics. Through examples, we formulate sequence alignment as an optimization problem and show how to compute the optimal alignment with dynamic programming. The examples and sample exercises have been used by the author in a specialized course in bioinformatics, but could be adapted…

  12. Online Bioinformatics Tutorials | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bioinformatics is a scientific discipline that applies computer science and information technology to help understand biological processes. The NIH provides a list of free online bioinformatics tutorials, either generated by the NIH Library or other institutes, which includes introductory lectures and "how to" videos on using various tools.

  13. Fuzzy Logic in Medicine and Bioinformatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Torres

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present a general view of the current applications of fuzzy logic in medicine and bioinformatics. We particularly review the medical literature using fuzzy logic. We then recall the geometrical interpretation of fuzzy sets as points in a fuzzy hypercube and present two concrete illustrations in medicine (drug addictions and in bioinformatics (comparison of genomes.

  14. Molecular analysis of sourdough reveals Lactobacillus mindensis sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrmann, Matthias A; Müller, Martin R A; Vogel, Rudi F

    2003-01-01

    Genotypic fingerprinting to analyse the bacterial flora of an industrial sourdough revealed a coherent group of strains which could not be associated with a valid species. Comparative 16S rDNA sequence analysis showed that these strains formed a homogeneous cluster distinct from their closest relatives, Lactobacillus farciminis, Lactobacillus alimentarius and Lactobacillus kimchii. To characterize them further, physiological (sugar fermentation, formation of DL-lactate, hydrolysis of arginine, growth temperature, CO2 production) and chemotaxonomic properties have been determined. The DNA G +C content was 37.5 0.2 mol%. The peptidoglycan was of the lysine-D-iso-asparagine (L-Lys-D-Asp) type. The strains were homofermentative, Gram-positive, catalase-negative, non-spore-forming, non-motile rods. They were found as a major stable component of a rye flour sourdough fermentation. Physiological, biochemical as well as genotypic data suggested them to be a new species of the genus Lactobacillus. This was confirmed by DNA-DNA hybridization of genomic DNA, and the name Lactobacillus mindensis is proposed. The type strain of this species is DSM 14500T (=LMG 21508T).

  15. Meta-Analysis of Public Microarray Datasets Reveals Voltage-Gated Calcium Gene Signatures in Clinical Cancer Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Yang Wang

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs are well documented to play roles in cell proliferation, migration, and apoptosis; however, whether VGCCs regulate the onset and progression of cancer is still under investigation. The VGCC family consists of five members, which are L-type, N-type, T-type, R-type and P/Q type. To date, no holistic approach has been used to screen VGCC family genes in different types of cancer. We analyzed the transcript expression of VGCCs in clinical cancer tissue samples by accessing ONCOMINE (www.oncomine.org, a web-based microarray database, to perform a systematic analysis. Every member of the VGCCs was examined across 21 different types of cancer by comparing mRNA expression in cancer to that in normal tissue. A previous study showed that altered expression of mRNA in cancer tissue may play an oncogenic role and promote tumor development; therefore, in the present findings, we focus only on the overexpression of VGCCs in different types of cancer. This bioinformatics analysis revealed that different subtypes of VGCCs (CACNA1C, CACNA1D, CACNA1B, CACNA1G, and CACNA1I are implicated in the development and progression of diverse types of cancer and show dramatic up-regulation in breast cancer. CACNA1F only showed high expression in testis cancer, whereas CACNA1A, CACNA1C, and CACNA1D were highly expressed in most types of cancer. The current analysis revealed that specific VGCCs likely play essential roles in specific types of cancer. Collectively, we identified several VGCC targets and classified them according to different cancer subtypes for prospective studies on the underlying carcinogenic mechanisms. The present findings suggest that VGCCs are possible targets for prospective investigation in cancer treatment.

  16. Rising Strengths Hong Kong SAR in Bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; George Priya Doss, C; Zhu, Hailong; Agoramoorthy, Govindasamy

    2017-06-01

    Hong Kong's bioinformatics sector is attaining new heights in combination with its economic boom and the predominance of the working-age group in its population. Factors such as a knowledge-based and free-market economy have contributed towards a prominent position on the world map of bioinformatics. In this review, we have considered the educational measures, landmark research activities and the achievements of bioinformatics companies and the role of the Hong Kong government in the establishment of bioinformatics as strength. However, several hurdles remain. New government policies will assist computational biologists to overcome these hurdles and further raise the profile of the field. There is a high expectation that bioinformatics in Hong Kong will be a promising area for the next generation.

  17. The 2016 Bioinformatics Open Source Conference (BOSC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Nomi L; Cock, Peter J A; Chapman, Brad; Fields, Christopher J; Hokamp, Karsten; Lapp, Hilmar; Muñoz-Torres, Monica; Wiencko, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Message from the ISCB: The Bioinformatics Open Source Conference (BOSC) is a yearly meeting organized by the Open Bioinformatics Foundation (OBF), a non-profit group dedicated to promoting the practice and philosophy of Open Source software development and Open Science within the biological research community. BOSC has been run since 2000 as a two-day Special Interest Group (SIG) before the annual ISMB conference. The 17th annual BOSC ( http://www.open-bio.org/wiki/BOSC_2016) took place in Orlando, Florida in July 2016. As in previous years, the conference was preceded by a two-day collaborative coding event open to the bioinformatics community. The conference brought together nearly 100 bioinformatics researchers, developers and users of open source software to interact and share ideas about standards, bioinformatics software development, and open and reproducible science.

  18. Proteomic Analysis Reveals the Deregulation of Inflammation-Related Proteins in Acupuncture-Treated Rats with Asthma Onset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Dong Xu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the beneficial effects of acupuncture in asthma treatment have been well documented, little is known regarding the biological basis of this treatment. Changes in the lung proteome of acupuncture-treated rats with asthma onset were comparatively analyzed using a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE and mass-spectrometry- (MS- based proteomic approach. Acupuncture on specific acupuncture points appeared to improve respiratory function and reduce the total number of leukocytes and eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in OVA-induced asthma onset. Image analysis of 2DE gels revealed 32 differentially expressed acupuncture-specific protein spots in asthma onset; 30 of which were successfully identified as 28 unique proteins using LC-MS/MS. Bioinformatic analyses indicated that these altered proteins are most likely involved in inflammation-related biological functions, and the functional associations of these proteins result in an inflammation signaling pathway. Acupuncture regulates the pathway at different levels by regulating several key nodal proteins, including downregulating of proinflammatory proteins (e.g., S100A8, RAGE, and S100A11 and upregulating of anti-inflammatory proteins (e.g., CC10, ANXA5, and sRAGE. These deregulated inflammation-related proteins may mediate, at least in part, the antiasthmatic effect of acupuncture. Further functional investigation of these acupuncture-specific effector proteins could identify new drug candidates for the prophylaxis and treatment of asthma.

  19. 9th International Conference on Practical Applications of Computational Biology and Bioinformatics

    CERN Document Server

    Rocha, Miguel; Fdez-Riverola, Florentino; Paz, Juan

    2015-01-01

    This proceedings presents recent practical applications of Computational Biology and  Bioinformatics. It contains the proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Practical Applications of Computational Biology & Bioinformatics held at University of Salamanca, Spain, at June 3rd-5th, 2015. The International Conference on Practical Applications of Computational Biology & Bioinformatics (PACBB) is an annual international meeting dedicated to emerging and challenging applied research in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology. Biological and biomedical research are increasingly driven by experimental techniques that challenge our ability to analyse, process and extract meaningful knowledge from the underlying data. The impressive capabilities of next generation sequencing technologies, together with novel and ever evolving distinct types of omics data technologies, have put an increasingly complex set of challenges for the growing fields of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology. The analysis o...

  20. Incorporating Genomics and Bioinformatics across the Life Sciences Curriculum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ditty, Jayna L.; Kvaal, Christopher A.; Goodner, Brad; Freyermuth, Sharyn K.; Bailey, Cheryl; Britton, Robert A.; Gordon, Stuart G.; Heinhorst, Sabine; Reed, Kelynne; Xu, Zhaohui; Sanders-Lorenz, Erin R.; Axen, Seth; Kim, Edwin; Johns, Mitrick; Scott, Kathleen; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.

    2011-08-01

    into courses or independent research projects requires infrastructure for organizing and assessing student work. Here, we present a new platform for faculty to keep current with the rapidly changing field of bioinformatics, the Integrated Microbial Genomes Annotation Collaboration Toolkit (IMG-ACT). It was developed by instructors from both research-intensive and predominately undergraduate institutions in collaboration with the Department of Energy-Joint Genome Institute (DOE-JGI) as a means to innovate and update undergraduate education and faculty development. The IMG-ACT program provides a cadre of tools, including access to a clearinghouse of genome sequences, bioinformatics databases, data storage, instructor course management, and student notebooks for organizing the results of their bioinformatic investigations. In the process, IMG-ACT makes it feasible to provide undergraduate research opportunities to a greater number and diversity of students, in contrast to the traditional mentor-to-student apprenticeship model for undergraduate research, which can be too expensive and time-consuming to provide for every undergraduate. The IMG-ACT serves as the hub for the network of faculty and students that use the system for microbial genome analysis. Open access of the IMG-ACT infrastructure to participating schools ensures that all types of higher education institutions can utilize it. With the infrastructure in place, faculty can focus their efforts on the pedagogy of bioinformatics, involvement of students in research, and use of this tool for their own research agenda. What the original faculty members of the IMG-ACT development team present here is an overview of how the IMG-ACT program has affected our development in terms of teaching and research with the hopes that it will inspire more faculty to get involved.

  1. Isotope analysis reveals foraging area dichotomy for atlantic leatherback turtles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Caut

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea has undergone a dramatic decline over the last 25 years, and this is believed to be primarily the result of mortality associated with fisheries bycatch followed by egg and nesting female harvest. Atlantic leatherback turtles undertake long migrations across ocean basins from subtropical and tropical nesting beaches to productive frontal areas. Migration between two nesting seasons can last 2 or 3 years, a time period termed the remigration interval (RI. Recent satellite transmitter data revealed that Atlantic leatherbacks follow two major dispersion patterns after nesting season, through the North Gulf Stream area or more eastward across the North Equatorial Current. However, information on the whole RI is lacking, precluding the accurate identification of feeding areas where conservation measures may need to be applied. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using stable isotopes as dietary tracers we determined the characteristics of feeding grounds of leatherback females nesting in French Guiana. During migration, 3-year RI females differed from 2-year RI females in their isotope values, implying differences in their choice of feeding habitats (offshore vs. more coastal and foraging latitude (North Atlantic vs. West African coasts, respectively. Egg-yolk and blood isotope values are correlated in nesting females, indicating that egg analysis is a useful tool for assessing isotope values in these turtles, including adults when not available. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results complement previous data on turtle movements during the first year following the nesting season, integrating the diet consumed during the year before nesting. We suggest that the French Guiana leatherback population segregates into two distinct isotopic groupings, and highlight the urgent need to determine the feeding habitats of the turtle in the Atlantic in order to protect this species from incidental take by

  2. Quantitative flux analysis reveals folate-dependent NADPH production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jing; Ye, Jiangbin; Kamphorst, Jurre J.; Shlomi, Tomer; Thompson, Craig B.; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.

    2014-06-01

    ATP is the dominant energy source in animals for mechanical and electrical work (for example, muscle contraction or neuronal firing). For chemical work, there is an equally important role for NADPH, which powers redox defence and reductive biosynthesis. The most direct route to produce NADPH from glucose is the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, with malic enzyme sometimes also important. Although the relative contribution of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation to ATP production has been extensively analysed, similar analysis of NADPH metabolism has been lacking. Here we demonstrate the ability to directly track, by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, the passage of deuterium from labelled substrates into NADPH, and combine this approach with carbon labelling and mathematical modelling to measure NADPH fluxes. In proliferating cells, the largest contributor to cytosolic NADPH is the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. Surprisingly, a nearly comparable contribution comes from serine-driven one-carbon metabolism, in which oxidation of methylene tetrahydrofolate to 10-formyl-tetrahydrofolate is coupled to reduction of NADP+ to NADPH. Moreover, tracing of mitochondrial one-carbon metabolism revealed complete oxidation of 10-formyl-tetrahydrofolate to make NADPH. As folate metabolism has not previously been considered an NADPH producer, confirmation of its functional significance was undertaken through knockdown of methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (MTHFD) genes. Depletion of either the cytosolic or mitochondrial MTHFD isozyme resulted in decreased cellular NADPH/NADP+ and reduced/oxidized glutathione ratios (GSH/GSSG) and increased cell sensitivity to oxidative stress. Thus, although the importance of folate metabolism for proliferating cells has been long recognized and attributed to its function of producing one-carbon units for nucleic acid synthesis, another crucial function of this pathway is generating reducing power.

  3. The structural bioinformatics library: modeling in biomolecular science and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazals, Frédéric; Dreyfus, Tom

    2017-04-01

    Software in structural bioinformatics has mainly been application driven. To favor practitioners seeking off-the-shelf applications, but also developers seeking advanced building blocks to develop novel applications, we undertook the design of the Structural Bioinformatics Library ( SBL , http://sbl.inria.fr ), a generic C ++/python cross-platform software library targeting complex problems in structural bioinformatics. Its tenet is based on a modular design offering a rich and versatile framework allowing the development of novel applications requiring well specified complex operations, without compromising robustness and performances. The SBL involves four software components (1-4 thereafter). For end-users, the SBL provides ready to use, state-of-the-art (1) applications to handle molecular models defined by unions of balls, to deal with molecular flexibility, to model macro-molecular assemblies. These applications can also be combined to tackle integrated analysis problems. For developers, the SBL provides a broad C ++ toolbox with modular design, involving core (2) algorithms , (3) biophysical models and (4) modules , the latter being especially suited to develop novel applications. The SBL comes with a thorough documentation consisting of user and reference manuals, and a bugzilla platform to handle community feedback. The SBL is available from http://sbl.inria.fr. Frederic.Cazals@inria.fr. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  4. Identification and characterization of microRNAs related to salt stress in broccoli, using high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yunhong; Tian, Yunming; Luo, Xiaojun; Zhou, Tao; Huang, Zuoping; Liu, Ying; Qiu, Yihan; Hou, Bing; Sun, Dan; Deng, Hongyu; Qian, Shen; Yao, Kaitai

    2014-09-03

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a new class of endogenous regulators of a broad range of physiological processes, which act by regulating gene expression post-transcriptionally. The brassica vegetable, broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica), is very popular with a wide range of consumers, but environmental stresses such as salinity are a problem worldwide in restricting its growth and yield. Little is known about the role of miRNAs in the response of broccoli to salt stress. In this study, broccoli subjected to salt stress and broccoli grown under control conditions were analyzed by high-throughput sequencing. Differential miRNA expression was confirmed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The prediction of miRNA targets was undertaken using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) Orthology (KO) database and Gene Ontology (GO)-enrichment analyses. Two libraries of small (or short) RNAs (sRNAs) were constructed and sequenced by high-throughput Solexa sequencing. A total of 24,511,963 and 21,034,728 clean reads, representing 9,861,236 (40.23%) and 8,574,665 (40.76%) unique reads, were obtained for control and salt-stressed broccoli, respectively. Furthermore, 42 putative known and 39 putative candidate miRNAs that were differentially expressed between control and salt-stressed broccoli were revealed by their read counts and confirmed by the use of stem-loop real-time RT-PCR. Amongst these, the putative conserved miRNAs, miR393 and miR855, and two putative candidate miRNAs, miR3 and miR34, were the most strongly down-regulated when broccoli was salt-stressed, whereas the putative conserved miRNA, miR396a, and the putative candidate miRNA, miR37, were the most up-regulated. Finally, analysis of the predicted gene targets of miRNAs using the GO and KO databases indicated that a range of metabolic and other cellular functions known to be associated with salt stress were up-regulated in broccoli treated with salt. A comprehensive

  5. clubber: removing the bioinformatics bottleneck in big data analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Maximilian; Zhu, Chengsheng; Bromberg, Yana

    2018-01-01

    With the advent of modern day high-throughput technologies, the bottleneck in biological discovery has shifted from the cost of doing experiments to that of analyzing results. clubber is our automated cluster-load balancing system developed for optimizing these “big data” analyses. Its plug-and-play framework encourages re-use of existing solutions for bioinformatics problems. clubber’s goals are to reduce computation times and to facilitate use of cluster computing. The first goal is achieved by automating the balance of parallel submissions across available high performance computing (HPC) resources. Notably, the latter can be added on demand, including cloud-based resources, and/or featuring heterogeneous environments. The second goal of making HPCs user-friendly is facilitated by an interactive web interface and a RESTful API, allowing for job monitoring and result retrieval. We used clubber to speed up our pipeline for annotating molecular functionality of metagenomes. Here, we analyzed the Deepwater Horizon oil-spill study data to quantitatively show that the beach sands have not yet entirely recovered. Further, our analysis of the CAMI-challenge data revealed that microbiome taxonomic shifts do not necessarily correlate with functional shifts. These examples (21 metagenomes processed in 172 min) clearly illustrate the importance of clubber in the everyday computational biology environment. PMID:28609295

  6. clubber: removing the bioinformatics bottleneck in big data analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Maximilian; Zhu, Chengsheng; Bromberg, Yana

    2017-06-13

    With the advent of modern day high-throughput technologies, the bottleneck in biological discovery has shifted from the cost of doing experiments to that of analyzing results. clubber is our automated cluster-load balancing system developed for optimizing these "big data" analyses. Its plug-and-play framework encourages re-use of existing solutions for bioinformatics problems. clubber's goals are to reduce computation times and to facilitate use of cluster computing. The first goal is achieved by automating the balance of parallel submissions across available high performance computing (HPC) resources. Notably, the latter can be added on demand, including cloud-based resources, and/or featuring heterogeneous environments. The second goal of making HPCs user-friendly is facilitated by an interactive web interface and a RESTful API, allowing for job monitoring and result retrieval. We used clubber to speed up our pipeline for annotating molecular functionality of metagenomes. Here, we analyzed the Deepwater Horizon oil-spill study data to quantitatively show that the beach sands have not yet entirely recovered. Further, our analysis of the CAMI-challenge data revealed that microbiome taxonomic shifts do not necessarily correlate with functional shifts. These examples (21 metagenomes processed in 172 min) clearly illustrate the importance of clubber in the everyday computational biology environment.

  7. clubber: removing the bioinformatics bottleneck in big data analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Maximilian

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of modern day high-throughput technologies, the bottleneck in biological discovery has shifted from the cost of doing experiments to that of analyzing results. clubber is our automated cluster-load balancing system developed for optimizing these “big data” analyses. Its plug-and-play framework encourages re-use of existing solutions for bioinformatics problems. clubber’s goals are to reduce computation times and to facilitate use of cluster computing. The first goal is achieved by automating the balance of parallel submissions across available high performance computing (HPC resources. Notably, the latter can be added on demand, including cloud-based resources, and/or featuring heterogeneous environments. The second goal of making HPCs user-friendly is facilitated by an interactive web interface and a RESTful API, allowing for job monitoring and result retrieval. We used clubber to speed up our pipeline for annotating molecular functionality of metagenomes. Here, we analyzed the Deepwater Horizon oil-spill study data to quantitatively show that the beach sands have not yet entirely recovered. Further, our analysis of the CAMI-challenge data revealed that microbiome taxonomic shifts do not necessarily correlate with functional shifts. These examples (21 metagenomes processed in 172 min clearly illustrate the importance of clubber in the everyday computational biology environment.

  8. Computational biology and bioinformatics in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatumo, Segun A; Adoga, Moses P; Ojo, Opeolu O; Oluwagbemi, Olugbenga; Adeoye, Tolulope; Ewejobi, Itunuoluwa; Adebiyi, Marion; Adebiyi, Ezekiel; Bewaji, Clement; Nashiru, Oyekanmi

    2014-04-01

    Over the past few decades, major advances in the field of molecular biology, coupled with advances in genomic technologies, have led to an explosive growth in the biological data generated by the scientific community. The critical need to process and analyze such a deluge of data and turn it into useful knowledge has caused bioinformatics to gain prominence and importance. Bioinformatics is an interdisciplinary research area that applies techniques, methodologies, and tools in computer and information science to solve biological problems. In Nigeria, bioinformatics has recently played a vital role in the advancement of biological sciences. As a developing country, the importance of bioinformatics is rapidly gaining acceptance, and bioinformatics groups comprised of biologists, computer scientists, and computer engineers are being constituted at Nigerian universities and research institutes. In this article, we present an overview of bioinformatics education and research in Nigeria. We also discuss professional societies and academic and research institutions that play central roles in advancing the discipline in Nigeria. Finally, we propose strategies that can bolster bioinformatics education and support from policy makers in Nigeria, with potential positive implications for other developing countries.

  9. Computational biology and bioinformatics in Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segun A Fatumo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few decades, major advances in the field of molecular biology, coupled with advances in genomic technologies, have led to an explosive growth in the biological data generated by the scientific community. The critical need to process and analyze such a deluge of data and turn it into useful knowledge has caused bioinformatics to gain prominence and importance. Bioinformatics is an interdisciplinary research area that applies techniques, methodologies, and tools in computer and information science to solve biological problems. In Nigeria, bioinformatics has recently played a vital role in the advancement of biological sciences. As a developing country, the importance of bioinformatics is rapidly gaining acceptance, and bioinformatics groups comprised of biologists, computer scientists, and computer engineers are being constituted at Nigerian universities and research institutes. In this article, we present an overview of bioinformatics education and research in Nigeria. We also discuss professional societies and academic and research institutions that play central roles in advancing the discipline in Nigeria. Finally, we propose strategies that can bolster bioinformatics education and support from policy makers in Nigeria, with potential positive implications for other developing countries.

  10. Statistical modelling in biostatistics and bioinformatics selected papers

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, Defen

    2014-01-01

    This book presents selected papers on statistical model development related mainly to the fields of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics. The coverage of the material falls squarely into the following categories: (a) Survival analysis and multivariate survival analysis, (b) Time series and longitudinal data analysis, (c) Statistical model development and (d) Applied statistical modelling. Innovations in statistical modelling are presented throughout each of the four areas, with some intriguing new ideas on hierarchical generalized non-linear models and on frailty models with structural dispersion, just to mention two examples. The contributors include distinguished international statisticians such as Philip Hougaard, John Hinde, Il Do Ha, Roger Payne and Alessandra Durio, among others, as well as promising newcomers. Some of the contributions have come from researchers working in the BIO-SI research programme on Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, centred on the Universities of Limerick and Galway in Ireland and fu...

  11. When cloud computing meets bioinformatics: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shuigeng; Liao, Ruiqi; Guan, Jihong

    2013-10-01

    In the past decades, with the rapid development of high-throughput technologies, biology research has generated an unprecedented amount of data. In order to store and process such a great amount of data, cloud computing and MapReduce were applied to many fields of bioinformatics. In this paper, we first introduce the basic concepts of cloud computing and MapReduce, and their applications in bioinformatics. We then highlight some problems challenging the applications of cloud computing and MapReduce to bioinformatics. Finally, we give a brief guideline for using cloud computing in biology research.

  12. Toward Personalized Pressure Ulcer Care Planning: Development of a Bioinformatics System for Individualized Prioritization of Clinical Pratice Guideline

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0342 TITLE: Toward Personalized Pressure Ulcer Care Planning: Development of a Bioinformatics System for Individualized...Planning: Development of a Bioinformatics System for Individualized Prioritization of Clinical Pratice Guideline 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...recommendations of CPG has been identified by experts in the field. We will use bioinformatics to enable data extraction, storage, and analysis to support

  13. BioWarehouse: a bioinformatics database warehouse toolkit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stringer-Calvert David WJ

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This article addresses the problem of interoperation of heterogeneous bioinformatics databases. Results We introduce BioWarehouse, an open source toolkit for constructing bioinformatics database warehouses using the MySQL and Oracle relational database managers. BioWarehouse integrates its component databases into a common representational framework within a single database management system, thus enabling multi-database queries using the Structured Query Language (SQL but also facilitating a variety of database integration tasks such as comparative analysis and data mining. BioWarehouse currently supports the integration of a pathway-centric set of databases including ENZYME, KEGG, and BioCyc, and in addition the UniProt, GenBank, NCBI Taxonomy, and CMR databases, and the Gene Ontology. Loader tools, written in the C and JAVA languages, parse and load these databases into a relational database schema. The loaders also apply a degree of semantic normalization to their respective source data, decreasing semantic heterogeneity. The schema supports the following bioinformatics datatypes: chemical compounds, biochemical reactions, metabolic pathways, proteins, genes, nucleic acid sequences, features on protein and nucleic-acid sequences, organisms, organism taxonomies, and controlled vocabularies. As an application example, we applied BioWarehouse to determine the fraction of biochemically characterized enzyme activities for which no sequences exist in the public sequence databases. The answer is that no sequence exists for 36% of enzyme activities for which EC numbers have been assigned. These gaps in sequence data significantly limit the accuracy of genome annotation and metabolic pathway prediction, and are a barrier for metabolic engineering. Complex queries of this type provide examples of the value of the data warehousing approach to bioinformatics research. Conclusion BioWarehouse embodies significant progress on the

  14. BioWarehouse: a bioinformatics database warehouse toolkit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Thomas J; Pouliot, Yannick; Wagner, Valerie; Gupta, Priyanka; Stringer-Calvert, David W J; Tenenbaum, Jessica D; Karp, Peter D

    2006-03-23

    This article addresses the problem of interoperation of heterogeneous bioinformatics databases. We introduce BioWarehouse, an open source toolkit for constructing bioinformatics database warehouses using the MySQL and Oracle relational database managers. BioWarehouse integrates its component databases into a common representational framework within a single database management system, thus enabling multi-database queries using the Structured Query Language (SQL) but also facilitating a variety of database integration tasks such as comparative analysis and data mining. BioWarehouse currently supports the integration of a pathway-centric set of databases including ENZYME, KEGG, and BioCyc, and in addition the UniProt, GenBank, NCBI Taxonomy, and CMR databases, and the Gene Ontology. Loader tools, written in the C and JAVA languages, parse and load these databases into a relational database schema. The loaders also apply a degree of semantic normalization to their respective source data, decreasing semantic heterogeneity. The schema supports the following bioinformatics datatypes: chemical compounds, biochemical reactions, metabolic pathways, proteins, genes, nucleic acid sequences, features on protein and nucleic-acid sequences, organisms, organism taxonomies, and controlled vocabularies. As an application example, we applied BioWarehouse to determine the fraction of biochemically characterized enzyme activities for which no sequences exist in the public sequence databases. The answer is that no sequence exists for 36% of enzyme activities for which EC numbers have been assigned. These gaps in sequence data significantly limit the accuracy of genome annotation and metabolic pathway prediction, and are a barrier for metabolic engineering. Complex queries of this type provide examples of the value of the data warehousing approach to bioinformatics research. BioWarehouse embodies significant progress on the database integration problem for bioinformatics.

  15. Application of bioinformatics on the detection of pathogens by Pcr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezig, Slim; Sakhri, Saber

    2007-01-01

    Salmonellas are the main responsible agent for the frequent food-borne gastrointestinal diseases. Their detection using classical methods are laborious and their results take a lot of time to be revealed. In this context, we tried to set up a revealing technique of the invA virulence gene, found in the majority of Salmonella species. After amplification with PCR using specific primers created and verified by bioinformatics programs, two couples of primers were set up and they appeared to be very specific and sensitive for the detection of invA gene. (Author)

  16. Bioinformatic tools for PCR Primer design

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ES

    Bioinformatics is an emerging scientific discipline that uses information ... complex biological questions. ... and computer programs for various purposes of primer ..... polymerase chain reaction: Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 model studies.

  17. Challenge: A Multidisciplinary Degree Program in Bioinformatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mudasser Fraz Wyne

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Bioinformatics is a new field that is poorly served by any of the traditional science programs in Biology, Computer science or Biochemistry. Known to be a rapidly evolving discipline, Bioinformatics has emerged from experimental molecular biology and biochemistry as well as from the artificial intelligence, database, pattern recognition, and algorithms disciplines of computer science. While institutions are responding to this increased demand by establishing graduate programs in bioinformatics, entrance barriers for these programs are high, largely due to the significant prerequisite knowledge which is required, both in the fields of biochemistry and computer science. Although many schools currently have or are proposing graduate programs in bioinformatics, few are actually developing new undergraduate programs. In this paper I explore the blend of a multidisciplinary approach, discuss the response of academia and highlight challenges faced by this emerging field.

  18. Deciphering psoriasis. A bioinformatic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melero, Juan L; Andrades, Sergi; Arola, Lluís; Romeu, Antoni

    2018-02-01

    Psoriasis is an immune-mediated, inflammatory and hyperproliferative disease of the skin and joints. The cause of psoriasis is still unknown. The fundamental feature of the disease is the hyperproliferation of keratinocytes and the recruitment of cells from the immune system in the region of the affected skin, which leads to deregulation of many well-known gene expressions. Based on data mining and bioinformatic scripting, here we show a new dimension of the effect of psoriasis at the genomic level. Using our own pipeline of scripts in Perl and MySql and based on the freely available NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database: DataSet Record GDS4602 (Series GSE13355), we explore the extent of the effect of psoriasis on gene expression in the affected tissue. We give greater insight into the effects of psoriasis on the up-regulation of some genes in the cell cycle (CCNB1, CCNA2, CCNE2, CDK1) or the dynamin system (GBPs, MXs, MFN1), as well as the down-regulation of typical antioxidant genes (catalase, CAT; superoxide dismutases, SOD1-3; and glutathione reductase, GSR). We also provide a complete list of the human genes and how they respond in a state of psoriasis. Our results show that psoriasis affects all chromosomes and many biological functions. If we further consider the stable and mitotically inheritable character of the psoriasis phenotype, and the influence of environmental factors, then it seems that psoriasis has an epigenetic origin. This fit well with the strong hereditary character of the disease as well as its complex genetic background. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Open discovery: An integrated live Linux platform of Bioinformatics tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetrivel, Umashankar; Pilla, Kalabharath

    2008-01-01

    Historically, live linux distributions for Bioinformatics have paved way for portability of Bioinformatics workbench in a platform independent manner. Moreover, most of the existing live Linux distributions limit their usage to sequence analysis and basic molecular visualization programs and are devoid of data persistence. Hence, open discovery - a live linux distribution has been developed with the capability to perform complex tasks like molecular modeling, docking and molecular dynamics in a swift manner. Furthermore, it is also equipped with complete sequence analysis environment and is capable of running windows executable programs in Linux environment. Open discovery portrays the advanced customizable configuration of fedora, with data persistency accessible via USB drive or DVD. The Open Discovery is distributed free under Academic Free License (AFL) and can be downloaded from http://www.OpenDiscovery.org.in.

  20. Concepts and introduction to RNA bioinformatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorodkin, Jan; Hofacker, Ivo L.; Ruzzo, Walter L.

    2014-01-01

    RNA bioinformatics and computational RNA biology have emerged from implementing methods for predicting the secondary structure of single sequences. The field has evolved to exploit multiple sequences to take evolutionary information into account, such as compensating (and structure preserving) base...... for interactions between RNA and proteins.Here, we introduce the basic concepts of predicting RNA secondary structure relevant to the further analyses of RNA sequences. We also provide pointers to methods addressing various aspects of RNA bioinformatics and computational RNA biology....

  1. New Link in Bioinformatics Services Value Chain: Position, Organization and Business Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladen Čudanov

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents development in the bioinformatics services industry value chain, based on cloud computing paradigm. As genome sequencing costs per Megabase exponentially drop, industry needs to adopt. Paper has two parts: theoretical analysis and practical example of Seven Bridges Genomics Company. We are focused on explaining organizational, business and financial aspects of new business model in bioinformatics services, rather than technical side of the problem. In the light of that we present twofold business model fit for core bioinformatics research and Information and Communication Technologie (ICT support in the new environment, with higher level of capital utilization and better resistance to business risks.

  2. Fiat lux! Phylogeny and bioinformatics shed light on GABA functions in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, Hugues

    2013-06-01

    The non-protein amino acid γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) accumulates in plants in response to a wide variety of environmental cues. Recent data point toward an involvement of GABA in tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle activity and respiration, especially in stressed roots. To gain further insights into potential GABA functions in plants, phylogenetic and bioinformatic approaches were undertaken. Phylogenetic reconstruction of the GABA transaminase (GABA-T) protein family revealed the monophyletic nature of plant GABA-Ts. However, this analysis also pointed to the common origin of several plant aminotransferases families, which were found more similar to plant GABA-Ts than yeast and human GABA-Ts. A computational analysis of AtGABA-T co-expressed genes was performed in roots and in stress conditions. This second approach uncovered a strong connection between GABA metabolism and glyoxylate cycle during stress. Both in silico analyses open new perspectives and hypotheses for GABA metabolic functions in plants.

  3. Transcriptomic and bioinformatics analysis of the early time-course of the response to prostaglandin F2 alpha in the bovine corpus luteum

    Science.gov (United States)

    RNA expression analysis was performed on the corpus luteum tissue at five time points after prostaglandin F2 alpha treatment of midcycle cows using an Affymetrix Bovine Gene v1 Array. The normalized linear microarray data was uploaded to the NCBI GEO repository (GSE94069). Subsequent statistical ana...

  4. A genetic analysis of segregation distortion revealed by molecular ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Journal of Genetics, Vol. 90, No. ... Segregation analysis was based on 64 molecular markers, including 26 .... FHB of RIL populations was controlled by quantitative trait ... The authors acknowledge financial support by the National Basic.

  5. 2nd Colombian Congress on Computational Biology and Bioinformatics

    CERN Document Server

    Cristancho, Marco; Isaza, Gustavo; Pinzón, Andrés; Rodríguez, Juan

    2014-01-01

    This volume compiles accepted contributions for the 2nd Edition of the Colombian Computational Biology and Bioinformatics Congress CCBCOL, after a rigorous review process in which 54 papers were accepted for publication from 119 submitted contributions. Bioinformatics and Computational Biology are areas of knowledge that have emerged due to advances that have taken place in the Biological Sciences and its integration with Information Sciences. The expansion of projects involving the study of genomes has led the way in the production of vast amounts of sequence data which needs to be organized, analyzed and stored to understand phenomena associated with living organisms related to their evolution, behavior in different ecosystems, and the development of applications that can be derived from this analysis.  .

  6. Bioinformatics for whole-genome shotgun sequencing of microbial communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Chen

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The application of whole-genome shotgun sequencing to microbial communities represents a major development in metagenomics, the study of uncultured microbes via the tools of modern genomic analysis. In the past year, whole-genome shotgun sequencing projects of prokaryotic communities from an acid mine biofilm, the Sargasso Sea, Minnesota farm soil, three deep-sea whale falls, and deep-sea sediments have been reported, adding to previously published work on viral communities from marine and fecal samples. The interpretation of this new kind of data poses a wide variety of exciting and difficult bioinformatics problems. The aim of this review is to introduce the bioinformatics community to this emerging field by surveying existing techniques and promising new approaches for several of the most interesting of these computational problems.

  7. Navigating the changing learning landscape: perspective from bioinformatics.ca

    OpenAIRE

    Brazas, Michelle D.; Ouellette, B. F. Francis

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of YouTube channels in bioinformatics, open platforms for problem solving in bioinformatics, active web forums in computing analyses and online resources for learning to code or use a bioinformatics tool, the more traditional continuing education bioinformatics training programs have had to adapt. Bioinformatics training programs that solely rely on traditional didactic methods are being superseded by these newer resources. Yet such face-to-face instruction is still invaluable...

  8. Expression profile analysis of long noncoding RNA in HER-2-enriched subtype breast cancer by next-generation sequencing and bioinformatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang F

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Fan Yang, Shixu Lyu, Siyang Dong, Yehuan Liu, Xiaohua Zhang, Ouchen Wang Department of Surgical Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China Background: Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2-enriched subtype breast cancer is associated with a more aggressive phenotype and shorter survival time. Long noncoding RNAs (LncRNAs have essential roles in tumorigenesis and occupy a central place in cancer progression. Notably, few studies have focused on the dysregulation of LncRNAs in the HER-2-enriched subtype breast cancer. In this study, we analyzed the expression profile of LncRNAs and mRNAs in this particular subtype of breast cancer. Methods: Seven pairs of HER-2-enriched subtype breast cancer and normal tissue were sequenced. We screened out differently expressed genes and measured the correlation of the expression levels of dysregulated LncRNAs and HER-2 by Pearson’s correlation coefficient analysis. Gene ontology analysis and pathway analysis were used to understand the biological roles of these differently expressed genes. Pathway act network and coexpression network were constructed. Results: More than 1,300 LncRNAs and 2,800 mRNAs, which were significantly differently expressed, were identified. Among these LncRNAs, AFAP1-AS1 was the most dysregulated LncRNA, while ORM2 was the most dysregulated mRNA. LOC100288637 had the highest positive correlation coefficient of 0.93 with HER-2, while RPL13P5 had the highest negative correlation coefficient of -0.87. The pathway act network showed that MAPK signaling pathway, PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, metabolic pathways, cell cycle, and regulation of actin cytoskeleton were highly related with HER-2-enriched subtype breast cancer. Coexpression network recognized LINC00636, LINC01405, ADARB2-AS1, ST8SIA6-AS1, LINC00511, and DPP10-AS1 as core genes. Conclusion: These results analyze the functions of LncRNAs and provide

  9. Network analysis reveals multiscale controls on streamwater chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin J. McGuire; Christian E. Torgersen; Gene E. Likens; Donald C. Buso; Winsor H. Lowe; Scott W. Bailey

    2014-01-01

    By coupling synoptic data from a basin-wide assessment of streamwater chemistry with network-based geostatistical analysis, we show that spatial processes differentially affect biogeochemical condition and pattern across a headwater stream network. We analyzed a high-resolution dataset consisting of 664 water samples collected every 100 m throughout 32 tributaries in...

  10. Nispero: a cloud-computing based Scala tool specially suited for bioinformatics data processing

    OpenAIRE

    Evdokim Kovach; Alexey Alekhin; Eduardo Pareja Tobes; Raquel Tobes; Eduardo Pareja; Marina Manrique

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays it is widely accepted that the bioinformatics data analysis is a real bottleneck in many research activities related to life sciences. High-throughput technologies like Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) have completely reshaped the biology and bioinformatics landscape. Undoubtedly NGS has allowed important progress in many life-sciences related fields but has also presented interesting challenges in terms of computation capabilities and algorithms. Many kinds of tasks related with NGS...

  11. libcov: A C++ bioinformatic library to manipulate protein structures, sequence alignments and phylogeny

    OpenAIRE

    Butt, Davin; Roger, Andrew J; Blouin, Christian

    2005-01-01

    Background An increasing number of bioinformatics methods are considering the phylogenetic relationships between biological sequences. Implementing new methodologies using the maximum likelihood phylogenetic framework can be a time consuming task. Results The bioinformatics library libcov is a collection of C++ classes that provides a high and low-level interface to maximum likelihood phylogenetics, sequence analysis and a data structure for structural biological methods. libcov can be used ...

  12. ALF: a strategy for identification of unauthorized GMOs in complex mixtures by a GW-NGS method and dedicated bioinformatics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Košir, Alexandra Bogožalec; Arulandhu, Alfred J; Voorhuijzen, Marleen M; Xiao, Hongmei; Hagelaar, Rico; Staats, Martijn; Costessi, Adalberto; Žel, Jana; Kok, Esther J; Dijk, Jeroen P van

    2017-10-26

    The majority of feed products in industrialised countries contains materials derived from genetically modified organisms (GMOs). In parallel, the number of reports of unauthorised GMOs (UGMOs) is gradually increasing. There is a lack of specific detection methods for UGMOs, due to the absence of detailed sequence information and reference materials. In this research, an adapted genome walking approach was developed, called ALF: Amplification of Linearly-enriched Fragments. Coupling of ALF to NGS aims for simultaneous detection and identification of all GMOs, including UGMOs, in one sample, in a single analysis. The ALF approach was assessed on a mixture made of DNA extracts from four reference materials, in an uneven distribution, mimicking a real life situation. The complete insert and genomic flanking regions were known for three of the included GMO events, while for MON15985 only partial sequence information was available. Combined with a known organisation of elements, this GMO served as a model for a UGMO. We successfully identified sequences matching with this organisation of elements serving as proof of principle for ALF as new UGMO detection strategy. Additionally, this study provides a first outline of an automated, web-based analysis pipeline for identification of UGMOs containing known GM elements.

  13. Transcriptional Network Analysis Reveals Drought Resistance Mechanisms of AP2/ERF Transgenic Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongryul Ahn

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate at the molecular level how a transgenic version of rice “Nipponbare” obtained a drought-resistant phenotype. Using multi-omics sequencing data, we compared wild-type rice (WT and a transgenic version (erf71 that had obtained a drought-resistant phenotype by overexpressing OsERF71, a member of the AP2/ERF transcription factor (TF family. A comprehensive bioinformatics analysis pipeline, including TF networks and a cascade tree, was developed for the analysis of multi-omics data. The results of the analysis showed that the presence of OsERF71 at the source of the network controlled global gene expression levels in a specific manner to make erf71 survive longer than WT. Our analysis of the time-series transcriptome data suggests that erf71 diverted more energy to survival-critical mechanisms related to translation, oxidative response, and DNA replication, while further suppressing energy-consuming mechanisms, such as photosynthesis. To support this hypothesis further, we measured the net photosynthesis level under physiological conditions, which confirmed the further suppression of photosynthesis in erf71. In summary, our work presents a comprehensive snapshot of transcriptional modification in transgenic rice and shows how this induced the plants to acquire a drought-resistant phenotype.

  14. Revealing the underlying drivers of disaster risk: a global analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peduzzi, Pascal

    2017-04-01

    Disasters events are perfect examples of compound events. Disaster risk lies at the intersection of several independent components such as hazard, exposure and vulnerability. Understanding the weight of each component requires extensive standardisation. Here, I show how footprints of past disastrous events were generated using GIS modelling techniques and used for extracting population and economic exposures based on distribution models. Using past event losses, it was possible to identify and quantify a wide range of socio-politico-economic drivers associated with human vulnerability. The analysis was applied to about nine thousand individual past disastrous events covering earthquakes, floods and tropical cyclones. Using a multiple regression analysis on these individual events it was possible to quantify each risk component and assess how vulnerability is influenced by various hazard intensities. The results show that hazard intensity, exposure, poverty, governance as well as other underlying factors (e.g. remoteness) can explain the magnitude of past disasters. Analysis was also performed to highlight the role of future trends in population and climate change and how this may impacts exposure to tropical cyclones in the future. GIS models combined with statistical multiple regression analysis provided a powerful methodology to identify, quantify and model disaster risk taking into account its various components. The same methodology can be applied to various types of risk at local to global scale. This method was applied and developed for the Global Risk Analysis of the Global Assessment Report on Disaster Risk Reduction (GAR). It was first applied on mortality risk in GAR 2009 and GAR 2011. New models ranging from global assets exposure and global flood hazard models were also recently developed to improve the resolution of the risk analysis and applied through CAPRA software to provide probabilistic economic risk assessments such as Average Annual Losses (AAL

  15. Sensitization trajectories in childhood revealed by using a cluster analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoos, Ann-Marie M.; Chawes, Bo L.; Melen, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood 2000 (COPSAC2000) birth cohort with specific IgE against 13 common food and inhalant allergens at the ages of ½, 1½, 4, and 6 years. An unsupervised cluster analysis for 3-dimensional data (nonnegative sparse parallel factor analysis) was used to extract latent......BACKGROUND: Assessment of sensitization at a single time point during childhood provides limited clinical information. We hypothesized that sensitization develops as specific patterns with respect to age at debut, development over time, and involved allergens and that such patterns might be more...... biologically and clinically relevant. OBJECTIVE: We sought to explore latent patterns of sensitization during the first 6 years of life and investigate whether such patterns associate with the development of asthma, rhinitis, and eczema. METHODS: We investigated 398 children from the at-risk Copenhagen...

  16. Fractal analysis reveals reduced complexity of retinal vessels in CADASIL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Cavallari

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL affects mainly small cerebral arteries and leads to disability and dementia. The relationship between clinical expression of the disease and progression of the microvessel pathology is, however, uncertain as we lack tools for imaging brain vessels in vivo. Ophthalmoscopy is regarded as a window into the cerebral microcirculation. In this study we carried out an ophthalmoscopic examination in subjects with CADASIL. Specifically, we performed fractal analysis of digital retinal photographs. Data are expressed as mean fractal dimension (mean-D, a parameter that reflects complexity of the retinal vessel branching. Ten subjects with genetically confirmed diagnosis of CADASIL and 10 sex and age-matched control subjects were enrolled. Fractal analysis of retinal digital images was performed by means of a computer-based program, and the data expressed as mean-D. Brain MRI lesion volume in FLAIR and T1-weighted images was assessed using MIPAV software. Paired t-test was used to disclose differences in mean-D between CADASIL and control groups. Spearman rank analysis was performed to evaluate potential associations between mean-D values and both disease duration and disease severity, the latter expressed as brain MRI lesion volumes, in the subjects with CADASIL. The results showed that mean-D value of patients (1.42±0.05; mean±SD was lower than control (1.50±0.04; p = 0.002. Mean-D did not correlate with disease duration nor with MRI lesion volumes of the subjects with CADASIL. The findings suggest that fractal analysis is a sensitive tool to assess changes of retinal vessel branching, likely reflecting early brain microvessel alterations, in CADASIL patients.

  17. Penicillium simile sp. nov. revealed by morphological and phylogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davolos, Domenico; Pietrangeli, Biancamaria; Persiani, Anna Maria; Maggi, Oriana

    2012-02-01

    The morphology of three phenetically identical Penicillium isolates, collected from the bioaerosol in a restoration laboratory in Italy, displayed macro- and microscopic characteristics that were similar though not completely ascribable to Penicillium raistrickii. For this reason, a phylogenetic approach based on DNA sequencing analysis was performed to establish both the taxonomic status and the evolutionary relationships of these three peculiar isolates in relation to previously described species of the genus Penicillium. We used four nuclear loci (both rRNA and protein coding genes) that have previously proved useful for the molecular investigation of taxa belonging to the genus Penicillium at various evolutionary levels. The internal transcribed spacer region (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2), domains D1 and D2 of the 28S rDNA, a region of the tubulin beta chain gene (benA) and part of the calmodulin gene (cmd) were amplified by PCR and sequenced. Analysis of the rRNA genes and of the benA and cmd sequence data indicates the presence of three isogenic isolates belonging to a genetically distinct species of the genus Penicillium, here described and named Penicillium simile sp. nov. (ATCC MYA-4591(T)  = CBS 129191(T)). This novel species is phylogenetically different from P. raistrickii and other related species of the genus Penicillium (e.g. Penicillium scabrosum), from which it can be distinguished on the basis of morphological trait analysis.

  18. Subfield profitability analysis reveals an economic case for cropland diversification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandes, E.; McNunn, G. S.; Schulte, L. A.; Bonner, I. J.; Muth, D. J.; Babcock, B. A.; Sharma, B.; Heaton, E. A.

    2016-01-01

    Public agencies and private enterprises increasingly desire to achieve ecosystem service outcomes in agricultural systems, but are limited by perceived conflicts between economic and ecosystem service goals and a lack of tools enabling effective operational management. Here we use Iowa—an agriculturally homogeneous state representative of the Maize Belt—to demonstrate an economic rationale for cropland diversification at the subfield scale. We used a novel computational framework that integrates disparate but publicly available data to map ˜3.3 million unique potential management polygons (9.3 Mha) and reveal subfield opportunities to increase overall field profitability. We analyzed subfield profitability for maize/soybean fields during 2010-2013—four of the most profitable years in recent history—and projected results for 2015. While cropland operating at a loss of US 250 ha-1 or more was negligible between 2010 and 2013 at 18 000-190 000 ha (profitable areas, incorporating conservation management that breaks even (e.g., planting low-input perennials), into low-yielding portions of fields could increase overall cropland profitability by 80%. This approach is applicable to the broader region and differs substantially from the status quo of ‘top-down’ land management for conservation by harnessing private interest to align profitability with the production of ecosystem services.

  19. Proteomics Analysis Reveals Previously Uncharacterized Virulence Factors in Vibrio proteolyticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Ray

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Members of the genus Vibrio include many pathogens of humans and marine animals that share genetic information via horizontal gene transfer. Hence, the Vibrio pan-genome carries the potential to establish new pathogenic strains by sharing virulence determinants, many of which have yet to be characterized. Here, we investigated the virulence properties of Vibrio proteolyticus, a Gram-negative marine bacterium previously identified as part of the Vibrio consortium isolated from diseased corals. We found that V. proteolyticus causes actin cytoskeleton rearrangements followed by cell lysis in HeLa cells in a contact-independent manner. In search of the responsible virulence factor involved, we determined the V. proteolyticus secretome. This proteomics approach revealed various putative virulence factors, including active type VI secretion systems and effectors with virulence toxin domains; however, these type VI secretion systems were not responsible for the observed cytotoxic effects. Further examination of the V. proteolyticus secretome led us to hypothesize and subsequently demonstrate that a secreted hemolysin, belonging to a previously uncharacterized clan of the leukocidin superfamily, was the toxin responsible for the V. proteolyticus-mediated cytotoxicity in both HeLa cells and macrophages. Clearly, there remains an armory of yet-to-be-discovered virulence factors in the Vibrio pan-genome that will undoubtedly provide a wealth of knowledge on how a pathogen can manipulate host cells.

  20. Comparative Genomic Analysis Reveals Ecological Differentiation in the Genus Carnobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskandar, Christelle F; Borges, Frédéric; Taminiau, Bernard; Daube, Georges; Zagorec, Monique; Remenant, Benoît; Leisner, Jørgen J; Hansen, Martin A; Sørensen, Søren J; Mangavel, Cécile; Cailliez-Grimal, Catherine; Revol-Junelles, Anne-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) differ in their ability to colonize food and animal-associated habitats: while some species are specialized and colonize a limited number of habitats, other are generalist and are able to colonize multiple animal-linked habitats. In the current study, Carnobacterium was used as a model genus to elucidate the genetic basis of these colonization differences. Analyses of 16S rRNA gene meta-barcoding data showed that C. maltaromaticum followed by C. divergens are the most prevalent species in foods derived from animals (meat, fish, dairy products), and in the gut. According to phylogenetic analyses, these two animal-adapted species belong to one of two deeply branched lineages. The second lineage contains species isolated from habitats where contact with animal is rare. Genome analyses revealed that members of the animal-adapted lineage harbor a larger secretome than members of the other lineage. The predicted cell-surface proteome is highly diversified in C. maltaromaticum and C. divergens with genes involved in adaptation to the animal milieu such as those encoding biopolymer hydrolytic enzymes, a heme uptake system, and biopolymer-binding adhesins. These species also exhibit genes for gut adaptation and respiration. In contrast, Carnobacterium species belonging to the second lineage encode a poorly diversified cell-surface proteome, lack genes for gut adaptation and are unable to respire. These results shed light on the important genomics traits required for adaptation to animal-linked habitats in generalist Carnobacterium .

  1. Proteomic Analysis of Hylocereus polyrhizus Reveals Metabolic Pathway Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingzhu Hua

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Red dragon fruit or red pitaya (Hylocereus polyrhizus is the only edible fruit that contains betalains. The color of betalains ranges from red and violet to yellow in plants. Betalains may also serve as an important component of health-promoting and disease-preventing functional food. Currently, the biosynthetic and regulatory pathways for betalain production remain to be fully deciphered. In this study, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ-based proteomic analyses were used to reveal the molecular mechanism of betalain biosynthesis in H. polyrhizus fruits at white and red pulp stages, respectively. A total of 1946 proteins were identified as the differentially expressed between the two samples, and 936 of them were significantly highly expressed at the red pulp stage of H. polyrhizus. RNA-seq and iTRAQ analyses showed that some transcripts and proteins were positively correlated; they belonged to “phenylpropanoid biosynthesis”, “tyrosine metabolism”, “flavonoid biosynthesis”, “ascorbate and aldarate metabolism”, “betalains biosynthesis” and “anthocyanin biosynthesis”. In betalains biosynthesis pathway, several proteins/enzymes such as polyphenol oxidase, CYP76AD3 and 4,5-dihydroxy-phenylalanine (DOPA dioxygenase extradiol-like protein were identified. The present study provides a new insight into the molecular mechanism of the betalain biosynthesis at the posttranscriptional level.

  2. Sequence and structural analysis of the chitinase insertion domain reveals two conserved motifs involved in chitin-binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chitinases are prevalent in life and are found in species including archaea, bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals. They break down chitin, which is the second most abundant carbohydrate in nature after cellulose. Hence, they are important for maintaining a balance between carbon and nitrogen trapped as insoluble chitin in biomass. Chitinases are classified into two families, 18 and 19 glycoside hydrolases. In addition to a catalytic domain, which is a triosephosphate isomerase barrel, many family 18 chitinases contain another module, i.e., chitinase insertion domain. While numerous studies focus on the biological role of the catalytic domain in chitinase activity, the function of the chitinase insertion domain is not completely understood. Bioinformatics offers an important avenue in which to facilitate understanding the role of residues within the chitinase insertion domain in chitinase function.Twenty-seven chitinase insertion domain sequences, which include four experimentally determined structures and span five kingdoms, were aligned and analyzed using a modified sequence entropy parameter. Thirty-two positions with conserved residues were identified. The role of these conserved residues was explored by conducting a structural analysis of a number of holo-enzymes. Hydrogen bonding and van der Waals calculations revealed a distinct subset of four conserved residues constituting two sequence motifs that interact with oligosaccharides. The other conserved residues may be key to the structure, folding, and stability of this domain.Sequence and structural studies of the chitinase insertion domains conducted within the framework of evolution identified four conserved residues which clearly interact with the substrates. Furthermore, evolutionary studies propose a link between the appearance of the chitinase insertion domain and the function of family 18 chitinases in the subfamily A.

  3. Integrated ligand-receptor bioinformatic and in vitro functional analysis identifies active TGFA/EGFR signaling loop in papillary thyroid carcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Degl'Innocenti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTCs, the most frequent thyroid cancer, is usually not life threatening, but may recur or progress to aggressive forms resistant to conventional therapies. A more detailed understanding of the signaling pathways activated in PTCs may help to identify novel therapeutic approaches against these tumors. The aim of this study is to identify signaling pathways activated in PTCs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined coordinated gene expression patterns of ligand/receptor (L/R pairs using the L/R database DRLP-rev1 and five publicly available thyroid cancer datasets of gene expression on a total of 41 paired PTC/normal thyroid tissues. We identified 26 (up and 13 (down L/R pairs coordinately and differentially expressed. The relevance of these L/R pairs was confirmed by performing the same analysis on REarranged during Transfection (RET/PTC1-infected thyrocytes with respect to normal thyrocytes. TGFA/EGFR emerged as one of the most tightly regulated L/R pair. Furthermore, PTC clinical samples analyzed by real-time RT-PCR expressed EGFR transcript levels similar to those of 5 normal thyroid tissues from patients with pathologies other than thyroid cancer, whereas significantly elevated levels of TGFA transcripts were only present in PTCs. Biochemical analysis of PTC cell lines demonstrated the presence of EGFR on the cell membrane and TGFA in conditioned media. Moreover, conditioned medium of the PTC cell line NIM-1 activated EGFR expressed on HeLa cells, culminating in both ERK and AKT phosphorylation. In NIM-1 cells harboring BRAF mutation, TGFA stimulated proliferation, contributing to PI3K/AKT activation independent of MEK/ERK signaling. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We compiled a reliable list of L/R pairs associated with PTC and validated the biological role of one of the emerged L/R pair, the TGFA/EGFR, in this cancer, in vitro. These data provide a better understanding of the factors involved in the

  4. Structural Bioinformatics and Protein Docking Analysis of the Molecular Chaperone-Kinase Interactions: Towards Allosteric Inhibition of Protein Kinases by Targeting the Hsp90-Cdc37 Chaperone Machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennady Verkhivker

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental role of the Hsp90-Cdc37 chaperone system in mediating maturation of protein kinase clients and supporting kinase functional activity is essential for the integrity and viability of signaling pathways involved in cell cycle control and organism development. Despite significant advances in understanding structure and function of molecular chaperones, the molecular mechanisms and guiding principles of kinase recruitment to the chaperone system are lacking quantitative characterization. Structural and thermodynamic characterization of Hsp90-Cdc37 binding with protein kinase clients by modern experimental techniques is highly challenging, owing to a transient nature of chaperone-mediated interactions. In this work, we used experimentally-guided protein docking to probe the allosteric nature of the Hsp90-Cdc37 binding with the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4 kinase clients. The results of docking simulations suggest that the kinase recognition and recruitment to the chaperone system may be primarily determined by Cdc37 targeting of the N-terminal kinase lobe. The interactions of Hsp90 with the C-terminal kinase lobe may provide additional “molecular brakes” that can lock (or unlock kinase from the system during client loading (release stages. The results of this study support a central role of the Cdc37 chaperone in recognition and recruitment of the kinase clients. Structural analysis may have useful implications in developing strategies for allosteric inhibition of protein kinases by targeting the Hsp90-Cdc37 chaperone machinery.

  5. Gas Hydrate-Sediment Morphologies Revealed by Pressure Core Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, M.; Schultheiss, P.; Roberts, J.; Druce, M.

    2006-12-01

    Analysis of HYACINTH pressure cores collected on IODP Expedition 311 and NGHP Expedition 1 showed gas hydrate layers, lenses, and veins contained in fine-grained sediments as well as gas hydrate contained in coarse-grained layers. Pressure cores were recovered from sediments on the Cascadia Margin off the North American West Coast and in the Krishna-Godavari Basin in the Western Bay of Bengal in water depths of 800- 1400 meters. Recovered cores were transferred to laboratory chambers without loss of pressure and nondestructive measurements were made at in situ pressures and controlled temperatures. Gamma density, P-wave velocity, and X-ray images showed evidence of grain-displacing and pore-filling gas hydrate in the cores. Data highlights include X-ray images of fine-grained sediment cores showing wispy subvertical veins of gas hydrate and P-wave velocity excursions corresponding to grain-displacing layers and pore-filling layers of gas hydrate. Most cores were subjected to controlled depressurization experiments, where expelled gas was collected, analyzed for composition, and used to calculate gas hydrate saturation within the core. Selected cores were stored under pressure for postcruise analysis and subsampling.

  6. Fundamentals of bioinformatics and computational biology methods and exercises in matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Gautam B

    2015-01-01

    This book offers comprehensive coverage of all the core topics of bioinformatics, and includes practical examples completed using the MATLAB bioinformatics toolbox™. It is primarily intended as a textbook for engineering and computer science students attending advanced undergraduate and graduate courses in bioinformatics and computational biology. The book develops bioinformatics concepts from the ground up, starting with an introductory chapter on molecular biology and genetics. This chapter will enable physical science students to fully understand and appreciate the ultimate goals of applying the principles of information technology to challenges in biological data management, sequence analysis, and systems biology. The first part of the book also includes a survey of existing biological databases, tools that have become essential in today’s biotechnology research. The second part of the book covers methodologies for retrieving biological information, including fundamental algorithms for sequence compar...

  7. p3d--Python module for structural bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fufezan, Christian; Specht, Michael

    2009-08-21

    High-throughput bioinformatic analysis tools are needed to mine the large amount of structural data via knowledge based approaches. The development of such tools requires a robust interface to access the structural data in an easy way. For this the Python scripting language is the optimal choice since its philosophy is to write an understandable source code. p3d is an object oriented Python module that adds a simple yet powerful interface to the Python interpreter to process and analyse three dimensional protein structure files (PDB files). p3d's strength arises from the combination of a) very fast spatial access to the structural data due to the implementation of a binary space partitioning (BSP) tree, b) set theory and c) functions that allow to combine a and b and that use human readable language in the search queries rather than complex computer language. All these factors combined facilitate the rapid development of bioinformatic tools that can perform quick and complex analyses of protein structures. p3d is the perfect tool to quickly develop tools for structural bioinformatics using the Python scripting language.

  8. p3d – Python module for structural bioinformatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fufezan Christian

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput bioinformatic analysis tools are needed to mine the large amount of structural data via knowledge based approaches. The development of such tools requires a robust interface to access the structural data in an easy way. For this the Python scripting language is the optimal choice since its philosophy is to write an understandable source code. Results p3d is an object oriented Python module that adds a simple yet powerful interface to the Python interpreter to process and analyse three dimensional protein structure files (PDB files. p3d's strength arises from the combination of a very fast spatial access to the structural data due to the implementation of a binary space partitioning (BSP tree, b set theory and c functions that allow to combine a and b and that use human readable language in the search queries rather than complex computer language. All these factors combined facilitate the rapid development of bioinformatic tools that can perform quick and complex analyses of protein structures. Conclusion p3d is the perfect tool to quickly develop tools for structural bioinformatics using the Python scripting language.

  9. mORCA: sailing bioinformatics world with mobile devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Del-Pino, Sergio; Falgueras, Juan; Perez-Wohlfeil, Esteban; Trelles, Oswaldo

    2018-03-01

    Nearly 10 years have passed since the first mobile apps appeared. Given the fact that bioinformatics is a web-based world and that mobile devices are endowed with web-browsers, it seemed natural that bioinformatics would transit from personal computers to mobile devices but nothing could be further from the truth. The transition demands new paradigms, designs and novel implementations. Throughout an in-depth analysis of requirements of existing bioinformatics applications we designed and deployed an easy-to-use web-based lightweight mobile client. Such client is able to browse, select, compose automatically interface parameters, invoke services and monitor the execution of Web Services using the service's metadata stored in catalogs or repositories. mORCA is available at http://bitlab-es.com/morca/app as a web-app. It is also available in the App store by Apple and Play Store by Google. The software will be available for at least 2 years. ortrelles@uma.es. Source code, final web-app, training material and documentation is available at http://bitlab-es.com/morca. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  10. GOBLET: The Global Organisation for Bioinformatics Learning, Education and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Teresa K.; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik; Brazas, Michelle E.; Corpas, Manuel; Gaudet, Pascale; Lewitter, Fran; Mulder, Nicola; Palagi, Patricia M.; Schneider, Maria Victoria; van Gelder, Celia W. G.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, high-throughput technologies have brought big data to the life sciences. The march of progress has been rapid, leaving in its wake a demand for courses in data analysis, data stewardship, computing fundamentals, etc., a need that universities have not yet been able to satisfy—paradoxically, many are actually closing “niche” bioinformatics courses at a time of critical need. The impact of this is being felt across continents, as many students and early-stage researchers are being left without appropriate skills to manage, analyse, and interpret their data with confidence. This situation has galvanised a group of scientists to address the problems on an international scale. For the first time, bioinformatics educators and trainers across the globe have come together to address common needs, rising above institutional and international boundaries to cooperate in sharing bioinformatics training expertise, experience, and resources, aiming to put ad hoc training practices on a more professional footing for the benefit of all. PMID:25856076

  11. Combining medical informatics and bioinformatics toward tools for personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarachan, B D; Simmons, M K; Subramanian, P; Temkin, J M

    2003-01-01

    Key bioinformatics and medical informatics research areas need to be identified to advance knowledge and understanding of disease risk factors and molecular disease pathology in the 21 st century toward new diagnoses, prognoses, and treatments. Three high-impact informatics areas are identified: predictive medicine (to identify significant correlations within clinical data using statistical and artificial intelligence methods), along with pathway informatics and cellular simulations (that combine biological knowledge with advanced informatics to elucidate molecular disease pathology). Initial predictive models have been developed for a pilot study in Huntington's disease. An initial bioinformatics platform has been developed for the reconstruction and analysis of pathways, and work has begun on pathway simulation. A bioinformatics research program has been established at GE Global Research Center as an important technology toward next generation medical diagnostics. We anticipate that 21 st century medical research will be a combination of informatics tools with traditional biology wet lab research, and that this will translate to increased use of informatics techniques in the clinic.

  12. Best practices in bioinformatics training for life scientists.

    KAUST Repository

    Via, Allegra

    2013-06-25

    The mountains of data thrusting from the new landscape of modern high-throughput biology are irrevocably changing biomedical research and creating a near-insatiable demand for training in data management and manipulation and data mining and analysis. Among life scientists, from clinicians to environmental researchers, a common theme is the need not just to use, and gain familiarity with, bioinformatics tools and resources but also to understand their underlying fundamental theoretical and practical concepts. Providing bioinformatics training to empower life scientists to handle and analyse their data efficiently, and progress their research, is a challenge across the globe. Delivering good training goes beyond traditional lectures and resource-centric demos, using interactivity, problem-solving exercises and cooperative learning to substantially enhance training quality and learning outcomes. In this context, this article discusses various pragmatic criteria for identifying training needs and learning objectives, for selecting suitable trainees and trainers, for developing and maintaining training skills and evaluating training quality. Adherence to these criteria may help not only to guide course organizers and trainers on the path towards bioinformatics training excellence but, importantly, also to improve the training experience for life scientists.

  13. Translational Bioinformatics and Clinical Research (Biomedical) Informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirintrapun, S Joseph; Zehir, Ahmet; Syed, Aijazuddin; Gao, JianJiong; Schultz, Nikolaus; Cheng, Donavan T

    2015-06-01

    Translational bioinformatics and clinical research (biomedical) informatics are the primary domains related to informatics activities that support translational research. Translational bioinformatics focuses on computational techniques in genetics, molecular biology, and systems biology. Clinical research (biomedical) informatics involves the use of informatics in discovery and management of new knowledge relating to health and disease. This article details 3 projects that are hybrid applications of translational bioinformatics and clinical research (biomedical) informatics: The Cancer Genome Atlas, the cBioPortal for Cancer Genomics, and the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center clinical variants and results database, all designed to facilitate insights into cancer biology and clinical/therapeutic correlations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Aspergillus Mine - publishing bioinformatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesth, Tammi Camilla; Rasmussen, Jane Lind Nybo; Theobald, Sebastian

    Genome analysis is no longer a field reserved for specialists and experimental laboratories are doing groundbreaking research using genome sequencing and analysis. In this new era, it is essential that data, analysis and results are shared between scientists. But this can be a challenge, even mor...

  15. The GMOD Drupal Bioinformatic Server Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanicolaou, Alexie; Heckel, David G.

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Next-generation sequencing technologies have led to the widespread use of -omic applications. As a result, there is now a pronounced bioinformatic bottleneck. The general model organism database (GMOD) tool kit (http://gmod.org) has produced a number of resources aimed at addressing this issue. It lacks, however, a robust online solution that can deploy heterogeneous data and software within a Web content management system (CMS). Results: We present a bioinformatic framework for the Drupal CMS. It consists of three modules. First, GMOD-DBSF is an application programming interface module for the Drupal CMS that simplifies the programming of bioinformatic Drupal modules. Second, the Drupal Bioinformatic Software Bench (biosoftware_bench) allows for a rapid and secure deployment of bioinformatic software. An innovative graphical user interface (GUI) guides both use and administration of the software, including the secure provision of pre-publication datasets. Third, we present genes4all_experiment, which exemplifies how our work supports the wider research community. Conclusion: Given the infrastructure presented here, the Drupal CMS may become a powerful new tool set for bioinformaticians. The GMOD-DBSF base module is an expandable community resource that decreases development time of Drupal modules for bioinformatics. The biosoftware_bench module can already enhance biologists' ability to mine their own data. The genes4all_experiment module has already been responsible for archiving of more than 150 studies of RNAi from Lepidoptera, which were previously unpublished. Availability and implementation: Implemented in PHP and Perl. Freely available under the GNU Public License 2 or later from http://gmod-dbsf.googlecode.com Contact: alexie@butterflybase.org PMID:20971988

  16. The GMOD Drupal bioinformatic server framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanicolaou, Alexie; Heckel, David G

    2010-12-15

    Next-generation sequencing technologies have led to the widespread use of -omic applications. As a result, there is now a pronounced bioinformatic bottleneck. The general model organism database (GMOD) tool kit (http://gmod.org) has produced a number of resources aimed at addressing this issue. It lacks, however, a robust online solution that can deploy heterogeneous data and software within a Web content management system (CMS). We present a bioinformatic framework for the Drupal CMS. It consists of three modules. First, GMOD-DBSF is an application programming interface module for the Drupal CMS that simplifies the programming of bioinformatic Drupal modules. Second, the Drupal Bioinformatic Software Bench (biosoftware_bench) allows for a rapid and secure deployment of bioinformatic software. An innovative graphical user interface (GUI) guides both use and administration of the software, including the secure provision of pre-publication datasets. Third, we present genes4all_experiment, which exemplifies how our work supports the wider research community. Given the infrastructure presented here, the Drupal CMS may become a powerful new tool set for bioinformaticians. The GMOD-DBSF base module is an expandable community resource that decreases development time of Drupal modules for bioinformatics. The biosoftware_bench module can already enhance biologists' ability to mine their own data. The genes4all_experiment module has already been responsible for archiving of more than 150 studies of RNAi from Lepidoptera, which were previously unpublished. Implemented in PHP and Perl. Freely available under the GNU Public License 2 or later from http://gmod-dbsf.googlecode.com.

  17. Bioinformatics analyses of Shigella CRISPR structure and spacer classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengfei; Zhang, Bing; Duan, Guangcai; Wang, Yingfang; Hong, Lijuan; Wang, Linlin; Guo, Xiangjiao; Xi, Yuanlin; Yang, Haiyan

    2016-03-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) are inheritable genetic elements of a variety of archaea and bacteria and indicative of the bacterial ecological adaptation, conferring acquired immunity against invading foreign nucleic acids. Shigella is an important pathogen for anthroponosis. This study aimed to analyze the features of Shigella CRISPR structure and classify the spacers through bioinformatics approach. Among 107 Shigella, 434 CRISPR structure loci were identified with two to seven loci in different strains. CRISPR-Q1, CRISPR-Q4 and CRISPR-Q5 were widely distributed in Shigella strains. Comparison of the first and last repeats of CRISPR1, CRISPR2 and CRISPR3 revealed several base variants and different stem-loop structures. A total of 259 cas genes were found among these 107 Shigella strains. The cas gene deletions were discovered in 88 strains. However, there is one strain that does not contain cas gene. Intact clusters of cas genes were found in 19 strains. From comprehensive analysis of sequence signature and BLAST and CRISPRTarget score, the 708 spacers were classified into three subtypes: Type I, Type II and Type III. Of them, Type I spacer referred to those linked with one gene segment, Type II spacer linked with two or more different gene segments, and Type III spacer undefined. This study examined the diversity of CRISPR/cas system in Shigella strains, demonstrated the main features of CRISPR structure and spacer classification, which provided critical information for elucidation of the mechanisms of spacer formation and exploration of the role the spacers play in the function of the CRISPR/cas system.

  18. Changes in cod muscle proteins during frozen storage revealed by proteome analysis and multivariate data analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærsgård, Inger Vibeke Holst; Nørrelykke, M.R.; Jessen, Flemming

    2006-01-01

    Multivariate data analysis has been combined with proteomics to enhance the recovery of information from 2-DE of cod muscle proteins during different storage conditions. Proteins were extracted according to 11 different storage conditions and samples were resolved by 2-DE. Data generated by 2-DE...... was subjected to principal component analysis (PCA) and discriminant partial least squares regression (DPLSR). Applying PCA to 2-DE data revealed the samples to form groups according to frozen storage time, whereas differences due to different storage temperatures or chilled storage in modified atmosphere...... light chain 1, 2 and 3, triose-phosphate isomerase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, aldolase A and two ?-actin fragments, and a nuclease diphosphate kinase B fragment to change in concentration, during frozen storage. Application of proteomics, multivariate data analysis and MS/MS to analyse...

  19. Differential network analysis reveals genetic effects on catalepsy modules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovidiu D Iancu

    Full Text Available We performed short-term bi-directional selective breeding for haloperidol-induced catalepsy, starting from three mouse populations of increasingly complex genetic structure: an F2 intercross, a heterogeneous stock (HS formed by crossing four inbred strains (HS4 and a heterogeneous stock (HS-CC formed from the inbred strain founders of the Collaborative Cross (CC. All three selections were successful, with large differences in haloperidol response emerging within three generations. Using a custom differential network analysis procedure, we found that gene coexpression patterns changed significantly; importantly, a number of these changes were concordant across genetic backgrounds. In contrast, absolute gene-expression changes were modest and not concordant across genetic backgrounds, in spite of the large and similar phenotypic differences. By inferring strain contributions from the parental lines, we are able to identify significant differences in allelic content between the selected lines concurrent with large changes in transcript connectivity. Importantly, this observation implies that genetic polymorphisms can affect transcript and module connectivity without large changes in absolute expression levels. We conclude that, in this case, selective breeding acts at the subnetwork level, with the same modules but not the same transcripts affected across the three selections.

  20. Network analysis reveals distinct clinical syndromes underlying acute mountain sickness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P Hall

    Full Text Available Acute mountain sickness (AMS is a common problem among visitors at high altitude, and may progress to life-threatening pulmonary and cerebral oedema in a minority of cases. International consensus defines AMS as a constellation of subjective, non-specific symptoms. Specifically, headache, sleep disturbance, fatigue and dizziness are given equal diagnostic weighting. Different pathophysiological mechanisms are now thought to underlie headache and sleep disturbance during acute exposure to high altitude. Hence, these symptoms may not belong together as a single syndrome. Using a novel visual analogue scale (VAS, we sought to undertake a systematic exploration of the symptomatology of AMS using an unbiased, data-driven approach originally designed for analysis of gene expression. Symptom scores were collected from 292 subjects during 1110 subject-days at altitudes between 3650 m and 5200 m on Apex expeditions to Bolivia and Kilimanjaro. Three distinct patterns of symptoms were consistently identified. Although fatigue is a ubiquitous finding, sleep disturbance and headache are each commonly reported without the other. The commonest pattern of symptoms was sleep disturbance and fatigue, with little or no headache. In subjects reporting severe headache, 40% did not report sleep disturbance. Sleep disturbance correlates poorly with other symptoms of AMS (Mean Spearman correlation 0.25. These results challenge the accepted paradigm that AMS is a single disease process and describe at least two distinct syndromes following acute ascent to high altitude. This approach to analysing symptom patterns has potential utility in other clinical syndromes.

  1. Demographic analysis reveals gradual senescence in the flatworm Macrostomum lignano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braeckman Bart P

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Free-living flatworms ("Turbellaria" are appropriate model organisms to gain better insight into the role of stem cells in ageing and rejuvenation. Ageing research in flatworms is, however, still scarce. This is partly due to culture difficulties and the lack of a complete set of demographic data, including parameters such as median lifespan and age-specific mortality rate. In this paper, we report on the first flatworm survival analysis. We used the species Macrostomum lignano, which is an emerging model for studying the reciprocal influence between stem cells, ageing and rejuvenation. This species has a median lifespan of 205 ± 13 days (average ± standard deviation [SD] and a 90th percentile lifespan of 373 ± 32 days. The maximum lifespan, however, is more than 745 days, and the average survival curve is characterised by a long tail because a small number of individuals lives twice as long as 90% of the population. Similar to earlier observations in a wide range of animals, in M. lignano the age-specific mortality rate increases exponentially, but levels off at the oldest ages. To compare the senescence of M. lignano with that of other ageing models, we determined the mortality rate doubling time, which is 0.20 ± 0.02 years. As a result, we can conclude that M. lignano shows gradual senescence at a rate similar to the vertebrate ageing models Rattus norvegicus and Mus musculus. We argue that M. lignano is a suitable model for ageing and rejuvenation research, and especially for the role of stem cells in these processes, due to its accessible stem cell system and regeneration capacity, and the possibility of combining stem cell studies with demographic analyses.

  2. Network analysis reveals multiscale controls on streamwater chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Kevin J.; Torgersen, Christian E.; Likens, Gene E.; Buso, Donald C.; Lowe, Winsor H.; Bailey, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    By coupling synoptic data from a basin-wide assessment of streamwater chemistry with network-based geostatistical analysis, we show that spatial processes differentially affect biogeochemical condition and pattern across a headwater stream network. We analyzed a high-resolution dataset consisting of 664 water samples collected every 100 m throughout 32 tributaries in an entire fifth-order stream network. These samples were analyzed for an exhaustive suite of chemical constituents. The fine grain and broad extent of this study design allowed us to quantify spatial patterns over a range of scales by using empirical semivariograms that explicitly incorporated network topology. Here, we show that spatial structure, as determined by the characteristic shape of the semivariograms, differed both among chemical constituents and by spatial relationship (flow-connected, flow-unconnected, or Euclidean). Spatial structure was apparent at either a single scale or at multiple nested scales, suggesting separate processes operating simultaneously within the stream network and surrounding terrestrial landscape. Expected patterns of spatial dependence for flow-connected relationships (e.g., increasing homogeneity with downstream distance) occurred for some chemical constituents (e.g., dissolved organic carbon, sulfate, and aluminum) but not for others (e.g., nitrate, sodium). By comparing semivariograms for the different chemical constituents and spatial relationships, we were able to separate effects on streamwater chemistry of (i) fine-scale versus broad-scale processes and (ii) in-stream processes versus landscape controls. These findings provide insight on the hierarchical scaling of local, longitudinal, and landscape processes that drive biogeochemical patterns in stream networks.

  3. Network analysis reveals multiscale controls on streamwater chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Kevin J; Torgersen, Christian E; Likens, Gene E; Buso, Donald C; Lowe, Winsor H; Bailey, Scott W

    2014-05-13

    By coupling synoptic data from a basin-wide assessment of streamwater chemistry with network-based geostatistical analysis, we show that spatial processes differentially affect biogeochemical condition and pattern across a headwater stream network. We analyzed a high-resolution dataset consisting of 664 water samples collected every 100 m throughout 32 tributaries in an entire fifth-order stream network. These samples were analyzed for an exhaustive suite of chemical constituents. The fine grain and broad extent of this study design allowed us to quantify spatial patterns over a range of scales by using empirical semivariograms that explicitly incorporated network topology. Here, we show that spatial structure, as determined by the characteristic shape of the semivariograms, differed both among chemical constituents and by spatial relationship (flow-connected, flow-unconnected, or Euclidean). Spatial structure was apparent at either a single scale or at multiple nested scales, suggesting separate processes operating simultaneously within the stream network and surrounding terrestrial landscape. Expected patterns of spatial dependence for flow-connected relationships (e.g., increasing homogeneity with downstream distance) occurred for some chemical constituents (e.g., dissolved organic carbon, sulfate, and aluminum) but not for others (e.g., nitrate, sodium). By comparing semivariograms for the different chemical constituents and spatial relationships, we were able to separate effects on streamwater chemistry of (i) fine-scale versus broad-scale processes and (ii) in-stream processes versus landscape controls. These findings provide insight on the hierarchical scaling of local, longitudinal, and landscape processes that drive biogeochemical patterns in stream networks.

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of ferlin genes reveals ancient eukaryotic origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lek Monkol

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ferlin gene family possesses a rare and identifying feature consisting of multiple tandem C2 domains and a C-terminal transmembrane domain. Much currently remains unknown about the fundamental function of this gene family, however, mutations in its two most well-characterised members, dysferlin and otoferlin, have been implicated in human disease. The availability of genome sequences from a wide range of species makes it possible to explore the evolution of the ferlin family, providing contextual insight into characteristic features that define the ferlin gene family in its present form in humans. Results Ferlin genes were detected from all species of representative phyla, with two ferlin subgroups partitioned within the ferlin phylogenetic tree based on the presence or absence of a DysF domain. Invertebrates generally possessed two ferlin genes (one with DysF and one without, with six ferlin genes in most vertebrates (three DysF, three non-DysF. Expansion of the ferlin gene family is evident between the divergence of lamprey (jawless vertebrates and shark (cartilaginous fish. Common to almost all ferlins is an N-terminal C2-FerI-C2 sandwich, a FerB motif, and two C-terminal C2 domains (C2E and C2F adjacent to the transmembrane domain. Preservation of these structural elements throughout eukaryotic evolution suggests a fundamental role of these motifs for ferlin function. In contrast, DysF, C2DE, and FerA are optional, giving rise to subtle differences in domain topologies of ferlin genes. Despite conservation of multiple C2 domains in all ferlins, the C-terminal C2 domains (C2E and C2F displayed higher sequence conservation and greater conservation of putative calcium binding residues across paralogs and orthologs. Interestingly, the two most studied non-mammalian ferlins (Fer-1 and Misfire in model organisms C. elegans and D. melanogaster, present as outgroups in the phylogenetic analysis, with results suggesting

  5. Meta-Analysis of High-Throughput Datasets Reveals Cellular Responses Following Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin C. Bowick

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The continuing use of high-throughput assays to investigate cellular responses to infection is providing a large repository of information. Due to the large number of differentially expressed transcripts, often running into the thousands, the majority of these data have not been thoroughly investigated. Advances in techniques for the downstream analysis of high-throughput datasets are providing additional methods for the generation of additional hypotheses for further investigation. The large number of experimental observations, combined with databases that correlate particular genes and proteins with canonical pathways, functions and diseases, allows for the bioinformatic exploration of functional networks that may be implicated in replication or pathogenesis. Herein, we provide an example of how analysis of published high-throughput datasets of cellular responses to hemorrhagic fever virus infection can generate additional functional data. We describe enrichment of genes involved in metabolism, post-translational modification and cardiac damage; potential roles for specific transcription factors and a conserved involvement of a pathway based around cyclooxygenase-2. We believe that these types of analyses can provide virologists with additional hypotheses for continued investigation.

  6. Bioinformatics analysis of SARS coronavirus genome polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović-Lažetić Gordana M

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have compared 38 isolates of the SARS-CoV complete genome. The main goal was twofold: first, to analyze and compare nucleotide sequences and to identify positions of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, insertions and deletions, and second, to group them according to sequence similarity, eventually pointing to phylogeny of SARS-CoV isolates. The comparison is based on genome polymorphism such as insertions or deletions and the number and positions of SNPs. Results The nucleotide structure of all 38 isolates is presented. Based on insertions and deletions and dissimilarity due to SNPs, the dataset of all the isolates has been qualitatively classified into three groups each having their own subgroups. These are the A-group with "regular" isolates (no insertions / deletions except for 5' and 3' ends, the B-group of isolates with "long insertions", and the C-group of isolates with "many individual" insertions and deletions. The isolate with the smallest average number of SNPs, compared to other isolates, has been identified (TWH. The density distribution of SNPs, insertions and deletions for each group or subgroup, as well as cumulatively for all the isolates is also presented, along with the gene map for TWH. Since individual SNPs may have occurred at random, positions corresponding to multiple SNPs (occurring in two or more isolates are identified and presented. This result revises some previous results of a similar type. Amino acid changes caused by multiple SNPs are also identified (for the annotated sequences, as well as presupposed amino acid changes for non-annotated ones. Exact SNP positions for the isolates in each group or subgroup are presented. Finally, a phylogenetic tree for the SARS-CoV isolates has been produced using the CLUSTALW program, showing high compatibility with former qualitative classification. Conclusions The comparative study of SARS-CoV isolates provides essential information for genome polymorphism, indication of strain differences and variants evolution. It may help with the development of effective treatment.

  7. Applied bioinformatics: Genome annotation and transcriptome analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gupta, Vikas

    agricultural and biological importance. Its capacity to form symbiotic relationships with rhizobia and microrrhizal fungi has fascinated researchers for years. Lotus has a small genome of approximately 470 Mb and a short life cycle of 2 to 3 months, which has made Lotus a model legume plant for many molecular...

  8. Bioinformatic tools for PCR Primer design

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ES

    reaction (PCR), oligo hybridization and DNA sequencing. Proper primer design is actually one of the most important factors/steps in successful DNA sequencing. Various bioinformatics programs are available for selection of primer pairs from a template sequence. The plethora programs for PCR primer design reflects the.

  9. "Extreme Programming" in a Bioinformatics Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Scott; Alger, Christianna; Deutschman, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    The importance of Bioinformatics tools and methodology in modern biological research underscores the need for robust and effective courses at the college level. This paper describes such a course designed on the principles of cooperative learning based on a computer software industry production model called "Extreme Programming" (EP).…

  10. Bioinformatics: A History of Evolution "In Silico"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondrej, Vladan; Dvorak, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Bioinformatics, biological databases, and the worldwide use of computers have accelerated biological research in many fields, such as evolutionary biology. Here, we describe a primer of nucleotide sequence management and the construction of a phylogenetic tree with two examples; the two selected are from completely different groups of organisms:…

  11. Protein raftophilicity. How bioinformatics can help membranologists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik; Sperotto, Maria Maddalena

    )-based bioinformatics approach. The ANN was trained to recognize feature-based patterns in proteins that are considered to be associated with lipid rafts. The trained ANN was then used to predict protein raftophilicity. We found that, in the case of α-helical membrane proteins, their hydrophobic length does not affect...

  12. Bioinformatics in Undergraduate Education: Practical Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, John A.

    2004-01-01

    Bioinformatics has emerged as an important research tool in recent years. The ability to mine large databases for relevant information has become increasingly central to many different aspects of biochemistry and molecular biology. It is important that undergraduates be introduced to the available information and methodologies. We present a…

  13. Implementing bioinformatic workflows within the bioextract server

    Science.gov (United States)

    Computational workflows in bioinformatics are becoming increasingly important in the achievement of scientific advances. These workflows typically require the integrated use of multiple, distributed data sources and analytic tools. The BioExtract Server (http://bioextract.org) is a distributed servi...

  14. Privacy Preserving PCA on Distributed Bioinformatics Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, new bioinformatics technologies, such as gene expression microarray, genome-wide association study, proteomics, and metabolomics, have been widely used to simultaneously identify a huge number of human genomic/genetic biomarkers, generate a tremendously large amount of data, and dramatically increase the knowledge on human…

  15. Bioboxes: standardised containers for interchangeable bioinformatics software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmann, Peter; Dröge, Johannes; Bremges, Andreas; McHardy, Alice C; Sczyrba, Alexander; Barton, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Software is now both central and essential to modern biology, yet lack of availability, difficult installations, and complex user interfaces make software hard to obtain and use. Containerisation, as exemplified by the Docker platform, has the potential to solve the problems associated with sharing software. We propose bioboxes: containers with standardised interfaces to make bioinformatics software interchangeable.

  16. Development and implementation of a bioinformatics online ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thus, there is the need for appropriate strategies of introducing the basic components of this emerging scientific field to part of the African populace through the development of an online distance education learning tool. This study involved the design of a bioinformatics online distance educative tool an implementation of ...

  17. SPECIES DATABASES AND THE BIOINFORMATICS REVOLUTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biological databases are having a growth spurt. Much of this results from research in genetics and biodiversity, coupled with fast-paced developments in information technology. The revolution in bioinformatics, defined by Sugden and Pennisi (2000) as the "tools and techniques for...

  18. Molecular bioinformatics: algorithms and applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schulze-Kremer, S

    1996-01-01

    ... on molecular biology, especially D N A sequence analysis and protein structure prediction. These two issues are also central to this book. Other application areas covered here are: interpretation of spectroscopic data and discovery of structure-function relationships in D N A and proteins. Figure 1 depicts the interdependence of computer science,...

  19. Navigating the changing learning landscape: perspective from bioinformatics.ca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazas, Michelle D; Ouellette, B F Francis

    2013-09-01

    With the advent of YouTube channels in bioinformatics, open platforms for problem solving in bioinformatics, active web forums in computing analyses and online resources for learning to code or use a bioinformatics tool, the more traditional continuing education bioinformatics training programs have had to adapt. Bioinformatics training programs that solely rely on traditional didactic methods are being superseded by these newer resources. Yet such face-to-face instruction is still invaluable in the learning continuum. Bioinformatics.ca, which hosts the Canadian Bioinformatics Workshops, has blended more traditional learning styles with current online and social learning styles. Here we share our growing experiences over the past 12 years and look toward what the future holds for bioinformatics training programs.

  20. Component-Based Approach for Educating Students in Bioinformatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poe, D.; Venkatraman, N.; Hansen, C.; Singh, G.

    2009-01-01

    There is an increasing need for an effective method of teaching bioinformatics. Increased progress and availability of computer-based tools for educating students have led to the implementation of a computer-based system for teaching bioinformatics as described in this paper. Bioinformatics is a recent, hybrid field of study combining elements of…

  1. Pattern analysis approach reveals restriction enzyme cutting abnormalities and other cDNA library construction artifacts using raw EST data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Sun

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expressed Sequence Tag (EST sequences are widely used in applications such as genome annotation, gene discovery and gene expression studies. However, some of GenBank dbEST sequences have proven to be “unclean”. Identification of cDNA termini/ends and their structures in raw ESTs not only facilitates data quality control and accurate delineation of transcription ends, but also furthers our understanding of the potential sources of data abnormalities/errors present in the wet-lab procedures for cDNA library construction. Results After analyzing a total of 309,976 raw Pinus taeda ESTs, we uncovered many distinct variations of cDNA termini, some of which prove to be good indicators of wet-lab artifacts, and characterized each raw EST by its cDNA terminus structure patterns. In contrast to the expected patterns, many ESTs displayed complex and/or abnormal patterns that represent potential wet-lab errors such as: a failure of one or both of the restriction enzymes to cut the plasmid vector; a failure of the restriction enzymes to cut the vector at the correct positions; the insertion of two cDNA inserts into a single vector; the insertion of multiple and/or concatenated adapters/linkers; the presence of 3′-end terminal structures in designated 5′-end sequences or vice versa; and so on. With a close examination of these artifacts, many problematic ESTs that have been deposited into public databases by conventional bioinformatics pipelines or tools could be cleaned or filtered by our methodology. We developed a software tool for Abnormality Filtering and Sequence Trimming for ESTs (AFST, http://code.google.com/p/afst/ using a pattern analysis approach. To compare AFST with other pipelines that submitted ESTs into dbEST, we reprocessed 230,783 Pinus taeda and 38,709 Arachis hypogaea GenBank ESTs. We found 7.4% of Pinus taeda and 29.2% of Arachis hypogaea GenBank ESTs are “unclean” or abnormal, all of which could be cleaned

  2. Bioinformatics and systems biology research update from the 15th International Conference on Bioinformatics (InCoB2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönbach, Christian; Verma, Chandra; Bond, Peter J; Ranganathan, Shoba

    2016-12-22

    The International Conference on Bioinformatics (InCoB) has been publishing peer-reviewed conference papers in BMC Bioinformatics since 2006. Of the 44 articles accepted for publication in supplement issues of BMC Bioinformatics, BMC Genomics, BMC Medical Genomics and BMC Systems Biology, 24 articles with a bioinformatics or systems biology focus are reviewed in this editorial. InCoB2017 is scheduled to be held in Shenzen, China, September 20-22, 2017.

  3. Biowep: a workflow enactment portal for bioinformatics applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Paolo; Bartocci, Ezio; Bertolini, Guglielmo; De Paoli, Flavio; Marra, Domenico; Mauri, Giancarlo; Merelli, Emanuela; Milanesi, Luciano

    2007-03-08

    The huge amount of biological information, its distribution over the Internet and the heterogeneity of available software tools makes the adoption of new data integration and analysis network tools a necessity in bioinformatics. ICT standards and tools, like Web Services and Workflow Management Systems (WMS), can support the creation and deployment of such systems. Many Web Services are already available and some WMS have been proposed. They assume that researchers know which bioinformatics resources can be reached through a programmatic interface and that they are skilled in programming and building workflows. Therefore, they are not viable to the majority of unskilled researchers. A portal enabling these to take profit from new technologies is still missing. We designed biowep, a web based client application that allows for the selection and execution of a set of predefined workflows. The system is available on-line. Biowep architecture includes a Workflow Manager, a User Interface and a Workflow Executor. The task of the Workflow Manager is the creation and annotation of workflows. These can be created by using either the Taverna Workbench or BioWMS. Enactment of workflows is carried out by FreeFluo for Taverna workflows and by BioAgent/Hermes, a mobile agent-based middleware, for BioWMS ones. Main workflows' processing steps are annotated on the basis of their input and output, elaboration type and application domain by using a classification of bioinformatics data and tasks. The interface supports users authentication and profiling. Workflows can be selected on the basis of users' profiles and can be searched through their annotations. Results can be saved. We developed a web system that support the selection and execution of predefined workflows, thus simplifying access for all researchers. The implementation of Web Services allowing specialized software to interact with an exhaustive set of biomedical databases and analysis software and the creation of

  4. Biowep: a workflow enactment portal for bioinformatics applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romano Paolo

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The huge amount of biological information, its distribution over the Internet and the heterogeneity of available software tools makes the adoption of new data integration and analysis network tools a necessity in bioinformatics. ICT standards and tools, like Web Services and Workflow Management Systems (WMS, can support the creation and deployment of such systems. Many Web Services are already available and some WMS have been proposed. They assume that researchers know which bioinformatics resources can be reached through a programmatic interface and that they are skilled in programming and building workflows. Therefore, they are not viable to the majority of unskilled researchers. A portal enabling these to take profit from new technologies is still missing. Results We designed biowep, a web based client application that allows for the selection and execution of a set of predefined workflows. The system is available on-line. Biowep architecture includes a Workflow Manager, a User Interface and a Workflow Executor. The task of the Workflow Manager is the creation and annotation of workflows. These can be created by using either the Taverna Workbench or BioWMS. Enactment of workflows is carried out by FreeFluo for Taverna workflows and by BioAgent/Hermes, a mobile agent-based middleware, for BioWMS ones. Main workflows' processing steps are annotated on the basis of their input and output, elaboration type and application domain by using a classification of bioinformatics data and tasks. The interface supports users authentication and profiling. Workflows can be selected on the basis of users' profiles and can be searched through their annotations. Results can be saved. Conclusion We developed a web system that support the selection and execution of predefined workflows, thus simplifying access for all researchers. The implementation of Web Services allowing specialized software to interact with an exhaustive set of biomedical

  5. Microarray analysis reveals key genes and pathways in Tetralogy of Fallot

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yue-E; Qiu, Hui-Xian; Jiang, Jian-Bing; Wu, Rong-Zhou; Xiang, Ru-Lian; Zhang, Yuan-Hai

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify key genes that may be involved in the pathogenesis of Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) using bioinformatics methods. The GSE26125 microarray dataset, which includes cardiovascular tissue samples derived from 16 children with TOF and five healthy age-matched control infants, was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. Differential expression analysis was performed between TOF and control samples to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) using Student's t-test, and the R/limma package, with a log2 fold-change of >2 and a false discovery rate of <0.01 set as thresholds. The biological functions of DEGs were analyzed using the ToppGene database. The ReactomeFIViz application was used to construct functional interaction (FI) networks, and the genes in each module were subjected to pathway enrichment analysis. The iRegulon plugin was used to identify transcription factors predicted to regulate the DEGs in the FI network, and the gene-transcription factor pairs were then visualized using Cytoscape software. A total of 878 DEGs were identified, including 848 upregulated genes and 30 downregulated genes. The gene FI network contained seven function modules, which were all comprised of upregulated genes. Genes enriched in Module 1 were enriched in the following three neurological disorder-associated signaling pathways: Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease. Genes in Modules 0, 3 and 5 were dominantly enriched in pathways associated with ribosomes and protein translation. The Xbox binding protein 1 transcription factor was demonstrated to be involved in the regulation of genes encoding the subunits of cytoplasmic and mitochondrial ribosomes, as well as genes involved in neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore, dysfunction of genes involved in signaling pathways associated with neurodegenerative disorders, ribosome function and protein translation may contribute to the pathogenesis of TOF

  6. Bioinformatics in New Generation Flavivirus Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penelope Koraka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Flavivirus infections are the most prevalent arthropod-borne infections world wide, often causing severe disease especially among children, the elderly, and the immunocompromised. In the absence of effective antiviral treatment, prevention through vaccination would greatly reduce morbidity and mortality associated with flavivirus infections. Despite the success of the empirically developed vaccines against yellow fever virus, Japanese encephalitis virus and tick-borne encephalitis virus, there is an increasing need for a more rational design and development of safe and effective vaccines. Several bioinformatic tools are available to support such rational vaccine design. In doing so, several parameters have to be taken into account, such as safety for the target population, overall immunogenicity of the candidate vaccine, and efficacy and longevity of the immune responses triggered. Examples of how bio-informatics is applied to assist in the rational design and improvements of vaccines, particularly flavivirus vaccines, are presented and discussed.

  7. Bioinformatic prediction and functional characterization of human KIAA0100 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Cui

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Our previous study demonstrated that human KIAA0100 gene was a novel acute monocytic leukemia-associated antigen (MLAA gene. But the functional characterization of human KIAA0100 gene has remained unknown to date. Here, firstly, bioinformatic prediction of human KIAA0100 gene was carried out using online softwares; Secondly, Human KIAA0100 gene expression was downregulated by the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR/CRISPR-associated (Cas 9 system in U937 cells. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were next evaluated in KIAA0100-knockdown U937 cells. The bioinformatic prediction showed that human KIAA0100 gene was located on 17q11.2, and human KIAA0100 protein was located in the secretory pathway. Besides, human KIAA0100 protein contained a signalpeptide, a transmembrane region, three types of secondary structures (alpha helix, extended strand, and random coil , and four domains from mitochondrial protein 27 (FMP27. The observation on functional characterization of human KIAA0100 gene revealed that its downregulation inhibited cell proliferation, and promoted cell apoptosis in U937 cells. To summarize, these results suggest human KIAA0100 gene possibly comes within mitochondrial genome; moreover, it is a novel anti-apoptotic factor related to carcinogenesis or progression in acute monocytic leukemia, and may be a potential target for immunotherapy against acute monocytic leukemia.

  8. A review of bioinformatic methods for forensic DNA analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yao-Yuan; Harbison, SallyAnn

    2018-03-01

    Short tandem repeats, single nucleotide polymorphisms, and whole mitochondrial analyses are three classes of markers which will play an important role in the future of forensic DNA typing. The arrival of massively parallel sequencing platforms in forensic science reveals new information such as insights into the complexity and variability of the markers that were previously unseen, along with amounts of data too immense for analyses by manual means. Along with the sequencing chemistries employed, bioinformatic methods are required to process and interpret this new and extensive data. As more is learnt about the use of these new technologies for forensic applications, development and standardization of efficient, favourable tools for each stage of data processing is being carried out, and faster, more accurate methods that improve on the original approaches have been developed. As forensic laboratories search for the optimal pipeline of tools, sequencer manufacturers have incorporated pipelines into sequencer software to make analyses convenient. This review explores the current state of bioinformatic methods and tools used for the analyses of forensic markers sequenced on the massively parallel sequencing (MPS) platforms currently most widely used. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Comprehensive decision tree models in bioinformatics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Stiglic

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Classification is an important and widely used machine learning technique in bioinformatics. Researchers and other end-users of machine learning software often prefer to work with comprehensible models where knowledge extraction and explanation of reasoning behind the classification model are possible. METHODS: This paper presents an extension to an existing machine learning environment and a study on visual tuning of decision tree classifiers. The motivation for this research comes from the need to build effective and easily interpretable decision tree models by so called one-button data mining approach where no parameter tuning is needed. To avoid bias in classification, no classification performance measure is used during the tuning of the model that is constrained exclusively by the dimensions of the produced decision tree. RESULTS: The proposed visual tuning of decision trees was evaluated on 40 datasets containing classical machine learning problems and 31 datasets from the field of bioinformatics. Although we did not expected significant differences in classification performance, the results demonstrate a significant increase of accuracy in less complex visually tuned decision trees. In contrast to classical machine learning benchmarking datasets, we observe higher accuracy gains in bioinformatics datasets. Additionally, a user study was carried out to confirm the assumption that the tree tuning times are significantly lower for the proposed method in comparison to manual tuning of the decision tree. CONCLUSIONS: The empirical results demonstrate that by building simple models constrained by predefined visual boundaries, one not only achieves good comprehensibility, but also very good classification performance that does not differ from usually more complex models built using default settings of the classical decision tree algorithm. In addition, our study demonstrates the suitability of visually tuned decision trees for datasets

  10. Comprehensive decision tree models in bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiglic, Gregor; Kocbek, Simon; Pernek, Igor; Kokol, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Classification is an important and widely used machine learning technique in bioinformatics. Researchers and other end-users of machine learning software often prefer to work with comprehensible models where knowledge extraction and explanation of reasoning behind the classification model are possible. This paper presents an extension to an existing machine learning environment and a study on visual tuning of decision tree classifiers. The motivation for this research comes from the need to build effective and easily interpretable decision tree models by so called one-button data mining approach where no parameter tuning is needed. To avoid bias in classification, no classification performance measure is used during the tuning of the model that is constrained exclusively by the dimensions of the produced decision tree. The proposed visual tuning of decision trees was evaluated on 40 datasets containing classical machine learning problems and 31 datasets from the field of bioinformatics. Although we did not expected significant differences in classification performance, the results demonstrate a significant increase of accuracy in less complex visually tuned decision trees. In contrast to classical machine learning benchmarking datasets, we observe higher accuracy gains in bioinformatics datasets. Additionally, a user study was carried out to confirm the assumption that the tree tuning times are significantly lower for the proposed method in comparison to manual tuning of the decision tree. The empirical results demonstrate that by building simple models constrained by predefined visual boundaries, one not only achieves good comprehensibility, but also very good classification performance that does not differ from usually more complex models built using default settings of the classical decision tree algorithm. In addition, our study demonstrates the suitability of visually tuned decision trees for datasets with binary class attributes and a high number of possibly

  11. Penalized feature selection and classification in bioinformatics

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Shuangge; Huang, Jian

    2008-01-01

    In bioinformatics studies, supervised classification with high-dimensional input variables is frequently encountered. Examples routinely arise in genomic, epigenetic and proteomic studies. Feature selection can be employed along with classifier construction to avoid over-fitting, to generate more reliable classifier and to provide more insights into the underlying causal relationships. In this article, we provide a review of several recently developed penalized feature selection and classific...

  12. iTRAQ proteomics analysis reveals that PI3K is highly associated with bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Liu, Zhongjie; Yu, Xujiao; Lai, Luying; Li, Haobo; Liu, Zipeng; Li, Le; Jiang, Shan; Xia, Zhengyuan; Xu, Shi-yuan

    2016-02-01

    Bupivacaine, a commonly used local anesthetic, has potential neurotoxicity through diverse signaling pathways. However, the key mechanism of bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity remains unclear. Cultured human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells were treated (bupivacaine) or untreated (control) with bupivacaine for 24 h. Compared to the control group, bupivacaine significantly increased cyto-inhibition, cellular reactive oxygen species, DNA damage, mitochondrial injury, apoptosis (increased TUNEL-positive cells, cleaved caspase 3, and Bcl-2/Bax), and activated autophagy (enhanced LC3II/LC3I ratio). To explore changes in protein expression and intercommunication among the pathways involved in bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity, an 8-plex iTRAQ proteomic technique and bioinformatics analysis were performed. Compared to the control group, 241 differentially expressed proteins were identified, of which, 145 were up-regulated and 96 were down-regulated. Bioinformatics analysis of the cross-talk between the significant proteins with altered expression in bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity indicated that phosphatidyl-3-kinase (PI3K) was the most frequently targeted protein in each of the interactions. We further confirmed these results by determining the downstream targets of the identified signaling pathways (PI3K, Akt, FoxO1, Erk, and JNK). In conclusion, our study demonstrated that PI3K may play a central role in contacting and regulating the signaling pathways that contribute to bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Bioinformatics Training: A Review of Challenges, Actions and Support Requirements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, M.V.; Watson, J.; Attwood, T.

    2010-01-01

    As bioinformatics becomes increasingly central to research in the molecular life sciences, the need to train non-bioinformaticians to make the most of bioinformatics resources is growing. Here, we review the key challenges and pitfalls to providing effective training for users of bioinformatics...... services, and discuss successful training strategies shared by a diverse set of bioinformatics trainers. We also identify steps that trainers in bioinformatics could take together to advance the state of the art in current training practices. The ideas presented in this article derive from the first...

  14. Bioinformatics on the Cloud Computing Platform Azure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, Hugh P.; Owen, Anne M.; Harrison, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the applicability of the Microsoft cloud computing platform, Azure, for bioinformatics. We focus on the usability of the resource rather than its performance. We provide an example of how R can be used on Azure to analyse a large amount of microarray expression data deposited at the public database ArrayExpress. We provide a walk through to demonstrate explicitly how Azure can be used to perform these analyses in Appendix S1 and we offer a comparison with a local computation. We note that the use of the Platform as a Service (PaaS) offering of Azure can represent a steep learning curve for bioinformatics developers who will usually have a Linux and scripting language background. On the other hand, the presence of an additional set of libraries makes it easier to deploy software in a parallel (scalable) fashion and explicitly manage such a production run with only a few hundred lines of code, most of which can be incorporated from a template. We propose that this environment is best suited for running stable bioinformatics software by users not involved with its development. PMID:25050811

  15. Chapter 16: text mining for translational bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, K Bretonnel; Hunter, Lawrence E

    2013-04-01

    Text mining for translational bioinformatics is a new field with tremendous research potential. It is a subfield of biomedical natural language processing that concerns itself directly with the problem of relating basic biomedical research to clinical practice, and vice versa. Applications of text mining fall both into the category of T1 translational research-translating basic science results into new interventions-and T2 translational research, or translational research for public health. Potential use cases include better phenotyping of research subjects, and pharmacogenomic research. A variety of methods for evaluating text mining applications exist, including corpora, structured test suites, and post hoc judging. Two basic principles of linguistic structure are relevant for building text mining applications. One is that linguistic structure consists of multiple levels. The other is that every level of linguistic structure is characterized by ambiguity. There are two basic approaches to text mining: rule-based, also known as knowledge-based; and machine-learning-based, also known as statistical. Many systems are hybrids of the two approaches. Shared tasks have had a strong effect on the direction of the field. Like all translational bioinformatics software, text mining software for translational bioinformatics can be considered health-critical and should be subject to the strictest standards of quality assurance and software testing.

  16. Promoting synergistic research and education in genomics and bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jack Y; Yang, Mary Qu; Zhu, Mengxia Michelle; Arabnia, Hamid R; Deng, Youping

    2008-01-01

    Bioinformatics and Genomics are closely related disciplines that hold great promises for the advancement of research and development in complex biomedical systems, as well as public health, drug design, comparative genomics, personalized medicine and so on. Research and development in these two important areas are impacting the science and technology.High throughput sequencing and molecular imaging technologies marked the beginning of a new era for modern translational medicine and personalized healthcare. The impact of having the human sequence and personalized digital images in hand has also created tremendous demands of developing powerful supercomputing, statistical learning and artificial intelligence approaches to handle the massive bioinformatics and personalized healthcare data, which will obviously have a profound effect on how biomedical research will be conducted toward the improvement of human health and prolonging of human life in the future. The International Society of Intelligent Biological Medicine (http://www.isibm.org) and its official journals, the International Journal of Functional Informatics and Personalized Medicine (http://www.inderscience.com/ijfipm) and the International Journal of Computational Biology and Drug Design (http://www.inderscience.com/ijcbdd) in collaboration with International Conference on Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (Biocomp), touch tomorrow's bioinformatics and personalized medicine throughout today's efforts in promoting the research, education and awareness of the upcoming integrated inter/multidisciplinary field. The 2007 international conference on Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (BIOCOMP07) was held in Las Vegas, the United States of American on June 25-28, 2007. The conference attracted over 400 papers, covering broad research areas in the genomics, biomedicine and bioinformatics. The Biocomp 2007 provides a common platform for the cross fertilization of ideas, and to help shape knowledge and

  17. PCR-Based Analysis of ColE1 Plasmids in Clinical Isolates and Metagenomic Samples Reveals Their Importance as Gene Capture Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Ares-Arroyo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available ColE1 plasmids are important vehicles for the spread of antibiotic resistance in the Enterobacteriaceae and Pasteurellaceae families of bacteria. Their monitoring is essential, as they harbor important resistant determinants in humans, animals and the environment. In this work, we have analyzed ColE1 replicons using bioinformatic and experimental approaches. First, we carried out a computational study examining the structure of different ColE1 plasmids deposited in databases. Bioinformatic analysis of these ColE1 replicons revealed a mosaic genetic structure consisting of a host-adapted conserved region responsible for the housekeeping functions of the plasmid, and a variable region encoding a wide variety of genes, including multiple antibiotic resistance determinants. From this exhaustive computational analysis we developed a new PCR-based technique, targeting a specific sequence in the conserved region, for the screening, capture and sequencing of these small plasmids, either specific for Enterobacteriaceae or specific for Pasteurellaceae. To validate this PCR-based system, we tested various collections of isolates from both bacterial families, finding that ColE1 replicons were not only highly prevalent in antibiotic-resistant isolates, but also present in susceptible bacteria. In Pasteurellaceae, ColE1 plasmids carried almost exclusively antibiotic resistance genes. In Enterobacteriaceae, these plasmids encoded a large range of traits, including not only antibiotic resistance determinants, but also a wide variety of genes, showing the huge genetic plasticity of these small replicons. Finally, we also used a metagenomic approach in order to validate this technique, performing this PCR system using total DNA extractions from fecal samples from poultry, turkeys, pigs and humans. Using Illumina sequencing of the PCR products we identified a great diversity of genes encoded by ColE1 replicons, including different antibiotic resistance

  18. Keemei: cloud-based validation of tabular bioinformatics file formats in Google Sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rideout, Jai Ram; Chase, John H; Bolyen, Evan; Ackermann, Gail; González, Antonio; Knight, Rob; Caporaso, J Gregory

    2016-06-13

    Bioinformatics software often requires human-generated tabular text files as input and has specific requirements for how those data are formatted. Users frequently manage these data in spreadsheet programs, which is convenient for researchers who are compiling the requisite information because the spreadsheet programs can easily be used on different platforms including laptops and tablets, and because they provide a familiar interface. It is increasingly common for many different researchers to be involved in compiling these data, including study coordinators, clinicians, lab technicians and bioinformaticians. As a result, many research groups are shifting toward using cloud-based spreadsheet programs, such as Google Sheets, which support the concurrent editing of a single spreadsheet by different users working on different platforms. Most of the researchers who enter data are not familiar with the formatting requirements of the bioinformatics programs that will be used, so validating and correcting file formats is often a bottleneck prior to beginning bioinformatics analysis. We present Keemei, a Google Sheets Add-on, for validating tabular files used in bioinformatics analyses. Keemei is available free of charge from Google's Chrome Web Store. Keemei can be installed and run on any web browser supported by Google Sheets. Keemei currently supports the validation of two widely used tabular bioinformatics formats, the Quantitative Insights into Microbial Ecology (QIIME) sample metadata mapping file format and the Spatially Referenced Genetic Data (SRGD) format, but is designed to easily support the addition of others. Keemei will save researchers time and frustration by providing a convenient interface for tabular bioinformatics file format validation. By allowing everyone involved with data entry for a project to easily validate their data, it will reduce the validation and formatting bottlenecks that are commonly encountered when human-generated data files are

  19. An overview of the Hadoop/MapReduce/HBase framework and its current applications in bioinformatics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, Ronald C.

    2010-01-01

    Bioinformatics researchers are increasingly confronted with analysis of ultra large-scale data sets, a problem that will only increase at an alarming rate in coming years. Recent developments in open source software, that is, the Hadoop project and associated software, provide a foundation for scaling to petabyte scale data warehouses on Linux clusters, providing fault-tolerant parallelized analysis on such data using a programming style named MapReduce. An overview is given of the current usage within the bioinformatics community of Hadoop, a top-level Apache Software Foundation project, and of associated open source software projects. The concepts behind Hadoop and the associated HBase project are defined, and current bioinformatics software that employ Hadoop is described. The focus is on next-generation sequencing, as the leading application area to date.

  20. A bioinformatic survey of RNA-binding proteins in Plasmodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, B P Niranjan; Shrestha, Sony; Hart, Kevin J; Liang, Xiaoying; Kemirembe, Karen; Cui, Liwang; Lindner, Scott E

    2015-11-02

    The malaria parasites in the genus Plasmodium have a very complicated life cycle involving an invertebrate vector and a vertebrate host. RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) are critical factors involved in every aspect of the development of these parasites. However, very few RBPs have been functionally characterized to date in the human parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Using different bioinformatic methods and tools we searched P. falciparum genome to list and annotate RBPs. A representative 3D models for each of the RBD domain identified in P. falciparum was created using I-TESSAR and SWISS-MODEL. Microarray and RNAseq data analysis pertaining PfRBPs was performed using MeV software. Finally, Cytoscape was used to create protein-protein interaction network for CITH-Dozi and Caf1-CCR4-Not complexes. We report the identification of 189 putative RBP genes belonging to 13 different families in Plasmodium, which comprise 3.5% of all annotated genes. Almost 90% (169/189) of these genes belong to six prominent RBP classes, namely RNA recognition motifs, DEAD/H-box RNA helicases, K homology, Zinc finger, Puf and Alba gene families. Interestingly, almost all of the identified RNA-binding helicases and KH genes have cognate homologs in model species, suggesting their evolutionary conservation. Exploration of the existing P. falciparum blood-stage transcriptomes revealed that most RBPs have peak mRNA expression levels early during the intraerythrocytic development cycle, which taper off in later stages. Nearly 27% of RBPs have elevated expression in gametocytes, while 47 and 24% have elevated mRNA expression in ookinete and asexual stages. Comparative interactome analyses using human and Plasmodium protein-protein interaction datasets suggest extensive conservation of the PfCITH/PfDOZI and PfCaf1-CCR4-NOT complexes. The Plasmodium parasites possess a large number of putative RBPs belonging to most of RBP families identified so far, suggesting the presence of extensive post

  1. H3ABioNet, a sustainable pan-African bioinformatics network for human heredity and health in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Nicola J.; Adebiyi, Ezekiel; Alami, Raouf; Benkahla, Alia; Brandful, James; Doumbia, Seydou; Everett, Dean; Fadlelmola, Faisal M.; Gaboun, Fatima; Gaseitsiwe, Simani; Ghazal, Hassan; Hazelhurst, Scott; Hide, Winston; Ibrahimi, Azeddine; Jaufeerally Fakim, Yasmina; Jongeneel, C. Victor; Joubert, Fourie; Kassim, Samar; Kayondo, Jonathan; Kumuthini, Judit; Lyantagaye, Sylvester; Makani, Julie; Mansour Alzohairy, Ahmed; Masiga, Daniel; Moussa, Ahmed; Nash, Oyekanmi; Ouwe Missi Oukem-Boyer, Odile; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Panji, Sumir; Patterton, Hugh; Radouani, Fouzia; Sadki, Khalid; Seghrouchni, Fouad; Tastan Bishop, Özlem; Tiffin, Nicki; Ulenga, Nzovu

    2016-01-01

    The application of genomics technologies to medicine and biomedical research is increasing in popularity, made possible by new high-throughput genotyping and sequencing technologies and improved data analysis capabilities. Some of the greatest genetic diversity among humans, animals, plants, and microbiota occurs in Africa, yet genomic research outputs from the continent are limited. The Human Heredity and Health in Africa (H3Africa) initiative was established to drive the development of genomic research for human health in Africa, and through recognition of the critical role of bioinformatics in this process, spurred the establishment of H3ABioNet, a pan-African bioinformatics network for H3Africa. The limitations in bioinformatics capacity on the continent have been a major contributory factor to the lack of notable outputs in high-throughput biology research. Although pockets of high-quality bioinformatics teams have existed previously, the majority of research institutions lack experienced faculty who can train and supervise bioinformatics students. H3ABioNet aims to address this dire need, specifically in the area of human genetics and genomics, but knock-on effects are ensuring this extends to other areas of bioinformatics. Here, we describe the emergence of genomics research and the development of bioinformatics in Africa through H3ABioNet. PMID:26627985

  2. BioRuby: bioinformatics software for the Ruby programming language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Naohisa; Prins, Pjotr; Nakao, Mitsuteru; Bonnal, Raoul; Aerts, Jan; Katayama, Toshiaki

    2010-10-15

    The BioRuby software toolkit contains a comprehensive set of free development tools and libraries for bioinformatics and molecular biology, written in the Ruby programming language. BioRuby has components for sequence analysis, pathway analysis, protein modelling and phylogenetic analysis; it supports many widely used data formats and provides easy access to databases, external programs and public web services, including BLAST, KEGG, GenBank, MEDLINE and GO. BioRuby comes with a tutorial, documentation and an interactive environment, which can be used in the shell, and in the web browser. BioRuby is free and open source software, made available under the Ruby license. BioRuby runs on all platforms that support Ruby, including Linux, Mac OS X and Windows. And, with JRuby, BioRuby runs on the Java Virtual Machine. The source code is available from http://www.bioruby.org/. katayama@bioruby.org

  3. An overview of topic modeling and its current applications in bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Tang, Lin; Dong, Wen; Yao, Shaowen; Zhou, Wei

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid accumulation of biological datasets, machine learning methods designed to automate data analysis are urgently needed. In recent years, so-called topic models that originated from the field of natural language processing have been receiving much attention in bioinformatics because of their interpretability. Our aim was to review the application and development of topic models for bioinformatics. This paper starts with the description of a topic model, with a focus on the understanding of topic modeling. A general outline is provided on how to build an application in a topic model and how to develop a topic model. Meanwhile, the literature on application of topic models to biological data was searched and analyzed in depth. According to the types of models and the analogy between the concept of document-topic-word and a biological object (as well as the tasks of a topic model), we categorized the related studies and provided an outlook on the use of topic models for the development of bioinformatics applications. Topic modeling is a useful method (in contrast to the traditional means of data reduction in bioinformatics) and enhances researchers' ability to interpret biological information. Nevertheless, due to the lack of topic models optimized for specific biological data, the studies on topic modeling in biological data still have a long and challenging road ahead. We believe that topic models are a promising method for various applications in bioinformatics research.

  4. mockrobiota: a Public Resource for Microbiome Bioinformatics Benchmarking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokulich, Nicholas A; Rideout, Jai Ram; Mercurio, William G; Shiffer, Arron; Wolfe, Benjamin; Maurice, Corinne F; Dutton, Rachel J; Turnbaugh, Peter J; Knight, Rob; Caporaso, J Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Mock communities are an important tool for validating, optimizing, and comparing bioinformatics methods for microbial community analysis. We present mockrobiota, a public resource for sharing, validating, and documenting mock community data resources, available at http://caporaso-lab.github.io/mockrobiota/. The materials contained in mockrobiota include data set and sample metadata, expected composition data (taxonomy or gene annotations or reference sequences for mock community members), and links to raw data (e.g., raw sequence data) for each mock community data set. mockrobiota does not supply physical sample materials directly, but the data set metadata included for each mock community indicate whether physical sample materials are available. At the time of this writing, mockrobiota contains 11 mock community data sets with known species compositions, including bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic mock communities, analyzed by high-throughput marker gene sequencing. IMPORTANCE The availability of standard and public mock community data will facilitate ongoing method optimizations, comparisons across studies that share source data, and greater transparency and access and eliminate redundancy. These are also valuable resources for bioinformatics teaching and training. This dynamic resource is intended to expand and evolve to meet the changing needs of the omics community.

  5. Multiobjective optimization in bioinformatics and computational biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handl, Julia; Kell, Douglas B; Knowles, Joshua

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the application of multiobjective optimization in the fields of bioinformatics and computational biology. A survey of existing work, organized by application area, forms the main body of the review, following an introduction to the key concepts in multiobjective optimization. An original contribution of the review is the identification of five distinct "contexts," giving rise to multiple objectives: These are used to explain the reasons behind the use of multiobjective optimization in each application area and also to point the way to potential future uses of the technique.

  6. Introducing bioinformatics, the biosciences' genomic revolution

    CERN Document Server

    Zanella, Paolo

    1999-01-01

    The general audience for these lectures is mainly physicists, computer scientists, engineers or the general public wanting to know more about what’s going on in the biosciences. What’s bioinformatics and why is all this fuss being made about it ? What’s this revolution triggered by the human genome project ? Are there any results yet ? What are the problems ? What new avenues of research have been opened up ? What about the technology ? These new developments will be compared with what happened at CERN earlier in its evolution, and it is hoped that the similiraties and contrasts will stimulate new curiosity and provoke new thoughts.

  7. Databases and Associated Bioinformatic Tools in Studies of Food Allergens, Epitopes and Haptens – a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bucholska Justyna

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Allergies and/or food intolerances are a growing problem of the modern world. Diffi culties associated with the correct diagnosis of food allergies result in the need to classify the factors causing allergies and allergens themselves. Therefore, internet databases and other bioinformatic tools play a special role in deepening knowledge of biologically-important compounds. Internet repositories, as a source of information on different chemical compounds, including those related to allergy and intolerance, are increasingly being used by scientists. Bioinformatic methods play a signifi cant role in biological and medical sciences, and their importance in food science is increasing. This study aimed at presenting selected databases and tools of bioinformatic analysis useful in research on food allergies, allergens (11 databases, epitopes (7 databases, and haptens (2 databases. It also presents examples of the application of computer methods in studies related to allergies.

  8. Quantum Bio-Informatics II From Quantum Information to Bio-Informatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accardi, L.; Freudenberg, Wolfgang; Ohya, Masanori

    2009-02-01

    / H. Kamimura -- Massive collection of full-length complementary DNA clones and microarray analyses: keys to rice transcriptome analysis / S. Kikuchi -- Changes of influenza A(H5) viruses by means of entropic chaos degree / K. Sato and M. Ohya -- Basics of genome sequence analysis in bioinformatics - its fundamental ideas and problems / T. Suzuki and S. Miyazaki -- A basic introduction to gene expression studies using microarray expression data analysis / D. Wanke and J. Kilian -- Integrating biological perspectives: a quantum leap for microarray expression analysis / D. Wanke ... [et al.].

  9. Transcriptome analysis reveals key differentially expressed genes involved in wheat grain development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonglong Yu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Wheat seed development is an important physiological process of seed maturation and directly affects wheat yield and quality. In this study, we performed dynamic transcriptome microarray analysis of an elite Chinese bread wheat cultivar (Jimai 20 during grain development using the GeneChip Wheat Genome Array. Grain morphology and scanning electron microscope observations showed that the period of 11–15 days post-anthesis (DPA was a key stage for the synthesis and accumulation of seed starch. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling and significance analysis of microarrays revealed that the period from 11 to 15 DPA was more important than the 15–20 DPA stage for the synthesis and accumulation of nutritive reserves. Series test of cluster analysis of differential genes revealed five statistically significant gene expression profiles. Gene ontology annotation and enrichment analysis gave further information about differentially expressed genes, and MapMan analysis revealed expression changes within functional groups during seed development. Metabolic pathway network analysis showed that major and minor metabolic pathways regulate one another to ensure regular seed development and nutritive reserve accumulation. We performed gene co-expression network analysis to identify genes that play vital roles in seed development and identified several key genes involved in important metabolic pathways. The transcriptional expression of eight key genes involved in starch and protein synthesis and stress defense was further validated by qRT-PCR. Our results provide new insight into the molecular mechanisms of wheat seed development and the determinants of yield and quality.

  10. An "in silico" Bioinformatics Laboratory Manual for Bioscience Departments: "Prediction of Glycosylation Sites in Phosphoethanolamine Transferases"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyuruk, Hakan; Cavas, Levent

    2014-01-01

    Genomics and proteomics projects have produced a huge amount of raw biological data including DNA and protein sequences. Although these data have been stored in data banks, their evaluation is strictly dependent on bioinformatics tools. These tools have been developed by multidisciplinary experts for fast and robust analysis of biological data.…

  11. The DBCLS BioHackathon: standardization and interoperability for bioinformatics web services and workflows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katayama, T.; Arakawa, K.; Nakao, M.; Prins, J.C.P.

    2010-01-01

    Web services have become a key technology for bioinformatics, since life science databases are globally decentralized and the exponential increase in the amount of available data demands for efficient systems without the need to transfer entire databases for every step of an analysis. However,

  12. Supercomputing with toys: harnessing the power of NVIDIA 8800GTX and playstation 3 for bioinformatics problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Justin; Dai, Manhong; Jakupovic, Elvis; Watson, Stanley; Meng, Fan

    2007-01-01

    Modern video cards and game consoles typically have much better performance to price ratios than that of general purpose CPUs. The parallel processing capabilities of game hardware are well-suited for high throughput biomedical data analysis. Our initial results suggest that game hardware is a cost-effective platform for some computationally demanding bioinformatics problems.

  13. OpenHelix: bioinformatics education outside of a different box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jennifer M; Mangan, Mary E; Perreault-Micale, Cynthia; Lathe, Scott; Sirohi, Neeraj; Lathe, Warren C

    2010-11-01

    The amount of biological data is increasing rapidly, and will continue to increase as new rapid technologies are developed. Professionals in every area of bioscience will have data management needs that require publicly available bioinformatics resources. Not all scientists desire a formal bioinformatics education but would benefit from more informal educational sources of learning. Effective bioinformatics education formats will address a broad range of scientific needs, will be aimed at a variety of user skill levels, and will be delivered in a number of different formats to address different learning styles. Informal sources of bioinformatics education that are effective are available, and will be explored in this review.

  14. Differential proteomic analysis reveals novel links between primary metabolism and antibiotic production in Amycolatopsis balhimycina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallo, G.; Renzone, G.; Alduina, R.

    2010-01-01

    A differential proteomic analysis, based on 2-DE and MS procedures, was performed on Amycolatopsis balhimycina DSM5908, the actinomycete producing the vancomycin-like antibiotic balhimycin. A comparison of proteomic profiles before and during balhimycin production characterized differentially...... available over the World Wide Web as interactive web pages (http://www.unipa.it/ampuglia/Abal-proteome-maps). Functional clustering analysis revealed that differentially expressed proteins belong to functional groups involved in central carbon metabolism, amino acid metabolism and protein biosynthesis...... intermediates, were upregulated during antibiotic production. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that 8 out of 14 upregulated genes showed a positive correlation between changes at translational and transcriptional expression level. Furthermore, proteomic analysis of two nonproducing mutants, restricted to a sub...

  15. Using team cognitive work analysis to reveal healthcare team interactions in a birthing unit

    OpenAIRE

    Ashoori, Maryam; Burns, Catherine M.; d'Entremont, Barbara; Momtahan, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive work analysis (CWA) as an analytical approach for examining complex sociotechnical systems has shown success in modelling the work of single operators. The CWA approach incorporates social and team interactions, but a more explicit analysis of team aspects can reveal more information for systems design. In this paper, Team CWA is explored to understand teamwork within a birthing unit at a hospital. Team CWA models are derived from theories and models of teamworkand leverage the exis...

  16. Proteomic analysis of three gonad types of swamp eel reveals genes differentially expressed during sex reversal

    OpenAIRE

    Sheng, Yue; Zhao, Wei; Song, Ying; Li, Zhigang; Luo, Majing; Lei, Quan; Cheng, Hanhua; Zhou, Rongjia

    2015-01-01

    A variety of mechanisms are engaged in sex determination in vertebrates. The teleost fish swamp eel undergoes sex reversal naturally and is an ideal model for vertebrate sexual development. However, the importance of proteome-wide scanning for gonad reversal was not previously determined. We report a 2-D electrophoresis analysis of three gonad types of proteomes during sex reversal. MS/MS analysis revealed a group of differentially expressed proteins during ovary to ovotestis to testis transf...

  17. Small RNA-Seq analysis reveals microRNA-regulation of the Imd pathway during Escherichia coli infection in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shengjie; Shen, Li; Sun, Lianjie; Xu, Jiao; Jin, Ping; Chen, Liming; Ma, Fei

    2017-05-01

    Drosophila have served as a model for research on innate immunity for decades. However, knowledge of the post-transcriptional regulation of immune gene expression by microRNAs (miRNAs) remains rudimentary. In the present study, using small RNA-seq and bioinformatics analysis, we identified 67 differentially expressed miRNAs in Drosophila infected with Escherichia coli compared to injured flies at three time-points. Furthermore, we found that 21 of these miRNAs were potentially involved in the regulation of Imd pathway-related genes. Strikingly, based on UAS-miRNAs line screening and Dual-luciferase assay, we identified that miR-9a and miR-981 could both negatively regulate Drosophila antibacterial defenses and decrease the level of the antibacterial peptide, Diptericin. Taken together, these data support the involvement of miRNAs in the regulation of the Drosophila Imd pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Proteomic analysis of HIV-1 Nef cellular binding partners reveals a role for exocyst complex proteins in mediating enhancement of intercellular nanotube formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukerji Joya

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 Nef protein contributes to pathogenesis via multiple functions that include enhancement of viral replication and infectivity, alteration of intracellular trafficking, and modulation of cellular signaling pathways. Nef stimulates formation of tunneling nanotubes and virological synapses, and is transferred to bystander cells via these intercellular contacts and secreted microvesicles. Nef associates with and activates Pak2, a kinase that regulates T-cell signaling and actin cytoskeleton dynamics, but how Nef promotes nanotube formation is unknown. Results To identify Nef binding partners involved in Pak2-association dependent Nef functions, we employed tandem mass spectrometry analysis of Nef immunocomplexes from Jurkat cells expressing wild-type Nef or Nef mutants defective for the ability to associate with Pak2 (F85L, F89H, H191F and A72P, A75P in NL4-3. We report that wild-type, but not mutant Nef, was associated with 5 components of the exocyst complex (EXOC1, EXOC2, EXOC3, EXOC4, and EXOC6, an octameric complex that tethers vesicles at the plasma membrane, regulates polarized exocytosis, and recruits membranes and proteins required for nanotube formation. Additionally, Pak2 kinase was associated exclusively with wild-type Nef. Association of EXOC1, EXOC2, EXOC3, and EXOC4 with wild-type, but not mutant Nef, was verified by co-immunoprecipitation assays in Jurkat cells. Furthermore, shRNA-mediated depletion of EXOC2 in Jurkat cells abrogated Nef-mediated enhancement of nanotube formation. Using bioinformatic tools, we visualized protein interaction networks that reveal functional linkages between Nef, the exocyst complex, and the cellular endocytic and exocytic trafficking machinery. Conclusions Exocyst complex proteins are likely a key effector of Nef-mediated enhancement of nanotube formation, and possibly microvesicle secretion. Linkages revealed between Nef and the exocyst complex suggest a new paradigm of

  19. Revealing the equivalence of two clonal survival models by principal component analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lachet, Bernard; Dufour, Jacques

    1976-01-01

    The principal component analysis of 21 chlorella cell survival curves, adjusted by one-hit and two-hit target models, lead to quite similar projections on the principal plan: the homologous parameters of these models are linearly correlated; the reason for the statistical equivalence of these two models, in the present state of experimental inaccuracy, is revealed [fr

  20. Using team cognitive work analysis to reveal healthcare team interactions in a birthing unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashoori, Maryam; Burns, Catherine M; d'Entremont, Barbara; Momtahan, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive work analysis (CWA) as an analytical approach for examining complex sociotechnical systems has shown success in modelling the work of single operators. The CWA approach incorporates social and team interactions, but a more explicit analysis of team aspects can reveal more information for systems design. In this paper, Team CWA is explored to understand teamwork within a birthing unit at a hospital. Team CWA models are derived from theories and models of teamwork and leverage the existing CWA approaches to analyse team interactions. Team CWA is explained and contrasted with prior approaches to CWA. Team CWA does not replace CWA, but supplements traditional CWA to more easily reveal team information. As a result, Team CWA may be a useful approach to enhance CWA in complex environments where effective teamwork is required. This paper looks at ways of analysing cognitive work in healthcare teams. Team Cognitive Work Analysis, when used to supplement traditional Cognitive Work Analysis, revealed more team information than traditional Cognitive Work Analysis. Team Cognitive Work Analysis should be considered when studying teams.

  1. Using team cognitive work analysis to reveal healthcare team interactions in a birthing unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashoori, Maryam; Burns, Catherine M.; d'Entremont, Barbara; Momtahan, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive work analysis (CWA) as an analytical approach for examining complex sociotechnical systems has shown success in modelling the work of single operators. The CWA approach incorporates social and team interactions, but a more explicit analysis of team aspects can reveal more information for systems design. In this paper, Team CWA is explored to understand teamwork within a birthing unit at a hospital. Team CWA models are derived from theories and models of teamworkand leverage the existing CWA approaches to analyse team interactions. Team CWA is explained and contrasted with prior approaches to CWA. Team CWA does not replace CWA, but supplements traditional CWA to more easily reveal team information. As a result, Team CWA may be a useful approach to enhance CWA in complex environments where effective teamwork is required. Practitioner Summary: This paper looks at ways of analysing cognitive work in healthcare teams. Team Cognitive Work Analysis, when used to supplement traditional Cognitive Work Analysis, revealed more team information than traditional Cognitive Work Analysis. Team Cognitive Work Analysis should be considered when studying teams PMID:24837514

  2. Bioinformatics and the Politics of Innovation in the Life Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yinhua; Datta, Saheli; Salter, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    The governments of China, India, and the United Kingdom are unanimous in their belief that bioinformatics should supply the link between basic life sciences research and its translation into health benefits for the population and the economy. Yet at the same time, as ambitious states vying for position in the future global bioeconomy they differ considerably in the strategies adopted in pursuit of this goal. At the heart of these differences lies the interaction between epistemic change within the scientific community itself and the apparatus of the state. Drawing on desk-based research and thirty-two interviews with scientists and policy makers in the three countries, this article analyzes the politics that shape this interaction. From this analysis emerges an understanding of the variable capacities of different kinds of states and political systems to work with science in harnessing the potential of new epistemic territories in global life sciences innovation. PMID:27546935

  3. Meta-learning framework applied in bioinformatics inference system design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arredondo, Tomás; Ormazábal, Wladimir

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a meta-learner inference system development framework which is applied and tested in the implementation of bioinformatic inference systems. These inference systems are used for the systematic classification of the best candidates for inclusion in bacterial metabolic pathway maps. This meta-learner-based approach utilises a workflow where the user provides feedback with final classification decisions which are stored in conjunction with analysed genetic sequences for periodic inference system training. The inference systems were trained and tested with three different data sets related to the bacterial degradation of aromatic compounds. The analysis of the meta-learner-based framework involved contrasting several different optimisation methods with various different parameters. The obtained inference systems were also contrasted with other standard classification methods with accurate prediction capabilities observed.

  4. A bioinformatics roadmap for the human vaccines project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuermann, Richard H; Sinkovits, Robert S; Schenkelberg, Theodore; Koff, Wayne C

    2017-06-01

    Biomedical research has become a data intensive science in which high throughput experimentation is producing comprehensive data about biological systems at an ever-increasing pace. The Human Vaccines Project is a new public-private partnership, with the goal of accelerating development of improved vaccines and immunotherapies for global infectious diseases and cancers by decoding the human immune system. To achieve its mission, the Project is developing a Bioinformatics Hub as an open-source, multidisciplinary effort with the overarching goal of providing an enabling infrastructure to support the data processing, analysis and knowledge extraction procedures required to translate high throughput, high complexity human immunology research data into biomedical knowledge, to determine the core principles driving specific and durable protective immune responses.

  5. Bioinformatic identification and experimental validation of miRNAs from foxtail millet (Setaria italica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jun; Xie, Hao; Sun, Qingpeng; Wang, Jun; Lu, Min; Wang, Weixiang; Guo, Erhu; Pan, Jinbao

    2014-08-10

    MiRNAs are a novel group of non-coding small RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression. Many miRNAs have been identified and investigated extensively in plant species with sequenced genomes. However, few miRNAs have been identified in foxtail millet (Setaria italica), which is an ancient cereal crop of great importance for dry land agriculture. In this study, 271 foxtail millet miRNAs belonging to 44 families were identified using a bioinformatics approach. Twenty-three pairs of sense/antisense miRNAs belonging to 13 families, and 18 miRNA clusters containing members of 8 families were discovered in foxtail millet. We identified 432 potential targets for 38 miRNA families, most of which were predicted to be involved in plant development, signal transduction, metabolic pathways, disease resistance, and environmental stress responses. Gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed that 101, 56, and 23 target genes were involved in molecular functions, biological processes, and cellular components, respectively. We investigated the expression patterns of 43 selected miRNAs using qRT-PCR analysis. All of the miRNAs were expressed ubiquitously with many exhibiting different expression levels in different tissues. We validated five predicted targets of four miRNAs using the RNA ligase mediated rapid amplification of cDNA end (5'-RLM-RACE) method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Data mining in bioinformatics using Weka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Eibe; Hall, Mark; Trigg, Len; Holmes, Geoffrey; Witten, Ian H

    2004-10-12

    The Weka machine learning workbench provides a general-purpose environment for automatic classification, regression, clustering and feature selection-common data mining problems in bioinformatics research. It contains an extensive collection of machine learning algorithms and data pre-processing methods complemented by graphical user interfaces for data exploration and the experimental comparison of different machine learning techniques on the same problem. Weka can process data given in the form of a single relational table. Its main objectives are to (a) assist users in extracting useful information from data and (b) enable them to easily identify a suitable algorithm for generating an accurate predictive model from it. http://www.cs.waikato.ac.nz/ml/weka.

  7. Bioinformatic and Biometric Methods in Plant Morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surangi W. Punyasena

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in microscopy, imaging, and data analyses have permitted both the greater application of quantitative methods and the collection of large data sets that can be used to investigate plant morphology. This special issue, the first for Applications in Plant Sciences, presents a collection of papers highlighting recent methods in the quantitative study of plant form. These emerging biometric and bioinformatic approaches to plant sciences are critical for better understanding how morphology relates to ecology, physiology, genotype, and evolutionary and phylogenetic history. From microscopic pollen grains and charcoal particles, to macroscopic leaves and whole root systems, the methods presented include automated classification and identification, geometric morphometrics, and skeleton networks, as well as tests of the limits of human assessment. All demonstrate a clear need for these computational and morphometric approaches in order to increase the consistency, objectivity, and throughput of plant morphological studies.

  8. Academic Training - Bioinformatics: Decoding the Genome

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Jones

    2006-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE SERIES 27, 28 February 1, 2, 3 March 2006 from 11:00 to 12:00 - Auditorium, bldg. 500 Decoding the Genome A special series of 5 lectures on: Recent extraordinary advances in the life sciences arising through new detection technologies and bioinformatics The past five years have seen an extraordinary change in the information and tools available in the life sciences. The sequencing of the human genome, the discovery that we possess far fewer genes than foreseen, the measurement of the tiny changes in the genomes that differentiate us, the sequencing of the genomes of many pathogens that lead to diseases such as malaria are all examples of completely new information that is now available in the quest for improved healthcare. New tools have allowed similar strides in the discovery of the associated protein structures, providing invaluable information for those searching for new drugs. New DNA microarray chips permit simultaneous measurement of the state of expression of tens...

  9. The importance of proper bioinformatics analysis and clinical interpretation of tumor genomic profiling: a case study of undifferentiated sarcoma and a constitutional pathogenic BRCA2 mutation and an MLH1 variant of uncertain significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Elizabeth; Chao, Elizabeth C; Yeager, Nicholas D

    2015-09-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology is increasingly utilized to identify therapeutic targets for patients with malignancy. This technology also has the capability to reveal the presence of constitutional genetic alterations, which may have significant implications for patients and their family members. Here we present the case of a 23 year old Caucasian patient with recurrent undifferentiated sarcoma who had NGS-based tumor analysis using an assay which simultaneously analyzed the entire coding sequence of 236 cancer-related genes (3769 exons) plus 47 introns from 19 genes often rearranged or altered in cancer. Pathogenic alterations were reported in tumor as the predicted protein alterations, BRCA2 "R645fs*15″ and MLH1 "E694*". Because constitutional BRCA2 and MLH1 gene mutations are associated with Hereditary Breast Ovarian Cancer Syndrome (HBOCS) and Lynch syndrome respectively, sequence analysis of DNA isolated from peripheral blood was performed. The presence of the alterations, BRCA2 c.1929delG and MLH1 c.2080G>T, corresponding to the previously reported predicted protein alterations, were confirmed by Sanger sequencing in the constitutional DNA. An additional DNA finding was reported in this analysis, MLH1 c.2081A>C at the neighboring nucleotide. Further evaluation of the family revealed that all alterations were paternally inherited and the two MLH1 substitutions were in cis, more appropriately referred to as MLH1 c.2080_2081delGAinsTC, which is classified as a variant of uncertain significance. This case illustrates important considerations related to appropriate interpretation of NGS tumor results and follow-up of patients with potentially deleterious constitutional alterations.

  10. EXPLORATORY DATA ANALYSIS AND MULTIVARIATE STRATEGIES FOR REVEALING MULTIVARIATE STRUCTURES IN CLIMATE DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is on data analysis strategy in a complex, multidimensional, and dynamic domain. The focus is on the use of data mining techniques to explore the importance of multivariate structures; using climate variables which influences climate change. Techniques involved in data mining exercise vary according to the data structures. The multivariate analysis strategy considered here involved choosing an appropriate tool to analyze a process. Factor analysis is introduced into data mining technique in order to reveal the influencing impacts of factors involved as well as solving for multicolinearity effect among the variables. The temporal nature and multidimensionality of the target variables is revealed in the model using multidimensional regression estimates. The strategy of integrating the method of several statistical techniques, using climate variables in Nigeria was employed. R2 of 0.518 was obtained from the ordinary least square regression analysis carried out and the test was not significant at 5% level of significance. However, factor analysis regression strategy gave a good fit with R2 of 0.811 and the test was significant at 5% level of significance. Based on this study, model building should go beyond the usual confirmatory data analysis (CDA, rather it should be complemented with exploratory data analysis (EDA in order to achieve a desired result.

  11. Analysis of plasma microRNA expression profiles revealed different cancer susceptibility in healthy young adult smokers and middle-aged smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Bing; Gao, Hongmin; Zhang, Tianyang; Cui, Qinghua

    2016-04-19

    Cigarette smoking is a world-wide habit and an important risk factor for cancer. It was known that cigarette smoking can change the expression of circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) in healthy middle-aged adults. However, it remains unclear whether cigarette smoking can change the levels of circulating miRNAs in young healthy smokers and whether there are differences in cancer susceptibility for the two cases. In this study, the miRNA expression profiles of 28 smokers and 12 non-smokers were determined by Agilent human MicroRNA array. We further performed bioinformatics analysis for the differentially expressed miRNAs. The result showed that 35 miRNAs were differentially expressed. Among them, 24 miRNAs were up-regulated and 11 miRNAs were down-regulated in smokers. Functional enrichment analysis showed that the deregulated miRNAs are related to immune system and hormones regulation. Strikingly, the up-regulated miRNAs are mostly associated with hematologic cancers, such as lymphoma, leukemia. As a comparison, the up-regulated plasma miRNAs in middle-aged smokers are mostly associated with solid cancers, such as hepatocellular carcinoma and lung cancer, suggesting that smoking could have different influences on young adults and middle-aged adults. In a conclusion, we identified the circulating miRNAs deregulated by cigarette smoking and revealed that the age-dependent deregulated miRNAs tend to be mainly involved in different types of human cancers.

  12. Evaluating an Inquiry-Based Bioinformatics Course Using Q Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramlo, Susan E.; McConnell, David; Duan, Zhong-Hui; Moore, Francisco B.

    2008-01-01

    Faculty at a Midwestern metropolitan public university recently developed a course on bioinformatics that emphasized collaboration and inquiry. Bioinformatics, essentially the application of computational tools to biological data, is inherently interdisciplinary. Thus part of the challenge of creating this course was serving the needs and…

  13. Bioinformatics education dissemination with an evolutionary problem solving perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungck, John R; Donovan, Samuel S; Weisstein, Anton E; Khiripet, Noppadon; Everse, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Bioinformatics is central to biology education in the 21st century. With the generation of terabytes of data per day, the application of computer-based tools to stored and distributed data is fundamentally changing research and its application to problems in medicine, agriculture, conservation and forensics. In light of this 'information revolution,' undergraduate biology curricula must be redesigned to prepare the next generation of informed citizens as well as those who will pursue careers in the life sciences. The BEDROCK initiative (Bioinformatics Education Dissemination: Reaching Out, Connecting and Knitting together) has fostered an international community of bioinformatics educators. The initiative's goals are to: (i) Identify and support faculty who can take leadership roles in bioinformatics education; (ii) Highlight and distribute innovative approaches to incorporating evolutionary bioinformatics data and techniques throughout undergraduate education; (iii) Establish mechanisms for the broad dissemination of bioinformatics resource materials and teaching models; (iv) Emphasize phylogenetic thinking and problem solving; and (v) Develop and publish new software tools to help students develop and test evolutionary hypotheses. Since 2002, BEDROCK has offered more than 50 faculty workshops around the world, published many resources and supported an environment for developing and sharing bioinformatics education approaches. The BEDROCK initiative builds on the established pedagogical philosophy and academic community of the BioQUEST Curriculum Consortium to assemble the diverse intellectual and human resources required to sustain an international reform effort in undergraduate bioinformatics education.

  14. Recent developments in life sciences research: Role of bioinformatics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Life sciences research and development has opened up new challenges and opportunities for bioinformatics. The contribution of bioinformatics advances made possible the mapping of the entire human genome and genomes of many other organisms in just over a decade. These discoveries, along with current efforts to ...

  15. Generative Topic Modeling in Image Data Mining and Bioinformatics Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin

    2012-01-01

    Probabilistic topic models have been developed for applications in various domains such as text mining, information retrieval and computer vision and bioinformatics domain. In this thesis, we focus on developing novel probabilistic topic models for image mining and bioinformatics studies. Specifically, a probabilistic topic-connection (PTC) model…

  16. Assessment of a Bioinformatics across Life Science Curricula Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, David R.; Miskowski, Jennifer A.; Grunwald, Sandra K.; Abler, Michael L.

    2007-01-01

    At the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, we have undertaken a program to integrate the study of bioinformatics across the undergraduate life science curricula. Our efforts have included incorporating bioinformatics exercises into courses in the biology, microbiology, and chemistry departments, as well as coordinating the efforts of faculty within…

  17. Concepts Of Bioinformatics And Its Application In Veterinary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bioinformatics has advanced the course of research and future veterinary vaccines development because it has provided new tools for identification of vaccine targets from sequenced biological data of organisms. In Nigeria, there is lack of bioinformatics training in the universities, expect for short training courses in which ...

  18. Current status and future perspectives of bioinformatics in Tanzania ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main bottleneck in advancing genomics in present times is the lack of expertise in using bioinformatics tools and approaches for data mining in raw DNA sequences generated by modern high throughput technologies such as next generation sequencing. Although bioinformatics has been making major progress and ...

  19. The 2015 Bioinformatics Open Source Conference (BOSC 2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Nomi L; Cock, Peter J A; Lapp, Hilmar; Chapman, Brad; Davey, Rob; Fields, Christopher; Hokamp, Karsten; Munoz-Torres, Monica

    2016-02-01

    The Bioinformatics Open Source Conference (BOSC) is organized by the Open Bioinformatics Foundation (OBF), a nonprofit group dedicated to promoting the practice and philosophy of open source software development and open science within the biological research community. Since its inception in 2000, BOSC has provided bioinformatics developers with a forum for communicating the results of their latest efforts to the wider research community. BOSC offers a focused environment for developers and users to interact and share ideas about standards; software development practices; practical techniques for solving bioinformatics problems; and approaches that promote open science and sharing of data, results, and software. BOSC is run as a two-day special interest group (SIG) before the annual Intelligent Systems in Molecular Biology (ISMB) conference. BOSC 2015 took place in Dublin, Ireland, and was attended by over 125 people, about half of whom were first-time attendees. Session topics included "Data Science;" "Standards and Interoperability;" "Open Science and Reproducibility;" "Translational Bioinformatics;" "Visualization;" and "Bioinformatics Open Source Project Updates". In addition to two keynote talks and dozens of shorter talks chosen from submitted abstracts, BOSC 2015 included a panel, titled "Open Source, Open Door: Increasing Diversity in the Bioinformatics Open Source Community," that provided an opportunity for open discussion about ways to increase the diversity of participants in BOSC in particular, and in open source bioinformatics in general. The complete program of BOSC 2015 is available online at http://www.open-bio.org/wiki/BOSC_2015_Schedule.

  20. Sequence analysis of serum albumins reveals the molecular evolution of ligand recognition properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanali, Gabriella; Ascenzi, Paolo; Bernardi, Giorgio; Fasano, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    Serum albumin (SA) is a circulating protein providing a depot and carrier for many endogenous and exogenous compounds. At least seven major binding sites have been identified by structural and functional investigations mainly in human SA. SA is conserved in vertebrates, with at least 49 entries in protein sequence databases. The multiple sequence analysis of this set of entries leads to the definition of a cladistic tree for the molecular evolution of SA orthologs in vertebrates, thus showing the clustering of the considered species, with lamprey SAs (Lethenteron japonicum and Petromyzon marinus) in a separate outgroup. Sequence analysis aimed at searching conserved domains revealed that most SA sequences are made up by three repeated domains (about 600 residues), as extensively characterized for human SA. On the contrary, lamprey SAs are giant proteins (about 1400 residues) comprising seven repeated domains. The phylogenetic analysis of the SA family reveals a stringent correlation with the taxonomic classification of the species available in sequence databases. A focused inspection of the sequences of ligand binding sites in SA revealed that in all sites most residues involved in ligand binding are conserved, although the versatility towards different ligands could be peculiar of higher organisms. Moreover, the analysis of molecular links between the different sites suggests that allosteric modulation mechanisms could be restricted to higher vertebrates.

  1. Personalized cloud-based bioinformatics services for research and education: use cases and the elasticHPC package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kalioby, Mohamed; Abouelhoda, Mohamed; Krüger, Jan; Giegerich, Robert; Sczyrba, Alexander; Wall, Dennis P; Tonellato, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Bioinformatics services have been traditionally provided in the form of a web-server that is hosted at institutional infrastructure and serves multiple users. This model, however, is not flexible enough to cope with the increasing number of users, increasing data size, and new requirements in terms of speed and availability of service. The advent of cloud computing suggests a new service model that provides an efficient solution to these problems, based on the concepts of "resources-on-demand" and "pay-as-you-go". However, cloud computing has not yet been introduced within bioinformatics servers due to the lack of usage scenarios and software layers that address the requirements of the bioinformatics domain. In this paper, we provide different use case scenarios for providing cloud computing based services, considering both the technical and financial aspects of the cloud computing service model. These scenarios are for individual users seeking computational power as well as bioinformatics service providers aiming at provision of personalized bioinformatics services to their users. We also present elasticHPC, a software package and a library that facilitates the use of high performance cloud computing resources in general and the implementation of the suggested bioinformatics scenarios in particular. Concrete examples that demonstrate the suggested use case scenarios with whole bioinformatics servers and major sequence analysis tools like BLAST are presented. Experimental results with large datasets are also included to show the advantages of the cloud model. Our use case scenarios and the elasticHPC package are steps towards the provision of cloud based bioinformatics services, which would help in overcoming the data challenge of recent biological research. All resources related to elasticHPC and its web-interface are available at http://www.elasticHPC.org.

  2. 4273π: bioinformatics education on low cost ARM hardware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Daniel; Ferrier, David Ek; Holland, Peter Wh; Mitchell, John Bo; Plaisier, Heleen; Ritchie, Michael G; Smart, Steven D

    2013-08-12

    Teaching bioinformatics at universities is complicated by typical computer classroom settings. As well as running software locally and online, students should gain experience of systems administration. For a future career in biology or bioinformatics, the installation of software is a useful skill. We propose that this may be taught by running the course on GNU/Linux running on inexpensive Raspberry Pi computer hardware, for which students may be granted full administrator access. We release 4273π, an operating system image for Raspberry Pi based on Raspbian Linux. This includes minor customisations for classroom use and includes our Open Access bioinformatics course, 4273π Bioinformatics for Biologists. This is based on the final-year undergraduate module BL4273, run on Raspberry Pi computers at the University of St Andrews, Semester 1, academic year 2012-2013. 4273π is a means to teach bioinformatics, including systems administration tasks, to undergraduates at low cost.

  3. The development and application of bioinformatics core competencies to improve bioinformatics training and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Nicola; Schwartz, Russell; Brazas, Michelle D; Brooksbank, Cath; Gaeta, Bruno; Morgan, Sarah L; Pauley, Mark A; Rosenwald, Anne; Rustici, Gabriella; Sierk, Michael; Warnow, Tandy; Welch, Lonnie

    2018-02-01

    Bioinformatics is recognized as part of the essential knowledge base of numerous career paths in biomedical research and healthcare. However, there is little agreement in the field over what that knowledge entails or how best to provide it. These disagreements are compounded by the wide range of populations in need of bioinformatics training, with divergent prior backgrounds and intended application areas. The Curriculum Task Force of the International Society of Computational Biology (ISCB) Education Committee has sought to provide a framework for training needs and curricula in terms of a set of bioinformatics core competencies that cut across many user personas and training programs. The initial competencies developed based on surveys of employers and training programs have since been refined through a multiyear process of community engagement. This report describes the current status of the competencies and presents a series of use cases illustrating how they are being applied in diverse training contexts. These use cases are intended to demonstrate how others can make use of the competencies and engage in the process of their continuing refinement and application. The report concludes with a consideration of remaining challenges and future plans.

  4. The development and application of bioinformatics core competencies to improve bioinformatics training and education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooksbank, Cath; Morgan, Sarah L.; Rosenwald, Anne; Warnow, Tandy; Welch, Lonnie

    2018-01-01

    Bioinformatics is recognized as part of the essential knowledge base of numerous career paths in biomedical research and healthcare. However, there is little agreement in the field over what that knowledge entails or how best to provide it. These disagreements are compounded by the wide range of populations in need of bioinformatics training, with divergent prior backgrounds and intended application areas. The Curriculum Task Force of the International Society of Computational Biology (ISCB) Education Committee has sought to provide a framework for training needs and curricula in terms of a set of bioinformatics core competencies that cut across many user personas and training programs. The initial competencies developed based on surveys of employers and training programs have since been refined through a multiyear process of community engagement. This report describes the current status of the competencies and presents a series of use cases illustrating how they are being applied in diverse training contexts. These use cases are intended to demonstrate how others can make use of the competencies and engage in the process of their continuing refinement and application. The report concludes with a consideration of remaining challenges and future plans. PMID:29390004

  5. Comparative analysis of fungal genomes reveals different plant cell wall degrading capacity in fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Fungi produce a variety of carbohydrate activity enzymes (CAZymes) for the degradation of plant polysaccharide materials to facilitate infection and/or gain nutrition. Identifying and comparing CAZymes from fungi with different nutritional modes or infection mechanisms may provide information for better understanding of their life styles and infection models. To date, over hundreds of fungal genomes are publicly available. However, a systematic comparative analysis of fungal CAZymes across the entire fungal kingdom has not been reported. Results In this study, we systemically identified glycoside hydrolases (GHs), polysaccharide lyases (PLs), carbohydrate esterases (CEs), and glycosyltransferases (GTs) as well as carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) in the predicted proteomes of 103 representative fungi from Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota, and Zygomycota. Comparative analysis of these CAZymes that play major roles in plant polysaccharide degradation revealed that fungi exhibit tremendous diversity in the number and variety of CAZymes. Among them, some families of GHs and CEs are the most prevalent CAZymes that are distributed in all of the fungi analyzed. Importantly, cellulases of some GH families are present in fungi that are not known to have cellulose-degrading ability. In addition, our results also showed that in general, plant pathogenic fungi have the highest number of CAZymes. Biotrophic fungi tend to have fewer CAZymes than necrotrophic and hemibiotrophic fungi. Pathogens of dicots often contain more pectinases than fungi infecting monocots. Interestingly, besides yeasts, many saprophytic fungi that are highly active in degrading plant biomass contain fewer CAZymes than plant pathogenic fungi. Furthermore, analysis of the gene expression profile of the wheat scab fungus Fusarium graminearum revealed that most of the CAZyme genes related to cell wall degradation were up-regulated during plant infection. Phylogenetic analysis also

  6. Ferricyanide-based analysis of aqueous lignin suspension revealed sequestration of water-soluble lignin moieties

    OpenAIRE

    Joshua, CJ; Simmons, BA; Singer, SW

    2016-01-01

    © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry. This study describes the application of a ferricyanide-based assay as a simple and inexpensive assay for rapid analysis of aqueous lignin samples. The assay measures the formation of Prussian blue from the redox reaction between a mixture of potassium ferricyanide and ferric chloride, and phenolic hydroxyl groups of lignin or lignin-derived phenolic moieties. This study revealed that soluble lignin moieties exhibited stronger ferricyanide reactivity than...

  7. Allosteric effects in bacteriophage HK97 procapsids revealed directly from covariance analysis of cryo EM data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Nan; Veesler, David; Doerschuk, Peter C; Johnson, John E

    2018-05-01

    The information content of cryo EM data sets exceeds that of the electron scattering potential (cryo EM) density initially derived for structure determination. Previously we demonstrated the power of data variance analysis for characterizing regions of cryo EM density that displayed functionally important variance anomalies associated with maturation cleavage events in Nudaurelia Omega Capensis Virus and the presence or absence of a maturation protease in bacteriophage HK97 procapsids. Here we extend the analysis in two ways. First, instead of imposing icosahedral symmetry on every particle in the data set during the variance analysis, we only assume that the data set as a whole has icosahedral symmetry. This change removes artifacts of high variance along icosahedral symmetry axes, but retains all of the features previously reported in the HK97 data set. Second we present a covariance analysis that reveals correlations in structural dynamics (variance) between the interior of the HK97 procapsid with the protease and regions of the exterior (not seen in the absence of the protease). The latter analysis corresponds well with hydrogen deuterium exchange studies previously published that reveal the same correlation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Relax with CouchDB--into the non-relational DBMS era of bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manyam, Ganiraju; Payton, Michelle A; Roth, Jack A; Abruzzo, Lynne V; Coombes, Kevin R

    2012-07-01

    With the proliferation of high-throughput technologies, genome-level data analysis has become common in molecular biology. Bioinformaticians are developing extensive resources to annotate and mine biological features from high-throughput data. The underlying database management systems for most bioinformatics software are based on a relational model. Modern non-relational databases offer an alternative that has flexibility, scalability, and a non-rigid design schema. Moreover, with an accelerated development pace, non-relational databases like CouchDB can be ideal tools to construct bioinformatics utilities. We describe CouchDB by presenting three new bioinformatics resources: (a) geneSmash, which collates data from bioinformatics resources and provides automated gene-centric annotations, (b) drugBase, a database of drug-target interactions with a web interface powered by geneSmash, and (c) HapMap-CN, which provides a web interface to query copy number variations from three SNP-chip HapMap datasets. In addition to the web sites, all three systems can be accessed programmatically via web services. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Relax with CouchDB - Into the non-relational DBMS era of Bioinformatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manyam, Ganiraju; Payton, Michelle A.; Roth, Jack A.; Abruzzo, Lynne V.; Coombes, Kevin R.

    2012-01-01

    With the proliferation of high-throughput technologies, genome-level data analysis has become common in molecular biology. Bioinformaticians are developing extensive resources to annotate and mine biological features from high-throughput data. The underlying database management systems for most bioinformatics software are based on a relational model. Modern non-relational databases offer an alternative that has flexibility, scalability, and a non-rigid design schema. Moreover, with an accelerated development pace, non-relational databases like CouchDB can be ideal tools to construct bioinformatics utilities. We describe CouchDB by presenting three new bioinformatics resources: (a) geneSmash, which collates data from bioinformatics resources and provides automated gene-centric annotations, (b) drugBase, a database of drug-target interactions with a web interface powered by geneSmash, and (c) HapMap-CN, which provides a web interface to query copy number variations from three SNP-chip HapMap datasets. In addition to the web sites, all three systems can be accessed programmatically via web services. PMID:22609849

  10. Integration of Proteomics, Bioinformatics, and Systems Biology in Traumatic Brain Injury Biomarker Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guingab-Cagmat, J.D.; Cagmat, E.B.; Hayes, R.L.; Anagli, J.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major medical crisis without any FDA-approved pharmacological therapies that have been demonstrated to improve functional outcomes. It has been argued that discovery of disease-relevant biomarkers might help to guide successful clinical trials for TBI. Major advances in mass spectrometry (MS) have revolutionized the field of proteomic biomarker discovery and facilitated the identification of several candidate markers that are being further evaluated for their efficacy as TBI biomarkers. However, several hurdles have to be overcome even during the discovery phase which is only the first step in the long process of biomarker development. The high-throughput nature of MS-based proteomic experiments generates a massive amount of mass spectral data presenting great challenges in downstream interpretation. Currently, different bioinformatics platforms are available for functional analysis and data mining of MS-generated proteomic data. These tools provide a way to convert data sets to biologically interpretable results and functional outcomes. A strategy that has promise in advancing biomarker development involves the triad of proteomics, bioinformatics, and systems biology. In this review, a brief overview of how bioinformatics and systems biology tools analyze, transform, and interpret complex MS datasets into biologically relevant results is discussed. In addition, challenges and limitations of proteomics, bioinformatics, and systems biology in TBI biomarker discovery are presented. A brief survey of researches that utilized these three overlapping disciplines in TBI biomarker discovery is also presented. Finally, examples of TBI biomarkers and their applications are discussed. PMID:23750150

  11. A global perspective on evolving bioinformatics and data science training needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attwood, Teresa K; Blackford, Sarah; Brazas, Michelle D; Davies, Angela; Schneider, Maria Victoria

    2017-08-29

    Bioinformatics is now intrinsic to life science research, but the past decade has witnessed a continuing deficiency in this essential expertise. Basic data stewardship is still taught relatively rarely in life science education programmes, creating a chasm between theory and practice, and fuelling demand for bioinformatics training across all educational levels and career roles. Concerned by this, surveys have been conducted in recent years to monitor bioinformatics and computational training needs worldwide. This article briefly reviews the principal findings of a number of these studies. We see that there is still a strong appetite for short courses to improve expertise and confidence in data analysis and interpretation; strikingly, however, the most urgent appeal is for bioinformatics to be woven into the fabric of life science degree programmes. Satisfying the relentless training needs of current and future generations of life scientists will require a concerted response from stakeholders across the globe, who need to deliver sustainable solutions capable of both transforming education curricula and cultivating a new cadre of trainer scientists. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  12. The eBioKit, a stand-alone educational platform for bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-de-Diego, Rafael; de Villiers, Etienne P; Klingström, Tomas; Gourlé, Hadrien; Conesa, Ana; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik

    2017-09-01

    Bioinformatics skills have become essential for many research areas; however, the availability of qualified researchers is usually lower than the demand and training to increase the number of able bioinformaticians is an important task for the bioinformatics community. When conducting training or hands-on tutorials, the lack of control over the analysis tools and repositories often results in undesirable situations during training, as unavailable online tools or version conflicts may delay, complicate, or even prevent the successful completion of a training event. The eBioKit is a stand-alone educational platform that hosts numerous tools and databases for bioinformatics research and allows training to take place in a controlled environment. A key advantage of the eBioKit over other existing teaching solutions is that all the required software and databases are locally installed on the system, significantly reducing the dependence on the internet. Furthermore, the architecture of the eBioKit has demonstrated itself to be an excellent balance between portability and performance, not only making the eBioKit an exceptional educational tool but also providing small research groups with a platform to incorporate bioinformatics analysis in their research. As a result, the eBioKit has formed an integral part of training and research performed by a wide variety of universities and organizations such as the Pan African Bioinformatics Network (H3ABioNet) as part of the initiative Human Heredity and Health in Africa (H3Africa), the Southern Africa Network for Biosciences (SAnBio) initiative, the Biosciences eastern and central Africa (BecA) hub, and the International Glossina Genome Initiative.

  13. Bioinformatics for discovery of microbiome variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brejnrod, Asker Daniel

    of various molecular methods to build hypotheses about the impact of a copper contaminated soil. The introduction is a broad introduction to the field of microbiome research with a focus on the technologies that enable these discoveries and how some of the broader issues have related to this thesis......Sequencing based tools have revolutionized microbiology in recent years. Highthroughput DNA sequencing have allowed high-resolution studies on microbial life in many different environments and at unprecedented low cost. These culture-independent methods have helped discovery of novel bacteria...... 1 ,“Large-scale benchmarking reveals false discoveries and count transformation sensitivity in 16S rRNA gene amplicon data analysis methods used in microbiome studies”, benchmarked the performance of a variety of popular statistical methods for discovering differentially abundant bacteria . between...

  14. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Mosquito C6/36 Cells Reveals Host Proteins Involved in Zika Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Qi-Lin; Deng, Cheng-Lin; Chen, Xi; Wang, Jun; Wang, Shao-Bo; Wang, Wei; Deng, Fei; Zhang, Bo; Xiao, Gengfu; Zhang, Lei-Ke

    2017-06-15

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging arbovirus belonging to the genus Flavivirus of the family Flaviviridae During replication processes, flavivirus manipulates host cell systems to facilitate its replication, while the host cells activate antiviral responses. Identification of host proteins involved in the flavivirus replication process may lead to the discovery of antiviral targets. The mosquitoes Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus are epidemiologically important vectors for ZIKV, and effective restrictions of ZIKV replication in mosquitoes will be vital in controlling the spread of virus. In this study, an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis of ZIKV-infected Aedes albopictus C6/36 cells was performed to investigate host proteins involved in the ZIKV infection process. A total of 3,544 host proteins were quantified, with 200 being differentially regulated, among which CHCHD2 can be upregulated by ZIKV infection in both mosquito C6/36 and human HeLa cells. Our further study indicated that CHCHD2 can promote ZIKV replication and inhibit beta interferon (IFN-β) production in HeLa cells, suggesting that ZIKV infection may upregulate CHCHD2 to inhibit IFN-I production and thus promote virus replication. Bioinformatics analysis of regulated host proteins highlighted several ZIKV infection-regulated biological processes. Further study indicated that the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) plays roles in the ZIKV entry process and that an FDA-approved inhibitor of the 20S proteasome, bortezomib, can inhibit ZIKV infection in vivo Our study illustrated how host cells respond to ZIKV infection and also provided a candidate drug for the control of ZIKV infection in mosquitoes and treatment of ZIKV infection in patients. IMPORTANCE ZIKV infection poses great threats to human health, and there is no FDA-approved drug available for the treatment of ZIKV infection. During replication, ZIKV manipulates host cell systems to facilitate its replication, while host cells activate

  15. Recent adaptive events in human brain revealed by meta-analysis of positively selected genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Analysis of positively-selected genes can help us understand how human evolved, especially the evolution of highly developed cognitive functions. However, previous works have reached conflicting conclusions regarding whether human neuronal genes are over-represented among genes under positive selection. METHODS AND RESULTS: We divided positively-selected genes into four groups according to the identification approaches, compiling a comprehensive list from 27 previous studies. We showed that genes that are highly expressed in the central nervous system are enriched in recent positive selection events in human history identified by intra-species genomic scan, especially in brain regions related to cognitive functions. This pattern holds when different datasets, parameters and analysis pipelines were used. Functional category enrichment analysis supported these findings, showing that synapse-related functions are enriched in genes under recent positive selection. In contrast, immune-related functions, for instance, are enriched in genes under ancient positive selection revealed by inter-species coding region comparison. We further demonstrated that most of these patterns still hold even after controlling for genomic characteristics that might bias genome-wide identification of positively-selected genes including gene length, gene density, GC composition, and intensity of negative selection. CONCLUSION: Our rigorous analysis resolved previous conflicting conclusions and revealed recent adaptation of human brain functions.

  16. Bioinformatics research in the Asia Pacific: a 2007 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Shoba; Gribskov, Michael; Tan, Tin Wee

    2008-01-01

    We provide a 2007 update on the bioinformatics research in the Asia-Pacific from the Asia Pacific Bioinformatics Network (APBioNet), Asia's oldest bioinformatics organisation set up in 1998. From 2002, APBioNet has organized the first International Conference on Bioinformatics (InCoB) bringing together scientists working in the field of bioinformatics in the region. This year, the InCoB2007 Conference was organized as the 6th annual conference of the Asia-Pacific Bioinformatics Network, on Aug. 27-30, 2007 at Hong Kong, following a series of successful events in Bangkok (Thailand), Penang (Malaysia), Auckland (New Zealand), Busan (South Korea) and New Delhi (India). Besides a scientific meeting at Hong Kong, satellite events organized are a pre-conference training workshop at Hanoi, Vietnam and a post-conference workshop at Nansha, China. This Introduction provides a brief overview of the peer-reviewed manuscripts accepted for publication in this Supplement. We have organized the papers into thematic areas, highlighting the growing contribution of research excellence from this region, to global bioinformatics endeavours.

  17. Continuing Education Workshops in Bioinformatics Positively Impact Research and Careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazas, Michelle D; Ouellette, B F Francis

    2016-06-01

    Bioinformatics.ca has been hosting continuing education programs in introductory and advanced bioinformatics topics in Canada since 1999 and has trained more than 2,000 participants to date. These workshops have been adapted over the years to keep pace with advances in both science and technology as well as the changing landscape in available learning modalities and the bioinformatics training needs of our audience. Post-workshop surveys have been a mandatory component of each workshop and are used to ensure appropriate adjustments are made to workshops to maximize learning. However, neither bioinformatics.ca nor others offering similar training programs have explored the long-term impact of bioinformatics continuing education training. Bioinformatics.ca recently initiated a look back on the impact its workshops have had on the career trajectories, research outcomes, publications, and collaborations of its participants. Using an anonymous online survey, bioinformatics.ca analyzed responses from those surveyed and discovered its workshops have had a positive impact on collaborations, research, publications, and career progression.

  18. Bioinformatics approaches for identifying new therapeutic bioactive peptides in food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Khaldi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT:The traditional methods for mining foods for bioactive peptides are tedious and long. Similar to the drug industry, the length of time to identify and deliver a commercial health ingredient that reduces disease symptoms can take anything between 5 to 10 years. Reducing this time and effort is crucial in order to create new commercially viable products with clear and important health benefits. In the past few years, bioinformatics, the science that brings together fast computational biology, and efficient genome mining, is appearing as the long awaited solution to this problem. By quickly mining food genomes for characteristics of certain food therapeutic ingredients, researchers can potentially find new ones in a matter of a few weeks. Yet, surprisingly, very little success has been achieved so far using bioinformatics in mining for food bioactives.The absence of food specific bioinformatic mining tools, the slow integration of both experimental mining and bioinformatics, and the important difference between different experimental platforms are some of the reasons for the slow progress of bioinformatics in the field of functional food and more specifically in bioactive peptide discovery.In this paper I discuss some methods that could be easily translated, using a rational peptide bioinformatics design, to food bioactive peptide mining. I highlight the need for an integrated food peptide database. I also discuss how to better integrate experimental work with bioinformatics in order to improve the mining of food for bioactive peptides, therefore achieving a higher success rates.

  19. Transcriptomic analysis of human retinal detachment reveals both inflammatory response and photoreceptor death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Noëlle Delyfer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Retinal detachment often leads to a severe and permanent loss of vision and its therapeutic management remains to this day exclusively surgical. We have used surgical specimens to perform a differential analysis of the transcriptome of human retinal tissues following detachment in order to identify new potential pharmacological targets that could be used in combination with surgery to further improve final outcome. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Statistical analysis reveals major involvement of the immune response in the disease. Interestingly, using a novel approach relying on coordinated expression, the interindividual variation was monitored to unravel a second crucial aspect of the pathological process: the death of photoreceptor cells. Within the genes identified, the expression of the major histocompatibility complex I gene HLA-C enables diagnosis of the disease, while PKD2L1 and SLCO4A1 -which are both down-regulated- act synergistically to provide an estimate of the duration of the retinal detachment process. Our analysis thus reveals the two complementary cellular and molecular aspects linked to retinal detachment: an immune response and the degeneration of photoreceptor cells. We also reveal that the human specimens have a higher clinical value as compared to artificial models that point to IL6 and oxidative stress, not implicated in the surgical specimens studied here. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This systematic analysis confirmed the occurrence of both neurodegeneration and inflammation during retinal detachment, and further identifies precisely the modification of expression of the different genes implicated in these two phenomena. Our data henceforth give a new insight into the disease process and provide a rationale for therapeutic strategies aimed at limiting inflammation and photoreceptor damage associated with retinal detachment and, in turn, improving visual prognosis after retinal surgery.

  20. Bioinformatics in cancer therapy and drug design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horbach, D.Y.; Usanov, S.A.

    2005-01-01

    One of the mechanisms of external signal transduction (ionizing radiation, toxicants, stress) to the target cell is the existence of membrane and intracellular proteins with intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity. No wonder that etiology of malignant growth links to abnormalities in signal transduction through tyrosine kinases. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinases play fundamental roles in development, proliferation and differentiation of tissues of epithelial, mesenchymal and neuronal origin. There are four types of EGFR: EGF receptor (ErbB1/HER1), ErbB2/Neu/HER2, ErbB3/HER3 and ErbB4/HER4. Abnormal expression of EGFR, appearance of receptor mutants with changed ability to protein-protein interactions or increased tyrosine kinase activity have been implicated in the malignancy of different types of human tumors. Bioinformatics is currently using in investigation on design and selection of drugs that can make alterations in structure or competitively bind with receptors and so display antagonistic characteristics. (authors)

  1. Bioinformatics in cancer therapy and drug design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horbach, D Y [International A. Sakharov environmental univ., Minsk (Belarus); Usanov, S A [Inst. of bioorganic chemistry, National academy of sciences of Belarus, Minsk (Belarus)

    2005-05-15

    One of the mechanisms of external signal transduction (ionizing radiation, toxicants, stress) to the target cell is the existence of membrane and intracellular proteins with intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity. No wonder that etiology of malignant growth links to abnormalities in signal transduction through tyrosine kinases. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinases play fundamental roles in development, proliferation and differentiation of tissues of epithelial, mesenchymal and neuronal origin. There are four types of EGFR: EGF receptor (ErbB1/HER1), ErbB2/Neu/HER2, ErbB3/HER3 and ErbB4/HER4. Abnormal expression of EGFR, appearance of receptor mutants with changed ability to protein-protein interactions or increased tyrosine kinase activity have been implicated in the malignancy of different types of human tumors. Bioinformatics is currently using in investigation on design and selection of drugs that can make alterations in structure or competitively bind with receptors and so display antagonistic characteristics. (authors)

  2. Bioinformatics study of the mangrove actin genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basyuni, M.; Wasilah, M.; Sumardi

    2017-01-01

    This study describes the bioinformatics methods to analyze eight actin genes from mangrove plants on DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank as well as predicted the structure, composition, subcellular localization, similarity, and phylogenetic. The physical and chemical properties of eight mangroves showed variation among the genes. The percentage of the secondary structure of eight mangrove actin genes followed the order of a helix > random coil > extended chain structure for BgActl, KcActl, RsActl, and A. corniculatum Act. In contrast to this observation, the remaining actin genes were random coil > extended chain structure > a helix. This study, therefore, shown the prediction of secondary structure was performed for necessary structural information. The values of chloroplast or signal peptide or mitochondrial target were too small, indicated that no chloroplast or mitochondrial transit peptide or signal peptide of secretion pathway in mangrove actin genes. These results suggested the importance of understanding the diversity and functional of properties of the different amino acids in mangrove actin genes. To clarify the relationship among the mangrove actin gene, a phylogenetic tree was constructed. Three groups of mangrove actin genes were formed, the first group contains B. gymnorrhiza BgAct and R. stylosa RsActl. The second cluster which consists of 5 actin genes the largest group, and the last branch consist of one gene, B. sexagula Act. The present study, therefore, supported the previous results that plant actin genes form distinct clusters in the tree.

  3. Parallel evolutionary computation in bioinformatics applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, Jorge; Sobral, João Luis; Rocha, Miguel

    2013-05-01

    A large number of optimization problems within the field of Bioinformatics require methods able to handle its inherent complexity (e.g. NP-hard problems) and also demand increased computational efforts. In this context, the use of parallel architectures is a necessity. In this work, we propose ParJECoLi, a Java based library that offers a large set of metaheuristic methods (such as Evolutionary Algorithms) and also addresses the issue of its efficient execution on a wide range of parallel architectures. The proposed approach focuses on the easiness of use, making the adaptation to distinct parallel environments (multicore, cluster, grid) transparent to the user. Indeed, this work shows how the development of the optimization library can proceed independently of its adaptation for several architectures, making use of Aspect-Oriented Programming. The pluggable nature of parallelism related modules allows the user to easily configure its environment, adding parallelism modules to the base source code when needed. The performance of the platform is validated with two case studies within biological model optimization. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Network analysis of oyster transcriptome revealed a cascade of cellular responses during recovery after heat shock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingling Zhang

    Full Text Available Oysters, as a major group of marine bivalves, can tolerate a wide range of natural and anthropogenic stressors including heat stress. Recent studies have shown that oysters pretreated with heat shock can result in induced heat tolerance. A systematic study of cellular recovery from heat shock may provide insights into the mechanism of acquired thermal tolerance. In this study, we performed the first network analysis of oyster transcriptome by reanalyzing microarray data from a previous study. Network analysis revealed a cascade of cellular responses during oyster recovery after heat shock and identified responsive gene modules and key genes. Our study demonstrates the power of network analysis in a non-model organism with poor gene annotations, which can lead to new discoveries that go beyond the focus on individual genes.

  5. The Revealed Competitiveness of Major Ports in the East Asian Region: An Additive Market Share Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Seung Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the single cargo market, the ordinary market share analysis method has been the representative tool for revealed competitiveness analysis. This paper develops and employs an applied market share index called the additive market share (AMS. Data are collected from 15 major container ports for the 1998-2013 period. In comparison to the results of an ordinary market share analysis, the highest AMS is observed for the Bohai Rim port cluster from 2008, not for the Yangtze River cluster or the Pearl River cluster. There are substitutable relationships between Yangtze River and non-Chinese ports and between Pearl River and Bohai Rim ports from 2001. Finally, there is an internal competition at Pearl River and Yangtze River ports, whereas Bohai Rim and non-Chinese ports show internally complementary relationships.

  6. Revealed preferences towards the appraisal of orphan drugs in Poland - multi criteria decision analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolasa, Katarzyna; Zwolinski, Krzysztof Miroslaw; Zah, Vladimir; Kaló, Zoltán; Lewandowski, Tadeusz

    2018-04-27

    A Multi Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) technique was adopted to reveal the preferences of the Appraisal Body of the Polish HTA agency towards orphan drugs (OMPs). There were 34 positive and 23 negative HTA recommendations out of 54 distinctive drug-indication pairs. The MCDA matrix consisted of 13 criteria, seven of which made the most impact on the HTA process. Appraisal of clinical evidence, cost of therapy, and safety considerations were the main contributors to the HTA guidance, whilst advancement of technology and manufacturing costs made the least impact. MCDA can be regarded as a valuable tool for revealing decision makers' preferences in the healthcare sector. Given that only roughly half of all criteria included in the MCDA matrix were deemed to make an impact on the HTA process, there is certainly some room for improvement with respect to the adaptation of a new approach towards the value assessment of OMPs in Poland.

  7. Proteome-wide analysis of arginine monomethylation reveals widespread occurrence in human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Sara C; Sylvestersen, Kathrine B; Mund, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    to the frequency of somatic mutations at arginine methylation sites throughout the proteome, we observed that somatic mutations were common at arginine methylation sites in proteins involved in mRNA splicing. Furthermore, in HeLa and U2OS cells, we found that distinct arginine methyltransferases differentially...... kidney 293 cells, indicating that the occurrence of this modification is comparable to phosphorylation and ubiquitylation. A site-level conservation analysis revealed that arginine methylation sites are less evolutionarily conserved compared to arginines that were not identified as modified...... as coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1)] or PRMT1 increased the RNA binding function of HNRNPUL1. High-content single-cell imaging additionally revealed that knocking down CARM1 promoted the nuclear accumulation of SRSF2, independent of cell cycle phase. Collectively, the presented human...

  8. Bioconductor: open software development for computational biology and bioinformatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gentleman, R.C.; Carey, V.J.; Bates, D.M.

    2004-01-01

    The Bioconductor project is an initiative for the collaborative creation of extensible software for computational biology and bioinformatics. The goals of the project include: fostering collaborative development and widespread use of innovative software, reducing barriers to entry into interdisci......The Bioconductor project is an initiative for the collaborative creation of extensible software for computational biology and bioinformatics. The goals of the project include: fostering collaborative development and widespread use of innovative software, reducing barriers to entry...... into interdisciplinary scientific research, and promoting the achievement of remote reproducibility of research results. We describe details of our aims and methods, identify current challenges, compare Bioconductor to other open bioinformatics projects, and provide working examples....

  9. Comparative analysis reveals that polyploidy does not decelerate diversification in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, S H; Glick, L; Tsigenopoulos, C S; Otto, S P; Mayrose, I

    2014-02-01

    While the proliferation of the species-rich teleost fish has been ascribed to an ancient genome duplication event at the base of this group, the broader impact of polyploidy on fish evolution and diversification remains poorly understood. Here, we investigate the association between polyploidy and diversification in several fish lineages: the sturgeons (Acipenseridae: Acipenseriformes), the botiid loaches (Botiidae: Cypriniformes), Cyprininae fishes (Cyprinidae: Cypriniformes) and the salmonids (Salmonidae: Salmoniformes). Using likelihood-based evolutionary methodologies, we co-estimate speciation and extinction rates associated with polyploid vs. diploid fish lineages. Family-level analysis of Acipenseridae and Botiidae revealed no significant difference in diversification rates between polyploid and diploid relatives, while analysis of the subfamily Cyprininae revealed higher polyploid diversification. Additionally, order-level analysis of the polyploid Salmoniformes and its diploid sister clade, the Esociformes, did not support a significantly different net diversification rate between the two groups. Taken together, our results suggest that polyploidy is generally not associated with decreased diversification in fish - a pattern that stands in contrast to that previously observed in plants. While there are notable differences in the time frame examined in the two studies, our results suggest that polyploidy is associated with different diversification patterns in these two major branches of the eukaryote tree of life. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  10. Multilocus sequence analysis of nectar pseudomonads reveals high genetic diversity and contrasting recombination patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Pérez, Sergio; de Vega, Clara; Herrera, Carlos M

    2013-01-01

    The genetic and evolutionary relationships among floral nectar-dwelling Pseudomonas 'sensu stricto' isolates associated to South African and Mediterranean plants were investigated by multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) of four core housekeeping genes (rrs, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD). A total of 35 different sequence types were found for the 38 nectar bacterial isolates characterised. Phylogenetic analyses resulted in the identification of three main clades [nectar groups (NGs) 1, 2 and 3] of nectar pseudomonads, which were closely related to five intrageneric groups: Pseudomonas oryzihabitans (NG 1); P. fluorescens, P. lutea and P. syringae (NG 2); and P. rhizosphaerae (NG 3). Linkage disequilibrium analysis pointed to a mostly clonal population structure, even when the analysis was restricted to isolates from the same floristic region or belonging to the same NG. Nevertheless, signatures of recombination were observed for NG 3, which exclusively included isolates retrieved from the floral nectar of insect-pollinated Mediterranean plants. In contrast, the other two NGs comprised both South African and Mediterranean isolates. Analyses relating diversification to floristic region and pollinator type revealed that there has been more unique evolution of the nectar pseudomonads within the Mediterranean region than would be expected by chance. This is the first work analysing the sequence of multiple loci to reveal geno- and ecotypes of nectar bacteria.

  11. Multilocus Sequence Analysis of Nectar Pseudomonads Reveals High Genetic Diversity and Contrasting Recombination Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Pérez, Sergio; de Vega, Clara; Herrera, Carlos M.

    2013-01-01

    The genetic and evolutionary relationships among floral nectar-dwelling Pseudomonas ‘sensu stricto’ isolates associated to South African and Mediterranean plants were investigated by multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) of four core housekeeping genes (rrs, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD). A total of 35 different sequence types were found for the 38 nectar bacterial isolates characterised. Phylogenetic analyses resulted in the identification of three main clades [nectar groups (NGs) 1, 2 and 3] of nectar pseudomonads, which were closely related to five intrageneric groups: Pseudomonas oryzihabitans (NG 1); P. fluorescens, P. lutea and P. syringae (NG 2); and P. rhizosphaerae (NG 3). Linkage disequilibrium analysis pointed to a mostly clonal population structure, even when the analysis was restricted to isolates from the same floristic region or belonging to the same NG. Nevertheless, signatures of recombination were observed for NG 3, which exclusively included isolates retrieved from the floral nectar of insect-pollinated Mediterranean plants. In contrast, the other two NGs comprised both South African and Mediterranean isolates. Analyses relating diversification to floristic region and pollinator type revealed that there has been more unique evolution of the nectar pseudomonads within the Mediterranean region than would be expected by chance. This is the first work analysing the sequence of multiple loci to reveal geno- and ecotypes of nectar bacteria. PMID:24116076

  12. Discovery of novel xylosides in co-culture of basidiomycetes Trametes versicolor and Ganoderma applanatum by integrated metabolomics and bioinformatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lu; Zhu, Li-Ping; Xu, Xiao-Yan; Tan, Ling-Ling; Sadilek, Martin; Fan, Huan; Hu, Bo; Shen, Xiao-Ting; Yang, Jie; Qiao, Bin; Yang, Song

    2016-09-01

    Transcriptomic analysis of cultured fungi suggests that many genes for secondary metabolite synthesis are presumably silent under standard laboratory condition. In order to investigate the expression of silent genes in symbiotic systems, 136 fungi-fungi symbiotic systems were built up by co-culturing seventeen basidiomycetes, among which the co-culture of Trametes versicolor and Ganoderma applanatum demonstrated the strongest coloration of confrontation zones. Metabolomics study of this co-culture discovered that sixty-two features were either newly synthesized or highly produced in the co-culture compared with individual cultures. Molecular network analysis highlighted a subnetwork including two novel xylosides (compounds 2 and 3). Compound 2 was further identified as N-(4-methoxyphenyl)formamide 2-O-β-D-xyloside and was revealed to have the potential to enhance the cell viability of human immortalized bronchial epithelial cell line of Beas-2B. Moreover, bioinformatics and transcriptional analysis of T. versicolor revealed a potential candidate gene (GI: 636605689) encoding xylosyltransferases for xylosylation. Additionally, 3-phenyllactic acid and orsellinic acid were detected for the first time in G. applanatum, which may be ascribed to response against T.versicolor stress. In general, the described co-culture platform provides a powerful tool to discover novel metabolites and help gain insights into the mechanism of silent gene activation in fungal defense.

  13. High-speed image analysis reveals chaotic vibratory behaviors of pathological vocal folds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yu, E-mail: yuzhang@xmu.edu.c [Key Laboratory of Underwater Acoustic Communication and Marine Information Technology of the Ministry of Education, Xiamen University, Xiamen Fujian 361005 (China); Shao Jun [Shanghai EENT Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Krausert, Christopher R. [Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI 53792-7375 (United States); Zhang Sai [Key Laboratory of Underwater Acoustic Communication and Marine Information Technology of the Ministry of Education, Xiamen University, Xiamen Fujian 361005 (China); Jiang, Jack J. [Shanghai EENT Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI 53792-7375 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Research highlights: Low-dimensional human glottal area data. Evidence of chaos in human laryngeal activity from high-speed digital imaging. Traditional perturbation analysis should be cautiously applied to aperiodic high speed image signals. Nonlinear dynamic analysis may be helpful for understanding disordered behaviors in pathological laryngeal systems. - Abstract: Laryngeal pathology is usually associated with irregular dynamics of laryngeal activity. High-speed imaging facilitates direct observation and measurement of vocal fold vibrations. However, chaotic dynamic characteristics of aperiodic high-speed image data have not yet been investigated in previous studies. In this paper, we will apply nonlinear dynamic analysis and traditional perturbation methods to quantify high-speed image data from normal subjects and patients with various laryngeal pathologies including vocal fold nodules, polyps, bleeding, and polypoid degeneration. The results reveal the low-dimensional dynamic characteristics of human glottal area data. In comparison to periodic glottal area series from a normal subject, aperiodic glottal area series from pathological subjects show complex reconstructed phase space, fractal dimension, and positive Lyapunov exponents. The estimated positive Lyapunov exponents provide the direct evidence of chaos in pathological human vocal folds from high-speed digital imaging. Furthermore, significant differences between the normal and pathological groups are investigated for nonlinear dynamic and perturbation analyses. Jitter in the pathological group is significantly higher than in the normal group, but shimmer does not show such a difference. This finding suggests that the traditional perturbation analysis should be cautiously applied to high speed image signals. However, the correlation dimension and the maximal Lyapunov exponent reveal a statistically significant difference between normal and pathological groups. Nonlinear dynamic analysis is capable of

  14. High-speed image analysis reveals chaotic vibratory behaviors of pathological vocal folds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yu; Shao Jun; Krausert, Christopher R.; Zhang Sai; Jiang, Jack J.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Low-dimensional human glottal area data. → Evidence of chaos in human laryngeal activity from high-speed digital imaging. → Traditional perturbation analysis should be cautiously applied to aperiodic high speed image signals. → Nonlinear dynamic analysis may be helpful for understanding disordered behaviors in pathological laryngeal systems. - Abstract: Laryngeal pathology is usually associated with irregular dynamics of laryngeal activity. High-speed imaging facilitates direct observation and measurement of vocal fold vibrations. However, chaotic dynamic characteristics of aperiodic high-speed image data have not yet been investigated in previous studies. In this paper, we will apply nonlinear dynamic analysis and traditional perturbation methods to quantify high-speed image data from normal subjects and patients with various laryngeal pathologies including vocal fold nodules, polyps, bleeding, and polypoid degeneration. The results reveal the low-dimensional dynamic characteristics of human glottal area data. In comparison to periodic glottal area series from a normal subject, aperiodic glottal area series from pathological subjects show complex reconstructed phase space, fractal dimension, and positi